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Sample records for compatibility analysis ii

  1. Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for FY 2001

    SciTech Connect

    LAURICELLA, T.L.

    2000-09-27

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for grab samples obtained to address waste compatibility.

  2. Toxicological studies on potentiated ionophores in chickens. II. Compatibility study.

    PubMed

    Lehel, J; Laczay, P; Móra, Z; Semjén, G

    1995-01-01

    Two trials were carried out on a total of 2 x 360 Tetra-82 broiler chickens to study how the presence of the antioxidant duokvin as potentiating agent influenced the compatibility of reduced doses of monensin (12.5 mg/kg of feed) or maduramicin (3.0 mg/kg of feed) with other chemotherapeutic agents (tiamulin, erythromycin, sulfaquinoxaline, sulfachlorpyrazine, flumequine, tylosin, kitasamycin) widely used in broiler rearing. Compatibility was assessed on the basis of the appearance of clinical signs suggestive of toxic interaction, the mortality rate, body mass gain, feed consumption and drinking water intake, and changes in AST and LDH activities of the blood plasma. The monensin-duokvin combination (12.5 mg monensin/kg of feed + 120 mg duokvin/kg of feed) was found to be compatible with erythromycin, sulfaquinoxaline, sulfachlorpyrazine, flumequine, tylosin and kitasamycin. For tiamulin, a slight incompatibility was observed; however, this was much less severe than that found for monensin administered at a dose of 100 mg/kg of feed. The maduramicin-duokvin combination (3.0 mg maduramicin/kg of feed + 120 mg duokvin/kg of feed) was compatible with all the compounds tested; thus, it can be safely applied also in combination with tiamulin.

  3. Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for FY 2000

    SciTech Connect

    SASAKI, L.M.

    1999-12-29

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for grab samples obtained to address waste compatibility. It is written in accordance with requirements identified in Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (Mulkey et al. 1999) and Tank Farm Waste Transfer Compatibility Program (Fowler 1999). In addition to analyses to support Compatibility, the Waste Feed Delivery program has requested that tank samples obtained for Compatibility also be analyzed to confirm the high-level waste and/or low-activity waste envelope(s) for the tank waste (Baldwin 1999). The analytical requirements to confirm waste envelopes are identified in Data Quality Objectives for TWRS Privatization Phase I: Confirm Tank T is an Appropriate Feed Source for Low-Activity Waste Feed Batch X (Nguyen 1999a) and Data Quality Objectives for RPP Privatization Phase I: Confirm Tank T is an Appropriate Feed Source for High-Level Waste Feed Batch X (Nguyen 1999b).

  4. Compatibility grab sampling and analysis plan for fiscal year 1999

    SciTech Connect

    SASAKI, L.M.

    1999-05-12

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for grab samples obtained to address waste compatibility. Analytical requirements are taken from two revisions of the Compatibility data quality objectives (DQOs). Revision 1 of the DQO (Fowler 1995) listed analyses to be performed to meet both safety and operational data needs for the Compatibility program. Revision 2A of the DQO (Mulkey and Miller 1998) addresses only the safety-related requirements; the operational requirements of Fowler (1995) have not been superseded by Mulkey and Miller (1998). Therefore, safety-related data needs are taken from Mulkey and Miller (1998) and operational-related data needs are taken from Fowler (1995). Ammonia and total alpha analyses are also performed in accordance with Fowler (1998a, 1998b).

  5. Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Group VA-H3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armanda, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    During the eight weeks working at NASA, I was fortunate enough to work with the Expendable Launch Vehicle's (ELV) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Team, who is responsible for the evaluation and analysis of any EMI risk an ELV mission might face. This group of people concern themselves with practically any form of electromagnetic interference that may risk the safety of a rocket, a mission, or even people. Taking this into consideration, the group investigates natural forms of interference, such as lightning, to manmade interferences, such as antennas.

  6. Statistical analysis in dBASE-compatible databases.

    PubMed

    Hauer-Jensen, M

    1991-01-01

    Database management in clinical and experimental research often requires statistical analysis of the data in addition to the usual functions for storing, organizing, manipulating and reporting. With most database systems, transfer of data to a dedicated statistics package is a relatively simple task. However, many statistics programs lack the powerful features found in database management software. dBASE IV and compatible programs are currently among the most widely used database management programs. d4STAT is a utility program for dBASE, containing a collection of statistical functions and tests for data stored in the dBASE file format. By using d4STAT, statistical calculations may be performed directly on the data stored in the database without having to exit dBASE IV or export data. Record selection and variable transformations are performed in memory, thus obviating the need for creating new variables or data files. The current version of the program contains routines for descriptive statistics, paired and unpaired t-tests, correlation, linear regression, frequency tables, Mann-Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, a time-saving procedure for counting observations according to user specified selection criteria, survival analysis (product limit estimate analysis, log-rank test, and graphics), and normal t and chi-squared distribution functions.

  7. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  8. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  9. Intrasystem Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Program. Volume III. Computer Program Documentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    and TART, should be stored separately so they can each be accessed separately for com- pilation and execution. It is nor absolutely necessary to store...analysis results for further use. 6.1 IDIPR CARD INPUT 6.1.1 Input Card Format The basic format for all input cards is a free-field f .- mat with param...data. for t he avg t ci. ’hiis dlata is iin LtIle [u0rilpol )cc1fi e d ill LOLPH mittl data, 12. Wi re Mat . FileI. Th is F iik ohuli Lt duii~r tgju ii~at

  10. Irradiation and compatibility testing of Li/sub 2/O materials at EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, D.L.; Krsul, J.R.; Laug, M.T.; Tetenbaum, M.; Walters, L.C.

    1982-12-01

    A study was made of the neutron-irradiation behavior of /sup 6/Li-enriched Li/sub 2/O material in EBR-II. In addition, a stress corrosion study was performed ex-reactor to test compatibility of Li/sub 2/O materials with a variety of stainless steels. Results of the irradiation testing showed that tritium and helium retention in the Li/sub 2/O (approx. 89% dense) lessened with neutron exposure. Helium tritium retention appeared to approach steady-state after approx. 1% /sup 6/Li burnup. The effect was likely caused by the formation of open porosity in the pellets. The stress corrosion studies, using a 316 stainless steel (Ti-modified) and a 35% Ni alloy, showed that stress does not enhance the corrosion, and that dry Li/sub 2/O is not significantly corrosive, the LiOH content producing the corrosive effects. Corrosion, in general, was not severe as a passivation in sealed capsules seemed to occur after a time greatly reducing corrosion rates.

  11. Compatibility conditions of structural mechanics for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1990-01-01

    The equilibrium equations and the compatibility conditions are fundamental to the analyses of structures. However, anyone who undertakes even a cursory generic study of the compatibility conditions can discover, with little effort, that historically this facet of structural mechanics had not been adequately researched by the profession. Now the compatibility conditions (CC's) have been researched and are understood to a great extent. For finite element discretizations, the CC's are banded and can be divided into three distinct categories: (1) the interface CC's; (2) the cluster or field CC's; and (3) the external CC's. The generation of CC's requires the separating of a local region, then writing the deformation displacement relation (ddr) for the region, and finally, the eliminating of the displacements from the ddr. The procedure to generate all three types of CC's is presented and illustrated through examples of finite element models. The uniqueness of the CC's thus generated is shown.

  12. Compatibility conditions of structural mechanics for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S. N.; Berke, L.; Gallagher, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    The equilibrium equations and the compatibility conditions are fundamental to the analyses of structures. However, anyone who undertakes even a cursory generic study of the compatibility conditions can discover, with little effort, that historically this facet of structural mechanics had not been adequately researched by the profession. Now the compatibility conditions (CC's) have been researched and are understood to a great extent. For finite element discretizations, the CC's are banded and can be divided into three distinct categories: (1) the interface CC's; (2) the cluster or field CC's; and (3) the external CC's. The generation of CC's requires the separating of a local region, then writing the deformation displacement relation (ddr) for the region, and finally, the eliminating of the displacements from the ddr. The procedure to generate all three types of CC's is presented and illustrated through examples of finite element models. The uniqueness of the CC's thus generated is shown.

  13. 76 FR 23824 - Guidance for Industry: “Computer Crossmatch” (Computerized Analysis of the Compatibility Between...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... Analysis of the Compatibility Between the Donor's Cell Type and the Recipient's Serum or Plasma Type... Crossmatch' (Computerized Analysis of the Compatibility between the Donor's Cell Type and the Recipient's... donor's cell type and the recipient's serum or plasma type. The guidance describes practices that...

  14. Compatibility between wood production and other values and uses on forested lands: a problem analysis.

    Treesearch

    Charles E. Peterson; Robert A. Monserud

    2002-01-01

    We provide background documentation for the Pacific Northwest Research Station’s Wood Compatibility Initiative, a 5-year multidisciplinary research effort that began in response to 1997 Congressional direction. This problem analysis was the initial effort to examine the state of knowledge regarding compatibility between wood production and other values and to develop a...

  15. Compatible host/mycorrhizal fungus combinations for micropropagated sea oats: II. Field evaluation.

    PubMed

    Al Agely, Abid; Sylvia, David M

    2008-07-01

    Sea oats (Uniola paniculata L.) are the dominant plant in the pioneer coastal dunes of Florida and are widely used for dune restoration. DNA analysis has revealed significant ecotypic variation among Atlantic and Gulf coast populations of sea oats, but little is known about the diversity of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) communities present in the dune systems. In a prior greenhouse study, we evaluated the functional diversity that exists among the AM fungal communities from divergent Florida dunes and selected effective host/AM fungus combinations for further study. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of these compatible combinations on the growth of sea oats planted at Anastasia State Recreation Area (AN) on the Atlantic coast and St. George Island State Park (SG) on the Gulf coast. Micropropagated sea oats from each site were inoculated with AM fungal communities also from AN and SG or a microbial filtrate control. The complete factorial of treatment combinations were grown in the greenhouse for 8 weeks and outplanted to the AN and SG field sites. After 1 year, root colonization was evaluated, and after 2 years, root colonization, shoot and root dry masses, and shoot- and root-P contents were determined. Overall, sea oats planted at AN had greater percent root colonization, shoot dry mass, and shoot-P content than those planted at SG. At AN, the local sea oat ecotype responded more to the fungal community from the same site relative to shoot dry mass and shoot-P content. At SG, the local fungal community produced larger plants with greater P content regardless of the origin of the host. We conclude that sea oat productivity is responsive to AM fungal ecotype as well as host ecotype, and fungal origin should therefore be taken into account when planning sea oat plantings on coastal dunes.

  16. Phosphorescent Platinum(II) and Palladium(II) Complexes with Azatetrabenzoporphyrins—New Red Laser Diode-Compatible Indicators for Optical Oxygen Sensing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A new class of oxygen indicators is described. Platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes of azatetrabenzoporphyrins occupy an intermediate position between tetrabenzoporphyrins and phthalocyanines and combine features of both. The new dyes are excitable in the red part of the spectrum and possess strong room-temperature NIR phosphorescence. Other features include excellent spectral compatibility with the red laser diodes and 632.8 nm line of He−Ne laser, excellent photostability, and significantly shorter decay times than for the respective meso-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrins. Applicability of the complexes for optical oxygen sensing is demonstrated. PMID:20186289

  17. Contact analysis studies of an ESCAP resist with scCO2 compatible additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Abhinav; Toepperwein, Gregory N.; Tanaka, Manabu; Riggleman, Robert A.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Ober, Christopher K.

    2009-03-01

    Rapid technological advances have presented several environmental issues and call for the use of environmentally friendly processes. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) is a widely used solvent that can enhance processing performance in photolithography, especially in the development step. Supercritical CO2 is a good solvent for many nonpolar molecules with low molecular weights. However, it is generally a very poor solvent for high molecular-weight photoresists. Recently researchers have reported the ability to develop conventional polymeric resists in scCO2 using tailored soluble additives. The mechanism of dissolution of a polymer photoresist in scCO2 in the presence of these additives is clearly at a very early stage of understanding. To understand this mechanism in more detail, we synthesized a series of scCO2 compatible quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) and used them as additives in the dry development of model and commercially available photoresists. In this paper, we describe the various interactions that the QAS additive has with the different functional groups on the polymer resist to assist its dissolution in scCO2. Using contact analysis plots we report the dominant interactions between the additive and the resist material. We report the results with two salts (QAS-I and QAS-II) to show the structure-property relation of these amphiphilic additives with an ESCAP resist. Finally, we report the lithographic evaluation of a commercial EUV resist using an appropriate scCO2 compatible QAS after development in scCO2.

  18. Performance Analysis of a Link-16/JTIDS Compatible Waveform With Noncoherent Detection, Diversity and Side Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    OF A LINK-16/ JTIDS COMPATIBLE WAVEFORM WITH NONCOHERENT DETECTION, DIVERSITY AND SIDE INFORMATION by Ioannis Kagioglidis September 2009...3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Performance Analysis of a Link-16/ JTIDS Compatible Waveform with...System ( JTIDS ) is a hybrid frequency-hopped, direct sequence spread spectrum system. A (31, 15) Reed-Solomon (RS) code is used for forward error

  19. Compatibility of person-centered planning and applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Holburn, Steve

    2001-01-01

    In response to Osborne (1999), the aims and practices of person-centered planning (PCP) are compared to the basic principles of applied behavior analysis set forth by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968, 1987). The principal goal of PCP is social integration of people with disabilities; it qualifies as a socially important behavior, and its problems have been displayed sufficiently. However, social integration is a complex social problem whose solution requires access to system contingencies that influence lifestyles. Nearly all of the component goals of PCP proposed by O'Brien (1987b) have been reliably quantified, although concurrent measurement of outcomes such as friendship, autonomy, and respect presents a formidable challenge. Behavioral principles such as contingency and contextual control are operative within PCP, but problems in achieving reliable implementation appear to impede an experimental analysis. PMID:22478371

  20. Basic EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) Technology Advancement for C3 Systems - Model Revision for IEMCAP (Intrasystem Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Program).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    Leviatan and A. T. Adams, The Response of a Two-Wire Transmission Line to Incident Field and Voltage Excitation, Including the Effects of Higher Order Hodes...AFB, NY. [20] W. R. Johnson, A. K. Thomas , et. al., Development of a Space Vehicle Electromagnetic Interference/Compatibility Specification, NASA

  1. Reanalysis, compatibility and correlation in analysis of modified antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1989-01-01

    A simple computational procedure is synthesized to process changes in the microwave-antenna pathlength-error measure when there are changes in the antenna structure model. The procedure employs structural modification reanalysis methods combined with new extensions of correlation analysis to provide the revised rms pathlength error. Mainframe finite-element-method processing of the structure model is required only for the initial unmodified structure, and elementary postprocessor computations develop and deal with the effects of the changes. Several illustrative computational examples are included. The procedure adapts readily to processing spectra of changes for parameter studies or sensitivity analyses.

  2. The problem of mechanical compatibility of natural building stones in the restoration of monuments. Part II: Specimens with modified boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninis, Nikolaos L.; Kourkoulis, Stavros K.

    2011-12-01

    It was pointed out in Part I of this short two-paper series, that the mechanical incompatibility between the authentic building stone of ancient monuments and the stones used as substitute ones during restoration projects, may be the reason of violation of basic restoration principles concerning the protection of the ancient material. In this context certain geometrical configurations of the boundaries of the specimens are examined in this Part II as a possible means of modifying the mechanical behaviour of the substitute stones, in order to make them as compatible as possible with the authentic material. Modifications of both the contact surfaces (in order to change the friction conditions) of the specimens as well as of the free ones (in order to quantify the influence of transforming the smooth cylindrical surface to a fluted one) are examined experimentally. This approach is based on existing observations and numerical studies indicating that the behaviour of a stone specimen in the post-peak region is affected by the geometrical configuration of its boundaries. Taking advantage of the experimental results an alternative compatibility criterion is introduced for situations where the “required” quality of the building stone is its ability to withstand deformation without failing structurally, a characteristic pertinent to statically indeterminate structures, whose design is based on deformation control. This criterion combines both peak stress and maximum failure strain providing a better insight into the problem of mechanical incompatibility of natural building stones.

  3. Solid phase microextraction analysis of B83 SLTS and Core B compatibility test units

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D M; Ithaca, J; King, H A; Malcolm, S

    1999-03-26

    Solid phase microextraction has permitted the efficient collection and analysis of a broad range of volatile and semivolatile compounds outgassed from materials. In 1998, we implemented a microextraction protocol at Mason and Hanger, Pantex Plant, for the analysis of weapons and compatibility test units. The chemical information that was obtained from this work is interpreted by determining the source and outgas mechanism for each compound in the weapon signature, which is a task only accomplished by analysis of material standards.

  4. Thermal behaviour of procaine and benzocaine Part II: compatibility study with some pharmaceutical excipients used in solid dosage forms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The compatibility study of active substances with excipients finds an important role in the domain of pharmaceutical research, being known the fact that final formulation is the one administered to the patient. In order to evaluate the compatibility between active substance and excipients, different analytical techniques can be used, based on their accuracy, reproducibility and fastness. Results Compatibility study of two well-known active substances, procaine and benzocaine, with four commonly used excipients, was carried out employing thermal analysis (TG/DTG/HF) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (UATR-FT-IR). The selected excipients were microcrystalline cellulose, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate and talc. Equal proportion of active substance and excipients (w/w) was utilized in the interaction study. The absolute value of the difference between the melting point peak of active substances and the one corresponding for the active substances in the analysed mixture, as well the absolute value of the difference between the enthalpy of the pure active ingredient melting peak and that of its melting peak in the different analysed mixtures were chosen as indexes of the drug-excipient interaction degree. All the results obtained through thermal analysis were also sustained by FT-IR spectroscopy. Conclusions The corroboration of data obtained by thermal analysis with the ones from FT-IR spectroscopy indicated that no interaction occurs between procaine and benzocaine, with microcrystalline cellulose and talc, as well for the benzocaine-lactose mixture. Interactions were confirmed between procaine and benzocaine respectively and magnesium stearate, and for procaine and lactose. PMID:23962059

  5. Conversion of the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS) to an IBM PC Compatible Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruep, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The conversion of the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS) software from a Silicon Graphics UNIX-based platform to a DOS-based IBM PC compatible is discussed. Relevant background information is given, followed by a discussion of the steps taken to accomplish the conversion and a discussion of the type of problems encountered during the conversion. A brief comparison of aerodynamic data obtained using APAS with data from another source is also made.

  6. Mating Compatibility and Restriction Analysis of Ganoderma Isolates from Oil Palm and Other Palm Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Chan Jer; Seman, Idris Abu; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2015-01-01

    Mating compatibility and restriction analyses of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions were performed to determine the relations between Ganoderma boninense, the most common species associated with basal stem rot in oil palm and Ganoderma isolates from infected oil palm, two ornamental palms, sealing wax palm (Cyrtostachys renda) and MacArthur palm (Ptychosperma macarthurii), an isolate from coconut stump (Cocos nucifera), Ganoderma miniatocinctum, Ganoderma zonatum and Ganoderma tornatum. The results showed that G. boninense was compatible with Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, G. miniatocinctum and G. zonatum, Ganoderma isolates from sealing wax palm, MacArthur palm and coconut stump. G. boninense was not compatible with G. tornatum. Therefore, the results suggested that the G. boninense, G. miniatocinctum, G. zonatum, and Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, ornamental palms and coconut stump could represent the same biological species. In performing a restriction analysis of the ITS regions, variations were observed in which five haplotypes were generated from the restriction patterns. An unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis showed that all the Ganoderma isolates were grouped into five primary groups, and the similarity values of the isolates ranged from 97% to 100%. Thus, a restriction analysis of the ITS regions showed that G. boninense and the Ganoderma isolates from other palm hosts were closely related. On the basis of the mating compatibility test and the restriction analysis of the ITS regions performed in this study, a diverse group of Ganoderma species from oil palm and other palm hosts are closely related, except for G. tornatum and Ganoderma isolates from tea and rubber. PMID:26868709

  7. Mating Compatibility and Restriction Analysis of Ganoderma Isolates from Oil Palm and Other Palm Hosts.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chan Jer; Seman, Idris Abu; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2015-12-01

    Mating compatibility and restriction analyses of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions were performed to determine the relations between Ganoderma boninense, the most common species associated with basal stem rot in oil palm and Ganoderma isolates from infected oil palm, two ornamental palms, sealing wax palm (Cyrtostachys renda) and MacArthur palm (Ptychosperma macarthurii), an isolate from coconut stump (Cocos nucifera), Ganoderma miniatocinctum, Ganoderma zonatum and Ganoderma tornatum. The results showed that G. boninense was compatible with Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, G. miniatocinctum and G. zonatum, Ganoderma isolates from sealing wax palm, MacArthur palm and coconut stump. G. boninense was not compatible with G. tornatum. Therefore, the results suggested that the G. boninense, G. miniatocinctum, G. zonatum, and Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, ornamental palms and coconut stump could represent the same biological species. In performing a restriction analysis of the ITS regions, variations were observed in which five haplotypes were generated from the restriction patterns. An unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis showed that all the Ganoderma isolates were grouped into five primary groups, and the similarity values of the isolates ranged from 97% to 100%. Thus, a restriction analysis of the ITS regions showed that G. boninense and the Ganoderma isolates from other palm hosts were closely related. On the basis of the mating compatibility test and the restriction analysis of the ITS regions performed in this study, a diverse group of Ganoderma species from oil palm and other palm hosts are closely related, except for G. tornatum and Ganoderma isolates from tea and rubber.

  8. Combinatorial compatibility as habit-controlling factor in lysozyme crystallization II. Morphological evidence for tetrameric growth units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, C. S.; Bennema, P.

    1997-03-01

    This work (Part II) explores the relation between units and morphology. It shows the equivalence in behaviour between the attachment energies and the results of Monte Carlo growth kinetics simulations. The energetically optimal combination of the F slices in 1 1 0, 0 1 1 and 1 1 1 in a monomolecular interpretation leads to unsatisfactory agreement with experimentally observed morphology. In a tetrameric (or octameric) interpretation, the unit cell must be subdivided self-consistently in terms of stable molecular clusters. Thus, the presence or absence of the 1 1 1 form functions as a direct experimental criterion for distinguishing between monomolecular growth layers, and tetrameric (or octameric) growth layers of the same composition, but subjected to the condition of combinatorial compatibility, as the F slices combine to produce the growth habit. When that condition is taken into account, the tetrameric (or octameric) theoretical morphology in the broken bond model is in good agreement with experiment over a wide range. Subjectmatter for future study is summarized.

  9. Proteomic analysis of the compatible interaction of wheat and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici).

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xiwen; Liu, Xinhao; Yu, Haibo; Du, Congyang; Li, Mengda; He, Dexian

    2017-02-01

    Proteome characteristics of wheat leaves with the powdery mildew pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt) infection were investigated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and tandem MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. We identified 46 unique proteins which were differentially expressed at 24, 48, and 72 h post-inoculation. The functional classification of these proteins showed that most of them were involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism, defense responses, and signal transduction. Upregulated proteins included primary metabolism pathways and defense responses, while proteins related to photosynthesis and signal transduction were mostly downregulated. As expected, more antioxidative proteins were activated at the later infection stage than the earlier stage, suggesting that the antioxidative system of host plays a role in maintaining the compatible interaction between wheat and powdery mildew. A high accumulation of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in infected leaves indicated the regulation of the TCA cycle and pentose phosphate pathway in parallel to the activation of host defenses. The downregulation of MAPK5 could be facilitated for the compatible interaction of wheat plants and Bgt. qRT-PCR analysis supported the data of protein expression profiles. Our results reveal the relevance of primary plant metabolism and defense responses during compatible interaction, and provide new insights into the biology of susceptible wheat in response to Bgt infection.

  10. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of Virulence Factors in Leptosphaeria maculans during Compatible and Incompatible Interactions with Canola

    PubMed Central

    Sonah, Humira; Zhang, Xuehua; Deshmukh, Rupesh K.; Borhan, M. Hossein; Fernando, W. G. Dilantha; Bélanger, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Leptosphaeria maculans is a hemibiotrophic fungus that causes blackleg of canola (Brassica napus), one of the most devastating diseases of this crop. In the present study, transcriptome profiling of L. maculans was performed in an effort to understand and define the pathogenicity genes that govern both the biotrophic and the necrotrophic phase of the fungus, as well as those that separate a compatible from an incompatible interaction. For this purpose, comparative RNA-seq analyses were performed on L. maculans isolate D5 at four different time points following inoculation on susceptible cultivar Topas-DH16516 or resistant introgression line Topas-Rlm2. Analysis of 1.6 billion Illumina reads readily identified differentially expressed genes that were over represented by candidate secretory effector proteins, CAZymes, and other pathogenicity genes. Comparisons between the compatible and incompatible interactions led to the identification of 28 effector proteins whose chronology and level of expression suggested a role in the establishment and maintenance of biotrophy with the plant. These included all known Avr genes of isolate D5 along with eight newly characterized effectors. In addition, another 15 effector proteins were found to be exclusively expressed during the necrotrophic phase of the fungus, which supports the concept that L. maculans has a separate and distinct arsenal contributing to each phase. As for CAZymes, they were often highly expressed at 3 dpi but with no difference in expression between the compatible and incompatible interactions, indicating that other factors were necessary to determine the outcome of the interaction. However, their significantly higher expression at 11 dpi in the compatible interaction confirmed that they contributed to the necrotrophic phase of the fungus. A notable exception was LysM genes whose high expression was singularly observed on the susceptible host at 7 dpi. In the case of TFs, their higher expression at 7 and 11

  11. Intrasystem Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Program. Volume 1. User’s Manual Engineering Section

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    NARROWBAND SPECTRUM LEVEL AT f~SN es P EMTR BROADBAND SPECTRUM LEVEL AT f SB e SS RCPT SPECTRUM (SENSITIVITY) LEVEL AT f S RCPT SPECTRUM LEVEL AT fp rp R... es ) BANDWIDTH FACTOR S RCPT SPECTRUM LEVEL AT f es es AN ADJUSTMENT AMOUNT (NARROWBAND) AB ADJUSTMENT AMOUNT (BROADBAND) asm ADJUSTMENT SAFETY MARGIN...ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY 19 May 72 - 19 Nov 73 ANALYSIS PROGRA14 .i S PERFORMING ORG REPORT NUMBER Volume I - User’s Manual Engineering Section None 7 AuTHOR

  12. Gene expression analysis in Musa acuminata during compatible interactions with Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Nancy Eunice Niño; Alves, Gabriel Sergio Costa; Almeida, Rosane Mansan; Amorim, Edson Perito; Fortes Ferreira, Claudia; Togawa, Roberto Coiti; Costa, Marcos Mota Do Carmo; Grynberg, Priscila; Santos, Jansen Rodrigo Pereira; Cares, Juvenil Enrique; Miller, Robert Neil Gerard

    2017-03-01

    Endoparasitic root-knot nematodes (RKNs) ( Meloidogyne spp.) cause considerable losses in banana ( Musa spp.), with Meloidogyne incognita a predominant species in Cavendish sub-group bananas. This study investigates the root transcriptome in Musa acuminata genotypes 4297-06 (AA) and Cavendish Grande Naine (CAV; AAA) during early compatible interactions with M. incognita . Roots were analysed by brightfield light microscopy over a 35 d period to examine nematode penetration and morphological cell transformation. RNA samples were extracted 3, 7 and 10 days after inoculation (DAI) with nematode J2 juveniles, and cDNA libraries were sequenced using lllumina HiSeq technology. Sequences were mapped to the M. acuminata ssp. malaccensis var. Pahang genome sequence, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) identified and transcript representation determined by gene set enrichment and pathway mapping. Microscopic analysis revealed a life cycle of M. incognita completing in 24 d in CAV and 27 d in 4279-06. Comparable numbers of DEGs were up- and downregulated in each genotype, with potential involvement of many in early host defence responses involving reactive oxygen species and jasmonate/ethylene signalling. DEGs revealed concomitant auxin metabolism and cell wall modification processes likely to be involved in giant cell formation. Notable transcripts related to host defence included those coding for leucine-rich repeat receptor-like serine/threonine-protein kinases, peroxidases, thaumatin-like pathogenesis-related proteins, and DREB, ERF, MYB, NAC and WRKY transcription factors. Transcripts related to giant cell development included indole acetic acid-amido synthetase GH3.8 genes, involved in auxin metabolism, as well as genes encoding expansins and hydrolases, involved in cell wall modification. Expression analysis in M. acuminata during compatible interactions with RKNs provides insights into genes modulated during infection and giant cell formation. Increased

  13. Development of intensity compatible time-histories for dynamic analysis of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Jens-Uwe; Akcay Stäuble, Sunay

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of the functionality of critical infrastructures and lifelines after an earthquake strongly depends on an accurate assessment of the degree of damage exhibited during the earthquake. Usual engineering parameters like linear-elastic response spectra or linear-elastic uniform hazard spectra in terms of spectral accelerations are not suitable for predicting damage because the process of damaging is a non-linear process. The only seismological parameter that implicitly contains the required information on the damaging impact of earthquakes is intensity. This parameter in different scales (EMS-98, MSK-64, MMI) is directly linked to physical observations including the damage of buildings. Additionally, intensity information directly captures spatial variation of ground motions related to the same or similar degree damage by construction of isoseismal lines. Therefore intensities are very suitable for predicting possible impacts of earthquakes on critical infrastructures or lifelines. For engineering applications intensity relevant information has to be converted into engineering characteristics. Because dynamic analyses (time-history analysis, frequently even nonlinear ones) became a standard approach for the design and for the validation of safety of critical infrastructures and lifelines it is reasonable to develop intensity-compatible time-histories for engineering application as an alternative to standard methods. In the paper an approach how to develop intensity-compatible time-histories from recorded time-histories is presented. Based on published international data a set of intensity compatible time-histories covering the site intensity range between intensity V and VIII (EMS scale) is developed. The time-histories developed are compared with typical time-histories derived from spectral matching of a uniform hazard spectrum from a large scale PSHA corresponding to approximately the same intensity class. For this comparison in-structure floor

  14. Proximity Compatibility and Information Display: The Effects of Space and Color on the Analysis of Aircraft Stall Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    7 AD Technical Memorandum 16-89 PROXIMITY COMPATIBILITY AND INFORMATION DISPLAY: THE EFFECTS OF SPACE AND COLOR ON THE 00 ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT STALL...Include Security Classification) ! 11 ,,i.itv Compatibility and Information Display: The Effects of Space and Color on the ’..s of Aircraft Stall...Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number), FIElD GROUP SUB -GROUP -display< . - color - , .clutter’ - - 03 1 , -attention; aviation

  15. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions. Final report, Volume II - data tables, high pressure refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine if exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials after retrofit to the alternative refrigerant/lubricant. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Measurements were also taken after 168 and 336 hours. As a control, some samples were exposed to the original refrigerant/mineral oil for a total of 1000 hours.

  16. The REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey: power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C.; Guzzo, L.; Phleps, S.

    2011-05-01

    We present the power spectrum of galaxy clusters measured from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. This new sample extends the flux limit of the original REFLEX catalogue to 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2, yielding a total of 911 clusters with ≥94 per cent completeness in redshift follow-up. The analysis of the data is improved by creating a set of 100 REFLEX II-catalogue-like mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite of large-volume Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) N-body simulations (L-BASICC II). The measured power spectrum is in agreement with the predictions from a ΛCDM cosmological model. The measurements show the expected increase in the amplitude of the power spectrum with increasing X-ray luminosity. On large scales, we show that the shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a scale-independent bias and provide a model for the amplitude that allows us to connect our measurements with a cosmological model. By implementing a luminosity-dependent power-spectrum estimator, we observe that the power spectrum measured from the REFLEX II sample is weakly affected by flux-selection effects. The shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a featureless power spectrum on scales k > 0.01 h Mpc-1 and hence no statistically significant signal of baryonic acoustic oscillations can be detected. We show that the measured REFLEX II power spectrum displays signatures of non-linear evolution.

  17. An efficient method for the extraction of chloroplast proteins compatible for 2-DE and MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Pengxiang; Wang, Xuchu; Kuang, Tingyun; Li, Yinxin

    2009-09-01

    Comparative proteomic analysis of chloroplast by 2-DE has received significant attention in recent years. However, the complication of membrane systems in chloroplast made it challenging to elucidate entire chloroplast proteome by 2-DE. Here, we developed an efficient method for extracting chloroplast proteins, and produced excellent 2-DE profiles from both Arabidopsis thaliana and Salicornia europaea. Comparison of this method with another two protocols for the extraction of A. thaliana chloroplast proteins showed that our method obtained higher protein yields and produced more protein spots on both pH 3-10 and 4-7 2-DE gels. Moreover, this method recovered more proteins in the basic and high M(r) regions, thereby offering the best extraction of chloroplast proteins. Identification of 15 specific chloroplast-targeted proteins on our gels by MALDI-TOF MS revealed that this method was compatible with MS, and recovered more chloroplast membrane proteins than the commonly used methods. This protocol is expected to have a wide application in future chloroplast proteomic analysis.

  18. Vegetative compatibility and genetic analysis of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum isolates from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barcelos, Q L; Souza, E A; Damasceno e Silva, K J

    2011-02-15

    The causal agent of common bean anthracnose, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, has considerable genetic and pathogenic variability, which makes the development of resistant cultivars difficult. We examined variability within and between Brazilian pathotypes of C. lindemuthianum through the identification of vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) and by RAPD analysis. Two hundred and ninety-five nit mutants were obtained from 47 isolates of various pathotypes of the fungus collected from different regions, host cultivars and years. In complementation tests, 45 VCGs were identified. Eighteen RAPD primers were employed in the molecular analyses, producing 111 polymorphic bands. Estimates of genetic similarities, determined from the Sorence-Dice coefficient, ranged from 0.42 to 0.97; the dendrogram obtained by cluster analysis revealed 18 groups of isolates. RAPD and VCG markers presented high genotypic diversity. The number of significant associations (P=0.05) between RAPD, VCG and pathogenicity markers ranged from 0 (VCG) to 80% (pathogenicity). The test of multilocus association (rd) for RAPD markers was significantly different from zero (P<0.001), suggesting linkage disequilibrium. However, the results for VCG markers show the presence of recombination mechanisms. In conclusion, RAPD markers and VCGs were useful for detecting genetic variability among isolates of C. lindemuthianum. We found considerable diversity among isolates from the same geographic origin within a short interval; this suggests rapid evolution. There is a need for further studies to elucidate the population structure of this pathogen in agro-ecosystems.

  19. Detergent-compatible proteases: microbial production, properties, and stain removal analysis.

    PubMed

    Niyonzima, Francois Niyongabo; More, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are one of the most important commercial enzymes used in various industrial domains such as detergent and leather industries. The alkaline proteases as well as other detergent-compatible enzymes such as lipases and amylases serve now as the key components in detergent formulations. They break down various stains during fabric washing. The search for detergent-compatible proteases with better properties is a continuous exercise. The current trend is to use detergent-compatible proteases that are stable over a wide temperature range. Although the proteases showing stability at elevated pH have the capacity to be used in detergent formulations, their usage can be significant if they are also stable and compatible with detergent and detergent ingredients, and also able to remove protein stains. Despite the existence of some reviews on alkaline proteases, there is no specification for the use of alkaline proteases as detergent additives. The present review describes the detergent-compatible proteases tested as detergent additives. An overview was provided for screening, optimization, purification, and properties of detergent compatible proteases, with an emphasis on the stability and compatibility of the alkaline proteases with the detergent and detergent compounds, as well as stain removal examination methods.

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several compounds with Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical compatibility between Fe-19.8Cr-4.8Al (weight percent), which is the base composition for the commercial superalloy MA956, and several carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, and silicides was analyzed from thermodynamic considerations. The effect of addition of minor alloying elements, such as Ti, Y, and Y2O3, to the Fe-Cr-Al alloy on chemical compatibility between the alloy and various compounds was also analyzed. Several chemically compatible compounds that can be potential reinforcement materials and/or interface coating materials for Fe-Cr-Al based composites were identified.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of ceramic reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  3. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of ceramic reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with beta phase NiAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with beta phase NiAl alloys within the concentration range 40 to 50 at. percent Al have been analyzed from thermodynamic considerations at 1373 and 1573 K. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, oxides, nitrides, beryllides, and silicides. Thermodynamic data for NiAl alloys have been reviewed and activity of Ni and Al in the beta phase have been derived at 1373 and 1573 K. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and the matrix have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been defined.

  5. Comparison of prognostic compatibility between seventh AJCC/TNM of the esophagus and 14th JCGC staging systems in Siewert type II adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tsutomu; Komatsu, Shuhei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kubota, Takeshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Konishi, Hirotaka; Morimura, Ryo; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Sakakura, Chohei; Otsuji, Eigo

    2013-08-01

    The Seventh American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/TNM classification defined that the classification for adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction (AEG) was included in the esophageal category. However, there still remain various classifications in AEG such as the Seventh AJCC/TNM of the esophagus and the 14th Japanese Classification of Gastric Cancer staging system (JCGC) in Japan. This study was designed to evaluate the compatibility of both the Seventh AJCC/TNM of the esophagus and the 14th JCGC staging systems in Siewert type II adenocarcinoma. Between 1999 and 2011, 47 consecutive patients with Siewert type II adenocarcinoma underwent curative surgery at our Institution. We reviewed their hospital records retrospectively. Overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years were 44.3% and 33.4%, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that the extent of lymph node metastasis was the only independent prognostic factor (p=0.0194, HR=12.927). In the ≤pN2 group by 14th JCGC, deeper tumor depth was significantly correlated with poor prognosis, whereas in the ≥pN3 group, deeper tumor depth did not affect prognosis, suggesting a strong effect of nodal factor on prognosis and more similar prognostic stratification to the Seventh edition of the AJCC/TNM classification of the esophagus. Nodal involvement status might be a more important prognostic factor than tumor depth in patients with Siewert type II adenocaricinoma. The Seventh classification of AJCC/TNM of the esophagus might be more compatible with Siewert type II adenocarcinoma.

  6. Time-Course Transcriptome Analysis of Compatible and Incompatible Pollen-Stigma Interactions in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Gao, Changbin; Yue, Yao; Liu, Zhiquan; Ma, Chaozhi; Zhou, Guilong; Yang, Yong; Duan, Zhiqiang; Li, Bing; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2017-01-01

    Brassica species exhibit both compatible and incompatible pollen-stigma interactions, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, RNA-seq technology was applied in a comprehensive time-course experiment (2, 5, 10, 20, and 30 min) to explore gene expression during compatible/incompatible pollen-stigma interactions in stigma. Moderate changes of gene expression were observed both in compatible pollination (PC) and incompatible pollination (PI) within 10 min, whereas drastic changes showed up by 30 min, especially in PI. Stage specific DEGs [Differentially Expressed Gene(s)] were identified, and signaling pathways such as stress response, defense response, cell wall modification and others were found to be over-represented. In addition, enriched genes in all samples were analyzed as well, 293 most highly expressed genes were identified and annotated. Gene Ontology and metabolic pathway analysis revealed 10 most highly expressed genes and 37 activated metabolic pathways. According to the data, downstream components were activated in signaling pathways of both compatible and incompatible responses, and incompatible response had more complicated signal transduction networks. This study provides more detailed molecular information at different time points after compatible and incompatible pollination, deepening our knowledge about pollen-stigma interactions. PMID:28515735

  7. A suite of Gateway® compatible ternary expression vectors for functional analysis in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Y S; Chaudhari, Y K; Usher, J; Cairns, T C; Csukai, M; Haynes, K

    2015-06-01

    Gene overexpression is a widely used functional genomics approach in fungal biology. However, to date it has not been established in Zymoseptoria tritici which is an important pathogen of wheat (Triticum species). Here we report a suite of Gateway® recombination compatible ternary expression vectors for Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of Z. tritici. The suite of 32 vectors is based on a combination of four resistance markers for positive selection against glufosinate ammonium, geneticin, hygromycin and sulfonylurea; three constitutive Z. tritici promoters (pZtATUB, pZtGAPDH and pZtTEF) and a nitrogen responsive promoter (pZtNIA1) for controlled expression of the open reading frames. Half of the vectors facilitate expression of proteins tagged with C-terminal EGFP. All 32 vectors allow high frequency targeting of the overexpression cassette into the Ku70 locus and complement the Ku70 gene when transformed into a Z. tritici ku70 null strain, thus circumventing additional phenotypes that can arise from random integration. This suite of ternary expression vectors will be a useful tool for functional analysis through gene overexpression in Z. tritici.

  8. The Transcriptome of Compatible and Incompatible Interactions of Potato (Solanum tuberosum) with Phytophthora infestans Revealed by DeepSAGE Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gyetvai, Gabor; Sønderkær, Mads; Göbel, Ulrike; Basekow, Rico; Ballvora, Agim; Imhoff, Maren; Kersten, Birgit; Nielsen, Kåre-Lehman; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most important disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum). Understanding the molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility to late blight is therefore highly relevant for developing resistant cultivars, either by marker-assissted selection or by transgenic approaches. Specific P. infestans races having the Avr1 effector gene trigger a hypersensitive resistance response in potato plants carrying the R1 resistance gene (incompatible interaction) and cause disease in plants lacking R1 (compatible interaction). The transcriptomes of the compatible and incompatible interaction were captured by DeepSAGE analysis of 44 biological samples comprising five genotypes, differing only by the presence or absence of the R1 transgene, three infection time points and three biological replicates. 30.859 unique 21 base pair sequence tags were obtained, one third of which did not match any known potato transcript sequence. Two third of the tags were expressed at low frequency (<10 tag counts/million). 20.470 unitags matched to approximately twelve thousand potato transcribed genes. Tag frequencies were compared between compatible and incompatible interactions over the infection time course and between compatible and incompatible genotypes. Transcriptional changes were more numerous in compatible than in incompatible interactions. In contrast to incompatible interactions, transcriptional changes in the compatible interaction were observed predominantly for multigene families encoding defense response genes and genes functional in photosynthesis and CO2 fixation. Numerous transcriptional differences were also observed between near isogenic genotypes prior to infection with P. infestans. Our DeepSAGE transcriptome analysis uncovered novel candidate genes for plant host pathogen interactions, examples of which are discussed with respect to possible function. PMID:22328937

  9. Radiofrequency identification and medical devices: the regulatory framework on electromagnetic compatibility. Part II: active implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Eugenio; Censi, Federica; Triventi, Michele; Bartolini, Pietro; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2012-05-01

    The number and the types of electromagnetic emitters to which patients with active implantable medical devices (AIMD) are exposed to in their daily activities have proliferated over the last decade. Radiofrequency identification (RFID) is an example of wireless technology applied in many fields. The interaction between RFID emitters and AIMD is an important issue for patients, industry and regulators, because of the risks associated with such interactions. The different AIMDs refer to different standards that address the electromagnetic immunity issue in different ways. Indeed, different test setups, immunity levels and rationales are used to guarantee that AIMDs are immune to electromagnetic nonionizing radiation. In this article, the regulatory framework concerning electromagnetic compatibility between RFID systems and AIMDs is analyzed to understand whether and how the application of the current AIMD standards allows for the effective control of the possible risks associated with RFID technology.

  10. Development of an ISO 9000-compatible occupational health standard--II: defining the potential benefits and open issues.

    PubMed

    Levine, S P; Dyjack, D T

    1996-04-01

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is currently voting on a final draft of ISO 14000 Environmental Standards that follow the general philosophy of ISO 9000 product quality standards. Should the international community also consider development of an ISO 9000-14000 compatible occupational safety and health management standard (OS&HMS) or an environment, safety, and health management standard? The first paper in this series (Am. Ind. Hyg. Assoc. J. 56:599-609 [1995]) introduced this subject, reviewed the historical precedents, and identified the underlying issues. In this paper the authors identify some of the potential benefits and most critical open issues that may affect the viability of an OS&HMS at the national and international levels. Twelve potential benefits are identified in the major categories of national and international, and industrial and governmental benefits; 16 open issues are identified in the major categories of applications, ethics, cost, and international issues.

  11. Compatibility analysis of material and energy recovery in a regional solid waste management system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Hsi; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2003-01-01

    The rising prices of raw materials and concerns about energy conservation have resulted in an increasing interest in the simultaneous recovery of materials and energy from waste streams. Compatibility exists for several economic, environmental, and managerial reasons. Installing an on-site or off-site presorting facility before an incinerator could be a feasible alternative to achieve both goals if household recycling programs cannot succeed in local communities. However, the regional impacts of presorting solid waste on a waste-to-energy facility remain unclear because of the inherent complexity of solid waste compositions and properties over different areas. This paper applies a system-based approach to assess the impact of installing a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) process before an incinerator. Such an RDF process, consisting of standard unit operations of shredding, magnetic separation, trommel screening, and air classification, might be useful for integrating the recycling and presorting efforts for a large-scale municipal incinerator from a regional sense. An optimization modeling analysis is performed to characterize such integration potential so that the optimal size of the RDF process and associated shipping patterns for flow control can be foreseen. It aims at exploring how the waste inflows with different rates of generation, physical and chemical compositions, and heating values collected from differing administrative districts can be processed by either a centralized presorting facility or an incinerator to meet both the energy recovery and throughput requirements. A case study conducted in Taipei County, which is one of the most densely populated metropolitan areas in Taiwan, further confirms the application potential of such a cost-benefit analysis.

  12. Compatibility: drugs and parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Talita Muniz Maloni; Ferraresi, Andressa de Abreu

    2016-01-01

    Standardization and systematization of data to provide quick access to compatibility of leading injectable drugs used in hospitals for parenteral nutrition. We selected 55 injectable drugs analyzed individually with two types of parenteral nutrition: 2-in-1 and 3-in-1. The following variables were considered: active ingredient, compatibility of drugs with the parenteral nutrition with or without lipids, and maximum drug concentration after dilution for the drugs compatible with parenteral nutrition. Drugs were classified as compatible, incompatible and untested. After analysis, relevant information to the product's compatibility with parental nutrition was summarized in a table. Systematization of compatibility data provided quick and easy access, and enabled standardizing pharmacists work.

  13. A Materials Compatibility and Thermal Stability Analysis of Common Hydrocarbon Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, M. L.; Stiegemeier, B. R.

    2005-01-01

    A materials compatibility and thermal stability investigation was conducted using five common liquid hydrocarbon fuels and two structural materials. The tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center Heated Tube Facility under environmental conditions similar to those encountered in regeneratively cooled rocket engines. Scanning-electron microscopic analysis in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was utilized to characterize the condition of the tube inner wall surface and any carbon deposition or corrosion that was formed during selected runs. Results show that the carbon deposition process in stainless steel tubes was relatively insensitive to fuel type or test condition. The deposition rates were comparable for all fuels and none of the stainless steel test pieces showed any signs of corrosion. For tests conducted with copper tubing, the sulfur content of the fuel had a significant impact on both the condition of the tube wall and carbon deposition rates. Carbon deposition rates for the lowest sulfur fuels (2 ppm) were slightly higher than those recorded in the stainless steel tubes with no corrosion observed on the inner wall surface. For slightly higher sulfur content (25 ppm) fuels, nodules that intruded into the flow area were observed to form on the inner wall surface. These nodules induced moderate tube pressure drop increases. The highest sulfur content fuels (400 ppm) produced extensive wall pitting and dendritic copper sulfide growth that was continuous along the entire tube wall surface. The result of this tube degradation was the inability to maintain flow rate due to rapidly increasing test section pressure drops. Accompanying this corrosion were carbon deposition rates an order of magnitude greater than those observed in comparable stainless steel tests. The results of this investigation indicate that trace impurities in fuels (i.e. sulfur) can significantly impact the carbon deposition process and produce unacceptable

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with FeAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with FeAl alloys within the concentration range 40 to 50 at pct Al have been analyzed from thermodynamic considerations at 1173 and 1273 K. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, oxides, nitrides, and silicides. Although several chemically compatible reinforcement materials are identified, the coefficients of thermal expansion for none of these materials match closely with that of FeAl alloys and this might pose serious problems in the design of composite systems based on FeAl alloys.

  15. Soil Analysis Micro-Mission Concepts Derived from the MSP 2001 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Meloy, T. P.; Anderson, M. S.; Buehler, M. G.; Frant, M. A.; Grannan, S. M.; Fuerstenau, S. D.; Keller, H. U.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Marshall, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) will evaluate the Martian environment for soil and dust-related hazards to human exploration as part of the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. The integrated MECA payload contains a wet-chemistry laboratory, a microscopy station, an electrometer to characterize the electrostatic environment, and arrays of material patches to study abrasion and adhesion. Heritage will be all-important for low cost micro-missions, and adaptations of instruments developed for the Pathfinder, '98 and '01 Landers should be strong contenders for '03 flights. This talk has three objectives: (1) Familiarize the audience with MECA instrument capabilities; (2) present concepts for stand-alone and/or mobile versions of MECA instruments; and (3) broaden the context of the MECA instruments from human exploration to a comprehensive scientific survey of Mars. Due to time limitations, emphasis will be on the chemistry and microscopy experiments. Ion-selective electrodes and related sensors in MECA's wet-chemistry laboratory will evaluate total dissolved solids, redox potential, pH, and the concentration of many soluble ions and gases in wet Martian soil. These electrodes can detect potentially dangerous heavy-metal ions, emitted pathogenic gases, and the soil's corrosive potential, and experiments will include cyclic voltammetry and anodic stripping. For experiments beyond 2001, enhancements could allow multiple use of the cells (for mobile experiments) and reagent addition (for quantitative mineralogical and exobiological analysis). MECA's microscopy station combines optical and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) in an actively focused, controlled illumination environment to image particles from millimeters to nanometers in size. Careful selection of substrates allows controlled experiments in adhesion, abrasion, hardness, aggregation, magnetic and other properties. Special tools allow primitive manipulation (brushing and scraping) of samples

  16. Soil Analysis Micro-Mission Concepts Derived from the MSP 2001 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Meloy, T. P.; Anderson, M. S.; Buehler, M. G.; Frant, M. A.; Grannan, S. M.; Fuerstenau, S. D.; Keller, H. U.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Marshall, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) will evaluate the Martian environment for soil and dust-related hazards to human exploration as part of the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. The integrated MECA payload contains a wet-chemistry laboratory, a microscopy station, an electrometer to characterize the electrostatic environment, and arrays of material patches to study abrasion and adhesion. Heritage will be all-important for low cost micro-missions, and adaptations of instruments developed for the Pathfinder, '98 and '01 Landers should be strong contenders for '03 flights. This talk has three objectives: (1) Familiarize the audience with MECA instrument capabilities; (2) present concepts for stand-alone and/or mobile versions of MECA instruments; and (3) broaden the context of the MECA instruments from human exploration to a comprehensive scientific survey of Mars. Due to time limitations, emphasis will be on the chemistry and microscopy experiments. Ion-selective electrodes and related sensors in MECA's wet-chemistry laboratory will evaluate total dissolved solids, redox potential, pH, and the concentration of many soluble ions and gases in wet Martian soil. These electrodes can detect potentially dangerous heavy-metal ions, emitted pathogenic gases, and the soil's corrosive potential, and experiments will include cyclic voltammetry and anodic stripping. For experiments beyond 2001, enhancements could allow multiple use of the cells (for mobile experiments) and reagent addition (for quantitative mineralogical and exobiological analysis). MECA's microscopy station combines optical and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) in an actively focused, controlled illumination environment to image particles from millimeters to nanometers in size. Careful selection of substrates allows controlled experiments in adhesion, abrasion, hardness, aggregation, magnetic and other properties. Special tools allow primitive manipulation (brushing and scraping) of samples

  17. A Laboratory Exercise for Compatibility Testing of Hazardous Wastes in an Environmental Analysis Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, J. C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses a new program at the University of Michigan in hazardous waste management. Describes a laboratory demonstration that deals with the reactivity and potential violence of several reactions that may be encountered on a hazardous waste site. Provides criteria for selecting particular compatibility testing methods. (TW)

  18. A Laboratory Exercise for Compatibility Testing of Hazardous Wastes in an Environmental Analysis Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, J. C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses a new program at the University of Michigan in hazardous waste management. Describes a laboratory demonstration that deals with the reactivity and potential violence of several reactions that may be encountered on a hazardous waste site. Provides criteria for selecting particular compatibility testing methods. (TW)

  19. Viscoelastic finite element stress analysis of the thermal compatibility of dental bilayer ceramic systems.

    PubMed

    DeHoff, Paul H; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that viscoelastic finite element analyses can reliably predict the effect of geometry on maximum tensile stresses in bilayer screening tests that are used to determine thermal compatibility. Three-dimensional viscoelastic finite element models of a beam, cylinder, disk, sphere, central incisor crown, molar crown, and posterior three-unit fixed partial denture (FPD) were used to calculate residual stresses after simulated bench cooling. Four compatible and four incompatible systems were evaluated. The highest residual tensile stresses for all material combinations were associated with the three-unit FPD. Residual tensile stresses ranged from 5.4 MPa in the disk for a compatible combination to 262 MPa in the three-unit FPD for an incompatible system. Residual tensile stresses in the three-unit FPD ranged from 16.8 MPa to 44.0 MPa for the compatible systems and from 175 MPa to 262 MPa for the incompatible systems. Based on finite element calculations, it is predicted that all-ceramic dental prostheses with an average thermal contraction mismatch (500 degrees C to 25 degrees C) greater than +/- 1.0 ppm/K will likely exhibit a relatively high percentage of failures in clinical use compared with systems having smaller thermal contraction mismatch between core and veneering ceramics.

  20. Comparative analysis of microarray data in Arabidopsis transcriptome during compatible interactions with plant viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To analyze transcriptome response to virus infection, we have assembled currently available microarray data on changes in gene expression levels in compatible Arabidopsis-virus interactions. We used the mean r (Pearson’s correlation coefficient) for neighboring pairs to estimate pairwise local simil...

  1. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - Mixing Procedures and Materials Compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, Becky D.; Sandstrom, Mary M.; Warner, Kirstin F.; Sorensen, Daniel N.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Moran, Jesse S.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Whinnery, LeRoy L.; Hsu, Peter C.; Whipple, Richard E.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Reynolds, John G.

    2011-01-14

    Three mixing procedures have been standardized for the IDCA proficiency test—solid-solid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid. Due to the variety of precursors used in formulating the materials for the test, these three mixing methods have been designed to address all combinations of materials. Hand mixing is recommended for quantities less than 10 grams and Jar Mill mixing is recommended for quantities over 10 grams. Consideration must also be given to the type of container used for the mixing due to the wide range of chemical reactivity of the precursors and mixtures. Eight web site sources from container and chemical manufacturers have been consulted. Compatible materials have been compiled as a resource for selecting containers made of materials stable to the mixtures. In addition, container materials used in practice by the participating laboratories are discussed. Consulting chemical compatibility tables is highly recommended for each operation by each individual engaged in testing the materials in this proficiency test.

  2. Integrated force method - Compatibility conditions of structural mechanics for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The equilibrium equations and the compatibility conditions are fundamental to the analyses of structures. However, anyone who undertakes even a cursory generic study of the compatibility conditions can discover, with little effort, that historically this facet of structural mechanics had not been adequately researched by the profession. Now the compatibility conditions (CC's) have been researched and are understood to a great extent. For finite element discretizations, the CC's are banded and can be divided into three distinct categories: (1) the interface CC's, (2) the cluster or field CC's, and (3) the external CC's. The generation of CC's requires the separating of a local region, then writing the deformation displacement relation (ddr) for the region, and finally, the eliminating of the displacements from the ddr. The procedure to generate all three types of CC's is presented and illustrated through examples of finite element models. The uniqueness of the CC's thus generated is shown. The utilization of CC's has resulted in the novel integrated force method (IFM). The solution that is obtained by the IFM converges with a significantly fewer number of elements, compared to the stiffness and the hybrid methods.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Compatibility Effects on Invigorating Blood Circulation for Cyperi Rhizoma Series of Herb Pairs Using Untargeted Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pei; Shang, Er-Xin; Zhu, Yue; Yu, Jin-Gao; Qian, Da-Wei; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2017-01-01

    The mutual-assistance compatibility of Cyperi Rhizoma (Xiangfu, XF) and Angelicae Sinensis Radix (Danggui, DG), Chuanxiong Rhizoma (Chuanxiong, CX), Paeoniae Radix Alba (Baishao, BS), or Corydalis Rhizoma (Yanhusuo, YH), found in a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) named Xiang-Fu-Si-Wu Decoction (XFSWD), can produce synergistic and promoting blood effects. Nowadays, XFSWD has been proved to be effective in activating blood circulation and dissipating blood stasis. However, the role of the herb pairs synergistic effects in the formula were poorly understood. In order to quantitatively assess the compatibility effects of herb pairs, mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolomics studies were performed. The plasma and urine metabolic profiles of acute blood stasis rats induced by adrenaline hydrochloride and ice water and administered with Cyperi Rhizoma—Angelicae Sinensis Radix (XD), Cyperi Rhizoma—Chuanxiong Rhizoma (XC), Cyperi Rhizoma—Paeoniae Radix Alba (XB), Cyperi Rhizoma—Corydalis Rhizoma (XY) were compared. Relative peak area of identified metabolites was calculated and principal component analysis (PCA) score plot from the potential markers was used to visualize the overall differences. Then, the metabolites results were used with biochemistry indicators and genes expression values as parameters to quantitatively evaluate the compatibility effects of XF series of herb pairs by PCA and correlation analysis. The collective results indicated that the four XF herb pairs regulated glycerophospholipid metabolism, steroid hormone biosynthesis and arachidonic acid metabolism pathway. XD was more prominent in regulating the blood stasis during the four XF herb pairs. This study demonstrated that metabolomics was a useful tool to efficacy evaluation and compatibility effects of TCM elucidation. PMID:29018346

  4. Task Analysis Inventories. Series II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesson, Carl E.

    This second in a series of task analysis inventories contains checklists of work performed in twenty-two occupations. Each inventory is a comprehensive list of work activities, responsibilities, educational courses, machines, tools, equipment, and work aids used and the products produced or services rendered in a designated occupational area. The…

  5. Analysis of population structure of Aspergillus flavus from peanut based on vegetative compatibility, geographic origin, mycotoxin and sclerotia production.

