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Sample records for compatibility analysis ii

  1. Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Group VA-H3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armanda, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    During the eight weeks working at NASA, I was fortunate enough to work with the Expendable Launch Vehicle's (ELV) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Team, who is responsible for the evaluation and analysis of any EMI risk an ELV mission might face. This group of people concern themselves with practically any form of electromagnetic interference that may risk the safety of a rocket, a mission, or even people. Taking this into consideration, the group investigates natural forms of interference, such as lightning, to manmade interferences, such as antennas.

  2. Statistical analysis in dBASE-compatible databases.

    PubMed

    Hauer-Jensen, M

    1991-01-01

    Database management in clinical and experimental research often requires statistical analysis of the data in addition to the usual functions for storing, organizing, manipulating and reporting. With most database systems, transfer of data to a dedicated statistics package is a relatively simple task. However, many statistics programs lack the powerful features found in database management software. dBASE IV and compatible programs are currently among the most widely used database management programs. d4STAT is a utility program for dBASE, containing a collection of statistical functions and tests for data stored in the dBASE file format. By using d4STAT, statistical calculations may be performed directly on the data stored in the database without having to exit dBASE IV or export data. Record selection and variable transformations are performed in memory, thus obviating the need for creating new variables or data files. The current version of the program contains routines for descriptive statistics, paired and unpaired t-tests, correlation, linear regression, frequency tables, Mann-Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, a time-saving procedure for counting observations according to user specified selection criteria, survival analysis (product limit estimate analysis, log-rank test, and graphics), and normal t and chi-squared distribution functions.

  3. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  4. Irradiation and compatibility testing of Li/sub 2/O materials at EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, D.L.; Krsul, J.R.; Laug, M.T.; Tetenbaum, M.; Walters, L.C.

    1982-12-01

    A study was made of the neutron-irradiation behavior of /sup 6/Li-enriched Li/sub 2/O material in EBR-II. In addition, a stress corrosion study was performed ex-reactor to test compatibility of Li/sub 2/O materials with a variety of stainless steels. Results of the irradiation testing showed that tritium and helium retention in the Li/sub 2/O (approx. 89% dense) lessened with neutron exposure. Helium tritium retention appeared to approach steady-state after approx. 1% /sup 6/Li burnup. The effect was likely caused by the formation of open porosity in the pellets. The stress corrosion studies, using a 316 stainless steel (Ti-modified) and a 35% Ni alloy, showed that stress does not enhance the corrosion, and that dry Li/sub 2/O is not significantly corrosive, the LiOH content producing the corrosive effects. Corrosion, in general, was not severe as a passivation in sealed capsules seemed to occur after a time greatly reducing corrosion rates.

  5. Compatibility conditions of structural mechanics for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S. N.; Berke, L.; Gallagher, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    The equilibrium equations and the compatibility conditions are fundamental to the analyses of structures. However, anyone who undertakes even a cursory generic study of the compatibility conditions can discover, with little effort, that historically this facet of structural mechanics had not been adequately researched by the profession. Now the compatibility conditions (CC's) have been researched and are understood to a great extent. For finite element discretizations, the CC's are banded and can be divided into three distinct categories: (1) the interface CC's; (2) the cluster or field CC's; and (3) the external CC's. The generation of CC's requires the separating of a local region, then writing the deformation displacement relation (ddr) for the region, and finally, the eliminating of the displacements from the ddr. The procedure to generate all three types of CC's is presented and illustrated through examples of finite element models. The uniqueness of the CC's thus generated is shown.

  6. Compatibility conditions of structural mechanics for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1990-01-01

    The equilibrium equations and the compatibility conditions are fundamental to the analyses of structures. However, anyone who undertakes even a cursory generic study of the compatibility conditions can discover, with little effort, that historically this facet of structural mechanics had not been adequately researched by the profession. Now the compatibility conditions (CC's) have been researched and are understood to a great extent. For finite element discretizations, the CC's are banded and can be divided into three distinct categories: (1) the interface CC's; (2) the cluster or field CC's; and (3) the external CC's. The generation of CC's requires the separating of a local region, then writing the deformation displacement relation (ddr) for the region, and finally, the eliminating of the displacements from the ddr. The procedure to generate all three types of CC's is presented and illustrated through examples of finite element models. The uniqueness of the CC's thus generated is shown.

  7. 76 FR 23824 - Guidance for Industry: “Computer Crossmatch” (Computerized Analysis of the Compatibility Between...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... Analysis of the Compatibility Between the Donor's Cell Type and the Recipient's Serum or Plasma Type... Crossmatch' (Computerized Analysis of the Compatibility between the Donor's Cell Type and the Recipient's... donor's cell type and the recipient's serum or plasma type. The guidance describes practices that...

  8. Compatible host/mycorrhizal fungus combinations for micropropagated sea oats: II. Field evaluation.

    PubMed

    Al Agely, Abid; Sylvia, David M

    2008-07-01

    Sea oats (Uniola paniculata L.) are the dominant plant in the pioneer coastal dunes of Florida and are widely used for dune restoration. DNA analysis has revealed significant ecotypic variation among Atlantic and Gulf coast populations of sea oats, but little is known about the diversity of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) communities present in the dune systems. In a prior greenhouse study, we evaluated the functional diversity that exists among the AM fungal communities from divergent Florida dunes and selected effective host/AM fungus combinations for further study. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of these compatible combinations on the growth of sea oats planted at Anastasia State Recreation Area (AN) on the Atlantic coast and St. George Island State Park (SG) on the Gulf coast. Micropropagated sea oats from each site were inoculated with AM fungal communities also from AN and SG or a microbial filtrate control. The complete factorial of treatment combinations were grown in the greenhouse for 8 weeks and outplanted to the AN and SG field sites. After 1 year, root colonization was evaluated, and after 2 years, root colonization, shoot and root dry masses, and shoot- and root-P contents were determined. Overall, sea oats planted at AN had greater percent root colonization, shoot dry mass, and shoot-P content than those planted at SG. At AN, the local sea oat ecotype responded more to the fungal community from the same site relative to shoot dry mass and shoot-P content. At SG, the local fungal community produced larger plants with greater P content regardless of the origin of the host. We conclude that sea oat productivity is responsive to AM fungal ecotype as well as host ecotype, and fungal origin should therefore be taken into account when planning sea oat plantings on coastal dunes.

  9. Phosphorescent Platinum(II) and Palladium(II) Complexes with Azatetrabenzoporphyrins—New Red Laser Diode-Compatible Indicators for Optical Oxygen Sensing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A new class of oxygen indicators is described. Platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes of azatetrabenzoporphyrins occupy an intermediate position between tetrabenzoporphyrins and phthalocyanines and combine features of both. The new dyes are excitable in the red part of the spectrum and possess strong room-temperature NIR phosphorescence. Other features include excellent spectral compatibility with the red laser diodes and 632.8 nm line of He−Ne laser, excellent photostability, and significantly shorter decay times than for the respective meso-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrins. Applicability of the complexes for optical oxygen sensing is demonstrated. PMID:20186289

  10. Performance Analysis of a Link-16/JTIDS Compatible Waveform With Noncoherent Detection, Diversity and Side Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    OF A LINK-16/ JTIDS COMPATIBLE WAVEFORM WITH NONCOHERENT DETECTION, DIVERSITY AND SIDE INFORMATION by Ioannis Kagioglidis September 2009...3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Performance Analysis of a Link-16/ JTIDS Compatible Waveform with...System ( JTIDS ) is a hybrid frequency-hopped, direct sequence spread spectrum system. A (31, 15) Reed-Solomon (RS) code is used for forward error

  11. Compatibility of person-centered planning and applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Holburn, Steve

    2001-01-01

    In response to Osborne (1999), the aims and practices of person-centered planning (PCP) are compared to the basic principles of applied behavior analysis set forth by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968, 1987). The principal goal of PCP is social integration of people with disabilities; it qualifies as a socially important behavior, and its problems have been displayed sufficiently. However, social integration is a complex social problem whose solution requires access to system contingencies that influence lifestyles. Nearly all of the component goals of PCP proposed by O'Brien (1987b) have been reliably quantified, although concurrent measurement of outcomes such as friendship, autonomy, and respect presents a formidable challenge. Behavioral principles such as contingency and contextual control are operative within PCP, but problems in achieving reliable implementation appear to impede an experimental analysis. PMID:22478371

  12. The problem of mechanical compatibility of natural building stones in the restoration of monuments. Part II: Specimens with modified boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninis, Nikolaos L.; Kourkoulis, Stavros K.

    2011-12-01

    It was pointed out in Part I of this short two-paper series, that the mechanical incompatibility between the authentic building stone of ancient monuments and the stones used as substitute ones during restoration projects, may be the reason of violation of basic restoration principles concerning the protection of the ancient material. In this context certain geometrical configurations of the boundaries of the specimens are examined in this Part II as a possible means of modifying the mechanical behaviour of the substitute stones, in order to make them as compatible as possible with the authentic material. Modifications of both the contact surfaces (in order to change the friction conditions) of the specimens as well as of the free ones (in order to quantify the influence of transforming the smooth cylindrical surface to a fluted one) are examined experimentally. This approach is based on existing observations and numerical studies indicating that the behaviour of a stone specimen in the post-peak region is affected by the geometrical configuration of its boundaries. Taking advantage of the experimental results an alternative compatibility criterion is introduced for situations where the “required” quality of the building stone is its ability to withstand deformation without failing structurally, a characteristic pertinent to statically indeterminate structures, whose design is based on deformation control. This criterion combines both peak stress and maximum failure strain providing a better insight into the problem of mechanical incompatibility of natural building stones.

  13. Thermal behaviour of procaine and benzocaine Part II: compatibility study with some pharmaceutical excipients used in solid dosage forms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The compatibility study of active substances with excipients finds an important role in the domain of pharmaceutical research, being known the fact that final formulation is the one administered to the patient. In order to evaluate the compatibility between active substance and excipients, different analytical techniques can be used, based on their accuracy, reproducibility and fastness. Results Compatibility study of two well-known active substances, procaine and benzocaine, with four commonly used excipients, was carried out employing thermal analysis (TG/DTG/HF) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (UATR-FT-IR). The selected excipients were microcrystalline cellulose, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate and talc. Equal proportion of active substance and excipients (w/w) was utilized in the interaction study. The absolute value of the difference between the melting point peak of active substances and the one corresponding for the active substances in the analysed mixture, as well the absolute value of the difference between the enthalpy of the pure active ingredient melting peak and that of its melting peak in the different analysed mixtures were chosen as indexes of the drug-excipient interaction degree. All the results obtained through thermal analysis were also sustained by FT-IR spectroscopy. Conclusions The corroboration of data obtained by thermal analysis with the ones from FT-IR spectroscopy indicated that no interaction occurs between procaine and benzocaine, with microcrystalline cellulose and talc, as well for the benzocaine-lactose mixture. Interactions were confirmed between procaine and benzocaine respectively and magnesium stearate, and for procaine and lactose. PMID:23962059

  14. Solid phase microextraction analysis of B83 SLTS and Core B compatibility test units

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D M; Ithaca, J; King, H A; Malcolm, S

    1999-03-26

    Solid phase microextraction has permitted the efficient collection and analysis of a broad range of volatile and semivolatile compounds outgassed from materials. In 1998, we implemented a microextraction protocol at Mason and Hanger, Pantex Plant, for the analysis of weapons and compatibility test units. The chemical information that was obtained from this work is interpreted by determining the source and outgas mechanism for each compound in the weapon signature, which is a task only accomplished by analysis of material standards.

  15. Mating Compatibility and Restriction Analysis of Ganoderma Isolates from Oil Palm and Other Palm Hosts.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chan Jer; Seman, Idris Abu; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2015-12-01

    Mating compatibility and restriction analyses of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions were performed to determine the relations between Ganoderma boninense, the most common species associated with basal stem rot in oil palm and Ganoderma isolates from infected oil palm, two ornamental palms, sealing wax palm (Cyrtostachys renda) and MacArthur palm (Ptychosperma macarthurii), an isolate from coconut stump (Cocos nucifera), Ganoderma miniatocinctum, Ganoderma zonatum and Ganoderma tornatum. The results showed that G. boninense was compatible with Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, G. miniatocinctum and G. zonatum, Ganoderma isolates from sealing wax palm, MacArthur palm and coconut stump. G. boninense was not compatible with G. tornatum. Therefore, the results suggested that the G. boninense, G. miniatocinctum, G. zonatum, and Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, ornamental palms and coconut stump could represent the same biological species. In performing a restriction analysis of the ITS regions, variations were observed in which five haplotypes were generated from the restriction patterns. An unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis showed that all the Ganoderma isolates were grouped into five primary groups, and the similarity values of the isolates ranged from 97% to 100%. Thus, a restriction analysis of the ITS regions showed that G. boninense and the Ganoderma isolates from other palm hosts were closely related. On the basis of the mating compatibility test and the restriction analysis of the ITS regions performed in this study, a diverse group of Ganoderma species from oil palm and other palm hosts are closely related, except for G. tornatum and Ganoderma isolates from tea and rubber.

  16. Conversion of the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS) to an IBM PC Compatible Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruep, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The conversion of the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS) software from a Silicon Graphics UNIX-based platform to a DOS-based IBM PC compatible is discussed. Relevant background information is given, followed by a discussion of the steps taken to accomplish the conversion and a discussion of the type of problems encountered during the conversion. A brief comparison of aerodynamic data obtained using APAS with data from another source is also made.

  17. Mating Compatibility and Restriction Analysis of Ganoderma Isolates from Oil Palm and Other Palm Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Chan Jer; Seman, Idris Abu; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2015-01-01

    Mating compatibility and restriction analyses of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions were performed to determine the relations between Ganoderma boninense, the most common species associated with basal stem rot in oil palm and Ganoderma isolates from infected oil palm, two ornamental palms, sealing wax palm (Cyrtostachys renda) and MacArthur palm (Ptychosperma macarthurii), an isolate from coconut stump (Cocos nucifera), Ganoderma miniatocinctum, Ganoderma zonatum and Ganoderma tornatum. The results showed that G. boninense was compatible with Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, G. miniatocinctum and G. zonatum, Ganoderma isolates from sealing wax palm, MacArthur palm and coconut stump. G. boninense was not compatible with G. tornatum. Therefore, the results suggested that the G. boninense, G. miniatocinctum, G. zonatum, and Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, ornamental palms and coconut stump could represent the same biological species. In performing a restriction analysis of the ITS regions, variations were observed in which five haplotypes were generated from the restriction patterns. An unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis showed that all the Ganoderma isolates were grouped into five primary groups, and the similarity values of the isolates ranged from 97% to 100%. Thus, a restriction analysis of the ITS regions showed that G. boninense and the Ganoderma isolates from other palm hosts were closely related. On the basis of the mating compatibility test and the restriction analysis of the ITS regions performed in this study, a diverse group of Ganoderma species from oil palm and other palm hosts are closely related, except for G. tornatum and Ganoderma isolates from tea and rubber. PMID:26868709

  18. Basic EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) Technology Advancement for C3 Systems - Model Revision for IEMCAP (Intrasystem Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Program).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    shield wall. thick- * ness is less than a skin depth. The shield and transfer impedances are approxi- mately equal, i.e., T Z1 (3-52) Thus (3-51) and...oi Ik 0 0 47a Iona Ion W (I -All, ’Ii 6 47a 470 ion lOG@ yk I-kQ @ L &rl A- yout . Ik % . 100Q ha15 kfl ik a tii 4a it Ion ion ’i ia A Z i Ion k

  19. Proteomic analysis of the compatible interaction of wheat and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici).

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xiwen; Liu, Xinhao; Yu, Haibo; Du, Congyang; Li, Mengda; He, Dexian

    2017-02-01

    Proteome characteristics of wheat leaves with the powdery mildew pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt) infection were investigated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and tandem MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. We identified 46 unique proteins which were differentially expressed at 24, 48, and 72 h post-inoculation. The functional classification of these proteins showed that most of them were involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism, defense responses, and signal transduction. Upregulated proteins included primary metabolism pathways and defense responses, while proteins related to photosynthesis and signal transduction were mostly downregulated. As expected, more antioxidative proteins were activated at the later infection stage than the earlier stage, suggesting that the antioxidative system of host plays a role in maintaining the compatible interaction between wheat and powdery mildew. A high accumulation of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in infected leaves indicated the regulation of the TCA cycle and pentose phosphate pathway in parallel to the activation of host defenses. The downregulation of MAPK5 could be facilitated for the compatible interaction of wheat plants and Bgt. qRT-PCR analysis supported the data of protein expression profiles. Our results reveal the relevance of primary plant metabolism and defense responses during compatible interaction, and provide new insights into the biology of susceptible wheat in response to Bgt infection.

  20. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of Virulence Factors in Leptosphaeria maculans during Compatible and Incompatible Interactions with Canola

    PubMed Central

    Sonah, Humira; Zhang, Xuehua; Deshmukh, Rupesh K.; Borhan, M. Hossein; Fernando, W. G. Dilantha; Bélanger, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Leptosphaeria maculans is a hemibiotrophic fungus that causes blackleg of canola (Brassica napus), one of the most devastating diseases of this crop. In the present study, transcriptome profiling of L. maculans was performed in an effort to understand and define the pathogenicity genes that govern both the biotrophic and the necrotrophic phase of the fungus, as well as those that separate a compatible from an incompatible interaction. For this purpose, comparative RNA-seq analyses were performed on L. maculans isolate D5 at four different time points following inoculation on susceptible cultivar Topas-DH16516 or resistant introgression line Topas-Rlm2. Analysis of 1.6 billion Illumina reads readily identified differentially expressed genes that were over represented by candidate secretory effector proteins, CAZymes, and other pathogenicity genes. Comparisons between the compatible and incompatible interactions led to the identification of 28 effector proteins whose chronology and level of expression suggested a role in the establishment and maintenance of biotrophy with the plant. These included all known Avr genes of isolate D5 along with eight newly characterized effectors. In addition, another 15 effector proteins were found to be exclusively expressed during the necrotrophic phase of the fungus, which supports the concept that L. maculans has a separate and distinct arsenal contributing to each phase. As for CAZymes, they were often highly expressed at 3 dpi but with no difference in expression between the compatible and incompatible interactions, indicating that other factors were necessary to determine the outcome of the interaction. However, their significantly higher expression at 11 dpi in the compatible interaction confirmed that they contributed to the necrotrophic phase of the fungus. A notable exception was LysM genes whose high expression was singularly observed on the susceptible host at 7 dpi. In the case of TFs, their higher expression at 7 and 11

  1. Transcriptome analysis of the compatible interaction of tomato with Verticillium dahliae using RNA-sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Guangxuan; Liu, Kun; Kang, Jingmin; Xu, Kedong; Zhang, Yi; Hu, Lizong; Zhang, Ju; Li, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Tomato Verticillium wilt is a soil-borne vascular disease caused by the necrotrophic fungus Verticillium dahliae. Although some understanding of plant defense mechanisms against V. dahliae infection has been gained for incompatible interactions, including identification of inducible resistant genes and defense signaling pathways, the genes and signaling pathways involved in the compatible interaction remain unclear. To investigate the molecular basis of the compatible interaction between tomato and V. dahliae, transcriptomes of V. dahliae infected tomatoes were compared to those of a control group. A total of approximately 25 million high-quality reads were generated by means of the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) method. The sequence reads were aligned to the tomato reference genome and analyzed to measure gene expression levels, and to identify alternative splicing events. Comparative analysis between the two samples revealed 1,953 significantly differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 1,281 up-regulated and 672 down-regulated genes. The RNA-Seq output was confirmed using RT-qPCR for 10 selected genes. The Nr, Swiss-Prot, Gene Ontology (GO), Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases were used to annotate DEG functions. Of the 1,953 DEGs identified, 1,953, 1,579, 1,739, 862, and 380 were assigned by Nr, Swiss-Prot, GO, COG, and KEGG, respectively. The important functional groups identified via GO and COG enrichment were those responsible for fundamental biological regulation, secondary metabolism, and signal transduction. Of DEGs assigned to 87 KEGG pathways, most were associated with phenylpropanoid metabolism and plant–pathogen interaction pathways. Most of the DEGs involved in these two pathways were up-regulated, and may be involved in regulating the tomato-V. dahliae compatible interaction. The results will help to identify key susceptible genes and contribute to a better understanding of the

  2. Development of intensity compatible time-histories for dynamic analysis of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Jens-Uwe; Akcay Stäuble, Sunay

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of the functionality of critical infrastructures and lifelines after an earthquake strongly depends on an accurate assessment of the degree of damage exhibited during the earthquake. Usual engineering parameters like linear-elastic response spectra or linear-elastic uniform hazard spectra in terms of spectral accelerations are not suitable for predicting damage because the process of damaging is a non-linear process. The only seismological parameter that implicitly contains the required information on the damaging impact of earthquakes is intensity. This parameter in different scales (EMS-98, MSK-64, MMI) is directly linked to physical observations including the damage of buildings. Additionally, intensity information directly captures spatial variation of ground motions related to the same or similar degree damage by construction of isoseismal lines. Therefore intensities are very suitable for predicting possible impacts of earthquakes on critical infrastructures or lifelines. For engineering applications intensity relevant information has to be converted into engineering characteristics. Because dynamic analyses (time-history analysis, frequently even nonlinear ones) became a standard approach for the design and for the validation of safety of critical infrastructures and lifelines it is reasonable to develop intensity-compatible time-histories for engineering application as an alternative to standard methods. In the paper an approach how to develop intensity-compatible time-histories from recorded time-histories is presented. Based on published international data a set of intensity compatible time-histories covering the site intensity range between intensity V and VIII (EMS scale) is developed. The time-histories developed are compared with typical time-histories derived from spectral matching of a uniform hazard spectrum from a large scale PSHA corresponding to approximately the same intensity class. For this comparison in-structure floor

  3. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions. Final report, Volume II - data tables, high pressure refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine if exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials after retrofit to the alternative refrigerant/lubricant. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Measurements were also taken after 168 and 336 hours. As a control, some samples were exposed to the original refrigerant/mineral oil for a total of 1000 hours.

  4. The REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey: power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C.; Guzzo, L.; Phleps, S.

    2011-05-01

    We present the power spectrum of galaxy clusters measured from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. This new sample extends the flux limit of the original REFLEX catalogue to 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2, yielding a total of 911 clusters with ≥94 per cent completeness in redshift follow-up. The analysis of the data is improved by creating a set of 100 REFLEX II-catalogue-like mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite of large-volume Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) N-body simulations (L-BASICC II). The measured power spectrum is in agreement with the predictions from a ΛCDM cosmological model. The measurements show the expected increase in the amplitude of the power spectrum with increasing X-ray luminosity. On large scales, we show that the shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a scale-independent bias and provide a model for the amplitude that allows us to connect our measurements with a cosmological model. By implementing a luminosity-dependent power-spectrum estimator, we observe that the power spectrum measured from the REFLEX II sample is weakly affected by flux-selection effects. The shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a featureless power spectrum on scales k > 0.01 h Mpc-1 and hence no statistically significant signal of baryonic acoustic oscillations can be detected. We show that the measured REFLEX II power spectrum displays signatures of non-linear evolution.

  5. Detergent-compatible proteases: microbial production, properties, and stain removal analysis.

    PubMed

    Niyonzima, Francois Niyongabo; More, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are one of the most important commercial enzymes used in various industrial domains such as detergent and leather industries. The alkaline proteases as well as other detergent-compatible enzymes such as lipases and amylases serve now as the key components in detergent formulations. They break down various stains during fabric washing. The search for detergent-compatible proteases with better properties is a continuous exercise. The current trend is to use detergent-compatible proteases that are stable over a wide temperature range. Although the proteases showing stability at elevated pH have the capacity to be used in detergent formulations, their usage can be significant if they are also stable and compatible with detergent and detergent ingredients, and also able to remove protein stains. Despite the existence of some reviews on alkaline proteases, there is no specification for the use of alkaline proteases as detergent additives. The present review describes the detergent-compatible proteases tested as detergent additives. An overview was provided for screening, optimization, purification, and properties of detergent compatible proteases, with an emphasis on the stability and compatibility of the alkaline proteases with the detergent and detergent compounds, as well as stain removal examination methods.

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several compounds with Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical compatibility between Fe-19.8Cr-4.8Al (weight percent), which is the base composition for the commercial superalloy MA956, and several carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, and silicides was analyzed from thermodynamic considerations. The effect of addition of minor alloying elements, such as Ti, Y, and Y2O3, to the Fe-Cr-Al alloy on chemical compatibility between the alloy and various compounds was also analyzed. Several chemically compatible compounds that can be potential reinforcement materials and/or interface coating materials for Fe-Cr-Al based composites were identified.

  7. Thermodynamic analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with beta phase NiAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with beta phase NiAl alloys within the concentration range 40 to 50 at. percent Al have been analyzed from thermodynamic considerations at 1373 and 1573 K. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, oxides, nitrides, beryllides, and silicides. Thermodynamic data for NiAl alloys have been reviewed and activity of Ni and Al in the beta phase have been derived at 1373 and 1573 K. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and the matrix have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been defined.

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of ceramic reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  10. A suite of Gateway® compatible ternary expression vectors for functional analysis in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Y S; Chaudhari, Y K; Usher, J; Cairns, T C; Csukai, M; Haynes, K

    2015-06-01

    Gene overexpression is a widely used functional genomics approach in fungal biology. However, to date it has not been established in Zymoseptoria tritici which is an important pathogen of wheat (Triticum species). Here we report a suite of Gateway® recombination compatible ternary expression vectors for Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of Z. tritici. The suite of 32 vectors is based on a combination of four resistance markers for positive selection against glufosinate ammonium, geneticin, hygromycin and sulfonylurea; three constitutive Z. tritici promoters (pZtATUB, pZtGAPDH and pZtTEF) and a nitrogen responsive promoter (pZtNIA1) for controlled expression of the open reading frames. Half of the vectors facilitate expression of proteins tagged with C-terminal EGFP. All 32 vectors allow high frequency targeting of the overexpression cassette into the Ku70 locus and complement the Ku70 gene when transformed into a Z. tritici ku70 null strain, thus circumventing additional phenotypes that can arise from random integration. This suite of ternary expression vectors will be a useful tool for functional analysis through gene overexpression in Z. tritici.

  11. Radiofrequency identification and medical devices: the regulatory framework on electromagnetic compatibility. Part II: active implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Eugenio; Censi, Federica; Triventi, Michele; Bartolini, Pietro; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2012-05-01

    The number and the types of electromagnetic emitters to which patients with active implantable medical devices (AIMD) are exposed to in their daily activities have proliferated over the last decade. Radiofrequency identification (RFID) is an example of wireless technology applied in many fields. The interaction between RFID emitters and AIMD is an important issue for patients, industry and regulators, because of the risks associated with such interactions. The different AIMDs refer to different standards that address the electromagnetic immunity issue in different ways. Indeed, different test setups, immunity levels and rationales are used to guarantee that AIMDs are immune to electromagnetic nonionizing radiation. In this article, the regulatory framework concerning electromagnetic compatibility between RFID systems and AIMDs is analyzed to understand whether and how the application of the current AIMD standards allows for the effective control of the possible risks associated with RFID technology.

  12. Development of an ISO 9000-compatible occupational health standard--II: defining the potential benefits and open issues.

    PubMed

    Levine, S P; Dyjack, D T

    1996-04-01

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is currently voting on a final draft of ISO 14000 Environmental Standards that follow the general philosophy of ISO 9000 product quality standards. Should the international community also consider development of an ISO 9000-14000 compatible occupational safety and health management standard (OS&HMS) or an environment, safety, and health management standard? The first paper in this series (Am. Ind. Hyg. Assoc. J. 56:599-609 [1995]) introduced this subject, reviewed the historical precedents, and identified the underlying issues. In this paper the authors identify some of the potential benefits and most critical open issues that may affect the viability of an OS&HMS at the national and international levels. Twelve potential benefits are identified in the major categories of national and international, and industrial and governmental benefits; 16 open issues are identified in the major categories of applications, ethics, cost, and international issues.

  13. Compatibility analysis of material and energy recovery in a regional solid waste management system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Hsi; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2003-01-01

    The rising prices of raw materials and concerns about energy conservation have resulted in an increasing interest in the simultaneous recovery of materials and energy from waste streams. Compatibility exists for several economic, environmental, and managerial reasons. Installing an on-site or off-site presorting facility before an incinerator could be a feasible alternative to achieve both goals if household recycling programs cannot succeed in local communities. However, the regional impacts of presorting solid waste on a waste-to-energy facility remain unclear because of the inherent complexity of solid waste compositions and properties over different areas. This paper applies a system-based approach to assess the impact of installing a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) process before an incinerator. Such an RDF process, consisting of standard unit operations of shredding, magnetic separation, trommel screening, and air classification, might be useful for integrating the recycling and presorting efforts for a large-scale municipal incinerator from a regional sense. An optimization modeling analysis is performed to characterize such integration potential so that the optimal size of the RDF process and associated shipping patterns for flow control can be foreseen. It aims at exploring how the waste inflows with different rates of generation, physical and chemical compositions, and heating values collected from differing administrative districts can be processed by either a centralized presorting facility or an incinerator to meet both the energy recovery and throughput requirements. A case study conducted in Taipei County, which is one of the most densely populated metropolitan areas in Taiwan, further confirms the application potential of such a cost-benefit analysis.

  14. A Materials Compatibility and Thermal Stability Analysis of Common Hydrocarbon Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, M. L.; Stiegemeier, B. R.

    2005-01-01

    A materials compatibility and thermal stability investigation was conducted using five common liquid hydrocarbon fuels and two structural materials. The tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center Heated Tube Facility under environmental conditions similar to those encountered in regeneratively cooled rocket engines. Scanning-electron microscopic analysis in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was utilized to characterize the condition of the tube inner wall surface and any carbon deposition or corrosion that was formed during selected runs. Results show that the carbon deposition process in stainless steel tubes was relatively insensitive to fuel type or test condition. The deposition rates were comparable for all fuels and none of the stainless steel test pieces showed any signs of corrosion. For tests conducted with copper tubing, the sulfur content of the fuel had a significant impact on both the condition of the tube wall and carbon deposition rates. Carbon deposition rates for the lowest sulfur fuels (2 ppm) were slightly higher than those recorded in the stainless steel tubes with no corrosion observed on the inner wall surface. For slightly higher sulfur content (25 ppm) fuels, nodules that intruded into the flow area were observed to form on the inner wall surface. These nodules induced moderate tube pressure drop increases. The highest sulfur content fuels (400 ppm) produced extensive wall pitting and dendritic copper sulfide growth that was continuous along the entire tube wall surface. The result of this tube degradation was the inability to maintain flow rate due to rapidly increasing test section pressure drops. Accompanying this corrosion were carbon deposition rates an order of magnitude greater than those observed in comparable stainless steel tests. The results of this investigation indicate that trace impurities in fuels (i.e. sulfur) can significantly impact the carbon deposition process and produce unacceptable

  15. Soil Analysis Micro-Mission Concepts Derived from the MSP 2001 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Meloy, T. P.; Anderson, M. S.; Buehler, M. G.; Frant, M. A.; Grannan, S. M.; Fuerstenau, S. D.; Keller, H. U.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Marshall, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) will evaluate the Martian environment for soil and dust-related hazards to human exploration as part of the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. The integrated MECA payload contains a wet-chemistry laboratory, a microscopy station, an electrometer to characterize the electrostatic environment, and arrays of material patches to study abrasion and adhesion. Heritage will be all-important for low cost micro-missions, and adaptations of instruments developed for the Pathfinder, '98 and '01 Landers should be strong contenders for '03 flights. This talk has three objectives: (1) Familiarize the audience with MECA instrument capabilities; (2) present concepts for stand-alone and/or mobile versions of MECA instruments; and (3) broaden the context of the MECA instruments from human exploration to a comprehensive scientific survey of Mars. Due to time limitations, emphasis will be on the chemistry and microscopy experiments. Ion-selective electrodes and related sensors in MECA's wet-chemistry laboratory will evaluate total dissolved solids, redox potential, pH, and the concentration of many soluble ions and gases in wet Martian soil. These electrodes can detect potentially dangerous heavy-metal ions, emitted pathogenic gases, and the soil's corrosive potential, and experiments will include cyclic voltammetry and anodic stripping. For experiments beyond 2001, enhancements could allow multiple use of the cells (for mobile experiments) and reagent addition (for quantitative mineralogical and exobiological analysis). MECA's microscopy station combines optical and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) in an actively focused, controlled illumination environment to image particles from millimeters to nanometers in size. Careful selection of substrates allows controlled experiments in adhesion, abrasion, hardness, aggregation, magnetic and other properties. Special tools allow primitive manipulation (brushing and scraping) of samples

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with FeAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with FeAl alloys within the concentration range 40 to 50 at pct Al have been analyzed from thermodynamic considerations at 1173 and 1273 K. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, oxides, nitrides, and silicides. Although several chemically compatible reinforcement materials are identified, the coefficients of thermal expansion for none of these materials match closely with that of FeAl alloys and this might pose serious problems in the design of composite systems based on FeAl alloys.

  17. Comparative analysis of microarray data in Arabidopsis transcriptome during compatible interactions with plant viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To analyze transcriptome response to virus infection, we have assembled currently available microarray data on changes in gene expression levels in compatible Arabidopsis-virus interactions. We used the mean r (Pearson’s correlation coefficient) for neighboring pairs to estimate pairwise local simil...

  18. A Laboratory Exercise for Compatibility Testing of Hazardous Wastes in an Environmental Analysis Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, J. C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses a new program at the University of Michigan in hazardous waste management. Describes a laboratory demonstration that deals with the reactivity and potential violence of several reactions that may be encountered on a hazardous waste site. Provides criteria for selecting particular compatibility testing methods. (TW)

  19. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - Mixing Procedures and Materials Compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, Becky D.; Sandstrom, Mary M.; Warner, Kirstin F.; Sorensen, Daniel N.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Moran, Jesse S.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Whinnery, LeRoy L.; Hsu, Peter C.; Whipple, Richard E.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Reynolds, John G.

    2011-01-14

    Three mixing procedures have been standardized for the IDCA proficiency test—solid-solid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid. Due to the variety of precursors used in formulating the materials for the test, these three mixing methods have been designed to address all combinations of materials. Hand mixing is recommended for quantities less than 10 grams and Jar Mill mixing is recommended for quantities over 10 grams. Consideration must also be given to the type of container used for the mixing due to the wide range of chemical reactivity of the precursors and mixtures. Eight web site sources from container and chemical manufacturers have been consulted. Compatible materials have been compiled as a resource for selecting containers made of materials stable to the mixtures. In addition, container materials used in practice by the participating laboratories are discussed. Consulting chemical compatibility tables is highly recommended for each operation by each individual engaged in testing the materials in this proficiency test.

  20. Task Analysis Inventories. Series II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesson, Carl E.

    This second in a series of task analysis inventories contains checklists of work performed in twenty-two occupations. Each inventory is a comprehensive list of work activities, responsibilities, educational courses, machines, tools, equipment, and work aids used and the products produced or services rendered in a designated occupational area. The…

  1. Integrated force method - Compatibility conditions of structural mechanics for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The equilibrium equations and the compatibility conditions are fundamental to the analyses of structures. However, anyone who undertakes even a cursory generic study of the compatibility conditions can discover, with little effort, that historically this facet of structural mechanics had not been adequately researched by the profession. Now the compatibility conditions (CC's) have been researched and are understood to a great extent. For finite element discretizations, the CC's are banded and can be divided into three distinct categories: (1) the interface CC's, (2) the cluster or field CC's, and (3) the external CC's. The generation of CC's requires the separating of a local region, then writing the deformation displacement relation (ddr) for the region, and finally, the eliminating of the displacements from the ddr. The procedure to generate all three types of CC's is presented and illustrated through examples of finite element models. The uniqueness of the CC's thus generated is shown. The utilization of CC's has resulted in the novel integrated force method (IFM). The solution that is obtained by the IFM converges with a significantly fewer number of elements, compared to the stiffness and the hybrid methods.

  2. Summary of CPAS Gen II Parachute Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Aaron L.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Fraire, Usbaldo, Jr.; Moore, James W.; Olson, Leah M.; Ray, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft is currently under development by NASA and Lockheed Martin. Like Apollo, Orion will use a series of parachutes to slow its descent and splashdown safely. The Orion parachute system, known as the CEV Parachute Assembly System (CPAS), is being designed by NASA, the Engineering and Science Contract Group (ESCG), and Airborne Systems. The first generation (Gen I) of CPAS testing consisted of thirteen tests and was executed in the 2007-2008 timeframe. The Gen I tests provided an initial understanding of the CPAS parachutes. Knowledge gained from Gen I testing was used to plan the second generation of testing (Gen II). Gen II consisted of six tests: three singleparachute tests, designated as Main Development Tests, and three Cluster Development Tests. Gen II required a more thorough investigation into parachute performance than Gen I. Higher fidelity instrumentation, enhanced analysis methods and tools, and advanced test techniques were developed. The results of the Gen II test series are being incorporated into the CPAS design. Further testing and refinement of the design and model of parachute performance will occur during the upcoming third generation of testing (Gen III). This paper will provide an overview of the developments in CPAS analysis following the end of Gen I, including descriptions of new tools and techniques as well as overviews of the Gen II tests.

  3. Compatibility Analysis of Space Qualified Intermediate Bus Converter and Point of Load Regulators for Digital Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderbeerg, Bjarne; Bussarakons, Tiva

    2008-09-01

    Distributed power architecture (DPA) has become the power system solutions of choice for digital loads such as FPGAs and other ASIC devices to optimize the system efficiency and dynamic response due to negative effect of parasitic impedances. IR's ZB with its world class efficiency performance and SBB design platforms are the key power conversion elements of such DPA power system solutions. This paper examines the compatibility of the ZB series, an intermediate bus converter (IBC) and the SBB series, a non-isolated synchronous buck point of load (POL) regulator to insure the stability of the power converters and the power system under various static and dynamic loading conditions.

  4. Finite state model and compatibility theory - New analysis tools for permutation networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.-T.; Tripathi, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    A simple model to describe the fundamental operation theory of shuffle-exchange-type permutation networks, the finite permutation machine (FPM), is described, and theorems which transform the control matrix result to a continuous compatible vector result are developed. It is found that only 2n-1 shuffle exchange passes are necessary, and that 3n-3 passes are sufficient, to realize all permutations, reducing the sufficient number of passes by two from previous results. The flexibility of the approach is demonstrated by the description of a stack permutation machine (SPM) which can realize all permutations, and by showing that the FPM corresponding to the Benes (1965) network belongs to the SPM. The FPM corresponding to the network with two cascaded reverse-exchange networks is found to realize all permutations, and a simple mechanism to verify several equivalence relationships of various permutation networks is discussed.

  5. Busted Butte Phase II Excavation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Keifer

    2000-11-29

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an engineering excavation and ground support design for the Busted Butte phase II mine back. The analysis will apply engineering practices and previous proven design methods for pillar design and ground support in accordance with applicable Integrated Safety Management principles and functions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the Busted Butte Test Facility. The intended use of this analysis is to provide testing excavation boundaries, ground support and pillar design input to drawing(s) to support test operations implementation. This design activity has been prepared under ''Technical Work Plan For Test Facilities Design FY01 Work Activities'' (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2000b). No deviations from the TWP have been necessary for this analysis.

  6. Water Ingress Failure Analysis of Whistler II Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Water Ingress Failure Analysis of Whistler II Unit by Andrew J Bayba ARL-TN-0623 August 2014...Failure Analysis of Whistler II Unit Andrew J Bayba Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...Ingress Failure Analysis of Whistler II Unit 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew J Bayba

  7. Compatibility: drugs and parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Talita Muniz Maloni; Ferraresi, Andressa de Abreu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Standardization and systematization of data to provide quick access to compatibility of leading injectable drugs used in hospitals for parenteral nutrition. Methods We selected 55 injectable drugs analyzed individually with two types of parenteral nutrition: 2-in-1 and 3-in-1. The following variables were considered: active ingredient, compatibility of drugs with the parenteral nutrition with or without lipids, and maximum drug concentration after dilution for the drugs compatible with parenteral nutrition. Drugs were classified as compatible, incompatible and untested. Results After analysis, relevant information to the product’s compatibility with parental nutrition was summarized in a table. Conclusion Systematization of compatibility data provided quick and easy access, and enabled standardizing pharmacists work. PMID:27074235

  8. Analysis of expressed sequence tags derived from a compatible Mycosphaerella fijiensis-banana interaction.

    PubMed

    Portal, Orelvis; Izquierdo, Yovanny; De Vleesschauwer, David; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Milady; Acosta-Suárez, Mayra; Ocaña, Bárbara; Jiménez, Elio; Höfte, Monica

    2011-05-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis, a hemibiotrophic fungus, is the causal agent of black leaf streak disease, the most serious foliar disease of bananas and plantains. To analyze the compatible interaction of M. fijiensis with Musa spp., a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library was constructed to identify transcripts induced at late stages of infection in the host and the pathogen. In addition, a full-length cDNA library was created from the same mRNA starting material as the SSH library. The SSH procedure was effective in identifying specific genes predicted to be involved in plant-fungal interactions and new information was obtained mainly about genes and pathways activated in the plant. Several plant genes predicted to be involved in the synthesis of phenylpropanoids and detoxification compounds were identified, as well as pathogenesis-related proteins that could be involved in the plant response against M. fijiensis infection. At late stages of infection, jasmonic acid and ethylene signaling transduction pathways appear to be active, which corresponds with the necrotrophic life style of M. fijiensis. Quantitative PCR experiments revealed that antifungal genes encoding PR proteins and GDSL-like lipase are only transiently induced 30 days post inoculation (dpi), indicating that the fungus is probably actively repressing plant defense. The only fungal gene found was induced 37 dpi and encodes UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of trehalose. Trehalose biosynthesis was probably induced in response to prior activation of plant antifungal genes and may act as an osmoprotectant against membrane damage.

  9. Analysis of the compatibility of dental implant systems in fibula free flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Carbiner, Ramin; Jerjes, Waseem; Shakib, Kaveh; Giannoudis, Peter V; Hopper, Colin

    2012-06-21

    As a result of major ablative surgery, head and neck oncology patients can be left with significant defects in the orofacial region. The resultant defect raises the need for advanced reconstruction techniques. The reconstruction in this region is aimed at restoring function and facial contour. The use of vascularised free flaps has revolutionised the reconstruction in the head and neck. Advances in reconstruction techniques have resulted in continuous improvement of oral rehabilitation. For example, endosteal implants are being used to restore the masticatory function by the way of prosthetic replacement of the dentition. Implant rehabilitation usually leads to improved facial appearance, function, restoration of speech and mastication. Suitable dental implant placement's site requires satisfactory width, height and quality of bone. Reconstruction of hard tissue defects therefore will need to be tailored to meet the needs for implant placement.The aim of this feasibility study was to assess the compatibility of five standard commercially available dental implant systems (Biomet 3i, Nobel Biocare, Astra tech, Straumann and Ankylos) for placement into vascularised fibula graft during the reconstruction of oromandibular region.Radiographs (2D) of the lower extremities from 142 patients in the archives of the Department of Radiology in University College London Hospitals (UCLH) were analysed in this study. These radiographs were from 61 females and 81 males. Additionally, 60 unsexed dry fibular bones, 30 right sided, acquired from the collection of the Department of Anatomy, University College London (UCL) were also measured to account for the 3D factor.In the right fibula (dry bone), 90% of the samples measured had a width of 13.1 mm. While in the left fibula (dry bone), 90% of the samples measured had a width of 13.3 mm. Fibulas measured on radiographs had a width of 14.3 mm in 90% of the samples. The length ranges of the dental implants used in this study were: 7

  10. Analysis of the compatibility of dental implant systems in fibula free flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    As a result of major ablative surgery, head and neck oncology patients can be left with significant defects in the orofacial region. The resultant defect raises the need for advanced reconstruction techniques. The reconstruction in this region is aimed at restoring function and facial contour. The use of vascularised free flaps has revolutionised the reconstruction in the head and neck. Advances in reconstruction techniques have resulted in continuous improvement of oral rehabilitation. For example, endosteal implants are being used to restore the masticatory function by the way of prosthetic replacement of the dentition. Implant rehabilitation usually leads to improved facial appearance, function, restoration of speech and mastication. Suitable dental implant placement’s site requires satisfactory width, height and quality of bone. Reconstruction of hard tissue defects therefore will need to be tailored to meet the needs for implant placement. The aim of this feasibility study was to assess the compatibility of five standard commercially available dental implant systems (Biomet 3i, Nobel Biocare, Astra tech, Straumann and Ankylos) for placement into vascularised fibula graft during the reconstruction of oromandibular region. Radiographs (2D) of the lower extremities from 142 patients in the archives of the Department of Radiology in University College London Hospitals (UCLH) were analysed in this study. These radiographs were from 61 females and 81 males. Additionally, 60 unsexed dry fibular bones, 30 right sided, acquired from the collection of the Department of Anatomy, University College London (UCL) were also measured to account for the 3D factor. In the right fibula (dry bone), 90% of the samples measured had a width of 13.1 mm. While in the left fibula (dry bone), 90% of the samples measured had a width of 13.3 mm. Fibulas measured on radiographs had a width of 14.3 mm in 90% of the samples. The length ranges of the dental implants used in this study

  11. Gateway-compatible vectors for high-throughput gene functional analysis in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and other monocot species.

    PubMed

    Mann, David G J; Lafayette, Peter R; Abercrombie, Laura L; King, Zachary R; Mazarei, Mitra; Halter, Mathew C; Poovaiah, Charleson R; Baxter, Holly; Shen, Hui; Dixon, Richard A; Parrott, Wayne A; Neal Stewart, C

    2012-02-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a C4 perennial grass and has been identified as a potential bioenergy crop for cellulosic ethanol because of its rapid growth rate, nutrient use efficiency and widespread distribution throughout North America. The improvement of bioenergy feedstocks is needed to make cellulosic ethanol economically feasible, and genetic engineering of switchgrass is a promising approach towards this goal. A crucial component of creating transgenic switchgrass is having the capability of transforming the explants with DNA sequences of interest using vector constructs. However, there are limited options with the monocot plant vectors currently available. With this in mind, a versatile set of Gateway-compatible destination vectors (termed pANIC) was constructed to be used in monocot plants for transgenic crop improvement. The pANIC vectors can be used for transgene overexpression or RNAi-mediated gene suppression. The pANIC vector set includes vectors that can be utilized for particle bombardment or Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. All the vectors contain (i) a Gateway cassette for overexpression or silencing of the target sequence, (ii) a plant selection cassette and (iii) a visual reporter cassette. The pANIC vector set was functionally validated in switchgrass and rice and allows for high-throughput screening of sequences of interest in other monocot species as well.

  12. Compatibility Conditions of Structural Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1999-01-01

    The theory of elasticity has camouflaged a deficiency in the compatibility formulation since 1860. In structures the ad hoc compatibility conditions through virtual "cuts" and closing "gaps" are not parallel to the strain formulation in elasticity. This deficiency in the compatibility conditions has prevented the development of a direct stress determination method in structures and in elasticity. We have addressed this deficiency and attempted to unify the theory of compatibility. This work has led to the development of the integrated force method for structures and the completed Beltrami-Michell formulation for elasticity. The improved accuracy observed in the solution of numerical examples by the integrated force method can be attributed to the compliance of the compatibility conditions. Using the compatibility conditions allows mapping of variables and facile movement among different structural analysis formulations. This paper reviews and illustrates the requirement of compatibility in structures and in elasticity. It also describes the generation of the conditions and quantifies the benefits of their use. The traditional analysis methods and available solutions (which have been obtained bypassing the missed conditions) should be verified for compliance of the compatibility conditions.

  13. Are sweep net sampling and pitfall trapping compatible with molecular analysis of predation?

    PubMed

    Harwood, James D

    2008-08-01

    Molecular analysis of predation enables accurate and reliable elucidation of trophic linkages in complex food webs, but identifying the strength of such interactions can be subject to error. Currently two techniques dominate: monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although the optimization and characterization of these systems ensures their sensitivity and specificity, predator collection protocols such as sweep-netting and vacuum sampling could overestimate feeding rates because of surface-level contamination, yielding positive reactivity or predation within the sampling device. Therefore, two sampling techniques (sweep-net sampling and hand collection) were compared within an alfalfa agroecosystem using a monoclonal antibody-based ELISA to test the hypothesis that cross-contamination is a source of error, i.e., significantly more predators (linyphiid spiders) would test positive for prey (Diptera) proteins. A concurrent study examining the viability of trapping predators into saline solution was also undertaken. No significant differences were found between the proportions of spiders screening positive for Diptera when collected by sweep-net versus hand collection, rejecting the hypothesis that sweep-netting predators for subsequent molecular gut content analysis overestimates predation frequency. ELISA was also capable of detecting prey proteins in predator guts from pitfall traps containing phosphate-buffered saline, indicating the suitability of this approach for the collection and analysis of epigeal predators. Although these results indicate that sweep netting and pitfall trapping into solution is appropriate in this predator-prey and ELISA analysis system, caution should be exercised with other interactions and PCR-based analysis. The likelihood for false-positive reactivity should therefore be considered on a case-by-case basis.

  14. Shuttle communication and tracking systems signal design and interface compatibility analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Various options for the Dedicated Payload Communication Link (DPCL) were evaluated. Specific subjects addressed include: payload to DPCL power transfer in the proximity of the payload, DPCL antenna pointing considerations, and DPCL transceiver implementations which can be mounted on the deployed antenna boom. Additional analysis of the Space Telescope performance was conducted. The feasibility of using the Global Positioning System (GPS) for attitude determination and control for large spacecraft was examined. The objective of the Shuttle Orbiter Radar Test and Evaluation (SORTE) program was to quantify the Ku-band radar tracking accuracy using White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) radar and optical tracking equipment, with helicopter and balloon targets.

  15. Structural analysis of succinoglycan oligosaccharides from Sinorhizobium meliloti strains with different host compatibility phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Senay; Wood, Karl; Reuhs, Bradley L

    2013-05-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti NRG247 has a Fix(+) phenotype on Medicago truncatula A20 and is Fix(-) on M. truncatula A17, and the phenotype is reversed with S. meliloti NRG185. As the succinoglycan was shown to impact host specificity, an analysis of the succinoglycan oligosaccharides produced by each strain was conducted. The symbiotically active succinoglycan trimeric oligosaccharides (STOs) from the two S. meliloti strains were compared by chromatography and mass spectrometry, and the analysis of the S. meliloti NRG247 oligosaccharides showed that this strain produces an abundance of STO trimer 1 (T1), containing no succinate (i.e., three nonsuccinylated repeats), yet the low-molecular-weight pool contained no nonsuccinylated monomers (potential repeats). This showed that STO T1 is likely to be the active signal on M. truncatula A20 and that the biosynthesis of the STOs is not a random polymerization of the monomer population. The results also suggest that the fully succinylated STO T7 is required for the infection of M. truncatula A17.

  16. Compatibility between mental disorder and mental capacity: analysis of a particular case of group sexual homicide.

    PubMed

    Carabellese, Felice; Vinci, Francesco; Catanesi, Roberto

    2008-11-01

    On the night of August 19, 2000, at the foot of Castel del Monte, an 8-year-old girl was brutally murdered. The perpetrators were identified as five young men who captured their victim and sexually abused her. The policemen found the cadaver by following "Mario," one of the five, who had been discovered lying on the ground, near the castle. Investigation led to demonstrate that the murder was not premeditated. The only desire of the group was to sexually molest the little girl. Mario showed signs of psychiatric pathology and for that he underwent psychiatric evaluation by judicial authorities. Analysis of this case, combined with a criminological and medical-legal perspective led to conclusions very much different from the expectations of Mario's defense attorneys. Mario, a marginal figure and seemingly the least intelligent, played the role of group instigator, both in the initiation of sexually abusing the child, as well as in the elimination of an inconvenient witness. However, the group was able to activate Mario's sadistic fantasies and his sexual perversions, and he ended up in a catalyzing role influencing the behavior of others and realizing what would otherwise remain only fantasies. The circularity of the group allows people like Mario, who are apparently subordinate, to influence the behavior of others. Mario was found to have a mental disorder but it was not sufficient to diminish his personal responsibility related to the crime. In fact, according to Italian judicial code, it is necessary that the motivation for the crime was psychopathological. It was for this reason that, according to Italian law, all of the members of the group were considered to be responsible for the crimes committed and were condemned.

  17. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  18. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  19. Transcriptome analysis reveals a complex interplay between resistance and effector genes during the compatible lentil-Colletotrichum lentis interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bhadauria, Vijai; Vijayan, Perumal; Wei, Yangdou; Banniza, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum lentis is a hemibiotrophic pathogen and causes anthracnose on lentil. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying the symptomatic phase of infection, a cDNA plasmid library was developed from the susceptible lentil cultivar Eston infected with an isolate of the virulent race 0 of C. lentis. The library was sequenced on the Sanger sequencing platform, generating a total of 11,094 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) representing 3,488 unigenes. Mapping of unigenes onto the C. lentis and the L. culinaris genomes resulted in the identification of 2,418 unigenes of fungal origin and 1,070 unigenes of plant origin. Gene ontology term analysis of unigenes revealed that the transcriptome contained 22 candidate effectors, such as in planta induced ToxB and CyanoVirin-N, and 26 resistance genes, including suppressor of npr1-1 constitutive 1 and dirigent. Comparative genomics analyses revealed that three of the candidate effectors are likely located in the subtelomeric regions, and two of them show no synteny with the closely related species C. higginsianum, suggesting genomic rearrangements, such as translocation during speciation to colonize different niches. The data suggest a complex molecular interplay between disease resistance proteins and effectors during compatible interaction in which the pathogen exploits defense responses mounted by the host. PMID:28186158

  20. Transcriptome analysis reveals a complex interplay between resistance and effector genes during the compatible lentil-Colletotrichum lentis interaction.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, Vijai; Vijayan, Perumal; Wei, Yangdou; Banniza, Sabine

    2017-02-10

    Colletotrichum lentis is a hemibiotrophic pathogen and causes anthracnose on lentil. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying the symptomatic phase of infection, a cDNA plasmid library was developed from the susceptible lentil cultivar Eston infected with an isolate of the virulent race 0 of C. lentis. The library was sequenced on the Sanger sequencing platform, generating a total of 11,094 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) representing 3,488 unigenes. Mapping of unigenes onto the C. lentis and the L. culinaris genomes resulted in the identification of 2,418 unigenes of fungal origin and 1,070 unigenes of plant origin. Gene ontology term analysis of unigenes revealed that the transcriptome contained 22 candidate effectors, such as in planta induced ToxB and CyanoVirin-N, and 26 resistance genes, including suppressor of npr1-1 constitutive 1 and dirigent. Comparative genomics analyses revealed that three of the candidate effectors are likely located in the subtelomeric regions, and two of them show no synteny with the closely related species C. higginsianum, suggesting genomic rearrangements, such as translocation during speciation to colonize different niches. The data suggest a complex molecular interplay between disease resistance proteins and effectors during compatible interaction in which the pathogen exploits defense responses mounted by the host.

