Science.gov

Sample records for competition linking form

  1. Demolishing the competition: the longitudinal link between competitive video games, competitive gambling, and aggression.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Paul J C; Willoughby, Teena

    2013-07-01

    The majority of research on the link between video games and aggression has focused on the violent content in games. In contrast, recent experimental research suggests that it is video game competition, not violence, that has the greatest effect on aggression in the short-term. However, no researchers have examined the long-term relationship between video game competition and aggression. In addition, if competition in video games is a significant reason for the link between video game play and aggression, then other competitive activities, such as competitive gambling, also may predict aggression over time. In the current study, we directly assessed the socialization (competitive video game play and competitive gambling predicts aggression over time) versus selection hypotheses (aggression predicts competitive video game play and competitive gambling over time). Adolescents (N = 1,492, 50.8 % female) were surveyed annually from Grade 9 to Grade 12 about their video game play, gambling, and aggressive behaviors. Greater competitive video game play and competitive gambling predicted higher levels of aggression over time, after controlling for previous levels of aggression, supporting the socialization hypothesis. The selection hypothesis also was supported, as aggression predicted greater competitive video game play and competitive gambling over time, after controlling for previous competitive video game play and competitive gambling. Our findings, taken together with the fact that millions of adolescents play competitive video games every day and that competitive gambling may increase as adolescents transition into adulthood, highlight the need for a greater understanding of the relationship between competition and aggression.

  2. Demolishing the Competition: The Longitudinal Link between Competitive Video Games, Competitive Gambling, and Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adachi, Paul J. C.; Willoughby, Teena

    2013-01-01

    The majority of research on the link between video games and aggression has focused on the violent content in games. In contrast, recent experimental research suggests that it is video game competition, not violence, that has the greatest effect on aggression in the short-term. However, no researchers have examined the long-term relationship…

  3. Demolishing the Competition: The Longitudinal Link between Competitive Video Games, Competitive Gambling, and Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adachi, Paul J. C.; Willoughby, Teena

    2013-01-01

    The majority of research on the link between video games and aggression has focused on the violent content in games. In contrast, recent experimental research suggests that it is video game competition, not violence, that has the greatest effect on aggression in the short-term. However, no researchers have examined the long-term relationship…

  4. The link between competitive sports and gambling behaviors among youths.

    PubMed

    Gavriel-Fried, Belle; Bronstein, Israel; Sherpsky, Idit

    2015-04-01

    This study examines the association between physical activities and gambling, making a distinction between two characteristics of the former: intensity level and type (competitive/non-competitive). 316 adolescents from four high schools in Israel completed questionnaires. For males, participation in competitive athletic sports was associated with gambling frequency and problem gambling. For females, participation in competitive athletic sports was associated only with gambling frequency. Both types of physical activity and gender are important when analyzing the association between gambling and sporting activities. Youths involved in competitive sports are at greater risk for gambling involvement. (Am J Addict 2015;24:200-202). © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  5. 76 FR 20976 - Wireline Competition Bureau Releases 2011 Annual Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet (FCC Form...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... COMMISSION Wireline Competition Bureau Releases 2011 Annual Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet (FCC Form.... SUMMARY: In this document, the Wireline Competition Bureau released the revised annual Telecommunications... (describing a filer's principal telecommunications activities) into Appendix B. (5) Noting that...

  6. Telecom Link--A Competitive Simulated Design Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, J.; Allen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Telecom link is a structured design exercise concerned with building a telecommunications link between London and Amsterdam. Designed for A-level physics, the simulation requires a minimum of 10 hours. Aims of the exercise, design specifications and technical aspects, and summaries of four possible technologies used in the simulation are…

  7. Protonated Form: The Potent Form of Potassium-Competitive Acid Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hua-Jun; Deng, Wei-Qiao; Zou, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Potassium-competitive acid blockers (P-CABs) are highly safe and active drugs targeting H+,K+-ATPase to cure acid-related gastric diseases. In this study, we for the first time investigate the interaction mechanism between the protonated form of P-CABs and human H+,K+-ATPase using homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics and binding free energy calculation methods. The results explain why P-CABs have higher activities with higher pKa values or at lower pH. With positive charge, the protonated forms of P-CABs have more competitive advantage to block potassium ion into luminal channel and to bind with H+,K+-ATPase via electrostatic interactions. The binding affinity of the protonated form is more favorable than that of the neutral P-CABs. In particular, Asp139 should be a very important binding site for the protonated form of P-CABs through hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. These findings could promote the rational design of novel P-CABs. PMID:24845980

  8. Modelling the multidimensional niche by linking functional traits to competitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Daniel S.; Leonard, Kenneth E.; Drake, John M.; Hall, David W.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Bradford, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Linking competitive outcomes to environmental conditions is necessary for understanding species' distributions and responses to environmental change. Despite this importance, generalizable approaches for predicting competitive outcomes across abiotic gradients are lacking, driven largely by the highly complex and context-dependent nature of biotic interactions. Here, we present and empirically test a novel niche model that uses functional traits to model the niche space of organisms and predict competitive outcomes of co-occurring populations across multiple resource gradients. The model makes no assumptions about the underlying mode of competition and instead applies to those settings where relative competitive ability across environments correlates with a quantifiable performance metric. To test the model, a series of controlled microcosm experiments were conducted using genetically related strains of a widespread microbe. The model identified trait microevolution and performance differences among strains, with the predicted competitive ability of each organism mapped across a two-dimensional carbon and nitrogen resource space. Areas of coexistence and competitive dominance between strains were identified, and the predicted competitive outcomes were validated in approximately 95% of the pairings. By linking trait variation to competitive ability, our work demonstrates a generalizable approach for predicting and modelling competitive outcomes across changing environmental contexts. PMID:26136444

  9. Modelling the multidimensional niche by linking functional traits to competitive performance.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Daniel S; Leonard, Kenneth E; Drake, John M; Hall, David W; Crowther, Thomas W; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-07-22

    Linking competitive outcomes to environmental conditions is necessary for understanding species' distributions and responses to environmental change. Despite this importance, generalizable approaches for predicting competitive outcomes across abiotic gradients are lacking, driven largely by the highly complex and context-dependent nature of biotic interactions. Here, we present and empirically test a novel niche model that uses functional traits to model the niche space of organisms and predict competitive outcomes of co-occurring populations across multiple resource gradients. The model makes no assumptions about the underlying mode of competition and instead applies to those settings where relative competitive ability across environments correlates with a quantifiable performance metric. To test the model, a series of controlled microcosm experiments were conducted using genetically related strains of a widespread microbe. The model identified trait microevolution and performance differences among strains, with the predicted competitive ability of each organism mapped across a two-dimensional carbon and nitrogen resource space. Areas of coexistence and competitive dominance between strains were identified,and the predicted competitive outcomes were validated in approximately 95% of the pairings. By linking trait variation to competitive ability, our work demonstrates a generalizable approach for predicting and modelling competitive outcomes across changing environmental contexts.

  10. Analysis of quasifission competition in fusion reactions forming heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerton, Kalee; Kohley, Zachary; Morrissey, Dave; Wakhle, Aditya; Stiefel, Krystin; Hinde, David; Dasgupta, Mahananda; Williams, Elizabeth; Simenel, Cedric; Carter, Ian; Cook, Kaitlin; Jeung, Dongyun; Luong, Duc Huy; McNeil, Steven; Palshetkar, Chandani; Rafferty, Dominic

    2015-10-01

    Heavy-ion fusion reactions have provided a mechanism for the production of superheavy elements allowing for the extension of both the periodic table and chart of the nuclides. However, fusion of the projectile and target, forming a compound nucleus, is hindered by orders of magnitude by the quasifission process in heavy systems. In order to fully understand this mechanism, and make accurate predictions for superheavy element production cross sections, a clear description of the interplay between the fusion-fission and quasifission reaction channels is necessary. The mass-angle distributions of fragments formed in 8 different Cr + W reactions were measured at the Australia National University in order to explore the N/Z dependence of the quasifission process. Two sets of data were measured: one at a constant energy relative to the fusion barrier and one at a constant compound nucleus excitation energy. The results of this analysis will provide insight into the effect of using more neutron-rich beams in superheavy element production reactions.

  11. Cross linking molecular systems to form ultrathin dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Danqin

    Dehydrogenation leads to cross linking of polymer or polymer like formation in very different systems: self-assembled monolayers and in closo -carboranes leading to the formation of semiconducting and dielectric boron carbide. We find evidence of intermolecular interactions for a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed from a large molecular adsorbate, [1,1';4',1"-terphenyl]-4,4"-dimethanethiol, from the dispersion of the molecular orbitals with changing the wave vector k and from the changes with temperature. With the formation self assembled molecular (SAM) layer, the molecular orbitals hybridize to electronic bands, with indications of significant band dispersion of the unoccupied molecular orbitals. Although organic adsorbates and thin films are generally regarded as "soft" materials, the effective Debye temperature, indicative of the dynamic motion of the lattice normal to the surface, can be very high, e.g. in the multilayer film formed from [1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'-dimethanethiol (BPDMT). Depending on molecular orientation, the effective Debye temperature can be comparable to that of graphite due to the 'stiffness' of the benzene rings, but follows the expected Debye-Waller behavior for the core level photoemission intensities with temperature. This is not always the case. We find that a monomolecular film formed from [1,1';4',1"-terphenyl]-4,4"-dimethanethiol deviates from Debye-Waller temperature behavior and is likely caused by temperature dependent changes in molecular orientation. We also find evidence for the increase in dielectric character with polymerization (cross-linking) in spite of the decrease in the HOMO-LUMO gap upon irradiation of TPDMT. The changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap, with cross-linking, are roughly consistent with the band dispersion. The decomposition and cross-linking processes are also accompanied by changes in molecular orientation. The energetics of the three isomeric carborane cage compounds [ closo-1,2-orthocarborane, closo-1

  12. Mechanisms linking affective reactions to competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns in male martial artists

    PubMed Central

    Cerin, E; Barnett, A

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine affective linkages between competition-related and competition-extraneous concern domains. A secondary purpose was to establish the contributions of pre-competition affects to post-competition performance appraisals, independent of pre-competition performance expectations. Thirty-nine highly skilled male martial artists were assessed at five random times a day for a week and 1 h before a major competition on affective states and sources of concern. They also reported their performance expectations and post-competition performance appraisals. Affective states triggered by competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns persisted in time. Carry-over effects were stronger after reports of competition-related concerns, emphasizing the subjective importance of the competitive event. Although positive (enjoyment and surprise) and negative (sadness and guilt) affective spill-over was observed from competition-extraneous to competition-related concerns, the reverse held true only for disgust. These findings may be due to the athletes' ability to regulate affective reactions within a sporting setting, in particular. Spill-over from competition-extraneous to competition-related concerns is indicative of a lesser degree of control over work/study and family life. Given that average weekly negative affects and anger/disgust were independent predictors of post-competition performance appraisals, the phenomenon of spill-over and other affective linkage mechanisms in sport warrant further investigation. PMID:21917020

  13. Mechanisms linking affective reactions to competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns in male martial artists.

    PubMed

    Cerin, E; Barnett, A

    2011-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine affective linkages between competition-related and competition-extraneous concern domains. A secondary purpose was to establish the contributions of pre-competition affects to post-competition performance appraisals, independent of pre-competition performance expectations. Thirty-nine highly skilled male martial artists were assessed at five random times a day for a week and 1 h before a major competition on affective states and sources of concern. They also reported their performance expectations and post-competition performance appraisals. Affective states triggered by competition-related and competition-extraneous concerns persisted in time. Carry-over effects were stronger after reports of competition-related concerns, emphasizing the subjective importance of the competitive event. Although positive (enjoyment and surprise) and negative (sadness and guilt) affective spill-over was observed from competition-extraneous to competition-related concerns, the reverse held true only for disgust. These findings may be due to the athletes' ability to regulate affective reactions within a sporting setting, in particular. Spill-over from competition-extraneous to competition-related concerns is indicative of a lesser degree of control over work/study and family life. Given that average weekly negative affects and anger/disgust were independent predictors of post-competition performance appraisals, the phenomenon of spill-over and other affective linkage mechanisms in sport warrant further investigation. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Enzyme-linked, aptamer-based, competitive biolayer interferometry biosensor for palytoxin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shunxiang; Zheng, Xin; Hu, Bo; Sun, Mingjuan; Wu, Jihong; Jiao, Binghua; Wang, Lianghua

    2017-03-15

    In this study, we coupled biolayer interferometry (BLI) with competitive binding assay through an enzyme-linked aptamer and developed a real-time, ultra-sensitive, rapid quantitative method for detection of the marine biotoxin palytoxin. Horseradish peroxidase-labeled aptamers were used as biorecognition receptors to competitively bind with palytoxin, which was immobilized on the biosensor surface. The palytoxin: horseradish peroxidase-aptamer complex was then submerged in a 3,3'-diaminobenzidine solution, which resulted in formation of a precipitated polymeric product directly on the biosensor surface and a large change in the optical thickness of the biosensor layer. This change could obviously shift the interference pattern and generate a response profile on the BLI biosensor. The biosensor showed a broad linear range for palytoxin (200-700pg/mL) with a low detection limit (0.04pg/mL). Moreover, the biosensor was applied to the detection of palytoxin in spiked extracts and showed a high degree of selectivity for palytoxin, good reproducibility, and stability. This enzyme-linked, aptamer-based, competitive BLI biosensor offers a promising method for rapid and sensitive detection of palytoxin and other analytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Linking the evolution and form of warning coloration in nature.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Martin; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2012-02-07

    Many animals are toxic or unpalatable and signal this to predators with warning signals (aposematism). Aposematic appearance has long been a classical system to study predator-prey interactions, communication and signalling, and animal behaviour and learning. The area has received considerable empirical and theoretical investigation. However, most research has centred on understanding the initial evolution of aposematism, despite the fact that these studies often tell us little about the form and diversity of real warning signals in nature. In contrast, less attention has been given to the mechanistic basis of aposematic markings; that is, 'what makes an effective warning signal?', and the efficacy of warning signals has been neglected. Furthermore, unlike other areas of adaptive coloration research (such as camouflage and mate choice), studies of warning coloration have often been slow to address predator vision and psychology. Here, we review the current understanding of warning signal form, with an aim to comprehend the diversity of warning signals in nature. We present hypotheses and suggestions for future work regarding our current understanding of several inter-related questions covering the form of warning signals and their relationship with predator vision, learning, and links to broader issues in evolutionary ecology such as mate choice and speciation.

  16. Linking the evolution and form of warning coloration in nature

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Martin; Ruxton, Graeme D.

    2012-01-01

    Many animals are toxic or unpalatable and signal this to predators with warning signals (aposematism). Aposematic appearance has long been a classical system to study predator–prey interactions, communication and signalling, and animal behaviour and learning. The area has received considerable empirical and theoretical investigation. However, most research has centred on understanding the initial evolution of aposematism, despite the fact that these studies often tell us little about the form and diversity of real warning signals in nature. In contrast, less attention has been given to the mechanistic basis of aposematic markings; that is, ‘what makes an effective warning signal?’, and the efficacy of warning signals has been neglected. Furthermore, unlike other areas of adaptive coloration research (such as camouflage and mate choice), studies of warning coloration have often been slow to address predator vision and psychology. Here, we review the current understanding of warning signal form, with an aim to comprehend the diversity of warning signals in nature. We present hypotheses and suggestions for future work regarding our current understanding of several inter-related questions covering the form of warning signals and their relationship with predator vision, learning, and links to broader issues in evolutionary ecology such as mate choice and speciation. PMID:22113031

  17. Recurrent Network Dynamics; a Link between Form and Motion

    PubMed Central

    Joukes, Jeroen; Yu, Yunguo; Victor, Jonathan D.; Krekelberg, Bart

    2017-01-01

    To discriminate visual features such as corners and contours, the brain must be sensitive to spatial correlations between multiple points in an image. Consistent with this, macaque V2 neurons respond selectively to patterns with well-defined multipoint correlations. Here, we show that a standard feedforward model (a cascade of linear–non-linear filters) does not capture this multipoint selectivity. As an alternative, we developed an artificial neural network model with two hierarchical stages of processing and locally recurrent connectivity. This model faithfully reproduced neurons’ selectivity for multipoint correlations. By probing the model, we gained novel insights into early form processing. First, the diverse selectivity for multipoint correlations and complex response dynamics of the hidden units in the model were surprisingly similar to those observed in V1 and V2. This suggests that both transient and sustained response dynamics may be a vital part of form computations. Second, the model self-organized units with speed and direction selectivity that was correlated with selectivity for multipoint correlations. In other words, the model units that detected multipoint spatial correlations also detected space-time correlations. This leads to the novel hypothesis that higher-order spatial correlations could be computed by the rapid, sequential assessment and comparison of multiple low-order correlations within the receptive field. This computation links spatial and temporal processing and leads to the testable prediction that the analysis of complex form and motion are closely intertwined in early visual cortex. PMID:28360844

  18. Competition.

    PubMed

    Chambers, D W

    1997-01-01

    Our ambivalence toward competition can be traced to an unspoken preference for certain types of competition which give us an advantage over the types we value less. Four types are defined (a) pure (same rules, same objectives), (b) collaborative (same rules, shared objective), (c) market share (different rules, same objectives), and (d) market growth (different rules, value added orientation). The defining characteristics of the four types of competition are respectively: needing a referee, arguing over the spoils, differentiation and substitutability, and customer focus. Dentistry has features of all four types of competition, thus making it difficult to have a meaningful discussion or frame a coherent policy on this topic.

  19. Competitiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minihan, Charles E.

    1991-03-01

    Competition is defined as a spirited, sometimes ruthless, engagement of rivals such as in a race, a match, or an effort by one person to sell goods or services to customers in the marketplace of another. Sound familiar? If you will bear with me for a few minutes, I would like to examine competitiveness on a more global basis with emphasis on the rules of the game. You may be thinking that more often than not the competitive arena is relatively small and far from global, and its consequences are singularly influential on a trivial document called the P & L. However, with the newly established freedom of a major segment of the world population and with the industrial capability formerly known as Communist moving into what has heretofore been "our" limited arena, the competition could get very brisk. Brisk, and perhaps ruthless, unless we work together to try to establish an international industrial policy that is truly based on equality of competitive opportunity for all.

  20. Competitive interactions between corals and turf algae depend on coral colony form

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Mark JA

    2016-01-01

    Turf algae are becoming more abundant on coral reefs worldwide, but their effects on other benthic organisms remain poorly described. To describe the general characteristics of competitive interactions between corals and turf algae, we determined the occurrence and outcomes of coral–turf algal interactions among different coral growth forms (branching, upright, massive, encrusting, plating, and solitary) on a shallow reef in Vietnam. In total, the amount of turf algal interaction, i.e., the proportion of the coral boundary directly bordering turf algae, was quantified for 1,276 coral colonies belonging to 27 genera and the putative outcome of each interaction was noted. The amount of turf algal interaction and the outcome of these interactions differed predictably among the six growth forms. Encrusting corals interacted most often with turf algae, but also competed most successfully against turf algae. The opposite was observed for branching corals, which rarely interacted with turf algae and rarely won these competitive interactions. Including all other growth forms, a positive relationship was found between the amount of competitive interactions with neighboring turf algae and the percentage of such interaction won by the coral. This growth form dependent ability to outcompete turf algae was not only observed among coral species, but also among different growth forms in morphologically plastic coral genera (Acropora, Favia, Favites, Montastrea, Montipora, Porites) illustrating the general nature of this relationship. PMID:27190707

  1. Competitive interactions between corals and turf algae depend on coral colony form.

    PubMed

    Swierts, Thomas; Vermeij, Mark Ja

    2016-01-01

    Turf algae are becoming more abundant on coral reefs worldwide, but their effects on other benthic organisms remain poorly described. To describe the general characteristics of competitive interactions between corals and turf algae, we determined the occurrence and outcomes of coral-turf algal interactions among different coral growth forms (branching, upright, massive, encrusting, plating, and solitary) on a shallow reef in Vietnam. In total, the amount of turf algal interaction, i.e., the proportion of the coral boundary directly bordering turf algae, was quantified for 1,276 coral colonies belonging to 27 genera and the putative outcome of each interaction was noted. The amount of turf algal interaction and the outcome of these interactions differed predictably among the six growth forms. Encrusting corals interacted most often with turf algae, but also competed most successfully against turf algae. The opposite was observed for branching corals, which rarely interacted with turf algae and rarely won these competitive interactions. Including all other growth forms, a positive relationship was found between the amount of competitive interactions with neighboring turf algae and the percentage of such interaction won by the coral. This growth form dependent ability to outcompete turf algae was not only observed among coral species, but also among different growth forms in morphologically plastic coral genera (Acropora, Favia, Favites, Montastrea, Montipora, Porites) illustrating the general nature of this relationship.

  2. Development of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for diethylcarbamazine.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Y; Takamura, N; Fujimaki, Y; Yamaguchi, T; Kitagawa, T; Aoki, Y

    1996-08-01

    A sensitive and reproducible competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the determination of the concentration of diethylcarbamazine (DEC) in biological fluids was developed. Since DEC has no functional group to conjugate with bovine serum albumin (BSA), N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-ethyl-4-methyl-1-piperazinecarboxamide (DEC-NH2) was first synthesized. This compound was then converted to carboxyl DEC (DEC-COOH) and conjugated to BSA and to poly-L-lysine for use as immunogen and solid-phase marker, respectively. The competitive ELISA was conducted by simultaneously incubating DEC with mouse anti-DEC antiserum over DEC-poly-L-lysine solid phase. Subsequently, the binding of anti-DEC antibody was detected by using sheep anti-mouse IgG peroxidase conjugate as a tracer. The reliability, determined by the coefficient of variation for inter and intra-assay, was satisfactory. The cross-reactivities of anti-DEC antibodies with DEC metabolites, related compounds and ivermectin were negligible. Using this assay, DEC levels were easily determined in serum of Mongolian jirds (Meriones unguiculatus) up to 4 hours following a single dose of DEC citrate base (100 mg/kg of body weight) via intraperitoneal route.

  3. Biotin-Streptavidin Competition Mediates Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules in Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Tang, Thean-Hock

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is the gold standard assay for detecting and identifying biomolecules using antibodies as the probe. Improving ELISA is crucial for detecting disease-causing agents and facilitating diagnosis at the early stages of disease. Biotinylated antibody and streptavidin-conjugated horse radish peroxide (streptavidin-HRP) often are used with ELISA to enhance the detection of various kinds of targets. In the present study, we used a competition-based strategy in which we pre-mixed free biotin with streptavidin-HRP to generate high-performance system, as free biotin occupies some of the biotin binding sites on streptavidin, thereby providing more chances for streptavidin-HRP to bind with biotinylated antibody. ESAT-6, which is a protein secreted early during tuberculosis infection, was used as the model target. We found that 8 fM of free biotin mixed with streptavidin-HRP anchored the higher detection level of ESAT-6 by four-fold compared with detection without free biotin (only streptavidin-HRP), and the limit of detection of the new method was 250 pM. These results suggest that biotin-streptavidin competition can be used to improve the diagnosis of analytes in other types of sensors. PMID:26954237

  4. Biotin-Streptavidin Competition Mediates Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules in Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Gopinath, Subash C B; Tang, Thean-Hock

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is the gold standard assay for detecting and identifying biomolecules using antibodies as the probe. Improving ELISA is crucial for detecting disease-causing agents and facilitating diagnosis at the early stages of disease. Biotinylated antibody and streptavidin-conjugated horse radish peroxide (streptavidin-HRP) often are used with ELISA to enhance the detection of various kinds of targets. In the present study, we used a competition-based strategy in which we pre-mixed free biotin with streptavidin-HRP to generate high-performance system, as free biotin occupies some of the biotin binding sites on streptavidin, thereby providing more chances for streptavidin-HRP to bind with biotinylated antibody. ESAT-6, which is a protein secreted early during tuberculosis infection, was used as the model target. We found that 8 fM of free biotin mixed with streptavidin-HRP anchored the higher detection level of ESAT-6 by four-fold compared with detection without free biotin (only streptavidin-HRP), and the limit of detection of the new method was 250 pM. These results suggest that biotin-streptavidin competition can be used to improve the diagnosis of analytes in other types of sensors.

  5. Competition with and without priority control: linking rivalry to attention through winner-take-all networks with memory

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Svenja; Gruenhage, Gina; Walper, Daniel; Rutishauser, Ueli; Einhäuser, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Competition is ubiquitous in perception. For example, items in the visual field compete for processing resources, and attention controls their priority (biased competition). The inevitable ambiguity in the interpretation of sensory signals yields another form of competition: distinct perceptual interpretations compete for access to awareness. Rivalry, where two equally likely percepts compete for dominance, explicates the latter form of competition. Building upon the similarity between attention and rivalry, we propose to model rivalry by a generic competitive circuit that is widely used in the attention literature—a winner-take-all (WTA) network. Specifically, we show that a network of two coupled WTA circuits replicates three common hallmarks of rivalry: the distribution of dominance durations, their dependence on input strength (“Levelt's propositions”), and the effects of stimulus removal (blanking). This model introduces a form of memory by forming discrete states and explains experimental data better than competitive models of rivalry without memory. This result supports the crucial role of memory in rivalry specifically and in competitive processes in general. Our approach unifies the seemingly distinct phenomena of rivalry, memory, and attention in a single model with competition as the common underlying principle. PMID:25581077

  6. Competition with and without priority control: linking rivalry to attention through winner-take-all networks with memory.

    PubMed

    Marx, Svenja; Gruenhage, Gina; Walper, Daniel; Rutishauser, Ueli; Einhäuser, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    Competition is ubiquitous in perception. For example, items in the visual field compete for processing resources, and attention controls their priority (biased competition). The inevitable ambiguity in the interpretation of sensory signals yields another form of competition: distinct perceptual interpretations compete for access to awareness. Rivalry, where two equally likely percepts compete for dominance, explicates the latter form of competition. Building upon the similarity between attention and rivalry, we propose to model rivalry by a generic competitive circuit that is widely used in the attention literature-a winner-take-all (WTA) network. Specifically, we show that a network of two coupled WTA circuits replicates three common hallmarks of rivalry: the distribution of dominance durations, their dependence on input strength ("Levelt's propositions"), and the effects of stimulus removal (blanking). This model introduces a form of memory by forming discrete states and explains experimental data better than competitive models of rivalry without memory. This result supports the crucial role of memory in rivalry specifically and in competitive processes in general. Our approach unifies the seemingly distinct phenomena of rivalry, memory, and attention in a single model with competition as the common underlying principle.

  7. Linked Data: Forming Partnerships at the Data Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, A.; Chandler, C. L.; Arko, R. A.; Jones, M. B.; Hitzler, P.; Janowicz, K.; Krisnadhi, A.; Schildhauer, M.; Fils, D.; Narock, T.; Groman, R. C.; O'Brien, M.; Patton, E. W.; Kinkade, D.; Rauch, S.

    2015-12-01

    The challenges presented by big data are straining data management software architectures of the past. For smaller existing data facilities, the technical refactoring of software layers become costly to scale across the big data landscape. In response to these challenges, data facilities will need partnerships with external entities for improved solutions to perform tasks such as data cataloging, discovery and reuse, and data integration and processing with provenance. At its surface, the concept of linked open data suggests an uncalculated altruism. Yet, in his concept of five star open data, Tim Berners-Lee explains the strategic costs and benefits of deploying linked open data from the perspective of its consumer and producer - a data partnership. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) addresses some of the emerging needs of its research community by partnering with groups doing complementary work and linking their respective data layers using linked open data principles. Examples will show how these links, explicit manifestations of partnerships, reduce technical debt and provide a swift flexibility for future considerations.

  8. Enhancing Technology Education by Forming Links with Industry: A New Zealand Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunton, Margaret; Coll, Richard K.

    2005-01-01

    The New Zealand technology curriculum suggests that schools should seek to develop links with industry as a means of providing real-world examples of technology practice. However, if a school is to form links, what form might such links take, and with whom should they be made? The case study research reported here represents an investigation into…

  9. Enhancing Technology Education by Forming Links with Industry: A New Zealand Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunton, Margaret; Coll, Richard K.

    2005-01-01

    The New Zealand technology curriculum suggests that schools should seek to develop links with industry as a means of providing real-world examples of technology practice. However, if a school is to form links, what form might such links take, and with whom should they be made? The case study research reported here represents an investigation into…

  10. Changed clonal growth form induced by sand burial facilitates the acclimation of Carex brevicuspis to competition.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Xie, Yonghong; Zhu, Lianlian; Jiang, Li; Chen, Xinsheng; Pan, Baihan; Deng, Zhengmiao

    2015-01-01

    guerrilla growth form and spacer elongation induced by sand burial helped C. brevicuspis to acclimate to competition.

  11. Competition between links in ``producer-consumer'' trophic chains in an aquatic closed system with spatially separated components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Pechurkin, N. S.; Somova, L. A.

    The work analyzes functioning of a "producer-consumer" closed aquatic system with spatially separated links, where each component consisted of two species. Producers in the system were the microalgae of Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus sp., consumers - Paramecium caudatum infusoria and Brachionus sp. rotifers. In the experiment the competing predators were consuming on a mixed culture of algae, and the competition of algae was studied under nitrogen limitation. Under these conditions competitiveness of Scenedesmus was higher than that of Chlorella vulgaris. Metabolism products of Scenedesmus algae have been found to have negative effect on reproduction of Paramecium caudatum protozoa. Predator population dynamics in the "consumer" link demonstrated that the rotifers that consume two algal species are more competitive compared to protozoa feeding on chlorella only.

  12. Competition between links in "producer-consumer" trophic chains in an aquatic closed system with spatially separated components.

    PubMed

    Pisman, T I; Pechurkin, N S; Somova, L A

    2001-01-01

    The work analyzes functioning of a "producer-consumer" closed aquatic system with spatially separated links, where each component consisted of two species. Producers in the system were the microalgae of Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus sp., consumers--Paramecium caudatum infusoria and Brachionus sp. rotifers. In the experiment the competing predators were consuming on a mixed culture of algae, and the competition of algae was studied under nitrogen limitation. Under these conditions competitiveness of Scenedesmus was higher than that of Chlorella vulgaris. Metabolism products of Scenedesmus algae have been found to have negative effect on reproduction of Paramecium caudatum protozoa. Predator population dynamics in the "consumer" link demonstrated that the rotifers that consume two algal species are more competitive compared to protozoa feeding on chlorella only. Grant numbers: N99-04-96017, N25. c 2001. COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Coupled dynamics of node and link states in complex networks: a model for language competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carro, Adrián; Toral, Raúl; San Miguel, Maxi

    2016-11-01

    Inspired by language competition processes, we present a model of coupled evolution of node and link states. In particular, we focus on the interplay between the use of a language and the preference or attitude of the speakers towards it, which we model, respectively, as a property of the interactions between speakers (a link state) and as a property of the speakers themselves (a node state). Furthermore, we restrict our attention to the case of two socially equivalent languages and to socially inspired network topologies based on a mechanism of triadic closure. As opposed to most of the previous literature, where language extinction is an inevitable outcome of the dynamics, we find a broad range of possible asymptotic configurations, which we classify as: frozen extinction states, frozen coexistence states, and dynamically trapped coexistence states. Moreover, metastable coexistence states with very long survival times and displaying a non-trivial dynamics are found to be abundant. Interestingly, a system size scaling analysis shows, on the one hand, that the probability of language extinction vanishes exponentially for increasing system sizes and, on the other hand, that the time scale of survival of the non-trivial dynamical metastable states increases linearly with the size of the system. Thus, non-trivial dynamical coexistence is the only possible outcome for large enough systems. Finally, we show how this coexistence is characterized by one of the languages becoming clearly predominant while the other one becomes increasingly confined to ‘ghetto-like’ structures: small groups of bilingual speakers arranged in triangles, with a strong preference for the minority language, and using it for their intra-group interactions while they switch to the predominant language for communications with the rest of the population.

  14. A competitive peptide inhibitor KIDARI negatively regulates HFR1 by forming nonfunctional heterodimers in Arabidopsis photomorphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Shin-Young; Seo, Pil Joon; Ryu, Jae Yong; Cho, Shin-Hae; Woo, Je-Chang; Park, Chung-Mo

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic dimer formation is an elaborate means of modulating transcription factor activities in diverse cellular processes. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED 1 (HFR1), for example, plays a role in plant photomorphogenesis by forming non-DNA binding heterodimers with PHYTOCHROMEINTERACTING FACTORS (PIFs). Recent studies have shown that a small HLH protein KIDARI (KDR) negatively regulates the HFR1 activity in the process. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the KDR control of the HFR1 activity are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that KDR attenuates the HFR1 activity by competitively forming nonfunctional heterodimers, causing liberation of PIF4 from the transcriptionally inactive HFR1-PIF4 complex. Accordingly, the photomorphogenic hypocotyl growth of the HFR1-overexpressing plants can be suppressed by KDR coexpression, as observed in the HFR1-deficient hfr1-201 mutant. These results indicate that the PIF4 activity is modulated through a double layer of competitive inhibition by HFR1 and KDR, which could in turn ensure fine-tuning of the PIF4 activity under fluctuating light conditions.

  15. Links between grievance, complaint and different forms of entitlement.

    PubMed

    Weintrobe, Sally

    2004-02-01

    The author argues that different kinds of object relationships underlie the phenomena of grievance and complaint. Grievance is addressed to an object held responsible for a failure of idealisation, and the object is scolded or punished for this failure. Nursing grievance can restore the ideal object in phantasy and block mourning the ideal. With pathological grievance the self is seen as ideal and awareness of dependence on the libidinal other is denied, as are the passage of time and the transience of experience. An attitude of narcissistic entitlement to be special and exempt from ordinary reality is seen as intrinsic to the more persistent and pathological forms of grievance, and this narcissistic entitlement fuels grievance. Turning to complaint, the author argues that complaint is addressed to an object that is less idealised; there is more open acknowledgement of the need for and dependence on the other to realise liveliness. Complaint is the voice of the authentic lively self and intrinsic to complaint is a sense of lively entitlement. The author presents clinical material to illustrate these themes, and to show movement between complaint and grievance. Some technical difficulties in working with grievance are discussed.

  16. Re-forming medical delivery systems: economic organization and dynamics of regional planning and managed competition.

    PubMed

    Perkins, B B

    1999-01-01

    This paper compares structural components of medical delivery in two major systemwide reform strategies in the United States. Commonly portrayed in terms of opposing ideologies of planning vs. market reform, regional organization and managed competition have promoted similar structural elements and geographic configurations. They both support growth of institution-based specialized teams and hospital consolidation. They both differentiate hospital care into vertically integrated levels, and develop regions as the key production and market area for organized delivery systems. System-wide management or regulation in each has tried to control allocation of resources, capital investment, and competition. Developed in the context of large-scale industrial production, these components have inherent economic dynamics and together they shape the market structure of medical care. The final section briefly considers the locus of power in the two reform approaches and the implication for choosing mechanisms of reform. It also notes that despite their rhetoric, the two strategies do not shape their services according to information about population benefit. The conclusion points out that the commonalities in structure and power demonstrate the dominance of economic organization in medical reform and contribute to the wide acceptance of this business form of organization as an international model.

  17. Appearance- and Competition-Focused Performance Goals: Examining Their Links with Performance in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warburton, Victoria; Spray, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    We examined the utility of distinguishing between appearance- and competition-focused approach and avoidance performance goals to our understanding of motivation in physical education. Four achievement goals were tested composed of approach-avoidance and appearance-competition components. Three hundred and two pupils, aged 11-14 years, completed…

  18. Appearance- and Competition-Focused Performance Goals: Examining Their Links with Performance in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warburton, Victoria; Spray, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    We examined the utility of distinguishing between appearance- and competition-focused approach and avoidance performance goals to our understanding of motivation in physical education. Four achievement goals were tested composed of approach-avoidance and appearance-competition components. Three hundred and two pupils, aged 11-14 years, completed…

  19. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus by antimicrobial biofilms formed by competitive exclusion microorganisms on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeri; Park, Sunhyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Kim, Hoikyung; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2016-12-05

    The goal of this study was to develop a desiccation resistant antimicrobial surface using biofilm of competitive exclusion (CE) microorganism inhibitory to Staphylococcus aureus. We isolated 161 microorganisms from soils, foods, and food-contact surfaces that are inhibitory to S. aureus. Among them, three CE microorganisms (Streptomyces spororaveus strain Gaeunsan-18, Bacillus safensis strain Chamnamu-sup 5-25, and Pseudomonas azotoformans strain Lettuce-9) exhibiting strong antibacterial activity and high growth rates were selected for evaluation. These isolates formed biofilms within 24h on stainless steel coupons (SSCs) immersed in Bennet's broth and tryptic soy broth at 25°C. Cells in these biofilms showed significantly (P≤0.05) enhanced resistance to a desiccation (43% relative humidity [RH]) compared to those attached to SSCs but not in biofilms. The antimicrobial activities of biofilms formed by these isolates on SSCs against S. aureus at 25°C and 43% RH were determined. Compared to SSCs lacking biofilms formed by CE microorganisms, populations of S. aureus on SSCs harboring CE biofilms were significantly lower (P≤0.05). Results indicate that persistent antimicrobial activity against S. aureus on stainless steel surfaces can be achieved by the presence of biofilms of CE microorganisms. This information will be useful when developing strategies to improve the microbiological safety of foods during storage, processing, and distribution by facilitating the development of effective antimicrobial food-contact surfaces.

  20. Auxin transport through PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3) controls shade avoidance and fitness during competition

    PubMed Central

    Keuskamp, Diederik H.; Pollmann, Stephan; Voesenek, Laurentius A. C. J.; Peeters, Anton J. M.; Pierik, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Plants grow in dense vegetations at the risk of being out-competed by neighbors. To increase their competitive power, plants display adaptive responses, such as rapid shoot elongation (shade avoidance) to consolidate light capture. These responses are induced upon detection of proximate neighbors through perception of the reduced ratio between red (R) and far-red (FR) light that is typical for dense vegetations. The plant hormone auxin is a central regulator of plant development and plasticity, but until now it has been unknown how auxin transport is controlled to regulate shade-avoidance responses. Here, we show that low R:FR detection changes the cellular location of the PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3) protein, a regulator of auxin efflux, in Arabidopsis seedlings. As a result, auxin levels in the elongating hypocotyls are increased under low R:FR. Seedlings of the pin3-3 mutant lack this low R:FR-induced increase of endogenous auxin in the hypocotyl and, accordingly, have no elongation response to low R:FR. We hypothesize that low R:FR-induced stimulation of auxin biosynthesis drives the regulation of PIN3, thus allowing shade avoidance to occur. The adaptive significance of PIN3-mediated control of shade-avoidance is shown in plant competition studies. It was found that pin3 mutants are outcompeted by wild-type neighbors who suppress fitness of pin3-3 by 40%. We conclude that low R:FR modulates the auxin distribution by a change in the cellular location of PIN3, and that this control can be of great importance for plants growing in dense vegetations. PMID:21149713

  1. Competitiveness as the Factor of Settlements Terms Forming at the Market of Chocolate Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandrashina, Elena A.; Zotova, Anna S.; Smolina, Ekaterina S.; Dorozhkin, Vladimir E.; Dneprov, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the investigated problem is caused by increasing levels of competition in the industry markets of chocolate producers in Russia and the need to maintain the profitability of the companies' activities in the unstable macroeconomic conditions. The aim of the article is to assess the impact of competitive forces on settlements terms…

  2. Theorizing Strategic Human Resource Development: Linking Financial Performance and Sustainable Competitive Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Po

    2007-01-01

    This paper is to explore potential new underlying theory of strategic human resource development based on critiques of current theoretical foundations of HRD. It offers a new definition and model of Strategic HRD based on resource-based view of firm and human resource, with linkage to financial performance and competitiveness. Proposed new model…

  3. Competitive adsorption of a phthalate esters mixture by chitosan bead and alpha-cyclodextrin-linked chitosan bead.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ying-Chien; Chen, Chih-Yu

    2009-12-01

    The competitive adsorption effect by chitosan bead and alpha-cyclodextrin-linked chitosan bead on a mixture of six phthalate esters (PAEs) was investigated. The adsorption efficiency of short-chain hydrophilic PAEs was reduced when long-chain hydrophobic PAEs co-existed in the solution. Moreover, the adsorption efficiency of adsorbents for PAE is correlated to the distribution ratio (Kd), which shows that the Kd of hydrophobic PAEs is higher than that of hydrophilic PAEs. Both chitosan bead and alpha-cyclodextrin-linked chitosan bead exhibit the same phenomenon. The effect of alpha-cyclodextrin (CD)-linked chitosan bead is more significant compared with that of chitosan bead. Furthermore, it is observed that both adsorbents spontaneously adsorb PAEs by free energy (deltaG0), but the hydrophilic PAE co-existing with DMP (dimethyl phthalate) results in less entropy (deltaS0) change compared with a hydrophobic PAE co-existing with DMP. In a continuous system to treat a PAE mixture, hydrophobic PAE shows a higher breakthrough capacity than hydrophilic PAE. Moreover, the competitive adsorption results in the laboratory were comparable with those in field studies.

  4. Effects of Decabromodiphenyl Ether (BDE-209) on Inter-Specific Competition between Two Species of Marine Bloom-Forming Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxin; Tang, Xuexi; Zhou, Bin; Wang, You

    2013-01-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), a new kind of persistent organic pollutants, was selected to investigate its influence on population growth and inter-specific competition between two species of marine bloom-forming microalgae, Heterosigma akashiwo and Karenia mikimotoi. (1)BDE-209 showed acute toxic effects on both microalgae and H. akashiwo was more sensitive from view of 96 h-EC50 and the ultrastructure variation. (2)The microalgal population growth patterns in mono-culture were density-dependent and the growth of both species in the normal co-culture was significantly depressed by competition (P<0.05) with different initial biomass ratios. BDE-209 exposure significantly changed the growth. (3) Lotka-Volterra competition model was used to simulate the interaction between the microalgae. BDE-209 exposure broke the competitive balance to make competition gradually shift in favor of H. akashiwo. Results suggested BDE-209 did have toxic effects on either microalgal growth or the inter-specific competition, which was quite different from previous reports. Further exploration of the mechanism is needed. PMID:23555557

  5. Strategy and society: the link between competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael E; Kramer, Mark R

    2006-12-01

    Governments, activists, and the media have become adept at holding companies to account for the social consequences of their actions. In response, corporate social responsibility has emerged as an inescapable priority for business leaders in every country. Frequently, though, CSR efforts are counterproductive, for two reasons. First, they pit business against society, when in reality the two are interdependent. Second, they pressure companies to think of corporate social responsibility in generic ways instead of in the way most appropriate to their individual strategies. The fact is, the prevailing approaches to CSR are so disconnected from strategy as to obscure many great opportunities for companies to benefit society. What a terrible waste. If corporations were to analyze their opportunities for social responsibility using the same frameworks that guide their core business choices, they would discover, as Whole Foods Market, Toyota, and Volvo have done, that CSR can be much more than a cost, a constraint, or a charitable deed--it can be a potent source of innovation and competitive advantage. In this article, Michael Porter and Mark Kramer propose a fundamentally new way to look at the relationship between business and society that does not treat corporate growth and social welfare as a zero-sum game. They introduce a framework that individual companies can use to identify the social consequences of their actions; to discover opportunities to benefit society and themselves by strengthening the competitive context in which they operate; to determine which CSR initiatives they should address; and to find the most effective ways of doing so. Perceiving social responsibility as an opportunity rather than as damage control or a PR campaign requires dramatically different thinking--a mind-set, the authors warn, that will become increasingly important to competitive success.

  6. Quantitative determination of recombinant bovine somatotropin in commercial shrimp feed using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Munro, James L; Boon, Virginia A

    2010-02-10

    Recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST), also known as growth hormone, is used to enhance production and development of animals within the agriculture and aquaculture industries. Its use is controversial because of its potential effects on human and animal health. To screen for rbST in shrimp feed, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with an inhibition step was developed. Sample and rbST antibody (rabbit anti-rbST) were incubated at room temperature for 30 min. Subsequently, this competitive reaction was transferred to a microplate coated with rbST, using goat antirabbit IgG linked with horseradish peroxidise as the secondary antibody. Substrates for peroxidise were added, and the absorbance at 410 nm was determined. The applicability of the method was assessed using rbST extracted from "spiked" shrimp feed samples. The assay was reproducible and linear with R(2) values greater than 0.98 over the standard curve range of 20-500 microg/g. The intra- and interday precisions expressed as relative standard deviations were 3.4 and 5.3%, respectively. The mean recovery from 15 spiked feed samples was 105%. This assay will be a valuable tool for quantitative detection of rbST by both governments and commercial companies and can be modified for other types of feed.

  7. Variability in sperm form and function in the context of sperm competition risk in two Tupinambis lizards

    PubMed Central

    Blengini, Cecilia S; Sergio, Naretto; Gabriela, Cardozo; Giojalas, Laura C; Margarita, Chiaraviglio

    2014-01-01

    In polyandrous species, sperm morphometry and sperm velocity are under strong sexual selection. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the role of sperm competition in sperm trait variation, this aspect is still poorly understood. It has been suggested that an increase in sperm competition pressure could reduce sperm size variation or produce a diversity of sperm to maximize male fertilization success. We aim at elucidating the variability of sperm morphometric traits and velocity in two Tupinambis lizards in the context of sperm competition risk. Sperm traits showed substantial variation at all levels examined: between species, among males within species, and within the ejaculate of individual males. Sperm velocity was found to be positively correlated with flagellum: midpiece ratio, with relatively longer flagella associated with faster sperm. Our results document high variability in sperm form and function in lizards. PMID:25505535

  8. Variability in sperm form and function in the context of sperm competition risk in two Tupinambis lizards.

    PubMed

    Blengini, Cecilia S; Sergio, Naretto; Gabriela, Cardozo; Giojalas, Laura C; Margarita, Chiaraviglio

    2014-11-01

    In polyandrous species, sperm morphometry and sperm velocity are under strong sexual selection. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the role of sperm competition in sperm trait variation, this aspect is still poorly understood. It has been suggested that an increase in sperm competition pressure could reduce sperm size variation or produce a diversity of sperm to maximize male fertilization success. We aim at elucidating the variability of sperm morphometric traits and velocity in two Tupinambis lizards in the context of sperm competition risk. Sperm traits showed substantial variation at all levels examined: between species, among males within species, and within the ejaculate of individual males. Sperm velocity was found to be positively correlated with flagellum: midpiece ratio, with relatively longer flagella associated with faster sperm. Our results document high variability in sperm form and function in lizards.

  9. Understanding mass school shootings: links between personhood and power in the competitive school environment.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephen; Kyle, Ken

    2005-09-01

    This paper explores perspectives about certain individual and social characteristics that may contribute to school shootings by students. It begins with perspectives on individual/environment fit, arguing first that persons marginalized by their caregivers during their upbringing, and by their peers, are lacking in the social interactions that help develop ethical behavior. Our argument contends that lacking such interactions may result in the failure to develop a sound moral philosophy. Further, we argue that when such persons enter the highly competitive environment found in some suburban and rural schools, some will be continually and consistently marginalized, finding their means of self-expression and sense of significance subdued. Their need for self-expression and a sense of significance as persons will surface, but without the benefit of a moral philosophy to guide that expression, this may result in deviant means of expression, such as violence--even extraordinary violence. We do not attempt to identify a list of specific traits of school shooters, which might lead to the development of a profile of school shooters. Rather, we are concerned with the characteristics of the environment in which shootings might occur, and how students not fully prepared for that environment might react. Thus, this paper is an overview of how seeds of the neglect of the basic needs of personhood, when sown early in life, and nurtured by peers, might come to fruition in the fertile field of the competitive school environment.

  10. Models of Genetic Drift as Limiting Forms of the Lotka-Volterra Competition Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, George W. A.; McKane, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the Moran model and stochastic Lotka-Volterra competition (SLVC) model is explored via time scale separation arguments. For neutral systems the two are found to be equivalent at long times. For systems with selective pressure, their behavior differs. It is argued that the SLVC is preferable to the Moran model since in the SLVC population size is regulated by competition, rather than arbitrarily fixed as in the Moran model. As a consequence, ambiguities found in the Moran model associated with the introduction of more complex processes, such as selection, are avoided.

  11. Models of genetic drift as limiting forms of the Lotka-Volterra competition model.

    PubMed

    Constable, George W A; McKane, Alan J

    2015-01-23

    The relationship between the Moran model and stochastic Lotka-Volterra competition (SLVC) model is explored via time scale separation arguments. For neutral systems the two are found to be equivalent at long times. For systems with selective pressure, their behavior differs. It is argued that the SLVC is preferable to the Moran model since in the SLVC population size is regulated by competition, rather than arbitrarily fixed as in the Moran model. As a consequence, ambiguities found in the Moran model associated with the introduction of more complex processes, such as selection, are avoided.

  12. A Direct, Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) as a Quantitative Technique for Small Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jennifer L.; Rippe, Karen Duda; Imarhia, Kelly; Swift, Aileen; Scholten, Melanie; Islam, Naina

    2012-01-01

    ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) is a widely used technique with applications in disease diagnosis, detection of contaminated foods, and screening for drugs of abuse or environmental contaminants. However, published protocols with a focus on quantitative detection of small molecules designed for teaching laboratories are limited. A…

  13. Electrathon Competition: A Technology Club's Most Successful Project Links School and Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copes, Brian

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about his most successful electric vehicle project that links school and industry. Some people in the public school arena stereotype industrial technology as a dumping ground for underachieving students, and many of his students believed that they could not succeed in higher education classes. He challenged…

  14. A Direct, Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) as a Quantitative Technique for Small Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jennifer L.; Rippe, Karen Duda; Imarhia, Kelly; Swift, Aileen; Scholten, Melanie; Islam, Naina

    2012-01-01

    ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) is a widely used technique with applications in disease diagnosis, detection of contaminated foods, and screening for drugs of abuse or environmental contaminants. However, published protocols with a focus on quantitative detection of small molecules designed for teaching laboratories are limited. A…

  15. Electrathon Competition: A Technology Club's Most Successful Project Links School and Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copes, Brian

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about his most successful electric vehicle project that links school and industry. Some people in the public school arena stereotype industrial technology as a dumping ground for underachieving students, and many of his students believed that they could not succeed in higher education classes. He challenged…

  16. The dark side of competition: How competitive behaviour and striving to avoid inferiority are linked to depression, anxiety, stress and self-harm.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Paul; McEwan, Kirsten; Bellew, Rebecca; Mills, Alison; Gale, Corinne

    2009-06-01

    This study was guided by the social rank theory of depression and aimed to explore the relationship between depression, anxiety, stress and self-harm with striving to avoid inferiority, feelings of shame and styles of attachment. Participants diagnosed with depression (n = 62) completed a series of questionnaires measuring striving to avoid inferiority, fears of missing out, being overlooked and active rejection, attachment, social rank and psychopathologies. Striving to avoid inferiority was significantly linked to social rank variables and anxious attachment. Mediator analyses revealed that the relationship between striving to avoid inferiority and depression was mediated by the social rank variable of external shame, and also anxious attachment. These findings suggest that elevated competitive behaviour can have a 'dark side'. When people feel insecure in their social environments, it can focus them on a hierarchical view of themselves and others, with a fear of rejection if they feel they have become too inferior or subordinate. This may increase vulnerability to depression, anxiety and stress.

  17. Interactive processes link the multiple symptoms of fatigue in sport competition.

    PubMed

    Knicker, Axel J; Renshaw, Ian; Oldham, Anthony R H; Cairns, Simeon P

    2011-04-01

    Muscle physiologists often describe fatigue simply as a decline of muscle force and infer this causes an athlete to slow down. In contrast, exercise scientists describe fatigue during sport competition more holistically as an exercise-induced impairment of performance. The aim of this review is to reconcile the different views by evaluating the many performance symptoms/measures and mechanisms of fatigue. We describe how fatigue is assessed with muscle, exercise or competition performance measures. Muscle performance (single muscle test measures) declines due to peripheral fatigue (reduced muscle cell force) and/or central fatigue (reduced motor drive from the CNS). Peak muscle force seldom falls by >30% during sport but is often exacerbated during electrical stimulation and laboratory exercise tasks. Exercise performance (whole-body exercise test measures) reveals impaired physical/technical abilities and subjective fatigue sensations. Exercise intensity is initially sustained by recruitment of new motor units and help from synergistic muscles before it declines. Technique/motor skill execution deviates as exercise proceeds to maintain outcomes before they deteriorate, e.g. reduced accuracy or velocity. The sensation of fatigue incorporates an elevated rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during submaximal tasks, due to a combination of peripheral and higher CNS inputs. Competition performance (sport symptoms) is affected more by decision-making and psychological aspects, since there are opponents and a greater importance on the result. Laboratory based decision making is generally faster or unimpaired. Motivation, self-efficacy and anxiety can change during exercise to modify RPE and, hence, alter physical performance. Symptoms of fatigue during racing, team-game or racquet sports are largely anecdotal, but sometimes assessed with time-motion analysis. Fatigue during brief all-out racing is described biomechanically as a decline of peak velocity, along with altered

  18. Competition for soil nitrate and invasive weed resistance of three shrub-steppe growth forms

    Treesearch

    Eamonn D. Leonard

    2007-01-01

    Determining mechanisms responsible for weed resistance and invasion success are two issues that have potential in aiding successful land management decisions. The first experiment evaluates the competitive effects of an invasive annual grass downy brome (Bromus tectorum L.), an invasive biennial forb dyer's woad (Isatis tinctoria...

  19. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for furaltadone metabolite AMOZ in fish and shrimp samples.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu-Dong; Xu, Zhen-Lin; Zhang, Shi-Wei; Wang, Hong; Yang, Jin-Yi; Lei, Hong-Tao; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Sun, Yuan-Ming

    2012-11-07

    A monoclonal antibody-based competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with improved sensitivity and specificity for the determination of furaltadone metabolite 5-methylamorpholino-3-amino-2-oxazolidone (AMOZ) was described. AMOZ was derivatized with 2-(3-formylphenoxy)acetic acid and coupled with bovine serum albumin to form a novel immunogen. BABL/c mice were immunized and monoclonal antibody specific to the nitrophenyl derivative of AMOZ (NP-AMOZ) was produced and characterized. Four other haptens with different heterology to the immunizing hapten were synthesized and coupled to ovalbumin as coating antigens to study the effect of heterologous coating on assay sensitivity. Under the optimized heterologous coating format, the competitive indirect ELISA showed very high sensitivity to NP-AMOZ, with an IC(50) of 0.14 μg/L and limit of detection of 0.01 μg/L. The assay showed high specificity toward NP-AMOZ, and negligible cross-reactivity with analogous compounds was observed. The average recoveries of AMOZ from spiked fish and shrimp samples were estimated to range from 81.0 to 104.0%, with coefficients of variation below 20%. Good correlation was obtained between the results of ELISA analysis and of standard liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. These results indicated that the proposed ELISA is ideally suited as a monitoring method for AMOZ residues at trace level.

  20. In situ forming chitosan hydrogels prepared via ionic/covalent co-cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Moura, M José; Faneca, H; Lima, M Pedroso; Gil, M Helena; Figueiredo, M Margarida

    2011-09-12

    In situ forming chitosan hydrogels have been prepared via coupled ionic and covalent cross-linking. Thus, different amounts of genipin (0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20% (w/w)), used as a chemical cross-linker, were added to a solution of chitosan that was previously neutralized with a glycerol-phosphate complex (ionic cross-linker). In this way, it was possible to overcome the pH barrier of the chitosan solution, to preserve its thermosensitive character, and to enhance the extent of cross-linking in the matrix simultaneously. To investigate the contributions of the ionic cross-linking and the chemical cross-linking, separately, we prepared the hydrogels without the addition of either genipin or the glycerol-phosphate complex. The addition of genipin to the neutralized solution disturbs the ionic cross-linking process and the chemical cross-linking becomes the dominant process. Moreover, the genipin concentration was used to modulate the network structure and performance. The more promising formulations were fully characterized, in a hydrated state, with respect to any equilibrium swelling, the development of internal structure, the occurrence of in vitro degradability and cytotoxicity, and the creation of in vivo injectability. Each of the hydrogel systems exhibited a notably high equilibrium water content, arising from the fact that their internal structure (examined by conventional SEM, and environmental SEM) was highly porous with interconnecting pores. The porosity and the pore size distribution were quantified by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Although all gels became degraded in the presence of lysozyme, their degradation rate greatly depended on the genipin load. Through in vitro viability tests, the hydrogel-based formulations were shown to be nontoxic. The in vivo injection of a co-cross-linking formulation revealed that the gel was rapidly formed and localized at the injection site, remaining in position for at least 1 week.

  1. Gene-environment interplay in the link of friends' and nonfriends' behaviors with children's social reticence in a competitive situation.

