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Sample records for complejo articular temporomandibular

  1. Juxta-articular Myxoma of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhou-Xi; Yang, Chi; Chen, Min-Jie; Wilson, Julian J

    2015-11-01

    The juxta-articular myxoma represents a benign mesenchymal neoplasm that arises from tissue within or adjacent to a joint space. There have been a number of reported cases involving myxomas of the knee, shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hip. To our knowledge there, however, have been no reported cases of juxta-articular myxomas of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This report describes the case of a 57-year-old woman with a juxta-articular myxoma of the left TMJ extending into the infratemporal fossa (ITF). Access to the tumor was accomplished via a preauricular incision and low condylar osteotomy which allowed for displacement of the condyle for direct visualization and excision of the tumor. The postoperative course was benign and the patient demonstrated no cosmetic or functional limitation. Likewise, follow-up at 30 months showed no evidence of recurrence. Benign encapsulated tumors of the ITF can be effectively accessed by means of a modified preauricular incision, low condylar osteotomy, and anterior meniscal release. This direct approach allows for excellent surgical exposure, minimal surgical site morbidity, and maintenance of physiologic joint function and occlusion.

  2. The relationship between the temporomandibular joint capsule, articular disc and jaw muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Schmolke, C

    1994-01-01

    The anatomy of the temporomandibular joint capsule and its possible relationships to other structures near the joint are not fully understood. A 3-dimensional analysis based on sagittal, frontal and horizontal serial sections through the human temporomandibular joint region was therefore undertaken. Capsular elements which directly connect the temporal bone with the mandible were seen only on the lateral side of the joint. In the posterior, anterior and medial regions of the joint the upper and lower laminae of the articular disc are attached separately either to the temporal bone or to the mandibular condyle. The shaping of the articular cavities and the texture of the joint capsule permit movements of the articular disc predominantly in the anteromedial direction. On the entire medial side of the joint the articular disc and its capsular attachments are in close contact with the fascia of the lateral pterygoid muscle whereby a small portion of the upper head of this muscle inserts directly into the anteromedial part of the articular disc. Thus both the upper and the lower heads of the lateral pterygoid muscle are likely to influence the position of the articular disc directly during temporomandibular joint movements. Laterally, the articular disc is attached to the fascia of the masseter muscle, and part of the lateral ligament inserts into the temporalis fascia. Since these attachments are relatively weak, neither the temporalis nor the masseter muscles are considered to act directly on the articular disc; instead, via afferents from muscle spindles, they may take part in signalling the position of the temporomandibular joint components, including that of the articular disc. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8014124

  3. Absence of the articular disc in the tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Sugisaki, M; Abe, S

    2013-12-01

    The articular disc of the temporomandibular joint is a constant structure in mammals. According to Parsons' report in 1900, however, it is absent in four animals: the armadillo, two kinds of monotremes and the Tasmanian devil. Thereafter, no research was performed to confirm this observation. The aim of this study was to determine by anatomical and histological examination whether the Tasmanian devil has an articular disc in its temporomandibular joint. Six fresh frozen corpses and one dry skull of Tasmanian devils were obtained from the School of Zoology, University of Tasmania. The corpses were dissected and the morphology of the temporomandibular joint was carefully observed by gross anatomical and histological examination. The structure of the temporomandibular joint of the dry skull was examined macroscopically and by micro-computed tomography. In all cases, absence of the articular disc in the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint was morphologically confirmed. The surface layer of both the condyle and the glenoid fossa comprised a thick fibrous tissue. Micro-computed tomography revealed dense and fine trabecular bone in the condyle. The thick fibrous tissue covering the condyle and high-density trabecular bone in the condyle might play a role in absorption against powerful mastication and heavy loading of the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Conservative treatment of temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis: intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, L; Masiero, S; Marioni, G

    2005-10-01

    Promising short-term results in the treatment of temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis with intra-articular injections of sodium hyaluronate (SH) have been reported in preliminary studies. The present prospective study compared long-term outcomes of temporomandibular joint SH injections with those of a conventional non-surgical treatment (bite-plane). Data from three groups of 20 patients with degenerative temporomandibular joint disease were considered. Group A underwent one cycle of five injections of 1 mL SH. Group B underwent a bite-plane treatment for at least 6 months. We considered a control group of 20 patients who refused any treatments. The description of the outcomes was based on objective and subjective parameters after a 6-month follow-up. Sodium hyaluronate and bite-plane treatments significantly improved patients conditions in all considered parameters. No significant differences in outcomes were confirmed by the statistical analysis. The tolerability of SH treatment resulted to be significantly higher. The analysis of results of serial controls in the SH treated group disclosed a significant worsening in pain at rest by comparing 1 and 6 months follow-up. Sodium hyaluronate infiltration resulted a valid non-surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint degenerative disease. Five well-tolerated intra-articular SH injections achieved equivalent results to those of a 6 months bite-plane treatment. We did not diagnose any complications of SH intra-articular injections. Longer time follow-up is necessary to determine the stability of SH properties.

  5. [Arthrocentesis of the temporomandibular joint and intra-articular injections : An update].

    PubMed

    Marty, P; Louvrier, A; Weber, E; Dubreuil, P-A; Chatelain, B; Meyer, C

    2016-09-01

    Arthocentesis of the temporomandibular joint combined with intra-articular washout and, more recently, intra-articular injection of pharmacological agents has been developed from the 1990s and is nowadays extensively in use for the treatment of temporomandibular dysfunctions (TMDs). The goal of our work was to answer 3 questions: 1. Is intra-articular washout effective for the treatment of TMDs ? 2. What kind of pharmacological agents may nowadays be injected in addition to washout and are these injections useful ? 3. What is the place of these treatments in the treatment strategies of TMDs ? A bibliographic research has been carried out in the PubMed database using following keywords arthrocentesis, temporomandibular joint. The 27 articles published between 1991 and 2016, indicating patient's inclusion criterions and objectively evaluating the clinical results (mouth opening, intra-articular noises, pain) were selected. Pharmacological agents were noticed when used. 1. All authors concluded to the efficacy of intra-articular washout. No prognostic factor for arthrocentesis efficacy could be identified. 2. Main pharmacological agents used were steroids, hyaluronic acid, morphine-based drugs and platelet rich plasma. Superiority of ith-injection protocols failed to win unanimous support. All authors who compared with- and without-injection protocols concluded to the superiority of with-injection protocols, whatever the agent. Numerous studies have proven the efficacy of intra-articular washout for the treatment of TMDs resistant to noninvasive treatments. The advantage of any kind of pharmacological agent is not clear. Mechanisms of action are not all elucidated. No pharmacological agent showed any superiority over another. Study methodologies are often defective: imprecise inclusion criterions, short follow-up, confounding variables not taken into account, few comparison between pharmacological agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  6. Is Mandibular Fossa Morphology and Articular Eminence Inclination Associated with Temporomandibular Dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Akhlaghian, Marzieh; Abolvardi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Finding a significant relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) morphology and the incidence of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) may help early prediction and prevention of these problems. Purpose The purpose of the present study was to determine the morphology of mandibular fossa and the articular eminence inclination in patients with TMD and in control group using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Method The CBCT data of bilateral TMJs of 40 patients with TMD and 23 symptom-free cases were evaluated. The articular eminence inclination, as well as the glenoid fossa depth and width of the mandibular fossa were measured. The paired t-test was used to compare these values between two groups. Results The articular eminence inclination and glenoid fossa width and depth were significantly higher in patients with TMD than in the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion The articular eminence inclination was steeper in patients with TMD than in the control group. Glenoid fossa width and depth were higher in patients with TMD than that in the control group. This information may shed light on the relationship between TMJ morphology and the incidence of TMD. PMID:27284559

  7. Functional anatomy of the equine temporomandibular joint: Collagen fiber texture of the articular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Adams, K; Schulz-Kornas, E; Arzi, B; Failing, K; Vogelsberg, J; Staszyk, C

    2016-11-01

    In the last decade, the equine masticatory apparatus has received much attention. Numerous studies have emphasized the importance of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the functional process of mastication. However, ultrastructural and histological data providing a basis for biomechanical and histopathological considerations are not available. The aim of the present study was to analyze the architecture of the collagen fiber apparatus in the articular surfaces of the equine TMJ to reveal typical morphological features indicating biomechanical adaptions. Therefore, the collagen fiber alignment was visualized using the split-line technique in 16 adult warmblood horses without any history of TMJ disorders. Within the central two-thirds of the articular surfaces of the articular tubercle, the articular disc and the mandibular head, split-lines ran in a correspondent rostrocaudal direction. In the lateral and medial aspects of these articular surfaces, the split-line pattern varied, displaying curved arrangements in the articular disc and punctual split-lines in the bony components. Mediolateral orientated split-lines were found in the rostral and caudal border of the articular disc and in the mandibular fossa. The complex movements during the equine chewing cycle are likely assigned to different areas of the TMJ. The split-line pattern of the equine TMJ is indicative of a relative movement of the joint components in a preferential rostrocaudal direction which is consigned to the central aspects of the TMJ. The lateral and medial aspects of the articular surfaces provide split-line patterns that indicate movements particularly around a dorsoventral axis.

  8. The effect of intra-articular irrigation injection therapy on osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Gu, Z Y; Wu, H L; Wu, Q L; Cao, Z Q; Zhang, Y X

    1998-12-01

    To investigate the effect of intra-articular irrigation-injection therapy in treating osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint. Thirty-seven patients (the test group) received intra-articular irrigation injection; 26 patients (the control group) received intra-articular injection of steroid. The synovial fluid, aspirated from five subjects of the test group before and after the therapy, was assayed to determine the tumor necrosis factor. Clinical evaluations were performed 3 months after the therapy. Thirteen subjects in the test group fell into the "excellent" category, 19 into the "good" category, and five into the "no effect" category; in the control group, eight subjects fell into the "excellent" category; nine into the "good" category, and nine into the "no effect" category. The category difference in total effectiveness between the test group and the control group is statistically significant (X2 = 3.9340 P < 0.05). TNF in synovial fluid also showed statistically significant differences before and after treatment (T = 2.8825, P < 0.05). Intra-articular irrigation injection is an effective therapy method for treating osteoarthrosis and is superior to intra-articular injection of steroid.

  9. Serial variation in histological character of articular soft tissue in young human adult temporomandibular joint condyles.

    PubMed

    Bibb, C A; Pullinger, A G; Baldioceda, F

    1993-04-01

    Histological variation was studied in serial sections, in contrast to previous studies which have generalized from representative sections. The sample consisted of consecutive serial sagittal sections from the central third of nine condyles, plus an accompanying stone cast showing the intact articular surface before sectioning. The thickness of the articular soft tissue and its fibrous connective tissue and cartilage components was measured, and the presence of undifferentiated mesenchymal (UM) cells was assessed by low-power light microscopy. Components of variance analysis showed that section-to-section variation in thickness was of the same order as differences between joints, each explaining approx. 50% of the variance in both connective tissue and cartilage thickness. The fibrous connective tissue contributed as much to the overall variation in soft tissue thickness as did the cartilage component (SD 0.0946 versus 0.0909 mm for the superior sector). Serial UM cell variability was common, and the UM cells were often distributed in islands rather than uniformly across the articular tissue. Condyles with the greatest surface irregularity were characterized by greater serial variability in fibrous connective tissue thickness, more frequent absence of cartilage, and more areas of UM cell depletion. These results suggest that serial variation in histological character may be more important than mean values in the description of surface contours and articular tissue relations in the temporomandibular joint. This should influence the design of future investigations.

  10. Condyle Excursion Angle, Articular Eminence Inclination, and Temporomandibular Joint Morphologic Relations With Disc Displacement.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Katharina Alves; Sousa Melo, Saulo Leonardo; Torres, Marianna Guanaes Gomes; Campos, Paulo Sérgio F; Bento, Patrícia Meira; Melo, Daniela Pita de

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relations of the condyle excursion angle (CEA) and the morphology and morphometry of the articular eminence to disc displacement (DD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of symptomatic patients. MRIs of 199 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) were evaluated. Qualitative and quantitative morphologic analyses were performed with tools available in PACS 11.0 (Carestream Health, Inc, Rochester, NY). The articular eminence inclination (AEI), eminence height (EH), CEA, and articular eminence morphologic shape were evaluated. Statistical analyses were used to evaluate any possible association of the variables with DD in the closed- and open-mouth positions, age, and gender. The significance level was set at .05. Elderly women (>60 yr) presented higher prevalence values (43.26%). There was no statistical correlation between DD and gender (P = .4290). Higher mean values of the AEI and EH were associated with box-shaped eminences. The EH, AEI, and CEA were not related to the presence or absence of DD and the different types of DD. The AEI (P = .002) and CEA (P < .001) values were higher for TMJs with disc reduction in the open-mouth position. Disc position in the closed- and open-mouth positions is not influenced by articular eminence morphology; however, the AEI and CEA have an influence on disc reduction. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of collagen type IV antibody in the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint of human fetuses.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Luís Otávio Carvalho; Lodi, Fábio Redivo; Gomes, Thiago Simão; Marques, Sergio Ricardo; Fernandes Junior, João Antão; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fijiyama; Alonso, Luís Garcia

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyze the immunohistochemical expression of the marker of type IV collagen in the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of human fetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human fetuses aging from 21 to 24 weeks of intrauterine life were studied. The TMJ were supplied by the Federal University of Uberaba. The ages of the fetuses were determined by measuring the crown-rump length (CRL). Macroscopically, the fetuses were fixed in a formalin solution at 10% and dissected by removing the skin and the subcutaneous tissue, exposing the deep structures. An immunohistochemical marker of type IV collagen was used in order to characterize the presence of blood vessels in the central region of the temporomandibular joint disc. Analysis of the immunohistochemical marker of type IV collagen showed the presence of blood vessels in the central region of the temporomandibular disc in human fetuses.

  12. Arthroscopic treatment for intra-articular adhesions of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanyong; Huang, Dong; Liu, Xiuming; Yang, Chi; Undt, Gerhard; Haddad, S Majd; Chen, Zhuozhi

    2011-08-01

    To introduce arthroscopic surgery of intra-articulator adhesion of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) upper compartment and evaluate its effect. One hundred forty-two patients (159 joints) with intra-articular adhesions confirmed by arthroscope were treated with lysis of the adhesions, intra-articular cleanup surgery, or capsule radiofrequency catheter ablation. One hundred ten patients (123 joints) with disc displacement were treated with the disc repositioning and suturing technique. The follow-up index includes jaw movement, visual analog scale pain value, and patients' self-evaluation. The therapeutic effect was divided into excellent, good, and poor. Excellent and good patients were defined as effective. Jaw movement and visual analog scale pain value before and after the operation were evaluated by a paired t test. The average follow-up period was 10.3 months (range: 2-27 months), and 33.80% (48/142) of all joints were excellent; 56.34% (80/142) were good, and 9.86% (14/142) were poor. The total effectiveness rate was 90.14% (128/142). Of all patients, 93.66% (133/142) felt more comfortable than they had before the operation. The interincisal opening increased from a preoperative 23.14 ± 5.93 mm (range: 10-40 mm) to postoperative 37.48 ± 3.51 mm (range: 30-40 mm; P < .01), and the pain scores were reduced from 28.94 ± 23.54 (0-80) to 4.44 ± 10.10 (0-40; P < .05). The effect of arthroscopic surgery on temporomandibular joint intra-articular adhesion was positive. It can increase the mouth's range of motion, improve jaw function, and reduce pain during jaw movement. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of oral stabilization appliances in intra-articular pressure of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Casares, Guillermo; Thomas, Alejandro; Carmona, Joaquin; Acero, Julio; Vila, Carlos Navarro

    2014-07-01

    This study analyzed the intra-articular pressure in the upper compartment of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) under different functional conditions. The influence of stabilization appliances on intra-articular pressure was studied. Seventy-four joints from 64 patients (55 women and 9 men; mean age: 43.2 ± 11.86 years; range: 19-61 years) with TMJ disorders were examined. Only 50 joints passed the inclusion criteria. Intra-articular pressure was measured using a 21G needle inserted into the joint and connected to a pressure transducer. Pressure was measured with the jaw in the following positions: at rest, maximal mouth opening, clenching in maximal intercuspal position, and clenching with an oral interoclusal appliance. Fifty joints were included in the study (without blood reflux), mean pressure at rest was negative (-6.06 ± 4.55 mmHg); when the mouth was opened to its maximal position the pressure was lower (-26.09 ± 6.42 mmHg). Mean intra-articular pressure was higher in the maximal intercuspal position (58.56 ± 24.90 mmHg). When an interoclusal appliance device was fitted, mean intra-articular pressure reduced its value by 31.24%, which reached a mean value of 40.56 ± 18.84 mmHg (P<0.001). There were no significant differences in sex. The group over 45 years old had higher pressure values in maximal open mouth position than the group of patients under 45 years old (P<0.02). Interoclusal appliances can reduce pressure in the upper compartment of the TMJ and improve functional status of the joint.

  14. Intra-articular injection of tenoxicam following temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aktas, I; Yalcin, S; Sencer, S

    2010-05-01

    This study examined the clinical and radiological effects of intra-articular tenoxicam injection following arthrocentesis and compared them with arthrocentesis alone in patients with disc displacement without reduction (DDwoR). 24 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) in 21 patients with DDwoR were studied. Patients were divided randomly into Group A in which only arthrocentesis was performed (14 TMJs in 14 patients) and Group AT which received arthrocentesis plus intra-articular injection of tenoxicam (10 TMJs in 7 patients). Patients were evaluated before the procedure, on postoperative day 7, then 2, 3, 4 weeks, and 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 months postoperatively. Intensity of joint pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Maximum mouth opening was recorded at each follow-up. TMJ sounds and palpation scores were noted as positive or negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed before and 6 months after treatment in both groups. Disc form, disc location during neutral position, reduction with movement, joint effusion, structures of the articular surfaces, and bone marrow anomalies were evaluated all in MRIs. Both treatments succesfully increased maximum mouth opening and reduced TMJ pain; there were no complications. Difference between the groups was not statistically significant and a larger controlled study is necessary to clarify this use of tenoxicam.

  15. Fracture of the articular disc in the temporomandibular joint: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    An, S-Y

    2015-01-01

    Disc fracture of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a little-known pathological condition owing to its extreme rarity. We report two cases of elderly patients who were diagnosed with disc fracture of the TMJ based on MRI, and we review related reports. On physical examination, an incomplete bite and mild joint pain were observed on the affected side in both patients. An MRI showed a complete fracture in the intermediate zone of the articular disc in the TMJ; the posterior fragment was displaced posteriorly, causing occlusal change in the closed position of the condyle and an incomplete bite. Conservative treatment including manual manipulation, physical therapy and oral appliance had no effect on the occlusal abnormality. Although the inciting cause of the disc fracture remained unclear, the degenerative changes in the joint may have been a factor by increasing the brittleness and reducing the elasticity of the disc. PMID:25308829

  16. Are intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid effective for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Goiato, M C; da Silva, E V F; de Medeiros, R A; Túrcio, K H L; Dos Santos, D M

    2016-12-01

    This systematic review aimed to investigate whether intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) are better than other drugs used in temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis, for the improvement of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms. Two independent reviewers performed an electronic search of the MEDLINE and Web of Science databases for relevant studies published in English up to March 2016. The key words used included a combination of 'hyaluronic acid', 'viscosupplementation', 'intra-articular injections', 'corticosteroids', or 'non steroidal anti inflammatory agents' with 'temporomandibular disorder'. Selected studies were randomized clinical trials and prospective or retrospective studies that primarily investigated the application of HA injections compared to other intra-articular medications for the treatment of TMD. The initial screening yielded 523 articles. After evaluation of the titles and abstracts, eight were selected. Full texts of these articles were accessed and all fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Intra-articular injections of HA are beneficial in improving the pain and/or functional symptoms of TMDs. However, other drug therapies, such as corticosteroid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug injections, can be used with satisfactory results. Well-designed clinical studies are necessary to identify an adequate protocol, the number of sessions needed, and the appropriate molecular weight of HA for use. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Temporomandibular Joint Condylar Changes Following Maxillomandibular Advancement and Articular Disc Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Joao Roberto; Wolford, Larry Miller; Cassano, Daniel Serra; da Porciuncula, Guilherme; Paniagua, Beatriz; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate condylar changes 1 year after bimaxillary surgical advancement with or without articular disc repositioning using longitudinal quantitative measurements in 3-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) models. Methods Twenty-seven patients treated with maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) underwent cone-beam computed tomography before surgery immediately after surgery and at 1-year follow-up. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging before surgery to assess disc displacements. Ten patients without disc displacement received MMA only. Seventeen patients with articular disc displacement received MMA with simultaneous TMJ disc repositioning (MMA-Drep). Pre- and postsurgical 3D models were superimposed using a voxel-based registration on the cranial base. Results The location, direction, and magnitude of condylar changes were displayed and quantified by graphic semitransparent overlays and 3D color-coded surface distance maps. Rotational condylar displacements were similar in the 2 groups. Immediately after surgery, condylar translational displacements of at least 1.5 mm occurred in a posterior, superior, or mediolateral direction in patients treated with MMA, whereas patients treated with MMA-Drep presented more marked anterior, inferior, and mediolateral condylar displacements. One year after surgery, more than half the patients in the 2 groups presented condylar resorptive changes of at least 1.5 mm. Patients treated with MMA-Drep presented condylar bone apposition of at least 1.5 mm at the superior surface in 26.4%, the anterior surface in 23.4%, the posterior surface in 29.4%, the medial surface in 5.9%, or the lateral surface in 38.2%, whereas bone apposition was not observed in patients treated with MMA. Conclusions One year after surgery, condylar resorptive changes greater than 1.5 mm were observed in the 2 groups. Articular disc repositioning facilitated bone apposition in localized condylar regions in patients treated with MMA

  18. Evaluation of articular disc loading in the temporomandibular joints after prosthetic and pharmacological treatment in model studies.

    PubMed

    Pihut, Małgorzata E; Margielewicz, Jerzy; Kijak, Edward; Wiśniewska, Grażyna

    2017-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is often related to excessive load in the stomatognathic system. The objective of the model tests, using numeric calculations, was to assess the articular disc loads in the temporomandibular joints after prosthetic and pharmacological treatment of functional disorders of the masticatory organ. The study involved 10 patients, aged 21-48 years, of both sexes, randomly selected from a group of 120 patients treated with relaxation occlusal splints (60 patients, group I) and intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin type A (60 patients, group II), suffering from temporomandibular joint dysfunction with the dominant muscle component. In all subjects, a specialized functional examination was carried out. Treatment groups: occlusal splint therapy (group I) and intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin type A (group II). An assessment of the loads of 4 disc zones of the temporomandibular joints was carried out based on the results of clinical studies (phase I of the study), and numeric model tests (phase II). In the representatives of the study groups (5 patients in each group), measurements of occlusal forces and an evaluation of tension of the masseter and temporalis muscle were performed. The results of the average load values for all evaluated zones of the right and left articular disc differ in a statistically significant way in favor of group II, with the exception of the external mid part of the discs. In the case of the anterior of the right disc, the load was lower in patients belonging to group I than in those obtained in group II. Botulinum toxin type A significantly reduces the loads within the temporomandibular joints, generated by masseter muscle hypertonia.

  19. Crimping of collagen in the intra-articular disc of the temporomandibular joint: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, B K

    2000-07-01

    Very occasional reference is made to the presence of collagen crimps in the fibre bundles of the intra-articular disc (IAD) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). As the crimp structure may confer important biomechanical properties on the IAD, the present study was undertaken to determine its distribution in a variety of mammals, including humans. IADs from the rat, rabbit, guinea pig, ferret, sheep, marmoset and human were either sectioned or examined as whole mount preparations with polarized light. Apart from the guinea pig, where fibre bundles in the central region of the disc showed considerable overlap and masking of the crimp structure, the anteroposterior aligned fibres in the central region of all remaining animals showed the conspicuous presence of crimps. The periodicity of the crimp distance varied between about 10 and 30 microm. There was variation of the crimp periodicity between animals and between regions of the same disc. The crimping was associated with undulations along the length of the collagen fibres visible at the light microscope level using routine staining. The possible significance of crimping in association with internal derangement is discussed.

  20. MRI analysis of the relationship between bone changes in the temporomandibular joint and articular disc position in symptomatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Gil, C; Santos, KCP; Dutra, MEP; Kodaira, SK; Oliveira, JX

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate bone changes in the condyle, articular eminence and glenoid fossa in relation to the position of the articular disc. Methods 148 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 74 symptomatic patients who underwent MRI were evaluated. The position of the disc was classified as either normal (N), disc displacement with reduction (DDwR), disc displacement without reduction (DDwoR) and posterior displacement (PD). Bone changes were investigated in the condyle and temporal components of the TMJ and classified as osteophytosis, sclerosis or erosion. Results There were no bone changes in the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone. Of the total number of TMJs studied, 94 (63.5%) were N, 34 (23%) presented DDwoR, 19 (12.8%) presented DDwR and 1 (0.7%) presented PD. The bone changes in the condyle and posterior aspect of the articular eminence were associated with the position of the disc. The bone changes in the anterior aspect of the articular eminence were not associated with the position of the disc. Conclusion In cases of DDwoR, bone changes in the condyles were more common. The combination of erosion and osteophytosis in the condyle and the bone changes of the posterior aspect of the articular eminence were associated with disc position. PMID:22241883

  1. Efficacy of arthroscopic surgery and midlaser treatments for chronic temporomandibular joint articular disc derangement following motor vehicle accident.

    PubMed

    McNamara, D C; Rosenberg, I; Jackson, P A; Hogben, J

    1996-12-01

    As a result of motor vehicle accident soft-tissue injury, temporomandibular joint articular disc derangement may develop and persist despite symptomatic treatment and medication. This study reports the effectiveness of management directed at controlling the TMJ and masticatory neuromuscular pain dysfunction with a TMJ/interocclusal stabilization appliance, specific biofeedback and ultrasound therapy. Following these conservative measures residual articular disc derangement was present in some subjects who were offered arthroscopic surgery and infrared midlaser with TMJ/occlusal stabilization. Twenty subjects with residual disc derangement were randomly selected into two groups with and without arthroscopic surgery, and analyses of variance made before treatment, 12 months after conservative procedures, 3 months following arthroscopic surgery and midlaser therapy and 3 years since commencement of management. Dependent variables compared were pain-discomfort, Clinical Dysfunction Index, articular disc derangement and maximal voluntary jaw opening. Conservative management alone provided significant reduction of pain-discomfort and clinical dysfunction, while arthroscopic surgery resulted in significant reduction in articular disc derangement. The midlaser with TMJ/occlusal stabilization maintained significant improvement in the variables (p < 0.01) for both groups. The common articular deviations in form found at arthroscopy were soft tissue alteration with hyperaemia, synovitis, synovial membrane and posterior attachment folding with connective tissue hyperplasia, and disc displacement with fibrous adhesions. The Global Status Score of pain behaviour compared with residual function, confirmed the presence of greater pain before treatment commenced.