  1. Compatibility of segmented thermoelectric generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J.; Ursell, T.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that power generation efficiency improves when materials with appropriate properties are combined either in a cascaded or segmented fashion across a temperature gradient. Past methods for determining materials used in segmentation weremainly concerned with materials that have the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. However, the example of SiGe segmented with Bi2Te3 and/or various skutterudites shows a marked decline in device efficiency even though SiGe has the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. The origin of the incompatibility of SiGe with other thermoelectric materials leads to a general definition of compatibility and intrinsic efficiency. The compatibility factor derived as = (Jl+zr - 1) a is a function of only intrinsic material properties and temperature, which is represented by a ratio of current to conduction heat. For maximum efficiency the compatibility factor should not change with temperature both within a single material, and in the segmented leg as a whole. This leads to a measure of compatibility not only between segments, but also within a segment. General temperature trends show that materials are more self compatible at higher temperatures, and segmentation is more difficult across a larger -T. The compatibility factor can be used as a quantitative guide for deciding whether a material is better suited for segmentation orcascading. Analysis of compatibility factors and intrinsic efficiency for optimal segmentation are discussed, with intent to predict optimal material properties, temperature interfaces, and/or currentheat ratios.

  2. Run II data analysis on the grid

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Mandrichenko, Igor Terekhov and Frank Wurthwein

    2002-12-02

    In this document, we begin the technical design for the distributed RunII computing for CDF and D0. The present paper defines the three components of the data handling area of Run II computing, namely the Data Handling System, the Storage System and the Application. We outline their functionality and interaction between them. We identify necessary and desirable elements of the interfaces.

  3. Compatibility between Text Mining and Qualitative Research in the Perspectives of Grounded Theory, Content Analysis, and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Chong Ho; Jannasch-Pennell, Angel; DiGangi, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to illustrate that text mining and qualitative research are epistemologically compatible. First, like many qualitative research approaches, such as grounded theory, text mining encourages open-mindedness and discourages preconceptions. Contrary to the popular belief that text mining is a linear and fully automated…

  4. MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry and thermogravimetric analysis of Mg(II), Ca(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pt(II) adducts with monomethoxypolyethylene glycol 5000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwelase, S. R.; Bariyanga, J.

    2002-05-01

    We have prepared and isolated complexes of Mg(II), Ca(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pt(II) with monomethoxypolyethylene glycol 5000 in a pH 7 buffer at 40 °C in order to study the interaction of this polymer carrier with the ions likely to be found in the human body. Their characterization was done by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, thermogravimetry and elemental analysis. The mass spectra allowed us to determine not only the molecular weights but also the nature of the complexes and the findings were in agreement with the elementary analysis data. The calcium ion was found not directly linked to polyethylene glycol but through water molecules. The overall results indicated strong bonding for Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes and weak interactions for Mg(II), Ca(II) and Pt(II).

  5. Content Analysis of "School Psychology International", 1990-2011: An Analysis of Trends and Compatibility with the NASP Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Steven G.; Akin-Little, Angeleque; Lloyd, Keryn

    2011-01-01

    Formal analysis of research publications serves as one indicator of the current status of a profession or a journal. Content analyses provide both practitioners and academicians with information on the status of research in the profession. These types of analyses can also provide information on the concordance between published research and what…

  6. Compatible Lie Bialgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Zhong; Bai, Cheng-Ming

    2015-06-01

    A compatible Lie algebra is a pair of Lie algebras such that any linear combination of the two Lie brackets is a Lie bracket. We construct a bialgebra theory of compatible Lie algebras as an analogue of a Lie bialgebra. They can also be regarded as a “compatible version” of Lie bialgebras, that is, a pair of Lie bialgebras such that any linear combination of the two Lie bialgebras is still a Lie bialgebra. Many properties of compatible Lie bialgebras as the “compatible version” of the corresponding properties of Lie bialgebras are presented. In particular, there is a coboundary compatible Lie bialgebra theory with a construction from the classical Yang-Baxter equation in compatible Lie algebras as a combination of two classical Yang-Baxter equations in Lie algebras. Furthermore, a notion of compatible pre-Lie algebra is introduced with an interpretation of its close relation with the classical Yang-Baxter equation in compatible Lie algebras which leads to a construction of the solutions of the latter. As a byproduct, the compatible Lie bialgebras fit into the framework to construct non-constant solutions of the classical Yang-Baxter equation given by Golubchik and Sokolov. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11271202, 11221091, 11425104 and Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education under Grant No. 20120031110022

  7. Molecular analysis of two Chinese pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) spontaneous self-compatible mutants, Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui.

    PubMed

    Li, M F; Li, X F; Han, Zh H; Shu, H R; Li, T Zh

    2009-09-01

    Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui are spontaneous bud mutants of Chinese pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) from Ya Li. Both fruit set rate and seed number after self-pollination, together with pollen tube growth, prove that Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui are self-compatible. The fruit set rate and seed number after cross-pollination suggest that the self-compatibility of Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui may be due to natural mutations of the stylar S allele and pollen S allele, respectively. PCR amplification of the S-RNase gene in self-pollinated progeny of Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui show that they contain point mutations in the stylar S(21) allele and pollen S(34) allele, respectively. The cDNA sequence of the Yan Zhuang stylar S-RNase gene revealed that the 182nd nucleotide of the S(21)-RNase (cDNA) sequence had been substituted resulting in a Gly to Val mutation, and this might affect the stability of the S-RNase. In addition, Western blotting showed that one Yan Zhuang stylar S-RNase was absent and the expression level of another S-RNase protein was decreased compared to Ya Li. Therefore, we suggest that the self-compatibility of Yan Zhuang is caused by a point mutation in an S(21)-RNase nucleotide.

  8. Compatibility in multiparameter quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragy, Sammy; Jarzyna, Marcin; Demkowicz-Dobrzański, Rafał

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous estimation of multiple parameters in quantum metrological models is complicated by factors relating to the (i) existence of a single probe state allowing for optimal sensitivity for all parameters of interest, (ii) existence of a single measurement optimally extracting information from the probe state on all the parameters, and (iii) statistical independence of the estimated parameters. We consider the situation when these concerns present no obstacle, and for every estimated parameter the variance obtained in the multiparameter scheme is equal to that of an optimal scheme for that parameter alone, assuming all other parameters are perfectly known. We call such models compatible. In establishing a rigorous theoretical framework for investigating compatibility, we clarify some ambiguities and inconsistencies present in the literature and discuss several examples to highlight interesting features of unitary and nonunitary parameter estimation, as well as deriving new bounds for physical problems of interest, such as the simultaneous estimation of phase and local dephasing.

  9. On Software Compatibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ershov, Andrei P.

    The problem of compatibility of software hampers the development of computer application. One solution lies in standardization of languages, terms, peripherais, operating systems and computer characteristics. (AB)

  10. Preparation and Spectrophotometric Analysis of Hexaamminenickel(II) Chloride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieder, Grace M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed at Brooklyn College (New York) in which the preparation and ammonia analysis of an amminenickel(II) chloride is extended to include a spectrophotometric analysis for nickel. Discusses the materials needed and the procedure for the experiment which takes nine hours of laboratory work. (TW)

  11. Theoretical analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with NiAl and FeAl matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Several potential reinforcement materials were assessed for their chemical, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and mechanical compatibility with the intermetallic matrices based on NiAl and FeAl. Among the ceramic reinforcement materials, Al2O3, TiC, and TiB2, appear to be the optimum choices for NiAl and FeAl matrices. However, the problem of CTE mismatch with the matrix needs to be solved for these three reinforcement materials. Beryllium-rich intermetallic compounds can be considered as potential reinforcement materials provided suitable reaction barrier coatings can be developed for these. Based on preliminary thermodynamic calculations, Sc2O3 and TiC appear to be suitable as reaction barrier coatings for the beryllides. Several reaction barrier coatings are also suggested for the currently available SiC fibers.

  12. Multiwell experiment: reservoir modeling analysis, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, A.I.

    1985-05-01

    This report updates an ongoing analysis by reservoir modelers at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of well test data from the Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX). Results of previous efforts were presented in a recent METC Technical Note (Horton 1985). Results included in this report pertain to the poststimulation well tests of Zones 3 and 4 of the Paludal Sandstone Interval and the prestimulation well tests of the Red and Yellow Zones of the Coastal Sandstone Interval. The following results were obtained by using a reservoir model and history matching procedures: (1) Post-minifracture analysis indicated that the minifracture stimulation of the Paludal Interval did not produce an induced fracture, and extreme formation damage did occur, since a 65% permeability reduction around the wellbore was estimated. The design for this minifracture was from 200 to 300 feet on each side of the wellbore; (2) Post full-scale stimulation analysis for the Paludal Interval also showed that extreme formation damage occurred during the stimulation as indicated by a 75% permeability reduction 20 feet on each side of the induced fracture. Also, an induced fracture half-length of 100 feet was determined to have occurred, as compared to a designed fracture half-length of 500 to 600 feet; and (3) Analysis of prestimulation well test data from the Coastal Interval agreed with previous well-to-well interference tests that showed extreme permeability anisotropy was not a factor for this zone. This lack of permeability anisotropy was also verified by a nitrogen injection test performed on the Coastal Red and Yellow Zones. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Proximity Compatibility and Information Display: The Effects of Space and Color on the Analysis of Aircraft Stall Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    is displayed in close prc xiinity (Polson, Wickens, Klapp , & Colle, 1989). Conversely, focused attention performance is best when the information to be...Journal of E-pt i mental Psychology: I-.uman Percc’ ion and Performance 9(3), 380-393. Polst, :, M , Wick1 1is, C. . , Klapp , S. T. , & cal 1, Ii

  14. LABCEDE and COCHISE Analysis II. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    C-0O69 UNCLASSIFIED PSI-TR-207A NL. 11368 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART AFGL -TR-80 -0063(I) LABCEDE AND COCHISE ANALYSIS H Volume I r( W. T...uniformly across the test chamber (i.e., helium is not cryogenically pumped by the walls). The added reactant gases, N2 , 02, etc. are still adsorbed by...infrared (IR) mirror flange is directed through the reaction cell, reflected from a plane MgF2 - coated mirror mounted on the IR lens baffle, and viewed by

  15. High throughput analysis of drugs of abuse in hair by combining purposely designed sample extraction compatible with immunometric methods used for drug testing in urine.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, R; Civit, E; Svaizer, F; Lotti, A; Gottardi, M; Miozzo, M

    2010-03-20

    Drug testing in hair usually requires a rather complex sample treatment before drugs are amenable to analysis by either immunological and/or chromatographic coupled to mass spectrometry methods. Immunological methods applied are usually dedicated to hair analysis as analytes present in this matrix are not always the same present in urine. Comedical s.a.s. laboratories recently commercialized reagents (VMA-T) purposely designed for hair sample treatment which are compatible with current immunometric methods used for urine drug testing. This is possible as some analytes (6-MAM and cocaine) present in hair after sample treatment are converted to those detected in urine (morphine and benzoylecgonine). A correlation study for several drug classes performed in two laboratories with 32 clinical and 12 spiked drug free (controls) hair samples shows that implementation of the method on clinical chemistry analyzers is easy and that results obtained by different operators and instruments are comparable and reproducible. The main advantage of VMA-T method is the possibility to simultaneously extract from hair main drug classes, in a period of time lower than 2h and its compatibility with immunological methods applied in urine drug testing.

  16. Decomposition of Copper (II) Sulfate Pentahydrate: A Sequential Gravimetric Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Arlo D.; Kalbus, Lee H.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an improved experiment of the thermal dehydration of copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate. The improvements described here are control of the temperature environment and a quantitative study of the decomposition reaction to a thermally stable oxide. Data will suffice to show sequential gravimetric analysis. (Author/SA)

  17. Analysis of the tomato leaf transcriptome during successive hemibiotrophic stages of a compatible interaction with the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Zuluaga, Andrea P; Vega-Arreguín, Julio C; Fei, Zhangjun; Matas, Antonio J; Patev, Sean; Fry, William E; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2016-01-01

    The infection of plants by hemibiotrophic pathogens involves a complex and highly regulated transition from an initial biotrophic, asymptomatic stage to a later necrotrophic state, characterized by cell death. Little is known about how this transition is regulated, and there are conflicting views regarding the significance of the plant hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) in the different phases of infection. To provide a broad view of the hemibiotrophic infection process from the plant perspective, we surveyed the transcriptome of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) during a compatible interaction with the hemibiotrophic oomycete Phytophthora infestans during three infection stages: biotrophic, the transition from biotrophy to necrotrophy, and the necrotrophic phase. Nearly 10 000 genes corresponding to proteins in approximately 400 biochemical pathways showed differential transcript abundance during the three infection stages, revealing a major reorganization of plant metabolism, including major changes in source-sink relations, as well as secondary metabolites. In addition, more than 100 putative resistance genes and pattern recognition receptor genes were induced, and both JA and SA levels and associated signalling pathways showed dynamic changes during the infection time course. The biotrophic phase was characterized by the induction of many defence systems, which were either insufficient, evaded or suppressed by the pathogen.

  18. Molecular analysis of pericentrin gene (PCNT) in a series of 24 Seckel/microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) families.

    PubMed

    Willems, M; Geneviève, D; Borck, G; Baumann, C; Baujat, G; Bieth, E; Edery, P; Farra, C; Gerard, M; Héron, D; Leheup, B; Le Merrer, M; Lyonnet, S; Martin-Coignard, D; Mathieu, M; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Verloes, A; Colleaux, L; Munnich, A; Cormier-Daire, V

    2010-12-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II, MIM 210720) and Seckel syndrome (SCKL, MIM 210600) belong to the primordial dwarfism group characterised by intrauterine growth retardation, severe proportionate short stature, and pronounced microcephaly. MOPD II is distinct from SCKL by more severe growth retardation, radiological abnormalities, and absent or mild mental retardation. Seckel syndrome is associated with defective ATR dependent DNA damage signalling. In 2008, loss-of-function mutations in the pericentrin gene (PCNT) have been identified in 28 patients, including 3 SCKL and 25 MOPDII cases. This gene encodes a centrosomal protein which plays a key role in the organisation of mitotic spindles. The aim of this study was to analyse PCNT in a large series of SCKL-MOPD II cases to further define the clinical spectrum associated with PCNT mutations. Among 18 consanguineous families (13 SCKL and 5 MOPDII) and 6 isolated cases (3 SCKL and 3 MOPD II), 13 distinct mutations were identified in 5/16 SCKL and 8/8 MOPDII including five stop mutations, five frameshift mutations, two splice site mutations, and one apparent missense mutation affecting the last base of exon 19. Moreover, we demonstrated that this latter mutation leads to an abnormal splicing with a predicted premature termination of translation. The clinical analysis of the 5 SCKL cases with PCNT mutations showed that they all presented minor skeletal changes and clinical features compatible with MOPDII diagnosis. It is therefore concluded that, despite variable severity, MOPDII is a genetically homogeneous condition due to loss-of-function of pericentrin.

  19. Integrated data analysis at TJ-II: The density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Milligen, B. Ph. van; Estrada, T.; Ascasibar, E.; Tafalla, D.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Fraguas, A. Lopez; Jimenez, J. A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Dinklage, A.; Fischer, R.

    2011-07-15

    An integrated data analysis system based on Bayesian inference has been developed for the TJ-II stellarator. It reconstructs the electron density profile at a single time point, using data from interferometry, reflectometry, Thomson scattering, and the Helium beam, while providing a detailed error analysis. In this work, we present a novel analysis of the ambiguity inherent in profile reconstruction from reflectometry and show how the integrated data analysis approach elegantly resolves it. Several examples of the application of the technique are provided, in both low-density discharges with and without electrode biasing, and in high-density discharges with an (L-H) confinement transition.

  20. Compatibility and noncontextuality for sequential measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guehne, Otfried; Kleinmann, Matthias; Cabello, Adan; Larsson, Jan-Aake; Kirchmair, Gerhard; Zaehringer, Florian; Gerritsma, Rene; Roos, Christian F.

    2010-02-15

    A basic assumption behind the inequalities used for testing noncontextual hidden variable models is that the observables measured on the same individual system are perfectly compatible. However, compatibility is not perfect in actual experiments using sequential measurements. We discuss the resulting 'compatibility loophole' and present several methods to rule out certain hidden variable models that obey a kind of extended noncontextuality. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of experimental imperfections in a recent trapped-ion experiment and apply our analysis to that case.

  1. Design and integration of a generic disposable array-compatible sensor housing into an integrated disposable indirect microfluidic flow injection analysis system.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Bastian E; Schickling, Benjamin; Prokop, Jürgen; Piotter, Volker; Rapp, Michael; Länge, Kerstin

    2011-10-01

    We describe an integration strategy for arbitrary sensors intended to be used as biosensors in biomedical or bioanalytical applications. For such devices ease of handling (by a potential end user) as well as strict disposable usage are of importance. Firstly we describe a generic array compatible polymer sensor housing with an effective sample volume of 1.55 μl. This housing leaves the sensitive surface of the sensor accessible for the application of biosensing layers even after the embedding. In a second step we show how this sensor housing can be used in combination with a passive disposable microfluidic chip to set up arbitrary 8-fold sensor arrays and how such a system can be complemented with an indirect microfluidic flow injection analysis (FIA) system. This system is designed in a way that it strictly separates between disposable and reusable components- by introducing tetradecane as an intermediate liquid. This results in a sensor system compatible with the demands of most biomedical applications. Comparative measurements between a classical macroscopic FIA system and this integrated indirect microfluidic system are presented. We use a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor as an exemplary detector in this work.

  2. 49 CFR 175.78 - Stowage compatibility of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Compatibility Group S, explosives are permitted to be transported aboard a passenger aircraft. Only certain..., explosives may be transported aboard a cargo aircraft. (ii) Division 1.4 explosives in Compatibility Group S... of special fireworks or railway torpedoes. [71 FR 14604, Mar. 22, 2006, as amended at 71 FR...

  3. 49 CFR 175.78 - Stowage compatibility of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Compatibility Group S, explosives are permitted to be transported aboard a passenger aircraft. Only certain..., explosives may be transported aboard a cargo aircraft. (ii) Division 1.4 explosives in Compatibility Group S... a position that will allow contact with a package of special fireworks or railway torpedoes....

  4. Chemical compatibility of cartridge materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Roy C.; Zee, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    This twelve month progress report deals with the chemical compatibility of semiconductor crystals grown in zero gravity. Specifically, it studies the chemical compatibility between TZM, a molybdenum alloy containing titanium and zirconium, and WC 103, a titanium alloy containing Niobium and Hafnium, and Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and Cadmium Zinc Tellurite (CdZnTe). Due to the health hazards involved, three approaches were used to study the chemical compatibility between the semiconductor and cartridge materials: reaction retort, thermogravimetric analysis, and bulk cylindrical cartridge containers. A scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer was used to examine all samples after testing. The first conclusion drawn is that reaction rates with TZM were not nearly as great as they were with WC 103. Second, the total reaction between GaAs and WC 103 was almost twice that with TZM. Therefore, even though WC 103 is easier to fabricate, at least half of the cartridge thickness will be degraded if contact is made with one of the semiconductor materials leading to a loss of strength properties.

  5. Space processing applications payload equipment study. Volume 2B: Payload interface analysis (power/thermal/electromagnetic compatibility)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, R. L. (Editor); Smith, A. G. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    As a part of the task of performing preliminary engineering analysis of modular payload subelement/host vehicle interfaces, a subsystem interface analysis was performed to establish the integrity of the modular approach to the equipment design and integration. Salient areas that were selected for analysis were power and power conditioning, heat rejection and electromagnetic capability (EMC). The equipment and load profiles for twelve representative experiments were identified. Two of the twelve experiments were chosen as being representative of the group and have been described in greater detail to illustrate the evaluations used in the analysis. The shuttle orbiter will provide electrical power from its three fuel cells in support of the orbiter and the Spacelab operations. One of the three shuttle orbiter fuel cells will be dedicated to the Spacelab electrical power requirements during normal shuttle operation. This power supplies the Spacelab subsystems and the excess will be available to the payload. The current Spacelab sybsystem requirements result in a payload allocation of 4.0 to 4.8 kW average (24 hour/day) and 9.0 kW peak for 15 minutes.

  6. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  7. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  8. A protein extraction method for low protein concentration solutions compatible with the proteomic analysis of rubber particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Sun, Yong; Tong, Zheng; Yang, Qian; Chang, Lili; Meng, Xueru; Wang, Limin; Tian, Weimin; Wang, Xuchu

    2016-11-01

    The extraction of high-purity proteins from the washing solution (WS) of rubber particles (also termed latex-producing organelles) from laticifer cells in rubber tree for proteomic analysis is challenging due to the low concentration of proteins in the WS. Recent studies have revealed that proteins in the WS might play crucial roles in natural rubber biosynthesis. To further examine the involvement of these proteins in natural rubber biosynthesis, we designed an efficiency method to extract high-purity WS proteins. We improved our current borax and phenol-based method by adding reextraction steps with phenol (REP) to improve the yield from low protein concentration samples. With this new method, we extracted WS proteins that were suitable for proteomics. Indeed, compared to the original borax and phenol-based method, the REP method improved both the quality and quantity of isolated proteins. By repeatedly extracting from low protein concentration solutions using the same small amount of phenol, the REP method yielded enough protein of sufficiently high-quality from starting samples containing less than 0.02 mg of proteins per milliliter. This method was successfully applied to extract the rubber particle proteins from the WS of natural rubber latex samples. The REP-extracted WS proteins were resolved by 2DE, and 28 proteins were positively identified by MS. This method has the potential to become widely used for the extraction of proteins from low protein concentration solutions for proteomic analysis.

  9. Design of a compact ultrahigh vacuum-compatible setup for the analysis of chemical vapor deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Theodor; Nowak, Martin; Zielasek, Volkmar Bäumer, Marcus; Mundloch, Udo; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-10-15

    Optimizing thin film deposition techniques requires contamination-free transfer from the reactor into an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber for surface science analysis. A very compact, multifunctional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) reactor for direct attachment to any typical UHV system for thin film analysis was designed and built. Besides compactness, fast, easy, and at the same time ultimately clean sample transfer between reactor and UHV was a major goal. It was achieved by a combination of sample manipulation parts, sample heater, and a shutter mechanism designed to fit all into a NW38 Conflat six-ways cross. The present reactor design is versatile to be employed for all commonly employed variants of CVD, including Atomic Layer Deposition. A demonstration of the functionality of the system is provided. First results of the setup (attached to an Omicron Multiprobe x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy system) on the temperature dependence of Pulsed Spray Evaporation-CVD of Ni films from Ni acetylacetonate as the precursor demonstrate the reactor performance and illustrate the importance of clean sample transfer without breaking vacuum in order to obtain unambiguous results on the quality of CVD-grown thin Ni films. The widely applicable design holds promise for future systematic studies of the fundamental processes during chemical vapor deposition or atomic layer deposition.

  10. Electron diffraction based analysis of phase fractions and texture in nanocrystalline thin films, part II: implementation.

    PubMed

    Lábár, János L

    2009-02-01

    This series of articles describes a method that performs (semi)quantitative phase analysis for nanocrystalline transmission electron microscope samples from selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns. Volume fractions of phases and their textures are obtained separately in the method. First, the two-dimensional SAED pattern is converted into an X-ray diffraction-like one-dimensional distribution. Volume fractions of the nanocrystalline components are determined by fitting the spectral components, calculated for the previously identified phases with a priori known structures. Blackman correction is also applied to take into account dynamic effects for medium grain sizes. Peak shapes and experimental parameters (camera length, etc.) are refined during the fitting iterations. Parameter space is explored with the help of the Downhill-SIMPLEX algorithm. Part I presented the principles, while Part II now elaborates current implementation, and Part III will demonstrate its usage by examples. The method is implemented in a computer program that runs under the Windows operating system on IBM PC compatible machines.

  11. Automatically produced FRP beams with embedded FOS in complex geometry: process, material compatibility, micromechanical analysis, and performance tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabler, Markus; Tkachenko, Viktoriya; Küppers, Simon; Kuka, Georg G.; Habel, Wolfgang R.; Milwich, Markus; Knippers, Jan

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of the presented work was to evolve a multifunctional beam composed out of fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) and an embedded optical fiber with various fiber Bragg grating sensors (FBG). These beams are developed for the use as structural member for bridges or industrial applications. It is now possible to realize large scale cross sections, the embedding is part of a fully automated process and jumpers can be omitted in order to not negatively influence the laminate. The development includes the smart placement and layout of the optical fibers in the cross section, reliable strain transfer, and finally the coupling of the embedded fibers after production. Micromechanical tests and analysis were carried out to evaluate the performance of the sensor. The work was funded by the German ministry of economics and technology (funding scheme ZIM). Next to the authors of this contribution, Melanie Book with Röchling Engineering Plastics KG (Haren/Germany; Katharina Frey with SAERTEX GmbH & Co. KG (Saerbeck/Germany) were part of the research group.

  12. THE SPECTRUM AND TERM ANALYSIS OF V II

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, A. P.; Pickering, J. C.; Semeniuk, J. I.

    2013-07-15

    The spectrum and extended term analysis of V II are presented. Fourier transform spectrometry was used to record high resolution spectra of singly ionized vanadium in the region 1492-5800 A (67020-17260 cm{sup -1}) with vanadium-neon and vanadium-argon hollow cathode lamps as sources. The wavenumber uncertainty for the center of gravity of the strongest lines is typically 0.002 cm{sup -1}, an improvement of an order of magnitude over previous measurements. Most of the lines exhibit partly resolved hyperfine structure. The V II energy levels in the 1985 compilation of Sugar and Corliss have been confirmed and revised, with the exception of the high-lying 4f levels and eight of the lower levels. Thirty-nine of the additional eighty-five high levels published by Iglesias et al. have also been confirmed and revised, and three of their missing levels have been found. The energy uncertainty of the revised levels has been reduced by about an order of magnitude. In total, 176 even levels and 233 odd levels are presented. Wavenumbers and classifications are given for 1242 V II lines.

  13. Analysis of Hemoglobin Glycation Using Microfluidic CE-MS: A Rapid, Mass Spectrometry Compatible Method for Assessing Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Redman, Erin A; Ramos-Payan, Maria; Mellors, J Scott; Ramsey, J Michael

    2016-05-17

    to provide a more complete picture of a patient's glycemic control in the months leading up to blood collection. The results presented here demonstrate that the microfluidic CE-MS method is capable of rapidly assessing Hb and HSA glycation from low volumes of whole blood with minimal sample preparation and has the potential to provide more information in a single analysis step than current technologies.

  14. Final Safety Analysis Addenda to Hazards Summary Report, Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): upgrading of plant protection system. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, N. L.; Keeton, J. M.; Sackett, J. I.

    1980-06-01

    This report is the second in a series of compilations of the formal Final Safety Analysis Addenda (FSAA`s) to the EBR-II Hazard Summary Report and Addendum. Sections 2 and 3 are edited versions of the original FSAA`s prepared in support of certain modifications to the reactor-shutdown-system portion of the EBR-II plant-protection system. Section 4 is an edited version of the original FSAA prepared in support of certain modifications to a system classified as an engineered safety feature. These sections describe the pre- and postmodification system, the rationale for the modification, and required supporting safety analysis. Section 5 provides an updated description and analysis of the EBR-II emergency power system. Section 6 summarizes all significant modifications to the EBR-II plant-protection system to date.

  15. Influence of different mineral and Organic pesticide treatments on Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) contents determined by derivative potentiometric stripping analysis in Italian white and red wines.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Francesco; La Pera, Lara; Di Bella, Giuseppa; Nicotina, Mariano; Dugo, Giacomo

    2003-02-12

    This paper deals with the use of derivative potentiometric stripping analysis (dPSA) as a rapid and precise method to determine Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels in red and white wine samples from Sicily, Campania, and Tuscany and to investigate the possible connection between the content of these metals and the pesticide treatments used in vine-growing to control plant diseases and pests. dPSA allowed direct quantitation of heavy metals in acidified wines without any sample pretreatment. Mean recoveries of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ranged from 95.5 to 99.2% for white wine samples and from 96.1 to 100.0% for red wine samples. The obtained results showed that Cd(II) was not found in any sample and that Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels were always lower than the toxicity limits in both fungicide- and water-treated wines. Nevertheless, the contents of metals were increased in samples from organic and inorganic pesticides treatment with respect to the water-treated samples. In particular, quinoxyfen, dinocap-penconazole, and dinocap applications considerably increased Cu(II) and Zn(II) contents in white and red wines. The levels of lead were significantly raised by azoxystrobin and sulfur treatments.

  16. Elastomer Compatible With Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial rubber resists ignition on impact and seals at low temperatures. Filled fluoroelastomer called "Katiflex" developed for use in seals of vessels holding cold liquid and gaseous oxygen. New material more compatible with liquid oxygen than polytetrafluoroethylene. Provides dynamic seal at -196 degrees C with only 4 times seal stress required at room temperature. In contrast, conventional rubber seals burn or explode on impact in high-pressure oxygen, and turn hard or even brittle at liquid-oxygen temperatures, do not seal reliably, also see (MFS-28124).

  17. From compatible factorization to near-compatible factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldiabat, Raja'i.; Ibrahim, Haslinda

    2014-12-01

    A compatible factorization of order ν, is an ν× ν-1/2 array in which the entries in row i form a near-one-factor with focus i, and the triples associated with the rows contain no repetitions. In this paper, we aim to amend this compatible factorization so that we can display ν(ν-1)/2 - 2ν/3 triples with the minimum repeated triples. Throughout this paper we propose a new type of factorization called near-compatible factorization. First, we present the compatible factorization towards developing a near-compatible factorization. Second, we discuss briefly the necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of near-compatible factorization. Then, we exemplify the construction for case ν = 9 as a groundwork in developing near-compatible factorization.

  18. SLR precision analysis for LAGEOS I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilsu, Gaye; Sahin, Muhammed

    2000-10-01

    This paper deals with the problem of properly weighting satellite observations which are non-uniform in quality. The technique, the variance component estimation method developed by Helmert, was first applied to the 1987 LAGEOS I SLR data by Sahin et al. (1992). This paper investigates the performance of the globally distributed SLR stations using the Helmert type variance component estimation. As well as LAGEOS I data, LAGEOS II data were analysed, in order to compare with the previously analysed 1987 LAGEOS I data. The LAGEOS I and II data used in this research were obtained from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS), which archives data acquired from stations operated by NASA and by other U.S. and international organizations. The data covers the years 1994, 1995 and 1996. The analysis is based on "full-rate" laser observations, which consist of hundreds to thousands of ranges per satellite pass. The software used is based on the SATAN package (SATellite ANalysis) developed at the Royal Greenwich Observatory in the UK.

  19. SHEFEX II Flight Instrumentation And Preparation Of Post Flight Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Thomas; Siebe, Frank; Gulhan, Ali

    2011-05-01

    A main disadvantage of modern TPS systems for re- entry vehicles is the expensive manufacturing and maintenance process due to the complex geometry of these blunt nose configurations. To reduce the costs and to improve the aerodynamic performance the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is following a different approach using TPS structures consisting of flat ceramic tiles. To test these new sharp edged TPS structures the SHEFEX I flight experiment was designed and successfully performed by DLR in 2005. To further improve the reliability of the sharp edged TPS design at even higher Mach numbers, a second flight experiment SHEFEX II will be performed in September 2011. In comparison to SHEFEX I the second flight experiment has a fully symmetrical shape and will reach a maximum Mach number of about 11. Furthermore the vehicle has an active steering system using four canards to control the flight attitude during re-entry, e.g. roll angle, angle of attack and sideslip. After a successful flight the evaluation of the flight data will be performed using a combination of numerical and experimental tools. The data will be used for the improvement of the present numerical analysis tools and to get a better understanding of the aerothermal behaviour of sharp TPS structures. This paper presents the flight instrumentation of the SHEFEX II TPS. In addition the concept of the post flight analysis is presented.

  20. Aerothermal Analysis of the Project Fire II Afterbody Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael J.; Loomis, Mark; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to simulate the wake flow and afterbody heating of the Project Fire II ballistic reentry to Earth at 11.4 km/sec. Laminar results are obtained over a portion of the trajectory between the initial heat pulse and peak afterbody heating. Although non-catalytic forebody convective heating results are in excellent agreement with previous computations, initial predictions of afterbody heating were about a factor of two below the experimental values. Further analysis suggests that significant catalysis may be occurring on the afterbody heat shield. Computations including finite-rate catalysis on the afterbody surface are in good agreement with the data over the early portion of the trajectory, but are conservative near the peak afterbody heating point, especially on the rear portion of the conical frustum. Further analysis of the flight data from Fire II shows that peak afterbody heating occurs before peak forebody heating, a result that contradicts computations and flight data from other entry vehicles. This result suggests that another mechanism, possibly pyrolysis, may be occurring during the later portion of the trajectory, resulting in less total heat transfer than the current predictions.

  1. Voltammetric analysis of Cu (II), Cd (II) and Zn (II) complexes and their cyclic voltammetry with several cephalosporin antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Abo El-Maali, N; Osman, A H; Aly, A A M; Al-Hazmi, G A A

    2005-02-01

    Both osteryoung square wave voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry have been utilized to elucidate and confirm the possible complexation reaction that occur between the various cephalosporin antibiotics and either the toxic, non-essential metal ion, viz. Cd (II), or the essential but toxic (when their concentration exceeds certain level in serum) metal ions, viz. Cu (II) and Zn (II). Voltammetric measurements indicated the existence of 1:1 metal-to-ligand ratio (as in cephalexin and cephapirin complexes), 1:2 ratio (such as in cefamandole, cefuroxime and cefotaxime complexes) and 2:1 ratio in case of ceftazidime complexes. Adsorption behavior was evidenced for Cu (II)-cefuroxime or ceftazidime complexes as well as for those for Zn (II)-cephalexin or cephapirin. This phenomenon could be used for the determination of either the antibiotic or the metal ion using adsorptive stripping voltammetry. Detection limits down to 7x10(-10) M have been easily achieved.

  2. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  3. Tank 241-SY-102 January 2000 Compatibility Grab Samples Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    BELL, K.E.

    2000-05-11

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples taken in January 2000 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank SY-102 samples were performed as directed in Comparability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 2000 (Sasaki 1999). No notification limits were exceeded. Preliminary data on samples 2SY-99-5, -6, and -7 were reported in ''Format II Report on Tank 241-SY-102 Waste Compatibility Grab Samples Taken in January 2000'' (Lockrem 2000). The data presented here represent the final results.

  4. Electro-magnetic compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, H.

    1980-05-01

    The historical background to the growth in problems of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) in UK Military aircraft is reviewed and the present approach for minimizing these problems during development is discussed. The importance of using representative aircraft for final EMC assessments is stressed, and the methods of approach in planning and executing such tests are also outlined. The present equipment qualification procedures are based on assumptions regarding the electromagnetic fields present within the airframe, and the nature of the coupling mechanisms. These cannot be measured with any certainty in representative aircraft. Thus EMC assessments rely on practical tests. Avionics systems critical to flight safety, and systems vital to mission effectiveness require test methods that provide a measure of the safety and performance margins available to account for variations that occur in production and service use. Some proven methods are available, notably for detonator circuits, but in most other areas further work is required. Encouraging process has been made in the use of current probes for the measurement of interfering signals on critical signal lines, in conjunction with complementary test house procedures, as a means for obtaining the safety margins required in flight and engine control systems. Performance margins for mission systems using digital techniques are difficult to determine, and there is a need for improved test techniques. The present EMC qualification tests for equipment in the laboratory do not guarantee freedom from interference when installed, and the results are limited in value for correlating with aircraft tests.

  5. Analysis of Antarctic Denitrification in 2003 Winter Observed by ILAS-II Onboard the ADEOS-II Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, H.; Saeki, K.; Sugita, T.

    2005-12-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC) play an important role in ozone destruction in both Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere in winter. They take up gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3) and grow up when temperature is below nitric acid saturation temperature (TNAT). When PSC becomes large, it starts to descend and nitric acid is removed from the air mass, resulting in denitrification. The Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer-II (ILAS-II) onboard the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite-II (ADEOS-II) successfully made measurements for the whole Antarctic winter in 2003. ILAS-II measured vertical profiles of O3, HNO3, NO2, H2O, N2O, CH4, ClONO2, N2O5, etc. in addition to the aerosol extinction coefficients at 780 nm. In this study, we analyzed denitrification from ILAS-II HNO3 and N2O data in regard to temperature history on the trajectory. The quantity of denitrification was estimated from the difference between measured HNO3 and HNO3* assumed from HNO3-- N2O correlation. In this analysis, it was found that denitrification was observed only for those airmass that experienced temperature below TICE (ice saturation temperature) in late June, 2003. In late July, it was found that most airmass inside the polar vortex was denitrified regardless of temperature history. This suggests that permanent denitrification has occurred in June-July period. The transition of relationship between denitrification and airmass temperature history was discovered from the ILAS-II data. Also, major types of PSC have found to be changed from nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in June to ice in July, from the ILAS-II data. This is considered to be due to the lack of nitric acid in the airmass due to the denitrification in July.

  6. Solar Electric Generating System II finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dohner, J.L.; Anderson, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    On June 2, 1992, Landers` earthquake struck the Solar Electric Generating System II, located in Daggett, California. The 30 megawatt power station, operated by the Daggett Leasing Corporation (DLC), suffered substantial damage due to structural failures in the solar farm. These failures consisted of the separation of sliding joints supporting a distribution of parabolic glass mirrors. At separation, the mirrors fell to the ground and broke. It was the desire of the DLC and the Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and to redesign these joints so that, in the event of future quakes, costly breakage will be avoided. To accomplish this task, drawings of collector components were developed by the STDAC, from which a detailed finite element computer model of a solar collector was produced. This nonlinear dynamic model, which consisted of over 8,560 degrees of freedom, underwent model reduction to form a low order nonlinear dynamic model containing only 40 degrees of freedom. This model was then used as a design tool to estimate joint dynamics. Using this design tool, joint configurations were modified, and an acceptable joint redesign determined. The results of this analysis showed that the implementation of metal stops welded to support shafts for the purpose of preventing joint separation is a suitable joint redesign. Moreover, it was found that, for quakes of Landers` magnitude, mirror breakage due to enhanced vibration in the trough assembly is unlikely.

  7. Analysis of Myosin II Minifilament Orientation at Epithelial Zonula Adherens

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Magdalene; Liang, Xuan; Gomez, Guillermo A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II (NMII) form bipolar filaments, which bind F-actin to exert cellular contractility during physiological processes (Vicente-Manzanares et al., 2009). Using a combinatorial approach to fluorescently label both N- and C-termini of the NMII heavy chain, recent works have demonstrated the ability to visualize NMII bipolar filaments at various subcellular localizations (Ebrahim et al., 2013; Beach et al., 2014). At the zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelia, NMII minifilaments bind the circumferential actin bundles in a pseudo-sarcomeric manner (Ebrahim et al., 2013), a conformation required to maintain junctional tension and tissue integrity (Ratheesh et al., 2012). By expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-NMIIA heavy chain and immunolabel it using a NMIIA C-terminus specific antibody, we were able to visualize the NMII minifilaments bound to F-actin bundles in Caco-2 cells (Michael et al., 2016), as previously reported (Ebrahim et al., 2013; Beach et al., 2014). In addition, we designed an FIJI/MATLAB analysis module to quantify the size, distance and alignment of these minifilaments with respect to junctional F-actin at the ZA. Measurements of the dispersion of minifilaments angles were proven to be a useful parameter that closely correlated to the extent of contractility at junctions (Michael et al., 2016). PMID:28251171

  8. Compatible quantum theory.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, R; Hohenberg, P C

    2014-09-01

    Formulations of quantum mechanics (QM) can be characterized as realistic, operationalist, or a combination of the two. In this paper a realistic theory is defined as describing a closed system entirely by means of entities and concepts pertaining to the system. An operationalist theory, on the other hand, requires in addition entities external to the system. A realistic formulation comprises an ontology, the set of (mathematical) entities that describe the system, and assertions, the set of correct statements (predictions) the theory makes about the objects in the ontology. Classical mechanics is the prime example of a realistic physical theory. A straightforward generalization of classical mechanics to QM is hampered by the inconsistency of quantum properties with classical logic, a circumstance that was noted many years ago by Birkhoff and von Neumann. The present realistic formulation of the histories approach originally introduced by Griffiths, which we call 'compatible quantum theory (CQT)', consists of a 'microscopic' part (MIQM), which applies to a closed quantum system of any size, and a 'macroscopic' part (MAQM), which requires the participation of a large (ideally, an infinite) system. The first (MIQM) can be fully formulated based solely on the assumption of a Hilbert space ontology and the noncontextuality of probability values, relying in an essential way on Gleason's theorem and on an application to dynamics due in large part to Nistico. Thus, the present formulation, in contrast to earlier ones, derives the Born probability formulas and the consistency (decoherence) conditions for frameworks. The microscopic theory does not, however, possess a unique corpus of assertions, but rather a multiplicity of contextual truths ('c-truths'), each one associated with a different framework. This circumstance leads us to consider the microscopic theory to be physically indeterminate and therefore incomplete, though logically coherent. The completion of the theory

  9. Reference manual for generation and analysis of Habitat Time Series: version II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milhous, Robert T.; Bartholow, John M.; Updike, Marlys A.; Moos, Alan R.

    1990-01-01

    by the Aquatic Systems Branch of the National Ecology Research Center. For more information about the TSLIB software, refer to the Memorandum of Understanding. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology and TSLIB. Other chapters in this manual provide information on the different aspects of using the models. The information contained in the other chapters includes (2) acquisition, entry, manipulation, and listing of streamflow data; (3) entry, manipulation, and listing of the habitat-versus-streamflow function; (4) transferring streamflow data; (5) water resources systems analysis; (6) generation and analysis of daily streamflow and habitat values; (7) generation of the time series of monthly habitats; (8) manipulation, analysis, and display of month time series data; and (9) generation, analysis, and display of annual time series data. Each section includes documentation for the programs therein with at least one page of information for each program, including a program description, instructions for running the program, and sample output. The Appendixes contain the following: (A) sample file formats; (B) descriptions of default filenames; (C) alphabetical summary of batch-procedure files; (D) installing and running TSLIB on a microcomputer; (E) running TSLIB on a CDC Cyber computer; (F) using the TSLIB user interface program (RTSM); and (G) running WATSTORE on the USGS Amdahl mainframe computer. The number for this version of TSLIB--Version II-- is somewhat arbitrary, as the TSLIB programs were collected into a library some time ago; but operators tended to use and manage them as individual programs. Therefore, we will consider the group of programs from the past that were only on the CDC Cyber computer as Version 0; the programs from the past that were on both the Cyber and the IBM-compatible microcomputer as Version I; and the programs contained in this reference manual as Version II.

  10. Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Douglas, N, ed.

    2004-11-25

    simulations. + Identification and design of compatible spatial discretizations of PDEs, their classification, analysis, and relations. + Relationships between different compatible spatial discretization methods and concepts which have been developed; + Impact of compatible spatial discretizations upon physical fidelity, verification and validation of simulations, especially in large-scale, multiphysics settings. + How solvers address the demands placed upon them by compatible spatial discretizations. This report provides information about the program and abstracts of all the presentations.

  11. Molecular analysis of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency with hepatocardiomuscular expression

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefont, J.P.; Cepanec, C.; Leroux, J.P.

    1996-05-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency, an inherited disorder of mitochondrial long-chain fatty-acid (LCFA) oxidation, results in two distinct clinical act phenotypes, namely, an adult (muscular) form and an infantile (hepatocardiomuscular) form. The rationale of this phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. The adult form of the disease is commonly ascribed to the Ser-113-Leu substitution in CPT II. Only few data are available regarding the molecular basis of the infantile form of the disease. We report herein a homozygous A-2399-C transversion predicting a Tyr-628-Ser substitution in a CPT II-deficient infant. In vitro expression of mutant cDNA in COS-1 cells demonstrated the responsibility of this mutation for the disease. Metabolic consequences of the Ser-113-Leu and Tyr-628-Ser substitutions were studied in fibroblasts. The Tyr-628-Ser substitution (infantile form) resulted in a 10% CPT II residual activity, markedly impairing LCFA oxidation, whereas the Ser-113-Leu substitution (adult form) resulted in a 20% CPT II residual activity, without consequence on LCFA oxidation. These data show that CPT II activity has to be reduced below a critical threshold in order for LCFA oxidation in fibroblasts to be impaired. The hypothesis that this critical threshold differs among tissues could provide a basis to explain phenotypic heterogeneity of CPT II deficiency. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Quantitative analysis of peptide-MHC class II interaction.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, B; Jung, G; Wiesmüller, K H

    1999-12-01

    The tremendous progress in the field of basic immunology and immunochemistry made in the last decade has significantly advanced our understanding of antigen processing and presentation by MHC class I and II proteins. In this review different techniques to study peptide interaction with MHC class II molecules are summarized and their impact on the elucidation of quantitative parameters, like affinities or kinetic data, is discussed. A recently introduced method based on synthetic combinatorial peptide libraries allows to quantify the binding contribution of each amino acid residue in a class II ligand and is presented in more detail. As this knowledge is fundamental for current investigations in modern medicine, e.g. for novel immune system based therapy concepts, further aspects like the design of new high affinity MHC class II ligands and the prediction of peptide antigens are discussed.

  13. The FT-IR spectrometric analysis of the changes of polyphenol oxidase II secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chunhua; Dai, Ya; Liu, Qingliang; Xie, Yongshu; Xu, Xiaolong

    2003-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase II is a novel protein purified from tobacco, which acts as a key role in plant defense system. From the analysis of FT-IR spectrums, Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD) spectrums and second-derivative spectrums of PPO II at different pH and peroxide PPO II adduct, the secondary structure fractions are analyzed. PPO II at low pH (pH=3.0) and peroxide PPO II adduct almost keep the same secondary structure of native PPO II. The percentages of β-turn and random coil increase rapidly and the percentages of α-helix and anti-parallel β-sheet decrease rapidly at high pH (pH=10.0) comparing with that of native PPO II. All these conclusions are proved by the secondary structure calculations of circular dichroism spectrums in different states.

  14. Quantitative proteome analysis in benign thyroid nodular disease using the fluorescent ruthenium II tris(bathophenanthroline disulfonate) stain.

    PubMed

    Berger, K; Wissmann, D; Ihling, C; Kalkhof, S; Beck-Sickinger, A; Sinz, A; Paschke, R; Führer, D

    2004-11-30

    Thyroid tumorigenesis involves qualitative and quantitative changes in protein expression, which can be comprehensively studied by proteome analysis. However, one of the technical bottlenecks of proteomics remains a reliable, sensitive and inexpensive method for quantification of differentially expressed proteins. This is due to the limited linear range of most available protein stains, i.e. silver and Coomassie blue, and high costs of commercially available fluorescent stains. In this paper we describe our experience with a lab-made ruthenium based fluorescent stain (ruthenium II tris(bathophenanthroline disulfonate) (RuBPs)) to perform proteome analysis of nodular thyroid disease. We first compared the properties of RuBPs with two highly sensitive protein stains: (1) silver staining and (2) the commercially available fluorescent dye Sypro Ruby. We show that in addition to its highly sensitive staining capabilities similar to Sypro Ruby and silver (2 ng), RuBPs offers several advantages such as a broad dynamic range (similar to Sypro Ruby and 500 times broader than the dynamic range of silver stain), low costs ( 0.03 per gel) and excellent compatibility with mass spectrometry. We then applied the inexpensive RuBPs stain to 2D gels (pH 4-7) of four benign thyroid nodules and normal thyroid tissue. We were able to detect approximately 1800 protein spots/gel in our thyroid samples. Quantitative changes in protein expression levels of at least 20-42 proteins were noted in the benign nodules compared with the normal thyroid tissue of the same patient. Differentially expressed spots were further characterised by nano-LC-FTICR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. In summary we demonstrate, that the novel fluorescent ruthenium II tris(bathophenanthroline disulfonate) stain is a highly sensitive, reliable and inexpensive tool for quantitative proteome analysis in thyroid nodular disease.

  15. Analysis of xylosyltransferase II binding to the anticoagulant heparin.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Javier Carrera; Ambrosius, Michael; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Götting, Christian

    2009-05-22

    The key enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of glycosaminoglycan production are represented by the human xylosyltransferase I and its isoform II (XylT-I and XylT-II). The glycosaminoglycan heparin interacts with a variety of proteins, thereby regulating their activities, also those of xylosyltransferases. The identification of unknown amino acids responsible for heparin-binding of XylT-II was addressed in this study. Thus, six XylT-II fragments were designed as fusion proteins with MBP and we received soluble and purified MBP/XylT-II from Escherichia coli. Heparin-binding studies showed that all fragments bound with low affinity to heparin. Prolonging of XylT-II fragments did not account for a cooperative effect of multiple heparin-binding motifs and in turn for a stronger heparin-binding. Sequence alignment and surface polarity plot led to the identification of two highly positively charged Cardin-Weintraub motifs with surface accessibility, resulting in combination with short clusters of basic amino acids for strong heparin-binding of native xylosyltransferases.

  16. Analysis of xylosyltransferase II binding to the anticoagulant heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, Javier Carrera; Ambrosius, Michael; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Goetting, Christian

    2009-05-22

    The key enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of glycosaminoglycan production are represented by the human xylosyltransferase I and its isoform II (XylT-I and XylT-II). The glycosaminoglycan heparin interacts with a variety of proteins, thereby regulating their activities, also those of xylosyltransferases. The identification of unknown amino acids responsible for heparin-binding of XylT-II was addressed in this study. Thus, six XylT-II fragments were designed as fusion proteins with MBP and we received soluble and purified MBP/XylT-II from Escherichia coli. Heparin-binding studies showed that all fragments bound with low affinity to heparin. Prolonging of XylT-II fragments did not account for a cooperative effect of multiple heparin-binding motifs and in turn for a stronger heparin-binding. Sequence alignment and surface polarity plot led to the identification of two highly positively charged Cardin-Weintraub motifs with surface accessibility, resulting in combination with short clusters of basic amino acids for strong heparin-binding of native xylosyltransferases.

  17. COMPATIBILITY OF BENTONITE AND DNAPLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The compatibility of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), trichloroethylene (TCE), methylene chloride (MC), and creosote with commercially available sodium bentonite pellets was evaluated using stainless steel, double-ring, falling-head permeameters. The Hydraulic conductiv...

  18. Simultaneous determination of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) in surface waters by solid phase extraction and flow injection analysis with spectrophotometric detection.

    PubMed

    Castillo, E; Cortina, J L; Beltrán, J; Prat, M D; Granados, M

    2001-07-01

    A method for heavy metal monitoring using spectrophotometric detection is presented. Traces of Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) at the low microg l(-1) level can be determined simultaneously after both selective removal of metal interferences and preconcentration using 'extraction chromatographic resins'. Lewatit TP807'84, which contains di(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid as active component, was used as solid adsorbent. Two minicolumns containing this resin were used: one at pH 3.2 for the removal of interferences, such as Zn(II) and Fe(III), and the other at pH 5.5 for the selective preconcentration of the target analytes. Spectrophotometric determination used FIA methodology with sulfarsazene as chromogenic reagent and partial least-squares multivariate calibration. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of surface waters from the Llobregat river and ground water samples from wells in the Guadiamar basin. Accuracy, expressed in terms of recoveries, was in the range 80-120% and relative standard deviations were below 10%.

  19. Theoretical analysis of BLM system for HLS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Kai; Li, Yu-Xiong; Li, Wei-Min; He, Li-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Hefei Light Source (HLS) is being upgraded to HLS II. Its emittance will be much lower than before, therefore the Touschek scattering will increase significantly and become the dominant factor of beam loss. So it is necessary to build a new beam loss monitoring (BLM) system that, in contrast to the old one, is able to obtain the quantity and position information of lost electrons. This information is useful in the commissioning, troubleshooting, and beam lifetime studying for HLS II. This paper analyzes the distribution features of different kinds of lost electrons, introduces the operation parameters of the new machine and discusses how to choose proper monitoring positions. Based on these comprehensive analyses, a new BLM system for HLS II is proposed.

  20. PIV Analysis of Cavitation Flow Characteristics of He II

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, K.; Murakami, M.

    2006-04-27

    In the present experimental study cavitation phenomena in both He I and He II flows were investigated through the application of the PIV technique and visual observation under the saturated vapor pressure condition. The cavitation flow was generated in the downstream regions of a Venturi channel and a converging jet nozzle driven by a contracting metal bellows. It is seen that cavitation inception is a kind of stochastic process and has definite temperature dependence. The spatial distribution of the cavitation bubble velocity is measured by using the PIV technique. Some differences in the cavitating flow pattern and the void fraction are found between He II and He I cavitating flows. The PIV result indicates that the void fraction for He II flow is larger than that for He I flow.

  1. Design and analysis of a tendon-based computed tomography-compatible robot with remote center of motion for lung biopsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunpeng; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhiyong; Yuan, Wei; Dou, Huaisu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Daguang; Bian, Yuan

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, biopsy is a decisive method of lung cancer diagnosis, whereas lung biopsy is time-consuming, complex and inaccurate. So a computed tomography-compatible robot for rapid and precise lung biopsy is developed in this article. According to the actual operation process, the robot is divided into two modules: 4-degree-of-freedom position module for location of puncture point is appropriate for patient's almost all positions and 3-degree-of-freedom tendon-based orientation module with remote center of motion is compact and computed tomography-compatible to orientate and insert needle automatically inside computed tomography bore. The workspace of the robot surrounds patient's thorax, and the needle tip forms a cone under patient's skin. A new error model of the robot based on screw theory is proposed in view of structure error and actuation error, which are regarded as screw motions. Simulation is carried out to verify the precision of the error model contrasted with compensation via inverse kinematics. The results of insertion experiment on specific phantom prove the feasibility of the robot with mean error of 1.373 mm in laboratory environment, which is accurate enough to replace manual operation.

  2. Immunohistochemical analysis of lattice corneal dystrophies types I and II.

    PubMed Central

    Kivelä, T; Tarkkanen, A; McLean, I; Ghiso, J; Frangione, B; Haltia, M

    1993-01-01

    Corneal buttons from four patients with lattice corneal dystrophy (LD) type I, thought to be an isolated corneal amyloidosis, and from six patients with LD type II, part of systemic familial amyloidosis, Finnish type (FAF; Meretoja's syndrome), were studied by immunohistochemistry to determine the differential distribution in the amyloid deposits of amyloid P component (AP), mutated gelsolin specific for FAF, and native gelsolin. In both types of LD, antibodies to AP labelled lattice lines and a discontinuous layer of amyloid deposits under Bowman's layer. In LD type II, particularly, they also reacted with streak-like amyloid deposits between corneal almellae, especially in the limbal region. While the anti-FAF antiserum strongly labelled all amyloid deposits in LD type II, it failed to react unequivocally with them in LD type I. Both in LD type I and in two control specimens representing granular dystrophy, the monoclonal antibody (MAb) GS-2C4 to gelsolin faintly labelled some deposits, while in LD type II it reacted non-homogeneously with most amyloid deposits. In all specimens, MAb GS-2C4 labelled corneal epithelial cells and occasional stromal keratocytes and endothelial cells. The results suggest that Meretoja's syndrome, a systemic disease, can be diagnosed even retrospectively from corneal buttons subjected to histopathological study. Images PMID:8110676

  3. Analysis of Thermal Imagery Collected at Grayling II, Grayling, Michigan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    Terrain features’ LWB and SWB IR signatures by time of day during Grayling II exercise (04Mar- 15Apr94) (Continued...29 7 (Concluded) ....................................................................................... 31 8 Bare soil LWB and SWB IR... LWB and SWB IR signatures and air temperature (E3 station, 2 m above ground) during Grayling H exercise

  4. Analysis of grid-assembly shielding of EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghetti, D.; Franklin, F.C.; Kucera, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Differing neutron exposure rates to the EBR-II lower grid plenum assembly resulting from the historical changes in reactor configuration and shielding are analyzed to obtain the fluences and the steel displacements-per-atom values in this irreplaceable component.