    PubMed

    Guimond, Fanny-Alexandra; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Forget-Dubois, Nadine; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E; Boivin, Michel

    2014-03-01

    This study used a genetically informed design to assess the effects of friends' and nonfriends' reticent and dominant behaviors on children's observed social reticence in a competitive situation. Potential gene-environment correlations (rGE) and gene-environment interactions (GxE) in the link between (a) friends' and nonfriends' behaviors and (b) children's social reticence were examined. The sample comprised 466 twin children (i.e., the target children), each of whom was assessed in kindergarten together with a same-sex friend and two nonfriend classmates of either sex. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that children with a genetic disposition for social reticence showed more reticent behavior in the competitive situation and were more likely to affiliate with reticent friends (i.e., rGE). Moreover, a higher level of children's reticent behavior was predicted by their friends' higher social reticence (particularly for girls) and their friends' higher social dominance, independently of children's genetic disposition. Children's social reticence was also predicted by their nonfriends' behaviors. Specifically, children were less reticent when male nonfriends showed high levels of social reticence in the competitive situation, and this was particularly true for children with a genetic disposition for social reticence (i.e., GxE). Moreover, children genetically vulnerable for social reticence seemed to foster dominant behavior in their female nonfriend peers (i.e., rGE). In turn, male nonfriends seemed to be more dominant as soon as the target children were reticent, even if the target children did not have a stable genetic disposition for this behavior. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. A new competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (MRP83-CA15-3) for MUC1 measurement in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mohammadnejad, J; Rasaee, Mohammad J; Saqhafi, B; Rajabibazl, M; Rahbarizadeh, F; Omidfar, K; Paknejad, M

    2006-01-01

    A new competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was developed in this study. Monoclonal antibody (PR81) against the tandem repeat of the core protein was prepared, characterized, purified, and conjugated to HRP. This antibody exhibited no cross reactions with proteins such as bovine serum albumin, keyhole limpet homocyanin, human serum albumin, casein, human milk fat globin (HMFG), and peptone. The native cancerous MUC1 protein was purified from ascites fluid of a patient suffering from small cell lung carcinoma by immunoaffinity chromatography and used as a standard preparation in the assay buffer. The standard curve was constructed following a competitive procedure in the range of 0-200 U/mL. The level of MUC1 in normal and cancerous samples was compared following this procedure and using available CA15-3 EIA (Can Ag), as well as LIAISON CA15-3 commercial kits. The correlation coefficient between the procedure reported in this work (MRP83-CA15-3) and CA15-3 EIA (Can Ag) was 0.68 and was 0.95 with the LIAISON CA15-3 kit. We concluded that the present assay can detect MUC1 in breast cancer patients with great sensitivity and accuracy.

  3. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for quantification of tetrastatin in body fluids and tumor extracts.

    PubMed

    Dupont-Deshorgue, A; Oudart, J B; Brassart, B; Deslee, G; Perotin, J M; Diebold, M D; Monboisse, J C; Ramont, L; Brassart-Pasco, S

    2015-08-01

    Basement membrane collagens or derived fragments are measured in biological fluids such as blood and urine of patients and appear to be useful for diagnosis, prognostication, or treatment monitoring as proposed for endostatin, a fragment of collagen XVIII, or tumstatin, a fragment of collagen IV. Tetrastatin, the NC1 alpha 4 collagen IV domain, was previously reported to inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a method to measure tetrastatin concentrations in human fluids. We developed a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It allowed measuring tetrastatin levels in human serum, bronchial aspiration and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and lung tissue extracts. The tetrastatin level was significantly higher in tumor tissues than in healthy lung tissues. Tetrastatin competitive ELISA could be useful to quantify tetrastatin in tissues and biological fluids for the diagnosis or prognostication of diseases in which basement membrane metabolism may be altered, especially tumor progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Form Follows Function: can Tropical Mountain Forest Competition Drive the Growth of Topography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocard, G. Y.; Willenbring, J. K.; Scatena, F. N.

    2014-12-01

    Forest succession theory maintains that trees drape existing landscapes as passive niche optimizers. Here, we explore the opposite view - that tree type can control the landscape morphology through canopy and soil structure differences between tree types. Using field observations combined with the analysis of a 1 m-resolution LiDAR DEM and cosmogenic nuclide geochemical techniques, we report links between topographic position, erosion rates, and tree distribution above 600 m in elevation in the pristine, tropical rainforest of the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico. Above 600 m, flat ridges connect a subdued topographic surface and cap a relict landscape composed of 10s-of-meters-thick saprolite derived from a quartz dioritic bedrock. Erosion in the form of concave coves dissects this landscape, exposing the underlying corestones and bedrock and progressively creating a new landscape of greater local relief and higher erosion. To understand the origin of the increase in local relief we measured the respective contributions of ridges and coves to the stream signal by analyzing 10Be in soils and stream sediments. We find that, in the coves, erosion is systematically higher than on the ridges, confirming the increase in landscape dissection. Because the overall forest structure has not been altered by anthropogenic disturbances, the tree type represents a long-term feature of the landscape. We analyzed the distribution of tree associations over the LiDAR topography by classifying high-resolution multispectral images of the forest. Vegetation in the study area is dominated by Palm and Palo Colorado forests. We found an almost systematic association of the Palm forest with the coves and of the Palo Colorado with the ridges. These forest types vary in their potential to prevent or enhance soil erosion. The Palo Colorado generates greater soil coverage and rain interception rates. Therefore, we propose that soils are more vulnerable to erosion under the Palm

  5. Substance use and mental health disorders are linked to different forms of intimate partner violence victimisation.

    PubMed

    Salom, Caroline L; Williams, Gail M; Najman, Jakob M; Alati, Rosa

    2015-06-01

    Substance and mental health disorders convey significant health burdens and impair interpersonal relationships. We tested associations between comorbid substance and mental health disorders and different forms of intimate partner violence (IPV) experienced by young adults. Mothers (n = 6703) were recruited during pregnancy to the longitudinal Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy. Mother/offspring dyads were followed up from birth to 21 years. Offspring with complete psychiatric data at 21 years who reported having had an intimate partnership were included (n = 1781). Participants' experiences of psychological, physical and severe combined IPV were assessed at 21 years using a summarised form of the Composite Abuse Scale. We used the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to obtain lifetime diagnoses of mental health and substance disorders. Multivariable logistic regression models of each IPV form were adjusted for individual, family and neighbourhood factors during adolescence, and for other forms of IPV. We have shown specific links between different forms of IPV experienced and individual substance and mental health disorders. Mental health disorders were related to all three forms of IPV, while alcohol disorders were linked to psychological IPV (ORAUD = 1.86; 1.21-2.86) and illicit substance disorders to physical IPV (ORSUD = 2.07; 1.25-3.43). The co-occurrence of related disorders was strongly linked to psychological and physical IPV. Intimate partner violence was experienced by both men and women. Substance and mental health disorders were associated with specific forms of IPV victimisation, suggesting that screening IPV clients and mental health/substance disorder patients for the converse problems may be important for intervention planning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence for X-linked introgression between molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae from Angola.

    PubMed

    Choi, K S; Townson, H

    2012-06-01

    The M and S molecular forms of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) are morphologically identical incipient species in which reproductive isolation is incomplete, enabling low-level gene flow between forms. In an attempt to find differences between the M and S forms, sequence variation was studied at loci along the X chromosome in adult female An. gambiae from Angola. A high proportion of M form specimens from Angola (79% of the 456 X chromosomes sampled) were found to contain a 16-bp insertion in intron 4 of the X-linked GPRCCK1 locus, relative to the AgamP3 release of the An. gambiae PEST genome sequence. The insertion was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in Angolan M form populations. The same insertion was found in all S form specimens examined, regardless of where in Africa they were sampled, but was absent from a sample of M form specimens collected in Ghana, Bioko and Mali. In M form specimens from Angola, there was an association between alleles at the GPRCCK1 locus and those at a microsatellite locus, AGXH678, close to the centromere of the X chromosome, with significant linkage disequilibrium between loci separated by 0.472 Mbp (P < 0.033). We show that the insertion results from introgression from the S form into the M form, rather than from the retention of an ancestral character. Gene flow from the S to M form could allow genes of adaptive value to be transferred, including those conferring insecticide resistance and others influencing ecology and behaviour, and thus malaria transmission and control. We discuss factors that may have led to this introgression event.

  7. Serologic testing for avian influenza viruses in wild birds: comparison of two commercial competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ramírez, Elisa; Rodríguez, Vanessa; Sommer, Dagmar; Blanco, Juan Manuel; Acevedo, Pelayo; Heffels-Redmann, Ursula; Höfle, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Serologic testing of wild birds for avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance poses problems due to species differences and nonspecific inhibitors that may be present in sera of wild birds. Recently available competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) kits offer a new species-independent approach. In this study we compare two commercial competitive cELISAs, using a total of 184 serum and plasma samples from 23 species of wild birds belonging to 10 orders. Thirteen samples were from experimentally high pathogenicity AI and low pathogenicity AI infected red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa), 77 samples were from a flock of sentinel hybrid ducks confirmed infected by AI by real-time PCR, and 94 samples were from wild birds admitted to a rehabilitation center. Both ELISAs detected AI antibodies in the experimentally infected partridges, whereas hemagglutination inhibition (HI) was negative. Concordance in results between the two ELISAs was 51.5%. When specific subtype-H5/H7 HI-positive samples were considered for comparison, ELISA 1 appeared to perform better on ducks, whereas ELISA 2 appeared to perform better in other wild bird species. Overall, 68.2% of H5/H7 positive samples tested positive by ELISA 1 and 36% by ELISA 2. Both ELISAs detected AIV-antibody-positive samples negative by specific HI against 9 of the 16 existing hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes. Presumably this reflects either higher sensitivity of cELISA when compared to HI, presence of antibodies against HA subtypes not tested, or unspecific reactions. Performance of ELISA 1 on ducks appears to be comparable to in-house cELISA previously used by other authors in wild birds, but requires a relatively large sample volume. Alternatively, although ELISA 2 required a smaller sample volume, it was less effective at identifying HI-positive samples. The results reflect the necessity of validation of cELISA tests for individual species or at least families, as required by the OIE.

  8. A novel X‐linked recessive form of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobaterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; Fieschi, Claire; Filipe‐Santos, Orchidée; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Perronne, Christian; Chapgier, Ariane; de Beaucoudrey, Ludovic; Vogt, Guillaume; Sanlaville, Damien; Lemainque, Arnaud; Emile, Jean‐François; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean‐Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is associated with infection caused by weakly virulent mycobacteria in otherwise healthy people. Causal germline mutations in five autosomal genes (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IL12RB1, IL12B) and one X‐linked (NEMO) gene have been described. The gene products are physiologically related, as they are involved in interleukin 12/23‐dependent, interferon γ‐mediated immunity. However, no genetic aetiology has yet been identified for about half the patients with MSMD. Methods A large kindred was studied, including four male maternal relatives with recurrent mycobacterial disease, suggesting X‐linked recessive inheritance. Three patients had recurrent disease caused by the bacille Calmette–Guérin vaccine, and the fourth had recurrent tuberculosis. The infections showed tropism for the peripheral lymph nodes. Results Known autosomal and X‐linked genetic aetiologies of MSMD were excluded through genetic and immunological investigations. Genetic linkage analysis of the X‐chromosome identified two candidate regions, on Xp11.4–Xp21.2 and Xq25–Xq26.3, with a maximum LOD score of 2. Conclusion A new X‐linked recessive form of MSMD is reported, paving the way for the identification of a new MSMD‐causing gene. PMID:17293536

  9. Mechanics of semiflexible chains formed by poly(ethylene glycol)-linked paramagnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Sibani Lisa; Gast, Alice P

    2003-08-01

    Magnetorheological particles, permanently linked into chains, provide a magnetically actuated means to manipulate microscopic fluid flow. Paramagnetic colloidal particles form reversible chains by acquiring dipole moments in the presence of an external magnetic field. By chemically connecting paramagnetic colloidal particles, flexible magnetoresponsive chains can be created. We link the paramagnetic microspheres using streptavidin-biotin binding. Streptavidin coated microspheres are placed in a flow cell and a magnetic field is applied, causing the particles to form chains. Then a solution of polymeric linkers of bis-biotin-poly(ethylene glycol) molecules is added in the presence of the field. These linked chains remain responsive to a magnetic field; however, in the absence of an external magnetic field these chains bend and flex due to thermal motion. The chain flexibility is determined by the length of the spacer molecule between particles and is quantified by the flexural rigidity or bending stiffness. To understand the mechanical properties of the chains, we use a variety of optical trapping experiments to measure the flexural rigidity. Increasing the length of the poly(ethylene glycol) chain in the linker increases the flexibility of the chains.

  10. Gene-Environment Interplay in the Link of Friends' and Nonfriends' Behaviors with Children's Social Reticence in a Competitive Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimond, Fanny-Alexandra; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Forget-Dubois, Nadine; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boivin, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This study used a genetically informed design to assess the effects of friends' and nonfriends' reticent and dominant behaviors on children's observed social reticence in a competitive situation. Potential gene-environment correlations (rGE) and gene-environment interactions (GxE) in the link between (a) friends' and…

  11. Gene-Environment Interplay in the Link of Friends' and Nonfriends' Behaviors with Children's Social Reticence in a Competitive Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimond, Fanny-Alexandra; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Forget-Dubois, Nadine; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boivin, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This study used a genetically informed design to assess the effects of friends' and nonfriends' reticent and dominant behaviors on children's observed social reticence in a competitive situation. Potential gene-environment correlations (rGE) and gene-environment interactions (GxE) in the link between (a) friends' and…

  12. Antitrust and hospital mergers: does the nonprofit form affect competitive substance?

    PubMed

    Greaney, Thomas L

    2006-06-01

    Following a string of government losses in cases challenging hospital mergers in federal court, the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice issued their report on competition in health care seeking to set the record straight on a number of issues that underlie the judiciary's resolution of these cases. One such issue is the import of nonprofit status for applying antitrust law. This essay describes antitrust's role in addressing the consolidation in the hospital sector and the subtle influence that the social function of the nonprofit hospital has had in merger litigation. Noting that the political and social context in which these institutions operate is never far from the surface, it takes issue with the proposal to cabin merger doctrine so as to deny the significance of nonprofit status in merger analysis. Given the dynamic change in the regulatory climate and heterogeneity of local health care markets, it advises courts not to accept the FTC's preemptive standard regarding the significance of hospitals' nonprofit status and keep open the possibility of fashioning new presumptive rules tailored to more complete economic accounts of nonprofit firm behavior.

  13. Two forms of self-criticism mediate differently the shame-psychopathological symptoms link.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Paula; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Duarte, Joana

    2017-03-01

    This study explored the relation between external shame, two types of self-criticism, and depressive, anxious and stress symptoms, in a clinical sample. Specifically, we set out to test whether the impact of external shame on such symptoms would be mediated by two forms of self-criticism. A total of 279 patients (228 female and 51 male; mean age of 28.58) with axis I and II disorders recruited from several outpatients psychiatric services in Portugal completed the Other as Shamer Scale (OAS), the Forms of Self-Criticizing/Attacking and Self-Reassuring Scale (FSCRS), and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-42). Self-criticism mediated in part the shame-psychopathological symptoms link, especially the hated self form. The alternative model where shame mediates the link between self-criticism and psychopathological symptoms was also significant. This result suggests that fear of being devalued in the minds of others has a significant impact on people's psychological well-being, and this effect can be partially explained by self-criticism. This study highlights that inadequate self and hated self are separable types of self-criticism, because they show different patterns of association with psychopathology. Shame and self-criticism appear to mutually enhance one another, and both are associated with psychopathological symptoms. External shame and self-criticism should be a target in treatment. External shame and self-criticism are associated with depressive, anxious, and stress symptoms, in a clinical sample. Self-criticism, especially hatred for the self, mediates the shame-psychopathological symptoms link. Shame and self-criticism should be addressed in therapeutic interventions targeting the reduction of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  14. Competitive and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for Mycobacterium bovis infections based on MPB70 and lipoarabinomannan antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, E A; Stilwell, K; Rohonczy, E B; Martineau, P

    1997-01-01

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (C-ELISA) using M. bovis BCG Tokyo culture filtrate as antigen and anti-MPB70 4C3/17 monoclonal antibody was developed for use in multiple animal species. An analysis of the C-ELISA data for cattle and bison serum panels revealed specificities of 68% to 85% and sensitivities of 85% to 89%. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) of this data revealed areas of 81% to 92% for C-ELISA and demonstrated that C-ELISA as well as the indirect ELISA protocols, MPB70-ELISA and LAM-ELISA, discriminate M. bovis infected animals from non-infected animals for these particular panels. The kappa statistic values for agreement beyond chance between C-ELISA and MPB70-ELISA were determined after ELISA cutoffs were adjusted to minimize false positives. There were poor to excellent agreements between C-ELISA and MPB70-ELISA in all species tested (Bovidae, Cervidae, and Camelidae) that were consistently higher than the kappa statistic between C-ELISA and LAM-ELISA. The humoral response to one antigen and little or no response to the other in many animals argued for a parallel interpretation of C-ELISA and LAM-ELISA to increase sensitivity. PMID:9008794

  15. Bluetongue in Bosnia: comparisons of competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and standard agar gel immunodiffusion tests.

    PubMed

    Velić, L; Velić, R; Bajrović, T; Dukić, B; Camo, D

    2004-01-01

    At the end of August 2002, clinical symptoms of bluetongue (BT) (fever between 39 degrees C and 41 degrees C, muco-purulent or bloody nasal discharge, oedema of the lips and the intramandibular space, foot lesions including laminitis and coronitis in some cases, diarrhoea and dysentery) were recorded in Pramenka sheep flocks in north-east Bosnia in August 2002. A total of 9 599 serum samples (ovine: 8 967; bovine: 632) from 40 communities of Bosnia and Herzegovina were tested for the presence of anti-bluetongue virus (BTV) antibodies using competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA) and the standard agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test. The c-ELISA revealed BTV-seropositive reactions in 187 (1.94%) samples and the AGID test detected 141 (1.53%) cases. Complete agreement was recorded between the c-ELISA and AGID test results for bovine sera. These results indicate that the ability of c-ELISA to detect anti-bluetongue virus antibodies in ovine sera was superior to that of the AGID. All positive sera were collected from animals in the river areas of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  16. Monoclonal antibody-based competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of morbillivirus antibody in marine mammal sera.

    PubMed

    Saliki, J T; Lehenbauer, T W

    2001-05-01

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), using two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), was developed and compared with the standard virus neutralization test (VNT) for detecting antibodies against canine distemper virus (CDV) and phocine distemper virus (PDV) in sera from dogs and various species of marine mammals. The test depends on the blocking of MAb binding to solid-phase antigen in the presence of positive serum. Test conditions were optimized by using control VNT-negative and -positive sera specific for CDV and PDV. A positive cutoff value of 30% inhibition, which represents the mean cutoff of a VNT-negative population (n = 623) plus 2 standard deviations, was adopted for the test. A total of 736 serum samples were tested by the new cELISA and by the VNT as the "gold standard." An unexpected but useful finding was the ability of this CDV- and PDV-specific cELISA to also detect antibodies against the related pair dolphin morbillivirus and porpoise morbillivirus. Based on a subpopulation of 625 sera used in statistical analyses, the overall sensitivity and specificity of cELISA relative to those of the VNT were 94.9 and 97.7%, respectively. Because the cELISA proved to be nearly as sensitive and specific as the VNT while being simpler and more rapid, it would be an adequate screening test for suspect CDV or PDV cases and would also be useful for epidemiological surveillance of morbilliviral infections in marine mammal populations.

  17. Monoclonal antibody production and the development of an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for screening spiramycin in milk.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenxiao; Zhang, Huiyan; Li, Xiangmei; Liu, Xinxin; Zhang, Suxia; Shi, Weimin; Shen, Jianzhong; Wang, Zhanhui

    2013-11-20

    To monitor spiramycin (SP) residue in milk, a monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) was developed. This study described the preparation of three immunogens and the production of a high-affinity mAb. After optimization, the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) for the developed icELISA was estimated as 0.97 ng/mL in the assay buffer, and the limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 2.51 and 4.40 μg/L in the milk matrix. The newly developed assay demonstrated negligible cross-reactivity with 15 other macrolide antibiotics, but not with kitasamycin (23.4%). The mean recoveries ranged from 81 to 103% for the spiked samples (5, 10, and 50 μg/L), and the coefficient of variation ranged from 5.4 to 9.6%. The icELISA was validated by LC-MS/MS method, and all results demonstrated that it was a suitable screening method for detecting SP residue in milk without requiring a cleanup process.

  18. A highly rapid and simple competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for monitoring paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in shellfish.

    PubMed

    Kawatsu, Kentaro; Kanki, Masashi; Harada, Tetsuya; Kumeda, Yuko

    2014-11-01

    Using a streptavidin-coated well plate, a biotin-labelled anti-gonyautoxin 2/3 monoclonal antibody GT-13A, and a decarbamoyl saxitoxin-peroxidase conjugate, a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PSP-ELISA) was developed for monitoring paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins in shellfish. This assay is simple to perform and can be completed in approximately 20 min. The PSP-ELISA was compared to the mouse bioassay (MBA) for the detection of PSP toxins in shellfish samples (n=83) collected from the coast of Osaka Prefecture, Japan. When positive and negative results were indicated based on the regulatory limit for PSP toxins (4 mouse unit(MU)/g of shellfish meat), the PSP-ELISA results showed a sensitivity of 100% (25 of 25) and a specificity of 89.7% (52 of 58 samples) compared to the MBA results. These results suggest that the PSP-ELISA could be used as a rapid and simple screening method prior to the MBA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determination of norfloxacin in waters using a specific polyclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianlan; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Qiuxin; Yu, Yiyi; Peng, Xianzhi

    2011-02-28

    A specific polyclonal anti-norfloxacin antibody was obtained, and a sensitive indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) was developed for determining trace amounts of norfloxacin in various waters. Good linearity was achieved in the range from 0.1 to 10 μg L(-1). The average IC(50) value was determined to be 2.2 μg L(-1) and the limit of detection was 0.016 μg L(-1) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in phosphate-buffered saline buffer. Recoveries of norfloxacin at various spiking levels ranged from 74 to 105% in groundwater, surface water, treated and untreated wastewater samples, with relative standard deviations of 3-5%. The assay was applied for determining norfloxacin in municipal wastewater, surface water, and groundwater collected in a metropolis of China. Raw wastewater samples were only submitted to filtration and pH adjustment while the other water samples were pre-concentrated by solid phase extraction prior to the icELISA assay. Good agreement of the results obtained by the icELISA and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry further confirmed the reliability and accuracy of the icELISA for rapid detection of norfloxacin in waters. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection of Francisella tularensis-Specific Antibodies in Patients with Tularemia by a Novel Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Fujita, Osamu; Uda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Yamada, Akio

    2013-01-01

    A novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was developed and evaluated for detection of antibodies against Francisella tularensis in humans. The assay is based on the ability of serum antibodies to inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide antigens. The assay was evaluated using serum samples of tularemia patients, inactivated F. tularensis-immunized rabbits, and F. tularensis-infected mice. Antibodies against F. tularensis were successfully detected in serum samples of tularemia patients as well as the immunized and infected animals. The cELISA method was compared to indirect ELISA (iELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination test (MA) using serum samples of 19 tularemia patients and 50 healthy individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of cELISA were 93.9 and 96.1%, respectively, in comparison to the iELISA. MA was less sensitive than cELISA with a sensitivity and specificity of only 81.8 and 98.0%, respectively. A high degree of correlation (R2 = 0.8226) was observed between cELISA and iELISA results. The novel cELISA developed in this study appears to be highly sensitive and specific for serodiagnosis of human tularemia. The potential of the MAb-based cELISA to be used in both human and animal samples emphasizes its usefulness for serological survey of tularemia among multiple animal species. PMID:23114700

  1. Abacavir forms novel cross-linking abacavir protein adducts in patients.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaoli; Lawrenson, Alexandre S; Berry, Neil G; Maggs, James L; French, Neil S; Back, David J; Khoo, Saye H; Naisbitt, Dean J; Park, B Kevin

    2014-04-21

    Abacavir (ABC), a nucleoside-analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor, is associated with severe hypersensitivity reactions that are thought to involve the activation of CD8+ T cells in a HLA-B*57:01-restricted manner. Recent studies have claimed that noncovalent interactions of ABC with HLA-B*57:01 are responsible for the immunological reactions associated with ABC. However, the formation of hemoglobin-ABC aldehyde (ABCA) adducts in patients exposed to ABC suggests that protein conjugation might represent a pathway for antigen formation. To further characterize protein conjugation reactions, we used mass spectrometric methods to define ABCA modifications in patients receiving ABC therapy. ABCA formed a novel intramolecular cross-linking adduct on human serum albumin (HSA) in patients and in vitro via Michael addition, followed by nucleophilic adduction of the aldehyde with a neighboring protein nucleophile. Adducts were detected on Lys159, Lys190, His146, and Cys34 residues in the subdomain IB of HSA. Only a cysteine adduct and a putative cross-linking adduct were detected on glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP). These findings reveal that ABC forms novel types of antigens in all patients taking the drug. It is therefore vital that the immunological consequences of such pathways of haptenation are explored in the in vitro models that have been used by various groups to define new mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity exemplified by ABC.

  2. Performance of Competitive and Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays, Gel Immunoprecipitation with Native Hapten Polysaccharide, and Standard Serological Tests in Diagnosis of Sheep Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Marín, C. M.; Moreno, E.; Moriyón, I.; Díaz, R.; Blasco, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    Competitive and standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), rose bengal (RB), complement fixation, and agar gel immunoprecipitation with native hapten (AGID-NH) were compared by using sera from Brucella-free, Brucella melitensis-infected, and B. melitensis Rev1-vaccinated sheep. The most sensitive tests were indirect ELISA and RB, and the most specific tests were AGID-NH and competitive ELISA. We show that RB followed by AGID-NH is a simple and effective system for diagnosing sheep brucellosis. PMID:10066666

  3. Validation and Field Evaluation of a Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Diagnosis of Babesia bovis Infections in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Mariana; Echaide, Ignacio; de Echaide, Susana Torioni; Wilkowsky, Silvina; Zabal, Osvaldo; Mosqueda, Juan J.; Schnittger, Leonhard

    2012-01-01

    Infections by Babesia bovis limit cattle production and cause important economic losses in tropical and subtropical areas around the world. Monitoring of calf sera can be used to detect unprotected cattle herds and to decide on strategic control measures, as well as for epidemiological studies. Merozoite surface antigen 2c (MSA-2c) is an immunodominant surface protein expressed in B. bovis merozoites and sporozoites and contains B-cell epitopes that are conserved among geographic isolates. A monoclonal antibody against recombinant MSA-2c (rMSA-2c) was previously shown to inhibit the binding of anti-B. bovis antibodies to a parasite B-cell epitope in a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) format. In the work at hand, the parameters of this cELISA were reevaluated and adjusted when necessary, and a cutoff value was determined by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of a total of 357 bovine sera of known reactivity, as assessed by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFAT). The established rMSA-2c cELISA demonstrated a specificity of 98% and a sensitivity of 96.2%. An additional set of 303 field bovine sera from regions where ticks are endemic and tick-free regions of Argentina was tested by both rMSA-2c cELISA and IFAT, and the results were shown to be in very good agreement (kappa index, 0.8325). The performance shown by rMSA-2c cELISA in the detection of B. bovis-specific antibodies and its suitability for standardization and large-scale production, as well as the possibility of its application in most veterinary diagnostic laboratories, make the assay a powerful tool for the surveillance of herd immunity as a strategic measure for the control of bovine babesiosis. PMID:22492742

  4. Monoclonal Antibody-Based Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detection of Morbillivirus Antibody in Marine Mammal Sera

    PubMed Central

    Saliki, Jeremiah T.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.

    2001-01-01

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), using two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), was developed and compared with the standard virus neutralization test (VNT) for detecting antibodies against canine distemper virus (CDV) and phocine distemper virus (PDV) in sera from dogs and various species of marine mammals. The test depends on the blocking of MAb binding to solid-phase antigen in the presence of positive serum. Test conditions were optimized by using control VNT-negative and -positive sera specific for CDV and PDV. A positive cutoff value of 30% inhibition, which represents the mean cutoff of a VNT-negative population (n = 623) plus 2 standard deviations, was adopted for the test. A total of 736 serum samples were tested by the new cELISA and by the VNT as the “gold standard.” An unexpected but useful finding was the ability of this CDV- and PDV-specific cELISA to also detect antibodies against the related pair dolphin morbillivirus and porpoise morbillivirus. Based on a subpopulation of 625 sera used in statistical analyses, the overall sensitivity and specificity of cELISA relative to those of the VNT were 94.9 and 97.7%, respectively. Because the cELISA proved to be nearly as sensitive and specific as the VNT while being simpler and more rapid, it would be an adequate screening test for suspect CDV or PDV cases and would also be useful for epidemiological surveillance of morbilliviral infections in marine mammal populations. PMID:11326007

  5. Magnetic-nanobead-based competitive enzyme-linked aptamer assay for the analysis of oxytetracycline in food.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunxia; Tang, Zonggui; Liu, Changbin; Kang, Lichao; Sun, Fengxia

    2015-05-01

    This study presents a novel analytical method for the detection of oxytetracycline (OTC) in complex food matrices based on a direct competitive enzyme-linked aptamer assay and magnetic separation technology. In this protocol, free OTC competed with horseradish peroxidase labeled OTC (OTC-HRP) for binding to the OTC aptamer immobilized on magnetic beads. The parameters that can affect the response, such as avidin concentration, aptamer concentration, OTC-HRP concentration, incubation temperature, incubation time, blocking agent, and binding buffer, were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the linear range for the OTC concentration detection is 0.5-100 ng mL(-1), with a concentration of OTC needed to obtain 50 % of the maximum signal of 14.47 ng mL(-1). The limit of detection and the limit of quantitation were 0.88 and 3.40 ng mL(-1), respectively. There was no obvious cross-reactivity with most of the tetracycline pesticides. The recovery rates ranged from 71.0 to 91.2 % for the food samples, including chicken, milk, and honey, and the relative standard deviation was less than 15.0 %. The proposed method was applied to measure OTC in real samples, and was validated using high-performance liquid chromatography. This method has the advantages of magnetic separation and the concentration effect of magnetic nanoparticles, the specificity of the aptamer, and the high-throughput of microtiter plates; it offers a promising approach for the screening of OTC because it is simple, rapid, highly sensitive, and has low cost.

  6. Serosurveillance for Francisella tularensis Among Wild Animals in Japan Using a Newly Developed Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Uda, Akihiko; Fujita, Osamu; Mizoguchi, Toshio; Shindo, Junji; Park, Chun-Ho; Kudo, Noboru; Hatai, Hitoshi; Oyamada, Toshifumi; Yamada, Akio; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tularemia, a highly infectious zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, occurs sporadically in Japan. However, little is known about the prevalence of the disease in wild animals. A total of 632 samples obtained from 150 Japanese black bears, 142 Japanese hares, 120 small rodents, 97 rats, 53 raptors, 26 Japanese monkeys, 21 Japanese raccoon dogs, 20 masked palm civets, and three Japanese red foxes between 2002 and 2010 were investigated for the presence of antibodies to F. tularensis by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination (MA) test. Seropositive cELISA and MA results were obtained in 23 and 18 Japanese black bears, three and two Japanese raccoon dogs, and two and one small rodents, respectively. All MA-positive samples (n=21) were also positive by cELISA. Six of seven samples that were only positive by cELISA were confirmed to be antibody-positive by western blot analysis. These findings suggest that cELISA is a highly sensitive and useful test for serosurveillance of tularemia among various species of wild animals. Because this is the first study to detect F. tularensis–seropositive Japanese raccoon dogs, these could join Japanese black bears as sentinel animals for tularemia in the wild in Japan. Further continuous serosurveillance for F. tularensis in various species of wild animals using appropriate methods such as cELISA is important to assess the risks of human exposure and to improve our understanding of the ecology of F. tularensis in the wild. PMID:24689989

  7. Serosurveillance for Francisella tularensis among wild animals in Japan using a newly developed competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Uda, Akihiko; Fujita, Osamu; Mizoguchi, Toshio; Shindo, Junji; Park, Chun-Ho; Kudo, Noboru; Hatai, Hitoshi; Oyamada, Toshifumi; Yamada, Akio; Morikawa, Shigeru; Tanabayashi, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-01

    Tularemia, a highly infectious zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, occurs sporadically in Japan. However, little is known about the prevalence of the disease in wild animals. A total of 632 samples obtained from 150 Japanese black bears, 142 Japanese hares, 120 small rodents, 97 rats, 53 raptors, 26 Japanese monkeys, 21 Japanese raccoon dogs, 20 masked palm civets, and three Japanese red foxes between 2002 and 2010 were investigated for the presence of antibodies to F. tularensis by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination (MA) test. Seropositive cELISA and MA results were obtained in 23 and 18 Japanese black bears, three and two Japanese raccoon dogs, and two and one small rodents, respectively. All MA-positive samples (n=21) were also positive by cELISA. Six of seven samples that were only positive by cELISA were confirmed to be antibody-positive by western blot analysis. These findings suggest that cELISA is a highly sensitive and useful test for serosurveillance of tularemia among various species of wild animals. Because this is the first study to detect F. tularensis-seropositive Japanese raccoon dogs, these could join Japanese black bears as sentinel animals for tularemia in the wild in Japan. Further continuous serosurveillance for F. tularensis in various species of wild animals using appropriate methods such as cELISA is important to assess the risks of human exposure and to improve our understanding of the ecology of F. tularensis in the wild.

  8. A direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for rapid detection of anilofos residues in agricultural products and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Gao, Ai H; Liu, Bing; Sheng, Wei; Tan, Chao; Yuan, Meng; Wang, Shuo

    2013-01-01

    A direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dc-ELISA) was developed to measure anilofos levels in agricultural and environmental samples. The ELISA was developed using rabbit polyclonal antibodies against a hapten-protein conjugate of anilofos-bovine serum albumin. The limit of detection was 0.1 μg L(-1), and there was no cross-reactivity with other related pesticides or structurally similar compounds. The matrix effects of rice (aromatic rice, white rice, brown rice), corn, barley, wheat and soil were measured and removed by extraction and dilution with phosphate buffered saline with 0.05% Tween-20. For water samples (tap water and river water), the matrix effects were also removed by dilution with phosphate buffered saline with Tween-20. The detection limits for anilofos in authentic samples (aromatic rice, white rice, brown rice, corn, barley, wheat, soil, tap water and river water) were 2, 2, 2, 3, 2, 2, and 2 μg kg(-1), and 0.5 and 1 μg L(-1), respectively . The anilofos recovery ranged from 81.0-116.0% with a coefficient of variation of 1.7-9.0%. The method was validated using GC, and the results showed good correlation with the dc-ELISA data (r(2) = 0.9795). Forty-two cereal samples were randomly collected from different supermarkets and analyzed using the developed dc-ELISA. No anilofos was found in these products. The developed immunoassay is suitable for rapid quantitation of anilofos residues.

  9. Competition between surface adsorption and folding of fibril-forming polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Ran; Kleijn, J. Mieke; Abeln, Sanne; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2015-02-01

    Self-assembly of polypeptides into fibrillar structures can be initiated by planar surfaces that interact favorably with certain residues. Using a coarse-grained model, we systematically studied the folding and adsorption behavior of a β -roll forming polypeptide. We find that there are two different folding pathways depending on the temperature: (i) at low temperature, the polypeptide folds in solution into a β -roll before adsorbing onto the attractive surface; (ii) at higher temperature, the polypeptide first adsorbs in a disordered state and folds while on the surface. The folding temperature increases with increasing attraction as the folded β -roll is stabilized by the surface. Surprisingly, further increasing the attraction lowers the folding temperature again, as strong attraction also stabilizes the adsorbed disordered state, which competes with folding of the polypeptide. Our results suggest that to enhance the folding, one should use a weakly attractive surface. They also explain the recent experimental observation of the nonmonotonic effect of charge on the fibril formation on an oppositely charged surface [C. Charbonneau et al., ACS Nano 8, 2328 (2014), 10.1021/nn405799t].

  10. Competitive mechanisms in sentence processing: common and distinct production and reading comprehension networks linked to the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Gina F; Gennari, Silvia P

    2014-01-01

    Despite much interest in language production and comprehension mechanisms, little is known about the relationship between the two. Previous research suggests that linguistic knowledge is shared across these tasks and that the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) may be commonly recruited. However, it remains unclear the extent to which production and comprehension share competition mechanisms. Here we investigate this issue and specifically examine competition in determining the event roles in a sentence (agent or affected participant). We used both behavioral and fMRI methods and compared the reading and production of high- and low-competition sentences, specifically targeting LIFG. We found that activity in pars opercularis (PO), independently identified by a competition-driven localizer, was modulated by competition in both tasks. Psychophysiological interaction analyses seeded in PO revealed task-specific networks: In comprehension, PO only interacted with the posterior temporal lobe, whereas in production, it interacted with a large network including hippocampal, posterior temporal, medial frontal and subcortical structures. Production and comprehension therefore recruit partially distinct functional networks but share competitive processes within fronto-temporal regions. We argue that these common regions store long-term linguistic associations and compute their higher-order contingencies, but competition in production ignites a larger neural network implementing planning, as required by task demands. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. X-Linked Recessive form of Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus in a 7-Year-Old Boy.

    PubMed

    Janchevska, A; Tasic, V; Gucev, Z; Krstevska-Konstantinova, M; Cheong, H I

    2014-12-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is caused by the inability of renal collecting duct cells to respond to arginine vasopressin (AVP)/antidiuretic hormone (ADH). We present the case of a 7-year-old boy with a history of excretion of large amounts of dilute urine and polydipsia since infancy. The boy had several vomiting episodes with mild dehydration during the first 3 years of life. There was no evidence of headaches, dizziness or visual problems. He drinks between 2 and 3 L/day and has 24-hour diuresis of 2 liters, now. He has prepubertal appearance with appropriate weight [+0.85 standard deviation score (SDS)] and height (+0.15 SDS) for his age. His intelligence was also normal. The water deprivation test showed low urine osmolality after 8 hours of dehydration. After desmopressin administration, urine osmolality remained low. Serum osmolality was in the normal range for sex and age before and after desmopressin administration. This indicated a nephrogenic form of diabetes insipidus. Molecular analyses revealed a P286L [p.Pro(CCC)286Leu(CTC)] mutation in the AVPR2 gene, that was inherited from his mother. This patient is the first case with genetically confirmed X-linked inherited form of NDI in the Republic of Macedonia. Molecular analysis confirmed the clinical diagnosis and enabled genetic advice for this family.

  12. A repeat protein links Rubisco to form the eukaryotic carbon-concentrating organelle

    PubMed Central

    Mackinder, Luke C. M.; Meyer, Moritz T.; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Chen, Vivian K.; Mitchell, Madeline C.; Caspari, Oliver; Freeman Rosenzweig, Elizabeth S.; Pallesen, Leif; Reeves, Gregory; Itakura, Alan; Roth, Robyn; Sommer, Frederik; Geimer, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Goodenough, Ursula; Stitt, Mark; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Biological carbon fixation is a key step in the global carbon cycle that regulates the atmosphere's composition while producing the food we eat and the fuels we burn. Approximately one-third of global carbon fixation occurs in an overlooked algal organelle called the pyrenoid. The pyrenoid contains the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and enhances carbon fixation by supplying Rubisco with a high concentration of CO2. Since the discovery of the pyrenoid more that 130 y ago, the molecular structure and biogenesis of this ecologically fundamental organelle have remained enigmatic. Here we use the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to discover that a low-complexity repeat protein, Essential Pyrenoid Component 1 (EPYC1), links Rubisco to form the pyrenoid. We find that EPYC1 is of comparable abundance to Rubisco and colocalizes with Rubisco throughout the pyrenoid. We show that EPYC1 is essential for normal pyrenoid size, number, morphology, Rubisco content, and efficient carbon fixation at low CO2. We explain the central role of EPYC1 in pyrenoid biogenesis by the finding that EPYC1 binds Rubisco to form the pyrenoid matrix. We propose two models in which EPYC1’s four repeats could produce the observed lattice arrangement of Rubisco in the Chlamydomonas pyrenoid. Our results suggest a surprisingly simple molecular mechanism for how Rubisco can be packaged to form the pyrenoid matrix, potentially explaining how Rubisco packaging into a pyrenoid could have evolved across a broad range of photosynthetic eukaryotes through convergent evolution. In addition, our findings represent a key step toward engineering a pyrenoid into crops to enhance their carbon fixation efficiency. PMID:27166422

  13. A repeat protein links Rubisco to form the eukaryotic carbon-concentrating organelle.

    PubMed

    Mackinder, Luke C M; Meyer, Moritz T; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Chen, Vivian K; Mitchell, Madeline C; Caspari, Oliver; Freeman Rosenzweig, Elizabeth S; Pallesen, Leif; Reeves, Gregory; Itakura, Alan; Roth, Robyn; Sommer, Frederik; Geimer, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Goodenough, Ursula; Stitt, Mark; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-05-24

    Biological carbon fixation is a key step in the global carbon cycle that regulates the atmosphere's composition while producing the food we eat and the fuels we burn. Approximately one-third of global carbon fixation occurs in an overlooked algal organelle called the pyrenoid. The pyrenoid contains the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and enhances carbon fixation by supplying Rubisco with a high concentration of CO2 Since the discovery of the pyrenoid more that 130 y ago, the molecular structure and biogenesis of this ecologically fundamental organelle have remained enigmatic. Here we use the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to discover that a low-complexity repeat protein, Essential Pyrenoid Component 1 (EPYC1), links Rubisco to form the pyrenoid. We find that EPYC1 is of comparable abundance to Rubisco and colocalizes with Rubisco throughout the pyrenoid. We show that EPYC1 is essential for normal pyrenoid size, number, morphology, Rubisco content, and efficient carbon fixation at low CO2 We explain the central role of EPYC1 in pyrenoid biogenesis by the finding that EPYC1 binds Rubisco to form the pyrenoid matrix. We propose two models in which EPYC1's four repeats could produce the observed lattice arrangement of Rubisco in the Chlamydomonas pyrenoid. Our results suggest a surprisingly simple molecular mechanism for how Rubisco can be packaged to form the pyrenoid matrix, potentially explaining how Rubisco packaging into a pyrenoid could have evolved across a broad range of photosynthetic eukaryotes through convergent evolution. In addition, our findings represent a key step toward engineering a pyrenoid into crops to enhance their carbon fixation efficiency.

  14. The role of growth form and correlated traits in competitive ranking of six perennial ruderal plant species grown in unbalanced mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Hansjörg; Steinlein, Thomas; Ullmann, Isolde

    1998-02-01

    The competitive abilities of six perennial ruderal plants of three different growth forms were compared via yield measures using an additive diallel experimental design with unbalanced mixtures (9:3 or 3:9 plants per pot, respectively). Thus, in a given mixture species A was grown in two configurations: three individuals in centre position of the pot together with nine plants of species B in border position and vice versa. Effect competitive abilities as well as response competitive abilities of the species were significantly related to canopy height and plant biomass. The species with lower rosette growth form and smaller biomasses were weaker competitors than the species possessing elevated canopies along with higher biomasses, whereas total leaf area was not significantly correlated with competitive ability between species. Species differences in competitive ability were stronger between the plants grown in the central position than between those grown in the border position. Furthermore, interactions between species-specific traits and configuration could be observed, indicating the importance of species proportions and arrangement patterns for evaluation of competitive outcome in the field. The degree of complete transitivity of the competitive network of the six ruderal species, which was significantly higher than expected under the null model in our experimental design, also seemed to depend on species proportions in mixture. Shifts in root:shoot ratio of the centre plants when faced with competition by the border plants were in the direction of higher shoot allocation for the weak competitors with rosette growth form irrespective of the neighbour species, except for Bunias orientalis, which showed a more plastic response. The stronger competitors showed higher root allocation ( Urtica dioica) or were hardly affected at all. Consistent with the results of our experiment, the weaker competitors occur at rather frequently disturbed and therefore transient

  15. Cross-Linking Mast Cell Specific Gangliosides Stimulates the Release of Newly Formed Lipid Mediators and Newly Synthesized Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Filho, Edismauro Garcia Freitas; da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Zanotto, Camila Ziliotto; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are immunoregulatory cells that participate in inflammatory processes. Cross-linking mast cell specific GD1b derived gangliosides by mAbAA4 results in partial activation of mast cells without the release of preformed mediators. The present study examines the release of newly formed and newly synthesized mediators following ganglioside cross-linking. Cross-linking the gangliosides with mAbAA4 released the newly formed lipid mediators, prostaglandins D2 and E2, without release of leukotrienes B4 and C4. The effect of cross-linking these gangliosides on the activation of enzymes in the arachidonate cascade was then investigated. Ganglioside cross-linking resulted in phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 and increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2. Translocation of 5-lipoxygenase from the cytosol to the nucleus was not induced by ganglioside cross-linking. Cross-linking of GD1b derived gangliosides also resulted in the release of the newly synthesized mediators, interleukin-4, interleukin-6, and TNF-α. The effect of cross-linking the gangliosides on the MAP kinase pathway was then investigated. Cross-linking the gangliosides induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38 as well as activating both NFκB and NFAT in a Syk-dependent manner. Therefore, cross-linking the mast cell specific GD1b derived gangliosides results in the activation of signaling pathways that culminate with the release of newly formed and newly synthesized mediators.

  16. Pseudacteon tricuspis: its behavior and development according to the social form of its host and the role of interference competition among females.

    PubMed

    Chirino, Mónica G; Folgarait, Patricia J; Gilbert, Lawrence E

    2012-04-01

    We studied how the behavior and performance of Pseudacteon tricuspis Borgmeier varies with the social form of its host Solenopsis invicta Buren, in its native range in Argentina where monogyne colonies are more abundant than polygynes (approximately 75 vs. 25%). Female, P. tricuspis took 44% less time (50 vs. 89 s) to attack monogyne than polygyne ants, but oviposition attempts were similar (23 vs. 18 attacks). The presence of the parasitoid affected the average size of foragers on the trail, with the proportion of minor workers increasing on both social forms. In the laboratory, P. tricuspis selected similar host sizes, although pupal survival was 25% higher on monogynes than on polygynes. Developmental times of both genders were similar (33-35 d), although larger females emerged from bigger hosts. The sex ratio of P. tricuspis was more male biased when exploiting polygyne ants. Intraspecific competition significantly affected parasitoid reproductive success, being significantly higher for a solitary female than when three females were present, although the size of workers selected did not vary. The male:female ratio also changed, being 1:1 without competition but 2:1 with competition. We demonstrated for the first time the consequences of interference competition among P. tricuspis females, a common behavior observed in others parasitoids. We discuss why P. tricuspis sex ratios are always biased toward males in both social forms and suggest that similar studies of interference competition within and between already naturalized Pseudacteon species in the United States could help predict establishment patterns.

  17. Self-assembly made durable: water-repellent materials formed by cross-linking fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaobing; Shen, Yanfei; Kessel, Stefanie; Fernandes, Paulo; Yoshida, Kaname; Yagai, Shiki; Kurth, Dirk G; Möhwald, Helmuth; Nakanishi, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Fullerene flakes: A diacetylene-functionalized fullerene derivative self-organizes into flakelike microparticles (see picture). Both the diacetylene and C(60) moieties can be effectively cross-linked, which leads to supramolecular materials with remarkable resistivity to solvent, heat, and mechanical stress. Moreover, the surface of the cross-linked flakelike objects is highly durable and water-repellent.

  18. Addressing the Struggle to Link Form and Understanding in Fractions Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osana, Helena P.; Pitsolantis, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although making explicit links between procedures and concepts during instruction in mathematics is important, it is still unclear the precise moments during instruction when such links are best made. Aims: The objective was to test the effectiveness of a 3-week classroom intervention on the fractions knowledge of grade 5/6 students.…

  19. Revising traditional theory on the link between plant body size and fitness under competition: evidence from old-field vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, Amanda J; Aarssen, Lonnie W

    2014-01-01

    The selection consequences of competition in plants have been traditionally interpreted based on a “size-advantage” hypothesis – that is, under intense crowding/competition from neighbors, natural selection generally favors capacity for a relatively large plant body size. However, this conflicts with abundant data, showing that resident species body size distributions are usually strongly right-skewed at virtually all scales within vegetation. Using surveys within sample plots and a neighbor-removal experiment, we tested: (1) whether resident species that have a larger maximum potential body size (MAX) generally have more successful local individual recruitment, and thus greater local abundance/density (as predicted by the traditional size-advantage hypothesis); and (2) whether there is a general between-species trade-off relationship between MAX and capacity to produce offspring when body size is severely suppressed by crowding/competition – that is, whether resident species with a larger MAX generally also need to reach a larger minimum reproductive threshold size (MIN) before they can reproduce at all. The results showed that MIN had a positive relationship with MAX across resident species, and local density – as well as local density of just reproductive individuals – was generally greater for species with smaller MIN (and hence smaller MAX). In addition, the cleared neighborhoods of larger target species (which had relatively large MIN) generally had – in the following growing season – a lower ratio of conspecific recruitment within these neighborhoods relative to recruitment of other (i.e., smaller) species (which had generally smaller MIN). These data are consistent with an alternative hypothesis based on a ‘reproductive-economy-advantage’ – that is, superior fitness under competition in plants generally requires not larger potential body size, but rather superior capacity to recruit offspring that are in turn capable of producing grand

  20. [The effect of structure of benzimidazoles on the character of forming intramolecular cross-links in DNA and chromatin].

    PubMed

    Mil', E M; Zhil'tsova, V M; Biniukov, V I; Zhizhina, G P; Stoliarova, L G; Kuznetsov, Iu P

    1994-01-01

    An investigation of a number of benzimidazole class preparations, being distinguished by a position of aminomethyl substitutes, has been carried out. It has been shown, that the non-substituted preparation BIO-10 does not form UV-cross-links in DNA and chromatine; BIO-40, having one substitute in the position 2, causes the formation of inter-molecular cross-links DNA-DNA. The preparation BIO-50, having 2 aminomethyl groups in the imidazole nucleus positions 2 and 6, forms cross-links DNA-DNA and DNA-protein in chromatine. The generation of radicals by the preparations BIO-10 and BIO-50 has been studied by the EPR-method by use of spin trap. It has been demonstrated, that BIO-10, unlike BIO-50, actively generates superoxide. A supposition has been made, that an UV-formation of superoxide-radical in the presence of BIO-10 might be a reason of DNA-macromolecule destruction.

  1. Use of Continuous Exponential Families to Link Forms via Anchor Tests. Research Report. ETS RR-11-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberman, Shelby J.; Yan, Duanli

    2011-01-01

    Continuous exponential families are applied to linking test forms via an internal anchor. This application combines work on continuous exponential families for single-group designs and work on continuous exponential families for equivalent-group designs. Results are compared to those for kernel and equipercentile equating in the case of chained…

  2. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for murine hepcidin-1: correlation with hepatic mRNA expression in established and novel models of dysregulated iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gutschow, Patrick; Schmidt, Paul J; Han, Huiling; Ostland, Vaughn; Bartnikas, Thomas B; Pettiglio, Michael A; Herrera, Carolina; Butler, James S; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas; Fleming, Mark D; Westerman, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Mice have been essential for distinguishing the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis. Currently, investigators monitor levels of murine hepatic hepcidin-1 mRNA as a surrogate marker for the bioactive hepcidin protein itself. Here, we describe and validate a competitive, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that quantifies hepcidin-1 in mouse serum and urine. The assay exhibits a biologically relevant lower limit of detection, high precision, and excellent linearity and recovery. We also demonstrate correlation between serum and urine hepcidin-1 values and validate the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by analyzing plasma hepcidin response of mice to physiological challenges, including iron deficiency, iron overload, acute blood loss, and inflammation. Furthermore, we analyze multiple murine genetic models of iron dysregulation, including β-thalassemia intermedia (Hbb(th3/+)), hereditary hemochromatosis (Hfe(-/-), Hjv(-/-), and Tfr2(Y245X/Y245X)), hypotransferrinemia (Trf(hpx/hpx)), heterozygous transferrin receptor 1 deficiency (Tfrc(+/-)) and iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (Tmprss6(-/-) and Tmprss6(hem8/hem8)). Novel compound iron metabolism mutants were also phenotypically characterized here for the first time. We demonstrate that serum hepcidin concentrations correlate with liver hepcidin mRNA expression, transferrin saturation and non-heme liver iron. In some circumstances, serum hepcidin-1 more accurately predicts iron parameters than hepcidin mRNA, and distinguishes smaller, statistically significant differences between experimental groups.

  3. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for murine hepcidin-1: correlation with hepatic mRNA expression in established and novel models of dysregulated iron homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gutschow, Patrick; Schmidt, Paul J.; Han, Huiling; Ostland, Vaughn; Bartnikas, Thomas B.; Pettiglio, Michael A.; Herrera, Carolina; Butler, James S.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas; Fleming, Mark D.; Westerman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Mice have been essential for distinguishing the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis. Currently, investigators monitor levels of murine hepatic hepcidin-1 mRNA as a surrogate marker for the bioactive hepcidin protein itself. Here, we describe and validate a competitive, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that quantifies hepcidin-1 in mouse serum and urine. The assay exhibits a biologically relevant lower limit of detection, high precision, and excellent linearity and recovery. We also demonstrate correlation between serum and urine hepcidin-1 values and validate the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by analyzing plasma hepcidin response of mice to physiological challenges, including iron deficiency, iron overload, acute blood loss, and inflammation. Furthermore, we analyze multiple murine genetic models of iron dysregulation, including β-thalassemia intermedia (Hbbth3/+), hereditary hemochromatosis (Hfe−/−, Hjv−/−, and Tfr2Y245X/Y245X), hypotransferrinemia (Trfhpx/hpx), heterozygous transferrin receptor 1 deficiency (Tfrc+/−) and iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (Tmprss6−/− and Tmprss6hem8/hem8). Novel compound iron metabolism mutants were also phenotypically characterized here for the first time. We demonstrate that serum hepcidin concentrations correlate with liver hepcidin mRNA expression, transferrin saturation and non-heme liver iron. In some circumstances, serum hepcidin-1 more accurately predicts iron parameters than hepcidin mRNA, and distinguishes smaller, statistically significant differences between experimental groups. PMID:25425686

  4. [Detection of Autoantibodies Against the 1-Adrenergic Receptor in the Sera of Patients via the Competitive cell-Based Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay].

    PubMed

    Shevelev, A Y; Kostiukevich, M V; Efremov, E E; Vlasik, T N; Mironova, N A; Zykov, K A; Kashirina, N M; Kuznetsova, I B; Sharf, T V; Mamochkina, E N; Lipatova, L N; Peklo, M M; Rutkevich, P N; Yanushevskaya, E V; Rybalkin, I N; Stukalova, O V; Malkina, T A; Belyaeva, M M; Kuznetsova, T V; Tkachev, G A; Zinchenko, L V; Gupalo, E M; Agapova, O Y; Yureneva-Tkhorzhevskaya, T V; Rvacheva, A V; Sidorova, M V; Sadgyan, A S; Tereshchenko, S N; Golitsyn, S P

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the level of anti-1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies in patients with ventricular arrhythmias with no signs of organic heart disease and with presence of cardiovascular pathology in comparison with a group of healthy volunteers. The study included 44 patients with ventricular arrhythmias with no signs of organic heart disease ("idiopathic"), 34 patients with diagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) of inflammatory origin, 35 patients with coronary heart disease and ventricular arrhythmias, 12patients with coronary heart disease with no ventricular arrhythmias, and 19 healthy volunteers (control group). The level of autoantibodies against the 1-adrenergic receptor was determined by the developed competitive cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by the standard ELISA using peptides corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the 1-adrenergic receptor. Elevated level of autoantibodies detected by a competitive cell-based ELISA was observed in 62% of patients with DCM compared to 21% of healthy volunteers (p=0.0006). In patients with "idiopathic" ventricular arrhythmias, the level of 1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies was lower than in healthy subjects (p=0.003). Coronary heart disease patients with or without ventricular arrhythmias exhibited no differences from the control group. The number of significantly positive signals in peptide-based ELISA did not exceed 10% in any of the groups. No correlation between the data from competitive cell-based ELISA and peptide-based ELISA was found. This study demonstrated that competitive cell-based ELISA technique can be applied for detection of 1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies. The results in DCM patients generally correspond to the expected. Decreased level of autoantibodies in patients with "idiopathic" ventricular arrhythmias indicates that this disease is related to changes in the immune system. Such relation is not observed in the case of coronary heart disease

  5. Detection of Ganoderic Acid A in Ganoderma lingzhi by an Indirect Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Kohno, Toshitaka; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushroom traditionally used for treating various diseases. Ganoderic acid A is one of the major bioactive Ganoderma triterpenoids isolated from Ganoderma species. Herein, we produced a highly specific monoclonal antibody against ganoderic acid A (MAb 12 A) and developed an indirect competitive ELISA for the highly sensitive detection of ganoderic acid A in Ganoderma lingzhi, with a limit of detection of 6.10 ng/mL. Several validation analyses support the accuracy and reliability of the developed indirect competitive ELISA for use in the quality control of Ganoderma based on ganoderic acid A content. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of ganoderic acid A in G. lingzhi revealed that the pileus exhibits the highest ganoderic acid A content compared with the stipe and spore of the fruiting body; the best extraction efficiency was found when 50 % ethanol was used, which suggests the use of a strong liquor to completely harness the potential of Ganoderma triterpenoids in daily life. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. The form of sexual selection arising from male-male competition depends on the presence of females in the social environment.

    PubMed

    Procter, D S; Moore, A J; Miller, C W

    2012-05-01

    Sexual selection arises from social interactions, and if social environments vary so too should sexual selection. For example, male-male competition often occurs either in the presence or in the absence of females, and such changes in the social environment could affect the form and strength of sexual selection. Here we examine how the presence of a female influences selection arising from male-male competition in a leaf-footed cactus bug, Narnia femorata, which has a resource defence mating system. Males compete for territories on cacti because females lay eggs on the cactus plants. Females are not always present when this competition first occurs; however, the presence or absence of the female matters. We found that both the form and strength of selection on male traits, those traits that influenced success in intrasexual competition, depended on the social context. When a female was not present, male size and the area of the sexually dimorphic hind legs was only marginally important to winning a contest. However, males with larger overall size and leg area were more likely to win in the presence of a female. There was also positive quadratic selection on these traits when a female was present with both the largest and the smallest males winning. The implication is unexpected alternative strategies when females are present. Our results support the notion that sexual selection should be studied under all relevant social contexts.