  2. Evaluation of Pain Regression in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction Treated by Intra-Articular Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Pihut, M.; Szuta, M.; Ferendiuk, E.; Zeńczak-Więckiewicz, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regression of temporomandibular pain as a result of intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction previously subjected to prosthetic treatment. Materials and Methods. The baseline study material consisted of 10 patients, both males and females, aged 28 to 53 years, previously treated due to painful temporomandibular joint dysfunction using occlusal splints. All patients were carried out to a specialist functional assessment of the dysfunction using the Polish version of the RDC/TMD questionnaire axis I and II. Intra-articular injections were preceded by a preparation of PRP. The injection sites were determined by the method used during arthroscopic surgical procedures. Following aspiration, 0.5 mL of plasma was injected into each temporomandibular joint. Results. The comparison of the intensity of pain during all examinations suggests a beneficial effect of the procedure being performed as the mean VAS score was 6.5 at examination I, 2.8 at examination II, and 0.6 at examination III. Conclusion. Application of the intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma into the temporomandibular joints has a positive impact on the reduction of the intensity of pain experienced by patients treated for temporomandibular joint dysfunction. PMID:25157351

  3. The ultrastructure of the intra-articular disc of the temporomandibular joint, with special reference to fibrocartilage.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, B K; Pacy, J

    1999-01-01

    Cells in the intra-articular disc of the temporomandibular joint of the rat, guinea pig, rabbit, ferret, marmoset and sheep were studied at the ultrastructural level. The cells were generally rounded in outline and possessed moderate amounts of roughened endoplasmic reticulum and other organelles associated with protein synthesis and secretion. No intracellular collagen profiles were observed. Many of the cells possessed conspicuous amounts of microfilamentous material. Cell membranes in the rat, guinea pig, rabbit, ferret and sheep were closely applied to the collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix. Occasionally in these animals, a narrow, irregular space containing microfilamentous material surrounded the cell membrane. Many cells in the marmoset differed from this description in being completely surrounded by an obvious pericellular matrix devoid of collagen fibrils and being comprised of microfilamentous material embedded in an amorphous ground substance. These chondrocyte-like cells in the intra-articular disc of the marmoset differed from chondrocytes in hyaline cartilage by lacking a pericellular capsule.

  4. Interrelationship between temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (OA) and cervical spine pain: Effects of intra-articular injection with hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Cadorin, Cristina; Frizziero, Antonio; Masiero, Stefano; Manfredini, Daniele

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate cervical spine pain and function after five sessions of viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA) in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Forty-nine patients, (79% females, aged between 43-81 years), affected by TMJ osteoarthritis and concurrent cervical spine pain and limited function were recruited. All patients underwent a cycle of five weekly arthrocenteses and viscosupplementation with 1 ml of medium molecular weight HA according to the single-needle arthrocentesis technique. Outcome variables were TMJ pain (VAS), cervical active ranges of motion, cervical disability (NPDS), and presence of painful palpation sites. Assessments were carried out at baseline and at one, three and six months after the end of treatment protocol. A significant reduction over time was shown both in TMJ pain levels and in NPDS values with respect to baseline (p < 0.001). Most parameters of active cervical range of motion showed an improvement with time. Benefits remained stable throughout six months after the viscosupplementation protocol. A protocol of TMJ intra articular arthrocentesis and viscosupplementation improved cervical function and reduced disability in patients with concurrent cervical spine pain. These findings add to the complex amount of literature on the relationship between temporomandibular disorders and cervical spine disorders.

  5. [Intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid for anterior disc displacement of temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Long, X

    2017-03-09

    Anterior disc displacement (ADD) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is regarded as one of the major findings in temporomandibular disorders (TMD). It is related to joint noise, pain, mandibular dysfunction, degenerative change and osteoarthritis. In the mean time, the pathological changes were found in synovial membrane and synovial fluid. Hyaluronic acid is a principal component of the synovial fluid which plays an important role in nutrition, lubrication, anti-inflammation and cartilage repair. The synthesis, molecule weight, and concentration of hyaluronic acid are decreased during TMD and cause TMJ degenerative changes. The clinical conditions, pathological changes, the mechanism of action for hyaluronic acid and the treatment of anterior disc displacement of TMJ are discussed in this article.

  6. Can puncture increase the risk of intra-articular adhesion in the temporomandibular joint?

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiu Ming; Cai, Xie Yi; Yang, Chi; Zhang, Shan Yong; Chen, Min Jie; Yun, Bai; Chen, Zhuo Zhi

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to compare the incidence and severity of intra-articular adhesion under arthroscopy between patients with and without a history of joint puncture. Eighty-nine patients with internal derangements of TMJ who underwent arthroscopic disc repositioning and suturing surgery from February 2008 to September 2008 were included in this study. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on whether the patient had undergone joint puncture before surgery or not. The diagnosis of intra-articular adhesion was made according to the manifestation under arthroscopy. Incidence and severity of intra-articular adhesion between these 2 groups was compared. The incidence of intra-articular adhesion in the patients with a history of puncture was 69.23%, which was higher than that in the patients without a history of puncture (24.36%). The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The incidence of severe adhesions in patients with a history of joint puncture was also higher than that in patients without a history of puncture (26.09% vs. 2.56%, P < 0.01). Puncture may increase the risk of intra-articular adhesion in patients with internal derangement.

  7. Temporomandibular joint disorders treated with articular injection: the effectiveness of plasma rich in growth factors-Endoret.

    PubMed

    Giacomello, Maurizio; Giacomello, Alberto; Mortellaro, Carmen; Gallesio, Giorgia; Mozzati, Marco

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis treatment through articular injections of plasma rich in growth factors (PGRF)-Endoret. Thirteen patients (median age, 47.64 y; SD, 7.51; range, 40-64 y; male-female ratio, 2:11) with osteoarthritis of TMJ associated to chronic pain have been selected. They were treated with articular injections of PRGF-Endoret, measuring the maximum mouth opening and pain level before the first injection (t0), 30 days after just before the second (t1), and after 6 months (t2). Data were analyzed using the paired Student's t-test data. The visual analogue scale score at t0 is 7.69 (range, 4-10; SD, 1.9), whereas that at t1 is 1.54 (range, 0-5; SD, 1.74) and that at t2 is 0.23 (range, 0-2; SD, 0.65). These differences in the results are statistically highly significant (P < 0.0001 comparison t0-t1 and t0-t2 and P < 0.01 comparison t1-t2). In terms of maximum mouth opening, it reduced from 30.15 mm at t0 (range, 26-40 mm; SD, 4.44) to 37.54 mm at t1 (range, 31-51 mm; SD, 5.10), with an increase of 7.38 mm (range, 4-11 mm; SD, 2.02) and a highly significant difference (P < 0.0001). At t2, it was 39.54 mm (range, 34-51; SD, 4.55) with an increase of 9.38 mm (range, 5-12 mm; SD, 2.21) compared with t0 and that of 2.00 mm compared with t1. Both differences in the results are statistically significant (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.01, respectively). The articular injections of PRGF-Endoret represent a very efficient method to control pain and to improve the TMJ mobility.

  8. Effects of tissue-engineered articular disc implants on the biomechanical loading of the human temporomandibular joint in a three-dimensional finite element model.

    PubMed

    Al-Sukhun, Jehad; Ashammakhi, Nureddin; Penttila, Heikki

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate biomechanical loading of the temporomandibular joint when using a biodegradable laminate implant to replace the articular disc and to test the hypothesis that the use of the implant reduces stress distribution in the condyle, implant, and glenoid fossa. A finite element model of a female human mandible, including the temporomandibular joint, which had two standard endosseous implants inserted bilaterally in the premolar region, was constructed from computed tomography scan images using a commercially available finite element software. The disc, condyle, and glenoid fossa were arbitrarily divided into five regions: the anterior, posterior, medial, lateral, and central. The disc was then replaced with a poly-L/DL-lactide biodegradable laminate. The finite element model was then used to predict principal and Von Mises stresses. The use of poly-L/DL-lactide implant resulted in remarkable reduction in Von Mises stresses (approximately threefold) in the anterior, central, and medial regions of the mandibular condyle in comparison with slight to moderate stress reductions in the corresponding regions of the implant and glenoid fossa. The mandibular condyle also demonstrated the largest total displacement in all directions followed by the implant and glenoid fossa. The use of an alloplastic implant such as the bioresorbable, poly-L/DL-lactide laminate to replace the articular disc reduces loading of the mandibular condyle rather than the implant and glenoid fossa. These findings lead to support the hypothesis that the mandibular condyle more likely functions as a shock absorber than the disc. The use of bioresorbable laminate implants might prove an efficient technique to replace the articular disc and promote normal function of the temporomandibular joint.

  9. Viscoelastic properties and residual strain in a tensile creep test on bovine temporomandibular articular discs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Tanaka, M; Aoyama, J; Watanabe, M; Hattori, Y; Asai, D; Iwabe, T; Sasaki, A; Sugiyama, M; Tanne, K

    2002-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the creep characteristics and residual strain of bovine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs in tension. Twenty discs were divided into three specimens each: central, lateral and medial regions. Tension of 1.0 MPa was applied and sustained for 20 min to the specimens from 10 right-side discs, and tension of 1.5 MPa to specimens from 10 left-side discs. After the period of tension for creep, the specimens were removed from the tension devices and restoration observed for 20 min. Time-dependent creep curves showed a marked change in strain during the initial 5s. The essential time delay in strain ceased after 2 min, and strain reached an almost steady level after 3 min. At a tensile stress of 1.5 MPa, a strain of 14.5% on average was produced after 20 min creep in the central specimens; peripheral specimens showed strains of 12.4% on average. There were significant differences in strain between the central and peripheral specimens. The residual strain after 20 min restoration was 0.93% on average and there were no significant regional differences. This creep feature could be well represented by a generalized linear viscoelastic model. It was concluded that the regional differences in viscoelasticity might be caused by the complicated articulating functions of the TMJ, and that the residual strain caused by sustained stress could be an important factor in disc deformation.

  10. Relationship between intra-articular adhesions and disc position in temporomandibular joints: Magnetic resonance and arthroscopic findings and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Millon-Cruz, Alejandrina; Martín-Granizo, Rafael; Encinas, Alejandro; Berguer, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between intra-articular adhesions (IA) and disc position on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and direct arthroscopic vision, and to compare the presence of IA and clinical symptoms in patients diagnosed with internal derangements (ID) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), along with their clinical outcomes. A total of 67 patients (134 TMJs) were included in the study. All patients were refractory to previous conservative treatment, and MRI was performed before surgery in all cases. The incidence of IA was evaluated in relation to disc displacement, type of displacement (with or without reduction), and stage of ID according to the Wilkes-Bronstein classification. Patients were divided into an adhesion and non-adhesion group. The association between the two groups with respect to preoperative clinical parameters (maximal interincisal opening, locking duration, joint pain, patient age) and postoperative parameters at 6 and 12 months was evaluated. The incidence of IA was 44% and the most common location was the anterior recess of the joint. IA were found in 58.3% of the joints with disc displacement without reduction, and in 28.9% of those with disc displacement with reduction (p < 0.05). In joints with well-positioned discs, adhesions were found in 15% of the cases. Patient age and locking duration were significantly higher in the adhesions group (p < 0.05). In relation to clinical outcome, there was no clinically relevant difference between groups at 6 and 12 months. In TMJ with disc displacement without reduction, the presence of IA was significantly higher than in joints with well-positioned discs or displacement with reduction, which leads to the hypothesis that disc hypomobility is an important factor in the genesis of adhesions. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α in Temporomandibular Joint Synovial Fluid Predicts Treatment Effects on Pain by Intra-Articular Glucocorticoid Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Lars; Alstergren, Per; Kopp, Sigvard

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) synovial fluid and blood on the treatment effect on TMJ pain by intra-articular injection of glucocorticoid in patients with chronic inflammatory TMJ disorders. High pretreatment level of TNF-α in the synovial fluid was associated with a decrease of TNF-α and elimination of pain upon maximal mouth opening. Elimination of this TMJ pain was accordingly associated with decrease in synovial fluid level of TNF-α. There was also a significant decrease of C-reactive protein and TMJ resting pain after treatment. In conclusion, this study indicates that presence of TNF-α in the synovial fluid predicts a treatment effect of intra-articular injection of glucocorticoid on TMJ movement pain in patients with chronic TMJ inflammatory disorders. PMID:17392588

  12. A comparative study on the impact of intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid, tenoxicam and betametazon on the relief of temporomandibular joint disorder complaints.

    PubMed

    Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Özkiriş, Mahmut; Okur, Aylin; Korkmaz, Murat; Saydam, Levent

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of intra-articular injections of three different agents with well known anti-inflammatory properties. Between April 2010 and January 2013 a total of 100 patients who were diagnosed as temporomandibular joint disorder in the Department of Otolaryngology at Bozok University School of Medicine were prospectively studied. Patients with symptoms of jaw pain, limited or painful jaw movement, clicking or grating within the joint, were evaluated with temporomandibular CT to investigate the presence of cartilage or capsule degeneration. In the study group there were 55 female and 45 male patients who were non-responders to conventional anti-inflammatory treatment for TMJ complaints. The patients were randomly divided into four groups consisting of a control group and three different groups who underwent intra-articular injection of one given anti-inflammatory agent for each group. We injected saline solution to intra-articular space in the control group. Of three anti-inflammatory agents including hyaluronic acid (HA, Hyalgan intra-articular injection, Sodium hyaluronate 10 mg/ml, 2 ml injection syringe, Bilim Pharmaceutical Company, Istanbul, Turkey); betamethasone (CS, Diprospan flacon, 7.0 mg betamethasone/1 ml, Schering-Plough Pharmaceutical Company, Istanbul, Turkey) and; tenoxicam (TX, Tilcotil flacon, 20 mg tenoxicam/ml, Roche Pharmaceutical Company, Istanbul, Turkey) were administered intra-articularly under, ultrasonographic guidance. Following the completion of injections the, changes in subjective symptoms were compared with visual analogue scales, (VAS) scores at 1st and 6th weeks' follow-up visits between four groups. The HA group did significantly better pain relief scores compared to the, other groups at 1st and 6th weeks (p < 0.05). TX and CS groups' pain scores were better than control group values (p < 0.05, for both agents). The pain relief effect of TX was noted to decrease significantly between the 1st

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of perforation of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Yura, Shinya; Nobata, Koji; Shima, Tsuyoshi

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of diagnosing a perforation of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is poor with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We recently reported that a high signal-intensity area is usually found on fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI in the joint space between the articular disc and cartilage surface in joints in which the disc is displaced. A discrete image with an area of high signal-intensity in the middle of the articular disc may indicate perforation or rupture. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of diagnosis of a perforated articular disc by fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI with that of arthroscopy. We studied 50 joints in 50 patients with closed lock of the TMJ who were examined with MRI and then by arthroscopy using an ultra-thin arthroscope. The agreement between the two methods of diagnosis was assessed using the κ coefficient. Evidence of perforation of the disc on MRI and arthroscopically was found in the same 7 joints; there was complete concordance (κ=1.00, p<0.001). The accuracy of diagnosis of perforation of a disc by fat-saturated MRI was therefore the same as that by arthroscopy using an ultra-thin arthroscope.

  14. Preliminary evaluation of histological changes found in a mechanical arthropatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) exposed to an intra-articular Hyaluronic acid (HA) injection, in a rat model.

    PubMed

    El-Hakim, Ibrahim E; Elyamani, Ahmed Omar

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates the histological effects of Hyaluronic acid injections in the treatment of induced temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis in rats. Twenty-four male Wister rats were subjected to induced mechanical osteoarthritis by manual hypermobility for 10 successive days. Animals were then divided into two groups; group I (control) and group II (experimental). Ten days after the induction of hypermobility, the right TMJ of the experimental animals was injected with a dose of 0.12 mg HA intra-articularly and 0.12 mg saline was injected into the left joint; while animals in the control group were left without any treatment. Two rats from group I were killed at one, two and six weeks; while 6 animals from group II were killed at one, two and four weeks post injection. The disk of the right joints in the experimental animals was of normal thickness and there was an increase in the thickness of the fibrocartilagenous layer. In the left joint; ulcerative changes in the disk were evident where the fibres were not well oriented and scalloped areas in the temporal bone area were present denoting osteoclastic activity. Repeated intra-articular TMJ injection of Hyaluronic acid appears to be a safe and effective way of inhibiting the progression of osteoarthritic changes in the joint through development of articular cartilage and reducing fibrous tissue proliferation. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative study in patients with symptomatic internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: analgesic outcomes of arthrocentesis with or without intra-articular morphine and tramadol.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, A; Satilmis, T; Basa, S

    2015-04-01

    Our aim was to find out whether pain was better controlled if morphine or tramadol was injected intra-articularly after arthrocentesis with Ringer's lactate in patients with painful temporomandibular joints (TMJ). This placebo-controlled, double-blind study involved 30 patients who had not responded to conservative treatment and who were divided randomly into 3 groups of 10 patients each. All patients had arthrocentesis, and the drugs were given as intra-articular injections immediately after the procedure. One group was give 5% Ringer's lactate 1ml, the second morphine 1mg, and the third tramadol 50mg. Visual analogue scales (VAS) for pain were recorded at maximum mouth opening and at rest before intra-articular injection and after 15 and 30min; at 1, 2, 3, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48h; and at 1, 3, and 6 monthly follow-up. The mean (SD) VAS decreased from 6.90 (1.45) to 2.6 (2.5) in the control group, from 7.30 (1.64) to 1.20 (0.79) in the morphine group (p=0.005), and from 7.10 (1.73) to 1.50 (1.78) in the tramadol group (p=0.005). We conclude that morphine given by intra-articular injection after arthrocentesis gives a significant, sustained (6 months) improvement in pain relief compared with simple arthrocentesis alone. The effect was similar with tramadol except that it was shorter lived. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The short-term effect of intra-articular injections of sodium hyaluronate and corticosteroid on temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kopp, S; Wenneberg, B; Haraldson, T; Carlsson, G E

    1985-06-01

    The short-term effect of intra-articular injections of sodium hyaluronate and a corticosteroid (betamethasone) was compared in a sample of 33 patients who had pain and tenderness to palpation in the temporomandibular joint of at least six months duration that had not responded to previous conservative treatment. The two drugs were randomly allocated to the patients. A volume of 0.5 ml of the drug was injected twice into the superior joint compartment of the TMJ with a two-week interval between injections. The effect on subjective symptoms, clinical signs, and bite force was assessed. Both drugs reduced the symptoms and signs significantly, and no statistically significant difference in effect could be found between drugs in this regard. The results indicate that the difference between the drugs in terms of short-term therapeutic effects is small, and that sodium hyaluronate could be used as an alternative to corticosteroid for patients who have signs of TMJ inflammation, especially for those who have symptomatic osteoarthrosis.

  17. Clinical efficacy of a centric relation occlusal splint and intra-articular liquid phase concentrated growth factor injection for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung-Wu; Huang, Yi-Chia; Wu, Shang-Liang; Ko, Shun-Yao; Tsai, Chiang-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The agony that accompanies the incidence and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) is an important concern in the oral and maxillofacial region. The objective of this study was to explore the clinical findings after centric relation occlusal splint (CROS) treatment and intra-articular injection treatment with liquid phase concentrated growth factors (LPCGFs) in patients with disc displacement without reduction (DDWOR). The group under investigation of this retrospective cohort study included patients with DDWOR who received treatment from April 2014 until March 2016. The predictor variable was the therapeutic method. The outcome variables included joint crepitus sound, visual analog scale (VAS) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia, TMD-associated headache, myofascial pain with referral, deviation of the mandible during opening (DoM), and maximal interincisal opening (MIO). At the stage of CROS treatment, evaluation of all variables adopted the individual as the unit; at the stage after LPCGF injection, the evaluation of joint sound adopted the joint as the unit, whereas the other variables adopted the individual as the unit. Among the 29 patients, 6 (20.68%) were males and 23 (79.31%) were females. Distribution by age ranged from 15 to 84 years (mean age 39.55 ± 15.49 years). After CROS treatment, except for the joint crepitus sound, which failed to achieve significant improvement (P > 0.05), other symptoms, such as DOM, TMD-associated headache, myofascial pain with referral, TMJ arthralgia, and MIO, all achieved statistically significant improvements (P < 0.05). After 2 mL of LPCGF was injected once after CROS treatment, 26 joint crepitus sound symptoms were relieved (P < 0.001) after an average of 48.5 ± 64.1 days. CROS alone can alleviate TMD clinical symptoms, except for the joint crepitus sound. Approximately 72.2% of joint crepitus sounds could be improved within 48 days, on average, once 2 mL of LPCGF was

  18. [The temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Louryan, S

    1992-10-01

    With its discordant articular surfaces and complete division in two cavities separated by a disk, the temporomandibular joint appears as a complex anatomical and functional entity. Combined movements involving anteroposterior gliding between the disk and temporal bone in the upper cavity, anteroposterior condyle translation, hinge and rotation movements between the disk and mandibular condyle contribute to the different movements of the jaw. With dental occlusion, the masticatory apparatus therefore includes five functionally coordinated articular compartments. Various impairments of the normal static and dynamic features of the temporomandibular joint may lead to relatively frequent pathological conditions which can be easily diagnosed by modern imaging and arthroscopic methods.

  19. Is Intra-Articular Steroid Injection to the Temporomandibular Joint for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis More Effective and Efficient When Performed With Image Guidance?

    PubMed

    Resnick, Cory M; Vakilian, Pouya M; Kaban, Leonard B; Peacock, Zachary S

    2017-04-01

    To compare short-term outcomes and procedure times for intra-articular steroid injection (IASI) to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with and without the use of intraoperative image guidance for patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). This is a retrospective study of children with JIA who underwent TMJ IASI at Boston Children's Hospital (Boston, MA). Patients were divided into groups according to IASI technique: 1) "landmark" group if performed by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon using an anatomic landmark technique with no intraoperative image guidance or 2) "image-guided" group if performed by an interventional radiologist using intraoperative ultrasound and computed tomography. Predictor variables included IASI technique (landmark vs image guided), age, gender, JIA subtype, category of medications for arthritis, and presence of family history of autoimmune disease. Outcome variables were changes in patient-reported pain, maximal incisal opening (MIO), synovial enhancement ratio (ER), and total procedure time. Forty-five patients with 71 injected TMJs were included. Twenty-two patients with 36 injected TMJs were in the landmark group and 23 patients with 35 injected joints were in the image-guided group. There were no relevant differences in age, gender, family history of rheumatologic disease, or disease subtype between groups. There were no differences in resolution of pain (P = 1.00), increase in MIO (P = .975), or decrease in ER (P = .492) between groups, but procedure times averaged 49 minutes longer for the image-guided group (P < .008). There were no statistical differences in short-term outcomes, but procedure times were longer for the image-guided group. Although specific indications for the use of image guidance might exist, routine use of this procedure cannot be justified. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intra-articular corticosteroid injections to the temporomandibular joints are safe and appear to be effective therapy in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Matthew L; Good, Jennifer; Sharpe, Tyler; Beukelman, Timothy; Young, Daniel; Waite, Peter D; Cron, Randy Q

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intra-articular corticosteroid injections (IACIs) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) when administered by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon without imaging guidance. This was a retrospective study of children with JIA, seen at a single center, who were selected based on having received IACIs of the TMJ. All subjects received the intervention, which consisted of referral to a single oral and maxillofacial surgeon for TMJ IACI with 5 to 10 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide, under general anesthesia. Primary outcomes assessed in all subjects were the safety of the procedure and efficacy as determined by the change in maximal incisal opening (MIO). In addition, a subset of 31 subjects underwent repeat magnetic resonance imaging of the TMJ, permitting analysis of the change in the acute and chronic findings of arthritis in those patients. Sixty-three patients (68% female) received 137 IACIs. The mean age for diagnosis of JIA was 8.5 years, and the mean age at presentation for TMJ injections was 10 years. The injections were well tolerated: only 1 patient developed the steroid complication of hypopigmentation, and none developed degeneration or ankylosis. In terms of efficacy, the mean MIO increased from 40.8 ± 0.93 to 43.5 ± 0.90 mm (P = .001); in addition, changing the unit of analysis to individual joints, in patients who underwent repeat magnetic resonance imaging examination, 51% of TMJs showed magnetic resonance imaging evidence of improvement of arthritic changes, of whom 18% had complete resolution of TMJ arthritis. The results indicate that IACI of the TMJ can be safely performed by experienced oral and maxillofacial surgeons without a requirement for computed tomographic guidance. In addition, these results show that IACI may be effective in the management of TMJ arthritis, although further studies are required. Copyright © 2012 American

  1. Temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Herb, Kathleen; Cho, Sung; Stiles, Marlind Alan

    2006-12-01

    Pain caused by temporomandibular disorders originates from either muscular or articular conditions, or both. Distinguishing the precise source of the pain is a significant diagnostic challenge to clinicians, and effective management hinges on establishing a correct diagnosis. This paper examines terminology and regional anatomy as it pertains to functional and dysfunctional states of the temporomandibular joint and muscles of mastication. A review of the pathophysiology of the most common disorders is provided. Trends in evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, and research are presented.

  2. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  3. Temporomandibular disorders in headache patients

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its seve-rity in individuals with headache. Study Design: 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic questionnaire. The severity of TMD was defined by the temporomandibular index (TMI). Results: The TMD signs and symptoms were always more frequent in individuals with headache, especially report of pain in TMJ area (CDH, n=16; EH, n=12; WH, n=6), pain to palpation on masseter (CDH, n=19; EH, n=16; WH, n=11) which are significantly more frequent in episodic and chronic daily headache. The mean values of temporomandibular and articular index (CDH patients) and muscular index (CDH and EH patients) were statistically higher than in patients of the control group, notably the articular (CDH=0.38; EH=0.25;WH=0.19) and muscular (CDH=0.46; EH=0.51; WH=0.26) indices. Conclusions: These findings allow us to speculate that masticatory and TMJ pain are more common in headache subjects. Besides, it seems that the TMD is more severe in headache patients. Key words:Temporomandibular dysfunction, headache disorders. PMID:22926473

  4. [Temporomandibular joint arthropathy in situ steroid injection].

    PubMed

    Gagé, J; Gallucci, A; Arnaud, M; Chossegros, C; Foletti, J M

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) affect the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMDs most often result from occlusal and/or muscular disorders and are then called primary or idiopathic TMDs. Less frequently, TMDs are related to local (trauma, infection) or general (rheumatoid arthritis) causes and are then called secondary TMDs. A little known iatrogenic cause of secondary TDM is the osteoarthritis that may be induced by intra-articular cortisone injections. We report one case of condylar lysis that occurred after one single intra-articular cortisone injection. A 62-years-old woman consulted for a long-lasting TMD on the left side manifesting itself through pain and noise. She benefited one year before from an intra-articular injection of cortisone by her rheumatologist for repeated closed lock of her left TMJ. Physical examination showed limited mouth opening with deviation on the left side. Lateral movements on the right side were impossible. The panoramic X-ray showed a condylar lysis on the left side that was on the CT scan. MRI additionally showed an anteriorly displaced and severely reshaped disc and an articular inflammation without intra-articular effusion. TMJ osteoarthritis secondary to unique or repeated intra-articular steroid injections are little-known. They are clinically expressed as typical TMDs and characterized on X-rays by condylar lysis and inflammation. Intra-articular injections of steroids are not totally harmless and other treatments must be preferred. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Temporomandibular joint biomechanical restrictions: the fluid and synovial membrane.