  5. Gold nanorods for surface Plasmon resonance detection of mercury (II) in flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Khang; Heider, Emily C; Brooks, Scott C; Barbosa, Fernando; Campiglia, Andres D

    2014-10-01

    This article investigates the flow injection analysis of mercury (II) ions in tap water samples via surface Plasmon resonance detection. Quantitative analysis of mercury (II) is based on the chemical interaction of metallic mercury with gold nanorods immobilized on a glass substrate. A new flow cell design is presented with the ability to accommodate the detecting substrate in the sample compartment of commercial spectrometers. Two alternatives are here considered for mercury (II) detection, namely stop-flow and continuous flow injection analysis modes. The best limit of detection (2.4 ng mL(-1)) was obtained with the continuous flow injection analysis approach. The accurate determination of mercury (II) ions in samples of unknown composition is demonstrated with a fortified tap water sample.

  6. Spatial compatibility and affordance compatibility in patients with chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kume, Yu; Sato, Fumiyasu; Hiraoka, Yuya; Suzuki, Shingo; Niyama, Yoshitsugu

    2016-12-01

    A deterioration in information-processing performance is commonly recognized in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Although the enhancement of cognitive skills in patients with schizophrenia is important, the types of external stimuli that influence performance have not received much attention. The aim of present study was to clarify the effects of spatial and affordance compatibility in patients with schizophrenia, compared with those in healthy people. The subjects (25 patients with schizophrenia and 25 healthy controls) participated in two experiment examining the effects of the spatial location of stimuli and the action-relevance of objects. The results showed that the effect of spatial compatibility was similar in both the patients and the controls, whereas the influence of action-relevant objects was not highlighted in either patients with chronic schizophrenia or healthy controls. These findings provide important evidence of a normal spatial compatibility effect in patients with chronic schizophrenia. However, further research examining the affordance compatibility effect is needed, taking into consideration the symptomatology and the severity of the social functioning level in patients with schizophrenia.

  7. Analysis of data collected by the Tatyana II satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilianaa, Rivera; Oscar, Martínez; Eduardo, Mendoza-Torres; Humberto, Salazar

    2011-04-01

    The Tatyana II satellite is the second one of the University Satellite Program, which is led by the Moscow State University with the participation of the Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla. This satellite has ultraviolet, red-infrared and charged particles detectors. In this work preliminary results based on the data collected by these detectors on board the satellite over a period of ~3.5 months are presented.

  8. Chemical compatibility of cartridge materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Bryan; Wilcox, R. C.; Zee, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives were to determine the chemical compatibility of titanium-zirconium-molybdenum (TZM) with GaAs and CdZnTe, and Inconel with HgCdTe and HgZnTe. At the present time, no other studies regarding the compatibility of these crystal components and their respective cartridge materials have been performed. This study was to identify any possible problems between these materials to insure proper containment of possibly hazardous fumes during crystal growth experiments. In this study, the reaction zone between the materials was studied and the amount of degradation to the system was measured. Detailed results are presented.

  9. Phenotype Characterization and DSPP Mutational Analysis of Three Brazilian Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type II Families

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, A.C.; Santos, L.J.S.; Paula, L.M.; Dong, J.; MacDougall, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform phenotype analysis and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) mutational analysis on 3 Brazilian families diagnosed with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II) attending the Dental Anomalies Clinic in Brasilia, Brazil. Physical and oral examinations, as well as radiographic and histopathological analyses, were performed on 28 affected and unaffected individuals. Clinical, radiographic and histopathological analyses confirmed the diagnosis of DGI-II in 19 individuals. Pulp stones were observed in ground sections of several teeth in 2 families, suggesting that obliteration of pulp chambers and root canals results from the growth of these nodular structures. Mutational DSPP gene analysis of representative affected family members revealed 7 various non-disease-causing alterations in exons 1–4 within the dentin sialoprotein domain. Further longitudinal studies are necessary to elucidate the progression of pulpal obliteration in the DGI-II patients studied as well as the molecular basis of their disease. PMID:18797159

  10. An analytical and experimental stress analysis of a practical mode II fracture-test specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chisholm, D. B.; Jones, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    A boundary collocation method has been employed to determine the Mode II stress intensity factors for a pair of through-the-thickness edge cracks in a finite isotropic plate. An elastostatic analysis has been carried out in terms of the complete Williams stress function employing both even and odd components. The results of the numerical analysis were verified by a two-step procedure whereby the symmetric and antisymmetric portions of the solution were independently compared with existing solutions. The complete solution was verified by comparison with a photoelastic analysis. A compact shear specimen (CSS) of Hysol epoxy resin was loaded in a photoelastic experiment designed to study the isochromatic fringe patterns resulting from the Mode II crack tip stress distribution. The experiment verified that a pure Mode II stress distribution existed in the neighborhood of the crack tips and confirmed the accuracy of the boundary collocation solution for the Mode II stress intensity factors.

  11. The analysis of the immobilization mechanism of Ni(II) on Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhi; Cheng, Yangjian; Pan, Danmei; Yin, Shungao; Huang, Feng; Guan, Xiong; Lin, Zhang

    2011-04-01

    This work focused on the identification of biosorption mechanism of Ni(II) by living Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) based on batch experiments and a variety of microscopic equipments. The adsorption equilibrium reached rapidly in 2 h and the maximum nickel adsorption capability of B. cereus was 17.7 mg x g(-1) (dry weight). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that the bacterial surface roughness increased from 7.9 +/- 0.5 nm to 12.6 +/- 1.6 nm during this process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation confirmed that there was Ni(II) on the bacterial surface. However, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin section analysis coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that Ni(II) could also be found in the inner portions of the bacteria. Inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) quantitative analysis elucidated that over 70% of the immobilized Ni(II) was binding on the surface of bacteria. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that the Ni(II) collected by the bacteria was amorphous. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis indicated that amides and carboxylation functional groups might be involved in the coordination of Ni(II).

  12. Rubber composition compatible with hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repar, J.

    1973-01-01

    Formulation improves compatibility of butyl rubbers with hydrazine while reducing permeation to low levels necessary for prolonged storage in space. This is accomplished by replacing carbon-black filler with inert materials such as hydrated silica or clay. Pressure increases suggest that hydrazine is decomposed only slightly by new type of rubber.

  13. Verbal response-effect compatibility.

    PubMed

    Koch, Iring; Kunde, Wilfried

    2002-12-01

    Ideomotor theory states that motor responses are activated by an anticipation of their sensory effects. We assumed that anticipated effects would produce response-effect (R-E) compatibility when there is dimensional overlap of effects and responses. In a four-choice task, visual digit stimuli called for verbal responses (color names). Each response produced a written response-effect on the screen. In different groups, the response-effect was a colored color word (e.g., blue in blue), a white color word, or a colored nonword (Xs in blue). In different blocks, the predictable effects were either incompatible (e.g., response "blue" --> effect: green) or compatible with the response. We found faster responses with compatible than with incompatible R-E mappings. The compatibility effect was strongest with colored words, intermediate with white words, and smallest with colored nonwords. We conclude that effect anticipation influences response selection on both a perceptual level (related to the word's color) and a conceptual level (related to the word's meaning).

  14. A CMOS compatible, ferroelectric tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Ambriz Vargas, Fabian; Kolhatkar, Gitanjali; Broyer, Maxime; Hadj Youssef, Azza; Nouar, Rafik; Sarkissian, Andranik; Thomas, Reji; Gomez-Yanez, Carlos; Gauthier, Marc A; Ruediger, Andreas

    2017-04-03

    In recent years, the experimental demonstration of Ferroelectric Tunnel Junctions (FTJ) based on perovskite tunnel barriers has been reported. However, integrating these perovskite materials into conventional silicon memory technology remains challenging due to their lack of compatibility with the complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS). The present communication reports the fabrication of an FTJ based on a CMOS compatible tunnel barrier Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 (6 unit cells thick) on an equally CMOS compatible TiN electrode. Analysis of the FTJ by grazing angle incidence X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of the non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic phase (Pbc2_1, ferroelectric phase). The FTJ characterization is followed by the reconstruction of the electrostatic potential profile in the as-grown TiN/Hf0.5Zr0.5O2/Pt heterostructure. A direct tunneling current model across a trapezoidal barrier was used to correlate the electronic and electrical properties of our FTJ devices. The good agreement between the experimental and the theoretical model attests to the tunneling electroresistance effect (TER) in our FTJ device. A TER ratio of ~15 was calculated for the present FTJ device at low read voltage (+0.2 V). This study makes Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 a promising candidate for integration into conventional Si memory technology.

  15. Molecular cloning, expression, and evolution analysis of type II CHI gene from peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhao, Shuzhen; Wang, Jiangshan; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Guan, Hongshan; Hou, Lei; Li, Changsheng; Xia, Han; Wang, Xingjun

    2015-01-01

    Chalcone isomerase (CHI) plays critical roles in plant secondary metabolism, which is important for the interaction between plants and the environment. CHI genes are widely studied in various higher plants. However, little information about CHI genes is available in peanut. Based on conservation of CHI gene family, we cloned the peanut type II CHI gene (AhCHI II) cDNA and genome sequence. The amino acid sequence of peanut CHI II was highly homologous to type II CHI from other plant species. qRT-PCR results showed that peanut CHI II is mainly expressed in roots; however, peanut CHI I is mainly expressed in tissues with high content of anthocyanin. Gene duplication and gene cluster analysis indicated that CHI II was derived from CHI I 65 million years ago approximately. Our gene structure analysis results are not in agreement with the previous hypothesis that CHI II was derived from CHI I by the insertion of an intron into the first exon. Moreover, no positive selection pressure was found in CHIs, while, 32.1 % of sites were under neutral selection, which may lead to mutation accumulation and fixation during great changes of environment.

  16. New advances in MR-compatible bioartificial liver

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Rex E.; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    MR-compatible bioartificial liver (BAL) studies have been performed for 30 years and are reviewed. There are two types of study: (i) metabolism and drug studies using multinuclear MRS; primarily short-term (< 8 h) studies; (ii) the use of multinuclear MRS and MRI to noninvasively define the features and functions of BAL systems for long-term liver tissue engineering. In the latter, these systems often undergo not only modification of the perfusion system, but also the construction of MR radiofrequency probes around the bioreactor. We present novel MR-compatible BALs and the use of multinuclear MRS (13C, 19F, 31P) for the noninvasive monitoring of their growth, metabolism and viability, as well as 1H MRI methods for the determination of flow profiles, diffusion, cell distribution, quality assurance and bioreactor integrity. Finally, a simple flexible coil design and circuit, and life support system, are described that can make almost any BAL MR-compatible. PMID:22351642

  17. Compatibility and kidney transplantation: the way to go.

    PubMed

    Doxiadis, Ilias I N

    2012-01-01

    Long lasting debates in the past questioned the relevance of any sort of compatibility in post mortal kidney transplantation. It is for no say that fully compatible transplants have the highest chances for a long patient and graft survival. In the present report the use of HLA-DR as a representative of the Major Histocompatibility Complex class II genes in the allocation of organs is discussed. The major arguments are the easiness to offer to patients a compatible graft in a relatively short waiting time, an increase in graft survival, the less sensitization during the transplantation period, and the lower waiting time for a retransplant. Even if the number of organ donors remains the same a lowering of the mean waiting time is expected because of the longer period of graft survival.

  18. Flow injection analysis of mercury(II) in pharmaceuticals based on enzyme inhibition and biosensor detection.

    PubMed

    Bertocchi, P; Ciranni, E; Compagnone, D; Magearu, V; Palleschi, G; Pirvutoiu, S; Valvo, L

    1999-06-01

    An enzymatic amperometric procedure for measurement of mercury(II) in pharmaceuticals, based on the inhibition of invertase and on a glucose electrode was studied. Analytical parameters for measurements in batch and flow injection analysis (FIA) have been optimised. Mercury(II) was detected in the 10-60 ppb range with RSD < or =2%. A sample throughput of 6 h(-1) for batch and 15 h(-1) for FIA was obtained. The total mercury(II) from thimerosal (thiomersal, sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate) in eye-drop samples was measured with the amperometric procedure after oxidative cleavage treatment. Results for both batch and FIA procedures correlated well with atomic absorbtion spectroscopy (AAS) data.

  19. Educational Cost Analysis in Action: Case Studies for Planners -- II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Philip H.; Hallak, Jacques

    This document is the second in a series of three documents, which together contain 27 case studies on the uses of cost analysis in educational planning. The case studies are presented to help planners and administrators see how cost analysis can be used to improve the efficiency of their educational systems, or to get the best value existing…

  20. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol intravenous infusion formulation optimization, stability and compatibility testing: A case study to overcome polysorbate 80 interference in chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Inas A; Hammell, Dana C; Hassan, Hazem E; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2016-06-05

    Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol is a progestin/estrogen combination hormonal contraceptive indicated for the prevention of pregnancy in women. The very poor solubility and wettability of these drugs, along with their high potency (adsorption issues), give rise to difficulties in designing intravenous (IV) formulations to assess absolute bioavailability of products containing both drugs. The purpose of this study was to develop an IV formulation, evaluate its stability under different conditions and evaluate its compatibility with IV sets for potential use in absolute bioavailability studies in humans. Also, a selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for quantification of ethinyl estradiol and norelgestromin in polysorbate 80 matrix was developed and validated. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV solution was prepared using sterile water for injection with 2.5% ethanol and 2.5% polysorbate 80 as a cosolvent/surfactant system to obtain a final drug solution of 25μg ethinyl estradiol and 252μg norelgestromin from a concentrated stock drug solution. The stabilities of the concentrated stock and IV solutions were assessed after storing them in the refrigerator (3.7±0.6°C) and at room temperature (19.5±0.5°C), respectively. Additional studies were conducted to examine the stability of the IV solution using an Alarias(®) low sorbing IV administration set with and without an inline filter. The solution was allowed to drip at 1mL/min over a 60min period. Samples were obtained at the beginning, middle and end of the 60min duration. The chemical stability was evaluated for up to 10 days. Norelgestromin and ethinyl estradiol concentration, purity, and degradant levels were determined using the HPLC method. The norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV formulation met the chemical stability criteria when tested on day 1 through day 9 (216h). Norelgestromin concentrations assayed in stock and IV solutions were in the range of 90.0-98.5% and 90

  1. Genetic Analysis of the Aspergillus flavus Vegetative Compatibility Group to Which a Biological Control Agent That Limits Aflatoxin Contamination in U.S. Crops Belongs.

    PubMed

    Grubisha, Lisa C; Cotty, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Some filamentous fungi in Aspergillus section Flavi produce carcinogenic secondary compounds called aflatoxins. Aflatoxin contamination is routinely managed in commercial agriculture with strains of Aspergillus flavus that do not produce aflatoxins. These non-aflatoxin-producing strains competitively exclude aflatoxin producers and reshape fungal communities so that strains with the aflatoxin-producing phenotype are less frequent. This study evaluated the genetic variation within naturally occurring atoxigenic A. flavus strains from the endemic vegetative compatibility group (VCG) YV36. AF36 is a strain of VCG YV36 and was the first fungus used in agriculture for aflatoxin management. Genetic analyses based on mating-type loci, 21 microsatellite loci, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the aflC gene were applied to a set of 237 YV36 isolates collected from 1990 through 2005 from desert legumes and untreated fields and from fields previously treated with AF36 across the southern United States. One haplotype dominated across time and space. No recombination with strains belonging to VCGs other than YV36 was detected. All YV36 isolates carried the SNP in aflC that prevents aflatoxin biosynthesis and the mat1-2 idiomorph at the mating-type locus. These results suggest that VCG YV36 has a clonal population structure maintained across both time and space. These results demonstrate the genetic stability of atoxigenic strains belonging to a broadly distributed endemic VCG in both untreated populations and populations where the short-term frequency of VCG YV36 has increased due to applications of a strain used to competitively exclude aflatoxin producers. This work supports the hypothesis that strains of this VCG are not involved in routine genetic exchange with aflatoxin-producing strains.

  2. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: a sensor array for chemical analysis of the Martian soil.

    PubMed

    Kounaves, Samuel P; Lukow, Stefan R; Comeau, Brian P; Hecht, Michael H; Grannan-Feldman, Sabrina M; Manatt, Ken; West, Steven J; Wen, Xiaowen; Frant, Martin; Gillette, Tim

    2003-07-25

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified for the now canceled MSP (Mars Surveyor Program) '01 Lander. The MECA package consisted of a microscope, electrometer, material patch plates, and a wet chemistry laboratory (WCL). The primary goal of MECA was to analyze the Martian soil (regolith) for possible hazards to future astronauts and to provide a better understanding of Martian regolith geochemistry. The purpose of the WCL was to analyze for a range of soluble ionic chemical species and electrochemical parameters. The heart of the WCL was a sensor array of electrochemically based ion-selective electrodes (ISE). After 20 months storage at -23 degrees C and subsequent extended freeze/thawing cycles, WCL sensors were evaluated to determine both their physical durability and analytical responses. A fractional factorial calibration of the sensors was used to obtain slope, intercept, and all necessary selectivity coefficients simultaneously for selected ISEs. This calibration was used to model five cation and three anion sensors. These data were subsequently used to determine concentrations of several ions in two soil leachate simulants (based on terrestrial seawater and hypothesized Mars brine) and four actual soil samples. The WCL results were compared to simulant and soil samples using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that flight qualification and prolonged low-temperature storage conditions had minimal effects on the sensors. In addition, the analytical optimization method provided quantitative and qualitative data that could be used to accurately identify the chemical composition of the simulants and soils. The WCL has the ability to provide data that can be used to "read" the chemical, geological, and climatic history of Mars, as well as the potential habitability of its regolith.

  3. Genetic Analysis of the Aspergillus flavus Vegetative Compatibility Group to Which a Biological Control Agent That Limits Aflatoxin Contamination in U.S. Crops Belongs

    PubMed Central

    Cotty, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Some filamentous fungi in Aspergillus section Flavi produce carcinogenic secondary compounds called aflatoxins. Aflatoxin contamination is routinely managed in commercial agriculture with strains of Aspergillus flavus that do not produce aflatoxins. These non-aflatoxin-producing strains competitively exclude aflatoxin producers and reshape fungal communities so that strains with the aflatoxin-producing phenotype are less frequent. This study evaluated the genetic variation within naturally occurring atoxigenic A. flavus strains from the endemic vegetative compatibility group (VCG) YV36. AF36 is a strain of VCG YV36 and was the first fungus used in agriculture for aflatoxin management. Genetic analyses based on mating-type loci, 21 microsatellite loci, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the aflC gene were applied to a set of 237 YV36 isolates collected from 1990 through 2005 from desert legumes and untreated fields and from fields previously treated with AF36 across the southern United States. One haplotype dominated across time and space. No recombination with strains belonging to VCGs other than YV36 was detected. All YV36 isolates carried the SNP in aflC that prevents aflatoxin biosynthesis and the mat1-2 idiomorph at the mating-type locus. These results suggest that VCG YV36 has a clonal population structure maintained across both time and space. These results demonstrate the genetic stability of atoxigenic strains belonging to a broadly distributed endemic VCG in both untreated populations and populations where the short-term frequency of VCG YV36 has increased due to applications of a strain used to competitively exclude aflatoxin producers. This work supports the hypothesis that strains of this VCG are not involved in routine genetic exchange with aflatoxin-producing strains. PMID:26092465

  4. Analysis by single-gene reassortment demonstrates that the 1918 influenza virus is functionally compatible with a low-pathogenicity avian influenza virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Li; Davis, A Sally; Jagger, Brett W; Schwartzman, Louis M; Dunham, Eleca J; Kash, John C; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2012-09-01

    The 1918-1919 "Spanish" influenza pandemic is estimated to have caused 50 million deaths worldwide. Understanding the origin, virulence, and pathogenic properties of past pandemic influenza viruses, including the 1918 virus, is crucial for current public health preparedness and future pandemic planning. The origin of the 1918 pandemic virus has not been resolved, but its coding sequences are very like those of avian influenza virus. The proteins encoded by the 1918 virus differ from typical low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses at only a small number of amino acids in each open reading frame. In this study, a series of chimeric 1918 influenza viruses were created in which each of the eight 1918 pandemic virus gene segments was replaced individually with the corresponding gene segment of a prototypical low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) H1N1 virus in order to investigate functional compatibility of the 1918 virus genome with gene segments from an LPAI virus and to identify gene segments and mutations important for mammalian adaptation. This set of eight "7:1" chimeric viruses was compared to the parental 1918 and LPAI H1N1 viruses in intranasally infected mice. Seven of the 1918 LPAI 7:1 chimeric viruses replicated and caused disease equivalent to the fully reconstructed 1918 virus. Only the chimeric 1918 virus containing the avian influenza PB2 gene segment was attenuated in mice. This attenuation could be corrected by the single E627K amino acid change, further confirming the importance of this change in mammalian adaptation and mouse pathogenicity. While the mechanisms of influenza virus host switch, and particularly mammalian host adaptation are still only partly understood, these data suggest that the 1918 virus, whatever its origin, is very similar to avian influenza virus.

  5. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: a sensor array for chemical analysis of the Martian soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, Samuel P.; Lukow, Stefan R.; Comeau, Brian P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Grannan-Feldman, Sabrina M.; Manatt, Ken; West, Steven J.; Wen, Xiaowen; Frant, Martin; Gillette, Tim

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified for the now canceled MSP (Mars Surveyor Program) '01 Lander. The MECA package consisted of a microscope, electrometer, material patch plates, and a wet chemistry laboratory (WCL). The primary goal of MECA was to analyze the Martian soil (regolith) for possible hazards to future astronauts and to provide a better understanding of Martian regolith geochemistry. The purpose of the WCL was to analyze for a range of soluble ionic chemical species and electrochemical parameters. The heart of the WCL was a sensor array of electrochemically based ion-selective electrodes (ISE). After 20 months storage at -23 degrees C and subsequent extended freeze/thawing cycles, WCL sensors were evaluated to determine both their physical durability and analytical responses. A fractional factorial calibration of the sensors was used to obtain slope, intercept, and all necessary selectivity coefficients simultaneously for selected ISEs. This calibration was used to model five cation and three anion sensors. These data were subsequently used to determine concentrations of several ions in two soil leachate simulants (based on terrestrial seawater and hypothesized Mars brine) and four actual soil samples. The WCL results were compared to simulant and soil samples using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that flight qualification and prolonged low-temperature storage conditions had minimal effects on the sensors. In addition, the analytical optimization method provided quantitative and qualitative data that could be used to accurately identify the chemical composition of the simulants and soils. The WCL has the ability to provide data that can be used to "read" the chemical, geological, and climatic history of Mars, as well as the potential habitability of its regolith.

  6. Spectroscopic, Elemental and Thermal Analysis, and Positron Annihilation Studies on Ca(II), Sr(II), Ba(II), Pb(II), and Fe(III) Penicillin G Potassium Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, M. S.; Sharshara, T.

    2015-11-01

    The [Pb(Pin)2] · 3H2O, [M(Pin)(H2O)2(Cl)] · nH2O (M = SrII, CaII or BaII; n = 0-1), and [Fe(Pin)2(Cl)(H2O)] · H2O penicillin G potassium (Pin) complexes were synthesized and characterized using elemental analyses, molar conductivity, thermal analysis and electronic spectroscopy techniques. The positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) and Doppler broadening (DB) techniques have been employed to probe the defects and structural changes of Pin ligand and its complexes. The PAL and DB line-shape parameters were discussed in terms of the structure, molecular weight, ligand-metal molar ratio, and other properties of the Pin complexes.

  7. Compatibility of technologies with regulations in the waste management of H-3, I-129, C-14, and Kr-85. Part II. Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Kolba, V.M.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Steindler, M.J.

    1983-11-01

    Waste forms of /sup 3/H, /sup 129/I, /sup 14/C, and /sup 85/Kr separated from fuel reprocessing streams and procedures for managing them were analyzed regarding compliance with regulations. Transportation of these wastes in certain DOT-specification packagings would be permissible, but some of these packagings may not be acceptable in some disposal situations. Transportation of gaseous /sup 85/Kr in a currently certified cylinder is possible, but a fuel reprocessor may wish to ship larger quantities per package. Disposal of tritium using a package designed by a DOE contractor and shallow land burial, in accord with the regulations of 10 CFR 61, seems practicable. Although 10 CFR 61 permits shallow land burial of /sup 129/I, the concentration limit requires distribution in a volume that may seem impractical to commercial fuel reprocessors. The concentration limit of 10 CFR 61 for shallow land burial of /sup 14/C requires distribution in a lesser, although still large, volume. For both /sup 129/I and /sup 14/C, management as high-level waste offers the advantage of smaller volumes. Similar advantages may be offered by greater confinement or non-near surface concepts for disposal. The concrete waste forms developed for these nuclides may not meet technical criteria being formulated for geologic disposal. The lack of accommodation of /sup 85/Kr at disposal facilities makes storage of the gaseous form at the fuel reprocessing plant, followed by dispersal after partial decay, seem attractive. Ocean disposal of /sup 129/I and /sup 14/C by the rules of the International Atomic Energy Agency-London Ocean Dumping Convention offers advantages over shallow land burial: higher allowed concentrations, resulting in smaller volumes and fewer packages. These rules, however, thwart ocean disposal of /sup 85/Kr since gaseous forms are banned, and for solid forms, concentration limits would require distribution of radioactivity in very large volumes. 80 references.

  8. Compatibility of Segments of Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Ursell, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    A method of calculating (usually for the purpose of maximizing) the power-conversion efficiency of a segmented thermoelectric generator is based on equations derived from the fundamental equations of thermoelectricity. Because it is directly traceable to first principles, the method provides physical explanations in addition to predictions of phenomena involved in segmentation. In comparison with the finite-element method used heretofore to predict (without being able to explain) the behavior of a segmented thermoelectric generator, this method is much simpler to implement in practice: in particular, the efficiency of a segmented thermoelectric generator can be estimated by evaluating equations using only hand-held calculator with this method. In addition, the method provides for determination of cascading ratios. The concept of cascading is illustrated in the figure and the definition of the cascading ratio is defined in the figure caption. An important aspect of the method is its approach to the issue of compatibility among segments, in combination with introduction of the concept of compatibility within a segment. Prior approaches involved the use of only averaged material properties. Two materials in direct contact could be examined for compatibility with each other, but there was no general framework for analysis of compatibility. The present method establishes such a framework. The mathematical derivation of the method begins with the definition of reduced efficiency of a thermoelectric generator as the ratio between (1) its thermal-to-electric power-conversion efficiency and (2) its Carnot efficiency (the maximum efficiency theoretically attainable, given its hot- and cold-side temperatures). The derivation involves calculation of the reduced efficiency of a model thermoelectric generator for which the hot-side temperature is only infinitesimally greater than the cold-side temperature. The derivation includes consideration of the ratio (u) between the

  9. Quantitative analysis of topoisomerase II{alpha} to rapidly evaluate cell proliferation in brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Masashi; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Kano, Hideyuki; Kawabata, Yasuhiro; Katsuki, Takahisa; Shirahata, Mitsuaki; Ono, Makoto; Yamana, Norikazu; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Takahashi, Jun A. . E-mail: jat@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-06-17

    Immunohistochemical cell proliferation analyses have come into wide use for evaluation of tumor malignancy. Topoisomerase II{alpha} (topo II{alpha}), an essential nuclear enzyme, has been known to have cell cycle coupled expression. We here show the usefulness of quantitative analysis of topo II{alpha} mRNA to rapidly evaluate cell proliferation in brain tumors. A protocol to quantify topo II{alpha} mRNA was developed with a real-time RT-PCR. It took only 3 h to quantify from a specimen. A total of 28 brain tumors were analyzed, and the level of topo II{alpha} mRNA was significantly correlated with its immuno-staining index (p < 0.0001, r = 0.9077). Furthermore, it sharply detected that topo II{alpha} mRNA decreased in growth-inhibited glioma cell. These results support that topo II{alpha} mRNA may be a good and rapid indicator to evaluate cell proliferate potential in brain tumors.

  10. Forensic discrimination of dyed hair color: II. Multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Julie A; Siegel, Jay A; Goodpaster, John V

    2011-01-01

    This research is intended to assess the ability of UV-visible microspectrophotometry to successfully discriminate the color of dyed hair. Fifty-five red hair dyes were analyzed and evaluated using multivariate statistical techniques including agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC), principal component analysis (PCA), and discriminant analysis (DA). The spectra were grouped into three classes, which were visually consistent with different shades of red. A two-dimensional PCA observations plot was constructed, describing 78.6% of the overall variance. The wavelength regions associated with the absorbance of hair and dye were highly correlated. Principal components were selected to represent 95% of the overall variance for analysis with DA. A classification accuracy of 89% was observed for the comprehensive dye set, while external validation using 20 of the dyes resulted in a prediction accuracy of 75%. Significant color loss from successive washing of hair samples was estimated to occur within 3 weeks of dye application.

  11. Final Report: Posttest Analysis of Omega II Optical Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Newlander, C D; Fisher, J H

    2007-01-30

    Preliminary posttest analyses have been completed on optical specimens exposed during the Omega II test series conducted on 14 July 2006. The Omega Facility, located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester was used to produce X-ray environments through the interaction of intense pulsed laser radiation upon germanium-loaded silica aerogels. The optical specimen testing was supported by GH Systems through experiment design, pre- and post-test analyses, specimen acquisition, and overall technical experience. The test specimens were fabricated and characterized by Surface Optics Corporation (SOC), San Diego, CA and were simple protected gold coatings on silica substrates. Six test specimens were exposed, five filtered with thin beryllium foil filters, and one unfiltered which was exposed directly to the raw environment. The experimental objectives were: (1) demonstrate that tests of optical specimens could be performed at the Omega facility; (2) evaluate the use and survivability of beryllium foil filters as a function of thickness; (3) obtain damage data on optical specimens which ranged from no damage to damage; (4) correlate existing thermal response models with the damage data; (5) evaluate the use of the direct raw environment upon the specimen response and the ability/desirability to conduct sensitive optical specimen tests using the raw environment; and (6) initiate the development of a protocol for performing optical coatings/mirror tests. This report documents the activities performed by GH Systems in evaluating and using the environments provided by LLNL, the PUFFTFT analyses performed using those environments, and the calculated results compared to the observed and measured posttest data.

  12. Machine-Scored Testing, Part II: Creativity and Item Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuba, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    Explains how multiple choice test items can be devised to measure higher-order learning, including engineering problem solving. Discusses the value and information provided in item analysis procedures with machine-scored tests. Suggests elements to consider in test design. (ML)

  13. Topics in Finance: Part II--Financial Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, Judy

    2010-01-01

    The second article in a series designed to supplement the introductory financial management course, this essay addresses financial statement analysis, including its impact on stock valuation, disclosure, and managerial behavior. [For "Topics in Finance Part I--Introduction and Stockholder Wealth Maximization," see EJ1060345.

  14. Using quantum erasure to exorcise Maxwell's demon: II. Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostovtsev, Yuri; Sariyanni, Zoe-Elizabeth; Suhail Zubairy, M.; O. Scully, Marlan

    2005-10-01

    We present an analysis of the single atom negentropy quantum heat engine to determine the fundamental limits of its operation. The engine has an internal reservoir of negentropy which allows one to extract work from a single thermal reservoir. The process is attended by constantly increasing entropy and does not violate the second law of thermodynamics.

  15. Comparative analysis of a CFo ATP synthase subunit II homologue derived from marine and fresh-water algae.

    PubMed

    Suda, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Okuda, Yuko; Tsunemoto, Mei; Matsuda, Yuri; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ikeda, Kazunori; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Harada, Kazuo; Bamba, Takeshi; Hirata, Kazumasa

    2009-11-01

    Comparative analysis was performed with a CFo ATP synthase subunit II homologue (CFo-II) derived from marine or fresh-water algae. The marine algae-derived CFo-II-transformed Escherichia coli grew and accumulated ATP more vigorously in NaCl or Cadmium containing medium, suggesting that this gene was useful for the development of stress-tolerant plant.

  16. 46 CFR 151.03-17 - Compatible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-17 Compatible. Compatible means that a cargo will... prime considerations are the chemical, physical, or thermal properties of the reaction including...

  17. Normal coordinate analysis of the dithiocarbamate ligand and bis-(N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate)nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and cadmium(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, N. S.; Kellner, R.; Nikolov, G. St.

    1984-03-01

    The vibrational frequencies of H 2NCS 2- (H 2dtc), Et 2dtc -, and M(Et 2dtc) 2 (M = Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd) have been calculated by performing normal coordinate analysis using Gribov's fragmentation procedure within the generalized valence force field approximation. The force field resulting from the experimental frequencies shows a high degree of mixing between the different parts of the molecules. The fragmentation approach has allowed a detailed assignment of the observed frequencies even in the highly correlated force field.

  18. What is a "DNA-Compatible" Reaction?

    PubMed

    Malone, Marie L; Paegel, Brian M

    2016-04-11

    DNA-encoded synthesis can generate vastly diverse screening libraries of arbitrarily complex molecules as long as chemical reaction conditions do not compromise DNA's informational integrity, a fundamental constraint that "DNA-compatible" reaction development does not presently address. We devised DNA-encoded reaction rehearsal, an integrated analysis of reaction yield and impact on DNA, to acquire these key missing data. Magnetic DNA-functionalized sensor beads quantitatively report the % DNA template molecules remaining viable for PCR amplification after exposure to test reaction conditions. Analysis of solid-phase bond forming (e.g., Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling, reductive amination) and deprotection reactions (e.g., allyl esters, silyl ethers) guided the definition and optimization of DNA-compatible reaction conditions (>90% yield, >30% viable DNA molecules), most notably in cases that involved known (H(+), Pd) and more obscure (Δ, DMF) hazards to DNA integrity. The data provide an empirical yet mechanistically consistent and predictive framework for designing successful DNA-encoded reaction sequences for combinatorial library synthesis.

  19. [Comparative analysis of spatial organization of myoglobins. II. Secondary structure].

    PubMed

    Korobov, V N; Nazarenko, V I; Radomskiĭ, N F; Starodub, N F

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of probability of distribution curves of alpha-helical sites and bends of polypeptide chains of myoglobins in half-water mammals (beaver, nutria, muskrat, otter) carried out in comparison with those of myoglobins of the horse and Sperm whale (X-ray diffraction analysis has revealed their tertiary structure) has revealed a coincidence of the secondary structure sites end bends of the chain in the studied respiratory hemoproteins of muscles. Despite a considerable number of amino acid substitutions the profiles of alpha-helicity and B-bends of the compared proteins are practically identical. This indicates to the "resistance" of the probability curves to amino acid substitutions and to retention of the tertiary structure of myoglobins in evolutionary remote species of the animals.

  20. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.

    2015-03-30

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from Pb210decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we also perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in our data. Finally, we confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.

  1. Bayesian analysis. II. Signal detection and model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretthorst, G. Larry

    In the preceding. paper, Bayesian analysis was applied to the parameter estimation problem, given quadrature NMR data. Here Bayesian analysis is extended to the problem of selecting the model which is most probable in view of the data and all the prior information. In addition to the analytic calculation, two examples are given. The first example demonstrates how to use Bayesian probability theory to detect small signals in noise. The second example uses Bayesian probability theory to compute the probability of the number of decaying exponentials in simulated T1 data. The Bayesian answer to this question is essentially a microcosm of the scientific method and a quantitative statement of Ockham's razor: theorize about possible models, compare these to experiment, and select the simplest model that "best" fits the data.

  2. Random vibration analysis of the Topaz-II nuclear reactor power system. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.E.

    1995-06-01

    The TOPAZ-II Ya-21U is one of six Russian made space nuclear power systems which is based on theomionic power conversion. The U.S. is presently analyzing TOPAZ-II to determine the reliability and feasibility of using this system. A structural analysis test was conducted on the TOPAZ unit in May 1993 to provide data from which modal parameters could be identified. This test showed the fundamental frequency to be 10.5 Hz, yet the test results that the Russians conducted identified a fundamental frequency of 5 Hz. Another finite element model was created incorporating new developments in TOPAZ-II and modifications to the finite element model to better simulate the mass properties of the TOPAZ-II2. A second structural analysis test was conducted on the TOPAZ unit 06-09 September 1994. This thesis focuses on the random vibration analysis of the TOPAZ-II Ya-2lU utilizing the most recent test results and the Master Series (updated version) I-DEAS software. The modal respose of the model and simulated random vibration tests were within 8.33%. This model is a feasible tool which can be used to analyze the TOPAZ unit without testing the unit to fatigue.

  3. Elastomers Compatible With High-Pressure Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Compatibility increased by fluorination. Report describes experiments aimed at improving compatibility of some fluorinated elastomers with high-pressure oxygen. Such elastomers needed for seals, gaskets, and positive-expulsion devices used with high-pressure oxygen. Oxygen - compatibility tests carried out on five elastomers chosen on the basis of literature survey.

  4. Compatible poliomyelitis cases in India during 2000.

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Kathryn A.; Hlady, W. Gary; Banerjee, Kaushik; Gupta, Dhananjoy; Francis, Paul; Durrani, Sunita; Zuber, Patrick L. F.; Sutter, Roland W.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of compatible poliomyelitis cases and to assess the programmatic implications of clusters of such cases in India. METHODS: We described the characteristics of compatible poliomyelitis cases, identified clusters of compatible cases (two or more in the same district or neighbouring districts within two months), and examined their relationship to wild poliovirus cases. FINDINGS: There were 362 compatible cases in 2000. The incidence of compatible cases was higher in districts with laboratory-confirmed poliomyelitis cases than in districts without laboratory-confirmed cases. Of 580 districts, 96 reported one compatible case and 72 reported two or more compatible cases. Among these 168 districts with at least one compatible case, 123 had internal or cross- border clusters of compatible cases. In 27 districts with clusters of compatible cases, no wild poliovirus was isolated either in the same district or in neighbouring districts. Three of these 27 districts presented laboratory-confirmed poliomyelitis cases during 2001. CONCLUSION: Most clusters of compatible cases occurred in districts identified as areas with continuing wild poliovirus transmission and where mopping-up vaccination campaigns were carried out. As certification nears, areas with compatible poliomyelitis cases should be investigated and deficiencies in surveillance should be corrected in order to ensure that certification is justified. PMID:12640469

  5. Coproduction of detergent compatible bacterial enzymes and stain removal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Niyonzima, Francois N; More, Sunil S

    2015-10-01

    Most of the detergents that are presently produced contain the detergent compatible enzymes to improve and accelerate the washing performance by removing tough stains. The process is environment friendly as the use of enzymes in the detergent formulation reduces the utilization of toxic detergent constituents. The current trend is to use the detergent compatible enzymes that are active at low and ambient temperature in order to save energy and maintain fabric quality. As the detergent compatible bacterial enzymes are used together in the detergent formulation, it is important to co-produce the detergent enzymes in a single fermentation medium as the enzyme stability is assured, and production cost gets reduced enormously. The review reports on the production, purification, characterization and application of detergent compatible amylases, lipases, and proteases are available. However, there is no specific review or minireview on the concomitant production of detergent compatible amylases, lipases, and proteases. In this minireview, the coproduction of detergent compatible enzymes by bacterial species, enzyme stability towards detergents and detergent components, and stain release analysis were discussed.

  6. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    DOE PAGES

    Agnese, R.

    2015-03-30

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from Pb210decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we also perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in ourmore » data. Finally, we confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.« less

  7. Design and calibration of a vacuum compatible scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Phillip B.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum compatible scanning tunneling microscope was designed and built, capable of imaging solid surfaces with atomic resolution. The single piezoelectric tube design is compact, and makes use of sample mounting stubs standard to a commercially available surface analysis system. Image collection and display is computer controlled, allowing storage of images for further analysis. Calibration results from atomic scale images are presented.

  8. Randomizing world trade. II. A weighted network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squartini, Tiziano; Fagiolo, Giorgio; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2011-10-01

    Based on the misleading expectation that weighted network properties always offer a more complete description than purely topological ones, current economic models of the International Trade Network (ITN) generally aim at explaining local weighted properties, not local binary ones. Here we complement our analysis of the binary projections of the ITN by considering its weighted representations. We show that, unlike the binary case, all possible weighted representations of the ITN (directed and undirected, aggregated and disaggregated) cannot be traced back to local country-specific properties, which are therefore of limited informativeness. Our two papers show that traditional macroeconomic approaches systematically fail to capture the key properties of the ITN. In the binary case, they do not focus on the degree sequence and hence cannot characterize or replicate higher-order properties. In the weighted case, they generally focus on the strength sequence, but the knowledge of the latter is not enough in order to understand or reproduce indirect effects.

  9. Analysis of silicon nanocrystals in silicon-rich SiO II synthesized by CO II laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Jung; Lin, Gong-Ru; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Chou, Li-Jen

    2005-11-01

    The localized synthesis of 4.2-5.6 nm-Si nanocrystals (nc-Si) in Si-rich SiO II (SRSO) by CO 2 laser annealing at laser intensity of below ablation-threshold (6 kW/cm2) is demonstrated. Since the SRSO exhibits a high absorption coefficient of up to 0.102 cm -1 at wavelength of 10.6 μm, a direct-writing CO II laser annealing system with focusing spot size of 0.2 mm2 is used to locally anneal the SRSO and precipitate the nc-Si. A thermophysical model reveals that the surface temperature of SRSO ranging from 130 °C to 3350 °C is achieved by varying the laser power densities from 1.5 to 13.5 kW/cm2. The CO II laser-ablation-threshold power density is about 6 kW/cm2, corresponding to the optimized annealing temperature 1285 °C at the ablation threshold. The CO IIlaser annealing is capable of the precise control on power density and spot size, which benefits from the in-situ and localized annealing temperature control of SRSO film, and also prevents from the eternal damage of the other electronic devices nearby the annealing site. The nc-Si dependent photoluminescence (PL) were observed at 806 nm or longer, whereas the laser-ablation damaged SRSO film exhibits significant blue PL at 410 nm due to the oxygen-related structural defects. The refractive index of the lasertreated SRSO film is increasing from 1.57 to 2.31 as the laser intensity increases from 1.5 to 6.0 kW/cm2 which is mainly attributed to the increasing density of nc-Si embedded in SRSO. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis reveals that the average size of nc-Si embedded in SRSO film is about 5.3 nm, which correlates well with the theoretical prediction of a corresponding PL at 806 nm. The HRTEM estimated square density of the nc-Si in SRSO film under the laser intensity of 6 kW/cm2 is about 10 18 cm -3.

  10. Detergent-compatible bacterial amylases.

    PubMed

    Niyonzima, Francois N; More, Sunil S

    2014-10-01

    Proteases, lipases, amylases, and cellulases are enzymes used in detergent formulation to improve the detergency. The amylases are specifically supplemented to the detergent to digest starchy stains. Most of the solid and liquid detergents that are currently manufactured contain alkaline enzymes. The advantages of using alkaline enzymes in the detergent formulation are that they aid in removing tough stains and the process is environmentally friendly since they reduce the use of toxic detergent ingredients. Amylases active at low temperature are preferred as the energy consumption gets reduced, and the whole process becomes cost-effective. Most microbial alkaline amylases are used as detergent ingredients. Various reviews report on the production, purification, characterization, and application of amylases in different industry sectors, but there is no specific review on bacterial or fungal alkaline amylases or detergent-compatible amylases. In this mini-review, an overview on the production and property studies of the detergent bacterial amylases is given, and the stability and compatibility of the alkaline bacterial amylases in the presence of the detergents and the detergent components are highlighted.

  11. The Vineland-II in Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Item Content Category Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balboni, Giulia; Tasso, Alessandra; Muratori, Filippo; Cubelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We investigated which item subsets of the Vineland-II can discriminate low-functioning preschoolers with ASD from matched peers with other neurodevelopmental disorders, using a regression analysis derived from a normative sample to account for cognitive and linguistic competencies. At variance with the typical profile, a pattern with Communication…

  12. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the KABC-II in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Kimberly E.; Rothlisberg, Barbara A.; McIntosh, David E.; Hunt, Madeline S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study assessed the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (KABC-II) in relation to the synthesized Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory of intelligence with a preschool sample. Participants were 200 preschool children between four and five years of age. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted, and different…

  13. Impact of the HERA I+II combined data on the CT14 QCD global analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulat, S.; Hou, T.-J.; Gao, J.; Guzzi, M.; Huston, J.; Nadolsky, P.; Pumplin, J.; Schmidt, C.; Stump, D.; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-11-01

    A brief description of the impact of the recent HERA run I+II combination of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross-section data on the CT14 global analysis of PDFs is given. The new CT14HERA2 PDFs at NLO and NNLO are illustrated. They employ the same parametrization used in the CT14 analysis, but with an additional shape parameter for describing the strange quark PDF. The HERA I+II data are reasonably well described by both CT14 and CT14HERA2 PDFs, and differences are smaller than the PDF uncertainties of the standard CT14 analysis. Both sets are acceptable when the error estimates are calculated in the CTEQ-TEA (CT) methodology and the standard CT14 PDFs are recommended to be continuously used for the analysis of LHC measurements.

  14. Spherical harmonic analysis of steady photospheric flows. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1992-01-01

    The use of the spherical harmonic functions to analyze the nearly steady flows in the solar photosphere is extended to situations in which B(0) the latitude at disk center, is nonzero and spurious velocities are present. The procedures for extracting the rotation profile and meridional circulation are altered to account for the seasonal tilt of the sun's rotation axis toward and away from the observer. A more robust and accurate method for separating the limb shift and meridional circulation signals is described. The analysis procedures include the ability to mask out areas containing spurious velocities (velocity-like signals that do not represent true flow velocities in the photosphere). The procedures are shown to work well in extracting the various flow components from realistic artificial data with a broad, continuous spectrum for the supergranulation. The presence of this supergranulation signal introduces errors of a few m/s in the measurements of the rotation profile, meridional circulation, and limb shift from a single Doppler image.

  15. THE CARNEGIE-IRVINE GALAXY SURVEY. II. ISOPHOTAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhaoyu; Ho, Luis C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Peng, Chien Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey (CGS) is a comprehensive investigation of the physical properties of a complete, representative sample of 605 bright (B{sub T} {<=} 12.9 mag) galaxies in the southern hemisphere. This contribution describes the isophotal analysis of the broadband (BVRI) optical imaging component of the project. We pay close attention to sky subtraction, which is particularly challenging for some of the large galaxies in our sample. Extensive crosschecks with internal and external data confirm that our calibration and sky subtraction techniques are robust with respect to the quoted measurement uncertainties. We present a uniform catalog of one-dimensional radial profiles of surface brightness and geometric parameters, as well as integrated colors and color gradients. Composite profiles highlight the tremendous diversity of brightness distributions found in disk galaxies and their dependence on Hubble type. A significant fraction of S0 and spiral galaxies exhibit non-exponential profiles in their outer regions. We perform Fourier decomposition of the isophotes to quantify non-axisymmetric deviations in the light distribution. We use the geometric parameters, in conjunction with the amplitude and phase of the m = 2 Fourier mode, to identify bars and quantify their size and strength. Spiral arm strengths are characterized using the m = 2 Fourier profiles and structure maps. Finally, we utilize the information encoded in the m = 1 Fourier profiles to measure disk lopsidedness. The databases assembled here and in Paper I lay the foundation for forthcoming scientific applications of CGS.

  16. Space Shuttle filament wound case compressive strength study. II - Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messick, M. J.; Nuismer, R. J.; Jamison, G. T.; Graves, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    In order to explain the results of the testing conducted in Part I and relate the subscale test specimen performance to case performance during prelaunch loading, a comprehensive analysis program was conducted. Finite element models of both full-scale case and subscale test coupons were made. Validated axisymmetric models were used for the case analyses. Modeling of coupons was accomplished using a generalized plane strain finite element model in most cases, although some three-dimensional finite element modeling was used to investigate the importance of three-dimensional effects on the coupon performance. The large number of plies and complexity of the test coupons used limited the finite element grids to a through-the-thickness discretization of one element per ply. Delaminations observed in the helical ply dropoff region were modeled using frictionless sliders. Comparisons of predicted strains and displacements were made with the test data from both cases and coupons to validate the finite element models. Based on observations of the test results and finite element predictions, a failure criterion for both coupons and cases was postulated and then validated by comparing performance predictions to test results. Finally, the validated failure criterion was used to predict the performance of the first two flight cases under prelaunch loads.

  17. Mars Hybrid Propulsion System Trajectory Analysis. Part II; Cargo Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, Patrick R.; Merrill, Raymond G.; Qu, Min

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Human Spaceflight Architecture Team is developing a reusable hybrid transportation architecture in which both chemical and electric propulsion systems are used to send crew and cargo to Mars destinations such as Phobos, Deimos, the surface of Mars, and other orbits around Mars. By combining chemical and electrical propulsion into a single spaceship and applying each where it is more effective, the hybrid architecture enables a series of Mars trajectories that are more fuel-efficient than an all chemical architecture without significant increases in flight times. This paper shows the feasibility of the hybrid transportation architecture to pre-deploy cargo to Mars and Phobos in support of the Evolvable Mars Campaign crew missions. The analysis shows that the hybrid propulsion stage is able to deliver all of the current manifested payload to Phobos and Mars through the first three crew missions. The conjunction class trajectory also allows the hybrid propulsion stage to return to Earth in a timely fashion so it can be reused for additional cargo deployment. The 1,100 days total trip time allows the hybrid propulsion stage to deliver cargo to Mars every other Earth-Mars transit opportunity. For the first two Mars surface mission in the Evolvable Mars Campaign, the short trip time allows the hybrid propulsion stage to be reused for three round-trip journeys to Mars, which matches the hybrid propulsion stage's designed lifetime for three round-trip crew missions to the Martian sphere of influence.

  18. Compatibility and Infectivity of a Cercospora rodmanii Formulation with Enhancing Agents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Background .... ....................... 3 Rationale. ... ........................ 3 Purpose and Objectives ..... ................ 4 PART II: MATERIALS AND...ability of compatible agents to increase the infectivity of the C. rodmanii formulation on waterhyacinth. 4 PART II: MATERIALS AND METHODS The Formulation...light sources to the build- ing were sealed with opaque material . Sixteen fluorescent lights were supplemented by six 122-cm plant growth lights

  19. Is religious education compatible with science education?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-04-01

    This paper tackles a highly controversial issue: the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education respectively. We challenge the popular view that science and religion are compatible or even complementary. In order to do so, we give a brief characterization of our conceptions of science and religion. Conspicuous differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological and attitudinal level are noted. Regarding these aspects, closer examination reveals that science and religion are not only different but in fact incompatible. Some consequences of our analysis for education as well as for education policy are explored. We submit that a religious education, particularly at an early age, is an obstacle to the development of a scientific mentality. For this and other reasons, religious education should be kept away from public schools and universities. Instead of promoting a religious world view, we should teach our children what science knows about religion, i.e., how science explains the existence of religion in historical, biological, psychological and sociological terms.

  20. Stress analysis in oral obturator prostheses, part II: photoelastic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Haddad, Marcela Filié; Moreno, Amália; Zahoui, Abbas; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2014-06-01

    In part I of the study, two attachment systems [O-ring; bar-clip (BC)] were used, and the system with three individualized O-rings provided the lowest stress on the implants and the support tissues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the stress distribution, through the photoelastic method, on implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses associated with different attachment systems: BOC-splinted implants with a bar connected to two centrally placed O-rings, and BOD-splinted implants with a BC connected to two distally placed O-rings (cantilever). One photoelastic model of the maxilla with oral-sinus-nasal communication with three parallel implants was fabricated. Afterward, two implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses with the two attachment systems described above were constructed. Each assembly was positioned in a circular polariscope and a 100-N axial load was applied in three different regions with implants by using a universal testing machine. The results were obtained through photograph record analysis of stress. The BOD system exhibited the highest stress concentration, followed by the BOC system. The O-ring, centrally placed on the bar, allows higher mobility of the prostheses and homogeneously distributes the stress to the region of the alveolar ridge and implants. It can be concluded that the use of implants with O-rings, isolated or connected with a bar, to rehabilitate maxillectomized patients allows higher prosthesis mobility and homogeneously distributes the stress to the alveolar ridge region, which may result in greater chewing stress distribution to implants and bone tissue. The clinical implication of the augmented bone support loss after maxillectomy is the increase of stress in the attachment systems and, consequently, a higher tendency for displacement of the prosthesis.

  1. An Analysis of a Finite Element Method for Convection-Diffusion Problems. Part II. A Posteriori Error Estimates and Adaptivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    AN ANALYSIS OF A FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR CONVECTION- DIFFUSION PROBLEMS PART II: A POSTERIORI ERROR ESTIMATES AND ADAPTIVITY by W. G. Szymczak Y 6a...PERIOD COVERED AN ANALYSIS OF A FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR final life of the contract CONVECTION- DIFFUSION PROBLEM S. Part II: A POSTERIORI ERROR ...Element Method for Convection- Diffusion Problems. Part II: A Posteriori Error Estimates and Adaptivity W. G. Szvmczak and I. Babu~ka# Laboratory for

  2. Erythrocyte membrane analysis for type II diabetes detection using Raman spectroscopy in high-wavenumber region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyong; Zeng, Yongyi; Lin, Juqiang; Wang, Jing; Li, Ling; Huang, Zufang; Li, Buhong; Zeng, Haishan; Chen, Rong

    2014-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy was employed to detect lipid variation occurring in type II diabetic erythrocyte membrane (EM) without using exogenous reagents. In high-wavenumber (HW) region, significant Raman spectral differences between diabetic and normal EM are observed at 2850, 2873, 2885, 2935, and 2965 cm-1, which are mainly related to lipid in EM. Based on principal component analysis, the diagnostic accuracy of HW region for diabetes detection is 98.8%, which is much higher than that of low-wavenumber region (82.9%). The results suggest that EM HW Raman region has great promise for the reagent-free and non-invasive detection of type II diabetes.