  7. Regain in Body Mass After Weigh-In is Linked to Success in Real Life Judo Competition.

    PubMed

    Reale, Reid; Cox, Gregory R; Slater, Gary; Burke, Louise M

    2016-12-01

    We examined the relationship between the regain of body mass (BM) after weigh-in and success in real-life judo competition. Eighty-six (36 females, 50 males) senior judoka volunteered for this observational study of an international judo competition. Subjects were weighed at the official weigh-in and one hour before their first competition fight (15-20 hr later). Regain in BM after weigh-in was compared between medal winners and nonmedalists, winners and losers of each fight, males and females and across weight divisions. Heavyweights were excluded from analysis. Prefight BM was greater than BM at official weigh-in for both males and females, with % BM gains of 2.3 ± 2.0 (p ≤ .0001; ES= 1.59; CI95% [1.63, 2.98]) and 3.1 ± 2.2 (p ≤ .0001; ES = 2.03; CI95% [2.30, 3.89]), respectively. No significant differences were found between weight divisions for post weigh-in BM regain. Differences in post weigh-in BM regain were significantly higher in medal winners than nonmedalists for males and females combined (1.4 ± 0.4% BM; p = .0026; ES= 0.69; CI95% [0.05, 2.34]) and for males alone (1.5 ± 0.6% BM; p = .017; ES= 0.74; CI95% [0.02, 2.64]), but not for females (1.2 ± 0.7% BM; p = .096; ES = 0.58; CI95% [-0.02, 2.31]). Differences in BM regain after weigh-in between winners and losers were significant across all fights (0.9 ± 0.3% BM; p = .0021; ES= 0.43; CI95% [0.31, 1.41]) but not for first round fights (0.8 ± 0.5% BM; p = .1386, ES = 0.38; CI95% [-0.26, 1.86]). Winners showed a greater regain in BM post weigh-in than losers. This may reflect the greater magnitude of the BM loss needed to achieve weigh-in targets which also relates to the experience level of successful athletes.

  8. Mapping of the X linked form of hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM1)

    PubMed

    Padayachee, M; Levinsky, R J; Kinnon, C; Finn, A; McKeown, C; Feighery, C; Notarangelo, L D; Hendriks, R W; Read, A P; Malcolm, S

    1993-03-01

    X linked immunodeficiency with hyperimmunoglobulinaemia M (HIGM1), which is characterised by agammaglobulinaemia together with excess IgM production reflecting an impairment of the immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch of B lymphocytes, has been mapped to Xq26. We report multipoint linkage data in six families with HIGM1 which show that the most likely position for the gene is close to HPRT with a maximum lod score of 4.89. The finding of recombinations between HIGM1 and both HPRT and DXS42 implies that HIGM1 is not allelic to X linked lymphoproliferative disease. These data will be useful in genetic counselling in families and will also be useful in testing candidate genes.

  9. Self-organizing path integration using a linked continuous attractor and competitive network: path integration of head direction.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Simon M; Rolls, Edmund T

    2006-12-01

    A key issue is how networks in the brain learn to perform path integration, that is update a represented position using a velocity signal. Using head direction cells as an example, we show that a competitive network could self-organize to learn to respond to combinations of head direction and angular head rotation velocity. These combination cells can then be used to drive a continuous attractor network to the next head direction based on the incoming rotation signal. An associative synaptic modification rule with a short term memory trace enables preceding combination cell activity during training to be associated with the next position in the continuous attractor network. The network accounts for the presence of neurons found in the brain that respond to combinations of head direction and angular head rotation velocity. Analogous networks in the hippocampal system could self-organize to perform path integration of place and spatial view representations.

  10. Competition in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, John Martin; DeVitis, Joseph L.

    This book discusses various major aspects of competition in education. It identifies competition within educational policies, programs, and practices, as well as the problems that certain forms of competition create. It also traces the influences of American competitive values on education. Chapter 1 provides an introductory overview of the…

  11. Competition in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, John Martin; DeVitis, Joseph L.

    This book discusses various major aspects of competition in education. It identifies competition within educational policies, programs, and practices, as well as the problems that certain forms of competition create. It also traces the influences of American competitive values on education. Chapter 1 provides an introductory overview of the…

  12. Self-cross-linking biopolymers as injectable in situ forming biodegradable scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Biji; Jayakrishnan, A

    2005-06-01

    The injectable polymer scaffolds which are biocompatible and biodegradable are important biomaterials for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Hydrogels derived from natural proteins and polysaccharides are ideal scaffolds for tissue engineering since they resemble the extracellular matrices of the tissue comprised of various amino acids and sugar-based macromolecules. Here, we report a new class of hydrogels derived from oxidized alginate and gelatin. We show that periodate-oxidized sodium alginate having appropriate molecular weight and degree of oxidation rapidly cross-links proteins such as gelatin in the presence of small concentrations of sodium tetraborate (borax) to give injectable systems for tissue engineering, drug delivery and other medical applications. The rapid gelation in the presence of borax is attributed to the slightly alkaline pH of the medium as well as the ability of borax to complex with hydroxyl groups of polysaccharides. The effect of degree of oxidation and concentration of alginate dialdehyde, gelatin and borax on the speed of gelation was examined. As a general rule, the gelling time decreased with increase in concentration of oxidized alginate, gelatin and borax and increase in the degree of oxidation of alginate. Cross-linking parameters of the gel matrix were studied by swelling measurements and trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) assay. In general, the degree of cross-linking was found to increase with increase in the degree of oxidation of alginate, whereas the swelling ratio and the degree of swelling decreased. The gel was found to be biocompatible and biodegradable. The potential of the system as an injectable drug delivery vehicle and as a tissue-engineering scaffold is demonstrated by using primaquine as a model drug and by encapsulation of hepatocytes inside the gel matrix, respectively.

  13. A sensitive and robust competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Brazil nut ( Bertholletia excelsa L.) detection.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Girdhari M; Roux, Kenneth H; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2009-01-28

    Undeclared Brazil nut residue in food products is of great concern because it can trigger life-threatening allergic reactions in sensitive patients. A rabbit polyclonal antibody-based competitive ELISA (IC(50) = 23.2 +/- 9 ng/mL, n = 76) with good sensitivity, detection range of 10-90 ng/mL, was developed. The ELISA could detect Brazil nut seed proteins over a pH range of 5-12. The optimal pH range for the detection assay was 7-10. Among the 66 tested foods/ingredients, only cinnamon exhibited statistically significant interference (1.36%, p = 0.05). Exposing Brazil nut seeds to processing did not adversely affect the nut seed protein detection using the assay. Brazil nut seed protein recovery from 100 mg of foods spiked with 10 and 1 microg of soluble Brazil nut proteins or 100 and 10 microg of defatted Brazil nut flour exhibited a wide recovery range, 63-315%, indicating protein-food matrix interaction.

  14. Subnanometer atomic force microscopy of peptide–mineral interactions links clustering and competition to acceleration and catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Friddle, R. W.; Weaver, M. L.; Qiu, S. R.; Wierzbicki, A.; Casey, W. H.; De Yoreo, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro observations have revealed major effects on the structure, growth, and composition of biomineral phases, including stabilization of amorphous precursors, acceleration and inhibition of kinetics, and alteration of impurity signatures. However, deciphering the mechanistic sources of these effects has been problematic due to a lack of tools to resolve molecular structures on mineral surfaces during growth. Here we report atomic force microscopy investigations using a system designed to maximize resolution while minimizing contact force. By imaging the growth of calcium-oxalate monohydrate under the influence of aspartic-rich peptides at single-molecule resolution, we reveal how the unique interactions of polypeptides with mineral surfaces lead to acceleration, inhibition, and switching of growth between two distinct states. Interaction with the positively charged face of calcium-oxalate monohydrate leads to formation of a peptide film, but the slow adsorption kinetics and gradual relaxation to a well-bound state result in time-dependent effects. These include a positive feedback between peptide adsorption and step inhibition described by a mathematical catastrophe that results in growth hysteresis, characterized by rapid switching from fast to near-zero growth rates for very small reductions in supersaturation. Interactions with the negatively charged face result in formation of peptide clusters that impede step advancement. The result is a competition between accelerated solute attachment and inhibition due to blocking of the steps by the clusters. The findings have implications for control of pathological mineralization and suggest artificial strategies for directing crystallization. PMID:20018743

  15. Friendship Conflict, Conflict Responses, and Instability: Unique Links to Anxious and Angry Forms of Rejection Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croft, Carissa D.; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Rejection sensitivity (RS) instigates conflict and prompts maladaptive conflict responses within romantic relationships. We tested whether RS had similar effects within friendships (N = 262, X[subscript age] = 11.7) by investigating whether (a) RS was associated with more frequent conflict, (b) two RS forms prompted different conflict responses,…

  16. Friendship Conflict, Conflict Responses, and Instability: Unique Links to Anxious and Angry Forms of Rejection Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croft, Carissa D.; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Rejection sensitivity (RS) instigates conflict and prompts maladaptive conflict responses within romantic relationships. We tested whether RS had similar effects within friendships (N = 262, X[subscript age] = 11.7) by investigating whether (a) RS was associated with more frequent conflict, (b) two RS forms prompted different conflict responses,…

  17. Learning Site Analysis Form. Reference Guide. Connections: Linking Work and Learning Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR. Education and Work Program.

    The Learning Site Analysis Form (LSAF) helps teachers and other school staff collaborate with employers to identify opportunities for students to learn at the workplace. This reference guide is designed to help school staff and employers use the LSAF and apply its results to structure experiences that connect classroom learning to the world of…

  18. The Link between Form and Meaning in American Sign Language: Lexical Processing Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Robin L.; Vinson, David P.; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    Signed languages exploit iconicity (the transparent relationship between meaning and form) to a greater extent than spoken languages. where it is largely limited to onomatopoeia. In a picture-sign matching experiment measuring reaction times, the authors examined the potential advantage of iconicity both for 1st- and 2nd-language learners of…

  19. Simultaneous determination of soy isoflavone glycosides, daidzin and genistin by monoclonal antibody-based highly sensitive indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Yusakul, Gorawit; Pongkitwitoon, Benyakan; Paudel, Madan Kumar; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2015-02-15

    Soy isoflavones are known as major bioactive compounds in soybean (Glycine max), which is an indispensable food. Despite their utility, the consumption of isoflavones has recently been limited because they exhibit oestrogenic and topoisomerase II inhibitory effects. To assess their intake limitation, accurate, sensitive, and effective quantitative analyses are necessary. In this study, we produced the monoclonal antibody (MAb) against daidzin (DZ) and applied it to an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) for the simultaneous determination of DZ and genistin (GEN), which are known as two major soy isoflavone glycosides in soy products. Using the DZ-MAb, we developed a sensitive icELISA method, where the limit of detection for DZ and GEN was 1.95ng/ml. Several validation analyses revealed that the icELISA is sufficiently accurate and sensitive to be used to assess the overconsumption of soy isoflavones, which would lead to the safe dietary intake of soy products.

  20. The link of feast-phase dissolved oxygen (DO) with substrate competition and microbial selection in PHA production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Oehmen, Adrian; Freitas, Elisabete B; Carvalho, Gilda; Reis, Maria A M

    2017-04-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biobased and biodegradable polyesters with the potential to replace conventional plastics. Aeration requires large amounts of energy in PHA production by mixed microbial cultures (MMCs), particularly during the feast phase due to substrate uptake. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of DO concentrations on microbial selection, substrate competition and PHA production performance by MMCs. This represents the first study investigating DO impact on PHA production while feeding the multiple volatile fatty acids (VFAs) typically encountered in real fermented feedstocks, as well as the substrate preferences at different DO levels. Efficient microbial cultures were enriched under both high (3.47 ± 1.12 mg/L) and low (0.86 ± 0.50 mg/L) DO conditions in the feast phase containing mostly the same populations but with different relative abundance. The most abundant microorganisms in the two MMCs were Plasticicumulans, Zoogloea, Paracoccus, and Flavobacterium. Butyrate and valerate were found to be the preferred substrates as compared to acetate and propionate regardless of DO concentrations. In the accumulation step, the PHA storage capacity and yield were less affected by the change of DO levels when applying the culture selected under low DO in the feast phase (PHA storage capacity >60% and yield > 0.9 Cmol PHA/Cmol VFA). A high DO level is required for maximal PHA accumulation rates with the four VFAs (acetate, propionate, butyrate and valerate) present, due to the lower specific uptake rates of acetate and propionate under low DO conditions. However, butyrate and valerate specific uptake rates were less impacted by DO levels and hence low DO for PHA accumulation may be effective when feed is composed of these substrates only. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Linking structure to fragility in bulk metallic glass-forming liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shuai E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de; Stolpe, Moritz E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de; Gross, Oliver; Gallino, Isabella; Hembree, William; Busch, Ralf; Evenson, Zach; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kruzic, Jamie J.

    2015-05-04

    Using in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that the structural evolution of various bulk metallic glass-forming liquids can be quantitatively connected to their viscosity behavior in the supercooled liquid near T{sub g}. The structural signature of fragility is identified as the temperature dependence of local dilatation on distinct key atomic length scales. A more fragile behavior results from a more pronounced thermally induced dilatation of the structure on a length scale of about 3 to 4 atomic diameters, coupled with shallower temperature dependence of structural changes in the nearest neighbor environment. These findings shed light on the structural origin of viscous slowdown during undercooling of bulk metallic glass-forming liquids and demonstrate the promise of predicting the properties of bulk metallic glasses from the atomic scale structure.

  2. Competition between a Lawn-Forming Cynodon dactylon and a Tufted Grass Species Hyparrhenia hirta on a South-African Dystrophic Savanna.

    PubMed

    Zwerts, J A; Prins, H H T; Bomhoff, D; Verhagen, I; Swart, J M; de Boer, W F

    2015-01-01

    South African savanna grasslands are often characterised by indigestible tufted grass species whereas lawn grasses are far more desirable in terms of herbivore sustenance. We aimed to investigate the role of nutrients and/or the disturbance (grazing, trampling) by herbivores on the formation of grazing lawns. We conducted a series of common garden experiments to test the effect of nutrients on interspecific competition between a typical lawn-forming grass species (Cynodon dactylon) and a species that is frequently found outside grazing lawns (Hyparrhenia hirta), and tested for the effect of herbivore disturbance in the form of trampling and clipping. We also performed a vegetation and herbivore survey to apply experimentally derived insights to field observations. Our results showed that interspecific competition was not affected by soil nutrient concentrations. C. dactylon did show much more resilience to disturbance than H. hirta, presumably due to the regenerative capacity of its rhizomes. Results from the field survey were in line with these findings, describing a correlation between herbivore pressure and C. dactylon abundance. We conclude that herbivore disturbance, and not soil nutrients, provide C. dactylon with a competitive advantage over H. hirta, due to vegetative regeneration from its rhizomes. This provides evidence for the importance of concentrated, high herbivore densities for the creation and maintenance of grazing lawns.

  3. Competition between a Lawn-Forming Cynodon dactylon and a Tufted Grass Species Hyparrhenia hirta on a South-African Dystrophic Savanna

    PubMed Central

    Zwerts, J. A.; Prins, H. H. T.; Bomhoff, D.; Verhagen, I.; Swart, J. M.; de Boer, W. F.

    2015-01-01

    South African savanna grasslands are often characterised by indigestible tufted grass species whereas lawn grasses are far more desirable in terms of herbivore sustenance. We aimed to investigate the role of nutrients and/or the disturbance (grazing, trampling) by herbivores on the formation of grazing lawns. We conducted a series of common garden experiments to test the effect of nutrients on interspecific competition between a typical lawn-forming grass species (Cynodon dactylon) and a species that is frequently found outside grazing lawns (Hyparrhenia hirta), and tested for the effect of herbivore disturbance in the form of trampling and clipping. We also performed a vegetation and herbivore survey to apply experimentally derived insights to field observations. Our results showed that interspecific competition was not affected by soil nutrient concentrations. C. dactylon did show much more resilience to disturbance than H. hirta, presumably due to the regenerative capacity of its rhizomes. Results from the field survey were in line with these findings, describing a correlation between herbivore pressure and C. dactylon abundance. We conclude that herbivore disturbance, and not soil nutrients, provide C. dactylon with a competitive advantage over H. hirta, due to vegetative regeneration from its rhizomes. This provides evidence for the importance of concentrated, high herbivore densities for the creation and maintenance of grazing lawns. PMID:26510157

  4. Antimicrobial Protegrin-1 Forms Amyloid-Like Fibrils with Rapid Kinetics Suggesting a Functional Link

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyunbum; Arce, Fernando Teran; Mustata, Mirela; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Capone, Ricardo; Nussinov, Ruth; Lal, Ratnesh

    2011-01-01

    Protegrin-1 (PG-1) is an 18 residues long, cysteine-rich β-sheet antimicrobial peptide (AMP). PG-1 induces strong cytotoxic activities on cell membrane and acts as a potent antibiotic agent. Earlier we reported that its cytotoxicity is mediated by its channel-forming ability. In this study, we have examined the amyloidogenic fibril formation properties of PG-1 in comparison with a well-defined amyloid, the amyloid-β (Aβ1–42) peptide. We have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thioflavin-T staining to investigate the kinetics of PG-1 fibrils growth and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the underlying mechanism. AFM images of PG-1 on a highly hydrophilic surface (mica) show fibrils with morphological similarities to Aβ1–42 fibrils. Real-time AFM imaging of fibril growth suggests that PG-1 fibril growth follows a relatively fast kinetics compared to the Aβ1–42 fibrils. The AFM results are in close agreement with results from thioflavin-T staining data. Furthermore, the results indicate that PG-1 forms fibrils in solution. Significantly, in contrast, we do not detect fibrillar structures of PG-1 on an anionic lipid bilayer 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine; only small PG-1 oligomers can be observed. Molecular dynamics simulations are able to identify the presence of these small oligomers on the membrane bilayer. Thus, our current results show that cytotoxic AMP PG-1 is amyloidogenic and capable of forming fibrils. Overall, comparing β-rich AMPs and amyloids such as Aβ, in addition to cytotoxicity and amyloidogenicity, they share a common structural motif, and are channel forming. These combined properties support a functional relationship between amyloidogenic peptides and β-sheet-rich cytolytic AMPs, suggesting that amyloids channels may have an antimicrobial function. PMID:21463591

  5. Forming cross-linked peptidoglycan from synthetic gram-negative Lipid II.

    PubMed

    Lebar, Matthew D; Lupoli, Tania J; Tsukamoto, Hirokazu; May, Janine M; Walker, Suzanne; Kahne, Daniel

    2013-03-27

    The bacterial cell wall precursor, Lipid II, has a highly conserved structure among different organisms except for differences in the amino acid sequence of the peptide side chain. Here, we report an efficient and flexible synthesis of the canonical Lipid II precursor required for the assembly of Gram-negative peptidoglycan (PG). We use a rapid LC/MS assay to analyze PG glycosyltransfer (PGT) and transpeptidase (TP) activities of Escherichia coli penicillin binding proteins PBP1A and PBP1B and show that the native m-DAP residue in the peptide side chain of Lipid II is required in order for TP-catalyzed peptide cross-linking to occur in vitro. Comparison of PG produced from synthetic canonical E. coli Lipid II with PG isolated from E. coli cells demonstrates that we can produce PG in vitro that resembles native structure. This work provides the tools necessary for reconstituting cell wall synthesis, an essential cellular process and major antibiotic target, in a purified system.

  6. Strongly linked current flow in polycrystalline forms of the superconductor MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larbalestier, D. C.; Cooley, L. D.; Rikel, M. O.; Polyanskii, A. A.; Jiang, J.; Patnaik, S.; Cai, X. Y.; Feldmann, D. M.; Gurevich, A.; Squitieri, A. A.; Naus, M. T.; Eom, C. B.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Cava, R. J.; Regan, K. A.; Rogado, N.; Hayward, M. A.; He, T.; Slusky, J. S.; Khalifah, P.; Inumaru, K.; Haas, M.

    2001-03-01

    The discovery of superconductivity at 39K in magnesium diboride, MgB2, raises many issues, a critical one being whether this material resembles a high-temperature copper oxide superconductor or a low-temperature metallic superconductor in terms of its behaviour in strong magnetic fields. Although the copper oxides exhibit very high transition temperatures, their in-field performance is compromized by their large anisotropy, the result of which is to restrict high bulk current densities to a region much less than the full magnetic-field-temperature (H-T) space over which superconductivity is found. Moreover, the weak coupling across grain boundaries makes transport current densities in untextured polycrystalline samples low and strongly sensitive to magnetic field. Here we report that, despite the multiphase, untextured, microscale, subdivided nature of our MgB2 samples, supercurrents flow throughout the material without exhibiting strong sensitivity to weak magnetic fields. Our combined magnetization, magneto-optical, microscopy and X-ray investigations show that the supercurrent density is mostly determined by flux pinning, rather than by the grain boundary connectivity. Our results therefore suggest that this new superconductor class is not compromized by weak-link problems, a conclusion of significance for practical applications if higher temperature analogues of this compound can be discovered.

  7. Positive and Negative Effects of Habitat-Forming Algae on Survival, Growth and Intra-Specific Competition of Limpets

    PubMed Central

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.; Burrows, Michael T.; Jackson, Angus C.; Mayer-Pinto, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of environmental change on the distribution and abundance of strongly interacting organisms, such as intertidal macroalgae and their grazers, needs a thorough knowledge of their underpinning ecological relationships. Control of grazer-plant interactions is bi-directional on northwestern European coasts: grazing by limpets structures populations of macroalgae, while macroalgae provide habitat and food for limpets. Scottish shores dominated by the macroalga Fucus vesiculosus support lower densities and larger sizes of limpets Patella vulgata than shores with less Fucus. These patterns may be due to differences in inter-size-class competitive interactions of limpets among shores with different covers of Fucus. To examine this model, densities of small and large limpets were manipulated in plots with and without Fucus. Amounts of biofilm were measured in each plot. The presence of Fucus increased survival but hindered growth of small (15 mm TL) limpets, which were negatively affected by the presence of large limpets (31 mm TL). In contrast, large limpets were not affected by the presence of Fucus or of small limpets. This suggests the occurrence of asymmetric inter-size-class competition, which was influenced by the presence of macroalgae. Macroalgae and increased densities of limpets did not influence amounts of biofilm. Our findings highlight the role of interactions among organisms in generating ecological responses to environmental change. PMID:23251589

  8. Characterization of inclusion bodies with cytoprotective properties formed by seipinopathy-linked mutant seipin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daisuke; Yagi, Takuya; Ikawa, Masahito; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2012-02-01

    Gain-of-toxic mutations in the N-glycosylation motif of the seipin/BSCL2 gene (namely, the N88S and S90L mutations) cause autosomal dominant motor neuron diseases, termed 'seipinopathy'. Expressed mutant seipin is improperly folded and accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), leading to an unfolded protein response (UPR). Furthermore, cells expressing mutant seipin contain unique cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IB) that form via a different mechanism from that of ubiquitinated inclusions, or aggresomes. Whether the formation of these IB is pathogenic or protective in neurodegenerative diseases remains unclear. Here, we determined that mutant seipin IB are negative for two well-established ER markers, immunoglobulin-heavy-chain-binding protein and calnexin, indicating a distinct compartmentalization from the main ER, and that mutant seipin IB are formed via a mechanism that is independent of major UPR transducers and ER chaperons. Electron microscopy and coexpression study with variant α1-antitrypsin cDNA showed that seipin IB are compatible with unique cytoplasmic vesicles known as ER-derived protective organelles (ERPO). We also obtained evidence that seipin IB exhibit a cytoprotective property via the attenuation of ER stress. These findings suggest that ERPO, such as seipin IB, are a novel adaptation machinery against the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER.

  9. Ordered ferrimagnetic form of ferrihydrite reveals links among structure, composition, and magnetism

    PubMed Central

    Michel, F. Marc; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Morales, María P.; Serna, Carlos J.; Boily, Jean-François; Liu, Qingsong; Ambrosini, Andrea; Cismasu, A. Cristina; Brown, Gordon E.

    2010-01-01

    The natural nanomineral ferrihydrite is an important component of many environmental and soil systems and has been implicated as the inorganic core of ferritin in biological systems. Knowledge of its basic structure, composition, and extent of structural disorder is essential for understanding its reactivity, stability, and magnetic behavior, as well as changes in these properties during aging. Here we investigate compositional, structural, and magnetic changes that occur upon aging of “2-line” ferrihydrite in the presence of adsorbed citrate at elevated temperature. Whereas aging under these conditions ultimately results in the formation of hematite, analysis of the atomic pair distribution function and complementary physicochemical and magnetic data indicate formation of an intermediate ferrihydrite phase of larger particle size with few defects, more structural relaxation and electron spin ordering, and pronounced ferrimagnetism relative to its disordered ferrihydrite precursor. Our results represent an important conceptual advance in understanding the nature of structural disorder in ferrihydrite and its relation to the magnetic structure and also serve to validate a controversial, recently proposed structural model for this phase. In addition, the pathway we identify for forming ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite potentially explains the magnetic enhancement that typically precedes formation of hematite in aerobic soil and weathering environments. Such magnetic enhancement has been attributed to the formation of poorly understood, nano-sized ferrimagnets from a ferrihydrite precursor. Whereas elevated temperatures drive the transformation on timescales feasible for laboratory studies, our results also suggest that ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite could form naturally at ambient temperature given sufficient time. PMID:20133643

  10. Ordered ferrimagnetic form of ferrihydrite reveals links among structure, composition, and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Michel, F Marc; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Morales, María P; Serna, Carlos J; Boily, Jean-François; Liu, Qingsong; Ambrosini, Andrea; Cismasu, A Cristina; Brown, Gordon E

    2010-02-16

    The natural nanomineral ferrihydrite is an important component of many environmental and soil systems and has been implicated as the inorganic core of ferritin in biological systems. Knowledge of its basic structure, composition, and extent of structural disorder is essential for understanding its reactivity, stability, and magnetic behavior, as well as changes in these properties during aging. Here we investigate compositional, structural, and magnetic changes that occur upon aging of "2-line" ferrihydrite in the presence of adsorbed citrate at elevated temperature. Whereas aging under these conditions ultimately results in the formation of hematite, analysis of the atomic pair distribution function and complementary physicochemical and magnetic data indicate formation of an intermediate ferrihydrite phase of larger particle size with few defects, more structural relaxation and electron spin ordering, and pronounced ferrimagnetism relative to its disordered ferrihydrite precursor. Our results represent an important conceptual advance in understanding the nature of structural disorder in ferrihydrite and its relation to the magnetic structure and also serve to validate a controversial, recently proposed structural model for this phase. In addition, the pathway we identify for forming ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite potentially explains the magnetic enhancement that typically precedes formation of hematite in aerobic soil and weathering environments. Such magnetic enhancement has been attributed to the formation of poorly understood, nano-sized ferrimagnets from a ferrihydrite precursor. Whereas elevated temperatures drive the transformation on timescales feasible for laboratory studies, our results also suggest that ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite could form naturally at ambient temperature given sufficient time.

  11. Ordered ferrimagnetic form of ferrihydrite reveals links among structure, composition, and magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, F. Marc; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Morales, María P.; Serna, Carlos J.; Boily, Jean-François; Liu, Qingsong; Ambrosini, Andrea; Cismasu, A. Cristina; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.

    2010-11-19

    The natural nanomineral ferrihydrite is an important component of many environmental and soil systems and has been implicated as the inorganic core of ferritin in biological systems. Knowledge of its basic structure, composition, and extent of structural disorder is essential for understanding its reactivity, stability, and magnetic behavior, as well as changes in these properties during aging. Here we investigate compositional, structural, and magnetic changes that occur upon aging of '2-line' ferrihydrite in the presence of adsorbed citrate at elevated temperature. Whereas aging under these conditions ultimately results in the formation of hematite, analysis of the atomic pair distribution function and complementary physicochemical and magnetic data indicate formation of an intermediate ferrihydrite phase of larger particle size with few defects, more structural relaxation and electron spin ordering, and pronounced ferrimagnetism relative to its disordered ferrihydrite precursor. Our results represent an important conceptual advance in understanding the nature of structural disorder in ferrihydrite and its relation to the magnetic structure and also serve to validate a controversial, recently proposed structural model for this phase. In addition, the pathway we identify for forming ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite potentially explains the magnetic enhancement that typically precedes formation of hematite in aerobic soil and weathering environments. Such magnetic enhancement has been attributed to the formation of poorly understood, nano-sized ferrimagnets from a ferrihydrite precursor. Whereas elevated temperatures drive the transformation on timescales feasible for laboratory studies, our results also suggest that ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite could form naturally at ambient temperature given sufficient time.

  12. The Ancient Immunoglobulin Domains of Peroxidasin Are Required to Form Sulfilimine Cross-links in Collagen IV*

    PubMed Central

    Ero-Tolliver, Isi A.; Hudson, Billy G.; Bhave, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    The collagen IV sulfilimine cross-link and its catalyzing enzyme, peroxidasin, represent a dyad critical for tissue development, which is conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Peroxidasin forms novel sulfilimine bonds between opposing methionine and hydroxylysine residues to structurally reinforce the collagen IV scaffold, a function critical for basement membrane and tissue integrity. However, the molecular mechanism underlying cross-link formation remains unclear. In this work, we demonstrate that the catalytic domain of peroxidasin and its immunoglobulin (Ig) domains are required for efficient sulfilimine bond formation. Thus, these molecular features underlie the evolutionarily conserved function of peroxidasin in tissue development and integrity and distinguish peroxidasin from other peroxidases, such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO). PMID:26178375

  13. Surveying Medieval Archaeology: a New Form for Harris Paradigm Linking Photogrammetry and Temporal Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drap, P.; Papini, O.; Pruno, E.; Nucciotti, M.; Vannini, G.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents some reflexions concerning an interdisciplinary project between Medieval Archaeologists from the University of Florence (Italy) and ICT researchers from CNRS LSIS of Marseille (France), aiming towards a connection between 3D spatial representation and archaeological knowledge. It is well known that Laser Scanner, Photogrammetry and Computer Vision are very attractive tools for archaeologists, although the integration of representation of space and representation of archaeological time has not yet found a methodological standard of reference. We try to develop an integrated system for archaeological 3D survey and all other types of archaeological data and knowledge through integrating observable (material) and non-graphic (interpretive) data. Survey plays a central role, since it is both a metric representation of the archaeological site and, to a wider extent, an interpretation of it (being also a common basis for communication between the 2 teams). More specifically 3D survey is crucial, allowing archaeologists to connect actual spatial assets to the stratigraphic formation processes (i.e. to the archaeological time) and to translate spatial observations into historical interpretation of the site. We propose a common formalism for describing photogrammetrical survey and archaeological knowledge stemming from ontologies: Indeed, ontologies are fully used to model and store 3D data and archaeological knowledge. Xe equip this formalism with a qualitative representation of time. Stratigraphic analyses (both of excavated deposits and of upstanding structures) are closely related to E. C. Harris theory of "Stratigraphic Unit" ("US" from now on). Every US is connected to the others by geometric, topological and, eventually, temporal links, and are recorded by the 3D photogrammetric survey. However, the limitations of the Harris Matrix approach lead to use another representation formalism for stratigraphic relationships, namely Qualitative Constraints

  14. Rapid competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using a monoclonal antibody reacting with a 15-kilodalton tegumental antigen of Schistosoma mansoni for serodiagnosis of schistosomiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, A J; Piuvezam, M R; de Moura, H; Maddison, S; Peralta, J M

    1993-01-01

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CELISA) for antibody detection was developed by using a monoclonal antibody which reacts with a 15-kDa tegumental antigen of the adult worm of Schistosoma mansoni. This monoclonal antibody was not able to react with antigens of Schistosoma japonicum or Schistosoma haematobium in enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) and indirect immunofluorescence tests. The assay was performed in a period of 1 h using an adult worm crude extract antigen. To evaluate the CELISA, a total of 73 serum samples was analyzed: 35 were from S. mansoni-infected patients, 23 were from individuals with parasitic infections other than schistosomiasis, and 14 were from healthy individuals. All serum samples from healthy individuals and from patients infected with other parasites were negative, as were two (6%) samples from patients infected with S. mansoni. EITB analysis showed that 32 of 33 CELISA-positive samples were positive in the EITB but with different patterns of reactivity. A 15-kDa protein reacted with 60% of serum samples, and a 60-kDa protein showed the highest level of reactivity (85%). The two samples from patients infected with S. mansoni that were negative in the CELISA reacted with 70-, 60-, 50-, 47-, and 38-kDa proteins. One sample, positive in CELISA, did not react with proteins of the antigenic extract. Images PMID:8408548

  15. Mutations in PNPLA6 are linked to photoreceptor degeneration and various forms of childhood blindness

    PubMed Central

    Kmoch, S.; Majewski, J.; Ramamurthy, V.; Cao, S.; Fahiminiya, S.; Ren, H.; MacDonald, I.M.; Lopez, I.; Sun, V.; Keser, V.; Khan, A.; Stránecký, V.; Hartmannová, H.; Přistoupilová, A.; Hodaňová, K.; Piherová, L.; Kuchař, L.; Baxová, A.; Chen, R.; Barsottini, O.G.P.; Pyle, A.; Griffin, H.; Splitt, M.; Sallum, J.; Tolmie, J.L.; Sampson, J.R.; Chinnery, P.; Canada, Care4Rare; Banin, E.; Sharon, D.; Dutta, S.; Grebler, R.; Helfrich-Foerster, C.; Pedroso, J.L.; Kretzschmar, D.; Cayouette, M.; Koenekoop, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Blindness due to retinal degeneration affects millions of people worldwide, but many disease-causing mutations remain unknown. PNPLA6 encodes the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing protein 6, also known as neuropathy target esterase (NTE), which is the target of toxic organophosphates that induce human paralysis due to severe axonopathy of large neurons. Mutations in PNPLA6 also cause human spastic paraplegia characterized by motor neuron degeneration. Here we identify PNPLA6 mutations in childhood blindness in seven families with retinal degeneration, including Leber congenital amaurosis and Oliver McFarlane syndrome. PNPLA6 localizes mostly at the inner segment plasma membrane in photo-receptors and mutations in Drosophila PNPLA6 lead to photoreceptor cell death. We also report that lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid levels are elevated in mutant Drosophila. These findings show a role for PNPLA6 in photoreceptor survival and identify phospholipid metabolism as a potential therapeutic target for some forms of blindness. PMID:25574898

  16. Binding and photoreactivity of psoralen linked to triple helix-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Oh, D H; Hanawalt, P C

    2000-09-01

    Triple helix-forming oligonucleotides conjugated to a psoralen (psoTFO) have been designed to bind to three distinct purine-rich sequences within the human interstitial collagenase (MMP1) gene. Gel mobility shift assays indicate that these psoTFO bind to and photoreact with model target DNA sequences following ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation. The dissociation constants for binding of the psoTFO to their targets range from 0.3 to 4 microM. Psoralen monoadducts with the purine-rich target strand and interstrand crosslinks are efficiently formed on targets containing either 5'-ApT-3' or 5'-TpA-3' sequences adjacent to the TFO binding sequence. The dependence of adduct formation on UVA dose has provided quantitative estimates of the overall rate constants for psoralen monoadduct and crosslink formation in the presence of a TFO. When psoralen is tethered to a TFO, the rate of monoadduct formation exceeds that of crosslinking for all sequences studied. This contrasts with the relatively low rate of monoadduct formation that has been reported for free psoralens, suggesting that the bound TFO facilitates the initial photochemistry that generates monoadducts, but does not significantly affect interstrand crosslink formation. psoTFO and UVA treatment inhibit DNA cleavage by a restriction endonuclease when the psoralen covalently reacts directly at the endonuclease site. The particular TFO studied do not completely inhibit endonuclease activity when they are noncovalently bound or when the covalent psoralen adduct does not coincide with the endonuclease site. Our findings confirm that TFO are capable of directing psoralen photoadducts to specific DNA targets and suggest that TFO can significantly modulate psoralen photoreactivity and DNA-protein interactions.

  17. The link between atmospheric radicals and newly formed particles at a spruce forest site in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, B.; Bourtsoukidis, E.; Sun, T. S.; Bingemer, H.; Rondo, L.; Javed, U.; Li, J.; Axinte, R.; Li, X.; Brauers, T.; Sonderfeld, H.; Koppmann, R.; Sogachev, A.; Jacobi, S.; Spracklen, D. V.

    2014-10-01

    It has been claimed for more than a century that atmospheric new particle formation is primarily influenced by the presence of sulfuric acid. However, the activation process of sulfuric acid related clusters into detectable particles is still an unresolved topic. In this study we focus on the PARADE campaign measurements conducted during August/September 2011 at Mt Kleiner Feldberg in central Germany. During this campaign a set of radicals, organic and inorganic compounds and oxidants and aerosol properties were measured or calculated. We compared a range of organic and inorganic nucleation theories, evaluating their ability to simulate measured particle formation rates at 3 nm in diameter (J3) for a variety of different conditions. Nucleation mechanisms involving only sulfuric acid tentatively captured the observed noon-time daily maximum in J3, but displayed an increasing difference to J3 measurements during the rest of the diurnal cycle. Including large organic radicals, i.e. organic peroxy radicals (RO2) deriving from monoterpenes and their oxidation products, in the nucleation mechanism improved the correlation between observed and simulated J3. This supports a recently proposed empirical relationship for new particle formation that has been used in global models. However, the best match between theory and measurements for the site of interest was found for an activation process based on large organic peroxy radicals and stabilised Criegee intermediates (sCI). This novel laboratory-derived algorithm simulated the daily pattern and intensity of J3 observed in the ambient data. In this algorithm organic derived radicals are involved in activation and growth and link the formation rate of smallest aerosol particles with OH during daytime and NO3 during night-time. Because the RO2 lifetime is controlled by HO2 and NO we conclude that peroxy radicals and NO seem to play an important role for ambient radical chemistry not only with respect to oxidation capacity but

  18. The link between atmospheric radicals and newly formed particles at a spruce forest site in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, B.; Bourtsoukidis, E.; Sun, T. S.; Bingemer, H.; Rondo, L.; Javed, U.; Li, J.; Axinte, R.; Li, X.; Brauers, T.; Sonderfeld, H.; Koppmann, R.; Sogachev, A.; Jacobi, S.; Spracklen, D. V.

    2013-10-01

    It has been claimed for more than a century that atmospheric new particle formation is primarily influenced by the presence of sulphuric acid. However, the activation process of sulphuric acid related clusters into detectable particles is still an unresolved topic. In this study we focus on the PARADE campaign measurements conducted during August/September 2011 at Mt. Kleiner Feldberg in central Germany. During this campaign a set of radicals, organic and inorganic compounds and oxidants and aerosol properties were measured or calculated. We compared a range of organic and inorganic nucleation theories, evaluating their ability to simulate measured particle formation rates at 3 nm in diameter (J3) for a variety of different conditions. Nucleation mechanisms involving only sulphuric acid tentatively captured the observed noon-time daily maximum in J3, but displayed an increasing difference to J3 measurements during the rest of the diurnal cycle. Including large organic radicals, i.e. organic peroxy radicals (RO2) deriving from monoterpenes and their oxidation products in the nucleation mechanism improved the correlation between observed and simulated J3. This supports a recently proposed empirical relationship for new particle formation that has been used in global models. However, the best match between theory and measurements for the site of interest was found for an activation process based on large organic peroxy radicals and stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI). This novel laboratory derived algorithm simulated the daily pattern and intensity of J3 observed in the ambient data. In this algorithm organic derived radicals are involved in activation and growth and link the formation rate of smallest aerosol particles with OH during daytime and NO3 during nighttime. Because of the RO2s lifetime is controlled by HO2 and NO we conclude that peroxy radicals and NO seem to play an important role for ambient radical chemistry not only with respect to oxidation

  19. Linking satellites via Earth hot spots and the Internet to form ad hoc constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stu; Grosvenor, Sandra; Ingram, Mary Ann; Langley, John; Miranda, Felix A.; Lee, Richard Q.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Zaman, Afroz; Popovic, Zoya; Sherwood, Robert L.; Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley

    2005-01-01

    As more assets are placed in orbit, opportunities emerge to combine various sets of satellites in temporary constellations to perform collaborative image collections. Often, new operations concepts for a satellite or set of satellites emerge after launch. To the degree with which new space assets can be inexpensively and rapidly integrated into temporary or "ad hoc" constellations, will determine whether these new ideas will be implemented or not. On the Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) satellite, a New Millennium Program mission, a number of experiments were conducted and are being conducted to demonstrate various aspects of an architecture that, when taken as a whole, will enable progressive mission autonomy. In particular, the target architecture will use adaptive ground antenna arrays to form, as close as possible, the equivalent of wireless access points for low earth orbiting satellites. Coupled with various ground and flight software and the Internet, the architecture enables progressive mission autonomy. Thus, new collaborative sensing techniques can be implemented post-launch. This paper will outline the overall operations concept and highlight details of both the research effort being conducted in the area of adaptive antenna arrays and some of the related successful autonomy software that has been implemented using EO-1 and other operational satellites.

  20. Linking Satellites Via Earth "Hot Spots" and the Internet to Form Ad Hoc Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stu; Grosvenor, Sandra; Ingram, Mary Ann; Langley, John; Miranda, Felix; Lee, Richard Q.; Romanofsky, Robert; Zaman, Afoz; Popovic, Zoya

    2004-01-01

    As more assets are placed in orbit, opportunities emerge to combine various sets of satellites in temporary constellations to perform collaborative image collections. Often, new operations concepts for a satellite or set of satellites emerge after launch. To the degree with which new space assets can be inexpensively and rapidly integrated into temporary or "ad hoc" constellations, will determine whether these new ideas will be implemented or not. On the Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) satellite, a New Millennium Program mission, a number of experiments were conducted and are being conducted to demonstrate various aspects of an architecture that, when taken as a whole, will enable progressive mission autonomy. In particular, the target architecture will use adaptive ground antenna arrays to form, as close as possible, the equivalent of wireless access points for low earth orbiting satellites. Coupled with various ground and flight software and the Internet. the architecture enables progressive mission autonomy. Thus, new collaborative sensing techniques can be implemented post-launch. This paper will outline the overall operations concept and highlight details of both the research effort being conducted in

  1. Linking Satellites Via Earth "Hot Spots" and the Internet to Form Ad Hoc Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stu; Grosvenor, Sandra; Ingram, Mary Ann; Langley, John; Miranda, Felix; Lee, Richard Q.; Romanofsky, Robert; Zaman, Afoz; Popovic, Zoya

    2004-01-01

    As more assets are placed in orbit, opportunities emerge to combine various sets of satellites in temporary constellations to perform collaborative image collections. Often, new operations concepts for a satellite or set of satellites emerge after launch. To the degree with which new space assets can be inexpensively and rapidly integrated into temporary or "ad hoc" constellations, will determine whether these new ideas will be implemented or not. On the Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) satellite, a New Millennium Program mission, a number of experiments were conducted and are being conducted to demonstrate various aspects of an architecture that, when taken as a whole, will enable progressive mission autonomy. In particular, the target architecture will use adaptive ground antenna arrays to form, as close as possible, the equivalent of wireless access points for low earth orbiting satellites. Coupled with various ground and flight software and the Internet. the architecture enables progressive mission autonomy. Thus, new collaborative sensing techniques can be implemented post-launch. This paper will outline the overall operations concept and highlight details of both the research effort being conducted in

  2. Pyoderma gangrenosum and its syndromic forms: evidence for a link with autoinflammation.

    PubMed

    Marzano, A V; Borghi, A; Meroni, P L; Cugno, M

    2016-11-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare inflammatory neutrophilic dermatosis manifesting as painful ulcers with violaceous, undermined borders on the lower extremities. It may occur in the context of classic syndromes like PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne) and SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis), as well as in a recently described entity named PASH (pyoderma gangrenosum, acne and suppurative hidradenitis). Pyoderma gangrenosum has recently been included within the spectrum of autoinflammatory diseases, which are characterized by recurrent episodes of sterile inflammation, without circulating autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells. In PAPA syndrome, different mutations involving the PSTPIP1 gene, via an increased binding affinity to pyrin, induce the assembly of inflammasomes. These are molecular platforms involved in the activation of caspase 1, a protease that cleaves inactive prointerleukin (pro-IL)-1β to its active isoform IL-1β. The overproduction of IL-1β triggers the release of a number of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which are responsible for the recruitment and activation of neutrophils, leading to neutrophil-mediated inflammation. In SAPHO syndrome, the activation of the PSTPIP2 inflammasome has been suggested to play a role in inducing the dysfunction of the innate immune system. Patients with PASH have recently been reported to present alterations of genes involved in well-known autoinflammatory diseases, such as PSTPIP1, MEFV, NOD2 and NLRP3. Pyoderma gangrenosum and its syndromic forms can be regarded as a single clinicopathological spectrum in the context of autoinflammation.

  3. Competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibody in sheep and other ruminants to a conserved epitope of malignant catarrhal fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Shen, D T; Knowles, D P; Gorham, J R; Crawford, T B

    1994-01-01

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a severe, usually fatal, acute systemic disease syndrome of certain domestic and wild ruminants caused by members of the family Gammaherpesvirinae. Two distinct but closely related viruses cause clinically indistinguishable syndromes: one that is indigenous to the widebeest and the other that apparently is indigenous to domestic sheep. Neither the pathogenesis nor the epidemiology of sheep-associated MCF (SA-MCF) is understood, primarily because of a lack of adequate detection methods for the etiologic agent or antibody against it. No acceptably documented isolates of SA-MCF virus have been reported, and existing antibody assays suffer from significant cross-reactivity with other viruses. As a basis for a specific serologic assay, an attempt was made to identify an epitope conserved among all isolates of MCF viruses, by using a monoclonal antibody (MAb) produced against a previously reported U.S. isolate of MCF virus. A MAb (15-A) which bound a conserved epitope present on all four isolates of MCF virus examined was found. MAb 15-A did not react with eight common sheep and goat viruses or five common bovine viruses. Immunoprecipitation revealed that the 15-A epitope was located on the viral glycoprotein complex, with molecular masses of 115, 110, 105, 78, and 45 kDa. Sera from experimentally and naturally infected animals which yielded a similar glycoprotein complex immunoprecipitation pattern competed with MAb 15-A for its epitope. A competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on MAb 15-A was therefore developed. The assay detected antibody in inapparently infected sheep and in cattle, deer, and bison with clinical MCF. Of the 149 serum samples from sheep associated with MCF outbreaks, 88 (55%) were seropositive by competitive inhibition ELISA. Images PMID:7523438

  4. An ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates the Uptake of α-(1,6)-Linked Dietary Oligosaccharides in Bifidobacterium and Correlates with Competitive Growth on These Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Fredslund, Folmer; Vujičić Žagar, Andreja; Andersen, Thomas Lars; Svensson, Birte; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2016-01-01

    The molecular details and impact of oligosaccharide uptake by distinct human gut microbiota (HGM) are currently not well understood. Non-digestible dietary galacto- and gluco-α-(1,6)-oligosaccharides from legumes and starch, respectively, are preferentially fermented by mainly bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the human gut. Here we show that the solute binding protein (BlG16BP) associated with an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter from the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 binds α-(1,6)-linked glucosides and galactosides of varying size, linkage, and monosaccharide composition with preference for the trisaccharides raffinose and panose. This preference is also reflected in the α-(1,6)-galactoside uptake profile of the bacterium. Structures of BlG16BP in complex with raffinose and panose revealed the basis for the remarkable ligand binding plasticity of BlG16BP, which recognizes the non-reducing α-(1,6)-diglycoside in its ligands. BlG16BP homologues occur predominantly in bifidobacteria and a few Firmicutes but lack in other HGMs. Among seven bifidobacterial taxa, only those possessing this transporter displayed growth on α-(1,6)-glycosides. Competition assays revealed that the dominant HGM commensal Bacteroides ovatus was out-competed by B. animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 in mixed cultures growing on raffinose, the preferred ligand for the BlG16BP. By comparison, B. ovatus mono-cultures grew very efficiently on this trisaccharide. These findings suggest that the ABC-mediated uptake of raffinose provides an important competitive advantage, particularly against dominant Bacteroides that lack glycan-specific ABC-transporters. This novel insight highlights the role of glycan transport in defining the metabolic specialization of gut bacteria. PMID:27502277

  5. Development of an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay applied to the Botrytis cinerea quantification in tissues of postharvest fruits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Botrytis cinerea is a phytopathogenic fungus responsible for the disease known as gray mold, which causes substantial losses of fruits at postharvest. This fungus is present often as latent infection and an apparently healthy fruit can deteriorate suddenly due to the development of this infection. For this reason, rapid and sensitive methods are necessary for its detection and quantification. This article describes the development of an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantification of B. cinerea in apple (Red Delicious), table grape (pink Moscatel), and pear (William's) tissues. Results The method was based in the competition for the binding site of monoclonal antibodies between B. cinerea antigens present in fruit tissues and B. cinerea purified antigens immobilized by a crosslinking agent onto the surface of the microtiter plates. The method was validated considering parameters such as selectivity, linearity, precision, accuracy and sensibility. The calculated detection limit was 0.97 μg mL-1 B. cinerea antigens. The immobilized antigen was perfectly stable for at least 4 months assuring the reproducibility of the assay. The fungus was detected and quantified in any of the fruits tested when the rot was not visible yet. Results were compared with a DNA quantification method and these studies showed good correlation. Conclusions The developed method allowed detects the presence of B. cinerea in asymptomatic fruits and provides the advantages of low cost, easy operation, and short analysis time determination for its possible application in the phytosanitary programs of the fruit industry worldwide. PMID:21970317

  6. A VAPB mutant linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis generates a novel form of organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Fasana, Elisa; Fossati, Matteo; Ruggiano, Annamaria; Brambillasca, Silvia; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Navone, Francesca; Francolini, Maura; Borgese, Nica

    2010-05-01

    VAPB (vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident tail-anchored adaptor protein involved in lipid transport. A dominantly inherited mutant, P56S-VAPB, causes a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and forms poorly characterized inclusion bodies in cultured cells. To provide a cell biological basis for the understanding of mutant VAPB pathogenicity, we investigated its biogenesis and the inclusions that it generates. Translocation assays in cell-free systems and in cultured mammalian cells were used to investigate P56S-VAPB membrane insertion, and the inclusions were characterized by confocal imaging and electron microscopy. We found that mutant VAPB inserts post-translationally into ER membranes in a manner indistinguishable from the wild-type protein but that it rapidly clusters to form inclusions that remain continuous with the rest of the ER. Inclusions were induced by the mutant also when it was expressed at levels comparable to the endogenous wild-type protein. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that the inclusions represent a novel form of organized smooth ER (OSER) consisting in a limited number of parallel cisternae (usually 2 or 3) interleaved by a approximately 30 nm-thick electron-dense cytosolic layer. Our results demonstrate that the ALS-linked VAPB mutant causes dramatic ER restructuring that may underlie its pathogenicity in motoneurons.

  7. Production of a baculovirus-derived gp50 protein and utilization in a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the serodiagnosis of pseudorabies virus.

    PubMed Central

    Prud'homme, I; Zhou, E M; Traykova, M; Trotter, H; Chan, M; Afshar, A; Harding, M J

    1997-01-01

    The pseudorabies virus (PRV) gp50 envelope glycoprotein gene was cloned and expressed in a recombinant baculovirus. An anti-gp50 Mab (1842) recognized a protein of approximately 40 kDa in immunoblotting assays from infected insect cell lysates, while this product was not present in cells infected with wild-type baculovirus. The recombinant protein was purified by lectin affinity chromatography, utilizing lectins specific for O-linked oligosaccharides (Artocarpus integrifolia and Glycine max). Competitive (c) ELISAs, using either crude or lectin-purified antigen, were devised for the detection of antibodies to PRV in sera, and were capable of monitoring sero-conversion by day 14 post-infection. Furthermore, a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 98% (crude lysate antigen) or 96% (lectin-purified antigen) was found for a panel of 80 swine sera, using the cELISA, as compared to a serum neutralization (SN) test. These studies demonstrated that recombinant PRV gp50 protein shows promise as a cELISA antigen, for serodetection of PRV. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:9342453

  8. A serological study of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome using a virus neutralization test and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyojin; Kim, Eun-Ju; Cho, In-Soo; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, Jeong Soo; Lee, Ji Youn

    2017-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is caused by the SFTS virus (SFTSV). The SFTSV appears to have a wide host range, as SFTSV-positive ticks have been isolated from both farm animals and wild rodents. Therefore, it is important to monitor SFTSV-positive animals to prevent the transmission of SFTSV from animals to humans. Previously, we developed a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) to detect SFTSV-specific antibodies from field animals and compared the cELISA results to those from an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). In this study, cELISA results were compared to and evaluated against the results from both an IFA and a virus neutralization (VN) test of 193 bovine serum samples (including two bovine positive control sera) and 70 horse serum samples. The consistency (98.9%) between cELISA and VN results was higher than that (97.4%) between cELISA and IFA for the bovine serum samples. Similarly, for the horse serum samples, the consistency (88.6%) between cELISA and VN results was higher than that (84.3%) between the cELISA and IFA. These findings indicate that our newly developed cELISA can be used for surveillance or epidemiological studies of SFTSV in animals. PMID:27297411

  9. Development and validation of an indirect competitive enzyme linked-immunosorbent assay for the determination of potentially allergenic sesame (Sesamum indicum) in food.

    PubMed

    Husain, Fatima Tazeen; Bretbacher, Ines Elisabeth; Nemes, Albert; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2010-02-10

    This study was designed to develop an indirect competitive enzyme linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect traces of sesame in food. Antibodies against sesame were prepared by immunizing a hen with a protein extract of white, peeled sesame. The ELISA did not show any cross-reactivity with 12 of 13 food ingredients tested, only for chocolate was a low cross-reactivity of 0.7% observed. To eliminate matrix effects, sesame protein standard solutions were prepared by diluting the sesame extract with blank food matrix (1:20 diluted with PBS). Recovery of sesame protein in food samples (crisp toasts, snacks, and rolls) spiked with different sesame protein concentrations ranged from 85% to 120%, with the exception of multigrain crisp toast, resulting in too high recoveries (117%-160%) and whole grain bread, yielding too low recoveries (70%-85%). In crisp bread, cracker, cereals, and snacks the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 5 microg of sesame protein/g of food, in fresh breads and rolls, the LOD was 11 microg of sesame protein/g of food.

  10. Comparison between conventional indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) and simplified icELISA for small molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Gang; Yi, Guo-Xiang; Wang, Bao-Min; Deng, Ai-Xing; Nan, Tie-Gui; Li, Zhao-Hu; Li, Qing X

    2006-06-30

    A simplified indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) for small molecules was established by modifying the procedure of conventional icELISA. The key change was that the analyte, antibody, and enzyme-labeled second antibody in the simplified icELISA were added in one step, whereas in conventional icELISA these reagents were added in two separate steps. Three small chemicals, namely zeatin riboside, glycyrrhetinic acid, and chlorimuron-ethyl, were used to verify the new assay format and compare the results obtained from conventional icELISA and simplified icELISA. The results indicated that, under optimized conditions, the new assay offered several advantages over the conventional icELISA, which are simpler, less time consuming and higher sensitive although it requires more amount of reagents. The assay sensitivity (IC50) was improved for 1.2-1.4-fold. Four licorice roots samples were analyzed by conventional icELISA and simplified icELISA, as well as liquid chromatography (LC). There was no significant difference among the content obtained from the three methods for each sample. The correlation between data obtained from conventional icELISA and simplified icELISA analyses was 0.9888. The results suggest that the simplified icELISA be useful for high throughput screening of small molecules.

  11. Development and validation of a sensitive monoclonal antibody-based indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the determination of the aflatoxin M1 levels in milk.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dapeng; Yang, Bijia; Pan, Yuanhu; Wang, Yulian; Chen, Dongmei; Liu, Zhenli; Yang, Wenxiang; Tao, Yanfei; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-04-01

    A sensitive monoclonal antibody (mAb) against aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) was generated to quickly monitor the AFM1 residues in milk. Then, a mAb-based indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ic-ELISA) was established that utilizes simple sample preparation and clean-up methods. The obtained 3D8 mAb, which is an IgG1 isotype mAb, displayed an IC50 value of 64.75 ng L(-1) for AFM1 and did not exhibit measurable cross-reactivity with other aflatoxins and antibiotics. The decision limit (CCα, α = 1%), detection capability (CCβ, β = 5%), and LOQ value for the AFM1 matrix calibration method were 24 ng L(-1), 27.5 ng L(-1), and 35 ng L(-1) in the milk matrices, respectively. The AFM1 recovery ranged from 85.3% to 107.6%. The CVs were less than 13.8%. A positive correlation (r > 0.99) was observed between the ic-ELISA and HPLC-MS/MS results. This ic-ELISA would be a useful tool for screening the AFM1 residues in milk.

  12. A novel in situ-formed hydrogel wound dressing by the photocross-linking of a chitosan derivative.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guozhong; Ling, Kai; Zhao, Peng; Xu, Zhenghong; Deng, Cao; Zheng, Hua; Huang, Jin; Chen, Jinghua

    2010-01-01

    In situ photopolymerized hydrogel dressings create minimally invasive methods that offer advantages over the use of preformed dressings such as conformability in any wound bed, convenience of application, and improved patient compliance and comfort. Here, we report an in situ-formed hydrogel membrane through ultraviolet cross-linking of a photocross-linkable azidobenzoic hydroxypropyl chitosan aqueous solution. The hydrogel membrane is stable, flexible, and transparent, with a bulk network structure of smoothness, integrity, and density. Fluid uptake ability, water vapor transmission rate, water retention, and bioadhesion of the thus resulted hydrogel membranes (0.1 mm thick) were determined to range from 97.0-96.3%, 2,934-2,561 g/m(2)/day, 36.69-22.94% (after 6 days), and 4.8-12.3 N/cm(2), respectively. These data indicate that the hydrogel membrane can maintain a long period of moist environment over the wound bed for enhancing reepithelialization. Specifically, these properties of the hydrogel membrane were controllable to some extent, by adjusting the substitution degree of the photoreactive azide groups. The hydrogel membrane also exhibited barrier function, as it was impermeable to bacteria but permeable to oxygen. In vitro experiments using two major skin cell types (dermal fibroblast and epidermal keratinocyte) revealed the hydrogel membrane have neither cytotoxicity nor an effect on cell proliferation. Taken together, the in situ photocross-linked azidobenzoic hydroxypropyl chitosan hydrogel membrane has a great potential in the management of wound healing and skin burn.