    PubMed

    Cascone, P; Vetrano, S; Nicolai, G; Fabiani, F

    1999-07-01

    The authors analyze the functions of the synovial membrane and the chemical-physical properties of synovial fluid. In particular they evaluate the role played by synovial fluid in the complex mechanism of the temporomandibular joint. Every single part that belongs to the temporomandibular joint, together with the stomatognathic apparatus, plays a specific and particular role according to the dynamics and to the preservation of the correct temporomandibular joint physiology. The physiological postural and functional relationship between the various parts of the temporomandibular joint is guaranteed by a number of biomechanical restrictions that lead and influence the regular execution of the articular movements. The most involved biomechanical restrictions in the temporomandibular joint are the temporomandibular ligament, the lateral disc ligament, the bilaminar zone or retrodiscal tissue, the synovial membrane, and the synovial fluid.

  6. Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Frederick; Steinkeler, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial disease process caused by muscle hyperfunction or parafunction, traumatic injuries, hormonal influences, and articular changes. Symptoms of TMD include decreased mandibular range of motion, muscle and joint pain, joint crepitus, and functional limitation or deviation of jaw opening. Only after failure of noninvasive options should more invasive and nonreversible treatments be initiated. Treatment can be divided into noninvasive, minimally invasive, and invasive options. Temporomandibular joint replacement is reserved for severely damaged joints with end-stage disease that has failed all other more conservative treatment modalities.

  7. Effects of several temporomandibular disorders on the stress distributions of temporomandibular joint: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan; Qian, Yingli; Zhang, Yuanli; Fan, Yubo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate stress distributions in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) for comparison with healthy TMJs. A model of mandible and normal TMJs was developed according to CT images. The interfaces between the discs and the articular cartilages were treated as contact elements. Nonlinear cable elements were used to simulate disc attachments. Based on this model, seven models of various TMDs were established. The maximum stresses of the discs with anterior, posterior, medial and lateral disc displacement (ADD, PDD, MDD and LDD) were 12.09, 9.33, 10.71 and 6.07 times magnitude of the identically normal disc, respectively. The maximum stresses of the posterior articular eminences in ADD, PDD, MDD, LDD, relaxation of posterior attachments and disc perforation models were 21, 59, 46, 21, 13 and 15 times greater than the normal model, respectively. TMDs could cause increased stresses in the discs and posterior articular eminences.

  8. Morphological characteristics of the temporomandibular joint in the pouch young of the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Kawashima, S; Amemiya, T

    2015-04-01

    We recently reported the absence of the articular disc, which is a constant structure in mammals, in the temporomandibular joint of the adult Tasmanian devil. However, whether the articular disc disappears with growth of the animal was unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pouch young of the Tasmanian devil has the articular disc. The temporomandibular joint of a fresh carcass of the pouch young, whose crown-rump length was 43 mm, was examined microscopically and by microcomputed tomography. The absence of the articular disc in the pouch young temporomandibular joint was histologically confirmed. It is suggested that the articular disc of the Tasmanian devil is naturally absent. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Pathogenesis of degenerative temporomandibular joint arthritides.

    PubMed

    Milam, Stephen B

    2005-09-01

    Over the past decade, remarkable progress has been made in the study of molecular mechanisms involved in degenerative temporomandibular joint arthritides. Based on recent findings, models of degenerative temporomandibular joint disease predict that mechanical loads trigger a cascade of molecular events leading to disease in susceptible individuals. These events involve the production or release of free radicals, cytokines, fatty acid catabolites, neuropeptides, and matrix-degrading enzymes. Under normal circumstances, these molecules may be involved in the remodeling of articular tissues in response to changing functional demands. However, if functional demands exceed the adaptive capacity of the temporomandibular joint or if the affected individual is susceptible to maladaptive responses, then a disease state will ensue. An individual's susceptibility to degenerative temporomandibular joint disease may be determined by several factors, including genetic backdrop, sex, age, and nutritional status. It is hoped that, by furthering our understanding of the molecular events that underlie degenerative temporomandibular joint diseases, improved diagnostics and effective therapies for these debilitating conditions will be developed.

  10. Anatomical and physiological considerations regarding the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Boering, G

    1979-12-01

    The structure and function of the human temporomandibular joint has concerned several investigators but still fundamental questions exist and require further examination. A profound knowledge of the normal anatomy and histology of the temporomandibular joint is necessary to understand its function and functional disturbances. It is also necessary for a good understanding of clinical findings and the interpretation of radiographs. In this paper a clinically orientated description has been given of the anatomy and histology of the mandibular head, the articular fossa and eminence, the articular disc, the capsule and ligaments, the synovial membrane, the innervation of the joint and the normal relationship between the different components. About the physiology of the temporomandibular joint many controversial theories exist. A lot of research has still to be done, especially in the field of the co-ordination of the function of both joints, the muscles and the dentition.

  11. [Temporomandibular joint, occlusion and bruxism].

    PubMed

    Orthlieb, J D; Ré, J P; Jeany, M; Giraudeau, A

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint and dental occlusion are joined for better and worse. TMJ has its own weaknesses, sometimes indicated by bad functional habits and occlusal disorders. Occlusal analysis needs to be addressed simply and clearly. The term "malocclusion" is not reliable to build epidemiological studies, etiologic mechanisms or therapeutic advice on this "diagnosis". Understanding the impact of pathogenic malocclusion is not just about occlusal relationships that are more or less defective, it requires to locate them within the skeletal framework, the articular and behavioural context of the patient, and above all to assess their impact on the functions of the masticatory system. The TMJ-occlusion couple is often symbiotic, developing together in relation to its environment, compensating for its own shortcomings. However, a third partner may alter this relationship, such as bruxism, or more generally oral parafunctions, trauma or an interventionist practitioner.

  12. Temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Dorrit; González-Garcia, Raul

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is still controversial. TMJ arthrocentesis represents a form of minimally invasive surgical treatment in patients suffering from internal derangement of the TMJ, especially closed lock. It consists of washing the joint with the possibility of depositing a drug or other therapeutic substance. Resolution of symptoms is due to the removal of chemical inflammatory mediators and changes in intra-articular pressure. Numerous clinical studies regarding this technique have been published. The goal of this paper is to review all clinical articles that have been published with regard to the critique of this technique. 19 articles with different designs fulfilling selection guidelines were chosen. A series of clinical and procedure variables were analyzed. Although the mean of improvement was higher that 80%, further research is needed to determine more homogeneous indications for TMJ athrocentesis. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, arthrocentesis, minimally invasive surgery. PMID:22322493

  13. Ankylosis of temporomandibular joint after the traumatic brain injury: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinggong; Li, Bo; Long, Xing; Li, Jian; Yan, Quanmei

    2013-08-01

    Mouth opening limitation after the neurosurgical procedures is a common complication and usually resolves within 3 months. If limited mouth opening remains unresolved on the long term, an intra-articular ankylosis of temporomandibular joint may develop eventually. The possible mechanisms base on the myositis and atrophy of the masticatory muscles for these craniotomies are often involved in the temporalis. This article reports two unusual cases with the intra-articular ankylosis of temporomandibular joint after the traumatic brain injury, who received a modified surgical treatment for joint ankylosis. Therefore, the early diagnosis and intervention are important to minimize these complications. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Ros Mendoza, L H; Cañete Celestino, E; Velilla Marco, O

    2008-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small joint with complex anatomy and function. Diverse pathologies with very different symptoms can affect the TMJ. While various imaging techniques such as plain-film radiography and computed tomography can be useful, magnetic resonance imaging's superior contrast resolution reveals additional structures like the articular disk, making this technique essential for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. We analyze the MRI signs of the different pathologies that can affect the TMJ from the structural and functional points of view.

  15. Functional anatomy of the temporomandibular joint (I).

    PubMed

    Sava, Anca; Scutariu, Mihaela Monica

    2012-01-01

    Jaw movement is analyzed as the action between two rigid components jointed together in a particular way, the movable mandible against the stabilized cranium. Jaw articulation distinguishes form most other synovial joints of the body by the coincidence of certain characteristic features. Its articular surfaces are not covered by hyaline cartilage as elsewhere. The two jointed components carry teeth the shape, position and occlusion of which having a unique influence on specific positions and movements within the joint. A fibrocartilaginous disc is interposed between upper and lower articular surfaces; this disc compensates for the incongruities in opposing parts and allows sliding, pivoting, and rotating movements between the bony components. These are the reasons for our review of the functional anatomy of the temporomandibular joint.

  16. Temporomandibular joint computed tomography: development of a direct sagittal technique

    SciTech Connect

    van der Kuijl, B.; Vencken, L.M.; de Bont, L.G.; Boering, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Radiology plays an important role in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders. Different techniques are used with computed tomography offering simultaneous imaging of bone and soft tissues. It is therefore suited for visualization of the articular disk and may be used in patients with suspected internal derangements and other disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Previous research suggests advantages to direct sagittal scanning, which requires special positioning of the patient and a sophisticated scanning technique. This study describes the development of a new technique of direct sagittal computed tomographic imaging of the temporomandibular joint using a specially designed patient table and internal light visor positioning. No structures other than the patient's head are involved in the imaging process, and misleading artifacts from the arm or the shoulder are eliminated. The use of the scanogram allows precise correction of the condylar axis and selection of exact slice level.

  17. Arthrocentesis for temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Peter A; Ilankovan, Vellupillai

    2006-06-01

    The management of refractory temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain is both challenging and controversial. A number of simple, noninvasive approaches have been used in the management of this condition with variable success. In patients who fail to respond to conventional conservative measures, in a joint that is not deemed to be grossly mechanically deranged, we advocate the use of TMJ arthrocentesis. In our practice, this is followed by intra-articular morphine infusion in an attempt to give long-term pain relief. Arthrocentesis is a simple technique with minimal morbidity that can be tried instead of more invasive procedures. To date we have used arthrocentesis of the upper joint space, with intra-articular morphine injection in over 500 TMJs. Approximately 90% of patients have found the procedure beneficial, with pain often being reduced 1 year after the procedure. We recommend arthrocentesis as an effective, minimally invasive technique in patients with continuing pain in the TMJ that is unresponsive to conservative management. We additionally advocate the use of intra-articular morphine as a long acting analgesic in these patients. Although arthrocentesis is a well documented technique and there have been many studies published in relation to the use of intra-articular morphine in orthopedic surgery, further research is required, to delineate its use in the TMJ more fully.

  18. Temporomandibular joint disorders' impact on pain, function, and disability.

    PubMed

    Chantaracherd, P; John, M T; Hodges, J S; Schiffman, E L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders ("TMJ intra-articular status"), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability ("TMD impact"). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject's most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, -0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure → DDwR → DDwoR → DJD) should be explored. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  19. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders’ Impact on Pain, Function, and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Chantaracherd, P.; John, M.T.; Hodges, J.S.; Schiffman, E.L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders (“TMJ intra-articular status”), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability (“TMD impact”). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject’s most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], −0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, −0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure → DDwR → DDwoR → DJD) should be explored. PMID:25572112

  20. The posterior segment of the temporomandibular joint capsule and its anatomic relationship.

    PubMed

    Mérida-Velasco, J Ramón; Rodríguez, J Francisco; de la Cuadra, Crótida; Peces, M Dolores; Mérida, J Antonio; Sánchez, Indalecio

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to clarify the arrangement of the posterior segment of the temporomandibular joint capsule and its pertinent relationships. The temporomandibular region was dissected bilaterally in 20 adult cadavers. Natural stained latex was injected into 16 cadavers through the external carotid artery to facilitate the dissection of the arterial vessels. The posterior segment of the joint capsule is made up of the so-called "bilaminar zone" of the articular disc. The upper internal portion of the posterior segment of the capsule was reinforced by the discomalleolar ligament. The retroarticular space was filled with loose connective tissue and the anterior branches of the anterior tympanic artery were distributed throughout the posterior segment of the joint capsule. The posterior segment of the temporomandibular joint capsule corresponds to the bilaminar zone of the articular disc. The structures of the retroarticular space are extracapsular.

  1. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  2. Temporomandibular joint diagnostics using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, A-K; Kristensen, M; Arvidsson, L Z

    2015-01-01

    The present review will give an update on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging using CBCT. It will focus on diagnostic accuracy and the value of CBCT compared with other imaging modalities for the evaluation of TMJs in different categories of patients; osteoarthritis (OA), juvenile OA, rheumatoid arthritis and related joint diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other intra-articular conditions. Finally, sections on other aspects of CBCT research related to the TMJ, clinical decision-making and concluding remarks are added. CBCT has emerged as a cost- and dose-effective imaging modality for the diagnostic assessment of a variety of TMJ conditions. The imaging modality has been found to be superior to conventional radiographical examinations as well as MRI in assessment of the TMJ. However, it should be emphasized that the diagnostic information obtained is limited to the morphology of the osseous joint components, cortical bone integrity and subcortical bone destruction/production. For evaluation of soft-tissue abnormalities, MRI is mandatory. There is an obvious need for research on the impact of CBCT examinations on patient outcome. PMID:25369205

  3. Three-dimensional temporomandibular joint modeling and animation.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Piero; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Pagnoni, Mario; Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Tedaldi, Massimiliano

    2008-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) model derives from a study of the cranium by 3D virtual reality and mandibular function animation. The starting point of the project is high-fidelity digital acquisition of a human dry skull. The cooperation between the maxillofacial surgeon and the cartoonist enables the reconstruction of the fibroconnective components of the TMJ that are the keystone for comprehension of the anatomic and functional features of the mandible. The skeletal model is customized with the apposition of the temporomandibular ligament, the articular disk, the retrodiskal tissue, and the medial and the lateral ligament of the disk. The simulation of TMJ movement is the result of the integration of up-to-date data on the biomechanical restrictions. The 3D TMJ model is an easy-to-use application that may be run on a personal computer for the study of the TMJ and its biomechanics.

  4. [Dissertations 25 years after date 43. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction and condylar resorption following orthognathic surgery].

    PubMed

    Kerstens, H C J

    2015-12-01

    A surgical-orthodontic treatment has a direct influence on a patient's skeletal, dental, functional and psychological factors. A variety of surgical and anatomical factors determine the result of this complex treatment. Risk factors are a retrognathy with a steep mandibular angle, and the anatomy of the mandibular condyles and the fossa. The customary surgical techniques have an enhancing influence on the function of the temporomandibular joint. The role of the position of the articular disc remains unclear. Since 1989, more insight has gradually been gained in the aspects having an influence on the function of the temporomandibular joint following orthognathic surgery.

  5. Intra articular synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Radha; Tameem, Afroz; Vidyasagar, J V S

    2010-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue neoplasm with a characteristic biphasic pattern. Incidence in soft tissues is 5-10%. Intra articularly synovial sarcoma is extremely rare. Fewer than 5% of all synovial sarcomas arise within the joint space. We report a case of intra articular synovial sarcoma in a young male who presented as internal derangement of the knee.

  6. A study of the temporomandibular joint during bruxism.

    PubMed

    Commisso, María S; Martínez-Reina, Javier; Mayo, Juana

    2014-06-01

    A finite element model of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the human mandible was fabricated to study the effect of abnormal loading, such as awake and asleep bruxism, on the articular disc. A quasilinear viscoelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the disc. The viscoelastic nature of this tissue is shown to be an important factor when sustained (awake bruxism) or cyclic loading (sleep bruxism) is simulated. From the comparison of the two types of bruxism, it was seen that sustained clenching is the most detrimental activity for the TMJ disc, producing an overload that could lead to severe damage of this tissue.

  7. [Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    König, H; Spitzer, W J

    1986-05-01

    Because of its position, the temporomandibular joint is difficult to demonstrate by conventional radiological methods. Even the use of complex methods, such as arthro-tomography or CT, does not result in the satisfactory demonstration of the soft tissues and, in particular, of the articular disc. Magnetic resonance was carried out in 24 patients; it was possible to differentiate functional from morphological changes in the cartilage and these are discussed. Measurements were carried out during progressive opening of the mouth. This permits direct demonstration of reversible and irreversible cartilage displacement and of other changes in the joint and cartilages.

  8. Imaging the temporomandibular joint

    SciTech Connect

    Katzberg, R.W.; Manzione, J.V.; Westesson, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book encompasses all imaging modalities as they apply to the Temporomandibular Joint and its disorders. The volume employs correlative line drawings to elaborate on diagnostic images. It helps teach methods of TMJ imaging and describes findings identified by different imaging modalities to both radiologists and dental clinicians.

  9. Temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Buescher, Jennifer J

    2007-11-15

    Temporomandibular joint disorders are common in adults; as many as one third of adults report having one or more symptoms, which include jaw or neck pain, headache, and clicking or grating within the joint. Most symptoms improve without treatment, but various noninvasive therapies may reduce pain for patients who have not experienced relief from self-care therapies. Physical therapy modalities (e.g., iontophoresis, phonophoresis), psychological therapies (e.g., cognitive behavior therapy), relaxation techniques, and complementary therapies (e.g., acupuncture, hypnosis) are all used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders; however, no therapies have been shown to be uniformly superior for the treatment of pain or oral dysfunction. Noninvasive therapies should be attempted before pursuing invasive, permanent, or semi-permanent treatments that have the potential to cause irreparable harm. Dental occlusion therapy (e.g., oral splinting) is a common treatment for temporomandibular joint disorders, but a recent systematic review found insufficient evidence for or against its use. Some patients with intractable temporomandibular joint disorders develop chronic pain syndrome and may benefit from treatment, including antidepressants or cognitive behavior therapy.

  10. Clinical treatment of a ruptured temporomandibular joint disc: morphological changes at 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Lucas; Porto, Felipe; Agarwal, Sachin; Grossman, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis is a disease that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This case report chronicles the diagnosis and treatment of a patient for whom this pathological condition was accompanied by a rupture of the articular disc. The patient presented with loud sounds in the left TMJ and an irregular mandibular occlusal plane due to condylar intrusion in the glenoid fossa on the ipsilateral side. A noninvasive treatment was selected. A 4-month follow-up revealed remission of the articular sounds, and tissue regeneration was noted. These improvements remained visible at 5-year follow-up.

  11. [Course of action in front of children or adolescent suffering from temporomandibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Robin, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are described in children from the age of 4. Their prevalence and severity increase strongly during the second decade, which corresponds to the period of orthodontic treatments. At this age the most common symptoms are joint clicking sounds (more than 70% of the cases), sometimes accompanied by episodes of intermittent locking. They would be favored by oral parafunctional activities (gum chewing, biting habits, bruxism...), ligamentous hyperlaxity and modification of the intra-articular space relations during growth. The questioning of the patient and his parents and clinical examination (muscular, articular and occlusal) are essential and very often sufficient for establishing the diagnosis. Even more than in the adult, the therapeutic attitude must rely on conservative and non-irreversible methods (explanations, suppression of the parafunctions, occlusal splints in the case of severe bruxism). These considerations are illustrated by the presentation of two representative clinical cases of temporomandibular disorders frequently encountered in children and adolescents.

  12. Articular cartilage biochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuettner, K.E.; Schleyerbach, R.; Hascall, V.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains six parts, each consisting of several papers. The part titles are: Cartilage Matrix Components; Biosynthesis and Characterization of Cartilage--Specific Matrix Components and Events; Cartilage Metabolism; In Vitro Studies of Articular Cartilage Metabolism; Normal and Pathologic Metabolism of Cartilage; and Destruction of the Articular Cartilage in Rheumatoid Diseases. Some of the paper topics are: magnetic resonance imaging; joint destruction; age-related changes; proteoglycan structure; and biosynthesis of cartilage proteoglycan.

  13. [Temporomandibular joint: MRI diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Kress, B; Schmitter, M

    2005-09-01

    MRI of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) requires 1.5 T. The radiologist must be familiar with the anatomy and pathology of the TMJ. This review gives a description of MRI protocols for the TMJ, and MRI anatomy and pathology of the TMJ (open and closed mouth) by means of MR images and drawings. Diagnosing of the TMJ related diseases depends on standardized clinical and MR examinations. Therefore close interdisciplinary cooperation between dentist and radiologist is necessary.

  14. A study of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis using computed tomographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Massilla Mani, F; Sivasubramanian, S Satha

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the various bony changes in osteoarthritis (OA) of elderly patients who are suffering from temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) and to find if all the changes manifesting in generalized OA were presented in temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Thirty TMJs of fifteen elderly patients who were diagnosed with TMD were selected for the study. Patient with TMD were subjected to computerized tomographic (CT) imaging, and the various bony changes in the TMJ were recorded. CT study of TMJ showed that there is a positive evidence of joint involvement in 80% of the cases. In this study, female patients were more commonly affected by OA than the males. The condylar changes (69.93%) are more common than the changes in the articular eminence (6.6%) and condylar fossa (10%). About 56.6% of TMJ in the study was affected by the early manifestations of the OA. CT study showed that there is a positive evidence of TMJ involvement in the elderly patients with TMD. The results show that condylar changes are more common than the changes in the articular eminence and condylar fossa. The study also shows that most of the patients are affected by early TMJ OA; hence, initiating treatment at early stages may prevent the disease progression. Copyright © 2016 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Temporomandibular joint pain assessment.

    PubMed

    Stegenga, B; de Bont, L G; Boering, G

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pain characteristics of patients with temporomandibular joint-related pain and propose a rationale for the assessment of pain and its impact on patients with temporomandibular disorders. Based on anamnestic information, the 88 patients in the sample were classified according to pain grade: (1) acute/subacute nonrecurrent or recurrent pain, n = 41 (46.6%); (2) persistently recurring pain in relatively high frequency, or nonsevere persistent pain, n = 32 (36.4%); (3) persistent and impairing pain, n = 8 (9.1%); (4) persistent and disabling pain, n = 7 (7.9%); and (5) persistent and handicapping pain, n = 0. Regarding TMJ pain provoked during the clinical examination, there was a significant difference among diagnostic subgroups, subgroups with different pain intensity levels, and pain grade subgroups, but no significant differences could be found based on the duration of the pain symptoms. Subgroups also did not significantly differ in scores on the Multi-dimensional Pain Inventory and the General Health Questionnaire. Based on the results of the study, the assessment of nonchronic TMJ pain may generally be limited to an accurate description of the pain complaint and thorough clinical assessment. Multidimensional assessment may be useful when the TMJ pain persists or is persistently recurring. Depending on individual circumstances, additional assessment procedures may prove to be useful. A general strategy for pain assessment in temporomandibular disorders is proposed.

  16. Antioxidant capacity of synovial fluid in the temporomandibular joint correlated with radiological morphology of temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Kyoko; Ohba, Seigo; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Shinpei; Ishimaru, Jun-Ichi; Sano, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the correlation between the antioxidant capacity of synovial fluid and radiological findings of intra-articular structures in patients with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We recruited 21 patients (9 men and 12 women, aged 18-84 years of age) with such disorders, excluding myofascial pain and dysfunction syndrome, or other muscular disorders. The clinical variables recorded included age, sex, interincisal distance, and visual analogue pain scores (VAS). Radiological findings were obtained from diagnostic arthrogram and cone-beam computed tomography (CT). The antioxidant capacity of the synovial fluid was measured by chemiluminescence. Eleven patients were radiologically diagnosed with closed lock, and the remaining 10 with no closed lock. An anchored intra-articular disc was most often seen on cone-beam CT (n=19) followed by perforated disc (n=7), osteoarthrosis (n=7), and anterior disc displacement without reduction (n=5). Although there were no significant differences between antioxidant capacity and age, sex, VAS, or any findings on cone-beam CT, antioxidant capacity was significantly decreased in the patients with closed lock compared with those who did not have closed lock (p=0.02). The results suggest an association between the oxidative stress of the synovial fluid and closed-lock in disorders of the TMJ.

  17. Temporomandibular disorders in scuba divers-an increased risk during diving certification training.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Ozmen; Tek, Mustafa; Seven, Hüseyin

    2012-11-01

    The design of a diving regulator's mouthpiece increases the risk of a temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in scuba divers. The total weight of a diving regulator is reflected directly on the temporomandibular joint, causing articular and periarticular disorders. In the current study, the prevalence of TMD in scuba divers triggered during diving certification training is investigated. We also aimed to determine the factors that lead to TMD during diving training and clarify the observation that there is an increased incidence of TMD in inexperienced divers. The study was held between 2006 and 2011. Ninety-seven divers were referred with the complaint of pain around temporomandibular area. The divers were classified according to their diving experience. Symptoms and signs of TMD were graded. Fourteen divers were diagnosed with TMD. Temporomandibular disorder was seen more frequently in inexperienced divers than in experienced divers (P = 0.0434). The most prevalent symptom was an increased effort for mouthpiece gripping. Temporomandibular joint tenderness and trigger point activation were the mostly seen physical signs. Thirteen divers had an improvement with therapy. The increased effort for stabilizing the mouthpiece is a recognized factor in TMD development. Attention must be paid to an association of scuba diving with TMDs, especially in inexperienced divers having a scuba certification training.

  18. Macroscopic and microscopic aspects of the temporomandibular joint related to its clinical implication.

    PubMed

    Siéssere, Selma; Vitti, Mathias; Semprini, Marisa; Regalo, Simone Cecílio Hallak; Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki; Dias, Fernando José; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; de Sousa, Luiz Gustavo

    2008-10-01

    , mandibular fossa, and articular eminence of the temporomandibular joint. It was concluded that the temporomandibular joint is a complex structure and the clinician must have the ability to formulate the diagnosis based on the understanding of morphological aspects of the structures that compose the stomatognatic system.

  19. 'Inverse' temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Alemán Navas, R M; Martínez Mendoza, M G

    2011-08-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation can be classified into four groups (anterior, posterior, lateral, and superior) depending on the direction of displacement and the location of the condylar head. All the groups are rare except for anterior dislocation. 'Inverse' TMJ dislocation is a bilateral anterior and superior dislocation with impaction of the mandible over the maxilla; to the authors' knowledge only two cases have previously been reported in the literature. Inverse TMJ dislocation has unique clinical and radiographic findings, which are described for this case. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Posttraumatic Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulos, Helen E.; Quinn, Peter D.; Granquist, Eric; Chou, Joli C.

    2009-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has many essential functions. None of its components are exempt from injury. Facial asymmetry, malocclusion, disturbances in growth, osteoarthritis, and ankylosis can manifest as complications from trauma to the TMJ. The goals of initial treatment include achievement of pretraumatic function, restoration of facial symmetry, and resolution of pain. These same objectives hold true for late repairs and reconstruction of the TMJ apparatus. Treatment is demanding, and with opposing approaches. The following article explores various treatment options for problems presenting as a result of a history of trauma to the TMJ. PMID:22110802

  1. [Total temporomandibular joint prostheses].

    PubMed

    Zwetyenga, N; Amroun, S; Wajszczak, B-L; Moris, V

    2016-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is probably the most complex human joint. As in all joints, its prosthetic replacement may be indicated in selected cases. Significant advances have been made in the design of TMJ prostheses during the last three decades and the indications have been clarified. The aim of our work was to make an update on the current total TMJ total joint replacement. Indications, contraindications, prosthetic components, advantages, disadvantages, reasons for failure or reoperation, virtual planning and surgical protocol have been exposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Temporomandibular joint disc surgery].