    PubMed

    Pildain, M Belén; Vaamonde, Graciela; Cabral, Daniel

    2004-05-15

    Isolates of Aspergillus flavus obtained from a new growing peanut region in Argentina (Formosa province) were examined for aflatoxin types B and G and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) production. Sclerotia diameters and the number of sclerotia produced per square centimetre were also determined for each isolate. They were tested by vegetative compatibility group analysis to investigate their genetic relatedness and correlate the results with vegetative compatibility groups previously described from the major peanut-growing area (Córdoba province) in our country. Two isolates were considered atypical because they simultaneously produce aflatoxins B and G and CPA. A. flavus population from Formosa province was very diverse genetically. Vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) formed by typical isolations of A. flavus were different among agroecological sites. Formosa isolates could not be grouped to any of the Córdoba VCGs, while that one of the VCGs that contain atypical isolates included strains from the two geographical regions. Each VCG included isolates of the same mycotoxin and sclerotia production pattern. The two regions analysed have different climatic conditions, soil type, crop sequence history and also are in different latitude. These parameters may reflect different geographic adaptation between isolates from both sites.

  6. Compatibility Analysis of Space Qualified Intermediate Bus Converter and Point of Load Regulators for Digital Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderbeerg, Bjarne; Bussarakons, Tiva

    2008-09-01

    Distributed power architecture (DPA) has become the power system solutions of choice for digital loads such as FPGAs and other ASIC devices to optimize the system efficiency and dynamic response due to negative effect of parasitic impedances. IR's ZB with its world class efficiency performance and SBB design platforms are the key power conversion elements of such DPA power system solutions. This paper examines the compatibility of the ZB series, an intermediate bus converter (IBC) and the SBB series, a non-isolated synchronous buck point of load (POL) regulator to insure the stability of the power converters and the power system under various static and dynamic loading conditions.

  7. Summary of CPAS Gen II Parachute Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Aaron L.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Fraire, Usbaldo, Jr.; Moore, James W.; Olson, Leah M.; Ray, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft is currently under development by NASA and Lockheed Martin. Like Apollo, Orion will use a series of parachutes to slow its descent and splashdown safely. The Orion parachute system, known as the CEV Parachute Assembly System (CPAS), is being designed by NASA, the Engineering and Science Contract Group (ESCG), and Airborne Systems. The first generation (Gen I) of CPAS testing consisted of thirteen tests and was executed in the 2007-2008 timeframe. The Gen I tests provided an initial understanding of the CPAS parachutes. Knowledge gained from Gen I testing was used to plan the second generation of testing (Gen II). Gen II consisted of six tests: three singleparachute tests, designated as Main Development Tests, and three Cluster Development Tests. Gen II required a more thorough investigation into parachute performance than Gen I. Higher fidelity instrumentation, enhanced analysis methods and tools, and advanced test techniques were developed. The results of the Gen II test series are being incorporated into the CPAS design. Further testing and refinement of the design and model of parachute performance will occur during the upcoming third generation of testing (Gen III). This paper will provide an overview of the developments in CPAS analysis following the end of Gen I, including descriptions of new tools and techniques as well as overviews of the Gen II tests.

  8. Finite state model and compatibility theory - New analysis tools for permutation networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.-T.; Tripathi, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    A simple model to describe the fundamental operation theory of shuffle-exchange-type permutation networks, the finite permutation machine (FPM), is described, and theorems which transform the control matrix result to a continuous compatible vector result are developed. It is found that only 2n-1 shuffle exchange passes are necessary, and that 3n-3 passes are sufficient, to realize all permutations, reducing the sufficient number of passes by two from previous results. The flexibility of the approach is demonstrated by the description of a stack permutation machine (SPM) which can realize all permutations, and by showing that the FPM corresponding to the Benes (1965) network belongs to the SPM. The FPM corresponding to the network with two cascaded reverse-exchange networks is found to realize all permutations, and a simple mechanism to verify several equivalence relationships of various permutation networks is discussed.

  9. Improved blood compatibility of segmented polyurethane by polymeric additives having phospholipid polar group. II. Dispersion state of the polymeric additive and protein adsorption on the surface.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, K; Shibata, N; Tanaka, S; Iwasaki, Y; Kurosaki, T; Nakabayashi, N

    1996-11-01

    To improve the blood compatibility of a segmented polyurethane (SPU), phospholipid polymer, i.e., 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) copolymerized with cyclohexyl methacrylate or 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate, was blended into SPU as a polymeric additive. The blending was achieved by a solvent-evaporation technique from a homogeneous solution containing both the SPU and the MPC polymer. Surface analysis of the SPU membrane blended with the MPC polymer (SPU/MPC polymer membrane) revealed that the MPC polymer was concentrated at the surface of the SPU membrane which contacted the substrate, Teflon, compared with that which contacted air during the membrane-formation period. The dispersion state of the MPC polymer in the SPU membrane was evaluated in detail by staining the MPC unit with osmium tetraoxide. When sonication was applied during preparation of the mixed solution containing SPU and the MPC polymer, the dispersion of the MPC polymer in the SPU membrane was different from that without sonication. That is, the size of the domains of the MPC polymer became smaller but the number of the domains increased. The amount of the MPC polymer mixed with SPU affected the dispersion state. Plasma proteins adsorbed on the SPU/MPC polymer membrane surface after contact with human plasma were detected by gold-colloid-labeled immunoassay. Both albumin and fibrinogen were observed on the SPU membrane; however, the amount of these proteins was reduced on the SPU/MPC polymer membrane. Thus it was concluded that the blood compatibility of the SPU was effectively improved by the blending of the MPC polymer.

  10. [Preparation of spider silk protein bilayer small diameter vascular scaffold and blood compatibility analysis in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Xu, Yanli; Qiu, Hui; Li, Min; Chen, Yuqing

    2013-07-01

    To prepare a spider silk protein bilayer small diameter vascular scaffold using electrospinning, and to observe the blood compatibility in vitro. The Arg-Gly-Asp-recombinant spider silk protein (pNSR16), polycaprolactone (PCL), gelatin (Gt), and heparin (Hep) were blended. Spider silk protein bilayer small diameter vascular scaffold (experimental group) was prepared by electrospinning, with pNSR16 : PCL : Hep (5 : 85 : 10, W/W) hybrid electrospun solution as inner spinning solution and pNSR16 : PCL : Gt (5 : 85 : 10, W/W) hybrid electrospun solution as outer spinning solution, but pNSR16 : PCL (5 : 85, W/W) hybrid electrospun solution was used as inner spinning solution in control group. The scaffold structure of experimental group was observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM); and the hemolysis rate, recalcification clotting time, dynamic clotting time, platelet adhesion, and platelet activation in vitro were compared between 2 groups. SEM results showed that bilayer fibers of scaffold were quite different in experimental group; the diameter distribution of inner layer fibers was relatively uniform with small pores, however diameter difference of the outer layer fiber was relatively big with big pores. The contact angle, hemolysis rate, recalcification clotting time, and P-selectin expression of scaffold were (35 +/- 3) degrees, 1.2% +/- 0.1%, (340 +/- 11) s, and 0.412 +/- 0.027 respectively in experimental group, and were (70 +/- 4) degrees, 1.9% +/- 0.1%, (260 +/- 16) s, and 0.678 +/- 0.031 respectively in control group; significant difference were found in indexes between 2 groups (P < 0.05). With the extension of time, the curve of coagulation time in experimental group sloped downward slowly and had a long time; the blood clotting index values before 30 minutes were significantly higher than those in control group (P < 0.05). Platelet adhesion test showed that the scaffold surface almost had no platelet adhesion in experimental group. The spider silk

  11. Compatibility: drugs and parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Talita Muniz Maloni; Ferraresi, Andressa de Abreu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Standardization and systematization of data to provide quick access to compatibility of leading injectable drugs used in hospitals for parenteral nutrition. Methods We selected 55 injectable drugs analyzed individually with two types of parenteral nutrition: 2-in-1 and 3-in-1. The following variables were considered: active ingredient, compatibility of drugs with the parenteral nutrition with or without lipids, and maximum drug concentration after dilution for the drugs compatible with parenteral nutrition. Drugs were classified as compatible, incompatible and untested. Results After analysis, relevant information to the product’s compatibility with parental nutrition was summarized in a table. Conclusion Systematization of compatibility data provided quick and easy access, and enabled standardizing pharmacists work. PMID:27074235

  12. Analysis of expressed sequence tags derived from a compatible Mycosphaerella fijiensis-banana interaction.

    PubMed

    Portal, Orelvis; Izquierdo, Yovanny; De Vleesschauwer, David; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Milady; Acosta-Suárez, Mayra; Ocaña, Bárbara; Jiménez, Elio; Höfte, Monica

    2011-05-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis, a hemibiotrophic fungus, is the causal agent of black leaf streak disease, the most serious foliar disease of bananas and plantains. To analyze the compatible interaction of M. fijiensis with Musa spp., a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library was constructed to identify transcripts induced at late stages of infection in the host and the pathogen. In addition, a full-length cDNA library was created from the same mRNA starting material as the SSH library. The SSH procedure was effective in identifying specific genes predicted to be involved in plant-fungal interactions and new information was obtained mainly about genes and pathways activated in the plant. Several plant genes predicted to be involved in the synthesis of phenylpropanoids and detoxification compounds were identified, as well as pathogenesis-related proteins that could be involved in the plant response against M. fijiensis infection. At late stages of infection, jasmonic acid and ethylene signaling transduction pathways appear to be active, which corresponds with the necrotrophic life style of M. fijiensis. Quantitative PCR experiments revealed that antifungal genes encoding PR proteins and GDSL-like lipase are only transiently induced 30 days post inoculation (dpi), indicating that the fungus is probably actively repressing plant defense. The only fungal gene found was induced 37 dpi and encodes UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of trehalose. Trehalose biosynthesis was probably induced in response to prior activation of plant antifungal genes and may act as an osmoprotectant against membrane damage.

  13. Busted Butte Phase II Excavation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Keifer

    2000-11-29

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an engineering excavation and ground support design for the Busted Butte phase II mine back. The analysis will apply engineering practices and previous proven design methods for pillar design and ground support in accordance with applicable Integrated Safety Management principles and functions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the Busted Butte Test Facility. The intended use of this analysis is to provide testing excavation boundaries, ground support and pillar design input to drawing(s) to support test operations implementation. This design activity has been prepared under ''Technical Work Plan For Test Facilities Design FY01 Work Activities'' (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2000b). No deviations from the TWP have been necessary for this analysis.

  14. Analysis of the compatibility of dental implant systems in fibula free flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    As a result of major ablative surgery, head and neck oncology patients can be left with significant defects in the orofacial region. The resultant defect raises the need for advanced reconstruction techniques. The reconstruction in this region is aimed at restoring function and facial contour. The use of vascularised free flaps has revolutionised the reconstruction in the head and neck. Advances in reconstruction techniques have resulted in continuous improvement of oral rehabilitation. For example, endosteal implants are being used to restore the masticatory function by the way of prosthetic replacement of the dentition. Implant rehabilitation usually leads to improved facial appearance, function, restoration of speech and mastication. Suitable dental implant placement’s site requires satisfactory width, height and quality of bone. Reconstruction of hard tissue defects therefore will need to be tailored to meet the needs for implant placement. The aim of this feasibility study was to assess the compatibility of five standard commercially available dental implant systems (Biomet 3i, Nobel Biocare, Astra tech, Straumann and Ankylos) for placement into vascularised fibula graft during the reconstruction of oromandibular region. Radiographs (2D) of the lower extremities from 142 patients in the archives of the Department of Radiology in University College London Hospitals (UCLH) were analysed in this study. These radiographs were from 61 females and 81 males. Additionally, 60 unsexed dry fibular bones, 30 right sided, acquired from the collection of the Department of Anatomy, University College London (UCL) were also measured to account for the 3D factor. In the right fibula (dry bone), 90% of the samples measured had a width of 13.1 mm. While in the left fibula (dry bone), 90% of the samples measured had a width of 13.3 mm. Fibulas measured on radiographs had a width of 14.3 mm in 90% of the samples. The length ranges of the dental implants used in this study

  15. Analysis of the compatibility of dental implant systems in fibula free flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Carbiner, Ramin; Jerjes, Waseem; Shakib, Kaveh; Giannoudis, Peter V; Hopper, Colin

    2012-06-21

    As a result of major ablative surgery, head and neck oncology patients can be left with significant defects in the orofacial region. The resultant defect raises the need for advanced reconstruction techniques. The reconstruction in this region is aimed at restoring function and facial contour. The use of vascularised free flaps has revolutionised the reconstruction in the head and neck. Advances in reconstruction techniques have resulted in continuous improvement of oral rehabilitation. For example, endosteal implants are being used to restore the masticatory function by the way of prosthetic replacement of the dentition. Implant rehabilitation usually leads to improved facial appearance, function, restoration of speech and mastication. Suitable dental implant placement's site requires satisfactory width, height and quality of bone. Reconstruction of hard tissue defects therefore will need to be tailored to meet the needs for implant placement.The aim of this feasibility study was to assess the compatibility of five standard commercially available dental implant systems (Biomet 3i, Nobel Biocare, Astra tech, Straumann and Ankylos) for placement into vascularised fibula graft during the reconstruction of oromandibular region.Radiographs (2D) of the lower extremities from 142 patients in the archives of the Department of Radiology in University College London Hospitals (UCLH) were analysed in this study. These radiographs were from 61 females and 81 males. Additionally, 60 unsexed dry fibular bones, 30 right sided, acquired from the collection of the Department of Anatomy, University College London (UCL) were also measured to account for the 3D factor.In the right fibula (dry bone), 90% of the samples measured had a width of 13.1 mm. While in the left fibula (dry bone), 90% of the samples measured had a width of 13.3 mm. Fibulas measured on radiographs had a width of 14.3 mm in 90% of the samples. The length ranges of the dental implants used in this study were: 7

  16. Gateway-compatible vectors for high-throughput gene functional analysis in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and other monocot species.

    PubMed

    Mann, David G J; Lafayette, Peter R; Abercrombie, Laura L; King, Zachary R; Mazarei, Mitra; Halter, Mathew C; Poovaiah, Charleson R; Baxter, Holly; Shen, Hui; Dixon, Richard A; Parrott, Wayne A; Neal Stewart, C

    2012-02-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a C4 perennial grass and has been identified as a potential bioenergy crop for cellulosic ethanol because of its rapid growth rate, nutrient use efficiency and widespread distribution throughout North America. The improvement of bioenergy feedstocks is needed to make cellulosic ethanol economically feasible, and genetic engineering of switchgrass is a promising approach towards this goal. A crucial component of creating transgenic switchgrass is having the capability of transforming the explants with DNA sequences of interest using vector constructs. However, there are limited options with the monocot plant vectors currently available. With this in mind, a versatile set of Gateway-compatible destination vectors (termed pANIC) was constructed to be used in monocot plants for transgenic crop improvement. The pANIC vectors can be used for transgene overexpression or RNAi-mediated gene suppression. The pANIC vector set includes vectors that can be utilized for particle bombardment or Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. All the vectors contain (i) a Gateway cassette for overexpression or silencing of the target sequence, (ii) a plant selection cassette and (iii) a visual reporter cassette. The pANIC vector set was functionally validated in switchgrass and rice and allows for high-throughput screening of sequences of interest in other monocot species as well.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of European species of Proteocephalus (Cestoda: Proteocephalidea): compatibility of molecular and morphological data, and parasite-host coevolution.

    PubMed

    Skeríková, A; Hypsa, V; Scholz, T V

    2001-08-01

    The phylogeny of European species of the tapeworm genus Proteocephalus was studied, based on partial 18S rDNA and morphological data. The group was found to be monophyletic. The analysis showed a low informative value of available morphological characters in comparison with molecular data. The morphological matrix resulted in a poorly resolved tree which is, however, compatible with the topology (Proteocephalus osculatus (Proteocephalus torulosus (Proteocephalus macrocephalus, Proteocephalus filicollis) (Proteocephalus tetrastomus, Proteocephalus percae, Proteocephalus longicollis))) based on the 18S rDNA data. A comparison performed by the program TreeMap showed a lack of significant congruency between parasite and host phylogenies. Therefore, the distribution of species in their hosts appears to be independent of the phylogeny and it is likely to be a result of host-switching, rather than co-speciation events.

  18. Compatibility Conditions of Structural Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1999-01-01

    The theory of elasticity has camouflaged a deficiency in the compatibility formulation since 1860. In structures the ad hoc compatibility conditions through virtual "cuts" and closing "gaps" are not parallel to the strain formulation in elasticity. This deficiency in the compatibility conditions has prevented the development of a direct stress determination method in structures and in elasticity. We have addressed this deficiency and attempted to unify the theory of compatibility. This work has led to the development of the integrated force method for structures and the completed Beltrami-Michell formulation for elasticity. The improved accuracy observed in the solution of numerical examples by the integrated force method can be attributed to the compliance of the compatibility conditions. Using the compatibility conditions allows mapping of variables and facile movement among different structural analysis formulations. This paper reviews and illustrates the requirement of compatibility in structures and in elasticity. It also describes the generation of the conditions and quantifies the benefits of their use. The traditional analysis methods and available solutions (which have been obtained bypassing the missed conditions) should be verified for compliance of the compatibility conditions.

  19. Are sweep net sampling and pitfall trapping compatible with molecular analysis of predation?

    PubMed

    Harwood, James D

    2008-08-01

    Molecular analysis of predation enables accurate and reliable elucidation of trophic linkages in complex food webs, but identifying the strength of such interactions can be subject to error. Currently two techniques dominate: monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although the optimization and characterization of these systems ensures their sensitivity and specificity, predator collection protocols such as sweep-netting and vacuum sampling could overestimate feeding rates because of surface-level contamination, yielding positive reactivity or predation within the sampling device. Therefore, two sampling techniques (sweep-net sampling and hand collection) were compared within an alfalfa agroecosystem using a monoclonal antibody-based ELISA to test the hypothesis that cross-contamination is a source of error, i.e., significantly more predators (linyphiid spiders) would test positive for prey (Diptera) proteins. A concurrent study examining the viability of trapping predators into saline solution was also undertaken. No significant differences were found between the proportions of spiders screening positive for Diptera when collected by sweep-net versus hand collection, rejecting the hypothesis that sweep-netting predators for subsequent molecular gut content analysis overestimates predation frequency. ELISA was also capable of detecting prey proteins in predator guts from pitfall traps containing phosphate-buffered saline, indicating the suitability of this approach for the collection and analysis of epigeal predators. Although these results indicate that sweep netting and pitfall trapping into solution is appropriate in this predator-prey and ELISA analysis system, caution should be exercised with other interactions and PCR-based analysis. The likelihood for false-positive reactivity should therefore be considered on a case-by-case basis.

  20. Shuttle communication and tracking systems signal design and interface compatibility analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Various options for the Dedicated Payload Communication Link (DPCL) were evaluated. Specific subjects addressed include: payload to DPCL power transfer in the proximity of the payload, DPCL antenna pointing considerations, and DPCL transceiver implementations which can be mounted on the deployed antenna boom. Additional analysis of the Space Telescope performance was conducted. The feasibility of using the Global Positioning System (GPS) for attitude determination and control for large spacecraft was examined. The objective of the Shuttle Orbiter Radar Test and Evaluation (SORTE) program was to quantify the Ku-band radar tracking accuracy using White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) radar and optical tracking equipment, with helicopter and balloon targets.

  1. Structural analysis of succinoglycan oligosaccharides from Sinorhizobium meliloti strains with different host compatibility phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Senay; Wood, Karl; Reuhs, Bradley L

    2013-05-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti NRG247 has a Fix(+) phenotype on Medicago truncatula A20 and is Fix(-) on M. truncatula A17, and the phenotype is reversed with S. meliloti NRG185. As the succinoglycan was shown to impact host specificity, an analysis of the succinoglycan oligosaccharides produced by each strain was conducted. The symbiotically active succinoglycan trimeric oligosaccharides (STOs) from the two S. meliloti strains were compared by chromatography and mass spectrometry, and the analysis of the S. meliloti NRG247 oligosaccharides showed that this strain produces an abundance of STO trimer 1 (T1), containing no succinate (i.e., three nonsuccinylated repeats), yet the low-molecular-weight pool contained no nonsuccinylated monomers (potential repeats). This showed that STO T1 is likely to be the active signal on M. truncatula A20 and that the biosynthesis of the STOs is not a random polymerization of the monomer population. The results also suggest that the fully succinylated STO T7 is required for the infection of M. truncatula A17.

  2. Development and analysis of an in vivo-compatible metabolic network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background During infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis confronts a generally hostile and nutrient-poor in vivo host environment. Existing models and analyses of M. tuberculosis metabolic networks are able to reproduce experimentally measured cellular growth rates and identify genes required for growth in a range of different in vitro media. However, these models, under in vitro conditions, do not provide an adequate description of the metabolic processes required by the pathogen to infect and persist in a host. Results To better account for the metabolic activity of M. tuberculosis in the host environment, we developed a set of procedures to systematically modify an existing in vitro metabolic network by enhancing the agreement between calculated and in vivo-measured gene essentiality data. After our modifications, the new in vivo network contained 663 genes, 838 metabolites, and 1,049 reactions and had a significantly increased sensitivity (0.81) in predicted gene essentiality than the in vitro network (0.31). We verified the modifications generated from the purely computational analysis through a review of the literature and found, for example, that, as the analysis suggested, lipids are used as the main source for carbon metabolism and oxygen must be available for the pathogen under in vivo conditions. Moreover, we used the developed in vivo network to predict the effects of double-gene deletions on M. tuberculosis growth in the host environment, explore metabolic adaptations to life in an acidic environment, highlight the importance of different enzymes in the tricarboxylic acid-cycle under different limiting nutrient conditions, investigate the effects of inhibiting multiple reactions, and look at the importance of both aerobic and anaerobic cellular respiration during infection. Conclusions The network modifications we implemented suggest a distinctive set of metabolic conditions and requirements faced by M. tuberculosis during host infection compared with

  3. Compatibility between mental disorder and mental capacity: analysis of a particular case of group sexual homicide.

    PubMed

    Carabellese, Felice; Vinci, Francesco; Catanesi, Roberto

    2008-11-01

    On the night of August 19, 2000, at the foot of Castel del Monte, an 8-year-old girl was brutally murdered. The perpetrators were identified as five young men who captured their victim and sexually abused her. The policemen found the cadaver by following "Mario," one of the five, who had been discovered lying on the ground, near the castle. Investigation led to demonstrate that the murder was not premeditated. The only desire of the group was to sexually molest the little girl. Mario showed signs of psychiatric pathology and for that he underwent psychiatric evaluation by judicial authorities. Analysis of this case, combined with a criminological and medical-legal perspective led to conclusions very much different from the expectations of Mario's defense attorneys. Mario, a marginal figure and seemingly the least intelligent, played the role of group instigator, both in the initiation of sexually abusing the child, as well as in the elimination of an inconvenient witness. However, the group was able to activate Mario's sadistic fantasies and his sexual perversions, and he ended up in a catalyzing role influencing the behavior of others and realizing what would otherwise remain only fantasies. The circularity of the group allows people like Mario, who are apparently subordinate, to influence the behavior of others. Mario was found to have a mental disorder but it was not sufficient to diminish his personal responsibility related to the crime. In fact, according to Italian judicial code, it is necessary that the motivation for the crime was psychopathological. It was for this reason that, according to Italian law, all of the members of the group were considered to be responsible for the crimes committed and were condemned.

  4. Viscoelastic stress analysis of thermally compatible and incompatible metal-ceramic systems.

    PubMed

    DeHoff, P H; Anusavice, K J

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze transient and residual midpoint deflections and stresses in metal-opaque porcelain-body porcelain systems with matched and mismatched thermal contraction coefficients. Calculations and measurements were made for seven trimaterial strips that covered a wide range of thermal contraction mismatches among constituent materials. Midpoint deflections were measured in a beam-bending viscometer during slow cooling from an initial temperature of 700 degrees C. Linear regression analysis with a correlation coefficient of 0.950 was used to compare measured and calculated residual midpoint deflections. Stress relaxation data were fit to a three-term exponential series by nonlinear regression analyses with correlation ratios ranging from 0.9972 to 0.9999. While finite element analyses correctly predicted the general shape of the deflection behavior as a function of temperature for all combinations, the best agreement between measured mean residual midpoint deflections and calculated values (+250 microns vs. +268 microns) was obtained for strips composed of a Au-Pd alloy (alpha m = 13.5 ppm/ degree C) with a medium expansion opaque porcelain (alpha o = 13.3 ppm/degree C) and a high expansion body porcelain (alpha B = 14.4 ppm/degree C). The highest calculated residual tensile stress of +26 MPa at the surface of body porcelain was associated with the 0.5-mm-thick Ni-Cr-Be alloy strip (alpha m = 15.1 ppm/degree C) with medium expansion porcelains (alpha o = 13.5 ppm/degree C and alpha B = 13.9 ppm/degree C). The smallest measured residual deflection (+10 microns) was also associated with this combination. The results of this study indicated that metal-ceramic strips are sensitive indicators of stress development caused by a thermal contraction mismatch; however, the magnitudes of the residual deflections do not necessarily correlate with the stress magnitudes in the ceramic. Currently there are no U.S. or international standards that define

  5. Gene expression and genetic analysis reveal diverse causes of recessive self-compatibility in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Wen; Zhang, Jianfeng; Yang, Yong; Ma, Chaozhi; Liu, Zhiquan; Gao, Changbin; Zhou, Guilong; Tu, Jinxing; Shen, Jinxiong; Fu, Tingdong

    2014-11-28

    Brassica napus (AACC) is self-compatible, although its ancestor species Brassica rapa (AA) and Brassica oleracea (CC) are self-incompatible. Most B.napus accessions have dominant self-compatibility (SC) resulting from an insertion of 3.6 kb in the promoter region of BnSCR-1 on the A genome, while recessive SC in B.napus has rarely been observed. Expression and cloning of SRK and SCR genes and genetic analysis were carried out to dissect bases of recessive SC in B.napus. Eleven accessions were screened to identify stable recessive SC and had the S genotype BnS-7 on the A genome and BnS-6 on the C genome similarly to BrS-29 and BoS-15, respectively. In eight SC accessions, BnSCR-7 and BnSCR-6 were nearly undetectable and harbored no structural mutations in the promoters, while SRK genes were expressed at normal levels and contained intact CDS, with the exception of BnSRK-7 in line C32. SRK and SCR genes were expressed normally but their CDSs had no mutations in three SC accessions. In self-incompatible S-1300 and 11 F1 hybrids, SRK genes and BnSCR-1300 transcripts were present at high levels, while expression of the BnSCR-7 and BnSCR-6 were absent. Plants of S genotype S1300S1300 were completely SI, while SI phenotypes of SBnS-7SBnS-7 and S1300SBnS-7 plants were segregated in BC1 and F2 populations. The recessive SC in eight accessions is caused by the loss of function of BnSCR-7 and BnSCR-6 in pollen. Translational repression contributes to the recessive SC in three accessions, whose SRK and SCR genes were expressed normally and had identical CDSs to BrS-29 or BoS-15. SI in 11 F1 hybrids relies on the expression of BnSCR-1300 rather than SRK genes. Other factor(s) independent of the S locus are involved in recessive SC. Therefore, diverse causes underlie recessive SC in B. napus, yielding insight into these complex mechanisms.

  6. Transcriptome analysis reveals a complex interplay between resistance and effector genes during the compatible lentil-Colletotrichum lentis interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bhadauria, Vijai; Vijayan, Perumal; Wei, Yangdou; Banniza, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum lentis is a hemibiotrophic pathogen and causes anthracnose on lentil. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying the symptomatic phase of infection, a cDNA plasmid library was developed from the susceptible lentil cultivar Eston infected with an isolate of the virulent race 0 of C. lentis. The library was sequenced on the Sanger sequencing platform, generating a total of 11,094 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) representing 3,488 unigenes. Mapping of unigenes onto the C. lentis and the L. culinaris genomes resulted in the identification of 2,418 unigenes of fungal origin and 1,070 unigenes of plant origin. Gene ontology term analysis of unigenes revealed that the transcriptome contained 22 candidate effectors, such as in planta induced ToxB and CyanoVirin-N, and 26 resistance genes, including suppressor of npr1-1 constitutive 1 and dirigent. Comparative genomics analyses revealed that three of the candidate effectors are likely located in the subtelomeric regions, and two of them show no synteny with the closely related species C. higginsianum, suggesting genomic rearrangements, such as translocation during speciation to colonize different niches. The data suggest a complex molecular interplay between disease resistance proteins and effectors during compatible interaction in which the pathogen exploits defense responses mounted by the host. PMID:28186158

  7. Multicriteria analysis as a tool to investigate compatibility between conservation and development on Salina Island, Aeolian Archipelago, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodini, Antonio; Giavelli, Giovanni

    1992-09-01

    Several multicriteria evaluation techniques have been developed since the 1970s. The need to compare different territorial policies has justified their introduction into environmental research. These methods are based on the numerical manipulation of heterogeneous information, which varies in terms of reference scale and type of measure (continuous, ordinal, qualitative, binary, etc.). During recent years, diverse investigations have focused on general conditions on Salina, the “green island” of the Aeolian archipelago. Such studies, within an interdisciplinary project, aimed to explore the possibility of implementing conservation strategies that are compatible with human needs, landscape preservation, and sustainable economic development. Three different evaluation techniques are applied, namely multicriteria weighted concordance and discordance analysis and a qualitative procedure. They are used to compare four alternative plans for the socioeconomic development of Salina Island. These plans lie between extreme alternatives: total protection of natural resources and maximizing economic development based on tourism. The plans are compared to each other on the basis of 14 criteria that reflect the socioenvironmental perception of Salina's inhabitants. The approach used in this research seems particularly fruitful because of its flexibility: it offers decision makers the chance to manage heterogeneous data and information that is not easily quantifiable. Such “soft” information helps to evaluate environmental conditions more precisely, and to make a less damaging choice among alternative development plans.

  8. Transcriptome analysis reveals a complex interplay between resistance and effector genes during the compatible lentil-Colletotrichum lentis interaction.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, Vijai; Vijayan, Perumal; Wei, Yangdou; Banniza, Sabine

    2017-02-10

    Colletotrichum lentis is a hemibiotrophic pathogen and causes anthracnose on lentil. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying the symptomatic phase of infection, a cDNA plasmid library was developed from the susceptible lentil cultivar Eston infected with an isolate of the virulent race 0 of C. lentis. The library was sequenced on the Sanger sequencing platform, generating a total of 11,094 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) representing 3,488 unigenes. Mapping of unigenes onto the C. lentis and the L. culinaris genomes resulted in the identification of 2,418 unigenes of fungal origin and 1,070 unigenes of plant origin. Gene ontology term analysis of unigenes revealed that the transcriptome contained 22 candidate effectors, such as in planta induced ToxB and CyanoVirin-N, and 26 resistance genes, including suppressor of npr1-1 constitutive 1 and dirigent. Comparative genomics analyses revealed that three of the candidate effectors are likely located in the subtelomeric regions, and two of them show no synteny with the closely related species C. higginsianum, suggesting genomic rearrangements, such as translocation during speciation to colonize different niches. The data suggest a complex molecular interplay between disease resistance proteins and effectors during compatible interaction in which the pathogen exploits defense responses mounted by the host.

  9. Compatibility of segmented thermoelectric generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J.; Ursell, T.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that power generation efficiency improves when materials with appropriate properties are combined either in a cascaded or segmented fashion across a temperature gradient. Past methods for determining materials used in segmentation weremainly concerned with materials that have the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. However, the example of SiGe segmented with Bi2Te3 and/or various skutterudites shows a marked decline in device efficiency even though SiGe has the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. The origin of the incompatibility of SiGe with other thermoelectric materials leads to a general definition of compatibility and intrinsic efficiency. The compatibility factor derived as = (Jl+zr - 1) a is a function of only intrinsic material properties and temperature, which is represented by a ratio of current to conduction heat. For maximum efficiency the compatibility factor should not change with temperature both within a single material, and in the segmented leg as a whole. This leads to a measure of compatibility not only between segments, but also within a segment. General temperature trends show that materials are more self compatible at higher temperatures, and segmentation is more difficult across a larger -T. The compatibility factor can be used as a quantitative guide for deciding whether a material is better suited for segmentation orcascading. Analysis of compatibility factors and intrinsic efficiency for optimal segmentation are discussed, with intent to predict optimal material properties, temperature interfaces, and/or currentheat ratios.

  10. Compatibility of segmented thermoelectric generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J.; Ursell, T.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that power generation efficiency improves when materials with appropriate properties are combined either in a cascaded or segmented fashion across a temperature gradient. Past methods for determining materials used in segmentation weremainly concerned with materials that have the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. However, the example of SiGe segmented with Bi2Te3 and/or various skutterudites shows a marked decline in device efficiency even though SiGe has the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. The origin of the incompatibility of SiGe with other thermoelectric materials leads to a general definition of compatibility and intrinsic efficiency. The compatibility factor derived as = (Jl+zr - 1) a is a function of only intrinsic material properties and temperature, which is represented by a ratio of current to conduction heat. For maximum efficiency the compatibility factor should not change with temperature both within a single material, and in the segmented leg as a whole. This leads to a measure of compatibility not only between segments, but also within a segment. General temperature trends show that materials are more self compatible at higher temperatures, and segmentation is more difficult across a larger -T. The compatibility factor can be used as a quantitative guide for deciding whether a material is better suited for segmentation orcascading. Analysis of compatibility factors and intrinsic efficiency for optimal segmentation are discussed, with intent to predict optimal material properties, temperature interfaces, and/or currentheat ratios.

  11. Automated Dental Epidemiology System. II. Systems Analysis and Functional Design,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    A"D-n134 803 AUTOMATED DENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY SYSTEM II SYSTEMSi/ ANALYSIS AND FUNCTIONAL DE5IGN(U) NAVAnL DENTAL RESERRCH INST GREAT LAKES IL M C DIEHL... DENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY SYSTEM: II. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND FUNCTIONAL DESIGN M. C. DIEHL DTICSELECTEOCT 218 D >- NAVAL 8DENTAL RESEARCH ’INSTITUTE Naval...NAVAL DENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE NAVAL BASE, BUILDING I-H GREAT LAKES, ILLINOIS 60088 AUTOMATED DENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY SYSTEM: II. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

  12. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  13. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  14. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  15. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  16. A rapid compatibility analysis of potential offshore sand sources for beaches of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mustain, N.; Griggs, G.; Barnard, P.L.

    2007-01-01

    The beaches of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell, which are narrow as a result of either natural and/or anthropogenic factors, may benefit from nourishment. Sand compatibility is fundamental to beach nourishment success and grain size is the parameter often used to evaluate equivalence. Only after understanding which sand sizes naturally compose beaches in a specific cell, especially the smallest size that remains on the beach, can the potential compatibility of source areas, such as offshore borrow sites, be accurately assessed. This study examines sediments on the beach and in the nearshore (5-20m depth) for the entire Santa Barbara Littoral Cell east of Point Conception. A digital bed sediment camera, the Eyeball??, and spatial autocorrelation technique were used to determine sediment grain size. Here we report on whether nearshore sediments are comparable and compatible with beach sands of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  17. Run II data analysis on the grid

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Mandrichenko, Igor Terekhov and Frank Wurthwein

    2002-12-02

    In this document, we begin the technical design for the distributed RunII computing for CDF and D0. The present paper defines the three components of the data handling area of Run II computing, namely the Data Handling System, the Storage System and the Application. We outline their functionality and interaction between them. We identify necessary and desirable elements of the interfaces.

  18. Compatibility between Text Mining and Qualitative Research in the Perspectives of Grounded Theory, Content Analysis, and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Chong Ho; Jannasch-Pennell, Angel; DiGangi, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to illustrate that text mining and qualitative research are epistemologically compatible. First, like many qualitative research approaches, such as grounded theory, text mining encourages open-mindedness and discourages preconceptions. Contrary to the popular belief that text mining is a linear and fully automated…

  19. [Clinical study on aconite prescriptions with incompatible herbs in different areas based on association rules and analysis on compatibility features].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ting; Fan, Xin-sheng; Tian, Shuo; Jiang, Chen-xue; Chen, Fei

    2015-03-01

    To explore the current application and features of Aconite prescriptions with incompatible herbs in grade A class three hospitals in east China and central China through a clinical study and comparative analysis. Clinical prescriptions containing Aconite with incompatible herbs were collected. Association rules were utilized to analyze the compatible features of these herbs. This analysis found that the frequently used incompatible herba; pairs are Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata-Pinelliae Rhizoma, with the support rate of 44.45%, occupying nearly half of the surveyed prescriptions; Pinelliae Rhizoma is the most frequently used herb in the two areas, with support rate up to 76.24%. Among the top 10 herbal pairs in the support rate, except for Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata and Pinelliae Rhizoma, the top 10 herbs in Central China were mostly for warming the middle jiao and tonifying qi, such as Zingiberis Rhizoma, Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma and Codonopsis Radix; Whereas those in east China were mostly for activating and nourishing blood, such as Angelicae Sinensis Radix, Chuanxiong Rhizoma, and Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma. Among the top 10 herbal pairs in the support rate, except for Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata-Pinelliae Rhizoma, the core herbal pairs applied in central China were mainly for resolving phlegm and warming the middle jiao, such as Pinelliae Rhizoma-Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma, Pinelliae Rhizoma-Zingiberis Rhizoma; Whereas those in east China were principally for activating blood and tonifying qi, like Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma and Pinelliae Rhizoma, Angelicae Sinensis Radix and Pinelliae Rhizoma. Among the core herbal groups in the two areas, the most frequently used herbal groups in the two areas are Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata, Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma and Pinelliae Rhizoma with the support rate of 59.73%, accounting for the highest proportion among all of herbal groups. There are the combined

  20. Content Analysis of "School Psychology International", 1990-2011: An Analysis of Trends and Compatibility with the NASP Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Steven G.; Akin-Little, Angeleque; Lloyd, Keryn

    2011-01-01

    Formal analysis of research publications serves as one indicator of the current status of a profession or a journal. Content analyses provide both practitioners and academicians with information on the status of research in the profession. These types of analyses can also provide information on the concordance between published research and what…

  1. Content Analysis of "School Psychology International", 1990-2011: An Analysis of Trends and Compatibility with the NASP Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Steven G.; Akin-Little, Angeleque; Lloyd, Keryn

    2011-01-01

    Formal analysis of research publications serves as one indicator of the current status of a profession or a journal. Content analyses provide both practitioners and academicians with information on the status of research in the profession. These types of analyses can also provide information on the concordance between published research and what…

  2. Compatible Lie Bialgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Zhong; Bai, Cheng-Ming

    2015-06-01

    A compatible Lie algebra is a pair of Lie algebras such that any linear combination of the two Lie brackets is a Lie bracket. We construct a bialgebra theory of compatible Lie algebras as an analogue of a Lie bialgebra. They can also be regarded as a “compatible version” of Lie bialgebras, that is, a pair of Lie bialgebras such that any linear combination of the two Lie bialgebras is still a Lie bialgebra. Many properties of compatible Lie bialgebras as the “compatible version” of the corresponding properties of Lie bialgebras are presented. In particular, there is a coboundary compatible Lie bialgebra theory with a construction from the classical Yang-Baxter equation in compatible Lie algebras as a combination of two classical Yang-Baxter equations in Lie algebras. Furthermore, a notion of compatible pre-Lie algebra is introduced with an interpretation of its close relation with the classical Yang-Baxter equation in compatible Lie algebras which leads to a construction of the solutions of the latter. As a byproduct, the compatible Lie bialgebras fit into the framework to construct non-constant solutions of the classical Yang-Baxter equation given by Golubchik and Sokolov. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11271202, 11221091, 11425104 and Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education under Grant No. 20120031110022

  3. Molecular analysis of two Chinese pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) spontaneous self-compatible mutants, Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui.

    PubMed

    Li, M F; Li, X F; Han, Zh H; Shu, H R; Li, T Zh

    2009-09-01

    Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui are spontaneous bud mutants of Chinese pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) from Ya Li. Both fruit set rate and seed number after self-pollination, together with pollen tube growth, prove that Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui are self-compatible. The fruit set rate and seed number after cross-pollination suggest that the self-compatibility of Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui may be due to natural mutations of the stylar S allele and pollen S allele, respectively. PCR amplification of the S-RNase gene in self-pollinated progeny of Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui show that they contain point mutations in the stylar S(21) allele and pollen S(34) allele, respectively. The cDNA sequence of the Yan Zhuang stylar S-RNase gene revealed that the 182nd nucleotide of the S(21)-RNase (cDNA) sequence had been substituted resulting in a Gly to Val mutation, and this might affect the stability of the S-RNase. In addition, Western blotting showed that one Yan Zhuang stylar S-RNase was absent and the expression level of another S-RNase protein was decreased compared to Ya Li. Therefore, we suggest that the self-compatibility of Yan Zhuang is caused by a point mutation in an S(21)-RNase nucleotide.

  4. Compatibility Assessment Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egbert, James Allen

    2016-01-01

    In support of ground system development for the Space Launch System (SLS), engineers are tasked with building immense engineering models of extreme complexity. The various systems require rigorous analysis of pneumatics, hydraulic, cryogenic, and hypergolic systems. There are certain standards that each of these systems must meet, in the form of pressure vessel system (PVS) certification reports. These reports can be hundreds of pages long, and require many hours to compile. Traditionally, each component is analyzed individually, often utilizing hand calculations in the design process. The objective of this opportunity is to perform these analyses in an integrated fashion with the parametric CADCAE environment. This allows for systems to be analyzed on an assembly level in a semi-automated fashion, which greatly improves accuracy and efficiency. To accomplish this, component specific parameters were stored in the Windchill database to individual Creo Parametric models based on spec control drawings. These parameters were then accessed by using the Prime Analysis within Creo Parametric. MathCAD Prime spreadsheets were created that automatically extracted these parameters, performed calculations, and generated reports. The reports described component compatibility based on local conditions such as pressure, temperature, density, and flow rates. The reports also determined component pairing compatibility, such as properly sizing relief valves with regulators. The reports stored the input conditions that were used to determine compatibility to increase traceability of component selection. The desired workflow for using this tool would begin with a Creo Schematics diagram of a PVS system. This schematic would store local conditions and locations of components. The schematic would then populate an assembly within Creo Parametric, using Windchill database parts. These parts would have their attributes already assigned, and the MathCAD spreadsheets could begin running

  5. On Software Compatibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ershov, Andrei P.

    The problem of compatibility of software hampers the development of computer application. One solution lies in standardization of languages, terms, peripherais, operating systems and computer characteristics. (AB)

  6. On Software Compatibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ershov, Andrei P.

    The problem of compatibility of software hampers the development of computer application. One solution lies in standardization of languages, terms, peripherais, operating systems and computer characteristics. (AB)

  7. MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry and thermogravimetric analysis of Mg(II), Ca(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pt(II) adducts with monomethoxypolyethylene glycol 5000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwelase, S. R.; Bariyanga, J.

    2002-05-01

    We have prepared and isolated complexes of Mg(II), Ca(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pt(II) with monomethoxypolyethylene glycol 5000 in a pH 7 buffer at 40 °C in order to study the interaction of this polymer carrier with the ions likely to be found in the human body. Their characterization was done by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, thermogravimetry and elemental analysis. The mass spectra allowed us to determine not only the molecular weights but also the nature of the complexes and the findings were in agreement with the elementary analysis data. The calcium ion was found not directly linked to polyethylene glycol but through water molecules. The overall results indicated strong bonding for Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes and weak interactions for Mg(II), Ca(II) and Pt(II).

  8. Compatibility in multiparameter quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragy, Sammy; Jarzyna, Marcin; Demkowicz-Dobrzański, Rafał

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous estimation of multiple parameters in quantum metrological models is complicated by factors relating to the (i) existence of a single probe state allowing for optimal sensitivity for all parameters of interest, (ii) existence of a single measurement optimally extracting information from the probe state on all the parameters, and (iii) statistical independence of the estimated parameters. We consider the situation when these concerns present no obstacle, and for every estimated parameter the variance obtained in the multiparameter scheme is equal to that of an optimal scheme for that parameter alone, assuming all other parameters are perfectly known. We call such models compatible. In establishing a rigorous theoretical framework for investigating compatibility, we clarify some ambiguities and inconsistencies present in the literature and discuss several examples to highlight interesting features of unitary and nonunitary parameter estimation, as well as deriving new bounds for physical problems of interest, such as the simultaneous estimation of phase and local dephasing.

  9. SPLAT II: An Aircraft Compatible, Ultra-Sensitive, High Precision Instrument for In-Situ Characterization of the Size and Composition of Fine and Ultrafine Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Yang, Juan; Choi, Eric Y.; Imre, Dan G.

    2009-05-01

    The properties of aerosols depend on the size and internal compositions of the individual particles. The vast majority of atmospheric aerosols are smaller than 200 nm, yet the single particle mass spectrometers, the only instruments that can characterize the size and internal compositions of individual particles, typically detect these small particles with extremely low efficiencies. In this paper we describe a new instrument called SPLAT II that provides unparalleled sensitivity to small particles, detecting 100% of particles that are larger than 125 nm and 40% of 100 nm particles. This instrument also brings an increase by a factor of 10 in temporal resolution, sizing up to 500 particles per second and characterizing the composition of up to 100 of them. SPLAT II uses a two-laser, two-step process to evaporate the particles and generate ions, producing high quality, reproducible mass spectra of the refractive and non-refractive aerosol fractions to yield the complete compositions of individual particles. The instrument control board provides for size dependent delays for lasers’ triggers to eliminate a size dependent hit rate. The mass spectra are recorded with 14-bit vertical resolution and analyzed using custom software packages. The instrument’s high sizing resolution and sensitivity makes it possible to combine it with the differential mobility analyzer(s) and measure particle size, composition, density, dynamic shape factor, hygroscopicity, and fractal dimension.

  10. ANALYSIS OF NSLS-II TOUSCHEK LIFETIME

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.; Kramer, S.L.

    2011-03-28

    As scrapers are adopted for the loss control of NSLS-II storage ring, Touschek lifetime estimations for various cases are required to assure the stable operation. However, to estimate the Touschek lifetime, momentum apertures should be measured all along the ring and, if we want to estimate the lifetime in various situations, it can take extremely long time. Thus, rather than simulating for each case, a semi-analytic methods with the interpolations are used for the measurements of the momentum apertures. In this paper, we described the methods and showed the results. Having enough Touschek lifetime is important for synchrotron light source for the users to perform experiments with stable beams. In NSLS-II, the scrapers will be installed for the loss control. Especially, the horizontal scrapers will be installed where the dispersions are maximum. Therefore, we need to find the proper scraper gap values which do not reduce the lifetime too much for the stable beam operation. To estimate reliable Touschek lifetime, we should measure the momentum apertures at many positions along the ring. For the rough estimation of the Touschek lifetime, the RF momentum acceptance can be used and for a more detailed estimation, the linear approximation of synchrotron oscillation can be used. However, for the strong focussing synchrotrons, like NSLS-II, the linear approximation is not enough to obtain the reliable momentum apertures, and, in general, particle tracking simulations are used. However, for NSLS-II case, we need to track the particle about 400 turns at each point to make it a full synchrotron oscillation period and to obtain the reliable Touschek lifetime we need measure the momentum apertures at several hundred positions at least. Therefore, it can take quite a long time if we want to have the reasonable resolution for the measurements. Furthermore, at the simulation, if we want to measure the aperture inside a element, we should divide the element and this will make the

  11. TMV-Gate vectors: Gateway compatible tobacco mosaic virus based expression vectors for functional analysis of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kagale, Sateesh; Uzuhashi, Shihomi; Wigness, Merek; Bender, Tricia; Yang, Wen; Borhan, M. Hossein; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Plant viral expression vectors are advantageous for high-throughput functional characterization studies of genes due to their capability for rapid, high-level transient expression of proteins. We have constructed a series of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) based vectors that are compatible with Gateway technology to enable rapid assembly of expression constructs and exploitation of ORFeome collections. In addition to the potential of producing recombinant protein at grams per kilogram FW of leaf tissue, these vectors facilitate either N- or C-terminal fusions to a broad series of epitope tag(s) and fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the utility of these vectors in affinity purification, immunodetection and subcellular localisation studies. We also apply the vectors to characterize protein-protein interactions and demonstrate their utility in screening plant pathogen effectors. Given its broad utility in defining protein properties, this vector series will serve as a useful resource to expedite gene characterization efforts. PMID:23166857

  12. Theoretical analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with NiAl and FeAl matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Several potential reinforcement materials were assessed for their chemical, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and mechanical compatibility with the intermetallic matrices based on NiAl and FeAl. Among the ceramic reinforcement materials, Al2O3, TiC, and TiB2, appear to be the optimum choices for NiAl and FeAl matrices. However, the problem of CTE mismatch with the matrix needs to be solved for these three reinforcement materials. Beryllium-rich intermetallic compounds can be considered as potential reinforcement materials provided suitable reaction barrier coatings can be developed for these. Based on preliminary thermodynamic calculations, Sc2O3 and TiC appear to be suitable as reaction barrier coatings for the beryllides. Several reaction barrier coatings are also suggested for the currently available SiC fibers.

  13. TMV-Gate vectors: gateway compatible tobacco mosaic virus based expression vectors for functional analysis of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kagale, Sateesh; Uzuhashi, Shihomi; Wigness, Merek; Bender, Tricia; Yang, Wen; Borhan, M Hossein; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Plant viral expression vectors are advantageous for high-throughput functional characterization studies of genes due to their capability for rapid, high-level transient expression of proteins. We have constructed a series of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) based vectors that are compatible with Gateway technology to enable rapid assembly of expression constructs and exploitation of ORFeome collections. In addition to the potential of producing recombinant protein at grams per kilogram FW of leaf tissue, these vectors facilitate either N- or C-terminal fusions to a broad series of epitope tag(s) and fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the utility of these vectors in affinity purification, immunodetection and subcellular localisation studies. We also apply the vectors to characterize protein-protein interactions and demonstrate their utility in screening plant pathogen effectors. Given its broad utility in defining protein properties, this vector series will serve as a useful resource to expedite gene characterization efforts.

  14. Tritium modeling/BEATRIX-II data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M.C.; Attaya, H.; Johnson, C.E.; Kopasz, J.P.

    1992-12-31

    Models have been developed to describe the tritium transport in Li{sub 2}O. The mechanisms considered are bulk diffusion, surface desorption, surface adsorption, and solubility. These models have been incorporated into the TIARA steady-state inventory code and the DISPL2 steady-state and transient code. Preliminary validation efforts have focused on the inventory and tritium release rate data from in-reactor, purge-flow tests VOM-15H, EXOTIC-2, CRITIC-1, and MOZART. The models and validation effort are reported in detail in ANL/FPP/TM-260. Since the BEATRIX-II data were released officially in November 1991, validation efforts have been concentrated on the tritium release rate data from the {open_quotes}isothermal{close_quotes} thin-ring sample. In this report, results are presented for the comparison of predicted long-time inventory changes (in response to temperature and hydrogen purge pressure changes) to values determined from the tritium release data.

  15. [Health technology assessment: II. Cost effectiveness analysis].

    PubMed

    Secoli, Silvia Regina; Nita, Marcelo Eidi; Ono-Nita, Suzane Kioko; Nobre, Moacyr

    2010-01-01

    New health technologies have made an impact in clinical and economic outcomes. Therefore, research methodologies that allow to evaluate the efficiency of these new technologies such as cost-effectiveness analysis are necessary. Cost-effectiveness analysis assess the value of health care interventions or drugs, the technology. Cost-effectiveness analysis is also deemed a determinant of modern health care practice, because the therapeutic options available at public (SUS) or private health care system must go through a formal health technology assessment in Brazil; thus, both the health care system and the health care professionals have to reevaluate the clinical consequences and costs of their actions to assure that the most efficient technologies are the one used in the practice. In this second article about health technology assessment we review the concepts of cost-effectiveness analysis, the steps involved in performing such analysis, and the criteria most frequently used to critically review the results.

  16. Preparation and Spectrophotometric Analysis of Hexaamminenickel(II) Chloride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieder, Grace M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed at Brooklyn College (New York) in which the preparation and ammonia analysis of an amminenickel(II) chloride is extended to include a spectrophotometric analysis for nickel. Discusses the materials needed and the procedure for the experiment which takes nine hours of laboratory work. (TW)

  17. Preparation and Spectrophotometric Analysis of Hexaamminenickel(II) Chloride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieder, Grace M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed at Brooklyn College (New York) in which the preparation and ammonia analysis of an amminenickel(II) chloride is extended to include a spectrophotometric analysis for nickel. Discusses the materials needed and the procedure for the experiment which takes nine hours of laboratory work. (TW)

  18. High throughput analysis of drugs of abuse in hair by combining purposely designed sample extraction compatible with immunometric methods used for drug testing in urine.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, R; Civit, E; Svaizer, F; Lotti, A; Gottardi, M; Miozzo, M

    2010-03-20

    Drug testing in hair usually requires a rather complex sample treatment before drugs are amenable to analysis by either immunological and/or chromatographic coupled to mass spectrometry methods. Immunological methods applied are usually dedicated to hair analysis as analytes present in this matrix are not always the same present in urine. Comedical s.a.s. laboratories recently commercialized reagents (VMA-T) purposely designed for hair sample treatment which are compatible with current immunometric methods used for urine drug testing. This is possible as some analytes (6-MAM and cocaine) present in hair after sample treatment are converted to those detected in urine (morphine and benzoylecgonine). A correlation study for several drug classes performed in two laboratories with 32 clinical and 12 spiked drug free (controls) hair samples shows that implementation of the method on clinical chemistry analyzers is easy and that results obtained by different operators and instruments are comparable and reproducible. The main advantage of VMA-T method is the possibility to simultaneously extract from hair main drug classes, in a period of time lower than 2h and its compatibility with immunological methods applied in urine drug testing.

  19. Orbit Response Matrix Analysis Applied at PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, C.; Wolski, A.; Ecklund, S.; Safranek, J.A.; Tenenbaum, P.; Terebilo, A.; Turner, J.L.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2005-05-17

    The analysis of orbit response matrices has been used very successfully to measure and correct the gradient and skew gradient distribution in many accelerators. It allows determination of an accurately calibrated model of the coupled machine lattice, which then can be used to calculate the corrections necessary to improve coupling, dynamic aperture and ultimately luminosity. At PEP-II, the Matlab version of LOCO has been used to analyze coupled response matrices for both the LER and the HER. The large number of elements in PEP-II and the very complicated interaction region present unique challenges to the data analysis. All necessary tools to make the analysis method useable at PEP-II have been implemented and LOCO can now be used as a routine tool for lattice diagnostic.

  20. Analysis of the tomato leaf transcriptome during successive hemibiotrophic stages of a compatible interaction with the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Zuluaga, Andrea P; Vega-Arreguín, Julio C; Fei, Zhangjun; Matas, Antonio J; Patev, Sean; Fry, William E; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2016-01-01

    The infection of plants by hemibiotrophic pathogens involves a complex and highly regulated transition from an initial biotrophic, asymptomatic stage to a later necrotrophic state, characterized by cell death. Little is known about how this transition is regulated, and there are conflicting views regarding the significance of the plant hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) in the different phases of infection. To provide a broad view of the hemibiotrophic infection process from the plant perspective, we surveyed the transcriptome of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) during a compatible interaction with the hemibiotrophic oomycete Phytophthora infestans during three infection stages: biotrophic, the transition from biotrophy to necrotrophy, and the necrotrophic phase. Nearly 10 000 genes corresponding to proteins in approximately 400 biochemical pathways showed differential transcript abundance during the three infection stages, revealing a major reorganization of plant metabolism, including major changes in source-sink relations, as well as secondary metabolites. In addition, more than 100 putative resistance genes and pattern recognition receptor genes were induced, and both JA and SA levels and associated signalling pathways showed dynamic changes during the infection time course. The biotrophic phase was characterized by the induction of many defence systems, which were either insufficient, evaded or suppressed by the pathogen.