  3. Settlement-Compatible Lunar Transporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, G.

    Over the past few years we have published papers in this forum identifying, characterizing and advocating settlement-compatible transportation architectures for Mars. In the present paper, we do the same for the Moon and show evolutionary potentials for growth of lunar architectures into Mars architectures of the types discussed in our previous papers. The essence of a settlement-compatible architecture is that it yields a low recurring transportation cost and that the elements of the architecture are enduring, i.e., fully reusable with lifetimes on the order of Earth-based capital investments. Our previous papers have shown that extension of human habitation to other bodies in our Solar System is probably unaffordable with any other approach. The design of a settlement-compatible architecture begins with Earth launch. In our prior papers, we simply identified the Earth launch option as a fully reusable system with roughly Shuttle (or Atlas 5 or Delta 4 or Sea Launch or Ariane 5) capability, i.e. about 20 metric t. to low Earth orbit and a payload bay of dimensions about 5 m diameter x 15 to 20 m length. This is what the commercial market needs; this is where the traffic demand is; this is approximately the design point for a next-generation (after Shuttle) reusable launch vehicle. We continue in that vein for the present paper. Human mission advocates may argue it isn't big enough; that they need 80 metric t. payload to orbit. We answer that to achieve our cost criteria, there isn't much of a choice, and that the savings in launch cost will far outweigh the added expense for on-orbit assembly. Lunar transportation is considerably less demanding than Mars transportation. The main difference is in trip time. Because lunar trips are short, the crew habitat can be small, a la the Apollo Command Module, and the propulsion system to move it is also small by comparison. We analyze and depict a lunar transportation system based on crew elements adapted from the

  4. 77 FR 59702 - Promoting U.S. EC Regulatory Compatibility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... greater transatlantic regulatory compatibility generally. Concrete ideas on how greater compatibility.... We also invite you to share your concrete ideas on how greater compatibility could be achieved in...

  5. POINTBLANK: A Strategic and National Security Decision making Analysis of the World War II Combined Bomber Offensive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    ANALYSIS OF THE WORLD WAR II COMBINED BOMBER OFFENSIVE DTIC :111192-07858 COLONEL GEORGE E. CROWDER 1991 ’ PROEDf PUBLIC AIR UNIVERSITY E; OISIUTIDN...Decision Making Analysis of the World War II Combined Bomber Offensive by George E. Crowder Colonel, USAF A RESEARCH REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY IN

  6. Bioinformatic Analysis of Plasma Apolipoproteins A-I and A-II Revealed Unique Features of A-I/A-II HDL Particles in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Toshimi; Kurata, Hideaki; Kondo, Kazuo; Itakura, Hiroshige; Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Urata, Takeyoshi; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Plasma concentration of apoA-I, apoA-II and apoA-II-unassociated apoA-I was analyzed in 314 Japanese subjects (177 males and 137 females), including one (male) homozygote and 37 (20 males and 17 females) heterozygotes of genetic CETP deficiency. ApoA-I unassociated with apoA-II markedly and linearly increased with HDL-cholesterol, while apoA-II increased only very slightly and the ratio of apoA-II-associated apoA-I to apoA-II stayed constant at 2 in molar ratio throughout the increase of HDL-cholesterol, among the wild type and heterozygous CETP deficiency. Thus, overall HDL concentration almost exclusively depends on HDL with apoA-I without apoA-II (LpAI) while concentration of HDL containing apoA-I and apoA-II (LpAI:AII) is constant having a fixed molar ratio of 2 : 1 regardless of total HDL and apoA-I concentration. Distribution of apoA-I between LpAI and LpAI:AII is consistent with a model of statistical partitioning regardless of sex and CETP genotype. The analysis also indicated that LpA-I accommodates on average 4 apoA-I molecules and has a clearance rate indistinguishable from LpAI:AII. Independent evidence indicated LpAI:A-II has a diameter 20% smaller than LpAI, consistent with a model having two apoA-I and one apoA-II. The functional contribution of these particles is to be investigated. PMID:27526664

  7. Barley leaf transcriptome and metabolite analysis reveals new aspects of compatibility and Piriformospora indica-mediated systemic induced resistance to powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Molitor, Alexandra; Zajic, Doreen; Voll, Lars M; Pons-K Hnemann, Jorn; Samans, Birgit; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Waller, Frank

    2011-12-01

    Colonization of barley roots with the basidiomycete fungus Piriformospora indica (Sebacinales) induces systemic resistance against the biotrophic leaf pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (B. graminis). To identify genes involved in this mycorrhiza-induced systemic resistance, we compared the leaf transcriptome of P. indica-colonized and noncolonized barley plants 12, 24, and 96 h after challenge with a virulent race of B. graminis. The leaf pathogen induced specific gene sets (e.g., LRR receptor kinases and WRKY transcription factors) at 12 h postinoculation (hpi) (prepenetration phase) and vesicle-localized gene products 24 hpi (haustorium establishment). Metabolic analysis revealed a progressing shift of steady state contents of the intermediates glucose-1-phosphate, uridinediphosphate-glucose, and phosphoenolpyruvate 24 and 96 hpi, indicating that B. graminis shifts central carbohydrate metabolism in favor of sucrose biosynthesis. Both B. graminis and P. indica increased glutamine and alanine contents, whereas substrates for starch and nitrogen assimilation (adenosinediphosphate- glucose and oxoglutarate) decreased. In plants that were more B. graminis resistant due to P. indica root colonization, 22 transcripts, including those of pathogenesis-related genes and genes encoding heat-shock proteins, were differentially expressed ?twofold in leaves after B. graminis inoculation compared with non-mycorrhized plants. Detailed expression analysis revealed a faster induction after B. graminis inoculation between 8 and 16 hpi, suggesting that priming of these genes is an important mechanism of P. indica-induced systemic disease resistance.

  8. Compatibility of bentonite and DNAPLs

    SciTech Connect

    McCaulou, D.R.; Huling, S.G.

    1999-10-01

    The compatibility of dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), trichloroethylene (TCE), methylene chloride (MC), and creosote with commercially available sodium bentonite pellets was evaluated using stainless steel, double ring, falling head permeameters. The hydraulic conductivity (K) of the bentonite clay was measured under three experimental conditions: (1) water soluble constituents of the DNAPLs were used to hydrate and permeate the bentonite; (2) bentonite pellets were submersed in DNAPL prior to hydration and permeation with water; and (3) DNAPLs were pooled on water-hydrated bentonite. Further, the effect of hydraulic head on water-hydrated bentonite permeated with TCE and the effects of TCE exposure time to mixtures of bentonite grout and sand were measured.

  9. Genome-wide Analysis of RNA Polymerase II Termination at Protein-Coding Genes.

    PubMed

    Baejen, Carlo; Andreani, Jessica; Torkler, Phillipp; Battaglia, Sofia; Schwalb, Bjoern; Lidschreiber, Michael; Maier, Kerstin C; Boltendahl, Andrea; Rus, Petra; Esslinger, Stephanie; Söding, Johannes; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-03-06

    At the end of protein-coding genes, RNA polymerase (Pol) II undergoes a concerted transition that involves 3'-processing of the pre-mRNA and transcription termination. Here, we present a genome-wide analysis of the 3'-transition in budding yeast. We find that the 3'-transition globally requires the Pol II elongation factor Spt5 and factors involved in the recognition of the polyadenylation (pA) site and in endonucleolytic RNA cleavage. Pol II release from DNA occurs in a narrow termination window downstream of the pA site and requires the "torpedo" exonuclease Rat1 (XRN2 in human). The Rat1-interacting factor Rai1 contributes to RNA degradation downstream of the pA site. Defects in the 3'-transition can result in increased transcription at downstream genes.

  10. The Physical Conditions of Intermediate-Redshift Mg II Absorbing Clouds from Voigt Profile Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Vogt, Steven S.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed and statistical analysis of the column densities and Doppler b parameters of Mg II absorbing clouds at redshifts 0.4<=z<=1.2. We draw on the HIRES/Keck data (Δv~=6.6 km s-1) and Voigt profile (VP) fitting results presented by Churchill & Vogt (Paper I). The sample comprises 175 clouds from 23 systems along 18 quasar lines of sight. In order to better understand whether the inferred physical conditions in the absorbing clouds could be ``false'' conditions, which can arise due to the nonuniqueness inherent in parameterizing complex absorption profiles, we performed extensive simulations of the VP analyses presented in this paper. In brief, we find the following: (1) The Fe II and Mg II column densities are correlated at the 9 σ level. There is a 5 σ anticorrelation between the Mg I/Mg II column density ratio and the Mg II column density. (2) Power-law fits to the column density distributions for Mg II, Fe II, and Mg I yielded power-law slopes of approximately -1.6, -1.7, and -2.0, respectively. (3) The observed peaks of the Doppler parameter distributions were ~5 km s-1 for Mg II and Fe II and ~7 km s-1 for Mg I. The clouds are consistent with being thermally broadened, with temperatures in the 30,000-40,000 K range. (4) A two-component Gaussian model to the velocity two-point correlation function yielded velocity dispersions of 54 and 166 km s-1. The narrow component has roughly twice the amplitude of the broader component. The width and amplitude of the broader component decreases as equivalent width increases. (5) From photoionization models we find that the column density ratios are most consistent with being photoionized by the ultraviolet extragalactic ionizing background, as opposed to stellar radiation. Based on the Mg I to Mg II column density ratios, it appears that at least two-phase ionization models are required to explain the data. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated

  11. Prevalence and risk factors of type II endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jichun; Ma, Yukui; Huang, Bin; Yuan, Ding; Yang, Yi; Zeng, Guojun; Xiong, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to determine the current evidence on risk factors for type II endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Materials and methods A systematic literature search was carried out for studies that evaluated the association of demographic, co-morbidity, and other patient-determined factors with the onset of type II endoleaks. Pooled prevalence of type II endoleaks after EVAR was updated. Results Among the 504 studies screened, 45 studies with a total of 36,588 participants were included in this review. The pooled prevalence of type II endoleaks after EVAR was 22% [95% confidence interval (CI), 19%–25%]. The main factors consistently associated with type II endoleaks included age [pooled odds ratio (OR), 0.37; 95% CI, 0.31–0.43; P<0.001], smoking (pooled OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55–0.92; P<0.001), patent inferior mesenteric artery (pooled OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.06–3.71; P = 0.012), maximum aneurysm diameter (pooled OR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.17–0.30; P<0.001), and number of patent lumbar arteries (pooled OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 2.81–3.33; P<0.001). Sex, diabetes, hypertension, anticoagulants, antiplatelet, hyperlipidemia, chronic renal insufficiency, types of graft material, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) did not show any association with the onset of type II endoleaks. Conclusions Clinicians can use the identified risk factors to detect and manage patients at risk of developing type II endoleaks after EVAR. However, further studies are needed to analyze a number of potential risk factors. PMID:28182753

  12. A Topaz-II bimodal design assessment study and system analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Paramonov, Dmitry V.; Xue, Huimin; Ogloblin, Boris G.; Shumov, Dmitry P.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary conceptual design study is performed to investigate the feasibility of near-term, simple, minimum design changes to the Russian TOPAZ-II space power system to provide bimodal operation, electric power and direct thermal propulsion for future missions. To simulate the fully integrated, TOPAZ-II Bimodal system the capabilities of the Thermionic Transient Analysis Model (TITAM) are extended to take into account the proposed design modification of the Thermionic Fuel Elements (TFEs), waste heat recovery, pre-injection electric heating of the hydrogen propellant. This system model is used to characterize and identify promising design options and assess the performance parameters of the TOPAZ-II Bimodal system. Results of the study indicate that the TOPAZ-II system can be easily modified to support bimodal missions at a thrust level of 2.5 to 7.5 N and a corresponding specific impulse of 830 s to 600 s, respectively. Testing of TOPAZ-II Bimodal system can be accomplished at the Air Force Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The proposed design modification will build on the vast expertise and technology base available at the different Institutes, particularly at the Central Design Bureau of Machine Building (CDBMB) in St. Petersburg.

  13. Constituting fully integrated visual analysis system for Cu(II) on TiO₂/cellulose paper.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Lin, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Liang, Wenjie; Zhong, Yanxue; Cai, Jiabai

    2014-07-15

    As a cheap and abundant porous material, cellulose filter paper was used to immobilize nano-TiO2 and denoted as TiO2/cellulose paper (TCP). With high adsorption capacity for Cu(II) (more than 1.65 mg), TCP was used as an adsorbent, photocatalyst, and colorimetric sensor at the same time. Under the optimum adsorption conditions, i.e., pH 6.5 and 25 °C, the adsorption ratio of Cu(II) was higher than 96.1%. Humic substances from the matrix could be enriched onto TCP but the interference of their colors on colorimetric detection could be eliminated by the photodegradation. In the presence of hydroxylamine, neocuproine, as a selective indicator, was added onto TCP, and a visual color change from white to orange was generated. The concentration of Cu(II) was quantified by the color intensity images using image processing software. This fully integrated visual analysis system was successfully applied for the detection of Cu(II) in 10.0 L of drinking water and seawater with a preconcentration factor of 10(4). The log-linear calibration curve for Cu(II) was in the range of 0.5-50.0 μg L(-1) with a determination coefficient (R(2)) of 0.985 and its detection limit was 0.073 μg L(-1).

  14. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals That Ethylene/H2O2-Mediated Hypersensitive Response and Programmed Cell Death Determine the Compatible Interaction of Sand Pear and Alternaria alternata

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Jing; Chang, Youhong; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    A major restriction on sand pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) production is black spot disease caused by the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria alternata. However, the pear response mechanism to A. alternata is unknown at the molecular level. Here, host responses of a resistant cultivar Cuiguan (CG) and a susceptible cultivar Sucui1 (SC1) to A. alternata infection were investigated. We found that the primary necrotic lesion formed at 1 dpi and the expansion of lesions was aggressive in SC1. Data from transcriptomic profiles using RNA-Seq technology identified a large number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between CG and SC1 in the early phase of A. alternata infection. K-mean cluster and Mapman analysis revealed that genes involved in ethylene (ET) biosynthesis and ET signaling pathway, such as ACS, ACOs, and ERFs, and in hypersensitive response (HR) and programmed cell death (PCD) were significantly enriched and up-regulated in the susceptible cultivar SC1. Conversely, genes involved in response to hydrogen peroxide and superoxide were differentially up-regulated in the resistant cultivar CG after inoculation with the fungus. Furthermore, ET levels were highly accumulated in SC1, but not in CG. Higher activities of detoxifying enzymes such as catalases were detected in CG. Our results demonstrate that the ET-/H2O2-mediated PCD and detoxifying processes play a vital role in the interaction of pear and A. alternata. PMID:28261248

  15. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume II - Potentiometric Data Document Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume II of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the potentiometric data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  16. Analysis of cobalt(II) in 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaammine cobalt(III) perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, R.J.; Brown, N.E.; Deutsch, E.A.

    1985-10-30

    A new method of analysis is described for cobalt(II) complexes in 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaammine cobalt(III) perchlorate. The color reagent is 2,2'-dipyridyl-2-pyridyl hydrazone (DPPH), which complexes with the Co(II) and is oxidized to a substitution inert Co(III) (DPPH)/sub 2/ complex. Interferences from other ions is not a problem because the complex is stable at pH 2 - where complexes formed between DPPH and other ions are not stable. The usual air oxidant in this type of analysis has been replaced with ammonium peroxydisulfate improving both the precision and accuracy. The Sandell sensitivity is 0.0015 ..mu..g Co(II)/cm/sup 2/. The system obeys Beer's Law up to 4 ..mu..g in Co(II)mL of solution and has a molar absorptivity of 3.9 x 10/sup 4/ L/mole cm at 514 nm. The procedure was used to determine the degree of decomposition in samples that had undergone partial thermal decomposition. 11 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Advanced subsonic long-haul transport terminal area compatibility study. Volume 1: Compatibility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was made to identify airplane research and technology necessary to ensure advanced transport aircraft the capability of accommodating forecast traffic without adverse impact on airport communities. Projections were made of the delay, noise, and emissions impact of future aircraft fleets on typical large urban airport. Design requirements, based on these projections, were developed for an advanced technology, long-haul, subsonic transport. A baseline aircraft was modified to fulfill the design requirements for terminal area compatibility. Technical and economic comparisons were made between these and other aircraft configured to support the study.

  18. Biophysical Constraints and Ecological Compatibilities of Diverse Agroecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A diagnostic approach based on multi-scale integrated analysis and model simulations was employed to identify specific or common biophysical constraints, technological changes and ecological compatibilities of the diverse subsistence and organic agro-ecosystems in the Fertile Crescent of West Asia a...

  19. Analysis of the Wakefield Effects in the PEP-II SLAC B-FACTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    We present the history and analysis of different wake field effects throughout the operational life of the PEP-II SLAC B-factory. Although the impedance of the high and low energy rings is small, the intense high current beams generated a lot of power. The effects from these wake fields are: heating and damage of vacuum beam chamber elements like RF seals, vacuum valves , shielded bellows, BPM buttons and ceramic tiles; vacuum spikes, vacuum instabilities and high detector background; beam longitudinal and transverse instabilities. We also discuss the methods used to eliminate these effects. Results of this analysis and the PEP-II experience may be very useful in the design of new storage rings and light sources.

  20. Serum albumin analysis for type II diabetes detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyong; Cao, Gang; Lin, Juqiang; Liu, Nenrong; Liao, Fadian; Ruan, Qiuyong; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Zufang; Li, Ling; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy combined with membrane electrophoresis (ME) was firstly employed to detect albumin variation in type II diabetic development. Albumin was first purified from human serum by ME and then mixed with silver nanoparticles to perform SERS spectral analysis. SERS spectra were obtained from blood albumin samples of 20 diabetic patients and 19 healthy volunteers. Subtle but discernible changes in the acquired mean spectra of the two groups were observed. Tentative assignment of albumin SERS bands indicated specific structural changes of albumin molecule with diabetic development. Meanwhile, PCA-LDA diagnostic algorithms were employed to classify the two kinds of albumin SERS spectra, yielding the diagnostic sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.7%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that the EM-SERS method in combination with multivariate statistical analysis has great potential for the label-free detection of albumin variation for improving type II diabetes screening.

  1. The use of MAVIS II to integrate the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, R.; Kwon, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    The MAVIS II computer program provides for the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions. This report describes the individual components of the program and how MAVIS II is used with other available tools to integrate the design and understanding of explosive valves. The rationale and model used for each valve interaction is described. Comparisons of the calculated results with available data have demonstrated the feasibility and accuracy of using MAVIS II for analytical studies of explosive valve interactions. The model used for the explosive or pyrotechnic used as the driving force in explosive valves is the most critical to be understood and modeled. MAVIS II is an advanced version that incorporates a plastic, as well as elastic, modeling of the deformations experienced when plungers are forced into a bore. The inclusion of a plastic model has greatly expanded the use of MAVIS for all categories (opening, closure, or combined) of valves, especially for the closure valves in which the sealing operation requires the plastic deformation of either a plunger or bore over a relatively large area. In order to increase its effectiveness, the use of MAVIS II should be integrated with the results from available experimental hardware. Test hardware such as the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Velocity Generator test provide experimental data for accurate comparison of the actual valve functions. Variable Explosive Chamber (VEC) and Constant Explosive Volume (CEV) tests are used to provide the proper explosive equation-of-state for the MAVIS calculations of the explosive driving forces. The rationale and logistics of this integration is demonstrated through an example. A recent valve design is used to demonstrate how MAVIS II can be integrated with experimental tools to provide an understanding of the interactions in this valve.

  2. Tone compatibility between HDR displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bist, Cambodge; Cozot, Rémi; Madec, Gérard; Ducloux, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) is the latest trend in television technology and we expect an in ux of HDR capable consumer TVs in the market. Initial HDR consumer displays will operate on a peak brightness of about 500-1000 nits while in the coming years display peak brightness is expected to go beyond 1000 nits. However, professionally graded HDR content can range from 1000 to 4000 nits. As with Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) content, we can expect HDR content to be available in variety of lighting styles such as low key, medium key and high key video. This raises concerns over tone-compatibility between HDR displays especially when adapting to various lighting styles. It is expected that dynamic range adaptation between HDR displays uses similar techniques as found with tone mapping and tone expansion operators. In this paper, we survey simple tone mapping methods of 4000 nits color-graded HDR content for 1000 nits HDR displays. We also investigate tone expansion strategies when HDR content graded in 1000 nits is displayed on 4000 nits HDR monitors. We conclude that the best tone reproduction technique between HDR displays strongly depends on the lighting style of the content.

  3. Assessing shelf aggregate environmental compatibility and suitability for beach nourishment: a case study for Tuscany (Italy).

    PubMed

    Bigongiari, Nicola; Cipriani, Luigi E; Pranzini, Enzo; Renzi, Monia; Vitale, Giovanni

    2015-04-15

    Beach nourishment practices are a key aspect in coastal management plans for stakeholders and communities. Stemming from a concrete case-study (Tuscany), this research analyzes: (i) principal problems of current law regulating dredging, (ii) gaps in technical guidelines, (iii) advantages of integrated approaches to the decision-making process, (iv) possible applicable nourishment options and their costs and benefits. Our results show that sand compatibility is driven mainly by grain-size stability due to the occurrence of lower pollution levels in off-shore deposits than in threatened beaches, thus current laws and guidelines should be improved to fill the evident gap in the evaluation process and to include a more complete approach to data evaluation and an integrated approach to ecotoxicity evaluation, which is relevant in cases of geochemical anomalies. The cost-benefit analysis performed indicates that only dredging intended to manage more than 1 million m(3) of aggregates would represent a real advantage for local communities.

  4. Full genome analysis of a novel type II feline coronavirus NTU156.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Nan; Chang, Ruey-Yi; Su, Bi-Ling; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2013-04-01

    Infections by type II feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) have been shown to be significantly correlated with fatal feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Despite nearly six decades having passed since its first emergence, different studies have shown that type II FCoV represents only a small portion of the total FCoV seropositivity in cats; hence, there is very limited knowledge of the evolution of type II FCoV. To elucidate the correlation between viral emergence and FIP, a local isolate (NTU156) that was derived from a FIP cat was analyzed along with other worldwide strains. Containing an in-frame deletion of 442 nucleotides in open reading frame 3c, the complete genome size of NTU156 (28,897 nucleotides) appears to be the smallest among the known type II feline coronaviruses. Bootscan analysis revealed that NTU156 evolved from two crossover events between type I FCoV and canine coronavirus, with recombination sites located in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and M genes. With an exchange of nearly one-third of the genome with other members of alphacoronaviruses, the new emerging virus could gain new antigenicity, posing a threat to cats that either have been infected with a type I virus before or never have been infected with FCoV.

  5. Analysis of Metric Type II Burst and EUV Waves Generated by Shock Wave Driven by Cme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha-Silva, Rafael; Fernandes, Francisco; Selhorst, Caius

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between solar type II radio bursts produced by plasma oscillations and coronal shocks is well shown since the 1960s. However, the details of the association between the drivers of the shocks and the metric type II bursts remains a controversial issue. The flares and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the potential drivers of these shocks. In this work, we present the analysis of a metric type II burst observed on May 17, 2013, by spectrometers from e-CALLISTO network and EUV images from the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI), aboard the STEREO. The event was associated with an M3.2 X-ray flare and a halo CME. The EUV images show the EUV wave was produced by the expansion of the CME. The heights of the EUV wave fronts and the magnetic field intensity determined in the regions of the shock are consistent with those the heights of radio source obtained with the three-fold Newkirk density model, which suggests an oblique propagation of the shock. The finding of an accelerating shock with speed of 530-640 km/s and of 870-1220 km/s for the first and the second stages of the type II emission, respectively, is consistent with both the average speed of the associated EUV wave front, of 626 km/s, during the initial expansion of the CME, and with the linear speed of the CME, of 1345 km/s. These results will be presented and discussed.

  6. Impression techniques for multiple implants: a photoelastic analysis. Part II: comparison of four acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Júnior, Itamar; de Lima Lucas, Barbara; Gomide, Henner Alberto; Gomes, Vanderlei Luiz

    2013-10-01

    Four commercial brands of chemically activated acrylic resin were compared through photoelastic analysis. Photoelastic resin blocks were made with 2 implants placed parallel to each other and 2 square transfer copings splinted. Both transfers were splinted with chemically activated acrylic resin: Dencrilay, Duralay I, Duralay II, and GC. Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (P < .05). Statistically significant differences were found among the 3 brands of chemically activated acrylic resin. Dencrilay showed greater dimensional alteration. Duralay I and GC are recommended for the transfer of the position of the multi-implants.

  7. Is Religious Education Compatible with Science Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education, challenges the popular view that science and religion are compatible or complementary. Discusses differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological, and attitudinal levels. Argues that religious education should be kept…

  8. Reevaluation of Stratospheric Ozone Trends From SAGE II Data Using a Simultaneous Temporal and Spatial Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damadeo, R. P.; Zawodny, J. M.; Thomason, L. W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper details a new method of regression for sparsely sampled data sets for use with time-series analysis, in particular the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II ozone data set. Non-uniform spatial, temporal, and diurnal sampling present in the data set result in biased values for the long-term trend if not accounted for. This new method is performed close to the native resolution of measurements and is a simultaneous temporal and spatial analysis that accounts for potential diurnal ozone variation. Results show biases, introduced by the way data is prepared for use with traditional methods, can be as high as 10%. Derived long-term changes show declines in ozone similar to other studies but very different trends in the presumed recovery period, with differences up to 2% per decade. The regression model allows for a variable turnaround time and reveals a hemispheric asymmetry in derived trends in the middle to upper stratosphere. Similar methodology is also applied to SAGE II aerosol optical depth data to create a new volcanic proxy that covers the SAGE II mission period. Ultimately this technique may be extensible towards the inclusion of multiple data sets without the need for homogenization.

  9. TTF3 power coupler thermal analysis for LCLS-II CW operation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Nantista, C.; Raubenheimer, T.; Solyak, N.; Gonin, I.

    2015-05-13

    The TESLA 9-cell SRF cavity design has been adopted for use in the LCLS-II SRF Linac. Its TTF3 coaxial fundamental power coupler (FPC), optimized for pulsed operation in European XFEL and ILC, requires modest changes to make it suitable for LCLS-II continuous-wave (CW) operation. For LCLS-II it must handle up to 7 kW of power, fully reflected, with the maximum temperature around 450 K, the coupler bake temperature. In order to improve TTF3 FPC cooling, an increased copper plating thickness will be used on the inner conductor of the ‘warm’ section of the coupler. Also, the antenna will be shortened to achieve higher cavity Qext values. Fully 3D FPC thermal analysis has been performed using the SLAC-developed parallel finite element code suite ACE3P, which includes electromagnetic codes and an integrated electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical multi-physics code. In this paper, we present TTF3 FPC thermal analysis simulation results obtained using ACE3P as well as a comparison with measurement results.

  10. Analysis of the interaction of the novel RNA polymerase II (pol II) subunit hsRPB4 with its partner hsRPB7 and with pol II.

    PubMed

    Khazak, V; Estojak, J; Cho, H; Majors, J; Sonoda, G; Testa, J R; Golemis, E A

    1998-04-01

    Under conditions of environmental stress, prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae selectively utilize particular subunits of RNA polymerase II (pol II) to alter transcription to patterns favoring survival. In S. cerevisiae, a complex of two such subunits, RPB4 and RPB7, preferentially associates with pol II during stationary phase; of these two subunits, RPB4 is specifically required for survival under nonoptimal growth conditions. Previously, we have shown that RPB7 possesses an evolutionarily conserved human homolog, hsRPB7, which was capable of partially interacting with RPB4 and the yeast transcriptional apparatus. Using this as a probe in a two-hybrid screen, we have now established that hsRPB4 is also conserved in higher eukaryotes. In contrast to hsRPB7, hsRPB4 has diverged so that it no longer interacts with yeast RPB7, although it partially complements rpb4- phenotypes in yeast. However, hsRPB4 associates strongly and specifically with hsRPB7 when expressed in yeast or in mammalian cells and copurifies with intact pol II. hsRPB4 expression in humans parallels that of hsRPB7, supporting the idea that the two proteins may possess associated functions. Structure-function studies of hsRPB4-hsRPB7 are used to establish the interaction interface between the two proteins. This identification completes the set of human homologs for RNA pol II subunits defined in yeast and should provide the basis for subsequent structural and functional characterization of the pol II holoenzyme.

  11. Analysis of the Interaction of the Novel RNA Polymerase II (pol II) Subunit hsRPB4 with Its Partner hsRPB7 and with pol II

    PubMed Central

    Khazak, Vladimir; Estojak, Joanne; Cho, Helen; Majors, Jenifer; Sonoda, Gonosuke; Testa, Joseph R.; Golemis, Erica A.

    1998-01-01

    Under conditions of environmental stress, prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae selectively utilize particular subunits of RNA polymerase II (pol II) to alter transcription to patterns favoring survival. In S. cerevisiae, a complex of two such subunits, RPB4 and RPB7, preferentially associates with pol II during stationary phase; of these two subunits, RPB4 is specifically required for survival under nonoptimal growth conditions. Previously, we have shown that RPB7 possesses an evolutionarily conserved human homolog, hsRPB7, which was capable of partially interacting with RPB4 and the yeast transcriptional apparatus. Using this as a probe in a two-hybrid screen, we have now established that hsRPB4 is also conserved in higher eukaryotes. In contrast to hsRPB7, hsRPB4 has diverged so that it no longer interacts with yeast RPB7, although it partially complements rpb4− phenotypes in yeast. However, hsRPB4 associates strongly and specifically with hsRPB7 when expressed in yeast or in mammalian cells and copurifies with intact pol II. hsRPB4 expression in humans parallels that of hsRPB7, supporting the idea that the two proteins may possess associated functions. Structure-function studies of hsRPB4-hsRPB7 are used to establish the interaction interface between the two proteins. This identification completes the set of human homologs for RNA pol II subunits defined in yeast and should provide the basis for subsequent structural and functional characterization of the pol II holoenzyme. PMID:9528765

  12. Early maternal investment in mice: no evidence for compatible-genes sexual selection despite hybrid vigor.

    PubMed

    Rülicke, T; Guncz, N; Wedekind, C

    2006-05-01

    Confronting a recently mated female with a strange male can induce a pregnancy block ('Bruce effect'). The physiology of this effect is well studied, but its functional significance is still not fully understood. The 'anticipated infanticide hypothesis' suggests that the pregnancy block serves to avoid the cost of embryogenesis and giving birth to offspring that are likely to be killed by a new territory holder. Some 'compatible-genes sexual selection hypotheses' suggest that the likelihood of a pregnancy block is also dependent on the female's perception of the stud's and the stimulus male's genetic quality. We used two inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6 and BALB/c) to test all possible combinations of female strain, stud strain, and stimulus strain under experimental conditions (N(total) = 241 mated females). As predicted from previous studies, we found increased rates of pregnancy blocks if stud and stimulus strains differed, and we found evidence for hybrid vigour in offspring of between-strain mating. Despite the observed heterosis, pregnancies of within-strain matings were not more likely to be blocked than pregnancies of between-strain matings. A power analysis revealed that if we missed an existing effect (type-II error), the effect must be very small. If a female gave birth, the number and weight of newborns were not significantly influenced by the stimulus males. In conclusion, we found no support for the 'compatible-genes sexual selection hypotheses'.

  13. Results from a Low-Energy Analysis of the CDMS II Germanium Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D.S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C.N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Brink, P.L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2010-11-01

    We report results from a reanalysis of data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Data taken between October 2006 and September 2008 using eight germanium detectors are reanalyzed with a lowered, 2 keV recoil-energy threshold, to give increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below {approx}10 GeV/c{sup 2}. This analysis provides stronger constraints than previous CDMS II results for WIMP masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2} and excludes parameter space associated with possible low-mass WIMP signals from the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  14. Results from a low-energy analysis of the CDMS II germanium data.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Z; Akerib, D S; Arrenberg, S; Bailey, C N; Balakishiyeva, D; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cooley, J; do Couto e Silva, E; Cushman, P; Daal, M; DeJongh, F; Di Stefano, P; Dragowsky, M R; Duong, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fox, J; Fritts, M; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hertel, S A; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Kamaev, O; Kiveni, M; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Liu, S; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moore, D; Nelson, H; Ogburn, R W; Phipps, A; Pyle, M; Qiu, X; Ramberg, E; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Resch, R; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tarka, M; Wikus, P; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2011-04-01

    We report results from a reanalysis of data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Data taken between October 2006 and September 2008 using eight germanium detectors are reanalyzed with a lowered, 2 keV recoil-energy threshold, to give increased sensitivity to interactions from weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with masses below ∼10  GeV/c(2). This analysis provides stronger constraints than previous CDMS II results for WIMP masses below 9  GeV/c(2) and excludes parameter space associated with possible low-mass WIMP signals from the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  15. Progress in accident analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-10-11

    The present work continues our effort to perform an integrated safety analysis for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design. Recently we developed a base case for a severe accident scenario in order to calculate accident doses for HYLIFE-II. It consisted of a total loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in which all the liquid flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) was lost at the beginning of the accident. Results showed that the off-site dose was below the limit given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for public protection in case of accident, and that his dose was dominated by the tritium released during the accident.

  16. Campylobacter jejuni fatty acid synthase II: Structural and functional analysis of [beta]-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew S.; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Yeo, Hye-Jeong

    2009-08-14

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is crucial for all living cells. In contrast to higher organisms, bacteria use a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS II) composed of a series of individual proteins, making FAS II enzymes excellent targets for antibiotics discovery. The {beta}-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ) catalyzes an essential step in the FAS II pathway. Here, we report the structure of Campylobacter jejuni FabZ (CjFabZ), showing a hexamer both in crystals and solution, with each protomer adopting the characteristic hot dog fold. Together with biochemical analysis of CjFabZ, we define the first functional FAS II enzyme from this pathogen, and provide a framework for investigation on roles of FAS II in C. jejuni virulence

  17. Subclassification of Recursive Partitioning Analysis Class II Patients With Brain Metastases Treated Radiosurgically

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Sato, Yasunori; Serizawa, Toru; Kawabe, Takuya; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nagano, Osamu; Barfod, Bierta E.; Ono, Junichi; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Although the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class is generally used for predicting survival periods of patients with brain metastases (METs), the majority of such patients are Class II and clinical factors vary quite widely within this category. This prompted us to divide RPA Class II patients into three subclasses. Methods and Materials: This was a two-institution, institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study using two databases: the Mito series (2,000 consecutive patients, comprising 787 women and 1,213 men; mean age, 65 years [range, 19-96 years]) and the Chiba series (1,753 patients, comprising 673 female and 1,080 male patients; mean age, 65 years [range, 7-94 years]). Both patient series underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery alone, without whole-brain radiotherapy, for brain METs during the same 10-year period, July 1998 through June 2008. The Cox proportional hazard model with a step-wise selection procedure was used for multivariate analysis. Results: In the Mito series, four factors were identified as favoring longer survival: Karnofsky Performance Status (90% to 100% vs. 70% to 80%), tumor numbers (solitary vs. multiple), primary tumor status (controlled vs. not controlled), and non-brain METs (no vs. yes). This new index is the sum of scores (0 and 1) of these four factors: RPA Class II-a, score of 0 or 1; RPA Class II-b, score of 2; and RPA Class II-c, score of 3 or 4. Next, using the Chiba series, we tested whether our index is valid for a different patient group. This new system showed highly statistically significant differences among subclasses in both the Mito series and the Chiba series (p < 0.001 for all subclasses). In addition, this new index was confirmed to be applicable to Class II patients with four major primary tumor sites, that is, lung, breast, alimentary tract, and urogenital organs. Conclusions: Our new grading system should be considered when designing future clinical trials involving brain MET

  18. Physico-mechanical analysis data in support of compatibility of chitosan/κ-carrageenan polyelectrolyte films achieved by ascorbic acid, and the thermal degradation theory of κ-carrageenan influencing the properties of its blends.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mahdiyar; Ettelaie, Rammile; Rajabzadeh, Ghadir

    2016-12-01

    This article presents the complementary data regarding compatibilization of chitosan/κ-carrageenan polyelectrolyte complex for synthesizing of a soft film using ascorbic acid. It includes the thermal-theory for estimating the degradation of κ-carrageenan, as reflected in alteration of the structural properties of the blend. The data has been provided to demonstrate that the blend solution based on chitosan, a polycation, and κ-carrageenan, a polyanion polymer, produces an incompatible polyelectrolyte composite, susceptible to coaservative phase separation. We present further data on water resistance, water barrier property, mechanical parameters, scanning electron micrograph, as well as contact angle image dataset of the chitosan/κ-carrageenan film. The physical data were collected by water solubility and water permeability assays, with a view to elucidate the role of ascorbic acid in the compatibility of polyelectrolyte blends. The mechanical data is obtained from a stress-strain curve for evaluation of tensile strength and elongation at break point of the chitosan/κ-carrageenan film. The microstructure observations were performed using scanning electron micrograph. These dataset confirm fabrication of a soft film in the presence of ascorbic acid, with reduced heterogeneities in the polyelectrolyte film structure. The κ-carrageenan was also treated by a thermal process, prior to inclusion into the chitosan solution, to investigate the impact of this on the mechanical and structural features of the resulting blend. We present the required data and the theoretical analysis supporting the thermal chain degradation of a polymer and its effects on behavior of the film. Additional information, characterizing the hydrophobicity of the surface of the blend layers is obtained by measuring water contact angles using a contact anglemeter.

  19. Multi-reverse flow injection analysis integrated with multi-optical sensor for simultaneous determination of Mn(II), Fe(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Youngvises, Napaporn; Suwannasaroj, Kittigan; Jakmunee, Jaroon; AlSuhaimi, Awadh

    2017-05-01

    Multi-reverse flow injection analysis (Mr-FIA) integrated with multi-optical sensor was developed and optimized for the simultaneous determination of multi ions; Mn(II), Fe(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) in water samples. The sample/standard solutions were propelled making use of a four channels peristaltic pump whereas 4 colorimetric reagents specific for the metal ions were separately injected in sample streams using multi-syringe pump. The color zones that formed in the individual mixing coils were then streamed into multi-channels spectrometer, which comprised of four flows through cell and four pairs of light emitting diode and photodiode, whereby signals were measured concurrently. The linearity range (along with detection limit, µgL(-1)) was 0.050-3.0(16), 0.30-2.0 (11), 0.050-1.0(12) and 0.10-1.0(50)mgL(-1), for Mn(II), Fe(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III), respectively. In the interim, the correlation coefficients were 0.9924-0.9942. The percentages relative standard deviation was less than 3. The proposed system was applied successfully to determine targeted metal ions simultaneously in natural water with high sample throughput and low reagent consumption, thus it satisfies the criteria of Green Analytical Chemistry (GAC) and its goals.

  20. Structural analysis and physico-chemical characterization of mononuclear manganese(II) and polynuclear copper(II) complexes with pyridine-based alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zienkiewicz-Machnik, Małgorzata; Masternak, Joanna; Kazimierczuk, Katarzyna; Barszcz, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    Two novel manganese(II) and copper(II) complexes, mononuclear [Mn(H2O)2(2-(CH2)2OHpy)2](NO3)2 (1) and polynuclear [Cu(SO4)(2-(CH2)2OHpy)2]n (2), based on 2-(hydroxyethyl)pyridine (2-(CH2)2OHpy) were synthesised and fully characterised using X-ray structure analysis as well as spectroscopic, magnetic and thermal methods. Both central metal ions Mn(1) and Cu(1) are coordinated by two N,O-donor 2-(CH2)2OHpy ligands and possess an almost perfect octahedral geometry (a chromophore of {MN2O4} type). The coordination sphere of Mn(II) is completed by two molecules of water, whereas, in polynuclear complex 2, Cu(II) atoms are linked along the a crystallographic direction by bridging sulfate ligands in a μ2-κ2 binding mode to form chains. The intermolecular interactions in 1 and 2 have been interpreted in view of the 3D Hirshfeld surface analysis and associated 2D fingerprint plots. Furthermore, the complexes have been tested with ABTSrad + assay in order to assess their antioxidant activity. In addition, the IC50 values calculated for 1 and 2 revealed that the complexes show a higher antioxidant activity than corresponding ligand.

  1. Fermi Bubbles under Dark Matter Scrutiny Part II: Particle Physics Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wei-Chih; Urbano, Alfredo; Xue, Wei E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it

    2014-04-01

    The analysis of the gamma-ray photons collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveals, after removal of astrophysical background, the existence of an excess towards the Galactic center. This excess peaks around few GeV, and its origin is compatible with the gamma-ray flux originating from Dark Matter annihilation. In this work we take a closer look on this interpretation; we investigate which kind of Dark Matter, and which type of interactions with the Standard Model fields are able to reproduce the observed signal. The structure of the paper is twofold. In the first part, we follow an effective field theory approach considering both fermionic and scalar Dark Matter. The computation of the relic density, the constraint imposed from the null result of direct searches, and the reliability of the effective field theory description allow us to single out only two viable dim-6 operators in the case of fermionic Dark Matter. In the second part, we analyze some concrete models. In particular, we find that the scalar Higgs portal can provide a simple, concrete and realistic scenario able to explain the GeV excess under scrutiny.

  2. Development and characterisation of disposable gold electrodes, and their use for lead(II) analysis.

    PubMed

    Noh, Mohd F Md; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2006-12-01

    There is an increasing need to assess the harmful effects of heavy-metal-ion pollution on the environment. The ability to detect and measure toxic contaminants on site using simple, cost effective, and field-portable sensors is an important aspect of environmental protection and facilitating rapid decision making. A screen-printed gold sensor in a three-electrode configuration has been developed for analysis of lead(II) by square-wave stripping voltammetry (SWSV). The working electrode was fabricated with gold ink deposited by use of thick-film technology. Conditions affecting the lead stripping response were characterised and optimized. Experimental data indicated that chloride ions are important in lead deposition and subsequent analysis with this type of sensor. A linear concentration range of 10-50 microg L(-1) and 25-300 microg L(-1) with detection limits of 2 microg L(-1) and 5.8 microg L(-1) were obtained for lead(II) for measurement times of four and two minutes, respectively. The electrodes can be reused up to 20 times after cleaning with 0.5 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid. Interference of other metals with the response to lead were also examined to optimize the sensor response for analysis of environmental samples. The analytical utility of the sensor was demonstrated by applying the system to a variety of wastewater and soil sample extracts from polluted sites. The results are sufficient evidence of the feasibility of using these screen-printed gold electrodes for the determination of lead(II) in wastewater and soil extracts. For comparison purposes a mercury-film electrode and ICP-MS were used for validation.

  3. Motion analysis and trials of the deep sea hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Yan-hui; Wu, Zhi-liang; Wang, Shu-xin

    2017-03-01

    A hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II has been developed and field tested. It is equipped with an active buoyancy unit and a compact propeller unit. Its working modes have been expanded to buoyancy driven gliding and propeller driven level-flight, which can make the glider work in strong currents, as well as many other complicated ocean environments. Its maximal gliding speed reaches 1 knot and the propelling speed is up to 3 knots. In this paper, a 3D dynamic model of Petrel-II is derived using linear momentum and angular momentum equations. According to the dynamic model, the spiral motion in the underwater space is simulated for the gliding mode. Similarly the cycle motion on water surface and the depth-keeping motion underwater are simulated for the level-flight mode. These simulations are important to the performance analysis and parameter optimization for the Petrel-II underwater glider. The simulation results show a good agreement with field trials.

  4. Osmotically induced synthesis of the compatible solute hydroxyectoine is mediated by an evolutionarily conserved ectoine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Bursy, Jan; Pierik, Antonio J; Pica, Nathalie; Bremer, Erhard

    2007-10-26

    By using natural abundance (13)C NMR spectroscopy, we investigated the types of compatible solutes synthesized in a variety of Bacilli under high salinity growth conditions. Glutamate, proline, and ectoine were the dominant compatible solutes synthesized by the various Bacillus species. The majority of the inspected Bacilli produced the tetrahydropyrimidine ectoine in response to high salinity stress, and a subset of these also synthesized a hydroxylation derivative of ectoine, 5-hydroxyectoine. In Salibacillus salexigens, a representative of the ectoine- and 5-hydroxyectoine-producing species, ectoine production was linearly correlated with the salinity of the growth medium and dependent on an ectABC biosynthetic operon. The formation of 5-hydroxyectoine was primarily a stationary growth phase phenomenon. The enzyme responsible for ectoine hydroxylation (EctD) was purified from S. salexigens to apparent homogeneity. The EctD protein was shown in vitro to directly hydroxylate ectoine in a reaction dependent on iron(II), molecular oxygen, and 2-oxoglutarate. We identified the structural gene (ectD) for the ectoine hydroxylase in S. salexigens. Northern blot analysis showed that the transcript levels of the ectABC and ectD genes increased as a function of salinity. Many EctD-related proteins can be found in data base searches in various Bacteria. Each of these bacterial species also contains an ectABC ectoine biosynthetic gene cluster, suggesting that 5-hydroxyectoine biosynthesis strictly depends on the prior synthesis of ectoine. Our data base searches and the biochemical characterization of the EctD protein from S. salexigens suggest that the EctD-related ectoine hydroxylases are members of a new subfamily within the non-heme-containing, iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily (EC 1.14.11).

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (NORWTH00120010) Town Highway 012 Bloody Brook, Norwich, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NORWTH00120010 on town highway 12 crossing Bloody Brook, Norwich, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, available from VTAOT files, was compiled prior to conducting the Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 8.98-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the left bank upstream and the left and right banks downstream are forested. The immediate right bank upstream is covered by shrub and brush with pasture on the overbank. Town Highway 12 runs along the valley of Bloody Brook; however, at structure NORWTH00120010 the road crosses Bloody Brook at a 90-degree angle. In the study area, Bloody Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.014 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 41 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble (D50 is 51.0 mm or 0.167 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on October 31, 1994, indicated that the reach was unstable. The town highway 12 crossing of Bloody Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., July 29, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The right abutment is protected by sparse type-2 stone fill (less than 24 inches diameter). The channel is skewed 0 degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees

  6. Harmonic Analysis and H2-Functions on Siegel Domains of Type II

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, R. D.; Vági, S.

    1972-01-01

    It is known that the distinguished boundary of a Siegel domain of type II can be identified with a simply connected nilpotent Lie group of step two. The Plancherel formula for this group and the irreducible unitary representations which enter into that formula are determined. The H2-space of the domain and its Szegö kernel are characterized in terms of the harmonic analysis of the above group, in particular, the integral representations for H2-functions due to Gindikin and Korányi-Stein are shown to be instances of the Fourier inversion formula. PMID:16591961

  7. National Aviation Fuel Scenario Analysis Program (NAFSAP). Volume I. Model Description. Volume II. User Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    TESI CHART NATIONAI RUREAt (F ANDA[)Rt 1V4 A NATIONAL. AVIATION ~ FUEL SCENARIO.. ANALYSIS PROGRAM 49!! VOLUM I: MODEL DESCRIA~v 4<C VOLUME II: tr)ER...O %a 0 CD -00 a0 Dcc% %D Ln n q F u-u - ON 4w - u-u-MN N En -4C u-u-u-u- u- .- u-- - u--4uu 41 4t 1- The second major class of inputs to NAFSAP is the...this option determines the specific form of the number of new purchases (NOBUYS) computation. 14 L " - - .. .... . .I li I I q i . .. . . . . . r I I i

  8. Steady state thermal radiation analysis between the TOPAZ-II radiator and a heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Maveety, J.G.; Wold, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    In this study the authors investigate the feasibility and efficiency of coupling a single-pass heat exchanger to the TOPAZ-II space power system operating at steady state conditions. A first and second law analysis was performed in order to determine the optimal operating conditions which minimize the pumping power and maximize the flow exergy of the working fluid. The results of this study show that (1) the space power system is basically unaffected by the addition of this heat exchanger and (2) as much as 60% of the availability is destroyed by irreversibilities while operating at optimal flow conditions.

  9. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for tank 241-SY-102 grab samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-08-14

    Three grab samples (2SY-96-1, 2SY-96-2, and 2SY-96-3) were taken from Riser 1A of Tank 241-SY 102 on January 14, 1997, and received by 222-S Laboratory on January 14, 1997. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farm Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results. Acetone analysis was not performed in accordance with Cancellation of Acetone Analysis for Tank 241-SY-102 Grab Samples.

  10. RE-ANALYSIS OF THE RADIO LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF GALACTIC H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paladini, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; DeZotti, G.

    2009-09-10

    We have re-analyzed continuum and recombination lines radio data available in the literature in order to derive the luminosity function (LF) of Galactic H II regions. The study is performed by considering the first and fourth Galactic quadrants independently. We estimate the completeness level of the sample in the fourth quadrant at 5 Jy, and the one in the first quadrant at 2 Jy. We show that the two samples (fourth or first quadrant) include, as well as giant and supergiant H II regions, a significant number of subgiant sources. The LF is obtained, in each Galactic quadrant, with a generalized Schmidt's estimator using an effective volume derived from the observed spatial distribution of the considered H II regions. The re-analysis also takes advantage of recently published ancillary absorption data allowing to solve the distance ambiguity for several objects. A single power-law fit to the LFs retrieves a slope equal to -2.23 {+-} 0.07 (fourth quadrant) and to -1.85 {+-} 0.11 (first quadrant). We also find marginal evidence of a luminosity break at L{sub knee} = 10{sup 23.45} erg s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1} for the LF in the fourth quadrant. We convert radio luminosities into equivalent H{alpha} and Lyman continuum luminosities to facilitate comparisons with extragalactic studies. We obtain an average total H II regions Lyman continuum luminosity of 0.89 {+-} 0.23 x 10{sup 53} s{sup -1}, corresponding to 30% of the total ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy.

  11. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 3, Verification/validation assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.

    1987-10-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum are enhanced by the incorporation of directional porosities and permeabilities that aid in modeling solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated procedures are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume I - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. Volume II - User's Manual contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a model problem. This volume, Volume III - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. This volume also documents comparisons between the results of simulations of single- and multiassembly storage systems and actual experimental data. 11 refs., 55 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. 36 CFR 1193.51 - Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the user. (b) Connection point for external audio processing devices. Products providing auditory output shall provide the auditory signal at a standard signal level through an industry standard... signal compatibility. Products, including those providing voice communication functionality,...

  13. 36 CFR 1193.51 - Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... a connector by the user. (b) Connection point for external audio processing devices. Products providing auditory output shall provide the auditory signal at a standard signal level through an industry...) TTY signal compatibility. Products, including those providing voice communication functionality,...

  14. 36 CFR 1193.51 - Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... a connector by the user. (b) Connection point for external audio processing devices. Products providing auditory output shall provide the auditory signal at a standard signal level through an industry...) TTY signal compatibility. Products, including those providing voice communication functionality,...

  15. 36 CFR 1193.51 - Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a connector by the user. (b) Connection point for external audio processing devices. Products providing auditory output shall provide the auditory signal at a standard signal level through an industry...) TTY signal compatibility. Products, including those providing voice communication functionality,...

  16. 36 CFR 1193.51 - Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a connector by the user. (b) Connection point for external audio processing devices. Products providing auditory output shall provide the auditory signal at a standard signal level through an industry...) TTY signal compatibility. Products, including those providing voice communication functionality,...

  17. EVA-Compatible Microbial Swab Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    When we send humans to search for life on Mars, we'll need to know what we brought with us versus what may already be there. To ensure our crewed spacecraft meet planetary protection requirements—and to protect our science from human contamination—we'll need to know whether micro-organisms are leaking/venting from our ships and spacesuits. This is easily done by swabbing external vents and suit surfaces for analysis, but requires a specialized tool for the job. Engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently developed an Extravehicular Activity (EVA)-compatible swab tool that can be used to sample current space suits and life support systems. Data collected now will influence Mars life support and EVA hardware early in the planning process, before design changes become difficult and expensive.NASA’s EVA swab tool pairs a Space Shuttle-era tool handle with a commercially available swab tip mounted into a custom-designed end effector. A glove-compatible release mechanism allows the handle to quickly switch between swab tips, much like a shaving razor handle can snap onto a disposable blade cartridge. Swab tips are stowed inside individual sterile containers, each fitted with a microbial filter that allows the container to equalize atmospheric pressure, but prevents cabin contaminants from rushing into the container when passing from the EVA environment into a pressurized cabin. A bank of containers arrayed inside a tool caddy allows up to six individual samples to be collected during a given spacewalk.NASA plans to use the tool in 2016 to collect samples from various spacesuits during ground testing to determine what (if any) human-borne microbial contamination leaks from the suit under simulated thermal vacuum conditions. Next, the tool will be used on board the International Space Station to assess the types of microbial contaminants found on external environmental control and life support system vents. Data will support

  18. [Safety and electromagnetic compatibility in sanitary field].

    PubMed

    Bini, M; Feroldi, P; Ferri, C; Ignesti, A; Olmi, R; Priori, S; Riminesi, C; Tobia, L

    2012-01-01

    In sanitary field and especially in a hospital, multiple sources of non ionizing radiation are used for diagnostic and therapeutic aims. In sanitary sector both workers and users are present at the same time, and in some cases general population could need higher protection than workers in relationship to the exposition to electromagnetic fields. In order to protect health and safety of patients, general population and workers of hospitals and with the aim to identify, analyze, evaluate and study its level of significance, electrical, magnetic and electromagnetic sources Research Italian project Si.C.E.O. (Safety And Electromagnetic Compatibility In Sanitary Field) was instituted. Target of our research project was to deepen risk of exposition elements with analysis of outdoor (e.g. power lines, transmission cabinets) and indoor (e.g. equipment for physical therapy) sources, located in sanitary structures and to verify the level exposition of workers and common population end the respect of specific regulation, and finally to define technical and organizational measures really useful for protection and reduction of risk.

  19. Cognitive compatibility of motorcyclists and car drivers.

    PubMed

    Walker, Guy H; Stanton, Neville A; Salmon, Paul M

    2011-05-01

    Incompatibility between different types of road user is a problem that previous research has shown to be resistant to a range of interventions. Cars and motorcycles are particularly prone to this. Insight is provided in this paper by a naturalistic method using concurrent verbal protocols and an automatic, highly reliable semantic network creation tool. The method shows how the same road situation is interpreted differently by car drivers and motorcyclists in ways congruent with wider accident rates. Analysis of the structure and content of the semantic networks reveals a greater degree of cognitive compatibility on faster roads such as motorways, but evidence of more critical incompatibilities on country roads and junctions. Both of these road types are implicated in helping to activate cognitive schema which in turn generate stereotypical behaviors unfavourable to the anticipation of motorcyclists by car drivers. The results are discussed in terms of practical measures such as road signs which warn of events behind as well as in front, cross-mode training and the concept of route driveability.

  20. Joint SatOPS Compatibility Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Danford

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) participation in the interagency cooperation committee, the Joint SatOps Compatibility Committee (JSCC), and the compatible Sat 2 efforts. Part of GSFC's participation in the JSCC is to work with the Goddard Mission Systems Evolution Center (GMSEC) to provides a publish/subscribe framework to enable rapid integration of commercially available satellite control products.

  1. Signal classification using global dynamical models, Part II: SONAR data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kremliovsky, M.; Kadtke, J.

    1996-06-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a numerical method for nonlinear signal detection and classification which made use of techniques borrowed from dynamical systems theory. Here in Part II of the paper, we will describe an example of data analysis using this method, for data consisting of open ocean acoustic (SONAR) recordings of marine mammal transients, supplied from NUWC sources. The purpose here is two-fold: first to give a more operational description of the technique and provide rules-of-thumb for parameter choices; and second to discuss some new issues raised by the analysis of non-ideal (real-world) data sets. The particular data set considered here is quite non-stationary, relatively noisy, is not clearly localized in the background, and as such provides a difficult challenge for most detection/classification schemes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Signal classification using global dynamical models, Part II: SONAR data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremliovsky, Michael; Kadtke, James

    1996-06-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a numerical method for nonlinear signal detection and classification which made use of techniques borrowed from dynamical systems theory. Here in Part II of the paper, we will describe an example of data analysis using this method, for data consisting of open ocean acoustic (SONAR) recordings of marine mammal transients, supplied from NUWC sources. The purpose here is two-fold: first to give a more operational description of the technique and provide rules-of-thumb for parameter choices; and second to discuss some new issues raised by the analysis of non-ideal (real-world) data sets. The particular data set considered here is quite non-stationary, relatively noisy, is not clearly localized in the background, and as such provides a difficult challenge for most detection/classification schemes.