    PubMed

    Potier, J; Maes, J-M; Nicot, R; Dumousseau, T; Cotelle, M; Ferri, J

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are a common disease and may be responsible for major functional and painful repercussions. Treatment is not consensual. The literature highlights the role of conservative treatments (physiotherapy, analgesics, splints) in a first attempt. Minimally invasive surgical techniques (arthroscopy, arthrocentesis) have developed rapidly in recent decades. They have proven effective and reliable, especially in patients suffering from irreducible or reducible anterior disc dislocation or presenting with arthopathies. The goal of our work was to make an update about disk surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Temporomandibular disorders and headaches.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Bassiur, Jennifer P

    2014-05-01

    Headache and temporomandibular disorders should be treated together but separately. If there is marked limitation of opening, imaging of the joint may be necessary. The treatment should then include education regarding limiting jaw function, appliance therapy, instruction in jaw posture, and stretching exercises, as well as medications to reduce inflammation and relax the muscles. The use of physical therapies, such as spray and stretch and trigger point injections, is helpful if there is myofascial pain. Tricyclic antidepressants and the new-generation antiepileptic drugs are effective in muscle pain conditions. Arthrocentesis and/or arthroscopy may help to restore range of motion.

  4. [Temporomandibular dysfunction causes orofacial pain].

    PubMed

    Bakke, Merete

    2010-11-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain. They are characterized by painful and hampered jaw function. Especially disc displacements, osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscle problems are frequent. The pain is localized in the jaws, face and temples, and jaw opening may be reduced, asymmetrical or irregular with noises from the temporomandibular joints. In cases with restricted jaw mobility or when the pain is provoked or aggravated by jaw function, referral to odontological examination is indicated. The prognosis is good, but full recovery may take years.

  5. Temporomandibular disorders and occlusion.

    PubMed

    Badel, Tomislav; Marotti, Miljenko; Pavicin, Ivana Savić; Basić-Kes, Vanja

    2012-09-01

    Occlusion has an important place within the multifactorial concept of the temporomandibular disorder (TMD) etiopathogenesis as well as in every form of dental treatment. The modern concept of treatment of these disorders differentiates initial and definitive forms of treatment. The aim of this paper is to analyze recent viewpoints on the role of occlusion in the etiopathogenesis and treatment ofTMDs. Masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints are directly connected with occlusal relations and TMDs are traditionally linked with occlusal disorders. The initial occlusal treatment can be applied to all TMD patients, regardless of their having intact teeth with respect to physiological occlusal relations and in patients in need of orthodontic or prosthodontic treatment or an oral surgical procedure. On managing TMD patients, there are doubts about the indications for definitive treatment and whether there has been a possibility of treating a painful TMD by reversible treatment modalities, that is, by initial treatment. Other types of orofacial pain such as trigeminal neuralgia can be comorbid with TMDs but also result in unnecessary procedures on the teeth and prosthodontic work if they are not recognized. Although dental profession mainly recognizes the importance of occlusal treatment of TMD problems, their relationship is controversial because it is not strictly demonstrated in numerous scientific studies. Occlusion is not the dominant cause of TMD problems.

  6. On the development, morphology and function of the temporomandibular joint in the light of the orofacial system.

    PubMed

    Fanghänel, Jochen; Gedrange, Tomasz

    2007-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint has a key role in the biocybernetic functional cycle of the orofacial system. It has developed as a "secondary joint" and displays a number of features relating to the articular tubercle, the mandibular condyle, the articular disc, the joint cartilage and the retroarticular pad. The joint cartilage of the mandibular condyle is a primary compensatory growth centre also comprising distant effects. The coordinate course of the mandibular movements is controlled by a complex reflex mechanism and neuronal controller cycles. Morphology, function and clinical aspects are of equal interest to both physicians and dentists.

  7. Denervation of the painful temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Dellon, Lee; Maloney, Christopher T

    2006-09-01

    The successful management of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain remains elusive. Often the initial relief of pain is complicated by recurrence of the symptoms. This time frame suggests that the pain may be related to neuromas of the nerves that innervate the TMJ. In 2003, an anatomic description of the innervation of the TMJ suggested that denervation of this joint might be the appropriate treatment for pain resistant to traditional forms of therapy. In January, 2005, this approach was used to treat recalcitrant left TMJ pain in a 21-year-old woman with congenital hearing loss who had recurrent dislocations of her TMJ articular disc. She previously had two arthroscopic surgeries and one open attempt to treat her TMJ pain. The last failed TMJ surgery created a painful neuroma that prevented her from wearing her hearing aid. A medial and lateral denervation of the TMJ joint was done. The successful results of this surgery are presented at one-year follow-up. The technical considerations of this approach and risk to the facial nerve are discussed.

  8. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  9. [HYALURONIC ACID: STRUCTURE, FUNCTIONS, THE POSSIBILITES OF APPLYING IN THE COMPLEX TREATMENT OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISEASES. A REWIEW].

    PubMed

    Volovar, O S; Malanchuk, V A; Kryzhanivska, O A

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the use of hyaluronic acid has become increasingly important in treatment of degenerative disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Urgency is caused by numerous studies in biology and pharmacology on structure and function of hyaluronic acid and its influence on the processes of repair damaged bone and articular cartilage restoration, as well as the positive long-term results of treatment in this group of patients.

  10. Evaluation of the reproducibility in the interpretation of magnetic resonance images of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Butzke, K W; Batista Chaves, K D; Dias da Silveira, H E; Dias da Silveira, H L

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to determine the intra- and interexaminer reproducibility in the interpretation of MRI of the temporomandibular joint among independent observers, with respect to six specific articular characteristics, and to discover which of these had greater and lesser agreement. Methods 30 magnetic resonance examinations of temporomandibular joints of adults were independently interpreted by 9 experienced and trained observers at 2 different times. Observers were divided into three groups according to their specialties: surgeon dentists specialized in temporomandibular dysfunction and orofacial pain, surgeon dentists specialized in radiology and medical doctors specialized in radiology. The reproducibility analysis was carried out using Cohen's kappa coefficient. Results The interexaminer reproducibility ranged from slight to fair. The intraexaminer reproducibility ranged from slight to no agreement. In the interexaminer evaluation, anterior disc displacement without reduction presented greater agreement, whereas change in condylar head shape showed the poorest agreement. In the intraexaminer evaluation, anterior disc displacement without reduction presented slight agreement, whereas, for the other characteristics, no agreement was observed. Conclusion Examiners do not demonstrate reproducibility in the interpretation of MRI of temporomandibular joints. Therefore, more efforts are necessary with respect to understanding the changes that may be detected in these images in terms of diagnosis and appropriate treatment approaches. PMID:20203277

  11. The temporomandibular joint in video motion--noninvasive image techniques to present the functional anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kordass, B

    1999-01-01

    The presentation of the functional anatomy of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is involved with difficulties if dynamic aspects are to be of prime interest, and it should be demonstrated with the highest resolution. Usually noninvasive techniques like MRI and sonography are available for presenting functionality of the temporomandibular joint in video motion. Such images reflect the functional anatomy much better than single pictures of figures could do. In combination with computer aided records of the condyle movements the video motion of MR and sonographical images represent tools for better understanding the relationships between functional or dysfunctional patterns and the morphological or dysmorphological shape and structure of the temporomandibular joint. The possibilities of such tools will be explained and discussed in detail relating, in addition, to loading effects caused by transmitted occlusal pressure onto the joint compartments. If pressure occurs the condyle slides mainly more or less retrocranially whereas the articular disc takes up a more displaced position and a deformed shape. In a few extreme cases the disc prolapses out of the joint space. These video pictures offer new aspects for the diagnosis of the disc-condyle stability and can also be used for explicit educational programs on the complex dysfunction-dysmorphology-relationship of temporomandibular diseases.

  12. Jacob's disease associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Capote, Ana; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Blasco, Ana; Muñoz, Mario F

    2005-01-01

    Jacob's disease is regarded a rare condition in which a joint formation is established between an enlarged mandibular coronoid process and the inner aspect of the zygomatic body. Chronic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk displacement has been proposed as etiological factor of coronoid process enlargement. We present a 23-year-old woman with long-standing TMJ dysfunction and restricted interincisal opening, who developed a progressive zygomatic asymmetry. The patient underwent treatment by intraoral coronoidectomy and homolateral TMJ arthroscopy in the same surgery. The histopathological diagnosis of the coronoid sample was cartilage-capped exostoses with presence of articular fibrous cartilage. Although the low prevalence of this entity, it should be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients with progressive limitation of mouth opening, although a TMJ syndrome may be present as a cause of this entity.

  13. Temporomandibular joints: high-resolution computed tomographic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was performed in 43 patients. Exquisite detail of the face, skull base, and TMJs was obtained with CT using soft tissue and bone algorithms, narrow collimation, and multiplanar images. In 10 patients clinically suspected of joint derangement, CT results were in close agreement with surgical findings and arthrography in 13/15 joints. CT showed indirect signs of disc dislocation, and the dislocated disc itself in 81% of affected joints. In two patients, arthrography with CT proved to be more helpful than conventional arthrography alone. CT without intra-articular contrast material provided information not appreciated on conventional radiogaphs in 28 patients (65%) and was particularly helpful in evaluating patients with disc pathosis and trauma. Early experience with CT of the TMJ shows that it is an excellent method of evaluation at acceptable radiation exposure levels that adds essential information not seen on standard radiographs.

  14. Genetic Influences on Temporomandibular Joint Development and Growth.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Robert J; Jing, Junjun; Feng, Jian Q

    2015-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small synovial joint at which the mandible articulates with the skull during movements involved in speaking and mastication. However, the secondary cartilage lining its joint surfaces is indicative of a very different developmental history than limb cartilages. This review summarizes our current knowledge of genes that regulate the formation of primary components of the TMJ, as well as genes that regulate postnatal growth of the TMJ. Although the TMJ is regulated by some of the same genes that are important in limb joints, others appear unique to the TMJ or have different actions. Runx2, Sox9, and members of the TGF-β/BMP family are critical drivers of chondrogenesis during condylar cartilage morphogenesis, and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is important for formation of the articular disc and cavitation. Osterix (Osx) is a critical regulator of endochondral bone formation during postnatal TMJ growth. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint: CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Le, Wei-Jie; Li, Ming-Hua; Yu, Qiang; Shi, Hui-Min

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Eight subjects with PVNS were examined with both pre and post contrast CT scans. All lesions were histopathologically confirmed through surgery. CT appearances of the lesions were reviewed. Among the eight subjects, 8 (100%) demonstrated soft tissue mass and enhancement after contrast administration, 6 (75%) appeared as all or focal areas of noncontrast hyperdensity, 6 (75%) had widening of the joint spaces. Bony erosion of the mandibular condyles and articular surfaces were found in 7 (87.5%) and 6 (75%) subjects, respectively. Based on the CT findings, PVNS of the TMJ is characterized by hyperdensity soft tissue mass and further increase in density after contrast administration, bony destruction of the mandibular condyles and skull base, and intracranial extension. © 2014.

  16. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis in child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Rahul J; Devrukhkar, Vishakha N; Khare, Sumedh S; Saraf, Tanvi A

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an intracapsular union of the disc-condyle complex to the temporal articular surface that restricts mandibular movements, including the fibrous adhesions or bony fusion between condyle, disc, glenoid fossa, and eminence. It is a serious and disabling condition that may cause problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and hygiene. This report describes a case of a 12-year-old girl with inability to open her mouth, diagnosed with unilateral right bony TMJ ankylosis. The surgical approach consisted of gap arthroplasty with interpositional temporalis muscle flap followed by vigorous physiotherapy. The treatment of TMJ ankylosis poses a significant challenge because of technical difficulties and a high incidence of recurrence. Its treatment includes the orthodontist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, pediatric dentist, and psychologist and physical therapist as part of the healthcare team.

  17. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint with intracranial extension.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Cai, Xie-Yi; Yang, Chi; Chen, Min-Jie; Qiu, Ya-Ting; Zhuo, Ziang

    2015-03-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis is an uncommon benign tumor-like proliferative lesion with an undetermined origin. Involvement of the temporomandibular joint is uncommon. Although pigmented villonodular synovitis is a benign lesion, it can grow with an aggressive pattern, and it extends extra-articularly in most of the reported cases, about one-third of them exhibiting intracranial involvement. The authors reported an additional case of a 47-year-old woman with intracranial extension, who had a history of joint pain and trismus. The preoperative diagnosis was made with arthroscopy. The lesion was completely excised via preauricular approach and condylotomy. The bone defect was covered by the pedicled temporalis myofascial fat flap. The patient has been symptom-free for 40 months postoperatively.

  18. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of the human temporomandibular joint disc.

    PubMed

    Beek, M; Koolstra, J H; van Ruijven, L J; van Eijden, T M

    2000-03-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of the articular disc of the human temporomandibular joint has been developed. The geometry of the articular cartilage and articular disc surfaces in the joint was measured using a magnetic tracking device. First, polynomial functions were fitted through the coordinates of these scattered measurements. Next, the polynomial description was transformed into a triangulated description to allow application of an automatic mesher. Finally, a finite element mesh of the articular disc was created by filling the geometry with tetrahedral elements. The articulating surfaces of the mandible and skull were modeled by quadrilateral patches. The finite element mesh and the patches were combined to create a three-dimensional model in which unrestricted sliding of the disc between the articulating surfaces was allowed. Simulation of statical joint loading at the closed jaw position predicted that the stress and strain distributions were located primarily in the intermediate zone of the articular disc with the highest values in the lateral part. Furthermore, it was predicted that considerable deformations occurred for relatively small joint loads and that relatively large variations in the direction of joint loading had little influence on the distribution of the deformations.

  19. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  20. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction in the mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Tuerlings, Virginie; Limme, Michel

    2004-06-01

    A functional and articular examination was carried out of 136 children (70 boys, 66 girls) aged from 6 to 12 years (6 years 1 month to 12 years 9 months), all presenting with a malocclusion in the mixed dentition and who had not yet received orthodontic treatment. The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of signs of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) in this population and to evaluate the possible relationship between certain 'individual' parameters and TMD signs. The results showed an elevated prevalence of muscle tenderness, particularly in the lateral pterygoid muscle, which was found to be sensitive in 80.9 per cent of patients. Muscle tenderness had a tendency to increase with age and was greater on the right side. Temporomandibular joint sounds were present in 35.3 per cent of the subjects and more frequent in girls and in older children. Of the children who presented a mandibular deviation on maximal opening (19.8 per cent), 13.2 per cent had a predominance of opening deviation towards the left. Retruded contact position interferences were present in 57.4 per cent of the children and 72.1 per cent presented lateral and protrusive interferences. Assessment of the maximal amplitudes of mandibular movements did not reveal any limitations. These results indicate that few relationships exist between individual parameters and TMD signs.

  1. Temporomandibular chronic dislocation: The long-standing condition

    PubMed Central

    Puche-Torres, Miguel; Iglesias-Gimilio, Maria-Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Background The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation can be categorised into three groups: acute, habitual or recurrent and long-standing. The long-standing or protracted lower jaw dislocation refers to a condition that persists for more than one month without reduction. There are a great variety of methods for its treatment, from the manual or non-surgical, to surgical ones like the indirect approach (conservative surgical approach) and direct approach (open joint). Additional procedures in unsuccessful cases may include extra-articular orthognathic techniques to correct a malocclusion until joint replacement. Material and Methods We report four new cases with a minimum of 6 weeks dislocation who were seen since 1995 to 2015 in the Maxillofacial Department of the Clínico Hospital (Valencia, Spain), in which the mean age was 57.5 years. Most of them were bilateral and the gender was predominantly female. Additionally, we have reviewed the related literature. Results All of the cases were successfully treated and half of them required open surgery. Conclusions The report confirms the difficulty of the treatment and reaffirms the necessity to bear in mind the wide variety of methods available for the treatment of this pathology. We stress the difficulties associated with managing the treatment and of suggesting new guidelines. The best option still remains not to delay the diagnostic and to select the appropriate initial treatment. Key words:Temporomandibular luxation, TMJ dislocation, protracted dislocation, long-standing dislocation. PMID:27694782

  2. MRI characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis in the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Kretapirom, K; Okochi, K; Nakamura, S; Tetsumura, A; Ohbayashi, N; Yoshino, N; Kurabayashi, T

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate characteristic MRI findings of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). Methods: 61 patients (122 TMJs) with RA in the TMJ and 50 patients (100 TMJs) with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were included in this study. MR images of these patients were assessed by two oral radiologists for the presence or absence of osseous changes, disc displacement, joint effusion and synovial proliferation. These findings were compared between the two patient groups. Results: Osseous changes in the condyle and articular eminence/fossa in the RA patient group were significantly more frequent than in the TMD patient group, and were often very severe. Joint effusion was also significantly more frequent in the RA patient group. Synovial proliferation was found in all TMJs in the RA patient group, whereas it was very uncommon in the TMD patient group. Conclusions: Severe osseous changes in the condyle and synovial proliferation were considered characteristic MRI findings of RA in the TMJs. PMID:22842633

  3. Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: A review of the anatomy, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Young, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint are conditions in which the articular disc has become displaced from its original position the condylar head. Relevant anatomic structures and their functional relationships are briefly discussed. The displacement of the disc can result in numerous presentations, with the most common being disc displacement with reduction (with or without intermittent locking), and disc displacement without reduction (with or without limited opening). These are described in this article according to the standardized Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, as well as the less common posterior disc displacement. Appropriate management usually ranges from patient education and monitoring to splints, physical therapy, and medications. In rare and select cases, surgery may be necessary. However, in for the majority of internal derangements, the prognosis is good, particularly with conservative care. PMID:26929478

  4. Subcutaneous Lipoatrophy and Skin Depigmentation Secondary to TMJ Intra-Articular Corticosteroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Skármeta, Nicolás Patricio; Hormazábal, Fernando Ariel; Alvarado, Juan; Rodriguez, Ana Maria

    2017-08-05

    Chronic orofacial pain is a complex multidimensional experience that produces disability and impairment of normal mandibular function. Overall estimations of chronic orofacial pain prevalence are 7 to 11% of the general population. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are one of the most prevalent chronic orofacial pain conditions, with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia accounting for 30.1% of TMD patients. Interventional procedures are often used in pain and palliative medicine to achieve reasonable and cost-effective pain relief. The use of intra-articular corticosteroids in relieving arthralgia and improving joint function has been well documented. We present the clinical case of an 84-year-old female patient who presented to the Hospital del Salvador orofacial pain service with preauricular pain, limited range of motion, provoked pain at palpation, and decreased function in the preauricular region. In accordance with the DC/TMD criteria, left TMJ arthralgia and degenerative joint disease was diagnosed and was later corroborated by cone beam computed tomography. An intra-articular injection of 10 mg of methylprednisolone was prescribed, and the patient underwent the procedure in accordance with Hospital del Salvador's intra-articular injection protocol. The patient underwent the intervention without any inconvenience. At the 3-week follow-up visit, the patient presented with a depigmented depression zone adjacent to the site of injection. After echotomography, we concluded that the patient had developed skin depigmentation and subcutaneous lipoatrophy related to the intra-articular injection of methylprednisolone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this complication secondary to an interventional procedure in the TMJ. Clinicians should be aware of, and patients must be advised of, this rare complication before an intra-articular intervention. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by

  5. Temporomandibular joint disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Howard, James A

    2013-01-01

    A child's difficulty in verbalizing the precise location and nature of facial pain and jaw dysfunction often results in a nondefinitive history, increasing the importance of the dentist's awareness of the early signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). A focused examination of the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joints, and associated capsular and ligamentous structures can reveal if a patient's symptoms are TMD in origin. An accurate differential diagnosis enables timely referral to appropriate health care providers and minimizes the use of diagnostic imaging.

  6. Temporomandibular disorders: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Scott S; Greenberg, Martin S; Liu, Frederick; Steinkeler, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Temporomandibular disorders remain a common cause of visits to primary care physicians, internists, pediatricians, and emergency departments. Advances in the clinical diagnosis, radiographic imaging, and classification of these disorders have improved long-term management. There are several types of disorders of the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joint as well as associated structures and each may have a complex cause, clinical course, and response to therapy. Host susceptibility plays a role at several stages of these disorders. Future research offers greater possibility in defining this heterogeneous group of disorders and providing more focused and effective treatment strategies.

  7. Manual reduction of articular disc after traumatic extraction of mandibular third molar: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Rubens; Manzi, Marcello Roberto; de Carvalho, Matheus Furtado; Luz, João Gualberto de Cerqueira; Pimentel, Angélica Castro; Deboni, Maria Cristina Zindel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Disc displacement without reduction with limited opening is an intracapsular biomechanical disorder involving the condyle-disc complex. With the mouth closed, the disc is in an anterior position in relation to the condylar head and does not reduce with mouth opening. This disorder is associated with persistent limited mandibular opening. Case report: The patient presented severe limitation to fully open the mouth, interfering in her ability to eat. Clinical examination also revealed maximum assisted jaw opening (passive stretch) with less than 40 mm of maximum interincisal opening. Magnetic resonance imaging was the method of choice to identify the temporomandibular disorders. Conclusion: By means of reporting this rare case of anterior disc displacement without reduction with limited opening, after traumatic extraction of a mandibular third molar, in which manual reduction of temporomandibular joint articular disc was performed, it was possible to prove that this technique is effective in the prompt restoration of mandibular movements. PMID:26560828

  8. Topical versus systemic diclofenac in the treatment of temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction symptoms.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo Businco, L; Di Rienzo Businco, A; D'Emilia, M; Lauriello, M; Coen Tirelli, G

    2004-10-01

    The most frequent symptom of craniomandibular dysfunction is pain in the preauricular area or in the temporo-mandibular joint, usually localized at the level of the masticatory musculature. Patients sometimes also complain of reflect otalgia, headaches and facial pain. Osteoarthrosis is a frequent degenerative debilitating chronic disorder that can affect the temporomandibular joint. It causes pain and articular rigidity, a reduction in mobility, and radiological alterations are visible in stratigraphy. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a topically applied non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug that has recently become commercially available (diclofenac sodium in a patented carrier containing dimethyl sulfoxide, that favours transcutaneous absorption) which is commonly used to alleviate pain in knee or elbow joints, versus oral diclofenac, in the treatment of symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint was diagnosed in 36 adult patients. The patients were randomized in two age- and gender -matched groups. Group A (18 patients) received oral diclofenac sodium administered after a meal in 50-mg tablets twice a day for 14 days. Group B (18 patients) received 16 mg/ml topical diclofenac (diclofenac topical solution, 10 drops 4 times a day for 14 days). All patients completed a questionnaire at the start and end of therapy. Patients were asked to quantify on a graded visual analogue scale and to reply to questions about the pain and tenderness of the temporomandibular joint and the functional limitation of mouth opening. Patients were also requested to report side-effects of the treatment. All patients showed relief from pain after treatment: the difference between the two groups was not significant (p > 0.05). Post-treatment, 16 patients of group A had epigastralgic symptoms. Three patients treated with topical diclofenac showed a modest irritation of the temporomandibular joint region, and disappeared

  9. Articular manifestations of systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bensen, W G

    1983-11-01

    Many systemic diseases present with articular manifestations. An understanding of the clinical, laboratory and radiological features of these diseases can lead to early diagnosis and appropriate therapy. This article describes the articular presentation and management of four generalized disorders: idiopathic hemachromatosis; sarcoidosis; hepatitis-B virus-induced arthritis, and polymyositis-dermatomyositis induced arthritis.

  10. On the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint and the muscles that act upon it: observations on the gray whale, Eschrichtius robustus.

    PubMed

    El Adli, Joseph J; Deméré, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    The temporomandibular joint and its associated musculature are described in a neonate gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) and serve as the basis for direct anatomical comparisons with the temporomandibular region in other clades of baleen whales (Mysticeti). Members of the right whale/bowhead whale clade (Balaenidae) are known to possess a synovial lower jaw joint, while members of the rorqual clade (Balaenopteridae) have a nonsynovial temporomandibular joint characterized by a highly flexible fibrocartilaginous pad and no joint capsule. In contrast, the gray whale possesses a modified temporomandibular joint (intermediate condition), with a vestigial joint cavity lacking a fibrous capsule, synovial membrane, and articular disk. In addition, the presence of a rudimentary fibrocartilaginous pad appears to be homologous to that seen in balaenopterid mysticetes. The intrinsic temporomandibular musculature in the gray whale was found to include a multibellied superficial masseter and a single-bellied deep masseter. The digastric and internal pterygoid muscles in E. robustus are enlarged relative to the condition documented in species of Balaenoptera. A relatively complex insertion of the temporalis muscle on the dentary is documented in the gray whale and the low, knob-like process on the gray whale dentary is determined to be homologous with the prominent coronoid process of rorquals. Comparison with the anatomy of the temporomandibular musculature in rorquals reveals an increased importance of alpha rotation of the dentary in the gray whale. This difference in muscular morphology and lines of muscle action is interpreted as representing adaptations for suction feeding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Development of Synovial Membrane in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, R.C.; Arraéz-Aybar, L.A.; Klein, O.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities. PMID:26708184

  12. Alterations of the Temporomandibular Joint on Magnetic Resonance Imaging according to Growth and Development in Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tatsurou; Konoo, Tetsuro; Habu, Manabu; Oda, Masafumi; Kito, Shinji; Kodama, Masaaki; Kokuryo, Shinya; Wakasugi-Sato, Nao; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Nishida, Ikuko; Morikawa, Kazumasa; Saeki, Katsura; Maki, Kenshi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Terashita, Masamichi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The paper explains the alterations of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the growth and development of schoolchildren. Appearance and disappearance of a “double contour-like structure” (DCLS) of the mandibular condyle on MRI according to the growth and development of schoolchildren were demonstrated. In addition, possible constituents of DCLS and the significance of detection of DCLS on MRI were also speculated. The relationship between red marrow and yellow marrow in the articular eminence of temporal bone, the disappearance of DCLS, and alterations of the mandibular condyle have been elucidated. PMID:23316233

  13. Primary headaches interfere with the efficacy of temporomandibular disorders management

    PubMed Central

    PORPORATTI, André Luís; COSTA, Yuri Martins; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; BONJARDIM, Leonardo Rigoldi; CALDERON, Patrícia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the influence of Primary Headache (PH) on efficacy of a Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) conservative therapy and its association with the presence of self-reported parafunctional habits. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Sample was composed of 400 medical records, divided into four groups: I) Muscular TMD (n=64); II) Muscular TMD+PH (n=48); III) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD (n=173); IV) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD+PH (n=115). All groups had undergone a TMD therapy for three months with a stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes, with no specific headache management. Current pain intensity and existence or not of self-reported bruxism were assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Chi-Square test followed by Odds were used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: results of this study showed that: (1) A conservative therapy with stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes was effective in the TMD pain relief; (2) Groups with an additional diagnosis of PH had worsened the pain improvement significantly; and (3) no association between the presence of self-reported bruxism and PH was found. CONCLUSIONS: this study could elucidate the important effect that headache may have on the TMD management. PMID:25004051

  14. The stock alloplastic temporomandibular joint implant can influence the behavior of the opposite native joint: A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Ramos, António M; Mesnard, Michel

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of total stock temporomandibular implants on load mechanisms in both condyles in a specific patient. The patient presented with a disc with wear, and the introduction of a total temporomandibular prosthesis was simulated to compare the articular behavior. Based on specific patient computed tomographic images, two finite element models were created: one model with two intact temporomandibular joints (one joint with pathology), and other model with one implanted joint. The simulations considered the five most important muscles acting in the mandible, and it was possible to evaluate the biomechanical changes in the structures (skull, mandible, and articular disc). The results revealed more load transfer in the opposite condyle than in the damaged one; the insertion of a total temporomandibular implant changed the load transfer to the opposite condyle. There was decreased stress in the disc by about 50% and increased strain distribution. In the mandibular condyle with implant, the screw fixation is critical, with minimum strain around -9430 με for first screw position. In the cranium, the implant changed the bone strains with a minimum principal strain observed around -2500 με in six screw positions. This study indicates that replacing the damaged joint by an implant in an ideal position will improve joint position and consequently redistribute the loads. The study findings provide strong evidence that placing an implant on one side of the mandible will affect the load distribution on that structure and particularly on the opposite side. The temporomandibular joint changes condyle movement; with an implanted condyle, the movement is almost blocked. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Estrogen receptors in the temporomandibular joint of the baboon (Papio cynocephalus): an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdemorte, T.B.; Van Sickels, J.E.; Dolwick, M.F.; Sheridan, P.J.; Holt, G.R.; Aragon, S.B.; Gates, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Using an autoradiographic method, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) complex of five aged female baboons was studied for the presence of receptors for estradiol-17 beta. The study was performed in an effort to learn more of the pathophysiology of this joint and in an attempt to provide a scientific basis to explain the reported preponderance of women who seek and undergo treatment for signs and symptoms referable to the TMJ. This experiment revealed that the TMJ complex contains numerous cells with receptors for estrogen, particularly the articular surface of the condyle, articular disk, and capsule. Muscles of mastication contained relatively fewer receptors. As a result, one may postulate a role for the sex steroid hormones in the maintenance, repair, and/or pathogenesis of the TMJ. Additional studies are necessary to fully determine the significance of hormone receptors in this site and any correlation between diseases of the TMJ and the endocrine status of affected patients.