  1. Multiwell experiment: reservoir modeling analysis, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, A.I.

    1985-05-01

    This report updates an ongoing analysis by reservoir modelers at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of well test data from the Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX). Results of previous efforts were presented in a recent METC Technical Note (Horton 1985). Results included in this report pertain to the poststimulation well tests of Zones 3 and 4 of the Paludal Sandstone Interval and the prestimulation well tests of the Red and Yellow Zones of the Coastal Sandstone Interval. The following results were obtained by using a reservoir model and history matching procedures: (1) Post-minifracture analysis indicated that the minifracture stimulation of the Paludal Interval did not produce an induced fracture, and extreme formation damage did occur, since a 65% permeability reduction around the wellbore was estimated. The design for this minifracture was from 200 to 300 feet on each side of the wellbore; (2) Post full-scale stimulation analysis for the Paludal Interval also showed that extreme formation damage occurred during the stimulation as indicated by a 75% permeability reduction 20 feet on each side of the induced fracture. Also, an induced fracture half-length of 100 feet was determined to have occurred, as compared to a designed fracture half-length of 500 to 600 feet; and (3) Analysis of prestimulation well test data from the Coastal Interval agreed with previous well-to-well interference tests that showed extreme permeability anisotropy was not a factor for this zone. This lack of permeability anisotropy was also verified by a nitrogen injection test performed on the Coastal Red and Yellow Zones. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Compatibility and noncontextuality for sequential measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guehne, Otfried; Kleinmann, Matthias; Cabello, Adan; Larsson, Jan-Aake; Kirchmair, Gerhard; Zaehringer, Florian; Gerritsma, Rene; Roos, Christian F.

    2010-02-15

    A basic assumption behind the inequalities used for testing noncontextual hidden variable models is that the observables measured on the same individual system are perfectly compatible. However, compatibility is not perfect in actual experiments using sequential measurements. We discuss the resulting 'compatibility loophole' and present several methods to rule out certain hidden variable models that obey a kind of extended noncontextuality. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of experimental imperfections in a recent trapped-ion experiment and apply our analysis to that case.

  3. An Interspecific Backcross of Lycopersicon Esculentum X L. Hirsutum: Linkage Analysis and a Qtl Study of Sexual Compatibility Factors and Floral Traits

    PubMed Central

    Bernacchi, D.; Tanksley, S. D.

    1997-01-01

    A BC(1) population of the self-compatible tomato Lycopersicon esculentum and its wild self-incompatible relative L. hirsutum f. typicum was used for restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage analysis and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of reproductive behavior and floral traits. The self-incompatibility locus, S, on chromosome 1 harbored the only QTL for self-incompatibility indicating that the transition to self-compatibility in the lineage leading to the cultivated tomato was primarily the result of mutations at the S locus. Moreover, the major QTL controlling unilateral incongruity also mapped to the S locus, supporting the hypothesis that self-incompatibility and unilateral incongruity are not independent mechanisms. The mating behavior of near-isogenic lines carrying the L. hirsutum allele for the S locus on chromosome 1 in an otherwise L. esculentum background support these conclusions. The S locus region of chromosome 1 also harbors most major QTL for several floral traits important to pollination biology (e.g., number and size of flowers), suggesting a gene complex controlling both genetic and morphological mechanisms of reproduction control. Similar associations in other flowering plants suggest that such complex may have been conserved since early periods of plant evolution or else reflect a convergent evolutionary process. PMID:9335620

  4. Design and integration of a generic disposable array-compatible sensor housing into an integrated disposable indirect microfluidic flow injection analysis system.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Bastian E; Schickling, Benjamin; Prokop, Jürgen; Piotter, Volker; Rapp, Michael; Länge, Kerstin

    2011-10-01

    We describe an integration strategy for arbitrary sensors intended to be used as biosensors in biomedical or bioanalytical applications. For such devices ease of handling (by a potential end user) as well as strict disposable usage are of importance. Firstly we describe a generic array compatible polymer sensor housing with an effective sample volume of 1.55 μl. This housing leaves the sensitive surface of the sensor accessible for the application of biosensing layers even after the embedding. In a second step we show how this sensor housing can be used in combination with a passive disposable microfluidic chip to set up arbitrary 8-fold sensor arrays and how such a system can be complemented with an indirect microfluidic flow injection analysis (FIA) system. This system is designed in a way that it strictly separates between disposable and reusable components- by introducing tetradecane as an intermediate liquid. This results in a sensor system compatible with the demands of most biomedical applications. Comparative measurements between a classical macroscopic FIA system and this integrated indirect microfluidic system are presented. We use a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor as an exemplary detector in this work.

  5. Neutronics analysis for HYLIFE-II

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, M.T.

    1990-12-20

    A preliminary neutronics analysis of the HYLIFE-2 reactor concept gives a tritium breeding ratio of 1.17 and a system energy multiplication factor of 1.14. Modified SS-316 (in which Mn is substituted for Ni) is superior to Hastelloy X and Hastelloy N as a firstwall material considering He generation, dpa-limited lifetime, and shallow-burial index. Since Flibe is corrosive to Mn metals, however, a favorable first-wall material is yet to be decided on. Flibe impurities considered (e.g., inherent impurities and those arising from wall erosion or secondary-coolant leakage) do not increase the hazard to the public over that of pure Flibe. The main issues for HYLIFE-2 are the high shallow-burial index (106) and the requirement to contain some 99.7% of the {sup 18}F inventory to prevent its release to the public 18 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. On intracluster Faraday rotation. II - Statistical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawler, J. M.; Dennison, B.

    1982-01-01

    The comparison of a reliable sample of radio source Faraday rotation measurements seen through rich clusters of galaxies, with sources seen through the outer parts of clusters and therefore having little intracluster Faraday rotation, indicates that the distribution of rotation in the former population is broadened, but only at the 80% level of statistical confidence. Employing a physical model for the intracluster medium in which the square root of magnetic field strength/turbulent cell per gas core radius number ratio equals approximately 0.07 microgauss, a Monte Carlo simulation is able to reproduce the observed broadening. An upper-limit analysis figure of less than 0.20 microgauss for the field strength/turbulent cell ratio, combined with lower limits on field strength imposed by limitations on the Compton-scattered flux, shows that intracluster magnetic fields must be tangled on scales greater than about 20 kpc.

  7. Decomposition of Copper (II) Sulfate Pentahydrate: A Sequential Gravimetric Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Arlo D.; Kalbus, Lee H.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an improved experiment of the thermal dehydration of copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate. The improvements described here are control of the temperature environment and a quantitative study of the decomposition reaction to a thermally stable oxide. Data will suffice to show sequential gravimetric analysis. (Author/SA)

  8. Decomposition of Copper (II) Sulfate Pentahydrate: A Sequential Gravimetric Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Arlo D.; Kalbus, Lee H.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an improved experiment of the thermal dehydration of copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate. The improvements described here are control of the temperature environment and a quantitative study of the decomposition reaction to a thermally stable oxide. Data will suffice to show sequential gravimetric analysis. (Author/SA)

  9. Molecular analysis of pericentrin gene (PCNT) in a series of 24 Seckel/microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) families.

    PubMed

    Willems, M; Geneviève, D; Borck, G; Baumann, C; Baujat, G; Bieth, E; Edery, P; Farra, C; Gerard, M; Héron, D; Leheup, B; Le Merrer, M; Lyonnet, S; Martin-Coignard, D; Mathieu, M; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Verloes, A; Colleaux, L; Munnich, A; Cormier-Daire, V

    2010-12-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II, MIM 210720) and Seckel syndrome (SCKL, MIM 210600) belong to the primordial dwarfism group characterised by intrauterine growth retardation, severe proportionate short stature, and pronounced microcephaly. MOPD II is distinct from SCKL by more severe growth retardation, radiological abnormalities, and absent or mild mental retardation. Seckel syndrome is associated with defective ATR dependent DNA damage signalling. In 2008, loss-of-function mutations in the pericentrin gene (PCNT) have been identified in 28 patients, including 3 SCKL and 25 MOPDII cases. This gene encodes a centrosomal protein which plays a key role in the organisation of mitotic spindles. The aim of this study was to analyse PCNT in a large series of SCKL-MOPD II cases to further define the clinical spectrum associated with PCNT mutations. Among 18 consanguineous families (13 SCKL and 5 MOPDII) and 6 isolated cases (3 SCKL and 3 MOPD II), 13 distinct mutations were identified in 5/16 SCKL and 8/8 MOPDII including five stop mutations, five frameshift mutations, two splice site mutations, and one apparent missense mutation affecting the last base of exon 19. Moreover, we demonstrated that this latter mutation leads to an abnormal splicing with a predicted premature termination of translation. The clinical analysis of the 5 SCKL cases with PCNT mutations showed that they all presented minor skeletal changes and clinical features compatible with MOPDII diagnosis. It is therefore concluded that, despite variable severity, MOPDII is a genetically homogeneous condition due to loss-of-function of pericentrin.

  10. Integrated data analysis at TJ-II: The density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Milligen, B. Ph. van; Estrada, T.; Ascasibar, E.; Tafalla, D.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Fraguas, A. Lopez; Jimenez, J. A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Dinklage, A.; Fischer, R.

    2011-07-15

    An integrated data analysis system based on Bayesian inference has been developed for the TJ-II stellarator. It reconstructs the electron density profile at a single time point, using data from interferometry, reflectometry, Thomson scattering, and the Helium beam, while providing a detailed error analysis. In this work, we present a novel analysis of the ambiguity inherent in profile reconstruction from reflectometry and show how the integrated data analysis approach elegantly resolves it. Several examples of the application of the technique are provided, in both low-density discharges with and without electrode biasing, and in high-density discharges with an (L-H) confinement transition.

  11. 49 CFR 175.78 - Stowage compatibility of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Compatibility Group S, explosives are permitted to be transported aboard a passenger aircraft. Only certain..., explosives may be transported aboard a cargo aircraft. (ii) Division 1.4 explosives in Compatibility Group S... of special fireworks or railway torpedoes. [71 FR 14604, Mar. 22, 2006, as amended at 71 FR...

  12. 49 CFR 175.78 - Stowage compatibility of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Compatibility Group S, explosives are permitted to be transported aboard a passenger aircraft. Only certain..., explosives may be transported aboard a cargo aircraft. (ii) Division 1.4 explosives in Compatibility Group S... a position that will allow contact with a package of special fireworks or railway torpedoes....

  13. Hydrazine-Compatible Elastomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markles, O., F.; Dye, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    Hydrazine hardly reacts with ethylene propylene diene monomer, even at high temperatures. According to report to tests, EPDM is most hydrazine-compatible material among elastomers. Has strong potential as valve-seat and O-ring seal with hydrazine, especially at high temperatures.

  14. Chemical compatibility of cartridge materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Roy C.; Zee, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    This twelve month progress report deals with the chemical compatibility of semiconductor crystals grown in zero gravity. Specifically, it studies the chemical compatibility between TZM, a molybdenum alloy containing titanium and zirconium, and WC 103, a titanium alloy containing Niobium and Hafnium, and Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and Cadmium Zinc Tellurite (CdZnTe). Due to the health hazards involved, three approaches were used to study the chemical compatibility between the semiconductor and cartridge materials: reaction retort, thermogravimetric analysis, and bulk cylindrical cartridge containers. A scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer was used to examine all samples after testing. The first conclusion drawn is that reaction rates with TZM were not nearly as great as they were with WC 103. Second, the total reaction between GaAs and WC 103 was almost twice that with TZM. Therefore, even though WC 103 is easier to fabricate, at least half of the cartridge thickness will be degraded if contact is made with one of the semiconductor materials leading to a loss of strength properties.

  15. Space processing applications payload equipment study. Volume 2B: Payload interface analysis (power/thermal/electromagnetic compatibility)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, R. L. (Editor); Smith, A. G. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    As a part of the task of performing preliminary engineering analysis of modular payload subelement/host vehicle interfaces, a subsystem interface analysis was performed to establish the integrity of the modular approach to the equipment design and integration. Salient areas that were selected for analysis were power and power conditioning, heat rejection and electromagnetic capability (EMC). The equipment and load profiles for twelve representative experiments were identified. Two of the twelve experiments were chosen as being representative of the group and have been described in greater detail to illustrate the evaluations used in the analysis. The shuttle orbiter will provide electrical power from its three fuel cells in support of the orbiter and the Spacelab operations. One of the three shuttle orbiter fuel cells will be dedicated to the Spacelab electrical power requirements during normal shuttle operation. This power supplies the Spacelab subsystems and the excess will be available to the payload. The current Spacelab sybsystem requirements result in a payload allocation of 4.0 to 4.8 kW average (24 hour/day) and 9.0 kW peak for 15 minutes.

  16. Analysis and prediction of traffic fatalities resulting from angle collisions including the effect of vehicles' configuration and compatibility.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Abdelwahab, Hassan

    2004-05-01

    Although the rapid growth in light truck vehicle (LTV) sales, including minivans, sports utility vehicles (SUVs), and light-duty trucks, has not been associated with an overall increase in collisions or traffic deaths in the US, there is a need for a research program to determine whether particular types of collisions have become more frequent or injurious because of the increase in the percent of LTVs in traffic. This paper presents an analysis of the effect of the increasing number of LTV registrations on fatal angle collision trends in the US. The analysis investigates the number of annual fatalities that result from angle collisions as well as collision configuration (car-car, car-LTV, LTV-car, and LTV-LTV). The analysis uses the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) crash databases covering the period 1975-2000. Results showed that death rates differ based on the collision configuration. Time series modeling results showed that fatalities in angle collisions will increase in the next 10 years, and that they are affected by the expected increase in the percentage of LTVs in traffic. Forecast showed that the total number of annual deaths is expected to reach 6300 deaths by the year 2010 (an increase of 12% over 2000). Analysis into the configuration of the collision indicated the seriousness of angle collisions involving an LTV striking a common passenger car (LTV-car). A time series model illustrated the significance of time lag and percent of LTVs in traffic on the increase of this type of fatal collisions. Forecasts from the time series model indicated a 32% increase in deaths due to this type of collisions in the next 10 years.

  17. [Initial experiences with a new kind of computer compatible coding and analysis system for inpatient and ambulatory services].

    PubMed

    Blessing, H; Marti, W K

    1989-12-01

    This paper describes a new concept of an operational database management system including the word processing program "Word Star". The system structure is composed of patients identities and linked MIR's (medical information records) to follow a patient's history in space and time. In- and out-patient's data are collected on a special data sheet with numeric responses from the following areas: demographics including risk factors, diagnosis, surgical procedure, intra- and postoperative morbidity analysis. Data are entered using a DBS-16 concurrent dos system and stored on a 105 Megabytes hard disk. The software program in its compiled version allows for processes like outpatients clinic management, appointments organisation and statistical analysis of different variables thus providing detailed information on patients postoperative morbidity.

  18. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  19. A protein extraction method for low protein concentration solutions compatible with the proteomic analysis of rubber particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Sun, Yong; Tong, Zheng; Yang, Qian; Chang, Lili; Meng, Xueru; Wang, Limin; Tian, Weimin; Wang, Xuchu

    2016-11-01

    The extraction of high-purity proteins from the washing solution (WS) of rubber particles (also termed latex-producing organelles) from laticifer cells in rubber tree for proteomic analysis is challenging due to the low concentration of proteins in the WS. Recent studies have revealed that proteins in the WS might play crucial roles in natural rubber biosynthesis. To further examine the involvement of these proteins in natural rubber biosynthesis, we designed an efficiency method to extract high-purity WS proteins. We improved our current borax and phenol-based method by adding reextraction steps with phenol (REP) to improve the yield from low protein concentration samples. With this new method, we extracted WS proteins that were suitable for proteomics. Indeed, compared to the original borax and phenol-based method, the REP method improved both the quality and quantity of isolated proteins. By repeatedly extracting from low protein concentration solutions using the same small amount of phenol, the REP method yielded enough protein of sufficiently high-quality from starting samples containing less than 0.02 mg of proteins per milliliter. This method was successfully applied to extract the rubber particle proteins from the WS of natural rubber latex samples. The REP-extracted WS proteins were resolved by 2DE, and 28 proteins were positively identified by MS. This method has the potential to become widely used for the extraction of proteins from low protein concentration solutions for proteomic analysis.

  20. Design of a compact ultrahigh vacuum-compatible setup for the analysis of chemical vapor deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Theodor; Nowak, Martin; Zielasek, Volkmar Bäumer, Marcus; Mundloch, Udo; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-10-15

    Optimizing thin film deposition techniques requires contamination-free transfer from the reactor into an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber for surface science analysis. A very compact, multifunctional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) reactor for direct attachment to any typical UHV system for thin film analysis was designed and built. Besides compactness, fast, easy, and at the same time ultimately clean sample transfer between reactor and UHV was a major goal. It was achieved by a combination of sample manipulation parts, sample heater, and a shutter mechanism designed to fit all into a NW38 Conflat six-ways cross. The present reactor design is versatile to be employed for all commonly employed variants of CVD, including Atomic Layer Deposition. A demonstration of the functionality of the system is provided. First results of the setup (attached to an Omicron Multiprobe x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy system) on the temperature dependence of Pulsed Spray Evaporation-CVD of Ni films from Ni acetylacetonate as the precursor demonstrate the reactor performance and illustrate the importance of clean sample transfer without breaking vacuum in order to obtain unambiguous results on the quality of CVD-grown thin Ni films. The widely applicable design holds promise for future systematic studies of the fundamental processes during chemical vapor deposition or atomic layer deposition.

  1. Platelet compatibility of magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Yahata, Chie; Mochizuki, Akira

    2017-09-01

    Lately, Mg alloys have been investigated as a new class of biomaterials owing to their excellent biodegradability and biocompatibility. It has previously been reported that the in vitro compatibility of a Mg alloy containing aluminum and zinc (AZ) alloy with the blood coagulation system is excellent due to Mg(2+) ions eluting from the alloy. In this study, the compatibility of the AZ alloy with platelets was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and flow cytometry. In the flow cytometry analysis, the platelets were stained using PAC-1 and P-selectin antibodies. SEM images and PAC-1 analyses showed no negative effects on the platelets, whereas P-selectin analysis showed marked platelet activation. To understand these contradictory results, the amount of β-thromboglobulin (β-TG) released from the platelets was investigated. From that investigation, it was concluded that platelets are markedly activated by the alloys. In addition to clarifying divergent results depending on the analysis method used, the effects of Mg(2+) ions and pH on platelet activation were studied. These results show that platelet activation is caused by an increase in pH at the alloy surface owing to the erosion of the alloy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Automatically produced FRP beams with embedded FOS in complex geometry: process, material compatibility, micromechanical analysis, and performance tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabler, Markus; Tkachenko, Viktoriya; Küppers, Simon; Kuka, Georg G.; Habel, Wolfgang R.; Milwich, Markus; Knippers, Jan

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of the presented work was to evolve a multifunctional beam composed out of fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) and an embedded optical fiber with various fiber Bragg grating sensors (FBG). These beams are developed for the use as structural member for bridges or industrial applications. It is now possible to realize large scale cross sections, the embedding is part of a fully automated process and jumpers can be omitted in order to not negatively influence the laminate. The development includes the smart placement and layout of the optical fibers in the cross section, reliable strain transfer, and finally the coupling of the embedded fibers after production. Micromechanical tests and analysis were carried out to evaluate the performance of the sensor. The work was funded by the German ministry of economics and technology (funding scheme ZIM). Next to the authors of this contribution, Melanie Book with Röchling Engineering Plastics KG (Haren/Germany; Katharina Frey with SAERTEX GmbH & Co. KG (Saerbeck/Germany) were part of the research group.

  3. A comparative proteomic analysis of the early response to compatible symbiotic bacteria in the roots of a supernodulating soybean variety.

    PubMed

    Salavati, Afshin; Bushehri, Ali Akbar Shahnejat; Taleei, Alireza; Hiraga, Susumu; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2012-01-04

    To reveal the processes involved in the early stages of symbiosis between soybean plants and root nodule bacteria, we conducted a proteomic analysis of the response to bacterial inoculation in the roots of supernodulating (En-b0-1) and non-nodulating (En1282) varieties, and their parental normal-nodulating variety (Enrei). A total of 56 proteins were identified from 48 differentially expressed protein spots in normal-nodulating variety after bacterial inoculation. Among 56 proteins, metabolism- and energy production-related proteins were upregulated in supernodulating and downregulated in non-nodulating varieties compared to normal-nodulating variety. The supernodulating and non-nodulating varieties responded oppositely to bacterial inoculation with respect to the expression of 11 proteins. Seven proteins of these proteins was downregulated in supernodulating varieties compared to non-nodulating variety, but expression of proteasome subunit alpha type 6, gamma glutamyl hydrolase, glucan endo-1,3-beta glucosidase, and nodulin 35 was upregulated. The expression of seven proteins mirrored the degree of nodule formation. At the transcript level, expression of stem 31kDa glycoprotein, leucine aminopeptidase, phosphoglucomutase, and peroxidase was downregulated in the supernodulating variety compared to the non-nodulating variety, and their expression in the normal-nodulating variety was intermediate. These results suggest that suppression of the autoregulatory mechanism in the supernodulating variety might be due to negative regulation of defense and signal transduction-related processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of Hemoglobin Glycation Using Microfluidic CE-MS: A Rapid, Mass Spectrometry Compatible Method for Assessing Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Redman, Erin A; Ramos-Payan, Maria; Mellors, J Scott; Ramsey, J Michael

    2016-05-17

    to provide a more complete picture of a patient's glycemic control in the months leading up to blood collection. The results presented here demonstrate that the microfluidic CE-MS method is capable of rapidly assessing Hb and HSA glycation from low volumes of whole blood with minimal sample preparation and has the potential to provide more information in a single analysis step than current technologies.

  5. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  6. Material compatibility with gaseous fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Harold G , Jr; Douglass, Howard W

    1957-01-01

    Static tests on the compatibility of fluorine with non-metals at atmospheric temperature eliminated many materials from further consideration for use in fluorine systems. Several materials were found compatible at atmospheric pressures. Only Teflon and ruby (aluminum oxide) were compatible at 1500 pounds per square inch gage.

  7. Elastomer Compatible With Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial rubber resists ignition on impact and seals at low temperatures. Filled fluoroelastomer called "Katiflex" developed for use in seals of vessels holding cold liquid and gaseous oxygen. New material more compatible with liquid oxygen than polytetrafluoroethylene. Provides dynamic seal at -196 degrees C with only 4 times seal stress required at room temperature. In contrast, conventional rubber seals burn or explode on impact in high-pressure oxygen, and turn hard or even brittle at liquid-oxygen temperatures, do not seal reliably, also see (MFS-28124).

  8. From compatible factorization to near-compatible factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldiabat, Raja'i.; Ibrahim, Haslinda

    2014-12-01

    A compatible factorization of order ν, is an ν× ν-1/2 array in which the entries in row i form a near-one-factor with focus i, and the triples associated with the rows contain no repetitions. In this paper, we aim to amend this compatible factorization so that we can display ν(ν-1)/2 - 2ν/3 triples with the minimum repeated triples. Throughout this paper we propose a new type of factorization called near-compatible factorization. First, we present the compatible factorization towards developing a near-compatible factorization. Second, we discuss briefly the necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of near-compatible factorization. Then, we exemplify the construction for case ν = 9 as a groundwork in developing near-compatible factorization.

  9. Electron diffraction based analysis of phase fractions and texture in nanocrystalline thin films, part II: implementation.

    PubMed

    Lábár, János L

    2009-02-01

    This series of articles describes a method that performs (semi)quantitative phase analysis for nanocrystalline transmission electron microscope samples from selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns. Volume fractions of phases and their textures are obtained separately in the method. First, the two-dimensional SAED pattern is converted into an X-ray diffraction-like one-dimensional distribution. Volume fractions of the nanocrystalline components are determined by fitting the spectral components, calculated for the previously identified phases with a priori known structures. Blackman correction is also applied to take into account dynamic effects for medium grain sizes. Peak shapes and experimental parameters (camera length, etc.) are refined during the fitting iterations. Parameter space is explored with the help of the Downhill-SIMPLEX algorithm. Part I presented the principles, while Part II now elaborates current implementation, and Part III will demonstrate its usage by examples. The method is implemented in a computer program that runs under the Windows operating system on IBM PC compatible machines.

  10. Comparative transcriptome analysis of self-incompatible flower stigmas and self-compatible bud stigmas following self-pollination in broccoli.

    PubMed

    Yu, H F; Wang, J S; Sheng, X G; Zhao, Z Q; Qi, Z R; Gu, H H

    2017-03-30

    DH07 is a DH line of Class I S-haplotype in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica), in which stigmas of flowers show self-incompatibility (SI) and stigmas of buds show self-compatibility (SC). The molecular mechanisms that lead to stigmas at different developmental stages having different responses to self-pollination are yet unknown. In the present study, comparative transcriptome profiling of the stigmas of flowers and buds before and after self-pollination was performed by RNA-sequencing using an Illumina HiSeq(TM) 2000. A total of 80,102,897 reads were generated for further analysis in four libraries. Comparisons of the transcriptome profiles before and after self-pollination revealed 579 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the stigmas of buds (SBs); of these, 431 DEGs showed increased and 148 DEGs showed decreased transcript abundance after self-pollination in SBs. There were a total of 686 DEGs between unpollinated stigmas of flowers (SFs) and pollinated SFs, among which, 517 DEGs were up regulated and 169 DEGs were down regulated. Following the self-pollination, 379 identified DEGs were common in both SBs and SFs. It was found that ARR7-like and oxysterol-binding family protein related DEGs could play key roles in SI or SC signal transduction. The results obtained in this study would form the foundation for further studies on investigating the molecular mechanisms of SI and SC in Brassica.

  11. The Spectrum and Term Analysis of V II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, A. P.; Pickering, J. C.; Semeniuk, J. I.

    2013-07-01

    The spectrum and extended term analysis of V II are presented. Fourier transform spectrometry was used to record high resolution spectra of singly ionized vanadium in the region 1492-5800 Å (67020-17260 cm-1) with vanadium-neon and vanadium-argon hollow cathode lamps as sources. The wavenumber uncertainty for the center of gravity of the strongest lines is typically 0.002 cm-1, an improvement of an order of magnitude over previous measurements. Most of the lines exhibit partly resolved hyperfine structure. The V II energy levels in the 1985 compilation of Sugar and Corliss have been confirmed and revised, with the exception of the high-lying 4f levels and eight of the lower levels. Thirty-nine of the additional eighty-five high levels published by Iglesias et al. have also been confirmed and revised, and three of their missing levels have been found. The energy uncertainty of the revised levels has been reduced by about an order of magnitude. In total, 176 even levels and 233 odd levels are presented. Wavenumbers and classifications are given for 1242 V II lines.

  12. THE SPECTRUM AND TERM ANALYSIS OF V II

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, A. P.; Pickering, J. C.; Semeniuk, J. I.

    2013-07-15

    The spectrum and extended term analysis of V II are presented. Fourier transform spectrometry was used to record high resolution spectra of singly ionized vanadium in the region 1492-5800 A (67020-17260 cm{sup -1}) with vanadium-neon and vanadium-argon hollow cathode lamps as sources. The wavenumber uncertainty for the center of gravity of the strongest lines is typically 0.002 cm{sup -1}, an improvement of an order of magnitude over previous measurements. Most of the lines exhibit partly resolved hyperfine structure. The V II energy levels in the 1985 compilation of Sugar and Corliss have been confirmed and revised, with the exception of the high-lying 4f levels and eight of the lower levels. Thirty-nine of the additional eighty-five high levels published by Iglesias et al. have also been confirmed and revised, and three of their missing levels have been found. The energy uncertainty of the revised levels has been reduced by about an order of magnitude. In total, 176 even levels and 233 odd levels are presented. Wavenumbers and classifications are given for 1242 V II lines.

  13. Final Safety Analysis Addenda to Hazards Summary Report, Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): upgrading of plant protection system. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, N. L.; Keeton, J. M.; Sackett, J. I.

    1980-06-01

    This report is the second in a series of compilations of the formal Final Safety Analysis Addenda (FSAA`s) to the EBR-II Hazard Summary Report and Addendum. Sections 2 and 3 are edited versions of the original FSAA`s prepared in support of certain modifications to the reactor-shutdown-system portion of the EBR-II plant-protection system. Section 4 is an edited version of the original FSAA prepared in support of certain modifications to a system classified as an engineered safety feature. These sections describe the pre- and postmodification system, the rationale for the modification, and required supporting safety analysis. Section 5 provides an updated description and analysis of the EBR-II emergency power system. Section 6 summarizes all significant modifications to the EBR-II plant-protection system to date.

  14. Aerothermal Analysis of the Project Fire II Afterbody Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael J.; Loomis, Mark; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to simulate the wake flow and afterbody heating of the Project Fire II ballistic reentry to Earth at 11.4 km/sec. Laminar results are obtained over a portion of the trajectory between the initial heat pulse and peak afterbody heating. Although non-catalytic forebody convective heating results are in excellent agreement with previous computations, initial predictions of afterbody heating were about a factor of two below the experimental values. Further analysis suggests that significant catalysis may be occurring on the afterbody heat shield. Computations including finite-rate catalysis on the afterbody surface are in good agreement with the data over the early portion of the trajectory, but are conservative near the peak afterbody heating point, especially on the rear portion of the conical frustum. Further analysis of the flight data from Fire II shows that peak afterbody heating occurs before peak forebody heating, a result that contradicts computations and flight data from other entry vehicles. This result suggests that another mechanism, possibly pyrolysis, may be occurring during the later portion of the trajectory, resulting in less total heat transfer than the current predictions.

  15. SHEFEX II Flight Instrumentation And Preparation Of Post Flight Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Thomas; Siebe, Frank; Gulhan, Ali

    2011-05-01

    A main disadvantage of modern TPS systems for re- entry vehicles is the expensive manufacturing and maintenance process due to the complex geometry of these blunt nose configurations. To reduce the costs and to improve the aerodynamic performance the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is following a different approach using TPS structures consisting of flat ceramic tiles. To test these new sharp edged TPS structures the SHEFEX I flight experiment was designed and successfully performed by DLR in 2005. To further improve the reliability of the sharp edged TPS design at even higher Mach numbers, a second flight experiment SHEFEX II will be performed in September 2011. In comparison to SHEFEX I the second flight experiment has a fully symmetrical shape and will reach a maximum Mach number of about 11. Furthermore the vehicle has an active steering system using four canards to control the flight attitude during re-entry, e.g. roll angle, angle of attack and sideslip. After a successful flight the evaluation of the flight data will be performed using a combination of numerical and experimental tools. The data will be used for the improvement of the present numerical analysis tools and to get a better understanding of the aerothermal behaviour of sharp TPS structures. This paper presents the flight instrumentation of the SHEFEX II TPS. In addition the concept of the post flight analysis is presented.

  16. SLR precision analysis for LAGEOS I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilsu, Gaye; Sahin, Muhammed

    2000-10-01

    This paper deals with the problem of properly weighting satellite observations which are non-uniform in quality. The technique, the variance component estimation method developed by Helmert, was first applied to the 1987 LAGEOS I SLR data by Sahin et al. (1992). This paper investigates the performance of the globally distributed SLR stations using the Helmert type variance component estimation. As well as LAGEOS I data, LAGEOS II data were analysed, in order to compare with the previously analysed 1987 LAGEOS I data. The LAGEOS I and II data used in this research were obtained from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS), which archives data acquired from stations operated by NASA and by other U.S. and international organizations. The data covers the years 1994, 1995 and 1996. The analysis is based on "full-rate" laser observations, which consist of hundreds to thousands of ranges per satellite pass. The software used is based on the SATAN package (SATellite ANalysis) developed at the Royal Greenwich Observatory in the UK.

  17. Influence of different mineral and Organic pesticide treatments on Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) contents determined by derivative potentiometric stripping analysis in Italian white and red wines.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Francesco; La Pera, Lara; Di Bella, Giuseppa; Nicotina, Mariano; Dugo, Giacomo

    2003-02-12

    This paper deals with the use of derivative potentiometric stripping analysis (dPSA) as a rapid and precise method to determine Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels in red and white wine samples from Sicily, Campania, and Tuscany and to investigate the possible connection between the content of these metals and the pesticide treatments used in vine-growing to control plant diseases and pests. dPSA allowed direct quantitation of heavy metals in acidified wines without any sample pretreatment. Mean recoveries of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ranged from 95.5 to 99.2% for white wine samples and from 96.1 to 100.0% for red wine samples. The obtained results showed that Cd(II) was not found in any sample and that Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels were always lower than the toxicity limits in both fungicide- and water-treated wines. Nevertheless, the contents of metals were increased in samples from organic and inorganic pesticides treatment with respect to the water-treated samples. In particular, quinoxyfen, dinocap-penconazole, and dinocap applications considerably increased Cu(II) and Zn(II) contents in white and red wines. The levels of lead were significantly raised by azoxystrobin and sulfur treatments.

  18. Time series analysis of nuclear instrumentation in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Imel, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    Results of a time series analysis of the scaler count data from the 3 wide range nuclear detectors in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II are presented. One of the channels was replaced, and it was desired to determine if there was any statistically significant change (ie, improvement) in the channel`s response after the replacement. Data were collected from all 3 channels for 16-day periods before and after detector replacement. Time series analysis and statistical tests showed that there was no significant change after the detector replacement. Also, there were no statistically significant differences among the 3 channels, either before or after the replacement. Finally, it was determined that errors in the reactivity change inferred from subcritical count monitoring during fuel handling would be on the other of 20-30 cents for single count intervals.

  19. Voltammetric analysis of Cu (II), Cd (II) and Zn (II) complexes and their cyclic voltammetry with several cephalosporin antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Abo El-Maali, N; Osman, A H; Aly, A A M; Al-Hazmi, G A A

    2005-02-01

    Both osteryoung square wave voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry have been utilized to elucidate and confirm the possible complexation reaction that occur between the various cephalosporin antibiotics and either the toxic, non-essential metal ion, viz. Cd (II), or the essential but toxic (when their concentration exceeds certain level in serum) metal ions, viz. Cu (II) and Zn (II). Voltammetric measurements indicated the existence of 1:1 metal-to-ligand ratio (as in cephalexin and cephapirin complexes), 1:2 ratio (such as in cefamandole, cefuroxime and cefotaxime complexes) and 2:1 ratio in case of ceftazidime complexes. Adsorption behavior was evidenced for Cu (II)-cefuroxime or ceftazidime complexes as well as for those for Zn (II)-cephalexin or cephapirin. This phenomenon could be used for the determination of either the antibiotic or the metal ion using adsorptive stripping voltammetry. Detection limits down to 7x10(-10) M have been easily achieved.

  20. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  1. Tank 241-SY-102 January 2000 Compatibility Grab Samples Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    BELL, K.E.

    2000-05-11

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples taken in January 2000 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank SY-102 samples were performed as directed in Comparability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 2000 (Sasaki 1999). No notification limits were exceeded. Preliminary data on samples 2SY-99-5, -6, and -7 were reported in ''Format II Report on Tank 241-SY-102 Waste Compatibility Grab Samples Taken in January 2000'' (Lockrem 2000). The data presented here represent the final results.

  2. Improved mass spectrometry compatibility is afforded by ammoniacal silver staining

    PubMed Central

    Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Luche, Sylvie; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle

    2006-01-01

    Sequence coverage in mass spectrometry analysis of protein digestion-derived peptides is a key issue for detailed characterization of proteins or identification at low quantities. In gel-based proteomics studies, the sequence coverage greatly depends on the protein detection method. It is shown here that ammoniacal silver detection methods offer improved sequence coverage over standard silver nitrate methods, while keeping the high sensitivity of silver staining With the development of 2D-PAGE-based proteomics, another burden is placed on the detection methods used for protein detection on 2D-gels. Besides the classical requirements of linearity, sensitivity and homogeneity from one protein to another, detection methods must now take into account another aspect, namely their compatibility with mass spectrometry. This compatibility is evidenced by two different and complementary aspects, which are i) the absence of adducts and artefactual modifications on the peptides obtained after protease digestion of a protein detected and digested in –gel and ii) the quantitative yield of peptides recovered after digestion and analyzed by the mass spectrometer. While this quantitative yield is not very important per se, it is however a crucial parameter as it strongly influences the signal to noise ratio of the mass spectrum, and thus the number of peptides that can be detected from a given protein input, especially at low protein amounts. This influences in turn the sequence coverage, and thus the detail of the analysis provided by the mass spectrometer. PMID:16548061

  3. Improved mass spectrometry compatibility is afforded by ammoniacal silver staining.

    PubMed

    Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Luche, Sylvie; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle

    2006-04-01

    Sequence coverage in MS analysis of protein digestion-derived peptides is a key issue for detailed characterization of proteins or identification at low quantities. In gel-based proteomics studies, the sequence coverage greatly depends on the protein detection method. It is shown here that ammoniacal silver detection methods offer improved sequence coverage over standard silver nitrate methods, while keeping the high sensitivity of silver staining. With the development of 2D-PAGE-based proteomics, another burden is placed on the detection methods used for protein detection on 2-D-gels. Besides the classical requirements of linearity, sensitivity, and homogeneity from one protein to another, detection methods must now take into account another aspect, namely their compatibility with MS. This compatibility is evidenced by two different and complementary aspects, which are (i) the absence of adducts and artefactual modifications on the peptides obtained after protease digestion of a protein detected and digested in - gel, and (ii) the quantitative yield of peptides recovered after digestion and analyzed by the mass spectrometer. While this quantitative yield is not very important per se, it is however a crucial parameter as it strongly influences the S/N of the mass spectrum and thus the number of peptides that can be detected from a given protein input, especially at low protein amounts. This influences in turn the sequence coverage and thus the detail of the analysis provided by the mass spectrometer.

  4. Compatible taper algorithms for California hardwoods

    Treesearch

    James W. Flewelling

    2007-01-01

    For 13 species of California hardwoods, cubic volume equations to three merchantability standards had been developed earlier. The equations predict cubic volume from the primary bole, forks, and branches, but do not differentiate between the sources of the wood. The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program needed taper equations that are compatible with the volume...

  5. Electro-magnetic compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, H.

    1980-05-01

    The historical background to the growth in problems of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) in UK Military aircraft is reviewed and the present approach for minimizing these problems during development is discussed. The importance of using representative aircraft for final EMC assessments is stressed, and the methods of approach in planning and executing such tests are also outlined. The present equipment qualification procedures are based on assumptions regarding the electromagnetic fields present within the airframe, and the nature of the coupling mechanisms. These cannot be measured with any certainty in representative aircraft. Thus EMC assessments rely on practical tests. Avionics systems critical to flight safety, and systems vital to mission effectiveness require test methods that provide a measure of the safety and performance margins available to account for variations that occur in production and service use. Some proven methods are available, notably for detonator circuits, but in most other areas further work is required. Encouraging process has been made in the use of current probes for the measurement of interfering signals on critical signal lines, in conjunction with complementary test house procedures, as a means for obtaining the safety margins required in flight and engine control systems. Performance margins for mission systems using digital techniques are difficult to determine, and there is a need for improved test techniques. The present EMC qualification tests for equipment in the laboratory do not guarantee freedom from interference when installed, and the results are limited in value for correlating with aircraft tests.

  6. Chloroplast Genetics of Chlamydomonas. II. Mapping by Cosegregation Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Ruth; Ramanis, Zenta

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents segregation and cosegregation data for a set of 15 chloroplast genes of Chlamydomonas, and uses these data to generate a linear map of the chloroplast genome. The data were derived from pedigree analysis of a total of 1596 zoospore clones resulting from 12 crosses in each of which 4 to 7 pairs of chloroplast alleles were segregating. The crosses are a subset of those previously described (Sager and Ramanis 1976). By means of pedigree analysis, Type II segregations (nonreciprocal conversion-like events) were distinguished from Type III segregations (reciprocal events). The average frequency of Type II segregation was found to be the same for all 15 genes, indicating randomness of this event with respect to map location (Figure 1). Type III segregations occurred with a different and characteristic frequency for each gene, and were interpreted as a measure of the distance of each gene from the postulated centromere-like attachment point. Cosegregations, involving two or more genes, occurred with frequencies characteristic of the particular genes and much lower than expected for the product of single-gene events, indicating strong positive interference. Pairwise cosegregation frequencies provided unambiguous data for the gene order, confirmed by cosegregation runs of three or more genes. Apparent lengths of cosegregation runs, as fractions of the total map, indicate much longer stretches of gene conversion-like events than have been reported for other genetic systems. Comparisons of cosegregation frequencies in cross 20 after 15'', 30'' and 15'' UV irradiation of the mt+ before mating, indicate little if any consistent effect of this irradiation on segregation events. PMID:17248717

  7. Exploring Interpersonal Compatibility in Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyton, Joann

    This study investigated William Schutz's three-dimensional theory of interpersonal behavior and compatibility (FIRO) to determine its validity as a group measure of compatibility. Data were collected from 248 students enrolled in a multi-section course in small group communications at a large midwestern university. Subjects self-selected…

  8. Statistical analysis of serum pepsinogen I (PG I) and II (PG II) levels, PG I/PG II ratios and serum gastrin levels in a general population.

    PubMed

    Kazuo, A; Junichi, M

    1996-10-01

    To allow adoption of serum pepsinogen as a screening indicator of gastric cancer, serum pepsinogen I & II levels, the ratios of PG I / PG II and the serum gastrin levels in a general population were studied using 850 samples selected at random from a rural area in Japan. The collected data were analyzed statistically to determine the distribution characteristics by various categories of sex and age. The following results were obtained:1. The distributions of PG I and PG II, the ratios of PG I/PG II and serum gastrin values largely deviated from the normal distribution. Therefore, the use of non-parametrical methods was recommended for analysis of these data.2. Although no significant difference between all selected men and all selected women was observed in any of the three parameters of PG I and PG II levels and the ratios of PG I / PG II, a significant difference between men and women was observed for PG I levels in under-fifty age groups. On the other hand, the median serum gastrin value (92.0 pg/ml) in all selected men was significantly lower than that (101.0 pg/ml) in all selected women. A statistically significant difference between men and women was observed in serum gastrin levels both in the under-forty age group and in the sixty and over age group.3. No significant difference was observed in the pattern of changes in PG I levels with increasing age in either men or women. While PG II levels in men varied irregularly with advancing age, PG II levels in women showed obvious increases with advancing age. The ratios of PG I / PG II showed a tendency to decrease with advancing age in both men and women. Conversely, serum gastrin levels increased with advancing age in both men and women.

  9. Molecular analysis of HLA class II genes in Goodpasture's disease.

    PubMed

    Burns, A P; Fisher, M; Li, P; Pusey, C D; Rees, A J

    1995-02-01

    A molecular analysis of HLA class II genes was undertaken in order to characterize the previously reported association between HLA-DR2 and glomerulonephritis caused by antibodies to glomerular basement membrane (Goodpasture's disease). Genomic DNA was prepared from 53 patients with Goodpasture's disease and analysed by: (i) Southern blotting using cDNA probes to DRB, DQA and DQB genes, after digestion with TaqI endonuclease; (ii) allele-specific oligonucleotide probing of specifically amplified DNA; and (iii) nucleotide sequencing of relevant alleles. The patients had a greatly increased frequency of DRw15 (a subspecificity of DR2) which was present in 75.5% of patients and 31% of controls (p < 0.0001). The frequency of DR4 was also increased, especially in patients without DRw15. Overall, 90.5% of the patients had either DRw15 or DR4. In contrast, the frequency of DR1 was significantly reduced (patients 5.6%, controls 20.7%, p < 0.01). Differences in the frequencies of DQA and DQB alleles could all be explained by linkage disequilibrium. Nucleotide sequences of relevant alleles were identical to those previously published. Comparison of derived amino acid sequences of expressed DR beta chains showed that the DR beta chains of DRw15 and DR4 shared a six-amino-acid motif from positions 26-31, that included four polymorphic amino acids none of which are shared with DR1. A sequence-specific oligonucleotide detected this amino-acid motif in 45/49 (91.8%) patients tested. Thus, this particular motif, which lies on the floor of the antigen binding groove, has a stronger association with Goodpasture's disease than any individual allele, and may be of pathogenic significance.

  10. Data analysis of photon beam position at PLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, J.; Shin, S. Huang, Jung-Yun; Kim, D.; Kim, C.; Kim, Ilyou; Lee, T.-Y.; Park, C.-D.; Kim, K. R.; Cho, Moohyun

    2016-07-27

    In the third generation light source, photon beam position stability is critical issue on user experiment. Generally photon beam position monitors have been developed for the detection of the real photon beam position and the position is controlled by feedback system in order to keep the reference photon beam position. In the PLS-II, photon beam position stability for front end of particular beam line, in which photon beam position monitor is installed, has been obtained less than rms 1μm for user service period. Nevertheless, detail analysis for photon beam position data in order to demonstrate the performance of photon beam position monitor is necessary, since it can be suffers from various unknown noises. (for instance, a back ground contamination due to upstream or downstream dipole radiation, undulator gap dependence, etc.) In this paper, we will describe the start to end study for photon beam position stability and the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis to demonstrate the reliability on photon beam position data.

  11. Compatible quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedberg, R.; Hohenberg, P. C.

    2014-09-01

    Formulations of quantum mechanics (QM) can be characterized as realistic, operationalist, or a combination of the two. In this paper a realistic theory is defined as describing a closed system entirely by means of entities and concepts pertaining to the system. An operationalist theory, on the other hand, requires in addition entities external to the system. A realistic formulation comprises an ontology, the set of (mathematical) entities that describe the system, and assertions, the set of correct statements (predictions) the theory makes about the objects in the ontology. Classical mechanics is the prime example of a realistic physical theory. A straightforward generalization of classical mechanics to QM is hampered by the inconsistency of quantum properties with classical logic, a circumstance that was noted many years ago by Birkhoff and von Neumann. The present realistic formulation of the histories approach originally introduced by Griffiths, which we call ‘compatible quantum theory (CQT)’, consists of a ‘microscopic’ part (MIQM), which applies to a closed quantum system of any size, and a ‘macroscopic’ part (MAQM), which requires the participation of a large (ideally, an infinite) system. The first (MIQM) can be fully formulated based solely on the assumption of a Hilbert space ontology and the noncontextuality of probability values, relying in an essential way on Gleason's theorem and on an application to dynamics due in large part to Nistico. Thus, the present formulation, in contrast to earlier ones, derives the Born probability formulas and the consistency (decoherence) conditions for frameworks. The microscopic theory does not, however, possess a unique corpus of assertions, but rather a multiplicity of contextual truths (‘c-truths’), each one associated with a different framework. This circumstance leads us to consider the microscopic theory to be physically indeterminate and therefore incomplete, though logically coherent. The

  12. Compatible quantum theory.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, R; Hohenberg, P C

    2014-09-01

    Formulations of quantum mechanics (QM) can be characterized as realistic, operationalist, or a combination of the two. In this paper a realistic theory is defined as describing a closed system entirely by means of entities and concepts pertaining to the system. An operationalist theory, on the other hand, requires in addition entities external to the system. A realistic formulation comprises an ontology, the set of (mathematical) entities that describe the system, and assertions, the set of correct statements (predictions) the theory makes about the objects in the ontology. Classical mechanics is the prime example of a realistic physical theory. A straightforward generalization of classical mechanics to QM is hampered by the inconsistency of quantum properties with classical logic, a circumstance that was noted many years ago by Birkhoff and von Neumann. The present realistic formulation of the histories approach originally introduced by Griffiths, which we call 'compatible quantum theory (CQT)', consists of a 'microscopic' part (MIQM), which applies to a closed quantum system of any size, and a 'macroscopic' part (MAQM), which requires the participation of a large (ideally, an infinite) system. The first (MIQM) can be fully formulated based solely on the assumption of a Hilbert space ontology and the noncontextuality of probability values, relying in an essential way on Gleason's theorem and on an application to dynamics due in large part to Nistico. Thus, the present formulation, in contrast to earlier ones, derives the Born probability formulas and the consistency (decoherence) conditions for frameworks. The microscopic theory does not, however, possess a unique corpus of assertions, but rather a multiplicity of contextual truths ('c-truths'), each one associated with a different framework. This circumstance leads us to consider the microscopic theory to be physically indeterminate and therefore incomplete, though logically coherent. The completion of the theory

  13. Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Douglas, N, ed.

    2004-11-25

    simulations. + Identification and design of compatible spatial discretizations of PDEs, their classification, analysis, and relations. + Relationships between different compatible spatial discretization methods and concepts which have been developed; + Impact of compatible spatial discretizations upon physical fidelity, verification and validation of simulations, especially in large-scale, multiphysics settings. + How solvers address the demands placed upon them by compatible spatial discretizations. This report provides information about the program and abstracts of all the presentations.

  14. [Analysis of soft tissue thickness in persons with malocclusions of Class II division 1 and Class II division 2].

    PubMed

    Tanić, Tatjana; Blažej, Zorica; Mitić, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Different malocclusions indicate different thickness of facial soft tissue. The aim of the study was to establish the differences in the thickness of facial soft tissue profile in persons with dentoskeletal Class II/1 and II/2 relationship. In the study we used cephalometric rendgenograms profile analysis of 60 patients aged 12-18 years of the Dental Clinic in Nis who had not previously undergone orthodontical treatment. According to the dentoskeletal jaws relations the patients were divided into two groups with Class II division 1 and Class II class division 2. In all of them the standard dentoskeletal profile analysis by Steiner and soft tissue profile analysis by Burston was done. The obtained findings were statistically analyzed and the comparison between the studied groups was performed. The results indicated the following: in the patients with Class II/1 relationship there was a significantly thinner upper lip (t=5.741; p<0.0001), thinner upper lip sulcus (t=3.858; p<0.001) and significantly thinner lower lip (t=2.009; p<0.05) in relation to the patients with Class 11/2. Compensatory effect in the Class II/1 patients was more distinctive in females, as their soft tissue profiles were thicker. In Class 11/2 patients this relationship was in favor of males. The facial soft tissue profile indicated significant differences in the thickness dependant on the type of malocclusion and gender. Because of their great variability and a significant participation in the formation of the profile, while planning orthodontic therapy, it is necessary to pay them full attention, with obligatory analysis of the dentoskeletal profile.

  15. Analysis of Antarctic Denitrification in 2003 Winter Observed by ILAS-II Onboard the ADEOS-II Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, H.; Saeki, K.; Sugita, T.

    2005-12-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC) play an important role in ozone destruction in both Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere in winter. They take up gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3) and grow up when temperature is below nitric acid saturation temperature (TNAT). When PSC becomes large, it starts to descend and nitric acid is removed from the air mass, resulting in denitrification. The Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer-II (ILAS-II) onboard the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite-II (ADEOS-II) successfully made measurements for the whole Antarctic winter in 2003. ILAS-II measured vertical profiles of O3, HNO3, NO2, H2O, N2O, CH4, ClONO2, N2O5, etc. in addition to the aerosol extinction coefficients at 780 nm. In this study, we analyzed denitrification from ILAS-II HNO3 and N2O data in regard to temperature history on the trajectory. The quantity of denitrification was estimated from the difference between measured HNO3 and HNO3* assumed from HNO3-- N2O correlation. In this analysis, it was found that denitrification was observed only for those airmass that experienced temperature below TICE (ice saturation temperature) in late June, 2003. In late July, it was found that most airmass inside the polar vortex was denitrified regardless of temperature history. This suggests that permanent denitrification has occurred in June-July period. The transition of relationship between denitrification and airmass temperature history was discovered from the ILAS-II data. Also, major types of PSC have found to be changed from nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in June to ice in July, from the ILAS-II data. This is considered to be due to the lack of nitric acid in the airmass due to the denitrification in July.

  16. Solar Electric Generating System II finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dohner, J.L.; Anderson, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    On June 2, 1992, Landers` earthquake struck the Solar Electric Generating System II, located in Daggett, California. The 30 megawatt power station, operated by the Daggett Leasing Corporation (DLC), suffered substantial damage due to structural failures in the solar farm. These failures consisted of the separation of sliding joints supporting a distribution of parabolic glass mirrors. At separation, the mirrors fell to the ground and broke. It was the desire of the DLC and the Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and to redesign these joints so that, in the event of future quakes, costly breakage will be avoided. To accomplish this task, drawings of collector components were developed by the STDAC, from which a detailed finite element computer model of a solar collector was produced. This nonlinear dynamic model, which consisted of over 8,560 degrees of freedom, underwent model reduction to form a low order nonlinear dynamic model containing only 40 degrees of freedom. This model was then used as a design tool to estimate joint dynamics. Using this design tool, joint configurations were modified, and an acceptable joint redesign determined. The results of this analysis showed that the implementation of metal stops welded to support shafts for the purpose of preventing joint separation is a suitable joint redesign. Moreover, it was found that, for quakes of Landers` magnitude, mirror breakage due to enhanced vibration in the trough assembly is unlikely.

  17. Analysis of Myosin II Minifilament Orientation at Epithelial Zonula Adherens

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Magdalene; Liang, Xuan; Gomez, Guillermo A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II (NMII) form bipolar filaments, which bind F-actin to exert cellular contractility during physiological processes (Vicente-Manzanares et al., 2009). Using a combinatorial approach to fluorescently label both N- and C-termini of the NMII heavy chain, recent works have demonstrated the ability to visualize NMII bipolar filaments at various subcellular localizations (Ebrahim et al., 2013; Beach et al., 2014). At the zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelia, NMII minifilaments bind the circumferential actin bundles in a pseudo-sarcomeric manner (Ebrahim et al., 2013), a conformation required to maintain junctional tension and tissue integrity (Ratheesh et al., 2012). By expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-NMIIA heavy chain and immunolabel it using a NMIIA C-terminus specific antibody, we were able to visualize the NMII minifilaments bound to F-actin bundles in Caco-2 cells (Michael et al., 2016), as previously reported (Ebrahim et al., 2013; Beach et al., 2014). In addition, we designed an FIJI/MATLAB analysis module to quantify the size, distance and alignment of these minifilaments with respect to junctional F-actin at the ZA. Measurements of the dispersion of minifilaments angles were proven to be a useful parameter that closely correlated to the extent of contractility at junctions (Michael et al., 2016). PMID:28251171

  18. ANALYSIS OF SPATIAL STRUCTURE OF THE SPICA H II REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-W.; Min, K.-W.; Seon, K.-I.; Han, W.; Edelstein, J.

    2010-08-20

    Far ultraviolet (FUV) spectral images of the Spica H II region are first presented here for the Si II* {lambda}1533.4 and Al II {lambda}1670.8 lines and then compared with the optical H{alpha} image. The H{alpha} and Si II* images show enhanced emissions in the southern part of the H II region where H I density increases outward. This high density region, which we identify as part of the 'interaction ring' of the Loop I superbubble and the Local Bubble, seems to bound the southern H II region. On the other hand, the observed profile of Al II shows a broad central peak, without much difference between the northern and southern parts, which we suspect results from multiple resonant scattering. The extended tails seen in the radial profiles of the FUV intensities suggest that the nebula may be embedded in a warm ionized gas. Simulation with a spectral synthesis code yields values of the Lyman continuum luminosity and the effective temperature of the central star similar to previous estimates with 10{sup 46.2} photons s{sup -1} and 26,000 K, respectively, but the density of the northern H II region, 0.22 cm{sup -3}, is much smaller than previous estimates for the H{alpha} brightest region.

  19. COMPATIBILITY OF BENTONITE AND DNAPLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The compatibility of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), trichloroethylene (TCE), methylene chloride (MC), and creosote with commercially available sodium bentonite pellets was evaluated using stainless steel, double-ring, falling-head permeameters. The Hydraulic conductiv...

  20. COMPATIBILITY OF BENTONITE AND DNAPLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The compatibility of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), trichloroethylene (TCE), methylene chloride (MC), and creosote with commercially available sodium bentonite pellets was evaluated using stainless steel, double-ring, falling-head permeameters. The Hydraulic conductiv...

  1. User's Guide To CHEAP0 II-Economic Analysis of Stand Prognosis Model Outputs

    Treesearch

    Joseph E. Horn; E. Lee Medema; Ervin G. Schuster

    1986-01-01

    CHEAP0 II provides supplemental economic analysis capability for users of version 5.1 of the Stand Prognosis Model, including recent regeneration and insect outbreak extensions. Although patterned after the old CHEAP0 model, CHEAP0 II has more features and analytic capabilities, especially for analysis of existing and uneven-aged stands....

  2. Reference manual for generation and analysis of Habitat Time Series: version II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milhous, Robert T.; Bartholow, John M.; Updike, Marlys A.; Moos, Alan R.