  13. Competition among hospitals.

    PubMed

    Noether, M

    1988-09-01

    The traditional view of hospital competition has posited that hospitals compete primarily along 'quality' dimensions, in the form of fancy equipment to attract admitting physicians and pleasant surroundings to entice patients. Price competition among hospitals is thought to be non-existent. This paper estimates the effects of various hospital market characteristics on hospital prices and expenses in an attempt to determine the form of hospital competition. The results suggest that both price and quality competition are greater in markets that are less concentrated, although the net effect of the two on prices is insignificant. It appears, therefore, that, despite important distortions, hospital markets are not immune to standard competitive forces.

  14. The myotubular myopathies: differential diagnosis of the X linked recessive, autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive forms and present state of DNA studies.

    PubMed Central

    Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Clarke, A; Samson, F; Fardeau, M; Dubowitz, V; Moser, H; Grimm, T; Barohn, R J; Barth, P G

    1995-01-01

    Clinical differences exist between the three forms of myotubular myopathy. They differ regarding age at onset, severity of the disease, and prognosis, and also regarding some of the clinical characteristics. The autosomal dominant form mostly has a later onset and milder course than the X linked form, and the autosomal recessive form is intermediate in both respects. These differences are, however, quantitative rather than qualitative. Muscle biopsy studies of family members are useful in some cases, and immunohistochemical staining of desmin and vimentin may help distinguish between the X linked and autosomal forms. Determining the mode of inheritance and prognosis in individual families, especially those with a single male patient, still poses a problem. Current molecular genetic results indicate that the gene for the X linked form is located in the proximal Xq28 region. Further molecular genetic studies are needed to examine the existence of genetic heterogeneity in myotubular myopathy and to facilitate diagnosis. Images PMID:8544184

  15. Connexin channels in Schwann cells and the development of the X-linked form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Ressot, C; Bruzzone, R

    2000-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease comprises a group of genetically heterogenous disorders of the peripheral nervous system. The X-linked form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMTX) is associated with mutations in the gene encoding the gap junction protein connexin32 (Cx32), which is expressed in Schwann cells. Immunocytochemical evidence suggests that Cx32 is localized to the incisures of Schmidt-Lanterman and the paranodes of myelinating Schwann cells, where it appears to form reflexive gap junctions. It is currently thought that this cytoplasmic continuity provides a much shorter diffusion pathway for the transport of ions, metabolites and second messenger molecules through intracellular channels between the adaxonal and peri-nuclear regions of Schwann cells, across the myelin sheath. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of connexins in Schwann cells and focuses on the lessons for channel function and disease pathophysiology derived from the functional analysis of Cx32 mutations. One of the most intriguing aspects emerging from this work is that several mutations retain functional competence, although the mutated channels exhibit altered gating properties. This suggests that partial and/or selective disruption of the radial communication pathway formed by Cx32 is sufficient to cause a functional deficit and lead to the development of CMTX. The next challenge will be to define, at the molecular level, the sequence of events involved in the disease process. The presence of a group of functional mutations should help understand the cellular basis of CMTX, by allowing the identification of the specific molecules that need to be exchanged through Cx32 channels, but are excluded from the mutated ones.

  16. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for nitroimidazoles in edible animal tissues and feeds.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Pan, Yuanhu; Wang, Yulian; Chen, Dongmei; Liu, Zhenli; Zhou, Qi; Feng, Liang; Peng, Dapeng; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-02-20

    The misuse of nitroimidazoles (NDZs) can lead to NDZs residues in edible animal tissues, which would be harmful to consumer health. To quickly monitor NDZs residues in edible animal tissues and feed, a monoclonal antibody-based indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ic-ELISA) with a simple sample preparation method and clean-up was developed in the present study. At first, a broad-specificity monoclonal antibody, 1D5, against NDZs has been produced, which the IC50 values of the NDZs, dimetridazole, ipronidazole, ronidazole hydroxydimetridazole, and hydroxyipronidazole, were 4.79μgL(-1), 0.47μgL(-1), 5.97μgL(-1), 23.48μgL(-1), and 15.03μgL(-1), respectively. The limit of detection of the method for the NDZ matrix calibration ranged from 4.2μgkg(-1) to 50.3μgkg(-1) in the feed matrices and from 0.11μgkg(-1) to 4.11μgkg(-1) in the edible animal tissues matrices. The recoveries of the NDZs were in the range of 75.5-111.8%. The CVs were less than 14.4%. A good correlation (r=0.9905) between the ELISA and HPLC-MS results of the tissues demonstrated the reliability of the developed ic-ELISA, which makes it a useful tool for screening of NDZs in animal edible tissue and feed.

  17. Development and validation of an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the screening of tylosin and tilmicosin in muscle, liver, milk, honey and eggs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dapeng; Ye, Shengqiang; Wang, Yulian; Chen, Dongmei; Tao, Yanfei; Huang, Lingli; Liu, Zhenli; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Xiaoqing; Yuan, Zonghui

    2012-01-11

    Incorrect use of tylosin and tilmicosin could result in allergy and select resistance. To monitor the illegal use of these antibiotics in animals, a monoclonal-based indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ic-ELISA) has been established. Several haptens were synthesized and conjugated to carrier protein. Female Balb/c mice were inoculated with the four different conjugates to produce monoclonal antibodies according to the schemes of immunization. Aftercell fusion and culture several times, nine hybridoma cell lines were isolated. Only one, 3C4 that has isotype IgG2a, was selected for detailed study. The cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibody 3C4 to tylosin and tilmicosin was 100% and 51% respectively. The standard curves based on the tylosin and tilmicosin matrix calibration ranged from 2.5 to 40 μg L(-1), with an IC(50) value of 6.1 μg L(-1) and 12.1 μg L(-1), respectively. The limits of detection of the ic-ELISA ranged from 5.1 μg kg(-1) to 13.8 μg kg(-1) in edible animal tissues. The recoveries were 74.1% to 120.7% with less than 18.6% of the coefficient of variation when tylosin and tilmicosin were spiked in various biological matrices with the concentrations of 25.0-200.0 μg kg(-1). Good correlations between the results of the ic-ELISA and high performance liquid chromatography were observed in the incurred tissues. These results suggest that the ic-ELISA is a sensitive, accurate and low-cost method that would be a useful tool for the screening of the residues of tylosin and tilmicosin in muscle, liver, milk, honey and eggs.

  18. Investigation of sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever virus infection in ruminants by PCR and competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Shen, D T; O'Toole, D; Knowles, D P; Gorham, J R; Crawford, T B

    1995-08-01

    Development of control measures for the gammaherpesviral disease of cattle known as sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) has been hampered by a lack of accurate diagnostic tests either for the causative virus or for antibody against that virus. A recently developed competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CI-ELISA) for the detection of antibody to malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) virus (MCFV) in ruminants based on a monoclonal antibody to a widely conserved epitope of MCFV (H. Li, D. T. Shen, D. P. Knowles, J. R. Gorham, and T. B. Crawford, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:1674-1679, 1994) and a PCR assay based on previously reported primers (S. I. F. Baxter, I. Pow, A. Bridgen, and H. W. Reid, Arch. Virol. 132:145-159, 1993) were used to detect anti-MCFV antibody and SA-MCFV DNA in sheep and other ruminants. The PCR amplified a specific 238-bp SA-MCFV genomic DNA fragment from peripheral blood lymphocytes of adult sheep and other ruminants with clinical MCF. Of 144 samples from randomly selected healthy adult sheep, 143 (99%) were positive by PCR and 136 (94%) were positive by CI-ELISA. The agreement between the two assays exceeded 95%. Of nine samples collected from cattle and deer with clinical MCF of apparent sheep origin, seven were CI-ELISA positive and all 9 were PCR positive. Among 59 serum samples from presuckling lambs, none contained antibody detectable by CI-ELISA. After suckling, maternal anti-MCFV antibody was detectable for about 10 +/- 3 weeks. Although all colostrum and milk samples from infected ewes were strongly PCR positive, the appearance of detectable SA-MCFV DNA in lambs was correlated generally with antibody patterns, which suggests that the natural infection event in sheep may not occur during the perinatal period but occurs sometime later in life.

  19. Development of a Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detection of Antibodies against the 3B Protein of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Parida, Satya; Salo, Tim; Hole, Kate; Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most highly contagious and economically devastating diseases, and it severely constrains the international trade of animals. Vaccination against FMD is a key element in the control of FMD. However, vaccination of susceptible animals raises critical issues, such as the differentiation of infected animals from vaccinated animals. The current study developed a reliable and rapid test to detect antibodies against the conserved, nonstructural proteins (NSPs) of the FMD virus (FMDV) to distinguish infected animals from vaccinated animals. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the FMDV NSP 3B was produced. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) for FMDV/NSP antibody detection was developed using a recombinant 3ABC protein as the antigen and the 3B-specific MAb. Sera collected from naive, FMDV experimentally infected, vaccinated carrier, and noncarrier animals were tested using the 3B cELISA. The diagnostic specificity was 99.4% for naive animals (cattle, pigs, and sheep) and 99.7% for vaccinated noncarrier animals. The diagnostic sensitivity was 100% for experimentally inoculated animals and 64% for vaccinated carrier animals. The performance of this 3B cELISA was compared to that of four commercial ELISA kits using a panel of serum samples established by the World Reference Laboratory for FMD at The Pirbright Institute, Pirbright, United Kingdom. The diagnostic sensitivity of the 3B cELISA for the panel of FMDV/NSP-positive bovine serum samples was 94%, which was comparable to or better than that of the commercially available NSP antibody detection kits. This 3B cELISA is a simple, reliable test to detect antibodies against FMDV nonstructural proteins. PMID:25651918

  20. Monoclonal antibodies suitable for incorporation into a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of specific antibodies to Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona.

    PubMed

    Surujballi, O; Elmgren, C

    2000-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were produced by fusing Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c and ND4 mice that were immunized with killed Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona whole cells. Thirty hybridomas which produced antibodies (of the IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, or IgG3 isotype) that bound to epitopes on the serovar pomona whole cell antigen were identified by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Twenty-eight of these 30 mAbs cross-reacted in the indirect ELISA with at least one whole cell antigen prepared from 12 other pathogenic Leptospira serovars, and/or with whole cell antigen from the non-pathogenic Leptospira biflexa serovar patoc. The two serovar pomona-specific mAbs, which were designated M897 and M898, were obtained from the ND4 mouse and were both of the IgG1 isotype. In competitive ELISAs, M897 and M898 were inhibited from binding to the pomona antigen by bovine sera with anti-serovar pomona microscopic agglutination test (MAT) titres ranging from 100 to 6400. No significant inhibition was observed with pomona MAT-negative sera or with sera from animals experimentally infected with serovars canicola, copenhageni, grippotyphosa, hardjo type hardjobovis or sejroe. The epitopes recognized by M897 and M898 were both highly susceptible to sodium meta-periodate oxidation, indicating a carbohydrate composition. Neither of these mAbs reacted in immunoblots with the separated components of the serovar pomona whole cell antigen.

  1. Cultural and Gender Differences in the Implications of Competition for Early Adolescent Friendship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Barry H.; Woodburn, Sharon; del Pilar Soteras del Toro, Maria; Udvari, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    Harry Stack Sullivan maintained that competition between friends in early adolescence would generally destroy their friendship. Working with early adolescent samples in Canada, Costa Rica, and Cuba, we found that hypercompetitiveness--a form of competition involving the need to prove one?s own superiority--was linked with conflict between friends,…

  2. Cultural and Gender Differences in the Implications of Competition for Early Adolescent Friendship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Barry H.; Woodburn, Sharon; del Pilar Soteras del Toro, Maria; Udvari, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    Harry Stack Sullivan maintained that competition between friends in early adolescence would generally destroy their friendship. Working with early adolescent samples in Canada, Costa Rica, and Cuba, we found that hypercompetitiveness--a form of competition involving the need to prove one?s own superiority--was linked with conflict between friends,…

  3. Evolution of leaf-form in land plants linked to atmospheric CO2 decline in the Late Palaeozoic era.

    PubMed

    Beerling, D J; Osborne, C P; Chaloner, W G

    2001-03-15

    The widespread appearance of megaphyll leaves, with their branched veins and planate form, did not occur until the close of the Devonian period at about 360 Myr ago. This happened about 40 Myr after simple leafless vascular plants first colonized the land in the Late Silurian/Early Devonian, but the reason for the slow emergence of this common feature of present-day plants is presently unresolved. Here we show, in a series of quantitative analyses using fossil leaf characters and biophysical principles, that the delay was causally linked with a 90% drop in atmospheric pCO2 during the Late Palaeozoic era. In contrast to simulations for a typical Early Devonian land plant, possessing few stomata on leafless stems, those for a planate leaf with the same stomatal characteristics indicate that it would have suffered lethal overheating, because of greater interception of solar energy and low transpiration. When planate leaves first appeared in the Late Devonian and subsequently diversified in the Carboniferous period, they possessed substantially higher stomatal densities. This observation is consistent with the effects of the pCO2 on stomatal development and suggests that the evolution of planate leaves could only have occurred after an increase in stomatal density, allowing higher transpiration rates that were sufficient to maintain cool and viable leaf temperatures.

  4. Inter-Specific Competition, but Not Different Soil Microbial Communities, Affects N Chemical Forms Uptake by Competing Graminoids of Upland Grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Roldán, Eduardo; Bardgett, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence that plants differ in their ability to take up both organic (ON) and inorganic (IN) forms of nitrogen (N) has increased ecologists’ interest on resource-based plant competition. However, whether plant uptake of IN and ON responds to differences in soil microbial community composition and/or functioning has not yet been explored, despite soil microbes playing a key role in N cycling. Here, we report results from a competition experiment testing the hypothesis that soil microbial communities differing in metabolic activity as a result of long-term differences to grazing exposure could modify N uptake of Eriophorum vaginatum L. and Nardus stricta L. These graminoids co-occur on nutrient-poor, mountain grasslands where E. vaginatum decreases and N. stricta increases in response to long-term grazing. We inoculated sterilised soil with soil microbial communities from continuously grazed and ungrazed grasslands and planted soils with both E. vaginatum and N. stricta, and then tracked uptake of isotopically labelled NH4+ (IN) and glycine (ON) into plant tissues. The metabolically different microbial communities had no effect on N uptake by either of the graminoids, which might suggest functional equivalence of soil microbes in their impacts on plant N uptake. Consistent with its dominance in soils with greater concentrations of ON relative to IN in the soluble N pool, Eriophorum vaginatum took up more glycine than N. stricta. Nardus stricta reduced the glycine proportion taken up by E. vaginatum, thus increasing niche overlap in N usage between these species. Local abundances of these species in mountain grasslands are principally controlled by grazing and soil moisture, although our results suggest that changes in the relative availability of ON to IN can also play a role. Our results also suggest that coexistence of these species in mountain grasslands is likely based on non-equilibrium mechanisms such as disturbance and/or soil heterogeneity. PMID:23236451

  5. Inter-specific competition, but not different soil microbial communities, affects N chemical forms uptake by competing graminoids of upland grasslands.

    PubMed

    Medina-Roldán, Eduardo; Bardgett, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    Evidence that plants differ in their ability to take up both organic (ON) and inorganic (IN) forms of nitrogen (N) has increased ecologists' interest on resource-based plant competition. However, whether plant uptake of IN and ON responds to differences in soil microbial community composition and/or functioning has not yet been explored, despite soil microbes playing a key role in N cycling. Here, we report results from a competition experiment testing the hypothesis that soil microbial communities differing in metabolic activity as a result of long-term differences to grazing exposure could modify N uptake of Eriophorum vaginatum L. and Nardus stricta L. These graminoids co-occur on nutrient-poor, mountain grasslands where E. vaginatum decreases and N. stricta increases in response to long-term grazing. We inoculated sterilised soil with soil microbial communities from continuously grazed and ungrazed grasslands and planted soils with both E. vaginatum and N. stricta, and then tracked uptake of isotopically labelled NH(4) (+) (IN) and glycine (ON) into plant tissues. The metabolically different microbial communities had no effect on N uptake by either of the graminoids, which might suggest functional equivalence of soil microbes in their impacts on plant N uptake. Consistent with its dominance in soils with greater concentrations of ON relative to IN in the soluble N pool, Eriophorum vaginatum took up more glycine than N. stricta. Nardus stricta reduced the glycine proportion taken up by E. vaginatum, thus increasing niche overlap in N usage between these species. Local abundances of these species in mountain grasslands are principally controlled by grazing and soil moisture, although our results suggest that changes in the relative availability of ON to IN can also play a role. Our results also suggest that coexistence of these species in mountain grasslands is likely based on non-equilibrium mechanisms such as disturbance and/or soil heterogeneity.

  6. Chemical and structural characterization of interstrand cross-links formed between abasic sites and adenine residues in duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Price, Nathan E.; Catalano, Michael J.; Liu, Shuo; Wang, Yinsheng; Gates, Kent S.

    2015-01-01

    A new type of interstrand DNA–DNA cross-link between abasic (Ap) sites and 2′-deoxyadenosine (dA) residues was recently reported, but the chemical structure and properties of this lesion were not rigorously established. Here we characterized the nucleoside cross-link remnant released by enzymatic digestion of duplex DNA containing the dA-Ap cross-link. A synthetic standard was prepared for the putative nucleoside cross-link remnant 6 in which the anomeric carbon of the 2-deoxyribose residue was connected to the exocyclic N6-amino group of dA. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis showed that the synthetic material 6 matched the authentic cross-link remnant released by enzymatic digestion of cross-linked DNA. These findings establish the chemical structure of the dA-Ap cross-link released from duplex DNA and may provide methods for the detection of this lesion in cellular DNA. Both the nucleoside cross-link remnant 6 and the cross-link in duplex DNA were quite stable at pH 7 and 37°C, suggesting that the dA-Ap cross-link could be a persistent lesion with the potential to block the action of various DNA processing enzymes. PMID:25779045

  7. Adaptations of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the detection of antibodies to influenza a virus in horse sera for use in wild aquatic birds.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M A; Skerratt, L F; Garland, S; Burgess, G W; Selleck, P

    2012-12-01

    We applied a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibodies for influenza A in equine sera to their detection in sera from wild aquatic birds. Suboptimal results were obtained for the optical density (OD) of the monoclonal antibody (MAb) control and reproducibility between duplicate analyses in the initial assessment. It was therefore necessary to modify the assay to deliver increased reliability and reproducibility while maintaining adequate sensitivity. We optimized reagent concentrations to obtain optimal OD values (close to 2) for the monoclonal antibody control and used 2, 2'-Azino-bis: 3-Benzthiazoline-6-Sulphonic Acid as an alternative chromogen to potentially reduce variability in duplicate analyses. The original assay was compared with the optimized versions, with and without post coating, for the detection of avian influenza viral antibodies in 240 sera obtained from wild plumed whistling ducks. A separate analytical sensitivity study on diluted positive field sera of plumed whistling ducks and a test of antigen stability after post coating were also performed. Some quantitative differences were detected between the original and modified assays. The original assay recorded higher percentage inhibition results which were potentially indicative of increased sensitivity. However, when reagent concentrations were increased in the original assay to the same levels as used in the modified versions, there were no quantitative differences for practical purposes. The original assay produced a median (OD) value of 0.81 for the (MAb) controls that is at the limit of acceptability. By contrast, the modified assays always produced acceptable optical density values for MAb controls. Our overall results indicated the modified assays were potentially more reliable (OD values close to 2), and of adequate sensitivity compared to the original assay in the detection of avian influenza viral antibodies in wild bird sera. Although further

  8. Anxiety symptoms as a moderator of the reciprocal links between forms of aggression and peer victimization in middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Cooley, John L; Frazer, Andrew L; Fite, Paula J; Brown, Shaquanna; DiPierro, Moneika

    2017-02-20

    The current short-term longitudinal study evaluated whether anxiety symptoms moderated the bidirectional associations between forms (i.e., physical and relational) of aggression and peer victimization over a 1-year period during middle childhood. Participants were 228 predominantly Caucasian children (50.4% boys; M = 8.32 years, SD = .95 years) in the second through fourth grades and their homeroom teachers. Children completed a self-report measure of anxiety symptoms at Time 1. Peer victimization was assessed using self-reports at Time 1 and approximately 1 year later (Time 2), and teachers provided ratings of children's aggressive behavior at both time points. A series of cross-lagged path analysis models indicated that high (+1 SD) initial levels of anxiety symptoms exacerbated the prospective link from Time 1 relational aggression to Time 2 peer victimization; conversely, when initial levels of anxiety symptoms were low (-1 SD), relational aggression predicted lower levels of subsequent peer victimization. Time 1 peer victimization was also found to predict lower levels of Time 2 physical aggression when initial levels of anxiety symptoms were low, and Time 1 anxiety symptoms were uniquely related to higher levels of relational aggression over a 1-year period. Regions of significance were calculated to further decompose significant interactions, which did not differ according to gender. Study findings are discussed within a social information processing theoretical framework, and directions for future research and implications for practice are reviewed. Specifically, co-occurring anxiety symptoms may need to be addressed in interventions for both aggression and peer victimization during middle childhood.

  9. Rapid immunoblot and kinase assay tests for a syndromal form of X linked mental retardation: Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    PubMed

    Merienne, K; Jacquot, S; Trivier, E; Pannetier, S; Rossi, A; Scott, C; Schinzel, A; Castellan, C; Kress, W; Hanauer, A

    1998-11-01

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is a syndromal form of X linked mental retardation, in which some associated facial, hand, and skeletal abnormalities are diagnostic features. Accurate diagnosis, critical for genetic counselling, is often difficult, especially in early childhood. We have recently shown that Coffin-Lowry syndrome is caused by mutations in the gene encoding RSK2, a growth factor regulated protein kinase. RSK2 mutations are very heterogeneous and most of them lead to premature termination of translation or to loss of phosphotransferase activity or both. In the present study, we have evaluated immunoblot and RSK2 kinase assays as a rapid and simple diagnostic test for CLS, using cultured lymphoblastoid or fibroblast cell lines. Western blot analysis failed to detect RSK2 in six patients, suggesting the presence of truncated proteins in these patients. This conclusion was confirmed in four patients, in whom the causative mutations, all leading to premature termination of translation, were identified. Of four patients showing a normal amount of RSK2 protein on western blot and tested for RSK2 phosphotransferase activity, one had a dramatically impaired activity. Analysis of the RSK2 cDNA sequence in this patient showed a mutation of a putative phosphorylation site that would be critical for RSK2 activity. Preliminary results show that, at least, the western blot protocol can be successfully applied to lymphocyte protein extracts prepared directly from blood samples. These assays promise to become important diagnostic tools for CLS, particularly with regard to very young patients with no family history of the condition.

  10. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2011-07-01

    International tests on competences, such as TIMSS or PISA, and knowledge of young students have revealed low average scores in many countries, often unexpectedly. One effective measure to increase the average standard of a population is to bring the last third of the group to a higher level. Therefore, many nations put some effort into this activity. This brings the danger that not enough attention is paid to students at the other end, those who are talented. Indeed, it is a very difficult task for a teacher to support the less able and at the same time challenge the gifted students, to lead them to the limits of their abilities and provide for a smooth transition to university study. Physics competitions have been proven to fulfil these last demands to a large degree, and therefore are an important additional and, to some extent, complementary tool for the promotion of talented students. This third special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics contains three papers, each dealing with a different form of science contest. The first continues the series of presentations of tasks performed at the International Young Physicists' Tournament, which was held in Vienna in 2011. First place went to the team from Singapore, and they have put their investigation on vertical oscillations of coupled magnets into written form (not required by the tournament, where an oral presentation and a defence and discussion are the central aspects). Their paper shows how rich in physics this problem is, and what level of solutions high-school students can already achieve. Sadly, those responsible for the organization of last year's International Physics Olympiad did not provide us with a report on this competition. This is unfortunate, since the Olympiad in Zagreb was very successful and, in particular, the experimental tasks were creative and demanding. Very similar to the aims and the execution of the Physics Olympiad is the International Olympiad on Astronomy

  11. Novel Protein Substrates of the Phospho-Form Modification System in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Their Connection to O-Linked Protein Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Anonsen, Jan Haug; Egge-Jacobsen, Wolfgang; Aas, Finn Erik; Børud, Bente; Koomey, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The zwitterionic phospho-form moieties phosphoethanolamine (PE) and phosphocholine (PC) are important components of bacterial membranes and cell surfaces. The major type IV pilus subunit protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, PilE, undergoes posttranslational modifications with these moieties via the activity of the pilin phospho-form transferase PptA. A number of observations relating to colocalization of phospho-form and O-linked glycan attachment sites in PilE suggested that these modifications might be either functionally or mechanistically linked or interact directly or indirectly. Moreover, it was unknown whether the phenomenon of phospho-form modification was solely dedicated to PilE or if other neisserial protein targets might exist. In light of these concerns, we screened for evidence of phospho-form modification on other membrane glycoproteins targeted by the broad-spectrum O-linked glycosylation system. In this way, two periplasmic lipoproteins, NGO1043 and NGO1237, were identified as substrates for PE addition. As seen previously for PilE, sites of PE modifications were clustered with those of glycan attachment. In the case of NGO1043, evidence for at least six serine phospho-form attachment sites was found, and further analyses revealed that at least two of these serines were also attachment sites for glycan. Finally, mutations altering glycosylation status led to the presence of pptA-dependent PC modifications on both proteins. Together, these results reinforce the associations established in PilE and provide evidence for dynamic interplay between phospho-form modification and O-linked glycosylation. The observations also suggest that phospho-form modifications likely contribute biologically at both intracellular and extracellular levels. PMID:22083701

  12. Exploring Alternative Test Form Linking Designs with Modified Equating Sample Size and Anchor Test Length. Research Report. ETS RR-13-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Qian, Jiahe; Lee, Yi-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of reduced equating sample size and shortened anchor test length on item response theory (IRT)-based linking and equating results. Data from two independent operational forms of a large-scale testing program were used to establish the baseline results for evaluating the results from…

  13. Rotational echo double resonance detection of cross-links formed in mussel byssus under high-flow stress.

    PubMed

    McDowell, L M; Burzio, L A; Waite, J H; Schaefer, J

    1999-07-16

    13C2H rotational echo double resonance NMR has been used to provide the first evidence for the formation of quinone-derived cross-links in mussel byssal plaques. Labeling of byssus was achieved by allowing mussels to filter feed from seawater containing L-[phenol-4-13C]tyrosine and L-[ring-d4]tyrosine for 2 days. Plaques and threads were harvested from two groups of mussels over a period of 28 days. One group was maintained in stationary water while the other was exposed to turbulent flow at 20 cm/s. The flow-stressed byssal plaques exhibited significantly enhanced levels of 5, 5'-di-dihydroxyphenylalanine cross-links. The average concentration of di-dihydroxyphenylalanine cross-links in byssal plaques is 1 per 1800 total protein amino acid residues.

  14. Possible link of the V-shaped phase diagram to the glass-forming ability and fragility in a water-salt mixture.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Mika; Tanaka, Hajime

    2011-03-25

    Water is a very poor glass former, but its link to the thermodynamic and kinetic anomalies remains elusive. We experimentally reveal that the glass-forming ability and fragility of a water-salt mixture are closely related to its equilibrium phase diagram. We propose that frustration between local and global orderings controls both the glass-forming ability and the fragility. Relying on the same role of salt and pressure, which commonly break tetrahedral order, we apply this idea to pure water under pressure. This scenario not only explains unusual behavior of water-type liquids such as water, Si, and Ge but also provides a mechanism for a link between the equilibrium phase diagram, glass-forming ability, and fragility for various materials including oxides, chalcogenides, and metallic glasses.

  15. Competitive Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Pierrette; Hiller, Christine A.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the evolution of competitive intelligence since 1994, including terminology and definitions and analytical techniques. Addresses the issue of ethics; explores how information technology supports the competitive intelligence process; and discusses education and training opportunities for competitive intelligence, including core competencies…

  16. Discovery of a gall-forming midge, Asphondylia pilosa Kieffer (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), on Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius (L.) Link) Fabaceae)

    Treesearch

    George P. Markin; Carol J. Horning

    2010-01-01

    Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius: (L.) Link), a native European perennial shrub, was introduced to the U.S. before the turn of the century as an ornamental for its bright yellow, pea-like flower. The plant found the western U.S. maritime zone to be an ideal habitat, thus it soon escaped from cultivation, and became an invasive weed now widely distributed from northern...

  17. Trapping of a cross-link formed by a major purine adduct of a metabolite of the carcinogen N-nitrosomorpholine by inorganic and biological reductants.

    PubMed

    Koissi, Niangoran; Fishbein, James C

    2013-05-20

    3-Hydroperoxy-N-nitrosomorpholine in buffered aqueous media in the presence of calf thymus DNA was treated with a phosphine reductant to generate the transient α-hydroxynitrosamine and subsequent diazonium ion that alkylated the DNA, as previously reported. Subsequent addition of hydride donors, for 30 min, followed by acid hydrolysis of the mixture allowed detection and quantification of 6-(2-{2-[(9H-purin-6-yl)amino]ethoxy}ethoxy)-9H-purin-2-amine, the reduced cross-link formed from deposition, via the diazonium ion, of a 3-oxapentanal fragment on O(6)-Gua, and condensation with N(6)-Ade, presumably in the vicinity. Decreasing the temperature of the reaction mixtures and decreasing the pH modestly increased the yields of the trapped cross-link. Among three borohydride reductants, NaNCBH3 is superior, being ∼4 times more effective on a molar basis, as opposed to a hydride equivalent basis, than NaBH4 or Na(AcO)3BH. For trapping with NaNCBH3, it is deduced that the reaction likely occurs with the iminium ion that is in protonic equilibrium with its conjugate base imine. In an experiment in which the hydroperoxide was decomposed and NaNCBH3 was introduced after various periods of time, the amount of cross-link was observed to increase, nearly linearly, by ∼4-fold over 1 week. These data indicate that there are a minimum of two populations of cross-links, one that forms rapidly, in minutes, and another that grows in with time, over days. Reduced nicotinamide cofactors and ascorbate are observed to effect reduction (over 3 days) of the cross-links, confirming the possibility that otherwise reversible cross-links might be immortalized under biological conditions.

  18. Maternal Competition in Women.

    PubMed

    Linney, Catherine; Korologou-Linden, Laurel; Campbell, Anne

    2017-03-01

    We examined maternal competition, an unexplored form of competition between women. Given women's high investment in offspring and mothers' key role in shaping their reproductive, social, and cultural success as adults, we might expect to see maternal competition between women as well as mate competition. Predictions about the effect of maternal characteristics (age, relationship status, educational background, number of children, investment in the mothering role) and child variables (age, sex) were drawn from evolutionary theory and sociological research. Mothers of primary school children (in two samples: N = 210 and 169) completed a series of questionnaires. A novel nine-item measure of maternal competitive behavior (MCQ) and two subscales assessing Covert (MCQ-C) and Face-to-Face (MCQ-FF) forms of competition were developed using confirmatory factor analysis. Competitiveness (MCQ score) was predicted by maternal investment, single motherhood, fewer children, and (marginally) child's older age. The effect of single motherhood (but not other predictors) was partially mediated by greater maternal investment. In response to a scenario of their child underperforming relative to their peers, a mother's competitive distress was a positive function of the importance she ascribed to their success and her estimation of her child's ability. Her competitive distress was highly correlated with the distress she attributed to a female friend, hinting at bidirectional dyadic effects. Qualitative responses indicated that nonspecific bragging and boasting about academic achievements were the most common irritants. Although 40% of women were angered or annoyed by such comments, less than 5% endorsed a direct hostile response. Instead, competitive mothers were conversationally shunned and rejected as friends. We suggest that the interdependence of mothers based on reciprocal childcare has supported a culture of egalitarianism that is violated by explicit competitiveness.

  19. A model linking immediate serial recall, the Hebb repetition effect and the learning of phonological word forms

    PubMed Central

    Page, M. P. A.; Norris, D.

    2009-01-01

    We briefly review the considerable evidence for a common ordering mechanism underlying both immediate serial recall (ISR) tasks (e.g. digit span, non-word repetition) and the learning of phonological word forms. In addition, we discuss how recent work on the Hebb repetition effect is consistent with the idea that learning in this task is itself a laboratory analogue of the sequence-learning component of phonological word-form learning. In this light, we present a unifying modelling framework that seeks to account for ISR and Hebb repetition effects, while being extensible to word-form learning. Because word-form learning is performed in the service of later word recognition, our modelling framework also subsumes a mechanism for word recognition from continuous speech. Simulations of a computational implementation of the modelling framework are presented and are shown to be in accordance with data from the Hebb repetition paradigm. PMID:19933143

  20. Accurate Modelling of a Flexible-Link Planar Mechanism by Means of a Linearized Model in the State-Space Form for Design of a Vibration Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GASPARETTO, A.

    2001-02-01

    Vibration control of flexible link mechanisms with more than two flexible links is still an open question, mainly because defining a model that is adequate for the designing of a controller is a rather difficult task. In this work, an accurate dynamic non-linear model of a flexible-link planar mechanism is presented. In order to bring the system into a form that is suitable for the design of a vibration controller, the model is then linearized about an operating point, so as to achieve a linear model of the system in the standard state-space form of system theory. The linear model obtained, which is valid for whatever planar mechanism with any number of flexible link, is then applied to a four-bar planar linkage. Extensive simulation is carried out, aimed at comparing the system dynamic evolution, both in the open- and in the closed-loop case, using the non-linear model and the linearized one. The results prove that the error made by using the linearized system instead of the non-linear one is small. Therefore, it can be concluded that the model proposed in this work can constitute an effective basis for designing and testing many types of vibration controllers for flexible planar mechanisms.

  1. Signal transducing molecules and glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-linked proteins form a caveolin-rich insoluble complex in MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    GPI-linked protein molecules become Triton-insoluble during polarized sorting to the apical cell surface of epithelial cells. These insoluble complexes, enriched in cholesterol, glycolipids, and GPI-linked proteins, have been isolated by flotation on sucrose density gradients and are thought to contain the putative GPI-sorting machinery. As the cellular origin and molecular protein components of this complex remain unknown, we have begun to characterize these low-density insoluble complexes isolated from MDCK cells. We find that these complexes, which represent 0.4-0.8% of the plasma membrane, ultrastructurally resemble caveolae and are over 150-fold enriched in a model GPI-anchored protein and caveolin, a caveolar marker protein. However, they exclude many other plasma membrane associated molecules and organelle-specific marker enzymes, suggesting that they represent microdomains of the plasma membrane. In addition to caveolin, these insoluble complexes contain a subset of hydrophobic plasma membrane proteins and cytoplasmically-oriented signaling molecules, including: (a) GTP- binding proteins--both small and heterotrimeric; (b) annex II--an apical calcium-regulated phospholipid binding protein with a demonstrated role in exocytic fusion events; (c) c-Yes--an apically localized member of the Src family of non-receptor type protein- tyrosine kinases; and (d) an unidentified serine-kinase activity. As we demonstrate that caveolin is both a transmembrane molecule and a major phospho-acceptor component of these complexes, we propose that caveolin could function as a transmembrane adaptor molecule that couples luminal GPI-linked proteins with cytoplasmically oriented signaling molecules during GPI-membrane trafficking or GPI-mediated signal transduction events. In addition, our results have implications for understanding v- Src transformation and the actions of cholera and pertussis toxins on hetero-trimeric G proteins. PMID:8349730

  2. 48 CFR 1353.206 - Competition requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Competition requirements... FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 1353.206 Competition requirements. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1306.303-70, use Form CD-492, Justification for Other Than Full and Open Competition, to support the requirements...

  3. 48 CFR 1353.206 - Competition requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Competition requirements... FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 1353.206 Competition requirements. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1306.303-70, use Form CD-492, Justification for Other Than Full and Open Competition, to support the...

  4. 48 CFR 1353.206 - Competition requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Competition requirements... FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 1353.206 Competition requirements. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1306.303-70, use Form CD-492, Justification for Other Than Full and Open Competition, to support the...

  5. 48 CFR 1353.206 - Competition requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Competition requirements... FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 1353.206 Competition requirements. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1306.303-70, use Form CD-492, Justification for Other Than Full and Open Competition, to support the...

  6. 48 CFR 1353.206 - Competition requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Competition requirements... FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 1353.206 Competition requirements. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1306.303-70, use Form CD-492, Justification for Other Than Full and Open Competition, to support the...

  7. Design and synthesis of immunoconjugates and development of competition inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CIEIA) for the detection of O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (sarin): an organophosphorous toxicant.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Manisha; Merwyn, S; Ghorpade, R; Agarwal, G S; Rao, M K; Rai, G P; Kaushik, M P

    2011-09-15

    Three haptens of the organophosphorus (OP) toxicant 'sarin' having different spacer arm were designed and synthesized. Haptens were conjugated with BSA (bovine serum albumin) and ovalbumin (OVA) for raising antibody and coating antigen. High antibody titer with higher specificity was obtained from 4-(4-(isopropoxy(methyl)phosphoryloxy)phenylamino)-4-oxobutanoic acid (hapten B) having reasonable long spacer arm. For the standard curve, an IC(50) (inhibitory concentration) of free antigen was found to be 0.415 μg mL(-1) on the basis of indirect competitive ELISA. The study revealed that heterology in competition inhibition enzyme immunoassay (CIEIA) produced remarkable improvement in the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Under the optimized conditions, the quantitative working range was found to be 0.19-1.56 μg mL(-1) with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.05 μg mL(-1). The antibodies showed negligible cross reactivity (CR) with other OP toxicants and pesticides, which makes the assay suitable for the selective detection of sarin.

  8. Job-Linked Literacy: Innovative Strategies at Work. Part II. Meeting the Challenge of Change: Basic Skills for a Competitive Workforce. A Work in America Policy Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosow, Jerome M.; Zager, Robert

    This volume, Interim Report No. 2 in a 3-year study, establishes the need for job-linked literacy programs that respond to technological and organizational change, outlines the character of successful programs, and demonstrates these programs' potential value. The volume is divided into two parts: report and case studies. The introduction to the…

  9. Job-Linked Literacy: Innovative Strategies at Work. Part II. Meeting the Challenge of Change: Basic Skills for a Competitive Workforce. A Work in America Policy Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosow, Jerome M.; Zager, Robert

    This volume, Interim Report No. 2 in a 3-year study, establishes the need for job-linked literacy programs that respond to technological and organizational change, outlines the character of successful programs, and demonstrates these programs' potential value. The volume is divided into two parts: report and case studies. The introduction to the…

  10. Trapping of a Cross-link Formed by a Major Purine Adduct of a Metabolite of the Carcinogen N-Nitrosomorpholine by Inorganic and Biological Reductants

    PubMed Central

    Koissi, Niangoran; Fishbein, James C.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroperoxy-N-nitrosomorpholine in buffered aqueous media in the presence of calf thymus DNA was treated with a phosphine reductant to generate the transient α-hydroxynitrosamine and subsequent diazonium ion that alkylated the DNA, as previously reported. Subsequent addition of hydride donors, for 30 min, followed by acid hydrolysis of the mixture allowed detection and quantification of 6-(2-(2-((9H-purin-6-yl)amino)ethoxy)ethoxy)-9H-purin-2-amine, the reduced cross-link formed from deposition, via the diazonium ion, of a 3-oxa-pentanal fragment on O6-Gua, and condensation with N6-Ade, presumably in the vicinity. Decreasing temperature of the reactions and decreasing pH modestly increased the yields of trapped crosslink. Among three borohydride reductants, NaNCBH3 is superior, being ∼4 times more effective on a molar basis, as opposed to a hydride equivalent basis, than NaBH4 or Na(AcO)3BH. For trapping with NaNCBH3, it is deduced that the reaction likely occurs with the iminium ion that is in protonic equilibrium with its conjugate base imine. In an experiment in which the hydroperoxide was decomposed and NaNCBH3 was introduced after various times, the amount of cross-link was observed to increase, nearly linearly, by about four-fold over one week. These data indicate that there are a minimum of 2 populations of cross-links, one that forms rapidly, in minutes, and another that grows in with time, over days. Reduced nicotinamide co-factors and ascorbate are observed to effect reduction (over 3 days) of the cross-links confirming the possibility that otherwise reversible cross-links might be immortalized under biological conditions. PMID:23587048

  11. Isolation of insoluble secretory product from bovine thyroid: extracellular storage of thyroglobulin in covalently cross-linked form

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular storage of thyroglobulin (TG) is an important prerequisite for maintaining constant levels of thyroid hormones in vertebrates. Storage of large amounts is made possible by compactation of TG in the follicle lumen with concentrations of at least 100-400 mg/ml. We recently observed that the luminal content from bovine thyroids can be isolated in an intact state and be separated from soluble TG. For this purpose, bovine thyroid tissue was homogenized and subjected to various steps of purification. This procedure resulted in a pellet of single globules measuring 20-120 microns in diameter. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a unique cobblestone-like surface pattern of isolated globules, showing in detail the impressions of the apical plasma membranes of thyrocytes which had formerly surrounded the luminal content before tissue homogenization. Isolated thyroid globules were rapidly digested by trypsin but extremely resistant to various protein solubilization procedures. Homogenization of isolated globules resulted in the release of approximately 3% of total protein, showing that only a minor proportion of TG was loosely incorporated in thyroid globules whereas approximately 22% appeared to be interconnected with the globule matrix by disulfide bridges. Analysis by SDS-gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting confirmed that the protein released by this procedure consisted of TG. The vast majority (approximately 75%) of the globule matrix protein was found to be covalently cross- linked by non-disulfide bonds. TG in isolated globules was highly iodinated (approximately 55 iodine atoms per 12-S TG subunit) suggesting that the covalent nondisulfide cross-linking occurs in part during the iodination of TG and that this process involves the formation of intermolecular dityrosine bridges. Mechanisms must exist which solubilize or disperse the insoluble luminal content prior to endocytosis of TG. PMID:1512290

  12. Selective activation of mitomycin A by thiols to form DNA cross-links and monoadducts: biochemical basis for the modulation of mitomycin cytotoxicity by the quinone redox potential.

    PubMed

    Paz, M M; Das, A; Palom, Y; He, Q Y; Tomasz, M

    2001-08-16

    Mitomycin A (MA) but not mitomycin C (MC) cross-linked linearized (32)P-pBR322 DNA in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT) or glutathione (GSH), as shown by a sensitive DNA cross-link assay. Incubation of calf-thymus DNA with MA and DTT or mercaptoethanol (MER) resulted in the formation of MA-DNA adducts, which were isolated from nuclease digests of the drug-DNA complexes by HPLC. The adducts were characterized by their UV absorption spectra, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS), and facile conversion from 7-methoxy- to 7-amino-substituted mitosene type adducts upon 10% NH(4)OH treatment, which were identical with known adducts of MC. Both DNA interstrand and intrastrand cross-link adducts, linking two deoxyguanosine residues at N(2), as well as several deoxyguanosine-N(2) monoadducts of MA, were identified. No DNA adducts were formed with MC under the same conditions. A specificity of DNA cross-link formation for the CpG sequence was observed using 12-mer synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as substrates and as DNA sequence models, in analogy to the known CpG sequence specificity of MC-induced DNA cross-links. MA is known to be more cytotoxic by 2-3 orders of magnitude than MC, and this property correlates with redox potentials of MA (-0.19 V) and MA analogues that are higher than those of MC (-0.40 V) and its analogues. It is suggested that the biochemical basis for the higher cytotoxic potency of MA is MA's propensity to be reductively activated by cellular thiols while MC is resistant to thiol activation. This distinction is probably derived from the large difference between the quinone redox potentials of the two drugs.

  13. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides form physically cross-linked, two-dimensional gels in the presence of divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Moritz; Schneck, Emanuel; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-08-14

    We established a bacterial membrane model with monolayers of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS Re and LPS Ra) and quantified their viscoelastic properties by using an interfacial stress rheometer coupled to a Langmuir film balance. LPS Re monolayers exhibited purely viscous behaviour in the absence of calcium ions, while the same monolayers underwent a viscous-to-elastic transition upon compression in the presence of Ca(2+). Our results demonstrated for the first time that LPSs in bacterial outer membranes can form two-dimensional elastic networks in the presence of Ca(2+). Different from LPS Re monolayers, the LPS Ra monolayers showed a very similar rheological transition both in the presence and absence of Ca(2+), suggesting that longer saccharide chains can form 2D physical gels even in the absence of Ca(2+). By exposure of the monolayers to the antimicrobial peptide protamine, we could directly monitor the differences in resistance of bacterial membranes according to the presence of calcium.

  14. A role for cortical crosstalk in the binding problem: stimulus-driven correlations that link color, form, and motion.

    PubMed

    Billock, Vincent A; Tsou, Brian H

    2004-01-01

    The putative independence of cortical mechanisms for color, form, and motion raises the binding problem-how is neural activity coordinated to create unified and correctly segmented percepts? Binding could be guided by stimulus-driven correlations between mechanisms, but the nature of these correlations is largely unexplored and no one has (intentionally) studied effects on binding if this joint information is compromised. Here, we develop a theoretical framework which: (1) describes crosstalk-generated correlations between cortical mechanisms for color, achromatic form, and motion, which arise from retinogeniculate encoding; (2) shows how these correlations can facilitate synchronization, segmentation, and binding; (3) provides a basis for understanding perceptual oddities and binding failures that occur for equiluminant and stabilized images. These ideas can be tested by measuring both perceptual events and neural activity while achromatic border contrast or stabilized image velocity is manipulated.

  15. Novel approach to activity evaluation for release-active forms of anti-interferon-gamma antibodies based on enzyme-linked immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Gavrilova, Elena S; Bobrovnik, Sergey A; Sherriff, Gordon; Myslivets, Andrey A; Tarasov, Sergey A; Epstein, Oleg I

    2014-01-01

    Selection of a suitable assay to measure the activity of drug agents based on release-active forms of anti-interferon-gamma antibodies (RA forms of Abs) is an important step forward in the investigation of such agents. In this study, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was utilized to examine the effect of RA forms of Abs specific for human interferon gamma on the interaction between monoclonal anti-interferon gamma antibodies and recombinant human interferon gamma. The experimental data and the results obtained by using relevant mathematical analysis showed that such RA forms of Abs are able to modulate the monoclonal antibody interaction with both soluble and immobilized (to the assay plate well) interferon gamma. These data demonstrated the importance of using relatively low concentrations of both soluble and plate-immobilized interferon gamma to detect the effects of RA forms of Abs to interferon gamma on the binding of monoclonal antibodies to interferon gamma. It has been suggested that the observed influence of RA forms of Abs on 'antibody-antigen' interaction could be used to detect and analyze the activity of drugs containing RA forms of Abs.

  16. A CENSUS OF OXYGEN IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: AN EMPIRICAL MODEL LINKING METALLICITIES, STAR FORMATION RATES, AND OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Dima, G. I.; Kewley, L. J.; Erb, D. K.; Dave, R.

    2012-09-20

    In this contribution, we present the first census of oxygen in star-forming galaxies in the local universe. We examine three samples of galaxies with metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs) at z = 0.07, 0.8, and 2.26, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and DEEP2 survey. We infer the total mass of oxygen produced and mass of oxygen found in the gas-phase from our local SDSS sample. The star formation history is determined by requiring that galaxies evolve along the relation between stellar mass and SFR observed in our three samples. We show that the observed relation between stellar mass and SFR for our three samples is consistent with other samples in the literature. The mass-metallicity relation is well established for our three samples, and from this we empirically determine the chemical evolution of star-forming galaxies. Thus, we are able to simultaneously constrain the SFRs and metallicities of galaxies over cosmic time, allowing us to estimate the mass of oxygen locked up in stars. Combining this work with independent measurements reported in the literature, we conclude that the loss of oxygen from the interstellar medium of local star-forming galaxies is likely to be a ubiquitous process with the oxygen mass loss scaling (almost) linearly with stellar mass. We estimate the total baryonic mass loss and argue that only a small fraction of the baryons inferred from cosmological observations accrete onto galaxies.

  17. Use of Activated Carbon in Packaging to Attenuate Formaldehyde-Induced and Formic Acid-Induced Degradation and Reduce Gelatin Cross-Linking in Solid Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Stephen T; Zelesky, Todd C; Chen, Raymond; Likar, Michael D; MacDonald, Bruce C; Hawkins, Joel M; Carroll, Sophia C; Johnson, Gail M; Space, J Sean; Jensen, James F; DeMatteo, Vincent A

    2016-07-01

    Formaldehyde and formic acid are reactive impurities found in commonly used excipients and can be responsible for limiting drug product shelf-life. Described here is the use of activated carbon in drug product packaging to attenuate formaldehyde-induced and formic acid-induced drug degradation in tablets and cross-linking in hard gelatin capsules. Several pharmaceutical products with known or potential vulnerabilities to formaldehyde-induced or formic acid-induced degradation or gelatin cross-linking were subjected to accelerated stability challenges in the presence and absence of activated carbon. The effects of time and storage conditions were determined. For all of the products studied, activated carbon attenuated drug degradation or gelatin cross-linking. This novel use of activated carbon in pharmaceutical packaging may be useful for enhancing the chemical stability of drug products or the dissolution stability of gelatin-containing dosage forms and may allow for the 1) extension of a drug product's shelf-life when the limiting attribute is a degradation product induced by a reactive impurity, 2) marketing of a drug product in hotter and more humid climatic zones than currently supported without the use of activated carbon, and 3) enhanced dissolution stability of products that are vulnerable to gelatin cross-linking.

  18. Loss-of-function mutations in the X-linked biglycan gene cause a severe syndromic form of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    PubMed Central

    Meester, Josephina A.N.; Vandeweyer, Geert; Pintelon, Isabel; Lammens, Martin; Van Hoorick, Lana; De Belder, Simon; Waitzman, Kathryn; Young, Luciana; Markham, Larry W.; Vogt, Julie; Richer, Julie; Beauchesne, Luc M.; Unger, Sheila; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Prsa, Milan; Dhillon, Rami; Reyniers, Edwin; Dietz, Harry C.; Wuyts, Wim; Mortier, Geert; Verstraeten, Aline; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) is typically inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, but rare X-linked families have been described. So far the only known X-linked gene is FLNA, which is associated with the periventricular nodular heterotopia type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, mutations in this gene only explain a small number of X-linked TAAD families. Methods We performed targeted resequencing of 368 candidate genes in a cohort of 11 molecularly unexplained Marfan probands. Subsequently, Sanger sequencing of BGN in 360 male and 155 female molecularly unexplained TAAD probands was carried out. Results We found five individuals with loss-of-function mutations in BGN, encoding the small leucine-rich proteoglycan biglycan. The clinical phenotype is characterized by early onset aortic aneurysm and dissection. Other recurrent findings include hypertelorism, pectus deformity, joint hypermobility, contractures and mild skeletal dysplasia. Fluorescent stainings revealed an increase in TGF-β signalling, evidenced by an increase in nuclear pSMAD2 in aortic wall. Our results are in line with prior reports demonstrating that Bgn-deficient male BALB/cA mice die from aortic rupture. Conclusion In conclusion, BGN gene defects in humans cause an X-linked syndromic form of severe TAAD, associated with preservation of elastic fibres and increased TGF-β signalling. PMID:27632686

  19. Pink1 forms a multiprotein complex with Miro and Milton, linking Pink1 function to mitochondrial trafficking.

    PubMed

    Weihofen, Andreas; Thomas, Kelly Jean; Ostaszewski, Beth L; Cookson, Mark R; Selkoe, Dennis J

    2009-03-10

    Recessive mutations in Pink1 lead to a selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that is characteristic of Parkinson disease. Pink1 is a kinase that is targeted in part to mitochondria, and loss of Pink1 function can alter mitochondrial morphology and dynamics, thus supporting a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and Parkinson disease etiology. Here, we report the unbiased identification and confirmation of a mitochondrial multiprotein complex that contains Pink1, the atypical GTPase Miro, and the adaptor protein Milton. Our screen also identified an interaction between Pink1 and Mitofilin. Based on previously established functions for Miro and Milton in the trafficking of mitochondria along microtubules, we postulate here a role for Pink1 in mitochondrial trafficking. Using subcellular fractionation, we show that the overexpression of Miro and Milton, both of which are known to reside at the outer mitochondrial membrane, increases the mitochondrial Pink1 pool, suggesting a function of Pink1 at the outer membrane. Further, we document that Pink1 expressed without a mitochondrial targeting sequence can still be targeted to a mitochondria-enriched subcellular fraction via Miro and Milton. The latter finding is important for the interpretation of a previously reported protective effect of Pink1 expressed without a mitochondrial targeting sequence. Finally, we find that Miro and Milton expression suppresses altered mitochondrial morphology induced by loss of Pink1 function in cell culture. Our findings suggest that Pink1 functions in the trafficking of mitochondria in cells.

  20. Genetic forms of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI): Vasopressin receptor defect (X-linked) and aquaporin defect (autosomal recessive and dominant).

    PubMed

    Bichet, Daniel G; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2016-03-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), which can be inherited or acquired, is characterized by an inability to concentrate urine despite normal or elevated plasma concentrations of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Polyuria with hyposthenuria and polydipsia are the cardinal clinical manifestations of the disease. About 90% of patients with congenital NDI are males with X-linked NDI who have mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor (AVPR2) gene encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor. In less than 10% of the families studied, congenital NDI has an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with mutations in the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) gene. When studied in vitro, most AVPR2 and AQP2 mutations lead to proteins trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum and are unable to reach the plasma membrane. Prior knowledge of AVPR2 or AQP2 mutations in NDI families and perinatal mutation testing is of direct clinical value and can avert the physical and mental retardation associated with repeated episodes of dehydration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Virus-based Photo-Responsive Nanowires Formed By Linking Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Murali; Abbineni, Gopal; Nimmo, Susan L.; Cao, Binrui; Mao, Chuanbin

    2013-05-01

    Owing to the genetic flexibility and error-free bulk production, bio-nanostructures such as filamentous phage showed great potential in materials synthesis, however, their photo-responsive behaviour is neither explored nor unveiled. Here we show M13 phage genetically engineered with tyrosine residues precisely fused to the major coat protein is converted into a photo-responsive organic nanowire by a site-specific chemical reaction with an aromatic amine to form an azo dye structure on the surface. The resulting azo-M13-phage nanowire exhibits reversible photo-responsive properties due to the photo-switchable cis-trans isomerisation of the azo unit formed on the phage. This result shows that site-specific display of a peptide on bio-nanostructures through site-directed genetic mutagenesis can be translated into site-directed chemical reaction for developing advanced materials. The photo-responsive properties of the azo-M13-phage nanowires may open the door for the development of light controllable smart devices for use in non-linear optics, holography data storage, molecular antenna, and actuators.

  2. Distributed piezoelectric vibration control for a flexible-link manipulator based on an observer in the form of partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongjun; Liu, Jinkun

    2016-02-01

    This paper mainly focuses on designing a distributed observer-based controller for a flexible-link manipulator bonded with piezoelectric actuators. The dynamic model of the link can be taken as an Euler-Bernoulli beam and takes on the form of partial differential equations (PDEs). The proposed observer, which is proven exponentially stable, has the ability to estimate infinite dimensional states, and only the boundary practical measurement values are needed. A novel distributed observer-based controller is subsequently developed to make the joint position track a desired trajectory and rapidly regulate vibrations on the whole beam, which is the main contribution of the paper. The closed-loop system is guaranteed exponentially stable by theoretical analysis and its favorable performance is demonstrated by numerical simulations.

  3. Mapping of a possible X-linked form of familial developmental dysphasia (FDD) in a single large pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, P.W.; Doody, R.S.; Epstein, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    Children diagnosed with developmental dysphasia develop speech very late without exhibiting sensory or motor dysfunction, and when they do begin to speak their grammar is abnormal. A large three-generation British pedigree was recently identified in which 16 out of 30 members were diagnosed as dysphasic. Assuming a dominant mode of inheritance with homogeneous phenotypic expression and complete penetrance among affected members, we showed by simulation analysis that this pedigree has the power to detect linkage to marker loci with an average maximum LOD score of 3.67 at {theta}=0.1. Given the absence of male-to-male transmission and a ratio of female to male affecteds (10/6) in this pedigree within the expected range for an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance, we decided to begin a genome-wide linkage analysis with microsatellite markers on the human X chromosome. Fifteen individuals (10 affected) from three generations were genotyped with 35 polymorphic STS`s (Research Genetics) which were approximately uniformly distributed along the X chromosome. Two-point linkage was assessed using the MLINK and ILINK programs from the LINKAGE package. Markers DXS1223, DXS987, DXS996 and DXS1060 on Xp22 showed consistent linkage to the disease locus with a maximum LOD score of 0.86 at a distance of 22 cM for DXS1060. If further analysis with additional markers and additional family members confirms X-linkage, such a localization would provide support for Lehrke`s hypothesis for X-linkage of major intellectual traits including verbal functioning.