  16. Extra-Articular Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Doral, Mahmut N; Huri, Gazi; Bohacek, Ivan; Turhan, Egemen; Bojanic, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    With the advent of endoscopy in the last 2 decades, a number of procedures, and modifications to them, have been developed and have advanced exponentially. The list of indications was extended over time because of several reasons: better understanding of the pathophysiology, better diagnostics, and advances in endoscopic technology. In this review article, we summarize the most frequently performed extra-articular endoscopic procedures on the extremities. As there are several methods, some have been described briefly, whereas others have been described in greater detail, such as suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome and Achilles tendon disorders, as they present our area of interest and subspecialty domain. Recent advances in the treatment of versatile pathologic entities have been described, together with new methods, which currently lack sufficient clinical data but still represent promising techniques for the future.

  17. Towards Regeneration of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Yoichi; Larmour, Colleen; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage is classified into permanent hyaline cartilage and has significant differences in structure, extracelluar matrix components, gene expression profile, and mechanical property from transient hyaline cartilage found in growth plate. In the process of synovial joint development, articular cartilage is originated from the interzone, developing at the edge of the cartilaginous anlagen, it establishes zonal structure over time and supports smooth movement of the synovial joint through life. The cascade actions of key regulators such as Wnts, GDF5, Erg, and PTHLH coordinate sequential steps of articular cartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes are restrictedly controlled not to differentiate into a hypertrophic stage by autocrine and paracrine factors and extracerllular matrix microenvironment, but retain potential to undergo hypertrophy. The basal calcified zone of articular cartilage is connected with subchondral bone, but not invaded by blood vessels nor replaced by bone, which is highly contrasted with the growth plate. Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capacity, but likely possesses and potentially uses intrinsic stem cell source in the superficial layer, Ranvier’s groove, the intra-articular tissues such as synovium and fat pad, and marrow below the subchondral bone. Considering the biological views on articular cartilage, several important points are raised for regeneration of articular cartilage. We should evaluate the nature of regenerated cartilage as permanent hyaline cartilage and not just hyaline cartilage. We should study how a hypertrophic phenotype of transplanted cells can be lastingly suppressed in regenerating tissue. Further, we should develop the methods and reagents to activate recruitment of intrinsic stem/progenitor cells into the damaged site. PMID:24078496

  18. [Arthrocentesis of the temporomandibular joint. Long-term results].

    PubMed

    Cascone, P; Spallaccia, F; Rivaroli, A

    1998-04-01

    The studies carried out by Nitzan et al. (1991) to the assumption that the simple washing of the upper compartment of the temporo-mandibular joint, without introducing the arthroscope, associated to the application of a bite at night was sufficient to obtain a pain relieving effect and an improvement in the joint functionality in cases of internal derangement of TMJ. The purpose of this work is to assess the long-term results obtained in our department by using only the arthrocentesis without the association of other therapeutic procedures for evaluating the benefit brought by the simple washing of the upper compartment of the joint. A sample of 10 patients subjected to arthrocentesis with an average follow-up of 23.8 months was examined. The evaluation of the patients was based on a clinical analysis and a series of instrumental tests including orthopanoramic X-rays, stratigraphies, RNM in some cases and an electrognatographic test. The parameters taken into consideration were maximum opening, articular noises, local pain in the articular region, the occurrence or not of headache. In our opinion arthrocentesis is a method of simple application, well accepted by patients, leading to a clear improvement of symptoms, as far as pain relieving effect and functionality are concerned, thanks to the possibility to drain by washing the constituents of the inflammation and the mediators of pain; this method may be applied routinely, as therapeutic support, in those patients with clinical histories of condilo-meniscal uncoordination and presenting limitations in the opening of the mouth and articular pains.

  19. Articular manifestations of familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mathon, G; Gagné, C; Brun, D; Lupien, P J; Moorjani, S

    1985-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia is characterised by a decreased removal of low density lipoproteins and premature coronary artery disease. Tendinous xanthomata are a hallmark of the disease. The affected joints may also be the sites of inflammation and pain. Arthropathy has been associated mainly with the homozygous form of familial hypercholesterolaemia, but it is also known to occur in the heterozygous form. We report on the articular manifestations in 73 patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia. About 40% of these patients had at least one episode of articular symptoms. The observed articular manifestations may be classified into four types: Achilles pain (18%), Achilles tendinitis (11%), oligoarticular arthritis (7%), polyarticular or rheumatic fever-like arthritis (4%). It is concluded that in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia articular manifestations are frequent, diverse, and may be the first symptom of this metabolic disorder. Images PMID:4037885

  20. Spontaneously developed osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint in STR/ort mice

    PubMed Central

    KUMAGAI, KENICHI; SUZUKI, SATSUKI; KANRI, YORIAKI; MATSUBARA, RYOTA; FUJII, KEISUKE; WAKE, MASAHIRO; SUZUKI, RYUJI; HAMADA, YOSHIKI

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis is typically a slowly progressive asymmetric disease. Little is known regarding the natural destruction of TMJ articular tissues. The aim of the present study was to investigate morphological changes in the TMJ of STR/ort mice, known to be the model for spontaneous osteoarthritis in the knee joint, and to evaluate STR/ort mice as a suitable animal model for TMJ osteoarthritis. TMJs from 32 STR/ort mice euthanized at 30, 40, 50 or 60 weeks of age, and from 6 CBA mice euthanized at 30, 40 or 60 weeks of age were examined. Toluidine blue and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were used to assess histological changes in the articular cartilage. Morphological changes in the articular cartilage of the TMJ were evaluated using microcomputed tomography. At the age of 40–50 weeks, 17 (68%) of the 25 STR/ort mice had loss of articular cartilage on histology, with cavitation and erosion of the exposed bone and gradual changes in condylar shape. Furthermore, osteoarthritic morphological changes, and structural alterations were observed by microcomputed tomography. The STR/ort mouse strain appears to develop spontaneous osteoarthritis-like lesions in the TMJ with age, and would be a useful model to study the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:26171147

  1. Spontaneously developed osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint in STR/ort mice.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Suzuki, Satsuki; Kanri, Yoriaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Fujii, Keisuke; Wake, Masahiro; Suzuki, Ryuji; Hamada, Yoshiki

    2015-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis is typically a slowly progressive asymmetric disease. Little is known regarding the natural destruction of TMJ articular tissues. The aim of the present study was to investigate morphological changes in the TMJ of STR/ort mice, known to be the model for spontaneous osteoarthritis in the knee joint, and to evaluate STR/ort mice as a suitable animal model for TMJ osteoarthritis. TMJs from 32 STR/ort mice euthanized at 30, 40, 50 or 60 weeks of age, and from 6 CBA mice euthanized at 30, 40 or 60 weeks of age were examined. Toluidine blue and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were used to assess histological changes in the articular cartilage. Morphological changes in the articular cartilage of the TMJ were evaluated using microcomputed tomography. At the age of 40-50 weeks, 17 (68%) of the 25 STR/ort mice had loss of articular cartilage on histology, with cavitation and erosion of the exposed bone and gradual changes in condylar shape. Furthermore, osteoarthritic morphological changes, and structural alterations were observed by microcomputed tomography. The STR/ort mouse strain appears to develop spontaneous osteoarthritis-like lesions in the TMJ with age, and would be a useful model to study the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis.

  2. Extra-articular hip endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Verhelst, L.; Guevara, V.; De Schepper, J.; Van Melkebeek, J.; Pattyn, C.; Audenaert, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the current available literature evidencing on peri-articular hip endoscopy (the third compartment). A comprehensive approach has been set on reports dealing with endoscopic surgery for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis, snapping hip (or coxa-saltans; external and internal), gluteus medius and minimus tears and endoscopy (or arthroscopy) after total hip arthroplasty. This information can be used to trigger further research, innovation and education in extra-articular hip endoscopy. PMID:23610664

  3. Articular Manifestations of Systemic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bensen, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    Many systemic diseases present with articular manifestations. An understanding of the clinical, laboratory and radiological features of these diseases can lead to early diagnosis and appropriate therapy. This article describes the articular presentation and management of four generalized disorders: idiopathic hemachromatosis; sarcoidosis; hepatitis-B virus-induced arthritis, and polymyositis-dermatomyositis induced arthritis. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:21283470

  4. [Kinesiotherapy and temporomandibular joint disorders].

    PubMed

    Bialas, C

    1997-01-01

    Physical therapy management is a part of the therapeutic treatment established in close relationship with the dentist or the maxillofacial surgery. The role of pain has always been an important evil, the psychological background has also to be taken into consideration. The sedative and calming role played by massage and relaxation can not occult the longterm improvement of functional rehabilitation. The aspect of physical therapy in relation to temporomandibular disorders is disregarded by the aspects because of its important role in functional treatment.

  5. Morphologic and Morphometric Description of the Temporomandibular Joint in the Domestic Dog Using Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Villamizar-Martinez, Lenin A; Villegas, Cristian M; Gioso, Marco A; Reiter, Alexander M; Patricio, Geni C; Pinto, Ana C

    2016-06-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the domestic dog is a synovial joint with 2 articular surfaces, the mandibular fossa of the squamous portion of the temporal bone and the articular head of the condylar process of the mandible. Although different diagnostic imaging techniques have been used to study the TMJ in dogs, morphologic and morphometric studies based on computed tomography (CT) are scarce. The purpose of the present study was to describe the morphologic and morphometric features of the TMJ in domestic dogs using CT. Width and depth of the mandibular fossa and 2 different angles between the mandibular fossa and the condylar process were measured in 96 TMJs of 48 dogs of different breeds (Labrador retriever, German shepherd, cocker spaniel, boxer, English bulldog, pug, shih tzu, and Cavalier King Charles spaniel). Temporomandibular joint conformation differed between breeds. Mid- and small-sized dogs had mandibular fossae that were more shallow, less developed retroarticular processes, and irregularly shaped condylar processes. The TMJs were more congruent in large dogs, presenting with deeper mandibular fossae, prominent retroarticular processes, and more uniform condylar processes. The measurements proposed in this study demonstrated 3 different morphologic conformations for the TMJ in the dogs of this study.

  6. Evaluation of Sports-Related Temporomandibular Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Sailors, Matthew E.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the steps used in evaluation of sports- related temporomandibular dysfunctions and make recommendation for treatment and referral based upon the evaluation findings. Data Sources: This review searched Cinahl (1982 to 1995) and Medline (1986 to 1995). Key words searched included “sports related temporomandibular dysfunction,” “temporomandibular dysfunction,” and “temporomandibular joint.” Data Synthesis: This paper provides an introduction to the anatomy and biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) as well as causes of temporomandibular disorders in athletes. An analysis of the evaluative steps used for the temporomandibular joint is also given. Findings that suggest specific temporomandibular dysfunctions are discussed. Conclusions/Recommendations: Recommendations about when dental consultation is most appropriate or if conservative treatment is indicated are included. Hopefully, this will provide the sports medicine practitioner with a better understanding of the joint and its dysfunctions, as well as eliminate some unnecessary and costly dental referrals for our athletes. ImagesFig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4. PMID:16558422

  7. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Orofacial Pain.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mansur; Schiffman, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) affect 5% to 12% of the United States population. This article discusses common conditions related to temporomandibular joints, including disc displacements, inflammatory disturbances, loose joint bodies, traumatic disturbances, and developmental conditions. Also addressed are the appropriate imaging modalities and diagnostic criteria for TMD.

  8. Internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint: morphologic description with correlation to joint function.

    PubMed

    Westesson, P L; Bronstein, S L; Liedberg, J

    1985-04-01

    Internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint has mainly been studied arthrographically from the standpoint of anterior disk displacement with or without reduction. Frequent clinical observations of disk deformation in joints with internal derangement implied the need for a systematic study of morphologic alterations associated with internal derangement. Therefore, morphology, internal derangement, and joint function were studied in 58 randomly selected autopsy specimens of the temporomandibular joint. The results showed that joints with superior disk position rarely demonstrated morphologic alterations. In joints with partially anterior disk position, disk deformation occurred somewhat more frequently (31%) and was consistently located in the part of the disk that was positioned anteriorly. Joints with completely anteriorly positioned disks showed disk deformation in 77% and irregularities of the articular surfaces in 65%. It appears that anterior disk position precedes disk deformation. Therefore, early causal treatment to correct symptomatic internal derangement appears indicated to decrease the possibility of development of disk deformation. Disk deformation was also closely associated with disturbed joint function and should therefore be an important consideration when one is planning treatment of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint.

  9. Clinical-surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder in a psoriatic arthritis patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Condylotomy is a surgical procedure that has been used as an option to treat temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. This technique has the advantage of avoiding intra-capsular alterations that might be found involving other surgical procedures. Its use, even when unilateral, has positive effect on treatment of both joints. Methods In order to better evaluate the benefits of a clinical-surgical treatment for TMD, the present report describes the case of a psoriatic arthritis patient. The case was clinically characterized by dental malloclusion, and imaging exams showed joint degeneration of the right mandibular condyle. The patient was treated by condylotomy technique after a prosthetic oral rehabilitation. Results No clinical-radiological signs or symptoms of progression of articular disease were observed within a period of 16 months after surgery. Furthermore, there was functional stability of the temporomandibular joint, total absence of local pain and improvement of mouth opening. Conclusion The present study suggests that condylotomy can be considered as a valid option for the management of TMD, since it has low surgical morbidity and favorable clinical outcomes. In this case, the patient had a medical diagnosis of systemic disease presenting general pain and pain at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in addition of causal agent of TMD (dental malloclusion). The difficulty of finding a single etiology (malocclusion vs. systemic disease) did not exclude the indication of a clinical-surgical treatment to re-establish the balance of TMJ. PMID:23556553

  10. Biglycan and Fibromodulin Have Essential Roles in Regulating Chondrogenesis and Extracellular Matrix Turnover in Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Mildred C.; Kilts, Tina M.; Ono, Mitsuaki; Inkson, Colette A.; Syed-Picard, Fatima; Karsdal, Morten A.; Oldberg, Åke; Bi, Yanming; Young, Marian F.

    2010-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint is critical for jaw movements and allows for mastication, digestion of food, and speech. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease that is marked by permanent cartilage destruction and loss of extracellular matrix (ECM). To understand how the ECM regulates mandibular condylar chondrocyte (MCC) differentiation and function, we used a genetic mouse model of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis that is deficient in two ECM proteins, biglycan and fibromodulin (Bgn−/0Fmod−/−). Given the unavailability of cell lines, we first isolated primary MCCs and found that they were phenotypically unique from hyaline articular chondrocytes isolated from the knee joint. Using Bgn−/0 Fmod−/− MCCs, we discovered the early basis for temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis arises from abnormal and accelerated chondrogenesis. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 is a growth factor that is critical for chondrogenesis and binds to both biglycan and fibromodulin. Our studies revealed the sequestration of TGF-β1 was decreased within the ECM of Bgn−/0 Fmod−/− MCCs, leading to overactive TGF-β1 signal transduction. Using an explant culture system, we found that overactive TGF-β1 signals induced chondrogenesis and ECM turnover in this model. We demonstrated for the first time a comprehensive study revealing the importance of the ECM in maintaining the mandibular condylar cartilage integrity and identified biglycan and fibromodulin as novel key players in regulating chondrogenesis and ECM turnover during temoporomandibular joint osteoarthritis pathology. PMID:20035055

  11. Evaluation of condylar positions in patients with temporomandibular disorders: A cone-beam computed tomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Imanimoghaddam, Mahrokh; Madani, Azam Sadat; Mahdavi, Pirooze; Bagherpour, Ali; Darijani, Mansoreh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the condylar position in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) and a normal group by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods In the TMD group, 25 patients (5 men and 20 women) were randomly selected among the ones suffering from TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). The control group consisted of 25 patients (8 men and 17 women) with normal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) who were referred to the radiology department in order to undergo CBCT scanning for implant treatment in the posterior maxilla. Linear measurements from the superior, anterior, and posterior joint spaces between the condyle and glenoid fossa were made through defined landmarks in the sagittal view. The inclination of articular eminence was also determined. Results The mean anterior joint space was 2.3 mm in the normal group and 2.8 mm in the TMD group, respectively. The results showed that there was a significant correlation between the superior and posterior joint spaces in both the normal and TMD groups, but it was only in the TMD group that the correlation coefficient among the dimensions of anterior and superior spaces was significant. There was a significant correlation between the inclination of articular eminence and the size of the superior and posterior spaces in the normal group. Conclusion The average dimension of the anterior joint space was different between the two groups. CBCT could be considered a useful diagnostic imaging modality for TMD patients. PMID:27358820

  12. Haplotypes of the RANK and OPG genes are associated with chronic arthralgia in individuals with and without temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Bonato, L L; Quinelato, V; Borojevic, R; Vieira, A R; Modesto, A; Granjeiro, J M; Tesch, R; Casado, P L

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between genetic polymorphisms and the comorbid presence of chronic systemic arthralgia in patients with articular temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Subjects were evaluated for the presence of TMD and asked about the presence of chronic joint pain. Four groups were included in the study: articular TMD and systemic arthralgia (n=85), no articular TMD and systemic arthralgia (n=82), articular TMD and no systemic arthralgia (n=21), no articular TMD and no systemic arthralgia (control, n=72). A total of 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the OPG, RANK, and RANKL genes were investigated. In the statistical analysis, a P-value of <0.05 was considered significant. For the OPG gene, an association was observed between the group with chronic arthralgia and joint TMD and the control group (P=0.04). There was also a tendency towards an association of the haplotype CGCCAA with an increased risk of developing chronic joint pain, even in the absence of TMD (P=0.06). For the RANK gene, the AGTGC haplotype was associated with the lowest risk of presenting chronic joint pain in individuals without TMD (P=0.03). This study supports the hypothesis that changes in the OPG and RANK genes influence the presence of chronic joint pain in individuals with and without TMD. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Biomechanical Effect of Different Denture Base Materials on the Articular Disc in Complete Denture Wearers: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    El-Zawahry, Mohamed M.; El-Ragi, Ahmed A.; El-Anwar, Mohamed I.; Ibraheem, Eman M.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different denture base materials on the stress distribution in TMJ articular disc (AD) in complete denture wearers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A three dimensional Finite Element (FEA) models of an individual temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was built on the basis CT scan. The FEA model consisted of four parts: the condyle, the articular disc, the denture base, and the articular eminence skull. Acrylic resin and chrome-cobalt denture base materials were studied. Static loading of 300N was vertically applied to the central fossa of the mandibular second premolar. Stress and strain were calculated to characterize the stress/strain patterns in the disc. RESULTS: The maximum tensile stresses were observed in the anterior and posterior bands of (AD) on load application with the two denture base materials. The superior boundaries of the glenoid fossa showed lower stress than those on the inferior boundaries facing the condyle. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of the present study it may be concluded that: The denture base material may have an effect in stress-strain pattern in TMJ articular disc. The stiffer denture base material, the better the distribution of the load to the underling mandibular supporting structures & reducing stresses induced in the articular disc. PMID:27275270

  14. Articular Cartilage Injury in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Timothy R.; Mithoefer, Kai; Scopp, Jason M.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the athletic population are observed with increasing frequency and, due to limited intrinsic healing capacity, can lead to progressive pain and functional limitation over time. If left untreated, isolated cartilage lesions can lead to progressive chondropenia or global cartilage loss over time. A chondropenia curve is described to help predict the outcome of cartilage injury based on different lesion and patient characteristics. Nutriceuticals and chondroprotective agents are being investigated as tools to slow the development of chondropenia. Several operative techniques have been described for articular cartilage repair or replacement and, more recently, cartilage regeneration. Rehabilitation guidelines are being developed to meet the needs of these new techniques. Next-generation techniques are currently evaluated to optimize articular cartilage repair biology and to provide a repair cartilage tissue that can withstand the high mechanical loads experienced by the athlete with consistent long-term durability. PMID:26069548

  15. [The pathology of temporomandibular joint luxations--anatomical studies on temporomandibular joint preparations].

    PubMed

    Pinkert, R

    1976-01-01

    After a description of the published hypothesis of luxation and subluxation in the temporomandibular joint the preparations of five temporomandibular joints is described. The results refer to the movement of the discus and the capitulum mandibulae and to the effects of the musculus temporalis and of the facies articularis ossis temporalis. In addition a hypothesis is established according to which the temporomandibular-joint-luxation may be considered to occur in the menisco-condylar part of the joint.

  16. Pathoanatomical characteristics of temporomandibular dysfunction: Where do we stand? (Narrative review part 1).

    PubMed

    Butts, Raymond; Dunning, James; Perreault, Thomas; Mettille, Jersey; Escaloni, James

    2017-07-01

    Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is a complicated and multifactorial condition that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and muscles of mastication, resulting in pain and disability in 5-12% of the population. The condition involves genetic, anatomic and hormonal factors and is propagated, in part, by trauma, habitual activity, psychosocial components and occlusal variation. Yet, the exact etiology of TMD is still unknown and the most strategic conservative management of the condition is still a topic of debate. The purpose of this paper, the first of a two part series, is to provide greater insight into the pathoanatomical factors associated with TMD. Consistent with Scully (2008, 2013), degenerative changes seem to disrupt the relationship between the TMJ capsule, articular disc and muscles of mastication. The resulting position of the articular disc coincides with three primary classifications of TMD: Type 1 (muscle disorders), Type 2a/b (disc displacement with and without reduction), and Type 3 (any joint pain). Given the association of the lateral pterygoid with both the joint capsule and articular disc, the superior and inferior head seem to play a key role in TMD. Both heads undergo biological changes associated with the vicious cycle, pain adaptation and integrated pain adaptation, making the muscle a key pain generator associated with TMD. Clinicians must understand the pathoanatomic features associated with TMD so as to choose appropriate treatment strategies, leading to optimal short and long-term outcomes. While the former is discussed in part 1 of this narrative review, the latter will be considered in part 2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of minimum interdental threshold ability in dentate female temporomandibular disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, E M; Calderon, P D S; Lauris, J R P; Pegoraro, L F; Conti, P C R

    2010-05-01

    Minimum interdental threshold is the smallest thickness that can be detected between teeth during an occlusion and has an influence on the occlusal force and on the control of mandibular movements. The aim of this study was to assess the possible association of the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) with the ability to detect a minimum interdental threshold. Two hundred women were equally divided into four groups: asymptomatic (control), subjects with masticatory muscle pain, with articular [temporomandibular joint (TMJ)] pain and mixed (muscular and articular pain). Evaluation of the ability to detect a minimum interdental threshold was performed using aluminium foils with 0.010, 0.024, 0.030, 0.050, 0.080 and 0.094 mm of thickness in the premolar region. A total of 20 tests with each thickness for each patient were performed, starting with the thickest foil (0.094 mm) and ending with the thinnest one. The myogenic pain and articular groups presented significantly higher threshold values (0.020 and 0.022 mm, respectively), when compared to the control. Both groups reached the level of certain perceptiveness only at 0.030 mm. No significant correlation was found between minimum interdental threshold and age. These results suggest that discrimination of thicknesses can be disturbed as a consequence of TMD manifestations and not the cause of it. Clinicians should, therefore, be aware that changes on muscles and TMJ can secondarily lead to occlusion changes. The mechanisms involved in this process, however, are not well understood and warrant further investigation.

  18. Development of artificial articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Oka, M; Ushio, K; Kumar, P; Ikeuchi, K; Hyon, S H; Nakamura, T; Fujita, H

    2000-01-01

    Attempts have been made to develop an artificial articular cartilage on the basis of a new viewpoint of joint biomechanics in which the lubrication and load-bearing mechanisms of natural and artificial joints are compared. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H), 'a rubber-like gel', was investigated as an artificial articular cartilage and the mechanical properties of this gel were improved through a new synthetic process. In this article the biocompatibility and various mechanical properties of the new improved PVA-H is reported from the perspective of its usefulness as an artificial articular cartilage. As regards lubrication, the changes in thickness and fluid pressure of the gap formed between a glass plate and the specimen under loading were measured and it was found that PVA-H had a thicker fluid film under higher pressures than polyethylene (PE) did. The momentary stress transmitted through the specimen revealed that PVA-H had a lower peak stress and a longer duration of sustained stress than PE, suggesting a better damping effect. The wear factor of PVA-H was approximately five times that of PE. Histological studies of the articular cartilage and synovial membranes around PVA-H implanted for 8-52 weeks showed neither inflammation nor degenerative changes. The artificial articular cartilage made from PVA-H could be attached to the underlying bone using a composite osteochondral device made from titanium fibre mesh. In the second phase of this work, the damage to the tibial articular surface after replacement of the femoral surface in dogs was studied. Pairs of implants made of alumina, titanium or PVA-H on titanium fibre mesh were inserted into the femoral condyles. The two hard materials caused marked pathological changes in the articular cartilage and menisci, but the hydrogel composite replacement caused minimal damage. The composite osteochondral device became rapidly attached to host bone by ingrowth into the supporting mesh. The clinical implications of

  19. Minimally invasive osteosynthesis technique for articular fractures.

    PubMed

    Beale, Brian S; Cole, Grayson

    2012-09-01

    Articular fractures require accurate reduction and rigid stabilization to decrease the chance of osteoarthritis and joint dysfunction. Articular fractures have been traditionally repaired by arthrotomy and internal fixation. Recently, minimally invasive techniques have been introduced to treat articular fractures, reducing patient morbidity and improving the accuracy of reduction. A variety of techniques, including distraction, radiographic imaging, and arthroscopy, are used with the minimally invasive osteosynthesis technique of articular fractures to achieve a successful repair and outcome.