    1990-01-01

    by the Aquatic Systems Branch of the National Ecology Research Center. For more information about the TSLIB software, refer to the Memorandum of Understanding. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology and TSLIB. Other chapters in this manual provide information on the different aspects of using the models. The information contained in the other chapters includes (2) acquisition, entry, manipulation, and listing of streamflow data; (3) entry, manipulation, and listing of the habitat-versus-streamflow function; (4) transferring streamflow data; (5) water resources systems analysis; (6) generation and analysis of daily streamflow and habitat values; (7) generation of the time series of monthly habitats; (8) manipulation, analysis, and display of month time series data; and (9) generation, analysis, and display of annual time series data. Each section includes documentation for the programs therein with at least one page of information for each program, including a program description, instructions for running the program, and sample output. The Appendixes contain the following: (A) sample file formats; (B) descriptions of default filenames; (C) alphabetical summary of batch-procedure files; (D) installing and running TSLIB on a microcomputer; (E) running TSLIB on a CDC Cyber computer; (F) using the TSLIB user interface program (RTSM); and (G) running WATSTORE on the USGS Amdahl mainframe computer. The number for this version of TSLIB--Version II-- is somewhat arbitrary, as the TSLIB programs were collected into a library some time ago; but operators tended to use and manage them as individual programs. Therefore, we will consider the group of programs from the past that were only on the CDC Cyber computer as Version 0; the programs from the past that were on both the Cyber and the IBM-compatible microcomputer as Version I; and the programs contained in this reference manual as Version II.

  3. Molecular analysis of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency with hepatocardiomuscular expression

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefont, J.P.; Cepanec, C.; Leroux, J.P.

    1996-05-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency, an inherited disorder of mitochondrial long-chain fatty-acid (LCFA) oxidation, results in two distinct clinical act phenotypes, namely, an adult (muscular) form and an infantile (hepatocardiomuscular) form. The rationale of this phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. The adult form of the disease is commonly ascribed to the Ser-113-Leu substitution in CPT II. Only few data are available regarding the molecular basis of the infantile form of the disease. We report herein a homozygous A-2399-C transversion predicting a Tyr-628-Ser substitution in a CPT II-deficient infant. In vitro expression of mutant cDNA in COS-1 cells demonstrated the responsibility of this mutation for the disease. Metabolic consequences of the Ser-113-Leu and Tyr-628-Ser substitutions were studied in fibroblasts. The Tyr-628-Ser substitution (infantile form) resulted in a 10% CPT II residual activity, markedly impairing LCFA oxidation, whereas the Ser-113-Leu substitution (adult form) resulted in a 20% CPT II residual activity, without consequence on LCFA oxidation. These data show that CPT II activity has to be reduced below a critical threshold in order for LCFA oxidation in fibroblasts to be impaired. The hypothesis that this critical threshold differs among tissues could provide a basis to explain phenotypic heterogeneity of CPT II deficiency. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Quantitative analysis of peptide-MHC class II interaction.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, B; Jung, G; Wiesmüller, K H

    1999-12-01

    The tremendous progress in the field of basic immunology and immunochemistry made in the last decade has significantly advanced our understanding of antigen processing and presentation by MHC class I and II proteins. In this review different techniques to study peptide interaction with MHC class II molecules are summarized and their impact on the elucidation of quantitative parameters, like affinities or kinetic data, is discussed. A recently introduced method based on synthetic combinatorial peptide libraries allows to quantify the binding contribution of each amino acid residue in a class II ligand and is presented in more detail. As this knowledge is fundamental for current investigations in modern medicine, e.g. for novel immune system based therapy concepts, further aspects like the design of new high affinity MHC class II ligands and the prediction of peptide antigens are discussed.

  5. Design and analysis of a tendon-based computed tomography-compatible robot with remote center of motion for lung biopsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunpeng; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhiyong; Yuan, Wei; Dou, Huaisu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Daguang; Bian, Yuan

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, biopsy is a decisive method of lung cancer diagnosis, whereas lung biopsy is time-consuming, complex and inaccurate. So a computed tomography-compatible robot for rapid and precise lung biopsy is developed in this article. According to the actual operation process, the robot is divided into two modules: 4-degree-of-freedom position module for location of puncture point is appropriate for patient's almost all positions and 3-degree-of-freedom tendon-based orientation module with remote center of motion is compact and computed tomography-compatible to orientate and insert needle automatically inside computed tomography bore. The workspace of the robot surrounds patient's thorax, and the needle tip forms a cone under patient's skin. A new error model of the robot based on screw theory is proposed in view of structure error and actuation error, which are regarded as screw motions. Simulation is carried out to verify the precision of the error model contrasted with compensation via inverse kinematics. The results of insertion experiment on specific phantom prove the feasibility of the robot with mean error of 1.373 mm in laboratory environment, which is accurate enough to replace manual operation.

  6. Analysis of xylosyltransferase II binding to the anticoagulant heparin.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Javier Carrera; Ambrosius, Michael; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Götting, Christian

    2009-05-22

    The key enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of glycosaminoglycan production are represented by the human xylosyltransferase I and its isoform II (XylT-I and XylT-II). The glycosaminoglycan heparin interacts with a variety of proteins, thereby regulating their activities, also those of xylosyltransferases. The identification of unknown amino acids responsible for heparin-binding of XylT-II was addressed in this study. Thus, six XylT-II fragments were designed as fusion proteins with MBP and we received soluble and purified MBP/XylT-II from Escherichia coli. Heparin-binding studies showed that all fragments bound with low affinity to heparin. Prolonging of XylT-II fragments did not account for a cooperative effect of multiple heparin-binding motifs and in turn for a stronger heparin-binding. Sequence alignment and surface polarity plot led to the identification of two highly positively charged Cardin-Weintraub motifs with surface accessibility, resulting in combination with short clusters of basic amino acids for strong heparin-binding of native xylosyltransferases.

  7. Analysis of xylosyltransferase II binding to the anticoagulant heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, Javier Carrera; Ambrosius, Michael; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Goetting, Christian

    2009-05-22

    The key enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of glycosaminoglycan production are represented by the human xylosyltransferase I and its isoform II (XylT-I and XylT-II). The glycosaminoglycan heparin interacts with a variety of proteins, thereby regulating their activities, also those of xylosyltransferases. The identification of unknown amino acids responsible for heparin-binding of XylT-II was addressed in this study. Thus, six XylT-II fragments were designed as fusion proteins with MBP and we received soluble and purified MBP/XylT-II from Escherichia coli. Heparin-binding studies showed that all fragments bound with low affinity to heparin. Prolonging of XylT-II fragments did not account for a cooperative effect of multiple heparin-binding motifs and in turn for a stronger heparin-binding. Sequence alignment and surface polarity plot led to the identification of two highly positively charged Cardin-Weintraub motifs with surface accessibility, resulting in combination with short clusters of basic amino acids for strong heparin-binding of native xylosyltransferases.

  8. Quantitative proteome analysis in benign thyroid nodular disease using the fluorescent ruthenium II tris(bathophenanthroline disulfonate) stain.

    PubMed

    Berger, K; Wissmann, D; Ihling, C; Kalkhof, S; Beck-Sickinger, A; Sinz, A; Paschke, R; Führer, D

    2004-11-30

    Thyroid tumorigenesis involves qualitative and quantitative changes in protein expression, which can be comprehensively studied by proteome analysis. However, one of the technical bottlenecks of proteomics remains a reliable, sensitive and inexpensive method for quantification of differentially expressed proteins. This is due to the limited linear range of most available protein stains, i.e. silver and Coomassie blue, and high costs of commercially available fluorescent stains. In this paper we describe our experience with a lab-made ruthenium based fluorescent stain (ruthenium II tris(bathophenanthroline disulfonate) (RuBPs)) to perform proteome analysis of nodular thyroid disease. We first compared the properties of RuBPs with two highly sensitive protein stains: (1) silver staining and (2) the commercially available fluorescent dye Sypro Ruby. We show that in addition to its highly sensitive staining capabilities similar to Sypro Ruby and silver (2 ng), RuBPs offers several advantages such as a broad dynamic range (similar to Sypro Ruby and 500 times broader than the dynamic range of silver stain), low costs ( 0.03 per gel) and excellent compatibility with mass spectrometry. We then applied the inexpensive RuBPs stain to 2D gels (pH 4-7) of four benign thyroid nodules and normal thyroid tissue. We were able to detect approximately 1800 protein spots/gel in our thyroid samples. Quantitative changes in protein expression levels of at least 20-42 proteins were noted in the benign nodules compared with the normal thyroid tissue of the same patient. Differentially expressed spots were further characterised by nano-LC-FTICR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. In summary we demonstrate, that the novel fluorescent ruthenium II tris(bathophenanthroline disulfonate) stain is a highly sensitive, reliable and inexpensive tool for quantitative proteome analysis in thyroid nodular disease.

  9. The FT-IR spectrometric analysis of the changes of polyphenol oxidase II secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chunhua; Dai, Ya; Liu, Qingliang; Xie, Yongshu; Xu, Xiaolong

    2003-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase II is a novel protein purified from tobacco, which acts as a key role in plant defense system. From the analysis of FT-IR spectrums, Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD) spectrums and second-derivative spectrums of PPO II at different pH and peroxide PPO II adduct, the secondary structure fractions are analyzed. PPO II at low pH (pH=3.0) and peroxide PPO II adduct almost keep the same secondary structure of native PPO II. The percentages of β-turn and random coil increase rapidly and the percentages of α-helix and anti-parallel β-sheet decrease rapidly at high pH (pH=10.0) comparing with that of native PPO II. All these conclusions are proved by the secondary structure calculations of circular dichroism spectrums in different states.

  10. PIV Analysis of Cavitation Flow Characteristics of He II

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, K.; Murakami, M.

    2006-04-27

    In the present experimental study cavitation phenomena in both He I and He II flows were investigated through the application of the PIV technique and visual observation under the saturated vapor pressure condition. The cavitation flow was generated in the downstream regions of a Venturi channel and a converging jet nozzle driven by a contracting metal bellows. It is seen that cavitation inception is a kind of stochastic process and has definite temperature dependence. The spatial distribution of the cavitation bubble velocity is measured by using the PIV technique. Some differences in the cavitating flow pattern and the void fraction are found between He II and He I cavitating flows. The PIV result indicates that the void fraction for He II flow is larger than that for He I flow.

  11. Theoretical analysis of BLM system for HLS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Kai; Li, Yu-Xiong; Li, Wei-Min; He, Li-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Hefei Light Source (HLS) is being upgraded to HLS II. Its emittance will be much lower than before, therefore the Touschek scattering will increase significantly and become the dominant factor of beam loss. So it is necessary to build a new beam loss monitoring (BLM) system that, in contrast to the old one, is able to obtain the quantity and position information of lost electrons. This information is useful in the commissioning, troubleshooting, and beam lifetime studying for HLS II. This paper analyzes the distribution features of different kinds of lost electrons, introduces the operation parameters of the new machine and discusses how to choose proper monitoring positions. Based on these comprehensive analyses, a new BLM system for HLS II is proposed.

  12. Compatibility testing with anhydrous ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Steve M.; Schweickart, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    Anhydrous ammonia has been proposed as the working fluid for a number of two-phase thermal control systems to be used in future space applications, including the Space Station Freedom and the Earth Observing Station (EOS). The compatibility of ammonia with the components in these systems is a major concern due to the corrosive nature of the fluid. Compatibility of ammonia with stainless steel and some aluminum alloys is well documented; however, data on other materials potentially suitable for aerospace use is less common. This paper documents the compatibility testing of nine materials with both gaseous and liquid ammonia. The test procedures are presented along with the resulting measurement data. Tensile strength was the only mechanical property tested that indicated a significant material incompatibility.

  13. Spatial compatibility and affordance compatibility in patients with chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kume, Yu; Sato, Fumiyasu; Hiraoka, Yuya; Suzuki, Shingo; Niyama, Yoshitsugu

    2016-12-01

    A deterioration in information-processing performance is commonly recognized in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Although the enhancement of cognitive skills in patients with schizophrenia is important, the types of external stimuli that influence performance have not received much attention. The aim of present study was to clarify the effects of spatial and affordance compatibility in patients with schizophrenia, compared with those in healthy people. The subjects (25 patients with schizophrenia and 25 healthy controls) participated in two experiment examining the effects of the spatial location of stimuli and the action-relevance of objects. The results showed that the effect of spatial compatibility was similar in both the patients and the controls, whereas the influence of action-relevant objects was not highlighted in either patients with chronic schizophrenia or healthy controls. These findings provide important evidence of a normal spatial compatibility effect in patients with chronic schizophrenia. However, further research examining the affordance compatibility effect is needed, taking into consideration the symptomatology and the severity of the social functioning level in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Simultaneous determination of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) in surface waters by solid phase extraction and flow injection analysis with spectrophotometric detection.

    PubMed

    Castillo, E; Cortina, J L; Beltrán, J; Prat, M D; Granados, M

    2001-07-01

    A method for heavy metal monitoring using spectrophotometric detection is presented. Traces of Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) at the low microg l(-1) level can be determined simultaneously after both selective removal of metal interferences and preconcentration using 'extraction chromatographic resins'. Lewatit TP807'84, which contains di(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid as active component, was used as solid adsorbent. Two minicolumns containing this resin were used: one at pH 3.2 for the removal of interferences, such as Zn(II) and Fe(III), and the other at pH 5.5 for the selective preconcentration of the target analytes. Spectrophotometric determination used FIA methodology with sulfarsazene as chromogenic reagent and partial least-squares multivariate calibration. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of surface waters from the Llobregat river and ground water samples from wells in the Guadiamar basin. Accuracy, expressed in terms of recoveries, was in the range 80-120% and relative standard deviations were below 10%.

  15. Chemical compatibility of cartridge materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Bryan; Wilcox, R. C.; Zee, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives were to determine the chemical compatibility of titanium-zirconium-molybdenum (TZM) with GaAs and CdZnTe, and Inconel with HgCdTe and HgZnTe. At the present time, no other studies regarding the compatibility of these crystal components and their respective cartridge materials have been performed. This study was to identify any possible problems between these materials to insure proper containment of possibly hazardous fumes during crystal growth experiments. In this study, the reaction zone between the materials was studied and the amount of degradation to the system was measured. Detailed results are presented.

  16. An ICF-CY-Based Content Analysis of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Kara; Coster, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Background: The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and its version for children and youth (ICF-CY), has been increasingly adopted as a system to describe function and disability. A content analysis of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II (VABS-II) was conducted to examine congruence with the functioning…

  17. Immunohistochemical analysis of lattice corneal dystrophies types I and II.

    PubMed Central

    Kivelä, T; Tarkkanen, A; McLean, I; Ghiso, J; Frangione, B; Haltia, M

    1993-01-01

    Corneal buttons from four patients with lattice corneal dystrophy (LD) type I, thought to be an isolated corneal amyloidosis, and from six patients with LD type II, part of systemic familial amyloidosis, Finnish type (FAF; Meretoja's syndrome), were studied by immunohistochemistry to determine the differential distribution in the amyloid deposits of amyloid P component (AP), mutated gelsolin specific for FAF, and native gelsolin. In both types of LD, antibodies to AP labelled lattice lines and a discontinuous layer of amyloid deposits under Bowman's layer. In LD type II, particularly, they also reacted with streak-like amyloid deposits between corneal almellae, especially in the limbal region. While the anti-FAF antiserum strongly labelled all amyloid deposits in LD type II, it failed to react unequivocally with them in LD type I. Both in LD type I and in two control specimens representing granular dystrophy, the monoclonal antibody (MAb) GS-2C4 to gelsolin faintly labelled some deposits, while in LD type II it reacted non-homogeneously with most amyloid deposits. In all specimens, MAb GS-2C4 labelled corneal epithelial cells and occasional stromal keratocytes and endothelial cells. The results suggest that Meretoja's syndrome, a systemic disease, can be diagnosed even retrospectively from corneal buttons subjected to histopathological study. Images PMID:8110676

  18. Analysis of Thermal Imagery Collected at Grayling II, Grayling, Michigan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    Terrain features’ LWB and SWB IR signatures by time of day during Grayling II exercise (04Mar- 15Apr94) (Continued...29 7 (Concluded) ....................................................................................... 31 8 Bare soil LWB and SWB IR... LWB and SWB IR signatures and air temperature (E3 station, 2 m above ground) during Grayling H exercise

  19. An analysis of the lumber planning process: Part II

    Treesearch

    Peter Koch

    1956-01-01

    This study is part II of an investigation pertaining to the peripheral-milling process of planing lumber. Some relationships were determined between cutterhead horsepower and various combinations of specimen, cutterhead, and feed factors. Power demand curves were interpreted through comparison with simultaneously taken one micro-second photos of the forming chips....

  20. Analysis of grid-assembly shielding of EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghetti, D.; Franklin, F.C.; Kucera, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Differing neutron exposure rates to the EBR-II lower grid plenum assembly resulting from the historical changes in reactor configuration and shielding are analyzed to obtain the fluences and the steel displacements-per-atom values in this irreplaceable component.

  1. Experimental analysis of the mechanism of chromatin remodeling by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Kulaeva, Olga I.; Pestov, Nikolai A.; Hsieh, Fu-Kai; Studitsky, Vasily M.

    2014-01-01

    The vital process of transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occurs in chromatin environment in eukaryotic cells; in fact, moderately transcribed genes retain nucleosomal structure. Recent studies suggest that chromatin structure presents a strong barrier for transcribing Pol II in vitro, and that DNA-histone interactions are only partially and transiently disrupted during transcript elongation on moderately active genes. Furthermore, elongating Pol II complex is one of the major targets during gene regulation. Below we describe a highly purified, defined experimental system that recapitulates many important properties of transcribed chromatin in vitro and allows detailed analysis of the underlying mechanisms. PMID:22910212

  2. Sorption selectivity of birnessite particle edges: a d-PDF analysis of Cd(ii) and Pb(ii) sorption by δ-MnO2 and ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    van Genuchten, Case M; Peña, Jasquelin

    2016-08-10

    Birnessite minerals (layer-type MnO2), which bear both internal (cation vacancies) and external (particle edges) metal sorption sites, are important sinks of contaminants in soils and sediments. Although the particle edges of birnessite minerals often dominate the total reactive surface area, especially in the case of nanoscale crystallites, the metal sorption reactivity of birnessite particle edges remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the sorption selectivity of birnessite particle edges by combining Cd(ii) and Pb(ii) adsorption isotherms at pH 5.5 with surface structural characterization by differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) analysis. We compared the sorption reactivity of δ-MnO2 to that of the nanomineral, 2-line ferrihydrite, which exhibits only external surface sites. Our results show that, whereas Cd(ii) and Pb(ii) both bind to birnessite layer vacancies, only Pb(ii) binds extensively to birnessite particle edges. For ferrihydrite, significant Pb(ii) adsorption to external sites was observed (roughly 20 mol%), whereas Cd(ii) sorption was negligible. These results are supported by bond valence calculations that show comparable degrees of saturation of oxygen atoms on birnessite and ferrihydrite particle edges. Therefore, we propose that the sorption selectivity of birnessite edges follows the same order of that reported previously for ferrihydrite: Ca(ii) < Cd(ii) < Ni(ii) < Zn(ii) < Cu(ii) < Pb(ii).

  3. Compatibility of Ohio trail users

    Treesearch

    Roger E. McCay; George H. Moeller

    1976-01-01

    Compatibility indexes show how Ohio trail users feel about meeting each other on the trail. All four of the major types of trail users-hikers, horseback riders, bicycle riders, and motorcycle riders-enjoy meeting their own kind. But they also feel antagonism toward the faster, more mechanized trail users; e.g., everyone likes hikers, but few like motorcycle riders....

  4. Verbal response-effect compatibility.

    PubMed

    Koch, Iring; Kunde, Wilfried

    2002-12-01

    Ideomotor theory states that motor responses are activated by an anticipation of their sensory effects. We assumed that anticipated effects would produce response-effect (R-E) compatibility when there is dimensional overlap of effects and responses. In a four-choice task, visual digit stimuli called for verbal responses (color names). Each response produced a written response-effect on the screen. In different groups, the response-effect was a colored color word (e.g., blue in blue), a white color word, or a colored nonword (Xs in blue). In different blocks, the predictable effects were either incompatible (e.g., response "blue" --> effect: green) or compatible with the response. We found faster responses with compatible than with incompatible R-E mappings. The compatibility effect was strongest with colored words, intermediate with white words, and smallest with colored nonwords. We conclude that effect anticipation influences response selection on both a perceptual level (related to the word's color) and a conceptual level (related to the word's meaning).

  5. Rubber composition compatible with hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repar, J.

    1973-01-01

    Formulation improves compatibility of butyl rubbers with hydrazine while reducing permeation to low levels necessary for prolonged storage in space. This is accomplished by replacing carbon-black filler with inert materials such as hydrated silica or clay. Pressure increases suggest that hydrazine is decomposed only slightly by new type of rubber.

  6. Electromagnetic compatibility in aerospace vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietersen, O. B. M.

    1983-01-01

    Electromagnetic compatibility in aerospace vehicles which requires careful consideration because of the generally high packing density of electronic equipment aboard aircraft or spacecraft, the complex cable hardness and the required reliability margins. The practical and computer aided methods which are in use to arrive at an undisturbed living together of electronic systems board these vehicles are reviewed.

  7. Gold nanorods for surface Plasmon resonance detection of mercury (II) in flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Khang; Heider, Emily C; Brooks, Scott C; Barbosa, Fernando; Campiglia, Andres D

    2014-10-01

    This article investigates the flow injection analysis of mercury (II) ions in tap water samples via surface Plasmon resonance detection. Quantitative analysis of mercury (II) is based on the chemical interaction of metallic mercury with gold nanorods immobilized on a glass substrate. A new flow cell design is presented with the ability to accommodate the detecting substrate in the sample compartment of commercial spectrometers. Two alternatives are here considered for mercury (II) detection, namely stop-flow and continuous flow injection analysis modes. The best limit of detection (2.4 ng mL(-1)) was obtained with the continuous flow injection analysis approach. The accurate determination of mercury (II) ions in samples of unknown composition is demonstrated with a fortified tap water sample.

  8. A CMOS compatible, ferroelectric tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Ambriz Vargas, Fabian; Kolhatkar, Gitanjali; Broyer, Maxime; Hadj Youssef, Azza; Nouar, Rafik; Sarkissian, Andranik; Thomas, Reji; Gomez-Yanez, Carlos; Gauthier, Marc A; Ruediger, Andreas

    2017-04-03

    In recent years, the experimental demonstration of Ferroelectric Tunnel Junctions (FTJ) based on perovskite tunnel barriers has been reported. However, integrating these perovskite materials into conventional silicon memory technology remains challenging due to their lack of compatibility with the complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS). The present communication reports the fabrication of an FTJ based on a CMOS compatible tunnel barrier Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 (6 unit cells thick) on an equally CMOS compatible TiN electrode. Analysis of the FTJ by grazing angle incidence X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of the non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic phase (Pbc2_1, ferroelectric phase). The FTJ characterization is followed by the reconstruction of the electrostatic potential profile in the as-grown TiN/Hf0.5Zr0.5O2/Pt heterostructure. A direct tunneling current model across a trapezoidal barrier was used to correlate the electronic and electrical properties of our FTJ devices. The good agreement between the experimental and the theoretical model attests to the tunneling electroresistance effect (TER) in our FTJ device. A TER ratio of ~15 was calculated for the present FTJ device at low read voltage (+0.2 V). This study makes Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 a promising candidate for integration into conventional Si memory technology.

  9. Analysis of data collected by the Tatyana II satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilianaa, Rivera; Oscar, Martínez; Eduardo, Mendoza-Torres; Humberto, Salazar

    2011-04-01

    The Tatyana II satellite is the second one of the University Satellite Program, which is led by the Moscow State University with the participation of the Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla. This satellite has ultraviolet, red-infrared and charged particles detectors. In this work preliminary results based on the data collected by these detectors on board the satellite over a period of ~3.5 months are presented.

  10. Foil Activation Analysis and Thermoluminescent Dosimetry on Skylab II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Skylab II Command Module was equipped with passive dosimeter located at five selected stations within the spacecraft to monitor radiation levels accumulated during the 28 day space mission . The passive sensors consisted of an array of thermoluminescent devices (TLD) ionization chambers, and activation foils. The thermoluminescent units chosen were the EG and G Corporation evaculated glass container type. Both lithium fluoride and manganese activated calcium fluoride were selected for use in the Skylab missions. (Modified author abstract)

  11. An analytical and experimental stress analysis of a practical mode II fracture-test specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chisholm, D. B.; Jones, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    A boundary collocation method has been employed to determine the Mode II stress intensity factors for a pair of through-the-thickness edge cracks in a finite isotropic plate. An elastostatic analysis has been carried out in terms of the complete Williams stress function employing both even and odd components. The results of the numerical analysis were verified by a two-step procedure whereby the symmetric and antisymmetric portions of the solution were independently compared with existing solutions. The complete solution was verified by comparison with a photoelastic analysis. A compact shear specimen (CSS) of Hysol epoxy resin was loaded in a photoelastic experiment designed to study the isochromatic fringe patterns resulting from the Mode II crack tip stress distribution. The experiment verified that a pure Mode II stress distribution existed in the neighborhood of the crack tips and confirmed the accuracy of the boundary collocation solution for the Mode II stress intensity factors.

  12. Phenotype Characterization and DSPP Mutational Analysis of Three Brazilian Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type II Families

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, A.C.; Santos, L.J.S.; Paula, L.M.; Dong, J.; MacDougall, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform phenotype analysis and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) mutational analysis on 3 Brazilian families diagnosed with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II) attending the Dental Anomalies Clinic in Brasilia, Brazil. Physical and oral examinations, as well as radiographic and histopathological analyses, were performed on 28 affected and unaffected individuals. Clinical, radiographic and histopathological analyses confirmed the diagnosis of DGI-II in 19 individuals. Pulp stones were observed in ground sections of several teeth in 2 families, suggesting that obliteration of pulp chambers and root canals results from the growth of these nodular structures. Mutational DSPP gene analysis of representative affected family members revealed 7 various non-disease-causing alterations in exons 1–4 within the dentin sialoprotein domain. Further longitudinal studies are necessary to elucidate the progression of pulpal obliteration in the DGI-II patients studied as well as the molecular basis of their disease. PMID:18797159

  13. An analytical and experimental stress analysis of a practical mode II fracture-test specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chisholm, D. B.; Jones, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    A boundary collocation method has been employed to determine the Mode II stress intensity factors for a pair of through-the-thickness edge cracks in a finite isotropic plate. An elastostatic analysis has been carried out in terms of the complete Williams stress function employing both even and odd components. The results of the numerical analysis were verified by a two-step procedure whereby the symmetric and antisymmetric portions of the solution were independently compared with existing solutions. The complete solution was verified by comparison with a photoelastic analysis. A compact shear specimen (CSS) of Hysol epoxy resin was loaded in a photoelastic experiment designed to study the isochromatic fringe patterns resulting from the Mode II crack tip stress distribution. The experiment verified that a pure Mode II stress distribution existed in the neighborhood of the crack tips and confirmed the accuracy of the boundary collocation solution for the Mode II stress intensity factors.

  14. New advances in MR-compatible bioartificial liver

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Rex E.; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    MR-compatible bioartificial liver (BAL) studies have been performed for 30 years and are reviewed. There are two types of study: (i) metabolism and drug studies using multinuclear MRS; primarily short-term (< 8 h) studies; (ii) the use of multinuclear MRS and MRI to noninvasively define the features and functions of BAL systems for long-term liver tissue engineering. In the latter, these systems often undergo not only modification of the perfusion system, but also the construction of MR radiofrequency probes around the bioreactor. We present novel MR-compatible BALs and the use of multinuclear MRS (13C, 19F, 31P) for the noninvasive monitoring of their growth, metabolism and viability, as well as 1H MRI methods for the determination of flow profiles, diffusion, cell distribution, quality assurance and bioreactor integrity. Finally, a simple flexible coil design and circuit, and life support system, are described that can make almost any BAL MR-compatible. PMID:22351642

  15. Compatibility and kidney transplantation: the way to go.

    PubMed

    Doxiadis, Ilias I N

    2012-01-01

    Long lasting debates in the past questioned the relevance of any sort of compatibility in post mortal kidney transplantation. It is for no say that fully compatible transplants have the highest chances for a long patient and graft survival. In the present report the use of HLA-DR as a representative of the Major Histocompatibility Complex class II genes in the allocation of organs is discussed. The major arguments are the easiness to offer to patients a compatible graft in a relatively short waiting time, an increase in graft survival, the less sensitization during the transplantation period, and the lower waiting time for a retransplant. Even if the number of organ donors remains the same a lowering of the mean waiting time is expected because of the longer period of graft survival.

  16. The analysis of the immobilization mechanism of Ni(II) on Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhi; Cheng, Yangjian; Pan, Danmei; Yin, Shungao; Huang, Feng; Guan, Xiong; Lin, Zhang

    2011-04-01

    This work focused on the identification of biosorption mechanism of Ni(II) by living Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) based on batch experiments and a variety of microscopic equipments. The adsorption equilibrium reached rapidly in 2 h and the maximum nickel adsorption capability of B. cereus was 17.7 mg x g(-1) (dry weight). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that the bacterial surface roughness increased from 7.9 +/- 0.5 nm to 12.6 +/- 1.6 nm during this process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation confirmed that there was Ni(II) on the bacterial surface. However, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin section analysis coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that Ni(II) could also be found in the inner portions of the bacteria. Inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) quantitative analysis elucidated that over 70% of the immobilized Ni(II) was binding on the surface of bacteria. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that the Ni(II) collected by the bacteria was amorphous. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis indicated that amides and carboxylation functional groups might be involved in the coordination of Ni(II).

  17. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol intravenous infusion formulation optimization, stability and compatibility testing: A case study to overcome polysorbate 80 interference in chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Inas A; Hammell, Dana C; Hassan, Hazem E; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2016-06-05

    Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol is a progestin/estrogen combination hormonal contraceptive indicated for the prevention of pregnancy in women. The very poor solubility and wettability of these drugs, along with their high potency (adsorption issues), give rise to difficulties in designing intravenous (IV) formulations to assess absolute bioavailability of products containing both drugs. The purpose of this study was to develop an IV formulation, evaluate its stability under different conditions and evaluate its compatibility with IV sets for potential use in absolute bioavailability studies in humans. Also, a selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for quantification of ethinyl estradiol and norelgestromin in polysorbate 80 matrix was developed and validated. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV solution was prepared using sterile water for injection with 2.5% ethanol and 2.5% polysorbate 80 as a cosolvent/surfactant system to obtain a final drug solution of 25μg ethinyl estradiol and 252μg norelgestromin from a concentrated stock drug solution. The stabilities of the concentrated stock and IV solutions were assessed after storing them in the refrigerator (3.7±0.6°C) and at room temperature (19.5±0.5°C), respectively. Additional studies were conducted to examine the stability of the IV solution using an Alarias(®) low sorbing IV administration set with and without an inline filter. The solution was allowed to drip at 1mL/min over a 60min period. Samples were obtained at the beginning, middle and end of the 60min duration. The chemical stability was evaluated for up to 10 days. Norelgestromin and ethinyl estradiol concentration, purity, and degradant levels were determined using the HPLC method. The norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV formulation met the chemical stability criteria when tested on day 1 through day 9 (216h). Norelgestromin concentrations assayed in stock and IV solutions were in the range of 90.0-98.5% and 90

  18. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: a sensor array for chemical analysis of the Martian soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, Samuel P.; Lukow, Stefan R.; Comeau, Brian P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Grannan-Feldman, Sabrina M.; Manatt, Ken; West, Steven J.; Wen, Xiaowen; Frant, Martin; Gillette, Tim

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified for the now canceled MSP (Mars Surveyor Program) '01 Lander. The MECA package consisted of a microscope, electrometer, material patch plates, and a wet chemistry laboratory (WCL). The primary goal of MECA was to analyze the Martian soil (regolith) for possible hazards to future astronauts and to provide a better understanding of Martian regolith geochemistry. The purpose of the WCL was to analyze for a range of soluble ionic chemical species and electrochemical parameters. The heart of the WCL was a sensor array of electrochemically based ion-selective electrodes (ISE). After 20 months storage at -23 degrees C and subsequent extended freeze/thawing cycles, WCL sensors were evaluated to determine both their physical durability and analytical responses. A fractional factorial calibration of the sensors was used to obtain slope, intercept, and all necessary selectivity coefficients simultaneously for selected ISEs. This calibration was used to model five cation and three anion sensors. These data were subsequently used to determine concentrations of several ions in two soil leachate simulants (based on terrestrial seawater and hypothesized Mars brine) and four actual soil samples. The WCL results were compared to simulant and soil samples using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that flight qualification and prolonged low-temperature storage conditions had minimal effects on the sensors. In addition, the analytical optimization method provided quantitative and qualitative data that could be used to accurately identify the chemical composition of the simulants and soils. The WCL has the ability to provide data that can be used to "read" the chemical, geological, and climatic history of Mars, as well as the potential habitability of its regolith.

  19. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: a sensor array for chemical analysis of the Martian soil.

    PubMed

    Kounaves, Samuel P; Lukow, Stefan R; Comeau, Brian P; Hecht, Michael H; Grannan-Feldman, Sabrina M; Manatt, Ken; West, Steven J; Wen, Xiaowen; Frant, Martin; Gillette, Tim

    2003-07-25

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified for the now canceled MSP (Mars Surveyor Program) '01 Lander. The MECA package consisted of a microscope, electrometer, material patch plates, and a wet chemistry laboratory (WCL). The primary goal of MECA was to analyze the Martian soil (regolith) for possible hazards to future astronauts and to provide a better understanding of Martian regolith geochemistry. The purpose of the WCL was to analyze for a range of soluble ionic chemical species and electrochemical parameters. The heart of the WCL was a sensor array of electrochemically based ion-selective electrodes (ISE). After 20 months storage at -23 degrees C and subsequent extended freeze/thawing cycles, WCL sensors were evaluated to determine both their physical durability and analytical responses. A fractional factorial calibration of the sensors was used to obtain slope, intercept, and all necessary selectivity coefficients simultaneously for selected ISEs. This calibration was used to model five cation and three anion sensors. These data were subsequently used to determine concentrations of several ions in two soil leachate simulants (based on terrestrial seawater and hypothesized Mars brine) and four actual soil samples. The WCL results were compared to simulant and soil samples using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that flight qualification and prolonged low-temperature storage conditions had minimal effects on the sensors. In addition, the analytical optimization method provided quantitative and qualitative data that could be used to accurately identify the chemical composition of the simulants and soils. The WCL has the ability to provide data that can be used to "read" the chemical, geological, and climatic history of Mars, as well as the potential habitability of its regolith.

  20. Analysis by single-gene reassortment demonstrates that the 1918 influenza virus is functionally compatible with a low-pathogenicity avian influenza virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Li; Davis, A Sally; Jagger, Brett W; Schwartzman, Louis M; Dunham, Eleca J; Kash, John C; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2012-09-01

    The 1918-1919 "Spanish" influenza pandemic is estimated to have caused 50 million deaths worldwide. Understanding the origin, virulence, and pathogenic properties of past pandemic influenza viruses, including the 1918 virus, is crucial for current public health preparedness and future pandemic planning. The origin of the 1918 pandemic virus has not been resolved, but its coding sequences are very like those of avian influenza virus. The proteins encoded by the 1918 virus differ from typical low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses at only a small number of amino acids in each open reading frame. In this study, a series of chimeric 1918 influenza viruses were created in which each of the eight 1918 pandemic virus gene segments was replaced individually with the corresponding gene segment of a prototypical low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) H1N1 virus in order to investigate functional compatibility of the 1918 virus genome with gene segments from an LPAI virus and to identify gene segments and mutations important for mammalian adaptation. This set of eight "7:1" chimeric viruses was compared to the parental 1918 and LPAI H1N1 viruses in intranasally infected mice. Seven of the 1918 LPAI 7:1 chimeric viruses replicated and caused disease equivalent to the fully reconstructed 1918 virus. Only the chimeric 1918 virus containing the avian influenza PB2 gene segment was attenuated in mice. This attenuation could be corrected by the single E627K amino acid change, further confirming the importance of this change in mammalian adaptation and mouse pathogenicity. While the mechanisms of influenza virus host switch, and particularly mammalian host adaptation are still only partly understood, these data suggest that the 1918 virus, whatever its origin, is very similar to avian influenza virus.

  1. Analysis of root proteome unravels differential molecular responses during compatible and incompatible interaction between chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri Race1 (Foc1).

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Moniya; Gupta, Sumanti; Bhar, Anirban; Chakraborti, Dipankar; Basu, Debabrata; Das, Sampa

    2014-11-03

    Vascular wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri Race 1 (Foc1) is a serious disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) accounting for approximately 10-15% annual crop loss. The fungus invades the plant via roots, colonizes the xylem vessels and prevents the upward translocation of water and nutrients, finally resulting in wilting of the entire plant. Although comparative transcriptomic profiling have highlighted some important signaling molecules, but proteomic studies involving chickpea-Foc1 are limited. The present study focuses on comparative root proteomics of susceptible (JG62) and resistant (WR315) chickpea genotypes infected with Foc1, to understand the mechanistic basis of susceptibility and/or resistance. The differential and unique proteins of both genotypes were identified at 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h post Foc1 inoculation. 2D PAGE analyses followed by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS identified 100 differentially (>1.5 fold<, p<0.05) or uniquely expressed proteins. These proteins were further categorized into 10 functional classes and grouped into GO (gene ontology) categories. Network analyses of identified proteins revealed intra and inter relationship of these proteins with their neighbors as well as their association with different defense signaling pathways. qRT-PCR analyses were performed to correlate the mRNA and protein levels of some proteins of representative classes. The differential and unique proteins identified indicate their involvement in early defense signaling of the host. Comparative analyses of expression profiles of obtained proteins suggest that albeit some common components participate in early defense signaling in both susceptible and resistant genotypes, but their roles and regulation differ in case of compatible and/or incompatible interactions. Thus, functional characterization of identified PR proteins (PR1, BGL2, TLP), Trypsin protease inhibitor, ABA responsive protein, cysteine protease, protein disulphide isomerase, ripening

  2. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: a sensor array for chemical analysis of the Martian soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, Samuel P.; Lukow, Stefan R.; Comeau, Brian P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Grannan-Feldman, Sabrina M.; Manatt, Ken; West, Steven J.; Wen, Xiaowen; Frant, Martin; Gillette, Tim

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified for the now canceled MSP (Mars Surveyor Program) '01 Lander. The MECA package consisted of a microscope, electrometer, material patch plates, and a wet chemistry laboratory (WCL). The primary goal of MECA was to analyze the Martian soil (regolith) for possible hazards to future astronauts and to provide a better understanding of Martian regolith geochemistry. The purpose of the WCL was to analyze for a range of soluble ionic chemical species and electrochemical parameters. The heart of the WCL was a sensor array of electrochemically based ion-selective electrodes (ISE). After 20 months storage at -23 degrees C and subsequent extended freeze/thawing cycles, WCL sensors were evaluated to determine both their physical durability and analytical responses. A fractional factorial calibration of the sensors was used to obtain slope, intercept, and all necessary selectivity coefficients simultaneously for selected ISEs. This calibration was used to model five cation and three anion sensors. These data were subsequently used to determine concentrations of several ions in two soil leachate simulants (based on terrestrial seawater and hypothesized Mars brine) and four actual soil samples. The WCL results were compared to simulant and soil samples using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that flight qualification and prolonged low-temperature storage conditions had minimal effects on the sensors. In addition, the analytical optimization method provided quantitative and qualitative data that could be used to accurately identify the chemical composition of the simulants and soils. The WCL has the ability to provide data that can be used to "read" the chemical, geological, and climatic history of Mars, as well as the potential habitability of its regolith.

  3. Genetic Analysis of the Aspergillus flavus Vegetative Compatibility Group to Which a Biological Control Agent That Limits Aflatoxin Contamination in U.S. Crops Belongs

    PubMed Central

    Cotty, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Some filamentous fungi in Aspergillus section Flavi produce carcinogenic secondary compounds called aflatoxins. Aflatoxin contamination is routinely managed in commercial agriculture with strains of Aspergillus flavus that do not produce aflatoxins. These non-aflatoxin-producing strains competitively exclude aflatoxin producers and reshape fungal communities so that strains with the aflatoxin-producing phenotype are less frequent. This study evaluated the genetic variation within naturally occurring atoxigenic A. flavus strains from the endemic vegetative compatibility group (VCG) YV36. AF36 is a strain of VCG YV36 and was the first fungus used in agriculture for aflatoxin management. Genetic analyses based on mating-type loci, 21 microsatellite loci, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the aflC gene were applied to a set of 237 YV36 isolates collected from 1990 through 2005 from desert legumes and untreated fields and from fields previously treated with AF36 across the southern United States. One haplotype dominated across time and space. No recombination with strains belonging to VCGs other than YV36 was detected. All YV36 isolates carried the SNP in aflC that prevents aflatoxin biosynthesis and the mat1-2 idiomorph at the mating-type locus. These results suggest that VCG YV36 has a clonal population structure maintained across both time and space. These results demonstrate the genetic stability of atoxigenic strains belonging to a broadly distributed endemic VCG in both untreated populations and populations where the short-term frequency of VCG YV36 has increased due to applications of a strain used to competitively exclude aflatoxin producers. This work supports the hypothesis that strains of this VCG are not involved in routine genetic exchange with aflatoxin-producing strains. PMID:26092465

  4. Genetic Analysis of the Aspergillus flavus Vegetative Compatibility Group to Which a Biological Control Agent That Limits Aflatoxin Contamination in U.S. Crops Belongs.

    PubMed

    Grubisha, Lisa C; Cotty, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Some filamentous fungi in Aspergillus section Flavi produce carcinogenic secondary compounds called aflatoxins. Aflatoxin contamination is routinely managed in commercial agriculture with strains of Aspergillus flavus that do not produce aflatoxins. These non-aflatoxin-producing strains competitively exclude aflatoxin producers and reshape fungal communities so that strains with the aflatoxin-producing phenotype are less frequent. This study evaluated the genetic variation within naturally occurring atoxigenic A. flavus strains from the endemic vegetative compatibility group (VCG) YV36. AF36 is a strain of VCG YV36 and was the first fungus used in agriculture for aflatoxin management. Genetic analyses based on mating-type loci, 21 microsatellite loci, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the aflC gene were applied to a set of 237 YV36 isolates collected from 1990 through 2005 from desert legumes and untreated fields and from fields previously treated with AF36 across the southern United States. One haplotype dominated across time and space. No recombination with strains belonging to VCGs other than YV36 was detected. All YV36 isolates carried the SNP in aflC that prevents aflatoxin biosynthesis and the mat1-2 idiomorph at the mating-type locus. These results suggest that VCG YV36 has a clonal population structure maintained across both time and space. These results demonstrate the genetic stability of atoxigenic strains belonging to a broadly distributed endemic VCG in both untreated populations and populations where the short-term frequency of VCG YV36 has increased due to applications of a strain used to competitively exclude aflatoxin producers. This work supports the hypothesis that strains of this VCG are not involved in routine genetic exchange with aflatoxin-producing strains.

  5. Analysis of medicine consumption in peacekeeping level II hospitals.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lan; Liu, Huiling; Li, Chunfeng; Gao, Guangkai

    2014-01-01

    The peacekeeping military units of contributing countries are unfamiliar with the conditions prevailing in foreign mission areas and therefore have difficulties with medical supplies storage. The aim of this study is to provide reasonable and practical guidance on the maintenance of medical supplies in the peacekeeping military units of contributing countries. A total of 1,972 prescriptions were received by the pharmacy in the peacekeeping level II hospital in the Republic of Sudan from February to July of 2009 including a total of 186 drug categories and 17,713 minimum packing units. Pairwise comparison was performed using the c2 test. When the total number of samples was smaller than 40, the Fisher's exact test was adopted for pairwise comparison. The majority of the consumed medicines mainly belonged to 6 categories, including specialty drugs, anti-microbial drugs, Chinese patent medicines, gastrointestinal drugs, central nervous system drugs, and drugs regulating fluids, electrolytes, and acid-base balance. Altogether, the drugs in the 6 categories accounted for 74% of all consumed medicines that were divided into a total of 20 categories. Medicine consumption in peacekeeping level II hospitals is unique, therefore the drugs used in military medical facilities should be prepared according to their actual needs in the area of peacekeeping operations.

  6. Compatibility of Segments of Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Ursell, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    A method of calculating (usually for the purpose of maximizing) the power-conversion efficiency of a segmented thermoelectric generator is based on equations derived from the fundamental equations of thermoelectricity. Because it is directly traceable to first principles, the method provides physical explanations in addition to predictions of phenomena involved in segmentation. In comparison with the finite-element method used heretofore to predict (without being able to explain) the behavior of a segmented thermoelectric generator, this method is much simpler to implement in practice: in particular, the efficiency of a segmented thermoelectric generator can be estimated by evaluating equations using only hand-held calculator with this method. In addition, the method provides for determination of cascading ratios. The concept of cascading is illustrated in the figure and the definition of the cascading ratio is defined in the figure caption. An important aspect of the method is its approach to the issue of compatibility among segments, in combination with introduction of the concept of compatibility within a segment. Prior approaches involved the use of only averaged material properties. Two materials in direct contact could be examined for compatibility with each other, but there was no general framework for analysis of compatibility. The present method establishes such a framework. The mathematical derivation of the method begins with the definition of reduced efficiency of a thermoelectric generator as the ratio between (1) its thermal-to-electric power-conversion efficiency and (2) its Carnot efficiency (the maximum efficiency theoretically attainable, given its hot- and cold-side temperatures). The derivation involves calculation of the reduced efficiency of a model thermoelectric generator for which the hot-side temperature is only infinitesimally greater than the cold-side temperature. The derivation includes consideration of the ratio (u) between the

  7. Compatibility of technologies with regulations in the waste management of H-3, I-129, C-14, and Kr-85. Part II. Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Kolba, V.M.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Steindler, M.J.

    1983-11-01

    Waste forms of /sup 3/H, /sup 129/I, /sup 14/C, and /sup 85/Kr separated from fuel reprocessing streams and procedures for managing them were analyzed regarding compliance with regulations. Transportation of these wastes in certain DOT-specification packagings would be permissible, but some of these packagings may not be acceptable in some disposal situations. Transportation of gaseous /sup 85/Kr in a currently certified cylinder is possible, but a fuel reprocessor may wish to ship larger quantities per package. Disposal of tritium using a package designed by a DOE contractor and shallow land burial, in accord with the regulations of 10 CFR 61, seems practicable. Although 10 CFR 61 permits shallow land burial of /sup 129/I, the concentration limit requires distribution in a volume that may seem impractical to commercial fuel reprocessors. The concentration limit of 10 CFR 61 for shallow land burial of /sup 14/C requires distribution in a lesser, although still large, volume. For both /sup 129/I and /sup 14/C, management as high-level waste offers the advantage of smaller volumes. Similar advantages may be offered by greater confinement or non-near surface concepts for disposal. The concrete waste forms developed for these nuclides may not meet technical criteria being formulated for geologic disposal. The lack of accommodation of /sup 85/Kr at disposal facilities makes storage of the gaseous form at the fuel reprocessing plant, followed by dispersal after partial decay, seem attractive. Ocean disposal of /sup 129/I and /sup 14/C by the rules of the International Atomic Energy Agency-London Ocean Dumping Convention offers advantages over shallow land burial: higher allowed concentrations, resulting in smaller volumes and fewer packages. These rules, however, thwart ocean disposal of /sup 85/Kr since gaseous forms are banned, and for solid forms, concentration limits would require distribution of radioactivity in very large volumes. 80 references.

  8. Analysis of NASA communications (Nascom) II network protocols and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidyar, Guy C.; Butler, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Communications (Nascom) Division of the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate is to undertake a major initiative to develop the Nascom II (NII) network to achieve its long-range service objectives for operational data transport to support the Space Station Freedom Program, the Earth Observing System, and other projects. NII is the Nascom ground communications network being developed to accommodate the operational traffic of the mid-1990s and beyond. The authors describe various baseline protocol architectures based on current and evolving technologies. They address the internetworking issues suggested for reliable transfer of data over heterogeneous segments. They also describe the NII architecture, topology, system components, and services. A comparative evaluation of the current and evolving technologies was made, and suggestions for further study are described. It is shown that the direction of the NII configuration and the subsystem component design will clearly depend on the advances made in the area of broadband integrated services.

  9. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: An application in rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Röver, Christian; Friede, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases are challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug-approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncertainty of between-trial heterogeneity can be dealt with probabilistically, which is critical if the number of studies is small. Furthermore, it allows quantifying and discounting the phase II data through the predictive distribution relevant for phase III. A phase III design is proposed which uses the phase II data and considers approval based on a phase III interim analysis. The design is illustrated with a non-inferiority case study from a Food and Drug Administration approval in herpetic keratitis (an orphan disease). Design operating characteristics are compared to those of a traditional design, which ignores the phase II data. An analysis of the phase II data reveals good but insufficient evidence for non-inferiority, highlighting the need for a phase III study. For the phase III study supported by phase II data, the interim analysis is based on half of the patients. For this design, the meta-analytic interim results are conclusive and would justify approval. In contrast, based on the phase III data only, interim results are inconclusive and require further evidence. To accelerate drug development for orphan diseases, innovative study designs and appropriate methodology are needed. Taking advantage of randomized phase II data when analyzing phase III studies looks promising because the evidence from phase II supports informed decision-making. The implementation of the Bayesian design is straightforward with public software such as R.

  10. Run II physics at the Fermilab Tevatron and advanced analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpalatha C Bhat

    2003-06-23

    The Fermilab Tevatron has the unique opportunity to explore physics at the electroweak scale with the highest ever proton-antiproton collision energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV and unprecedented luminosity. About 20 times more data is expected to be collected during the first phase of the collider Run II which is in its second year of data-taking. The second phase of Run II, expected to begin in 2005, will increase the integrated luminosity to about 10-15 fb{sup -1}. Discovering a low mass Higgs boson and evidence for Supersymmetry or for other new physics beyond the Standard Model are the main physics goals for Run II. It is widely recognized that the use of advanced analysis methods will be crucial to achieve these goals. I discuss the current status of Run II at the Tevatron, prospects and foreseen applications of advanced analysis methods.

  11. Deep functional analysis of synII, a 770 kb synthetic yeast chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Gong, Jianhui; Abramczyk, Dariusz; Walker, Roy; Zhao, Hongcui; Chen, Shihong; Liu, Wei; Luo, Yisha; Müller, Carolin A.; Paul-Dubois-Taine, Adrien; Alver, Bonnie; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Mitchell, Leslie A.; Luo, Zhouqing; Fan, Yanqun; Zhou, Baojin; Wen, Bo; Tan, Fengji; Wang, Yujia; Zi, Jin; Xie, Zexiong; Li, Bingzhi; Yang, Kun; Richardson, Sarah M.; Jiang, Hui; French, Christopher E.; Nieduszynski, Conrad A.; Koszul, Romain; Marston, Adele L.; Yuan, Yingjin; Wang, Jian; Bader, Joel S.; Dai, Junbiao; Boeke, Jef D.; Xu, Xun; Cai, Yizhi; Yang, Huanming

    2017-01-01

    Herein we report the successful design, construction and characterization of a 770 kb synthetic yeast chromosome II (synII). Our study incorporates characterization at multiple levels, including phenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, chromosome segregation and replication analysis to provide a thorough and comprehensive analysis of a synthetic chromosome. Our “Trans-Omics” analyses reveal a modest but potentially significant pervasive up-regulation of translational machinery observed in synII is mainly caused by the deletion of 13 tRNAs. By both complementation assays and SCRaMbLE, we targeted and debuged the origin of a growth defect at 37°C in glycerol medium, which is related to misregulation of the HOG response. Despite the subtle differences, the synII strain shows highly consistent biological processes comparable to the native strain. PMID:28280153

  12. Molecular cloning, expression, and evolution analysis of type II CHI gene from peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhao, Shuzhen; Wang, Jiangshan; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Guan, Hongshan; Hou, Lei; Li, Changsheng; Xia, Han; Wang, Xingjun

    2015-01-01

    Chalcone isomerase (CHI) plays critical roles in plant secondary metabolism, which is important for the interaction between plants and the environment. CHI genes are widely studied in various higher plants. However, little information about CHI genes is available in peanut. Based on conservation of CHI gene family, we cloned the peanut type II CHI gene (AhCHI II) cDNA and genome sequence. The amino acid sequence of peanut CHI II was highly homologous to type II CHI from other plant species. qRT-PCR results showed that peanut CHI II is mainly expressed in roots; however, peanut CHI I is mainly expressed in tissues with high content of anthocyanin. Gene duplication and gene cluster analysis indicated that CHI II was derived from CHI I 65 million years ago approximately. Our gene structure analysis results are not in agreement with the previous hypothesis that CHI II was derived from CHI I by the insertion of an intron into the first exon. Moreover, no positive selection pressure was found in CHIs, while, 32.1 % of sites were under neutral selection, which may lead to mutation accumulation and fixation during great changes of environment.

  13. Educational Cost Analysis in Action: Case Studies for Planners -- II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Philip H.; Hallak, Jacques

    This document is the second in a series of three documents, which together contain 27 case studies on the uses of cost analysis in educational planning. The case studies are presented to help planners and administrators see how cost analysis can be used to improve the efficiency of their educational systems, or to get the best value existing…

  14. Flow injection analysis of mercury(II) in pharmaceuticals based on enzyme inhibition and biosensor detection.

    PubMed

    Bertocchi, P; Ciranni, E; Compagnone, D; Magearu, V; Palleschi, G; Pirvutoiu, S; Valvo, L

    1999-06-01

    An enzymatic amperometric procedure for measurement of mercury(II) in pharmaceuticals, based on the inhibition of invertase and on a glucose electrode was studied. Analytical parameters for measurements in batch and flow injection analysis (FIA) have been optimised. Mercury(II) was detected in the 10-60 ppb range with RSD < or =2%. A sample throughput of 6 h(-1) for batch and 15 h(-1) for FIA was obtained. The total mercury(II) from thimerosal (thiomersal, sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate) in eye-drop samples was measured with the amperometric procedure after oxidative cleavage treatment. Results for both batch and FIA procedures correlated well with atomic absorbtion spectroscopy (AAS) data.

  15. Surface Analysis in Archaeology Using the Miniaturized Mössbauer Spectrometer MIMOS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Paulo A., Jr.; Bernhardt, B.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Gütlich, P.

    2003-12-01

    A miniaturized Mössbauer spectrometer (MIMOS II) which was designed and constructed for extraterrestrial applications, such as iron-containing rock and soil analysis on the planet Mars, has been employed to investigate the iron-containing constituents in the paintings of a Lekythos Greek vase. Greek pottery is commonly painted with black figures. The Mössbauer backscattering spectra recorded with MIMOS II at room temperature show that the hand-painted black figures contain hematite.

  16. [Analysis of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) in Chinese medicine by the system of porphyrin complexes and sulfhydryl cotton fiber].

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Zheng, Huai-li

    2004-02-01

    The reaction of alpha beta gamma delta-tetra(p-sulfophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS4) with Pb(II), Cd(II) or Cu(II) has been studied in this article, and the spectra of the Pb(II)-TPPS4, Cd(II)-TPPS4 and Cu(II)-TPPS4 show the spectral absorption of these complexes with high sensitivity. The molar absorptivities of Pb(II)-TPPS4, Cd(II)-TPPS4 and Cu(II)-TPPS4 are 2.5 x 10(5) L x mol(-1) x cm(-1), 5.2 x 10(5) L x mol(-1) x cm(-1) and 4.2 x 10(5) L x mol(-1) x cm(-1), respectively. With the sulfhydryl cotton fiber separation-enrichment method, this analytical system of porphyrin complexes has been successfully applied to determining the trace amounts of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) in Ginkgo bilobal leaves and tea leaves. The RSD of determining 10(-6)-10(-7) g x g(-1) Pb(II), Cd(II) or Cu(II) in samples lies between 3.3%-9.6%, and the recovery of added standard lies between 90%-103%. The proposed analytical method has the advantage of high sensitivity, simplicity and high efficiency of interfere-resisting.

  17. 46 CFR 151.03-17 - Compatible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-17 Compatible. Compatible means that a cargo will... prime considerations are the chemical, physical, or thermal properties of the reaction including...

  18. Spectroscopic, Elemental and Thermal Analysis, and Positron Annihilation Studies on Ca(II), Sr(II), Ba(II), Pb(II), and Fe(III) Penicillin G Potassium Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, M. S.; Sharshara, T.

    2015-11-01

    The [Pb(Pin)2] · 3H2O, [M(Pin)(H2O)2(Cl)] · nH2O (M = SrII, CaII or BaII; n = 0-1), and [Fe(Pin)2(Cl)(H2O)] · H2O penicillin G potassium (Pin) complexes were synthesized and characterized using elemental analyses, molar conductivity, thermal analysis and electronic spectroscopy techniques. The positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) and Doppler broadening (DB) techniques have been employed to probe the defects and structural changes of Pin ligand and its complexes. The PAL and DB line-shape parameters were discussed in terms of the structure, molecular weight, ligand-metal molar ratio, and other properties of the Pin complexes.

  19. 49 CFR 175.78 - Stowage compatibility of cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., explosives may be transported aboard a cargo aircraft. (ii) Division 1.4 explosives in Compatibility Group S... different hazards. The Segregation Table instructions apply whether or not the class or division is the... division 1 2 3 4.2 4.3 5.1 5.2 8 1 Note 1 Note 2 Note 2 Note 2 Note 2 Note 2 Note 2 Note 2 2 Note 2 3 Note...