  3. Polarization Analysis Equipment in SANS-J-II: Study of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane for Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yohei; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Putra, Ananda; Koizumi, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yoshifumi; Oku, Takayuki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi

    In small angle neutron scattering spectrometer, SANS-J-II at Japan Research Reactor No. 3 (JRR-3), a polarization analysis setup has been equipped, which is composed of transmission-type supermirror polarizer, radial-bender-type supermirror analyzer, π flipper, and solenoids for generating guide magnetic field. This setup was applied to the structural study of polymer electrolyte membrane, Nafion under water-swollen state. The sample is known to exhibit several characteristic peaks at wide angle region, which is related to water transporting channels. By use of polarization analysis technique, the coherent and incoherent contributions were successfully separated. Consequently, we obtained reliable information about decaying power law of ionic cluster peak and the shape of the broad peak, relating to ordering with short distance (5.6 Å).

  4. Driver Education Task Analysis. Volume II: Task Analysis Methods. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, A. James; Adams, Bert B.

    This report is the second in a series of four reports dealing with the development of performance-oriented driver education objectives and a set of measuring devices for evaluating attainment of the objectives. Included are descriptions of the analysis of driver's tasks and the evaluation of behavior criticality. During the analysis process, the…

  5. Mate choice for genetic compatibility in the house mouse.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Anna K; Musolf, Kerstin; Weidt, Andrea; König, Barbara

    2013-05-01

    In house mice, genetic compatibility is influenced by the t haplotype, a driving selfish genetic element with a recessive lethal allele, imposing fundamental costs on mate choice decisions. Here, we evaluate the cost of genetic incompatibility and its implication for mate choice in a wild house mice population. In laboratory reared mice, we detected no fertility (number of embryos) or fecundity (ability to conceive) costs of the t, and yet we found a high cost of genetic incompatibility: heterozygote crosses produced 40% smaller birth litter sizes because of prenatal mortality. Surprisingly, transmission of t in crosses using +/t males was influenced by female genotype, consistent with postcopulatory female choice for + sperm in +/t females. Analysis of paternity patterns in a wild population of house mice showed that +/t females were more likely than +/+ females to have offspring sired by +/+ males, and unlike +/+ females, paternity of their offspring was not influenced by +/t male frequency, further supporting mate choice for genetic compatibility. As the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is physically linked to the t, we investigated whether females could potentially use variation at the MHC to identify male genotype at the sperm or individual level. A unique MHC haplotype is linked to the t haplotype. This MHC haplotype could allow the recognition of t and enable pre- and postcopulatory mate choice for genetic compatibility. Alternatively, the MHC itself could be the target of mate choice for genetic compatibility. We predict that mate choice for genetic compatibility will be difficult to find in many systems, as only weak fertilization biases were found despite an exceptionally high cost of genetic incompatibility.

  6. Synthesis of artificial spectrum-compatible seismic accelerograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrochidou, E.; Alvanitopoulos, P. F.; Andreadis, I.; Elenas, A.; Mallousi, K.

    2014-08-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform is used to generate artificial seismic signals compatible with the acceleration spectra of natural seismic records. Artificial spectrum-compatible accelerograms are utilized instead of natural earthquake records for the dynamic response analysis of many critical structures such as hospitals, bridges, and power plants. The realistic estimation of the seismic response of structures involves nonlinear dynamic analysis. Moreover, it requires seismic accelerograms representative of the actual ground acceleration time histories expected at the site of interest. Unfortunately, not many actual records of different seismic intensities are available for many regions. In addition, a large number of seismic accelerograms are required to perform a series of nonlinear dynamic analyses for a reliable statistical investigation of the structural behavior under earthquake excitation. These are the main motivations for generating artificial spectrum-compatible seismic accelerograms and could be useful in earthquake engineering for dynamic analysis and design of buildings. According to the proposed method, a single natural earthquake record is deconstructed into amplitude and frequency components using the Hilbert-Huang transform. The proposed method is illustrated by studying 20 natural seismic records with different characteristics such as different frequency content, amplitude, and duration. Experimental results reveal the efficiency of the proposed method in comparison with well-established and industrial methods in the literature.

  7. Water/sand flooded and immersed critical experiment and analysis performed in support of the TOPAZ-II safety program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, Evgeny S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N.; Bubelev, Vladimir G.; Garin, Vladimir P.; Gomin, Evgeny A.; Kompanietz, Georgy V.; Krutov, Aleksei M.; Lobynstev, Vyacheslav A.; Maiorov, Lev V.; Polyakov, Dmitry N.; Chunyaev, Evgeny I.; Marshall, Albert C.; Sapir, Joseph L.; Pelowitz, Denise B.

    1995-01-01

    Presented is a brief description of the Narciss-M2 critical assemblies, which simulate accidental water/wet-sand immersion of the TOPAZ-II reactor as well as water-flooding of core cavities. Experimental results obtained from these critical assemblies, including experiments with several fuel elements removed from the core, are shown. These configurations with several extracted fuel elements simulate a proposed fuel-out anticriticality-device modification to the TOPAZ-II reactor. Preliminary computational analysis of these experiments using the Monte Carlo neutron-transport method is outlined. Nuclear criticality safety of the TOPAZ-II reactor with an incorporated anticriticality unit is demonstrated.

  8. Water/sand flooded and immersed critical experiment and analysis performed in support of the TOPAZ-II Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, E.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Bubelev, V.G.; Garin, V.P.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompanietz, G.V.; Krutoy, A.M.; Lobynstev, V.A.; Maiorov, L.V.; Polyakov, D.N.

    1994-11-01

    Presented is a brief description of the Narciss-M2 critical assemblies, which simulate accidental water/wet-sand immersion of the TOPAZ-II reactor as well as water-flooding of core cavities. Experimental results obtained from these critical assemblies, including experiments with several fuel elements removed from the core, are shown. These configurations with several extracted fuel elements simulate a proposed fuel-out anticriticality-device modification to the TOPAZ-II reactor. Preliminary computational analysis of these experiments using the Monte Carlo neutron-transport method is outlined. Nuclear criticality safety of the TOPAZ-II reactor with an incorporated anticriticality unit is demonstrated.

  9. Physics Metacognition Inventory Part II: Confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2015-11-01

    The Physics Metacognition Inventory was developed to measure physics students' metacognition for problem solving. In one of our earlier studies, an exploratory factor analysis provided evidence of preliminary construct validity, revealing six components of students' metacognition when solving physics problems including knowledge of cognition, planning, monitoring, evaluation, debugging, and information management. The college students' scores on the inventory were found to be reliable and related to students' physics motivation and physics grade. However, the results of the exploratory factor analysis indicated that the questionnaire could be revised to improve its construct validity. The goal of this study was to revise the questionnaire and establish its construct validity through a confirmatory factor analysis. In addition, a Rasch analysis was applied to the data to better understand the psychometric properties of the inventory and to further evaluate the construct validity. Results indicated that the final, revised inventory is a valid, reliable, and efficient tool for assessing student metacognition for physics problem solving.

  10. Evaluating the compatibility of multi-functional and intensive urban land uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleai, M.; Sharifi, A.; Sliuzas, R.; Mesgari, M.

    2007-12-01

    This research is aimed at developing a model for assessing land use compatibility in densely built-up urban areas. In this process, a new model was developed through the combination of a suite of existing methods and tools: geographical information system, Delphi methods and spatial decision support tools: namely multi-criteria evaluation analysis, analytical hierarchy process and ordered weighted average method. The developed model has the potential to calculate land use compatibility in both horizontal and vertical directions. Furthermore, the compatibility between the use of each floor in a building and its neighboring land uses can be evaluated. The method was tested in a built-up urban area located in Tehran, the capital city of Iran. The results show that the model is robust in clarifying different levels of physical compatibility between neighboring land uses. This paper describes the various steps and processes of developing the proposed land use compatibility evaluation model (CEM).

  11. Structural Analysis of the Rubisco-Assembly Chaperone RbcX-II from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuimin; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2015-01-01

    The most prevalent form of the Rubisco enzyme is a complex of eight catalytic large subunits (RbcL) and eight regulatory small subunits (RbcS). Rubisco biogenesis depends on the assistance by specific molecular chaperones. The assembly chaperone RbcX stabilizes the RbcL subunits after folding by chaperonin and mediates their assembly to the RbcL8 core complex, from which RbcX is displaced by RbcS to form active holoenzyme. Two isoforms of RbcX are found in eukaryotes, RbcX-I, which is more closely related to cyanobacterial RbcX, and the more distant RbcX-II. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains only RbcX-II isoforms, CrRbcX-IIa and CrRbcX-IIb. Here we solved the crystal structure of CrRbcX-IIa and show that it forms an arc-shaped dimer with a central hydrophobic cleft for binding the C-terminal sequence of RbcL. Like other RbcX proteins, CrRbcX-IIa supports the assembly of cyanobacterial Rubisco in vitro, albeit with reduced activity relative to cyanobacterial RbcX-I. Structural analysis of a fusion protein of CrRbcX-IIa and the C-terminal peptide of RbcL suggests that the peptide binding mode of RbcX-II may differ from that of cyanobacterial RbcX. RbcX homologs appear to have adapted to their cognate Rubisco clients as a result of co-evolution. PMID:26305355

  12. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.; Lessor, D.L.

    1987-09-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite-difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum incorporate directional porosities and permeabilities that are available to model solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated methods are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume 1 - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. This volume, Volume 2 - User's Manual, contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a sample problem. The final volume, Volume 3 - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. 6 refs.

  13. Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis of Class I and Class II FU Orionis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Rodón, Javier A.; Gómez, Mercedes

    2014-06-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUors) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUors in a homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUor stage. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of 24 of the 26 currently known FUors, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUors have more massive disks: we find that ~80% of the disks in FUors are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ~10-7 M ⊙ yr-1 versus ~10-5 M ⊙ yr-1 for standard young stellar objects (YSOs) and FUors, respectively. While the distributions of envelope mass accretion rates for class I FUors and standard class I objects are similar, FUors, on average, have higher envelope mass accretion rates than standard class II and class I sources. Most FUors (~70%) have envelope mass accretion rates above 10-7 M ⊙ yr-1. In contrast, 60% of the classical YSO sample has an accretion rate below this value. Our results support the current scenario in which changes experimented by the circumstellar disk explain the observed properties of these stars. However, the increase in the disk mass accretion rate is smaller than theoretically predicted, although in good agreement with previous determinations.

  14. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors’ dynamics that may be of utility in drug design. PMID:26975976

  15. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-03-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors’ dynamics that may be of utility in drug design.

  16. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2016-03-15

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors' dynamics that may be of utility in drug design.

  17. Supramolecular architectures in luminescent Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes containing imidazole derivatives: Crystal structures, vibrational and thermal properties, Hirshfeld surface analysis and electrostatic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Santo, Alejandro; Echeverría, Gustavo A.; Piro, Oscar E.; Pérez, Hiram; Ben Altabef, Aida; Gil, Diego M.

    2017-04-01

    Three novel zinc and cadmium complexes with 1-methylimidazole and 2-methylimidazole as ligands, mono-nuclear dichloro-bis(1-methylimidazole) zinc(II) and dibromo-bis(2-methylimidazole)cadmium(II) monohydrate complexes, and poly-nuclear bis(1-methylimidazole)-di-(μ2-bromo)cadmium(II) complex, namely, compounds 1-3, respectively, have been synthesized. The complexes were characterized by IR and Raman spectroscopies, thermal analysis and fluorescence. All the compounds exhibit interesting luminescent properties in solid state originated from intra-ligand (π→π*) transitions. Crystal structures of 1-3 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in P21/n space group, the Zn(II) ion lies at a crystal general position in a tetrahedral environment, and the mono-nuclear units are weakly bonded to one another by Csbnd H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. Compound 2 crystallizes in Pnma space group, and mirror-related tetrahedral units around Cd(II) ion are H-bonded through a water molecule. Compound 3 crystallizes in P21/c space group, and the Cd(II) ion presents a centrosymmetric octahedral coordination. Neighboring and equatorial edge-sharing octahedra conform a polymeric arrangement that extends along the crystal a-axis. Weak hydrogen bonds are the major driving forces in the crystal packing of the three complexes. Hirshfeld surface analysis reveals a detailed scrutiny of intermolecular interactions experienced by each complex. The surfaces mapped over dnorm property highlight the X···H (X = Cl, Br) as the main intermolecular contacts for the three complexes, being also relevant the presence of O⋯H contacts for complex 2. The surfaces mapped over Shape index and curvedness properties for the two Cd complexes allow identify π … π stacking interactions which are absent in the Zn complex. 2D fingerprint plots have been used to quantify the relative contribution of the intermolecular contacts to crystal stability of compounds, showing

  18. Simplified Acute Physiology Score II as Predictor of Mortality in Intensive Care Units: A Decision Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Allyn, Jérôme; Ferdynus, Cyril; Bohrer, Michel; Dalban, Cécile; Valance, Dorothée; Allou, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background End-of-life decision-making in Intensive care Units (ICUs) is difficult. The main problems encountered are the lack of a reliable prediction score for death and the fact that the opinion of patients is rarely taken into consideration. The Decision Curve Analysis (DCA) is a recent method developed to evaluate the prediction models and which takes into account the wishes of patients (or surrogates) to expose themselves to the risk of obtaining a false result. Our objective was to evaluate the clinical usefulness, with DCA, of the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) to predict ICU mortality. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study from January 2011 to September 2015, in a medical-surgical 23-bed ICU at University Hospital. Performances of the SAPS II, a modified SAPS II (without AGE), and age to predict ICU mortality, were measured by a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis and DCA. Results Among the 4.370 patients admitted, 23.3% died in the ICU. Mean (standard deviation) age was 56.8 (16.7) years, and median (first-third quartile) SAPS II was 48 (34–65). Areas under ROC curves were 0.828 (0.813–0.843) for SAPS II, 0.814 (0.798–0.829) for modified SAPS II and of 0.627 (0.608–0.646) for age. DCA showed a net benefit whatever the probability threshold, especially under 0.5. Conclusion DCA shows the benefits of the SAPS II to predict ICU mortality, especially when the probability threshold is low. Complementary studies are needed to define the exact role that the SAPS II can play in end-of-life decision-making in ICUs. PMID:27741304

  19. Synthesis, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, magnetic properties and biological activity studies of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes with Schiff base dye ligands.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Raziyeh Arab; Amani, Saeid

    2012-05-29

    Three azo group-containing Schiff base ligands, namely 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropylimino) methyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-4-nitrobenzene (2a), 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropylimino) methyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-2-chloro-4-nitrobenzene (2b) and 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropylimino) methyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-4-chloro-3-nitrobenzene (2c) were prepared. The ligands were characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, ¹³C- and ¹H-NMR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Next the corresponding copper(II) and cobalt(II) metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by the physicochemical and spectroscopic methods of elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, magnetic moment measurements, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (DSC). The room temperature effective magnetic moments of complexes are 1.45, 1.56, 1.62, 2.16, 2.26 and 2.80 B.M. for complexes 3a, 3b, 3c, 4a 4b, and 4c, respectively, indicating that the complexes are paramagnetic with considerable electronic communication between the two metal centers.

  20. The Tracking Meteogram, an AWIPS II Tool for Time-Series Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, Jason Eric; Sperow, Ken

    2015-01-01

    A new tool has been developed for the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) II through collaboration between NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) and the NWS Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL). Referred to as the "Tracking Meteogram", the tool aids NWS forecasters in assessing meteorological parameters associated with moving phenomena. The tool aids forecasters in severe weather situations by providing valuable satellite and radar derived trends such as cloud top cooling rates, radial velocity couplets, reflectivity, and information from ground-based lightning networks. The Tracking Meteogram tool also aids in synoptic and mesoscale analysis by tracking parameters such as the deepening of surface low pressure systems, changes in surface or upper air temperature, and other properties. The tool provides a valuable new functionality and demonstrates the flexibility and extensibility of the NWS AWIPS II architecture. In 2014, the operational impact of the tool was formally evaluated through participation in the NOAA/NWS Operations Proving Ground (OPG), a risk reduction activity to assess performance and operational impact of new forecasting concepts, tools, and applications. Performance of the Tracking Meteogram Tool during the OPG assessment confirmed that it will be a valuable asset to the operational forecasters. This presentation reviews development of the Tracking Meteogram tool, performance and feedback acquired during the OPG activity, and future goals for continued support and extension to other application areas.

  1. Vibrational spectra, normal coordinate analysis, and conformation of bis(ɑ-cyanoacetylacetonato)Cu(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandomi, Farzad; Vakili, Mohammad; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio calculations, Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Atoms-in-Molecules (AIM) analyses, and Fourier transform Raman (3200-350 cm-1) and infrared (4000-200 cm-1) spectral measurements have been made for bis(α-cyanoacetylacetonato)Cu(II), Cu(CNacac)2. The molecular structure and vibrational spectra of Cu(CNacac)2 is compared with those of bis(acetylacetonato)Cu(II), Cu(acac)2. The molecular electronic energies and the equilibrium geometries for all theoretically possible conformations are calculated. A normal coordinate analysis of the vibrational modes has been computed for the most stable conformation of Cu(CNacac)2, D2h symmetry. A complete assignment of the observed band frequencies has been proposed. The metal-O bond strength was investigated by geometry calculations, NBO, AIM, and spectroscopic results to realize the effect of cyano substitution at α-position. All theoretical and vibrational spectroscopic studies confirm stronger metal-ligand bond in Cu(CNacac)2 than that in Cu(acac)2.

  2. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  3. A survey of inlet/engine distortion compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowditch, D. N.; Coltrin, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The history of distortion analysis is traced back to its origin in parallel compressor theory which was initially proposed in the late fifties. The development of this theory is reviewed up to its inclusion in the complex computer codes of today. It is found to be a very useful tool to guide development but not quantitative enough to predict compatibility. Dynamic or instantaneous distortion methodology is also reviewed from its origins in the sixties, to its current application in the eighties. Many of the requirements for interpreting instantaneous distortion are considered and illustrated. Statistical methods for predicting the peak distortion are described, and their limitations and advantages discussed. Finally, some Reynolds number and scaling considerations for inlet testing are considered. It is concluded that the deterministic instantaneous distortion methodology combined with distortion testing of engines with screens will remain the primary method of predicting compatibility for the near future. However, parallel compressor analysis and statistical peak distortion prediction will be important tools employed during the development of inlet/engine compatibility.

  4. Physics Metacognition Inventory Part Ii: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Rasch Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2015-01-01

    The Physics Metacognition Inventory was developed to measure physics students' metacognition for problem solving. In one of our earlier studies, an exploratory factor analysis provided evidence of preliminary construct validity, revealing six components of students' metacognition when solving physics problems including knowledge of cognition,…

  5. JTIDS electromagnetic compatibility in the 960-1215 MHz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokuta, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    The Joint Tactical Information Distribution System (JTIDS) operates in the 960-1215 MHz frequency band. This band is allocated world-wide on a primary basis for aeronautical radio navigation. JTIDS was designed to be electromagnetically compatible with the Air Traffic Control systems that operate in this band. Over the past 15 years, extensive bench tests, flight tests, and analyses were conducted to assess the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of JTIDS in the 960-1215 MHz band. This report summarizes the results and conclusions of these efforts, presents some supporting data and provides specific guidance for the operation of JTIDS within the National Air Space. Guidance and recommendations are also provided to assist in the definition and scope of a JTIDS EMC test and analysis effort.

  6. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  7. Environmentally compatible hand wipe cleaning solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Catherine P.; Kovach, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    Several solvents of environmental concern have previously been used for hand wipe cleaning of SRB surfaces, including 1,1,1-trichloroethane, perchloroethylene, toluene, xylene, and MEK. USBI determined the major types of surfaces involved, and qualification requirements of replacement cleaning agents. Nineteen environmentally compatible candidates were tested on 33 material substrates with 26 types of potential surface contaminants, involving over 7,000 individual evaluations. In addition to the cleaning performance evaluation, bonding, compatibility, and corrosion tests were conducted. Results showed that one cleaner was not optimum for all surfaces. In most instances, some of the candidates cleaned better than the 1,1,1-trichloroethane baseline control. Aqueous cleaners generally cleaned better, and were more compatible with nonmetallic materials, such as paints, plastics, and elastomers. Organic base cleaners were better on metal surfaces. Five cleaners have been qualified and are now being implemented in SRB hand wipe cleaning operations.

  8. Compatibility Equations of Nonlinear Elasticity for Non-Simply-Connected Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavari, Arash

    2013-07-01

    Compatibility equations of elasticity are almost 150 years old. Interestingly, they do not seem to have been rigorously studied, to date, for non-simply-connected bodies. In this paper we derive necessary and sufficient compatibility equations of nonlinear elasticity for arbitrary non-simply-connected bodies when the ambient space is Euclidean. For a non-simply-connected body, a measure of strain may not be compatible, even if the standard compatibility equations ("bulk" compatibility equations) are satisfied. It turns out that there may be topological obstructions to compatibility; this paper aims to understand them for both deformation gradient F and the right Cauchy-Green strain C = F T F. We show that the necessary and sufficient conditions for compatibility of deformation gradient F are the vanishing of its exterior derivative and all its periods, that is, its integral over generators of the first homology group of the material manifold. We will show that not every non-null-homotopic path requires supplementary compatibility equations for F and linearized strain e. We then find both necessary and sufficient compatibility conditions for the right Cauchy-Green strain tensor C for arbitrary non-simply-connected bodies when the material and ambient space manifolds have the same dimensions. We discuss the well-known necessary compatibility equations in the linearized setting and the Cesàro-Volterra path integral. We then obtain the sufficient conditions of compatibility for the linearized strain when the body is not simply-connected. To summarize, the question of compatibility reduces to two issues: i) an integrability condition, which is d( F d X) = 0 for the deformation gradient and a curvature vanishing condition for C, and ii) a topological condition. For F d x this is a homological condition because the equation one is trying to solve takes the form d φ = F d X. For C, however, parallel transport is involved, which means that one needs to solve an equation

  9. Use of ELVIS II platform for random process modelling and analysis of its probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikova, Yu. S.; Nugmanov, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of probability density function estimation for a random process is one of the most common in practice. There are several methods to solve this problem. Presented laboratory work uses methods of the mathematical statistics to detect patterns in the realization of random process. On the basis of ergodic theory, we construct algorithm for estimating univariate probability density distribution function for a random process. Correlational analysis of realizations is applied to estimate the necessary size of the sample and the time of observation. Hypothesis testing for two probability distributions (normal and Cauchy) is used on the experimental data, using χ2 criterion. To facilitate understanding and clarity of the problem solved, we use ELVIS II platform and LabVIEW software package that allows us to make the necessary calculations, display results of the experiment and, most importantly, to control the experiment. At the same time students are introduced to a LabVIEW software package and its capabilities.

  10. The acoustic simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems, II: Program structure and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, C. W. S.

    1984-09-01

    The main objectives of the investigation reported in this paper, Part II, and its companion paper, Part I, are (a) to provide a formulation, including the mean flow effects and suitable for digital computer automation, of the acoustics of complicated piping systems, and (b) to develop a comprehensive digital computer program for the simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems. In this paper, the digital computer program structure and applications of the program developed, written in Fortran IV, are described. It is concluded that the computer program is versatile and user-friendly. It is capable of providing a great deal of information from one set of input data, and is open-ended and modular for updating.

  11. Analysis of molecular oxygen exit pathways in cyanobacterial photosystem II: Molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Kljashtorny, V. G.; Dontsova, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    In thylakoids of cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic organisms, the light-induced production of molecular oxygen is catalyzed by the giant lipid-pigment-protein complex called photosystem II (PSII). The oxygen-evolving complex is buried deep in the lumenal part of PSII, and dioxygen molecules need to pass through the protein environment in order to leave the active site of the enzyme free. Previous studies aimed at finding oxygen channels in PSII were based on either an analysis of the cavities within is static structure or experiments on the insertion of noble gas molecules into PSII crystals under elevated pressure. In these studies, some possible exit pathways for the molecules were found and the static positions of molecular oxygen were determined. In the present work, the oxygen movement in the transport system of PSII is simulated by molecular dynamics.

  12. JUPITER-II Program: ANL analysis of ZPPR-13A and ZPPR-13B

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, P.J.; Brumbach, S.B.

    1984-08-09

    The ZPPR-13 experiments provide basic physics data for radial-heterogeneous LMFBR cores of approximately 700 MWe size. Assemblies ZPPR-13A, ZPPR-13B and ZPPR-13C comprised the JUPITER-II cooperative program between US-DOE and PNC of Japan. The measurements were made between August 1982 and April 1984. This report describes in detail the results of the ANL analyses of phases 13A and 13B/1 and includes preliminary results for the later assemblies of phase 13B. The data were compiled primarily for discussions at the Third Jupiter Analysis Meeting to be held at ANL-West between September 11th and 14th, 1984.

  13. From structure to systems: high-resolution, quantitative genetic analysis of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Braberg, Hannes; Jin, Huiyan; Moehle, Erica A; Chan, Yujia A; Wang, Shuyi; Shales, Michael; Benschop, Joris J; Morris, John H; Qiu, Chenxi; Hu, Fuqu; Tang, Leung K; Fraser, James S; Holstege, Frank C P; Hieter, Philip; Guthrie, Christine; Kaplan, Craig D; Krogan, Nevan J

    2013-08-15

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) lies at the core of dynamic control of gene expression. Using 53 RNAPII point mutants, we generated a point mutant epistatic miniarray profile (pE-MAP) comprising ∼60,000 quantitative genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis enabled functional assignment of RNAPII subdomains and uncovered connections between individual regions and other protein complexes. Using splicing microarrays and mutants that alter elongation rates in vitro, we found an inverse relationship between RNAPII speed and in vivo splicing efficiency. Furthermore, the pE-MAP classified fast and slow mutants that favor upstream and downstream start site selection, respectively. The striking coordination of polymerization rate with transcription initiation and splicing suggests that transcription rate is tuned to regulate multiple gene expression steps. The pE-MAP approach provides a powerful strategy to understand other multifunctional machines at amino acid resolution.

  14. Aphid-induced defense responses in Mi-1-mediated compatible and incompatible tomato interactions.

    PubMed

    Martinez de Ilarduya, Oscar; Xie, QiGuang; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2003-08-01

    The tomato Mi-1 gene confers resistance to three species of root-knot nematode and potato aphid. We studied changes in expression of jasmonic acid (JA)- and salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defense genes in response to potato and green peach aphids. We determined changes in three PR proteins, lipoxygenase and proteinase inhibitors I and II transcripts, locally and systemically in both compatible and incompatible interactions in tomato. Transcripts for PR-1 were detected earlier and accumulated to higher levels in the incompatible than in the compatible potato aphid/tomato interactions. The transcript profiles of the other genes were similar in compatible compared with incompatible interactions. Pin1 and Pin2 RNAs were detected early and transiently in both compatible and incompatible interactions. In tomato plants containing Mi-1, systemic expression of PR-1 and GluB was detected in both compatible and incompatible interactions at 48 h after infestations with either aphid. These results suggest that aphid feeding involves both SA and JA/ethylene plant defense signaling pathways and that Mi-1-mediated resistance might involve a SA-dependent signaling pathway. Potato aphid feeding generated reactive oxygen species in both compatible and incompatible interactions. However, a hypersensitive response was absent in the Mi-1-mediated resistance response to potato aphids. Reciprocal grafting experiments revealed that resistance is cell autonomous, and local expression of Mi-1 is required for Mi-1-mediated resistance against the potato aphid.

  15. MRI and histologic analysis of collagen type II sponge on repairing the cartilage defects of rabbit knee joints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Honghui; Yang, Xiaohong; Liao, Yingyang; Zeng, Xuwen; Liang, Peihong; Kang, Ning; Tan, Jianrong; Liang, Zhiping

    2011-02-01

    There are limited treatment options for cartilage defects in clinical practice because of the lack of suitable biomaterials. Here, we evaluated the effects of collagen type II sponge on the articular cartilage repairing process using a cartilage injury of a rabbit knee joint model. We showed that the home-made collagen type II sponges appeared to have a suitable pore size of 93.26 ± 38.4 μm for chondrocyte growth. MRI with H&E staining results demonstrated that the effusion absorption in the collagen type II sponge treated group was quicker than that of the control group. Moreover, sporadic cartilage signals first appeared at 6 weeks in the collagen type II sponge treated group. Safranin O staining and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that the newly formed cartilage expresses glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen matrix. Using Sirius red polarized light staining, we showed that the newly formed cartilage-like areas from the collagen type II treated group are significantly greater than those of the control group. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the home-made collagen type II sponge is able to promote cartilage repair in the cartilage injury of a rabbit knee joint model.

  16. Studies in astronomical time series analysis. II - Statistical aspects of spectral analysis of unevenly spaced data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Detection of a periodic signal hidden in noise is frequently a goal in astronomical data analysis. This paper does not introduce a new detection technique, but instead studies the reliability and efficiency of detection with the most commonly used technique, the periodogram, in the case where the observation times are unevenly spaced. This choice was made because, of the methods in current use, it appears to have the simplest statistical behavior. A modification of the classical definition of the periodogram is necessary in order to retain the simple statistical behavior of the evenly spaced case. With this modification, periodogram analysis and least-squares fitting of sine waves to the data are exactly equivalent. Certain difficulties with the use of the periodogram are less important than commonly believed in the case of detection of strictly periodic signals. In addition, the standard method for mitigating these difficulties (tapering) can be used just as well if the sampling is uneven. An analysis of the statistical significance of signal detections is presented, with examples

  17. Studies in astronomical time series analysis. II - Statistical aspects of spectral analysis of unevenly spaced data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scargle, J. D.

    1982-12-01

    Detection of a periodic signal hidden in noise is frequently a goal in astronomical data analysis. This paper does not introduce a new detection technique, but instead studies the reliability and efficiency of detection with the most commonly used technique, the periodogram, in the case where the observation times are unevenly spaced. This choice was made because, of the methods in current use, it appears to have the simplest statistical behavior. A modification of the classical definition of the periodogram is necessary in order to retain the simple statistical behavior of the evenly spaced case. With this modification, periodogram analysis and least-squares fitting of sine waves to the data are exactly equivalent. Certain difficulties with the use of the periodogram are less important than commonly believed in the case of detection of strictly periodic signals. In addition, the standard method for mitigating these difficulties (tapering) can be used just as well if the sampling is uneven. An analysis of the statistical significance of signal detections is presented, with examples

  18. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - RDX Type II Class 5 Standard, Data Set 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Mary M.; Brown, Geoffrey W.; Preston, Daniel N.; Pollard, Colin J.; Warner, Kirstin F.; Sorenson, Daniel N.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Moran, Jesse S.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Reyes, Jose A.; Hsu, Peter C.; Whipple, Richard E.; Reynolds, John G.

    2011-04-11

    This document describes the results of the first reference sample material—RDX Type II Class 5—examined in the proficiency study for small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing of explosive materials for the Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program. The IDCA program is conducting proficiency testing on homemade explosives (HMEs). The reference sample materials are being studied to establish the accuracy of traditional explosives safety testing for each performing laboratory. These results will be used for comparison to results from testing HMEs. This effort, funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), ultimately will put the issues of safe handling of these materials in perspective with standard military explosives. The results of the study will add SSST testing results for a broad suite of different HMEs to the literature, potentially suggest new guidelines and methods for HME testing, and possibly establish what are the needed accuracies in SSST testing to develop safe handling practices. Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and scanning calorimetry analysis of a reference sample of RDX Type II Class 5. The results from each participating testing laboratory are compared using identical test material and preparation methods wherever possible. Note, however, the test procedures differ among the laboratories. These results are then compared to historical data from various sources. The performers involved are Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Air Force Research Laboratory/ RXQL (AFRL), Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, (IHD-NSWC), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). These tests are conducted as a proficiency study in order to establish some consistency in test protocols, procedures, and experiments and to understand how to compare results when test protocols are not identical.

  19. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II from Sitophilus zeamais.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chang-Liang; Wang, Jing-Bo; Wu, Hua; Liu, Jia-Yu; Ma, Zhi-Qing; Feng, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Xing

    2016-09-30

    Cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX II) containing a dual core CuA active site is one of the core subunits of mitochondrial Cytochrome c oxidase (Cco), which plays a significant role in the physiological process. In this report, the full-length cDNA of COXII gene was cloned from Sitophilus zeamais, which had an open reading frame (ORF) of 684 bp encoding 227 amino acids residues. The predicted COXII protein had a molecular mass of 26.2 kDa with pI value of 6.37. multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicated that Sitophilus zeamais COXII had high sequence identity with the COXII of other insect species. The gene was subcloned into the expression vector pET-32a, and induced by isopropyl β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) in E. coli Transetta (DE3) expression system. Finally the recombinant COXII with 6-His tag was purified using affinity chromatography with Ni(2+)-NTA agarose. Western Blotting (WB) showed the recombinant protein was about 44 kD, and the concentration of fusion protein was 50 μg/mL. UV-spectrophotometer and infrared spectrometer analysis showed that recombinant COXII could catalyze the oxidation of substrate Cytochrome C (Cyt c), and influenced by allyl isothiocyanate (AITC). By using molecular docking method, It was found that a sulfur atom of AITC structure could form a length of 2.9 Å hydrogen bond with Leu-31. These results suggested that tag-free COXII was functional and one of the action sites of AITC, which will be helpful to carry out a point mutation in binding sites for the future research.

  20. Electromagnetic Compatibility for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Space Shuttle electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). It includes an overview of the design of the shuttle with the areas that are of concern for the electromagnetic compatibility. It includes discussion of classical electromagnetic interference (EMI) and the work performed to control the electromagnetic interference. Another area of interest is electrostatic charging and the threat of electrostatic discharge and the attempts to reduce damage to the Shuttle from these possible hazards. The issue of electrical bonding is als reviewed. Lastly the presentation reviews the work performed to protect the shuttle from lightning, both in flight and on the ground.

  1. New tools for the systematic analysis and visualization of electronic excitations. II. Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Plasser, Felix Bäppler, Stefanie A.; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2014-07-14

    The excited states of a diverse set of molecules are examined using a collection of newly implemented analysis methods. These examples expose the particular power of three of these tools: (i) natural difference orbitals (the eigenvectors of the difference density matrix) for the description of orbital relaxation effects, (ii) analysis of the one-electron transition density matrix in terms of an electron-hole picture to identify charge resonance and excitonic correlation effects, and (iii) state-averaged natural transition orbitals for a compact simultaneous representation of several states. Furthermore, the utility of a wide array of additional analysis methods is highlighted. Five molecules with diverse excited state characteristics are chosen for these tasks: pyridine as a prototypical small heteroaromatic molecule, a model system of six neon atoms to study charge resonance effects, hexatriene in its neutral and radical cation forms to exemplify the cases of double excitations and spin-polarization, respectively, and a model iridium complex as a representative metal organic compound. Using these examples a number of phenomena, which are at first sight unexpected, are highlighted and their physical significance is discussed. Moreover, the generality of the conclusions of this paper is verified by a comparison of single- and multireference ab initio methods.

  2. Multicomponent Analysis of Junctional Movements Regulated by Myosin II Isoforms at the Epithelial Zonula Adherens

    PubMed Central

    Smutny, Michael; Wu, Selwin K.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Mangold, Sabine; Yap, Alpha S.; Hamilton, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    The zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelial cells is a site of cell-cell adhesion where cellular forces are exerted and resisted. Increasing evidence indicates that E-cadherin adhesion molecules at the ZA serve to sense force applied on the junctions and coordinate cytoskeletal responses to those forces. Efforts to understand the role that cadherins play in mechanotransduction have been limited by the lack of assays to measure the impact of forces on the ZA. In this study we used 4D imaging of GFP-tagged E-cadherin to analyse the movement of the ZA. Junctions in confluent epithelial monolayers displayed prominent movements oriented orthogonal (perpendicular) to the ZA itself. Two components were identified in these movements: a relatively slow unidirectional (translational) component that could be readily fitted by least-squares regression analysis, upon which were superimposed more rapid oscillatory movements. Myosin IIB was a dominant factor responsible for driving the unilateral translational movements. In contrast, frequency spectrum analysis revealed that depletion of Myosin IIA increased the power of the oscillatory movements. This implies that Myosin IIA may serve to dampen oscillatory movements of the ZA. This extends our recent analysis of Myosin II at the ZA to demonstrate that Myosin IIA and Myosin IIB make distinct contributions to junctional movement at the ZA. PMID:21799860

  3. Preliminary design analysis of the ALT-II limiter for TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Boyd, R.D.; Kempka, S.M.; Romig, A.D. Jr.; Smith, M.F.; Watson, R.D.; Whitley, J.B.; Conn, R.W.; Grotz, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Installation of a large toroidal belt pump limiter, Advanced Limiter Test II (ALT-II), on the TEXTOR tokamak at Juelich, FRG is anticipated for early 1986. This paper discusses the preliminary mechanical design and materials considerations undertaken as part of the feasibility study phase for ALT-II.

  4. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  5. Surface complexation and precipitate geometry for aqueous Zn(II) sorption on ferrihydrite: II. XANES analysis and simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.; Rehr, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis of sorption complexes has the advantages of high sensitivity (10- to 20-fold greater than extended X-ray absorption fine structure [EXAFS] analysis) and relative ease and speed of data collection (because of the short k-space range). It is thus a potentially powerful tool for characterization of environmentally significant surface complexes and precipitates at very low surface coverages. However, quantitative analysis has been limited largely to "fingerprint" comparison with model spectra because of the difficulty of obtaining accurate multiple-scattering amplitudes for small clusters with high confidence. In the present work, calculations of the XANES for 50- to 200-atom clusters of structure from Zn model compounds using the full multiple-scattering code Feff 8.0 accurately replicate experimental spectra and display features characteristic of specific first-neighbor anion coordination geometry and second-neighbor cation geometry and number. Analogous calculations of the XANES for small molecular clusters indicative of precipitation and sorption geometries for aqueous Zn on ferrihydrite, and suggested by EXAFS analysis, are in good agreement with observed spectral trends with sample composition, with Zn-oxygen coordination and with changes in second-neighbor cation coordination as a function of sorption coverage. Empirical analysis of experimental XANES features further verifies the validity of the calculations. The findings agree well with a complete EXAFS analysis previously reported for the same sample set, namely, that octahedrally coordinated aqueous Zn2+ species sorb as a tetrahedral complex on ferrihydrite with varying local geometry depending on sorption density. At significantly higher densities but below those at which Zn hydroxide is expected to precipitate, a mainly octahedral coordinated Zn2+ precipitate is observed. An analysis of the multiple scattering paths contributing to the XANES

  6. Launch Vehicle Fire Accident Preliminary Analysis of a Liquid-Metal Cooled Thermionic Nuclear Reactor: TOPAZ-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, G.; Zhao, S.; Ruan, K.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, launch vehicle propellant fire accident analysis of TOPAZ-II reactor has been done by a thermionic reactor core analytic code-TATRHG(A) developed by author. When a rocket explodes on a launch pad, its payload-TOPAZ-II can be subjected to a severe thermal environment from the resulting fireball. The extreme temperatures associated with propellant fires can create a destructive environment in or near the fireball. Different kind of propellants - liquid propellant and solid propellant which will lead to different fire temperature are considered. Preliminary analysis shows that the solid propellant fires can melt the whole toxic beryllium radial reflector.

  7. Solar Differential Rotation in Calcium II K Line Spectra Supported with Spectroheliogram Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Tyler; Keil, S. L.

    2013-07-01

    Two recent papers report on measuring differential rotation in data that views the Sun as a star. Unlike using tracers at different latitudes to measure the differential rotation, disk-integrated light averages over many latitudes and can only work if the features both exist at a dominate latitude that changes with the solar cycle and they persist long enough to affect the measured rotation rate. Bertello, Pevtsov, and Pietarila (2012, ApJ 761, pg 11) use disk-integrated Ca II K-line data from the SOLIS/ISS instrument to show that a change in rotation rate is clearly visible at the beginning of the current solar cycle in the disk-integrated K-line. Scargle, Keil, and Worden (2013, ApJ in press, arXiv:1303.6303) use the Sacramento Peak K-line series to look at the last current and previous three cycles with fairly strong evidence that the differential rotation is visible in cycle 22, but much harder to see in cycles 21 and 23. In order to understand the differences in the three cycles we report on solar differential rotation measurements in both the Sacramento Peak disk-integrated, Ca II K spectral time series (1977-2012) and full-disk, Ca II K spectroheliogram time series (1977-2002) observed at the Evans Solar Facility. The former data set is the same as used by Scargle et al (2013) and averages about 2-3 measurements per week. For the disk-integrated spectra, we use two interpolation schemes to fill in missing days (regression and singular value decomposition with proxy data sets) and use two methods (power spectra and autocorrelation) to find the rotation rates. We find a clear signature of solar differential rotation for solar cycle 21 and 22 and a partial signature for cycle 23. We test this result by measuring differential rotation using the Ca II K spectroheliograms using phase analysis between longitudinal bands. We have also explored the image features that lead to changes in the disk-integrated spectrum's signal-to-noise. The data analyzed in this

  8. Microscale Synthesis and (super 1)H NMR Analysis of Zn(super II) and Ni(super II) Tetraphenylporphyrins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saucedo, Laura; Mink, Larry M.

    2005-01-01

    A multisection undergraduate laboratory involving the microscale synthesis and spectroscopic analysis of unmetalled porphyrins and their corresponding metalloporphyins is described. The microscale synthesis involving the isolation of the metalloporphyrins as solids and their corresponding (super 1)H NMR spectra are presented.

  9. 60-day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for TX-244 grab samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-05

    Three grab samples (244-TX-96-1, 244-TX-96-2, and 244-TX-96-3) were taken from Riser 8 of Tank 241-TX-244 on October 18, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 18, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support ofthe Waste Compatibility Program. Notifications were made in accordance with TSAP for pH and OH- analyses. Upon further review, the pH notification was deemed unnecessary, as the notification limit did not apply to this tank.

  10. 60-Day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for AY-102 grab samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-01-31

    Four grab samples (2AY-96-15, 2AY-96-16, 2AY-96-17, and 2AY-96-18) were taken from Riser 15D of Tank 241-AY-102 on October 8, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 8, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results.

  11. [Cloning and analysis of three genes encoding type II CHH family neuropeptides from Fennropenaeus chinensis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zai-Zhao; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2003-10-01

    On the basis of sequence similarity, the crustean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) family peptides have been classified into two types of hormones: type I and type II. Molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) is a neuropeptide member of type II CHH family. Molting in shrimp is controlled by MIH and ecdysone. By inhibiting the synthesis of ecdysone in the Y-organ, MIH indirectly suppresses the molting activity of shrimp. In this study, we reported the cloning and characterization of 3 gene fragments encoding type II CHH family neuropeptides of the shrimp Fennropenaeus chinensis. According to the complementary DNA sequence of the mult-inhibiting hormone of Fennropenaeus chinensis, 3 primers were designed and synthesized. MP1 and MP2 are sense primers, and MP3 is anti-sense primer. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using genomic DNA of Fennropenaeus chinensis as template. Three PCR products were obtained using primers MP1 and MP3. Their sizes are about 600 bp, 850 bp, 1050 bp, respectively. A 580 bp PCR product was obtained using primers MP2 and MP3. All the 4 PCR products were cloned into pMD18-T vector. The recombinant clones were sequenced using ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer. After sequencing, all the DNA sequences were searched in the GenBank by Blast program to find similar gene sequences. The searching results revealed 3 DNA fragment sequences were of high similarity with CHH family neuropeptide genes from various crustean species. The 3 DNA fragments were named as NP1, NP2, and NP3. Their sizes were 540 bp, 601 bp, and 826 bp, respectively. Using the mRNA sequences with the most similarity to the 3 sequence fragments as reference, the gene structure of the 3 DNA fragment sequences was analyzed. The exons of 3 sequence fragments were aligned with their similar sequences by Clustal W program. Both NP1 and NP2 consisted of 1 intron and 2 exons. NP3 consisted of 2 introns and 3 exons. Sequence analysis suggested that these 3 products belonged to sequence fragments of neuropeptide

  12. Phylogenetic relationships among Phytophthora species inferred from sequence analysis of mitochondrially encoded cytochrome oxidase I and II genes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Frank N; Tooley, Paul W

    2003-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of 51 isolates representing 27 species of Phytophthora were assessed by sequence alignment of 568 bp of the mitochondrially encoded cytochrome oxidase II gene. A total of 1299 bp of the cytochrome oxidase I gene also were examined for a subset of 13 species. The cox II gene trees constructed by a heuristic search, based on maximum parsimony for a bootstrap 50% majority-rule consensus tree, revealed 18 species grouping into seven clades and nine species unaffiliated with a specific clade. The phylogenetic relationships among species observed on cox II gene trees did not exhibit consistent similarities in groupings for morphology, pathogenicity, host range or temperature optima. The topology of cox I gene trees, constructed by a heuristic search based on maximum parsimony for a bootstrap 50% majority-rule consensus tree for 13 species of Phytophthora, revealed 10 species grouping into three clades and three species unaffiliated with a specific clade. The groupings in general agreed with what was observed in the cox II tree. Species relationships observed for the cox II gene tree were in agreement with those based on ITS regions, with several notable exceptions. Some of these differences were noted in species in which the same isolates were used for both ITS and cox II analysis, suggesting either a differential rate of evolutionary divergence for these two regions or incorrect assumptions about alignment of ITS sequences. Analysis of combined data sets of ITS and cox II sequences generated a tree that did not differ substantially from analysis of ITS data alone, however, the results of a partition homogeneity test suggest that combining data sets may not be valid.

  13. 32 CFR 552.171 - Compatible use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Compatible use. 552.171 Section 552.171 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  14. 32 CFR 552.171 - Compatible use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Compatible use. 552.171 Section 552.171 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  15. 32 CFR 552.171 - Compatible use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compatible use. 552.171 Section 552.171 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  16. Catholic Educator Perceptions about Brain Compatible Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenen, Amie

    2009-01-01

    This document reports the findings of a doctoral project regarding the perceptions held by administrators and teachers of comprehensive Catholic schools in one Midwestern diocese. With the recent explosion of research in the area of the brain and brain compatible instruction it is valuable to know and understand the perceptions held by current…

  17. Compatibility Issues Affecting Information Systems and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, F. Wilfrid; Smith, Linda C.

    This UNISIST publication discusses issues related to the compatibility and standardization of bibliograpic records, index languages, software, hardware, and other information systems and services. Following an executive summary, definitions of terms, and other introductory material, existing information systems with common standards are briefly…

  18. Preparation of small bio-compatible microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Small, round, bio-compatible microspheres capable of covalently bonding proteins and having a uniform diameter below about 3500 A are prepared by substantially instantaneously initiating polymerization of an aqueous emulsion containing no more than 35% total monomer including an acrylic monomer substituted with a covalently bondable group such a hydroxyl, amino or carboxyl and a minor amount of a cross-linking agent.

  19. 9 CFR 3.7 - Compatible grouping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.7 Compatible grouping. Dogs and cats that are housed...; (b) Any dog or cat exhibiting a vicious or overly aggressive disposition must be housed separately... adult dogs or cats other than their dams or foster dams, except when permanently maintained in...

  20. 9 CFR 3.7 - Compatible grouping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.7 Compatible grouping. Dogs and cats that are housed...; (b) Any dog or cat exhibiting a vicious or overly aggressive disposition must be housed separately... adult dogs or cats other than their dams or foster dams, except when permanently maintained in...

  1. 9 CFR 3.7 - Compatible grouping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.7 Compatible grouping. Dogs and cats that are housed...; (b) Any dog or cat exhibiting a vicious or overly aggressive disposition must be housed separately... adult dogs or cats other than their dams or foster dams, except when permanently maintained in...

  2. 9 CFR 3.7 - Compatible grouping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.7 Compatible grouping. Dogs and cats that are housed...; (b) Any dog or cat exhibiting a vicious or overly aggressive disposition must be housed separately... adult dogs or cats other than their dams or foster dams, except when permanently maintained in...

  3. 9 CFR 3.7 - Compatible grouping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.7 Compatible grouping. Dogs and cats that are housed...; (b) Any dog or cat exhibiting a vicious or overly aggressive disposition must be housed separately... adult dogs or cats other than their dams or foster dams, except when permanently maintained in...

  4. Composite laminate free-edge reinforcement with U-shaped caps. I - Stress analysis. II - Theoretical-experimental correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. E.; Gossard, Terry, Jr.; Jones, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    The present generalized plane-strain FEM analysis for the prediction of interlaminar normal stress reduction when a U-shaped cap is bonded to the edge of a composite laminate gives attention to the highly variable transverse stresses near the free edge, cap length and thickness, and a gap under the cap due to the manufacturing process. The load-transfer mechanism between cap and laminate is found to be strain-compatibility, rather than shear lag. In the second part of this work, the three-dimensional composite material failure criteria are used in a progressive laminate failure analysis to predict failure loads of laminates with different edge-cap designs; symmetric 11-layer graphite-epoxy laminates with a one-layer cap of kevlar-epoxy are shown to carry 130-140 percent greater loading than uncapped laminates, under static tensile and tension-tension fatigue loading.

  5. Compatibility and Outgassing Studies for Directed Stockpile Work (FY05)

    SciTech Connect

    Alviso, C; Harvey, C; Vance, A

    2005-11-23

    Compatibility and outgassing studies of non-nuclear materials were carried out in support of the W80 Life Extension Program. These studies included small-scale laboratory experiments as well as participation in Sandia's Materials Aging and Compatibility test (MAC-1). Analysis of the outgassing signature of removable epoxy foam (REF) revealed unusually high levels of volatile organic compounds in the material. REF was replaced with the polyurethane PMDI. Laboratory compatibility tests of high priority materials were performed and revealed incompatibilities between Viton A (LX-07 binder) and syntactic polysulfide as well as Viton A and REF. With the removal of REF from the system, the incompatibility with Viton A is not an issue. In the case of the viton/polysulfide, both of these materials have a history of reliability in the stockpile, and the observed results, while scientifically interesting, appear to be a laboratory anomaly. Participation in the MAC-1 test led to a detailed study of Viton A degradation. At elevated temperatures up to 70 C, the Viton A samples darkened and exhibited increased crosslinking. Laboratory experiments were pursued to correlate the observed changes to exposure to specific compounds that were present in the MAC-1 canister atmospheres. Exposure to siloxanes resulted in changes similar to those seen in the MAC-1 samples. Knowledge gained from the MAC-1 test will be applied to the upcoming MAC-2 test planned for FY06. Finally, the suitability of isotopically labeled nitrogen fill gas ({sup 15}N{sub 2}) was addressed. This gas will behave as standard nitrogen with no compatibility concerns expected.

  6. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-02-23

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work a set of computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) has been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here the authors consider a severe lost of coolant accident (LOCA) producing simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the containment) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and containment building it self). Even though containment failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product release and transport. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 6 mSv (0.6 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  7. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility thermal hydraulic analysis for Title II design

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, E.R.

    1994-11-10

    The purpose of this work was to provide the thermal hydraulic analysis for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Title II design. Temperature distributions throughout the tank structure were calculated for subsequent use in the structural analysis and in the safety evaluation. Calculated temperatures of critical areas were compared to design allowables. Expected operating parameters were calculated for use in the ventilation system design and in the environmental impact documentation. The design requirements were obtained from the MWTF Functional Design Criteria (FDC). The most restrictive temperature limit given in the FDC is the 200 limit for the haunch and dome steel and concrete. The temperature limit for the rest of the primary and secondary tanks and concrete base mat and supporting pad is 250 F. Also, the waste should not be allowed to boil. The tank geometry was taken from ICF Kaiser Engineers Hanford drawing ES-W236A-Z1, Revision 1, included here in Appendix B. Heat removal rates by evaporation from the waste surface were obtained from experimental data. It is concluded that the MWTF tank cooling system will meet the design temperature limits for the design heat load of 700,000 Btu/h, even if cooling flow is lost to the annulus region, and temperatures change very slowly during transients due to the high heat capacity of the tank structure and the waste. Accordingly, transients will not be a significant operational problem from the viewpoint of meeting the specified temperature limits.

  8. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure . Part II; Severe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a finite element analysis and the testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part II of the paper considers the final test to failure of the test article in the presence of an intentionally inflicted severe discrete source damage under the wing up-bending loading condition. Finite element analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during the test and demonstrate that the hybrid wing body test article was able to redistribute and support the required design loads in a severely damaged condition.

  9. Sequence analysis of the MHC class II DPB1 gene in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Bak, E-J; Ishii, Y; Omatsu, T; Kyuwa, S; Hayasaka, I; Yoshikawa, Y

    2005-06-01

    The diversity of the MHC class II region in non-human primates is a focus of biomedical research because this region plays a crucial role in the recognition of antigens in the immune system. In particular, the chimpanzee [Pan troglodytes (Patr)], which belongs to the superfamily Hominoidea, has been used as a human model for the study of diseases such as human hepatitis C virus (HCV), human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, to which only humans and chimpanzees are susceptible. In the present study, polymorphisms of the MHC-DPB1 gene (Patr-DPB1) in a chimpanzee colony in Japan were examined using a stepwise polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. In order to design a suitable primer pair which would amplify exon 2 of the Patr-DPB1 gene, a fragment of approximately 8 kb from exon 1 to exon 3 was amplified from chimpanzee genomic DNA. After designing a 500-bp primer pair at the 3' region of intron 1 and the 5' region of intron 2, analysis of DPB1 exon 2 alleles of each chimpanzee was carried out. Twenty-two chimpanzees were used in our study, and we identified seven alleles by sequence analysis on the Patr-DPB1 gene, including one new allele. The obtained nucleotide sequence patterns suggest that Patr-DPB1 alleles emerge by genetic variations such as the exchange of sequence motifs and the accumulation of point mutations.

  10. America in World War II: An Analysis of History Textbooks from England, Japan, Sweden, and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Stuart; Nicholls, Jason

    2005-01-01

    This study examined how textbooks from England, Japan, Sweden, and the United States portray America's role in World War II. Analysis of the central story lines revealed that historical information purveyed to students in different nations varies considerably. Accordingly, U.S. textbooks emphasize the significant and pre-eminent role that the…

  11. Sequence analysis of bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II mRNA from ascitic and nonascitic commercial broilers.

    PubMed

    Cisar, C R; Balog, J M; Anthony, N B; Donoghue, A M

    2003-10-01

    Ascites syndrome, also known as pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS), is a common metabolic disorder in rapidly growing meat-type chickens. Environmental factors, such as cold, altitude, and diet, play significant roles in development of the disease, but there is also an important genetic component to PHS susceptibility. The human disease familial primary pulmonary hypertension (FPPH) is similar to PHS in broilers both genetically and physiologically. Several recent studies have shown that mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPR2) gene are a cause of FPPH in humans. To determine whether mutations in the chicken BMPR2 gene play a similar role in PHS susceptibility, BMPR-II mRNA from ascitic and nonascitic commercial broilers were sequenced and compared with the published Leghorn chicken BMPR-II mRNA sequence. Fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified in the commercial broiler BMPR-II mRNA. No mutations unique to ascites-susceptible broilers were present in the coding, 5' untranslated or 3' untranslated regions of BMPR-II mRNA. The twelve SNP present within the coding region of BMPR-II mRNA were synonymous substitutions and did not alter the BMPR-II protein sequence. In addition, analysis of BMPR2 gene expression by reverse transcriptase-PCR indicated that there were no differences in BMPR-II mRNA levels in ascitic and nonascitic birds. Therefore, it appears unlikely that mutations in the BMPR2 gene were responsible for susceptibility to PHS in these commercial broilers.