  4. Persistent Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from mussel production facilities form more biofilm but are not linked to specific genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jessika; Cruz, Cristina D; Tempelaars, Marcel; Abee, Tjakko; van Vliet, Arnoud H M; Fletcher, Graham C; Hedderley, Duncan; Palmer, Jon; Flint, Steve

    2017-09-01

    Contamination of mussels with the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes occurs during processing in the factory, possibly from bacteria persisting in the factory's indoor and outdoor areas. In this study, a selection of persistent (n=8) and sporadic (n=8) L. monocytogenes isolates associated with mussel-processing premises in New Zealand were investigated for their phenotypic and genomic characteristics. To identify traits that favour or contribute to bacterial persistence, biofilm formation, heat resistance, motility and recovery from dry surfaces were compared between persistent and sporadic isolates. All isolates exhibited low biofilm formation at 20°C, however, at 30°C persistent isolates showed significantly higher biofilm formation after 48h using cell enumeration and near significant difference using the crystal violet assay. All 16 isolates were motile at 20°C and 30°C and motility was fractionally higher for sporadic isolates, but no significant difference was observed. We found persistent isolates tend to exhibit greater recovery after incubation on dry surfaces compared to sporadic isolates. Two of the three most heat-resistant isolates were persistent, while four of five isolates lacking heat resistance were sporadic isolates. Comparison of genome sequences of persistent and sporadic isolates showed that there was no overall clustering of persistent or sporadic isolates, and that differences in prophages and plasmids were not associated with persistence. Our results suggest a link between persistence and biofilm formation, which is most likely multifactorial, combining subtle phenotypic and genotypic differences between isolates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Friendly competition.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2006-01-01

    Competition that is characterized by rules, often informal, agreed among mutually accepted participants, and that gives the competitors a special, advantageous status with others is called friendly competition. Dentists have engaged in it deeply and it is good for the profession. Friendly competition offers the advantages of spillover of commonly useful information and technologies, stimulation of innovation, a united and convenient face to customers and suppliers, and standards that promote growth. Friendly competition increases the size of the pie, regardless of market share. Paradoxically, this is even true for the little guy in the shadow of the giant. If carried to extremes, unfriendly competition leads to destroying competitors, the confusion of multiple rules, and encouragement of disruptive change.

  6. Exome Sequencing Reveals De Novo WDR45 Mutations Causing a Phenotypically Distinct, X-Linked Dominant Form of NBIA

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Tobias B.; Hogarth, Penelope; Kruer, Michael C.; Gregory, Allison; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Sanford, Lynn; Meyer, Esther; Kara, Eleanna; Cuno, Stephan M.; Harik, Sami I.; Dandu, Vasuki H.; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna; Dunaway, Todd; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Skinner, Steven; Frucht, Steven; Hanspal, Era; Schrander-Stumpel, Connie; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril; Garavaglia, Barbara; Bhatia, Kailash; Hardy, John; Strom, Tim M.; Boddaert, Nathalie; Houlden, Henry H.; Kurian, Manju A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Hayflick, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by abnormal iron deposition in the basal ganglia. We report that de novo mutations in WDR45, a gene located at Xp11.23 and encoding a beta-propeller scaffold protein with a putative role in autophagy, cause a distinctive NBIA phenotype. The clinical features include early-onset global developmental delay and further neurological deterioration (parkinsonism, dystonia, and dementia developing by early adulthood). Brain MRI revealed evidence of iron deposition in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus. Males and females are phenotypically similar, an observation that might be explained by somatic mosaicism in surviving males and germline or somatic mutations in females, as well as skewing of X chromosome inactivation. This clinically recognizable disorder is among the more common forms of NBIA, and we suggest that it be named accordingly as beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:23176820

  7. Co-operation, Competition and Crowding: A Discrete Framework Linking Allee Kinetics, Nonlinear Diffusion, Shocks and Sharp-Fronted Travelling Waves.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Stuart T; Baker, Ruth E; McElwain, D L Sean; Simpson, Matthew J

    2017-02-14

    Invasion processes are ubiquitous throughout cell biology and ecology. During invasion, individuals can become isolated from the bulk population and behave differently. We present a discrete, exclusion-based description of the birth, death and movement of individuals. The model distinguishes between individuals that are part of, or are isolated from, the bulk population by imposing different rates of birth, death and movement. This enables the simulation of various co-operative or competitive mechanisms, where there is either a positive or negative benefit associated with being part of the bulk population, respectively. The mean-field approximation of the discrete process gives rise to 22 different classes of partial differential equation, which can include Allee kinetics and nonlinear diffusion. Here we examine the ability of each class of partial differential equation to support travelling wave solutions and interpret the long time behaviour in terms of the individual-level parameters. For the first time we show that the strong Allee effect and nonlinear diffusion can result in shock-fronted travelling waves. We also demonstrate how differences in group and individual motility rates can influence the persistence of a population and provide conditions for the successful invasion of a population.

  8. Co-operation, Competition and Crowding: A Discrete Framework Linking Allee Kinetics, Nonlinear Diffusion, Shocks and Sharp-Fronted Travelling Waves

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Stuart T.; Baker, Ruth E.; McElwain, D. L. Sean; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Invasion processes are ubiquitous throughout cell biology and ecology. During invasion, individuals can become isolated from the bulk population and behave differently. We present a discrete, exclusion-based description of the birth, death and movement of individuals. The model distinguishes between individuals that are part of, or are isolated from, the bulk population by imposing different rates of birth, death and movement. This enables the simulation of various co-operative or competitive mechanisms, where there is either a positive or negative benefit associated with being part of the bulk population, respectively. The mean-field approximation of the discrete process gives rise to 22 different classes of partial differential equation, which can include Allee kinetics and nonlinear diffusion. Here we examine the ability of each class of partial differential equation to support travelling wave solutions and interpret the long time behaviour in terms of the individual-level parameters. For the first time we show that the strong Allee effect and nonlinear diffusion can result in shock-fronted travelling waves. We also demonstrate how differences in group and individual motility rates can influence the persistence of a population and provide conditions for the successful invasion of a population. PMID:28195135

  9. Co-operation, Competition and Crowding: A Discrete Framework Linking Allee Kinetics, Nonlinear Diffusion, Shocks and Sharp-Fronted Travelling Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Stuart T.; Baker, Ruth E.; McElwain, D. L. Sean; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2017-02-01

    Invasion processes are ubiquitous throughout cell biology and ecology. During invasion, individuals can become isolated from the bulk population and behave differently. We present a discrete, exclusion-based description of the birth, death and movement of individuals. The model distinguishes between individuals that are part of, or are isolated from, the bulk population by imposing different rates of birth, death and movement. This enables the simulation of various co-operative or competitive mechanisms, where there is either a positive or negative benefit associated with being part of the bulk population, respectively. The mean-field approximation of the discrete process gives rise to 22 different classes of partial differential equation, which can include Allee kinetics and nonlinear diffusion. Here we examine the ability of each class of partial differential equation to support travelling wave solutions and interpret the long time behaviour in terms of the individual-level parameters. For the first time we show that the strong Allee effect and nonlinear diffusion can result in shock-fronted travelling waves. We also demonstrate how differences in group and individual motility rates can influence the persistence of a population and provide conditions for the successful invasion of a population.

  10. Linking pre- and proto-stellar objects in the intermediate-/high-mass star forming region IRAS 05345+3157

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontani, F.; Zhang, Q.; Caselli, P.; Bourke, T. L.

    2009-05-01

    Context: To better understand the initial conditions of the high-mass star formation process, it is crucial to study at high angular resolution the morphology, the kinematics, and the interactions of the coldest condensations associated with intermediate-/high-mass star forming regions. Aims: This paper studies the cold condensations in the intermediate-/high-mass proto-cluster IRAS 05345+3157, focusing on the interaction with the other objects in the cluster. Methods: We performed millimeter high-angular resolution observations, both in the continuum and several molecular lines, with the PdBI and the SMA. In a recent paper, we published part of these data. The main finding of that work was the detection of two cold and dense gaseous condensations, called N and S (masses ˜ 2 and ˜ 9 M_⊙), characterised by high values of deuterium fractionation (˜ 0.1 in both cores) obtained from the column density ratio N(N{2}D+)/N(N{2}H+). In this paper, we present a full report of the observations, and a complete analysis of the data obtained. Results: The millimeter maps reveal the presence of 3 cores inside the interferometer primary beam, called C1-a, C1-b and C2. None of them are associated with cores N and S. C1-b is very likely associated with a newly formed early-B ZAMS star embedded inside a hot core, while C1-a is more likely associated with a class 0 intermediate-mass protostar. The nature of C2 is unclear. Both C1-a and C1-b are good candidates as driving sources of a powerful 12CO outflow, which strongly interacts with N, as demonstrated by the velocity gradient of the gas along this condensation. The N{2}H+ linewidths are between ˜ 1 and 2 km s-1 in the region where the continuum cores are located, and smaller (˜ 0.5-1.5 km s-1) towards N and S, indicating that the gas in the deuterated condensations is more quiescent than that associated with the continuum sources. This is consistent with the fact that they are still in the pre-stellar phase and hence the

  11. Quality assurance/quality control of foot and mouth disease solid phase competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay--Part I. Quality assurance: development of secondary and working standards.

    PubMed

    Goris, N; De Clercq, K

    2005-12-01

    International movement in animals and animal products has urged organisations like the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) to draw up guidelines to regulate and facilitate trade between Member Countries. However, as the global market continues to grow, further standardisation and harmonisation of antibody detection assays for infectious diseases are needed, especially regarding the development and use of reference materials. For OIE notifiable diseases for which primary or international reference standards are available or under development, National or Regional Reference Laboratories are encouraged to establish their own secondary and/or working standards. This paper describes the development of standards for the foot and mouth disease (FMD) solid phase competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using positive serum obtained from calves vaccinated against the FMD virus. The procedure outlined in this manuscript can easily be extrapolated to similar serological assays and should lead to further international harmonisation of assays and test results.

  12. Quality assurance/quality control of foot and mouth disease solid phase competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay--Part II. Quality control: comparison of two charting methods to monitor assay performance.

    PubMed

    Goris, N; De Clercq, K

    2005-12-01

    Diagnostic laboratories are increasingly required to meet stringent quality standards, and validated assays are needed to achieve formal accreditation. Validation of test methods is often considered to be finalised when the assay parameters and characteristics have been established. However, like any process, diagnostic assays are subject to random variation resulting in shifts in the mean test values. Continuous monitoring of assays using control charts will alert the interpreter of changes in performance. For this purpose, several charting methods have been developed and implemented. This paper compares the Shewhart and the exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts with respect to the day to day monitoring of internal quality control samples for the foot and mouth disease solid phase competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Both chart types are equally sensitive to shifts, but the EWMA method seems to provide the best balance between false rejection and false acceptance.

  13. The Effects of Scleral Collagen Cross-Linking Using Glyceraldehyde on the Progression of Form-Deprived Myopia in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yanhua; Cheng, Zhaohui; Liu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Guo, Haixia

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of collagen cross-linking using glyceraldehyde on the biomechanical properties of the sclera and the axial elongation of form-deprived myopia in the guinea pig. Thirty-six guinea pigs were randomly assigned to four groups: FDM (form-deprived myopia); FDMG (form-deprived myopia treated with glyceraldehyde); FDMS (form-deprived myopia treated with 0.9% isotonic sodium chloride); and normal control (free of form-deprivation). FDM was achieved in the right eye using a latex facemask. The right eye in FDMG was treated with a posterior subtenon injection of 0.5 M glyceraldehyde; 0.9% isotonic sodium chloride was administered to the right eye in FDMS group using the same method. Axial length, refraction, and stress-strain of the sclera were measured at scheduled time points. The treated eyes were also examined histologically by light microscopy. It was found that glyceraldehyde treatment significantly increased the stiffness of the sclera in the FDM eyes and abnormalities have not been observed in the retina and optic nerve of the treated eyes. But the development of myopia was not affected. PMID:27504195

  14. The Effects of Scleral Collagen Cross-Linking Using Glyceraldehyde on the Progression of Form-Deprived Myopia in Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yanhua; Cheng, Zhaohui; Liu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Guo, Haixia; Han, Quanhong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of collagen cross-linking using glyceraldehyde on the biomechanical properties of the sclera and the axial elongation of form-deprived myopia in the guinea pig. Thirty-six guinea pigs were randomly assigned to four groups: FDM (form-deprived myopia); FDMG (form-deprived myopia treated with glyceraldehyde); FDMS (form-deprived myopia treated with 0.9% isotonic sodium chloride); and normal control (free of form-deprivation). FDM was achieved in the right eye using a latex facemask. The right eye in FDMG was treated with a posterior subtenon injection of 0.5 M glyceraldehyde; 0.9% isotonic sodium chloride was administered to the right eye in FDMS group using the same method. Axial length, refraction, and stress-strain of the sclera were measured at scheduled time points. The treated eyes were also examined histologically by light microscopy. It was found that glyceraldehyde treatment significantly increased the stiffness of the sclera in the FDM eyes and abnormalities have not been observed in the retina and optic nerve of the treated eyes. But the development of myopia was not affected.

  15. Star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster: the link between molecular gas, atomic gas, and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Corbelli, E.; Bizzocchi, L.; Giovanardi, C.; Bomans, D.; Coelho, B.; De Looze, I.; Gonçalves, T. S.; Hunt, L. K.; Leonardo, E.; Madden, S.; Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Pappalardo, C.; Riguccini, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) observations of a sample of 20 star-forming dwarfs selected from the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, with oxygen abundances ranging from 12 + log (O / H) ~ 8.1 to 8.8. CO emission is observed in ten galaxies and marginally detected in another one. CO fluxes correlate with the FIR 250 μm emission, and the dwarfs follow the same linear relation that holds for more massive spiral galaxies extended to a wider dynamical range. We compare different methods to estimate H2 molecular masses, namely a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor and one dependent on H-band luminosity. The molecular-to-stellar mass ratio remains nearly constant at stellar masses ≲ 109 M⊙, contrary to the atomic hydrogen fraction, MHI/M∗, which increases inversely with M∗. The flattening of the MH2/M∗ ratio at low stellar masses does not seem to be related to the effects of the cluster environment because it occurs for both Hi-deficient and Hi-normal dwarfs. The molecular-to-atomic ratio is more tightly correlated with stellar surface density than metallicity, confirming that the interstellar gas pressure plays a key role in determining the balance between the two gaseous components of the interstellar medium. Virgo dwarfs follow the same linear trend between molecular gas mass and star formation rate as more massive spirals, but gas depletion timescales, τdep, are not constant and range between 100 Myr and 6 Gyr. The interaction with the Virgo cluster environment is removing the atomic gas and dust components of the dwarfs, but the molecular gas appears to be less affected at the current stage of evolution within the cluster. However, the correlation between Hi deficiency and the molecular gas depletion time suggests that the lack of gas replenishment from the outer regions of the disc is lowering the star formation activity. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30-m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany

  16. Interspecific Competition Underlying Mutualistic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeng, Seong Eun; Lee, Jae Woo; Lee, Deok-Sun

    2012-03-01

    Multiple classes of interactions may exist affecting one another in a given system. For the mutualistic networks of plants and pollinating animals, it has been known that the degree distribution is broad but often deviates from power-law form more significantly for plants than animals. To illuminate the origin of such asymmetry, we study a model network in which links are assigned under generalized preferential-selection rules between two groups of nodes and find the sensitive dependence of the resulting connectivity pattern on the model parameters. The nonlinearity of preferential selection can come from interspecific interactions among animals and among plants. The model-based analysis of real-world mutualistic networks suggests that a new animal determines its partners not only by their abundance but also under the competition with existing animal species, which leads to the stretched-exponential degree distributions of plants.

  17. Novel sensitive monoclonal antibody based competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of raw and processed bovine beta-casein

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Daniela S.

    2017-01-01

    Cow milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the most common childhood food allergy, which can sometimes persist or can newly develop in adulthood with severe symptoms. CMPA's treatment is complete dietary avoidance of milk proteins. To achieve this task, patients have to be aware of milk proteins found as "hidden allergens" in food commodities. In regard to milk proteins, it has been reported that allergenicity of caseins remains unaffected upon heat treatment. For these reasons, we aimed to obtain monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against native and denatured β-casein, one of the most abundant and antigenic caseins, in order to develop an indirect competitive ELISA (icELISA) to detect and quantify traces of this milk allergen in raw and processed foodstuffs. We developed two specific hybridoma clones, 1H3 and 6A12, which recognized β-casein in its denatured and native conformations by indirect ELISA (iELISA). Cross-reaction analysis by Western blot and iELISA indicated that these mAbs specifically recognized β-casein from bovine and goat milk extracts, while they did not cross-react with proteins present in other food matrixes. These highly specific mAbs enabled the development of sensitive, reliable and reproducible icELISAs to detect and quantify this milk protein allergen in food commodities. The extraction of β-casein from foodstuff was efficiently carried out at 60°C for 15 minutes, using an extraction buffer containing 1% SDS. The present study establishes a valid 1H3 based-icELISA, which allows the detection and quantification -0.29 ppm and 0.80 ppm, respectively- of small amounts of β-casein in raw and processed foods. Furthermore, we were able to detect milk contamination in incurred food samples with the same sensitivity as a commercial sandwich ELISA thus showing that this icELISA constitutes a reliable analytical method for control strategies in food industry and allergy prevention. PMID:28759641

  18. Toward new designed proteins derived from bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI): covalent cross-linking of two 'core modules' by oxime-forming ligation.

    PubMed

    Carulla, N; Woodward, C; Barany, G

    2001-01-01

    A 25-residue disulfide-cross-linked peptide, termed 'oxidized core module' (OxCM), that includes essentially all of the secondary structural elements of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) most refractory to hydrogen exchange, was shown previously to favor nativelike beta-sheet structure [Carulla, N., Woodward, C., and Barany, G. (2000) Synthesis and Characterization of a beta-Hairpin Peptide That Represents a 'Core Module' of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI). Biochemistry 39, 7927-7937]. The present work prepares to explore the hypothesis that the energies of nativelike conformations, relative to other possible conformations, could be decreased further by covalent linkage of two OxCMs. Optimized syntheses of six approximately 50-residue OxCM dimers are reported herein, featuring appropriate monomer modifications followed by oxime-forming ligation chemistry to create covalent cross-links at various positions and with differing lengths. Several side reactions were recognized through this work, and modified procedures to lessen or mitigate their occurrence were developed. Particularly noteworthy, guanidine or urea denaturants that were included as peptide-solubilizing components for some reaction mixtures were proven to form adducts with glyoxylyl moieties, thus affecting rates and outcomes. All six synthetic OxCM dimers were characterized by 1D (1)H NMR; three of them showed considerable chemical shift dispersion suggestive of self-association and mutual stabilization between the monomer units.

  19. IT product competition Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiu-Lian; Zhou, Lei; Shi, Jian-Jun; Wang, Yong-Li; Feng, Ai-Xia; He, Da-Ren

    2008-03-01

    Along with the technical development, the IT product competition becomes increasingly fierce in recent years. The factories, which produce the same IT product, have to improve continuously their own product quality for taking a large piece of cake in the product sale market. We suggest using a complex network description for the IT product competition. In the network the factories are defined as nodes, and two nodes are connected by a link if they produce a common IT product. The edge represents the sale competition relationship. 2121 factories and 265 products have been investigated. Some statistical properties, such as the degree distribution, node strength distribution, assortativity, and node degree correlation have been empirically obtained.

  20. EVALUATION OF A COMMERCIAL COMPETITIVE ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR DETECTION OF AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS SUBTYPE H5 ANTIBODIES IN ZOO BIRDS.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Andersen, Jannie Holmegaard; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Chriél, Mariann; Bertelsen, Mads Frost

    2017-09-01

    The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test is the current gold standard for detecting antibodies to avian influenza virus (AIV). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have been explored for use in poultry and certain wild bird species because of high efficiency and lower cost. This study compared a commercial ELISA for detection of AIV subtype H5 antibodies with HI test of 572 serum samples from zoo birds. There was no significant difference between the results of the two tests when statistically compared by a McNemar χ(2) test (P = 0.86) and assessment of κ (κ = 0.87). With a specificity of 94.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92-0.97), a sensitivity of 93.9% (95% CI, 0.91-0.97), and an excellent correlation between the two tests, this ELISA can be recommended as an alternative to the HI test for preliminary screening of zoo bird sera for antibodies to AIV subtype H5.

  1. The Peripheral Neuropathy-Linked Trembler and Trembler-J Mutant Forms of Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 are Folding-Destabilized†

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jeffrey K.; Mobley, Charles K.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the tetraspan membrane protein peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are known to result in peripheral neuropathies such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1A (CMT1A) disease via mechanisms that appear to be closely linked to misfolding of PMP22 in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To characterize the molecular defects in PMP22, we examined the structure and folding stability of two human disease mutant forms of PMP22 that are also the basis for mouse models of peripheral neuropathies: G150D (Trembler phenotype), and L16P (Trembler-J phenotype). Circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopic studies indicated that, when folded, the 3-D structures of these disease-linked mutants are similar to the folded wild type protein. However, the folded forms of the mutants were observed to be destabilized relative to the wild type protein, with the L16P mutant being particularly unstable. The rate of refolding from an unfolded state was observed to be very slow for the wild type protein, and no refolding was observed for either mutant. These results lead to the hypothesis that ER quality control recognizes the G150D and L16P mutant forms of PMP22 as defective through mechanisms closely related to their conformational instability and/or slow folding. It was also seen that wild type PMP22 binds Zn(II) and Cu(II) with micromolar affinity, a property that may be important to the stability and function of this protein. Zn(II) was able to rescue the stability defect of the Tr mutant. PMID:18795802

  2. Face-driven corner-linked octahedral nanocages: M6L8 cages formed by C3-symmetric triangular facial ligands linked via C4-symmetric square tetratopic Pd(II) ions at truncated octahedron corners.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dohyun; Kang, Sangmi; Park, Jaejoon; Lee, Kyungjae; John, Rohith P; Won, Hosik; Seong, Gi Hun; Kim, Yang Sun; Kim, Ghyung Hwa; Rhee, Hakjune; Lah, Myoung Soo

    2006-03-22

    The face-driven corner-linked truncated octahedral nanocages, [Pd6L8]12+ (1, L1 = N,N',N' '-tris(3-pyridinyl)-1,3,5-benzenetricarboxamide; 2, L2 = N,N',N' '-tris(4-pyridinylmethyl)-1,3,5-benzenetricarboxamide), were prepared with eight C3-symmetric tridentate ligands and six square planar tetratopic palladium(II) ions. The combination of the nitrogen donor atom at a approximately 120 degrees kink position of the carboxamido pyridinyl group and the tilted pyridyl versus the facial plane of the ligands can provide the needed curvature for the formation of octahedral cages. The nitrogen atoms can coordinate to the square planar palladium(II) ions to form kinks with approximately 120 degrees angles at the C4-symmetric square planar corners of the truncated octahedron. Depending on the conformation of the ligand, L1, two different truncated octahedral cages of around 2.4 nm in diameters were formed. The major form of 1 with syn-conformational ligands has a cavity volume of approximately 1600 A3. The cage has 12 ports (3.4 x 3.5 A2) at all edges of the octahedron. The minor form of cage 1 with anti-conformational ligands has a slightly increased cavity volume ( approximately 1900 A3) and port size (3.3 x 8.0 A2). The insertion of a methylene group in L2 has not only increased the cavity volume of 2 to approximately 2200 A3 but also enlarged the port size to 4.1 x 8.0 A2. However, an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of cage 2 showed that the cages had a height of 1.8 +/- 0.1 nm. This value is about 30% smaller than the calculated size of 2.6 nm from the crystal structure. This tip-induced decrease in height in cage 2 suggests the nonrigidity of cage 2.

  3. The link in Linking

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Jane C; Chiale, Pablo A; Gonzalez, Mario D; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    We present 2 cases of the slow-fast form of AVNRT with initially narrow QRS complexes followed by sudden unexpected transition to persistently wide QRS complexes due to aberrant intraventricular conduction. Introduction of a properly timed extrastimulus in one case and critical oscillations in cycle length due to short-long coupling in the second case set the stage for the initial bundle branch block. However, persistence of the aberrancy pattern once the initial event abated was maintained by the "linking" phenomenon. Delayed, retrograde concealed activation from the contralateral bundle branch perpetuated the initial bundle branch block. PMID:23840106

  4. The link in Linking.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Jane C; Chiale, Pablo A; Gonzalez, Mario D; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2013-05-01

    We present 2 cases of the slow-fast form of AVNRT with initially narrow QRS complexes followed by sudden unexpected transition to persistently wide QRS complexes due to aberrant intraventricular conduction. Introduction of a properly timed extrastimulus in one case and critical oscillations in cycle length due to short-long coupling in the second case set the stage for the initial bundle branch block. However, persistence of the aberrancy pattern once the initial event abated was maintained by the "linking" phenomenon. Delayed, retrograde concealed activation from the contralateral bundle branch perpetuated the initial bundle branch block.

  5. Transglutaminse 2 and EGGL, the Protein Cross-Link Formed by Transglutaminse 2, As Therapeutic Targets for Disabilities of Old Age

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aging of the extracellular matrix (ECM), the protein matrix that surrounds and penetrates the tissues and binds the body together, contributes significantly to functional aging of tissues. ECM proteins become increasingly cross-linked with age, and this cross-linking is probably important in the decline of the ECM's function. This article reviews the role of ε-(γ-glutamyl)-lysine (EGGL), a cross-link formed by transglutaminase enzymes, and particularly the widely expressed isozyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2), in the aging ECM. There is little direct data on EGGL accumulation with age, and no direct evidence of a role of EGGL in the aging of the ECM with pathology. However, several lines of circumstantial evidence suggest that EGGL accumulates with age, and its association with pathology suggests that this might reflect degradation of ECM function. TG activity increases with age in many circumstances. ECM protein turnover is such that some EGGL made by TG is likely to remain in place for years, if not decades, in healthy tissue, and both EGGL and TG levels are enhanced by age-related diseases. If further research shows EGGL does accumulate with age, removing it could be of therapeutic benefit. Also reviewed is the blockade of TG and active removal of EGGL as therapeutic strategies, with the conclusion that both have promise. EGGL removal may have benefit for acute fibrotic diseases, such as tendinopathy, and for treating generalized decline in ECM function with old age. Extracellular TG2 and EGGL are therefore therapeutic targets both for specific and more generalized diseases of aging. PMID:23968147

  6. The genetically modified polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule-positive cells for potential treatment of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jiho; Kim, Han-Soo; Kang, Joon Won; Kang, Hoon-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Cell transplantation of myelin-producing exogenous cells is being extensively explored as a means of remyelinating axons in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. We determined whether 3,3',5-Triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) overexpresses the ABCD2 gene in the polysialylated (PSA) form of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-positive cells and promotes cell proliferation and favors oligodendrocyte lineage differentiation. PSA-NCAM+ cells from newborn Sprague-Dawley rats were grown for five days on uncoated dishes in defined medium with or without supplementation of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and/or T3. Then, PSA-NCAM+ spheres were prepared in single cells and transferred to polyornithine/fibronectin-coated glass coverslips for five days to determine the fate of the cells according to the supplementation of these molecules. T3 responsiveness of ABCD2 was analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the growth and fate of cells were determined using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Results demonstrated that T3 induces overexpression of the ABCD2 gene in PSA-NCAM+ cells, and can enhance PSA-NCAM+ cell growth in the presence of bFGF, favoring an oligodendrocyte fate. These results may provide new insights into investigation of PSA-NCAM+ cells for therapeutic application to X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

  7. Meaning and consequence of the coexistence of competitive hydrogen bond/salt forms on the dissociation orientation of non-covalent complexes.

    PubMed

    Darii, Ekaterina; Alves, Sandra; Gimbert, Yves; Perret, Alain; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2017-03-15

    Non-covalent complexes (NCC) between hexose monophosphates (HexP) and arginine (R) were analyzed using ESI MS and MS/MS in negative mode under different (hard, HC and soft, SC) desolvation conditions. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) revealed the presence of different ionic species, namely, homo- and heteromultimers of R and HexP. Deprotonated heterodimers and corresponding sodiated species were enhanced under HC likely due to a decrease in available charge number associated with the reduction of H(+)/Na(+) exchange. The quantum calculations showed that the formation of covalent systems is very little exothermic, therefore, such systems are disfavored. Desolvation dependent CID spectra of deprotonated [(HexP+R)‒H](-) complexes demonstrated that they can exist within the hydrogen bond (HB) and salt bridge (SB) forms, yielding either NCC separation or covalent bond cleavages, respectively. Although HB forms are the main species, they cannot survive under HC; therefore, the minor SB forms became detectable. Energy-resolved mass spectrometry (ERMS) experiments revealed diagnostic fragment ions from both SB and HB forms, providing evidence that these isomeric forms are inconvertible. SB formation should result from the ionic interactions of highly acidic group of HexP with strongly basic guanidine group of arginine and thus requires an arginine zwitterion (ZW) form. This was confirmed by quantum calculations. Ion-ion interactions are significantly affected by the presence of sodium cation as demonstrated by the fragmentation patterns of sodiated complex species. Regarding CID data, only SB between protonated amino group of R and deprotonated phosphate group of HexP could be suggested, but the primary amine is not enough basic then, the SB must be fleeting. Nevertheless, the observation of the covalent bond cleavages suggests the presence of structures with a free negative charge able to induce fragmentations. Indeed, according to quantum calculations, solvated

  8. Competitive spirit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Leicester University will host the 65 international teams of students who will assemble in July for this year's International Physics Olympiad . The last time the Olympiad came to the UK was in 1986 in London, and it was the notable enthusiasm of the Leicester Physics and Astronomy department which persuaded the Olympiad Committee to give them the chance of organizing the prestigious event. The students taking part from all over the world are studying physics at A-level or an equivalent standard and they will take part in an intellectual marathon of theoretical and practical examinations. Each national team comprises five students selected from three rounds of competition and the teams will receive an official welcome from the city, as well as opportunities to visit some of the important educational and cultural centres of the surrounding region. The finalists will also be able to test their skills and initiative at the Challenger Learning Centre, which forms part of Leicester's new National Space Science Centre. Specific information on the event can be found on the Olympiad-2000 website at www.star.le.ac.uk/IphO-2000 . The Rudolf Ortvay problem solving contest in physics, which takes place in November, is a tradition of Eötvös University in Budapest, Hungary. The competition was first opened to international participants in 1998, enabling students from universities around the world to show their knowledge, ingenuity, problem-solving skills and physical insight into problems that are far beyond routine level. The problems (30 - 35 each year) are chosen from different branches of theoretical as well as applied physics. They have varying levels of difficulty, and every contestant can send solutions for ten problems. The focus is not on school-level problem-solving routines but rather on the `physical' way of thinking, recognition of the heart of the problem and an appropriate choice of mathematics. The majority of the assigned problems are original, few having

  9. Linking sediment connectivity to remotely sensed, reach-scale morphology identifies correlations between network-scale sediment regimes and local river forms and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, R. J. P.; Bizzi, S.; Castelletti, A.

    2015-12-01

    Connectivity describes the transport between sediment sources and sinks in fluvial networks, defining source-sink relations in the domains of sediment flux, delivery times, and supplied grain sizes. Connectivity embalms both sediment deliveries to individual reaches and sediment transport regimes on the network scale, and is a central driver behind fluvial biotic and abiotic processes, and related ecosystem services. Yet, river basin management is missing quantitative tools for studying connectivity in larger fluvial networks. With the CASCADE (Catchment Sediment Connectivity and Delivery) model we recently introduced a framework that quantifies sediment deliveries from each sediment source to all the connected sinks as individual cascading processes. This allows quantifying all domains of sediment connectivity at the reach scale as well as analyzing the resulting network-scale sediment regimes. CASCADE is applicable also for very large and poorly monitored river networks. We implement CASCADE for a large river network (7500 km) in SE Asia and quantify all domains of connectivity for all reaches in the network. We derive some relevant river morphological features for a subset of reaches in the network from high resolution satellite imagery and find significant links between observed forms and sediment connectivity information derived from CASCADE. CASCADE opens up novel opportunities to clarify the link between network scale sediment regimes and local morphologic processes and forms. This is of concrete interest for river basin management because CASCADE allows to assess impacts of anthropic disturbance on river sediment regimes and to anticipate resulting changes in local fluvial processes and related eco-system services.

  10. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2011-06-01

    With the aim of forming the ‘lock-washer’ conformation of the origin-binding domain of SV40 large T antigen in solution, using structure-based analysis an intermolecular disulfide bridge was engineered into the origin-binding domain to generate higher order oligomers in solution. The 1.7 Å resolution structure shows that the mutant forms a spiral in the crystal and has the de novo disulfide bond at the protein interface, although structural rearrangements at the interface are observed relative to the wild type. The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS–PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  11. Exploring the link between urban form and work related transportation using combined satellite image and census information: Case of the Great lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Guindon, Bert; Sun, Krista

    2016-05-01

    Aspects of urban transportation have significant implications for resource consumption and environmental quality. The level of travel activity, the viability of various modes of transportation and hence the level of transportation-related emissions are influenced by the structure of cities, i.e., their urban forms. While it is widely recognized that satellite remote sensing can provide spatial information on urban land cover and land use, its effective use for understanding impacts of urban form on issues such as transportation requires that this information be integrated with relevant demographic information. A comprehensive bi-national urban database, the Great Lakes Urban Survey (GLUS), comprising all cities with populations in excess of 200,000 has been created from Landsat imagery and national census and transportation survey information from Canada and the United States. A suite of analysis tools are proposed to utilize information sets such as GLUS to investigate the link between urban form and work-related travel. A new indicator, the Employment Deficit Measure (EDM), is proposed to quantify the balance between employment and worker availability at different transit horizons and hence to assess the viability of alternate modes of transportation. It is argued that the high degree of residential and commercial/industrial land uses greatly impact travel to work mode options as well as commute distance. A spatial interaction model is developed and found to accurately predict travel distance aggregated at the census tract level. We argue that this model could also be used to explore the relative levels of travel activity associated with different urban forms.

  12. Tough Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Roland

    1994-01-01

    College and university public relations specialists find that, to get competitive coverage for their institutions, they must provide the media with instant access to information and understand the way the media operate. Although the computer is useful in expanding contacts, responsiveness and information of real interest are foremost…

  13. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    1. Physics competitions: aims and realizations One aim of physics competitions is to increase the interest of young students, primarily at upper secondary level, to physics and natural sciences in general. A competition has motivational aspects known usually from sports events or games—comparing one's own ability with others, of course with the desire to be better and to win. If competitions reach nationwide and even international levels, additional stimulation is created. Competitions provide greatest attraction to possible winners, to the group of gifted people in a particular field. This implies that science contests are excellent tools for the promotion of talented students. Traditional teaching has been shown to have problems in supporting this group of students. Very often teachers are overstretched with the demands of teaching both low- and high-level students. Extracurricular activities are therefore a good chance to relieve the teacher, and to give talented students the opportunity for appropriate training and challenge. The competitions, however, have a broader impact and address more young people than one might guess from the statements above. Training courses and selection at school level give a larger group of students extra and, to some extent, complimentary education in physics. The degree of complexity of the tasks corresponds very often to the standards of the next level of education in the school system. Interestingly, many physics competitions have their origin in countries beyond the former Iron Curtain. They started as regional and national tournaments, were joined by neighbouring countries and have grown, in some cases, to events with participants from more than 80 countries. Although the features mentioned above are common to the different competitions, there are distinct differences between them [1]. The International Physics Olympiad (IPhO) is the oldest international physics competition for students at upper secondary level [2]. It dates

  14. Competitive sports for the disabled.

    PubMed

    Clark, M W

    1980-01-01

    A full life experience for people with and without physical disabilities usually includes some form of recreation or sport. Competition adds to enjoyment of sport for many people and can improve morale. This paper reviews some of the competitive opportunities available for people with a physical disability. These include competition within existing "able-bodied" organizations with or without adaptive devices and competition in separate organizations for those with disabilities. The latter include the National Wheelchair Basketball Association and the National Wheelchair Athletic Association.

  15. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A

    2011-06-01

    The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS-PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  16. Effect of Hydrophobic Chain Length on the Stability and Guest Exchange Behavior of Shell-Sheddable Micelles Formed by Disulfide-Linked Diblock Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haiyan; Li, Yixia; Yang, Jinxian; Ye, Xiaodong

    2017-09-19

    Reduction-responsive micelles hold enormous promise for the application as drug carriers due to the fast drug release triggered by reducing conditions and high anticancer activity. However, the effect of hydrophobic chain length on the stability and guest exchange of reduction-responsive micelles, especially for the micelles formed by diblock copolymers containing single disulfide group, are not fully understood. Here, shell-sheddable micelles formed by a series of disulfide-linked copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(-caprolactone) (PEG-SS-PCL) containing the same chain length of PEG but different chain lengths of hydrophobic block PCL were prepared and well characterized. The influence of the chain length of hydrophobic PCL block on the stability and guest exchange of PEG-SS-PCL micelles was studied by the use of both dynamic laser light scattering (DLS) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results show that longer PCL chains lead to slower aggregation rate and guest exchange of micelles in the aqueous solutions containing 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT). The cell uptake of the shell-sheddable PEG-SS-PCL micelles in vitro shows that the amount of internalization of dyes loaded in PEG-SS-PCL micelles increases with the chain length of hydrophobic PCL block investigated by flow cytometric analysis and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  17. Development and Application of an Indirect Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Detection of p,p′-DDE in Human Milk and Comparison of the Results against GC-ECD

    PubMed Central

    Hongsibsong, Surat; Wipasa, Jiraprapa; Pattarawarapan, Mookda; Chantara, Somporn; Stuetz, Wolfgang; Nosten, Francois; Prapamontol, Tippawan

    2012-01-01

    1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (p,p′-DDE) is the major metabolite of insecticide 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (p,p′-DDT) and a persistent organic pollutant (POPs) with concerns regarding its bioaccumulation and persistence in the environment and food chain. In the present study, an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ic-ELISA) specific for the detection of p,p′-DDE is described. In hapten synthesis, 2,2′-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethanol and glutaric anhydride were used as precursor and spacer arm, respectively. The hapten was then conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA) as immunogen for mouse immunization and also conjugated to ovalbumin as coating antigen for ELISA. The developed ic-ELISA was used for detecting p,p′-DDE in human milk samples and validated against the results from conventional gas chromatography–electron capture detection (GC-ECD). Coefficients of variation (%CV) of ELISA were 5.7–10.4% for intra-assay and 10.6–19.6% for interassay variations. The Pearson correlation coefficient of p,p′-DDE concentrations between ic-ELISA and GC-ECD was r = 0.766, which was in an acceptable range. The results indicate that the developed assay could be an alternative analytical tool for monitoring p,p′-DDE in lipimic matrices such as human milk. PMID:22122759

  18. Detection of Cattle Naturally Infected with Anaplasma marginale in a Region of Endemicity by Nested PCR and a Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Using Recombinant Major Surface Protein 5

    PubMed Central

    Torioni de Echaide, Susana; Knowles, Donald P.; McGuire, Travis C.; Palmer, Guy H.; Suarez, Carlos E.; McElwain, Terry F.

    1998-01-01

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using recombinant major surface protein 5 (rMSP5-cELISA) of Anaplasma marginale was validated in a naturally infected cattle herd in an area of eastern Oregon where A. marginale is endemic. The true positive and negative A. marginale infection status of 235 randomly selected cattle was determined by using a nested PCR (nPCR) coupled with msp5 sequence analysis and hybridization. Judgment of the reliability of the nPCR and hybridization for detection of persistent infections was based on three observations. First, the nPCR was able to detect as few as 30 infected erythrocytes per ml. Second, the nPCR was able to consistently detect low levels of rickettsemia in seven carrier cattle experimentally infected with A. marginale. Third, msp5 sequence analysis showed >95% identity among 30 nPCR amplicons from cattle naturally infected with field strains of A. marginale. The nPCR and hybridization identified 151 infected and 84 uninfected cattle among the 235 animals tested. With a cutoff point of 28%, the rMSP5-cELISA showed a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 95%. These results indicate that the rMSP5-cELISA can sensitively and specifically detect cattle with naturally acquired persistent A. marginale infections and suggest that it is an excellent assay for epidemiological studies, eradication programs, and regulation of international cattle movement. PMID:9508311

  19. Validation according to OIE criteria of a monoclonal, recombinant p26-based, serologic competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as screening method in surveillance programs for the detection of Equine infectious anemia virus antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Roberto; Autorino, Gian Luca; Ricci, Ida; Frontoso, Raffaele; Rosone, Francesca; Simula, Massimiliano; Scicluna, Maria Teresa

    2016-03-01

    The Italian National Reference Center for equine infectious anemia (CRAIE; Rome, Italy) developed and validated a monoclonal, recombinant p26-based competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) for the detection of EIA virus antibodies employing the 2010 criteria of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The following parameters were evaluated: cutoff values, repeatability, reproducibility, concordance, analytical sensitivity (Se), absolute analytical specificity (Sp), and diagnostic Se and Sp. Positive and negative predictive values were also defined in relation to the estimated prevalence. When the cELISA was used as a screening test for 96,468 samples in the Italian EIA surveillance program, 17% more EIA cases were detected than by the agar gel immunodiffusion test, and the apparent diagnostic Sp estimated from these samples was 99.8%, which was more than the diagnostic Sp (80.2%) estimated from validation. The high Se and Sp of the cELISA confirm its fit for purpose as a screening test. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. Pro-oxidant copper-binding mode of the Apo form of ALS-linked SOD1 mutant H43R denatured at physiological temperature.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Nobuhiro; Kitamura, Furi; Takeuchi, Hideo

    2013-08-06

    The mutation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), a major antioxidant enzyme, is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In a previous study, we showed that the metal-depleted apo form of an ALS-linked mutant, H43R, undergoes denaturation at physiological temperature (37 °C) in 90 min and acquires pro-oxidant activity in the presence of Cu(2+) and H2O2. In this study, we have examined the Cu(2+)-binding mode of denatured apo-H43R by circular dichroism (CD), fluorescent oxidation, UV Raman spectroscopy, and photooxidation. CD spectroscopy indicates that denatured apo-H43R loses native β-barrel structure and the binding of Cu(2+) to the denatured apo form induces local refolding. Fluorescent-oxidation assays in the absence and presence of Cu(2+) chelators show that denatured apo-H43R contains two Cu(2+)-binding sites with higher and lower Cu(2+) affinities and with pro-oxidant activities in the reverse order. UV Raman spectroscopy gives evidence that His residues are bound to Cu(2+) mainly through the imidazole Nτ atom at the higher-affinity site and through the Nπ atom at the lower-affinity site, sharing one His residue with each other. The Cu(2+)-binding mode of denatured apo-H43R is analogous to but different from the Cu,Zn-binding mode of the native holo form. Photooxidation experiments confirm the involvement of His residues in the pro-oxidant activity. Taken together, it is suggested that the binding of Cu(2+) induces the local refolding of denatured apo-H43R to create toxic catalytic centers that convert the enzyme from antioxidant to pro-oxidant, leading to the pathogenesis of ALS. His residues are essential for both Cu(2+)-binding and pro-oxidant activities.

  1. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2010-07-01

    This editorial opens the second special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics. In the first section last year, we asked for feedback on the idea of such a section and on the content of the articles. We received no answer whatsoever, which can be interpreted in two ways: the section is not interesting enough to raise motivation for feedback, or the reader is satisfied. Having no indication which scenario is the correct one, we are optimistic and favour the second. The section at hand contains three articles. Again, as last year, the organizer of the annual Olympiad reports on tasks and outcomes of this competition. The Olympiad took place in Merida, Mexico, and was by far the largest event with 316 contestants from 68 countries. Again, the predominance of Asian/Chinese students was manifest, showing how serious the training is taken by both their authorities and students. Unfortunately, the winners of the last International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT), the team from Korea, did not accept the offer to report on their prize-winning contribution. We are thankful that two students from Austria, who achieved second place with their team, took over and reported on the task which they presented in the finals of the competition. It connects the fields of sport and physics and explains a special move in skateboarding. The third contribution introduces a different competition, 'International Conference of Young Scientists'. On one hand, as in the Olympiad, it addresses individuals, not teams. On the other, as in the IYPT, students have several months to prepare and also the quality of the presentation is an important element of the judgment. In fact, this competition comes closer to real scientific research compared to the other events. Finally and again, we hope that this section will serve several purposes: To show the competitions as a very important tool in the support of gifted students. To raise awareness amongst university teachers, and

  2. Recent and historical range shifts of two canopy-forming seaweeds in North Spain and the link with trends in sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Linney; Viejo, Rosa M.; Martínez, Brezo; deCastro, Maite; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Gallardo, Tomás

    2013-08-01

    Geographical range shifts of two canopy-forming seaweeds, Himanthalia elongata (L.) S.F. Gray and Fucus serratus L. were investigated at their southern range boundary in Northern Spain from the end of nineteenth century to 2009. Given the good dispersal abilities of H. elongata and its short life-span, we hypothesize that this species will track environmental changes at a faster rate than the perennial and short-distance disperser F. serratus. Our results show a continuous and drastic westward retraction of H. elongata, which has nowadays virtually vanished in Northern Spain, whereas F. serratus is still found in the westernmost area. Despite this, the first species is still relatively abundant in the Iberian Peninsula, whereas the presence of the latter is scattered and reduced. Overall, range shifts fit with the warming trend in sea surface temperature (SST), whereas it is unlikely that increases in grazing pressure or coastal pollution have driven the observed changes, particularly the rapid trend in recent years. Differences in species traits are linked to range dynamics. The higher persistence of F. serratus at eastern shores may thus be related to its longer life span and its greater thermal tolerance. The presence of sporadic populations of H. elongata outside the zone of continuous distribution can be attributed to long-distance dispersal events during cold pulses. Relict populations in isolated and estuarine locations were left behind in the contracting range margins, particularly for F. serratus. In Northern Spain, the westward retreat of large canopy-forming algae seems to be a general phenomenon, involving other species such as kelps. Therefore, an evident reorganization of coastal assemblages is expected, though the temporal extent of changes and the consequences for ecosystem services need to be evaluated.

  3. Identification of a new splice form of the EDA1 gene permits detection of nearly all X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Monreal, A W; Zonana, J; Ferguson, B

    1998-01-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED), the most common of the ectodermal dysplasias, results in the abnormal development of teeth, hair, and eccrine sweat glands. The gene responsible for this disorder, EDA1, was identified by isolation of a single cDNA that was predicted to encode a 135-amino-acid protein. Mutations in this splice form were detected in <10% of families with XLHED. The subsequent cloning of the murine homologue of the EDA1 gene (Tabby [Ta]) allowed us to identify a second putative isoform of the EDA1 protein (isoform II) in humans. This EDA1 cDNA is predicted to encode a 391-residue protein, of which 256 amino acids are encoded by the new exons. The putative protein is 94% identical to the Ta protein and includes a collagen-like domain with 19 repeats of a Gly-X-Y motif in the presumptive extracellular domain. The genomic structure of the EDA1 gene was established, and the complete sequence of the seven new exons was determined in 18 XLHED-affected males. Putative mutations, including 12 missense, one nonsense, and four deletion mutations, were identified in approximately 95% of the families. The results suggest that EDA1 isoform II plays a critical role in tooth, hair, and sweat gland morphogenesis, whereas the biological significance of isoform I remains unclear. Identification of mutations in nearly all of the XLHED families studied suggests that direct molecular diagnosis of the disorder is feasible. Direct diagnosis will allow carrier detection in families with a single affected male and will assist in distinguishing XLHED from the rarer, clinically indistinguishable, autosomal recessive form of the disorder. PMID:9683615

  4. Identification of a new splice form of the EDA1 gene permits detection of nearly all X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia mutations.

    PubMed

    Monreal, A W; Zonana, J; Ferguson, B

    1998-08-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED), the most common of the ectodermal dysplasias, results in the abnormal development of teeth, hair, and eccrine sweat glands. The gene responsible for this disorder, EDA1, was identified by isolation of a single cDNA that was predicted to encode a 135-amino-acid protein. Mutations in this splice form were detected in <10% of families with XLHED. The subsequent cloning of the murine homologue of the EDA1 gene (Tabby [Ta]) allowed us to identify a second putative isoform of the EDA1 protein (isoform II) in humans. This EDA1 cDNA is predicted to encode a 391-residue protein, of which 256 amino acids are encoded by the new exons. The putative protein is 94% identical to the Ta protein and includes a collagen-like domain with 19 repeats of a Gly-X-Y motif in the presumptive extracellular domain. The genomic structure of the EDA1 gene was established, and the complete sequence of the seven new exons was determined in 18 XLHED-affected males. Putative mutations, including 12 missense, one nonsense, and four deletion mutations, were identified in approximately 95% of the families. The results suggest that EDA1 isoform II plays a critical role in tooth, hair, and sweat gland morphogenesis, whereas the biological significance of isoform I remains unclear. Identification of mutations in nearly all of the XLHED families studied suggests that direct molecular diagnosis of the disorder is feasible. Direct diagnosis will allow carrier detection in families with a single affected male and will assist in distinguishing XLHED from the rarer, clinically indistinguishable, autosomal recessive form of the disorder.

  5. A multifrequency study of the active star-forming complex NGC 6357 - I. Interstellar structures linked to the open cluster Pis 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. E.; Barbá, R.; Duronea, N. U.; Vasquez, J.; Arnal, E. M.; Goss, W. M.; Fernández Lajús, E.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the distribution of gas (ionized, neutral atomic and molecular) and interstellar dust in the complex star-forming region NGC 6357 with the goal of studying the interplay between the massive stars in the open cluster Pis 24 and the surrounding interstellar matter. Our study of the distribution of the ionized gas is based on narrow-band Hα, [S II]and [O III] images obtained with the Curtis-Schmidt Camera at CTIO, Chile, and on radio continuum observations at 1465 MHz taken with the VLA with a synthesized beam of 40 arcsec. The distribution of the molecular gas is analysed using 12CO(1-0) data obtained with the NANTEN radiotelescope, Chile (angular resolution = 2.7 arcmin). The interstellar dust distribution was studied using mid-infrared data from the GLIMPSE survey and far-infrared observations from IRAS. NGC 6357 consists of a large ionized shell and a number of smaller optical nebulosities. The optical, radio continuum, and near- and mid-IR images delineate the distributions of the ionized gas and interstellar dust in the H II regions and in previously unknown wind-blown bubbles linked to the massive stars in Pis 24 revealing surrounding photodissociation regions. The CO line observations allowed us to identify the molecular counterparts of the ionized structures in the complex and to confirm the presence of photodissociation regions. The action of the WR star HD 157504 on the surrounding gas was also investigated. The molecular mass in the complex is estimated to be (4 ± 2) × 105 M⊙. The mean electron densities derived from the radio data suggest electron densities >200 cm-3, indicating that NGC 6357 is a complex formed in a region of high ambient density. The known massive stars in Pis 24 and a number of newly inferred massive stars are mainly responsible for the excitation and photodissociation of the parental molecular cloud.

  6. Inhibition of Coxsackie B Virus Infection by Soluble Forms of Its Receptors: Binding Affinities, Altered Particle Formation, and Competition with Cellular Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, Ian G.; Evans, David J.; Blom, Anna M.; Kerrigan, Dave; Miners, J. Scott; Morgan, B. Paul; Spiller, O. Brad

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that soluble decay-accelerating factor (DAF) and coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) blocked coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) myocarditis in mice, but only soluble CAR blocked CVB3-mediated pancreatitis. Here, we report that the in vitro mechanisms of viral inhibition by these soluble receptors also differ. Soluble DAF inhibited virus infection through the formation of reversible complexes with CVB3, while binding of soluble CAR to CVB induced the formation of altered (A) particles with a resultant irreversible loss of infectivity. A-particle formation was characterized by loss of VP4 from the virions and required incubation of CVB3-CAR complexes at 37°C. Dimeric soluble DAF (DAF-Fc) was found to be 125-fold-more effective at inhibiting CVB3 than monomeric DAF, which corresponded to a 100-fold increase in binding affinity as determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Soluble CAR and soluble dimeric CAR (CAR-Fc) bound to CVB3 with 5,000- and 10,000-fold-higher affinities than the equivalent forms of DAF. While DAF-Fc was 125-fold-more effective at inhibiting virus than monomeric DAF, complement regulation by DAF-Fc was decreased 4 fold. Therefore, while the virus binding was a cooperative event, complement regulation was hindered by the molecular orientation of DAF-Fc, indicating that the regions responsible for complement regulation and virus binding do not completely overlap. Relative contributions of CVB binding affinity, receptor binding footprint on the virus capsid, and induction of capsid conformation alterations for the ability of cellular DAF and CAR to act as receptors are discussed. PMID:16140777

  7. Adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as multiple system atrophy: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ogaki, Kotaro; Koga, Shunsuke; Aoki, Naoya; Lin, Wenlang; Suzuki, Kinuko; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder and is caused by ABCD1 mutations. A cerebello-brainstem dominant form that mainly involves the cerebellum and brainstem is summarized in a review of the literature, with autopsy confirmed cases exceedingly rare. We report a 69-year-old white man who was diagnosed with this rare disorder and describe neuropathologic, ultrastructural and genetic analyses. He did not have adrenal insufficiency or a family history of X-ALD or Addison’s disease. His initial symptom was temporary loss of eyesight at age 34 years. His major symptoms were chronic and progressive gait disorder, weakness in his lower extremities, and spasticity, as well as autonomic failure and cerebellar ataxia suggesting possible multiple system atrophy (MSA). He also had seizures, hearing loss, and sensory disturbances. His brain MRI showed no obvious atrophy or significant white matter pathology in cerebrum, brainstem or cerebellum. He died at age 69 years with a diagnosis of multiple system atrophy. Microscopic analysis showed mild, patchy myelin rarefaction with perivascular clusters of PAS-positive, CD68-positive macrophages in the white matter most prominent in the cerebellum and occipital lobe, but also affecting optic tract and internal capsule. Electron microscopy of cerebellar white matter showed cleft-like trilamellar cytoplasmic inclusions in macrophages typical of X-ALD, which prompted genetic analysis that revealed a novel ABCD1 mutation, p.R163G. Given the relatively mild pathological findings and long disease duration, it is likely that the observed pathology was the result of a slow and indolent disease process. We described a patient who had sporadic cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD with long clinical course, mild pathological findings, and an ABCD1 p.R163G substitution. We also review a total of 34 cases of adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD. Although rare, X-ALD should be

  8. Adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as multiple system atrophy: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Kotaro; Koga, Shunsuke; Aoki, Naoya; Lin, Wenlang; Suzuki, Kinuko; Ross, Owen A; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-02-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder and is caused by ABCD1 mutations. A cerebello-brainstem dominant form that mainly involves the cerebellum and brainstem is summarized in a review of the literature, with autopsy-confirmed cases exceedingly rare. We report a 69-year-old White man who was diagnosed with this rare disorder and describe neuropathologic, ultrastructural and genetic analyses. He did not have adrenal insufficiency or a family history of X-ALD or Addison's disease. His initial symptom was temporary loss of eyesight at age 34 years. His major symptoms were chronic and progressive gait disorder, weakness in his lower extremities and spasticity, as well as autonomic failure and cerebellar ataxia suggesting possible multiple system atrophy (MSA). He also had seizures, hearing loss and sensory disturbances. His brain MRI showed no obvious atrophy or significant white matter pathology in cerebrum, brainstem or cerebellum. He died at age 69 years with a diagnosis of MSA. Microscopic analysis showed mild, patchy myelin rarefaction with perivascular clusters of PAS-positive, CD68-positive macrophages in the white matter most prominent in the cerebellum and occipital lobe, but also affecting the optic tract and internal capsule. Electron microscopy of cerebellar white matter showed cleft-like trilamellar cytoplasmic inclusions in macrophages typical of X-ALD, which prompted genetic analysis that revealed a novel ABCD1 mutation, p.R163G. Given the relatively mild pathological findings and long disease duration, it is likely that the observed pathology was the result of a slow and indolent disease process. We described a patient who had sporadic cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD with long clinical course, mild pathological findings, and an ABCD1 p.R163G substitution. We also review a total of 34 cases of adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD. Although rare, X-ALD should be considered in the

  9. Serum Antibodies from a Subset of Horses Positive for Babesia caballi by Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Demonstrate a Protein Recognition Pattern That Is Not Consistent with Infection

    PubMed Central

    Awinda, Peter O.; Mealey, Robert H.; Williams, Laura B. A.; Conrad, Patricia A.; Packham, Andrea E.; Reif, Kathryn E.; Grause, Juanita F.; Pelzel-McCluskey, Angela M.; Chung, Chungwon; Bastos, Reginaldo G.; Kappmeyer, Lowell S.; Howe, Daniel K.; Ness, SallyAnne L.; Knowles, Donald P.

    2013-01-01

    Tick-borne pathogens that cause persistent infection are of major concern to the livestock industry because of transmission risk from persistently infected animals and the potential economic losses they pose. The recent reemergence of Theileria equi in the United States prompted a widespread national survey resulting in identification of limited distribution of equine piroplasmosis (EP) in the U.S. horse population. This program identified Babesia caballi-seropositive horses using rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP-1)–competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), despite B. caballi being considered nonendemic on the U.S. mainland. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of RAP-1–cELISA as a single serological test to determine the infection status of B. caballi in U.S. horses. Immunoblotting indicated that sera from U.S. horses reacted with B. caballi lysate and purified B. caballi RAP-1 protein. Antibody reactivity to B. caballi lysate was exclusively directed against a single ∼50-kDa band corresponding to a native B. caballi RAP-1 protein. In contrast, sera from experimentally and naturally infected horses from regions where B. caballi is endemic bound multiple proteins ranging from 30 to 50 kDa. Dilutions of sera from U.S. horses positive by cELISA revealed low levels of antibodies, while sera from horses experimentally infected with B. caballi and from areas where B. caballi is endemic had comparatively high antibody levels. Finally, blood transfer from seropositive U.S. horses into naive horses demonstrated no evidence of B. caballi transmission, confirming that antibody reactivity in cELISA-positive U.S. horses was not consistent with infection. Therefore, we conclude that a combination of cELISA and immunoblotting is required for the accurate serodiagnosis of B. caballi. PMID:24049108

  10. Development and validation of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the measurement of total plasma immunoglobulins in healthy loggerhead sea (Caretta caretta) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Amy J; Stacy, Nicole I; Jacobson, Elliott; Le-Bert, Carolina R; Nollens, Hendrik H; Origgi, Francesco C; Green, Linda G; Bootorabi, Shadi; Bolten, Alan; Hernandez, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of circulating plasma immunoglobulins represents a valuable diagnostic tool in human and veterinary immunology, although its application is very limited in reptile medicine to date. The objectives of our study were the development and standardization of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) for the measurement of total plasma immunoglobulins (Igs; both IgM and IgY) in loggerhead sea turtles (LST; Caretta caretta; n = 254) and green turtles (GT; Chelonia mydas; n = 111), the establishment of reference intervals for Ig for both species, and the examination of associations between Ig and total protein (TP), condition index, and water temperature. The cELISA for Ig was successfully developed and optimized. Reference intervals for Ig were 0.38-0.94 g/dL in LST (median: 0.59 g/dL; range: 0.16-2.15 g/dL) and 0.40-0.85 g/dL in GT (median: 0.58 g/dL; range: 0.18-1.80 g/dL). In LST, there were positive linear relationships of Ig with TP, and TP with Ig and condition index, and a negative relationship of Ig with condition index. The positive linear relationships of Ig with TP, and TP with Ig were also identified in GT. These positive associations of Ig and TP were expected, as Ig represents fractions of TP, and TP reportedly increases with straight carapace length and weight. The negative association of Ig with condition index may indicate potential biological variations. The cELISA and reference intervals for total Ig of LST and GT presented herein have the potential to be useful as a diagnostic and research tool for sea turtle immunology.