  20. What is a "DNA-Compatible" Reaction?

    PubMed

    Malone, Marie L; Paegel, Brian M

    2016-04-11

    DNA-encoded synthesis can generate vastly diverse screening libraries of arbitrarily complex molecules as long as chemical reaction conditions do not compromise DNA's informational integrity, a fundamental constraint that "DNA-compatible" reaction development does not presently address. We devised DNA-encoded reaction rehearsal, an integrated analysis of reaction yield and impact on DNA, to acquire these key missing data. Magnetic DNA-functionalized sensor beads quantitatively report the % DNA template molecules remaining viable for PCR amplification after exposure to test reaction conditions. Analysis of solid-phase bond forming (e.g., Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling, reductive amination) and deprotection reactions (e.g., allyl esters, silyl ethers) guided the definition and optimization of DNA-compatible reaction conditions (>90% yield, >30% viable DNA molecules), most notably in cases that involved known (H(+), Pd) and more obscure (Δ, DMF) hazards to DNA integrity. The data provide an empirical yet mechanistically consistent and predictive framework for designing successful DNA-encoded reaction sequences for combinatorial library synthesis.

  1. JAEA Fatigue Analysis of EBR-II Duplex Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    J. H. Jackson; D. L. Porter; W. R. Lloyd; N. Kisohara

    2011-03-01

    Small, notched three-point bend specimens machined from duplex tubes, which were extracted from an EBR-II superheater, were fatigued through the nickel interlayer to determine propensity for crack arrest within this interlayer. Several of these specimens were fatigued in the near threshold, and steady state regimes of Paris Law behavior. Additionally, two specimens were fatigued to the edge of the nickel interlayer and then monotonically loaded. Micro-hardness profiles of the nickel interlayer were also measured. Fatigue behavior was found to be similar to previous studies in that arrest was only noted in the near threshold Paris regime (attributed to the presence of voids) and in the steady state regime exhibited an acceleration of crack growth rate through the nickel interlayer followed by a slight retardation. Monotonic loading resulted in crack branching or delamination along the interlayer. Although archival material was not available for this study, the hardness of the nickel interlayer was determined to have been lowered slightly during service by comparison to the expected hardness of a similar nickel braze prepared as specified for fabrication of these tubes.

  2. Local structure analysis of some Cu(II) theophylline complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, L.; Cozar, O.; Forizs, E.; Cr ăciun, C.; Ristoiu, D.; B ălan, C.

    1999-10-01

    The CuT 2L 2·2H 2O complexes [T=Theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine); L=NH 3, n-propylamine (npa), 2-aminoethanol (ae)] were prepared and investigated by ESR spectroscopy. Powder ESR spectrum of CuT 2(NH 3) 2·2H 2O is axial ( g||=2.255, g⊥=2.059). ESR spectrum of CuT 2(npa) 2·2H 2O with ( g||=2.299, g⊥=2.081) is a superposition of one axial ( g||=2.299, g⊥=2.073) and one isotropic component ( g0≈2.089), in the same amount. The axial spectra of the former complexes are due to a static Jahn-Teller effect ( EJT≈2880 cm -1). ESR spectrum of CuT 2(ae) 2·2H 2O is orthorhombic ( g1c=2.199, g2c=2.095, g3c=2.037). The local symmetries around the Cu(II) ions remain unchanged by DMF solvating, by adsorbing these solutions on NaY zeolite or by lowering the temperature.

  3. Compatible poliomyelitis cases in India during 2000.

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Kathryn A.; Hlady, W. Gary; Banerjee, Kaushik; Gupta, Dhananjoy; Francis, Paul; Durrani, Sunita; Zuber, Patrick L. F.; Sutter, Roland W.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of compatible poliomyelitis cases and to assess the programmatic implications of clusters of such cases in India. METHODS: We described the characteristics of compatible poliomyelitis cases, identified clusters of compatible cases (two or more in the same district or neighbouring districts within two months), and examined their relationship to wild poliovirus cases. FINDINGS: There were 362 compatible cases in 2000. The incidence of compatible cases was higher in districts with laboratory-confirmed poliomyelitis cases than in districts without laboratory-confirmed cases. Of 580 districts, 96 reported one compatible case and 72 reported two or more compatible cases. Among these 168 districts with at least one compatible case, 123 had internal or cross- border clusters of compatible cases. In 27 districts with clusters of compatible cases, no wild poliovirus was isolated either in the same district or in neighbouring districts. Three of these 27 districts presented laboratory-confirmed poliomyelitis cases during 2001. CONCLUSION: Most clusters of compatible cases occurred in districts identified as areas with continuing wild poliovirus transmission and where mopping-up vaccination campaigns were carried out. As certification nears, areas with compatible poliomyelitis cases should be investigated and deficiencies in surveillance should be corrected in order to ensure that certification is justified. PMID:12640469

  4. Elastomers Compatible With High-Pressure Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Compatibility increased by fluorination. Report describes experiments aimed at improving compatibility of some fluorinated elastomers with high-pressure oxygen. Such elastomers needed for seals, gaskets, and positive-expulsion devices used with high-pressure oxygen. Oxygen - compatibility tests carried out on five elastomers chosen on the basis of literature survey.

  5. Inheritance of graft compatibility in Douglas fir.

    Treesearch

    D.L. Copes

    1973-01-01

    Graft compatibility of genetically related and unrelated rootstock-scion combinations was compared. Scion clones were 75% compatible when grafted on half-related rootstocks but only 56% compatible when grafted on unrelated rootstocks. Most variance associated with graft incompatibility in Douglas-fir appears to be caused by multiple genes.

  6. Forensic discrimination of dyed hair color: II. Multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Julie A; Siegel, Jay A; Goodpaster, John V

    2011-01-01

    This research is intended to assess the ability of UV-visible microspectrophotometry to successfully discriminate the color of dyed hair. Fifty-five red hair dyes were analyzed and evaluated using multivariate statistical techniques including agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC), principal component analysis (PCA), and discriminant analysis (DA). The spectra were grouped into three classes, which were visually consistent with different shades of red. A two-dimensional PCA observations plot was constructed, describing 78.6% of the overall variance. The wavelength regions associated with the absorbance of hair and dye were highly correlated. Principal components were selected to represent 95% of the overall variance for analysis with DA. A classification accuracy of 89% was observed for the comprehensive dye set, while external validation using 20 of the dyes resulted in a prediction accuracy of 75%. Significant color loss from successive washing of hair samples was estimated to occur within 3 weeks of dye application.

  7. Coproduction of detergent compatible bacterial enzymes and stain removal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Niyonzima, Francois N; More, Sunil S

    2015-10-01

    Most of the detergents that are presently produced contain the detergent compatible enzymes to improve and accelerate the washing performance by removing tough stains. The process is environment friendly as the use of enzymes in the detergent formulation reduces the utilization of toxic detergent constituents. The current trend is to use the detergent compatible enzymes that are active at low and ambient temperature in order to save energy and maintain fabric quality. As the detergent compatible bacterial enzymes are used together in the detergent formulation, it is important to co-produce the detergent enzymes in a single fermentation medium as the enzyme stability is assured, and production cost gets reduced enormously. The review reports on the production, purification, characterization and application of detergent compatible amylases, lipases, and proteases are available. However, there is no specific review or minireview on the concomitant production of detergent compatible amylases, lipases, and proteases. In this minireview, the coproduction of detergent compatible enzymes by bacterial species, enzyme stability towards detergents and detergent components, and stain release analysis were discussed.

  8. Final Report: Posttest Analysis of Omega II Optical Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Newlander, C D; Fisher, J H

    2007-01-30

    Preliminary posttest analyses have been completed on optical specimens exposed during the Omega II test series conducted on 14 July 2006. The Omega Facility, located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester was used to produce X-ray environments through the interaction of intense pulsed laser radiation upon germanium-loaded silica aerogels. The optical specimen testing was supported by GH Systems through experiment design, pre- and post-test analyses, specimen acquisition, and overall technical experience. The test specimens were fabricated and characterized by Surface Optics Corporation (SOC), San Diego, CA and were simple protected gold coatings on silica substrates. Six test specimens were exposed, five filtered with thin beryllium foil filters, and one unfiltered which was exposed directly to the raw environment. The experimental objectives were: (1) demonstrate that tests of optical specimens could be performed at the Omega facility; (2) evaluate the use and survivability of beryllium foil filters as a function of thickness; (3) obtain damage data on optical specimens which ranged from no damage to damage; (4) correlate existing thermal response models with the damage data; (5) evaluate the use of the direct raw environment upon the specimen response and the ability/desirability to conduct sensitive optical specimen tests using the raw environment; and (6) initiate the development of a protocol for performing optical coatings/mirror tests. This report documents the activities performed by GH Systems in evaluating and using the environments provided by LLNL, the PUFFTFT analyses performed using those environments, and the calculated results compared to the observed and measured posttest data.

  9. Quantitative analysis of topoisomerase II{alpha} to rapidly evaluate cell proliferation in brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Masashi; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Kano, Hideyuki; Kawabata, Yasuhiro; Katsuki, Takahisa; Shirahata, Mitsuaki; Ono, Makoto; Yamana, Norikazu; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Takahashi, Jun A. . E-mail: jat@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-06-17

    Immunohistochemical cell proliferation analyses have come into wide use for evaluation of tumor malignancy. Topoisomerase II{alpha} (topo II{alpha}), an essential nuclear enzyme, has been known to have cell cycle coupled expression. We here show the usefulness of quantitative analysis of topo II{alpha} mRNA to rapidly evaluate cell proliferation in brain tumors. A protocol to quantify topo II{alpha} mRNA was developed with a real-time RT-PCR. It took only 3 h to quantify from a specimen. A total of 28 brain tumors were analyzed, and the level of topo II{alpha} mRNA was significantly correlated with its immuno-staining index (p < 0.0001, r = 0.9077). Furthermore, it sharply detected that topo II{alpha} mRNA decreased in growth-inhibited glioma cell. These results support that topo II{alpha} mRNA may be a good and rapid indicator to evaluate cell proliferate potential in brain tumors.

  10. Topics in Finance: Part II--Financial Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, Judy

    2010-01-01

    The second article in a series designed to supplement the introductory financial management course, this essay addresses financial statement analysis, including its impact on stock valuation, disclosure, and managerial behavior. [For "Topics in Finance Part I--Introduction and Stockholder Wealth Maximization," see EJ1060345.

  11. Autistic Behavior, Behavior Analysis, and the Gene--Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malott, Richard W.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the negative behavior-analytic commentary on Drash and Tudor's behavior-analytic analysis of the etiology of autistic repertoires and values. This article also asks that, in our effort to scrub it clean, we not drown Drash and Tudor's beautiful, but fragile, new-born, behavior-analytic baby in hyper-methodological,…

  12. Using quantum erasure to exorcise Maxwell's demon: II. Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostovtsev, Yuri; Sariyanni, Zoe-Elizabeth; Suhail Zubairy, M.; O. Scully, Marlan

    2005-10-01

    We present an analysis of the single atom negentropy quantum heat engine to determine the fundamental limits of its operation. The engine has an internal reservoir of negentropy which allows one to extract work from a single thermal reservoir. The process is attended by constantly increasing entropy and does not violate the second law of thermodynamics.

  13. Machine-Scored Testing, Part II: Creativity and Item Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuba, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    Explains how multiple choice test items can be devised to measure higher-order learning, including engineering problem solving. Discusses the value and information provided in item analysis procedures with machine-scored tests. Suggests elements to consider in test design. (ML)

  14. Design and calibration of a vacuum compatible scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Phillip B.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum compatible scanning tunneling microscope was designed and built, capable of imaging solid surfaces with atomic resolution. The single piezoelectric tube design is compact, and makes use of sample mounting stubs standard to a commercially available surface analysis system. Image collection and display is computer controlled, allowing storage of images for further analysis. Calibration results from atomic scale images are presented.

  15. Detergent-compatible bacterial amylases.

    PubMed

    Niyonzima, Francois N; More, Sunil S

    2014-10-01

    Proteases, lipases, amylases, and cellulases are enzymes used in detergent formulation to improve the detergency. The amylases are specifically supplemented to the detergent to digest starchy stains. Most of the solid and liquid detergents that are currently manufactured contain alkaline enzymes. The advantages of using alkaline enzymes in the detergent formulation are that they aid in removing tough stains and the process is environmentally friendly since they reduce the use of toxic detergent ingredients. Amylases active at low temperature are preferred as the energy consumption gets reduced, and the whole process becomes cost-effective. Most microbial alkaline amylases are used as detergent ingredients. Various reviews report on the production, purification, characterization, and application of amylases in different industry sectors, but there is no specific review on bacterial or fungal alkaline amylases or detergent-compatible amylases. In this mini-review, an overview on the production and property studies of the detergent bacterial amylases is given, and the stability and compatibility of the alkaline bacterial amylases in the presence of the detergents and the detergent components are highlighted.

  16. Models and Analysis of Wire Explosions Using TRAC II Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pekker, A.; Reisman, D.B.

    1999-09-10

    In order to understand the dynamics of Z-pinch imposions of thin wires in pulse-power accelerators, it is necessary to understand the physical process by which the initially solid wires are converted into plasma by rising current. For this purpose, we model wire explosions using TRAC II, a two-dimensional MHD code, in three distinct cases: pure tungsten, impure tungsten, and gold-plated tungsten. We compare our results--overall picture of the process, corona linear density, corona mass, and core expansion rate--to actual experiments performed at Sandia National Laboratory and Cornell University and present some explanations for the disagreements between our model and experimental observations. In Chapter 1, we discuss model results for several current waveforms (consisting of a 5 kA 50-150 ns pre-pulse and 80 kA 80 ns main pulse) for a pure tungsten wire, showing that the initial temperature of the wire does not affect the dynamics of the explosion. This suggests that different experimental results for unheated and preheated tungsten wires are due to the expulsion of impurities in the preheated wire and not to a change in the material properties of tungsten. To match the experimental set-up more accurately, we model the explosion of a tungsten wire with impurities in Chapter 2. The overall process predicted by the model agrees with experiment, namely the shunting of the current through the impurities region before tungsten expansion begins; however, quantitative results disagree with experimental observations mostly because of the extreme shunting of the current through the impurities in our model. Finally, in Chapter 3, we compare the explosions in gold-plated tungsten, pure tungsten, and pure gold wires under high (100 kA in 60 ns) and low (2 kA in 270 ns) currents, finding general agreement with experiment in the high-current case and a disagreement by a factor of ten in the low-current case. In addition, due to the similar properties of the two metals, we find

  17. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.

    2015-03-30

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from Pb210decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we also perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in our data. Finally, we confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.

  18. [Comparative analysis of spatial organization of myoglobins. II. Secondary structure].

    PubMed

    Korobov, V N; Nazarenko, V I; Radomskiĭ, N F; Starodub, N F

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of probability of distribution curves of alpha-helical sites and bends of polypeptide chains of myoglobins in half-water mammals (beaver, nutria, muskrat, otter) carried out in comparison with those of myoglobins of the horse and Sperm whale (X-ray diffraction analysis has revealed their tertiary structure) has revealed a coincidence of the secondary structure sites end bends of the chain in the studied respiratory hemoproteins of muscles. Despite a considerable number of amino acid substitutions the profiles of alpha-helicity and B-bends of the compared proteins are practically identical. This indicates to the "resistance" of the probability curves to amino acid substitutions and to retention of the tertiary structure of myoglobins in evolutionary remote species of the animals.

  19. Bayesian analysis. II. Signal detection and model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretthorst, G. Larry

    In the preceding. paper, Bayesian analysis was applied to the parameter estimation problem, given quadrature NMR data. Here Bayesian analysis is extended to the problem of selecting the model which is most probable in view of the data and all the prior information. In addition to the analytic calculation, two examples are given. The first example demonstrates how to use Bayesian probability theory to detect small signals in noise. The second example uses Bayesian probability theory to compute the probability of the number of decaying exponentials in simulated T1 data. The Bayesian answer to this question is essentially a microcosm of the scientific method and a quantitative statement of Ockham's razor: theorize about possible models, compare these to experiment, and select the simplest model that "best" fits the data.

  20. MAGNA (Materially and Geometrically Nonlinear Analysis). Part II. Preprocessor Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    INTRODUCTION Finite element methods and other numerica± techniques for performing complex structural analyses have matured to the point that they may be...used with confidence in the development and final qualification of complex structural designs. Numerical structural analysis is routinely used in a...qualification of designs for which full-scale testing is imprac- tical or impossible. As the size and/or complexity of an application increases, however, the

  1. Normal coordinate analysis of the dithiocarbamate ligand and bis-(N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate)nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and cadmium(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, N. S.; Kellner, R.; Nikolov, G. St.

    1984-03-01

    The vibrational frequencies of H 2NCS 2- (H 2dtc), Et 2dtc -, and M(Et 2dtc) 2 (M = Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd) have been calculated by performing normal coordinate analysis using Gribov's fragmentation procedure within the generalized valence force field approximation. The force field resulting from the experimental frequencies shows a high degree of mixing between the different parts of the molecules. The fragmentation approach has allowed a detailed assignment of the observed frequencies even in the highly correlated force field.

  2. Comparative analysis of a CFo ATP synthase subunit II homologue derived from marine and fresh-water algae.

    PubMed

    Suda, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Okuda, Yuko; Tsunemoto, Mei; Matsuda, Yuri; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ikeda, Kazunori; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Harada, Kazuo; Bamba, Takeshi; Hirata, Kazumasa

    2009-11-01

    Comparative analysis was performed with a CFo ATP synthase subunit II homologue (CFo-II) derived from marine or fresh-water algae. The marine algae-derived CFo-II-transformed Escherichia coli grew and accumulated ATP more vigorously in NaCl or Cadmium containing medium, suggesting that this gene was useful for the development of stress-tolerant plant.

  3. Is religious education compatible with science education?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-04-01

    This paper tackles a highly controversial issue: the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education respectively. We challenge the popular view that science and religion are compatible or even complementary. In order to do so, we give a brief characterization of our conceptions of science and religion. Conspicuous differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological and attitudinal level are noted. Regarding these aspects, closer examination reveals that science and religion are not only different but in fact incompatible. Some consequences of our analysis for education as well as for education policy are explored. We submit that a religious education, particularly at an early age, is an obstacle to the development of a scientific mentality. For this and other reasons, religious education should be kept away from public schools and universities. Instead of promoting a religious world view, we should teach our children what science knows about religion, i.e., how science explains the existence of religion in historical, biological, psychological and sociological terms.

  4. Random vibration analysis of the Topaz-II nuclear reactor power system. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.E.

    1995-06-01

    The TOPAZ-II Ya-21U is one of six Russian made space nuclear power systems which is based on theomionic power conversion. The U.S. is presently analyzing TOPAZ-II to determine the reliability and feasibility of using this system. A structural analysis test was conducted on the TOPAZ unit in May 1993 to provide data from which modal parameters could be identified. This test showed the fundamental frequency to be 10.5 Hz, yet the test results that the Russians conducted identified a fundamental frequency of 5 Hz. Another finite element model was created incorporating new developments in TOPAZ-II and modifications to the finite element model to better simulate the mass properties of the TOPAZ-II2. A second structural analysis test was conducted on the TOPAZ unit 06-09 September 1994. This thesis focuses on the random vibration analysis of the TOPAZ-II Ya-2lU utilizing the most recent test results and the Master Series (updated version) I-DEAS software. The modal respose of the model and simulated random vibration tests were within 8.33%. This model is a feasible tool which can be used to analyze the TOPAZ unit without testing the unit to fatigue.

  5. A facile and fully automated on-fiber derivatization protocol for direct analysis of short-chain aliphatic amines using a matrix compatible solid-phase microextraction coating.

    PubMed

    Gionfriddo, Emanuela; Passarini, Alice; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2016-07-29

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) analysis of short-chain aliphatic amines (C3-C6) in aqueous solutions was investigated using pentafluorobenzaldehyde (PFBAY) as on-fiber derivatization reagent. A standard gas generating vial agent was used for on-fiber loading of the derivatization agent so as to avoid the need for its regeneration at each derivatization cycle. Several parameters such as loading time, reaction temperature, and reaction/extraction time were optimized for headspace and direct sampling in aqueous solutions. Three different coating chemistries were tested and their performances compared in order to achieve the best compromise between sensitivity and analysis throughput. The newly developed PDMS/DVB/PDMS coating showed superior performance in terms of extraction efficiency while the capability to prevent on-fiber degradation of the derivatizing products. The optimized method was used for quantitation of short-chain aliphatic amines in aqueous samples and provided detection limits in the low ppb range for all the amines tested with accuracy values between 79 and 120%. The method was applied towards the analysis of environmental water samples and the accuracy of the results was evaluated by different calibration approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of Pershing II Reentry Vehicle (RV) Control Ring Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    8217 fracture toughness Te RV rings are fabricated from A356 -T6 aluminum . - -ro- Analysis of cast tensile coupon specimens was also performed to...strength, 22.9 ksi (158 MPa) yield strength, and 1 percent elongation. The RV control ring is specified to be fabricated from A356 , Class 10 aluminum ...the RV ring [1]. The fracture tough- ness of the RV control ring ( A356 -T6 aluminum ) has been shown to be 15.05 ksi .An (16.6.MPa. /-M). Since primarily

  7. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    DOE PAGES

    Agnese, R.

    2015-03-30

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from Pb210decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we also perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in ourmore » data. Finally, we confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.« less

  8. Settlement-Compatible Lunar Transporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, G.

    Over the past few years we have published papers in this forum identifying, characterizing and advocating settlement-compatible transportation architectures for Mars. In the present paper, we do the same for the Moon and show evolutionary potentials for growth of lunar architectures into Mars architectures of the types discussed in our previous papers. The essence of a settlement-compatible architecture is that it yields a low recurring transportation cost and that the elements of the architecture are enduring, i.e., fully reusable with lifetimes on the order of Earth-based capital investments. Our previous papers have shown that extension of human habitation to other bodies in our Solar System is probably unaffordable with any other approach. The design of a settlement-compatible architecture begins with Earth launch. In our prior papers, we simply identified the Earth launch option as a fully reusable system with roughly Shuttle (or Atlas 5 or Delta 4 or Sea Launch or Ariane 5) capability, i.e. about 20 metric t. to low Earth orbit and a payload bay of dimensions about 5 m diameter x 15 to 20 m length. This is what the commercial market needs; this is where the traffic demand is; this is approximately the design point for a next-generation (after Shuttle) reusable launch vehicle. We continue in that vein for the present paper. Human mission advocates may argue it isn't big enough; that they need 80 metric t. payload to orbit. We answer that to achieve our cost criteria, there isn't much of a choice, and that the savings in launch cost will far outweigh the added expense for on-orbit assembly. Lunar transportation is considerably less demanding than Mars transportation. The main difference is in trip time. Because lunar trips are short, the crew habitat can be small, a la the Apollo Command Module, and the propulsion system to move it is also small by comparison. We analyze and depict a lunar transportation system based on crew elements adapted from the

  9. Compatibility and Infectivity of a Cercospora rodmanii Formulation with Enhancing Agents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Background .... ....................... 3 Rationale. ... ........................ 3 Purpose and Objectives ..... ................ 4 PART II: MATERIALS AND...ability of compatible agents to increase the infectivity of the C. rodmanii formulation on waterhyacinth. 4 PART II: MATERIALS AND METHODS The Formulation...light sources to the build- ing were sealed with opaque material . Sixteen fluorescent lights were supplemented by six 122-cm plant growth lights

  10. Caprine plasma proteinase inhibitors--II. Genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Vankan, D M; Bell, K

    1993-01-01

    1. Analysis of the inheritances of the variants of five caprine plasma proteinase inhibitor systems in families demonstrated a genetic control of codominant alleles at five loci. 2. The PIA, B, C, D and E proteins are controlled by four (PIA1,2,3,4), three (PIB1,4,0), three (PIC2,3,0), five (PID1,2,3,4,0) and two (PIE1,2) alleles respectively. Null alleles were postulated for the PIB, PIC and PID systems. 3. The frequencies of the alleles differed substantially between the Australian and Texan Angoras and Cashmere breeds of goats. 4. The combined exclusion probability for the five PI systems was as high as 0.82 in the Cashmere breed, indicating the potential of the proteinase inhibitor proteins for parentage control purposes.

  11. Randomizing world trade. II. A weighted network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squartini, Tiziano; Fagiolo, Giorgio; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2011-10-01

    Based on the misleading expectation that weighted network properties always offer a more complete description than purely topological ones, current economic models of the International Trade Network (ITN) generally aim at explaining local weighted properties, not local binary ones. Here we complement our analysis of the binary projections of the ITN by considering its weighted representations. We show that, unlike the binary case, all possible weighted representations of the ITN (directed and undirected, aggregated and disaggregated) cannot be traced back to local country-specific properties, which are therefore of limited informativeness. Our two papers show that traditional macroeconomic approaches systematically fail to capture the key properties of the ITN. In the binary case, they do not focus on the degree sequence and hence cannot characterize or replicate higher-order properties. In the weighted case, they generally focus on the strength sequence, but the knowledge of the latter is not enough in order to understand or reproduce indirect effects.

  12. Compatibility of bentonite and DNAPLs

    SciTech Connect

    McCaulou, D.R.; Huling, S.G.

    1999-10-01

    The compatibility of dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), trichloroethylene (TCE), methylene chloride (MC), and creosote with commercially available sodium bentonite pellets was evaluated using stainless steel, double ring, falling head permeameters. The hydraulic conductivity (K) of the bentonite clay was measured under three experimental conditions: (1) water soluble constituents of the DNAPLs were used to hydrate and permeate the bentonite; (2) bentonite pellets were submersed in DNAPL prior to hydration and permeation with water; and (3) DNAPLs were pooled on water-hydrated bentonite. Further, the effect of hydraulic head on water-hydrated bentonite permeated with TCE and the effects of TCE exposure time to mixtures of bentonite grout and sand were measured.

  13. Barley leaf transcriptome and metabolite analysis reveals new aspects of compatibility and Piriformospora indica-mediated systemic induced resistance to powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Molitor, Alexandra; Zajic, Doreen; Voll, Lars M; Pons-K Hnemann, Jorn; Samans, Birgit; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Waller, Frank

    2011-12-01

    Colonization of barley roots with the basidiomycete fungus Piriformospora indica (Sebacinales) induces systemic resistance against the biotrophic leaf pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (B. graminis). To identify genes involved in this mycorrhiza-induced systemic resistance, we compared the leaf transcriptome of P. indica-colonized and noncolonized barley plants 12, 24, and 96 h after challenge with a virulent race of B. graminis. The leaf pathogen induced specific gene sets (e.g., LRR receptor kinases and WRKY transcription factors) at 12 h postinoculation (hpi) (prepenetration phase) and vesicle-localized gene products 24 hpi (haustorium establishment). Metabolic analysis revealed a progressing shift of steady state contents of the intermediates glucose-1-phosphate, uridinediphosphate-glucose, and phosphoenolpyruvate 24 and 96 hpi, indicating that B. graminis shifts central carbohydrate metabolism in favor of sucrose biosynthesis. Both B. graminis and P. indica increased glutamine and alanine contents, whereas substrates for starch and nitrogen assimilation (adenosinediphosphate- glucose and oxoglutarate) decreased. In plants that were more B. graminis resistant due to P. indica root colonization, 22 transcripts, including those of pathogenesis-related genes and genes encoding heat-shock proteins, were differentially expressed ?twofold in leaves after B. graminis inoculation compared with non-mycorrhized plants. Detailed expression analysis revealed a faster induction after B. graminis inoculation between 8 and 16 hpi, suggesting that priming of these genes is an important mechanism of P. indica-induced systemic disease resistance.

  14. Analysis of silicon nanocrystals in silicon-rich SiO II synthesized by CO II laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Jung; Lin, Gong-Ru; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Chou, Li-Jen

    2005-11-01

    The localized synthesis of 4.2-5.6 nm-Si nanocrystals (nc-Si) in Si-rich SiO II (SRSO) by CO 2 laser annealing at laser intensity of below ablation-threshold (6 kW/cm2) is demonstrated. Since the SRSO exhibits a high absorption coefficient of up to 0.102 cm -1 at wavelength of 10.6 μm, a direct-writing CO II laser annealing system with focusing spot size of 0.2 mm2 is used to locally anneal the SRSO and precipitate the nc-Si. A thermophysical model reveals that the surface temperature of SRSO ranging from 130 °C to 3350 °C is achieved by varying the laser power densities from 1.5 to 13.5 kW/cm2. The CO II laser-ablation-threshold power density is about 6 kW/cm2, corresponding to the optimized annealing temperature 1285 °C at the ablation threshold. The CO IIlaser annealing is capable of the precise control on power density and spot size, which benefits from the in-situ and localized annealing temperature control of SRSO film, and also prevents from the eternal damage of the other electronic devices nearby the annealing site. The nc-Si dependent photoluminescence (PL) were observed at 806 nm or longer, whereas the laser-ablation damaged SRSO film exhibits significant blue PL at 410 nm due to the oxygen-related structural defects. The refractive index of the lasertreated SRSO film is increasing from 1.57 to 2.31 as the laser intensity increases from 1.5 to 6.0 kW/cm2 which is mainly attributed to the increasing density of nc-Si embedded in SRSO. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis reveals that the average size of nc-Si embedded in SRSO film is about 5.3 nm, which correlates well with the theoretical prediction of a corresponding PL at 806 nm. The HRTEM estimated square density of the nc-Si in SRSO film under the laser intensity of 6 kW/cm2 is about 10 18 cm -3.

  15. An ICF-CY-based content analysis of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Kara; Coster, Wendy

    2012-12-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and its version for children and youth (ICF-CY), has been increasingly adopted as a system to describe function and disability. A content analysis of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II (VABS-II) was conducted to examine congruence with the functioning and disability component of this framework. The 383 VABS-II items contained a total of 1,231 concepts. Established linking rules were used to map these concepts to ICF-CY codes. Overall the VABS-II concepts were well represented in the ICF-CY. Most of the concepts mapped to activity codes; however, about 30% of concepts were coded as body function. Most concepts represented relatively discrete activities, with more limited coverage of broader categories often included in measures of participation. The VABS-II content maps well to the ICF-CY activity/participation codes. Although VABS-II items ask about typical performance, item requirements often imply specific means of performance.

  16. High-throughput engineering and analysis of peptide binding to class II MHC

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Boder, Eric T.

    2010-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) proteins govern stimulation of adaptive immunity by presenting antigenic peptides to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Many allelic variants of MHC-II exist with implications in peptide presentation and immunity; thus, high-throughput experimental tools for rapid and quantitative analysis of peptide binding to MHC-II are needed. Here, we present an expression system wherein peptide and MHC-II are codisplayed on the surface of yeast in an intracellular association-dependent manner and assayed by flow cytometry. Accordingly, the relative binding of different peptides and/or MHC-II variants can be assayed by genetically manipulating either partner, enabling the application of directed evolution approaches for high-throughput characterization or engineering. We demonstrate the application of this tool to map the side-chain preference for peptides binding to HLA-DR1 and to evolve novel HLA-DR1 mutants with altered peptide-binding specificity. PMID:20622157

  17. A primer for biomedical scientists on how to execute model II linear regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Ludbrook, John

    2012-04-01

    1. There are two very different ways of executing linear regression analysis. One is Model I, when the x-values are fixed by the experimenter. The other is Model II, in which the x-values are free to vary and are subject to error. 2. I have received numerous complaints from biomedical scientists that they have great difficulty in executing Model II linear regression analysis. This may explain the results of a Google Scholar search, which showed that the authors of articles in journals of physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry rarely use Model II regression analysis. 3. I repeat my previous arguments in favour of using least products linear regression analysis for Model II regressions. I review three methods for executing ordinary least products (OLP) and weighted least products (WLP) regression analysis: (i) scientific calculator and/or computer spreadsheet; (ii) specific purpose computer programs; and (iii) general purpose computer programs. 4. Using a scientific calculator and/or computer spreadsheet, it is easy to obtain correct values for OLP slope and intercept, but the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) are inaccurate. 5. Using specific purpose computer programs, the freeware computer program smatr gives the correct OLP regression coefficients and obtains 95% CI by bootstrapping. In addition, smatr can be used to compare the slopes of OLP lines. 6. When using general purpose computer programs, I recommend the commercial programs systat and Statistica for those who regularly undertake linear regression analysis and I give step-by-step instructions in the Supplementary Information as to how to use loss functions. © 2011 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Space Shuttle filament wound case compressive strength study. II - Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messick, M. J.; Nuismer, R. J.; Jamison, G. T.; Graves, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    In order to explain the results of the testing conducted in Part I and relate the subscale test specimen performance to case performance during prelaunch loading, a comprehensive analysis program was conducted. Finite element models of both full-scale case and subscale test coupons were made. Validated axisymmetric models were used for the case analyses. Modeling of coupons was accomplished using a generalized plane strain finite element model in most cases, although some three-dimensional finite element modeling was used to investigate the importance of three-dimensional effects on the coupon performance. The large number of plies and complexity of the test coupons used limited the finite element grids to a through-the-thickness discretization of one element per ply. Delaminations observed in the helical ply dropoff region were modeled using frictionless sliders. Comparisons of predicted strains and displacements were made with the test data from both cases and coupons to validate the finite element models. Based on observations of the test results and finite element predictions, a failure criterion for both coupons and cases was postulated and then validated by comparing performance predictions to test results. Finally, the validated failure criterion was used to predict the performance of the first two flight cases under prelaunch loads.

  19. Mars Hybrid Propulsion System Trajectory Analysis. Part II; Cargo Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, Patrick R.; Merrill, Raymond G.; Qu, Min

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Human Spaceflight Architecture Team is developing a reusable hybrid transportation architecture in which both chemical and electric propulsion systems are used to send crew and cargo to Mars destinations such as Phobos, Deimos, the surface of Mars, and other orbits around Mars. By combining chemical and electrical propulsion into a single spaceship and applying each where it is more effective, the hybrid architecture enables a series of Mars trajectories that are more fuel-efficient than an all chemical architecture without significant increases in flight times. This paper shows the feasibility of the hybrid transportation architecture to pre-deploy cargo to Mars and Phobos in support of the Evolvable Mars Campaign crew missions. The analysis shows that the hybrid propulsion stage is able to deliver all of the current manifested payload to Phobos and Mars through the first three crew missions. The conjunction class trajectory also allows the hybrid propulsion stage to return to Earth in a timely fashion so it can be reused for additional cargo deployment. The 1,100 days total trip time allows the hybrid propulsion stage to deliver cargo to Mars every other Earth-Mars transit opportunity. For the first two Mars surface mission in the Evolvable Mars Campaign, the short trip time allows the hybrid propulsion stage to be reused for three round-trip journeys to Mars, which matches the hybrid propulsion stage's designed lifetime for three round-trip crew missions to the Martian sphere of influence.

  20. Spherical harmonic analysis of steady photospheric flows. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1992-01-01

    The use of the spherical harmonic functions to analyze the nearly steady flows in the solar photosphere is extended to situations in which B(0) the latitude at disk center, is nonzero and spurious velocities are present. The procedures for extracting the rotation profile and meridional circulation are altered to account for the seasonal tilt of the sun's rotation axis toward and away from the observer. A more robust and accurate method for separating the limb shift and meridional circulation signals is described. The analysis procedures include the ability to mask out areas containing spurious velocities (velocity-like signals that do not represent true flow velocities in the photosphere). The procedures are shown to work well in extracting the various flow components from realistic artificial data with a broad, continuous spectrum for the supergranulation. The presence of this supergranulation signal introduces errors of a few m/s in the measurements of the rotation profile, meridional circulation, and limb shift from a single Doppler image.

  1. THE CARNEGIE-IRVINE GALAXY SURVEY. II. ISOPHOTAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhaoyu; Ho, Luis C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Peng, Chien Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey (CGS) is a comprehensive investigation of the physical properties of a complete, representative sample of 605 bright (B{sub T} {<=} 12.9 mag) galaxies in the southern hemisphere. This contribution describes the isophotal analysis of the broadband (BVRI) optical imaging component of the project. We pay close attention to sky subtraction, which is particularly challenging for some of the large galaxies in our sample. Extensive crosschecks with internal and external data confirm that our calibration and sky subtraction techniques are robust with respect to the quoted measurement uncertainties. We present a uniform catalog of one-dimensional radial profiles of surface brightness and geometric parameters, as well as integrated colors and color gradients. Composite profiles highlight the tremendous diversity of brightness distributions found in disk galaxies and their dependence on Hubble type. A significant fraction of S0 and spiral galaxies exhibit non-exponential profiles in their outer regions. We perform Fourier decomposition of the isophotes to quantify non-axisymmetric deviations in the light distribution. We use the geometric parameters, in conjunction with the amplitude and phase of the m = 2 Fourier mode, to identify bars and quantify their size and strength. Spiral arm strengths are characterized using the m = 2 Fourier profiles and structure maps. Finally, we utilize the information encoded in the m = 1 Fourier profiles to measure disk lopsidedness. The databases assembled here and in Paper I lay the foundation for forthcoming scientific applications of CGS.

  2. The Vineland-II in Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Item Content Category Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balboni, Giulia; Tasso, Alessandra; Muratori, Filippo; Cubelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We investigated which item subsets of the Vineland-II can discriminate low-functioning preschoolers with ASD from matched peers with other neurodevelopmental disorders, using a regression analysis derived from a normative sample to account for cognitive and linguistic competencies. At variance with the typical profile, a pattern with Communication…

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the KABC-II in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Kimberly E.; Rothlisberg, Barbara A.; McIntosh, David E.; Hunt, Madeline S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study assessed the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (KABC-II) in relation to the synthesized Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory of intelligence with a preschool sample. Participants were 200 preschool children between four and five years of age. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted, and different…

  4. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the KABC-II in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Kimberly E.; Rothlisberg, Barbara A.; McIntosh, David E.; Hunt, Madeline S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study assessed the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (KABC-II) in relation to the synthesized Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory of intelligence with a preschool sample. Participants were 200 preschool children between four and five years of age. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted, and different…

  5. A Policy Analysis: Successful Type II Alternative High Schools for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nienhuis, Victoria A.; Tendai, Jeanette L.

    2009-01-01

    This policy analysis project is designed at uncovering specific standards that can be utilized by a school district in developing and evaluating their Type II Alternative Schools to ensure high levels of student success within their programs. While there is a substantive body of research in alternative education, there are no universally accepted…

  6. Hollow cathode modeling: II. Physical analysis and parametric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sary, Gaétan; Garrigues, Laurent; Boeuf, Jean-Pierre

    2017-05-01

    A numerical emissive hollow cathode model which couples plasma and thermal aspects of the NASA NSTAR cathode has been presented in a companion paper and simulation results obtained using the plasma model were compared to experimental data. We now compare simulation results with measurements using the full coupled model. Inside the cathode, the simulated plasma density profile agrees with the experimental data up to the ±50% experimental uncertainty while the simulated emitter temperature differs from measurements by at most 5 K. We then proceed to an analysis of the cathode discharge both inside the cathode where electron emission is dominant and outside in the near plume where electron transport instabilities are important. As observed previously in the literature, the total emitted electron current is much larger (34 {{A}}) than the set discharge current collected at the anode (13 {{A}}) while ionization plays a negligible role. Extracted electrons are emitted from a region much shorter than the full emitter (0.9 {{cm}} versus 2.5 {{cm}}). The influence of an applied axial magnetic field in the plume is also assessed and we observe that it leads to a 10-fold increase of the plasma density 1 cm downstream of the orifice entrance while the simulated discharge potential at the anode is increased from 10 {{V}} up to 35.5 {{V}}. Lastly, we perform a parametric study on both the operating point (discharge current, mass flow rate) and design (inner radius) of the cathode. The simulated useful operating envelope is shown to be limited at low discharge current mostly because of the probable ion sputtering of the emitter and at high discharge current because of emitter evaporation, plasma oscillations and sputtering of the keeper electrode. The behavior of the cathode is also analyzed w.r.t. its internal radius and simulation results show that the useful emitter length scales linearly with the cathode radius.

  7. Stress analysis in oral obturator prostheses, part II: photoelastic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Haddad, Marcela Filié; Moreno, Amália; Zahoui, Abbas; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2014-06-01

    In part I of the study, two attachment systems [O-ring; bar-clip (BC)] were used, and the system with three individualized O-rings provided the lowest stress on the implants and the support tissues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the stress distribution, through the photoelastic method, on implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses associated with different attachment systems: BOC-splinted implants with a bar connected to two centrally placed O-rings, and BOD-splinted implants with a BC connected to two distally placed O-rings (cantilever). One photoelastic model of the maxilla with oral-sinus-nasal communication with three parallel implants was fabricated. Afterward, two implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses with the two attachment systems described above were constructed. Each assembly was positioned in a circular polariscope and a 100-N axial load was applied in three different regions with implants by using a universal testing machine. The results were obtained through photograph record analysis of stress. The BOD system exhibited the highest stress concentration, followed by the BOC system. The O-ring, centrally placed on the bar, allows higher mobility of the prostheses and homogeneously distributes the stress to the region of the alveolar ridge and implants. It can be concluded that the use of implants with O-rings, isolated or connected with a bar, to rehabilitate maxillectomized patients allows higher prosthesis mobility and homogeneously distributes the stress to the alveolar ridge region, which may result in greater chewing stress distribution to implants and bone tissue. The clinical implication of the augmented bone support loss after maxillectomy is the increase of stress in the attachment systems and, consequently, a higher tendency for displacement of the prosthesis.

  8. Impact of the HERA I+II combined data on the CT14 QCD global analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulat, S.; Hou, T.-J.; Gao, J.; Guzzi, M.; Huston, J.; Nadolsky, P.; Pumplin, J.; Schmidt, C.; Stump, D.; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-11-01

    A brief description of the impact of the recent HERA run I+II combination of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross-section data on the CT14 global analysis of PDFs is given. The new CT14HERA2 PDFs at NLO and NNLO are illustrated. They employ the same parametrization used in the CT14 analysis, but with an additional shape parameter for describing the strange quark PDF. The HERA I+II data are reasonably well described by both CT14 and CT14HERA2 PDFs, and differences are smaller than the PDF uncertainties of the standard CT14 analysis. Both sets are acceptable when the error estimates are calculated in the CTEQ-TEA (CT) methodology and the standard CT14 PDFs are recommended to be continuously used for the analysis of LHC measurements.

  9. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals That Ethylene/H2O2-Mediated Hypersensitive Response and Programmed Cell Death Determine the Compatible Interaction of Sand Pear and Alternaria alternata

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Jing; Chang, Youhong; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    A major restriction on sand pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) production is black spot disease caused by the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria alternata. However, the pear response mechanism to A. alternata is unknown at the molecular level. Here, host responses of a resistant cultivar Cuiguan (CG) and a susceptible cultivar Sucui1 (SC1) to A. alternata infection were investigated. We found that the primary necrotic lesion formed at 1 dpi and the expansion of lesions was aggressive in SC1. Data from transcriptomic profiles using RNA-Seq technology identified a large number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between CG and SC1 in the early phase of A. alternata infection. K-mean cluster and Mapman analysis revealed that genes involved in ethylene (ET) biosynthesis and ET signaling pathway, such as ACS, ACOs, and ERFs, and in hypersensitive response (HR) and programmed cell death (PCD) were significantly enriched and up-regulated in the susceptible cultivar SC1. Conversely, genes involved in response to hydrogen peroxide and superoxide were differentially up-regulated in the resistant cultivar CG after inoculation with the fungus. Furthermore, ET levels were highly accumulated in SC1, but not in CG. Higher activities of detoxifying enzymes such as catalases were detected in CG. Our results demonstrate that the ET-/H2O2-mediated PCD and detoxifying processes play a vital role in the interaction of pear and A. alternata. PMID:28261248

  10. A Linear Stochastic Dynamical Model of ENSO. Part II: Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C. J.; Battisti, D. S.

    2001-02-01

    In this study the behavior of a linear, intermediate model of ENSO is examined under stochastic forcing. The model was developed in a companion paper (Part I) and is derived from the Zebiak-Cane ENSO model. Four variants of the model are used whose stabilities range from slightly damped to moderately damped. Each model is run as a simulation while being perturbed by noise that is uncorrelated (white) in space and time. The statistics of the model output show the moderately damped models to be more realistic than the slightly damped models. The moderately damped models have power spectra that are quantitatively quite similar to observations, and a seasonal pattern of variance that is qualitatively similar to observations. All models produce ENSOs that are phase locked to the annual cycle, and all display the `spring barrier' characteristic in their autocorrelation patterns, though in the models this `barrier' occurs during the summer and is less intense than in the observations (inclusion of nonlinear effects is shown to partially remedy this deficiency). The more realistic models also show a decadal variability in the lagged autocorrelation pattern that is qualitatively similar to observations.Analysis of the models shows that the greatest part of the variability comes from perturbations that project onto the first singular vector, which then grow rapidly into the ENSO mode. Essentially, the model output represents many instances of the ENSO mode, with random phase and amplitude, stimulated by the noise through the optimal transient growth of the singular vectors.The limit of predictability for each model is calculated and it is shown that the more realistic (moderately damped) models have worse potential predictability (9-15 months) than the deterministic chaotic models that have been studied widely in the literature. The predictability limits are strongly correlated with the stability of the models' ENSO mode-the more highly damped models having much shorter

  11. Project on restaurant energy performance: end-use monitoring and analysis. Appendixes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Claar, C.N.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Heidell, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    This is the second volume of the report, ''The Porject on Restaurant Energy Performance - End-Use Monitoring and Analysis''. The first volume (PNL-5462) contains a summary and analysis of the metered energy performance data collected by the Project on Restaurant Energy Performance (PREP). Appendix I, presented here, contains monitoring site descriptions, measurement plans, and data summaries for the seven restaurants metered for PREP. Appendix II, also in this volume, is a description of the PREP computer system.

  12. Erythrocyte membrane analysis for type II diabetes detection using Raman spectroscopy in high-wavenumber region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyong; Zeng, Yongyi; Lin, Juqiang; Wang, Jing; Li, Ling; Huang, Zufang; Li, Buhong; Zeng, Haishan; Chen, Rong

    2014-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy was employed to detect lipid variation occurring in type II diabetic erythrocyte membrane (EM) without using exogenous reagents. In high-wavenumber (HW) region, significant Raman spectral differences between diabetic and normal EM are observed at 2850, 2873, 2885, 2935, and 2965 cm-1, which are mainly related to lipid in EM. Based on principal component analysis, the diagnostic accuracy of HW region for diabetes detection is 98.8%, which is much higher than that of low-wavenumber region (82.9%). The results suggest that EM HW Raman region has great promise for the reagent-free and non-invasive detection of type II diabetes.

  13. Tank Farm Waste Transfer Compatibility Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, K.D.

    1995-04-24

    The compatibility program described in this document formalizes the process for determining waste compatibility. Goal is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures during future operations, could possibly result in an unreviewed safety question. Waste transfer decision rules are presented as a process for assessing compatibility of wastes or waste mixtures. The process involves characterizing the waste comparing waste characteristics with the criteria, resolving potential incompatibilities, and documenting the process.

  14. Advanced subsonic long-haul transport terminal area compatibility study. Volume 1: Compatibility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was made to identify airplane research and technology necessary to ensure advanced transport aircraft the capability of accommodating forecast traffic without adverse impact on airport communities. Projections were made of the delay, noise, and emissions impact of future aircraft fleets on typical large urban airport. Design requirements, based on these projections, were developed for an advanced technology, long-haul, subsonic transport. A baseline aircraft was modified to fulfill the design requirements for terminal area compatibility. Technical and economic comparisons were made between these and other aircraft configured to support the study.

  15. Diagnosis of Cognitive Impairment Compatible with Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease. A Bayesian Network Model based on the Analysis of Oral Definitions of Semantic Categories.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, J M; Martínez-Tomás, R; Rincón, M; Peraita, H

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become one of the principal focuses of research in medicine, particularly when the disease is incipient or even prodromic, because treatments are more effective in these stages. Lexical-semantic-conceptual deficit (LSCD) in the oral definitions of semantic categories for basic objects is an important early indicator in the evaluation of the cognitive state of patients. The objective of this research is to define an economic procedure for cognitive impairment (CI) diagnosis, which may be associated with early stages of AD, by analysing cognitive alterations affecting declarative semantic memory. Because of its low cost, it could be used for routine clinical evaluations or screenings, leading to more expensive and selective tests that confirm or rule out the disease accurately. It should necessarily be an explanatory procedure, which would allow us to study the evolution of the disease in relation to CI, the irregularities in different semantic categories, and other neurodegenerative diseases. On the basis of these requirements, we hypothesise that Bayesian networks (BNs) are the most appropriate tool for this purpose. We have developed a BN for CI diagnosis in mild and moderate AD patients by analysing the oral production of semantic features. The BN causal model represents LSCD in certain semantic categories, both of living things (dog, pine, and apple) and non-living things (chair, car, and trousers), as symptoms of CI. The model structure, the qualitative part of the model, uses domain knowledge obtained from psychology experts and epidemiological studies. Further, the model parameters, the quantitative part of the model, are learnt automatically from epidemiological studies and Peraita and Grasso's linguistic corpus of oral definitions. This corpus was prepared with an incidental sampling and included the analysis of the oral linguistic production of 81 participants (42 cognitively healthy elderly people and 39

  16. Bioinformatic Analysis of Plasma Apolipoproteins A-I and A-II Revealed Unique Features of A-I/A-II HDL Particles in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Toshimi; Kurata, Hideaki; Kondo, Kazuo; Itakura, Hiroshige; Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Urata, Takeyoshi; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Plasma concentration of apoA-I, apoA-II and apoA-II-unassociated apoA-I was analyzed in 314 Japanese subjects (177 males and 137 females), including one (male) homozygote and 37 (20 males and 17 females) heterozygotes of genetic CETP deficiency. ApoA-I unassociated with apoA-II markedly and linearly increased with HDL-cholesterol, while apoA-II increased only very slightly and the ratio of apoA-II-associated apoA-I to apoA-II stayed constant at 2 in molar ratio throughout the increase of HDL-cholesterol, among the wild type and heterozygous CETP deficiency. Thus, overall HDL concentration almost exclusively depends on HDL with apoA-I without apoA-II (LpAI) while concentration of HDL containing apoA-I and apoA-II (LpAI:AII) is constant having a fixed molar ratio of 2 : 1 regardless of total HDL and apoA-I concentration. Distribution of apoA-I between LpAI and LpAI:AII is consistent with a model of statistical partitioning regardless of sex and CETP genotype. The analysis also indicated that LpA-I accommodates on average 4 apoA-I molecules and has a clearance rate indistinguishable from LpAI:AII. Independent evidence indicated LpAI:A-II has a diameter 20% smaller than LpAI, consistent with a model having two apoA-I and one apoA-II. The functional contribution of these particles is to be investigated. PMID:27526664

  17. POINTBLANK: A Strategic and National Security Decision making Analysis of the World War II Combined Bomber Offensive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    ANALYSIS OF THE WORLD WAR II COMBINED BOMBER OFFENSIVE DTIC :111192-07858 COLONEL GEORGE E. CROWDER 1991 ’ PROEDf PUBLIC AIR UNIVERSITY E; OISIUTIDN...Decision Making Analysis of the World War II Combined Bomber Offensive by George E. Crowder Colonel, USAF A RESEARCH REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY IN

  18. Biophysical Constraints and Ecological Compatibilities of Diverse Agroecosystems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A diagnostic approach based on multi-scale integrated analysis and model simulations was employed to identify specific or common biophysical constraints, technological changes and ecological compatibilities of the diverse subsistence and organic agro-ecosystems in the Fertile Crescent of West Asia a...

  19. Genome-wide Analysis of RNA Polymerase II Termination at Protein-Coding Genes.

    PubMed

    Baejen, Carlo; Andreani, Jessica; Torkler, Phillipp; Battaglia, Sofia; Schwalb, Bjoern; Lidschreiber, Michael; Maier, Kerstin C; Boltendahl, Andrea; Rus, Petra; Esslinger, Stephanie; Söding, Johannes; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-03-06

    At the end of protein-coding genes, RNA polymerase (Pol) II undergoes a concerted transition that involves 3'-processing of the pre-mRNA and transcription termination. Here, we present a genome-wide analysis of the 3'-transition in budding yeast. We find that the 3'-transition globally requires the Pol II elongation factor Spt5 and factors involved in the recognition of the polyadenylation (pA) site and in endonucleolytic RNA cleavage. Pol II release from DNA occurs in a narrow termination window downstream of the pA site and requires the "torpedo" exonuclease Rat1 (XRN2 in human). The Rat1-interacting factor Rai1 contributes to RNA degradation downstream of the pA site. Defects in the 3'-transition can result in increased transcription at downstream genes.

  20. The Physical Conditions of Intermediate-Redshift Mg II Absorbing Clouds from Voigt Profile Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Vogt, Steven S.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed and statistical analysis of the column densities and Doppler b parameters of Mg II absorbing clouds at redshifts 0.4<=z<=1.2. We draw on the HIRES/Keck data (Δv~=6.6 km s-1) and Voigt profile (VP) fitting results presented by Churchill & Vogt (Paper I). The sample comprises 175 clouds from 23 systems along 18 quasar lines of sight. In order to better understand whether the inferred physical conditions in the absorbing clouds could be ``false'' conditions, which can arise due to the nonuniqueness inherent in parameterizing complex absorption profiles, we performed extensive simulations of the VP analyses presented in this paper. In brief, we find the following: (1) The Fe II and Mg II column densities are correlated at the 9 σ level. There is a 5 σ anticorrelation between the Mg I/Mg II column density ratio and the Mg II column density. (2) Power-law fits to the column density distributions for Mg II, Fe II, and Mg I yielded power-law slopes of approximately -1.6, -1.7, and -2.0, respectively. (3) The observed peaks of the Doppler parameter distributions were ~5 km s-1 for Mg II and Fe II and ~7 km s-1 for Mg I. The clouds are consistent with being thermally broadened, with temperatures in the 30,000-40,000 K range. (4) A two-component Gaussian model to the velocity two-point correlation function yielded velocity dispersions of 54 and 166 km s-1. The narrow component has roughly twice the amplitude of the broader component. The width and amplitude of the broader component decreases as equivalent width increases. (5) From photoionization models we find that the column density ratios are most consistent with being photoionized by the ultraviolet extragalactic ionizing background, as opposed to stellar radiation. Based on the Mg I to Mg II column density ratios, it appears that at least two-phase ionization models are required to explain the data. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated

  1. Prevalence and risk factors of type II endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jichun; Ma, Yukui; Huang, Bin; Yuan, Ding; Yang, Yi; Zeng, Guojun; Xiong, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to determine the current evidence on risk factors for type II endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Materials and methods A systematic literature search was carried out for studies that evaluated the association of demographic, co-morbidity, and other patient-determined factors with the onset of type II endoleaks. Pooled prevalence of type II endoleaks after EVAR was updated. Results Among the 504 studies screened, 45 studies with a total of 36,588 participants were included in this review. The pooled prevalence of type II endoleaks after EVAR was 22% [95% confidence interval (CI), 19%–25%]. The main factors consistently associated with type II endoleaks included age [pooled odds ratio (OR), 0.37; 95% CI, 0.31–0.43; P<0.001], smoking (pooled OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55–0.92; P<0.001), patent inferior mesenteric artery (pooled OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.06–3.71; P = 0.012), maximum aneurysm diameter (pooled OR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.17–0.30; P<0.001), and number of patent lumbar arteries (pooled OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 2.81–3.33; P<0.001). Sex, diabetes, hypertension, anticoagulants, antiplatelet, hyperlipidemia, chronic renal insufficiency, types of graft material, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) did not show any association with the onset of type II endoleaks. Conclusions Clinicians can use the identified risk factors to detect and manage patients at risk of developing type II endoleaks after EVAR. However, further studies are needed to analyze a number of potential risk factors. PMID:28182753

  2. Tone compatibility between HDR displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bist, Cambodge; Cozot, Rémi; Madec, Gérard; Ducloux, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) is the latest trend in television technology and we expect an in ux of HDR capable consumer TVs in the market. Initial HDR consumer displays will operate on a peak brightness of about 500-1000 nits while in the coming years display peak brightness is expected to go beyond 1000 nits. However, professionally graded HDR content can range from 1000 to 4000 nits. As with Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) content, we can expect HDR content to be available in variety of lighting styles such as low key, medium key and high key video. This raises concerns over tone-compatibility between HDR displays especially when adapting to various lighting styles. It is expected that dynamic range adaptation between HDR displays uses similar techniques as found with tone mapping and tone expansion operators. In this paper, we survey simple tone mapping methods of 4000 nits color-graded HDR content for 1000 nits HDR displays. We also investigate tone expansion strategies when HDR content graded in 1000 nits is displayed on 4000 nits HDR monitors. We conclude that the best tone reproduction technique between HDR displays strongly depends on the lighting style of the content.