  12. Actuator Trade-Off Analysis for DARPA/BOSS Prototype II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-13

    Servomotors Advantages: • Well understood, mature technology • Simple to control – they generally respond to pulse-width-modulated ( PWM ) signals that are...easy to generate and require little in the way of electronics. UAVs are already set up to produce compatible PWM control signals and interface...requirements for our application. The key DRs that constrain our actuator choice are the blocked force and displacement. A plot was generated (FIG. 1

  13. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meloy, Thomas P.; Marshall, John; Hecht, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) will evaluate the Martian environment for soil and dust-related hazards to human exploration as part of the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. Sponsored by the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise, MECA's goal is to evaluate potential geochemical and environmental hazards that may confront future martian explorers, and to guide HEDS scientists in the development of high fidelity Mars soil simulants. In addition to objectives related to human exploration, the MECA data set will be rich in information relevant to basic geology, paleoclimate, and exobiology issues. The integrated MECA payload contains a wet-chemistry laboratory, a microscopy station, an electrometer to characterize the electrostatics of the soil and its environment, and arrays of material patches to study the abrasive and adhesive properties of soil grains. MECA is allocated a mass of 10 kg and a peak power usage of 15 W within an enclosure of 35 x 25 x 15 cm (figures I and 2). The Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) consists of four identical cells that will accept samples from surface and subsurface regions accessible to the Lander's robotic arm, mix them with water, and perform extensive analysis of the solution. Using an array of ion-specific electrodes (ISEs), cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical techniques, the chemistry cells will wet soil samples for measurement of basic soil properties of pH, redox potential, and conductivity. Total dissolved material, as well as targeted ions will be detected to the ppm level, including important exobiological ions such as Na, K+, Ca++, Mg++, NH4+, Cl, S04-, HC03, as well as more toxic ions such as Cu++, Pb++, Cd++, Hg++, and C104-. MECA's microscopy station combines optical and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) to image dust and soil particles from millimeters to nanometers in size. Illumination by red, green, and blue LEDs is augmented by an ultraviolet LED intended to excite

  14. Anthropological analysis of Koreans using HLA class II diversity among East Asians.

    PubMed

    Yang, J H; Sohn, Y-H; Ko, S-Y; Choi, S-E; Kim, M H; Oh, H-B

    2010-10-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) are useful markers for anthropological investigations because the allele and haplotype distributions at these loci vary widely among ethnic groups. HLA frequencies in Koreans, however, have not previously been analyzed on a phylogenetic basis. We determined the allele frequencies of four HLA class II (HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, and -DPB1) loci in 149 unrelated Korean individuals using a sequence-based typing method. A total of 29 HLA-DRB1, 17 HLA-DQA1, 16 HLA-DQB1, and 15 HLA-DPB1 alleles were identified. The most common allele at each locus was DRB1*0901, DQA1*0102, DQB1*0301, and DPB1*0501, respectively. Four-locus allelic association analysis showed the existence of 25 DRB1-DQA1-DQB1-DPB1 haplotypes with a frequency greater than 0.010. A dataset comprising ethnicity-specific information from published literature and the dbMHC database, as well as the allele frequencies determined in this study, was subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The analysis showed that Koreans are most closely related to Japanese and Han Chinese from Shandong province. Correspondence analyses showed that the current Korean population is located in a position intermediate between the northern and southern East Asian groups, supporting the theory of a bi- and/or multidirectional route of migration of early Korean settlers. This report can be used for anthropological studies, and may also be of use in the International Hematopoietic Stem Cell Sharing program.

  15. POWTEX Neutron Diffractometer at FRM II - New Perspectives for In-Situ Rock Deformation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, J. M.; Stipp, M.; Ullemeyer, K.; Klein, H.; Leiss, B.; Hansen, B. T.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2012-04-01

    In Geoscience quantitative texture analysis here defined as the quantitative analysis of the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), is a common tool for the investigation of fabric development in mono- and polyphase rocks, their deformation histories and kinematics. Bulk texture measurements also allow the quantitative characterisation of the anisotropic physical properties of rock materials. A routine tool to measure bulk sample volumes is neutron texture diffraction, as neutrons have large penetration capabilities of several cm in geological sample materials. The new POWTEX (POWder and TEXture) Diffractometer at the neutron research reactor FRM II in Garching, Germany is designed as a high-intensity diffractometer by groups from the RWTH Aachen, Forschungszentrum Jülich and the University of Göttingen. Complementary to existing neutron diffractometers (SKAT at Dubna, Russia; GEM at ISIS, UK; HIPPO at Los Alamos, USA; D20 at ILL, France; and the local STRESS-SPEC and SPODI at FRM II) the layout of POWTEX is focused on fast time-resolved experiments and the measurement of larger sample series as necessary for the study of large scale geological structures. POWTEX is a dedicated beam line for geoscientific research. Effective texture measurements without sample tilting and rotation are possible firstly by utilizing a range of neutron wavelengths simultaneously (Time-of-Flight technique) and secondly by the high detector coverage (9.8 sr) and a high flux (~1 - 107 n/cm2s) at the sample. Furthermore the instrument and the angular detector resolution is designed also for strong recrystallisation textures as well as for weak textures of polyphase rocks. These instrument characteristics allow in-situ time-resolved texture measurements during deformation experiments on rocksalt, ice and other materials as large sample environments will be implemented at POWTEX. The in-situ deformation apparatus is operated by a uniaxial spindle drive with a maximum axial load of

  16. SERVER DEVELOPMENT FOR NSLS-II PHYSICS APPLICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Kraimer, M.

    2011-03-28

    The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. The server software under development is available via an open source sourceforge project named epics-pvdata, which consists of modules pvData, pvAccess, pvIOC, and pvService. Examples of two services that already exist in the pvService module are itemFinder, and gather. Each service uses pvData to store in-memory transient data, pvService to transfer data over the network, and pvIOC as the service engine. The performance benchmarking for pvAccess and both gather service and item finder service are presented in this paper. The performance comparison between pvAccess and Channel Access are presented also. For an ultra low emittance synchrotron radiation light source like NSLS II, the control system requirements, especially for beam control are tight. To control and manipulate the beam effectively, a use case study has been performed to satisfy the requirement and theoretical evaluation has been performed. The analysis shows that model based control is indispensable for beam commissioning and routine operation. However, there are many challenges such as how to re-use a design model for on-line model based control, and how to combine the numerical methods for modeling of a realistic lattice with the analytical techniques for analysis of its properties. To satisfy the requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture for the software framework for beam commissioning and operation is critical. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating and plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service

  17. Quantitative proteome analysis of barley seeds using ruthenium(II)-tris-(bathophenanthroline-disulphonate) staining.

    PubMed

    Witzel, Katja; Surabhi, Giridara-Kumar; Jyothsnakumari, Gottimukkala; Sudhakar, Chinta; Matros, Andrea; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes the application of the recently introduced fluorescence stain Ruthenium(II)-tris-(bathophenanthroline-disulphonate) (RuBP) on a comparative proteome analysis of two phenotypically different barley lines. We carried out an analysis of protein patterns from 2-D gels of the parental lines of the Oregon Wolfe Barley mapping population DOM and REC and stained with either the conventional colloidal Coomassie Brilliant Blue (cCBB) or with the novel RuBP solution. We wished to experimentally verify the usefulness of such a stain in evaluating the complex pattern of a seed proteome, in comparison to the previously used cCBB staining technique. To validate the efficiency of visualization by both stains, we first compared the overall number of detected protein spots. On average, 790 spots were visible by cCBB staining and 1200 spots by RuBP staining. Then, the intensity of a set of spots was assessed, and changes in relative abundance were determined using image analysis software. As expected, staining with RuBP performed better in quantitation in terms of sensitivity and dynamic range. Furthermore, spots from a cultivar-specific region in the protein map were chosen for identification to asses the gain of biological information due to the staining procedure. From this particular region, eight spots were visualized exclusively by RuBP and identification was successful for all spots, proving the ability to identify even very low abundant proteins. Performance in MS analysis was comparable for both protein stains. Proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF MS peptide mass fingerprinting. This approach was not successful for all spots, due to the restricted entry number for barley in the database. Therefore, we subsequently used LC-ESI-Q-TOF MS/MS and de novo sequencing for identification. Because only an insufficient number of proteins from barley is annotated, an EST-based identification strategy was chosen for our experiment. We wished to test whether under

  18. New Gateway-compatible vectors for a high-throughput protein-protein interaction analysis by a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay in plants and their application to a plant clathrin structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kohji; Ishikawa, Syouta; Matsunami, Erika; Yamauchi, Junji; Homma, Keiichi; Faulkner, Christine; Oparka, Karl; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Nagaya, Tsutomu; Yokota, Kazushige; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play key roles in various biological processes. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay is an excellent tool for routine PPI analyses in living cells. We developed new Gateway vectors for a high-throughput BiFC analysis of plants, adopting a monomeric Venus split just after the tenth β-strand, and analyzed the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana coated vesicle coatmers, the clathrin heavy chain (CHC), and the clathrin light chain (CLC). In competitive BiFC tests, CLC interacted with CHC through a coiled-coil motif in the middle section of CLC. R1340, R1448, and K1512 in CHC and W94 in CLC are potentially key amino acids underlying the inter-chain interaction, consistent with analyses based on homology modeling. Our Gateway BiFC system, the V10-BiFC system, provides a useful tool for a PPI analysis in living plant cells. The CLC-CHC interaction identified may facilitate clathrin triskelion assembly needed for cage formation.

  19. Compatible embedding for 2D shape animation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, William V; Barla, Pascal; Anjyo, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We present new algorithms for the compatible embedding of 2D shapes. Such embeddings offer a convenient way to interpolate shapes having complex, detailed features. Compared to existing techniques, our approach requires less user input, and is faster, more robust, and simpler to implement, making it ideal for interactive use in practical applications. Our new approach consists of three parts. First, our boundary matching algorithm locates salient features using the perceptually motivated principles of scale-space and uses these as automatic correspondences to guide an elastic curve matching algorithm. Second, we simplify boundaries while maintaining their parametric correspondence and the embedding of the original shapes. Finally, we extend the mapping to shapes' interiors via a new compatible triangulation algorithm. The combination of our algorithms allows us to demonstrate 2D shape interpolation with instant feedback. The proposed algorithms exhibit a combination of simplicity, speed, and accuracy that has not been achieved in previous work.

  20. Coating for components requiring hydrogen peroxide compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yousefiani, Ali (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a heretofore-unknown use for zirconium nitride as a hydrogen peroxide compatible protective coating that was discovered to be useful to protect components that catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide or corrode when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. A zirconium nitride coating of the invention may be applied to a variety of substrates (e.g., metals) using art-recognized techniques, such as plasma vapor deposition. The present invention further provides components and articles of manufacture having hydrogen peroxide compatibility, particularly components for use in aerospace and industrial manufacturing applications. The zirconium nitride barrier coating of the invention provides protection from corrosion by reaction with hydrogen peroxide, as well as prevention of hydrogen peroxide decomposition.

  1. High-voltage-compatible, fully depleted CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Stephen E.; Bebek, Chris J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Emes, JohnE.; Fabricius, Max H.; Fairfield, Jessaym A.; Groom, Don E.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, William F.; Palaio, Nick P.; Roe, Natalie A.; Wang, Guobin

    2006-05-15

    We describe charge-coupled device (CCD) developmentactivities at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).Back-illuminated CCDs fabricated on 200-300 mu m thick, fully depleted,high-resistivity silicon substrates are produced in partnership with acommercial CCD foundry.The CCDs are fully depleted by the application ofa substrate bias voltage. Spatial resolution considerations requireoperation of thick, fully depleted CCDs at high substrate bias voltages.We have developed CCDs that are compatible with substrate bias voltagesof at least 200V. This improves spatial resolution for a given thickness,and allows for full depletion of thicker CCDs than previously considered.We have demonstrated full depletion of 650-675 mu m thick CCDs, withpotential applications in direct x-ray detection. In this work we discussthe issues related to high-voltage operation of fully depleted CCDs, aswell as experimental results on high-voltage-compatible CCDs.

  2. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT II) in liver transplant recipients: a retrospective multivariate analysis of prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Hüser, Norbert; Aßfalg, Volker; Reim, Daniel; Novotny, Alexander; Thorban, Stefan; Cheng, Zhangjun; Kornberg, Arno; Friess, Helmut; Büchler, Peter; Matevossian, Edouard

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the prevalence of HIT II in liver transplant recipients and analysed associated factors. In recipients with clinically suspected HIT II in the 4Ts pretest clinical scoring system HIPA-assay was performed. Next, 37 clinical variables were analysed retrospectively for their association with HIT II. Factors significantly correlated to our findings in univariate analysis were included in a multivariate model and binary logistic regression analysis. Among 46 recipients 21 patients were suspicious in the 4Ts pretest and 14 of them (30.4%) were diagnosed HIT-antibody positive. Patient's age (P = 0.001), postoperative dialysis (P = 0.028), and postoperative hospital stay (P = 0.035) were significantly associated with development of HIT-antibodies in univariate analysis. Postoperative dialysis and postoperative hospital stay turned out as epiphenomena of patient's age, the only independent predictor (P = 0.021). Using multiple χ(2) -testing, a cut-off could be calculated, assigning patients younger than 59 years to a low risk group and patients of 59 years and older to a high risk group. High incidence of peri-operative HIT II seroconversion in liver transplant recipients is not associated with factors known to induce thrombocyte activation, like blood products or cell-saver. Only patients' age was identified as independent predictor.

  3. Microwave spectrum compatibility in planetary research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmeth, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of solar system exploration, basic functions of the Deep Space Network (DSN), deep space microwave links, space research compatibility problems, and DSN's interference susceptibility. To maintain the operational integrity of competing radio systems using the microwave spectrum, the technology must extend to make possible the shared use of the spectral ranges without the ill effects of interferences. Suggestions are given which are only examples of many possible techniques that can eliminate or reduce interferences.

  4. Electromagnetic compatability 1982. Parts 1 & 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bem, D. J.; Moron, W.; Struzak, R. G.

    The origin, effect, measurement, and control of electromagnetic influences on biological and technological systems are discussed in reports and reviews. Subject areas addressed include electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and space technology, EMC theory and models, switching and discharge noise sources, antennas, EM fields and propagation, radio communication, immunity, wire communication, lightning, and EMC in power systems. Sections are also devoted to specific noise sources and filters, measurement technology, and EMC and biology.

  5. Survey - Monomethylhydrazine Propellant/Material Compatibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-01

    Alloys Martin Marietta (Refs.l0, 20) rated 1100-0, 2014- T6 , and 2219 -T87 compatible with MMH for 300 hours at 135’C, no corrosion or MMH decomposition...Ti, 6061- T6 Al. The aluminum alloys show no susceptibility. The order of decreasing stress corrosion cracking promotion for the fuels is hydrazine...decomposition of propellant and no noticeable corrosion of the metal surfaces. The metals were aluminum alloys 1100, 2014, 6061; corrosion -resistant steels

  6. Identification of Type II Interferon Receptors in Geese: Gene Structure, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Expression Patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Qi, Yulin; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) and IFNGR2 are two cell membrane molecules belonging to class II cytokines, which play important roles in the IFN-mediated antiviral signaling pathway. Here, goose IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were cloned and identified for the first time. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that relatively high levels of goose IFNγ mRNA transcripts were detected in immune tissues, including the harderian gland, cecal tonsil, cecum, and thymus. Relatively high expression levels of both IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were detected in the cecal tonsil, which implicated an important role of IFNγ in the secondary immune system of geese. No specific correlation between IFNγ, IFNGR1, and IFNGR2 expression levels was observed in the same tissues of healthy geese. IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed different expression profiles, although they appeared to maintain a relatively balanced state. Furthermore, the agonist R848 led to the upregulation of goose IFNγ but did not affect the expression of goose IFNGR1 or IFNGR2. In summary, trends in expression of goose IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed tissue specificity, as well as an age-related dependency. These findings may help us to better understand the age-related susceptibility to pathogens in birds.

  7. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

  8. Elastodynamic analysis of a gear pump. Part II: Meshing phenomena and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.; Rivola, A.

    2010-10-01

    A non-linear lumped kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps is presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machines. Two main sources of noise and vibration can be considered: pressure and gear meshing. Fluid pressure distribution on gears, which is time-varying, is computed and included as a resultant external force and torque acting on the gears. Parametric excitations due to time-varying meshing stiffness, the tooth profile errors (obtained by a metrological analysis), the backlash effects between meshing teeth, the lubricant squeeze and the possibility of tooth contact on both lines of action were also included. Finally, the torsional stiffness and damping of the driving shaft and the non-linear behaviour of the hydrodynamic journal bearings were also taken into account. Model validation was carried out on the basis of experimental data concerning case accelerations and force reactions. The model can be used in order to analyse the pump dynamic behaviour and to identify the effects of modifications in design and operation parameters, in terms of vibration and dynamic forces. Part I is devoted to the calculation of the gear eccentricity in the steady-state condition as result of the balancing between mean pressure loads, mean meshing force and bearing reactions, while in Part II the meshing phenomena are fully explained and the main simulation results are presented.

  9. SRC-II slurry preheater technical uncertainties. Report for the technical data analysis program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report reviews the performance, and draws conclusions therefrom, the coal slurry preheaters of the Ft. Lewis, Washington, Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Pilot Plant in the following areas: Coking, Erosion Corrosion, Heat transfer and pressure drop effects. Using prudent engineering judgement it postulates how such conclusions should affect the design and operability of large preheaters in future commercial scale plants. Also a recommendation is made for a small scale research and development effort that should result in a much firmer preheater design for any future facility. This report should be read in conjunction with the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Final Report, and volumes 1 and 2 of Slurry Preheater Design, SRC-II Process and also Ft. Lewis Slurry Preheater Data Analysis, 1-1/2 Inch Coil by Gulf Science and Technology Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co.'s background is based primarily on a racetrack shaped up-flow coil and these comments pertain specifically to a commercial heater of that type of design. 5 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  10. Final Analysis and Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Girard, T. A.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Ramos, A. R.; Marques, J. G.; Kling, A.; Puibasset, J.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Miley, H. S.; Payne, R. F.; Carvalho, F. P.; Prudêncio, M. I.; Gouveia, A.; Marques, R.

    2012-05-01

    We report the final results of the Phase II SIMPLE measurements, comprising two run stages of 15 superheated droplet detectors each, with the second stage including an improved neutron shielding. The analyses include a refined signal analysis, and revised nucleation efficiency based on a reanalysis of previously reported monochromatic neutron irradiations. The combined results yield a contour minimum of σp=5.7×10-3pb at 35GeV/c2 in the spin-dependent sector of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) proton interactions, the most restrictive to date for MW≤60GeV/c2 from a direct search experiment and overlapping, for the first time, with results previously obtained only indirectly. In the spin-independent sector, a minimum of 4.7×10-6pb at 35GeV/c2 is achieved, with the exclusion contour challenging a significant part of the light mass WIMP region of current interest.

  11. Update on the Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II): statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies had suggested that the outcome for patients with spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and no intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) might be improved with early evacuation of the haematoma. The Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) set out to establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients with spontaneous lobar ICH would improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It is an international, multi-centre, prospective randomised parallel group trial of early surgery in patients with spontaneous lobar ICH. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire. Results Recruitment to the study began on 27 November 2006 and closed on 15 August 2012 by which time 601 patients had been recruited. The protocol was published in Trials (http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/124/). This update presents the analysis plan for the study without reference to the unblinded data. The trial data will not be unblinded until after follow-up is completed in early 2013. The main trial results will be presented in spring 2013 with the aim to publish in a peer-reviewed journal at the same time. Conclusion The data from the trial will provide evidence on the benefits and risks of early surgery in patients with lobar ICH. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN22153967 PMID:23171588

  12. Area 3, SRC-II coal slurry preheater studies report for the technical data analysis program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    This report reviews the raw data gathered from the Preheater B test runs at Ft. Lewis, and also the Preheater B results presented in the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Process Final Report, Volumes 1 and 2 of Slurry Preheater Design, SRC-II Process and the Ft. Lewis Slurry Preheater Data Analysis, 1 1/2 Inch Coil by Gulf Science and Technology Corporation of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. attempts were made to correlate several variables not previously considered with slurry viscosity and thermal conductivity. Only partial success was realized. However, in the process of attempting to correlate these variables an understanding of why some variables could not be correlated was achieved. An attempt was also made, using multiple linear regression, to correlate coal slurry viscosity and thermal conductivity with several independent variables among which were temperature, coal concentration, total solids, coal type, slurry residence time, shear rate, and unit size. The final correlations included some, but not all, of these independent variables. This report is not a stand alone document and should be considered a supplement to work already done. It should be read in conjunction with the reports referenced above.

  13. Analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2) gene in giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca.

    PubMed

    Ling, S S; Zhu, Y; Lan, D; Li, D S; Pang, H Z; Wang, Y; Li, D Y; Wei, R P; Zhang, H M; Wang, C D; Hu, Y D

    2017-01-23

    The giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca (Ursidae), has a unique bamboo-based diet; however, this low-energy intake has been sufficient to maintain the metabolic processes of this species since the fourth ice age. As mitochondria are the main sites for energy metabolism in animals, the protein-coding genes involved in mitochondrial respiratory chains, particularly cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in electron transfer, could play an important role in giant panda metabolism. Therefore, the present study aimed to isolate, sequence, and analyze the COX2 DNA from individuals kept at the Giant Panda Protection and Research Center, China, and compare these sequences with those of the other Ursidae family members. Multiple sequence alignment showed that the COX2 gene had three point mutations that defined three haplotypes, with 60% of the sequences corresponding to haplotype I. The neutrality tests revealed that the COX2 gene was conserved throughout evolution, and the maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis, using homologous sequences from other Ursidae species, showed clustering of the COX2 sequences of giant pandas, suggesting that this gene evolved differently in them.

  14. A framework for biodynamic feedthrough analysis--part II: validation and application.

    PubMed

    Venrooij, Joost; van Paassen, Marinus M; Mulder, Mark; Abbink, David A; Mulder, Max; van der Helm, Frans C T; Bulthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-09-01

    Biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT) is a complex phenomenon, that has been studied for several decades. However, there is little consensus on how to approach the BDFT problem in terms of definitions, nomenclature, and mathematical descriptions. In this paper, the framework for BDFT analysis, as presented in Part I of this dual publication, is validated and applied. The goal of this framework is twofold. First of all, it provides some common ground between the seemingly large range of different approaches existing in BDFT literature. Secondly, the framework itself allows for gaining new insights into BDFT phenomena. Using recently obtained measurement data, parts of the framework that were not already addressed elsewhere, are validated. As an example of a practical application of the framework, it will be demonstrated how the effects of control device dynamics on BDFT can be understood and accurately predicted. Other ways of employing the framework are illustrated by interpreting the results of three selected studies from the literature using the BDFT framework. The presentation of the BDFT framework is divided into two parts. This paper, Part II, addresses the validation and application of the framework. Part I, which is also published in this journal issue, addresses the theoretical foundations of the framework. The work is presented in two separate papers to allow for a detailed discussion of both the framework's theoretical background and its validation.

  15. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    SciTech Connect

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  16. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Neil A.; Hudgins, Richard J.; McBain, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite liquid oxygen LO2 tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW), which is possible due to the 25%-40% reduction in weight that composite materials could provide over current aluminum technology. Although a composite LO2 tank makes these weight savings feasible, composite materials have not historically been viewed as "LO2 compatible." To be considered LO2 compatible, materials must be selected that will resist any type of detrimental, combustible reaction when exposed to usage environments. This is traditionally evaluated using a standard set of tests. However, materials that do not pass the standard tests can be shown to be safe for a particular application. This paper documents the approach and results of a joint NASA/Lockheed Martin program to select and verify LO2 compatible composite materials for liquid oxygen fuel tanks. The test approach developed included tests such as mechanical impact, particle impact, puncture, electrostatic discharge, friction, and pyrotechnic shock. These tests showed that composite liquid oxygen tanks are indeed feasible for future launch vehicles.

  17. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Justin A.; Naik, Gururaj V.; Baum, Brian K.; Dionne, Jennifer A.; Petach, Trevor A.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  18. An MR-compatible neonatal incubator

    PubMed Central

    Paley, M N J; Hart, A R; Lait, M; Griffiths, P D

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To develop a neonatal MR-compatible incubator for transporting babies between a neonatal intensive care unit and an MRI unit that is within the same hospital but geographically separate. Methods The system was strapped to a standard MR-compatible patient trolley, which provides space for resuscitation outside the incubator. A constant-temperature exothermic heat pad was used to maintain temperature together with a logging fluoro-optic temperature monitor and alarm system. The system has been designed to accommodate standard knee-sized coils from the major MR manufacturers. The original incubator was constructed from carbon fibre, but this required modification to prevent radiofrequency shading artefacts due to the conducting properties of the carbon fibre. A high-tensile polyester material was used, which combined light weight with high impact strength. The system could be moved onto the patient bed with the coils and infant in place by one technologist. Results Studies in eight neonatal patients produced high quality 1.5 T MR images with low motion artefacts. The incubator should also be compatible with imaging in 3 T MR systems, although further work is required to establish this. Images were acquired using both rapid and high-resolution sequences, including three-dimensional volumes, proton spectra and diffusion weighting. Conclusion The incubator provides a safe, quiet environment for neonates during transport and imaging, at low cost. PMID:22167517

  19. Structure and functional analysis of the IGF-II/IGF2R interaction

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James; Delaine, Carlie; Zaccheo, Oliver J; Siebold, Christian; Gilbert, Robert J; van Boxel, Gijs; Denley, Adam; Wallace, John C; Hassan, A Bassim; Forbes, Briony E; Jones, E Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic development and normal growth require exquisite control of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). In mammals the extracellular region of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor has gained an IGF-II-binding function and is termed type II IGF receptor (IGF2R). IGF2R sequesters IGF-II; imbalances occur in cancers and IGF2R is implicated in tumour suppression. We report crystal structures of IGF2R domains 11–12, 11–12–13–14 and domains 11–12–13/IGF-II complex. A distinctive juxtaposition of these domains provides the IGF-II-binding unit, with domain 11 directly interacting with IGF-II and domain 13 modulating binding site flexibility. Our complex shows that Phe19 and Leu53 of IGF-II lock into a hydrophobic pocket unique to domain 11 of mammalian IGF2Rs. Mutagenesis analyses confirm this IGF-II ‘binding-hotspot', revealing that IGF-binding proteins and IGF2R have converged on the same high-affinity site. PMID:18046459

  20. POWTEX Neutron Diffractometer at FRM II - New Perspectives in Rock Deformation and Recrystallisation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, J. M.; Stipp, M.; Ullemeyer, K.; Klein, H.; Leiss, B.; Hansen, B.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2011-12-01

    Neutron diffraction has become a routine method in Geoscience for the quantitative analysis of crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) and for (experimental) powder diffraction. Quantitative texture analysis is a common tool for the investigation of fabric development in mono- and polyphase rocks, their deformation histories and kinematics. Furthermore the quantitative characterization of anisotropic physical properties by bulk texture measurements can be achieved due to the high penetration capabilities of neutrons. To cope with increasing needs for beam time at neutron diffraction facilities with the corresponding technical characteristics and equipment, POWTEX (POWder and TEXture Diffractometer) is designed as a high-intensity diffractometer at the neutron research reactor FRM II in Garching, Germany by groups from the RWTH Aachen, Forschungszentrum Jülich and the University of Göttingen. Complementary to existing neutron diffractometers (SKAT at Dubna, Russia; GEM at ISIS, UK; HIPPO at Los Alamos, USA; D20 at ILL, France; and the local STRESS-SPEC and SPODI at FRM II) the layout of POWTEX is focused on fast (texture) measurements for either time-resolved experiments or the measurement of larger sample series as necessary for the study of large scale geological structures. By utilizing a range of neutron wavelengths simultaneously (TOF-technique), a high flux (~1 x 107 n/cm2s) and a high detector coverage ( 9.8 sr) effective texture measurements without sample tilting and rotation are possible. Furthermore the instrument and the angular detector resolution is sufficient for strong recrystallisation textures as well as weak textures of polyphase rocks. Thereby large sample environments will be implemented at POWTEX allowing in-situ time-resolved texture measurements during deformation experiments on rocksalt, ice and other materials. Furthermore a furnace for 3D-recrystallisation analysis of single grains will be realized complementary to the furnace

  1. Model based design and analysis of phase II HIV-1 trials.

    PubMed

    Rekić, Dinko; Röshammar, Daniel; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2013-08-01

    This work explores the advantages of a model based drug development (MBDD) approach for the design and analysis of antiretroviral phase II trials. Two different study settings were investigated: (1) a 5-arm placebo-controlled parallel group dose-finding/proof of concept (POC) study and (2) a comparison of investigational drug and competitor. Studies were simulated using a HIV-1 dynamics model in NONMEM. The Monte-Carlo Mapped Power method determined the sample size required for detecting a dose-response relationship and a significant difference in effect compared to the competitor using a MBDD approach. Stochastic simulation and re-estimation were used for evaluation of model parameter precision and bias given different sample sizes. Results were compared to those from an unpaired, two-sided t test and ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). In all scenarios, the MBDD approach resulted in smaller study sizes and more precisely estimated treatment effect than conventional statistical analysis. Using a MBDD approach, a sample size of 15 patients could be used to show POC and estimate ED50 with a good precision (relative standard error, 25.7 %). A sample size of 10 patients per arm was needed using the MBDD approach for detecting a difference in treatment effect of ≥20 % at 80 % power, a 3.4-fold reduction in sample size compared to a t test. The MBDD approach can be used to achieve more precise dose-response characterization facilitating decision making and dose selection. If necessitated, the sample size needed to reach a desired power can potentially be reduced compared to traditional statistical analyses. This may allow for comparison against competitors already in early clinical studies.

  2. Functional analysis of environmental DNA-derived type II polyketide synthases reveals structurally diverse secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhiyang; Kallifidas, Dimitris; Brady, Sean F.

    2011-01-01

    A single gram of soil is predicted to contain thousands of unique bacterial species. The majority of these species remain recalcitrant to standard culture methods, prohibiting their use as sources of unique bioactive small molecules. The cloning and analysis of DNA extracted directly from environmental samples (environmental DNA, eDNA) provides a means of exploring the biosynthetic capacity of natural bacterial populations. Environmental DNA libraries contain large reservoirs of bacterial genetic diversity from which new secondary metabolite gene clusters can be systematically recovered and studied. The identification and heterologous expression of type II polyketide synthase-containing eDNA clones is reported here. Functional analysis of three soil DNA-derived polyketide synthase systems in Streptomyces albus revealed diverse metabolites belonging to well-known, rare, and previously uncharacterized structural families. The first of these systems is predicted to encode the production of the known antibiotic landomycin E. The second was found to encode the production of a metabolite with a previously uncharacterized pentacyclic ring system. The third was found to encode the production of unique KB-3346-5 derivatives, which show activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis. These results, together with those of other small-molecule-directed metagenomic studies, suggest that culture-independent approaches are capable of accessing biosynthetic diversity that has not yet been extensively explored using culture-based methods. The large-scale functional screening of eDNA clones should be a productive strategy for generating structurally previously uncharacterized chemical entities for use in future drug development efforts. PMID:21768346

  3. Water/sand flooded and immersed critical experiment and analysis performed in support of the TOPAZ-II safety program

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, E.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Bubelev, V.G.; Garin, V.P.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompanietz, G.V.; Krutov, A.M.; Lobynstev, V.A.; Maiorov, L.V.; Polyakov, D.N.; Chunyaev, E.I.; Marshall, A.C.; Sapir, J.L.; Pelowitz, D.B.

    1995-01-20

    Presented is a brief description of the Narciss-M2 critical assemblies, which simulate accidental water/wet-sand immersion of the TOPAZ-II reactor as well as water-flooding of core cavities. Experimental results obtained from these critical assemblies, including experiments with several fuel elements removed from the core, are shown. These configurations with several extracted fuel elements simulate a proposed fuel-out anticriticality-device modification to the TOPAZ-II reactor. Preliminary computational analysis of these experiments using the Monte Carlo neutron-transport method is outlined. Nuclear criticality safety of the TOPAZ-II reactor with an incorporated anticriticality unit is demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  4. X-Ray Crystallographic Analysis, EPR Studies, and Computational Calculations of a Cu(II) Tetramic Acid Complex

    PubMed Central

    Matiadis, Dimitrios; Tsironis, Dimitrios; Stefanou, Valentina; Igglessi–Markopoulou, Olga; McKee, Vickie; Sanakis, Yiannis; Lazarou, Katerina N.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present a structural and spectroscopic analysis of a copper(II) N-acetyl-5-arylidene tetramic acid by using both experimental and computational techniques. The crystal structure of the Cu(II) complex was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction and shows that the copper ion lies on a centre of symmetry, with each ligand ion coordinated to two copper ions, forming a 2D sheet. Moreover, the EPR spectroscopic properties of the Cu(II) tetramic acid complex were also explored and discussed. Finally, a computational approach was performed in order to obtain a detailed and precise insight of product structures and properties. It is hoped that this study can enrich the field of functional supramolecular systems, giving place to the formation of coordination-driven self-assembly architectures. PMID:28316540

  5. Mass spectrometry analysis and quantitation of peptides presented on the MHC II molecules of mouse spleen dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozzacco, Leonia; Yu, Haiqiang; Zebroski, Henry A.; Dengjel, Jörn; Deng, Haiteng; Mojsov, Svetlana; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules are expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells and display short bound peptide fragments derived from self and nonself antigens. These peptide-MHC complexes function to maintain immunological tolerance in the case of self antigens and initiate the CD4+ T cell response in the case of foreign proteins. Here we report the application of LC-MS/MS analysis to identify MHC II peptides derived from endogenous proteins expressed in freshly isolated murine splenic DCs. The cell number was enriched in vivo upon treatment with Flt3L-B16 melanoma cells. In a typical experiment, starting with about 5× 108 splenic DCs, we were able to reliably identify a repertoire of over 100 MHC II peptides originating from about 55 proteins localized in membrane (23%), intracellular (26%), endo-lysosomal (12%), nuclear (14%) and extracellular (25%) compartments. Using synthetic isotopically labeled peptides corresponding to the sequences of representative bound MHC II peptides, we quantified by LC-MS relative peptide abundance. In a single experiment, peptides were detected in a wide concentration range spanning from 2.5 fmol/μL to 12 pmol/μL or from approximately 13 copies to 2×105 copies per DC. These peptides were found in similar amounts on B cells where we detected about 80 peptides originating from 55 proteins distributed homogenously within the same cellular compartments as in DCs. About 90 different binding motifs predicted by the epitope prediction algorithm were found within the sequences of the identified MHC II peptides. These results set a foundation for future studies to quantitatively investigate the MHC II repertoire on DCs generated under different immunization conditions. PMID:21913724

  6. Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage II Right- and Left-Sided Colon Cancer: Analysis of SEER-Medicare Data

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jennifer M.; Schumacher, Jessica; Allen, Glenn O.; Neuman, Heather; Lange, Erin O’Connor; LoConte, Noelle K.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Smith, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Survival benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy is established for stage III colon cancer; however, uncertainty exists for stage II patients. Tumor heterogeneity, specifically microsatellite instability (MSI) which is more common in right-sided cancers, may be the reason for this observation. We examined the relationship between adjuvant chemotherapy and overall 5-year mortality for stage II colon cancer by location (right- versus left-side) as a surrogate for MSI. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data, we identified Medicare beneficiaries from 1992 to 2005 with AJCC stage II (n=23,578) and III (n=17,148) primary adenocarcinoma of the colon who underwent surgery for curative intent. Overall 5-year mortality was examined with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression with propensity score weighting. Results Eighteen percent (n=2,941) of stage II patients with right-sided cancer and 22% (n=1,693) with left-sided cancer received adjuvant chemotherapy. After adjustment, overall 5-year survival benefit from chemotherapy was observed only for stage III patients (right-sided: HR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.59–0.68, p<0.001 and left-sided: HR 0.61; 95% CI, 0.56–0.68, p<0.001). No survival benefit was observed for stage II patients with either right-sided (HR 0.97; 95% CI, 0.87–1.09, p=0.64) or left-sided cancer (HR 0.97; 95% CI, 0.84–1.12, p=0.68). Conclusions Among Medicare patients with stage II colon cancer, a substantial number receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy did not improve overall 5-year survival for either right- or left-sided colon cancers. Our results reinforce existing guidelines and should be considered in treatment algorithms for older adults with stage II colon cancer. PMID:24643898

  7. Analysis of TOPAZ II and SPACE-R space nuclear power plants using a modified thermionic model

    SciTech Connect

    Habedank, O.D.

    1993-03-01

    Models based on the TDS thermionic diode model were developed for the TOPAZ II and SPACE-R nuclear power systems. Due to computer code limitations inherent in the TDS model, only the TOPAZ II system model ran successfully. Several parameter studies were conducted on the TOPAZ II model. These studies determined system performance and efficiency while varying the following: (1) the coolant flow inlet temperatures; (2) the rate of coolant temperature change; (3) the power profile of the core; and (4) the cesium reservoir temperature. Analysis of the results indicate that the model accurately represented the TOPAZ II system, underestimating published data by 10%. Coolant flow parameter studies indicate that raising coolant flow temperatures up to 100 K higher increases system power by put to 5%. Additional increases in temperature result in gradual performance degradation. Varying the axial power profile of the core from the actual peaked profile to a flat profile results in a negligible 0.3% change in total system performance. The peaked profile used in TOPAZ II produces the highest system efficiency of all the profiles modeled. The cesium pressure study indicates that the system is operating above optimum cesium pressure and that system performance is strongly dependent on cesium pressure. Increasing cesium reservoir temperature above design temperature by 30 K decreases system efficiency by 30%.

  8. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-05-01

    Two different mutations were found in two unrelated probands with lethal chondrodysplasias, one with achondrogenesis type II and the other with the less severe phenotype of hypochondrogenesis. The mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA followed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing and restriction site analysis. The proband with achondrogenesis type II had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted aspartate for glycine at position 310 of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II procollagen. The proband with hypochondrogenesis had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted serine for glycine at position 805. Type II collagen extracted from cartilage from the probands demonstrated the presence of type I collagen and a delayed electrophoretic mobility, indicating post-translational overmodifications. Analysis of CNBr peptides showed that, in proband 1, the entire peptides were overmodified. Examination of chondrocytes cultured in agarose or alginate indicated that there was a delayed secretion of type II procollagen. In addition, type II collagen synthesized by cartilage fragments from the probands demonstrated a decreased thermal stability. The melting temperature of the type II collagen containing the aspartate-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 4 degrees C, and that of the collagen containing the serine-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 2 degrees C. Electron microscopy of the extracellular matrix from the chondrocyte cultures showed a decreased density of matrix and the presence of unusually short and thin fibrils. Our results indicate that glycine substitutions in the N-terminal region of the type II collagen molecule can produce more severe phenotypes than mutations in the C-terminal region. The aspartate-for-glycine substitution at position 310, which was associated with defective secretion and a probable increased degradation of collagen, is the most destabilizing

  9. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-01-01

    Two different mutations were found in two unrelated probands with lethal chondrodysplasias, one with achondrogenesis type II and the other with the less severe phenotype of hypochondrogenesis. The mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA followed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing and restriction site analysis. The proband with achondrogenesis type II had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted aspartate for glycine at position 310 of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II procollagen. The proband with hypochondrogenesis had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted serine for glycine at position 805. Type II collagen extracted from cartilage from the probands demonstrated the presence of type I collagen and a delayed electrophoretic mobility, indicating post-translational overmodifications. Analysis of CNBr peptides showed that, in proband 1, the entire peptides were overmodified. Examination of chondrocytes cultured in agarose or alginate indicated that there was a delayed secretion of type II procollagen. In addition, type II collagen synthesized by cartilage fragments from the probands demonstrated a decreased thermal stability. The melting temperature of the type II collagen containing the aspartate-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 4 degrees C, and that of the collagen containing the serine-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 2 degrees C. Electron microscopy of the extracellular matrix from the chondrocyte cultures showed a decreased density of matrix and the presence of unusually short and thin fibrils. Our results indicate that glycine substitutions in the N-terminal region of the type II collagen molecule can produce more severe phenotypes than mutations in the C-terminal region. The aspartate-for-glycine substitution at position 310, which was associated with defective secretion and a probable increased degradation of collagen, is the most destabilizing

  10. Tubal sterilization and breast cancer incidence: results from the cancer prevention study II nutrition cohort and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Mia M; Patel, Alpa V; Sun, Juzhong; Teras, Lauren R; Gapstur, Susan M

    2013-03-15

    Tubal sterilization is a common form of contraception in the United States and is hypothesized to be associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. However, prior observational studies have reported inconsistent results. We investigated the association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk among 77,249 postmenopausal, cancer-free women in the Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II) Nutrition Cohort, enrolled in 21 states in the United States during 1992-1993. During 15 years of follow-up through June 30, 2007, 4,084 invasive breast cancer cases were diagnosed. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. A meta-analysis including the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort results with other published results from 4 case-control studies and 3 prospective studies was conducted to provide a summary estimate for the association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk. In the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort, tubal sterilization was not associated with breast cancer incidence (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.08, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.20). Associations stratified by year of tubal sterilization, age, and time since surgery were also null. The meta-analysis also found no association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk (odds ratio = 0.97, 95% confidence interval: 0.84, 1.09). Tubal sterilization does not appear to be associated with breast cancer risk.

  11. Preliminary results of the analysis of CaII K spectroheliograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kariyappa, R.; Pap, Judit M.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Kuhn, Jeff R.

    1995-01-01

    The preliminary results of the photometry of CaII K spectroheliograms are presented. From the spectrograms for 1992, plages, the magnetic network, intranetwork elements and the chromospheric background were separated using the histogram method. The intensity and area of these separated features, as well as the full disk intensity, were derived. The spatial K index was compared to the spectral CaII K index derived from line profiles. It was found that the spatial K index and intensity of plages, the network elements and the intranetwork and background regions were highly correlated with the MgII h and k c/w ratio.

  12. Development of hazard-compatible building fragility and vulnerability models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karaca, E.; Luco, N.

    2008-01-01

    We present a methodology for transforming the structural and non-structural fragility functions in HAZUS into a format that is compatible with conventional seismic hazard analysis information. The methodology makes use of the building capacity (or pushover) curves and related building parameters provided in HAZUS. Instead of the capacity spectrum method applied in HAZUS, building response is estimated by inelastic response history analysis of corresponding single-degree-of-freedom systems under a large number of earthquake records. Statistics of the building response are used with the damage state definitions from HAZUS to derive fragility models conditioned on spectral acceleration values. Using the developed fragility models for structural and nonstructural building components, with corresponding damage state loss ratios from HAZUS, we also derive building vulnerability models relating spectral acceleration to repair costs. Whereas in HAZUS the structural and nonstructural damage states are treated as if they are independent, our vulnerability models are derived assuming "complete" nonstructural damage whenever the structural damage state is complete. We show the effects of considering this dependence on the final vulnerability models. The use of spectral acceleration (at selected vibration periods) as the ground motion intensity parameter, coupled with the careful treatment of uncertainty, makes the new fragility and vulnerability models compatible with conventional seismic hazard curves and hence useful for extensions to probabilistic damage and loss assessment.

  13. An Evaluation of Blood Compatibility of Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Lai, Wenjia; Cui, Menghua; Liang, Ling; Lin, Yuchen; Fang, Qiaojun; Liu, Ying; Xie, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have tremendous potentials in medical devices due to their excellent antimicrobial properties. Blood compatibility should be investigated for AgNPs due to the potential blood contact. However, so far, most studies are not systematic and have not provided insights into the mechanisms for blood compatibility of AgNPs. In this study, we have investigated the blood biological effects, including hemolysis, lymphocyte proliferation, platelet aggregation, coagulation and complement activation, of 20 nm AgNPs with two different surface coatings (polyvinyl pyrrolidone and citrate). Our results have revealed AgNPs could elicit hemolysis and severely impact the proliferation and viability of lymphocytes at all investigated concentrations (10, 20, 40 μg/mL). Nevertheless, AgNPs didn’t show any effect on platelet aggregation, coagulation process, or complement activation at up to ~40 μg/mL. Proteomic analysis on AgNPs plasma proteins corona has revealed that acidic and small molecular weight blood plasma proteins were preferentially adsorbed onto AgNPs, and these include some important proteins relevant to hemostasis, coagulation, platelet, complement activation and immune responses. The predicted biological effects of AgNPs by proteomic analysis are mostly consistent with our experimental data since there were few C3 components on AgNPs and more negative than positive factors involving platelet aggregation and thrombosis. PMID:27145858

  14. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum

    SciTech Connect

    Trincão, José; Sousa Silva, Marta; Barata, Lídia; Bonifácio, Cecília; Carvalho, Sandra; Tomás, Ana Maria; Ferreira, António E. N.; Cordeiro, Carlos; Ponces Freire, Ana; Romão, Maria João

    2006-08-01

    A glyoxalase II from L. infantum was cloned, purified and crystallized and its structure was solved by X-ray crystallography. In trypanosomatids, trypanothione replaces glutathione in all glutathione-dependent processes. Of the two enzymes involved in the glyoxalase pathway, glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II, the latter shows absolute specificity towards trypanothione thioester, making this enzyme an excellent model to understand the molecular basis of trypanothione binding. Cloned glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals belong to space group C222{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, b = 88.3, c = 85.2 Å) and diffract beyond 2.15 Å using synchrotron radiation. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the human glyoxalase II structure as a search model. These results, together with future detailed kinetic characterization using lactoyltrypanothione, should shed light on the evolutionary selection of trypanothione instead of glutathione by trypano-somatids.

  15. The Spear Horizon: First spatial analysis of the Schöningen site 13 II-4.

    PubMed

    Böhner, Utz; Serangeli, Jordi; Richter, Pascale

    2015-12-01

    The Spear Horizon (Schöningen 13 II-4) from Schöningen, Lower Saxony, Germany, is one of the most important archeological sites dating to the Middle Pleistocene. Until today, the numerous finds have only been published individually, often outside of their context. Here we present for the first time the distribution map of the Spear Horizon together with a spatial analysis of the different categories of remains (flint, bones, and woods). The finds are situated in a 10 m wide belt, which runs parallel to a former lakeshore. The distribution of faunal remains correlates closely with the distribution of flint artifacts and wooden objects. We have been able to distinguish five different sectors that can be aligned with different events or activities. The greatest density of finds was evident within an area of 11 × 15 m, where most of the horse skulls were recovered. Some of the square meters contain more than 150 finds. During the excavation the profiles were continually documented and these data help us to reconstruct the shoreline of the paleo-lake with considerable accuracy. Over a distance of 60 m, the thickness and density of the organic mud and peat layers could be reconstructed in high resolution. The distribution of finds shows no preferred orientation or selection through size. The analyses only indicate small-scale dislocations and limited taphonomic alterations. The fraction of lithic artifacts with size ranges less than 2 cm are preserved, while some smaller bone fragments are missing. Most of the wooden artifacts are in-situ, but were deformed by the ice load during the Saalian ice age. While some small charcoal remains as well as a burnt artifact have been observed, there is no evidence of burnt bones. Our results allow a first insight into the formation history of the site.

  16. Analysis of the Phospholipid Profile of Metaphase II Mouse Oocytes Undergoing Vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Soyoung; Mok, Hyuck Jun; Suh, Chang Suk; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lim, Hyunjung Jade

    2014-01-01

    Oocyte freezing confers thermal and chemical stress upon the oolemma and various other intracellular structures due to the formation of ice crystals. The lipid profiles of oocytes and embryos are closely associated with both, the degrees of their membrane fluidity, as well as the degree of chilling and freezing injuries that may occur during cryopreservation. In spite of the importance of lipids in the process of cryopreservation, the phospholipid status in oocytes and embryos before and after freezing has not been investigated. In this study, we employed mass spectrometric analysis to examine if vitrification has an effect on the phospholipid profiles of mouse oocytes. Freshly prepared metaphase II mouse oocytes were vitrified using copper grids and stored in liquid nitrogen for 2 weeks. Fresh and vitrified-warmed oocytes were subjected to phospholipid extraction procedure. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that multiple species of phospholipids are reduced in vitrified-warmed oocytes. LIFT analyses identified 31 underexpressed and 5 overexpressed phospholipids in vitrified mouse oocytes. The intensities of phosphatidylinositol (PI) {18∶2/16∶0} [M−H]− and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) {14∶0/18∶2} [M−H]− were decreased the most with fold changes of 30.5 and 19.1 in negative ion mode, respectively. Several sphingomyelins (SM) including SM {d38∶3} [M+H]+ and SM {d34∶0} [M+K]+ were decreased significantly in positive ion mode. Overall, the declining trend of multiple phospholipids demonstrates that vitrification has a marked effect on phospholipid profiles of oocytes. These results show that the identified phospholipids can be used as potential biomarkers of oocyte undergoing vitrification and will allow for the development of strategies to preserve phospholipids during oocyte cryopreservation. PMID:25033391

  17. Synthesis and Isomeric Analysis of Ru(II) Complexes Bearing Pentadentate Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Gil-Sepulcre, Marcos; Axelson, Jordan C; Aguiló, Joan; Solà-Hernández, Lluís; Francàs, Laia; Poater, Albert; Blancafort, Lluís; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Guirado, Gonzalo; Escriche, Lluís; Llobet, Antoni; Bofill, Roger; Sala, Xavier

    2016-11-07

    A Ru(II)-pentadentate polypyridyl complex [Ru(II)(κ-N(5)-bpy2PYMe)Cl](+) (1(+), bpy2PYMe = 1-(2-pyridyl)-1,1-bis(6-2,2'-bipyridyl)ethane) and its aqua derivative [Ru(II)(κ-N(5)-bpy2PYMe)(H2O)](2+) (2(2+)) were synthesized and characterized by experimental and computational methods. In MeOH, 1(+) exists as two isomers in different proportions, cis (70%) and trans (30%), which are interconverted under thermal and photochemical conditions by a sequence of processes: chlorido decoordination, decoordination/recoordination of a pyridyl group, and chlorido recoordination. Under oxidative conditions in dichloromethane, trans-1(2+) generates a [Ru(III)(κ-N(4)-bpy2PYMe)Cl2](+) intermediate after the exchange of a pyridyl ligand by a Cl(-) counterion, which explains the trans/cis isomerization observed when the system is taken back to Ru(II). On the contrary, cis-1(2+) is in direct equilibrium with trans-1(2+), with absence of the κ-N(4)-bis-chlorido Ru(III)-intermediate. All these equilibria were modeled by density functional theory calculations. Interestingly, the aqua derivative is obtained as a pure trans-[Ru(II)(κ-N(5)-bpy2PYMe)(H2O)](2+) isomer (trans-2(2+)), while the addition of a methyl substituent to a single bpy of the pentadentate ligand leads to the formation of a single cis isomer for both chlorido and aqua derivatives [Ru(II)(κ-N(5)-bpy(bpyMe)PYMe)Cl](+) (3(+)) and [Ru(II)(κ-N(5)-bpy(bpyMe)PYMe)(H2O)](2+) (4(2+)) due to the steric constraints imposed by the modified ligand. This system was also structurally and electrochemically compared to the previously reported [Ru(II)(PY5Me2)X](n+) system (X = Cl, n = 1 (5(+)); X = H2O, n = 2 (6(2+))), which also contains a κ-N(5)-Ru(II) coordination environment, and to the newly synthesized [Ru(II)(PY4Im)X](n+) complexes (X = Cl, n = 1 (7(+)); X = H2O, n = 2 (8(2+))), which possess an electron-rich κ-N(4)C-Ru(II) site due to the replacement of a pyridyl group by an imidazolic carbene.

  18. Analysis of Topaz-II thermionic fuel element performance using TFEHX

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, A.C. ); Pawlowski, R.A. )

    1993-01-20

    Data reported by Russian Scientists and engineers for the TOPAZ-II single cell thermionic fuel elments (TFE) is compared with analytical results calculated using the TFEHX computer program in order to benchmark the code. The results of this comparison show good agreement with the TOPAZ-II results over a wide range of power inputs, cesium vapor pressures, and other design variables. Future refinements of the TFEHX methodology should enhance the performance of the code to better predict single cell TFE behavior.

  19. The Multiple Resonance Probe: A Novel Device for Industry Compatible Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Storch, Robert; Lapke, Martin; Oberrath, Jens; Schulz, Christian; Styrnoll, Tim; Zietz, Christian; Awakowicz, Peter; Musch, Thomas; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Rolfes, Ilona

    2012-10-01

    To be useful for the supervision or control of technical plasmas, a diagnostic method must be i) robust and stable, ii) insensitive to perturbation by the process, iii) itself not perturbing the process, iv) clearly and easily interpretable without the need for calibration, v) compliant with the requirements of process integration, and, last but not least, vi) economical in terms of investment, footprint, and maintenance. Plasma resonance spectroscopy, exploiting the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency, provides a good basis for such an ``industry compatible'' plasma diagnostics. The contribution will describe the general idea of active plasma resonance spectroscopy and introduce a mathematical formalism for its analysis. It will then focus on the novel multipole resonance probe (MRP), where the excited resonances can be classified explicitly and the connection between the probe response and the desired electron density can be cast as a simple formula. The current state of the MRP project will be described, including the experimental characterization of a prototype in comparison with Langmuir probes, and the development of a specialized measurement circuit.

  20. Rust transformation/rust compatible primers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emeric, Dario A.; Miller, Christopher E.

    1993-01-01

    Proper surface preparation has been the key to obtain good performance by a surface coating. The major obstacle in preparing a corroded or rusted surface is the complete removal of the contaminants and the corrosion products. Sandblasting has been traditionally used to remove the corrosion products before painting. However, sandblasting can be expensive, may be prohibited by local health regulations and is not applicable in every situation. To get around these obstacles, Industry developed rust converters/rust transformers and rust compatible primers (high solids epoxies). The potential use of these products for military equipment led personnel of the Belvoir Research, Development and Engineering Center (BRDEC) to evaluate the commercially available rust transformers and rust compatible primers. Prior laboratory experience with commercially available rust converters, as well as field studies in Hawaii and Puerto Rico, revealed poor performance, several inherent limitations, and lack of reliability. It was obvious from our studies that the performance of rust converting products was more dependent on the amount and type of rust present, as well as the degree of permeability of the coating, than on the product's ability to form an organometallic complex with the rust. Based on these results, it was decided that the Military should develop their own rust converter formulation and specification. The compound described in the specification is for use on a rusted surface before the application of an organic coating (bituminous compounds, primer or topcoat). These coatings should end the need for sandblasting or the removing of the adherent corrosion products. They also will prepare the surface for the application of the organic coating. Several commercially available rust compatible primers (RCP) were also tested using corroded surfaces. All of the evaluated RCP failed our laboratory tests for primers.