  11. Chemical structure and properties of interstrand cross-links formed by reaction of guanine residues with abasic sites in duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Michael J; Liu, Shuo; Andersen, Nisana; Yang, Zhiyu; Johnson, Kevin M; Price, Nathan E; Wang, Yinsheng; Gates, Kent S

    2015-03-25

    A new type of interstrand cross-link resulting from the reaction of a DNA abasic site with a guanine residue on the opposing strand of the double helix was recently identified, but the chemical connectivity of the cross-link was not rigorously established. The work described here was designed to characterize the chemical structure and properties of dG-AP cross-links generated in duplex DNA. The approach involved characterization of the nucleoside cross-link "remnant" released by enzymatic digestion of DNA duplexes containing the dG-AP cross-link. We first carried out a chemical synthesis and complete spectroscopic structure determination of the putative cross-link remnant 9b composed of a 2-deoxyribose adduct attached to the exocyclic N(2)-amino group of dG. A reduced analogue of the cross-link remnant was also prepared (11b). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed that the retention times and mass spectral properties of synthetic standards 9b and 11b matched those of the authentic cross-link remnants released by enzymatic digestion of duplexes containing the native and reduced dG-AP cross-link, respectively. These results establish the chemical connectivity of the dG-AP cross-link released from duplex DNA and provide a foundation for detection of this lesion in biological samples. The dG-AP cross-link in duplex DNA was remarkably stable, decomposing with a half-life of 22 days at pH 7 and 23 °C. The intrinsic chemical stability of the dG-AP cross-link suggests that this lesion in duplex DNA may have the power to block DNA-processing enzymes involved in transcription and replication.

  12. GIPC and GAIP form a complex with TrkA: a putative link between G protein and receptor tyrosine kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Lou, X; Yano, H; Lee, F; Chao, M V; Farquhar, M G

    2001-03-01

    NGF initiates the majority of its neurotrophic effects by promoting the activation of the tyrosine kinase receptor TrkA. Here we describe a novel interaction between TrkA and GIPC, a PDZ domain protein. GIPC binds to the juxtamembrane region of TrkA through its PDZ domain. The PDZ domain of GIPC also interacts with GAIP, an RGS (regulators of G protein signaling) protein. GIPC and GAIP are components of a G protein-coupled signaling complex thought to be involved in vesicular trafficking. In transfected HEK 293T cells GIPC, GAIP, and TrkA form a coprecipitable protein complex. Both TrkA and GAIP bind to the PDZ domain of GIPC, but their binding sites within the PDZ domain are different. The association of endogenous GIPC with the TrkA receptor was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation in PC12 (615) cells stably expressing TrkA. By immunofluorescence GIPC colocalizes with phosphorylated TrkA receptors in retrograde transport vesicles located in the neurites and cell bodies of differentiated PC12 (615) cells. These results suggest that GIPC, like other PDZ domain proteins, serves to cluster transmembrane receptors with signaling molecules. When GIPC is overexpressed in PC12 (615) cells, NGF-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (Erk1/2) decreases; however, there is no effect on phosphorylation of Akt, phospholipase C-gamma1, or Shc. The association of TrkA receptors with GIPC and GAIP plus the inhibition of MAP kinase by GIPC suggests that GIPC may provide a link between TrkA and G protein signaling pathways.

  13. GIPC and GAIP Form a Complex with TrkA: A Putative Link between G Protein and Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Xiaojing; Yano, Hiroko; Lee, Francis; Chao, Moses V.; Farquhar, Marilyn Gist

    2001-01-01

    NGF initiates the majority of its neurotrophic effects by promoting the activation of the tyrosine kinase receptor TrkA. Here we describe a novel interaction between TrkA and GIPC, a PDZ domain protein. GIPC binds to the juxtamembrane region of TrkA through its PDZ domain. The PDZ domain of GIPC also interacts with GAIP, an RGS (regulators of G protein signaling) protein. GIPC and GAIP are components of a G protein-coupled signaling complex thought to be involved in vesicular trafficking. In transfected HEK 293T cells GIPC, GAIP, and TrkA form a coprecipitable protein complex. Both TrkA and GAIP bind to the PDZ domain of GIPC, but their binding sites within the PDZ domain are different. The association of endogenous GIPC with the TrkA receptor was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation in PC12 (615) cells stably expressing TrkA. By immunofluorescence GIPC colocalizes with phosphorylated TrkA receptors in retrograde transport vesicles located in the neurites and cell bodies of differentiated PC12 (615) cells. These results suggest that GIPC, like other PDZ domain proteins, serves to cluster transmembrane receptors with signaling molecules. When GIPC is overexpressed in PC12 (615) cells, NGF-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (Erk1/2) decreases; however, there is no effect on phosphorylation of Akt, phospholipase C-γ1, or Shc. The association of TrkA receptors with GIPC and GAIP plus the inhibition of MAP kinase by GIPC suggests that GIPC may provide a link between TrkA and G protein signaling pathways. PMID:11251075

  14. The UV-Optical Color Gradients in Star-forming Galaxies at 0.5 < z < 1.5: Origins and Link to Galaxy Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F. S.; Jiang, Dongfei; Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M.; Zheng, Xianzhong; Yesuf, Hassen M.; Barro, Guillermo; Li, Yao; Li, Dingpeng; Wang, Weichen; Mao, Shude; Fang, Jerome J.

    2016-05-01

    The rest-frame UV-optical (i.e., NUV - B) color index is sensitive to the low-level recent star formation and dust extinction, but it is insensitive to the metallicity. In this Letter, we have measured the rest-frame NUV - B color gradients in ˜1400 large (r e > 0.″18), nearly face-on (b/a > 0.5) main sequence star-forming galaxies (SFGs) between redshift 0.5 and 1.5 in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields. With this sample, we study the origin of UV-optical color gradients in the SFGs at z ˜ 1 and discuss their link with the buildup of stellar mass. We find that the more massive, centrally compact, and more dust extinguished SFGs tend to have statistically more negative raw color gradients (redder centers) than the less massive, centrally diffuse, and less dusty SFGs. After correcting for dust reddening based on optical-spectral energy distribution fitting, the color gradients in the low-mass (M * < 1010 M ⊙) SFGs generally become quite flat, while most of the high-mass (M * > 1010.5 M ⊙) SFGs still retain shallow negative color gradients. These findings imply that dust reddening is likely the principal cause of negative color gradients in the low-mass SFGs, while both increased central dust reddening and buildup of compact old bulges are likely the origins of negative color gradients in the high-mass SFGs. These findings also imply that at these redshifts the low-mass SFGs buildup their stellar masses in a self-similar way, while the high-mass SFGs grow inside out.

  15. G-quadruplex structures formed by expanded hexanucleotide repeat RNA and DNA from the neurodegenerative disease-linked C9orf72 gene efficiently sequester and activate heme.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Jason C; Shumayrikh, Nisreen; Sen, Dipankar

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of a (G(4)C(2))n repeat within the human C9orf72 gene has been causally linked to a number of neurodegenerative diseases, most notably familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent studies have shown that the repeat expansion alters gene function in four ways, disrupting the gene's normal cellular roles and introducing toxic gain of function at the level of both DNA and RNA. (G(4)C(2))n DNA, as well as the RNA transcribed from it, are found to fold into four-stranded G-quadruplex structures. It has been shown that the toxicity of the RNA G-quadruplexes, often localized in intracellular RNA foci, lies in their ability to sequester many important RNA binding proteins. Herein we propose that a distinct toxic property of such RNA and DNA G-quadruplexes from the C9orf72 gene may arise from their ability to bind and oxidatively activate cellular heme. We show that G-quadruplexes formed by both (G(4)C(2))(4) RNA and DNA not only complex tightly with heme but also enhance its intrinsic peroxidase and oxidase propensities. By contrast, the antisense (C(4)G(2))(4) RNA and DNA neither bind heme nor influence its oxidative activity. Curiously, the ability of C9orf72 DNA and transcripts to bind and activate heme mirror similar properties that have been reported for the Aβ peptide and its oligomers in Alzheimer's disease neurons. It is therefore conceivable that C9orf72 RNA G-quadruplex tangles play roles in sequestering intracellular heme and promoting oxidative damage in ALS and FTD analogous to those proposed for Aβ peptide and its tangles in Alzheimer's Disease. Given that neurodegenerative diseases in general are characterized by mitochondrial and respiratory malfunctions, the role of C9orf72 DNA and RNA in heme sequestration as well as its inappropriate activation in ALS and FTD neurons may warrant examination.

  16. Post-Colonialism Perspectives on Educational Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Chuan-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Educational competition has always been the puzzle issue of educational researches. In this article, I analyze several aspects of educational competition within the perspective of post-colonialism discourse. In the political aspect, Taiwanese education is linked with political power, to present the post-colonial spirit by continuing dynastic…

  17. Post-Colonialism Perspectives on Educational Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Chuan-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Educational competition has always been the puzzle issue of educational researches. In this article, I analyze several aspects of educational competition within the perspective of post-colonialism discourse. In the political aspect, Taiwanese education is linked with political power, to present the post-colonial spirit by continuing dynastic…

  18. Electrophysiological evidence for emotional valence and competitive arousal effects on insight problem solving.

    PubMed

    Li, Yadan; Xiao, Xiao; Ma, Wenjuan; Jiang, Jun; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, Qinglin

    2013-11-13

    Accumulating evidence suggests that insight can be substantially influenced by task-irrelevant emotion stimuli and interpersonal competitive situation, and a close link might exist between them. Using a learning-testing paradigm and Event-Related Potentials (ERPs), the present study investigated the independent and joint effects of emotional and competitive information on insight problem solving especially their neural mechanisms. Subjects situated in either competitive or non-competitive condition learned heuristic logogriphs first and then viewed task-irrelevant positive or negative emotional pictures, which were followed by test logogriphs to solve. Both behavioral and ERP findings showed a more evident insight boost following negative emotional pictures in competitive context. Results demonstrated that negative emotion and competitive situation might promote insight by a defocused mode of attention (as indicated by N1 and P2), the enhanced semantic integration and breaking mental set (as indicated by N450), and the increased forming of novel associations activated by motivational arousal originating from competition (as indicated by P800-1600 and P1600-2500). These results indicate that the dynamic interactions between emotional valence and competitive arousal effects on insight. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hierarchical analysis of taxonomic variation in intraspecific competition across fish species.

    PubMed

    Foss-Grant, Andrew P; Zipkin, Elise F; Thorson, James T; Jensen, Olaf P; Fagan, William F

    2016-07-01

    The nature and intensity of intraspecific competition can vary greatly among taxa, yet similarities in these interactions can lead to similar population dynamics among related organisms. Variation along the spectrum of intraspecific competition, with contest and scramble competition as endpoints, leads to vastly different responses to population density. Here we investigated the diversity of intraspecific competition among fish species, predicting that functional forms of density-dependent reproduction would be conserved in related taxa. Using a hierarchical model that links stock-recruitment parameters among populations, species, and orders, we found that the strength of overcompensation, and therefore the type of intraspecific competition, is tightly clustered within taxonomic groupings, as species within an order share similar degrees of compensation. Specifically, species within the orders Salmoniformes and Pleuronectiformes exhibited density dependence indicative of scramble competition (overcompensation) while the orders Clupeiformes, Gadiformes, Perciformes, and Scorpaeniformes exhibited dynamics consistent with contest competition (compensation). Maximum potential recruitment also varied among orders, but with less clustering across species. We also tested whether stock-recruitment parameters correlated with maximum body length among species, but found no strong relationship. Our results suggest that much of the variation in the form of density-dependent reproduction among fish species may be predicted taxonomically due to evolved life history traits and reproductive behaviors. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  20. Cross-linking of rabbit skeletal muscle troponin subunits: labeling of cysteine-98 of troponin C with 4-maleimidobenzophenone and analysis of products formed in the binary complex with troponin T and the ternary complex with troponins I and T.

    PubMed

    Leszyk, J; Collins, J H; Leavis, P C; Tao, T

    1988-09-06

    The sulfhydryl-specific, heterobifunctional, photoactivatable cross-linker 4-maleimidobenzophenone (BPMal) was used to study the interaction of rabbit skeletal muscle troponin subunits TnC, TnT, and TnI. TnC was labeled at Cys-98 by the maleimide moiety of BPMal and then mixed with either TnT alone or TnI plus TnT, in the presence of Ca2+. Upon photolysis, TnI and/or TnT formed covalent cross-links with TnC. The cross-linked TnC-TnT heterodimer obtained from the binary complex was digested into progressively smaller cross-linked peptides that were purified by HPLC and then characterized by amino acid analysis and sequencing. An initial cross-linked CNBr fraction contained the expected peptide CB9 (residues 84-135) of TnC, plus CNBr peptides spanning residues 152-230 of TnT. Results from a peptic digest of the CNBr cross-linked fraction permitted the identification of residues 159-197 as the most highly cross-linked region in TnT. A final subtilisin digest yielded a heterogeneous cross-linked fraction, which suggested that an especially high degree of cross-links was formed in the vicinity of residues 175-178 (Met-Lys-Lys-Lys) of TnT. Although this region of TnT had previously been implicated in binding, we show here for the first time that it is close to Cys-98 of TnC. In an analogous study on the binary complex of TnC and TnI [Leszyk, J., Collins, J. H., Leavis, P. C., & Tao, T. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 7042-7047], we previously showed that Cys-98 of TnC was cross-linked mainly to CN4, the "inhibitory region", of TnI.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Competitive Science: Is Competition Ruining Science?

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Science has always been a competitive undertaking. Despite recognition of the benefits of cooperation and team science, reduced availability of funding and jobs has made science more competitive than ever. Here we consider the benefits of competition in providing incentives to scientists and the adverse effects of competition on resource sharing, research integrity, and creativity. The history of science shows that transformative discoveries often occur in the absence of competition, which only emerges once fields are established and goals are defined. Measures to encourage collaboration and ameliorate competition in the scientific enterprise are discussed. PMID:25605760

  2. Lunabotics Mining Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Rob; Murphy, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes a competition to design a lunar robot (lunabot) that can be controlled either remotely or autonomously, isolated from the operator, and is designed to mine a lunar aggregate simulant. The competition is part of a systems engineering curriculum. The 2010 competition winners in five areas of the competition were acknowledged, and the 2011 competition was announced.

  3. An exploration of competitiveness and caring in relation to psychopathology.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Kirsten; Gilbert, Paul; Duarte, Joana

    2012-03-01

    Social mentality theory outlines how specialist systems have evolved to facilitate different types of social behaviour such as caring for offspring, forming alliances, and competing for resources. This research explored how different types of self-experience are linked to the different social mentalities of competitive social ranking (focusing on gaining and defending one's social position/status/rank) in contrast to caring (being helpful to others). Perceived low social rank (with feelings of being inferior and unfavourable social comparison, SC) has been linked to depression, but a caring sense of self has less so. We hypothesized therefore that depression, in both clinical and non-clinical populations, would be primarily linked to competitive and rank focused sense of self rather than a caring sense of self. Students (N = 312) and patients with depression (N = 48) completed self-report scales measuring: self-experience related to competitiveness and caring; social rank; social safeness; and depression, anxiety, and stress. The data suggest that in students, and particularly in patients, competitiveness (and feeling unsuccessful in competing for resources) is strongly associated with depression. Although caring shares a small correlation with depression in students, and with depression, anxiety, and stress in patients, when controlling for the rank variable of submissive behaviour this relationship ceases to be significant. Submissive behaviour was found to be a full mediator between caring and depression. We also found that how safe and comfortable one feels in one's social relationships (social safeness), was a full mediator between competitiveness and depression. So, it is the feeling of being unable to compete where one does not feel secure in one's social environment that is particularly linked to depression. The results of this study suggest that self-experience is complex and multifaceted and is linked to different social roles that are socially

  4. Competition and Cheating

    MedlinePlus

    ... of competition. In our culture, with few exceptions, competitiveness is commonplace and in fact is rewarded. Children ... or card games, and you will recognize the competitiveness, striving and social learning taking place and sometimes ...

  5. Competition--a common motif for the imprinting mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, D P

    1997-01-01

    Imprinted genes, in contrast to the majority of mammalian genes, are able to restrict expression to one of the two parental alleles in somatic diploid cells. Although the silent allele of an imprinted gene appears to be transcriptionally repressed, it often bears little other resemblance to normal genes in an inactive state. The key to the imprinting mechanism may be a form of parental-specific expression-competition between cis-linked genes and not parental-specific expression versus repression. Thus, the imprinting mechanism may be better understood if the chromosomal region containing imprinted genes is viewed as 'active' on both parental chromosomes. PMID:9384569

  6. Linking the Standard and Advanced Forms of the Raven's Progressive Matrices in both the Pencil-and-Paper and Computer-Adaptive-Testing Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styles, Irene; Andrich, David

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the use of the Rasch model to help implement computerized administration of the standard and advanced forms of Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM), to compare relative item difficulties, and to convert scores between the standard and advanced forms. The sample consisted of 95 girls and 95 boys in Australia. (SLD)

  7. Relation of the number of cross-links and mechanical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube films formed by a dehydration condensation reaction.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Go; Sasamori, Kenichiro; Kimura, Hisamichi; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Motomiya, Kenichi; Jeyadevan, Balachandran; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2006-11-23

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films were prepared by employing a condensation reaction utilizing 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) to cross-link each MWCNT with carboxylic acid and hydroxyl groups. Morphological changes in the resultant MWCNT films were monitored using scanning electron microscopy and showed that the MWCNTs were randomly intertwined in the films. The prepared MWCNT films were 17 mm in diameter and 20 microm in thickness, and the apparent density was 0.59 g/cm(3). Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy confirmed that each MWCNT modified with carboxylic acid and hydroxyl groups was cross-linked through the ester bond. It was found that the ratio of the number of ester cross-links and carbon atoms of the nanotubes per unit apparent volume (cm(3)) of condensed-MWCNT films was 5.27 x 10(-3) using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The tensile strength and Vickers hardness of condensed-MWCNT films achieved an average of 15 and 9.2 MPa, respectively, and were greater than those of free-standing MWCNT films without ester bond.

  8. Autonomy Support and Its Links to Physical Activity and Competitive Performance: Mediations through Motivation, Competence, Action Orientation and Harmonious Passion, and the Moderator Role of Autonomy Support by Perceived Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvari, Hallgeir; Ulstad, Svein Olav; Bagoien, Tor Egil; Skjesol, Knut

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test a Self-Determination Theory (SDT) process model in relation to involvement in physical activity and competitive performance among students (N = 190). In this model, perceived autonomy support from teachers and coaches was expected to be positively related to autonomous motivation, perceived competence,…

  9. Autonomy Support and Its Links to Physical Activity and Competitive Performance: Mediations through Motivation, Competence, Action Orientation and Harmonious Passion, and the Moderator Role of Autonomy Support by Perceived Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvari, Hallgeir; Ulstad, Svein Olav; Bagoien, Tor Egil; Skjesol, Knut

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test a Self-Determination Theory (SDT) process model in relation to involvement in physical activity and competitive performance among students (N = 190). In this model, perceived autonomy support from teachers and coaches was expected to be positively related to autonomous motivation, perceived competence,…

  10. Improved diagnostic performance of a commercial anaplasma antibody competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using recombinant major surface protein 5–glutathione S-transferase fusion protein as antigen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study tested the hypothesis that removal of maltose binding protein from recombinant antigen used for plate coating would improve the specificity of Anaplasma antibody competitive ELISA. Three hundred and eight sera with significant MBP antibody binding (=30%I) in Anaplasma negative herds was 1...

  11. Competition in the Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Mark C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The conceptual introduction to this issue focuses on two questions: why study competition and what is a competitive market. Four instructional units follow, beginning with "Choosing Competitors." This preschool and kindergarten unit involves students in competitive games (naming colors), role playing competitive behaviors, comparing…

  12. Characterization of N-linked oligosaccharides bearing sialyl lewis x moieties on an alternatively glycosylated form of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1).

    PubMed

    Picard, M D; Pettey, C L; Marsh, H C; Thomas, L J

    2000-02-01

    We sought to produce a complement inhibitory protein possessing oligosaccharides specifically modified to contain the sialyl Lewis x (sLe(x)) moiety. This modified glycoprotein could combine anti-complement activity with the ability to inhibit selectin-mediated interactions and concentrate this activity to sites of activated endothelium where selectins are upregulated. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), previously shown to be effective in inhibiting the complement cascade, was produced in a cell line capable of adding fucose to N-linked oligosaccharides in the alpha1-3 linkage, which is necessary for sLe(x) glycosylation. The glycoprotein purified from these cells was designated sCR1sLe(x), and may prove to be more effective than sCR1 in some clinical applications. Detailed analysis and characterization of sCR1sLe(x) was performed to confirm that the N-linked oligosaccharides possessed sLe(x) moieties and also to determine the extent of sLe(x) glycosylation. The glycoproteins were characterized by oligosaccharide profiling, sequencing, linkage analysis and quantified by differential enzymic digestion, using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis. The major glycans were identified as biantennary oligosaccharides (including sialylated and non-core fucosylated glycans). The linkages of sialic acid and the branched fucose were analysed by digestion with linkage-specific enzymes and subsequent separation by electrophoresis. All data were consistent with the presence of sLe(x) moieties on the N-linked oligosaccharides of sCR1sLe(x). sCR1sLe(x) is a prime example of a recombinant protein expressed with oligosaccharides engineered for a specific biological function, and produced using a commercially viable method.

  13. Weyl-link semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Po-Yao; Yee, Chuck-Hou

    2017-08-01

    A family of topological semimetallic phases where twofold degenerate gapless points form linked rings is introduced. We refer to this phase as Weyl-link semimetals. A concrete two-band model with two linked nodal lines is constructed. We demonstrate that the Chern-Simons 3-form depends on the linking number of rings in a generic two-band model. In addition, we show the emergence of zero-energy modes in the Landau level spectrum can reveal the location of nodal lines, providing a method of probing their linking number.

  14. Competitive sourcing: From captivity to competition

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Eleven papers were presented at Elcon`s Annual Seminar on Electric Issues held on October 13-14, 1994 in Washington, DC. The theme of the conference was on competitive sourcing: From Captivity to Competition. The following topics were discussed: the FERC and competition in the electric power markets; the industrial role in the changing electric industry; commercials and residentials; the development of electricity futures; earthquakes in the states: Michigan experience; the loss of industrial load; competitive sourcing; municipalization; power marketing; and what is a non-sham wholesaler. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. Analog Optical Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Charles H., III

    2004-05-01

    Unlike books that focus on the devices used in links, such as lasers and photodiodes, among others, this text focuses on the next level. It covers the collection of devices that form a link, how the individual device performance affects the link performance, or the reverse. Analog links are used for the distribution of cable TV signals, and in conveying the signals to and from antennas (so called antenna remoting). The design of analog links differs significantly from digital links which are primarily used in telecommunications.

  16. Below ground competition among invading detritivores

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The factors regulating soil animal communities are poorly understood. Current theory favors niche complementarity and facilitation over competition as the primary forms of non-trophic interspecific interaction in soil fauna. However, competition frequently has been suggested as an important communi...

  17. N,N{prime}-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide cross-linking suggests a central core of helices II in oligomers of URF13, the pore-forming T-toxin receptor of cms-T maize mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, D.M. |; Kaspi, C.I.; Siedow, J.N.; Levings, C.S. III

    1994-08-16

    URF13 is a mitochondrially encoded, integral membrane protein found only in maize carrying the cms-T cytoplasm. URF13 is associated with cytoplasmic male sterility, Texas type, and causes susceptibility to the fungal pathogens Bipolaris maydis race T and Phyllosticta maydis. URF13 is predicted to contain three transmembrane {alpha}-helices and is a receptor for the pathotoxins (T-toxins) produced by B. maydis race T and P. maydis. Binding of T-toxin to URF13 leads to membrane permeability. Cross-linking of URF13 oligomers with N,N{prime}-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) protects Escherichia coli cells expressing URF13 and cms-T mitochondria from the permeability caused by T-toxin or methomyl. Using mutated forms of URF13 expressed in E. coli cells, the authors determined the molecular mechanism of DCCD protection. They separately changed Lys-37 in helix II to isoleucine (K37I-URF13) and Lys-32 in the helix I/helix II loop region to alanine (K32A-URF13). DCCD treatment of K37I-URF13-expressing cells did not protect the cells from permeability caused by T-toxin or methomyl. DCCD cross-linking was greatly reduced in K37I-URF13 and in D39V-URF13-expressing cells, but it was unaffected in K32A-URF13-expressing cells. Binding of methomyl or T-toxin decreases DCCD cross-linking of URF13 oligomers expressed in either E. coli or cms-T mitochondria. They conclude that Asp-39 in helix II is cross-linked by DCCD to Lys-37 in helix II of an adjacent URF13 molecule and that this cross-linking protects against toxin-mediated permeabilization. The results also indicate that helices II form a central core in URF13 oligomers.

  18. Hierarchical competitions subserving multi-attribute choice

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Laurence T; Dolan, Raymond J; Behrens, Timothy EJ

    2015-01-01

    Valuation is a key tenet of decision neuroscience, where it is generally assumed that different attributes of competing options are assimilated into unitary values. Such values are central to current neural models of choice. By contrast, psychological studies emphasize complex interactions between choice and valuation. Principles of neuronal selection also suggest competitive inhibition may occur in early valuation stages, before option selection. Here, we show behavior in multi-attribute choice is best explained by a model involving competition at multiple levels of representation. This hierarchical model also explains neural signals in human brain regions previously linked to valuation, including striatum, parietal and prefrontal cortex, where activity represents competition within-attribute, competition between attributes, and option selection. This multi-layered inhibition framework challenges the assumption that option values are computed before choice. Instead our results indicate a canonical competition mechanism throughout all stages of a processing hierarchy, not simply at a final choice stage. PMID:25306549

  19. Competitive Bidding in Medicare: Who Benefits From Competition?

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zirui; Landrum, Mary Beth; Chernew, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To conduct the first empirical study of competitive bidding in Medicare. Study Design and Methods We analyzed 2006–2010 Medicare Advantage data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services using longitudinal models adjusted for market and plan characteristics. Results A $1 increase in Medicare's payment to health maintenance organization (HMO) plans led to a $0.49 (P <.001) increase in plan bids, with $0.34 (P <.001) going to beneficiaries in the form of extra benefits or lower cost sharing. With preferred provider organization and private fee-for-service plans included, higher Medicare payments increased bids less ($0.33 per dollar), suggesting more competition among these latter plans. Conclusions As a market-based alternative to cost control through administrative pricing, competitive bidding relies on private insurance plans proposing prices they are willing to accept for insuring a beneficiary. However, competition is imperfect in the Medicare bidding market. As much as half of every dollar in increased plan payment went to higher bids rather than to beneficiaries. While having more insurers in a market lowered bids, the design of any bidding system for Medicare should recognize this shortcoming of competition. PMID:23009305

  20. Physics Competitions in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugosi, ErzséBet SzéP, Jenö

    The following sections are included: * Description of Physics Competitions in Hungary * Training of the Hungarian Team before the International Physics Olympiad * Few Problems for the Hungarian National Physics Competition for 15 - 16 Year Old students * Problems for the Hungarian National Physics Competition in 1989 for 17 - 18 Year Old Students * Experimental Problems for the Competition of KöMAL for 15 - 18 Year Old Students * Problems for the Hungarian National Physics Competition in 1989 for 17 - 18 Year Old Students * solving this equation we obtain m = 18kg * The work done is 427 joule - 80 joule 347 joule * Experimental Problems for the Competition of KöMAL for 15 - 18 Pear Old Students

  1. PD-1 gene polymorphic variation is linked with first symptom of disease and severity of relapsing-remitting form of MS.

    PubMed

    Pawlak-Adamska, Edyta; Nowak, Oskar; Karabon, Lidia; Pokryszko-Dragan, Anna; Partyka, Anna; Tomkiewicz, Anna; Ptaszkowski, Jakub; Frydecka, Irena; Podemski, Ryszard; Dybko, Jaroslaw; Bilinska, Malgorzata

    2017-04-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), where inflammation, demyelination together with the axonopathy are the cardinal features on pathologic ground, with a combined genetic and environmental background. The associations of PD-1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): PD-1.3 (in intron 4), PD-1.5 and PD-1.9 (both in exon 5) with clinical manifestation of MS in 479 south Polish individuals including 203 MS patients were analyzed. Presence of PD-1.5T allele was linked with the first manifestations of disease: diplopia and pyramidal signs - favored pyramidal signs but protected against of diplopia development. Farther, PD-1.3G/PD-1.5C/PD-1.9C haplotype significantly favored whereas GTC protected against diplopia. Besides, GTT haplotype strongly favored non-severe RRMS outcome and ATC haplotype was specific only for these MS patients. Our population-based case-control study, investigating selected three PD-1 SNPs: PD-1.3, PD-1.5 and PD-1.9, revealed that polymorphic variation may be rather disease-modifying than MS risk factor.

  2. Triplex-forming ability of oligonucleotides containing 1-aryl-1,2,3-triazole nucleobases linked via a two atom-length spacer.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yoshiyuki; Nakahara, Motoi; Obika, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    Phosphoramidites containing 2-propynyloxy or 1-butyn-4-yl as nucleobase precursors were synthesized and introduced into oligonucleotides using an automated DNA synthesizer. Copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of the oligonucleotides with various azides gave the corresponding triazolylated oligonucleotides, triplex-forming ability of these synthetic oligonucleotides with double-stranded DNA targets was evaluated by UV melting experiments. It was found that nucleobases containing 2-(1-m-carbonylaminophenyl-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)ethyl units likely interacted with A of a TA base pair in a parallel triplex DNA.

  3. Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liles, Cassandra

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition is a new competition that needs graphics, logos, rules, as well as an arena. Although this is the first year of the competition, the competition is modeled after an existing competition, the Centennial Lunar Excavator Challenge. This competition however is aimed at college students. This makes the challenge identifying key aspects of the original competition and modeling them to fit into an easier task, and creating exciting advertisement that helps encourage participation. By using a youth focus group, young insight, as well as guiding advice from experts in the field, hopefully an arena can be designed and built, rules can be molded and created to fit, and alluring graphics can be printed to bring about a successful first year of the Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition.

  4. Diversifying evolution of competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Baldauf, Sebastian A; Engqvist, Leif; Weissing, Franz J

    2014-10-29

    In many species, individuals express phenotypic characteristics that enhance their competitiveness, that is, the ability to acquire resources in competition with others. Moreover, the degree of competitiveness varies considerably across individuals and in time. By means of an evolutionary model, we provide an explanation for this finding. We make the assumption that investment into competitiveness enhances the probability to acquire a high-quality resource, but at the same time reduces the ability of exploiting acquired resources with maximal efficiency. The model reveals that under a broad range of conditions competitiveness either converges to a polymorphic state, where individuals differing in competitive ability stably coexist, or is subject to perpetual transitions between periods of high and low competitiveness. The dynamics becomes even more complex if females can evolve preferences for (or against) competitive males. In extreme cases, such preferences can even drive the population to extinction.

  5. Compactness of the Lithium Peroxide Thin Film Formed in Li-O2 Batteries and Its Link to the Charge Transport Mechanism: Insights from Stochastic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yinghui; Zhao, Ruijie; Deng, Yue; Franco, Alejandro A

    2017-02-02

    We simulated the discharge process of Li-O2 batteries and the growth of Li2O2 thin films at the mesoscale with a novel kinetic Monte Carlo model, which combined a stochastic description of mass transport and detailed elementary reaction kinetics. The simulation results show that the ordering of the Li2O2 thin film is determined by the interplay between diffusion and reaction kinetics. Due to the fast reaction kinetics on the catalyst, the Li2O2 formed in the presence of catalyst (cat-CNF) shows a low degree of ordering and is more likely to be amorphous. Moreover, the mobility of the LiO2 ion pair, which depends largely on the nature of the electrolyte, also impacts the homogeneity of the compactness of the Li2O2 thin film. These results are of high importance for understanding the role of the catalyst and reaction kinetics in Li-O2 batteries.

  6. Competition for Assistance Agreements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    It is EPA policy to promote competition in the award of assistance agreements to the maximum extent practicable.When assistance agreements are awarded competitively, it is EPA policy that the competitive process be fair and open & that no applicant receive

  7. Strategizing for Intense Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, William; Bourgeois, Ernest J., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Examines trend toward more aggressive student recruiting strategies by colleges and universities, applying a model that assesses five competitive forces-cause and effect of competition, the expanding marketplace, substitute products, buyer power, and supplier power, and examines various strategies for dealing with these competitive forces, such as…

  8. In Defence of Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prvulovich, Zika Rad

    1982-01-01

    Examines objections to competition as presented by educational philosopher Michael Fielding and others. The two major types of criticism of competition are that it is unfair and divisive and that it is selfish and immoral. The author advocates educational experiences which combine self-competition with cooperation. (AM)

  9. Competition and Intrinsic Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripathi, Kailas Nath

    1992-01-01

    Reports on a study of competition, motivation, and performance among 60 adolescents in India. Finds that direct competition with another person led to higher levels of immediate performance. Also finds that indirect competition against a pre-set standard resulted in greater intrinsic motivation. (CFR)

  10. Research on Competitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnsed, Vernon; Sochinski, James

    1983-01-01

    Marching band competition has become a major factor in instrumental music education. Studies reveal that directors, administrators, parents and students see the benefits of marching contests as mainly extra-musical. High school students and college freshmen had the most positive attitudes toward marching competition. The impact of competition on…

  11. In Defence of Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prvulovich, Zika Rad

    1982-01-01

    Examines objections to competition as presented by educational philosopher Michael Fielding and others. The two major types of criticism of competition are that it is unfair and divisive and that it is selfish and immoral. The author advocates educational experiences which combine self-competition with cooperation. (AM)

  12. Strategizing for Intense Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, William; Bourgeois, Ernest J., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Examines trend toward more aggressive student recruiting strategies by colleges and universities, applying a model that assesses five competitive forces-cause and effect of competition, the expanding marketplace, substitute products, buyer power, and supplier power, and examines various strategies for dealing with these competitive forces, such as…

  13. Cooperation Improves Success during Intergroup Competition: An Analysis Using Data from Professional Soccer Tournaments.

    PubMed

    David, Gwendolyn Kim; Wilson, Robbie Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The benefit mutually gained by cooperators is considered the ultimate explanation for why cooperation evolved among non-relatives. During intergroup competition, cooperative behaviours within groups that provide a competitive edge over their opposition should be favoured by selection, particularly in lethal human warfare. Aside from forming larger groups, three other ways that individuals within a group can cooperate to improve their chances of gaining a mutual benefit are: (i) greater networking, (ii) contributing more effort, and (iii) dividing labour. Greater cooperation is expected to increase the chances of gaining a group benefit by improving proficiency in the tasks critical to success-yet empirical tests of this prediction using real-world cases are absent. In this study, we used data derived from 12 international and professional soccer competitions to test the predictions that: 1) greater levels of cooperative behaviour are associated with winning group contests, 2) the three forms of cooperation differ in relative importance for winning matches, 3) competition and tournament-type affect the levels of cooperation and shooting proficiency in matches, and 4) greater levels of networking behaviour are associated with increased proficiency in the most critical task linked with winning success in soccer-shooting at goal. Winners were best predicted by higher shooting proficiency, followed by greater frequencies of networking interactions within a team but unexpectedly, fewer networking partners and less division of labour. Although significant variation was detected across competitions and tournament-types, greater levels of networking behaviour were consistently associated with increased proficiency in shooting at goal, which in turn was linked with winning success. This study empirically supports the idea that intergroup competition can favour cooperation among non-relatives.

  14. Cooperation Improves Success during Intergroup Competition: An Analysis Using Data from Professional Soccer Tournaments

    PubMed Central

    David, Gwendolyn Kim; Wilson, Robbie Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The benefit mutually gained by cooperators is considered the ultimate explanation for why cooperation evolved among non-relatives. During intergroup competition, cooperative behaviours within groups that provide a competitive edge over their opposition should be favoured by selection, particularly in lethal human warfare. Aside from forming larger groups, three other ways that individuals within a group can cooperate to improve their chances of gaining a mutual benefit are: (i) greater networking, (ii) contributing more effort, and (iii) dividing labour. Greater cooperation is expected to increase the chances of gaining a group benefit by improving proficiency in the tasks critical to success—yet empirical tests of this prediction using real-world cases are absent. In this study, we used data derived from 12 international and professional soccer competitions to test the predictions that: 1) greater levels of cooperative behaviour are associated with winning group contests, 2) the three forms of cooperation differ in relative importance for winning matches, 3) competition and tournament-type affect the levels of cooperation and shooting proficiency in matches, and 4) greater levels of networking behaviour are associated with increased proficiency in the most critical task linked with winning success in soccer—shooting at goal. Winners were best predicted by higher shooting proficiency, followed by greater frequencies of networking interactions within a team but unexpectedly, fewer networking partners and less division of labour. Although significant variation was detected across competitions and tournament-types, greater levels of networking behaviour were consistently associated with increased proficiency in shooting at goal, which in turn was linked with winning success. This study empirically supports the idea that intergroup competition can favour cooperation among non-relatives. PMID:26313929

  15. Water in low-mass star-forming regions with Herschel. The link between water gas and ice in protostellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzl, M.; Visser, R.; Walsh, C.; Albertsson, T.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; Mottram, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Our aim is to determine the critical parameters in water chemistry and the contribution of water to the oxygen budget by observing and modelling water gas and ice for a sample of eleven low-mass protostars, for which both forms of water have been observed. Methods: A simplified chemistry network, which is benchmarked against more sophisticated chemical networks, is developed that includes the necessary ingredients to determine the water vapour and ice abundance profiles in the cold, outer envelope in which the temperature increases towards the protostar. Comparing the results from this chemical network to observations of water emission lines and previously published water ice column densities, allows us to probe the influence of various agents (e.g., far-ultraviolet (FUV) field, initial abundances, timescales, and kinematics). Results: The observed water ice abundances with respect to hydrogen nuclei in our sample are 30-80 ppm, and therefore contain only 10-30% of the volatile oxygen budget of 320 ppm. The keys to reproduce this result are a low initial water ice abundance after the pre-collapse phase together with the fact that atomic oxygen cannot freeze-out and form water ice in regions with Tdust ≳ 15 K. This requires short prestellar core lifetimes ≲0.1 Myr. The water vapour profile is shaped through the interplay of FUV photodesorption, photodissociation, and freeze-out. The water vapour line profiles are an invaluable tracer for the FUV photon flux and envelope kinematics. Conclusions: The finding that only a fraction of the oxygen budget is locked in water ice can be explained either by a short pre-collapse time of ≲0.1 Myr at densities of nH ~ 104 cm-3, or by some other process that resets the initial water ice abundance for the post-collapse phase. A key for the understanding of the water ice abundance is the binding energy of atomic oxygen on ice. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European

  16. Eaf5/7/3 form a functionally independent NuA4 submodule linked to RNA polymerase II-coupled nucleosome recycling

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Dorine; Cramet, Myriam; Wang, Alice Y; Steunou, Anne-Lise; Lacoste, Nicolas; Schulze, Julia M; Côté, Valérie; Monnet-Saksouk, Julie; Piquet, Sandra; Nourani, Amine; Kobor, Michael S; Côté, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    The NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex is required for gene regulation, cell cycle progression, and DNA repair. Dissection of the 13-subunit complex reveals that the Eaf7 subunit bridges Eaf5 with Eaf3, a H3K36me3-binding chromodomain protein, and this Eaf5/7/3 trimer is anchored to NuA4 through Eaf5. This trimeric subcomplex represents a functional module, and a large portion exists in a native form outside the NuA4 complex. Gene-specific and genome-wide location analyses indicate that Eaf5/7/3 correlates with transcription activity and is enriched over the coding region. In agreement with a role in transcription elongation, the Eaf5/7/3 trimer interacts with phosphorylated RNA polymerase II and helps its progression. Loss of Eaf5/7/3 partially suppresses intragenic cryptic transcription arising in set2 mutants, supporting a role in nucleosome destabilization. On the other hand, loss of the trimer leads to an increase of replication-independent histone exchange over the coding region of transcribed genes. Taken together, these results lead to a model where Eaf5/7/3 associates with elongating polymerase to promote the disruption of nucleosomes in its path, but also their refolding in its wake. PMID:24843044

  17. Antisense Proline-Arginine RAN dipeptides linked to C9ORF72-ALS/FTD form toxic nuclear aggregates that initiate in vitro and in vivo neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xinmei; Tan, Wenzhi; Westergard, Thomas; Krishnamurthy, Karthik; ShamamandriMarkandaiah, Shashirekha; Shi, Yingxiao; Lin, Shaoyu; Shneider, Neil A.; Monaghan, John; Pandey, Udai B.; Pasinelli, Piera; Ichida, Justin K.; Trotti, Davide

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Expanded GGGGCC nucleotide repeats within the C9ORF72 gene are the most common genetic mutation associated with both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Sense and antisense transcripts of these expansions are translated to form five dipeptide repeat proteins (DRPs). We employed primary cortical and motor neuron cultures, live-cell imaging, and transgenic fly models and found that the arginine-rich dipeptides, in particular Proline-Arginine (PR), are potently neurotoxic. Factors that anticipated their neurotoxicity included aggregation in nucleoli, decreased number of processing bodies, and stress granules formation, implying global translational dysregulation as path accountable for toxicity. Nuclear PR aggregates were also found in human-induced motor neurons and postmortem spinal cord tissues from C9ORF72 ALS and ALS/FTD patients. Intronic G4C2 transcripts, but not loss of C9ORF72 protein, are also toxic to motor and cortical neurons. Interestingly, G4C2 transcript-mediated neurotoxicity synergizes with that of PR aggregates, suggesting convergence of mechanisms. PMID:25521377

  18. Antisense proline-arginine RAN dipeptides linked to C9ORF72-ALS/FTD form toxic nuclear aggregates that initiate in vitro and in vivo neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xinmei; Tan, Wenzhi; Westergard, Thomas; Krishnamurthy, Karthik; Markandaiah, Shashirekha S; Shi, Yingxiao; Lin, Shaoyu; Shneider, Neil A; Monaghan, John; Pandey, Udai B; Pasinelli, Piera; Ichida, Justin K; Trotti, Davide

    2014-12-17

    Expanded GGGGCC (G4C2) nucleotide repeats within the C9ORF72 gene are the most common genetic mutation associated with both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Sense and antisense transcripts of these expansions are translated to form five dipeptide repeat proteins (DRPs). We employed primary cortical and motor neuron cultures, live-cell imaging, and transgenic fly models and found that the arginine-rich dipeptides, in particular Proline-Arginine (PR), are potently neurotoxic. Factors that anticipated their neurotoxicity included aggregation in nucleoli, decreased number of processing bodies, and stress granule formation, implying global translational dysregulation as path accountable for toxicity. Nuclear PR aggregates were also found in human induced motor neurons and postmortem spinal cord tissues from C9ORF72 ALS and ALS/FTD patients. Intronic G4C2 transcripts, but not loss of C9ORF72 protein, are also toxic to motor and cortical neurons. Interestingly, G4C2 transcript-mediated neurotoxicity synergizes with that of PR aggregates, suggesting convergence of mechanisms.

  19. Supplementing managed competition.

    PubMed

    Higgins, W

    President Clinton's proposal for health care reform calls for managed competition within global expenditure targets. However, it is unlikely that health plans will have sufficient leverage with providers to negotiate arrangements consistent with expenditure targets in nonurban areas. This paper describes a reimbursement system based on competitive prospective payment and capitation (CPPC) which can supplement managed competition in less populous areas or replace managed competition should that strategy prove unsuccessful. The CPPC system is capable of enforcing an expenditure target while encouraging the formation of capitated networks and creating strong incentives for efficiency. It is generally compatible with the Clinton administration's version of managed competition.

  20. Team Competition Effects on Classroom Group Process. Report Number 174.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVries, David L.; And Others

    This study examined the effects of a unique form of team competition involving competition among individuals and teams on a variety of classroom group processes. A 3 x 2 (treatment x teacher) design was employed using intact high school social studies classes over a 12-week period. When compared to individual competitions, the team competition…

  1. Competitive mimicry: synthesis of a neglected class of mimetic relationships.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Meredith M; Grether, Gregory F

    2007-10-01

    Protective mimicry has been studied extensively for over a century. Mimicry in a competitive context, however, has remained largely neglected. It has been overlooked in mimicry classification schemes, and few systems have been rigorously studied. We define "competitive mimicry" as mimicry that enables access to a defended resource or aids in defense of a resource. We explain how competitive mimicry fits with existing mimicry classification schemes and outline criteria for identifying competitive mimicry systems. For each form of competitive mimicry, we describe the effects of the mimic on the model and receiver, predict the evolutionary dynamics of the system, and present examples. We then identify key directions for the study of competitive mimicry.

  2. A Disulfide Bond-forming Machine Is Linked to the Sortase-mediated Pilus Assembly Pathway in the Gram-positive Bacterium Actinomyces oris*

    PubMed Central

    Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Chang, Chungyu; Wu, Chenggang; Jooya, Neda; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2015-01-01

    Export of cell surface pilins in Gram-positive bacteria likely occurs by the translocation of unfolded precursor polypeptides; however, how the unfolded pilins gain their native conformation is presently unknown. Here, we present physiological studies to demonstrate that the FimA pilin of Actinomyces oris contains two disulfide bonds. Alanine substitution of cysteine residues forming the C-terminal disulfide bridge abrogates pilus assembly, in turn eliminating biofilm formation and polymicrobial interaction. Transposon mutagenesis of A. oris yielded a mutant defective in adherence to Streptococcus oralis, and revealed the essential role of a vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) gene in pilus assembly. Targeted deletion of vkor results in the same defects, which are rescued by ectopic expression of VKOR, but not a mutant containing an alanine substitution in its conserved CXXC motif. Depletion of mdbA, which encodes a membrane-bound thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase, abrogates pilus assembly and alters cell morphology. Remarkably, overexpression of MdbA or a counterpart from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, rescues the Δvkor mutant. By alkylation assays, we demonstrate that VKOR is required for MdbA reoxidation. Furthermore, crystallographic studies reveal that A. oris MdbA harbors a thioredoxin-like fold with the conserved CXXC active site. Consistently, each MdbA enzyme catalyzes proper disulfide bond formation within FimA in vitro that requires the catalytic CXXC motif. Because the majority of signal peptide-containing proteins encoded by A. oris possess multiple Cys residues, we propose that MdbA and VKOR constitute a major folding machine for the secretome of this organism. This oxidative protein folding pathway may be a common feature in Actinobacteria. PMID:26170452

  3. Link direction for link prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ke-ke; Small, Michael; Yan, Wei-sheng

    2017-03-01

    Almost all previous studies on link prediction have focused on using the properties of the network to predict the existence of links between pairs of nodes. Unfortunately, previous methods rarely consider the role of link direction for link prediction. In fact, many real-world complex networks are directed and ignoring the link direction will mean overlooking important information. In this study, we propose a phase-dynamic algorithm of the directed network nodes to analyse the role of link directions and demonstrate that the bi-directional links and the one-directional links have different roles in link prediction and network structure formation. From this, we propose new directional prediction methods and use six real networks to test our algorithms. In real networks, we find that compared to a pair of nodes which are connected by a one-directional link, a pair of nodes which are connected by a bi-directional link always have higher probabilities to connect to the common neighbours with only bi-directional links (or conversely by one-directional links). We suggest that, in the real networks, the bi-directional links will generally be more informative for link prediction and network structure formation. In addition, we propose a new directional randomized algorithm to demonstrate that the direction of the links plays a significant role in link prediction and network structure formation.

  4. Crystal structure of a nucleoside model for the inter­strand cross-link formed by the reaction of 2′-de­oxy­guanosine and an abasic site in duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Michael J.; Ruddraraju, Kasi Viswanatharaju; Barnes, Charles L.; Gates, Kent S.

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, 9-[(2R,4S,5R)-4-hy­droxy-5-(hy­droxy­meth­yl)tetra­hydro­furan-2-yl]-2-{[(2R,4S,5R)-4-meth­oxy-5-(meth­oxy­meth­yl)tetra­hydro­furan-2-yl]amino}-1H-purin-6(9H)-one, C17H25N5O7, crystallizes with two independent mol­ecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit. In the crystal, the guanosine moieties of mol­ecules A and B are linked by N—H⋯N and O—H⋯N hydrogen-bonding inter­actions, forming ribbons which are stacked to form columns along [100]. These columns are then linked by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the ribose moieties and numerous C—H⋯O inter­actions to complete the three-dimensional structure. PMID:27308004

  5. Approximate kernel competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2015-03-01

    Kernel competitive learning has been successfully used to achieve robust clustering. However, kernel competitive learning (KCL) is not scalable for large scale data processing, because (1) it has to calculate and store the full kernel matrix that is too large to be calculated and kept in the memory and (2) it cannot be computed in parallel. In this paper we develop a framework of approximate kernel competitive learning for processing large scale dataset. The proposed framework consists of two parts. First, it derives an approximate kernel competitive learning (AKCL), which learns kernel competitive learning in a subspace via sampling. We provide solid theoretical analysis on why the proposed approximation modelling would work for kernel competitive learning, and furthermore, we show that the computational complexity of AKCL is largely reduced. Second, we propose a pseudo-parallelled approximate kernel competitive learning (PAKCL) based on a set-based kernel competitive learning strategy, which overcomes the obstacle of using parallel programming in kernel competitive learning and significantly accelerates the approximate kernel competitive learning for large scale clustering. The empirical evaluation on publicly available datasets shows that the proposed AKCL and PAKCL can perform comparably as KCL, with a large reduction on computational cost. Also, the proposed methods achieve more effective clustering performance in terms of clustering precision against related approximate clustering approaches.

  6. Matching Effective HR Practices with Competitive Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuler, Randall S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines links between three competitive strategies (cost reduction, quality improvement, and innovation) and human resources (HR) practices. Describes a framework for ensuring that the two are made compatible and illustrates the process by showing how one $20 million business wrestled with these compatibility issues. (CH)

  7. Matching Effective HR Practices with Competitive Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuler, Randall S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines links between three competitive strategies (cost reduction, quality improvement, and innovation) and human resources (HR) practices. Describes a framework for ensuring that the two are made compatible and illustrates the process by showing how one $20 million business wrestled with these compatibility issues. (CH)

  8. Clusters and the new economics of competition.

    PubMed

    Porter, M E

    1998-01-01

    Economic geography in an era of global competition poses a paradox. In theory, location should no longer be a source of competitive advantage. Open global markets, rapid transportation, and high-speed communications should allow any company to source any thing from any place at any time. But in practice, Michael Porter demonstrates, location remains central to competition. Today's economic map of the world is characterized by what Porter calls clusters: critical masses in one place of linked industries and institutions--from suppliers to universities to government agencies--that enjoy unusual competitive success in a particular field. The most famous example are found in Silicon Valley and Hollywood, but clusters dot the world's landscape. Porter explains how clusters affect competition in three broad ways: first, by increasing the productivity of companies based in the area; second, by driving the direction and pace of innovation; and third, by stimulating the formation of new businesses within the cluster. Geographic, cultural, and institutional proximity provides companies with special access, closer relationships, better information, powerful incentives, and other advantages that are difficult to tap from a distance. The more complex, knowledge-based, and dynamic the world economy becomes, the more this is true. Competitive advantage lies increasingly in local things--knowledge, relationships, and motivation--that distant rivals cannot replicate. Porter challenges the conventional wisdom about how companies should be configured, how institutions such as universities can contribute to competitive success, and how governments can promote economic development and prosperity.

  9. THE COMPONENTS OF KIN COMPETITION

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyken, J. David

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that competition among kin alters the rate and often the direction of evolution in subdivided populations. Yet much remains unclear about the ecological and demographic causes of kin competition, or what role life cycle plays in promoting or ameliorating its effects. Using the multilevel Price equation, I derive a general equation for evolution in structured populations under an arbitrary intensity of kin competition. This equation partitions the effects of selection and demography, and recovers numerous previous models as special cases. I quantify the degree of kin competition, α, which explicitly depends on life cycle. I show how life cycle and demographic assumptions can be incorporated into kin selection models via α, revealing life cycles that are more or less permissive of altruism. As an example, I give closed-form results for Hamilton’s rule in a three-stage life cycle. Although results are sensitive to life cycle in general, I identify three demographic conditions that give life cycle invariant results. Under the infinite island model, α is a function of the scale of density regulation and dispersal rate, effectively disentangling these two phenomena. Population viscosity per se does not impede kin selection. PMID:20482610

  10. Quantifying competitive ability of perennial grasses to inhibit Scotch broom

    Treesearch

    Timothy Harrington

    2011-01-01

    Greenhouse pot studies were conducted to quantify the competitive abilities of three native perennial grass species to inhibit development of Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius (L.) Link ) seedlings: spike bentgrass (Agrostis exarata Trin. ), blue wildrye (Elymus glaucus Buckley), and western fescue (

  11. First Robotics Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-06

    Members of team 2377, in red, from Chesapeake High School in Maryland, react following a match during the second day of competition at the First Robotics Competition, Saturday, March 6, 2010, in Washington. The student competition is called "For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology", or FIRST. The program was founded in 1989 by Dean Kamen to inspire an appreciation of science and technology in young people, their schools and communities. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  12. Four paths of competition

    SciTech Connect

    Studness, C.M.

    1995-05-01

    The financial community`s focus on utility competition has been riveted on the proceedings now in progress at state regulatory commissions. The fear that something immediately damaging will come out of these proceedings seems to have diminished in recent months, and the stock market has reacted favorably. However, regulatory developments are only one of four paths leading to competition; the others are the marketplace, the legislatures, and the courts. Each could play a critical role in the emergence of competition.

  13. Intramural Gymnastics Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, William L.

    1981-01-01

    An intramural gymnastic competition, if properly organized, can foster student and community interest in gymnastics. Aspects of organization and essential preplanning include: directing, judging, scoring, and managing. (JN)

  14. Cell competition in vertebrate organ size regulation.

    PubMed

    Penzo-Méndez, Alfredo I; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-01-01

    The study of animal organ size determination has provided evidence of the existence of organ-intrinsic mechanisms that 'sense' and adjust organ growth. Cell competition, a form of cell interaction that equalizes cell population growth, has been proposed to play a role in organ size regulation. Cell competition involves a cell-context dependent response triggered by perceived differences in cell growth and/or proliferation rates, resulting in apoptosis in growth-disadvantaged cells and compensatory expansion of the more 'fit' cells. The mechanisms that allow cells to compare growth are not yet understood, but a number of genes and pathways have been implicated in cell competition. These include Myc, the members of the Hippo, JAK/STAT and WNT signaling pathways, and the Dlg/Lgl/Scrib and the Crb/Std/PatJ membrane protein complexes. Cell competition was initially characterized in the Drosophila imaginal disc, but several recent studies have shown that cell competition occurs in mouse embryonic stem cells and in the embryonic epiblast, where it plays a role in the regulation of early embryo size. In addition, competition-like behavior has been described in the adult mouse liver and the hematopoietic stem cell compartment. These data indicate that cell competition plays a more universal role in organ size regulation. In addition, as some authors have suggested that similar types of competitive behavior may operate in during tumorigenesis, there may be additional practical reasons for understanding this fundamental process of intercellular communication.

  15. Female competition and aggression: interdisciplinary perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Stockley, Paula; Campbell, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a Theme Issue combining interdisciplinary perspectives in the study of female competition and aggression. Despite a history of being largely overlooked, evidence is now accumulating for the widespread evolutionary significance of female competition. Here, we provide a synthesis of contributions to this Theme Issue on humans and other vertebrates, and highlight directions for future research. Females compete for resources needed to survive and reproduce, and for preferred mates. Although female aggression takes diverse forms, under most circumstances relatively low-risk competitive strategies are favoured, most probably due to constraints of offspring production and care. In social species, dominance relationships and threats of punishment can resolve social conflict without resort to direct aggression, and coalitions or alliances may reduce risk of retaliation. Consistent with these trends, indirect aggression is a low cost but effective form of competition among young women. Costs are also minimized by flexibility in expression of competitive traits, with aggressive behaviour and competitive signalling tailored to social and ecological conditions. Future research on female competition and the proximate mediators of female aggression will be greatly enhanced by opportunities for interdisciplinary exchange, as evidenced by contributions to this Theme Issue. PMID:24167303

  16. Reproductive efficiency and shade avoidance plasticity under simulated competition.

    PubMed

    Fazlioglu, Fatih; Al-Namazi, Ali; Bonser, Stephen P

    2016-07-01

    Plant strategy and life-history theories make different predictions about reproductive efficiency under competition. While strategy theory suggests under intense competition iteroparous perennial plants delay reproduction and semelparous annuals reproduce quickly, life-history theory predicts both annual and perennial plants increase resource allocation to reproduction under intense competition. We tested (1) how simulated competition influences reproductive efficiency and competitive ability (CA) of different plant life histories and growth forms; (2) whether life history or growth form is associated with CA; (3) whether shade avoidance plasticity is connected to reproductive efficiency under simulated competition. We examined plastic responses of 11 herbaceous species representing different life histories and growth forms to simulated competition (spectral shade). We found that both annual and perennial plants invested more to reproduction under simulated competition in accordance with life-history theory predictions. There was no significant difference between competitive abilities of different life histories, but across growth forms, erect species expressed greater CA (in terms of leaf number) than other growth forms. We also found that shade avoidance plasticity can increase the reproductive efficiency by capitalizing on the early life resource acquisition and conversion of these resources into reproduction. Therefore, we suggest that a reassessment of the interpretation of shade avoidance plasticity is necessary by revealing its role in reproduction, not only in competition of plants.