  3. A Topaz-II bimodal design assessment study and system analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Paramonov, Dmitry V.; Xue, Huimin; Ogloblin, Boris G.; Shumov, Dmitry P.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary conceptual design study is performed to investigate the feasibility of near-term, simple, minimum design changes to the Russian TOPAZ-II space power system to provide bimodal operation, electric power and direct thermal propulsion for future missions. To simulate the fully integrated, TOPAZ-II Bimodal system the capabilities of the Thermionic Transient Analysis Model (TITAM) are extended to take into account the proposed design modification of the Thermionic Fuel Elements (TFEs), waste heat recovery, pre-injection electric heating of the hydrogen propellant. This system model is used to characterize and identify promising design options and assess the performance parameters of the TOPAZ-II Bimodal system. Results of the study indicate that the TOPAZ-II system can be easily modified to support bimodal missions at a thrust level of 2.5 to 7.5 N and a corresponding specific impulse of 830 s to 600 s, respectively. Testing of TOPAZ-II Bimodal system can be accomplished at the Air Force Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The proposed design modification will build on the vast expertise and technology base available at the different Institutes, particularly at the Central Design Bureau of Machine Building (CDBMB) in St. Petersburg.

  4. Constituting fully integrated visual analysis system for Cu(II) on TiO₂/cellulose paper.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Lin, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Liang, Wenjie; Zhong, Yanxue; Cai, Jiabai

    2014-07-15

    As a cheap and abundant porous material, cellulose filter paper was used to immobilize nano-TiO2 and denoted as TiO2/cellulose paper (TCP). With high adsorption capacity for Cu(II) (more than 1.65 mg), TCP was used as an adsorbent, photocatalyst, and colorimetric sensor at the same time. Under the optimum adsorption conditions, i.e., pH 6.5 and 25 °C, the adsorption ratio of Cu(II) was higher than 96.1%. Humic substances from the matrix could be enriched onto TCP but the interference of their colors on colorimetric detection could be eliminated by the photodegradation. In the presence of hydroxylamine, neocuproine, as a selective indicator, was added onto TCP, and a visual color change from white to orange was generated. The concentration of Cu(II) was quantified by the color intensity images using image processing software. This fully integrated visual analysis system was successfully applied for the detection of Cu(II) in 10.0 L of drinking water and seawater with a preconcentration factor of 10(4). The log-linear calibration curve for Cu(II) was in the range of 0.5-50.0 μg L(-1) with a determination coefficient (R(2)) of 0.985 and its detection limit was 0.073 μg L(-1).

  5. Analysis of cobalt(II) in 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaammine cobalt(III) perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, R.J.; Brown, N.E.; Deutsch, E.A.

    1985-10-30

    A new method of analysis is described for cobalt(II) complexes in 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaammine cobalt(III) perchlorate. The color reagent is 2,2'-dipyridyl-2-pyridyl hydrazone (DPPH), which complexes with the Co(II) and is oxidized to a substitution inert Co(III) (DPPH)/sub 2/ complex. Interferences from other ions is not a problem because the complex is stable at pH 2 - where complexes formed between DPPH and other ions are not stable. The usual air oxidant in this type of analysis has been replaced with ammonium peroxydisulfate improving both the precision and accuracy. The Sandell sensitivity is 0.0015 ..mu..g Co(II)/cm/sup 2/. The system obeys Beer's Law up to 4 ..mu..g in Co(II)mL of solution and has a molar absorptivity of 3.9 x 10/sup 4/ L/mole cm at 514 nm. The procedure was used to determine the degree of decomposition in samples that had undergone partial thermal decomposition. 11 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Analysis of thermophilic fungal populations during phase II of composting for the cultivation of Agaricus subrufescens.

    PubMed

    Souza, Thiago Pereira; Marques, Simone Cristina; da Silveira e Santos, Débora Marques; Dias, Eustáquio Souza

    2014-09-01

    The composition and genetic diversity of fungal populations during phase II of compost production for the cultivation of Agaricus subrufescens was determined using culture-dependent and -independent methods on days 3, 6, 10, 12, and 14 of phase II composting. The isolates were morphologically characterized and subsequently analyzed using repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences (rep-PCR), and the intergenic region was sequenced to genetically identify the isolates. Changes on in the filamentous fungi population were analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the resulting bands were sequenced. The population did not significantly change from day 3 to 10 (2.55 x 10(5) -6 x 10(5) CFU g(-1)), and maximum counts on day 14 of phase II composting (6.92 log CFU g(-1)). In the morphological characterization, Scytalidium thermophilum, Thermomyces lanuginosus, and Thermomyces ibadanensis were the most abundant identified species. The 26 most abundant isolates identified by morphological analysis were characterized using rep-PCR. A significant amount of genetic diversity was detected among the isolates of all three studied species. Based on the DGGE analysis, the diversity of the fungi was reduced during phase II composting, and S. thermophilum was the predominant species identified throughout the entire process. Thus, this study presents the first report of the involvement of T. ibadanensis in the production of compost for Agaricus mushroom cultivation.

  7. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume II - Potentiometric Data Document Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume II of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the potentiometric data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  8. Is Religious Education Compatible with Science Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education, challenges the popular view that science and religion are compatible or complementary. Discusses differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological, and attitudinal levels. Argues that religious education should be kept…

  9. Tank Farm Waste Transfer Compatibility Program

    SciTech Connect

    FOWLER, K.D.

    2000-07-12

    The compatibility program described in this document formalizes the process for determining waste compatibility. The primary goal of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures during future operations. The process described involves characterizing waste, comparing characteristics with criteria, resolving potential incompatibilities and documenting the process.

  10. Is Religious Education Compatible with Science Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education, challenges the popular view that science and religion are compatible or complementary. Discusses differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological, and attitudinal levels. Argues that religious education should be kept…

  11. Tank Farm Waste Transfer Compatibility Program

    SciTech Connect

    FOWLER, K.D.

    2001-10-19

    The compatibility program described in this document formalizes the process for determining waste compatibility. The primary goal of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures during future operations. The process described involves characterizing waste, comparing characteristics with criteria, resolving potential incompatibilities and documenting the process.

  12. The use of MAVIS II to integrate the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, R.; Kwon, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    The MAVIS II computer program provides for the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions. This report describes the individual components of the program and how MAVIS II is used with other available tools to integrate the design and understanding of explosive valves. The rationale and model used for each valve interaction is described. Comparisons of the calculated results with available data have demonstrated the feasibility and accuracy of using MAVIS II for analytical studies of explosive valve interactions. The model used for the explosive or pyrotechnic used as the driving force in explosive valves is the most critical to be understood and modeled. MAVIS II is an advanced version that incorporates a plastic, as well as elastic, modeling of the deformations experienced when plungers are forced into a bore. The inclusion of a plastic model has greatly expanded the use of MAVIS for all categories (opening, closure, or combined) of valves, especially for the closure valves in which the sealing operation requires the plastic deformation of either a plunger or bore over a relatively large area. In order to increase its effectiveness, the use of MAVIS II should be integrated with the results from available experimental hardware. Test hardware such as the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Velocity Generator test provide experimental data for accurate comparison of the actual valve functions. Variable Explosive Chamber (VEC) and Constant Explosive Volume (CEV) tests are used to provide the proper explosive equation-of-state for the MAVIS calculations of the explosive driving forces. The rationale and logistics of this integration is demonstrated through an example. A recent valve design is used to demonstrate how MAVIS II can be integrated with experimental tools to provide an understanding of the interactions in this valve.

  13. Serum albumin analysis for type II diabetes detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyong; Cao, Gang; Lin, Juqiang; Liu, Nenrong; Liao, Fadian; Ruan, Qiuyong; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Zufang; Li, Ling; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy combined with membrane electrophoresis (ME) was firstly employed to detect albumin variation in type II diabetic development. Albumin was first purified from human serum by ME and then mixed with silver nanoparticles to perform SERS spectral analysis. SERS spectra were obtained from blood albumin samples of 20 diabetic patients and 19 healthy volunteers. Subtle but discernible changes in the acquired mean spectra of the two groups were observed. Tentative assignment of albumin SERS bands indicated specific structural changes of albumin molecule with diabetic development. Meanwhile, PCA-LDA diagnostic algorithms were employed to classify the two kinds of albumin SERS spectra, yielding the diagnostic sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.7%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that the EM-SERS method in combination with multivariate statistical analysis has great potential for the label-free detection of albumin variation for improving type II diabetes screening.

  14. VECTAN II - A computer program for the spatial analysis of the vectorcardiogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. P., Jr.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Wolthuis, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents the operation of a digital computer program, VECTAN II, for the spatial analysis of the vectorcardiogram (VCG). The program incorporates a unique waveform recognition algorithm based on the spatial vector length which has been shown to perform better than previous algorithms. The waveform analysis employed by the program considers the vectorcardiogram as a three dimensional entity rather than as scalar or planar representations. VECTAN II is designed chiefly to measure and quantify the VCG response of normal subjects to a controlled stress by analyzing one VCG complex every five seconds throughout a long experiment. The program has been used to analyze data from the NASA Johnson Space Center Cardiovascular Laboratory, from the pre- and postflight medical examinations of the Apollo 15, 16 and 17 crewmen, and from onboard Skylab experiments.

  15. Analysis of the Wakefield Effects in the PEP-II SLAC B-FACTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    We present the history and analysis of different wake field effects throughout the operational life of the PEP-II SLAC B-factory. Although the impedance of the high and low energy rings is small, the intense high current beams generated a lot of power. The effects from these wake fields are: heating and damage of vacuum beam chamber elements like RF seals, vacuum valves , shielded bellows, BPM buttons and ceramic tiles; vacuum spikes, vacuum instabilities and high detector background; beam longitudinal and transverse instabilities. We also discuss the methods used to eliminate these effects. Results of this analysis and the PEP-II experience may be very useful in the design of new storage rings and light sources.

  16. The effectiveness of the Herbst appliance for patients with Class II malocclusion: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin; Zhu, Yafen; Long, Hu; Zhou, Yang; Jian, Fan; Ye, Niansong; Gao, Meiya

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective: To systematically investigate review in literature the effects of the Herbst appliance for patients with Class II malocclusion patients. Method: We performed a comprehensive literature survey on PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, CENTRAL, SIGLE, and ClinicalTrial.gov up to December 2014. The selection criteria: randomized controlled trials or clinical controlled trials; using any kind of Herbst appliances to correct Class II division 1 malocclusions; skeletal and/or dental changes evaluated through lateral cephalograms. And the exclusion criteria: syndromic patients; individual case reports and series of cases; surgical interventions. Article screening, data extraction, assessment of risk of bias, and evaluation of evidence quality through GRADE were conducted independently by two well-trained orthodontic doctors. Consensus was made via group discussion of all authors when there is inconsistent information from the two. After that, sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis were performed to evaluate the robustness of the meta-analysis. Results: Twelve clinical controlled trials meet the above-mentioned criteria, and were included in this analysis. All included studies have eleven measures taken during both active treatment effect and long term effect periods, including four angular ones (i.e., SNA, SNB, ANB, mandibular plane angle) and seven linear ones (i.e. Co-Go, Co-Gn, overjet, overbite, molar relationship, A point-OLp, Pg-OLp) during active treatment effect period were statistically pooled. Meta-analysis and sensitivity analysis demonstrated that all these measures showed consistent results except for SNA, ANB, and overbite. Subgroup analysis showed significant changes in SNA, overbite, and Pg-OLp. Publication bias was detected in SNB, mandibular plane angle, and A point-OLp. Conclusion: The Herbst appliance is effective for patients with Class II malocclusion in active treatment period. Especially, there are obvious changes on dental

  17. Assessment of the Study of Army Logistics 1981. Volume II. Analysis of Recommendations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    ADA2 3 ASSESSMENT OF THE STUDY OF ARMY LOGISTICS 96 V UM II ANALYSIS OF RECOMMENDATIONS(U) DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF FOR LOGISTICS (ARMY) WASHINGTON DC...421. 2. Statement of Recommendation: "That O D implement procedures to monitor and correct stock fund cash balances to preclude an Army deficit drain...that, upon mobilization , Active Army TOE maintenance units would in many cases deploy from CONUS installations, ’eaving at least a temporary deficit in

  18. Early maternal investment in mice: no evidence for compatible-genes sexual selection despite hybrid vigor.

    PubMed

    Rülicke, T; Guncz, N; Wedekind, C

    2006-05-01

    Confronting a recently mated female with a strange male can induce a pregnancy block ('Bruce effect'). The physiology of this effect is well studied, but its functional significance is still not fully understood. The 'anticipated infanticide hypothesis' suggests that the pregnancy block serves to avoid the cost of embryogenesis and giving birth to offspring that are likely to be killed by a new territory holder. Some 'compatible-genes sexual selection hypotheses' suggest that the likelihood of a pregnancy block is also dependent on the female's perception of the stud's and the stimulus male's genetic quality. We used two inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6 and BALB/c) to test all possible combinations of female strain, stud strain, and stimulus strain under experimental conditions (N(total) = 241 mated females). As predicted from previous studies, we found increased rates of pregnancy blocks if stud and stimulus strains differed, and we found evidence for hybrid vigour in offspring of between-strain mating. Despite the observed heterosis, pregnancies of within-strain matings were not more likely to be blocked than pregnancies of between-strain matings. A power analysis revealed that if we missed an existing effect (type-II error), the effect must be very small. If a female gave birth, the number and weight of newborns were not significantly influenced by the stimulus males. In conclusion, we found no support for the 'compatible-genes sexual selection hypotheses'.

  19. Solid state compatibility studies with tablet excipients using non thermal methods.

    PubMed

    Liltorp, Karin; Larsen, Trine Gorm; Willumsen, Birgitte; Holm, René

    2011-06-01

    Compatibility between two new active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) and several pharmaceutical excipients used in solid formulations has been investigated by FT-IR and HPLC following storage under two different conditions. Compatibility was investigated by storage at isothermal stress conditions for (i) 3days and subsequently analysed by FT-IR and (ii) 12weeks of storage and analysis by HPLC. For the majority of the examined excipients a large degradation measured by HPLC after 12weeks storage was also detected by FT-IR following storage at isothermal stress conditions for 3days, i.e. there was a general agreement between the results obtained by the two protocols. Further, the FT-IR method showed clear incompatibility with three excipients where no degradation products were detected by HPLC, but where a significant decrease in the API quantified by the HPLC assay, was observed. The accelerated method thus showed a clear advantage: incompatibility found after 12weeks using HPLC was seen after 3days with FT-IR. Furthermore, FT-IR provides an insight into structural changes not seen with HPLC. This is exemplified by the desalting of a hydrogen bromide salt of one of the two compounds, which might lead to changes of the intrinsic dissolution rate and potentially affect the bioavailability of the API.

  20. Full genome analysis of a novel type II feline coronavirus NTU156.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Nan; Chang, Ruey-Yi; Su, Bi-Ling; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2013-04-01

    Infections by type II feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) have been shown to be significantly correlated with fatal feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Despite nearly six decades having passed since its first emergence, different studies have shown that type II FCoV represents only a small portion of the total FCoV seropositivity in cats; hence, there is very limited knowledge of the evolution of type II FCoV. To elucidate the correlation between viral emergence and FIP, a local isolate (NTU156) that was derived from a FIP cat was analyzed along with other worldwide strains. Containing an in-frame deletion of 442 nucleotides in open reading frame 3c, the complete genome size of NTU156 (28,897 nucleotides) appears to be the smallest among the known type II feline coronaviruses. Bootscan analysis revealed that NTU156 evolved from two crossover events between type I FCoV and canine coronavirus, with recombination sites located in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and M genes. With an exchange of nearly one-third of the genome with other members of alphacoronaviruses, the new emerging virus could gain new antigenicity, posing a threat to cats that either have been infected with a type I virus before or never have been infected with FCoV.

  1. Analysis of Metric Type II Burst and EUV Waves Generated by Shock Wave Driven by Cme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha-Silva, Rafael; Fernandes, Francisco; Selhorst, Caius

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between solar type II radio bursts produced by plasma oscillations and coronal shocks is well shown since the 1960s. However, the details of the association between the drivers of the shocks and the metric type II bursts remains a controversial issue. The flares and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the potential drivers of these shocks. In this work, we present the analysis of a metric type II burst observed on May 17, 2013, by spectrometers from e-CALLISTO network and EUV images from the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI), aboard the STEREO. The event was associated with an M3.2 X-ray flare and a halo CME. The EUV images show the EUV wave was produced by the expansion of the CME. The heights of the EUV wave fronts and the magnetic field intensity determined in the regions of the shock are consistent with those the heights of radio source obtained with the three-fold Newkirk density model, which suggests an oblique propagation of the shock. The finding of an accelerating shock with speed of 530-640 km/s and of 870-1220 km/s for the first and the second stages of the type II emission, respectively, is consistent with both the average speed of the associated EUV wave front, of 626 km/s, during the initial expansion of the CME, and with the linear speed of the CME, of 1345 km/s. These results will be presented and discussed.

  2. Barium compatibility of insulator material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, John M.; Zee, Ralph; Schuller, Michael

    1997-01-01

    The compatibility of insulator material systems in a barium environment was investigated. This work is part of an ongoing program to identify weaknesses in insulator/braze/refractory metal materials systems which provide electrical insulation in alkali-metal enhanced thermionic devices and other alkali-metal thermal-to-electric converters. Test articles consisting of alumina or sapphire insulators brazed to molybdenum via a nominal Cu-30% Ni braze, were exposed to barium vapor to ascertain possible reactions and/or failure mechanisms. The test matrix consisted of eight samples; 5 with a sapphire insulator, 3 with an alumina insulator. Each sample was exposed to a different combination of insulator/braze region temperature (1000 K or 1100 K) and partial pressure of barium (10-3 or 10-2 torr) for approximately 750 hours. Initial analysis indicated that the ceramic portions were free from corrosion and that the braze material was the weak link in the material system. Evidence of formation of a Cu-Ba intermetallic at the braze region was visible. Further analysis indicated that in some cases Al2O3 was being reduced by the Barium. The results of this research imply that use of Al2O3 based ceramics in a barium environment may be suspect to failures in the long term and that Cu-Ni brazes are not suitable for the barium environment.

  3. Impression techniques for multiple implants: a photoelastic analysis. Part II: comparison of four acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Júnior, Itamar; de Lima Lucas, Barbara; Gomide, Henner Alberto; Gomes, Vanderlei Luiz

    2013-10-01

    Four commercial brands of chemically activated acrylic resin were compared through photoelastic analysis. Photoelastic resin blocks were made with 2 implants placed parallel to each other and 2 square transfer copings splinted. Both transfers were splinted with chemically activated acrylic resin: Dencrilay, Duralay I, Duralay II, and GC. Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (P < .05). Statistically significant differences were found among the 3 brands of chemically activated acrylic resin. Dencrilay showed greater dimensional alteration. Duralay I and GC are recommended for the transfer of the position of the multi-implants.

  4. Level II scour analysis for bridge 2 (WODFTH00010002) on Town Highway 1, crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODFTH00010002 on Town Highway 1 crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont (figures 1-8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  5. Physico-mechanical analysis data in support of compatibility of chitosan/κ-carrageenan polyelectrolyte films achieved by ascorbic acid, and the thermal degradation theory of κ-carrageenan influencing the properties of its blends.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mahdiyar; Ettelaie, Rammile; Rajabzadeh, Ghadir

    2016-12-01

    This article presents the complementary data regarding compatibilization of chitosan/κ-carrageenan polyelectrolyte complex for synthesizing of a soft film using ascorbic acid. It includes the thermal-theory for estimating the degradation of κ-carrageenan, as reflected in alteration of the structural properties of the blend. The data has been provided to demonstrate that the blend solution based on chitosan, a polycation, and κ-carrageenan, a polyanion polymer, produces an incompatible polyelectrolyte composite, susceptible to coaservative phase separation. We present further data on water resistance, water barrier property, mechanical parameters, scanning electron micrograph, as well as contact angle image dataset of the chitosan/κ-carrageenan film. The physical data were collected by water solubility and water permeability assays, with a view to elucidate the role of ascorbic acid in the compatibility of polyelectrolyte blends. The mechanical data is obtained from a stress-strain curve for evaluation of tensile strength and elongation at break point of the chitosan/κ-carrageenan film. The microstructure observations were performed using scanning electron micrograph. These dataset confirm fabrication of a soft film in the presence of ascorbic acid, with reduced heterogeneities in the polyelectrolyte film structure. The κ-carrageenan was also treated by a thermal process, prior to inclusion into the chitosan solution, to investigate the impact of this on the mechanical and structural features of the resulting blend. We present the required data and the theoretical analysis supporting the thermal chain degradation of a polymer and its effects on behavior of the film. Additional information, characterizing the hydrophobicity of the surface of the blend layers is obtained by measuring water contact angles using a contact anglemeter.

  6. Analysis of the interaction of the novel RNA polymerase II (pol II) subunit hsRPB4 with its partner hsRPB7 and with pol II.

    PubMed

    Khazak, V; Estojak, J; Cho, H; Majors, J; Sonoda, G; Testa, J R; Golemis, E A

    1998-04-01

    Under conditions of environmental stress, prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae selectively utilize particular subunits of RNA polymerase II (pol II) to alter transcription to patterns favoring survival. In S. cerevisiae, a complex of two such subunits, RPB4 and RPB7, preferentially associates with pol II during stationary phase; of these two subunits, RPB4 is specifically required for survival under nonoptimal growth conditions. Previously, we have shown that RPB7 possesses an evolutionarily conserved human homolog, hsRPB7, which was capable of partially interacting with RPB4 and the yeast transcriptional apparatus. Using this as a probe in a two-hybrid screen, we have now established that hsRPB4 is also conserved in higher eukaryotes. In contrast to hsRPB7, hsRPB4 has diverged so that it no longer interacts with yeast RPB7, although it partially complements rpb4- phenotypes in yeast. However, hsRPB4 associates strongly and specifically with hsRPB7 when expressed in yeast or in mammalian cells and copurifies with intact pol II. hsRPB4 expression in humans parallels that of hsRPB7, supporting the idea that the two proteins may possess associated functions. Structure-function studies of hsRPB4-hsRPB7 are used to establish the interaction interface between the two proteins. This identification completes the set of human homologs for RNA pol II subunits defined in yeast and should provide the basis for subsequent structural and functional characterization of the pol II holoenzyme.

  7. Analysis of the Interaction of the Novel RNA Polymerase II (pol II) Subunit hsRPB4 with Its Partner hsRPB7 and with pol II

    PubMed Central

    Khazak, Vladimir; Estojak, Joanne; Cho, Helen; Majors, Jenifer; Sonoda, Gonosuke; Testa, Joseph R.; Golemis, Erica A.

    1998-01-01

    Under conditions of environmental stress, prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae selectively utilize particular subunits of RNA polymerase II (pol II) to alter transcription to patterns favoring survival. In S. cerevisiae, a complex of two such subunits, RPB4 and RPB7, preferentially associates with pol II during stationary phase; of these two subunits, RPB4 is specifically required for survival under nonoptimal growth conditions. Previously, we have shown that RPB7 possesses an evolutionarily conserved human homolog, hsRPB7, which was capable of partially interacting with RPB4 and the yeast transcriptional apparatus. Using this as a probe in a two-hybrid screen, we have now established that hsRPB4 is also conserved in higher eukaryotes. In contrast to hsRPB7, hsRPB4 has diverged so that it no longer interacts with yeast RPB7, although it partially complements rpb4− phenotypes in yeast. However, hsRPB4 associates strongly and specifically with hsRPB7 when expressed in yeast or in mammalian cells and copurifies with intact pol II. hsRPB4 expression in humans parallels that of hsRPB7, supporting the idea that the two proteins may possess associated functions. Structure-function studies of hsRPB4-hsRPB7 are used to establish the interaction interface between the two proteins. This identification completes the set of human homologs for RNA pol II subunits defined in yeast and should provide the basis for subsequent structural and functional characterization of the pol II holoenzyme. PMID:9528765

  8. Domain organization and functional analysis of type IIS restriction endonuclease Eco31I.

    PubMed

    Jakubauskas, Arturas; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Giedriene, Jolanta; Janulaitis, Arvydas

    2008-08-19

    Type IIS restriction endonuclease Eco31I harbors a single HNH active site and cleaves both DNA strands close to its recognition sequence, 5'-GGTCTC(1/5). A two-domain organization of Eco31I was determined by limited proteolysis. Analysis of proteolytic fragments revealed that the N-terminal domain of Eco31I is responsible for the specific DNA binding, while the C-terminal domain contains the HNH nuclease-like active site. Gel-shift and gel-filtration experiments revealed that a monomer of the N-terminal domain of Eco31I is able to bind a single copy of cognate DNA. However, in contrast to other studied type IIS enzymes, the isolated catalytic domain of Eco31I was inactive. Steady-state and transient kinetic analysis of Eco31I reactions was inconsistent with dimerization of Eco31I on DNA. Thus, we propose that Eco31I interacts with individual copies of its recognition sequence in its monomeric form and presumably remains a monomer as it cleaves both strands of double-stranded DNA. The domain organization and reaction mechanism established for Eco31I should be common for a group of evolutionary related type IIS restriction endonucleases Alw26I, BsaI, BsmAI, BsmBI and Esp3I that recognize DNA sequences bearing the common pentanucleotide 5'-GTCTC.

  9. Reevaluation of Stratospheric Ozone Trends From SAGE II Data Using a Simultaneous Temporal and Spatial Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damadeo, R. P.; Zawodny, J. M.; Thomason, L. W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper details a new method of regression for sparsely sampled data sets for use with time-series analysis, in particular the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II ozone data set. Non-uniform spatial, temporal, and diurnal sampling present in the data set result in biased values for the long-term trend if not accounted for. This new method is performed close to the native resolution of measurements and is a simultaneous temporal and spatial analysis that accounts for potential diurnal ozone variation. Results show biases, introduced by the way data is prepared for use with traditional methods, can be as high as 10%. Derived long-term changes show declines in ozone similar to other studies but very different trends in the presumed recovery period, with differences up to 2% per decade. The regression model allows for a variable turnaround time and reveals a hemispheric asymmetry in derived trends in the middle to upper stratosphere. Similar methodology is also applied to SAGE II aerosol optical depth data to create a new volcanic proxy that covers the SAGE II mission period. Ultimately this technique may be extensible towards the inclusion of multiple data sets without the need for homogenization.

  10. TTF3 power coupler thermal analysis for LCLS-II CW operation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Nantista, C.; Raubenheimer, T.; Solyak, N.; Gonin, I.

    2015-05-13

    The TESLA 9-cell SRF cavity design has been adopted for use in the LCLS-II SRF Linac. Its TTF3 coaxial fundamental power coupler (FPC), optimized for pulsed operation in European XFEL and ILC, requires modest changes to make it suitable for LCLS-II continuous-wave (CW) operation. For LCLS-II it must handle up to 7 kW of power, fully reflected, with the maximum temperature around 450 K, the coupler bake temperature. In order to improve TTF3 FPC cooling, an increased copper plating thickness will be used on the inner conductor of the ‘warm’ section of the coupler. Also, the antenna will be shortened to achieve higher cavity Qext values. Fully 3D FPC thermal analysis has been performed using the SLAC-developed parallel finite element code suite ACE3P, which includes electromagnetic codes and an integrated electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical multi-physics code. In this paper, we present TTF3 FPC thermal analysis simulation results obtained using ACE3P as well as a comparison with measurement results.

  11. Novel histopathologic feature identified through image analysis augments stage II colorectal cancer clinical reporting

    PubMed Central

    Caie, Peter D.; Zhou, Ying; Turnbull, Arran K.; Oniscu, Anca; Harrison, David J.

    2016-01-01

    A number of candidate histopathologic factors show promise in identifying stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) patients at a high risk of disease-specific death, however they can suffer from low reproducibility and none have replaced classical pathologic staging. We developed an image analysis algorithm which standardized the quantification of specific histopathologic features and exported a multi-parametric feature-set captured without bias. The image analysis algorithm was executed across a training set (n = 50) and the resultant big data was distilled through decision tree modelling to identify the most informative parameters to sub-categorize stage II CRC patients. The most significant, and novel, parameter identified was the ‘sum area of poorly differentiated clusters’ (AreaPDC). This feature was validated across a second cohort of stage II CRC patients (n = 134) (HR = 4; 95% CI, 1.5– 11). Finally, the AreaPDC was integrated with the significant features within the clinical pathology report, pT stage and differentiation, into a novel prognostic index (HR = 7.5; 95% CI, 3–18.5) which improved upon current clinical staging (HR = 4.26; 95% CI, 1.7– 10.3). The identification of poorly differentiated clusters as being highly significant in disease progression presents evidence to suggest that these features could be the source of novel targets to decrease the risk of disease specific death. PMID:27322148

  12. Blood compatibility of magnesium and its alloys.

    PubMed

    Feyerabend, Frank; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Mihailova, Boriana; Heidrich, Stefanie; Agha, Nezha Ahmad; Bismayer, Ulrich; Willumeit-Römer, Regine

    2015-10-01

    Blood compatibility analysis in the field of biomaterials is a highly controversial topic. Especially for degradable materials like magnesium and its alloys no established test methods are available. The purpose of this study was to apply advanced test methodology for the analysis of degrading materials to get a mechanistic insight into the corrosion process in contact with human blood and plasma. Pure magnesium and two magnesium alloys were analysed in a modified Chandler-Loop setup. Standard clinical parameters were determined, and a thorough analysis of the resulting implant surface chemistry was performed. The contact of the materials to blood evoked an accelerated inflammatory and cell-induced osteoconductive reaction. Corrosion products formed indicate a more realistic, in vivo like situation. The active regulation of corrosion mechanisms of magnesium alloys by different cell types should be more in the focus of research to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo observations and to understand the mechanism of action. This in turn could lead to a better acceptance of these materials for implant applications. The presented study deals with the first mechanistic insights during whole human blood contact and its influence on a degrading magnesium-based biomaterial. The combination of clinical parameters and corrosion layer analysis has been performed for the first time. It could be of interest due to the intended use of magnesium-based stents and for orthopaedic applications for clinical applications. An interest for the readers of Acta Biomaterialia may be given, as one of the first clinically approved magnesium-based devices is a wound-closure device, which is in direct contact with blood. Moreover, for orthopaedic applications also blood contact is of high interest. Although this is not the focus of the manuscript, it could help to rise awareness for potential future applications. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  13. Molecular analysis of G+C-rich upstream sequences regulating transcription of the human carbonic anhydrase II gene.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, L H; Venta, P J; Tashian, R E

    1987-01-01

    The upstream promoter sequences of the human carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) gene have been studied by 5' deletion analysis. Promoter activity was assayed by transfection and chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay in both human HeLa cells and murine L cells. This investigation showed that the CA II promoter is comparable in activity to that of the simian virus 40 early-region promoter and enhancer and that the CA II upstream sequences exert a different pattern of control in the two cell lines. Images PMID:2830500

  14. Variation in type II endometrial cancer risk by Hispanic subpopulation: An exploratory analysis.

    PubMed

    Schlumbrecht, Matthew; Baeker Bispo, Jordan A; Balise, Raymond R; Huang, Marilyn; Slomovitz, Brian; Kobetz, Erin

    2017-09-06

    Minorities have demonstrated an increased risk for type II endometrial cancers, but no data exists about risk among minority subpopulations. Our objective was to evaluate heterogeneity in risk of type II endometrial cancer (EC) histologies across race and Hispanic sub-groups using data from Florida's statewide cancer registry (FCDS). FCDS contains data on N=26,416 women diagnosed with EC from 2004 to 2013. Our analysis included women ≥18years of age who were classified as non-Hispanic White (NHW), non-Hispanic Black (NHB) or belonged to one of five Hispanic sub-groups, and had a histology code consistent with type I or type II EC. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed to model risk of type II versus type I ECs across racial and ethnic groups relative to NHW. Relative to NHW, overall odds of being diagnosed with a type II EC were significantly higher in NHB (OR=2.64, 95%CI: 2.38-2.92), Cubans (OR=1.35, 95%CI: 1.08-1.68) and South and Central Americans (SCA) (OR=1.84, 95%CI: 1.40-2.43). Compared to NHW, odds of serous EC were significantly higher in Cubans (OR=2.15, 95% CI: 1.51-3.05) and NHB (OR=2.51, 95% CI: 2.11-2.97); odds of carcinosarcoma (CS) were significantly higher in NHB (OR=2.97, 95% CI: 2.47-3.57) and Puerto Ricans (OR=2.35, 95%CI: 1.32-4.17); and odds of grade III adenocarcinoma (AG3) were significantly higher in NHB (OR=1.60, 95% CI: 1.42-1.81) and SCA (OR=1.76, 95%CI: 1.29-2.40). Risk of type II EC varies considerably across Hispanic sub-groups, with Cubans, Puerto Ricans and SCA characterized by elevated odds for specific type II histologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Results from a Low-Energy Analysis of the CDMS II Germanium Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D.S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C.N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Brink, P.L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2010-11-01

    We report results from a reanalysis of data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Data taken between October 2006 and September 2008 using eight germanium detectors are reanalyzed with a lowered, 2 keV recoil-energy threshold, to give increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below {approx}10 GeV/c{sup 2}. This analysis provides stronger constraints than previous CDMS II results for WIMP masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2} and excludes parameter space associated with possible low-mass WIMP signals from the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  16. Progress in accident analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-10-11

    The present work continues our effort to perform an integrated safety analysis for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design. Recently we developed a base case for a severe accident scenario in order to calculate accident doses for HYLIFE-II. It consisted of a total loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in which all the liquid flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) was lost at the beginning of the accident. Results showed that the off-site dose was below the limit given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for public protection in case of accident, and that his dose was dominated by the tritium released during the accident.

  17. Results from a low-energy analysis of the CDMS II germanium data.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Z; Akerib, D S; Arrenberg, S; Bailey, C N; Balakishiyeva, D; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cooley, J; do Couto e Silva, E; Cushman, P; Daal, M; DeJongh, F; Di Stefano, P; Dragowsky, M R; Duong, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fox, J; Fritts, M; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hertel, S A; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Kamaev, O; Kiveni, M; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Liu, S; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moore, D; Nelson, H; Ogburn, R W; Phipps, A; Pyle, M; Qiu, X; Ramberg, E; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Resch, R; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tarka, M; Wikus, P; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2011-04-01

    We report results from a reanalysis of data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Data taken between October 2006 and September 2008 using eight germanium detectors are reanalyzed with a lowered, 2 keV recoil-energy threshold, to give increased sensitivity to interactions from weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with masses below ∼10  GeV/c(2). This analysis provides stronger constraints than previous CDMS II results for WIMP masses below 9  GeV/c(2) and excludes parameter space associated with possible low-mass WIMP signals from the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  18. Finite element code for quench and stability analysis of superconducting magnets cooled by He II

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbounov, M.B.; Miller, J.R.; Van Sciver, S.W.

    1996-12-31

    The design of the protection system for the superconducting portion of the 45-T Hybrid Magnet System being constructed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and the establishment of safe and reliable operating procedures are critical tasks. To support these efforts, the finite element code SARUMAN has been extended to include capability for analysis of the stability and quench in Cable-in-Conduit Conductors (CICC) cooled by pressurized superfluid He II. This modification consists of introducing a temperature gradient term in the energy equation for the counterflow mechanism and extension of the properties of helium and other materials of the magnet to the He II temperature region. Using this new version of the code, the stability of the conductors for the 45-T Hybrid have been analyzed against different thermal disturbances and under a variety of possible operating conditions, as well as the evolution of the quench in the conductor.

  19. Analysis of complex vessel experiments using the Hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian containment code ALICE-II

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Ku, J.L.; Zeuch, W.R.

    1984-03-01

    This paper describes the ALICE-II analysis of and comparison with complex vessel experiments. Tests SM-2 through SM-5 were performed by SRI International in 1978 in studying the structural response of 1/20 scale models of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor to a simulated hypothetical core-disruptive accident. These experiments provided quality data for validating treatments of the nonlinear fluid-structure interactions and many complex excursion phenomena, such as flow through perforated structures, large material distortions, multi-dimensional sliding interfaces, flow around sharp corners, and highly contorted fluid boundaries. Correlations of the predicted pressures with the test results of all gauges are made. Wave characteristics and arrival times are also compared. Results show that the ALICE-II code predicts the pressure profile well. Despite the complexity, the code gave good results for the SM-5 test.

  20. Results from a Low-Energy Analysis of the CDMS II Germanium Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Z.; Filippini, J.; Golwala, S. R.; Moore, D.; Akerib, D. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Arrenberg, S.; Baudis, L.; Bruch, T.; Tarka, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Saab, T.; Bauer, D. A.; DeJongh, F.; Hall, J.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Ramberg, E.

    2011-04-01

    We report results from a reanalysis of data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Data taken between October 2006 and September 2008 using eight germanium detectors are reanalyzed with a lowered, 2 keV recoil-energy threshold, to give increased sensitivity to interactions from weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with masses below {approx}10 GeV/c{sup 2}. This analysis provides stronger constraints than previous CDMS II results for WIMP masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2} and excludes parameter space associated with possible low-mass WIMP signals from the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  1. Subclassification of Recursive Partitioning Analysis Class II Patients With Brain Metastases Treated Radiosurgically

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Sato, Yasunori; Serizawa, Toru; Kawabe, Takuya; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nagano, Osamu; Barfod, Bierta E.; Ono, Junichi; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Although the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class is generally used for predicting survival periods of patients with brain metastases (METs), the majority of such patients are Class II and clinical factors vary quite widely within this category. This prompted us to divide RPA Class II patients into three subclasses. Methods and Materials: This was a two-institution, institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study using two databases: the Mito series (2,000 consecutive patients, comprising 787 women and 1,213 men; mean age, 65 years [range, 19-96 years]) and the Chiba series (1,753 patients, comprising 673 female and 1,080 male patients; mean age, 65 years [range, 7-94 years]). Both patient series underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery alone, without whole-brain radiotherapy, for brain METs during the same 10-year period, July 1998 through June 2008. The Cox proportional hazard model with a step-wise selection procedure was used for multivariate analysis. Results: In the Mito series, four factors were identified as favoring longer survival: Karnofsky Performance Status (90% to 100% vs. 70% to 80%), tumor numbers (solitary vs. multiple), primary tumor status (controlled vs. not controlled), and non-brain METs (no vs. yes). This new index is the sum of scores (0 and 1) of these four factors: RPA Class II-a, score of 0 or 1; RPA Class II-b, score of 2; and RPA Class II-c, score of 3 or 4. Next, using the Chiba series, we tested whether our index is valid for a different patient group. This new system showed highly statistically significant differences among subclasses in both the Mito series and the Chiba series (p < 0.001 for all subclasses). In addition, this new index was confirmed to be applicable to Class II patients with four major primary tumor sites, that is, lung, breast, alimentary tract, and urogenital organs. Conclusions: Our new grading system should be considered when designing future clinical trials involving brain MET

  2. Compatibility considerations for low-mass rigid-belt vehicles.

    PubMed

    Niederer, P F; Kaeser, R; Walz, F H; Brunner, A; Faerber, E

    1995-08-01

    A number of staged impacts performed by our group with the aid of a test device representing a low-mass vehicle (LMV) indicates that a rigid-belt body (RBB) is a valid means for providing adequate occupant safety also for LMVs in the strict sense (curb mass less than 600 kg). The RBB concept raises the problem of compatibility, however. Ideally, the deformability of car front structures should increase with increasing vehicle weight in order to ascertain compatibility. Published data on frontal deformation characteristics substantiate in contrast that conventional cars today exhibit an opposite behaviour. To evaluate the compatibility properties of ultrastiff LMVs, two crash experiments were performed along with a theoretical model analysis. An LMV with a mass of 680 kg (including batteries, 50% mass of two dummies, instrumentation) designed according to the RBB concept and a conventional care of 1320 kg--(equivalent loading conditions as LMV)--were crashed at 56 km/h in a frontal direction against a deformable barrier (FMVSS 214). Furthermore, a mathematical model was based on estimated deformation characteristics of conventional vehicles to predict intrusion distances into the FMVSS barrier in hypothetical frontal crashes with 56 km/h. The results indicate that due to its low mass an LMV does not represent an excessive compatibility problem for other car occupants in spite of the stiff RBB characteristics.

  3. Confirming the validity of Part II of the National Board Dental Examinations: a practice analysis.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Gene A; Neumann, Laura M

    2003-12-01

    Successful completion of Part II of the National Board Dental Examinations is a part of the licensure process for dentists. Good testing practice requires that the content of a high stakes examination like Part II be based on a strong relationship between the content and the judgments of practicing dentists on what is important to their practice of dentistry. In an effort to demonstrate this relationship for Part II, the Joint Commission conducted a practice analysis, which involved a two-dimensional model. The sixty-three Competencies of the New Dentist, developed and promulgated by the American Dental Education Association, were used for one dimension, and the current content specifications were used for the other. A survey of 520 practicing dentists was conducted to determine the importance of each of the competencies for patient care. These dentists were recent graduates of accredited programs and passed Part II three to five years prior to the conduct of the practice analysis. The survey directed the respondents to rate the importance of the competencies on a scale from 1 to 5. Of the 520 in the sample, 244 dentists responded. The reliability index was above 0.90. The importance rating for each competency was translated into the associated number of items. The number of items devoted to each competency was allocated to the current content elements that are related to the knowledge and problem-solving skills that support each competency. The findings specified revisions in the relative number of items dedicated to the various elements in the specifications. These findings indicate that the items on the examination under the current distribution adequately reflected practice. In general, there were relatively small changes in the content specifications. The total number of changes in items was forty-eight, which represents changes in slightly less than 10 percent of the overall number of items.

  4. Campylobacter jejuni fatty acid synthase II: Structural and functional analysis of [beta]-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew S.; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Yeo, Hye-Jeong

    2009-08-14

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is crucial for all living cells. In contrast to higher organisms, bacteria use a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS II) composed of a series of individual proteins, making FAS II enzymes excellent targets for antibiotics discovery. The {beta}-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ) catalyzes an essential step in the FAS II pathway. Here, we report the structure of Campylobacter jejuni FabZ (CjFabZ), showing a hexamer both in crystals and solution, with each protomer adopting the characteristic hot dog fold. Together with biochemical analysis of CjFabZ, we define the first functional FAS II enzyme from this pathogen, and provide a framework for investigation on roles of FAS II in C. jejuni virulence

  5. Analysis of a collagen II degradation protein C2C and a collagen II formation protein CP II in serum of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Kilgallon, Conor P; Larsen, Scott; Wong, Alice; Yellowley, Clare

    2015-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a major cause of chronic lameness in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in captivity worldwide. Radiology and other imaging technologies are of limited use in the early diagnosis of this condition in elephants. Collagen II is a major component of articular cartilage. The degradation and formation of collagen II can be monitored by the measurement of specific biomarkers in biologic fluids such as serum. It is possible that these biomarkers could also prove useful in identifying disease in elephants. In this study two commercially available immunoassays which measure a marker of collagen II degradation (C2C) and a marker of collagen II formation (CPII) were evaluated in Asian elephants. The ability of the assays to detect and measure C2C and CPII in the serum of Asian elephants was confirmed. Median serum concentration of C2C was 148 ng/L in nonlame elephants (n=33) and 91.2 ng/L in lame elephants (n=7). The difference was statistically significant (P=0.0002). Median serum concentration of CPII was 519.3 ng/L in nonlame elephants and 318.7 ng/L in lame elephants. The difference was also statistically significant (P=0.039). Whereas CPII concentrations in lame elephants mirrored findings from human and animal osteoarthritis studies, C2C concentrations did not. Further studies which evaluate these and other similar biomarkers are necessary to elucidate their usefulness in the diagnosis of osteoarthritis in proboscidae.

  6. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for tank 241-SY-102 grab samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-08-14

    Three grab samples (2SY-96-1, 2SY-96-2, and 2SY-96-3) were taken from Riser 1A of Tank 241-SY 102 on January 14, 1997, and received by 222-S Laboratory on January 14, 1997. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farm Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results. Acetone analysis was not performed in accordance with Cancellation of Acetone Analysis for Tank 241-SY-102 Grab Samples.

  7. 36 CFR 1193.51 - Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the user. (b) Connection point for external audio processing devices. Products providing auditory output shall provide the auditory signal at a standard signal level through an industry standard... signal compatibility. Products, including those providing voice communication functionality,...

  8. 36 CFR 1193.51 - Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... a connector by the user. (b) Connection point for external audio processing devices. Products providing auditory output shall provide the auditory signal at a standard signal level through an industry...) TTY signal compatibility. Products, including those providing voice communication functionality,...

  9. 36 CFR 1193.51 - Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... a connector by the user. (b) Connection point for external audio processing devices. Products providing auditory output shall provide the auditory signal at a standard signal level through an industry...) TTY signal compatibility. Products, including those providing voice communication functionality,...

  10. 36 CFR 1193.51 - Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a connector by the user. (b) Connection point for external audio processing devices. Products providing auditory output shall provide the auditory signal at a standard signal level through an industry...) TTY signal compatibility. Products, including those providing voice communication functionality,...

  11. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Meloy, T. P.; Marshall, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Originally selected for the HEDS dust & soil payload for the 2001 Mars Surveyor Lander, The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) has now been completed, tested, and is ready for flight. This paper will review the four MECA instruments.

  12. Osmotically induced synthesis of the compatible solute hydroxyectoine is mediated by an evolutionarily conserved ectoine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Bursy, Jan; Pierik, Antonio J; Pica, Nathalie; Bremer, Erhard

    2007-10-26

    By using natural abundance (13)C NMR spectroscopy, we investigated the types of compatible solutes synthesized in a variety of Bacilli under high salinity growth conditions. Glutamate, proline, and ectoine were the dominant compatible solutes synthesized by the various Bacillus species. The majority of the inspected Bacilli produced the tetrahydropyrimidine ectoine in response to high salinity stress, and a subset of these also synthesized a hydroxylation derivative of ectoine, 5-hydroxyectoine. In Salibacillus salexigens, a representative of the ectoine- and 5-hydroxyectoine-producing species, ectoine production was linearly correlated with the salinity of the growth medium and dependent on an ectABC biosynthetic operon. The formation of 5-hydroxyectoine was primarily a stationary growth phase phenomenon. The enzyme responsible for ectoine hydroxylation (EctD) was purified from S. salexigens to apparent homogeneity. The EctD protein was shown in vitro to directly hydroxylate ectoine in a reaction dependent on iron(II), molecular oxygen, and 2-oxoglutarate. We identified the structural gene (ectD) for the ectoine hydroxylase in S. salexigens. Northern blot analysis showed that the transcript levels of the ectABC and ectD genes increased as a function of salinity. Many EctD-related proteins can be found in data base searches in various Bacteria. Each of these bacterial species also contains an ectABC ectoine biosynthetic gene cluster, suggesting that 5-hydroxyectoine biosynthesis strictly depends on the prior synthesis of ectoine. Our data base searches and the biochemical characterization of the EctD protein from S. salexigens suggest that the EctD-related ectoine hydroxylases are members of a new subfamily within the non-heme-containing, iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily (EC 1.14.11).

  13. Joint SatOPS Compatibility Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Danford

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) participation in the interagency cooperation committee, the Joint SatOps Compatibility Committee (JSCC), and the compatible Sat 2 efforts. Part of GSFC's participation in the JSCC is to work with the Goddard Mission Systems Evolution Center (GMSEC) to provides a publish/subscribe framework to enable rapid integration of commercially available satellite control products.

  14. EVA-Compatible Microbial Swab Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    When we send humans to search for life on Mars, we'll need to know what we brought with us versus what may already be there. To ensure our crewed spacecraft meet planetary protection requirements—and to protect our science from human contamination—we'll need to know whether micro-organisms are leaking/venting from our ships and spacesuits. This is easily done by swabbing external vents and suit surfaces for analysis, but requires a specialized tool for the job. Engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently developed an Extravehicular Activity (EVA)-compatible swab tool that can be used to sample current space suits and life support systems. Data collected now will influence Mars life support and EVA hardware early in the planning process, before design changes become difficult and expensive.NASA’s EVA swab tool pairs a Space Shuttle-era tool handle with a commercially available swab tip mounted into a custom-designed end effector. A glove-compatible release mechanism allows the handle to quickly switch between swab tips, much like a shaving razor handle can snap onto a disposable blade cartridge. Swab tips are stowed inside individual sterile containers, each fitted with a microbial filter that allows the container to equalize atmospheric pressure, but prevents cabin contaminants from rushing into the container when passing from the EVA environment into a pressurized cabin. A bank of containers arrayed inside a tool caddy allows up to six individual samples to be collected during a given spacewalk.NASA plans to use the tool in 2016 to collect samples from various spacesuits during ground testing to determine what (if any) human-borne microbial contamination leaks from the suit under simulated thermal vacuum conditions. Next, the tool will be used on board the International Space Station to assess the types of microbial contaminants found on external environmental control and life support system vents. Data will support

  15. Cognitive compatibility of motorcyclists and car drivers.

    PubMed

    Walker, Guy H; Stanton, Neville A; Salmon, Paul M

    2011-05-01

    Incompatibility between different types of road user is a problem that previous research has shown to be resistant to a range of interventions. Cars and motorcycles are particularly prone to this. Insight is provided in this paper by a naturalistic method using concurrent verbal protocols and an automatic, highly reliable semantic network creation tool. The method shows how the same road situation is interpreted differently by car drivers and motorcyclists in ways congruent with wider accident rates. Analysis of the structure and content of the semantic networks reveals a greater degree of cognitive compatibility on faster roads such as motorways, but evidence of more critical incompatibilities on country roads and junctions. Both of these road types are implicated in helping to activate cognitive schema which in turn generate stereotypical behaviors unfavourable to the anticipation of motorcyclists by car drivers. The results are discussed in terms of practical measures such as road signs which warn of events behind as well as in front, cross-mode training and the concept of route driveability.

  16. [Safety and electromagnetic compatibility in sanitary field].

    PubMed

    Bini, M; Feroldi, P; Ferri, C; Ignesti, A; Olmi, R; Priori, S; Riminesi, C; Tobia, L

    2012-01-01

    In sanitary field and especially in a hospital, multiple sources of non ionizing radiation are used for diagnostic and therapeutic aims. In sanitary sector both workers and users are present at the same time, and in some cases general population could need higher protection than workers in relationship to the exposition to electromagnetic fields. In order to protect health and safety of patients, general population and workers of hospitals and with the aim to identify, analyze, evaluate and study its level of significance, electrical, magnetic and electromagnetic sources Research Italian project Si.C.E.O. (Safety And Electromagnetic Compatibility In Sanitary Field) was instituted. Target of our research project was to deepen risk of exposition elements with analysis of outdoor (e.g. power lines, transmission cabinets) and indoor (e.g. equipment for physical therapy) sources, located in sanitary structures and to verify the level exposition of workers and common population end the respect of specific regulation, and finally to define technical and organizational measures really useful for protection and reduction of risk.

  17. Use of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) with persons with traumatic brain injury: analysis of factorial structure.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Shelley M; Lam, Chow S; Leahy, Brian

    2005-02-01

    To determine the factorial structure of the BDI-II in a TBI sample and possible predictor variables of depression following TBI. Principle components analysis with orthogonal rotation and linear regression analyses. Fifty-one individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) participated in this study. The factorial structure of the BDI-II, a 21-item self-report measure of depression, was examined with individuals in the early stages following TBI. Time since injury, severity of injury, location of lesion and previous substance abuse were examined as possible predictors of depression following TBI. A three-factor structure of the BDI-II was found for the TBI sample, which included Negative Self-Evaluation, Symptoms of Depression and Vegetative Symptoms of Depression. Time since injury was the only significant predictor of depression following TBI. Using the BDI-II, symptoms of depression after TBI fall into three key categories. With time since injury being the only significant predictor of depression following TBI, it appears that the depression could be more of a result of psychosocial factors than neurobiological factors. It was concluded that BDI-II can be useful in identifying symptoms of depression in the early stages following TBI.

  18. Fermi Bubbles under Dark Matter Scrutiny Part II: Particle Physics Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wei-Chih; Urbano, Alfredo; Xue, Wei E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it

    2014-04-01

    The analysis of the gamma-ray photons collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveals, after removal of astrophysical background, the existence of an excess towards the Galactic center. This excess peaks around few GeV, and its origin is compatible with the gamma-ray flux originating from Dark Matter annihilation. In this work we take a closer look on this interpretation; we investigate which kind of Dark Matter, and which type of interactions with the Standard Model fields are able to reproduce the observed signal. The structure of the paper is twofold. In the first part, we follow an effective field theory approach considering both fermionic and scalar Dark Matter. The computation of the relic density, the constraint imposed from the null result of direct searches, and the reliability of the effective field theory description allow us to single out only two viable dim-6 operators in the case of fermionic Dark Matter. In the second part, we analyze some concrete models. In particular, we find that the scalar Higgs portal can provide a simple, concrete and realistic scenario able to explain the GeV excess under scrutiny.

  19. Structural analysis and physico-chemical characterization of mononuclear manganese(II) and polynuclear copper(II) complexes with pyridine-based alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zienkiewicz-Machnik, Małgorzata; Masternak, Joanna; Kazimierczuk, Katarzyna; Barszcz, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    Two novel manganese(II) and copper(II) complexes, mononuclear [Mn(H2O)2(2-(CH2)2OHpy)2](NO3)2 (1) and polynuclear [Cu(SO4)(2-(CH2)2OHpy)2]n (2), based on 2-(hydroxyethyl)pyridine (2-(CH2)2OHpy) were synthesised and fully characterised using X-ray structure analysis as well as spectroscopic, magnetic and thermal methods. Both central metal ions Mn(1) and Cu(1) are coordinated by two N,O-donor 2-(CH2)2OHpy ligands and possess an almost perfect octahedral geometry (a chromophore of {MN2O4} type). The coordination sphere of Mn(II) is completed by two molecules of water, whereas, in polynuclear complex 2, Cu(II) atoms are linked along the a crystallographic direction by bridging sulfate ligands in a μ2-κ2 binding mode to form chains. The intermolecular interactions in 1 and 2 have been interpreted in view of the 3D Hirshfeld surface analysis and associated 2D fingerprint plots. Furthermore, the complexes have been tested with ABTSrad + assay in order to assess their antioxidant activity. In addition, the IC50 values calculated for 1 and 2 revealed that the complexes show a higher antioxidant activity than corresponding ligand.

  20. Multi-reverse flow injection analysis integrated with multi-optical sensor for simultaneous determination of Mn(II), Fe(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Youngvises, Napaporn; Suwannasaroj, Kittigan; Jakmunee, Jaroon; AlSuhaimi, Awadh

    2017-05-01

    Multi-reverse flow injection analysis (Mr-FIA) integrated with multi-optical sensor was developed and optimized for the simultaneous determination of multi ions; Mn(II), Fe(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) in water samples. The sample/standard solutions were propelled making use of a four channels peristaltic pump whereas 4 colorimetric reagents specific for the metal ions were separately injected in sample streams using multi-syringe pump. The color zones that formed in the individual mixing coils were then streamed into multi-channels spectrometer, which comprised of four flows through cell and four pairs of light emitting diode and photodiode, whereby signals were measured concurrently. The linearity range (along with detection limit, µgL(-1)) was 0.050-3.0(16), 0.30-2.0 (11), 0.050-1.0(12) and 0.10-1.0(50)mgL(-1), for Mn(II), Fe(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III), respectively. In the interim, the correlation coefficients were 0.9924-0.9942. The percentages relative standard deviation was less than 3. The proposed system was applied successfully to determine targeted metal ions simultaneously in natural water with high sample throughput and low reagent consumption, thus it satisfies the criteria of Green Analytical Chemistry (GAC) and its goals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. SMART Analysis Of A He II Explosive Event Observed With MOSES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Lewis; Kankelborg, C. C.; Thomas, R. J.

    2010-05-01

    Analysis of data from the MOSES (Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph) sounding rocket has shown a Transition Region Explosive Event (TREE) in He II 304 Å with an unusual structure that defies conventional models of explosive events; the outflow jets are not collinear or anti-parallel. Results from our preliminary analysis of this event, performed using a tomographic parallax technique but without full inversions, are reported in a paper submitted to the Astrophysical Journal, presently under revision. Early results of inversions using the Smoothed Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (SMART), reported at SPD 2009, showed qualitative agreement with parallax analysis results but disagreement in magnitude of doppler velocities. We address this discrepancy with further refinement of the inversion technique and show how the discrepancy in velocity magnitude can be understood.

  2. Statistical issues for design and analysis of single-arm multi-stage phase II cancer clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2015-05-01

    Phase II trials have been very widely conducted and published every year for cancer clinical research. In spite of the fast progress in design and analysis methods, single-arm two-stage design is still the most popular for phase II cancer clinical trials. Because of their small sample sizes, statistical methods based on large sample approximation are not appropriate for design and analysis of phase II trials. As a prospective clinical research, the analysis method of a phase II trial is predetermined at the design stage and it is analyzed during and at the end of the trial as planned by the design. The analysis method of a trial should be matched with the design method. For two-stage single arm phase II trials, Simon's method has been the standards for choosing an optimal design, but the resulting data have been analyzed and published ignoring the two-stage design aspect with small sample sizes. In this article, we review analysis methods that exactly get along with the exact two-stage design method. We also discuss some statistical methods to improve the existing design and analysis methods for single-arm two-stage phase II trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and characterisation of disposable gold electrodes, and their use for lead(II) analysis.