  20. Strapping for temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Babu, Abraham Samuel; John, Sandhya Mary; Unni, Amith

    2008-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) is a common problem seen in many of the dental clinics. Management of this depends on an accurate diagnosis of the cause for the TMJD. Physical therapy and rehabilitation play a vital role in the management of these dysfunctions. Physical therapy is useful in treating post-traumatic stiffness of the TMJ while strapping of the TMJ for a dysfunction along with conventional physical therapy is of benefit in terms of reduction in click, decrease in pain, and an improvement in function.

  1. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction: A Dental Overview

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, Clyde D.

    1985-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is common and often acutely painful. Because of the large and diverse symptom complex created by this disorder, patients frequently first seek relief from their physician rather than their dentist. In this article temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is defined and the presenting signs and symptoms are discussed. Their etiology is described in relation to the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint. Examination techniques can help in the differential diagnosis. Current treatment ranges from heat, local anesthesia and ultrasound to anxiolytics, transcutaneous nerve stimulation and nutritional supplementation. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:21274225

  2. Differences in articular-eminence inclination between medieval and contemporary human populations.

    PubMed

    Kranjčić, Josip; Vojvodić, Denis; Žabarović, Domagoj; Vodanović, Marin; Komar, Daniel; Mehulić, Ketij

    2012-08-01

    The articular-eminence inclination is an important element in the biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint and the entire masticatory system; however, very little is known about this inclination in archaeological human populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the values of, in addition to the differences between, the articular-eminence inclination in medieval and contemporary human populations. The study was carried out on two dry skull groups. The first group consisted of 14 dry skulls from the medieval culture group Bijelo Brdo (BB) of East Croatia, and the other consisted of 137 recent dry skulls from the osteologic collection of the Institute of Anatomy (IA) in Zagreb. All BB skulls were dentulous, whereas the IA skulls were divided into dentulous and edentulous groups. The articular-eminence inclination was measured in relation to the Frankfurt horizontal plane on digital images of the skull's two lateral views using AutoCAD computer software. The mean value of the articular-eminence inclination in the BB sample group (49.57°) was lower, with a statistical significance (p<0.01), than those of the IA dentulous (61.56°), the IA edentulous (62.54°), and all the combined IA (61.99°) specimens. Because the values of the articular-eminence inclination can vary a lot with reference to the number of specimens and the different methods used for measuring, the obtained values yield only orientational information. Further investigations including a larger number of medieval specimens are needed to confirm the results obtained from this study.

  3. TNF Accelerates Death of Mandibular Condyle Chondrocytes in Rats with Biomechanical Stimulation-Induced Temporomandibular Joint Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Lei; Liao, Lifan; Wang, Meiqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if temporomandibular joint chondrocyte apoptosis is induced in rats with dental biomechanical stimulation and what a role TNF takes. Methods Thirty-two rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 8/group) and exposed to incisor mal-occlusion induced by unilateral anterior crossbite biomechanical stimulation. Two groups were sampled at 2 or 4 weeks. The other two groups were treated with local injections of a TNF inhibitor or PBS into the temporomandibular joints area at 2 weeks and then sampled at 4 weeks. Twenty-four rats either served as unilateral anterior crossbite mock operation controls (n = 8/group) with sampling at 2 or 4 weeks or received a local injection of the TNF inhibitor at 2 weeks with sampling at 4 weeks. Chondrocytes were isolated from the temporomandibular joints of 6 additional rats and treated with TNF in vitro. Joint samples were assessed using Hematoxylin&eosin, Safranin O, TUNEL and immunohistochemistry staining, real-time PCR, fluorogenic activity assays and Western blot analyses. The isolated chondrocytes were also analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation led to temporomandibular joint cartilage degradation, associated with an increase in TUNEL-positive chondrocytes number, caspase-9 expression levels, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria at 2 weeks without changes in TNF and caspase-8 levels until after 4 weeks. TNF stimulated apoptosis of the isolated chondrocytes and up-regulated caspase-8 expression, but did not change caspase-9 expression levels. Local injection of TNF inhibitor down-regulated caspase-8 expression and reduced TUNEL-positive cell number, but did not reverse cartilage thickness reduction, caspase-9 up-regulation or cytochrome c release. Conclusions Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation induces mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis of articular chondrocytes. TNF accelerated the unilateral anterior crossbite induced chondrocytes apoptosis via death

  4. TNF Accelerates Death of Mandibular Condyle Chondrocytes in Rats with Biomechanical Stimulation-Induced Temporomandibular Joint Disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongxu; Zhang, Mian; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Lei; Liao, Lifan; Wang, Meiqing

    2015-01-01

    To determine if temporomandibular joint chondrocyte apoptosis is induced in rats with dental biomechanical stimulation and what a role TNF takes. Thirty-two rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 8/group) and exposed to incisor mal-occlusion induced by unilateral anterior crossbite biomechanical stimulation. Two groups were sampled at 2 or 4 weeks. The other two groups were treated with local injections of a TNF inhibitor or PBS into the temporomandibular joints area at 2 weeks and then sampled at 4 weeks. Twenty-four rats either served as unilateral anterior crossbite mock operation controls (n = 8/group) with sampling at 2 or 4 weeks or received a local injection of the TNF inhibitor at 2 weeks with sampling at 4 weeks. Chondrocytes were isolated from the temporomandibular joints of 6 additional rats and treated with TNF in vitro. Joint samples were assessed using Hematoxylin&eosin, Safranin O, TUNEL and immunohistochemistry staining, real-time PCR, fluorogenic activity assays and Western blot analyses. The isolated chondrocytes were also analyzed by flow cytometry. Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation led to temporomandibular joint cartilage degradation, associated with an increase in TUNEL-positive chondrocytes number, caspase-9 expression levels, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria at 2 weeks without changes in TNF and caspase-8 levels until after 4 weeks. TNF stimulated apoptosis of the isolated chondrocytes and up-regulated caspase-8 expression, but did not change caspase-9 expression levels. Local injection of TNF inhibitor down-regulated caspase-8 expression and reduced TUNEL-positive cell number, but did not reverse cartilage thickness reduction, caspase-9 up-regulation or cytochrome c release. Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation induces mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis of articular chondrocytes. TNF accelerated the unilateral anterior crossbite induced chondrocytes apoptosis via death-receptor pathway. However, anti-TNF therapy

  5. Temporomandibular juxtaarticular chondroma: case report.

    PubMed

    Vázquez Mahía, Inés; López-Cedrún Cembranos, José Luis; Ferreras Granado, José; Lorenzo Franco, Fernanda

    2007-03-01

    Chondromas are benign tumours composed of mature hyaline cartilage. We present here the first case in the English language medical literature of juxtaarticular chondroma of the temporomandibular joint in the parotid region. Within the rarity of cartilage disorders of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ), this particular condition is a diagnostic curiosity. The patient, a 54 year old woman, presented a right preauricular tumour of 3.5 cm. which had been developing for 4 years. It was not painful but there was a recent symptomology of TMJ dysfunction, with pain and clicks. The diagnostic possibilities of a parotid pleomorphic adenoma and of a cartilage tumour of the TMJ suggested a difficult preoperative differential diagnosis, which influenced our approach regarding therapy. The tumour was excised, preserving the parotid gland. This enabled us to confirm the histological diagnosis of chondroma, composed solely of chondroide tissue. We have described the clinical characteristics of our case, and carried out a review of the relevant literature, emphasising the differential diagnoses.

  6. Engineering Alloplastic Temporomandibular Joint Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Sinno, Hani; Tahiri, Youssef; Gilardino, Mirko; Bobyn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are part of a heterogeneous group of pathologies that manifest with a constellation of signs and symptoms. They are the most frequent cause of chronic orofacial pain and are prevalent in 12% of the general population. Despite the debilitating nature of these disorders, there is no standardization for treatment of the diseased temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this review, we present an overview of the functional anatomy of the TMJ and the engineering concepts that must be understood to better understand the indications for surgical management, the types of available treatments and the requirements for reconstruction. A comparison is made of the clinical outcomes with autogenous versus alloplastic reconstruction, including a history of alloplastic materials and the design features of currently available implants. Emphasis is made on material selection, modulus, stiffness, notch sensitivity and modularity. For the treatment of TMD, engineered TMJ alloplastic replacements have had considerable promise with additional room for improvement using new materials and recent design concepts. PMID:22363183

  7. The frictional coefficient of the temporomandibular joint and its dependency on the magnitude and duration of joint loading.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Kawai, N; Tanaka, M; Todoh, M; van Eijden, T; Hanaoka, K; Dalla-Bona, D A; Takata, T; Tanne, K

    2004-05-01

    In synovial joints, friction between articular surfaces leads to shear stress within the cartilaginous tissue, which might result in tissue rupture and failure. Joint friction depends on synovial lubrication of the articular surfaces, which can be altered due to compressive loading. Therefore, we hypothesized that the frictional coefficient of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is affected by the magnitude and duration of loading. We tested this by measuring the frictional coefficient in 20 intact porcine TMJs using a pendulum-type friction tester. The mean frictional coefficient was 0.0145 (SD 0.0027) after a constant loading of 50 N during 5 sec. The frictional coefficient increased with the length of the preceding loading duration and exceeded 0.0220 (SD 0.0014) after 1 hr. Application of larger loading (80 N) resulted in significantly larger frictional coefficients. In conclusion, the frictional coefficient in the TMJ was proportional to the magnitude and duration of joint loading.

  8. Unilateral bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint in a case of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    de Andrade Freitas Oliveira, Luciana Soares; de Oliveira-Santos, Christiano; de Melo, Daniela Pita; Gomes Torres, Marianna Guanaes; Flores Campos, Paulo Sérgio

    2013-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease with multiple articular and para-articular involvement that has a predilection for the axial skeleton. In spite of its high prevalence, ankylosis secondary to AS is a rare condition. A 31-year-old male diagnosed with AS was referred for computed tomography (CT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) due to severe mouth opening limitation. The patient had a 16-year medical history of AS and sought assistance due to TMJ pain and incapacity to open his mouth. Previous bony scintigraphy revealed involvement of the spine, sacroiliac joints, right knee, and left TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed erosion of the left condyle and posterior slope of the articular eminence, and a mass of heterogeneous signal intensity between these structures. The left condyle also presented sclerosis/edema of the bone marrow and the disk could not be identified. Sagittal and coronal CT images showed moderate alterations of the TMJ on the right side. On the left side, the images displayed markedly eroded condyle and mandibular fossa, and a bony mass resulting in ankylosis of the osseous components of the joint. TMJ ankylosis in AS patients is rare and very few reports have presented imaging features of the condition through advanced diagnostic techniques.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase and its inhibitor in temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis after indirect trauma in young goats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Liang; Li, Xin-Jun; Qin, Rui-Feng; Lei, De-Lin; Liu, Yan-Pu; Wu, Gao-Yi; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Yan-Jin; Wang, Da-Zhang; Hu, Kai-Jin

    2008-04-01

    Our aim was to examine the change in expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-13), matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3), and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in the articular cartilage of goats with experimentally-induced osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) at various times. Osteoarthrosis was induced in 20 goats in the bilateral TMJ and 5 goats acted as controls. There were 5 goats in each group, and a group was killed at 7 days, and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. The samples were collected, and the joints evaluated histologically. Immunofluorescence was used to detect the presence of MMPs and TIMP-1 in the articular disc and condylar cartilage. The ultrastructure of the articular disc and condylar surface at 1 month was examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Osteoarthrosis of the TMJ progressed gradually over time. MMP-13, MMP-3, and TIMP-1 were expressed strongly in the TMJ soon after injury; MMP-13 became gradually weakened, and MMP-3 strengthened later. None of these were expressed in the normal condyle. After a month the surface of the arthrotic condyle was uneven, and the underlying collagen fibrils were exposed in irregular fissures on the surface. The secretion of TIMP-1 was related closely to the changes of MMPs during osteoarthrosis of the TMJ. The unbalanced ratio between them caused degradation of the matrix of the cartilage and might be the cause of osteoarthrosis of the TMJ.

  10. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  11. Engineering lubrication in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    McNary, Sean M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-04-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  12. Clinical view of the temporomandibular joint disorder.

    PubMed

    Badel, Tomislav; Ćimić, Samir; Munitić, Mirna; Zadravec, Dijana; Kes, Vanja Bašić; Šimunković, Sonja Kraljević

    2014-12-01

    Temporomandibular pain has a musculoskeletal origin because it occurs as a consequence of masticatory muscle function disorder and temporomandibular joint disorder. Most common diagnoses of disorders are disc displacement and osteoarthritis, but their comorbidity can also occur. Pain is the most common symptom, where chronic temporomandibular pain may con- tribute to the occurrence of psychological disorders in the patient population. Splint is the most widespread dental method of treatment but other, noninvasive methods of musculoskeletal pain treatment are also recommended. Electronic axiography is used for visualization of mandibular movements, in particular pathologic sounds in the joints. Mental health, although not so obvious in dental practice, can influence the need of a multidisciplinary approach to the patient with disorder of the temporomandibular joint.

  13. Temporomandibular disorders, facial pain, and headaches.

    PubMed

    Bender, Steven D

    2012-05-01

    Headaches and facial pain are common in the general population. In many cases, facial pain can be resultant from temporomandibular joint disorders. Studies have identified an association between headaches and temporomandibular joint disorders suggesting the possibility of shared pathophysiologic mechanisms of these 2 maladies. The aim of this paper is to elucidate potential commonalities of these disorders and to provide a brief overview of an examination protocol that may benefit the headache clinician in daily practice.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Dym, Harry; Israel, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Current concepts and recommended treatment for temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction have evolved over time. This article attempts to distill the current information for this often confusing topic into relevant clinical issues that will allow the general dental practitioner to be better able to diagnose and interpret clinical findings, and institute a therapeutic regimen that will provide needed relief to patients suffering from TMD dysfunction. Current management methods, both surgical and nonsurgical, are reviewed and discussed.

  15. [Does dental class II division 2 predispose to temporomandibular disorders?].

    PubMed

    Zuaiter, Shireen; Robin, Olivier; Gebeile-Chauty, Sarah; Raberin, Monique

    2013-09-01

    Because of its anatomical/physiological characteristics, the Class II division 2 (class II, div. 2) is one of the malocclusions considered as a possible risk factor for Temporomandibular disorders (TMD). A literature review was conducted from the electronic databases of Medline and Elsevier Masson, through the year 2010, in order to clarify the relationships that may exist between Class II division 2 and TMD. This research helped identify 50 articles: 7 articles specifically concerned the Class II div. 2, 37 articles concerned some of the characteristics of the Class II div. 2, considered individually (Class II, deep bite, retroclined maxillary incisors, mandibular retrognathism) and 6 articles orthodontic treatment. From the conclusions of these studies, the Class II, div. 2 does not appear to represent a significant risk factor for TMD. The clearest association would involve mandibular retrognathism and the risk of articular disk displacement. However, given the low number of articles published on this topic, the methodological variability and the contradictory results, it is difficult to identify reliable conclusions and, consequently, the therapeutic indications for the treatment of Class II div. 2 patients with TMD.

  16. Temporomandibular joint sounds and disc dislocations incidence after orotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Estela T; Suazo, Iván C; Guimarães, Antonio S

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement and articular sounds incidence after orotracheal intubation. A prospective cohort study was conducted in the Hospital Universitário do Oeste do Paraná (HUOP), in Cascavel, Brazil. 100 patients (aged 14-74 years, mean 44 years), 34 male and 66 female, in need of surgical procedure with orotracheal intubation were evaluated. The anterior disc displacement with reduction incidence and the nonclassifiable sounds incidence by the Research Diagnostic Criteria Axis I was evaluated in all patients after orotracheal intubation. The patients was evaluated one day before and until two days after the procedure. Eight percent present with anterior disc displacement with reduction and 10% presented nonclassifiable sounds after the orotracheal intubation. There was no correlation of any kind regarding gender related influence in the incidence of disc dislocations (P = 0.2591) and TMJ sounds (P = 0.487). Although anterior disc dislocations and TMJ sounds after anesthetic with orotracheal intubation presented a low incidence (8%-10%), it is recommended that the evaluation of TMJ signs and symptoms be done before the anesthetic procedure to take care with susceptible patients manipulation.

  17. Clinical evaluation of patients with temporomandibular joint implants.

    PubMed

    Ta, Lauren E; Phero, James C; Pillemer, Stanley R; Hale-Donze, Hollie; McCartney-Francis, Nancy; Kingman, Albert; Max, Mitchell B; Gordon, Sharon M; Wahl, Sharon M; Dionne, Raymond A

    2002-12-01

    An undetermined number of patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) symptoms have been treated with intra-articular disc implants composed of Teflon ethylene/propylene or Teflon polytetrafluoroethylene and aluminum oxide (Proplast-Teflon; Vitek, Houston, TX). These implants have shown the potential to fragment in situ resulting in nonbiodegradable particles that stimulate a giant cell reaction and lead to degeneration of local structures, pain, and limitation of mandibular opening. We examined the possible relationship between TMJ implants and persistent pain, responses to sensory stimuli, quality of life, and systemic immune dysfunction. This case series (32 patients) were referred from university-based orofacial pain centers and private practices from across the United States. Laboratory and clinical assessments evaluated orofacial pain symptoms, neurologic function, clinical signs and symptoms of rheumatologic disease, physical function, systemic measures of immune function, and behavioral measures. We found that TMJ implant patients appeared to have altered sensitivity to sensory stimuli, a higher number of tender points with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia, increased self-report of chemical sensitivity, higher psychologic distress and significantly lower functional ability. Systemic illness or autoimmune disease was not evident in this series of TMJ implant patients. Significant problems were noted on clinical assessment of TMJ implant patients. This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use.

  18. "Bat Wing Surgical Approach for the Temporomandibular Joint".

    PubMed

    Garcia Y Sanchez, J M; Davila Torres, J; Pacheco Rubio, G; Gómez Rodríguez, C L

    2015-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is anatomically complex; with its close proximity to neurovascular structures, including the facial nerve that gives a high degree of difficulty during surgical exposure. When the first description on TMJ surgery by Orlow in 1913 was published it gave an account describing the basic retroauricular, preauricular, endoaural and submandibular approaches, on treatment of articular pathologies as used today. The proposed study of the 'Bat Wing' approach, first described in 1993 by Garcia y Sanchez J.M. as a surgical alternative, offers great advantages is that it avoids the section of the ear canal and provides a wide surgical field. The management of the proposed technique has wide application with multiple joints addressed, achieving major objectives such as avoiding facial nerve damage, as well as avoiding the section of the external auditory canal with an optimum visibility of the operative field. The Department of Maxillofacial Surgery National Medical Center XXI Century records over a period of approximately 18 months have completed twenty TMJ surgeries using the 'Bat Wing', approach. The bat wing approach is a surgical alternative that offers broad exposure of the surgical field in TMJ, it is effective and meets the goal of exposing the area to intervene safely, good visibility and access to the site to intervene. It perfectly fulfills the above described.

  19. Degenerative disorders of the temporomandibular joint: etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Detamore, M S; Mercuri, L G

    2008-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders have complex and sometimes controversial etiologies. Also, under similar circumstances, one person's TMJ may appear to deteriorate, while another's does not. However, once degenerative changes start in the TMJ, this pathology can be crippling, leading to a variety of morphological and functional deformities. Primarily, TMJ disorders have a non-inflammatory origin. The pathological process is characterized by deterioration and abrasion of articular cartilage and local thickening. These changes are accompanied by the superimposition of secondary inflammatory changes. Therefore, appreciating the pathophysiology of the TMJ degenerative disorders is important to an understanding of the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of internal derangement and osteoarthrosis of the TMJ. The degenerative changes in the TMJ are believed to result from dysfunctional remodeling, due to a decreased host-adaptive capacity of the articulating surfaces and/or functional overloading of the joint that exceeds the normal adaptive capacity. This paper reviews etiologies that involve biomechanical and biochemical factors associated with functional overloading of the joint and the clinical, radiographic, and biochemical findings important in the diagnosis of TMJ-osteoarthrosis. In addition, non-invasive and invasive modalities utilized in TMJ-osteoarthrosis management, and the possibility of tissue engineering, are discussed.

  20. A prospective study of 138 arthroscopies of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paulo Alexandre da; Lopes, Maria Teresa de Fatima Fernandes; Freire, Fernando Silva

    2015-01-01

    Internal derangements (ID) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) have a multifactorial etiology and are most often treated conservatively by splints, physical therapy and medications. Only in 2-5% of cases are the treatment surgical, either by arthroscopy or arthrotomy. To evaluate improvement of mouth opening, pain relief during function, position of the articular disk and complications following Arthroscopic Lyse and Lavage (ALL). A prospective study of 78 patients (138 TMJs) with TMJ ID, 5 males and 73 females, mean age 29.7 years, treated between January 2010 and April 2013, who were refractory to conservative treatment, had limited mouth opening and pain localized to the TMJ during function, and who were submitted to TMJ ALL and followed for a period of 12 months, with periodic reviews. ALL was effective in 93.6% of cases, with 85.3% experiencing improvement in mouth opening and 91.2% in pain reduction during function, 63% improvement in disk position and a rate of complications of 6.2%. In this study the ALL exhibited a high rate of success with low morbidity in internal derangements of the TMJ. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Synovial fluid dynamics with small disc perforation in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhan, J; Zheng, Y; Han, Y; Zhang, Z; Xi, Y; Zhu, P

    2012-10-01

    The articular disc plays an important role as a stress absorber in joint movement, resulting in stress reduction and redistribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The flow of synovial fluid in the TMJ may follow a regular pattern during movement of the jaw. We hypothesised that the regular pattern is disrupted when the TMJ disc is perforated. By computed tomography arthrography, we studied the upper TMJ compartment in patients with small disc perforation during jaw opening-closing at positions from 0 to 3 cm. Finite element fluid dynamic modelling was accomplished to analyse the pattern of fluid flow and pressure distribution during the movements. The results showed that the fluid flow in the upper compartment generally formed an anticlockwise circulation but with local vortexes with the jaw opening up to 2 cm. However, when the jaw opening-closing reached 3 cm, an abnormal flow field and the fluid pressure change associated with the perforation may increase the risk of perforation expansion or rupture and is unfavourable for self-repair of the perforated disc.

  2. [Understanding and treatment strategy for disc displacement of temporomandibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Ma, X C

    2017-03-09

    Understanding and treatment strategy for disc displacement of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were discussed in the present review. It has been strongly recommended by the author that the treatment strategy for disc displacement, one subtype of TMD, should be mainly the reversible conservative treatment methods. The most important goal of treatment for disc displacement is to recover the mobility and function of the joint in order to improve the quality of the patient's life. Comprehensive assessments both from somatic and psychological aspects for each TMD patient are necessary, especially for the patients with chronic pain. Although the role of surgical operative treatments is very limited in the general treatment strategy for TMD, it is still important for a few patients who had definite diagnosis of intra-articular disorders, severe symptoms affecting the quality of patient's life and failed to response to the correct conservative treatments. It should be very careful to treat the TMD patients by surgical operation or irreversible occlusion treatments changing the natural denture of the patient, such as full mouth occlusional reconstruction and extensive adjustment of occlusion.

  3. An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst: a case example and an anatomical explanation to support the articular theory within cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Capek, Stepan; Koutlas, Ioannis G; Strasia, Rhys P; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The authors describe the case of an intraneural ganglion cyst involving a cranial nerve (V3), which was found to have a joint connection in support of an articular origin within the cranial nerves. An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst was incidentally discovered on a plain radiograph prior to edentulation. It was resected from within the mandibular canal with no joint connection perceived at surgery. Histologically, the cyst was confirmed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. Reinterpretation of the preoperative CT scan showed the cyst arising from the temporomandibular joint. This case is consistent with the articular (synovial) theory of intraneural ganglion cysts. An anatomical explanation and potential joint connection are provided for this case as well as several other cases of intraneural cysts in the literature, and thus unifying cranial nerve involvement with accepted concepts of intraneural ganglion cyst formation and propagation.

  4. Classification of primary articular chondrocalcinosis.

    PubMed

    Zitnan, D; Sitaj, S

    1979-01-01

    Based on long-term observations the authors submit a categorization of primary (hereditary and solitary) articular chondrocalcinosis into three different sub-populations. Attention is drawn to the fact that the extent of the qualitative disorder of the articular cartilage, obviously conditioned genetically, is linked with the age factor and determines the quantitative differences of pyrophosphate arthropathy in primary chondrocalcinosis. In young age, as a rule in the third decade, severe polyarticular condrocalcinosis (first sub-population) develops which causes relatively soon invalidity, in middle age (5th and 6th decade) milder condrocalcinosis develops (second sub-population) which combines with extraarticular, tendinous and tissue calcifacations, and finally in advanced age oligoarticular chondrocalcinosis develops (third sub-population) which is usually associated with ankylosing hyperostosis of the spine. Articular chondrocalcinosis (CCA) which we described by this term as a special metabolic arthropathy which occurs in families and solitary and which we defined as a special nosological unit (35, 36,) has become generally known and firmly established in rheumatology. As ensues from numerous publications, primary (idiopathic) CCA which comprises the hereditary and solitary (sporadic) form is characterized by pyrophosphate arthropathy which develops on articular cartilages not damaged by another process (13, 25, 26, 37); on the other hand as secondary CCA we consider pyrophosphate arthropathies which are associated with metabolic, endocrine or other diseases (9, 30). The common sign of both basic forms of CCA is the presence of microcrystals of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CaPD) in articular cartilages, synovial fluid, or other articular structures (capsules, tendons, ligaments), characterized originally by McCarty et al. (11, 18) and later by other authors (2, 23, 27, 32). In addition to semantic (terminological) problems there were also questions of the

  5. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  6. Autophagy Modulates Articular Cartilage Vesicle Formation in Primary Articular Chondrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Ann K.; Gohr, Claudia M.; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Jackson, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. PMID:25869133

  7. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr3 in Chondrocytes leads to Osteoarthritis-like Defects in Temporomandibular Joint of Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Siru; Xie, Yangli; Li, Wei; Huang, Junlan; Wang, Zuqiang; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xianding; Tan, Qiaoyan; Huang, Shuo; Luo, Fengtao; Xu, Meng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Tingting; chen, Liang; Chen, Hangang; Su, Nan; Du, Xiaolan; Shen, Yue; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a common degenerative disease in adult, which is characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage. To investigate the role of FGFR3 in the homeostasis of TMJ cartilage during adult stage, we generated Fgfr3f/f; Col2a1-CreERT2 (Fgfr3 cKO) mice, in which Fgfr3 was deleted in chondrocytes at 2 months of age. OA-like defects were observed in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant increase in expressions of COL10, MMP13 and AMAMTS5. In addition, there was a sharp increase in chondrocyte apoptosis at the Fgfr3 cKO articular surface, which was accompanied by a down-regulation of lubricin expression. Importantly, the expressions of RUNX2 and Indian hedgehog (IHH) were up-regulated in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ. Primary Fgfr3 cKO chondrocytes were treated with IHH signaling inhibitor, which significantly reduced expressions of Runx2, Col10, Mmp13 and Adamts5. Furthermore, the IHH signaling inhibitor partially alleviated OA-like defects in the TMJ of Fgfr3 cKO mice, including restoration of lubricin expression and improvement of the integrity of the articular surface. In conclusion, our study proposes that FGFR3/IHH signaling pathway plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of TMJ articular cartilage during adult stage. PMID:27041063

  8. Bilateral Intra-Articular Radiofrequency Ablation for Cervicogenic Headache

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Teresa; Taftian, David; Chhatre, Akhil

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Cervicogenic headache is characterized by unilateral neck or face pain referred from various structures such as the cervical joints and intervertebral disks. A recent study of patients with cervical pain showed significant pain relief after cervical medial branch neurotomy but excluded patients with C1-2 joint pain. It remains unclear whether targeting this joint has potential for symptomatic relief. To address this issue, we present a case report of C1-2 joint ablation with positive outcomes. Case Presentation. A 27-year-old female presented with worsening cervicogenic headache. Her pain was 9/10 by visual analog scale (VAS) and described as cramping and aching. Pain was localized suboccipitally with radiation to her jaw and posterior neck, worse on the right. Associated symptoms included clicking of her temporomandibular joint, neck stiffness, bilateral headaches with periorbital pain, numbness, and tingling. History, physical exam, and diagnostic studies indicated localization to the C1-2 joint with 80% decrease in pain after C1-2 diagnostic blocks. She underwent bilateral intra-articular radiofrequency ablation of the C1-C2 joint. Follow-up at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks showed improved function and pain relief with peak results at 12 weeks. Conclusion. Clinicians may consider C1-C2 joint ablation as a viable long-term treatment option for cervicogenic headaches. PMID:28149652

  9. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to be... and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any total temporomandibular joint...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to be... and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any total temporomandibular joint prosthesis...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to be... and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any total temporomandibular joint prosthesis...