  17. Forging Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewig, John Warren

    Blacksmiths and their craft have changed with the times, and as times change for teachers, they too should be forgers of links. Teacher-to-teacher links should extend beyond the faculty lounge to support systems and active groups of individuals concerned about each other. Another personal link can be made by developing a grade level, system-wide…

  18. The relative importance of seed competition, resource competition and perturbations on community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, K.; Dyke, J. G.; Pavlick, R.; Reineking, B.; Reu, B.; Kleidon, A.

    2011-05-01

    While the regional climate is the primary selection pressure for whether a plant strategy can survive, however, competitive interactions strongly affect the relative abundances of plant strategies within communities. Here, we investigate the relative importance of competition and perturbations on the development of vegetation community structure. To do so, we develop DIVE (Dynamics and Interactions of VEgetation), a simple general model that links plant strategies to their competitive dynamics, using growth and reproduction characteristics that emerge from climatic constraints. The model calculates population dynamics based on establishment, mortality, invasion and exclusion in the presence of different strengths of perturbations, seed and resource competition. The highest levels of diversity were found in simulations without competition as long as mortality is not too high. However, reasonable successional dynamics were only achieved when resource competition is considered. Under high levels of competition, intermediate levels of perturbations were required to obtain coexistence. Since succession and coexistence are observed in plant communities, we conclude that the DIVE model with competition and intermediate levels of perturbation represents an adequate way to model population dynamics. Because of the simplicity and generality of DIVE, it could be used to understand vegetation structure and functioning at the global scale and the response of vegetation to global change.

  19. Hydrogen isotope effects in the dehydration of polystyrene-divinylbenzene type ion-exchange resins and the structure of electrolyte solutions. 1. Li/sup +/ form of variously cross-linked Dowex 50W resins

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.R.; Nandan, D.; Sarpal, S.K.

    1982-08-05

    Hydrogen isotope effects in the dehydration of the lithium form of strong acid polystyrene-divinylbenzene type ion exchangers (Dowex 50W) of varying cross-linking (2 to 12% DVB content) have been determined by a Rayleigh distillation type technique. The single-stage separation factors, ..cap alpha.., were dependent only on n/sub w/ and were independent of resin cross-linking. At n/sub w/ approx. = 4, ..cap alpha.. was lower than ..cap alpha../sub w/, the separation factor for pure water distillation at the same temperature. In the region of n/sub w/ = 10 to 12, ..cap alpha.. was greater than ..cap alpha../sub w/ and reached a maximum value. Beyond n/sub w/ approx. = 12, ..cap alpha.. decreased gradually with n/sub w/ but remained greater than ..cap alpha../sub w/. These results have been interpreted in terms of the hydration of lithium ions in the resin phase. These data indicate that the counterions in resin phase water behave like single ion solutions, provided counterion-water interactions are much greater than counterion-ionogenic group interactions. The resin network seems to influence the outermost layers (beyond the second hydration shell) of water molecules via hydrophobic interactions. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  20. Competitiveness, Technology and Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lall, Sanjaya

    This document examines competitiveness in the developing world. Chapters 1 through 3, which are largely conceptual, examine the following topics: the concept of competitiveness and why it is important; market-stimulating technology policies in developing countries, and the relationship between import liberalization and industrial performance.…

  1. Competition: Was Kohn Right?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, David Light; Bredemeier, Brenda Light

    2010-01-01

    Alfie Kohn made the case for competition being destructive to education. The truth may be that there are two separate ways to contest: true competition, which is a healthy desire to excel, and decompetition, which is the unhealthy desire merely to beat the opponent. Decompetition leads to the ills that Kohn enumerated. Educators should teach their…

  2. Competition: Was Kohn Right?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, David Light; Bredemeier, Brenda Light

    2010-01-01

    Alfie Kohn made the case for competition being destructive to education. The truth may be that there are two separate ways to contest: true competition, which is a healthy desire to excel, and decompetition, which is the unhealthy desire merely to beat the opponent. Decompetition leads to the ills that Kohn enumerated. Educators should teach their…

  3. Competitiveness, Technology and Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lall, Sanjaya

    This document examines competitiveness in the developing world. Chapters 1 through 3, which are largely conceptual, examine the following topics: the concept of competitiveness and why it is important; market-stimulating technology policies in developing countries, and the relationship between import liberalization and industrial performance.…

  4. Reflections on cell competition.

    PubMed

    Baillon, Ludovic; Basler, Konrad

    2014-08-01

    Cell competition is a process by which otherwise viable cells are actively eliminated due to the presence of more competitive cells. It is a conserved phenomenon and occurs in various developmental and experimental contexts. Competitive elimination represents a safeguard mechanism that potentiates animal development. However, the process can also be hijacked, for example, by cancer cells to promote and sustain malignancy. One of the challenges facing the field is that the term "cell competition" is used to describe a variety of phenomena whose relatedness is under debate. The goals of this review are to provide an overview of the literature on cell competition-like phenomena, highlight where there are discrepancies, and, when possible, provide alternative interpretations to reconcile the dissonance. Central to this is a comparison of the various models of cell competition. With our critical examination we seek to draw attention to future prospects in the field of cell competition. We believe that the elucidation of the interplay between loser and winner cells in the process of cell competition will provide new targets for the development of cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Woody competition control

    Treesearch

    Robert F. Lowery

    1986-01-01

    Control of woody competition is necessary to maintain shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) as an important component of natural stands and to maximize shortleaf pine plantation productivity in the Southeast. Competition control is key to maximizing timber production since growth is moisture-limited over much of its range. Volume growth gains of 40% have been reported...

  6. Competitive hybridization models.

    PubMed

    Cherepinsky, Vera; Hashmi, Ghazala; Mishra, Bud

    2010-11-01

    Microarray technology, in its simplest form, allows one to gather abundance data for target DNA molecules, associated with genomes or gene-expressions, and relies on hybridizing the target to many short probe oligonucleotides arrayed on a surface. While for such multiplexed reactions conditions are optimized to make the most of each individual probe-target interaction, subsequent analysis of these experiments is based on the implicit assumption that a given experiment yields the same result regardless of whether it was conducted in isolation or in parallel with many others. It has been discussed in the literature that this assumption is frequently false, and its validity depends on the types of probes and their interactions with each other. We present a detailed physical model of hybridization as a means of understanding probe interactions in a multiplexed reaction. Ultimately, the model can be derived from a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) describing kinetic mass action with conservation-of-mass equations completing the system. We examine pairwise probe interactions in detail and present a model of "competition" between the probes for the target--especially, when the target is effectively in short supply. These effects are shown to be predictable from the affinity constants for each of the four probe sequences involved, namely, the match and mismatch sequences for both probes. These affinity constants are calculated from the thermodynamic parameters such as the free energy of hybridization, which are in turn computed according to the nearest neighbor (NN) model for each probe and target sequence. Simulations based on the competitive hybridization model explain the observed variability in the signal of a given probe when measured in parallel with different groupings of other probes or individually. The results of the simulations can be used for experiment design and pooling strategies, based on which probes have been shown to have a strong effect

  7. Regulation, Competition and Network Evolution in Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillen, David; Morrison, William

    2003-01-01

    Our focus is the evolution of business strategies and network structure decisions in the commercial passenger aviation industry. The paper reviews the growth of hub-and-spoke networks as the dominant business model following deregulation in the latter part of the 20 century, followed by the emergence of value-based airlines as a global phenomenon at the end of the century. The paper highlights the link between airline business strategies and network structures, and examines the resulting competition between divergent network structure business models. In this context we discuss issues of market structure stability and the role played by competition policy.

  8. Matrix models for quantifying competitive intransitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Werner; Soliveres, Santiago; Kryszewski, Wojciech; Maestre, Fernando T.; Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the relative importance of intransitive competition networks in nature has been difficult because it requires a large number of pairwise competition experiments linked to observed field abundances of interacting species. Here we introduce metrics and statistical tests for evaluating the contribution of intransitivity to community structure using two kinds of data: competition matrices derived from the outcomes of pairwise experimental studies (C matrices) and species abundance matrices. We use C matrices to develop patch transition matrices (P) that predict community structure in a simple Markov chain model. We propose a randomization test to evaluate the degree of intransitivity from these P matrices in combination with empirical or simulated C matrices. Benchmark tests revealed that the methods could correctly detect intransitive competition networks, even in the absence of direct measures of pairwise competitive strength. These tests represent the first tools for estimating the degree of intransitivity in competitive networks from observational datasets. They can be applied to both spatio-temporal data sampled in homogeneous environments or across environmental gradients, and to experimental measures of pairwise interactions. To illustrate the methods, we analyzed empirical data matrices on the colonization of slug carrion by necrophagous flies and their parasitoids. PMID:25914427

  9. Matrix models for quantifying competitive intransitivity.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Werner; Soliveres, Santiago; Kryszewski, Wojciech; Maestre, Fernando T; Gotelli, Nicholas J

    2014-09-01

    Assessing the relative importance of intransitive competition networks in nature has been difficult because it requires a large number of pairwise competition experiments linked to observed field abundances of interacting species. Here we introduce metrics and statistical tests for evaluating the contribution of intransitivity to community structure using two kinds of data: competition matrices derived from the outcomes of pairwise experimental studies (C matrices) and species abundance matrices. We use C matrices to develop patch transition matrices (P) that predict community structure in a simple Markov chain model. We propose a randomization test to evaluate the degree of intransitivity from these P matrices in combination with empirical or simulated C matrices. Benchmark tests revealed that the methods could correctly detect intransitive competition networks, even in the absence of direct measures of pairwise competitive strength. These tests represent the first tools for estimating the degree of intransitivity in competitive networks from observational datasets. They can be applied to both spatio-temporal data sampled in homogeneous environments or across environmental gradients, and to experimental measures of pairwise interactions. To illustrate the methods, we analyzed empirical data matrices on the colonization of slug carrion by necrophagous flies and their parasitoids.

  10. Competition promotes the persistence of populations in ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Duan, Jinqiao; Liu, Tong

    2016-07-01

    Competition is one of the most common form in ecological systems, which plays important roles in population dynamics. However, the influences of competition on persistence of populations remain unclear when space effect is included. In this paper, we investigated a predator-prey model with competition and spatial diffusion. Based on pattern formations and time series of populations, we found that competitions induce the persistence of populations, which denies competitive exclusion principle. Moreover, we testify the robustness of these effects. Our results also suggest that space may lead to the emergence of new phenomenon in ecosystems.

  11. Competition promotes the persistence of populations in ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Duan, Jinqiao; Liu, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Competition is one of the most common form in ecological systems, which plays important roles in population dynamics. However, the influences of competition on persistence of populations remain unclear when space effect is included. In this paper, we investigated a predator-prey model with competition and spatial diffusion. Based on pattern formations and time series of populations, we found that competitions induce the persistence of populations, which denies competitive exclusion principle. Moreover, we testify the robustness of these effects. Our results also suggest that space may lead to the emergence of new phenomenon in ecosystems. PMID:27460143

  12. The effect of environmental regulation on firms' competitive performance: the case of the building & construction sector in some EU regions.

    PubMed

    Testa, Francesco; Iraldo, Fabio; Frey, Marco

    2011-09-01

    There is a considerable debate on the effects of environmental regulation on competitive performance. Based on survey data, this paper analyzes the two main research questions, derived from literature, on the links between environmental regulation and competitiveness, by focusing on firms operating in the building and construction sector, i.e.: 1) whether environmental policy stringency affects the competitive performance of firms in the building and construction sector 2) and how a specific form of environmental regulation (direct regulation, economic instruments and soft instruments) affects this performance? By applying a regression analysis, we find that a more stringent environmental regulation, measured by inspection frequency, provides a positive impulse for increasing investments in advanced technological equipment and innovative products and on business performance. Moreover, a well-designed "direct regulation" appears to be the most effective policy instrument for prompting the positive impact of environmental policies on innovation and intangible performance while economic instruments do negatively affect business performance.

  13. 46 CFR 282.10 - Basis for determining foreign-flag competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis for determining foreign-flag competition. 282.10... SERVICES IN THE FOREIGN COMMERCE OF THE UNITED STATES Foreign-Flag Competition § 282.10 Basis for determining foreign-flag competition. The foreign-flag competition shall form the basis for determining the...

  14. 46 CFR 282.10 - Basis for determining foreign-flag competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Basis for determining foreign-flag competition. 282.10... SERVICES IN THE FOREIGN COMMERCE OF THE UNITED STATES Foreign-Flag Competition § 282.10 Basis for determining foreign-flag competition. The foreign-flag competition shall form the basis for determining...

  15. Impact of grazing and life forms interactions on plant communities in arid areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhamad, Mohammad Noor

    2015-04-01

    Middle Eastern Mediterranean grasslands have evolved 8000-9000 years before present (BP). These grasslands were prehistorically subject to persistent pressure from grazing domesticated animals. Grazing and competition are the central factors affecting grassland communities, linking their maintenance, productivity, and management to biodiversity and livestock production. Arid and semi-arid Mediterranean grassland is a rich source of valuable forages for grazing livestock production systems in the eastern part of the Mediterranean region. Competition treatments (absence/presence of neighbors) were combined with three defoliation ( as surrogate to grazing) intensities (0%, 30% and 60%) in a factorial design. Relative interaction index (RII) was used to measure competition intensity. RII standardizes the reduction in growth of one species due to presence of neighbor species. Competition reduced grass biomass by approximately 10-15% for final and cumulative biomass. Competition role was eliminated under heavy defoliation or under harsh environmental conditions. Defoliation showed variable results on final and cumulative biomass. While heavy defoliation (60% clipping intensity) greatly reduced final grass biomass, light-moderate defoliation (30%) has increased cumulative biomass. Results showed that competition may limit the direct effect of defoliation on dominant grass species. Further, competition effect on dominant annual grasses showed positive and negative effects in relation to site productivity and best explained by a sinusoidal model. This hypothesized sinusoidal model suggests that facilitation and competition are alternatively affecting grassland communities along productivity gradient. The nature of interaction changes with changing community productivity revealing a cyclic pattern. The reflection points where interaction switches from facilitation to competition may explain the mechanism of maintaining high species diversity at intermediate level of

  16. Retail competition in the electric-utility industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelmfelt, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Regulation discourages competition between electric utilities that would lead to the duplication of distribution facilities or overlapping service territories. Fringe-area restraints can take the form of municipal franchise, state law, or some other form of agreement. Economists who believe that competition improves efficiency argue that regulation is inadequate as a substitute for competition and that natural monopoly theories are not always applied appropriately. Case studies confirm that the traditional assumptions are not compatible with the fact that competition between publicly-owned and investor-owned utilities has led to lower prices and increased sales. 1 figure. (DCK)

  17. 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-24

    Energy levels are high in the RoboPit as teams prepare for NASA's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. More than 40 student teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. arel using their mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participate in other competition requirements. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  18. A Study in Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Therese Anne

    1973-01-01

    Describes a microbiological experiment designed to study the competition between two species of bacteria. Experimental procedures and data obtained in conducting this experiment are provided, together with a discussion of the results. (JR)

  19. 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-23

    College team members watch a live display of their mining robots during test runs in the mining arena at NASA's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. More than 40 student teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. will use their uniquely-designed mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participate in other competition requirements. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  20. 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-24

    A robotic miner digs in the mining arena during NASA's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. More than 40 student teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. are using their uniquely-designed mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participate in other competition requirements. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  1. 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-23

    College team members prepare to enter the robotic mining arena for a test run during NASA's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. More than 40 student teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. will use their uniquely-designed mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participate in other competition requirements. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  2. 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-24

    The robotic miner from Mississippi State University digs in the mining arena during NASA's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. More than 40 student teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. are using their uniquely-designed mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participate in other competition requirements. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  3. 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-23

    Team Raptor members from the University of North Dakota College of Engineering and Mines check their robot, named "Marsbot," in the RoboPit at NASA's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. More than 40 student teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. will use their uniquely-designed mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participate in other competition requirements. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  4. 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-24

    Twin mining robots from the University of Iowa dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, during NASA's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. More than 40 student teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. are using their uniquely-designed mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participate in other competition requirements. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  5. 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-23

    Team members from Purdue University prepare their uniquely-designed robot miner in the RoboPit at NASA's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. More than 40 student teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. will use their uniquely-designed mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participate in other competition requirements. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  6. 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-23

    NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana welcomes participants to the agency's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. More than 40 student teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. will use their mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participate in other competition requirements. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  7. 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-24

    Team members from the New York University Tandon School of Engineering transport their robot to the mining arena during NASA's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. More than 40 student teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. are using their uniquely-designed mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participate in other competition requirements. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  8. 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-24

    Team members from West Virginia University prepare their mining robot for a test run in a giant sandbox before their scheduled mining run in the arena during NASA's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. More than 40 student teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. are using their uniquely-designed mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participate in other competition requirements. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  9. 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-24

    Derrick Matthews, left, with Kennedy Space Center's Communication and Public Engagement Directorate, and Kurt Leucht, event emcee, provide commentary at the mining arena during NASA's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. More than 40 student teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. are using their uniquely-designed mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participate in other competition requirements. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  10. Potential Competitive Dynamics of Acoustic Ecology.

    PubMed

    Radford, C A; Montgomery, J C

    2016-01-01

    The top predators in coastal marine ecosystems, such as whales, dolphins, seabirds, and large predatory fishes (including sharks), may compete with each other to exploit food aggregations. Finding these patchy food sources and being first to a food patch could provide a significant competitive advantage. Our hypothesis is that food patches have specific sound signatures that marine predators could detect and that acoustic sources and animal sensory capabilities may contribute to competition dynamics. Preliminary analysis shows that diving gannets have a distinct spectral signature between 80 and 200 Hz, which falls within the hearing sensitivity of large pelagic fishes. Therefore, we suggest that diving birds may contribute to the sound signatures of food aggregations, linking competition dynamics both above and below the water surface.

  11. Climate influences parasite-mediated competitive release.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Martin H; Jensen, K Thomas; Mouritsen, Kim N

    2011-09-01

    Parasitism is believed to play an important role in maintaining species diversity, for instance by facilitating coexistence between competing host species. However, the possibility that environmental factors may govern the outcome of parasite-mediated competition has rarely been considered. The closely related amphipods Corophium volutator and Corophium arenarium both serve as second intermediate host for detrimental trematodes. Corophium volutator is the superior competitor of the two, but also suffers from higher mortality when exposed to infective trematode stages. Here, we report parasite-mediated competitive release of C. arenarium in an intertidal habitat, in part triggered by unusually high temperatures linked to the North Atlantic climate oscillation (NAO). The elevated temperatures accelerated the transmission of cercariae from sympatric first intermediate hosts (mud snails) to amphipods, causing a local collapse of the parasite-sensitive C. volutator population and concordant increase in the abundance of the competitively inferior C. arenarium.

  12. Redefining competition in health care.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael E; Teisberg, Elizabeth Olmsted

    2004-06-01

    The U.S. health care system is in bad shape. Medical services are restricted or rationed, many patients receive poor care, and high rates of preventable medical error persist. There are wide and inexplicable differences in costs and quality among providers and across geographic areas. In well-functioning competitive markets--think computers, mobile communications, and banking--these outcomes would be inconceivable. In health care, these results are intolerable, with life and quality of life at stake. Competition in health care needs to change, say the authors. It currently operates at the wrong level. Payers, health plans, providers, physicians, and others in the system wrangle over the wrong things, in the wrong locations, and at the wrong times. System participants divide value instead of creating it. (And in some instances, they destroy it.) They shift costs onto one another, restrict access to care, stifle innovation, and hoard information--all without truly benefiting patients. This form of zero-sum competition must end, the authors argue, and must be replaced by competition at the level of preventing, diagnosing, and treating individual conditions and diseases. Among the authors' well-researched recommendations for reform: Standardized information about individual diseases and treatments should be collected and disseminated widely so patients can make informed choices about their care. Payers, providers, and health plans should establish transparent billing and pricing mechanisms to reduce cost shifting, confusion, pricing discrimination, and other inefficiencies in the system. And health care providers should be experts in certain conditions and treatments rather than try to be all things to all people. U.S. employers can also play a big role in reform by changing how they manage their health benefits.

  13. 2000 FIRST Robotics Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purman, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The New Horizons Regional Education Center (NHREC) in Hampton, VA sought and received NASA funding to support its participation in the 2000 FIRST Robotics competition. FIRST, Inc. (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) is an organization which encourages the application of creative science, math, and computer science principles to solve real-world engineering problems. The FIRST competition is an international engineering contest featuring high school, government, and business partnerships.

  14. First Robotics Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-06

    A student member of the team 768 "Technowarriors" from Woodlawn High School in Maryland runs a controller while competing in a match during the second day of the First Robotics Competition, Saturday, March 6, 2010, in Washington. The student competition is called "For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology", or FIRST. The program was founded in 1989 by Dean Kamen to inspire an appreciation of science and technology in young people, their schools and communities. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  15. 2000 FIRST Robotics Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purman, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The New Horizons Regional Education Center (NHREC) in Hampton, VA sought and received NASA funding to support its participation in the 2000 FIRST Robotics competition. FIRST, Inc. (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) is an organization which encourages the application of creative science, math, and computer science principles to solve real-world engineering problems. The FIRST competition is an international engineering contest featuring high school, government, and business partnerships.

  16. First Robotics Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-06

    Robots vie for position during the second day of the First Robotics Competition, Saturday, March 6, 2010, in Washington. The student competition is called "For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology", or FIRST. The program was founded in 1989 by Dean Kamen to inspire an appreciation of science and technology in young people, their schools and communities. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  17. Competition for land.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pete; Gregory, Peter J; van Vuuren, Detlef; Obersteiner, Michael; Havlík, Petr; Rounsevell, Mark; Woods, Jeremy; Stehfest, Elke; Bellarby, Jessica

    2010-09-27

    A key challenge for humanity is how a future global population of 9 billion can all be fed healthily and sustainably. Here, we review how competition for land is influenced by other drivers and pressures, examine land-use change over the past 20 years and consider future changes over the next 40 years. Competition for land, in itself, is not a driver affecting food and farming in the future, but is an emergent property of other drivers and pressures. Modelling studies suggest that future policy decisions in the agriculture, forestry, energy and conservation sectors could have profound effects, with different demands for land to supply multiple ecosystem services usually intensifying competition for land in the future. In addition to policies addressing agriculture and food production, further policies addressing the primary drivers of competition for land (population growth, dietary preference, protected areas, forest policy) could have significant impacts in reducing competition for land. Technologies for increasing per-area productivity of agricultural land will also be necessary. Key uncertainties in our projections of competition for land in the future relate predominantly to uncertainties in the drivers and pressures within the scenarios, in the models and data used in the projections and in the policy interventions assumed to affect the drivers and pressures in the future.

  18. Competition for land

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Pete; Gregory, Peter J.; van Vuuren, Detlef; Obersteiner, Michael; Havlík, Petr; Rounsevell, Mark; Woods, Jeremy; Stehfest, Elke; Bellarby, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    A key challenge for humanity is how a future global population of 9 billion can all be fed healthily and sustainably. Here, we review how competition for land is influenced by other drivers and pressures, examine land-use change over the past 20 years and consider future changes over the next 40 years. Competition for land, in itself, is not a driver affecting food and farming in the future, but is an emergent property of other drivers and pressures. Modelling studies suggest that future policy decisions in the agriculture, forestry, energy and conservation sectors could have profound effects, with different demands for land to supply multiple ecosystem services usually intensifying competition for land in the future. In addition to policies addressing agriculture and food production, further policies addressing the primary drivers of competition for land (population growth, dietary preference, protected areas, forest policy) could have significant impacts in reducing competition for land. Technologies for increasing per-area productivity of agricultural land will also be necessary. Key uncertainties in our projections of competition for land in the future relate predominantly to uncertainties in the drivers and pressures within the scenarios, in the models and data used in the projections and in the policy interventions assumed to affect the drivers and pressures in the future. PMID:20713395

  19. Experimental demonstration of the importance of competition under disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Violle, Cyrille; Pu, Zhichao; Jiang, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Ecologists have long recognized the roles of competition and disturbance in shaping ecological communities, and the combinatorial effects of these two factors have been the subject of substantial ecological research. Nevertheless, it is still unclear whether competition remains as an important structuring force in habitats strongly influenced by disturbance. The conventional belief remains that the importance of competition decreases with increasing disturbance, but limited theory suggests otherwise. Using protist communities established in laboratory microcosms, we demonstrate that disturbance does not diminish the importance of competition. Interspecific competition significantly increased rates of species extinction over a broad disturbance gradient, and increasing disturbance intensities increased, rather than decreased, the tempo of competitive exclusion. This community-level pattern is linked to the species-level pattern that interspecific competition led to most frequent extinctions of each species at the highest level of disturbance that the species can tolerate. Consequently, despite a strong tradeoff between competitive ability and disturbance tolerance across the competing species, species diversity generally declined with disturbance. The consistent structuring role of competition throughout the disturbance gradient underscores the need to understand competitive interactions and their consequences even in highly disturbed habitats. PMID:20616069

  20. Healthy Competition and Unsound Comparison: Reforming Educational Competition in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    It is frequently claimed that the "competition state" responds to external competition by making competition increasingly central to its internal processes as well. This article discusses education reform in Singapore as departing from the opposite position. In Singapore "excessive" competition in education is now targeted by…

  1. Healthy Competition and Unsound Comparison: Reforming Educational Competition in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    It is frequently claimed that the "competition state" responds to external competition by making competition increasingly central to its internal processes as well. This article discusses education reform in Singapore as departing from the opposite position. In Singapore "excessive" competition in education is now targeted by…

  2. Analysis of the JSF Engine Competition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Analyses ,4850 Mark Center Drive,Alexandria,VA,22311 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9 . SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...in a break-even percentage savings of 16 percent. 9 Because the DOD has not typically linked procurement and O&S costs in a single competition, we...slopes 9 Procurement Cost Estimates Used F135 Flight Test Engine (FTE) #3 actual data  Costs available by component  Applied F119 FTE and

  3. The genes encoding gonadal and nongonadal forms of 3[beta]-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/[Delta][sup 5]-[Delta][sup 4] isomerase are closely linked on mouse chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, P.A.; Meisler, M.H.; Payne, A.H. ); Taylor, B.A. )

    1993-04-01

    The biosynthesis of steroid hormones in the gonads and adrenal glands requires the activities of the enzyme 3[beta]-hydroxysteriod dehydrogenanse/isomerase (3[beta]HSD) which catalyzes the NAD[sup +]-dependant dehydrogenation and subsequent [Delta][sup 5] [r arrow] [Delta][sup 4] isomerization of[Delta][sup 5]-3[beta]-hydroxysteriods to [Delta][sup 4]-3-ketosteroids. The mouse expresses four isoforms of 3[beta]HSD. 3[beta]HSD I is expressed in gonads and adrenal glands and appears to be the major steroidogenic form, 3[beta]HSDs II and III are expressed in both liver and kidneys, and 3[beta]HSD IV has been detected only in kidneys. To determine the genetic relationship between the 3[beta]HSD isoforms, the authors have mapped the chromosomal locations of the four genes by linkage analysis using gene-specific process derived from the 3[prime] untranslated regions of 3 [beta]HSD cDNA clones. The four 3[beta]HSD structural genes (Hsd3b) are closely linked within a segment of chromosome 3 that is conserved on human chromosome 1. The order of markers on Chr 3 surrounding Hsd3b is: centromere-Gba-(4.4 [+-] 2.2)-Hsd3b-(3.3 [+-] 1.9)-Tshb-(6.7 [+-] 2.7)-Amy-1. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Community Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mary

    1975-01-01

    At Moraine Valley Community College (Illinois), a chain of events, programs, activities, and services has linked the college and community in such areas as fine arts, ethnic groups, public services, community action, community service, and community education. (Author/NHM)

  5. Link Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoho, Steve

    Link analysis is a collection of techniques that operate on data that can be represented as nodes and links. This chapter surveys a variety of techniques including subgraph matching, finding cliques and K-plexes, maximizing spread of influence, visualization, finding hubs and authorities, and combining with traditional techniques (classification, clustering, etc). It also surveys applications including social network analysis, viral marketing, Internet search, fraud detection, and crime prevention.

  6. Cooperative Competition: Possibly Oxymoronic But Definitely Smart

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    competition and warfare. 56 Anthropologist Agustin Fuentes writes “There is no doubt that the potential for aggressive conflict in a variety of forms...Studies, 27 March 2002. Fuentes, Agustin . “It‟s Not All Sex and Violence: Integrated Anthropology and the Role of Cooperation and Social Complexity

  7. Guidelines for the Application of Competition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    Data Package (TDP), Form, Fit and Function (F ) Description, Leader / Follower (L/F) Procurement, Educational Buy, Directed Licensing, Contractor Teaming...37 D. Leader / Follower (L/F) ..... .................... . 41 1. Definition ..... ... ....................... 41 2. Procedures...a Validated TDP ... .............. ... 28 4. Leader / Follower Models ...... .. ...................... 42 5. Teaming and Production Competition

  8. Competition-colonization dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ojosnegros, Samuel; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2010-01-01

    A single and purified clone of foot-and-mouth disease virus diversified in cell culture into two subpopulations that were genetically distinct. The subpopulation with higher virulence was a minority and was suppressed by the dominant but less virulent one. These two populations follow the competitioncolonization dynamics described in ecology. Virulent viruses can be regarded as colonizers because they killed the cells faster and they spread faster. The attenuated subpopulation resembles competitors because of its higher replication efficiency in coinfected cells. Our results suggest a new model for the evolution of virulence which is based on interactions between components of the quasispecies. Competition between viral mutants takes place at two levels, intracellular competition and competition for new cells. The two strategies are subjected to densitydependent selection. PMID:20798818

  9. Price competition in procurement

    SciTech Connect

    Keisler, J.M.; Buehring, W.A.

    1996-07-01

    When creating a private market to provide a public good, government agencies can influence the market`s competitive characteristics. Markets have predictable, but often counterintuitive, behaviors. To succeed in applying available controls, and thereby reduce future costs, agencies must understand the behavior of the market. A model has been constructed to examine some issues in establishing competition for a structure in which there are economies of scale and government is obligated to purchase a fixed total quantity of a good. This model is used to demonstrate a way to estimate the cost savings from several alternative plans for a buyer exploring competitive procurement. The results are not and cannot be accurate for budgeting purposes; rather, they indicate the approximate magnitude of changes in cost that would be associated with changes in the market structure within which procurement occurs.

  10. Advancing Manufacturing Research Through Competitions

    SciTech Connect

    Balakirsky, Stephen; Madhavan, Raj

    2009-01-01

    Competitions provide a technique for building interest and collaboration in targeted research areas. This paper will present a new competition that aims to increase collaboration amongst Universities, automation end-users, and automation manufacturers through a virtual competition. The virtual nature of the competition allows for reduced infrastructure requirements while maintaining realism in both the robotic equipment deployed and the scenarios. Details of the virtual environment as well as the competitions objectives, rules, and scoring metrics will be presented.

  11. Competitive hybridization models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepinsky, Vera; Hashmi, Ghazala; Mishra, Bud

    2010-11-01

    Microarray technology, in its simplest form, allows one to gather abundance data for target DNA molecules, associated with genomes or gene-expressions, and relies on hybridizing the target to many short probe oligonucleotides arrayed on a surface. While for such multiplexed reactions conditions are optimized to make the most of each individual probe-target interaction, subsequent analysis of these experiments is based on the implicit assumption that a given experiment yields the same result regardless of whether it was conducted in isolation or in parallel with many others. It has been discussed in the literature that this assumption is frequently false, and its validity depends on the types of probes and their interactions with each other. We present a detailed physical model of hybridization as a means of understanding probe interactions in a multiplexed reaction. Ultimately, the model can be derived from a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE’s) describing kinetic mass action with conservation-of-mass equations completing the system. We examine pairwise probe interactions in detail and present a model of “competition” between the probes for the target—especially, when the target is effectively in short supply. These effects are shown to be predictable from the affinity constants for each of the four probe sequences involved, namely, the match and mismatch sequences for both probes. These affinity constants are calculated from the thermodynamic parameters such as the free energy of hybridization, which are in turn computed according to the nearest neighbor (NN) model for each probe and target sequence. Simulations based on the competitive hybridization model explain the observed variability in the signal of a given probe when measured in parallel with different groupings of other probes or individually. The results of the simulations can be used for experiment design and pooling strategies, based on which probes have been shown to have a strong

  12. Measuring hospital competition.

    PubMed

    White, S L; Chirikos, T N

    1988-03-01

    This paper appraises the use of the Herfindahl market share index as an exogenous competition variable in empirical studies of the hospital sector. An analysis of cross-sectional Florida data shows that this index itself is significantly influenced by the demand and supply factors commonly included in econometric models of hospital performance. The analysis then illustrates that biased inferences about the effects of market competition on the costs of hospital care may result unless the values of the Herfindahl Index are treated endogenously in hospital cost models.

  13. First Robotics Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-05

    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., left, stands with Dean Kamen, the founder of First Robotics, as he talks about the importance of Science and Technology education during the First Robotics Competition, Friday March 5, 2010, in Washington. The student competition is called "For Inspiration and Recognition ofScience and Technology," or FIRST. The program was founded in 1989 by Kamen to inspire an appreciation of science and technology in young people, their schools and communities. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  14. First Robotics Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-05

    Students from the Highland School in Warrenton, Va. work on their robot in the "Pit Area" as they prepare to compete in the First Robotics Competition, Friday, March 5, 2010, in Washington. The student competition is called "For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology," or FIRST. The program was founded in 1989 by inventor Dean Kamen to inspire an appreciation of science and technology in young people, their schools and communities. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers) Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  15. First Robotics Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-05

    Students from McKinley Tech High School in Washington, D.C., work on their robot in the "Pit Area" as they prepare to compete in the First Robotics Competition, Friday, March 5, 2010, in Washington. The student competition is called "For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology," or FIRST. The program was founded in 1989 by inventor Dean Kamen to inspire an appreciation of science and technology in young people, their schools and communities. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  16. Competition between cyanobacteria and green algae at low versus elevated CO2: who will win, and why?

    PubMed

    Ji, Xing; Verspagen, Jolanda M H; Stomp, Maayke; Huisman, Jef

    2017-06-01

    Traditionally, it has often been hypothesized that cyanobacteria are superior competitors at low CO2 and high pH in comparison with eukaryotic algae, owing to their effective CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM). However, recent work indicates that green algae can also have a sophisticated CCM tuned to low CO2 levels. Conversely, cyanobacteria with the high-flux bicarbonate uptake system BicA appear well adapted to high inorganic carbon concentrations. To investigate these ideas we studied competition between three species of green algae and a bicA strain of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa at low (100 ppm) and high (2000 ppm) CO2. Two of the green algae were competitively superior to the cyanobacterium at low CO2, whereas the cyanobacterium increased its competitive ability with respect to the green algae at high CO2. The experiments were supported by a resource competition model linking the population dynamics of the phytoplankton species with dynamic changes in carbon speciation, pH and light. Our results show (i) that competition between phytoplankton species at different CO2 levels can be predicted from species traits in monoculture, (ii) that green algae can be strong competitors under CO2-depleted conditions, and (iii) that bloom-forming cyanobacteria with high-flux bicarbonate uptake systems will benefit from elevated CO2 concentrations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. Competitive Speech and Debate: How Play Influenced American Educational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartanen, Michael D.; Littlefield, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The authors identify competitive speech and debate as a form of play that helped democratize American citizenship for the poor, who used what they learned through the practice to advance their personal social and economic goals. In addition, this competitive activity led to the development of speech communication as an academic discipline and…

  18. Linking Literacy and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2010-01-01

    There are many links between literacy and movement. Movement and language are both forms of communication and self-expression. Rhythm is an essential component of both language and movement. While people may think of rhythm primarily in musical terms, there is a rhythm to words and sentences as well. Individuals develop an internal rhythm when…

  19. Linking Literacy and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2010-01-01

    There are many links between literacy and movement. Movement and language are both forms of communication and self-expression. Rhythm is an essential component of both language and movement. While people may think of rhythm primarily in musical terms, there is a rhythm to words and sentences as well. Individuals develop an internal rhythm when…

  20. Sperm competition games: a general model for precopulatory male-male competition.

    PubMed

    Parker, Geoff A; Lessells, Catherine M; Simmons, Leigh W

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive males face a trade-off between expenditure on precopulatory male-male competition--increasing the number of females that they secure as mates--and sperm competition--increasing their fertilization success with those females. Previous sperm allocation models have focused on scramble competition in which males compete by searching for mates and the number of matings rises linearly with precopulatory expenditure. However, recent studies have emphasized contest competition involving precopulatory expenditure on armaments, where winning contests may be highly dependent on marginal increases in relative armament level. Here, we develop a general model of sperm allocation that allows us to examine the effect of all forms of precopulatory competition on sperm allocation patterns. The model predicts that sperm allocation decreases if either the "mate-competition loading,"a, or the number of males competing for each mating, M, increases. Other predictions remain unchanged from previous models: (i) expenditure per ejaculate should increase and then decrease, and (ii) total postcopulatory expenditure should increase, as the level of sperm competition increases. A negative correlation between a and M is biologically plausible, and may buffer deviations from the previous models. There is some support for our predictions from comparative analyses across dung beetle species and frog populations. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. Competition in benthic marine invertebrates: the unrecognized role of exploitative competition for oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Nick; White, Craig R; Marshall, Dustin J

    2013-01-01

    Competition is a ubiquitous structuring force across systems, but different fields emphasize the role of different types of competition. In benthic marine environments, where some of the classic examples of competition were described, there is a strong emphasis on interference competition: marine invertebrates are assumed to compete fiercely for the limiting resource of space. Much of our understanding of the dynamics of this system is based on this assumption, yet empirical studies often find that increases in density can reduce performance despite free space being available. Furthermore, the assumption that space is the exclusively limiting resource raises paradoxes regarding species coexistence in this system. Here, we measure the availability of oxygen in the field and in the laboratory, as well as the tolerance of resident species to low-oxygen conditions. We show that oxygen can be the primary limiting resource in some instances, and that exploitative competition for this resource is very likely among benthic marine invertebrates. Furthermore, growth form (and the associated risk of oxygen limitation) covaries with the ability to withstand oxygen-poor conditions across a wide range of taxa. Oxygen availability at very small scales may influence the distribution and abundance of sessile marine invertebrates more than is currently appreciated. Furthermore, competition for multiple resources (space and oxygen) and trade-offs in competitive ability for each may promote coexistence in this system.

  2. Television and Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noll, Roger G.

    The television industry is characterized by numerous imperfections in market competition. The spectrum allocation policy of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assures that there will be only three national television networks; consequently in nearly all markets these stations account for 75% to 100% of revenues. These networks in turn…

  3. Television and Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noll, Roger G.

    The television industry is characterized by numerous imperfections in market competition. The spectrum allocation policy of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assures that there will be only three national television networks; consequently in nearly all markets these stations account for 75% to 100% of revenues. These networks in turn…

  4. Competitiveness and Campaign '88.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kernan-Schloss, Adam, Ed.; And Others

    This report profiles the positions of the six Democratic and six Republican 1988 presidential candidates on policy issues affecting U.S. competitiveness in the global economy. Candidate profiles are provided for: Bruce Babbitt, Michael Dukakis, Richard Gephardt, Albert Gore, Jr., Jesse Jackson, and Paul Simon (Democrats); and George Bush, Robert…

  5. Building Camaraderie from Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Educational institutions have adopted athletics programs to promote character building. Sports help people feel comfortable in their skins and provide unique opportunities to develop qualities such as cooperation, perseverance, and the ability to cope with fear. But the arena can be a hothouse for more primal feelings that emerge in competition.…

  6. Growing Competition for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Questia subscription-based online academic digital books library. Highlights include weaknesses of the collection; what college students want from a library; importance of marketing; competition for traditional academic libraries that may help improve library services; and the ability of Questia to overcome barriers and…

  7. Growing Competition for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Questia subscription-based online academic digital books library. Highlights include weaknesses of the collection; what college students want from a library; importance of marketing; competition for traditional academic libraries that may help improve library services; and the ability of Questia to overcome barriers and…

  8. Reed Hundt's Friendly Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educom Review, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Presents an interview with Reed Hundt, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), who implemented the Education Task Force to coordinate the FCC's role in educational provisions of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. He asserts that writing clear rules for the communications sector will promote competition and ensure educational…

  9. Competition in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Daphne

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the strategy she adopted to even out the participation among her multicultural students during their classroom discussions. The author realized that her students had different concepts about the classroom and different philosophies about competition. For the Americans and Indians, the classroom was a site of…

  10. Competitiveness Index 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Competitiveness, Washington, DC.

    The United States' economic performance in the world economy is compared with that of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom (the Summit 7 countries). Competitiveness is assessed by four economic indicators: standard of living, trade, manufacturing productivity, and investment. The United States continues to outinvest the…

  11. Competitiveness Index 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Competitiveness, Washington, DC.

    The United States' economic performance in the world economy is compared with that of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom (the Summit 7 countries). Competitiveness is assessed by four economic indicators: standard of living, trade, manufacturing productivity, and investment. The United States continues to outinvest the…

  12. Competition in Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Discusses five ways (high school newspaper and yearbook advertising, summer jobs, internships, contests, and student-run advertising agencies) students can start to prepare for a career in the competitive field of advertising while still in high school and college. (SR)

  13. A Winning Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, Kim; Franchini, Elease

    2012-01-01

    As a high school physics teacher, Kim Geddes is constantly searching for new experiences to challenge, motivate, and engage students. Last year, she incorporated ExploraVision into the energy unit of her school's physics curriculum with the help of their media specialist (Elease Franchini). ExploraVision is a competition offered through a…

  14. Competition in Individualized CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examines the effects of competition and cooperation on learning through computer-assisted instruction (CAI). A questionnaire was administered to 457 Israeli fourth graders who used two CAI arithmetic systems. The characteristics of the systems are discussed, and the results of the survey are correlated to students' gender and achievement levels.…

  15. Building Camaraderie from Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Educational institutions have adopted athletics programs to promote character building. Sports help people feel comfortable in their skins and provide unique opportunities to develop qualities such as cooperation, perseverance, and the ability to cope with fear. But the arena can be a hothouse for more primal feelings that emerge in competition.…

  16. Positioning for Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapovsky, Lucie; Hubbell, Loren Loomis

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes results of the 1999 National Association of College and Business Officers tuition discounting survey and identifies trends. Finds colleges and universities are reactively responding to market pressures and proactively trying to analyze and position themselves ahead of the competition, often regional rather than national, for the…

  17. Human Resources Competitiveness Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Competitiveness, Washington, DC.

    This report distills hundreds of indicators from both domestic and international sources to determine how the United States compares to other countries and to its own past performance in competitiveness. It attempts to establish a baseline of some key education and training indicators that, taken together, show where the nation stands and where it…

  18. A Winning Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, Kim; Franchini, Elease

    2012-01-01

    As a high school physics teacher, Kim Geddes is constantly searching for new experiences to challenge, motivate, and engage students. Last year, she incorporated ExploraVision into the energy unit of her school's physics curriculum with the help of their media specialist (Elease Franchini). ExploraVision is a competition offered through a…

  19. Competition in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Daphne

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the strategy she adopted to even out the participation among her multicultural students during their classroom discussions. The author realized that her students had different concepts about the classroom and different philosophies about competition. For the Americans and Indians, the classroom was a site of…

  20. Virtual Rural Community Development: Human Links That Sustain Web Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, Larry K.; Evans, Wayne H.; Marmet, Kathy

    Outmigration in the rural Upper Midwest prompted a group of citizens and University of South Dakota faculty to form the Center for the Advancement of Rural Communities (ARC). ARC considers how to stimulate traditionally competitive and isolated South Dakota peoples to collaborate for economic, social, educational, political, and cultural gains. As…

  1. Technology Assessment Need: Review on Attractiveness and Competitiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salwa Sait, Siti; Merlinda Muharam, Farrah; Chin, Thoo Ai; Sulaiman, Zuraidah

    2017-06-01

    Technology assessment is crucial in managing technology for the purpose of technology exploitation. With business environment continuously changing, firms have to address this issue critically as technology is considered one of the important elements to evaluate performance and gain competitive advantage. Missteps in deciding the best technology to be developed, employed or maintained would cost the firm overall value. To fulfil the need of finding the appropriate scale to assess suitable technology, this paper summarizes that technology assessment (TA) should cover two main aspects, namely technology attractiveness and competitiveness. These components are seen capable to link the scale suggested towards evaluation of financial and non-financial performance towards competitive advantage.

  2. Environmental structure and competitive scoring advantages in team competitions.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Sears; Clauset, Aaron

    2013-10-29

    In most professional sports, playing field structure is kept neutral so that scoring imbalances may be attributed to differences in team skill. It thus remains unknown what impact environmental heterogeneities can have on scoring dynamics or competitive advantages. Applying a novel generative model of scoring dynamics to roughly 10 million team competitions drawn from an online game, we quantify the relationship between the structure within a competition and its scoring dynamics, while controlling the impact of chance. Despite wide structural variations, we observe a common three-phase pattern in the tempo of events. Tempo and balance are highly predictable from a competition's structural features alone and teams exploit environmental heterogeneities for sustained competitive advantage. Surprisingly, the most balanced competitions are associated with specific environmental heterogeneities, not from equally skilled teams. These results shed new light on the design principles of balanced competition, and illustrate the potential of online game data for investigating social dynamics and competition.

  3. Environmental structure and competitive scoring advantages in team competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Sears; Clauset, Aaron

    2013-10-01

    In most professional sports, playing field structure is kept neutral so that scoring imbalances may be attributed to differences in team skill. It thus remains unknown what impact environmental heterogeneities can have on scoring dynamics or competitive advantages. Applying a novel generative model of scoring dynamics to roughly 10 million team competitions drawn from an online game, we quantify the relationship between the structure within a competition and its scoring dynamics, while controlling the impact of chance. Despite wide structural variations, we observe a common three-phase pattern in the tempo of events. Tempo and balance are highly predictable from a competition's structural features alone and teams exploit environmental heterogeneities for sustained competitive advantage. Surprisingly, the most balanced competitions are associated with specific environmental heterogeneities, not from equally skilled teams. These results shed new light on the design principles of balanced competition, and illustrate the potential of online game data for investigating social dynamics and competition.

  4. Psychological and Physical Implications of Highly Competitive Sports for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Edmund J.; Kleiber, Douglas

    1976-01-01

    A more constructive view of cultural socialization would promote cooperation rather than competition; cooperation is a value that children learn naturally through social interaction in forming and maintaining their own games. (MM)

  5. [Hospitals as vital links].

    PubMed

    Klink, A

    2013-01-01

    The reform of the system in 2006 aimed at reducing waiting lists in an efficient manner. Performance-linked funding and regulated competition did indeed lead to improved efficiency. The other side of the coin is overtreatment, and expensive and not infrequently damaging growth in volume. In order to control costs, three strategies have been determined: agreements with an annual cap on volume; (b) collaboration of regional health-care providers with the mission of improving results in health care (with profit-sharing if costs fall); and (c) fusions reducing the number of hospitals which reduces the burden of injuries (supply no longer creates its own demand). This article comments on these strategies. The author argues for a fourth approach: if the quality of health care improves, the number of complications will fall, overtreatment will decline and the outcome will be a decrease in burden of injuries. This requires the health care insurers to modify the way they manage their contracts and methods of payment, and stimulates competition based on quality.

  6. Limited evidence that competitive food and beverage practices affect adolescent consumption behaviors.

    PubMed

    Vericker, Tracy C

    2013-02-01

    Childhood obesity is emerging as a considerable public health problem with no clear antidote. The school food environment is a potential intervention point for policy makers, with competitive food and beverage regulation as a possible policy lever. This research examines the link between competitive food and beverage availability in school and adolescent consumption patterns using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999. Results from value-added multivariate regression models reveal limited evidence that competitive food policy affects fruit and vegetable consumption. Findings suggest a stronger link between competitive beverage policy and consumption of sweetened beverages for population subgroups.

  7. Plant competition and exclusion with optimizing individuals.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, David; Tschirhart, John

    2009-11-21

    Most models of plant competition represent competition as taking place between species when realistically competition takes place between individuals. We model individual plants as optimally choosing biomass in order to maximize net energy that is directed into reproduction. Competition is for access to light and a plant that grows more biomass adds to the leaf area index, creating negative feedback in the form of more self shading and shading of its neighbors. In each period and for given species densities, simultaneous maximization by all plants yields an equilibrium characterized by optimum biomasses. Between periods the net energies plants obtain are used to update the densities, and if densities change the equilibrium changes in the subsequent period. A steady state is attained when all plants have net energies that just allow for replacement. Four main predictions of the resource-ratio theory of competition are obtained, providing behavioral underpinnings for species level models. However, if individual plant parameters are not identical across species, then the predictions do not follow. The optimization framework yields many other predictions, including how specific leaf areas and resource stress impact biomass and leaf area indices.

  8. Competitiveness measurement system in the advertising sector.

    PubMed

    Poveda-Bautista, Rocío; García-Melón, Mónica; Baptista, Doris C

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a new approach to find indicators that can be used to measure companies' competitiveness and performance in an efficient and reliable way is presented. The aim is to assist managers of companies within a specific industrial sector by providing information about their relative position in the market so as to define better action plans that may improve the company's performance. The approach combines the use of the Analytic Network Process, a multicriteria decision method, with the Balanced Scorecard. It allows the definition of a number of competitiveness indicators based on the performance and setting of the advertising sector. In this way it is possible to obtain a Competitiveness Index that allows a company to know its relative position with respect to other companies in the sector, and establish a ranking of the companies ordered by their competitiveness level. A case study in the advertising industry of Venezuela is provided. Results show that improvement plans for the agencies analyzed should promote creativity, innovation and the use of new technologies, as a particular form of innovation. These factors were considered to be the most relevant indicators in the advertising sector. The participating experts agreed that the methodology is useful and an improvement over current competitiveness assessment methods.

  9. The Literature of Competitive Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Thomas D.

    1994-01-01

    Describes competitive intelligence (CI) literature in terms of its location, quantity, authorship, length, and problems of bibliographic access. Highlights include subject access; competitive intelligence research; espionage and security; monographs; and journals. (21 references) (LRW)

  10. The Literature of Competitive Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Thomas D.

    1994-01-01

    Describes competitive intelligence (CI) literature in terms of its location, quantity, authorship, length, and problems of bibliographic access. Highlights include subject access; competitive intelligence research; espionage and security; monographs; and journals. (21 references) (LRW)

  11. Welfare of competition horses.

    PubMed

    Atock, M A; Williams, R B

    1994-03-01

    In the large majority of cases and circumstances, horses benefit from their association with man. However, abuse of horses can occur, due to neglect or through the pressures of competition. The welfare of all animals, including competition horses, has become increasingly topical over the past ten years. Equestrian sport is coming under closer public scrutiny due to reports of apparent abuse. The bodies responsible for regulating these sports strenuously endeavour to protect the welfare of horses which compete under their rules and regulations. The Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI: International Equestrian Federation) is the sole authority for all international events in dressage, show-jumping, three-day event, driving, endurance riding and vaulting. The FEI rules illustrate the ways in which the welfare of competing horses is safeguarded.

  12. Designing Competitive Service Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Veronica; Turner, Trevor

    The explosives developed in Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth ­century by the famous Swede and patron of the world peace prize, Alfred Nobel, were extremely durable and, apart from the introduction of the electric detonator, have remained in use with minor modifications for almost a century (Fig. 5.1a). In the 1970s a new invention started a process of change that has transformed the explosives business from being a supplier of products to a provider of a service. Survival very much depended on the agility of ICI Explosives UK, hereinafter referred to as "ICI Explosives," in adapting to the new competitive environment. Manufacturing excellence was not a solution. Innovative thinking was required to sustain the ­business as changes in technology reduced the complexity that had ­protected the business from serious competition for over a century.

  13. Managed competition that works.

    PubMed

    Caper, P

    1993-05-19

    President Clinton has advocated managed competition within a global budget as a long-term strategy for simultaneously controlling health care costs and expanding access to medical care to all Americans. This proposal is intended to show how these two seemingly conflicting goals can be simultaneously accomplished. Managed competition, as it has been conceptualized to date, is primarily a strategy for reforming the system of providing health services. To work, it must be joined with a strategy for reforming our system of financing and paying for those services and of limiting overall system capacity. "Managed Competition That Works" is a proposal that would create a single trust-funded national system of health insurance, implemented through a system of vouchers to individuals. Global budgeting would be accomplished through establishment of the voucher's value each year. The trust fund would pay health plans for all medical care by capitation, but health plans would be free to negotiate a variety of payment arrangements with physicians, hospitals, and other providers. All plans would be required to offer a standard package of benefits, but would have great flexibility in offering benefits beyond the scope of the standard package, if those benefits replace high-cost with lower-cost services or permit the plan to compete more effectively for market share. This proposal would establish firm but acceptable national budget limits; provide universal, comprehensive, and uniform insurance coverage; eliminate cost shifting; encourage competition; reward efficiency-improving innovation; greatly reduce the need for centralized micromanagement of medical care; and retain local determination and a somewhat reduced level of consumer choice. Although this proposal is written as a national plan, trust funds could be implemented at the state level, if problems associated with portability of benefits among states could be solved.

  14. Staphylococci in Competition1

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, A. C.; Black, J. J.; Gunderson, M. F.

    1964-01-01

    Previous results showed definite repressive effects on the growth of staphylococci in mixed cultures due to the competitive growth of psychrophilic saprophytes. This study was continued, and the influence of other environmental factors, pH and salt, on the competition between staphylococci and saprophytes was investigated. Initial pH values varied from 5 to 9. At the extremes of the pH range, staphylococci failed to grow, while the saprophytes grew under all of the conditions tested. At pH 5, the growth curves for the saprophytes were markedly altered from those obtained at neutral pH. The lag phases were greatly lengthened at and below 20 C, but normal numbers of saprophytes were reached in the stationary phase. At pH 6 and 8, staphylococcal growth showed the same inhibition observed at pH 7, at and below 20 C; normal multiplication was observed above this temperature, but with accelerated death phases. Thus, pH did not primarily effect staphylococcal growth through its influence on saprophyte growth and competition, but rather directly affected the growth of Staphylococcus cultures. Salt concentrations from 3.5 to 9.5% were investigated for influence on staphylococcal growth in mixed populations. Above 3.5% salt, staphylococcal inhibition at and above 20 C was not as marked as in the controls, although normal numbers were never reached. The saprophytes were increasingly inhibited, and their lag phases materially lengthened as salt concentration was increased. Salt acted directly on the Staphylococcus population and also, by repressing saprophyte growth, decreased competition, which allowed the staphylococci to grow. PMID:14106943

  15. Competition for finite resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, L. Jonathan; Zia, R. K. P.

    2012-05-01

    The resources in a cell are finite, which implies that the various components of the cell must compete for resources. One such resource is the ribosomes used during translation to create proteins. Motivated by this example, we explore this competition by connecting two totally asymmetric simple exclusion processes (TASEPs) to a finite pool of particles. Expanding on our previous work, we focus on the effects on the density and current of having different entry and exit rates.

  16. A perturbation-based framework for link prediction via non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjun; Cai, Fei; Jiao, Pengfei; Pan, Lin

    2016-12-01

    Many link prediction methods have been developed to infer unobserved links or predict latent links based on the observed network structure. However, due to network noises and irregular links in real network, the performances of existed methods are usually limited. Considering random noises and irregular links, we propose a perturbation-based framework based on Non-negative Matrix Factorization to predict missing links. We first automatically determine the suitable number of latent features, which is inner rank in NMF, by Colibri method. Then, we perturb training set of a network by perturbation sets many times and get a series of perturbed networks. Finally, the common basis matrix and coefficients matrix of these perturbed networks are obtained via NMF and form similarity matrix of the network for link prediction. Experimental results on fifteen real networks show that the proposed framework has competitive performances compared with state-of-the-art link prediction methods. Correlations between the performances of different methods and the statistics of networks show that those methods with good precisions have similar consistence.