    PubMed

    Noh, Mohd F Md; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2006-12-01

    There is an increasing need to assess the harmful effects of heavy-metal-ion pollution on the environment. The ability to detect and measure toxic contaminants on site using simple, cost effective, and field-portable sensors is an important aspect of environmental protection and facilitating rapid decision making. A screen-printed gold sensor in a three-electrode configuration has been developed for analysis of lead(II) by square-wave stripping voltammetry (SWSV). The working electrode was fabricated with gold ink deposited by use of thick-film technology. Conditions affecting the lead stripping response were characterised and optimized. Experimental data indicated that chloride ions are important in lead deposition and subsequent analysis with this type of sensor. A linear concentration range of 10-50 microg L(-1) and 25-300 microg L(-1) with detection limits of 2 microg L(-1) and 5.8 microg L(-1) were obtained for lead(II) for measurement times of four and two minutes, respectively. The electrodes can be reused up to 20 times after cleaning with 0.5 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid. Interference of other metals with the response to lead were also examined to optimize the sensor response for analysis of environmental samples. The analytical utility of the sensor was demonstrated by applying the system to a variety of wastewater and soil sample extracts from polluted sites. The results are sufficient evidence of the feasibility of using these screen-printed gold electrodes for the determination of lead(II) in wastewater and soil extracts. For comparison purposes a mercury-film electrode and ICP-MS were used for validation.

  4. Motion analysis and trials of the deep sea hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Yan-hui; Wu, Zhi-liang; Wang, Shu-xin

    2017-03-01

    A hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II has been developed and field tested. It is equipped with an active buoyancy unit and a compact propeller unit. Its working modes have been expanded to buoyancy driven gliding and propeller driven level-flight, which can make the glider work in strong currents, as well as many other complicated ocean environments. Its maximal gliding speed reaches 1 knot and the propelling speed is up to 3 knots. In this paper, a 3D dynamic model of Petrel-II is derived using linear momentum and angular momentum equations. According to the dynamic model, the spiral motion in the underwater space is simulated for the gliding mode. Similarly the cycle motion on water surface and the depth-keeping motion underwater are simulated for the level-flight mode. These simulations are important to the performance analysis and parameter optimization for the Petrel-II underwater glider. The simulation results show a good agreement with field trials.

  5. Mate choice for genetic compatibility in the house mouse.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Anna K; Musolf, Kerstin; Weidt, Andrea; König, Barbara

    2013-05-01

    In house mice, genetic compatibility is influenced by the t haplotype, a driving selfish genetic element with a recessive lethal allele, imposing fundamental costs on mate choice decisions. Here, we evaluate the cost of genetic incompatibility and its implication for mate choice in a wild house mice population. In laboratory reared mice, we detected no fertility (number of embryos) or fecundity (ability to conceive) costs of the t, and yet we found a high cost of genetic incompatibility: heterozygote crosses produced 40% smaller birth litter sizes because of prenatal mortality. Surprisingly, transmission of t in crosses using +/t males was influenced by female genotype, consistent with postcopulatory female choice for + sperm in +/t females. Analysis of paternity patterns in a wild population of house mice showed that +/t females were more likely than +/+ females to have offspring sired by +/+ males, and unlike +/+ females, paternity of their offspring was not influenced by +/t male frequency, further supporting mate choice for genetic compatibility. As the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is physically linked to the t, we investigated whether females could potentially use variation at the MHC to identify male genotype at the sperm or individual level. A unique MHC haplotype is linked to the t haplotype. This MHC haplotype could allow the recognition of t and enable pre- and postcopulatory mate choice for genetic compatibility. Alternatively, the MHC itself could be the target of mate choice for genetic compatibility. We predict that mate choice for genetic compatibility will be difficult to find in many systems, as only weak fertilization biases were found despite an exceptionally high cost of genetic incompatibility.

  6. Analysis of solvation and structural contributions in spectral characteristics of dipyrrin Zn(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marfin, Yu. S.; Rumyantsev, E. V.

    2014-09-01

    Photophysical characteristics of several alkylated dipyrrin Zn(II) complexes in organic solvents were analyzed. Relations between spectral properties of complexes and physical-chemical parameters of solvents were determined with the use of linear regression analysis method. Each solvent parameter contribution in investigated spectral characteristics was estimated. Spectral properties of complexes under study depend on the specific interactions of zinc with the solvent molecules by specific axial coordination. Increasing of alkyl substitution lead to the bathochromic shifts in spectra due to the positive induction effect of alkyl groups.

  7. National Aviation Fuel Scenario Analysis Program (NAFSAP). Volume I. Model Description. Volume II. User Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    TESI CHART NATIONAI RUREAt (F ANDA[)Rt 1V4 A NATIONAL. AVIATION ~ FUEL SCENARIO.. ANALYSIS PROGRAM 49!! VOLUM I: MODEL DESCRIA~v 4<C VOLUME II: tr)ER...O %a 0 CD -00 a0 Dcc% %D Ln n q F u-u - ON 4w - u-u-MN N En -4C u-u-u-u- u- .- u-- - u--4uu 41 4t 1- The second major class of inputs to NAFSAP is the...this option determines the specific form of the number of new purchases (NOBUYS) computation. 14 L " - - .. .... . .I li I I q i . .. . . . . . r I I i

  8. Harmonic Analysis and H2-Functions on Siegel Domains of Type II

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, R. D.; Vági, S.

    1972-01-01

    It is known that the distinguished boundary of a Siegel domain of type II can be identified with a simply connected nilpotent Lie group of step two. The Plancherel formula for this group and the irreducible unitary representations which enter into that formula are determined. The H2-space of the domain and its Szegö kernel are characterized in terms of the harmonic analysis of the above group, in particular, the integral representations for H2-functions due to Gindikin and Korányi-Stein are shown to be instances of the Fourier inversion formula. PMID:16591961

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (NORWTH00120010) Town Highway 012 Bloody Brook, Norwich, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NORWTH00120010 on town highway 12 crossing Bloody Brook, Norwich, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, available from VTAOT files, was compiled prior to conducting the Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 8.98-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the left bank upstream and the left and right banks downstream are forested. The immediate right bank upstream is covered by shrub and brush with pasture on the overbank. Town Highway 12 runs along the valley of Bloody Brook; however, at structure NORWTH00120010 the road crosses Bloody Brook at a 90-degree angle. In the study area, Bloody Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.014 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 41 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble (D50 is 51.0 mm or 0.167 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on October 31, 1994, indicated that the reach was unstable. The town highway 12 crossing of Bloody Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., July 29, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The right abutment is protected by sparse type-2 stone fill (less than 24 inches diameter). The channel is skewed 0 degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees

  10. Steady state thermal radiation analysis between the TOPAZ-II radiator and a heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Maveety, J.G.; Wold, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    In this study the authors investigate the feasibility and efficiency of coupling a single-pass heat exchanger to the TOPAZ-II space power system operating at steady state conditions. A first and second law analysis was performed in order to determine the optimal operating conditions which minimize the pumping power and maximize the flow exergy of the working fluid. The results of this study show that (1) the space power system is basically unaffected by the addition of this heat exchanger and (2) as much as 60% of the availability is destroyed by irreversibilities while operating at optimal flow conditions.

  11. Stability of Class II fixed functional appliance therapy—a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    von Bremen, Julia; Ruf, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives: To systematically search for scientific evidence concerning the stability of treatment (Tx) results achieved by means of Class II fixed functional appliance therapy and to assess possible differences between appliances. Search Methods: An electronic search of databases and orthodontic journals was carried out (until December 2013), with supplemental hand searching. In addition to the names of all identified appliances, the term fixed functional was used in combination with each of the following search terms: long-term, post-Tx, relapse, retention, stability. Selection Criteria: To be included in the review, the articles had to contain clear data on: Class II Tx with a fixed functional appliance (>5 patients), post-Tx period ≥ 1 year, assessment of ANB angle, Wits appraisal, molar relationship, soft-tissue profile convexity excluding the nose, overjet and/or overbite. Data Collection and Analysis: The literature search revealed 20 scientific investigations which corresponded to only two of the 76 identified appliances (Herbst and Twin Force Bite Corrector). As only one publication was found for the Twin Force Bite Corrector, a meta-analysis could only be performed for Herbst Tx. The data were extracted, pooled and weighted according to the number of patients in each study. Results: The mean values for post-Tx relapse (percentages relative to the Tx changes) were: ANB angle 0.2 degrees (12.4 per cent), Wits appraisal 0.5mm (19.5 per cent), sagittal molar relationship 1.2mm/0.1 cusp widths (21.8 per cent /6.5 per cent); soft-tissue profile convexity excluding nose less than 0.1 degrees (1.0 per cent), overjet 1.8mm (26.2 per cent), overbite Class II:1 1.4mm (44.7 per cent), overbite Class II:2 1.0mm (22.2 per cent). Conclusions: The scientific evidence concerning the stability of Tx results is inexistent for most fixed functional appliances for Class II correction except for Herbst appliance Tx. Even if the evidence level of most included studies

  12. Chemical analysis of carbon stars in the Local Group. II. The Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abia, C.; de Laverny, P.; Wahlin, R.

    2008-04-01

    Aims:We present new results of our ongoing chemical study of carbon stars in Local Group galaxies to test the critical dependence of s-process nucleosynthesis on the stellar metallicity. Methods: We collected optical spectra with the VLT/UVES instrument of two carbon stars found in the Carina Dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) galaxy, namely ALW-C6 and ALW-C7. We performed a full chemical analysis using the new generation of hydrostatic, spherically symmetric carbon-rich model atmospheres and the spectral synthesis method in LTE. Results: The luminosities, atmosphere parameters and chemical composition of ALW-C6 and ALW-C7 are compatible with these stars being in the TP-AGB phase undergoing third dredge-up episodes, although their extrinsic nature (external pollution in a binary stellar system) cannot be definitively excluded. Our chemical analysis shows that the metallicity of both stars agree with the average metallicity ([Fe/H] -1.8 dex) previously derived for this satellite galaxy from the analysis of both low resolution spectra of RGB stars and the observed colour magnitude diagrams. ALW-C6 and ALW-C7 present strong s-element enhancements, [ s/Fe] = +1.6, +1.5, respectively. These enhancements and the derived s-process indexes [ ls/Fe] , [ hs/Fe] and [ hs/ls] are compatible with theoretical s-process nucleosynthesis predictions in low mass AGB stars ( 1.5 M_⊙) on the basis that the 13C(α,n)16O is the main source of neutrons. Furthermore, the analysis of C2 and CN bands reveals a large carbon enhancement (C/O 7 and 5, respectively), much larger than the values typically found in galactic AGB carbon stars (C/O 1{-}2). This is also in agreement with the theoretical prediction that AGB carbon stars are formed more easily through third dredge-up episodes as the initial stellar metallicity drops. However, theoretical low-mass AGB models apparently fail to simultaneously fit the observed s-element and carbon enhancements. On the other hand, Zr is found to be less enhanced in

  13. RE-ANALYSIS OF THE RADIO LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF GALACTIC H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paladini, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; DeZotti, G.

    2009-09-10

    We have re-analyzed continuum and recombination lines radio data available in the literature in order to derive the luminosity function (LF) of Galactic H II regions. The study is performed by considering the first and fourth Galactic quadrants independently. We estimate the completeness level of the sample in the fourth quadrant at 5 Jy, and the one in the first quadrant at 2 Jy. We show that the two samples (fourth or first quadrant) include, as well as giant and supergiant H II regions, a significant number of subgiant sources. The LF is obtained, in each Galactic quadrant, with a generalized Schmidt's estimator using an effective volume derived from the observed spatial distribution of the considered H II regions. The re-analysis also takes advantage of recently published ancillary absorption data allowing to solve the distance ambiguity for several objects. A single power-law fit to the LFs retrieves a slope equal to -2.23 {+-} 0.07 (fourth quadrant) and to -1.85 {+-} 0.11 (first quadrant). We also find marginal evidence of a luminosity break at L{sub knee} = 10{sup 23.45} erg s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1} for the LF in the fourth quadrant. We convert radio luminosities into equivalent H{alpha} and Lyman continuum luminosities to facilitate comparisons with extragalactic studies. We obtain an average total H II regions Lyman continuum luminosity of 0.89 {+-} 0.23 x 10{sup 53} s{sup -1}, corresponding to 30% of the total ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy.

  14. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 3, Verification/validation assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.

    1987-10-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum are enhanced by the incorporation of directional porosities and permeabilities that aid in modeling solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated procedures are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume I - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. Volume II - User's Manual contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a model problem. This volume, Volume III - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. This volume also documents comparisons between the results of simulations of single- and multiassembly storage systems and actual experimental data. 11 refs., 55 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. Synthesis of artificial spectrum-compatible seismic accelerograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrochidou, E.; Alvanitopoulos, P. F.; Andreadis, I.; Elenas, A.; Mallousi, K.

    2014-08-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform is used to generate artificial seismic signals compatible with the acceleration spectra of natural seismic records. Artificial spectrum-compatible accelerograms are utilized instead of natural earthquake records for the dynamic response analysis of many critical structures such as hospitals, bridges, and power plants. The realistic estimation of the seismic response of structures involves nonlinear dynamic analysis. Moreover, it requires seismic accelerograms representative of the actual ground acceleration time histories expected at the site of interest. Unfortunately, not many actual records of different seismic intensities are available for many regions. In addition, a large number of seismic accelerograms are required to perform a series of nonlinear dynamic analyses for a reliable statistical investigation of the structural behavior under earthquake excitation. These are the main motivations for generating artificial spectrum-compatible seismic accelerograms and could be useful in earthquake engineering for dynamic analysis and design of buildings. According to the proposed method, a single natural earthquake record is deconstructed into amplitude and frequency components using the Hilbert-Huang transform. The proposed method is illustrated by studying 20 natural seismic records with different characteristics such as different frequency content, amplitude, and duration. Experimental results reveal the efficiency of the proposed method in comparison with well-established and industrial methods in the literature.

  16. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 150 - Explanation of Figure 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. II Appendix II to Part 150—Explanation of Figure 1 Definition of a..., the inorganic acids. The cargo groups in the compatibility chart are separated into two categories: 1... certain Reactive Groups. Cargo Groups do not react hazardously with one another. Using the Compatibility...

  17. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 150 - Explanation of Figure 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. II Appendix II to Part 150—Explanation of Figure 1 Definition of a..., the inorganic acids. The cargo groups in the compatibility chart are separated into two categories: 1... certain Reactive Groups. Cargo Groups do not react hazardously with one another. Using the Compatibility...

  18. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 150 - Explanation of Figure 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. II Appendix II to Part 150—Explanation of Figure 1 Definition of a..., the inorganic acids. The cargo groups in the compatibility chart are separated into two categories: 1... certain Reactive Groups. Cargo Groups do not react hazardously with one another. Using the Compatibility...

  19. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 150 - Explanation of Figure 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. II Appendix II to Part 150—Explanation of Figure 1 Definition of a..., the inorganic acids. The cargo groups in the compatibility chart are separated into two categories: 1... certain Reactive Groups. Cargo Groups do not react hazardously with one another. Using the Compatibility...

  20. Evaluating the compatibility of multi-functional and intensive urban land uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleai, M.; Sharifi, A.; Sliuzas, R.; Mesgari, M.

    2007-12-01

    This research is aimed at developing a model for assessing land use compatibility in densely built-up urban areas. In this process, a new model was developed through the combination of a suite of existing methods and tools: geographical information system, Delphi methods and spatial decision support tools: namely multi-criteria evaluation analysis, analytical hierarchy process and ordered weighted average method. The developed model has the potential to calculate land use compatibility in both horizontal and vertical directions. Furthermore, the compatibility between the use of each floor in a building and its neighboring land uses can be evaluated. The method was tested in a built-up urban area located in Tehran, the capital city of Iran. The results show that the model is robust in clarifying different levels of physical compatibility between neighboring land uses. This paper describes the various steps and processes of developing the proposed land use compatibility evaluation model (CEM).

  1. Tumour Budding and Survival in Stage II Colorectal Cancer: a Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, F; Pezzica, E; Cabiddu, M; Coinu, A; Borgonovo, K; Ghilardi, M; Lonati, V; Corti, D; Barni, S

    2015-09-01

    Tumour budding is defined as the presence of isolated or small clusters of malignant cells at the invasive edge of the tumour. It is considered a negative prognostic factor in colorectal cancer (CRC) and is associated with a poor outcome and adverse pathological features. Here, we report a meta-analysis of the association of tumour budding and survival in stage II CRC patients. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and SCOPUS were searched for studies that assessed the relationship between tumour budding and 5-year overall survival (OS) in stage II CRC patients. Published data were extracted and used to compute odds ratios (ORs) for death at 5 years and hazard ratios (HRs) for survival amongst patients with respect to the extent of tumour budding, using multivariate analysis. Data were pooled using the Mantel-Haenszel random effect model. We analysed 12 studies that included a total of 1652 patients. High-grade budding was associated with worse OS at 5 years (OR for death, 6.25; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 4.04-9.67; P < 0.00001). The absolute difference in 5-year OS was -25 % (95 % CI, -18- - 33 %, P < 0.00001). It was particularly noteworthy that the presence of high-grade budding was associated with an increased risk of death (HR for death, 3.68; 95 % CI, 2.16-6.28, P < 0.00001). Tumour budding is associated with worse survival in stage II CRC, in particular in pT3N0M0 patients. It could therefore potentially be used when deciding whether to administer adjuvant chemotherapy in high-risk node negative CRC patients.

  2. Driver Education Task Analysis. Volume II: Task Analysis Methods. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, A. James; Adams, Bert B.

    This report is the second in a series of four reports dealing with the development of performance-oriented driver education objectives and a set of measuring devices for evaluating attainment of the objectives. Included are descriptions of the analysis of driver's tasks and the evaluation of behavior criticality. During the analysis process, the…

  3. Probability-based compatibility curves for calcium and phosphates in parenteral nutrition formulations.

    PubMed

    Gonyon, Thomas; Carter, Phillip W; Phillips, Gerald; Owen, Heather; Patel, Dipa; Kotha, Priyanka; Green, John-Bruce D

    2014-08-01

    The information content of the calcium phosphate compatibility curves for adult parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions may benefit from a more sophisticated statistical treatment. Binary logistic regression analyses were evaluated as part of an alternate method for generating formulation compatibility curves. A commercial PN solution was challenged with a systematic array of calcium and phosphate concentrations. These formulations were then characterized for particulates by visual inspection, light obscuration, and filtration followed by optical microscopy. Logistic regression analyses of the data were compared with traditional treatments for generating compatibility curves. Assay-dependent differences were observed in the compatibility curves and associated probability contours; the microscopic method of precipitate detection generated the most robust results. Calcium and phosphate compatibility data generated from small-volume glass containers reasonably predicted the observed compatibility of clinically relevant flexible containers. The published methods for creating calcium and phosphate compatibility curves via connecting the highest passing or lowest failing calcium concentrations should be augmented or replaced by probability contours of the entire experimental design to determine zones of formulation incompatibilities. We recommend researchers evaluate their data with logistic regression analysis to help build a more comprehensive probabilistic database of compatibility information. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  4. Signal classification using global dynamical models, Part II: SONAR data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremliovsky, Michael; Kadtke, James

    1996-06-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a numerical method for nonlinear signal detection and classification which made use of techniques borrowed from dynamical systems theory. Here in Part II of the paper, we will describe an example of data analysis using this method, for data consisting of open ocean acoustic (SONAR) recordings of marine mammal transients, supplied from NUWC sources. The purpose here is two-fold: first to give a more operational description of the technique and provide rules-of-thumb for parameter choices; and second to discuss some new issues raised by the analysis of non-ideal (real-world) data sets. The particular data set considered here is quite non-stationary, relatively noisy, is not clearly localized in the background, and as such provides a difficult challenge for most detection/classification schemes.

  5. Polarization Analysis Equipment in SANS-J-II: Study of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane for Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yohei; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Putra, Ananda; Koizumi, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yoshifumi; Oku, Takayuki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi

    In small angle neutron scattering spectrometer, SANS-J-II at Japan Research Reactor No. 3 (JRR-3), a polarization analysis setup has been equipped, which is composed of transmission-type supermirror polarizer, radial-bender-type supermirror analyzer, π flipper, and solenoids for generating guide magnetic field. This setup was applied to the structural study of polymer electrolyte membrane, Nafion under water-swollen state. The sample is known to exhibit several characteristic peaks at wide angle region, which is related to water transporting channels. By use of polarization analysis technique, the coherent and incoherent contributions were successfully separated. Consequently, we obtained reliable information about decaying power law of ionic cluster peak and the shape of the broad peak, relating to ordering with short distance (5.6 Å).

  6. Signal classification using global dynamical models, Part II: SONAR data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kremliovsky, M.; Kadtke, J.

    1996-06-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a numerical method for nonlinear signal detection and classification which made use of techniques borrowed from dynamical systems theory. Here in Part II of the paper, we will describe an example of data analysis using this method, for data consisting of open ocean acoustic (SONAR) recordings of marine mammal transients, supplied from NUWC sources. The purpose here is two-fold: first to give a more operational description of the technique and provide rules-of-thumb for parameter choices; and second to discuss some new issues raised by the analysis of non-ideal (real-world) data sets. The particular data set considered here is quite non-stationary, relatively noisy, is not clearly localized in the background, and as such provides a difficult challenge for most detection/classification schemes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Stability of Class II fixed functional appliance therapy--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bock, Niko C; von Bremen, Julia; Ruf, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    To systematically search for scientific evidence concerning the stability of treatment (Tx) results achieved by means of Class II fixed functional appliance therapy and to assess possible differences between appliances. An electronic search of databases and orthodontic journals was carried out (until December 2013), with supplemental hand searching. In addition to the names of all identified appliances, the term fixed functional was used in combination with each of the following search terms: long-term, post-Tx, relapse, retention, stability. To be included in the review, the articles had to contain clear data on: Class II Tx with a fixed functional appliance (>5 patients), post-Tx period ≥ 1 year, assessment of ANB angle, Wits appraisal, molar relationship, soft-tissue profile convexity excluding the nose, overjet and/or overbite. The literature search revealed 20 scientific investigations which corresponded to only two of the 76 identified appliances (Herbst and Twin Force Bite Corrector). As only one publication was found for the Twin Force Bite Corrector, a meta-analysis could only be performed for Herbst Tx. The data were extracted, pooled and weighted according to the number of patients in each study. The mean values for post-Tx relapse (percentages relative to the Tx changes) were: ANB angle 0.2 degrees (12.4 per cent), Wits appraisal 0.5mm (19.5 per cent), sagittal molar relationship 1.2mm/0.1 cusp widths (21.8 per cent /6.5 per cent); soft-tissue profile convexity excluding nose less than 0.1 degrees (1.0 per cent), overjet 1.8mm (26.2 per cent), overbite Class II:1 1.4mm (44.7 per cent), overbite Class II:2 1.0mm (22.2 per cent). The scientific evidence concerning the stability of Tx results is inexistent for most fixed functional appliances for Class II correction except for Herbst appliance Tx. Even if the evidence level of most included studies is rather low, good dentoskeletal stability without clinically relevant changes was found for most

  8. A survey of inlet/engine distortion compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowditch, D. N.; Coltrin, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The history of distortion analysis is traced back to its origin in parallel compressor theory which was initially proposed in the late fifties. The development of this theory is reviewed up to its inclusion in the complex computer codes of today. It is found to be a very useful tool to guide development but not quantitative enough to predict compatibility. Dynamic or instantaneous distortion methodology is also reviewed from its origins in the sixties, to its current application in the eighties. Many of the requirements for interpreting instantaneous distortion are considered and illustrated. Statistical methods for predicting the peak distortion are described, and their limitations and advantages discussed. Finally, some Reynolds number and scaling considerations for inlet testing are considered. It is concluded that the deterministic instantaneous distortion methodology combined with distortion testing of engines with screens will remain the primary method of predicting compatibility for the near future. However, parallel compressor analysis and statistical peak distortion prediction will be important tools employed during the development of inlet/engine compatibility.

  9. JTIDS electromagnetic compatibility in the 960-1215 MHz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokuta, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    The Joint Tactical Information Distribution System (JTIDS) operates in the 960-1215 MHz frequency band. This band is allocated world-wide on a primary basis for aeronautical radio navigation. JTIDS was designed to be electromagnetically compatible with the Air Traffic Control systems that operate in this band. Over the past 15 years, extensive bench tests, flight tests, and analyses were conducted to assess the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of JTIDS in the 960-1215 MHz band. This report summarizes the results and conclusions of these efforts, presents some supporting data and provides specific guidance for the operation of JTIDS within the National Air Space. Guidance and recommendations are also provided to assist in the definition and scope of a JTIDS EMC test and analysis effort.

  10. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  11. Environmentally compatible hand wipe cleaning solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Catherine P.; Kovach, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    Several solvents of environmental concern have previously been used for hand wipe cleaning of SRB surfaces, including 1,1,1-trichloroethane, perchloroethylene, toluene, xylene, and MEK. USBI determined the major types of surfaces involved, and qualification requirements of replacement cleaning agents. Nineteen environmentally compatible candidates were tested on 33 material substrates with 26 types of potential surface contaminants, involving over 7,000 individual evaluations. In addition to the cleaning performance evaluation, bonding, compatibility, and corrosion tests were conducted. Results showed that one cleaner was not optimum for all surfaces. In most instances, some of the candidates cleaned better than the 1,1,1-trichloroethane baseline control. Aqueous cleaners generally cleaned better, and were more compatible with nonmetallic materials, such as paints, plastics, and elastomers. Organic base cleaners were better on metal surfaces. Five cleaners have been qualified and are now being implemented in SRB hand wipe cleaning operations.

  12. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  13. Physics Metacognition Inventory Part II: Confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2015-11-01

    The Physics Metacognition Inventory was developed to measure physics students' metacognition for problem solving. In one of our earlier studies, an exploratory factor analysis provided evidence of preliminary construct validity, revealing six components of students' metacognition when solving physics problems including knowledge of cognition, planning, monitoring, evaluation, debugging, and information management. The college students' scores on the inventory were found to be reliable and related to students' physics motivation and physics grade. However, the results of the exploratory factor analysis indicated that the questionnaire could be revised to improve its construct validity. The goal of this study was to revise the questionnaire and establish its construct validity through a confirmatory factor analysis. In addition, a Rasch analysis was applied to the data to better understand the psychometric properties of the inventory and to further evaluate the construct validity. Results indicated that the final, revised inventory is a valid, reliable, and efficient tool for assessing student metacognition for physics problem solving.

  14. Compatibility Equations of Nonlinear Elasticity for Non-Simply-Connected Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavari, Arash

    2013-07-01

    Compatibility equations of elasticity are almost 150 years old. Interestingly, they do not seem to have been rigorously studied, to date, for non-simply-connected bodies. In this paper we derive necessary and sufficient compatibility equations of nonlinear elasticity for arbitrary non-simply-connected bodies when the ambient space is Euclidean. For a non-simply-connected body, a measure of strain may not be compatible, even if the standard compatibility equations ("bulk" compatibility equations) are satisfied. It turns out that there may be topological obstructions to compatibility; this paper aims to understand them for both deformation gradient F and the right Cauchy-Green strain C = F T F. We show that the necessary and sufficient conditions for compatibility of deformation gradient F are the vanishing of its exterior derivative and all its periods, that is, its integral over generators of the first homology group of the material manifold. We will show that not every non-null-homotopic path requires supplementary compatibility equations for F and linearized strain e. We then find both necessary and sufficient compatibility conditions for the right Cauchy-Green strain tensor C for arbitrary non-simply-connected bodies when the material and ambient space manifolds have the same dimensions. We discuss the well-known necessary compatibility equations in the linearized setting and the Cesàro-Volterra path integral. We then obtain the sufficient conditions of compatibility for the linearized strain when the body is not simply-connected. To summarize, the question of compatibility reduces to two issues: i) an integrability condition, which is d( F d X) = 0 for the deformation gradient and a curvature vanishing condition for C, and ii) a topological condition. For F d x this is a homological condition because the equation one is trying to solve takes the form d φ = F d X. For C, however, parallel transport is involved, which means that one needs to solve an equation

  15. Electromagnetic Compatibility for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Space Shuttle electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). It includes an overview of the design of the shuttle with the areas that are of concern for the electromagnetic compatibility. It includes discussion of classical electromagnetic interference (EMI) and the work performed to control the electromagnetic interference. Another area of interest is electrostatic charging and the threat of electrostatic discharge and the attempts to reduce damage to the Shuttle from these possible hazards. The issue of electrical bonding is als reviewed. Lastly the presentation reviews the work performed to protect the shuttle from lightning, both in flight and on the ground.

  16. Micro-Compatibility Testing of Polysulfone

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, H; Harvey, C; Maxwell, R; Vance, A

    2004-09-28

    Polysulfone has many useful properties, and its compatibility with other materials is of interest. It is a tough, rigid, high-strength thermoplastic that maintains its properties over a wide temperature range. It is chemically resistant to mineral acids and alkali and moderately resistant to hydrocarbon oils; however, it is not resistant to polar organic solvents such as ketones, chlorinated hydrocarbons and aromatic hydrocarbons. Micro-compatibility experiments were initiated to determine possible detrimental interactions in a sealed environment between polysulfone components and a number of other organic species.

  17. Water/sand flooded and immersed critical experiment and analysis performed in support of the TOPAZ-II safety program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, Evgeny S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N.; Bubelev, Vladimir G.; Garin, Vladimir P.; Gomin, Evgeny A.; Kompanietz, Georgy V.; Krutov, Aleksei M.; Lobynstev, Vyacheslav A.; Maiorov, Lev V.; Polyakov, Dmitry N.; Chunyaev, Evgeny I.; Marshall, Albert C.; Sapir, Joseph L.; Pelowitz, Denise B.

    1995-01-01

    Presented is a brief description of the Narciss-M2 critical assemblies, which simulate accidental water/wet-sand immersion of the TOPAZ-II reactor as well as water-flooding of core cavities. Experimental results obtained from these critical assemblies, including experiments with several fuel elements removed from the core, are shown. These configurations with several extracted fuel elements simulate a proposed fuel-out anticriticality-device modification to the TOPAZ-II reactor. Preliminary computational analysis of these experiments using the Monte Carlo neutron-transport method is outlined. Nuclear criticality safety of the TOPAZ-II reactor with an incorporated anticriticality unit is demonstrated.

  18. Water/sand flooded and immersed critical experiment and analysis performed in support of the TOPAZ-II Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, E.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Bubelev, V.G.; Garin, V.P.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompanietz, G.V.; Krutoy, A.M.; Lobynstev, V.A.; Maiorov, L.V.; Polyakov, D.N.

    1994-11-01

    Presented is a brief description of the Narciss-M2 critical assemblies, which simulate accidental water/wet-sand immersion of the TOPAZ-II reactor as well as water-flooding of core cavities. Experimental results obtained from these critical assemblies, including experiments with several fuel elements removed from the core, are shown. These configurations with several extracted fuel elements simulate a proposed fuel-out anticriticality-device modification to the TOPAZ-II reactor. Preliminary computational analysis of these experiments using the Monte Carlo neutron-transport method is outlined. Nuclear criticality safety of the TOPAZ-II reactor with an incorporated anticriticality unit is demonstrated.

  19. Aphid-induced defense responses in Mi-1-mediated compatible and incompatible tomato interactions.

    PubMed

    Martinez de Ilarduya, Oscar; Xie, QiGuang; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2003-08-01

    The tomato Mi-1 gene confers resistance to three species of root-knot nematode and potato aphid. We studied changes in expression of jasmonic acid (JA)- and salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defense genes in response to potato and green peach aphids. We determined changes in three PR proteins, lipoxygenase and proteinase inhibitors I and II transcripts, locally and systemically in both compatible and incompatible interactions in tomato. Transcripts for PR-1 were detected earlier and accumulated to higher levels in the incompatible than in the compatible potato aphid/tomato interactions. The transcript profiles of the other genes were similar in compatible compared with incompatible interactions. Pin1 and Pin2 RNAs were detected early and transiently in both compatible and incompatible interactions. In tomato plants containing Mi-1, systemic expression of PR-1 and GluB was detected in both compatible and incompatible interactions at 48 h after infestations with either aphid. These results suggest that aphid feeding involves both SA and JA/ethylene plant defense signaling pathways and that Mi-1-mediated resistance might involve a SA-dependent signaling pathway. Potato aphid feeding generated reactive oxygen species in both compatible and incompatible interactions. However, a hypersensitive response was absent in the Mi-1-mediated resistance response to potato aphids. Reciprocal grafting experiments revealed that resistance is cell autonomous, and local expression of Mi-1 is required for Mi-1-mediated resistance against the potato aphid.

  20. Structural Analysis of the Rubisco-Assembly Chaperone RbcX-II from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuimin; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2015-01-01

    The most prevalent form of the Rubisco enzyme is a complex of eight catalytic large subunits (RbcL) and eight regulatory small subunits (RbcS). Rubisco biogenesis depends on the assistance by specific molecular chaperones. The assembly chaperone RbcX stabilizes the RbcL subunits after folding by chaperonin and mediates their assembly to the RbcL8 core complex, from which RbcX is displaced by RbcS to form active holoenzyme. Two isoforms of RbcX are found in eukaryotes, RbcX-I, which is more closely related to cyanobacterial RbcX, and the more distant RbcX-II. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains only RbcX-II isoforms, CrRbcX-IIa and CrRbcX-IIb. Here we solved the crystal structure of CrRbcX-IIa and show that it forms an arc-shaped dimer with a central hydrophobic cleft for binding the C-terminal sequence of RbcL. Like other RbcX proteins, CrRbcX-IIa supports the assembly of cyanobacterial Rubisco in vitro, albeit with reduced activity relative to cyanobacterial RbcX-I. Structural analysis of a fusion protein of CrRbcX-IIa and the C-terminal peptide of RbcL suggests that the peptide binding mode of RbcX-II may differ from that of cyanobacterial RbcX. RbcX homologs appear to have adapted to their cognate Rubisco clients as a result of co-evolution. PMID:26305355

  1. Spectral energy distribution analysis of class I and class II FU Orionis stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Gómez, Mercedes; Rodón, Javier A. E-mail: mercedes@oac.uncor.edu

    2014-06-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUors) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUors in a homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUor stage. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of 24 of the 26 currently known FUors, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUors have more massive disks: we find that ∼80% of the disks in FUors are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} versus ∼10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for standard young stellar objects (YSOs) and FUors, respectively. While the distributions of envelope mass accretion rates for class I FUors and standard class I objects are similar, FUors, on average, have higher envelope mass accretion rates than standard class II and class I sources. Most FUors (∼70%) have envelope mass accretion rates above 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In contrast, 60% of the classical YSO sample has an accretion rate below this value. Our results support the current scenario in which changes experimented by the circumstellar disk explain the observed properties of these stars. However, the increase in the disk mass accretion rate is smaller than theoretically predicted, although in good agreement with previous determinations.

  2. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.; Lessor, D.L.

    1987-09-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite-difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum incorporate directional porosities and permeabilities that are available to model solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated methods are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume 1 - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. This volume, Volume 2 - User's Manual, contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a sample problem. The final volume, Volume 3 - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. 6 refs.

  3. Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis of Class I and Class II FU Orionis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Rodón, Javier A.; Gómez, Mercedes

    2014-06-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUors) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUors in a homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUor stage. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of 24 of the 26 currently known FUors, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUors have more massive disks: we find that ~80% of the disks in FUors are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ~10-7 M ⊙ yr-1 versus ~10-5 M ⊙ yr-1 for standard young stellar objects (YSOs) and FUors, respectively. While the distributions of envelope mass accretion rates for class I FUors and standard class I objects are similar, FUors, on average, have higher envelope mass accretion rates than standard class II and class I sources. Most FUors (~70%) have envelope mass accretion rates above 10-7 M ⊙ yr-1. In contrast, 60% of the classical YSO sample has an accretion rate below this value. Our results support the current scenario in which changes experimented by the circumstellar disk explain the observed properties of these stars. However, the increase in the disk mass accretion rate is smaller than theoretically predicted, although in good agreement with previous determinations.

  4. Comparative Analysis of the Flavobacterium columnare Genomovar I and II Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kumru, Salih; Tekedar, Hasan C.; Gulsoy, Nagihan; Waldbieser, Geoffrey C.; Lawrence, Mark L.; Karsi, Attila

    2017-01-01

    Columnaris disease caused by Gram-negative rod Flavobacterium columnare is one of the most common diseases of catfish. F. columnare is also a common problem in other cultured fish species worldwide. F. columnare has three major genomovars; we have sequenced a representative strain from genomovar I (ATCC 49512, which is avirulent in catfish) and genomovar II (94-081, which is highly pathogenic in catfish). Here, we present a comparative analysis of the two genomes. Interestingly, F. columnare ATCC 49512 and 94-081 meet criteria to be considered different species based on the Average Nucleotide Identity (90.71% similar) and DNA–DNA Hybridization (42.6% similar). Genome alignment indicated the two genomes have a large number of rearrangements. However, function-based comparative genomics analysis indicated that the two strains have similar functional capabilities with 2,263 conserved orthologous clusters; strain ATCC 49512 has 290 unique orthologous clusters while strain 94-081 has 391. Both strains carry type I secretion system, type VI secretion system, and type IX secretion system. The two genomes also have similar CRISPR capacities. The F. columnare strain ATCC 49512 genome contains a higher number of insertion sequence families and phage regions, while the F. columnare strain 94-081 genome has more genomic islands and more regulatory gene capacity. Transposon mutagenesis using Tn4351 in pathogenic strain 94-081 yielded six mutants, and experimental infections of fish showed hemolysin and glycine cleavage protein mutants had 15 and 10% mortalities, respectively, while the wild-type strain caused 100% mortalities. Our comparative and mutational analysis yielded important information on classification of genomovars I and II F. columnare as well as potential virulence genes in F. columnare strain 94-081. PMID:28790987

  5. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-03-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors’ dynamics that may be of utility in drug design.

  6. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors’ dynamics that may be of utility in drug design. PMID:26975976

  7. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2016-03-15

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors' dynamics that may be of utility in drug design.

  8. Supramolecular architectures in luminescent Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes containing imidazole derivatives: Crystal structures, vibrational and thermal properties, Hirshfeld surface analysis and electrostatic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Santo, Alejandro; Echeverría, Gustavo A.; Piro, Oscar E.; Pérez, Hiram; Ben Altabef, Aida; Gil, Diego M.

    2017-04-01

    Three novel zinc and cadmium complexes with 1-methylimidazole and 2-methylimidazole as ligands, mono-nuclear dichloro-bis(1-methylimidazole) zinc(II) and dibromo-bis(2-methylimidazole)cadmium(II) monohydrate complexes, and poly-nuclear bis(1-methylimidazole)-di-(μ2-bromo)cadmium(II) complex, namely, compounds 1-3, respectively, have been synthesized. The complexes were characterized by IR and Raman spectroscopies, thermal analysis and fluorescence. All the compounds exhibit interesting luminescent properties in solid state originated from intra-ligand (π→π*) transitions. Crystal structures of 1-3 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in P21/n space group, the Zn(II) ion lies at a crystal general position in a tetrahedral environment, and the mono-nuclear units are weakly bonded to one another by Csbnd H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. Compound 2 crystallizes in Pnma space group, and mirror-related tetrahedral units around Cd(II) ion are H-bonded through a water molecule. Compound 3 crystallizes in P21/c space group, and the Cd(II) ion presents a centrosymmetric octahedral coordination. Neighboring and equatorial edge-sharing octahedra conform a polymeric arrangement that extends along the crystal a-axis. Weak hydrogen bonds are the major driving forces in the crystal packing of the three complexes. Hirshfeld surface analysis reveals a detailed scrutiny of intermolecular interactions experienced by each complex. The surfaces mapped over dnorm property highlight the X···H (X = Cl, Br) as the main intermolecular contacts for the three complexes, being also relevant the presence of O⋯H contacts for complex 2. The surfaces mapped over Shape index and curvedness properties for the two Cd complexes allow identify π … π stacking interactions which are absent in the Zn complex. 2D fingerprint plots have been used to quantify the relative contribution of the intermolecular contacts to crystal stability of compounds, showing

  9. 14 CFR 150.23 - Noise compatibility programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Noise compatibility programs. 150.23... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT NOISE COMPATIBILITY PLANNING Development of Noise Exposure Maps and Noise Compatibility Programs § 150.23 Noise compatibility programs. (a) Any airport operator who has submitted an...

  10. 14 CFR 150.23 - Noise compatibility programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noise compatibility programs. 150.23... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT NOISE COMPATIBILITY PLANNING Development of Noise Exposure Maps and Noise Compatibility Programs § 150.23 Noise compatibility programs. (a) Any airport operator who has submitted an...

  11. 14 CFR 150.23 - Noise compatibility programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Noise compatibility programs. 150.23... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT NOISE COMPATIBILITY PLANNING Development of Noise Exposure Maps and Noise Compatibility Programs § 150.23 Noise compatibility programs. (a) Any airport operator who has submitted an...

  12. 14 CFR 150.23 - Noise compatibility programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Noise compatibility programs. 150.23... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT NOISE COMPATIBILITY PLANNING Development of Noise Exposure Maps and Noise Compatibility Programs § 150.23 Noise compatibility programs. (a) Any airport operator who has submitted an...

  13. 14 CFR 150.23 - Noise compatibility programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Noise compatibility programs. 150.23... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT NOISE COMPATIBILITY PLANNING Development of Noise Exposure Maps and Noise Compatibility Programs § 150.23 Noise compatibility programs. (a) Any airport operator who has submitted an...

  14. 46 CFR 150.150 - Exceptions to the compatibility chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exceptions to the compatibility chart. 150.150 Section... CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.150 Exceptions to the compatibility chart. The Commandant (G-MSO... 1, the Compatibility Chart. ...

  15. 46 CFR 150.150 - Exceptions to the compatibility chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions to the compatibility chart. 150.150 Section... CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.150 Exceptions to the compatibility chart. The Commandant (G-MSO... 1, the Compatibility Chart. ...

  16. Physics Metacognition Inventory Part Ii: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Rasch Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2015-01-01

    The Physics Metacognition Inventory was developed to measure physics students' metacognition for problem solving. In one of our earlier studies, an exploratory factor analysis provided evidence of preliminary construct validity, revealing six components of students' metacognition when solving physics problems including knowledge of cognition,…

  17. Physics Metacognition Inventory Part Ii: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Rasch Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2015-01-01

    The Physics Metacognition Inventory was developed to measure physics students' metacognition for problem solving. In one of our earlier studies, an exploratory factor analysis provided evidence of preliminary construct validity, revealing six components of students' metacognition when solving physics problems including knowledge of cognition,…

  18. The Tracking Meteogram, an AWIPS II Tool for Time-Series Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, Jason Eric; Sperow, Ken

    2015-01-01

    A new tool has been developed for the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) II through collaboration between NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) and the NWS Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL). Referred to as the "Tracking Meteogram", the tool aids NWS forecasters in assessing meteorological parameters associated with moving phenomena. The tool aids forecasters in severe weather situations by providing valuable satellite and radar derived trends such as cloud top cooling rates, radial velocity couplets, reflectivity, and information from ground-based lightning networks. The Tracking Meteogram tool also aids in synoptic and mesoscale analysis by tracking parameters such as the deepening of surface low pressure systems, changes in surface or upper air temperature, and other properties. The tool provides a valuable new functionality and demonstrates the flexibility and extensibility of the NWS AWIPS II architecture. In 2014, the operational impact of the tool was formally evaluated through participation in the NOAA/NWS Operations Proving Ground (OPG), a risk reduction activity to assess performance and operational impact of new forecasting concepts, tools, and applications. Performance of the Tracking Meteogram Tool during the OPG assessment confirmed that it will be a valuable asset to the operational forecasters. This presentation reviews development of the Tracking Meteogram tool, performance and feedback acquired during the OPG activity, and future goals for continued support and extension to other application areas.

  19. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  20. Vibrational spectra, normal coordinate analysis, and conformation of bis(ɑ-cyanoacetylacetonato)Cu(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandomi, Farzad; Vakili, Mohammad; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio calculations, Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Atoms-in-Molecules (AIM) analyses, and Fourier transform Raman (3200-350 cm-1) and infrared (4000-200 cm-1) spectral measurements have been made for bis(α-cyanoacetylacetonato)Cu(II), Cu(CNacac)2. The molecular structure and vibrational spectra of Cu(CNacac)2 is compared with those of bis(acetylacetonato)Cu(II), Cu(acac)2. The molecular electronic energies and the equilibrium geometries for all theoretically possible conformations are calculated. A normal coordinate analysis of the vibrational modes has been computed for the most stable conformation of Cu(CNacac)2, D2h symmetry. A complete assignment of the observed band frequencies has been proposed. The metal-O bond strength was investigated by geometry calculations, NBO, AIM, and spectroscopic results to realize the effect of cyano substitution at α-position. All theoretical and vibrational spectroscopic studies confirm stronger metal-ligand bond in Cu(CNacac)2 than that in Cu(acac)2.

  1. Simplified Acute Physiology Score II as Predictor of Mortality in Intensive Care Units: A Decision Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Allyn, Jérôme; Ferdynus, Cyril; Bohrer, Michel; Dalban, Cécile; Valance, Dorothée; Allou, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background End-of-life decision-making in Intensive care Units (ICUs) is difficult. The main problems encountered are the lack of a reliable prediction score for death and the fact that the opinion of patients is rarely taken into consideration. The Decision Curve Analysis (DCA) is a recent method developed to evaluate the prediction models and which takes into account the wishes of patients (or surrogates) to expose themselves to the risk of obtaining a false result. Our objective was to evaluate the clinical usefulness, with DCA, of the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) to predict ICU mortality. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study from January 2011 to September 2015, in a medical-surgical 23-bed ICU at University Hospital. Performances of the SAPS II, a modified SAPS II (without AGE), and age to predict ICU mortality, were measured by a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis and DCA. Results Among the 4.370 patients admitted, 23.3% died in the ICU. Mean (standard deviation) age was 56.8 (16.7) years, and median (first-third quartile) SAPS II was 48 (34–65). Areas under ROC curves were 0.828 (0.813–0.843) for SAPS II, 0.814 (0.798–0.829) for modified SAPS II and of 0.627 (0.608–0.646) for age. DCA showed a net benefit whatever the probability threshold, especially under 0.5. Conclusion DCA shows the benefits of the SAPS II to predict ICU mortality, especially when the probability threshold is low. Complementary studies are needed to define the exact role that the SAPS II can play in end-of-life decision-making in ICUs. PMID:27741304

  2. Synthesis, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, magnetic properties and biological activity studies of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes with Schiff base dye ligands.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Raziyeh Arab; Amani, Saeid

    2012-05-29

    Three azo group-containing Schiff base ligands, namely 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropylimino) methyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-4-nitrobenzene (2a), 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropylimino) methyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-2-chloro-4-nitrobenzene (2b) and 1-{3-[(3-hydroxypropylimino) methyl]-4-hydroxyphenylazo}-4-chloro-3-nitrobenzene (2c) were prepared. The ligands were characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, ¹³C- and ¹H-NMR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Next the corresponding copper(II) and cobalt(II) metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by the physicochemical and spectroscopic methods of elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, magnetic moment measurements, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (DSC). The room temperature effective magnetic moments of complexes are 1.45, 1.56, 1.62, 2.16, 2.26 and 2.80 B.M. for complexes 3a, 3b, 3c, 4a 4b, and 4c, respectively, indicating that the complexes are paramagnetic with considerable electronic communication between the two metal centers.

  3. 9 CFR 3.7 - Compatible grouping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.7 Compatible grouping. Dogs and cats that are housed...; (b) Any dog or cat exhibiting a vicious or overly aggressive disposition must be housed separately...

  4. 9 CFR 3.7 - Compatible grouping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.7 Compatible grouping. Dogs and cats that are housed...; (b) Any dog or cat exhibiting a vicious or overly aggressive disposition must be housed separately...

  5. 9 CFR 3.7 - Compatible grouping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.7 Compatible grouping. Dogs and cats that are housed...; (b) Any dog or cat exhibiting a vicious or overly aggressive disposition must be housed separately...

  6. 9 CFR 3.7 - Compatible grouping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.7 Compatible grouping. Dogs and cats that are housed...; (b) Any dog or cat exhibiting a vicious or overly aggressive disposition must be housed separately...

  7. 9 CFR 3.7 - Compatible grouping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.7 Compatible grouping. Dogs and cats that are housed...; (b) Any dog or cat exhibiting a vicious or overly aggressive disposition must be housed separately...

  8. 36 CFR 1193.51 - Compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 1193.51 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE.... Products which provide a function allowing voice communication and which do not themselves provide a TTY...) TTY signal compatibility. Products, including those providing voice communication functionality, shall...

  9. Compatibility Issues Affecting Information Systems and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, F. Wilfrid; Smith, Linda C.

    This UNISIST publication discusses issues related to the compatibility and standardization of bibliograpic records, index languages, software, hardware, and other information systems and services. Following an executive summary, definitions of terms, and other introductory material, existing information systems with common standards are briefly…

  10. Catholic Educator Perceptions about Brain Compatible Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenen, Amie

    2009-01-01

    This document reports the findings of a doctoral project regarding the perceptions held by administrators and teachers of comprehensive Catholic schools in one Midwestern diocese. With the recent explosion of research in the area of the brain and brain compatible instruction it is valuable to know and understand the perceptions held by current…

  11. 20 CFR 401.150 - Compatible purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... any other party if such disclosure is pursuant to a routine use published in the system's notice of system of records. A “Routine use” must be compatible with the purpose for which SSA collected the information. (b) Notice of routine use disclosures. A list of permissible routine use disclosures is included...

  12. Compatibility of Motion Facilitates Visuomotor Synchronization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hove, Michael J.; Spivey, Michael J.; Krumhansl, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    Prior research indicates that synchronized tapping performance is very poor with flashing visual stimuli compared with auditory stimuli. Three finger-tapping experiments compared flashing visual metronomes with visual metronomes containing a spatial component, either compatible, incompatible, or orthogonal to the tapping action. In Experiment 1,…

  13. Instant Print-Braille Compatibility with COBRA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durre, Ingeborg K.; Durre, Imke

    1999-01-01

    Describes an eight-dot computer Braille notation, COBRA, with integrated mathematical and scientific notation that achieves immediate print-Braille compatibility through one-to-one representation of letters and other characters. Text can be entered from the Braille or the Qwerty Keyboard and can be viewed simultaneously on the Braille display and…

  14. 32 CFR 552.171 - Compatible use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Compatible use. 552.171 Section 552.171 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  15. 32 CFR 552.171 - Compatible use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Compatible use. 552.171 Section 552.171 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  16. 32 CFR 552.171 - Compatible use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compatible use. 552.171 Section 552.171 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  17. Preparation of small bio-compatible microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Small, round, bio-compatible microspheres capable of covalently bonding proteins and having a uniform diameter below about 3500 A are prepared by substantially instantaneously initiating polymerization of an aqueous emulsion containing no more than 35% total monomer including an acrylic monomer substituted with a covalently bondable group such a hydroxyl, amino or carboxyl and a minor amount of a cross-linking agent.

  18. External audio for IBM-compatible computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Numerous applications benefit from the presentation of computer-generated auditory stimuli at points discontiguous with the computer itself. Modification of an IBM-compatible computer for use of an external speaker is relatively easy but not intuitive. This modification is briefly described.

  19. 20 CFR 401.150 - Compatible purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... system of records. A “Routine use” must be compatible with the purpose for which SSA collected the...) Disclosure to carry out SSA programs. We disclose information for published routine uses necessary to carry out SSA's programs. (2) Disclosure to carry out programs similar to SSA programs. We may disclose...

  20. Compatible taper equation for loblolly pine

    Treesearch

    J. P. McClure; R. L. Czaplewski

    1986-01-01

    Cao's compatible, segmented polynomial taper equation (Q. V. Cao, H. E. Burkhart, and T. A. Max. For. Sci. 26: 71-80. 1980) is fitted to a large loblolly pine data set from the southeastern United States. Equations are presented that predict diameter at a given height, height to a given top diameter, and volume below a given position on the main stem. All...

  1. 60-Day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for AY-102 grab samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-01-31

    Four grab samples (2AY-96-15, 2AY-96-16, 2AY-96-17, and 2AY-96-18) were taken from Riser 15D of Tank 241-AY-102 on October 8, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 8, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results.

  2. 60-day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for TX-244 grab samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-05

    Three grab samples (244-TX-96-1, 244-TX-96-2, and 244-TX-96-3) were taken from Riser 8 of Tank 241-TX-244 on October 18, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 18, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support ofthe Waste Compatibility Program. Notifications were made in accordance with TSAP for pH and OH- analyses. Upon further review, the pH notification was deemed unnecessary, as the notification limit did not apply to this tank.

  3. Studies in astronomical time series analysis. II - Statistical aspects of spectral analysis of unevenly spaced data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scargle, J. D.

    1982-12-01

    Detection of a periodic signal hidden in noise is frequently a goal in astronomical data analysis. This paper does not introduce a new detection technique, but instead studies the reliability and efficiency of detection with the most commonly used technique, the periodogram, in the case where the observation times are unevenly spaced. This choice was made because, of the methods in current use, it appears to have the simplest statistical behavior. A modification of the classical definition of the periodogram is necessary in order to retain the simple statistical behavior of the evenly spaced case. With this modification, periodogram analysis and least-squares fitting of sine waves to the data are exactly equivalent. Certain difficulties with the use of the periodogram are less important than commonly believed in the case of detection of strictly periodic signals. In addition, the standard method for mitigating these difficulties (tapering) can be used just as well if the sampling is uneven. An analysis of the statistical significance of signal detections is presented, with examples

  4. Studies in astronomical time series analysis. II - Statistical aspects of spectral analysis of unevenly spaced data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Detection of a periodic signal hidden in noise is frequently a goal in astronomical data analysis. This paper does not introduce a new detection technique, but instead studies the reliability and efficiency of detection with the most commonly used technique, the periodogram, in the case where the observation times are unevenly spaced. This choice was made because, of the methods in current use, it appears to have the simplest statistical behavior. A modification of the classical definition of the periodogram is necessary in order to retain the simple statistical behavior of the evenly spaced case. With this modification, periodogram analysis and least-squares fitting of sine waves to the data are exactly equivalent. Certain difficulties with the use of the periodogram are less important than commonly believed in the case of detection of strictly periodic signals. In addition, the standard method for mitigating these difficulties (tapering) can be used just as well if the sampling is uneven. An analysis of the statistical significance of signal detections is presented, with examples

  5. Studies in astronomical time series analysis. II - Statistical aspects of spectral analysis of unevenly spaced data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Detection of a periodic signal hidden in noise is frequently a goal in astronomical data analysis. This paper does not introduce a new detection technique, but instead studies the reliability and efficiency of detection with the most commonly used technique, the periodogram, in the case where the observation times are unevenly spaced. This choice was made because, of the methods in current use, it appears to have the simplest statistical behavior. A modification of the classical definition of the periodogram is necessary in order to retain the simple statistical behavior of the evenly spaced case. With this modification, periodogram analysis and least-squares fitting of sine waves to the data are exactly equivalent. Certain difficulties with the use of the periodogram are less important than commonly believed in the case of detection of strictly periodic signals. In addition, the standard method for mitigating these difficulties (tapering) can be used just as well if the sampling is uneven. An analysis of the statistical significance of signal detections is presented, with examples

  6. fMRI-compatible rehabilitation hand device

    PubMed Central

    Khanicheh, Azadeh; Muto, Andrew; Triantafyllou, Christina; Weinberg, Brian; Astrakas, Loukas; Tzika, Aria; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2006-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used in studying human brain functions and neurorehabilitation. In order to develop complex and well-controlled fMRI paradigms, interfaces that can precisely control and measure output force and kinematics of the movements in human subjects are needed. Optimized state-of-the-art fMRI methods, combined with magnetic resonance (MR) compatible robotic devices for rehabilitation, can assist therapists to quantify, monitor, and improve physical rehabilitation. To achieve this goal, robotic or mechatronic devices with actuators and sensors need to be introduced into an MR environment. The common standard mechanical parts can not be used in MR environment and MR compatibility has been a tough hurdle for device developers. Methods This paper presents the design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a novel, one degree of freedom, MR compatible, computer controlled, variable resistance hand device that may be used in brain MR imaging during hand grip rehabilitation. We named the device MR_CHIROD (Magnetic Resonance Compatible Smart Hand Interfaced Rehabilitation Device). A novel feature of the device is the use of Electro-Rheological Fluids (ERFs) to achieve tunable and controllable resistive force generation. ERFs are fluids that experience dramatic changes in rheological properties, such as viscosity or yield stress, in the presence of an electric field. The device consists of four major subsystems: a) an ERF based resistive element; b) a gearbox; c) two handles and d) two sensors, one optical encoder and one force sensor, to measure the patient induced motion and force. The smart hand device is designed to resist up to 50% of the maximum level of gripping force of a human hand and be controlled in real time. Results Laboratory tests of the device indicate that it was able to meet its design objective to resist up to approximately 50% of the maximum handgrip force. The detailed compatibility tests

  7. [Bonding compatibility between adhesive systems and composite resins].