  13. Tensorial electrokinetics in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-09-15

    Electrokinetic phenomena contribute to biomechanical functions of articular cartilage and underlie promising methods for early detection of osteoarthritic lesions. Although some transport properties, such as hydraulic permeability, are known to become anisotropic with compression, the direction-dependence of cartilage electrokinetic properties remains unknown. Electroosmosis experiments were therefore performed on adult bovine articular cartilage samples, whereby fluid flows were driven by electric currents in directions parallel and perpendicular to the articular surface of statically compressed explants. Magnitudes of electrokinetic coefficients decreased slightly with compression (from approximately -7.5 microL/As in the range of 0-20% compression to -6.0 microL/As in the 35-50% range) consistent with predictions of microstructure-based models of cartilage material properties. However, no significant dependence on direction of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was detected, even for conditions where the hydraulic permeability tensor is known to be anisotropic. This contrast may also be interpreted using microstructure-based models, and provides insights into structure-function relationships in cartilage extracellular matrix and physical mediators of cell responses to tissue compression. Findings support the use of relatively simple isotropic modeling approaches for electrokinetic phenomena in cartilage and related materials, and indicate that measurement of electrokinetic properties may provide particularly robust means for clinical evaluation of cartilage matrix integrity.

  14. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint as a Consequence of Persistent Long-Lasting Joint Dysfunction: Late Diagnosis of a Rare Occurrence.

    PubMed

    Paparo, Francesco; Massarelli, Mauro; Cordeschi, Riccardo; Sciannameo, Vito; Spallaccia, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    The authors present a rare patient of right synovial chondromatosis (SC) of the temporomandibular joint in which diagnosis was late and delay led to SC extension to the cranial base. Synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign disorder characterized by multiple cartilaginous free-floating nodules originated from the synovial membrane of large articular joints of the body. Differential diagnosis is with neoplasm and radical surgical removal is essential. The patient came to the authors' observation complaining about long-lasting temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The patient already underwent either functional or medical therapy in times without any improvement. Clinical examination showed limited mouth opening and swelling of the right preauricolar region with no signs of facial nerve palsy and without paresthesia or hearing loss. No history of recent trauma was recorded. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a mucous-like hyperintense mass with small hypointense spots inside. A preoperative computed tomography scan was performed and showed a mass extending from the superior aspect of the temporomandibular joint to the glenoid fossa, which was partially eroded. The patient underwent either open joint surgery or arthroscopy of the superior joint space and a large number of chondrocytes were removed. No complications were recorded postoperatively and the patient completely recovered after 6 months. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of synovial condromatosys of the right temporomandibular joint.

  16. Management of Temporomandibular Joint Reankylosis in Syndromic Patients Corrected with Joint Prostheses: Surgical and Rehabilitation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Luigi C.; Consorti, Giuseppe; Elia, Giovanni; Tieghi, Riccardo; Galiè, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA) is a severe disorder described as an intracapsular union of the disc-condyle complex to the temporal articular surface with bony fusion. The management of this disability is challenging and rarely based on surgical and rehabilitation protocols. We describe the treatment in two young adults affected by Goldenhar syndrome and Pierre Robin sequence with reankylosis after previous surgical treatments. There are three main surgical procedures for the treatment of TMJA: gap arthroplasty, interpositional arthroplasty, and joint reconstruction. Various authors have described reankylosis as a frequent event after treatment. Treatment failure could be associated with surgical errors and/or inadequate intensive postoperative physiotherapy. Surgical treatment should be individually tailored and adequate postoperative physiotherapy protocol is mandatory for success. PMID:24624260

  17. The value of magnetic resonance arthrography of the temporomandibular joint in imaging disc adhesions and perforations

    PubMed Central

    Venetis, G; Pilavaki, M; Triantafyllidou, K; Papachristodoulou, A; Lazaridis, N; Palladas, P

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study attempted to validate MR arthrography (MRAr) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in detecting the position, integrity and relations of the articular disc and retrodiscal tissue. Methods A total of 20 TMJs from 10 patients with severe TMJ dysfunction underwent MRI and MRAr. A paramagnetic contrast medium was injected into the upper joint compartment to observe possible adhesions and/or leakage into the lower compartment. 15 TMJs were surgically or arthroscopically explored and restored. Results MRAr was approximately in the same diagnostic value as MRI when locating position, but superior in detecting disc perforations (eight TMJs) and adhesions (seven TMJs) appearing together in four cases. Surgery confirmed radiological findings in all but one case, where arthroscopy and surgery failed to confirm a disc perforation indicated by MRAr. Conclusions TMJ MRAr may simultaneously reveal adhesions and perforations. Sensitivity and the probability of false-positive results require further study. PMID:21239570

  18. Post-surgical unilateral temporomandibular joint dislocation treated by open reduction followed by orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Satake, H; Yamada, T; Kitamura, N; Yoshimura, T; Sasabe, E; Yamamoto, T

    2011-03-01

    A case of prolonged unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation, which was treated by open surgical reduction and post-surgical orthodontic therapy, is presented. A 58-year-old woman presented complaining of facial asymmetry and malocclusion. She had received surgery for a malignant tumour in the right retromolar region 7 years previously. It was considered that contraction of the pterygoid muscle by surgical injury caused anterior meniscal displacement and TMJ dislocation. Since manual manipulation failed, direct open reduction was performed after separation of the lateral pterygoid muscle from the condylar head and removal of the intra-articular scar tissues. Although the condylar head was returned to the glenoid fossa, optimal occlusion was not obtained because of compensatory tooth movement and inclination. Satisfactory occlusion and symmetric facial appearance were brought about by post-surgical orthodontic therapy.

  19. [Intra-articular injection of cortisone].

    PubMed

    Hammer, M; Schwarz, T; Ganser, G

    2015-11-01

    Intra-articular injections with glucocorticoids are standard procedures according to therapy guidelines in many rheumatic conditions. There is increasing evidence from clinical trials on the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis that more patients will attain the target of remission using a combination of systemic medication and intra-articular injections with glucocorticoids compared to systemic medication alone. Intra-articular injections with glucocorticoids play an important role in the therapeutic management of pediatric rheumatic diseases. In many countries competency in performing intra-articular injections is among the important skills necessary for certification as a specialist in rheumatology.

  20. The Effect of Intra-articular Corticosteroids on Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wernecke, Chloe; Braun, Hillary J.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intra-articular (IA) corticosteroid therapy has been used for the treatment of inflammation and pain in the knee since the 1950s. Purpose: To review the current literature on the effects of IA corticosteroids on articular cartilage. Study Design: Systematic review. Methods: A MEDLINE and SCOPUS database search was performed, and studies were selected for basic science and clinical trial research on corticosteroids with direct outcome measures of cartilage health. Preliminary searches yielded 1929 articles, and final analysis includes 40 studies. Results: Methylprednisolone, dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, betamethasone, prednisolone, and triamcinolone were reported to display dose-dependent deleterious effects on cartilage morphology, histology, and viability in both in vitro and in vivo models. The beneficial animal in vivo effects of methylprednisolone, hydrocortisone, and triamcinolone occurred at low doses (usually <2-3 mg/dose or 8-12 mg/cumulative total dose in vivo), at which increased cell growth and recovery from damage was observed; the single human clinical trial indicated a beneficial effect of triamcinolone. However, at higher doses (>3 mg/dose or 18-24 mg/cumulative total dose in vivo), corticosteroids were associated with significant gross cartilage damage and chondrocyte toxicity. Dose and time dependency of corticosteroid chondrotoxicity was supported in the in vitro results, however, without clear dose thresholds. Conclusion: Corticosteroids have a time- and dose-dependent effect on articular cartilage, with beneficial effects occurring at low doses and durations and detrimental effects at high doses and durations. Clinically, beneficial effects are supported for IA administration, but the lowest efficacious dose should be used. PMID:26674652

  1. The temporomandibular joint of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus): part 1 - characterisation in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; Murphy, M K; Leale, D M; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to characterise the histologic, biomechanical and biochemical properties of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of California sea lions. In addition, we sought to identify structure-function relationships and to characterise TMJ lesions found in this species. Temporomandibular joints from fresh cadaver heads (n=14) of California sea lions acquired from strandings were examined macroscopically and microscopically. The specimens were also evaluated for their mechanical and biochemical properties. Furthermore, if TMJ arthritic changes were present, joint characteristics were described and compared to healthy joints. Five male and 9 female specimens demonstrated macroscopically normal fibrocartilaginous articular surfaces and fibrous discs in the TMJ. Out of the 9 female specimens, 4 specimens had TMJ lesions were seen either in the articular surface or the disc. Histologically, these pathologic specimens demonstrated subchondral bone defects, cartilage irregularities and inflammatory cell infiltrates. The normal TMJ discs did not exhibit significant direction dependence in tensile stiffness or strength in the rostrocaudal direction compared with the mediolateral direction among normal discs or discs from affected joints. The TMJ discs were not found to be anisotropic in tensile properties. This feature was further supported by randomly oriented collagen fibres as seen by electron microscopy. Furthermore, no significant differences were detected in biochemical composition of the discs dependent upon population. The TMJ and its disc of the California sea lion exhibit similarities but also differences compared to other mammals with regards to structure-function relationships. A fibrous TMJ disc rich in collagen with minimal glycosaminoglycan content was characterised, and random fibre organisation was associated with isotropic mechanical properties in the central region of the disc. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bayesian belief network analysis applied to determine the progression of temporomandibular disorders using MRI.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, H

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the applicability of a Bayesian belief network (BBN) to MR images to diagnose temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Our aim was to determine the progression of TMDs, focusing on how each finding affects the other. We selected 1.5-T MRI findings (33 variables) and diagnoses (bone changes and disc displacement) of patients with TMD from 2007 to 2008. There were a total of 295 cases with 590 sides of temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The data were modified according to the research diagnostic criteria of TMD. We compared the accuracy of the BBN using 11 algorithms (necessary path condition, path condition, greedy search-and-score with Bayesian information criterion, Chow-Liu tree, Rebane-Pearl poly tree, tree augmented naïve Bayes model, maximum log likelihood, Akaike information criterion, minimum description length, K2 and C4.5), a multiple regression analysis and an artificial neural network using resubstitution validation and 10-fold cross-validation. There were 191 TMJs (32.4%) with bone changes and 340 (57.6%) with articular disc displacement. The BBN path condition algorithm using resubstitution validation and 10-fold cross-validation was >99% accurate. However, the main advantage of a BBN is that it can represent the causal relationships between different findings and assign conditional probabilities, which can then be used to interpret the progression of TMD. Osteoarthritic bone changes progressed from condyle to articular fossa and finally to mandibular bone contours. Disc displacement was directly related to severe bone changes. Early bone changes were not directly related to disc displacement. TMJ functional factors (condylar translation, bony space and disc form) and age mediated between bone changes and disc displacement.

  3. Bayesian belief network analysis applied to determine the progression of temporomandibular disorders using MRI

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the applicability of a Bayesian belief network (BBN) to MR images to diagnose temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Our aim was to determine the progression of TMDs, focusing on how each finding affects the other. Methods: We selected 1.5-T MRI findings (33 variables) and diagnoses (bone changes and disc displacement) of patients with TMD from 2007 to 2008. There were a total of 295 cases with 590 sides of temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The data were modified according to the research diagnostic criteria of TMD. We compared the accuracy of the BBN using 11 algorithms (necessary path condition, path condition, greedy search-and-score with Bayesian information criterion, Chow–Liu tree, Rebane–Pearl poly tree, tree augmented naïve Bayes model, maximum log likelihood, Akaike information criterion, minimum description length, K2 and C4.5), a multiple regression analysis and an artificial neural network using resubstitution validation and 10-fold cross-validation. Results: There were 191 TMJs (32.4%) with bone changes and 340 (57.6%) with articular disc displacement. The BBN path condition algorithm using resubstitution validation and 10-fold cross-validation was >99% accurate. However, the main advantage of a BBN is that it can represent the causal relationships between different findings and assign conditional probabilities, which can then be used to interpret the progression of TMD. Conclusions: Osteoarthritic bone changes progressed from condyle to articular fossa and finally to mandibular bone contours. Disc displacement was directly related to severe bone changes. Early bone changes were not directly related to disc displacement. TMJ functional factors (condylar translation, bony space and disc form) and age mediated between bone changes and disc displacement. PMID:25472616

  4. Outcomes of temporomandibular joint arthroscopy in patients with painful but otherwise normal joints.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, George

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this retrospective clinical study was to assess the clinical outcomes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy in patients who presented with category 1 normal joints. The null hypothesis being tested was that patients with normal joints do not respond to TMJ arthroscopy. The clinical records of 116 patients who had undergone TMJ arthroscopy by the author from 2010 to 2013 were retrieved and individually analysed for inclusion in this retrospective, cohort clinical study. The inclusion criteria used to select patients for this study were those who had arthroscopically proven category 1 normal joints, free of intra-articular pathology. Of the 14 patients who were found to have normal joints, only 10 could be contacted for a follow-up survey. Despite the fact that all patients were informed that no joint pathology was found, six out of the 10 patients reported improvement in their temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms that lasted for more than 6 months following TMJ arthroscopy. The results of this investigation indicate that we can reject the null hypothesis, and that patients with normal TMJs do indeed respond to TMJ arthroscopy. What this limited study has highlighted is the pervasive effects of the placebo that all surgeons need to keep in mind when formulating treatment plans for patients with TMD.

  5. Otologic symptoms of temporomandibular disorder and effect of orofacial myofunctional therapy.

    PubMed

    de Felício, Cláudia Maria; Melchior, Melissa de Oliveira; Ferreira, Clãudia Lúcia Pimenta; Da Silva, Marco Antonio M Rodrigues

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of otologic symptoms and their relationship to orofacial signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD), and the effect of orofacial myofunctional therapy. The study was conducted on eight asymptomatic subjects (Group C) and 20 subjects with articular TMD, randomly distributed over two groups: one treated using orofacial myofunctional therapy (OMT Group) and a control group with TMD (Group CTMD). Patient selection was based upon the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD). All subjects submitted to a clinical examination with self-reporting of symptom severity, and to orofacial myofunctional and electromyographic evaluation at diagnosis and again, at the end of the study. Correlations were calculated using the Pearson test and inter- and intragroup comparisons were made (p < 0.05). In the diagnosis phase, subjects with TMD reported earache (65%), tinnitus (60%), ear fullness (90%), and 25% of the asymptomatic subjects reported tinnitus. The otologic symptoms were correlated with tenderness to palpation of the temporomandibular muscles and joints and with orofacial symptoms. Only the OMT group showed a reduction of otologic and orofacial symptoms, of tenderness to palpation and of the asymmetric index between muscles. OMT may help with muscle coordination and a remission of TMD symptoms.

  6. Biomechanical analysis comparing natural and alloplastic temporomandibular joint replacement using a finite element model.

    PubMed

    Mesnard, Michel; Ramos, Antonio; Ballu, Alex; Morlier, Julien; Cid, M; Simoes, J A

    2011-04-01

    Prosthetic materials and bone present quite different mechanical properties. Consequently, mandible reconstruction with metallic materials (or a mandible condyle implant) modifies the physiologic behavior of the mandible (stress, strain patterns, and condyle displacements). The changing of bone strain distribution results in an adaptation of the temporomandibular joint, including articular contacts. Using a validated finite element model, the natural mandible strains and condyle displacements were evaluated. Modifications of strains and displacements were then assessed for 2 different temporomandibular joint implants. Because materials and geometry play important key roles, mechanical properties of cortical bone were taken into account in models used in finite element analysis. The finite element model allowed verification of the worst loading configuration of the mandibular condyle. Replacing the natural condyle by 1 of the 2 tested implants, the results also show the importance of the implant geometry concerning biomechanical mandibular behavior. The implant geometry and stiffness influenced mainly strain distribution. The different forces applied to the mandible by the elevator muscles, teeth, and joint loads indicate that the finite element model is a relevant tool to optimize implant geometry or, in a subsequent study, to choose a more suitable distribution of the screws. Bone screws (number and position) have a significant influence on mandibular behavior and on implant stress pattern. Stress concentration and implant fracture must be avoided. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of the cytokine profiles of the synovial fluid in a normal temporomandibular joint: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Kim, Bum-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Yun; Yun, Pil-Young; Bae, Ji-Hyun; Oh, Ji-Su; Ahn, Jong-Mo; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sook-Young

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cytokine profiles of the synovial fluid from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) spaces of normal individuals and temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Thirty-four patients with planned orthognathic surgery did not present abnormalities of the TMJ on magnetic resonance images and radiographs and did not show the symptoms identified by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC-TMD); as a result, they were assigned to the control group. Twenty-two patients who sought treatment for TMD during the same period were assigned to the TMD group. Synovial fluid was collected from superior TMJ spaces, and cytokine expression was analysed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Significant differences were tested using Fisher's exact test (p<0.05). Granulocyte Macrophage Colony stimulating Factor (GM-CSF), interferon (INF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were detected in the TMD group, whereas no cytokines were detected in the control group. The most prevalent cytokines in the TMD group were IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF. IL-4 and IL-5 were not detected in either the TMD group or in the control group. None of the cytokines that were detected in patients with TMD were found in the articular spaces of normal individuals.

  8. [Morphological analysis for kinetic X-ray images of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Bandai, Natsuko; Sanada, Shigeru; Ueki, Kouichiro; Funabasama, Shintaro; Tsuduki, Shinji; Matsui, Takeshi

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a screening technique for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and assist dentists in objectively observing and evaluating pre/post-treatment status. Dynamic images of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) from one healthy volunteer were obtained by digital fluoroscopy in the lateral view on both right and left sides. Outlines of the glenoid fossa and the condyle were extracted, respectively, by using sobel operator (7x7) thresholding and labeling. Morphological parameters in time-sequence, such as fossa ratio, area, and distance of the joint space, were then analyzed. There were no differences between manual and computer analysis in extracting the outline of the glenoid fossa and the condyle. Deformity of the outline of the glenoid fossa and the condyle was not identified in this subject. The fossa ratio was 0.30+/-0.01 on the right and 0.29+/-0.02 on the left. The area and distance of the joint space in the post-glenoid fossa were slightly larger than those in the articular eminence on both sides. These morphological parameters were useful for screening and pre- and post-treatment evaluation of TMD patients.

  9. Characteristics of temporomandibular joint in patients with temporomandibular joint complaint

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanfeng; Guo, Xiaoqian; Sun, Xiaoxue; Wang, Ning; Xie, Min; Zhang, Jianqiang; Lv, Yuan; Han, Weili; Hu, Min; Liu, Hongchen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study was to investigate whether there was statistical difference between the bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: TMJ CBCT images of 123 cases were used to preliminarily determine the indicators suitable for the measuring method. TMJ CBCT image reconstruction was performed and 19 indicators were measured. Thirty-six cases without TMJ complaint served as controls. The comparison of bilateral TMJs was analyzed by paired t-test to find out the indicators without statistical significance. Twenty-nine patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds who underwent CBCT at the hospital were enrolled for the comparative study. The measured values were analyzed by paired t-test to determine the indicators with statistical difference. Results: In the control group, only radius value of bilateral TMJ was different statistically (P < 0.05). In the TMJ complaint group, the vertical 60° joint space of the bilateral TMJ was statistically different (P < 0.05) and the rest of the measured values showed no statistical difference. Conclusions: In the patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds, the vertical 60° joint space of the symptomatic side was significantly increased comparing with the asymptomatic side. PMID:26629112

  10. Modeling of temporomandibular joint function using MRI and jaw-tracking technologies--mechanics.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Luigi M

    2005-01-01

    The study of mechanics of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is important because its dysfunction and breakdown could be, at least partially, of mechanical origin. The incongruity of the articular surfaces of the TMJ is compensated by a fibrocartilaginous articular disc. Its dislocation and failure seem to be closely related to the development of osteoarthritis of the TMJ. The analysis of mandibular kinematics permits the detection and assessment of irregularities of TMJ function due to internal obstacles such as a displaced articular disc. Furthermore, the measurement of the dynamic relationship between the articular surfaces of the TMJ is useful to determine the strains undergone by the disc that if too high might compromise its integrity. The development of our research in TMJ mechanics has evolved from the acquisition of the traces of single mandibular points to an accurate and compact description of mandibular motion, in which the mechanical advantage of jaw muscles, and forces and torques acting on the jaw are considered as well. The combination of three-dimensional software models of TMJ anatomies obtained from MRI and jaw tracking with six degrees of freedom permits a subject-specific dynamic analysis of the intra-articular space, providing insight into individual disc deformation during function and TMJ loading. Studies performed with this system indicate that both TMJs are loaded during chewing, the balancing more so than the working joint. In fact, during chewing, the intra-articular distance is smaller for hard than for soft food, on closing than on opening, on the balancing than on the working side. This last finding is confirmed by static biting experiments, in which the condyle-fossa distance decreases more on the side contralateral to the bite force, depending on its magnitude. Also studies on the dynamics of compression areas indicate that plowing can occur through the disc during function, especially mediolaterally, due to stress field translation

  11. Influence of orthodontic treatment on temporomandibular disorders. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cañigral, Aránzazu; López-Caballo, José L.; Brizuela, Aritza; Moreno-Hay, Isabel; del Río-Highsmith, Jaime; Vega, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this literature systematic review was to evaluate the possible association between malocclusions, orthodontic treatment and development of temporomandibular disorders. Material and Methods: A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords “orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders”, “orthodontics and facial pain” and “malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders”. Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. Material and Methods A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords “orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders”, “orthodontics and facial pain” and “malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders”. Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. Results The search strategy resulted in 61 articles. After selection according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria 9 articles qualified for the final analysis. The articles which linked orthodontics and development of temporomandibular disorders showed very discrepant results. Some indicated that orthodontic treatment could improve signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, but none of them obtained statistically significant differences. Conclusions According to the authors examined, there is no evidence for a cause-effect relationship between orthodontic treatment and temporomandibular disorders, or that such treatment might improve or prevent them. More longitudinal studies are needed to verify any possible interrelationship. Key words:Malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders, orthodontics and facial pain, orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular dysfunction. PMID:26155354

  12. Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Gundlach, Karsten K H

    2010-03-01

    True ankylosis of the temporo-mandibular joint must be differentiated from other reasons why a patient is unable to open his mouth properly. It can be treated by various methods. It is the purpose of this paper to (a) Present various cases with different disorders that had lead to a restricted mouth opening and (b) Report upon the long-term post-operative results achieved by having applied various treatment options for true ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In 40 patients a true ankylosis was treated surgically by applying one of the two protocols: Either by interposing silastic sheetings or by implanting a TMJ prosthesis made of metal and consisting of 2 parts, a condylar head and a temporal fossa. Twenty patients could be followed up after 113 months on average - 13 patients of these have been treated by interposition of silastic and 7 have received endoprostheses. In 7 other patients, different reasons were found inhibiting freely opening the mouth. Congenital bony ankylosis of upper and lower alveolar processes, congenital or acquired bony fusion of the coronoid process with the zygomatic arch and/or temporal bone, acquired ankylosis between mandible and lateral pterygoid plate, ossifying myositis, or fibrosis of masticatory muscles following tumour irradiation. Not all of these could be operated upon and not all of these could be followed up. However, all patients operated upon followed a strict postoperative physiotherapeutic regimen. Long-term follow-up maximum interincisal distances (MiDs) were callipered: 34mm (mean; min. 22, max. 52) following silastic sheeting; 18mm (mean; min. 10, max. 23) following endoprosthesis implantation. In the one of the two patients who could be followed up after ankylosis of the coronoid with the temporal bone, the MiD measured 49mm 1 year postoperatively. In that one of the two patients who could be operated because of a unilateral bony fusion between the mandible and the pterygoid plate, MiD was only 26mm 8

  13. Temporomandibular joint internal derangements: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Helms, C.A.; Vogler, J.B. III; Morrish, R.B. Jr.; Goldman, S.M.; Capra, R.E.; Proctor, E.

    1984-08-01

    Two hundred patients with suspected displaced temporomandibular joint meniscus were studied with computed tomography. In 75 cases confirmation of the CT diagnosis was subsequently obtained via surgery or arthrography; correlation was found in 73 cases (97%), with one false-negative and one false-positive examination. When meniscus displacement was graded as mild, moderate, or severe, those cases diagnosed as moderate or severe were more likely to require surgery. The technique and interpretation of this technique is described; in most cases CT can replace arthrography in diagnosing displaced temporomandibular joint menisci.

  14. [Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMA) in children].

    PubMed

    García-Aparicio, L; Parri, F J; Sancho, M A; Sarget, R; Morales, L

    2000-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a degenerative disease that produces a limitation of mouth opening. In children, TMJ ankylosis usually presents with facial asymmetry, difficulty in feeding and rarely upper way obstruction. Ankylosis is commonly associated with trauma, infections, systemic and congenital diseases. Diagnosis must be clinical, being CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the most important methods to evaluate this disease. The treatment of TMJ ankylosis requires excision of the involved structures and reconstruction. We present our experience in treatment of the temporomandibular joint ankylosis. We have analysed the following parameters: age, sex, etiology, surgical technique, pre and postoperative oral opening.