  17. A perturbation-based framework for link prediction via non-negative matrix factorization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjun; Cai, Fei; Jiao, Pengfei; Pan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many link prediction methods have been developed to infer unobserved links or predict latent links based on the observed network structure. However, due to network noises and irregular links in real network, the performances of existed methods are usually limited. Considering random noises and irregular links, we propose a perturbation-based framework based on Non-negative Matrix Factorization to predict missing links. We first automatically determine the suitable number of latent features, which is inner rank in NMF, by Colibri method. Then, we perturb training set of a network by perturbation sets many times and get a series of perturbed networks. Finally, the common basis matrix and coefficients matrix of these perturbed networks are obtained via NMF and form similarity matrix of the network for link prediction. Experimental results on fifteen real networks show that the proposed framework has competitive performances compared with state-of-the-art link prediction methods. Correlations between the performances of different methods and the statistics of networks show that those methods with good precisions have similar consistence. PMID:27976672

  18. Competitive Intelligence and Social Advantage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Elisabeth; Cronin, Blaise

    1994-01-01

    Presents an overview of issues concerning civilian competitive intelligence (CI). Topics discussed include competitive advantage in academic and research environments; public domain information and libraries; covert and overt competitive intelligence; data diversity; use of the Internet; cooperative intelligence; and implications for library and…

  19. Energy's role in competitiveness: Context and strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Roop, J.M.

    1990-02-01

    This study of competitiveness has three objectives. The first objective is to explain how macroeconomic and microeconomic factors can affect structural change in the US economy and how energy is linked to these factors. The second objective is to provide an explanation of how many individual decision makers, in responding to higher energy prices, have changed the structure of the economy. This structural change, and the effect it has had on energy use, is estimated for the US economy. A major component of these changes results from changes in US trade with other countries, which gives rise to the third objective. The third objective is to develop a research design that will allow a better understanding of the role that energy plays in the competitiveness of goods in world trade. 30 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Habitat fragmentation and interspecific competition: Implications for lynx conservation [Chapter 4

    Treesearch

    Steven W. Buskirk

    2000-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and interspecific competition are two important forces that potentially affect lynx populations. Fragmentation operates by various mechanisms, including direct habitat loss, vehicle collisions and behavioral disturbance from roads, and changes in landscape features such as edges. Competition takes two forms: Exploitation competition involves...

  1. Attention competition with advertisement.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Uzay; Bingol, Haluk O

    2014-09-01

    In the new digital age, information is available in large quantities. Since information consumes primarily the attention of its recipients, the scarcity of attention is becoming the main limiting factor. In this study, we investigate the impact of advertisement pressure on a cultural market where consumers have a limited attention capacity. A model of competition for attention is developed and investigated analytically and by simulation. Advertisement is found to be much more effective when the attention capacity of agents is extremely scarce. We have observed that the market share of the advertised item improves if dummy items are introduced to the market while the strength of the advertisement is kept constant.

  2. Attention competition with advertisement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Uzay; Bingol, Haluk O.

    2014-09-01

    In the new digital age, information is available in large quantities. Since information consumes primarily the attention of its recipients, the scarcity of attention is becoming the main limiting factor. In this study, we investigate the impact of advertisement pressure on a cultural market where consumers have a limited attention capacity. A model of competition for attention is developed and investigated analytically and by simulation. Advertisement is found to be much more effective when the attention capacity of agents is extremely scarce. We have observed that the market share of the advertised item improves if dummy items are introduced to the market while the strength of the advertisement is kept constant.

  3. Rowing competitions and perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Alfinio; Bernhardt, Stephen A.; Shipman, Henry L.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is about integrating the use of graphing technology (specifically, GeoGebra) with principles of motion, principles of perspective, and the concept of vanishing points to model a dynamic event. Students were asked to analyse video images of a rowing competition filmed with a single camera positioned perpendicular to the race. The fixed position of the camera in such races makes it difficult to determine whether a scull closer to the camera is actually overtaking another, more distant scull. The paper illustrates how students in their first year at the university can integrate the use of technology, science, mathematics, and writing to solve a real world problem involving motion.

  4. House approves Competitiveness Bill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    After nearly 3 weeks of debate, the House approved the National Competitiveness Act of 1993 (HR820) on May 19. Subtitle B of the bill lays out specific roles for the National Science Foundation in supporting expansion of the agency's activities to include manufacturing technology development, worker training partnerships, and total quality management programs.Many geoscientists believe that this mandate runs contradictory to NSF's established mission of supporting basic research (Eos, April 13, 1993) and are concerned that basic research funds might be diverted to support manufacturing within the agency.

  5. Flexible Data Link

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    continuously-interleaved Reed- Solomon scheme with 8% overhead has the best trade-off of performance (net coding gain) and overhead. Therefore, this is...disparity between attenuation at sea level versus at a 9150 meter altitude. As the Flexible Data Link system is an airborne asset which may operate...Quadrature Amplitude Modulation QPSK Quadrature Phase Shift Key RF Radio Frequency RS Reed- Solomon S&E Scientist & Engineers SFP Small Form-factor

  6. Frozen phases with re-entrant transition for random heteropolymers with composition specific and annealed cross-links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, Lorin; Shakhnovich, Eugene

    1997-07-01

    A field theoretic formalism of random heteropolymers (RHPs) with composition specific cross-links that are annealed, is developed in this work. This system can serve as a simple meaningful model of proteins with disulfide bonds. The agent that cross-links the macromolecules, as in real proteins, is assumed to maintain an equilibrium cross-linking density within the heteropolymer globule; this situation is reminiscent to in vivo reagent induced cross-linking, and protrudes the experimental desired control on formation and dissolution of cross-links. The starting point of our analysis, i.e. the random heteropolymer Hamiltonian, captures both the chain connectivity and the essentially quenched nature of amino-acids distribution reminiscent of linear uncross-linked polypeptides. The conformational statistics of the RHP is determined within the replica approach. For experimentally realizable values of the RHP interaction parameters, we predict the appearance of two frozen phases of RHPs wherein a small number of chain conformations of order O(1) are being sampled. At the interim between the two phases our calculation predicts the appearance of a re-entrant transition wherein the number of chain conformations sampled is of order O(N). The occurrence of the re-entrant transition is due to a tight competition between the intersegment interactions (measured by χF), and the propensity of composition specific and annealed cross-links to form (determined by the chemical potential of the cross-linking agent). We suggest how to traverse the re-entrant transition line, by chemically manipulating the competition of dissimilar interactions of the disparate segments, and the specific propensity of the peptides to cross-link, and also, we provide an explanation for the observation that in nature cross-linking between alike rather than dissimilar segments is observed.

  7. Competition between conceptual relations affects compound recognition: the role of entropy.

    PubMed

    Schmidtke, Daniel; Kuperman, Victor; Gagné, Christina L; Spalding, Thomas L

    2016-04-01

    Previous research has suggested that the conceptual representation of a compound is based on a relational structure linking the compound's constituents. Existing accounts of the visual recognition of modifier-head or noun-noun compounds posit that the process involves the selection of a relational structure out of a set of competing relational structures associated with the same compound. In this article, we employ the information-theoretic metric of entropy to gauge relational competition and investigate its effect on the visual identification of established English compounds. The data from two lexical decision megastudies indicates that greater entropy (i.e., increased competition) in a set of conceptual relations associated with a compound is associated with longer lexical decision latencies. This finding indicates that there exists competition between potential meanings associated with the same complex word form. We provide empirical support for conceptual composition during compound word processing in a model that incorporates the effect of the integration of co-activated and competing relational information.

  8. The impact of competition among health care financing authorities on market yields and issuer interest expenses.

    PubMed

    Bernet, Patrick M; Carpenter, Caryl E; Saunders, Warren

    2011-01-01

    The main source of capital for non-for-profit health care organizations is tax-exempt municipal bonds. The tax-exempt nature of this debt requires that they be issued through financing authorities, which are run by, or affiliated with, state or local government agencies. In some states, all tax-exempt health care bonds must be issued through a single financing authority, but in other states the issuing health care organization has a choice of multiple authorities. Using a Herfindahl index of issuer concentration, prior research has found that greater competition among authorities results in lower interest costs to the issuing health care organization. We pick up where this earlier study left off, examining the links between authority competition, the interest expenses to the issuer, and the yield to the market investor. Although our analysis of all hospital bonds issued between 1994 and 2002 corroborates earlier findings with regard to interest expenses to the issuing health care organization, we also find market yield is lower for statewide authorities where issuer concentration is lower. Thus, authority competition is good from the issuers' point of view, but holds no favor in the investors' eyes. On the other hand, the lower market yield associated with statewide authorities does not make its way down to the issuer in the form of lower interest costs. To help sort through this paradox, we explore our findings through interviews of executives in state issuing authorities.

  9. Transatlantic link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (left) European Geophysical Society (EGS) President Rolf Meissner at AGU Headquarters with (center) Executive Director Fred Spilhaus and (right) Foreign Secretary Juan Roederer. Meissner attended the meeting of AGU's Committee on International Participation (CIP) on February 26, 1988. At that meeting, specific ways of fostering close links between AGU and EGS were discussed.A few weeks later, Roederer and AGU staff, working with EGS Secretary-General Arne Richter at the EGS meeting in Bologna, Italy, March 21-25, planned details of the establishment of an AGU office in Europe. The Copernicus Gesellschaft, a new entity located on the premises of the Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy in Lindau, Federal Republic of Germany, will provide the administrative staff and handle logistics.

  10. Canoe slalom competition analysis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Adam; Cochrane, Jodie; Sachlikidis, Alexi

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the differences between groups of elite canoe slalom athletes based on the class they paddle in and the strategies they use in competition. Canoe and kayak footage was recorded using three cameras and analysed using lapsed-time time-motion analysis. Analysis was undertaken on the ten fastest competition runs for men's kayak and canoes and women's kayak for the 22-gate semi-final/final course at the 2005 canoe slalom world championships. Comparison between the categories of paddlers revealed that despite canoe paddlers taking significantly (P < or = 0.05) fewer strokes than kayak paddlers, they were not significantly slower than men's single kayak paddlers with respect to their run times and only significantly slower between 4 of 22 gates. Results revealed also that paddlers using different turn strategies (spin vs. pivot) had significantly (P < or = 0.05) different split times for the gates before and after the execution of the manoeuvre. For a paddler this means that their individual strategy could be analysed and compared with those of others to determine if alternate strategies would be beneficial to their performance.

  11. Staphylococci in Competition1

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, A. C.; Black, J. J.; Gunderson, M. F.

    1964-01-01

    Foods containing large amounts of carbohydrate have frequently been involved in staphylococcal food poisoning. Custard has been considered to be a highly favorable culture medium for staphylococci; however, it may be a selective medium rather than an ideal one. The influence of dextrose, lactose, and sucrose in varying amounts from 0.25 to 18%, and of starch, on the growth of staphylococci in mixed populations with saprophytes was determined. The inhibitory effect of the sugars was much greater on the saprophyte population than on the staphylococci. Of the three sugars, sucrose was most inhibitory to the saprophytes. It greatly decreased their lag periods as the concentration of sugar increased. Dextrose was the least inhibitory; in fact, 0.5% dextrose gave considerable stimulus to saprophyte growth. This sharply repressed staphylococcal growth. Lactose occupied an intermediate position. Rapid onset of the death phase of the staphylococci was observed in all increased sugar concentrations and seemed to be a pH effect rather than a result of competition. Sucrose exerted an inhibitory effect on the growth of saprophytes at and above room temperature. In the presence of 2.5% corn starch, staphylococcal growth in mixed cultures was slightly inhibited, while the death phase was sharply accelerated. Thus, carbohydrates exert their influence on staphylococcal growth in mixed cultures through their effect on the saprophytes by decreasing or increasing competition. PMID:14106944

  12. Adolescent Suicide and Academic Competition in East Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Kangmin; Le Tendre, Gerald

    1998-01-01

    Uses recent data and new theoretical perspectives to reexamine hypothesized links between academic competition and adolescent suicide in East Asia, particularly Japan. Finds no direct connection, discusses possible indirect effects on individual motives, and suggests a more complicated model. Analyzes how cultural and historical factors may…

  13. Competitive Intelligence on the Internet-Going for the Gold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassler, Helene

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of competitive intelligence (CI) focuses on recent Web sties and several search techniques that provide valuable CI information. Highlights include links that display business relationships; information from vendors; general business sites; search engine strategies; local business newspapers; job postings; patent and trademark…

  14. Competitive Intelligence on the Internet-Going for the Gold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassler, Helene

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of competitive intelligence (CI) focuses on recent Web sties and several search techniques that provide valuable CI information. Highlights include links that display business relationships; information from vendors; general business sites; search engine strategies; local business newspapers; job postings; patent and trademark…

  15. [Competition and prices in the Mexican pharmaceutical market].

    PubMed

    Molina-Salazar, Raúl E; González-Marín, Eloy; Carbajal-de Nova, Carolina

    2008-01-01

    The forms of market competition define prices. The pharmaceutical market contains submarkets with different levels of competition; on the one hand are the innovating products with patents, and on the other, generic products with or without trade names. Innovating medicines generally have monopolistic prices, but when the patents expire prices drop because of competition from therapeutic alternatives. The trade name makes it easier to maintain monopolistic prices. In Mexico, medicine prices in the private market are high--according to aggregated estimates and prices for specific medicines--which reflect the limitations of pharmaceutical market competition and the power of the trade name. The public segment enjoys competitive prices using the WHO strategy for essential medicines on the basis of the Essential List.

  16. Competitions hatch butterfly attractors in foreign exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yu Ying

    2005-03-01

    Chaos in foreign exchange markets is a common issue of concern in the study of economic dynamics. In this work, we mainly investigate the competition effect on chaos in foreign exchange markets. As one of the main economic structures in the globalization process, competition between two target exchange rates with the same base currency forms a simple competitive exchange rate relation, where each exchange rate follows the chaotic model of De Grauwe (Exchange Rate Theory-Chaotic Models of Foreign Exchange Markets, Blackwell, Oxford, Cambridge, MA, 1993). The main discovery is, while each exchange rate is in its non-chaotic parameter regions, the effect of competition will “hatch” butterfly-like chaotic attractors in the competitive market. The positive Lyapunov exponent in the market explains the reason why chaos occurs.

  17. Comparing pre- and post-copulatory mate competition using social network analysis in wild crickets

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, David N.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    Sexual selection results from variation in success at multiple stages in the mating process, including competition before and after mating. The relationship between these forms of competition, such as whether they trade-off or reinforce one another, influences the role of sexual selection in evolution. However, the relationship between these 2 forms of competition is rarely quantified in the wild. We used video cameras to observe competition among male field crickets and their matings in the wild. We characterized pre- and post-copulatory competition as 2 networks of competing individuals. Social network analysis then allowed us to determine 1) the effectiveness of precopulatory competition for avoiding postcopulatory competition, 2) the potential for divergent mating strategies, and 3) whether increased postcopulatory competition reduces the apparent reproductive benefits of male promiscuity. We found 1) limited effectiveness of precopulatory competition for avoiding postcopulatory competition; 2) males do not specifically engage in only 1 type of competition; and 3) promiscuous individuals tend to mate with each other, which will tend to reduce variance in reproductive success in the population and highlights the trade-off inherent in mate guarding. Our results provide novel insights into the works of sexual competition in the wild. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the utility of using network analyses to study competitive interactions, even in species lacking obvious social structure. PMID:27174599

  18. Comparing pre- and post-copulatory mate competition using social network analysis in wild crickets.

    PubMed

    Fisher, David N; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rolando; Tregenza, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Sexual selection results from variation in success at multiple stages in the mating process, including competition before and after mating. The relationship between these forms of competition, such as whether they trade-off or reinforce one another, influences the role of sexual selection in evolution. However, the relationship between these 2 forms of competition is rarely quantified in the wild. We used video cameras to observe competition among male field crickets and their matings in the wild. We characterized pre- and post-copulatory competition as 2 networks of competing individuals. Social network analysis then allowed us to determine 1) the effectiveness of precopulatory competition for avoiding postcopulatory competition, 2) the potential for divergent mating strategies, and 3) whether increased postcopulatory competition reduces the apparent reproductive benefits of male promiscuity. We found 1) limited effectiveness of precopulatory competition for avoiding postcopulatory competition; 2) males do not specifically engage in only 1 type of competition; and 3) promiscuous individuals tend to mate with each other, which will tend to reduce variance in reproductive success in the population and highlights the trade-off inherent in mate guarding. Our results provide novel insights into the works of sexual competition in the wild. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the utility of using network analyses to study competitive interactions, even in species lacking obvious social structure.

  19. Competition can lead to unexpected patterns in tropical ant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwood, M. D. Farnon; Blüthgen, Nico; Fayle, Tom M.; Foster, William A.; Menzel, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Ecological communities are structured by competitive, predatory, mutualistic and parasitic interactions combined with chance events. Separating deterministic from stochastic processes is possible, but finding statistical evidence for specific biological interactions is challenging. We attempt to solve this problem for ant communities nesting in epiphytic bird's nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) in Borneo's lowland rainforest. By recording the frequencies with which each and every single ant species occurred together, we were able to test statistically for patterns associated with interspecific competition. We found evidence for competition, but the resulting co-occurrence pattern was the opposite of what we expected. Rather than detecting species segregation-the classical hallmark of competition-we found species aggregation. Moreover, our approach of testing individual pairwise interactions mostly revealed spatially positive rather than negative associations. Significant negative interactions were only detected among large ants, and among species of the subfamily Ponerinae. Remarkably, the results from this study, and from a corroborating analysis of ant communities known to be structured by competition, suggest that competition within the ants leads to species aggregation rather than segregation. We believe this unexpected result is linked with the displacement of species following asymmetric competition. We conclude that analysing co-occurrence frequencies across complete species assemblages, separately for each species, and for each unique pairwise combination of species, represents a subtle yet powerful way of detecting structure and compartmentalisation in ecological communities.

  20. Competition and integration in Swedish health care.

    PubMed

    Ahgren, Bengt

    2010-07-01

    Despite of an insignificant track record of quasi-market models in Sweden, new models of this kind have recently been introduced in health care; commonly referred to as "choice of care". This time citizens act as purchasers; choosing the primary care centre or family physician they want to be treated by, which, in turn, generates a capitation payment to the chosen unit. Policy makers believe that such systems will be self-remedial, that is, as a result of competition the strong providers survive while unprofitable ones will be eliminated. Because of negative consequences of the fragmented health care delivery, policy makers at the same time also promote different forms of integrated health care arrangements. One example is "local health care", which could be described as an upgraded community-oriented primary care, supported by adaptable hospital services, fitting the needs of a local population. This article reviews if it is possible to combine this kind of integrated care system with a competition driven model of governance, or if they are incompatible. The findings indicate that some choice of care schemes could hamper the development of integration in local health care. However, geographical monopolies like local health care, enclosed in a non-competitive context, lack the stimulus of competition that possibly improves performance. Thus, it could be argued that if choice of care and local health care should be combined, patients ought to choose between integrated health care arrangements and not among individual health professionals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 2016 U.S. Department of Energy Race to Zero Student Design Competition Guide

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-01

    This Guide to the Race to Zero Student Design Competition is a comprehensive overview of the framework, timeline, design parameters, judging criteria, and awards. This Guide provides links to resources that the teams will need.

  2. The Impact of Skills Development on Competitiveness: Empirical Evidence from a Cross-Country Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onsomu, Eldah N.; Ngware, Moses W.; Manda, Damiano K.

    2010-01-01

    In the past half-century, most countries have emphasized the development of human capital as an instrument for economic growth, sustainable development, and improved global competitiveness. However, limited evidence exists on the link between skills development and a country's competitiveness. This paper examines the contribution and association…

  3. Affirming the Goal: Is College and Career Readiness an Internationally Competitive Standard? Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    ACT examined the international competitiveness of college and career ready standards in the policy research report, Affirming the Goal: Is College and Career Readiness an Internationally Competitive Standard? In this study, ACT performed a linking analysis to identify the PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) scores in reading and…

  4. Limited Evidence That Competitive Food and Beverage Practices Affect Adolescent Consumption Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vericker, Tracy C.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity is emerging as a considerable public health problem with no clear antidote. The school food environment is a potential intervention point for policy makers, with competitive food and beverage regulation as a possible policy lever. This research examines the link between competitive food and beverage availability in school and…

  5. Limited Evidence That Competitive Food and Beverage Practices Affect Adolescent Consumption Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vericker, Tracy C.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity is emerging as a considerable public health problem with no clear antidote. The school food environment is a potential intervention point for policy makers, with competitive food and beverage regulation as a possible policy lever. This research examines the link between competitive food and beverage availability in school and…

  6. Sixth-Form Colleges: An Endangered Organisational Form?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoten, David William

    2014-01-01

    The sixth-form college sector is often marginalised in policy and academic discourse, where the much larger school and further education sectors dominate. This paper sets out to describe the sector's key features, assess its position within the wider education system and consider its future in an increasingly competitive education market. The…

  7. Topological knots and links in proteins.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski-Tumanski, Pawel; Sulkowska, Joanna I

    2017-03-28

    Twenty years after their discovery, knots in proteins are now quite well understood. They are believed to be functionally advantageous and provide extra stability to protein chains. In this work, we go one step further and search for links-entangled structures, more complex than knots, which consist of several components. We derive conditions that proteins need to meet to be able to form links. We search through the entire Protein Data Bank and identify several sequentially nonhomologous chains that form a Hopf link and a Solomon link. We relate topological properties of these proteins to their function and stability and show that the link topology is characteristic of eukaryotes only. We also explain how the presence of links affects the folding pathways of proteins. Finally, we define necessary conditions to form Borromean rings in proteins and show that no structure in the Protein Data Bank forms a link of this type.

  8. Low temperature cross linking polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A polyimide is formed by cross linking a prepolymer formed by reacting a polyfunctional ester, a polyfunctional amine, and an end-capping unit. By providing an end-capping unit, the prepolymer is curable at a relatively low temperature of about 175 to 245 C.

  9. Competition among hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Martin; Vogt, William B

    2003-01-01

    We examine competition in the hospital industry, in particular the effect of ownership type (for-profit, not-for-profit, government). We estimate a structural model of demand and pricing in the hospital industry in California, then use the estimates to simulate the effect of a merger. California hospitals in 1995 face an average price elasticity of demand of -4.85. Not-for-profit hospitals face less elastic demand and act as if they have lower marginal costs. Their prices are lower than those of for-profits, but markups are higher. We simulate the effects of the 1997 merger of two hospital chains. In San Luis Obispo County, where the merger creates a near monopoly, prices rise by up to 53%, and the predicted price increase would not be substantially smaller were the chains not-for-profit.

  10. EPCRA Trade Secret Forms and Instructions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This form is required in order to substantiate claims of trade secrecy. You must be able to describe safeguarding measures and disclosure history for the specific chemical identity, and identify harm to your competitive position.

  11. Immunological impact of Taekwondo competitions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y W; Shin, K W; Paik, I-Y; Jung, W M; Cho, S-Y; Choi, S T; Kim, H D; Kim, J Y

    2012-01-01

    Immunological changes in elite adolescent female athletes during Taekwondo competitions were investigated on-field. 6 female athletes (16.7 ± 0.8 year-old) volunteered and performed 5 bouts of demonstration Taekwondo competitions simulating real tournaments in intensity, duration, and break-time intervals on the same day. Blood samples were taken before, after the competitions and during the recovery, respectively. Immunological changes and oxidative stress in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were evaluated by flow-cytometry. During the competitions, exercise intensity was 92.2 ± 3.8% (86.1~95.7) of the maximal heart rate. Blood lactate increased immediately after the competitions (p=0.0165) and decreased to baseline during recovery. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the peripheral blood increased continuously during recovery (p<0.05, respectively). Natural killer cells increased immediately after the competitions (p=0.0006), and decreased during recovery. B and T cells increased immediately after the competitions and remained elevated throughout recovery (p<0.05, respectively). CD4/CD8 ratio after the competitions was decreased (p=0.0091) and returned to baseline during recovery. These results suggest that the immunological function of the elite female adolescent athletes could be attenuated after Taekwondo competitions. Further large-scaled Taekwondo studies on immunologic and apoptotic changes related to oxidative stress should be performed for improving and protecting the health of adolescent athletes.

  12. Spatial Aspects of Interspecific Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durrett, Rick; Levin, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Using several variants of a stochastic spatial model introduced by Silvertown et al., we investigate the effect of spatial distribution of individuals on the outcome of competition. First, we prove rigorously that if one species has a competitive advantage over each of the others, then eventually it takes over all the sites in the system. Second, we examine tradeoffs between competition and dispersal distance in a two-species system. Third, we consider a cyclic competitive relationship between three types. In this case, a nonspatial treatment leads to densities that follow neutrally stable cycles or even unstable spiral solutions, while a spatial model yields a stationary distribution with an interesting spatial structure.

  13. Mapping your competitive position.

    PubMed

    D'Aveni, Richard A

    2007-11-01

    A price-benefit positioning map helps you see, through your customers' eyes, how your product compares with all its competitors in a market. You can draw such a map quickly and objectively, without having to resort to costly, time-consuming consumer surveys or subjective estimates of the excellence of your product and the shortcomings of all the others. Creating a positioning map involves three steps: First, define your market to include everything your customers might consider to be your product's competitors or substitutes. Second, track the price your customers actually pay (wholesale or retail? bundled or unbundled?) and identify what your customers see as your offering's primary benefit. This is done through regression analysis, determining which of the product's attributes (as described objectively by rating services, government agencies, R&D departments, and the like) explains most of the variance in its price. Third, draw the map by plotting on a graph the position of every product in the market you've selected according to its price and its level of primary benefit, and draw a line that runs through the middle of the points. What you get is a picture of the competitive landscape of your market, where all the products above the line command a price premium owing to some secondary benefit customers value, and all those below the line are positioned to earn market share through lower prices and reduced secondary benefits. Using examples as varied as Harley-Davidson motorcycles, Motorola cell phones, and the New York restaurant market, Tuck professor D'Aveni demonstrates some of the many ways the maps can be used: to locate unoccupied or less-crowded spaces in highly competitive markets, for instance, or to identify opportunities created through changes in the relationship between the primary benefit and prices. The maps even allow companies to anticipate--and counter-- rivals' strategies. R eprint RO711G

  14. Sperm competition and the evolution of gamete morphology in frogs.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Phillip G; Simmons, Leigh W; Roberts, J Dale

    2003-10-07

    Despite detailed knowledge of the ultrastructure of spermatozoa, there is a paucity of information on the selective pressures that influence sperm form and function. Theoretical models for both internal and external fertilizers predict that sperm competition could favour the evolution of longer sperm. Empirical tests of the external-fertilization model have been restricted to just one group, the fishes, and these tests have proved equivocal. We investigated how sperm competition affects sperm morphology in externally fertilizing myobatrachid frogs. We also examined selection acting on egg size, and covariation between sperm and egg morphology. Species were ranked according to probability of group spawning and hence risk of sperm competition. Body size, testis size and oviposition environment may also influence gamete traits and were included in our analyses. After controlling for phylogenetic relationships between the species examined, we found that an increased risk of sperm competition was associated with increased sperm head and tail lengths. Path analysis showed that sperm competition had its greatest direct effect on sperm tail length, as might be expected under selection resulting from competitive fertilization. Sperm competition did not influence egg size. Oviposition location had a strong influence on egg size and a weak influence on sperm length, with terrestrial spawners having larger gametes than aquatic spawners. Our analysis revealed significant correlated evolution between egg morphology and sperm morphology. These data provide a conclusive demonstration that sperm competition selects for increased sperm length in frogs, and evidence for evolutionary covariance between aspects of male and female gamete morphology.

  15. Martial arts sports medicine: current issues and competition event coverage.

    PubMed

    Nishime, Robert S

    2007-06-01

    More sports medicine professionals are becoming actively involved in the care of the martial arts athlete. Although there are many different forms of martial arts practiced worldwide, certain styles have shown a potential for increased participation in competitive-type events. Further research is needed to better understand the prevalence and profiles of injuries sustained in martial arts full-contact competitive events. Breaking down the martial art techniques into basic concepts of striking, grappling, and submission maneuvers, including choking and joint locking, may facilitate better understanding and management of injuries. This article outlines this approach and reviews the commonly encountered injuries and problems during martial arts full-contact competitions.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy is a form of heart disease. Dilated cardiomyopathy ...

  17. Effect of market competition on hospital performance for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Jared Lane K; LoSasso, Anthony T

    2011-12-01

    To investigate whether market competition is a potential driver of hospital performance on the key evidence-based Joint Commission heart-failure (HF) quality indicators of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker prescribed, left ventricular function assessment, smoking-cessation counseling, and discharge instructions. Retrospective multivariate analysis. Hospital performance data for HF was obtained from The Joint Commission's ORYX program from 2003 to 2006. The performance data were linked with hospital characteristics from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey and area-level sociodemographic information from the Area Resource File. Healthcare markets were defined as hospital referral regions (HRRs) and market competition intensity was defined by the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index. Hospital-level and HRR-level ordinary least squares fixed effects regression models were used to estimate the relationship between market competition and performance. A paired comparison indicated that there was a significant change in the mean hospital-level performance over time on all of the HF quality indicators. From the multivariate analyses, hospitals in the least competitive markets (Quintile 5) performed slightly better (2.9%) than the most competitive markets (Quintile 1) for left ventricular function assessment (P <.01). At the HRR level, however, the least competitive markets (Quintile 5) performed moderately worse (5.1%) on the discharge-instructions quality indicator compared with the most competitive markets (Quintile 1) (P = .05). Market competition intensity was associated with only small differences in hospital performance. The level of market competitiveness may produce only marginal incremental benefits to inpatient HF care.

  18. NMDA Receptors Mediate Synaptic Competition in Culture

    PubMed Central

    She, Kevin; Craig, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background Activity through NMDA type glutamate receptors sculpts connectivity in the developing nervous system. This topic is typically studied in the visual system in vivo, where activity of inputs can be differentially regulated, but in which individual synapses are difficult to visualize and mechanisms governing synaptic competition can be difficult to ascertain. Here, we develop a model of NMDA-receptor dependent synaptic competition in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons. Methodology/Principal Findings GluN1 -/- (KO) mouse hippocampal neurons lacking the essential NMDA receptor subunit were cultured alone or cultured in defined ratios with wild type (WT) neurons. The absence of functional NMDA receptors did not alter neuron survival. Synapse development was assessed by immunofluorescence for postsynaptic PSD-95 family scaffold and apposed presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut1. Synapse density was specifically enhanced onto minority wild type neurons co-cultured with a majority of GluN1 -/- neighbour neurons, both relative to the GluN1 -/- neighbours and relative to sister pure wild type cultures. This form of synaptic competition was dependent on NMDA receptor activity and not conferred by the mere physical presence of GluN1. In contrast to these results in 10% WT and 90% KO co-cultures, synapse density did not differ by genotype in 50% WT and 50% KO co-cultures or in 90% WT and 10% KO co-cultures. Conclusions/Significance The enhanced synaptic density onto NMDA receptor-competent neurons in minority coculture with GluN1 -/- neurons represents a cell culture paradigm for studying synaptic competition. Mechanisms involved may include a retrograde ‘reward’ signal generated by WT neurons, although in this paradigm there was no ‘punishment’ signal against GluN1 -/- neurons. Cell culture assays involving such defined circuits may help uncover the rules and mechanisms of activity-dependent synaptic competition in the developing nervous

  19. Marketing energy services in a competitive environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mykytyn, R.B.

    1996-05-01

    For nearly six decades electrical utilities have operated in a regulated environment established by the Public Utilities Holding Company Act (PUHCA) of 1935. This legislation granted generators exclusive franchise to market electrical power in a given geographical area in return for the company`s commitment to provide safe, reliable and fairly-priced electrical power to all customers within the region. For close to 40 years, this system of regulated monopoly functioned reasonably well to maintain a balance among the varied, and at times competing, interests in the industry. During the 1970s, however, the public argument in favor of competition within the electrical services industry gained momentum. Spiraling energy costs focused the consumer`s attention on the need for conservation and inspired a variety of technological developments as well as experiments in cogeneration. Today, the electrical utility industry is poised for great change. Soon, this industry will follow the natural gas, telecommunications, and transportation industries into the uncharted waters of deregulation. The most pressing consequence of moving from a regulated environment to one that is deregulated - in other words, a competitive environment - is the need to design and implement a completely new form of marketing program. The response among industry marketing managers ranges from confusion and concern to excitement and eager anticipation. Where you fall along this continuum depends on how well you understand competitive marketing practices and the degree to which your company`s management group is willing to initiate competitive strategies and tactics now in preparation for the coming competitive marketplace.

  20. LinkProt: a database collecting information about biological links

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowski-Tumanski, Pawel; Jarmolinska, Aleksandra I.; Niemyska, Wanda; Rawdon, Eric J.; Millett, Kenneth C.; Sulkowska, Joanna I.

    2017-01-01

    Protein chains are known to fold into topologically complex shapes, such as knots, slipknots or complex lassos. This complex topology of the chain can be considered as an additional feature of a protein, separate from secondary and tertiary structures. Moreover, the complex topology can be defined also as one additional structural level. The LinkProt database (http://linkprot.cent.uw.edu.pl) collects and displays information about protein links — topologically non-trivial structures made by up to four chains and complexes of chains (e.g. in capsids). The database presents deterministic links (with loops closed, e.g. by two disulfide bonds), links formed probabilistically and macromolecular links. The structures are classified according to their topology and presented using the minimal surface area method. The database is also equipped with basic tools which allow users to analyze the topology of arbitrary (bio)polymers. PMID:27794552

  1. A stable isotopic view on lianas' and trees' below ground competition for water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deurwaerder, Hannes; Hervé-Fernández, Pedro; Stahl, Clément; Bonal, Damien; Burban, Benoît; Petronelli, Pascal; Boeckx, Pascal; Verbeeck, Hans

    2017-04-01

    Various studies highlight an increase in liana abundance and biomass in the neotropics in the last decades. To date, the reason why this growth form expresses this trend is still unclear. One of the proposed hypotheses ascribes tropical lianas, in comparison to tropical trees, of being able to adapt better to increased drought conditions resulting from climate change. Moreover, lianas presumably have a deeper root system, providing access to deeper soil layers less susceptible for dehydration during drought events. A dual stable water isotopic approach (δ18O and δ2H) enables studying vegetation below ground competition and in combination with Bayesian mixing models can provide insight in the fractional contribution of distinct soil layer depths. In this perspective, precipitation (bulk and through fall), bulk soil (at different depths), stream and xylem water of both lianas and trees were sampled between October 7-13, 2015. The study focusses on two distinct plots differing in soil texture (sand and clay), localized in close vicinity of the Guyana flux tower at Paracou (French Guyana). Our study highlights the erroneous of the deep tap root hypothesis and provides new insights in water and nutrient competition between tropical lianas and trees during dry season. Lianas isotopic signature is enriched compared to those of trees. This can be linked to water source depth and soil seasonal replenishment. Moreover, liana displaying a very active soil surface root activity, efficiently capturing the low amount of dry season precipitation, while trees show to tap the deeper and less drought susceptible soil layers. A strategy, which not only results in a spatial niche separation in the underground competition for water, but it also provides lianas with a definite advantage in nutrient competition.

  2. Computational models of intergroup competition and warfare.

    SciTech Connect

    Letendre, Kenneth; Abbott, Robert G.

    2011-11-01

    This document reports on the research of Kenneth Letendre, the recipient of a Sandia Graduate Research Fellowship at the University of New Mexico. Warfare is an extreme form of intergroup competition in which individuals make extreme sacrifices for the benefit of their nation or other group to which they belong. Among animals, limited, non-lethal competition is the norm. It is not fully understood what factors lead to warfare. We studied the global variation in the frequency of civil conflict among countries of the world, and its positive association with variation in the intensity of infectious disease. We demonstrated that the burden of human infectious disease importantly predicts the frequency of civil conflict and tested a causal model for this association based on the parasite-stress theory of sociality. We also investigated the organization of social foraging by colonies of harvester ants in the genus Pogonomyrmex, using both field studies and computer models.

  3. Competition and cooperation in dynamic replication networks.

    PubMed

    Dadon, Zehavit; Wagner, Nathaniel; Alasibi, Samaa; Samiappan, Manickasundaram; Mukherjee, Rakesh; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2015-01-07

    The simultaneous replication of six coiled-coil peptide mutants by reversible thiol-thioester exchange reactions is described. Experimental analysis of the time dependent evolution of networks formed by the peptides under different conditions reveals a complex web of molecular interactions and consequent mutant replication, governed by competition for resources and by autocatalytic and/or cross-catalytic template-assisted reactions. A kinetic model, first of its kind, is then introduced, allowing simulation of varied network behaviour as a consequence of changing competition and cooperation scenarios. We suggest that by clarifying the kinetic description of these relatively complex dynamic networks, both at early stages of the reaction far from equilibrium and at later stages approaching equilibrium, one lays the foundation for studying dynamic networks out-of-equilibrium in the near future.

  4. Higher Education, Employability and Competitiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlin, Samo; Svetlicic, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between competitiveness and higher education systems in Europe. It explores whether more competitive countries have developed more labour-market-oriented systems of higher education (HE) that thereby give their graduates greater short term employability potential. Based on and a large-scale survey among 45.000…

  5. DOE Collegiate Wind Competition (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.

    2014-02-01

    This presentation for the January Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach webinar outlines the expanded need for workers in the wind industry and provides an overview of the DOE Wind Competition (to be held in May 2014) and the guiding principles of the competition.

  6. Competitive Skills Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Camino Coll., Torrance, CA.

    Almost 180 (22.5 percent) of BP Chemicals/HITCO, Inc. (BPCHI) employees have participated in the basic skills courses offered through the Competitive Skills Project (CSP) at El Camino College (Torrance, California). Workplace basics provide a solid foundation for Total Quality Management (TQM), enabling workers to be globally competitive. Two main…

  7. The 2005 Australian Informatics Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the Australian Informatics Competition (AIC), a non-programming competition aimed at identifying students with potential in programming and algorithmic design. It is the first step in identifying students to represent Australia at the International Olympiad in Informatics. The main aim of the AIC is to increase awareness of…

  8. Feature Discovery by Competitive Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumelhart, David E.; Zipser, David

    1985-01-01

    Reports results of studies with an unsupervised learning paradigm called competitive learning which is examined using computer simulation and formal analysis. When competitive learning is applied to parallel networks of neuron-like elements, many potentially useful learning tasks can be accomplished. (Author)

  9. Fresno County Mock Trial Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno City Unified School District, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: The Fresno County Office of Education and the Fresno Unified School District hosted the Mock Trial Competition. The state competition is sponsored by the Constitutional Rights Foundation, with cosponsorship from the California State Bar Association and the California Young Lawyer's Association. This…

  10. Mathematics + Competitions = A Winning Formula!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Tracy L.; Karnes, Frances A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes how teachers of the gifted can make the study of mathematics dynamic, innovative, and creative through the exploration of problem-solving skills and real-life applications. Math competitions and general academic competitions that include mathematics for elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools are highlighted. (CR)

  11. Virginia DECA Competitive Events Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum Center.

    This handbook combines in a single publication several sets of guidelines for separate competitive events sponsored by the Virginia Association of the Distributive Education Clubs of America (VA DECA). The handbook is organized to promote understanding of the relationships between the competitive events held on the national level and those…

  12. Achievement and Competitiveness in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin-Pierson, Sharon

    1988-01-01

    Achievement and competitiveness in women is examined within the new scholarship on women. Past research is reviewed and a new conceptualization of competitiveness is offered. Three tenets of the new scholarship on women identified in previous article by Greiner are described as having particular significance for understanding achievement and…

  13. Prediction of Competitive Microbial Growth.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

     Prediction of competitive microbial growth is becoming important for microbial food safety. There would be two approaches to predict competitive microbial growth with mathematical models. The first approach is the development of a growth model for competitive microbes. Among several candidates for the competition model considered, the combination of the primary growth model of the new logistic (NL) model and the competition model of the Lotka-Vorttera (LV) model showed the best performance in predicting microbial competitive growth in the mixed culture of two species. This system further successfully predicted the growth of three competitive species in mixed culture. The second approach is the application of the secondary model especially for the parameter of the maximum cell population in the primary growth model. The combination of the NL model and a polynomial model for the maximum population successfully predicted Salmonella growth in raw ground beef. This system further successfully predicted Salmonella growth in beef at various initial concentrations and temperatures. The first approach requires microbial growth data in monoculture for analysis. The second approach to the prediction of competitive growth from the viewpoint of microbial food safety would be more suitable for practical application.

  14. Higher Education, Employability and Competitiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlin, Samo; Svetlicic, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between competitiveness and higher education systems in Europe. It explores whether more competitive countries have developed more labour-market-oriented systems of higher education (HE) that thereby give their graduates greater short term employability potential. Based on and a large-scale survey among 45.000…

  15. Competitive strategy a new era.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Alan M

    2007-11-01

    By adopting five basic practices, your organization will be ready to advance to the next level of competitive fitness: Develop a reliable financial baseline. Insist on development of a competitive intelligence database system. Employ rigorous business planning. Advocate for focus and discipline. Really commit to competing.

  16. The need for competitive intelligence.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1989-01-01

    Often associated with marketing warfare, competitive intelligence has become an essential part of health-care organizations' strategic planning efforts. Without overstepping ethical boundaries, providers can gather a vast array of "intelligence" about their competition from public sources, from the marketplace and from competitors themselves.

  17. How to use competitive intelligence.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1989-02-01

    Keeping tabs on the competition is a necessity, not a luxury, for organizations operating in today's health-care marketplace. This article, the second of two, explores various strategies for using competitive intelligence and suggests ways to ensure organization-wide commitment to gathering and using this information as part of an overall strategic plan.

  18. Competitive Electricity Prices: An Update

    EIA Publications

    1998-01-01

    Illustrates a third impact of the move to competitive generation pricing -- the narrowing of the range of prices across regions of the country. This feature article updates information in Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing of Generation Services and Financial Status of Electric Utilities.

  19. Neurocognitive Performance: Returning to Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; McIntire, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Athletes who suffer from concussions under report their symptoms in order to expedite their return to competition. Athletic trainers and coaches must be aware of what is going on with athletes, even if it means requiring them to refrain from competition. Ninety percent of concussions are minor and can be difficult to diagnosis. There is a lack of…

  20. "Conjectural" links in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snarskii, A. A.; Zorinets, D. I.; Lande, D. V.

    2016-11-01

    This paper introduces the concept of Conjectural Link for Complex Networks, in particular, social networks. Conjectural Link we understand as an implicit link, not available in the network, but supposed to be present, based on the characteristics of its topology. It is possible, for example, when in the formal description of the network some connections are skipped due to errors, deliberately hidden or withdrawn (e.g. in the case of partial destruction of the network). Introduced a parameter that allows ranking the Conjectural Link. The more this parameter - the more likely that this connection should be present in the network. This paper presents a method of recovery of partially destroyed Complex Networks using Conjectural Links finding. Presented two methods of finding the node pairs that are not linked directly to one another, but have a great possibility of Conjectural Link communication among themselves: a method based on the determination of the resistance between two nodes, and method based on the computation of the lengths of routes between two nodes. Several examples of real networks are reviewed and performed a comparison to know network links prediction methods, not intended to find the missing links in already formed networks.

  1. How competition affects evolutionary rescue

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, Matthew Miles; de Mazancourt, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Populations facing novel environments can persist by adapting. In nature, the ability to adapt and persist will depend on interactions between coexisting individuals. Here we use an adaptive dynamic model to assess how the potential for evolutionary rescue is affected by intra- and interspecific competition. Intraspecific competition (negative density-dependence) lowers abundance, which decreases the supply rate of beneficial mutations, hindering evolutionary rescue. On the other hand, interspecific competition can aid evolutionary rescue when it speeds adaptation by increasing the strength of selection. Our results clarify this point and give an additional requirement: competition must increase selection pressure enough to overcome the negative effect of reduced abundance. We therefore expect evolutionary rescue to be most likely in communities which facilitate rapid niche displacement. Our model, which aligns to previous quantitative and population genetic models in the absence of competition, provides a first analysis of when competitors should help or hinder evolutionary rescue. PMID:23209167

  2. Robotic Mining Competition - Media Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-25

    NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana, at right, talks with Ken Kremer, Universe Today, during media day at the agency's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Cabana shared his thoughts about the competition and the progress made to make Kennedy a multi-user spaceport. Teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. used their mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participated in other competition requirements, May 22-26. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  3. Robotic Mining Competition - Media Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-25

    NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana, at right, talks with Kurt Leucht, event emcee, during media day at the agency's 8th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. At the mining arena, Cabana shared his thoughts about the competition and the progress made to make Kennedy a multi-user spaceport. Teams from colleges and universities around the U.S. used their mining robots to dig in a supersized sandbox filled with BP-1, or simulated Martian soil, and participated in other competition requirements, May 22-26. The Robotic Mining Competition is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions that could be used on NASA's Journey to Mars.

  4. Staphylococci in Competition1

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, A. C.; Black, J. J.; Gunderson, M. F.

    1964-01-01

    As is generally known, custards have been frequently involved in staphylococcal food poisonings and are regarded by some as an ideal culture medium. Previous studies showed that high carbohydrate concentrations repressed the growth of competing saprophytic species, allowing the growth of staphylococci in a mixture rather than stimulating the growth of the staphylococci. In an extension of those studies, the influence of the egg constituent of custard was investigated to determine its role in affecting the growth of pathogenic staphylococci in a competing mixture of psychrotrophic saprophytes. The normal competitive effect of the saprophytes on the growth of staphylococci was very slightly affected by the addition of 25% whole egg to the growth media. Approximately 9% egg yolk alone added to the medium resulted in a slight increase in the length of the lag period of the psychrotrophs and a slight increase in the number of staphylococci which grew. Addition of 25% whole egg plus 14.5% sucrose resulted in repression of saprophyte growth similar to that seen in high sucrose concentrations. Staphylococcal growth was more extensive in the presence of both whole egg and sucrose than in the presence of either ingredient alone. Incorporation of 4% corn oil in media was effective in repressing growth of the saprophytes at 37 C only. This allowed the staphylococci to dominate the population. At lower temperatures, staphylococci were unable to compete effectively. Buffering media of high carbohydrate content resulted in lengthened lag periods for the psychrotrophs and the appearance of very large staphylococcal populations. PMID:14106946

  5. Staphylococci in Competition1

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, A. C.; Black, J. J.; Gunderson, M. F.

    1962-01-01

    In studies carried on in bacteriological media with selected cultures, definite repressive effects were noted on the growth of the Staphylococcus population by a mixture of saprophytic, psychrophilic bacterial species. This repressive effect became more pronounced as the relative proportion of the bacterial population which was staphylococcal became smaller. A varied saprophytic bacterial flora of some numbers apparently would offer definite protection to foods through repression of staphylococcal growth and by rendering the food inedible before the rise of appreciable numbers of staphylococci. It would appear that at the optimal temperature for staphylococcal growth, staphylococci could multiply rapidly in the mixed population due to the comparative shortness of the generation time of this species and because of the lengthened lag phase of the saprophytic bacterial species at this elevated temperature, especially when only cultures having psychrophilic characteristics were present. This temperature is substantially above that encountered in practical experience. With the passage of time, the staphylococcal population was completely overgrown by the saprohytes present. This effect might be eliminated in the presence of psychrophilic and mesophilic, saprophytic species. The repressive effect of competition by saprophytic, psychrophilic organisms is extremely effective up to room temperature on the staphylococcal population. Even when significant staphylococcal populations were achieved in the artificial media, such tremendous numbers of saprophytes were obtained either earlier or at the same time so that a frozen food containing this population would be organoleptically unacceptable due to the degradative action of enzymes from the saprophytic psychrophile population. PMID:14485778

  6. Sensitizing potential of enzymatically cross-linked peanut proteins in a mouse model of peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Radosavljevic, Jelena; Nordlund, Emilia; Mihajlovic, Luka; Krstic, Maja; Bohn, Torsten; Buchert, Johanna; Velickovic, Tanja Cirkovic; Smit, Joost

    2014-03-01

    The cross-linking of proteins by enzymes to form high-molecular-weight protein, aggregates can be used to tailor the technological or physiological functionality of food products. Aggregation of dietary proteins by food processing may promote allergic sensitization, but the effects of enzymatic cross-linking of dietary proteins on the allergenic potential of food are not known. In this study, the bioavailability and the sensitizing or tolerizing potential of peanut proteins (PE) cross-linked with microbial tyrosinase from Trichoderma reesei and mushroom tyrosinase from Agaricus bisporus, were investigated. The impact of cross-linking of PE on the in vitro bioavailability of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled peanut proteins was tested in a Caco-2 cell monolayer and by competitive ELISA. The in vivo allergenicity or capacity to induce oral tolerance in mice were measured by serum levels of PE-specific antibodies and T cell cytokine production after exposure to PE and cross-linked PE. Enzymatic processing of peanut proteins by the two tyrosinases increased the bioavailability of major peanut allergen Ara h 2, but did not significantly change the allergenic or tolerizing properties of peanut. Enzymatic treatment of peanut proteins yielded cross-linked proteins with preserved molecular and immunological features of peanut allergens. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. 5 CFR 351.402 - Competitive area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Competition § 351.402 Competitive area. (a) Each agency shall establish competitive areas in which employees compete for retention under this part. (b) A competitive area must be defined solely in terms of the... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Competitive area. 351.402 Section...

  8. Triple, MPEG-conjugated, helix-forming oligonucleotides (TRIPEGXs): liquid-phase synthesis of natural and chimeric "all-purine" sequences linked to high molecular weight poly(ethylene glycols).

    PubMed

    Ballico, M; Drioli, S; Morvan, F; Xodo, L; Bonora, G M

    2001-01-01

    Long "all-purine" oligonucleotides, up to the 20mer, known to be active as antigene effectors, conjugated to high molecular weight monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)s (MPEG)s, were successfully synthesized. Through a liquid-phase, MPEG-supported process, both natural and chimeric sequences containing selected phosphorothioate backbone modifications were obtained, purified, and characterized. To follow their cellular trafficking, a fluorescent probe was linked by soluble supported organic reactions to the 5'-terminus, and the efficiency of the different synthetic procedures for the introduction of a fluorescein moiety was compared. The usefulness of the fluorescent marker was estimated by laser confocal microscopy that ascertains that the MPEG-conjugation enhances the oligonucleotide capacity to cross the cellular membranes and to be accumulated inside the nuclei.

  9. Multiple weak-link SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Kroger, H.

    1980-09-23

    The disclosed SQUID (Superconducting quantum interference device) comprises two superposed superconductive layers with an insulating layer therebetween. A plurality of holes through the insulating layer filled with superconductive material form weak links between the superconductive layers. One or more control lines superposed with respect to the superconductive layers provide magnetic flux through the area between the weak links to control the zero voltage supercurrent flowing through the weak links from one of the superconductive layers to the other thereby providing the switching function for Josephson superconductive circuits.

  10. Topological knots and links in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowski-Tumanski, Pawel; Sulkowska, Joanna I.

    2017-01-01

    Twenty years after their discovery, knots in proteins are now quite well understood. They are believed to be functionally advantageous and provide extra stability to protein chains. In this work, we go one step further and search for links—entangled structures, more complex than knots, which consist of several components. We derive conditions that proteins need to meet to be able to form links. We search through the entire Protein Data Bank and identify several sequentially nonhomologous chains that form a Hopf link and a Solomon link. We relate topological properties of these proteins to their function and stability and show that the link topology is characteristic of eukaryotes only. We also explain how the presence of links affects the folding pathways of proteins. Finally, we define necessary conditions to form Borromean rings in proteins and show that no structure in the Protein Data Bank forms a link of this type. PMID:28280100

  11. Competition Underway at NASA 2017 Robotic Mining Competition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-24

    NASA’s Eighth Annual Robotic Mining Competition (RMC) began its first of three days of actual competition at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Forty-five teams of college undergraduate and graduate students – and their uniquely-designed and built mining robots – race against the clock to collect and move the most simulated Martian soil. Students also are judged on how they use their robots to inspire their community about science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Competition continues through Friday. Managed by, and held annually at Kennedy Space Center, RMC is a NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate project designed to engage and retain students in STEM fields by expanding opportunities for student research and design. The project provides a competitive environment to foster innovative ideas and solutions with potential use on NASA’s deep space exploration missions, including to Mars.

  12. Testosterone, cortisol, and human competition.

    PubMed

    Casto, Kathleen V; Edwards, David A

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone and cortisol figure prominently in the research literature having to do with human competition. In this review, we track the history of this literature, concentrating particularly on major theoretical and empirical contributions, and provide commentary on what we see as important unresolved issues. In men and women, athletic competition is typically associated with an increase in testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). Hormone changes in response to non-athletic competition are less predictable. Person (e.g., power motivation, mood, aggressiveness, social anxiety, sex, and baseline levels of T and C) and context (e.g., whether a competition is won or lost, the closeness of the competition, whether the outcome is perceived as being influenced by ability vs. chance, provocations) factors can influence hormone responses to competition. From early on, studies pointed to a positive relationship between T and dominance motivation/status striving. Recent research, however, suggests that this relationship only holds for individuals with low levels of C - this is the core idea of the dual-hormone hypothesis, and it is certain that the broadest applications of the hypothesis have not yet been realized. Individuals differ with respect to the extent to which they embrace competition, but the hormonal correlates of competitiveness remain largely unexplored. Although rapid increases in both T and C associated with competition are likely adaptive, we still know very little about the psychological benefits of these hormonal changes. Administration studies have and will continue to contribute to this inquiry. We close with a discussion of what, we think, are important methodological and mechanistic issues for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Absence of Evidence for a Causal Link between Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Strain Variant L-BSE and Known Forms of Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in Human PrP Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Jaumain, Emilie; Quadrio, Isabelle; Herzog, Laetitia; Reine, Fabienne; Rezaei, Human; Andréoletti, Olivier; Laude, Hubert; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Haïk, Stéphane; Béringue, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    Prions are proteinaceous pathogens responsible for subacute spongiform encephalopathies in animals and humans. The prions responsible for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are zoonotic agents, causing variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. The transfer of prions between species is limited by a species barrier, which is thought to reflect structural incompatibilities between the host cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) and the infecting pathological PrP assemblies (PrP(Sc)) constituting the prion. A BSE strain variant, designated L-BSE and responsible for atypical, supposedly spontaneous forms of prion diseases in aged cattle, demonstrates zoonotic potential, as evidenced by its capacity to propagate more easily than classical BSE in transgenic mice expressing human PrP(C) and in nonhuman primates. In humanized mice, L-BSE propagates without any apparent species barrier and shares similar biochemical PrP(Sc) signatures with the CJD subtype designated MM2-cortical, thus opening the possibility that certain CJD cases classified as sporadic may actually originate from L-type BSE cross-transmission. To address this issue, we compared the biological properties of L-BSE and those of a panel of CJD subtypes representative of the human prion strain diversity using standard strain-typing criteria in human PrP transgenic mice. We found no evidence that L-BSE causes a known form of sporadic CJD. Since the quasi-extinction of classical BSE, atypical BSE forms are the sole BSE variants circulating in cattle worldwide. They are observed in rare cases of old cattle, making them difficult to detect. Extrapolation of our results suggests that L-BSE may propagate in humans as an unrecognized form of CJD, and we urge both the continued utilization of precautionary measures to eliminate these agents from the human food chain and active surveillance for CJD phenotypes in the general population. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. FIRST 2002, 2003, 2004 Robotics Competition(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purman, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The New Horizons Regional Education Center (NHREC) in Hampton, VA sought and received NASA funding to support its participation in the 2002, 2003, and 2004 FIRST Robotics Competitions. FIRST, Inc. (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) is an organization which encourages the application of creative science, math, and computer science principles to solve real-world engineering problems. The FIRST competition is an international engineering contest featuring high school, government, and business partnerships.

  15. Distributed Wind Competitiveness Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect

    2016-05-01

    The Competitiveness Improvement Project (CIP) is a periodic solicitation through the U.S. Department of Energy and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Manufacturers of small and medium wind turbines are awarded cost-shared grants via a competitive process to optimize their designs, develop advanced manufacturing processes, and perform turbine testing. The goals of the CIP are to make wind energy cost competitive with other distributed generation technology and increase the number of wind turbine designs certified to national testing standards. This fact sheet describes the CIP and funding awarded as part of the project.

  16. Bayesian sperm competition estimates.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Beatrix; Clark, Andrew G

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a Bayesian method for estimating parameters for a model of multiple mating and sperm displacement from genotype counts of brood-structured data. The model is initially targeted for Drosophila melanogaster, but is easily adapted to other organisms. The method is appropriate for use with field studies where the number of mates and the genotypes of the mates cannot be controlled, but where unlinked markers have been collected for a set of females and a sample of their offspring. Advantages over previous approaches include full use of multilocus information and the ability to cope appropriately with missing data and ambiguities about which alleles are maternally vs. paternally inherited. The advantages of including X-linked markers are also demonstrated. PMID:12663555

  17. Permission Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    The prevailing practice in public schools is to routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities that pose potential for liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered to be neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. The following case and the…

  18. Permission Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    The prevailing practice in public schools is to routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities that pose potential for liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered to be neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. The following case and the…

  19. 77 FR 2676 - Competitive Postal Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... Postal Service an artificial competitive advantage. The Commission gave considerable weight to the... 39 CFR Part 3015 Competitive Postal Products AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Commission is initiating a review to determine whether competitive...

  20. Competitive advantages of Caedibacter-infected Paramecia.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Jürgen; Czubatinski, Lars; Wegmann, Silke; Hubner, Markus; Alter, Margret; Albrecht, Petra

    2002-03-01

    Intracellular bacteria of the genus Caedibacter limit the reproduction of their host, the freshwater ciliate Paramecium. Reproduction rates of infected strains of paramecia were significantly lower than those of genetically identical strains that had lost their parasites after treatment with an antibiotic. Interference competition occurs when infected paramecia release a toxic form of the parasitic bacterium that kills uninfected paramecia. In mixed cultures of infected and uninfected strains of either P tetraurelia or of P novaurelia, the infected strains outcompeted the uninfected strains. Infection of new host paramecia seems to be rare. Infection of new hosts was not observed in either mixtures of infected with uninfected strains, or after incubation of paramecia with isolated parasites. The competitive advantages of the host paramecia, in combination with their vegetative reproduction, makes infection of new hosts by the bacterial parasites unnecessary, and could be responsible for the continued existence of "killer paramecia" in nature. Caedibacter parasites are not a defensive adaptation. Feeding rates and reproduction of the predators Didinium nasutum (Ciliophora) and Amoeba proteus (Amoebozoa, Gymnamoebia) were not influenced by whether or not their paramecia prey were infected. Infection of the predators frequently occurred when they preyed on infected paramecia. Caedibacter-infected predators may influence competition between Paramecium strains by release of toxic parasites into the environment that are harmful to uninfected strains.