    PubMed

    Giachetti, L; Scaminaci Russo, D; Landi, D

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse bonding compatibility between photo- and self-polymerising composite resins ad two-step total-etch (one component) adhesive systems with a different activation method. Thirty healthy extracted molars were cut transversally to obtain sixty flat dentin surfaces. The acid conditioned surfaces were bonded with Scotchbond 1 (3M), Excite (Vivadent) or Excite DSC (Vivadent). A cylinder of composite resin (3 mm diameter and 4 mm height) was constructed on each adhesive layer using photopolymerised Tetric Ceram (Vivadend) and dual Luxacore (DMG) but activated only chemically. The samples were subjected to the shear bond test. The fracture surfaces obtained were classified by type and site in the stereomicroscope. Twelve samples representing each group were further prepared for the SEM. The data obtained from the test, the microscopic investigation and statistical analysis (ANOVA and Bonferroni) seem to confirm the presence of a reduced bonding compatibility between one-component adhesive systems and self-polymerising composites. This incompatibility is evident for the adhesive Scotchbond 1 and limited for Excite, while it seems to be overcome by Excite DSC which appears to bond well with both Tetric Ceram and Luxacore. Adhesive-composite incompatibility seems to depend on the activation method of the composite as well as on that of the adhesive system. The chemical compatibility bet-ween these two materials is influenced not only by the chemical composition of the adhesive, but also by that of the composite.

  8. Analysis of molecular oxygen exit pathways in cyanobacterial photosystem II: Molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Kljashtorny, V. G.; Dontsova, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    In thylakoids of cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic organisms, the light-induced production of molecular oxygen is catalyzed by the giant lipid-pigment-protein complex called photosystem II (PSII). The oxygen-evolving complex is buried deep in the lumenal part of PSII, and dioxygen molecules need to pass through the protein environment in order to leave the active site of the enzyme free. Previous studies aimed at finding oxygen channels in PSII were based on either an analysis of the cavities within is static structure or experiments on the insertion of noble gas molecules into PSII crystals under elevated pressure. In these studies, some possible exit pathways for the molecules were found and the static positions of molecular oxygen were determined. In the present work, the oxygen movement in the transport system of PSII is simulated by molecular dynamics.

  9. Use of ELVIS II platform for random process modelling and analysis of its probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikova, Yu. S.; Nugmanov, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of probability density function estimation for a random process is one of the most common in practice. There are several methods to solve this problem. Presented laboratory work uses methods of the mathematical statistics to detect patterns in the realization of random process. On the basis of ergodic theory, we construct algorithm for estimating univariate probability density distribution function for a random process. Correlational analysis of realizations is applied to estimate the necessary size of the sample and the time of observation. Hypothesis testing for two probability distributions (normal and Cauchy) is used on the experimental data, using χ2 criterion. To facilitate understanding and clarity of the problem solved, we use ELVIS II platform and LabVIEW software package that allows us to make the necessary calculations, display results of the experiment and, most importantly, to control the experiment. At the same time students are introduced to a LabVIEW software package and its capabilities.

  10. The acoustic simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems, II: Program structure and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, C. W. S.

    1984-09-01

    The main objectives of the investigation reported in this paper, Part II, and its companion paper, Part I, are (a) to provide a formulation, including the mean flow effects and suitable for digital computer automation, of the acoustics of complicated piping systems, and (b) to develop a comprehensive digital computer program for the simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems. In this paper, the digital computer program structure and applications of the program developed, written in Fortran IV, are described. It is concluded that the computer program is versatile and user-friendly. It is capable of providing a great deal of information from one set of input data, and is open-ended and modular for updating.

  11. JUPITER-II Program: ANL analysis of ZPPR-13A and ZPPR-13B

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, P.J.; Brumbach, S.B.

    1984-08-09

    The ZPPR-13 experiments provide basic physics data for radial-heterogeneous LMFBR cores of approximately 700 MWe size. Assemblies ZPPR-13A, ZPPR-13B and ZPPR-13C comprised the JUPITER-II cooperative program between US-DOE and PNC of Japan. The measurements were made between August 1982 and April 1984. This report describes in detail the results of the ANL analyses of phases 13A and 13B/1 and includes preliminary results for the later assemblies of phase 13B. The data were compiled primarily for discussions at the Third Jupiter Analysis Meeting to be held at ANL-West between September 11th and 14th, 1984.

  12. From structure to systems: high-resolution, quantitative genetic analysis of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Braberg, Hannes; Jin, Huiyan; Moehle, Erica A; Chan, Yujia A; Wang, Shuyi; Shales, Michael; Benschop, Joris J; Morris, John H; Qiu, Chenxi; Hu, Fuqu; Tang, Leung K; Fraser, James S; Holstege, Frank C P; Hieter, Philip; Guthrie, Christine; Kaplan, Craig D; Krogan, Nevan J

    2013-08-15

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) lies at the core of dynamic control of gene expression. Using 53 RNAPII point mutants, we generated a point mutant epistatic miniarray profile (pE-MAP) comprising ∼60,000 quantitative genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis enabled functional assignment of RNAPII subdomains and uncovered connections between individual regions and other protein complexes. Using splicing microarrays and mutants that alter elongation rates in vitro, we found an inverse relationship between RNAPII speed and in vivo splicing efficiency. Furthermore, the pE-MAP classified fast and slow mutants that favor upstream and downstream start site selection, respectively. The striking coordination of polymerization rate with transcription initiation and splicing suggests that transcription rate is tuned to regulate multiple gene expression steps. The pE-MAP approach provides a powerful strategy to understand other multifunctional machines at amino acid resolution.

  13. Compatibility and Outgassing Studies for Directed Stockpile Work (FY05)

    SciTech Connect

    Alviso, C; Harvey, C; Vance, A

    2005-11-23

    Compatibility and outgassing studies of non-nuclear materials were carried out in support of the W80 Life Extension Program. These studies included small-scale laboratory experiments as well as participation in Sandia's Materials Aging and Compatibility test (MAC-1). Analysis of the outgassing signature of removable epoxy foam (REF) revealed unusually high levels of volatile organic compounds in the material. REF was replaced with the polyurethane PMDI. Laboratory compatibility tests of high priority materials were performed and revealed incompatibilities between Viton A (LX-07 binder) and syntactic polysulfide as well as Viton A and REF. With the removal of REF from the system, the incompatibility with Viton A is not an issue. In the case of the viton/polysulfide, both of these materials have a history of reliability in the stockpile, and the observed results, while scientifically interesting, appear to be a laboratory anomaly. Participation in the MAC-1 test led to a detailed study of Viton A degradation. At elevated temperatures up to 70 C, the Viton A samples darkened and exhibited increased crosslinking. Laboratory experiments were pursued to correlate the observed changes to exposure to specific compounds that were present in the MAC-1 canister atmospheres. Exposure to siloxanes resulted in changes similar to those seen in the MAC-1 samples. Knowledge gained from the MAC-1 test will be applied to the upcoming MAC-2 test planned for FY06. Finally, the suitability of isotopically labeled nitrogen fill gas ({sup 15}N{sub 2}) was addressed. This gas will behave as standard nitrogen with no compatibility concerns expected.

  14. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) and comparative microarray expression analysis of syncytial cells isolated from incompatible and compatible soybean (Glycine max) roots infected by the soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines).

    PubMed

    Klink, Vincent P; Overall, Christopher C; Alkharouf, Nadim W; MacDonald, Margaret H; Matthews, Benjamin F

    2007-11-01

    Syncytial cells in soybean (Glycine max cultivar [cv.] Peking) roots infected by incompatible and compatible populations of soybean cyst nematode (SCN [Heterodera glycines]) were collected using laser capture microdissection (LCM). Gene transcript abundance was assayed using Affymetrix soybean GeneChips, each containing 37,744 probe sets. Our analyses identified differentially expressed genes in syncytial cells that are not differentially expressed in the whole root analyses. Therefore, our results show that the mass of transcriptional activity occurring in the whole root is obscuring identification of transcriptional events occurring within syncytial cells. In syncytial cells from incompatible roots at three dpi, genes encoding lipoxygenase (LOX), heat shock protein (HSP) 70, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) were elevated almost tenfold or more, while genes encoding several transcription factors and DNA binding proteins were also elevated, albeit at lower levels. In syncytial cells formed during the compatible interaction at three dpi, genes encoding prohibitin, the epsilon chain of ATP synthase, allene oxide cyclase and annexin were more abundant. By 8 days, several genes of unknown function and genes encoding a germin-like protein, peroxidase, LOX, GAPDH, 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptolosonate 7-phosphate synthase, ATP synthase and a thioesterase were abundantly expressed. These observations suggest that gene expression is different in syncytial cells as compared to whole roots infected with nematodes. Our observations also show that gene expression is different between syncytial cells that were isolated from incompatible and compatible roots and that gene expression is changing over the course of syncytial cell development as it matures into a functional feeding site.

  15. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - RDX Type II Class 5 Standard, Data Set 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Mary M.; Brown, Geoffrey W.; Preston, Daniel N.; Pollard, Colin J.; Warner, Kirstin F.; Sorenson, Daniel N.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Moran, Jesse S.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Reyes, Jose A.; Hsu, Peter C.; Whipple, Richard E.; Reynolds, John G.

    2011-04-11

    This document describes the results of the first reference sample material—RDX Type II Class 5—examined in the proficiency study for small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing of explosive materials for the Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program. The IDCA program is conducting proficiency testing on homemade explosives (HMEs). The reference sample materials are being studied to establish the accuracy of traditional explosives safety testing for each performing laboratory. These results will be used for comparison to results from testing HMEs. This effort, funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), ultimately will put the issues of safe handling of these materials in perspective with standard military explosives. The results of the study will add SSST testing results for a broad suite of different HMEs to the literature, potentially suggest new guidelines and methods for HME testing, and possibly establish what are the needed accuracies in SSST testing to develop safe handling practices. Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and scanning calorimetry analysis of a reference sample of RDX Type II Class 5. The results from each participating testing laboratory are compared using identical test material and preparation methods wherever possible. Note, however, the test procedures differ among the laboratories. These results are then compared to historical data from various sources. The performers involved are Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Air Force Research Laboratory/ RXQL (AFRL), Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, (IHD-NSWC), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). These tests are conducted as a proficiency study in order to establish some consistency in test protocols, procedures, and experiments and to understand how to compare results when test protocols are not identical.

  16. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II from Sitophilus zeamais.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chang-Liang; Wang, Jing-Bo; Wu, Hua; Liu, Jia-Yu; Ma, Zhi-Qing; Feng, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Xing

    2016-09-30

    Cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX II) containing a dual core CuA active site is one of the core subunits of mitochondrial Cytochrome c oxidase (Cco), which plays a significant role in the physiological process. In this report, the full-length cDNA of COXII gene was cloned from Sitophilus zeamais, which had an open reading frame (ORF) of 684 bp encoding 227 amino acids residues. The predicted COXII protein had a molecular mass of 26.2 kDa with pI value of 6.37. multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicated that Sitophilus zeamais COXII had high sequence identity with the COXII of other insect species. The gene was subcloned into the expression vector pET-32a, and induced by isopropyl β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) in E. coli Transetta (DE3) expression system. Finally the recombinant COXII with 6-His tag was purified using affinity chromatography with Ni(2+)-NTA agarose. Western Blotting (WB) showed the recombinant protein was about 44 kD, and the concentration of fusion protein was 50 μg/mL. UV-spectrophotometer and infrared spectrometer analysis showed that recombinant COXII could catalyze the oxidation of substrate Cytochrome C (Cyt c), and influenced by allyl isothiocyanate (AITC). By using molecular docking method, It was found that a sulfur atom of AITC structure could form a length of 2.9 Å hydrogen bond with Leu-31. These results suggested that tag-free COXII was functional and one of the action sites of AITC, which will be helpful to carry out a point mutation in binding sites for the future research.

  17. Determination of Class II and Class III skeletal patterns: receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis on various cephalometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Han, U K; Kim, Y H

    1998-05-01

    Receiver operating characteristic analysis is an excellent method for evaluating and comparing the performance of diagnostic tests. The purpose of this study was to use the receiver operating characteristic analysis to evaluate the diagnostic ability of several cephalometric measurements in determining the presence of Class II and Class III skeletal patterns. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed on 976 cases. Fifteen cephalometric measurements were evaluated. A computer software program ROC ANALYZER was used to tabulate the areas under the curves and to perform the statistical comparison between the curves. The results of this study indicated that the Anteroposterior Dysplasia Indicator had the best diagnostic ability in identifying cases with Class II and Class III skeletal patterns. WITS Appraisal and Overjet were highly effective in diagnosing cases with Class II skeletal pattern. WITS Appraisal, Convexity, AB Plane Angle and Overjet also performed well in diagnosing cases with Class III skeletal pattern.

  18. Utilization of rice husk waste for Cd(II) adsorbent and its analysis using solid-phase spectrophotometry (sps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputro, S.; Masykuri, M.; Mahardiani, L.; Arini, S.; Ramelan, A. H.

    2017-04-01

    This research aims to know the use of rice husk waste for metal ion adsorbent of Cd(II), the optimum mass which are needed, the sensitivity of SPS as a method to determine the reduction level of Cd(II) metal ions in the level of μg/L. This research was conducted by using an experimental method in the laboratory. The used adsorbent in this research is rice husk charcoal which activated using ZnCl2 10% solution. Determination of the optimum adsorbent mass was done with reacted 0.5; 1.0; 1.5; 2.0; and 2.5 g of adsorbent and 20 mL Cd(II) which have concentration 75.27 μg/L during 30 minutes. Analysis the levels of Cd(II) used SPS method and characterization of adsorbent used FTIR. The result showed that activated rice husk charcoal can be used as adsorbent for Cd(II) metal ions in the simulated liquid waste with the adsorption capacity of 0.58 μg/g, the optimum mass was 2.0 gram with percentage of the adsorbed Cd(II) of 77.87%, SPS is a sensitive method to determine the reduction levels of Cd(II) metal ions in the level of μg/L with the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.06 μg/L.

  19. A model of the immune-compatibility using the install problem in computer science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Felipe

    2014-05-01

    We simulate the immune compatibility using the Install Problem: The idea is to define a Boolean variable for each antibody. This variable is true if the antibody must be in the immune system. The Install Problem refers to the incompatibility that some programs may have with an specific operative system making it impossible to be installed. The analysis was implemented using SMT-solvers, specifically Z3, and the code was wrote using the commands "DependsOn", "Conflict" and "Compatibility_check", making it possible to check the antibody compatibility. The programming languages used to build up the code were Z3-Python and Z3-SMT-Lib. The results can be used in systems biology and in the analysis of immunological therapies. As future line of research it could be developed a more complex algorithm to verify the immunological compatibility.

  20. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  1. Preliminary design analysis of the ALT-II limiter for TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Boyd, R.D.; Kempka, S.M.; Romig, A.D. Jr.; Smith, M.F.; Watson, R.D.; Whitley, J.B.; Conn, R.W.; Grotz, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Installation of a large toroidal belt pump limiter, Advanced Limiter Test II (ALT-II), on the TEXTOR tokamak at Juelich, FRG is anticipated for early 1986. This paper discusses the preliminary mechanical design and materials considerations undertaken as part of the feasibility study phase for ALT-II.

  2. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  3. Surface complexation and precipitate geometry for aqueous Zn(II) sorption on ferrihydrite: II. XANES analysis and simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.; Rehr, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis of sorption complexes has the advantages of high sensitivity (10- to 20-fold greater than extended X-ray absorption fine structure [EXAFS] analysis) and relative ease and speed of data collection (because of the short k-space range). It is thus a potentially powerful tool for characterization of environmentally significant surface complexes and precipitates at very low surface coverages. However, quantitative analysis has been limited largely to "fingerprint" comparison with model spectra because of the difficulty of obtaining accurate multiple-scattering amplitudes for small clusters with high confidence. In the present work, calculations of the XANES for 50- to 200-atom clusters of structure from Zn model compounds using the full multiple-scattering code Feff 8.0 accurately replicate experimental spectra and display features characteristic of specific first-neighbor anion coordination geometry and second-neighbor cation geometry and number. Analogous calculations of the XANES for small molecular clusters indicative of precipitation and sorption geometries for aqueous Zn on ferrihydrite, and suggested by EXAFS analysis, are in good agreement with observed spectral trends with sample composition, with Zn-oxygen coordination and with changes in second-neighbor cation coordination as a function of sorption coverage. Empirical analysis of experimental XANES features further verifies the validity of the calculations. The findings agree well with a complete EXAFS analysis previously reported for the same sample set, namely, that octahedrally coordinated aqueous Zn2+ species sorb as a tetrahedral complex on ferrihydrite with varying local geometry depending on sorption density. At significantly higher densities but below those at which Zn hydroxide is expected to precipitate, a mainly octahedral coordinated Zn2+ precipitate is observed. An analysis of the multiple scattering paths contributing to the XANES

  4. Multicomponent Analysis of Junctional Movements Regulated by Myosin II Isoforms at the Epithelial Zonula Adherens

    PubMed Central

    Smutny, Michael; Wu, Selwin K.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Mangold, Sabine; Yap, Alpha S.; Hamilton, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    The zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelial cells is a site of cell-cell adhesion where cellular forces are exerted and resisted. Increasing evidence indicates that E-cadherin adhesion molecules at the ZA serve to sense force applied on the junctions and coordinate cytoskeletal responses to those forces. Efforts to understand the role that cadherins play in mechanotransduction have been limited by the lack of assays to measure the impact of forces on the ZA. In this study we used 4D imaging of GFP-tagged E-cadherin to analyse the movement of the ZA. Junctions in confluent epithelial monolayers displayed prominent movements oriented orthogonal (perpendicular) to the ZA itself. Two components were identified in these movements: a relatively slow unidirectional (translational) component that could be readily fitted by least-squares regression analysis, upon which were superimposed more rapid oscillatory movements. Myosin IIB was a dominant factor responsible for driving the unilateral translational movements. In contrast, frequency spectrum analysis revealed that depletion of Myosin IIA increased the power of the oscillatory movements. This implies that Myosin IIA may serve to dampen oscillatory movements of the ZA. This extends our recent analysis of Myosin II at the ZA to demonstrate that Myosin IIA and Myosin IIB make distinct contributions to junctional movement at the ZA. PMID:21799860

  5. New tools for the systematic analysis and visualization of electronic excitations. II. Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasser, Felix; Bäppler, Stefanie A.; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The excited states of a diverse set of molecules are examined using a collection of newly implemented analysis methods. These examples expose the particular power of three of these tools: (i) natural difference orbitals (the eigenvectors of the difference density matrix) for the description of orbital relaxation effects, (ii) analysis of the one-electron transition density matrix in terms of an electron-hole picture to identify charge resonance and excitonic correlation effects, and (iii) state-averaged natural transition orbitals for a compact simultaneous representation of several states. Furthermore, the utility of a wide array of additional analysis methods is highlighted. Five molecules with diverse excited state characteristics are chosen for these tasks: pyridine as a prototypical small heteroaromatic molecule, a model system of six neon atoms to study charge resonance effects, hexatriene in its neutral and radical cation forms to exemplify the cases of double excitations and spin-polarization, respectively, and a model iridium complex as a representative metal organic compound. Using these examples a number of phenomena, which are at first sight unexpected, are highlighted and their physical significance is discussed. Moreover, the generality of the conclusions of this paper is verified by a comparison of single- and multireference ab initio methods.

  6. New tools for the systematic analysis and visualization of electronic excitations. II. Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Plasser, Felix Bäppler, Stefanie A.; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2014-07-14

    The excited states of a diverse set of molecules are examined using a collection of newly implemented analysis methods. These examples expose the particular power of three of these tools: (i) natural difference orbitals (the eigenvectors of the difference density matrix) for the description of orbital relaxation effects, (ii) analysis of the one-electron transition density matrix in terms of an electron-hole picture to identify charge resonance and excitonic correlation effects, and (iii) state-averaged natural transition orbitals for a compact simultaneous representation of several states. Furthermore, the utility of a wide array of additional analysis methods is highlighted. Five molecules with diverse excited state characteristics are chosen for these tasks: pyridine as a prototypical small heteroaromatic molecule, a model system of six neon atoms to study charge resonance effects, hexatriene in its neutral and radical cation forms to exemplify the cases of double excitations and spin-polarization, respectively, and a model iridium complex as a representative metal organic compound. Using these examples a number of phenomena, which are at first sight unexpected, are highlighted and their physical significance is discussed. Moreover, the generality of the conclusions of this paper is verified by a comparison of single- and multireference ab initio methods.

  7. Analysis of tablet compaction. II. Finite element analysis of density distributions in convex tablets.

    PubMed

    Sinka, I C; Cunningham, J C; Zavaliangos, A

    2004-08-01

    A Drucker-Prager/cap constitutive model, where the elastic and plastic model parameters are expressed as a function of relative density (RD), was presented in a companion article together with experimental calibration procedures. Here, we examine the RD distribution in curved-faced tablets with special reference to the die wall lubrication conditions. The compaction of powders is examined using finite element analysis, which involves the following factors: constitutive behavior of powder, friction between powder and tooling, geometry of die and punches, sequence of punch motions, and initial conditions that result from die fill. The predictions of the model are validated using experimental RD maps. It is shown that different die wall lubrication conditions induce opposite density distribution trends in identical tablets (weight, height, and material). The importance of the internal tablet structure is illustrated with respect to break force, failure mode, and friability: it is demonstrated that for a given average tablet density the break force and failure mode are not unique. Also, tablet regions having lower density locally have higher propensity for damage. The applicability of finite element analysis for optimizations of formulation design, process development, tablet image, and tool design is discussed. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 93:2040-2053, 2004

  8. p-exponent and p-leaders, Part II: Multifractal analysis. Relations to detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonarduzzi, R.; Wendt, H.; Abry, P.; Jaffard, S.; Melot, C.; Roux, S. G.; Torres, M. E.

    2016-04-01

    Multifractal analysis studies signals, functions, images or fields via the fluctuations of their local regularity along time or space, which capture crucial features of their temporal/spatial dynamics. It has become a standard signal and image processing tool and is commonly used in numerous applications of different natures. In its common formulation, it relies on the Hölder exponent as a measure of local regularity, which is by nature restricted to positive values and can hence be used for locally bounded functions only. In this contribution, it is proposed to replace the Hölder exponent with a collection of novel exponents for measuring local regularity, the p-exponents. One of the major virtues of p-exponents is that they can potentially take negative values. The corresponding wavelet-based multiscale quantities, the p-leaders, are constructed and shown to permit the definition of a new multifractal formalism, yielding an accurate practical estimation of the multifractal properties of real-world data. Moreover, theoretical and practical connections to and comparisons against another multifractal formalism, referred to as multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis, are achieved. The performance of the proposed p-leader multifractal formalism is studied and compared to previous formalisms using synthetic multifractal signals and images, illustrating its theoretical and practical benefits. The present contribution is complemented by a companion article studying in depth the theoretical properties of p-exponents and the rich classification of local singularities it permits.

  9. Solar Differential Rotation in Calcium II K Line Spectra Supported with Spectroheliogram Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Tyler; Keil, S. L.

    2013-07-01

    Two recent papers report on measuring differential rotation in data that views the Sun as a star. Unlike using tracers at different latitudes to measure the differential rotation, disk-integrated light averages over many latitudes and can only work if the features both exist at a dominate latitude that changes with the solar cycle and they persist long enough to affect the measured rotation rate. Bertello, Pevtsov, and Pietarila (2012, ApJ 761, pg 11) use disk-integrated Ca II K-line data from the SOLIS/ISS instrument to show that a change in rotation rate is clearly visible at the beginning of the current solar cycle in the disk-integrated K-line. Scargle, Keil, and Worden (2013, ApJ in press, arXiv:1303.6303) use the Sacramento Peak K-line series to look at the last current and previous three cycles with fairly strong evidence that the differential rotation is visible in cycle 22, but much harder to see in cycles 21 and 23. In order to understand the differences in the three cycles we report on solar differential rotation measurements in both the Sacramento Peak disk-integrated, Ca II K spectral time series (1977-2012) and full-disk, Ca II K spectroheliogram time series (1977-2002) observed at the Evans Solar Facility. The former data set is the same as used by Scargle et al (2013) and averages about 2-3 measurements per week. For the disk-integrated spectra, we use two interpolation schemes to fill in missing days (regression and singular value decomposition with proxy data sets) and use two methods (power spectra and autocorrelation) to find the rotation rates. We find a clear signature of solar differential rotation for solar cycle 21 and 22 and a partial signature for cycle 23. We test this result by measuring differential rotation using the Ca II K spectroheliograms using phase analysis between longitudinal bands. We have also explored the image features that lead to changes in the disk-integrated spectrum's signal-to-noise. The data analyzed in this

  10. Synthesis, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared, electronic and mass spectra of Mn(II), Co(II) and Fe(III) norfloxacin complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.

    2005-10-01

    The interactions of manganese acetate, ferric chloride and cobalt sulphate with norfloxacin (NOR) in acetone or methanol were studied. The isolated solid complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, electronic, mass spectra and thermal analysis. The results support the formation of complexes of the formula [Fe(NOR) 3]Cl 3·12H 2O and [M(NOR) 2]X 2·8H 2O (M=Mn(II) or Co(II) and X=(CH 3COO -) or SO4-2). The infrared spectra of the isolated solid complexes suggested, indicated that NOR act as bidentate ligands through one of the oxygen atoms of the carboxylic group and the ring carbonyl oxygen atom. The interpretation, mathematical analysis and evaluation of kinetic parameters of thermogravimetric (TGA) and its differential (DTG), such as entropy of activation, pre-exponential factors, activation energy evaluated by using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger equations for two complexes are carried out. General mechanisms describing the decomposition of the solid complexes are suggested.

  11. Launch Vehicle Fire Accident Preliminary Analysis of a Liquid-Metal Cooled Thermionic Nuclear Reactor: TOPAZ-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, G.; Zhao, S.; Ruan, K.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, launch vehicle propellant fire accident analysis of TOPAZ-II reactor has been done by a thermionic reactor core analytic code-TATRHG(A) developed by author. When a rocket explodes on a launch pad, its payload-TOPAZ-II can be subjected to a severe thermal environment from the resulting fireball. The extreme temperatures associated with propellant fires can create a destructive environment in or near the fireball. Different kind of propellants - liquid propellant and solid propellant which will lead to different fire temperature are considered. Preliminary analysis shows that the solid propellant fires can melt the whole toxic beryllium radial reflector.

  12. NOTE: Tools for the analysis of dose optimization: II. Sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, M.; Birkner, M.; Nüsslin, F.

    2002-10-01

    Dose optimization requires that the treatment goals be specified in a meaningful manner, but also that alterations to the specification lead to predictable changes in the resulting dose distribution. Within the framework of constrained optimization, it is possible to devise a tool that quantifies the impact on the objective of target volume coverage of any change to a dosimetric constraint of normal tissue or target dose homogeneity. This sensitivity analysis relies on properties of the Lagrange function that is associated with the constrained optimization problem, but does not depend on the method used to solve this problem. It is useful particularly in cases with multiple target volumes and critical normal structures, where constraints and objectives can interact in a non-intuitive manner.

  13. Composite laminate free-edge reinforcement with U-shaped caps. I - Stress analysis. II - Theoretical-experimental correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. E.; Gossard, Terry, Jr.; Jones, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    The present generalized plane-strain FEM analysis for the prediction of interlaminar normal stress reduction when a U-shaped cap is bonded to the edge of a composite laminate gives attention to the highly variable transverse stresses near the free edge, cap length and thickness, and a gap under the cap due to the manufacturing process. The load-transfer mechanism between cap and laminate is found to be strain-compatibility, rather than shear lag. In the second part of this work, the three-dimensional composite material failure criteria are used in a progressive laminate failure analysis to predict failure loads of laminates with different edge-cap designs; symmetric 11-layer graphite-epoxy laminates with a one-layer cap of kevlar-epoxy are shown to carry 130-140 percent greater loading than uncapped laminates, under static tensile and tension-tension fatigue loading.

  14. Microscale Synthesis and (super 1)H NMR Analysis of Zn(super II) and Ni(super II) Tetraphenylporphyrins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saucedo, Laura; Mink, Larry M.

    2005-01-01

    A multisection undergraduate laboratory involving the microscale synthesis and spectroscopic analysis of unmetalled porphyrins and their corresponding metalloporphyins is described. The microscale synthesis involving the isolation of the metalloporphyrins as solids and their corresponding (super 1)H NMR spectra are presented.

  15. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meloy, Thomas P.; Marshall, John; Hecht, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) will evaluate the Martian environment for soil and dust-related hazards to human exploration as part of the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. Sponsored by the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise, MECA's goal is to evaluate potential geochemical and environmental hazards that may confront future martian explorers, and to guide HEDS scientists in the development of high fidelity Mars soil simulants. In addition to objectives related to human exploration, the MECA data set will be rich in information relevant to basic geology, paleoclimate, and exobiology issues. The integrated MECA payload contains a wet-chemistry laboratory, a microscopy station, an electrometer to characterize the electrostatics of the soil and its environment, and arrays of material patches to study the abrasive and adhesive properties of soil grains. MECA is allocated a mass of 10 kg and a peak power usage of 15 W within an enclosure of 35 x 25 x 15 cm (figures I and 2). The Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) consists of four identical cells that will accept samples from surface and subsurface regions accessible to the Lander's robotic arm, mix them with water, and perform extensive analysis of the solution. Using an array of ion-specific electrodes (ISEs), cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical techniques, the chemistry cells will wet soil samples for measurement of basic soil properties of pH, redox potential, and conductivity. Total dissolved material, as well as targeted ions will be detected to the ppm level, including important exobiological ions such as Na, K+, Ca++, Mg++, NH4+, Cl, S04-, HC03, as well as more toxic ions such as Cu++, Pb++, Cd++, Hg++, and C104-. MECA's microscopy station combines optical and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) to image dust and soil particles from millimeters to nanometers in size. Illumination by red, green, and blue LEDs is augmented by an ultraviolet LED intended to excite

  16. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meloy, Thomas P.; Marshall, John; Hecht, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) will evaluate the Martian environment for soil and dust-related hazards to human exploration as part of the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. Sponsored by the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise, MECA's goal is to evaluate potential geochemical and environmental hazards that may confront future martian explorers, and to guide HEDS scientists in the development of high fidelity Mars soil simulants. In addition to objectives related to human exploration, the MECA data set will be rich in information relevant to basic geology, paleoclimate, and exobiology issues. The integrated MECA payload contains a wet-chemistry laboratory, a microscopy station, an electrometer to characterize the electrostatics of the soil and its environment, and arrays of material patches to study the abrasive and adhesive properties of soil grains. MECA is allocated a mass of 10 kg and a peak power usage of 15 W within an enclosure of 35 x 25 x 15 cm (figures I and 2). The Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) consists of four identical cells that will accept samples from surface and subsurface regions accessible to the Lander's robotic arm, mix them with water, and perform extensive analysis of the solution. Using an array of ion-specific electrodes (ISEs), cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical techniques, the chemistry cells will wet soil samples for measurement of basic soil properties of pH, redox potential, and conductivity. Total dissolved material, as well as targeted ions will be detected to the ppm level, including important exobiological ions such as Na, K+, Ca++, Mg++, NH4+, Cl, S04-, HC03, as well as more toxic ions such as Cu++, Pb++, Cd++, Hg++, and C104-. MECA's microscopy station combines optical and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) to image dust and soil particles from millimeters to nanometers in size. Illumination by red, green, and blue LEDs is augmented by an ultraviolet LED intended to excite

  17. [Analysis of clinical features of 6 patients with infantile type glycogen storage disease type II].

    PubMed

    Ding, Juan; Huang, Yu; Yang, Haipo; Zhang, Qingyou; Hou, Xinlin; Liu, Xueqin; Yang, Yanling; Xiong, Hui

    2015-06-01

    To summarize clinical features and diagnosis of Chinese infantile patients with glycogen storage disease type II (GSD II). Six infant patients with GSD II diagnosed from January 2012 to June 2014 in the Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital were enrolled into this study. Clinical information of the 6 patients, including clinical manifestation, blood biochemistry, chest X-ray, echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) activity and GAA gene mutation analysis by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product were reviewed. Of the 6 patients, five were female and one was male, five of whom were classic infantile type while the other one was atypical. The age of onset ranged from birth to 3-month-old. All patients had varying degrees of generalized muscle weakness, hypotonia and development retardation or retrogression. Other common findings were feeding difficulties in two patients, tongue weakness in two patients, respiratory distress in four patients, macroglossia in one patient, and hepatomegaly in two patients. Left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiomegaly were obvious in all the six patients. All six patients were found to have a enlarged heart in physical examination, and three patients who underwent a chest X-ray examination had an enlarged heart shadow. Four patients who had an echocardiography were found to have myocardial hypertrophy. The electrocardiogram in three patients showed short PR intervals and high voltage. The creatine kinase (CK) levels were three to seven times elevated. The mildest elevated CK was 441 IU/L, and the highest CK level was 1 238 U/L. Assay of GAA enzyme activity in whole blood showed significantly reduced activity (1.3 nmol/ (spot·d) to 2 nmol/(spot·d)) in the patients tested. Gene sequencing in 4 patients showed 8 pathogenic mutations, including 6 missense mutations, one nonsense mutation and one frameshift mutation. The missense mutations were c.998C > A (p.Thr333Lys), c

  18. [Cloning and analysis of three genes encoding type II CHH family neuropeptides from Fennropenaeus chinensis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zai-Zhao; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2003-10-01

    On the basis of sequence similarity, the crustean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) family peptides have been classified into two types of hormones: type I and type II. Molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) is a neuropeptide member of type II CHH family. Molting in shrimp is controlled by MIH and ecdysone. By inhibiting the synthesis of ecdysone in the Y-organ, MIH indirectly suppresses the molting activity of shrimp. In this study, we reported the cloning and characterization of 3 gene fragments encoding type II CHH family neuropeptides of the shrimp Fennropenaeus chinensis. According to the complementary DNA sequence of the mult-inhibiting hormone of Fennropenaeus chinensis, 3 primers were designed and synthesized. MP1 and MP2 are sense primers, and MP3 is anti-sense primer. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using genomic DNA of Fennropenaeus chinensis as template. Three PCR products were obtained using primers MP1 and MP3. Their sizes are about 600 bp, 850 bp, 1050 bp, respectively. A 580 bp PCR product was obtained using primers MP2 and MP3. All the 4 PCR products were cloned into pMD18-T vector. The recombinant clones were sequenced using ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer. After sequencing, all the DNA sequences were searched in the GenBank by Blast program to find similar gene sequences. The searching results revealed 3 DNA fragment sequences were of high similarity with CHH family neuropeptide genes from various crustean species. The 3 DNA fragments were named as NP1, NP2, and NP3. Their sizes were 540 bp, 601 bp, and 826 bp, respectively. Using the mRNA sequences with the most similarity to the 3 sequence fragments as reference, the gene structure of the 3 DNA fragment sequences was analyzed. The exons of 3 sequence fragments were aligned with their similar sequences by Clustal W program. Both NP1 and NP2 consisted of 1 intron and 2 exons. NP3 consisted of 2 introns and 3 exons. Sequence analysis suggested that these 3 products belonged to sequence fragments of neuropeptide

  19. Genetic compatibility and hatching success in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rolando; Tregenza, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Recent discussion of genetic benefits of polyandry and female mate choice has distinguished between two potential factors influencing offspring quality: (i) some males carry higher quality genes and (ii) males and females differ in their degree of genetic compatibility. We examined evidence for effects of good genes and genetic compatibility on embryonic survival of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a fish species with external fertilization that spawns in North Atlantic rivers. Using in vitro fertilization, we made all possible crosses among 10 males and 5 females collected in the spawning grounds. Male identity did not have any significant effect on hatching success. However, female identity and male×female interactions had a highly significant effect on hatching success. Our results suggest that genetic compatibility between male and female genomes plays an important role in embryo survival during the early stages of development in the sea lamprey. PMID:19049954

  20. Genetic compatibility and hatching success in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rolando; Tregenza, Tom

    2009-04-23

    Recent discussion of genetic benefits of polyandry and female mate choice has distinguished between two potential factors influencing offspring quality: (i) some males carry higher quality genes and (ii) males and females differ in their degree of genetic compatibility. We examined evidence for effects of good genes and genetic compatibility on embryonic survival of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a fish species with external fertilization that spawns in North Atlantic rivers. Using in vitro fertilization, we made all possible crosses among 10 males and 5 females collected in the spawning grounds. Male identity did not have any significant effect on hatching success. However, female identity and male x female interactions had a highly significant effect on hatching success. Our results suggest that genetic compatibility between male and female genomes plays an important role in embryo survival during the early stages of development in the sea lamprey.

  1. Measurement of immunoreactive angiotensin peptides in rat tissues: some pitfalls in angiotensin II analysis.

    PubMed

    De Silva, P E; Husain, A; Smeby, R R; Khairallah, P A

    1988-10-01

    Angiotensin II, the major effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system, is an endocrine and paracrine regulator of tissue function. To determine its physiological role, it is important to quantify angiotensin II and related fragment peptides in tissues and plasma as a first step toward understanding angiotensin II metabolism within tissues. A fully characterized, sensitive, and reproducible immunochemical assay has been developed for quantitating angiotensin II immunoreactivity in tissues and plasma. We identified two methodological events of critical importance, incompletely addressed in previously reported studies. First, the nonspecific interference resulting from Sep-Pak processing was found to be due to hydrophobic impurities in the octade-casilane absorbent which were eliminated by washing the Sep-Pak with tetrahydrofuran and hexane before use. Second, a significant discrepancy was observed in the recoveries of angiotensin II and 125I-angiotensin II added to tissue extracts following high-pressure liquid chromatography. Angiotensin II immunoreactivity extracted from decapitated rat adrenal gland, brain, and kidney (target organs for angiotensin II), ovary and uterus (potential target organs for angiotensin II), and plasma has been characterized. The predominant component of the angiotensin II immunoreactivity was the biologically active octapeptide angiotensin II. However, in the brain, the ratio of angiotensin II to C-terminal angiotensin II immunoreactive fragments was lower than observed in other tissues studied. Other angiotensin II C-terminal immunoreactive peptide fragments-the biologically active heptapeptide and the biologically inactive angiotensin(3-8) and angiotensin(4-8)--were also detected in variable quantities in the various tissues.

  2. Phylogenetic relationships among Phytophthora species inferred from sequence analysis of mitochondrially encoded cytochrome oxidase I and II genes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Frank N; Tooley, Paul W

    2003-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of 51 isolates representing 27 species of Phytophthora were assessed by sequence alignment of 568 bp of the mitochondrially encoded cytochrome oxidase II gene. A total of 1299 bp of the cytochrome oxidase I gene also were examined for a subset of 13 species. The cox II gene trees constructed by a heuristic search, based on maximum parsimony for a bootstrap 50% majority-rule consensus tree, revealed 18 species grouping into seven clades and nine species unaffiliated with a specific clade. The phylogenetic relationships among species observed on cox II gene trees did not exhibit consistent similarities in groupings for morphology, pathogenicity, host range or temperature optima. The topology of cox I gene trees, constructed by a heuristic search based on maximum parsimony for a bootstrap 50% majority-rule consensus tree for 13 species of Phytophthora, revealed 10 species grouping into three clades and three species unaffiliated with a specific clade. The groupings in general agreed with what was observed in the cox II tree. Species relationships observed for the cox II gene tree were in agreement with those based on ITS regions, with several notable exceptions. Some of these differences were noted in species in which the same isolates were used for both ITS and cox II analysis, suggesting either a differential rate of evolutionary divergence for these two regions or incorrect assumptions about alignment of ITS sequences. Analysis of combined data sets of ITS and cox II sequences generated a tree that did not differ substantially from analysis of ITS data alone, however, the results of a partition homogeneity test suggest that combining data sets may not be valid.

  3. Analysis of SBIR phase I and phase II review results at the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Vener, K J; Calkins, B M

    1991-09-01

    A cohort of phase I and phase II summary statements for the SBIR grant applications was evaluated to determine the strengths and weaknesses in approved and disapproved applications. An analysis of outcome variables (disapproval or unfunded status) was examined with respect to exposure variables (strengths or shortcomings). Logistic regression models were developed for comparisons to measure the predictive value of shortcomings and strengths to the outcomes. Disapproved phase I results were compared with an earlier 1985 study. Although the magnitude of the frequencies of shortcomings was greater in the present study, the relative rankings within shortcoming class were more alike than different. Also, the frequencies of shortcomings were, with one exception, not significantly different in the two studies. Differences in the summary statement review may have accounted for some differences observed between the 1985 data and results of the present study. Comparisons of Approved/Disapproved and Approved-Unfunded/Funded yielded the following observations. For phase I applicants, a lack of a clearly stated, testable hypothesis, a poorly qualified or described investigative team, and inadequate methodological approaches contributed significantly (in that order) to a rating of disapproval. A critical flaw for phase II proposals was failure to accomplish objectives of the phase I study. Methodological issues also dominate the distinctions in both comparison groups. A clear result of the data presented here and that published previously is that SBIR applicants need continuing assistance to improve the chances of their success. These results should serve as a guide to assist NIH staff as they provide information to prospective applicants focusing on key elements of the application. A continuing review of the SBIR program would be helpful to evaluate the quality of the submitted science.

  4. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-02-23

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work a set of computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) has been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here the authors consider a severe lost of coolant accident (LOCA) producing simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the containment) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and containment building it self). Even though containment failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product release and transport. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 6 mSv (0.6 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  5. Coating for components requiring hydrogen peroxide compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yousefiani, Ali (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a heretofore-unknown use for zirconium nitride as a hydrogen peroxide compatible protective coating that was discovered to be useful to protect components that catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide or corrode when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. A zirconium nitride coating of the invention may be applied to a variety of substrates (e.g., metals) using art-recognized techniques, such as plasma vapor deposition. The present invention further provides components and articles of manufacture having hydrogen peroxide compatibility, particularly components for use in aerospace and industrial manufacturing applications. The zirconium nitride barrier coating of the invention provides protection from corrosion by reaction with hydrogen peroxide, as well as prevention of hydrogen peroxide decomposition.

  6. High-voltage-compatible, fully depleted CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Stephen E.; Bebek, Chris J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Emes, JohnE.; Fabricius, Max H.; Fairfield, Jessaym A.; Groom, Don E.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, William F.; Palaio, Nick P.; Roe, Natalie A.; Wang, Guobin

    2006-05-15

    We describe charge-coupled device (CCD) developmentactivities at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).Back-illuminated CCDs fabricated on 200-300 mu m thick, fully depleted,high-resistivity silicon substrates are produced in partnership with acommercial CCD foundry.The CCDs are fully depleted by the application ofa substrate bias voltage. Spatial resolution considerations requireoperation of thick, fully depleted CCDs at high substrate bias voltages.We have developed CCDs that are compatible with substrate bias voltagesof at least 200V. This improves spatial resolution for a given thickness,and allows for full depletion of thicker CCDs than previously considered.We have demonstrated full depletion of 650-675 mu m thick CCDs, withpotential applications in direct x-ray detection. In this work we discussthe issues related to high-voltage operation of fully depleted CCDs, aswell as experimental results on high-voltage-compatible CCDs.

  7. Compatible embedding for 2D shape animation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, William V; Barla, Pascal; Anjyo, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We present new algorithms for the compatible embedding of 2D shapes. Such embeddings offer a convenient way to interpolate shapes having complex, detailed features. Compared to existing techniques, our approach requires less user input, and is faster, more robust, and simpler to implement, making it ideal for interactive use in practical applications. Our new approach consists of three parts. First, our boundary matching algorithm locates salient features using the perceptually motivated principles of scale-space and uses these as automatic correspondences to guide an elastic curve matching algorithm. Second, we simplify boundaries while maintaining their parametric correspondence and the embedding of the original shapes. Finally, we extend the mapping to shapes' interiors via a new compatible triangulation algorithm. The combination of our algorithms allows us to demonstrate 2D shape interpolation with instant feedback. The proposed algorithms exhibit a combination of simplicity, speed, and accuracy that has not been achieved in previous work.

  8. Arms race modeling: systematic analysis and synthesis. (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderton, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years there has been a significant proliferation of arms race models in journals and books across many disciplines. Numerous factors have been put forth as relevant by arms race modelers and diverse analytical and explanatory approaches have been employed. This indicates that arms race modeling can be advanced by a systematic analysis (review) and synthesis. This is the purpose of this thesis). Part I discusses the perspective, purposes, and organization of this thesis, definitions of arms race, and mathematical modeling as a tool of arms race research. Parts II-VI review in detail over 125 arms race models and numerous other defense determination models. Part VII synthesizes arms race modeling factors and approaches from the perspective of economics. Each side in an arms race is viewed as facing an economic choice problem of how to allocate scarce resources between defense and nondefense goods. Part VIII undertakes policy analysis using the models developed in Part VII. The three issues investigated are (1) nuclear-conventional substitutability in the European theater, (2) the Strategic Defense Initiative, and (3) the impact of arms races on outputs and factor rewards. Part IX discusses future research avenues related to arms race modeling.

  9. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility thermal hydraulic analysis for Title II design

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, E.R.

    1994-11-10

    The purpose of this work was to provide the thermal hydraulic analysis for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Title II design. Temperature distributions throughout the tank structure were calculated for subsequent use in the structural analysis and in the safety evaluation. Calculated temperatures of critical areas were compared to design allowables. Expected operating parameters were calculated for use in the ventilation system design and in the environmental impact documentation. The design requirements were obtained from the MWTF Functional Design Criteria (FDC). The most restrictive temperature limit given in the FDC is the 200 limit for the haunch and dome steel and concrete. The temperature limit for the rest of the primary and secondary tanks and concrete base mat and supporting pad is 250 F. Also, the waste should not be allowed to boil. The tank geometry was taken from ICF Kaiser Engineers Hanford drawing ES-W236A-Z1, Revision 1, included here in Appendix B. Heat removal rates by evaporation from the waste surface were obtained from experimental data. It is concluded that the MWTF tank cooling system will meet the design temperature limits for the design heat load of 700,000 Btu/h, even if cooling flow is lost to the annulus region, and temperatures change very slowly during transients due to the high heat capacity of the tank structure and the waste. Accordingly, transients will not be a significant operational problem from the viewpoint of meeting the specified temperature limits.

  10. Polarized Light Scanning Cryomacroscopy, Part II: Thermal Modeling and Analysis of Experimental Observations

    PubMed Central

    Feig, Justin S.G.; Solanki, Prem K.; Eisenberg, David P.; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at developing thermal analysis tools and explaining experimental observations made by means of polarized-light cryomacroscopy (Part I). Thermal modeling is based on finite elements analysis (FEA), where two model parameters are extracted from thermal measurements: (i) the overall heat transfer coefficient between the cuvette and the cooling chamber, and (ii) the effective thermal conductivity within the cryoprotective agent (CPA) at the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range. The effective thermal conductivity takes into account enhanced heat transfer due to convection currents within the CPA, creating the so-called Bénard cells. Comparison of experimental results with simulation data indicates that the uncertainty in simulations due to the propagation of uncertainty in measured physical properties exceeds the uncertainty in experimental measurements, which validates the modeling approach. It is shown in this study that while a cavity may form in the upper-center portion of the vitrified CPA, it has very little effect on estimating the temperature distribution within the domain. This cavity is driven by thermal contraction of the CPA, with the upper-center of the domain transitioning to glass last. Finally, it is demonstrated in this study that additional stresses may develop within the glass transition temperature range due to nonlinear behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient. This effect is reported here for the first time in the context of cryobiology, using the capabilities of polarized-light cryomacroscopy. PMID:27343139

  11. A case study of packaging waste collection systems in Portugal - Part II: Environmental and economic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pires, Ana; Sargedas, João; Miguel, Mécia; Pina, Joaquim; Martinho, Graça

    2017-03-01

    An understanding of the environmental impacts and costs related to waste collection is needed to ensure that existing waste collection schemes are the most appropriate with regard to both environment and cost. This paper is Part II of a three-part study of a mixed packaging waste collection system (curbside plus bring collection). Here, the mixed collection system is compared to an exclusive curbside system and an exclusive bring system. The scenarios were assessed using life cycle assessment and an assessment of costs to the waste management company. The analysis focuses on the collection itself so as to be relevant to waste managers and decision-makers who are involved only in this step of the packaging life cycle. The results show that the bring system has lower environmental impacts and lower economic costs, and is capable of reducing the environmental impacts of the mixed system. However, a sensitivity analysis shows that these results could differ if the curbside collection were to be optimized. From economic and environmental perspectives, the mixed system has few advantages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mass spectrometry and biochemical analysis of RNA polymerase II: targeting by protein phosphatase-1

    PubMed Central

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Klotchenko, Sergei A.; Artamonova, Tatiana O.; Ammosova, Tatiana; Washington, Kareem; Egorov, Vladimir V.; Shaldzhyan, Aram A.; Sergeeva, Maria V.; Zatulovskiy, Evgeny A.; Temkina, Olga A.; Petukhov, Mikhail G.; Vasin, Andrei V.; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail A.; Orlov, Yuri N.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription of eukaryotic genes is regulated by phosphorylation of serine residues of heptapeptide repeats of the carboxyterminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). We previously reported that protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) dephosphorylates RNAPII CTD in vitro and inhibition of nuclear PP1-blocked viral transcription. In this article, we analyzed the targeting of RNAPII by PP1 using biochemical and mass spectrometry analysis of RNAPII-associated regulatory subunits of PP1. Immunoblotting showed that PP1 co-elutes with RNAPII. Mass spectrometry approach showed the presence of U2 snRNP. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis points to NIPP1 and PNUTS as candidate regulatory subunits. Because NIPP1 was previously shown to target PP1 to U2 snRNP, we analyzed the effect of NIPP1 on RNAPII phosphorylation in cultured cells. Expression of mutant NIPP1 promoted RNAPII phosphorylation suggesting that the deregulation of cellular NIPP1/PP1 holoenzyme affects RNAPII phosphorylation and pointing to NIPP1 as a potential regulatory factor in RNAPII-mediated transcription. PMID:20941529

  13. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure . Part II; Severe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a finite element analysis and the testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part II of the paper considers the final test to failure of the test article in the presence of an intentionally inflicted severe discrete source damage under the wing up-bending loading condition. Finite element analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during the test and demonstrate that the hybrid wing body test article was able to redistribute and support the required design loads in a severely damaged condition.

  14. Sequence analysis of the MHC class II DPB1 gene in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Bak, E-J; Ishii, Y; Omatsu, T; Kyuwa, S; Hayasaka, I; Yoshikawa, Y

    2005-06-01

    The diversity of the MHC class II region in non-human primates is a focus of biomedical research because this region plays a crucial role in the recognition of antigens in the immune system. In particular, the chimpanzee [Pan troglodytes (Patr)], which belongs to the superfamily Hominoidea, has been used as a human model for the study of diseases such as human hepatitis C virus (HCV), human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, to which only humans and chimpanzees are susceptible. In the present study, polymorphisms of the MHC-DPB1 gene (Patr-DPB1) in a chimpanzee colony in Japan were examined using a stepwise polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. In order to design a suitable primer pair which would amplify exon 2 of the Patr-DPB1 gene, a fragment of approximately 8 kb from exon 1 to exon 3 was amplified from chimpanzee genomic DNA. After designing a 500-bp primer pair at the 3' region of intron 1 and the 5' region of intron 2, analysis of DPB1 exon 2 alleles of each chimpanzee was carried out. Twenty-two chimpanzees were used in our study, and we identified seven alleles by sequence analysis on the Patr-DPB1 gene, including one new allele. The obtained nucleotide sequence patterns suggest that Patr-DPB1 alleles emerge by genetic variations such as the exchange of sequence motifs and the accumulation of point mutations.

  15. Analysis and control of the photon beam position at PLS-II

    PubMed Central

    Ko, J.; Kim, I.-Y.; Kim, C.; Kim, D.-T.; Huang, J.-Y.; Shin, S.

    2016-01-01

    At third-generation light sources, the photon beam position stability is a critical issue for user experiments. In general, photon beam position monitors are developed to detect the real photon beam position, and the position is controlled by a feedback system in order to maintain the reference photon beam position. At Pohang Light Source II, a photon beam position stability of less than 1 µm r.m.s. was achieved for a user service period in the beamline, where the photon beam position monitor is installed. Nevertheless, a detailed analysis of the photon beam position data was necessary in order to ensure the performance of the photon beam position monitor, since it can suffer from various unknown types of noise, such as background contamination due to upstream or downstream dipole radiation, and undulator gap dependence. This paper reports the results of a start-to-end study of the photon beam position stability and a singular value decomposition analysis to confirm the reliability of the photon beam position data. PMID:26917132

  16. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part II: Thermal modeling and analysis of experimental observations.

    PubMed

    Feig, Justin S G; Solanki, Prem K; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    This study aims at developing thermal analysis tools and explaining experimental observations made by means of polarized-light cryomacroscopy (Part I). Thermal modeling is based on finite elements analysis (FEA), where two model parameters are extracted from thermal measurements: (i) the overall heat transfer coefficient between the cuvette and the cooling chamber, and (ii) the effective thermal conductivity within the cryoprotective agent (CPA) at the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range. The effective thermal conductivity takes into account enhanced heat transfer due to convection currents within the CPA, creating the so-called Bénard cells. Comparison of experimental results with simulation data indicates that the uncertainty in simulations due to the propagation of uncertainty in measured physical properties exceeds the uncertainty in experimental measurements, which validates the modeling approach. It is shown in this study that while a cavity may form in the upper-center portion of the vitrified CPA, it has very little effect on estimating the temperature distribution within the domain. This cavity is driven by thermal contraction of the CPA, with the upper-center of the domain transitioning to glass last. Finally, it is demonstrated in this study that additional stresses may develop within the glass transition temperature range due to nonlinear behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient. This effect is reported here for the first time in the context of cryobiology, using the capabilities of polarized-light cryomacroscopy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. New Gateway-compatible vectors for a high-throughput protein-protein interaction analysis by a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay in plants and their application to a plant clathrin structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kohji; Ishikawa, Syouta; Matsunami, Erika; Yamauchi, Junji; Homma, Keiichi; Faulkner, Christine; Oparka, Karl; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Nagaya, Tsutomu; Yokota, Kazushige; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play key roles in various biological processes. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay is an excellent tool for routine PPI analyses in living cells. We developed new Gateway vectors for a high-throughput BiFC analysis of plants, adopting a monomeric Venus split just after the tenth β-strand, and analyzed the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana coated vesicle coatmers, the clathrin heavy chain (CHC), and the clathrin light chain (CLC). In competitive BiFC tests, CLC interacted with CHC through a coiled-coil motif in the middle section of CLC. R1340, R1448, and K1512 in CHC and W94 in CLC are potentially key amino acids underlying the inter-chain interaction, consistent with analyses based on homology modeling. Our Gateway BiFC system, the V10-BiFC system, provides a useful tool for a PPI analysis in living plant cells. The CLC-CHC interaction identified may facilitate clathrin triskelion assembly needed for cage formation.

  18. Microwave spectrum compatibility in planetary research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmeth, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of solar system exploration, basic functions of the Deep Space Network (DSN), deep space microwave links, space research compatibility problems, and DSN's interference susceptibility. To maintain the operational integrity of competing radio systems using the microwave spectrum, the technology must extend to make possible the shared use of the spectral ranges without the ill effects of interferences. Suggestions are given which are only examples of many possible techniques that can eliminate or reduce interferences.

  19. Survey - Monomethylhydrazine Propellant/Material Compatibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-01

    Alloys Martin Marietta (Refs.l0, 20) rated 1100-0, 2014- T6 , and 2219 -T87 compatible with MMH for 300 hours at 135’C, no corrosion or MMH decomposition...Ti, 6061- T6 Al. The aluminum alloys show no susceptibility. The order of decreasing stress corrosion cracking promotion for the fuels is hydrazine...decomposition of propellant and no noticeable corrosion of the metal surfaces. The metals were aluminum alloys 1100, 2014, 6061; corrosion -resistant steels

  20. High Pressure Hydrogen Materials Compatibility of Piezoelectric Films

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Bonham, Charles C.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Pitman, Stan G.; Dahl, Michael E.; Henager, Charles H.

    2010-12-02

    Abstract: Hydrogen is being considered as a next-generation clean burning fuel. However, hydrogen has well known materials issues, including blistering and embrittlement in metals. Piezoelectric materials are used as actuators in hydrogen fuel technology. We present studies of materials compatibility of piezoelectric films in a high pressure hydrogen environment. Absorption of high pressure hydrogen was studied with Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and barium titanate (BTO) thin films. Hydrogen surface degradation in the form of blistering and Pb mixing was also observed.