  1. Are Automatic Imitation and Spatial Compatibility Mediated by Different Processes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Richard P.; Catmur, Caroline; Heyes, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Automatic imitation or "imitative compatibility" is thought to be mediated by the mirror neuron system and to be a laboratory model of the motor mimicry that occurs spontaneously in naturalistic social interaction. Imitative compatibility and spatial compatibility effects are known to depend on different stimulus dimensions--body…

  2. The Effect of Birth Order on Roommate Compatibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuh, John H.; Williams, Ondre J.

    1977-01-01

    A group of students were matched on the basis of compatible birth order; another was matched on the basis of conflicting birth order. After a month's experience in a residence hall their compatibility was examined. Students with conflicting birth order were more compatible than those with the same birth order. (Author)

  3. 46 CFR Figure 1 to Part 150 - Compatibility Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compatibility Chart 1 Figure 1 to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 150—Compatibility Chart EC02FE91.079...

  4. 46 CFR Figure 1 to Part 150 - Compatibility Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compatibility Chart 1 Figure 1 to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 150—Compatibility Chart EC02FE91.079...

  5. 46 CFR Figure 1 to Part 150 - Compatibility Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compatibility Chart 1 Figure 1 to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 150—Compatibility Chart EC02FE91.079...

  6. 46 CFR Figure 1 to Part 150 - Compatibility Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compatibility Chart 1 Figure 1 to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 150—Compatibility Chart EC02FE91.079...

  7. 46 CFR Figure 1 to Part 150 - Compatibility Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compatibility Chart 1 Figure 1 to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 150—Compatibility Chart EC02FE91.079...

  8. 47 CFR 76.1622 - Consumer education program on compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Consumer education program on compatibility. 76... SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1622 Consumer education program on compatibility. Cable system operators shall provide a consumer education program on compatibility matters...

  9. Angiotensin II and FCCP mobilizes calcium from different intracellular pools in adrenal glomerulosa cells; analysis of calcium fluxes.

    PubMed

    Balla, T; Szebeny, M; Kanyar, B; Spät, A

    1985-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of angiotensin II on the different pools of exchangeable Ca2+ in isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells. On the basis of steady state analysis of 45Ca exchange curves at least three kinetically distinct Ca2+ compartments are present in these cells. The most rapidly exchangeable compartment was regarded as Ca2+ loosely bound to the glycocalyx and the other compartments were considered to be intracellular Ca2+ pools. The effect of angiotensin II on different intracellular compartments was examined by adding the hormone at different phases of Ca2+ washout. Angiotensin increased the rate of 45Ca efflux within 1.5 min when added at the beginning of the washout. This effect, however, could not be detected when the hormone was added at the 30th min of washout, indicating that at least one hormone sensitive pool had lost most of its radioactivity by this time. In contrast to angiotensin II, the mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP mobilized almost the same quantity of 45Ca irrespective of the time of its addition during the washout. This latter finding suggests that this presumably mitochondrial Ca2+ pool has a slow rate of exchange and thus differs from the pool initially mobilized by angiotensin II. The initial Ca2+ mobilizing effect of angiotensin II was also observed in a Ca2+-free media which contained EGTA, indicating that this effect is not triggered by increased Ca2+ influx. In the present study we demonstrate in the intact glomerulosa cell that angiotensin II mobilizes Ca2+ from an intracellular Ca2+ store which appears to be distinct from the FCCP-sensitive store.

  10. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Janney, M.A.; Ferber, M.K.

    1992-03-24

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy. 2 figs.

  11. Compatibility of PETN with lead azide

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, R.; Fronabarger, J.W.; Johnson, R.; Fleming, W.

    1983-01-01

    The compatibility of PETN with lead azide at elevated temperatures has been investigated. Ramped and isothermal DSC methods were used to obtain energies of activation at temperatures above the melting point of PETN. Mixtures were found to show exothermic activity at lower temperatures than pure PETN. High Pressure Liquid Chromatography was used to follow the decomposition of PETN and PETN/lead azide mixtures at temperatures below the melting point. Reaction below 120/sup 0/C appeared minimal, while at higher temperatures, both PETN and PETN/lead azide mixtures showed degradation. A PETN/lead azide sample exploded at or near the melting point of PETN.

  12. Biomimetic principles to develop blood compatible surfaces.

    PubMed

    Semak, Vladislav; Fischer, Michael B; Weber, Viktoria

    2017-03-06

    Functionalized biomaterial surface patterns capable of resisting nonspecific adsorption while retaining their bioactivity are crucial in the advancement of biomedical technologies, but currently available biomaterials intended for use in whole blood frequently suffer from nonspecific adsorption of proteins and cells, leading to a loss of activity over time. In this review, we address two concepts for the design and modification of blood compatible biomaterial surfaces, zwitterionic modification and surface functionalization with glycans - both of which are inspired by the membrane structure of mammalian cells - and discuss their potential for biomedical applications.

  13. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, Jr., Harold D.; Janney, Mark A.; Ferber, Mattison K.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy.

  14. Liquid-Oxygen-Compatible Cement for Gaskets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, N. L.; Neale, B. C.

    1984-01-01

    Fluorelastomer and metal bonded reliably by new procedure. To cure fluoroelastomer cement, metal plate/gasket assembly placed in vacuum bag evacuated to minimum vacuum of 27 inches (69 cm) of mercury. Vacuum maintained throughout heating process and until assembly returns to ambient room temperature. Used to seal gaskets and O-rings or used to splice layers of elastomer to form non-standard sized O-rings. Another possible use is to apply protective, liquid-oxygen-compatible coating to metal parts.

  15. Rate-Compatible Protograph LDPC Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thuy V. (Inventor); Nosratinia, Aria (Inventor); Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Digital communication coding methods resulting in rate-compatible low density parity-check (LDPC) codes built from protographs. Described digital coding methods start with a desired code rate and a selection of the numbers of variable nodes and check nodes to be used in the protograph. Constraints are set to satisfy a linear minimum distance growth property for the protograph. All possible edges in the graph are searched for the minimum iterative decoding threshold and the protograph with the lowest iterative decoding threshold is selected. Protographs designed in this manner are used in decode and forward relay channels.

  16. Material Compatibility for Historic Items Decontaminated with ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report This project continued research of the effects of decontamination methods for biological agents on materials identified as representative of types of irreplaceable objects or works of art found in museums and/or archive settings. In the previous research, surrogate materials were checked for compatibility with four decontamination methods: chlorine dioxide, hydrogen peroxide vapor, methyl bromide, and ethylene oxide gas. This project investigated the effects of gamma irradiation, which has also been shown to be an effective decontamination method for biological agents, on the surrogate test materials.

  17. Kinetic fluorescence quenching of CdS quantum dots in the presence of Cu(II): chemometrics-assisted resolving of the kinetic data and quantitative analysis of Cu(II).

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Hamid; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Barati, Ali

    2014-06-05

    In this work, the kinetic fluorescence behavior of CdS quantum dots (QDs) in the presence of Cu(II) was investigated. In contrast to some other transition metal ions such as Ag(I), Ni(II), and Hg(II), a gradual red-shift in the emission spectrum of CdS QDs was observed for Cu(II) during the reaction course. More investigations revealed the existence of two chemical components in the recorded kinetic data in the presence of Cu(II). Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method was applied in order to extract pure emission spectra and time-dependent profiles of these two components at different concentrations of Cu(II). The results obtained from resolving the data by MCR-ALS got some information about the mechanism of the interaction between CdS QDs and Cu(II) ions which were in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Moreover, the multivariate method of analysis, partial least-squares (PLS) method, was used to develop a multivariate calibration model for quantitative analysis of Cu(II) using the entire kinetic data sets. The calibration and validation sets were created ranging from 0.02 to 1μM of Cu(II) and were successfully calibrated and predicted by the PLS model. This method allowed a sensitive determination of Cu(II) ions with a detection limit of 13nM based on three times of the standard deviation corresponding to PLS regression.

  18. Spitzer Analysis of H II Region Complexes in the Magellanic Clouds: Determining a Suitable Monochromatic Obscured Star Formation Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, B.; Gordon, K. D.; Babler, B.; Block, M.; Bolatto, A. D.; Bracker, S.; Carlson, L. R.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Hora, J. L.; Indebetouw, R.; Madden, S. C.; Meade, M.; Meixner, M.; Misselt, K.; Oey, M. S.; Oliveira, J. M.; Robitaille, T.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Vijh, U. P.; Whitney, B.

    2010-06-01

    H II regions are the birth places of stars, and as such they provide the best measure of current star formation rates (SFRs) in galaxies. The close proximity of the Magellanic Clouds allows us to probe the nature of these star forming regions at small spatial scales. To study the H II regions, we compute the bolometric infrared flux, or total infrared (TIR), by integrating the flux from 8 to 500 μm. The TIR provides a measure of the obscured star formation because the UV photons from hot young stars are absorbed by dust and re-emitted across the mid-to-far-infrared (IR) spectrum. We aim to determine the monochromatic IR band that most accurately traces the TIR and produces an accurate obscured SFR over large spatial scales. We present the spatial analysis, via aperture/annulus photometry, of 16 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 16 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) H II region complexes using the Spitzer Space Telescope's IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 8 μm) and MIPS (24, 70, 160 μm) bands. Ultraviolet rocket data (1500 and 1900 Å) and SHASSA Hα data are also included. All data are convolved to the MIPS 160 μm resolution (40 arcsec full width at half-maximum), and apertures have a minimum radius of 35''. The IRAC, MIPS, UV, and Hα spatial analysis are compared with the spatial analysis of the TIR. We find that nearly all of the LMC and SMC H II region spectral energy distributions (SEDs) peak around 70 μm at all radii, from ~10 to ~400 pc from the central ionizing sources. As a result, we find the following: the sizes of H II regions as probed by 70 μm are approximately equal to the sizes as probed by TIR (≈70 pc in radius); the radial profile of the 70 μm flux, normalized by TIR, is constant at all radii (70 μm ~ 0.45TIR); the 1σ standard deviation of the 70 μm fluxes, normalized by TIR, is a lower fraction of the mean (0.05-0.12 out to ~220 pc) than the normalized 8, 24, and 160 μm normalized fluxes (0.12-0.52); and these results are the same for the LMC and the SMC

  19. The Relationship Between Marital Satisfaction and Compatibility With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dadgari, Atena; Mazloom, Nahid; Heidari Firouz Abadi, Mohammad Reza; Bagheri, Imane

    2015-01-01

    Background: Marriage is a legal pact between a man and a woman for participating in a social life together which can play an important role in dealing with difficulties. Objectives: This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between marital satisfaction and compatibility with diabetes in patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients and Methods: The study method was descriptive-correctional. The study sample included 160 diabetic patients (103 females and 57 males) who were randomly selected. The instruments used were Enrich marital satisfaction questionnaire and the questionnaire of compatibility with diabetes. In addition, the data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and analysis of variance by SPSS. Results: The result of the study revealed a significant correlation (P = 0.006) between marital satisfaction and compatibility with diabetes in women with type 2 diabetes (r = 0.26). However, this correlation was not significant in men with diabetes. Also, a significant relationship existed between the dimensions of compatibility with diabetes and marital satisfaction in both men and women with diabetes. Conclusions: Marital satisfaction affects compatibility with diabetes in women. Therefore, it might be possible to increase compatibility with diabetes in them by offering specialized interventions as family and couples therapies and giving consultations. PMID:26834807

  20. Comparative evidence for the correlated evolution of polyploidy and self-compatibility in Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kelly; Goldberg, Emma E; Igić, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Breakdown of self-incompatibility occurs repeatedly in flowering plants with important evolutionary consequences. In plant families in which self-incompatibility is mediated by S-RNases, previous evidence suggests that polyploidy may often directly cause self-compatibility through the formation of diploid pollen grains. We use three approaches to examine relationships between self-incompatibility and ploidy. First, we test whether evolution of self-compatibility and polyploidy is correlated in the nightshade family (Solanaceae), and find the expected close association between polyploidy and self-compatibility. Second, we compare the rate of breakdown of self-incompatibility in the absence of polyploidy against the rate of breakdown that arises as a byproduct of polyploidization, and we find the former to be greater. Third, we apply a novel extension to these methods to show that the relative magnitudes of the macroevolutionary pathways leading to self-compatible polyploids are time dependent. Over small time intervals, the direct pathway from self-incompatible diploids is dominant, whereas the pathway through self-compatible diploids prevails over longer time scales. This pathway analysis is broadly applicable to models of character evolution in which sequential combinations of rates are compared. Finally, given the strong evidence for both irreversibility of the loss of self-incompatibility in the family and the significant association between self-compatibility and polyploidy, we argue that ancient polyploidy is highly unlikely to have occurred within the Solanaceae, contrary to previous claims based on genomic analyses.

  1. The Magnetic Heartbeat of the Sun; Diagnosing Pulses in the Solar MgII Index Using Wavelet Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, L.

    2015-12-01

    The solar Magnesium (Mg) II index, derived from the ratio of measurements across a solar absorption feature (280nm) in nearby spectral bands, serves as a proxy for solar chromospheric variability. Various space-borne instruments acquire MgII index data and, in comparison across instruments, the data appears to follow different temporal trends. These variations may lead to variations in the interpretation of model outputs used to understand and predict complex dynamics such as climate variability and space weather. This study seeks to reconcile the discrepancies between three MgII data sets in an attempt to create one, composite MgII index with elements common to all. For this investigation we use three temporally coincident data sets spanning 2003 to 2012: the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) SOLar STellar InterComparison Experiment (SOLSTICE), the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 16, and the University of Bremen Composite, compiled from various satellite records. Using wavelet analysis, we identify the statistically significant and independent signals of four known solar time scales in each of the data sets: the 24.7 day solar rotational period, the 12 day half-solar rotational period, the 3-7 month average lifetime of an active region, and the 11 year solar cycle. We then explore the time scales of variability remaining in the data records. We seek to define the remaining signal components as solar in origin, assumed common between sets, or as potentially originating from instrumental artifacts, not common to all sets. We find a signal with a 1-2 year period common to the three data records; a further comparison with the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) Calcium (Ca) II record establishes this period to be present in ground-based chromospheric variability measurement. In a last step, we use Bayesian analysis to quantify the uncertainty of a revised data set, comprised only of signals of known solar origin.

  2. A radiographic, morphologic, biochemical and molecular analysis of a case of achondrogenesis type II resulting from substitution for a glycine residue (Gly691-->Arg) in the type II collagen trimer.

    PubMed

    Mortier, G R; Wilkin, D J; Wilcox, W R; Rimoin, D L; Lachman, R S; Eyre, D R; Cohn, D H

    1995-02-01

    The type II collagenopathies form a continuous spectrum of clinical severity, ranging from lethal achondrogenesis type II and hypochondrogenesis, through spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and Kniest dysplasia to the Stickler syndrome and familial precocious osteoarthropathy at the mildest end of the spectrum. We have carried out a radiographic, morphologic, biochemical and molecular study in a case of achondrogenesis type II. Electron micrographs showed inclusion bodies of dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum in the chondrocytes and the presence of sparse collagen fibers in the cartilage matrix. Protein analysis of collagen from cartilage indicated posttranslational overmodification of the major cyanogen bromide peptides, and suggested a mutation near the carboxyl terminus of the type II collagen molecule. Analysis at the DNA level demonstrated that the phenotype was produced by a single base change (G-->C) that resulted in the substitution of glycine691 by arginine in the type II collagen triple helical domain. We confirm previous observations in three cases of hypochondrogenesis that glycine substitutions in the alpha 1(II) chain can result in a phenotype at the most severe end of the type II collagenopathy spectrum.

  3. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04

    patterns would be most viable for an energy station, TIAX developed several criteria for selecting a representative set of technology configurations. TIAX applied these criteria to all possible technology configurations to determine an optimized set for further analysis, as shown in Table ES-1. This analysis also considered potential energy station operational scenarios and their impact upon hydrogen and power production. For example, an energy station with a 50-kWe reformer could generate enough hydrogen to serve up to 12 vehicles/day (at 5 kg/fill) or generate up to 1,200 kWh/day, as shown in Figure ES-1. Buildings that would be well suited for an energy station would utilize both the thermal and electrical output of the station. Optimizing the generation and utilization of thermal energy, hydrogen, and electricity requires a detailed look at the energy transfer within the energy station and the transfer between the station and nearby facilities. TIAX selected the Baseline configuration given in Table ES-1 for an initial analysis of the energy and mass transfer expected from an operating energy station. Phase II The purpose of this technical analysis was to analyze the development of a hydrogen-dispensing infrastructure for transportation applications through the installation of a 50-75 kW stationary fuel cell-based energy station at federal building sites. The various scenarios, costs, designs and impacts of such a station were quantified for a hypothetical cost-shared program that utilizes a natural gas reformer to provide hydrogen fuel for both the stack(s) and a limited number of fuel cell powered vehicles, with the possibility of using cogeneration to support the building heat load.

  4. Backwards compatible high dynamic range video compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolzhenko, Vladimir; Chesnokov, Vyacheslav; Edirisinghe, Eran A.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a two layer CODEC architecture for high dynamic range video compression. The base layer contains the tone mapped video stream encoded with 8 bits per component which can be decoded using conventional equipment. The base layer content is optimized for rendering on low dynamic range displays. The enhancement layer contains the image difference, in perceptually uniform color space, between the result of inverse tone mapped base layer content and the original video stream. Prediction of the high dynamic range content reduces the redundancy in the transmitted data while still preserves highlights and out-of-gamut colors. Perceptually uniform colorspace enables using standard ratedistortion optimization algorithms. We present techniques for efficient implementation and encoding of non-uniform tone mapping operators with low overhead in terms of bitstream size and number of operations. The transform representation is based on human vision system model and suitable for global and local tone mapping operators. The compression techniques include predicting the transform parameters from previously decoded frames and from already decoded data for current frame. Different video compression techniques are compared: backwards compatible and non-backwards compatible using AVC and HEVC codecs.

  5. Environmentally compatible surfactants for the cosmetic industry.

    PubMed

    Berger, H

    1997-10-01

    From the application pattern of surfactant-containing cosmetic products, it is inevitable that the major part of the chemicals will be discharged into waste water and eventually will enter the environment. Because the environmental compatibility of the products is based on the ecological properties of their raw meterials, the biodegradability and ecotoxicological behaviour of the product components and particularly the surfactants, form the central elements of the environmental compatibility assessment. The tools for this evaluation are standardized test systems, which are described and discussed on the basis of the ecological data of selected surfactants. De par le type d'application des produits cosmetiques contenant des tensioactifs, il est inevitable que la plus grande partie des substances chimiques soit evacuee dans les eaux usees et finisse par arriver dans l'environnement. Puisque la compatibilite environnementale des produits est basee sur les proprietes ecologiques de leurs matieres premieres, la biodegradabilite et le comportement ecotoxicologique des composants des produits, et en particulier des tensioactifs, forment les elements majeurs de l'evaluation de la compatibilite environnementale. Les outils de cette evaluation sont des systemes d'essai normalises, qui sont decrits et commentes d'apres les donnees ecologiques de tensioactifs choisis.

  6. Photonic circuits integrated with CMOS compatible photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Dana; Craciunoiu, F.; Modreanu, M.; Caldararu, M.; Cernica, I.

    2001-06-01

    This paper presents the integration of photodetectors and photonic circuits (waveguides and interferometers, coupling elements and chemo-optical transducing layer) on one silicon chip. Different materials: silicon, doped or undoped silica, SiO xN y, polymers, and different technologies: LPCVD, APCVD, sol-gel, spinning, micromachining have been used to realize the photonic and micromechanical components and the transducers. Also, MOS compatible processes have been used for optoelectronic circuits. The attention was focused on the matching of all the involved technologies, to allow the monolithic integration of all components, and also on the design and fabrication of special structures of photodetectors. Two types of high responsivity photodetectors, a photo-FET and a bipolar NPN phototransistor, with modified structures that allow the optical coupling to the waveguides have been designed and experimented. An original 3-D model was developed for the system: opto-FET-coupler-waveguide. A test circuit for sensor applications was experimented. All the components of the test circuits, photodetectors, waveguides, couplers, were obtained using CMOS-compatible processes. The aim of our research activity was to obtain microsensors with optical read-out.

  7. Mixed waste chemical compatibility with packaging components

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Conroy, M.; Blalock, L.B.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper, a chemical compatibility testing program for packaging of mixed wastes at will be described. We will discuss the choice of four y-radiation doses, four time durations, four temperatures and four waste solutions to simulate the hazardous waste components of mixed wastes for testing materials compatibility of polymers. The selected simulant wastes are (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. A selection of 10 polymers with anticipated high resistance to one or more of these types of environments are proposed for testing as potential liner or seal materials. These polymers are butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer, cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorhyarin, ethylene-propylene rubber, fluorocarbon, glass-filled tetrafluoroethylene, high-density poly-ethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber. We will describe the elements of the testing plan along with a metric for establishing time resistance of the packaging materials to radiation and chemicals.

  8. Metal-detergent/cleaner compatibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hindin, B.; Ventresca, C.

    1994-01-14

    The Aerospace Guidance and Metrology Center (AGMC), located at the Newark Air Force Base (NAFB) in Newark, Ohio, repairs and services inertial navigation and guidance equipment for the United States Air Force and other Department of Defense (DoD) agencies. Until recently, AGMC has used large quantities of environmentally unfriendly, ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs) such as CFC-113 or 1,1,1 Trichloroethane (TCA) in their cleaning and degreasing procedures. During the last few years, AGMC has been evaluating alternative, environmentally acceptable chemicals to replace their ODC cleaners. This report describes the results of a study to determine the feasibility of using aqueous cleaners to replace the ODCs without causing unacceptable degradation of metal components. A total of 15 metals and 7 aqueous or semiaqueous cleaners were evaluated. The results show that aqueous cleaners can be used to replace traditional ODCs in both ultrasonic and soak cleaning processes with one major limitation. This limitation is that no single aqueous or semiaqueous cleaner studied in this program was able to replace CFC-113 for cleaning all metals. Aqueous cleaners must be matched to the specific metal that is being cleaned. Compatibility criteria and compatibility tables were established for determining metal/cleaner pairs that can be used without causing unacceptable degradation of the metal surfaces.

  9. Phase II dose-response trials: A simulation study to compare analysis method performance under design considerations.

    PubMed

    Rekowski, Jan; Köllmann, Claudia; Bornkamp, Björn; Ickstadt, Katja; Scherag, André

    2017-02-21

    Phase II trials are intended to provide information about the dose-response relationship and to support the choice of doses for a pivotal phase III trial. Recently, new analysis methods have been proposed to address these objectives, and guidance is needed to select the most appropriate analysis method in specific situations. We set up a simulation study to evaluate multiple performance measures of one traditional and three more recent dose-finding approaches under four design options and illustrate the investigated analysis methods with an example from clinical practice. Our results reveal no general recommendation for a particular analysis method across all design options and performance measures. However, we also demonstrate that the new analysis methods are worth the effort compared to the traditional ANOVA-based approach.

  10. Pollen Tube Growth and Self-Compatibility in Almond

    PubMed Central

    Socias i Company, Rafel; Kodad, Ossama; Fernández i Martí, Àngel; Alonso, José M.

    2013-01-01

    Although pollen tube growth has been an important criterion for self-compatibility evaluation in almond, there is not a clear-cut separation between positive and negative growth of pollen tubes in the different genotypes. The examination of pollen tube growth after selfing almond seedlings has allowed establishing different levels of compatibility, but not a clear-cut separation between self-compatible (SC) and self-incompatible (SI) genotypes, related to the presence of pseudo-self-compatibility in almond. Consequently, a relationship between pollen tube growth and self-compatibility in almond may be established for evaluating the seedlings in breeding programs. PMID:27137365

  11. Supernova 2014J at M82 - II. Direct analysis of a middle-class Type Ia supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallely, Patrick; Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Baron, E.; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Domínguez, I.; Galbany, Lluís; González Hernández, J. I.; Méndez, J.; Hamuy, M.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Catalán, S.; Cooke, E.; Fariña, C.; Génova-Santos, R.; Karjalainen, R.; Lietzen, H.; McCormac, J.; Riddick, F.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Skillen, I.; Tudor, V.; Vaduvescu, O.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse a time series of optical spectra of SN 2014J from almost two weeks prior to maximum to nearly four months after maximum. We perform our analysis using the SYNOW code, which is well suited to track the distribution of the ions with velocity in the ejecta. We show that almost all of the spectral features during the entire epoch can be identified with permitted transitions of the common ions found in normal supernovae (SNe) Ia in agreement with previous studies. We show that 2014J is a relatively normal SN Ia. At early times the spectral features are dominated by Si II, S II, Mg II, and Ca II. These ions persist to maximum light with the appearance of Na I and Mg I. At later times iron-group elements also appear, as expected in the stratified abundance model of the formation of normal Type Ia SNe. We do not find significant spectroscopic evidence for oxygen, until 100 d after maximum light. The +100 d identification of oxygen is tentative, and would imply significant mixing of unburned or only slight processed elements down to a velocity of 6000 kms-1. Our results are in relatively good agreement with other analyses in the infrared. We briefly compare SN 2011fe to SN 2014J and conclude that the differences could be due to different central densities at ignition or differences in the C/O ratio of the progenitors.

  12. Trace analysis of cefotaxime at carbon paste electrode modified with novel Schiff base Zn(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Preeti; Mohan, Swati; Kundu, Subir; Prakash, Rajiv

    2009-02-15

    Cefotaxime a third generation cephalosporin drug estimation in nanomolar concentration range is demonstrated for the first time in aqueous and human blood samples using novel Schiff base octahedral Zn(II) complex. The cefotaxime electrochemistry is studied over graphite paste and Zn(II) complex modified graphite paste capillary electrodes in H(2)SO(4) (pH 2.3) using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. Cefotaxime enrichment is observed over Zn(II) complex modified graphite paste electrode probably due to interaction of functional groups of cefotaxime with Zn(II) complex. Possible interactions between metal complex and cefotaxime drug is examined by UV-vis and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) techniques and further supported by voltammetric analysis. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) with modified electrode is applied for the determination of cefotaxime in acidified aqueous and blood samples. Cefotaxime estimation is successfully demonstrated in the range of 1-500 nM for aqueous samples and 0.1-100 microM in human blood samples. Reproducibility, accuracy and repeatability of the method are checked by triplicate reading for large number of samples. The variation in the measurements is obtained less than 10% without any interference of electrolyte or blood constituents.

  13. Analysis of Software Development Methodologies to Build Safety Software Applications for the SATEX-II: A Mexican Experimental Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar Cisneros, Jorge; Vargas Martinez, Hector; Pedroza Melendez, Alejandro; Alonso Arevalo, Miguel

    2013-09-01

    Mexico is a country where the experience to build software for satellite applications is beginning. This is a delicate situation because in the near future we will need to develop software for the SATEX-II (Mexican Experimental Satellite). SATEX- II is a SOMECyTA's project (the Mexican Society of Aerospace Science and Technology). We have experienced applying software development methodologies, like TSP (Team Software Process) and SCRUM in other areas. Then, we analyzed these methodologies and we concluded: these can be applied to develop software for the SATEX-II, also, we supported these methodologies with SSP-05-0 Standard in particular with ESA PSS-05-11. Our analysis was focusing on main characteristics of each methodology and how these methodologies could be used with the ESA PSS 05-0 Standards. Our outcomes, in general, may be used by teams who need to build small satellites, but, in particular, these are going to be used when we will build the on board software applications for the SATEX-II.

  14. Analysis of TOPAZ II and SPACE-R space nuclear power plants using a modified thermionic model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Habedank, O.D.

    1993-03-01

    Models based on the TDS thermionic diode model were developed for TOPAZ II and SPACER nuclear power systems. Several parameter studies were conducted with the TOPAZ II model. These determined system performance and efficiency while varying the following: (1) Coolant flow inlet temperatures. (2) Rate of coolant temperature change. (3) Power profile of the core. (4) Cesium reservoir temperature. Analysis of results indicate the model accurately represented the TOPAZ II system, underestimating published data by 10%. Coolant flow studies indicate that raising coolant temperatures up to 100 K higher increases system power by up to 5%. Additional increases in temperature result in gradual performance degradation. Varying the axial power profile of the core from the actual peaked profile to a flat profile results in a negligible 0.3% change in system performance. The peaked profile used in TOPAZ II produces the highest system efficiency of all the profiles modeled. The cesium pressure study indicates the system is operating above optimum cesium pressure and system performance is strongly dependent on cesium pressure. Increasing cesium reservoir temperature above design temperature by 30 K decreases system efficiency by 30%.

  15. Probability of success for phase III after exploratory biomarker analysis in phase II.

    PubMed

    Götte, Heiko; Kirchner, Marietta; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2017-02-23

    The probability of success or average power describes the potential of a future trial by weighting the power with a probability distribution of the treatment effect. The treatment effect estimate from a previous trial can be used to define such a distribution. During the development of targeted therapies, it is common practice to look for predictive biomarkers. The consequence is that the trial population for phase III is often selected on the basis of the most extreme result from phase II biomarker subgroup analyses. In such a case, there is a tendency to overestimate the treatment effect. We investigate whether the overestimation of the treatment effect estimate from phase II is transformed into a positive bias for the probability of success for phase III. We simulate a phase II/III development program for targeted therapies. This simulation allows to investigate selection probabilities and allows to compare the estimated with the true probability of success. We consider the estimated probability of success with and without subgroup selection. Depending on the true treatment effects, there is a negative bias without selection because of the weighting by the phase II distribution. In comparison, selection increases the estimated probability of success. Thus, selection does not lead to a bias in probability of success if underestimation due to the phase II distribution and overestimation due to selection cancel each other out. We recommend to perform similar simulations in practice to get the necessary information about the risk and chances associated with such subgroup selection designs.

  16. Promiscuous activity of ER glucosidase II discovered through donor specificity analysis of UGGT

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Atsushi; Totani, Kiichiro; Matsuo, Ichiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} UGGT has a narrow donor specificity. {yields} UGGT gave several non-natural high-mannose-type glycans. {yields} G-II has a promiscuous activity as broad specificity hexosidase. -- Abstract: In glycoprotein quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), UGGT (UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase) and glucosidase II (G-II) play key roles. UGGT serves as a glycoprotein folding sensor by virtue of its unique specificity to glucosylate glycoproteins at incompletely folded stage. By using various UDP-Glc analogues, we first analyzed donor specificity of UGGT, which was proven to be rather narrow. However, marginal activity was observed with UDP-galactose and UDP-glucuronic acid as well as with 3-, 4- and 6-deoxy glucose analogues to give corresponding transfer products. Intriguingly, G-II smoothly converted all of them back to Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}, providing an indication that G-II has a promiscuous activity as a broad specificity hexosidase.

  17. Novel zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes of a Mannich base derived from lawsone: Synthesis, single crystal X-ray analysis, ab initio density functional theory calculations and vibrational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Amanda P.; Vargas, Maria D.; Soto, Claudio A. Téllez; Ramos, Joanna M.; Visentin, Lorenzo do C.; Pinheiro, Carlos B.; Mangrich, Antônio S.; de Rezende, Edivaltrys I. P.

    Zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes of a tridentate Mannich base L1 derived from 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, pyridinecarboxyaldehyde and 2-aminomethylpyridine, [ZnL1Cl2]·H2O 1 and [CuL1Cl2]·2H2O 2, have been synthesized and fully characterized. The structure of complex 1 has been elucidated by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study: the zinc atom is pentacoordinate and the coordination geometry is a distorted square base pyramid, with a geometric structural parameter τ equal to 0.149. Vibrational spectroscopy and ab initio DFT calculations of both compounds have confirmed that the two complexes exhibit similar structures. Full assignment of the vibrational spectra was also supported by careful analysis of the distorted geometries generated by the normal modes

  18. Effect of Time on Gypsum-Impression Material Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, John Boram

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of dental gypsum with three recently introduced irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) alternatives. The test materials were Alginot® (Kerr™), Position Penta Quick® (3M ESPE™) and Silgimix ® (Sultan Dental™). The irreversible hydrocolloid impression material, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial® (Dentsply Caulk™) served as the control. Materials and Methods: Testing of materials was conducted in accordance with ANSI/ADA Specification No. 18 for Alginate Impression Materials. Statistical Analysis: The 3-Way ANOVA test was used to analyze measurements between different time points at a significance level of (p < 0.05). Outcome: It was found that there was greater compatibility between gypsum and the alternative materials over time than the traditional irreversible hydrocolloid material that was tested. A statistically significant amount of surface change/incompatibility was found over time with the combination of the dental gypsum products and the control impression material (Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial®).

  19. Compatibility Assessment of Advanced Stainless Steels in Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Type 316L stainless steel capsules containing commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS (austenitic, 14Cr-16Ni), NF-616 (ferritic/martensitic, 9Cr-2W-0.5Mo), or 316L (austenitic, 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo) stainless steel were exposed at 600 or 700 C for 100 and 400 h as a screening test for compatibility. Using weight change, tensile testing, and metallographic analysis, HT-UPS and 316L were found to be largely immune to changes resulting from sodium exposure, but NF-616 was found susceptible to substantial decarburization at 700 C. Subsequently, two thermal convection loops (TCLs) constructed of 316L and loaded with commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS and 316L were operated for 2000 h each one between 500 and 650 C, the other between 565 and 725 C at a flow rate of about 1.5 cm/s. Changes in specimen appearance, weight, and tensile properties were observed to be very minor in all cases, and there was no metallographic evidence of microstructure changes, composition gradients, or mass transfer resulting from prolonged exposure in a TCL. Thus, it appears that HT-UPS and 316L stainless steels are similarly compatible with commercially pure sodium under these exposure conditions.

  20. Column dynamic studies and breakthrough curve analysis for Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions adsorption onto palm oil boiler mill fly ash (POFA).

    PubMed

    Aziz, Abdul Shukor Abdul; Manaf, Latifah Abd; Man, Hasfalina Che; Kumar, Nadavala Siva

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the adsorption characteristics of palm oil boiler mill fly ash (POFA) derived from an agricultural waste material in removing Cd(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution via column studies. The performance of the study is described through the breakthrough curves concept under relevant operating conditions such as column bed depths (1, 1.5, and 2 cm) and influent metal concentrations (5, 10, and 20 mg/L). The Cd(II) and Cu(II) uptake mechanism is particularly bed depth- and concentration-dependant, favoring higher bed depth and lower influent metal concentration. The highest bed capacity of 34.91 mg Cd(II)/g and 21.93 mg Cu(II)/g of POFA was achieved at 20 mg/L of influent metal concentrations, column bed depth of 2 cm, and flow rate of 5 mL/min. The whole breakthrough curve simulation for both metal ions were best described using the Thomas and Yoon–Nelson models, but it is apparent that the initial region of the breakthrough for Cd(II) was better described using the BDST model. The results illustrate that POFA could be utilized effectively for the removal of Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column system.

  1. An analysis of preliminary SAGE II data on ozone and NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnold, D. M.; Chu, D. A.

    Zonal mean mixing ratios of ozone and NO2 measured by SAGE II on several days in March and April, 1985 are compared against zonal means for this time of year previously measured by SAGE I, SBUV, and LIMS. After allowing for calculated diurnal variations of these gases, agreement within 15 percent is found for ozone and 20 percent for NO2. It is noted that the profile error bars given on the SAGE II data tapes need to be carefully interpreted and that the measured tropical variances suggest that these error bars are being somewhat overestimated. Planetary waves in both ozone and NO2 in the middle stratosphere should be derivable from the SAGE II measurements.

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Trincão, José; Sousa Silva, Marta; Barata, Lídia; Bonifácio, Cecília; Carvalho, Sandra; Tomás, Ana Maria; Ferreira, António E. N.; Cordeiro, Carlos; Ponces Freire, Ana; Romão, Maria João

    2006-01-01

    In trypanosomatids, trypanothione replaces glutathione in all glutathione-dependent processes. Of the two enzymes involved in the glyoxalase pathway, glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II, the latter shows absolute specificity towards trypanothione thioester, making this enzyme an excellent model to understand the molecular basis of trypanothione binding. Cloned glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals belong to space group C2221 (unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, b = 88.3, c = 85.2 Å) and diffract beyond 2.15 Å using synchrotron radiation. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the human glyoxalase II structure as a search model. These results, together with future detailed kinetic characterization using lactoyltrypanothione, should shed light on the evolutionary selection of trypanothione instead of glutathione by trypano­somatids. PMID:16880563

  3. A genetic analysis of Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase II subunits in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hazoume, Adonis; Naderi, Kambiz; Candolfi, Ermanno; Kedinger, Claude; Chatton, Bruno; Vigneron, Marc

    2011-04-01

    RNA polymerase II is an essential nuclear multi subunit enzyme that transcribes nearly the whole genome. Its inhibition by the alpha-amanitin toxin leads to cell death. The enzyme of Plasmodium falciparum remains poorly characterized. Using a complementation assay in yeast as a genetic test, we demonstrate that five Plasmodium putative RNA polymerase subunits are indeed functional in vivo. The active site of this enzyme is built from the two largest subunits. Using site directed mutagenesis we were able to modify the active site of the yeast RNA polymerase II so as to introduce Plasmodium or human structural motifs. The resulting strains allow the screening of chemical libraries for potential specific inhibitors.

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 20 (IRASTH00080020) on Town Highway 8, crossing the Black River, Irasburg, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure IRASTH00080020 on town highway 8 crossing the Black River, Irasburg, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, available from VTAOT files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland physiographic province of north-central Vermont in the town of Irasburg. The 110-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the left bank surface cover is pasture and row crops and the right bank is covered by shrub and brush and is adjacent to woods. In the study area, the Black River has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.002 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 90 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel and cobbles (D50 is 49.7 mm or 0.163 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 4, 1994, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The town highway 8 crossing of the Black River is a 88-ft-long, one-lane covered bridge consisting of one 80-foot span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls on the upstream and downstream sides of the right abutment. The right abutment has stone fill protection. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour

  5. Tank 241-AP-103 08/1999 Compatibility Grab Samples and Analytical Results for the Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    BELL, K.E.

    1999-12-09

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-AP-103 (AP-103) grab samples taken in August 1999 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank AP-103 samples were performed as directed in ''Compatibility Grub Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1999'' (Sasaki 1999a). Any deviations from the instructions provided in the tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) were discussed in this narrative. No notification limits were exceeded.

  6. Implementation of a Proficiency-Based Diploma System in Maine: Phase II--District Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvernail, David L.; Stump, Erika K.; McCafferty, Anita Stewart; Hawes, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the findings from Phase II of a study of Maine's implementation of a proficiency-based diploma system. At the request of the Joint Standing Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs of the Maine Legislature, the Maine Policy Research Institute (MEPRI) has conducted a two-phased study of the implementation of Maine law…

  7. THREE-DIMENSIONAL GEOMETRIES AND THE ANALYSIS OF H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Kenneth; Barnes, J. E.; Ercolano, Barbara; Haffner, L. M.; Reynolds, R. J.; Dale, J.

    2013-06-20

    We compare emission line intensities from photoionization models of smooth and fractal shell geometries for low density H II regions, with particular focus on the low-ionization diagnostic diagram [N II]/H{alpha} versus H{alpha}. Building on previously published models and observations of Barnard's Loop, we show that the observed range of intensities and variations in the line intensity ratios may be reproduced with a three-dimensional shell geometry. Our models adopt solar abundances throughout the model nebula, in contrast with previous one-dimensional modeling which suggested the variations in line intensity ratios could only be reproduced if the heavy element abundances were increased by a factor of {approx}1.4. For spatially resolved H II regions, the multiple sightlines that pierce and sample different ionization and temperature conditions within smooth and fractal shells produce a range of line intensities that are easily overlooked if only the total integrated intensities from the entire nebula model are computed. Our conclusion is that inference of H II region properties, such as elemental abundances, via photoionization models of one-dimensional geometries must be treated with caution and further tested through three-dimensional modeling.

  8. Noise analysis of driven vortices of type-II superconductors - A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Suresh Babu; Pal, D.

    2015-06-01

    We present the zero temperature molecular dynamics simulation of vortices in low Tc type-II superconductors. We observe power law variation of noise in the dynamical phase. In comparison with the ordered vortex flow region the disordered vortex flow region shows large power law correlation of noise.

  9. Winning the War: A Historical Analysis of the FFA during World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kattlyn J.; Connors, James J.

    2009-01-01

    The United States' participation in World War II affected millions of men, women, and children, both at home and around the world. The war effort also affected the Future Farmers of America (FFA). FFA members, agriculture teachers, and national FFA officers all volunteered to serve their country during the war. Local FFA chapters and individual…

  10. An Evaluative Survey Report on ESEA Title II: Fiscal Years 1966-1968. Part I, Analysis and Interpretation. Part II, Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This report provides benchmark data on the effects that the provision of school library resources, textbooks, and other instructional materials under Title II of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) has had on education in the nation's public and private elementary and secondary schools. The passage of Title II of ESEA set the stage…

  11. Implementation of Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, E.; O'Leary, J.; Bell, S.; Djordjevic, S.; Givens, C,; Shokes, T.; Thompson, S.; Stahl, S.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on July 27, 2001 approved Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the associated TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC). Key initiatives in Revision 19 included matrix depletion, unlimited mixing of shipping categories, a flammability assessment methodology, and an alternative methodology for the determination of flammable gas generation rates. All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites shipping transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were required to implement Revision 19 methodology into their characterization and waste transportation programs by May 20, 2002. An implementation process was demonstrated by the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The three-part process used by RFETS included revision of the site-specific TRAMPAC, an evaluation of the contact-handled TRU waste inventory against the regulations in Revision 19, and design and development of software to facilitate future inventory analyses.

  12. Analysis of serum from type II diabetes mellitus and diabetic complication using surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, H. W.; Yan, X. L.; Dong, R. X.; Ban, G.; Li, K.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we show surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of serums from type II diabetes mellitus and diabetic complication (coronary disease, glaucoma and cerebral infarction), and analyze the SERS through the multivariate statistical methods of principal component analysis (PCA). In particular, we find that there exist many adenines in these serums, which maybe come from DNA (RNA) damage. The relative intensity of the band at 725±2 cm-1 assigned to adenine is higher for patients than for the healthy volunteers; therefore, it can be used as an important ‘fingerprint’ in order to diagnose these diseases. It is also shown that serums from type II diabetes mellitus group, diabetic complication group and healthy volunteers group can be discriminated by PCA.

  13. Fuel System Compatibility Issues for Prometheus-1

    SciTech Connect

    DC Noe; KB Gibbard; MH Krohn

    2006-01-20

    Compatibility issues for the Prometheus-1 fuel system have been reviewed based upon the selection of UO{sub 2} as the reference fuel material. In particular, the potential for limiting effects due to fuel- or fission product-component (cladding, liner, spring, etc) chemical interactions and clad-liner interactions have been evaluated. For UO{sub 2}-based fuels, fuel-component interactions are not expected to significantly limit performance. However, based upon the selection of component materials, there is a potential for degradation due to fission products. In particular, a chemical liner may be necessary for niobium, tantalum, zirconium, or silicon carbide-based systems. Multiple choices exist for the configuration of a chemical liner within the cladding; there is no clear solution that eliminates all concerns over the mechanical performance of a clad/liner system. A series of tests to evaluate the performance of candidate materials in contact with real and simulated fission products is outlined.

  14. Vacuum Compatibility of Laser-Sintered Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, W. F.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Bates, E. M.; Birmingham, W. J.; Quinley, M.; Woodruff, S.; Stuber, J. E.; Sieck, P. E.; Melnik, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    We present the design and results of a mass spectrometry system used to assess vacuum compatibility of selective laser-sintered parts. The parts are disks with a thickness of 0.20 cm and a diameter of 8.25 cm, and are made of aluminum, stainless steel, inconel, and titanium. From preliminary results, titanium had the lowest partial pressure for hydrogen. Outgassing from laser-sintered parts is compared against parts with similar surface area that are manufactured with traditional methods. Outgassing is also measured while the part is heated, emulating the conditions at the edge of high temperature plasma confinement chambers. Each part is placed on a heated container that can vary in temperature inside the mass spectrometer's vacuum chamber. The partial pressures of elements up to 200 atomic mass units are analyzed to obtain outgassing data from each sample. This work supported under DOE SBIR Grant DE SC0011858.

  15. Compatibility of elastomers in alternate jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.; Fedors, R. F.; Reilly, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    The compatibility of elastomeric compositions of known resistance to aircraft fuels was tested for potential use in Jet A type fuels obtainable from alternate sources, such as coal. Since such fuels were not available at the time, synthetic alternate fuels were prepared by adding tetralin to a petroleum based Jet A type fuel to simulate coal derived fuels which are expected to contain higher amounts of aromatic and hydroaromatic hydrocarbons. The elastomeric compounds tested were based on butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber, a castable Thiokol polysulfide rubber, and a castable fluorosilicone rubber. Batches of various cross-link densities of these rubbers were made and their chemical stress relaxation behavior in fuel, air, and nitrogen, their swelling properties, and response to mechanical testing were determined.

  16. Versatile UHV compatible Knudsen type effusion cell

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, A.K.; Banik, S.; Dhaka, R.S.; Biswas, C.; Barman, S.R.; Haak, H.

    2004-11-01

    A versatile Knudsen type effusion cell has been fabricated for growing nanostructures and epitaxial layers of metals and semiconductors. The cell provides excellent vacuum compatibility (10{sup -10} mbar range during operation), efficient water cooling, uniform heating, and moderate input power consumption (100 W at 1000 deg. C). The thermal properties of the cell have been determined. The performance of the cell has been assessed by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) for Mn adlayer growth on Al(111). We find that this Knudsen cell has a stable deposition rate of 0.17 monolayer per minute at 550 deg. C. From the XPS spectra, we show that the Mn adlayers are completely clean, i.e., devoid of any surface contamination.

  17. Hydrogen compatibility handbook for stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    This handbook compiles data on the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of stainless steels and discusses this data within the context of current understanding of hydrogen compatibility of metals. All of the tabulated data derives from continuing studies of hydrogen effects on materials that have been conducted at the Savannah River Laboratory over the past fifteen years. Supplementary data from other sources are included in the discussion. Austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardenable stainless steels have been studied. Damage caused by helium generated from decay of tritium is a distinctive effect that occurs in addition to the hydrogen isotopes protium and deuterium. The handbook defines the scope of our current knowledge of hydrogen effects in stainless steels and serves as a guide to selection of stainless steels for service in hydrogen.

  18. Small Vacuum Compatible Hyperthermal Atom Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, Ronald A. (Inventor); Davidson, Mark R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A vacuum compatible hyperthermal atom generator includes a membrane having two sides. the membrane having the capability of dissolving atoms into the membrane's bulk. A first housing is furnished in operative association with the first side of the membrane to provide for the exposure of the first side of the membrane to a gas species. A second housing is furnished in operative association with the second side of the membrane to provide a vacuum environment having a pressure of less than 1 x 10(exp -3) Torr on the second side of the membrane. Exciting means excites atoms adsorbed on the second side of the membrane to a non-binding state so that a portion from 0% to 100% of atoms adsorbed on the second side of is the membrane are released from the second side of the membrane primarily as an atom beam.

  19. Engine Materials Compatability with Alternative Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steve; Moore, D.

    2013-04-05

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  20. Engine Materials Compatibility with Alternate Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jeffery K; Pawel, Steven J; Wilson, Dane F

    2013-05-01

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  1. Propellant material compatibility program and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, L. R.; Cannon, W. A.; Coulbert, C. D.; Long, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of long-term (up to 10 years) contact of inert materials with earth-storable propellants were studied for the purpose of designing chemical propulsion system components that can be used for current as well as future planetary spacecraft. The primary experimental work, and results to date are reported. Investigations include the following propellants: hydrazine, hydrazine-hydrazine nitrate blends, monomethyl-hydrazine, and nitrogen tetroxide. Materials include: aluminum alloys, corrosion-resistant steels, and titanium alloys. More than 700 test specimen capsules were placed in long-term storage testing at 43 C in the special material compatibility facility. Material ratings relative to the 10-year requirement have been assigned.

  2. Spectrophotometric analysis of Ellerman bombs in the Ca II, Hα, and UV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariat, E.; Schmieder, B.; Berlicki, A.; Deng, Y.; Mein, N.; López Ariste, A.; Wang, S.

    2007-10-01

    Context: Even if Ellerman bombs have been observed in the Hα line within emerging magnetic flux regions since the early 20th century, their origin and the mechanisms that lead to their formation have been strongly debated. Recently, new arguments in favor of chromospheric magnetic reconnection have been advanced. Ellerman bombs seem to be the signature of reconnections that take place during the emergence of the magnetic field. Aims: We have observed an active region presenting emergence of magnetic flux. We detected and studied Ellerman bombs in two chromospheric lines: Ca ii 8542 Å and Hα. We investigated the link between Ellerman bombs and other structures and phenomena appearing in an emerging active region: UV bright points, arch filament systems, and magnetic topology. Methods: On August 3, 2004, we performed multi-wavelength observations of the active region NOAA 10655. This active region was the target of SoHO Joint Observation Program 157. Both SoHO/MDI and TRACE (195 Å and 1600 Å) were used. Simultaneously, we observed in the Ca ii and Na D1 lines with the spectro-imager MSDP mode of THEMIS. Alternately to the MSDP, we used the MTR spectropolarimeter on THEMIS to observe in Hα and in the Fe i doublet at 6302 Å. We derived the magnetic field vectors around some Ellerman bombs. Results: We present the first images of EBs in the Ca ii line and confirm that Ellerman bombs can indeed be observed in the Ca ii line, presenting the same “moustache” geometry profiles as in the Hα line, but with a narrower central absorption in the Ca ii line, in which the peaks of emission are around ±0.35 Å. We noticed that the Ellerman bombs observed in the wings of Ca ii line have an elongated shape - the length about 50% greater than the width. We derived mean semi-axis lengths of 1.4'' × 2.0''. In the UV time profiles of the Ellerman bombs, we noticed successive enhanced emissions. The distribution of lifetimes of these individual impulses presents a strong

  3. Bipolar I and II Disorders; A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on Differences in Comorbid Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Amerio, Andrea; Stubbs, Brendon; Odone, Anna; Tonna, Matteo; Marchesi, Carlo; Nassir Ghaemi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Context More than half of the bipolar disorder (BD) cases have an additional diagnosis; one of the most difficult to manage is obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Although some authors recently investigated the co-occurrence of anxiety and BD, the topic remains insufficiently studied. The current study aimed to investigate differences in comorbid OCD between BD-I and BD-II. Evidence Acquisition A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted on the prevalence and predictors of comorbid BD-I/BD-II and OCD. Relevant papers published until June 30, 2015 were identified searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library. Results Fourteen articles met the inclusion criteria. The pooled prevalence of BD-I in OCD was 3.9% (95% confidence interval (CI), 2.4 to 6.4, I2 = 83%, Q = 56) while that of BD-II in OCD was 13.5% (95% CI, 9.3 to 19.3, I2 = 89%, Q = 91). The pooled prevalence of OCD in BD-I was 21.7 (95% CI, 4.8 to 60.3, I2 = 84%, Q = 95). With regard to OCD-BD predictors, mean age and rate of males did not predict the prevalence of BD-I (β = 0.0731, 95% CI, -0.1097 to 0.256, z = 0.78; β = 0.035, 95% CI, -0.2356 to 0.1656, z = 0.34) and BD-II (β = 0.0577, 95% CI, -0.1942 to 0.0788, z = 0.83; β = -0.0317, 95% CI, -0.1483 to 0.085, z = 0.53) in OCD. The mean age explained some of the observed heterogeneity (R2 = 0.13; R2 = 0.08). Conclusions This first systematic review and meta-analysis of the prevalence and predictors of comorbid BD-I/BD-II and OCD suggests that BD-OCD comorbidity is a common condition in psychiatry. However, the available evidence does not allow to assess whether BD-I or BD-II are more common in patients with OCD. PMID:27826323

  4. CMOS-compatible spintronic devices: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Alexander; Windbacher, Thomas; Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2016-11-01

    For many decades CMOS devices have been successfully scaled down to achieve higher speed and increased performance of integrated circuits at lower cost. Today’s charge-based CMOS electronics encounters two major challenges: power dissipation and variability. Spintronics is a rapidly evolving research and development field, which offers a potential solution to these issues by introducing novel ‘more than Moore’ devices. Spin-based magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM) is already recognized as one of the most promising candidates for future universal memory. Magnetic tunnel junctions, the main elements of MRAM cells, can also be used to build logic-in-memory circuits with non-volatile storage elements on top of CMOS logic circuits, as well as versatile compact on-chip oscillators with low power consumption. We give an overview of CMOS-compatible spintronics applications. First, we present a brief introduction to the physical background considering such effects as magnetoresistance, spin-transfer torque (STT), spin Hall effect, and magnetoelectric effects. We continue with a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art spintronic devices for memory applications (STT-MRAM, domain wall-motion MRAM, and spin-orbit torque MRAM), oscillators (spin torque oscillators and spin Hall nano-oscillators), logic (logic-in-memory, all-spin logic, and buffered magnetic logic gate grid), sensors, and random number generators. Devices with different types of resistivity switching are analyzed and compared, with their advantages highlighted and challenges revealed. CMOS-compatible spintronic devices are demonstrated beginning with predictive simulations, proceeding to their experimental confirmation and realization, and finalized by the current status of application in modern integrated systems and circuits. We conclude the review with an outlook, where we share our vision on the future applications of the prospective devices in the area.

  5. The resupply interface mechanism RMS compatibility test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Stewart W.; Gallo, Frank G.

    1990-01-01

    Spacecraft on-orbit servicing consists of exchanging components such as payloads, orbital replacement units (ORUs), and consumables. To accomplish the exchange of consumables, the receiving vehicle must mate to the supplier vehicle. Mating can be accomplished by a variety of docking procedures. However, these docking schemes are mission dependent and can vary from shuttle bay berthing to autonomous rendezvous and docking. Satisfying the many docking conditions will require use of an innovative docking device. The device must provide fluid, electrical, pneumatic and data transfer between vehicles. Also, the proper stiffness must be obtained and sustained between the vehicles. A device to accomplish this, the resupply interface mechanism (RIM), was developed. The RIM is a unique device because it grasps the mating vehicle, draws the two vehicles together, simultaneously mates all connectors, and rigidizes the mating devices. The NASA-Johnson Manipulator Development Facility was used to study how compatible the RIM is to on orbit docking and berthing. The facility contains a shuttle cargo bay mockup with a remote manipulator system (RMS). This RMS is used to prepare crew members for shuttle missions involving spacecraft berthing operations. The MDF proved to be an excellant system for testing the RIM/RMS compatibility. The elements examined during the RIM JSC test were: RIM gross and fine alignment; berthing method sequence; visual cuing aids; utility connections; and RIM overall performance. The results showed that the RIM is a good device for spacecraft berthing operations. Mating was accomplished during every test run and all test operators (crew members) felt that the RIM is an effective device. The purpose of the JSC RIM test and its results are discussed.

  6. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Watkins, Casey N.

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant weight-saving potential for aerospace applications in propellant and oxidizer tanks. This application for oxygen tanks presents the challenge of being oxygen compatible in addition to complying with the other required material characteristics. This effort reports on the testing procedures and data obtained in examining and selecting potential composite materials for oxygen tank usage. Impact testing of composites has shown that most of these materials initiate a combustion event when impacted at 72 ft-lbf in the presence of liquid oxygen, though testing has also shown substantial variability in reaction sensitivities to impact. Data for screening of 14 potential composites using the Bruceton method is given herein and shows that the 50-percent reaction frequencies range from 17 to 67 ft-lbf. The pressure and temperature rises for several composite materials were recorded to compare the energy releases as functions of the combustion reactions with their respective reaction probabilities. The test data presented are primarily for a test pressure of 300 psia in liquid oxygen. The impact screening process is compared with oxygen index and autogenous ignition test data for both the composite and the basic resin. The usefulness of these supplemental tests in helping select the most oxygen compatible materials is explored. The propensity for mechanical impact ignition of the composite compared with the resin alone is also examined. Since an ignition-free composite material at the peak impact energy of 72 ft-lbf has not been identified, composite reactivity must be characterized over the impact energy level and operating pressure ranges to provide data for hazard analyses in selecting the best potential material for liquid tank usage.

  7. [A model of photosystem II for the analysis of a fast fluorescence rise in plant leaves].

    PubMed

    Beliaeva, N E; Bulychev, A A; Riznichenko, G Iu; Rubin, A B

    2011-01-01

    The polyphasic patterns of fluorescence induction rise in pea leaves in vivo and after the treatment with ionophores have been studied using a plant efficiency analyzer. To analyze in detail photosystem II (PS II) electron transfer processes, an extended PS II model was applied, which included the sums of exponential functions to specify explicitly the light-driven formation of the transmembrane electric potential (delta psi(t)) as well as pH in the lumen (pHL(t)) and stroma (pHs(t)). PS II model parameters and numerical coefficients in delta psi(t), and pHs(t) were evaluated to fit fluorescence induction data for different experimental conditions: leaf in vivo or after ionophore treatment at low or high light intensity. The model imitated changes in the pattern of fluorescence induction rise due to the elimination of transmembrane potential in the presence of ionophores, when delta psi = 0 and pHL(t), pHS(t) altered to small extent relative to control values in vivo, with maximum delta psi(t) approximately 90 MB and delta psi(t) approximately 40 MB, for the stationary state at deltapH aproximately equal to 1.8. As the light intensity was increased from 300 to 1200 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1), the heat dissipation rate constants increased threefold for nonradiative recombination of P680+Phe- and by approximately 30% for P680+Q(A)-. The parameters delta psi, pH(S) and pH(L) were analyzed as factors of PS II redox state populations and fluorescence yield. The kinetic mechanism of qE quenching is discussed, which is related with light induced pH(L) lumen acidification, when Q(A)- and P680+ recombination probability increases to regulate the QA reduction.

  8. Analysis of cDNA coding MHC class II beta chain of the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Hatta, Yuki; Kanai, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Kyuwa, Shigeru; Hayasaka, Ikuo; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2002-04-01

    The chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes, Patr) is the closest zoological living relative of humans and shares approximately 98.6% genetic homology to human beings. Although major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a critical role in T cell-mediated immune responses in vertebrates, the information on Patr MHC remains at a relatively poor level. Therefore, we attempted to isolate Patr MHC class II genes and determine their nucleotide sequences. The cDNAs encoding Patr MHC class II DP, DQ and DR beta chains were isolated from the cDNA library of a chimpanzee B lymphocyte cell line Bch261. As a result of screening, the clone 6-3-1 as a representative of Patr DP clone, clone 30-1 as a Patr DQ clone, and clones 4-7-1 and 55-1 having different sequences as Patr DR clones were detected. The clone 6-3-1 consisted of 1,062 nucleotides including an open reading frame (ORF) of 777 bp. In the same way, clone 30-1 consisted of 1,172 nucleotides including ORF of 786 bp, clones 4-7-1 and 55-1 consisted of 1,163 nucleotides including ORF of 801 bp. Except for five nucleotide changes, clones 4-7-1 and 55-1 were the same sequence. By comparison with the nucleotide sequences already reported on chimpanzee MHC class II beta 1 genes, clones 6-3-1, 30-1, 4-7-1 and 55-1 were classified as PatrDPB1*16, PatrDQB1*0302, PatrDRB1*0201 and PatrDRB1*0204, respectively. This is the first report to describe complete cDNA sequences of Patr DP and DQ molecules. The nucleotide sequence data of Patr MHC class II genes obtained in this study will be useful for the genotyping of Patr MHC class II genes in individual chimpanzees.

  9. Analysis of dechlorination kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Fe(II) in cement slurries.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bahngmi; Batchelor, Bill

    2008-03-21

    Degradative solidification/stabilization with ferrous iron (DS/S-Fe(II)) has been found to be effective in degrading a number of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons including 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA), 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (1,1,2,2-TeCA), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chloroform (CF). Previous studies have characterized degradation kinetics in DS/S-Fe(II) systems as affected by Fe(II) dose, pH and initial target organic concentration. The goal of this study is to investigate the importance of various chemical properties on degradation kinetics of DS/S-Fe(II). This was accomplished by first measuring rate constants for degradation of 1,1,1-TCA, 1,1,2,2-TeCA and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) in individual batch experiments. Rate constants developed in these experiments and those obtained from the literature were related to thermodynamic parameters including one-electron reduction potential, two-electron reduction potential, bond dissociation energy and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energies. Degradation kinetics by Fe(II) in cement slurries were generally represented by a pseudo-first-order rate law. The results showed that the rate constants for chlorinated methanes (e.g. CT, CF) and chlorinated ethanes (e.g. 1,1,1-TCA) were higher than those for chlorinated ethylenes (e.g. PCE, TCE, 1,1-DCE and VC) under similar experimental conditions. The log of the pseudo-first-order rate constant (k) was found to correlate better with lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energies (E(LUMO)) (R2=0.874) than with other thermodynamic parameter descriptors.

  10. Transcriptional network analysis reveals that AT1 and AT2 angiotensin II receptors are both involved in the regulation of genes essential for glioma progression.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Fujita, André; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Iamashita, Priscila; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are aggressive primary brain tumors with high infiltrative potential. The expression of Angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors has been associated with poor prognosis in human astrocytomas, the most common type of glioma. In this study, we investigated the role of Angiotensin II in glioma malignancy through transcriptional profiling and network analysis of cultured C6 rat glioma cells exposed to Ang II and to inhibitors of its membrane receptor subtypes. C6 cells were treated with Ang II and specific antagonists of AT1 and AT2 receptors. Total RNA was isolated after three and six hours of Ang II treatment and analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray technology. Gene expression data was evaluated through transcriptional network modeling to identify how differentially expressed (DE) genes are connected to each other. Moreover, other genes co-expressing with the DE genes were considered in these analyses in order to support the identification of enriched functions and pathways. A hub-based network analysis showed that the most connected nodes in Ang II-related networks exert functions associated with cell proliferation, migration and invasion, key aspects for glioma progression. The subsequent functional enrichment analysis of these central genes highlighted their participation in signaling pathways that are frequently deregulated in gliomas such as ErbB, MAPK and p53. Noteworthy, either AT1 or AT2 inhibitions were able to down-regulate different sets of hub genes involved in protumoral functions, suggesting that both Ang II receptors could be therapeutic targets for intervention in glioma. Taken together, our results point out multiple actions of Ang II in glioma pathogenesis and reveal the participation of both Ang II receptors in the regulation of genes relevant for glioma progression. This study is the first one to provide systems-level molecular data for better understanding the protumoral effects of Ang II in the proliferative and infiltrative behavior of

  11. Transcriptional Network Analysis Reveals that AT1 and AT2 Angiotensin II Receptors Are Both Involved in the Regulation of Genes Essential for Glioma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Fujita, André; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Iamashita, Priscila; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are aggressive primary brain tumors with high infiltrative potential. The expression of Angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors has been associated with poor prognosis in human astrocytomas, the most common type of glioma. In this study, we investigated the role of Angiotensin II in glioma malignancy through transcriptional profiling and network analysis of cultured C6 rat glioma cells exposed to Ang II and to inhibitors of its membrane receptor subtypes. C6 cells were treated with Ang II and specific antagonists of AT1 and AT2 receptors. Total RNA was isolated after three and six hours of Ang II treatment and analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray technology. Gene expression data was evaluated through transcriptional network modeling to identify how differentially expressed (DE) genes are connected to each other. Moreover, other genes co-expressing with the DE genes were considered in these analyses in order to support the identification of enriched functions and pathways. A hub-based network analysis showed that the most connected nodes in Ang II-related networks exert functions associated with cell proliferation, migration and invasion, key aspects for glioma progression. The subsequent functional enrichment analysis of these central genes highlighted their participation in signaling pathways that are frequently deregulated in gliomas such as ErbB, MAPK and p53. Noteworthy, either AT1 or AT2 inhibitions were able to down-regulate different sets of hub genes involved in protumoral functions, suggesting that both Ang II receptors could be therapeutic targets for intervention in glioma. Taken together, our results point out multiple actions of Ang II in glioma pathogenesis and reveal the participation of both Ang II receptors in the regulation of genes relevant for glioma progression. This study is the first one to provide systems-level molecular data for better understanding the protumoral effects of Ang II in the proliferative and infiltrative behavior of

  12. Very deep spectroscopy of the bright Saturn nebula NGC 7009 - II. Analysis of the rich optical recombination spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Liu, X.-W.

    2013-03-01

    In Paper I, we presented a deep, long-slit spectrum of the bright Saturn nebula NGC 7009. Numerous permitted lines emitted by the C+, N+, O+ and Ne+ ions were detected. Gaussian profile fitting to the spectrum yielded more than 1000 lines, the majority of which are optical recombination lines (ORLs) of heavy-element ions. In the current paper, we present a critical analysis of the rich optical recombination spectrum of NGC 7009, in the context of the bi-abundance nebular model proposed by Liu et al. Transitions from individual multiplets are checked carefully for potential blended lines. The observed relative intensities are compared with the theoretical predictions based on high-quality effective recombination coefficients, now available for the recombination line spectrum of a number of heavy-element ions. The possibility of plasma diagnostics using the ORLs of various heavy-element ions is discussed in detail. The line ratios that can be used to determine electron temperature are presented for each ion, although there is still a lack of adequate atomic data and some of the lines are still not detected in the spectrum of NGC 7009 due to weakness and/or line blending. Plasma diagnostics based on the N II and O II recombination spectra both yield electron temperatures close to 1000 K, which is lower than those derived from the collisionally excited line (CEL) ratios (e.g. the [O III] and [N II] nebular-to-auroral line ratios; see Paper I for details) by nearly one order of magnitude. The very low temperatures yielded by the O II and N II ORLs indicate that they originate from very cold regions. The C2+/H+, N2+/H+, O2+/H+ and Ne2+/H+ ionic abundance ratios derived from ORLs are consistently higher, by about a factor of 5, than the corresponding values derived from CELs. In calculating the ORL ionic abundance ratios, we have used the newly available high-quality effective recombination coefficients, and adopted an electron temperature of ˜1000 K, as given by the ORL

  13. Assessment of work compatibility across employees' demographics: a case study.

    PubMed

    Basha, S A; Maiti, J

    2017-03-01

    'Work compatibility' (WC) is a multi-dimensional diagnostic tool for measuring human performance that affects safety performance of work force. There are a dearth of literature on the use of WC in industrial applications. In this study, the status of WC and its components across employees' demographics such as age, experience, designation and location of work were examined in a steel plant in India. Data on 119 employees collected using Demand-Energizer Instrument was analysed. The results revealed that supervisors perceive higher energizers, higher demands and low WC as compared to workers. Older and high experience employees perceive higher energizers, lower demands and high WC as compared to younger and less experienced employees. All employee groups perceive higher demand for physical environment and physical task content. The problematic work groups identified are less experienced employees and workers in 'allied sections'. The outcomes of the study help the management in three ways to improve human performance at work places: (i) it provides useful information about the work factors to be considered for intervention design, (ii) it identifies the work groups to be targeted while preparing intervention strategies and (iii) it can be used as a leading indicator of human performance.

  14. A measurement system for aircraft/weapon electromagnetic compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mounteer, T.D.; Scott, L.D.; Stevenson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    An electromagnetic measurement system (EMMS) was designed and constructed to provide essential data relating to electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of modern weapons carried on military aircraft. This system measures the equivalent plane wave electric and magnetic fields impinging on a weapon's exterior surface arising from electromagnetic radiators on board host or nearby aircraft. To relate practical sensor responses to specified equivalent plane wave EMC field levels, a modern weapon shape was used as the primary sensor element which responds with a simple dipole antenna response at the lower frequencies and is instrumented with local skin current sensors. At higher frequencies, the locally induced currents can be related to the incident fields by simple scattering theory. Finally, an error analysis that catalogs all measurement path elements was performed to provide an error bound on the equivalent free electric field measurements reported by the EMMS. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  15. EXTENDED ANALYSIS OF THE SPECTRUM OF SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian

    2014-08-01

    We have made new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 2850-37900 Å with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 2 m Fourier transform spectrometer. These data extend our previously reported observations in the near-ultra-violet region. We present a comprehensive list of more than 5300 Cr II lines classified as transitions among 456 even and 457 odd levels, 179 of which are newly located in this work. Using highly excited levels of the 3d {sup 4}({sup 5} D)5g, 3d {sup 4}({sup 5} D)6g, and 3d {sup 4}({sup 5}D)6h configurations, we derive an improved ionization energy of 132971.02 ± 0.12 cm{sup –1} (16.486305 ± 0.000015 eV)

  16. Extended Analysis of the Spectrum of Singly Ionized Chromium (Cr II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian

    2014-08-01

    We have made new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 2850-37900 Å with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 2 m Fourier transform spectrometer. These data extend our previously reported observations in the near-ultra-violet region. We present a comprehensive list of more than 5300 Cr II lines classified as transitions among 456 even and 457 odd levels, 179 of which are newly located in this work. Using highly excited levels of the 3d 4(5 D)5g, 3d 4(5 D)6g, and 3d 4(5D)6h configurations, we derive an improved ionization energy of 132971.02 ± 0.12 cm-1 (16.486305 ± 0.000015 eV).

  17. Force Management Methods Task II. Volume I. Summary and Analysis Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    iiDi’stLII.J TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION PAGE INTRODUCTION 1 2 FORCE MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW 2 K 2.1 FORCE MANAGEMENT DEFINITION 4 2.2 FORCE MANAGEMENT ELEMENTS...34A w toIW W" r z a . 0a to, to co f. go-I I % at,, o" -, .... w a 1.45.4 -- - to~1.. S. h - .ar.. ]h. 2.1 FORCE MANAGEMENT DEFINITION The MIL-STD-1530A

  18. Analysis of RFSA Campaign No.2 Dissolver Solution for Hg(I) and Hg(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, H.P.

    2001-05-17

    TA 2-1083, under which RFSA processing is conducted, calls for a nominal mercuric ion concentration in the dissolver solution of 0.006M with a maximum of 0.01 M. The second RFSA campaign operated according to these guidelines with the initial Hg(II) concentration being 0.0068 M. Part of this study is to ascertain optimum excess Hg(I) for chloride removal.

  19. Measurements and Analysis of Longitudinal HOM Driven Coupled Bunch Modes in PEP-II Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Winkle, D.Van; /SLAC

    2008-07-07

    The growth rates of the longitudinal higher-order impedance-driven beam modes have greatly increased since the initial PEP-II design and commissioning. This increase is attributed to the addition of 6 1.2MW RF stations with 8 accelerating cavities in the HER and 2 1.2MW RF stations with 4 accelerating cavities in the LER, which allowed operations at twice the design current and almost four times the luminosity. As a result, the damping requirements for the longitudinal feedback have greatly increased since the design, and the feedback filters and control schemes have evolved during PEP-II operations. In this paper, growth and damping rate data for the higher-order mode (HOM) driven coupled-bunch modes are presented from various PEP-II runs and are compared with historical estimates during commissioning. The effect of noise in the feedback processing channel is also studied. Both the stability and performance limits of the system are analyzed.

  20. Single-molecule analysis of Mss116-mediated group II intron folding

    PubMed Central

    Karunatilaka, Krishanthi S.; Solem, Amanda; Pyle, Anna Marie; Rueda, David

    2015-01-01

    DEAD-box helicases are conserved enzymes involved in nearly all aspects of RNA metabolism, but their mechanisms of action remain unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism of the DEAD-box protein Mss116 on its natural substrate, the group II intron ai5γ. Group II introns are structurally complex catalytic RNAs considered evolutionarily related to the eukaryotic spliceosome, and an interesting paradigm for large RNA folding. We used single-molecule fluorescence to monitor the effect of Mss116 on folding dynamics of a minimal active construct, ai5γ–D135. The data show that Mss116 stimulates dynamic sampling between states along the folding pathway, an effect previously observed only with high Mg2+ concentrations. Furthermore, the data indicate that Mss116 promotes folding through discrete ATP-independent and ATP-dependent steps. We propose that Mss116 stimulates group II intron folding through a multi-step process that involves electrostatic stabilization of early intermediates and ATP hydrolysis during the final stages of native state assembly. PMID:20944626

  1. Impact of the Belle II pixel detector on the analysis of CP-violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudinén, F.

    2017-03-01

    The new asymmetric electron positron collider SuperKEKB in Tsukuba, Japan, is currently being commissioned. With a design luminosity of 8 · 1035 cm‑2 s‑1, leading ultimately to an integrated luminosity of about 50 ab‑1, it will overtake by almost two orders of magnitude the record integrated luminosity reached by its predecessor KEKB. With the upgrade, the beam energy asymmetry will be reduced resulting in a lower boost. Thus, the increase in luminosity and the reduction of the boost set stringent requirements on the performance of the Belle II detector, currently under construction, in order to cope with the expected large physics rates. Consisting of two layers mounted at 14 mm and 22 mm radius from the interaction point, the new Belle II pixel vertex detector based on DEPFET technology will provide the necessary three dimensional high precision position measurements of the trajectories of charged particles. This will allow the precise reconstruction of short lived particle vertices. The physics performance of the Belle II pixel vertex detector and its impact in the reduction of experimental uncertainties will be discussed focusing on the measurement of the CP-violating parameters in B-meson decay.

  2. GIANT H II REGIONS IN M101. I. X-RAY ANALYSIS OF HOT GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Wei; Chen Yang; Feng Li; Chu, You-Hua; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Wang, Q. Daniel; Li Jiangtao

    2012-11-20

    We performed a Chandra X-ray study of three giant H II regions (GHRs), NGC 5461, NGC 5462, and NGC 5471, in the spiral galaxy M101. The X-ray spectra of the three GHRs all contain a prominent thermal component with a temperature of {approx}0.2 keV. In NGC 5461, the spatial distribution of the soft (<1.5 keV) X-ray emission is generally in agreement with the extent of H1105, the most luminous H II region therein, but extends beyond its southern boundary, which could be attributed to outflows from the star cloud between H1105 and H1098. In NGC 5462, the X-ray emission is displaced from the H II regions and a ridge of blue stars; the H{alpha} filaments extending from the ridge of star cloud to the diffuse X-rays suggest that hot gas outflows have occurred. The X-rays from NGC 5471 are concentrated at the B-knot, a 'hypernova remnant' candidate. Assuming a Sedov-Taylor evolution, the derived explosion energy, on the order of 10{sup 52} erg, is consistent with a hypernova origin. In addition, a bright source in the field of NGC 5462 has been identified as a background active galactic nucleus, instead of a black hole X-ray binary in M101.

  3. Effector identity and orthogonal stimulus-response compatibility in blindness to response-compatible stimuli.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akio; Yokosawa, Kazuhiko

    2010-03-01

    Perceiving a visual stimulus is hampered when the stimulus is compatible with simultaneously prepared or executed action (blindness effect). We explored the roles of the effector identity of the responding hand and of orthogonal compatibility (above-right/below-left correspondence) in the blindness effect. In Experiment 1, participants conducted bimanual key presses with vertically arranged responses while perceiving a brief presentation of rightward or leftward arrowheads. A blindness effect based on the effector identity did emerge, but only with the above-right/below-left key-hand arrangement. An orthogonal blindness effect was not found in Experiment 2 with a horizontal key-press action task and a vertical arrowhead perception task. We concluded that the anatomical identity of the responding hand was not integrated into the action plan with an orthogonally incompatible key-hand arrangement. The findings are discussed in terms of the generality and limits of the blindness effect, and hierarchical response coding.

  4. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.; Kujak, S.; Waite, T. )

    1993-01-01

    Equipment manufacturers are challenged to replace CFC-based refrigerants and their lubricants with environmentally acceptable alternatives. Information on the compatibility of motor materials with these alternative refrigerants and lubricants is a basic requirement for reliable performance. This report presents compatibility data for 24 commercially used motor materials exposed to 17 refrigerant/lubricant combinations. This compatibility data will enable the phase out of CFC's to continue at its current fast pace and insure the continued reliable performance of refrigerant-based equipment.

  5. Blood compatibility of AAc, HEMA, and PEGMA-grafted cellulose film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Young Chang; Kwon, Oh Hyun

    2003-03-01

    To improve surface blood compatibility on cellulose film for hemodialysis, acrylic acid, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and three kinds of polyethylene glycol methacrylates were grafted onto the cellulose film surface by radiation grafting technique. Heparin was introduced onto the grafted cellulose film surfaces. The grafting and heparinization were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the attenuated total reflectance mode and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. The blood compatibility of the modified cellulose film was examined by the determination of platelet adhesion and thrombus formation.

  6. Advanced techniques for determining long term compatibility of materials with propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. L.; Stebbins, J. P.; Smith, A. W.; Pullen, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method for the prediction of propellant-material compatibility for periods of time up to ten years is presented. Advanced sensitive measurement techniques used in the prediction method are described. These include: neutron activation analysis, radioactive tracer technique, and atomic absorption spectroscopy with a graphite tube furnace sampler. The results of laboratory tests performed to verify the prediction method are presented.

  7. 32 CFR 256.5 - The air installation compatible use program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 256.4. AICUZ studies which contain an analysis of land use compatibility problems and potential... operational capabilities while reducing noise, real estate and construction requirements. (8) Recommendations... Departments real property holdings in the vicinity of military airfields where applicable. (e)...

  8. 32 CFR 256.5 - The air installation compatible use program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 256.4. AICUZ studies which contain an analysis of land use compatibility problems and potential...: (1) Determination by detailed study of flight operations, actual noise and safety surveys if... establishing the individual air installation AICUZ program. (2) When relocation or abandonment of a mission...

  9. Common Ground: Exploring Compatibilities between the Linked Data Models of the Library of Congress and OCLC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godby, Carol Jean; Denenberg, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Jointly released by OCLC and the Library of Congress, this white paper compares and contrasts the compatible linked data initiatives at both institutions. It is an executive summary of a more detailed technical analysis that will be released later this year. The white paper summarizes the recent activity of the Bibliographic Framework Initiative…

  10. Implementation of the Biosphere Compatibility Principle in Urban Planning: How to Train Next-Generation Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanova, Zinaida Ilyinichna; Yudenkova, Olga Valeryevna; Ishkov, Aleksandr Dmitrievich; Shnyrenkov, Evgeny Anatolyevich

    2015-01-01

    The co-authors address the relevant issues concerning the need to implement the principle of the biosphere compatibility as the core prerequisite for the symbiotic co-existence of man and nature. Caring treatment of the biosphere, termination of its excessive exploitation, analysis of the ratio between the biospheric potential of specific areas…

  11. Teaching Perspectives of Chinese Teachers: Compatibility with the Goals of the Physical Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lijuan; Ha, Amy Sau-ching; Wen, Xu

    2014-01-01

    This research primarily aimed to examine the compatibility of teaching perspectives of teachers with the Physical Education (PE) curriculum in China. The Teaching Perspective Inventory (Pratt, 1998) was used to collect data from 272 PE teachers. Descriptive statistics, MANOVAs, and correlational procedures were used for quantitative data analysis.…

  12. RNA Secondary Structures Having a Compatible Sequence of Certain Nucleotide Ratios.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Christopher L; Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian M

    2016-11-01

    Given a random RNA secondary structure, S, we study RNA sequences having fixed ratios of nucleotides that are compatible with S. We perform this analysis for RNA secondary structures subject to various base-pairing rules and minimum arc- and stack-length restrictions. Our main result reads as follows: in the simplex of nucleotide ratios, there exists a convex region, in which, in the limit of long sequences, a random structure asymptotically almost surely (a.a.s.) has compatible sequence with these ratios and outside of which a.a.s. a random structure has no such compatible sequence. We localize this region for RNA secondary structures subject to various base-pairing rules and minimum arc- and stack-length restrictions. In particular, for GC-sequences (GC denoting the nucleotides guanine and cytosine, respectively) having a ratio of G nucleotides smaller than 1/3, a random RNA secondary structure without any minimum arc- and stack-length restrictions has a.a.s. no such compatible sequence. For sequences having a ratio of G nucleotides larger than 1/3, a random RNA secondary structure has a.a.s. such compatible sequences. We discuss our results in the context of various families of RNA structures.

  13. [Magnetic resonance compatibility research for coronary mental stents].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Li; Wang, Shuo; Shang, Ruyao; Wang, Chunren

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to research magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents, and to evaluate the magnetic resonance compatibility based on laboratory testing results. Coronary stents magnetic resonance compatibility test includes magnetically induced displacement force test, magnetically induced torque test, radio frequency induced heating and evaluation of MR image. By magnetic displacement force and torque values, temperature, and image distortion values to determine metal coronary stent demagnetization effect. The methods can be applied to test magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents and evaluate its demagnetization effect.

  14. Insights from computational analysis of full-length β-ketoacyl-[ACP] synthase-II cDNA isolated from American and African oil palms

    PubMed Central

    Bhore, Subhash J.; Cha, Thye S.; Amelia, Kassim; Shah, Farida H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Palm oil derived from fruits (mesocarp) of African oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. Tenera) and American oil palm (E. oleifera) is important for food industry. Due to high yield, Elaeis guineensis (Tenera) is cultivated on commercial scale, though its oil contains high (~54%) level of saturated fatty acids. The rate-limiting activity of beta-ketoacyl-[ACP] synthase-II (KAS-II) is considered mainly responsible for the high (44%) level of palmitic acid (C16:0) in the oil obtained from E. guineensis. Objective: The objective of this study was to annotate KAS-II cDNA isolated from American and African oil palms. Materials and Methods: The full-length E. oleifera KAS-II (EoKAS-II) cDNA clone was isolated using random method of gene isolation. Whereas, the E. guineensis KAS-II (EgTKAS-II) cDNA was isolated using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique; and missing ends were obtained by employing 5’and 3’ RACE technique. Results: The results show that EoKAS-II and EgTKAS-II open reading frames (ORFs) are of 1689 and 1721 bp in length, respectively. Further analysis of the both EoKAS-II and EgTKAS-II predicted protein illustrates that they contains conserved domains for ‘KAS-I and II’, ‘elongating’ condensing enzymes, ‘condensing enzymes super-family’, and ‘3-oxoacyl-[ACP] synthase II’. The predicted protein sequences shows 95% similarity with each other. Consecutively, the three active sites (Cys, His, and His) were identified in both proteins. However, difference in positions of two active Histidine (His) residues was noticed. Conclusion: These insights may serve as the foundation in understanding the variable activity of KAS-II in American and African oil palms; and cDNA clones could be useful in the genetic engineering of oil palms. PMID:24678202

  15. Skills-demands compatibility as a determinant of flow experience in an inductive reasoning task.

    PubMed

    Schiefele, Ulrich; Raabe, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    The skills-demands fit hypothesis of flow theory was examined. Based on the earlier finding that high demands in a game situation do not reduce the experience of flow, a cognitive task paradigm was used. The effect of skills-demands compatibility on the experience of flow but not of other, similar psychological states (i.e., concentration, negative and positive activation) was also investigated. Participants were 89 undergraduate students who worked on a number of inductive reasoning tasks in four successive trials with or without skills-demands compatibility. The results clearly supported the skills-demands fit hypothesis; concentration and activation were affected only by the tasks' difficulty. Inductive reasoning tasks are a useful tool for the experimental analysis of flow, and skills-demands compatibility is a significant and powerful condition of flow, but not of other, similar psychological states.

  16. [Applications of mathematical statistics methods on compatibility researches of traditional Chinese medicines formulae].

    PubMed

    Mai, Lan-Yin; Li, Yi-Xuan; Chen, Yong; Xie, Zhen; Li, Jie; Zhong, Ming-Yu

    2014-05-01

    The compatibility of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) formulae containing enormous information, is a complex component system. Applications of mathematical statistics methods on the compatibility researches of traditional Chinese medicines formulae have great significance for promoting the modernization of traditional Chinese medicines and improving clinical efficacies and optimizations of formulae. As a tool for quantitative analysis, data inference and exploring inherent rules of substances, the mathematical statistics method can be used to reveal the working mechanisms of the compatibility of traditional Chinese medicines formulae in qualitatively and quantitatively. By reviewing studies based on the applications of mathematical statistics methods, this paper were summarized from perspective of dosages optimization, efficacies and changes of chemical components as well as the rules of incompatibility and contraindication of formulae, will provide the references for further studying and revealing the working mechanisms and the connotations of traditional Chinese medicines.

  17. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for Tank 241-AP-103 grab samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-10-02

    Three grab samples (3AP-97-2, 3AP-97-3, and 3AP-97-4) were taken from Riser 1 of Tank 241-AP-103 on August 21, 1997, and received by 222-S Laboratory on August 22, 1997. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1997 (TSAP) (Field, 1997) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste and Compatibility Program (Mulkey et. al., 1995) (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results. Appearance and Sample Breakdown Attachment 1 illustrates subsamples generated in the laboratory for analyses and identifies their sources. Furthermore, this reference relates tank farm identification numbers to their corresponding 222-S Laboratory Information Management System sample numbers. Table 1 summarizes appearance information and over-the-top (OTR) dose readings performed on each sample. For each sample, two 20 ml subsamples were created for inorganic and radiochemical analyses.

  18. Characterization of Multidrug Resistant E. faecalis Strains from Pigs of Local Origin by ADSRRS-Fingerprinting and MALDI -TOF MS; Evaluation of the Compatibility of Methods Employed for Multidrug Resistance Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Zięba, Przemysław; Gnat, Sebastian; Trościańczyk, Aleksandra; Adaszek, Łukasz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize multidrug resistant E. faecalis strains from pigs of local origin and to analyse the relationship between resistance and genotypic and proteomic profiles by amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites (ADSRRS-fingerprinting) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI -TOF MS). From the total pool of Enterococcus spp. isolated from 90 pigs, we selected 36 multidrug resistant E. faecalis strains, which represented three different phenotypic resistance profiles. Phenotypic resistance to tetracycline, macrolides, phenicols, and lincomycin and high-level resistance to aminoglycosides were confirmed by the occurrence of at least one corresponding resistance gene in each strain. Based on the analysis of the genotypic and phenotypic resistance of the strains tested, five distinct resistance profiles were generated. As a complement of this analysis, profiles of virulence genes were determined and these profiles corresponded to the phenotypic resistance profiles. The demonstration of resistance to a wide panel of antimicrobials by the strains tested in this study indicates the need of typing to determine the spread of resistance also at the local level. It seems that in the case of E. faecalis, type and scope of resistance strongly determines the genotypic pattern obtained with the ADSRRS-fingerprinting method. The ADSRRS-fingerprinting analysis showed consistency of the genetic profiles with the resistance profiles, while analysis of data with the use of the MALDI- TOF MS method did not demonstrate direct reproduction of the clustering pattern obtained with this method. Our observations were confirmed by statistical analysis (Simpson's index of diversity, Rand and Wallace coefficients). Even though the MALDI -TOF MS method showed slightly higher discrimination power than ADSRRS-fingerprinting, only the latter method allowed reproduction of the clustering pattern of

  19. Characterization of Multidrug Resistant E. faecalis Strains from Pigs of Local Origin by ADSRRS-Fingerprinting and MALDI -TOF MS; Evaluation of the Compatibility of Methods Employed for Multidrug Resistance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Zięba, Przemysław; Gnat, Sebastian; Trościańczyk, Aleksandra; Adaszek, Łukasz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize multidrug resistant E. faecalis strains from pigs of local origin and to analyse the relationship between resistance and genotypic and proteomic profiles by amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites (ADSRRS-fingerprinting) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI -TOF MS). From the total pool of Enterococcus spp. isolated from 90 pigs, we selected 36 multidrug resistant E. faecalis strains, which represented three different phenotypic resistance profiles. Phenotypic resistance to tetracycline, macrolides, phenicols, and lincomycin and high-level resistance to aminoglycosides were confirmed by the occurrence of at least one corresponding resistance gene in each strain. Based on the analysis of the genotypic and phenotypic resistance of the strains tested, five distinct resistance profiles were generated. As a complement of this analysis, profiles of virulence genes were determined and these profiles corresponded to the phenotypic resistance profiles. The demonstration of resistance to a wide panel of antimicrobials by the strains tested in this study indicates the need of typing to determine the spread of resistance also at the local level. It seems that in the case of E. faecalis, type and scope of resistance strongly determines the genotypic pattern obtained with the ADSRRS-fingerprinting method. The ADSRRS-fingerprinting analysis showed consistency of the genetic profiles with the resistance profiles, while analysis of data with the use of the MALDI- TOF MS method did not demonstrate direct reproduction of the clustering pattern obtained with this method. Our observations were confirmed by statistical analysis (Simpson’s index of diversity, Rand and Wallace coefficients). Even though the MALDI -TOF MS method showed slightly higher discrimination power than ADSRRS-fingerprinting, only the latter method allowed reproduction of the clustering pattern of

  20. Oxygen Compatibility Assessment of Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel; Sparks, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Fire hazards are inherent in oxygen systems and a storied history of fires in rocket engine propulsion components exists. To detect and mitigate these fire hazards requires careful, detailed, and thorough analyses applied during the design process. The oxygen compatibility assessment (OCA) process designed by NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) can be used to determine the presence of fire hazards in oxygen systems and the likelihood of a fire. This process may be used as both a design guide and during the approval process to ensure proper design features and material selection. The procedure for performing an OCA is a structured step-by-step process to determine the most severe operating conditions; assess the flammability of the system materials at the use conditions; evaluate the presence and efficacy of ignition mechanisms; assess the potential for a fire to breach the system; and determine the reaction effect (the potential loss of life, mission, and system functionality as the result of a fire). This process should be performed for each component in a system. The results of each component assessment, and the overall system assessment, should be recorded in a report that can be used in the short term to communicate hazards and their mitigation and to aid in system/component development and, in the long term, to solve anomalies that occur during engine testing and operation.

  1. Ultra-high vacuum compatible image furnace.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, A; Boeuf, J; Bauer, A; Russ, B; Löhneysen, H v; Pfleiderer, C

    2011-01-01

    We report the design of an optical floating-zone furnace for single-crystal growth under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible conditions. The system is based on a commercial image furnace, which has been refurbished to be all-metal sealed. Major changes concern the use of UHV rotary feedthroughs and bespoke quartz-metal seals with metal-O-rings at the lamp stage. As a consequence, the procedure of assembling the furnace for crystal growth is changed completely. Bespoke heating jackets permit to bake the system. For compounds with elevated vapor pressures, the ultra-high vacuum serves as a precondition for the use of a high-purity argon atmosphere up to 10 bar. In the ferromagnetic Heusler compound Cu(2)MnAl, the improvements of purity result in an improved stability of the molten zone, grain selection, and, hence, single-crystal growth. Similar improvements are observed in traveling-solvent floating-zone growth of the antiferromagnetic Heusler compound Mn(3)Si. These improvements underscore the great potential of optical float-zoning for the growth of high-purity single crystals of intermetallic compounds.

  2. Ultra-high vacuum compatible image furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, A.; BÅ`uf, J.; Bauer, A.; Russ, B.; Löhneysen, H. v.; Pfleiderer, C.

    2011-01-01

    We report the design of an optical floating-zone furnace for single-crystal growth under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible conditions. The system is based on a commercial image furnace, which has been refurbished to be all-metal sealed. Major changes concern the use of UHV rotary feedthroughs and bespoke quartz-metal seals with metal-O-rings at the lamp stage. As a consequence, the procedure of assembling the furnace for crystal growth is changed completely. Bespoke heating jackets permit to bake the system. For compounds with elevated vapor pressures, the ultra-high vacuum serves as a precondition for the use of a high-purity argon atmosphere up to 10 bar. In the ferromagnetic Heusler compound Cu _2MnAl, the improvements of purity result in an improved stability of the molten zone, grain selection, and, hence, single-crystal growth. Similar improvements are observed in traveling-solvent floating-zone growth of the antiferromagnetic Heusler compound Mn _3Si. These improvements underscore the great potential of optical float-zoning for the growth of high-purity single crystals of intermetallic compounds.

  3. Risk assessment compatible fire models (RACFMs)

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Gritzo, L.A.; Sherman, M.P.

    1998-07-01

    A suite of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Compatible Fire Models (RACFMs) has been developed to represent the hazard posed by a pool fire to weapon systems transported on the B52-H aircraft. These models represent both stand-off (i.e., the weapon system is outside of the flame zone but exposed to the radiant heat load from fire) and fully-engulfing scenarios (i.e., the object is fully covered by flames). The approach taken in developing the RACFMs for both scenarios was to consolidate, reconcile, and apply data and knowledge from all available resources including: data and correlations from the literature, data from an extensive full-scale fire test program at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) at China Lake, and results from a fire field model (VULCAN). In the past, a single, effective temperature, T{sub f}, was used to represent the fire. The heat flux to an object exposed to a fire was estimated using the relationship for black body radiation, {sigma}T{sub f}{sup 4}. Significant improvements have been made by employing the present approach which accounts for the presence of temperature distributions in fully-engulfing fires, and uses best available correlations to estimate heat fluxes in stand-off scenarios.

  4. Extended analysis of the system of even configurations of Ta II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachowska, E.; Dembczyński, J.; Windholz, L.; Ruczkowski, J.; Elantkowska, M.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a parametric study of the fine (fs) and hyperfine structure (hfs) for the even parity configurations of ionized tantalum (Ta II) using improved experimental fs and hfs data for 88 levels. A multi-configuration fitting procedure was performed for 47 configurations taking into account second-order perturbation theory including the effects of closed to open shell excitations. The fs and hfs parameters were calculated. Predicted values of level energies up to 86 000cm-1 are given, as well as gJ-Landé factors, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine structure constants A and B, when no experimental values are available.

  5. A Statistical Analysis of Langmuir Wave-Electron Correlations Observed by the CHARM II Auroral Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, M. P.; Labelle, J. W.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Kaeppler, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Langmuir-mode electron plasma waves are frequently observed by spacecraft in active plasma environments such as the ionosphere. Ionospheric Langmuir waves may be excited by the bump-on-tail instability generated by impinging beams of electrons traveling parallel to the background magnetic field (B). The Correlation of High-frequencies and Auroral Roar Measurement (CHARM II) sounding rocket was launched into a substorm at 9:49 UT on 17 February 2010, from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. The primary instruments included the University of Iowa Wave-Particle Correlator (WPC), the Dartmouth High-Frequency Experiment (HFE), several charged particle detectors, low-frequency wave instruments, and a magnetometer. The HFE is a receiver system which effectively yields continuous (100% duty cycle) electric-field waveform measurements from 100 kHz to 5 MHz, and which had its detection axis aligned nominally parallel to B. The HFE output was fed on-payload to the WPC, which uses a phase-locked loop to track the incoming wave frequency with the most power, then sorting incoming electrons at eight energy levels into sixteen wave-phase bins. CHARM II encountered several regions of strong Langmuir wave activity throughout its 15-minute flight, and the WPC showed wave-lock and statistically significant particle correlation distributions during several time periods. We show results of an in-depth analysis of the CHARM II WPC data for the entire flight, including statistical analysis of correlations which show evidence of direct interaction with the Langmuir waves, indicating (at various times) trapping of particles and both driving and damping of Langmuir waves by particles. In particular, the sign of the gradient in particle flux appears to correlate with the phase relation between the electrons and the wave field, with possible implications for the wave physics.

  6. RP-1 Thermal Stability and Copper Based Materials Compatibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegemeier, B. R.; Meyer, M. L.; Driscoll, E.

    2005-01-01

    A series of electrically heated tube tests was performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Heated Tube Facility to investigate the effect that sulfur content, test duration, and tube material play in the overall thermal stability and materials compatibility characteristics of RP-1. Scanning-electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to characterize the condition of the tube inner wall surface and any carbon deposition or corrosion formed during these runs. Results of the parametric study indicate that tests with standard RP-1 (total sulfur -23 ppm) and pure copper tubing are characterized by a depostion/deposit shedding process producing local wall temperature swings as high as 500 F. The effect of this shedding is to keep total carbon deposition levels relatively constant for run times from 20 minutes up to 5 hours, though increasing tube pressure drops were observed in all runs. Reduction in the total sulfur content of the fuel from 23 ppm to less than 0.1 ppm resulted in the elimination of deposit shedding, local wall temperature variation, and the tube pressure drop increases that were observed in standard sulfur level RP-1 tests. The copper alloy GRCop-84, a copper alloy developed specifically for high heat flux applications, was found to exhibit higher carbon deposition levels compared to identical tests performed in pure copper tubes. Results of the study are consistent with previously published heated tube data which indicates that small changes in fuel total sulfur content can lead to significant differences in the thermal stability of kerosene type fuels and their compatibility with copper based materials. In conjunction with the existing thermal stability database, these findings give insight into the feasibility of cooling a long life, high performance, high-pressure liquid rocket combustor and nozzle with RP-1.

  7. Analysis and compensation for code Doppler effect of BDS II signal under high dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Fangling

    2016-01-01

    In high dynamic circumstances, the acquisition of BDS (BeiDou Navigation Satellite System) signal would be affected by the pseudo-code Doppler. The pseudo-code frequency shift is more prominent and complex when BOC modulation has been adopted by BDS-II, but is not yet involved in current compensation algorithm. In addition, the most frequently used code Doppler compensation algorithm is modifying the sampling rate or local bit rate, which not only increases the complexity of the acquisition and tracking, but also is barely realizable for the hardware receiver to modify the local frequency. Therefore, this paper proposes a code Doppler compensation method based on double estimator receiver, which simultaneously controls NCO delay of code tracking loop and subcarrier tracking loop to compensate for pseudo-code frequency shift. The simulation and test are implemented with BDS-II BOC signal. The test results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively compensate for pseudo-code Doppler of BOC signal and has detection probability 3dB higher than the uncompensated situation when the false alarm rate is under 0.01 and the coherent integration time is 1ms.

  8. Optical Spectroscopy of Luminous Infrared Galaxies. II. Analysis of the Nuclear and Long-Slit Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, S.; Kim, D.-C.; Sanders, D. B.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Soifer, B. T.

    1995-05-01

    A spectroscopic survey of a sample of 200 luminous IRAS galaxies (LIGs: L_ir_^7^ > 3 x 10^10^ L_sun_; H_0_ = 75 km s^-1^ Mpc^-1^) was carried out using the Palomar 5 meter and University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescopes. Kim et al. (1995) described the data-taking and data-reduction procedures and presented line and continuum measurements extracted from the nucleus of these objects. In this paper, the nuclear data are combined with circumnuclear measurements on 23 of these galaxies to investigate the properties of the line-emitting gas and underlying stellar population in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear spectra of these galaxies were classified as H II region-like" or "AGN-like" using a large number of line-ratio diagnostics corrected for the underlying stellar absorption features. This correction is an important source of errors in some previous studies. The emission-line spectra of many AGNs were found to-be of relatively low ionization level and were therefore classified as LINER. We confirm that both the fraction of LIGs with AGN spectra and the fraction of Seyferts among the AGN increase with infrared luminosity, reaching values of 62% and 54% at the highest observed luminosities, respectively. The fraction of LINERs, on the other hand, is relatively constant at ~27%. The source of the ionization of the emission-line gas often is a function of the distance from the nucleus. Based on the emission-line ratios and the strengths of the stellar absorption features, circumnuclear starburst activity is a common feature of LIGs, regardless of their nuclear spectral types. The emission-line, absorption-line, continuum, radio, and IRAS properties of the LINERs suggest that most of the LINER emission in these infrared-selected galaxies is produced through shock ionization rather than photoionization by a genuine active nucleus. The nuclear region of Seyfert LIGs is found to be slightly less reddened than that of the LINERs and H II galaxies. The dust distribution generally

  9. Transition Region Explosive Events in He II 304Å: Observation and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Thomas; Kankelborg, Charles C.

    2016-05-01

    We present examples of transition region explosive events observed in the He II 304Å spectral line with the Multi Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES). With small (<5000 km) spatial scale and large non-thermal (100-150 km/s) velocities these events satisfy the observational signatures of transition region explosive events. Derived line profiles show distinct blue and red velocity components with very little broadening of either component. We observe little to no emission from low velocity plasma, making the plasmoid instability reconnection model unlikely as the plasma acceleration mechanism for these events. Rather, the single speed, bi-directional jet characteristics suggested by these data are consistent with acceleration via Petschek reconnection.Observations were made during the first sounding rocket flight of MOSES in 2006. MOSES forms images in 3 orders of a concave diffraction grating. Multilayer coatings largely restrict the passband to the He II 303.8Å and Si XI 303.3Å spectral lines. The angular field of view is about 8.5'x17', or about 20% of the solar disk. These images constitute projections of the volume I(x,y,λ), the intensity as a function of sky plane position and wavelength. Spectral line profiles are recovered via tomographic inversion of these projections. Inversion is carried out using a multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique.

  10. Single-molecule analysis of DNA uncoiling by a type II topoisomerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strick, Terence R.; Croquette, Vincent; Bensimon, David

    2000-04-01

    Type II DNA topoisomerases are ubiquitous ATP-dependent enzymes capable of transporting a DNA through a transient double-strand break in a second DNA segment. This enables them to untangle DNA and relax the interwound supercoils (plectonemes) that arise in twisted DNA. In vivo, they are responsible for untangling replicated chromosomes and their absence at mitosis or meiosis ultimately causes cell death. Here we describe a micromanipulation experiment in which we follow in real time a single Drosophila melanogaster topoisomerase II acting on a linear DNA molecule which is mechanically stretched and supercoiled. By monitoring the DNA's extension in the presence of ATP, we directly observe the relaxation of two supercoils during a single catalytic turnover. By controlling the force pulling on the molecule, we determine the variation of the reaction rate with the applied stress. Finally, in the absence of ATP, we observe the clamping of a DNA crossover by a single topoisomerase on at least two different timescales (configurations). These results show that single molecule experiments are a powerful new tool for the study of topoisomerases.

  11. Neutral “Cp-Free” Silyl-Lanthanide(II) Complexes: Synthesis, Structure, and Bonding Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Complexes featuring lanthanide silicon bonds represent a research area still in its infancy. Herein, we report a series of Cp-free lanthanide (+II) complexes bearing σ-bonded silyl ligands. By reactions of LnI2 (Ln = Yb, Eu, Sm) either with a 1,4-oligosilanyl dianion [K-Si(SiMe3)2SiMe2SiMe2Si(SiMe3)2-K)] (1) or with 2 (Me3Si)3SiK (3) the corresponding neutral metallacyclopentasilanes ({Me2Si(Me3Si)2Si}2)Ln·(THF)4 (Ln = Yb (2a), Eu (2b), Sm (2c)), or the disilylated complexes ({Me3Si}3Si)2Ln·(THF)3 (Ln = Yb (4a), Eu (4b), Sm (4c)), were selectively obtained. Complexes 2b, 2c, 4b, and 4c represent the first examples of structurally characterized Cp-free Eu and Sm complexes with silyl ligands. In both series, a linear correlation was observed between the Ln–Si bond lengths and the covalent radii of the corresponding lanthanide metals. Density functional theory calculations were also carried out for complexes 2a–c and 4a–c to elucidate the bonding situation between the Ln(+II) centers and Si. PMID:26132550

  12. Globular Cluster Abundances from High-resolution, Integrated-light Spectroscopy. II. Expanding the Metallicity Range for Old Clusters and Updated Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; McWilliam, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present abundances of globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way and Fornax from integrated-light (IL) spectra. Our goal is to evaluate the consistency of the IL analysis relative to standard abundance analysis for individual stars in those same clusters. This sample includes an updated analysis of seven clusters from our previous publications and results for five new clusters that expand the metallicity range over which our technique has been tested. We find that the [Fe/H] measured from IL spectra agrees to ∼0.1 dex for GCs with metallicities as high as [Fe/H] = ‑0.3, but the abundances measured for more metal-rich clusters may be underestimated. In addition we systematically evaluate the accuracy of abundance ratios, [X/Fe], for Na i, Mg i, Al i, Si i, Ca i, Ti i, Ti ii, Sc ii, V i, Cr i, Mn i, Co i, Ni i, Cu i, Y ii, Zr i, Ba ii, La ii, Nd ii, and Eu ii. The elements for which the IL analysis gives results that are most similar to analysis of individual stellar spectra are Fe i, Ca i, Si i, Ni i, and Ba ii. The elements that show the greatest differences include Mg i and Zr i. Some elements show good agreement only over a limited range in metallicity. More stellar abundance data in these clusters would enable more complete evaluation of the IL results for other important elements. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  13. Analysis of the photosystem II by modelling the fluorescence yield transients during 10 seconds after a 10 ns pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, Natalya E.; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Paschenko, Vladimir Z.; Riznichenko, Galina Yu.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of the photosystem II (PS II) redox states is imitated over nine orders of magnitude in time. Our simulations focus on the information of the chlorophyll a fluorescence induced by a 10 ns laser flash. The PS II model analyzes differences in the PS II reaction between leaves (A. Thaliana, spinach) and thermophilic Chlorella cells.

  14. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Brooks, Dusty Marie

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  15. Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program

    SciTech Connect

    BANNING, D.L.

    1999-07-02

    There are 177 waste storage tanks containing over 210,000 m{sup 3} (55 million gal) of mixed waste at the Hanford Site. The River Protection Project (RPP) has adopted the data quality objective (DQO) process used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (EPA 1994a) and implemented by RPP internal procedure (Banning 1999a) to identify the information and data needed to address safety issues. This DQO document is based on several documents that provide the technical basis for inputs and decision/action levels used to develop the decision rules that evaluate the transfer of wastes. A number of these documents are presently in the process of being revised. This document will need to be revised if there are changes to the technical criteria in these supporting documents. This DQO process supports various documents, such as sampling and analysis plans and double-shell tank (DST) waste analysis plans. This document identifies the type, quality, and quantity of data needed to determine whether transfer of supernatant can be performed safely. The requirements in this document are designed to prevent the mixing of incompatible waste as defined in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-040. Waste transfers which meet the requirements contained in this document and the Double-Shell Tank Waste Analysis Plan (Mulkey 1998) are considered to be compatible, and prevent the mixing of incompatible waste.

  16. Analysis of the Psychometric Properties of the Malay Version of Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) Among Postpartum Women in Kedah, North West of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wan Mahmud, Wan Mohd Rushidi; Awang, Amir; Herman, Iran; Mohamed, Mahmood Nazar

    2004-07-01

    Increased international collaboration in clinical trials has created a need for cross culturally valid instruments to assess the quality of life and behavioural disorders. Cross cultural studies of depressive symptomatology, in particular, must be preceded by an exhaustive study of the psychometric properties of the instruments to ensure the validity of the comparison. In this article, we examined the validity, reliability and factor structure of the Malay version of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) among Malay postpartum women attending selected health centres in Kedah, North West of Peninsular Malaysia. Our findings indicated that the current version of the BDI-II is psychometrically strong and appropriate for use in assessing depressive symptomatology among this group of women.

  17. 36 CFR 1193.21 - Accessibility, usability, and compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accessibility, usability, and compatibility. 1193.21 Section 1193.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION... Accessibility, usability, and compatibility. Where readily achievable, telecommunications equipment and...

  18. 36 CFR 1193.21 - Accessibility, usability, and compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accessibility, usability, and compatibility. 1193.21 Section 1193.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION... Accessibility, usability, and compatibility. Where readily achievable, telecommunications equipment and...

  19. 36 CFR 1193.21 - Accessibility, usability, and compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Accessibility, usability, and compatibility. 1193.21 Section 1193.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION... Accessibility, usability, and compatibility. Where readily achievable, telecommunications equipment and...

  20. 36 CFR 1193.21 - Accessibility, usability, and compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accessibility, usability, and compatibility. 1193.21 Section 1193.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION... Accessibility, usability, and compatibility. Where readily achievable, telecommunications equipment and...

  1. 47 CFR 76.1621 - Equipment compatibility offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Equipment compatibility offer. 76.1621 Section 76.1621 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1621 Equipment compatibility offer. Cable...

  2. 47 CFR 76.1621 - Equipment compatibility offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment compatibility offer. 76.1621 Section 76.1621 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1621 Equipment compatibility offer. Cable...

  3. 47 CFR 76.1621 - Equipment compatibility offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Equipment compatibility offer. 76.1621 Section 76.1621 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1621 Equipment compatibility offer. Cable...

  4. 47 CFR 76.1621 - Equipment compatibility offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Equipment compatibility offer. 76.1621 Section 76.1621 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1621 Equipment compatibility offer. Cable...

  5. 47 CFR 76.630 - Compatibility with consumer electronics equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compatibility with consumer electronics... Compatibility with consumer electronics equipment. (a) Cable system operators shall not scramble or otherwise... subscribe to a level of service above “basic only” but use a digital television or other device with a...

  6. 47 CFR 76.630 - Compatibility with consumer electronics equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compatibility with consumer electronics... Compatibility with consumer electronics equipment. (a) Cable system operators shall not scramble or otherwise... subscribe to a level of service above “basic only” but use a digital television or other device with a...

  7. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar...

  8. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics....

  9. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics....

  10. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar...

  11. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics....

  12. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics....

  13. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar...

  14. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar...

  15. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar electrical firing characteristics....

  16. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar...

  17. 36 CFR 1193.21 - Accessibility, usability, and compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accessibility, usability, and compatibility. 1193.21 Section 1193.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION... Accessibility, usability, and compatibility. Where readily achievable, telecommunications equipment and...

  18. Brain-Compatible Music Teaching Part 2: Teaching "Nongame" Songs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Susan

    2010-01-01

    In the previous issue of "General Music Today," the Early Childhood column explored brain-compatible ways of teaching action songs and singing games. This article illustrates the application of brain-compatible ways to teach songs that do not lend themselves to actions or games. There are two ways of teaching songs. One is based on the assumption…

  19. 47 CFR 76.1621 - Equipment compatibility offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Equipment compatibility offer. 76.1621 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1621 Equipment compatibility offer. Cable system... offer to supply each subscriber with special equipment that will enable the simultaneous reception...

  20. Differential Equations Compatible with Boundary Rational qKZ Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Yoshihiro

    2011-10-01

    We give diffierential equations compatible with the rational qKZ equation with boundary reflection. The total system contains the trigonometric degeneration of the bispectral qKZ equation of type (Cěen, Cn) which in the case of type GLn was studied by van Meer and Stokman. We construct an integral formula for solutions to our compatible system in a special case.