  15. Analyses of the temporomandibular disc.

    PubMed

    Jirman, R; Fricová, M; Horák, Z; Krystůfek, J; Konvicková, S; Mazánek, J

    2007-01-01

    This project is the beginning of a large research work with a goal to develop a new total replacement of temporomandibular (TM) joint. First aim of this work was to determine the relative displacement of the TM disc and the mandible during mouth opening. The movement of the TM disc was studied using a magnetic resonance imaging. Sagittal static images in revolved sections of the TM joint were obtained in various positions of jaw opening from 0 to 50 mm. The results provided a description of the TM disc displacements as a function of jaw opening. The displacements of the mandible and TM disc were about 16 mm and 10 mm respectively at mouth opening of 50 mm, maximum rotation of the mandible was 34s. The results of these measurements can be used for clinical diagnostics and also they were used as inputs for the follows finite element analysis (FEA). Second aim of this work was to create stress and strain analysis of TM joint using non-linear FEA. Complex of TM joint consists of mandibular disc, half skull and half mandible during normal jaw opening. The results illustrate the stress distributions in the TMJ during a normal jaw opening.

  16. Temporomandibular joint multidisciplinary team clinic.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nabeela; Poate, Tim; Nacher-Garcia, Cristina; Pugh, Nicola; Cowgill, Helen; Page, Lisa; Matthews, N Shaun

    2014-11-01

    Patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) commonly present to oral and maxillofacial departments and are increasingly being managed by a subspecialist group of surgeons. We review the outcomes of patients attending a specialist TMJ multidisciplinary team (MDT) clinic. All patients are simultaneously reviewed by a consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeon, consultant in oral medicine, specialist physiotherapist, and maxillofacial prosthetist, and they can also see a consultant liaison psychiatrist. They are referred from primary, secondary, and tertiary care when medical and surgical treatment in the routine TMJ clinic has failed, and are triaged by the attending maxillofacial surgeon. On discharge they are returned to the care of the referring practitioner. We review the outcomes of patients attending this clinic over a 2-year period and show improvements in pain scores and maximal incisal opening, as well as quality of life outcome measures. All units in the UK with an interest in the management of diseases of the TMJ should consider establishing this type of clinic and should use available resources and expertise to maximise outcomes.

  17. Conservative management of temporomandibular dysfunction: A literature review with implications for clinical practice guidelines (Narrative review part 2).

    PubMed

    Butts, Raymond; Dunning, James; Pavkovich, Ron; Mettille, Jersey; Mourad, Firas

    2017-07-01

    The effective management of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) requires a thorough understanding of the pathoanatomic factors that drive the underlying condition. After reviewing the etiology associated with TMD in Part 1 of this narrative review, the temporomandibular joint capsule, articular disc and muscles of mastication emerged as key players. (http://dx.doi.org/10.​1016/​j.​jbmt.​2017.​05.​017) Part 2 focuses on conservative treatment strategies best able to reduce the pain and disability associated with TMD. A review of the literature revealed limited support of strengthening exercises targeting the muscles of mastication. There was also limited evidence for manual soft tissue work targeting muscles of mastication, which may be specifically related to the limited accessibility of the pterygoid muscles to palpation. For the reduction of pain, there was little to no evidence supporting splint therapy and electrophysical modalities, including laser therapy, ultrasound, TENs and iontophoresis. However, for the reduction of pain and disability, non-thrust mobilization and high-velocity, low amplitude thrust manipulation techniques to the TMJ and/or upper cervical articulations that directly and indirectly target the TMJ joint capsule were generally supported in the literature. Studies that used dry needling or acupuncture of the lateral pterygoid and posterior, peri-articular connective tissue also led to significant improvements in pain and disability in patients with TMD. Thus, the most effective conservative management of TMD seems to be techniques best able to impact anatomic structures directly related to the etiology of TMD, to include the joint capsule, articular disc and muscles of mastication, specifically the superior and inferior head of the lateral pterygoid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Doublecortin is expressed in articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Ryan, James A; Di Cesare, Paul E; Liu, Judy; Walsh, Christopher A; You, Zongbing

    2007-11-23

    Articular cartilage and cartilage in the embryonic cartilaginous anlagen and growth plates are both hyaline cartilages. In this study, we found that doublecortin (DCX) was expressed in articular chondrocytes but not in chondrocytes from the cartilaginous anlagen or growth plates. DCX was expressed by the cells in the chondrogenous layers but not intermediate layer of joint interzone. Furthermore, the synovium and cruciate ligaments were DCX-negative. DCX-positive chondrocytes were very rare in tissue engineered cartilage derived from in vitro pellet culture of rat chondrosarcoma, ATDC5, and C3H10T1/2 cells. However, the new hyaline cartilage formed in rabbit knee defect contained mostly DCX-positive chondrocytes. Our results demonstrate that DCX can be used as a marker to distinguish articular chondrocytes from other chondrocytes and to evaluate the quality of tissue engineered or regenerated cartilage in terms of their "articular" or "non-articular" nature.

  19. Correlation Between Clinical Findings of Temporomandibular Disorders and MRI Characteristics of Disc Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman; Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Sheikh, Soheyl; Mittal, Amit; Gupta, Deepak; Gupta, Sonam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives : Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is a common condition that is best evaluated with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The first step in MR imaging of the TMJ is to evaluate the articular disk, or meniscus, in terms of its morphologic features and its location relative to the condyle in both closed- and open-mouth positions. Disk location is of prime importance because the presence of a displaced disk is a critical sign of TMJ dysfunction. However, disk displacement is also frequently seen in asymptomatic volunteers. It is important for the maxillofacial radiologist to detect early MR imaging signs of dysfunction, thereby avoiding the evolution of this condition to its advanced and irreversible phase which is characterized by osteoarthritic changes such as condylar flattening or osteophytes. Further the MR imaging techniques will allow a better understanding of the sources of TMJ pain and of any discrepancy between imaging findings and patient symptoms. Henceforth, the aim of the study was to evaluate whether MRI findings of various degrees of disk displacement could be correlated with the presence or absence of clinical signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. Materials and Methods : In this clinical study, 44 patients (88 TMJs) were examined clinically and divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients with clinical signs and symptoms of TMDs either unilaterally or bilaterally and considered as study group. Group 2 consisted of 22 patients with no signs and symptoms of TMDs and considered as control group. MRI was done for both the TMJs of each patient. Displacement of the posterior band of articular disc in relation to the condyle was quantified as anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR), anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWR), posterior disc displacement (PDD). Results : Disk displacement was found in 18 (81.8%) patients of 22 symptomatic subjects in Group 1

  20. Simulaciones hidrodinámicas de flujos complejos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Ibáñez Cabanell, José

    Son muchos los escenarios astrofísicos en que los procesos hidrodinámicos juegan un papel clave. En la complejidad que encierra la descripción de dichos procesos destaca el de la correcta simulación de flujos complejos donde la presencia de ondas de choque fuertes que, eventualmente, interaccionan entre ellas o también la presencia de inestabilidades (Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, etc.) suponen un verdadero desafío numérico. Los códigos hidrodinámicos basados en la solución de un problema de valores iniciales discontinuo (problema de Riemann) son, en la actualidad, los más robustos en el campo de la dinámica de fluidos computacional. En esta charla se dará un resumen de los fundamentos de dichas técnicas numéricas (esquemas de alta resolución de captura de choques) y se ilustrará su potencialidad mostrando una amplia gama de resultados en diferentes aplicaciones astrofísicas.

  1. Temporomandibular joint forces measured at the condyle of Macaca arctoides.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Gibbs, C H; Mahan, P E; Richmond, A F; Laskin, J L

    1990-06-01

    Forces were measured at the articular surface of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle in two stump-tail monkeys (Macaca arctoides) during chewing, incisal biting, and drinking and also during aggressive behaviors. Force was measured with a thin piezoelectric foil transducer, which was cemented over the anterior and superior surfaces of the condyle. Wires from the upper and lower surfaces of the foil were insulated between two layers of Teflon tape and run subcutaneously to a telemetry unit, which was implanted in the upper back. Force applied across the foil by the condyle was detected by the telemetry unit and transmitted to an FM radio receiver outside the animal. The FM signals were received and demodulated, and a signal proportional to the force applied between the condyle and the TMJ fossa was displayed on a chart recorder. Data were collected over an 8-day period. The animals were not constrained. The TMJ was found to be load bearing. The greatest force of 39.0 lb (17.7 kg) was measured during feisty vocal aggression. Forces ranged as high as 34.5 lb (15.7 kg) during chewing and 28.5 lb (13.0 kg) during incisal biting. Forces were greater on the working (food) side than on the nonworking (balancing) side by average ratios of 1.4 to 2.6. A large unilateral interference at the most distal molar greatly disturbed chewing. It reduced TMJ forces by 50% or more, and the monkey refused to chew on the side opposite the interference.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging features of the temporomandibular joint in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Macready, Dawn M; Hecht, Silke; Craig, Linden E; Conklin, Gordon A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the canine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is important in the clinical diagnosis of animals presenting with dysphagia, malocclusion and jaw pain. In humans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for evaluation of the TMJ. The objectives of this study were to establish a technical protocol for performing MRI of the canine TMJ and describe the MRI anatomy and appearance of the normal canine TMJ. Ten dogs (one fresh cadaver and nine healthy live dogs) were imaged. MRIs were compared with cadaveric tissue sections. T1-weighted (T1-W) transverse closed-mouth, T1-W sagittal closed-mouth, T1-W sagittal open-mouth, and T2-W sagittal open-mouth sequences were obtained. The condylar process of the mandible and the mandibular fossa of the temporal bone were hyperintense to muscle and isointense to hypointense to fat on T1-W images, mildly hyperintense to muscle on T2-W images, and were frequently heterogeneous. The articular disc was visible in 14/20 (70%) TMJs on T1-W images and 13/20 (65%) TMJs on T2-W images. The articular disc was isointense to hyperintense to muscle on T1-W images and varied from hypointense to hyperintense to muscle on T2-W images. The lateral collateral ligament was not identified in any joint. MRI allows evaluation of the osseous and certain soft tissue structures of the TMJ in dogs.

  3. Novel 3-dimensional analysis to evaluate temporomandibular joint space and shape.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Renie; Oberoi, Snehlata; Wiley, David F; Woodhouse, Christian; Tallman, Melissa; Tun, Wint Wint; McNeill, Charles; Miller, Arthur J; Hatcher, David

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to present and validate a novel semiautomated method for 3-dimensional evaluation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) space and condylar and articular shapes using cone-beam computed tomographic data. The protocol for 3-dimensional analysis with the Checkpoint software (Stratovan, Davis, Calif) was established by analyzing cone-beam computed tomographic images of 14 TMJs representing a range of TMJ shape variations. Upon establishment of the novel method, analysis of 5 TMJs was further repeated by several investigators to assess the reliability of the analysis. Principal components analysis identified 3 key components that characterized how the condylar head shape varied among the 14 TMJs. Principal component analysis allowed determination of the minimum number of landmarks or patch density to define the shape variability in this sample. Average errors of landmark placement ranged from 1.15% to 3.65%, and none of the 121 landmarks showed significant average errors equal to or greater than 5%. Thus, the mean intraobserver difference was small and within the clinically accepted margin of error. Interobserver error was not significantly greater than intraobserver error, indicating that this is a reliable methodology. This novel semiautomatic method is a reliable tool for the 3-dimensional analysis of the TMJ including both the form and the space between the articular eminence and the condylar head. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid on induced arthritis of the temporomandibular joint in rats.

    PubMed

    Lemos, George Azevedo; Rissi, Renato; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Palomari, Evanisi Teresa

    2015-07-01

    High molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HMWHA) has been used to treat temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, but controversial results have been described. This study aimed to characterize the morphological and biochemical actions of HMWHA on induced arthritis of the TMJ. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were used, and arthritis of the TMJ was induced through an intra-articular injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) (50 μl). One week after arthritis induction, the animals were treated with HMWHA (once per week for three weeks). Histological analyses were performed using sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin, toluidine blue and Picrosirius. Were also performed histomorphometric analysis and birefringence of collagenous fibers (polarization microscopy). Biochemical analyses of TMJ tissues were carried out through measurements of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and zymography for evaluation of metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and -9). Data were analyzed using paired t-test and unpaired t-test, with a 5% significance level. HMWHA reduced histologic changes and thickness of the articular disc, led to a greater arrangement of collagenous fibers, lower concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and lower activity in all isoforms of MMP-2 and -9 in TMJs with induced arthritis. These findings suggest that HMWHA may exert a protective effect on the TMJ.

  5. Temporomandibular joint cytokine profiles in the horse.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Gordon, John R; Allen, Andrew L

    2006-06-01

    It has been suggested that dental abnormalities lead to temporomandibular joint inflammation and pain that may be mitigated by regular dental care. There is considerable literature on the pathophysiology of equine joint disease including studies on cytokine profiles in diseased appendicular joints. This study examined the effects of age and dental malocclusions summarized as a dental pathology score on equine temporomandibular joint cytokine (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF alpha and TGF-beta1, -beta2, -beta3) concentrations. TGF-beta3 was not detected in any joint sample. IL-1, IL-6 and TNF alpha were not influenced by age. Foals had significantly lower concentrations of lL-8 and TGF-beta1, and higher levels of TGF-beta2 compared with older horses. Age did not effect cytokine concentration in older horses although there was a trend towards increasing 1L-8 with age. The dental pathology score increased with age in mature horses, however there was no effect of dental pathology score on cytokine concentration. There was no effect of incisor eruption, and presence or number of periodontal lesions on temporomandibular joint cytokine concentration. Our findings indicate that age but not dental pathology affected temporomandibular joint proinflammatory cytokine concentration in this population of horses.

  6. Temporomandibular disorders and fibromyalgia: comorbid conditions?

    PubMed

    Sollecito, Thomas P; Stoopler, Eric T; DeRossi, Scott S; Silverton, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and fibromyalgia (FM) are two clinical conditions prevalent in today's society. Many individuals suffer from chronic pain in various muscle groups, including the muscles of mastication. Previously, TMDs and FM were thought to be separate, unrelated clinical entities. New research has shown a possible link between the two conditions; this article sheds light on possible correlations between them.

  7. [The temporomandibular joint and inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Marotte, H

    2016-09-01

    Some inflammatory rheumatic diseases can involve the temporomandibular joint, such as rheumatoid arthritis and spondylarthritis. The aim of our work was to evaluate the current prevalence of these inflammatory TMJ diseases, to indicate the new therapeutics and to describe the collaboration between rheumatologist and maxillofacial surgeon in these pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Dental characteristics of patients with temporomandibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Quinteromarmol-Juárez, Myriam; Espinosa-de Santillana, Irene Aurora; Martínez-Torres, Jorge; Vargas-García, Hugo Alberto

    2009-01-01

    to describe the dental characteristics of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). a survey in 130 out patients from a Clinic of Maxilofacial Surgery Service, who fulfilled the selection criteria. The social and demographic data were reported in other paper. It was used a questionnaire to identify factors of risk for TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteries/Temporomandibular Disorders proposed by Dworkin. It was registered the Angle to molar bilaterally and canine, the presence of canine guides and incisal margin, the dental lost organs and previous surgical removal of third molars. Unvaried and bivariate statistical analysis was made. the clinical manifestations in patients with TMD which they appear in the upheavals temporomandibular were: pain to articulate, muscular pain, noises you will articulate with statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in the variables class to molar and canine of Angle, absence of canine guides and incisal margin, previous retirement of third molars, parafunctions, mandibulars deviations at rest, number of dental absences. the physiomechanical conditions in the oral cavity of the patients of upheavals temporomandibular are considered a risk factor condition.

  9. [Temporomandibular joint disorders: Physiotherapy and postural approaches].

    PubMed

    Breton-Torres, I; Trichot, S; Yachouh, J; Jammet, P

    2016-09-01

    Rehabilitation of temporomandibular joint dysfunctions has for a long time tried to treat symptoms: pain relief, joint kinetics restoration, disk re-capture by manual maneuvers. The authors present their own therapeutic approach, which is no longer limited to symptoms, but addresses the causes and identifies risk factors to prevent relapse.

  10. A comparison of MRI, radiographic and clinical findings of the position of the TMJ articular disc following open treatment of condylar neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Alexander; Zahnert, Diana; Klengel, Steffen; Loukota, Richard; Eckelt, Uwe

    2007-10-01

    We examined the position and function of the articular disc after open treatment of condylar fractures by comparing magnetic resonance images (MRI) and radiographs with clinical data. MRI and radiographs were taken after treatment of 28 patients with 33 fractures of the mandibular condyles. In all cases, the disc was located in the fossa after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). The MRI, radiographic and clinical findings did not correlate, and damage to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) could be seen more clearly on MRI than on clinical or radiographic examination. Damage to soft tissues seen on MRI after treatment was more pronounced in dislocated than in displaced fractures.

  11. Extra-articular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina; Tanasescu, R

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main characteristic is persistent joint inflammation that results in joint damage and loss of function. Although RA is more common in females, extra-articular manifestations of the disease are more common in males. The extra-articular manifestations of RA can occur at any age after onset. It is characterised by destructive polyarthritis and extra-articular organ involvement, including the skin, eye, heart, lung, renal, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. The frequence of extra-articular manifestations in RA differs from one country to another. Extra-articular organ involvement in RA is more frequently seen in patients with severe, active disease and is associated with increased mortality. Incidence and frequence figures for extra-articular RA vary according to study design. Extra-articular involvement is more likely in those who have RF and/or are HLA-DR4 positive. Occasionally, there are also systemic manifestations such as vasculitis, visceral nodules, Sjögren's syndrome, or pulmonary fibrosis present. Nodules are the most common extra-articular feature, and are present in up to 30%; many of the other classic features occur in 1% or less in normal clinic settings. Sjögren's syndrome, anaemia of chronic disease and pulmonary manifestations are relatively common – in 6-10%, are frequently present in early disease and are all related to worse outcomes measures of rheumatoid disease in particular functional impairment and mortality. The occurrence of these systemic manifestations is a major predictor of mortality in patients with RA. This paper focuses on extra-articular manifestations, defined as diseases and symptoms not directly related to the locomotor system. PMID:21977172

  12. Diagnostic imaging for temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Allison; Kalathingal, Sajitha

    2013-07-01

    The focus of this article is diagnostic imaging used for the evaluation of temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain patients. Imaging modalities discussed include conventional panoramic radiography, panoramic temporomandibular joint imaging mode, cone beam computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The imaging findings associated with common diseases of the temporomandibular joint are presented and indications for brain imaging are discussed. Advantages and disadvantages of each imaging modality are presented as well as illustrations of the various imaging techniques.

  13. Effect of methotrexate upon antigen-induced arthritis of the rabbit temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Rafayelyan, Smbat; Meyer, Philipp; Radlanski, Ralf J; Minden, Kirsten; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg; Präger, Thomas M

    2015-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can cause severe growth disturbances of the craniomandibular system. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) of the rabbit TMJ is simulating the inflammatory process of the TMJ in JIA. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a systemic administration of methotrexate (MTX) on AIA in rabbits by means of three different histological staining methods. After sensitization, a bilateral arthritis of the TMJ was induced by an intra-articular administration of ovalbumin in 12 New Zealand white rabbits aged 10 weeks. From the 13th week of age, six of the 12 rabbits received weekly intramuscular injections of MTX, and the other six animals remained without therapy. Another six animals served as controls, receiving no treatment or intra-articular injections at all. After euthanasia at the age of 22 weeks, all TMJs were retrieved en bloc. Sagittal sections were cut and stained with haematoxylin-eosin (H-E), Safranin-O for the evaluation of the Mankin score and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). In the arthritis group, a chronic inflammation with degeneration of the articular cartilage was visible. In the MTX group, the signs of cartilage degeneration were significantly reduced compared with the arthritis group. In contrast, the joints in the control group were inconspicuous. A correlation between the Mankin score and TRAP-positive cells could be found. Systemic administration of MTX seems to have a positive effect upon the inflammatory process in the rabbit TMJ but fails to eliminate the sign of arthritis completely. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Modeling the biomechanics of articular eminence function in anthropoid primates.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Claire E

    2011-11-01

    One of the most prominent features of the cranial component of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the articular eminence (AE). This bar of bone is the primary surface upon which the condyle translates and rotates during movements of the mandible, and is therefore the primary point at which forces are transmitted from the mandible to the cranium during loading of the masticatory apparatus. The shape of the AE is highly variable across primates, and the raised eminence of humans has often been considered a defining feature of the human TMJ, yet few data exist to address whether this variation is functionally significant. This study used a broad interspecific sample of anthropoid primates to elaborate upon and test the predictions of a previously proposed model of AE function. This model suggests that AE inclination acts to resist non-normal forces at the TMJ, thereby maximizing bite forces (BFs). AE inclination was predicted to covary with two specific features of the masticatory apparatus: height of the TMJ above the occlusal plane; and inclination of the masticatory muscles. A correlate of this model is that taxa utilizing more resistant food objects should also exhibit relatively more inclined AEs. Results of the correlation analyses found that AE inclination is strongly correlated with height of the TMJ above the occlusal plane, but less so with inclination of the masticatory muscles. Furthermore, pairwise comparisons of closely related taxa with documented dietary differences found that the AE is consistently more inclined in taxa that utilize more resistant food items. These data preliminarily suggest that variation in AE morphology across anthropoid primates is functionally related to maximizing BFs, and add to the growing dataset of masticatory morphologies linked to feeding behavior.

  15. Modeling the biomechanics of articular eminence function in anthropoid primates

    PubMed Central

    Terhune, Claire E

    2011-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of the cranial component of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the articular eminence (AE). This bar of bone is the primary surface upon which the condyle translates and rotates during movements of the mandible, and is therefore the primary point at which forces are transmitted from the mandible to the cranium during loading of the masticatory apparatus. The shape of the AE is highly variable across primates, and the raised eminence of humans has often been considered a defining feature of the human TMJ, yet few data exist to address whether this variation is functionally significant. This study used a broad interspecific sample of anthropoid primates to elaborate upon and test the predictions of a previously proposed model of AE function. This model suggests that AE inclination acts to resist non-normal forces at the TMJ, thereby maximizing bite forces (BFs). AE inclination was predicted to covary with two specific features of the masticatory apparatus: height of the TMJ above the occlusal plane; and inclination of the masticatory muscles. A correlate of this model is that taxa utilizing more resistant food objects should also exhibit relatively more inclined AEs. Results of the correlation analyses found that AE inclination is strongly correlated with height of the TMJ above the occlusal plane, but less so with inclination of the masticatory muscles. Furthermore, pairwise comparisons of closely related taxa with documented dietary differences found that the AE is consistently more inclined in taxa that utilize more resistant food items. These data preliminarily suggest that variation in AE morphology across anthropoid primates is functionally related to maximizing BFs, and add to the growing dataset of masticatory morphologies linked to feeding behavior. PMID:21923720

  16. Combined intra-articular and extra-articular reconstructions for anterior tibial subluxation.

    PubMed

    Zarins, B

    1985-04-01

    This article describes several procedures that combine intra-articular techniques with extra-articular techniques to stabilize the knee with anterior tibial subluxation. The procedures detailed are reconstruction using the semitendinosus tendon and the iliotibial tract; tenodesis using a strip of iliotibial tract combined with intra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with the central third of the patellar tendon; "mini-reconstruction"; and a procedure utilizing a vascularized patellar tendon graft plus "dynamic" augmentation.

  17. Direct sagital computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint

    SciTech Connect

    Manzione, J.V.; Seltzer, S.E.; Katzberg, R.W.; Hammerschlag, S.B.; Chiango, B.F.

    1983-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a common clinical problem that has been reported to affect 4%-28% of adults. Temporomandibular joint arthrography has shown that many of these patients have intraarticular abnormalities involving the meniscus. A noninvasive test that could demonstrate the meniscus as well as bony abnormalities of the joint would be an important advance. In an attempt to develop such a noninvasive test, we have performed direct sagittal computed tomography (CT) on cadaver temporomandibular joints and have correlated the images with anatomic sections. We are currently applying this technique clinically and report one representative example in which direct sagittal computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint accurately demonstrated an anteriorly displaced meniscus.

  18. [Tinnitus and temporomandibular joint: State of the art].

    PubMed

    Lina-Granade, G; Truy, E; Ionescu, E; Garnier, P; Thai Van, H

    2016-12-01

    Tinnitus has been described in temporomandibular joint dysfunction for a long time. Yet, other disorders, such as hearing loss, stress, anxiety and depression, play a major role in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. Temporomandibular joint dysfunctions seem to increase the risk of tinnitus in patients with other predisposing factors. Especially somatosensory tinnitus, which is characterized by sound modulations with neck or mandible movements, is frequently associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, but it is not pathognomonic of such a disorder. In such cases, functional therapy of the temporomandibular joint should be part of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of patients with tinnitus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Supporting Biomaterials for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Drescher, Wolf; Rath, Björn; Tingart, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and researchers worldwide are continuously faced with the challenge of regenerating articular cartilage defects. However, until now, it has not been possible to completely mimic the biological and biochemical properties of articular cartilage using current research and development approaches. In this review, biomaterials previously used for articular cartilage repair research are addressed. Furthermore, a brief discussion of the state of the art of current cell printing procedures mimicking native cartilage is offered in light of their use as future alternatives for cartilage tissue engineering. Inkjet cell printing, controlled deposition cell printing tools, and laser cell printing are cutting-edge techniques in this context. The development of mimetic hydrogels with specific biological properties relevant to articular cartilage native tissue will support the development of improved, functional, and novel engineered tissue for clinical application. PMID:26069634

  20. Articular manifestations in patients with Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-López, María Esther; Díez-Morrondo, Carolina; Sánchez-Andrade, Amalia; Pego-Reigosa, Robustiano; Díaz, Pablo; Castro-Gago, Manuel

    To determine the percentage of Lyme patients with articular manifestations in NW Spain and to know their evolution and response to treatment. A retrospective study (2006-2013) was performed using medical histories of confirmed cases of Lyme disease showing articular manifestations. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, together with the treatment and evolution of the patients, were analysed. Seventeen out of 108 LD confirmed patients (15.7%) showed articular manifestations. Regarding those 17 patients, 64.7%, 29.4% and 5.9% presented arthritis, arthralgia and bursitis, respectively. The knee was the most affected joint. Articular manifestations were often associated to neurological, dermatological and cardiac pathologies. Otherwise, most patients were in Stage III. The 11.8% of the cases progressed to a recurrent chronic arthritis despite the administration of an appropriate treatment. Lyme disease patients showing articular manifestations should be included in the diagnosis of articular affections in areas of high risk of hard tick bite, in order to establish a suitable and early treatment and to avoid sequels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  1. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Asim K; Gaddikeri, Santhosh; Singhal, Aparna; Hardin, Simms; Tran, Benson D; Medina, Josue A; Curé, Joel K

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and common tumors are also discussed in this article. PMID:25170394

  2. Surgery of temporomandibular joint under local anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Gajiwala, Kalpesh J.

    2008-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint ankylosis is a debilitating disorder arising from an inability to open the mouth. This leads to poor nutrition, poor dental hygiene, and stunted growth. Anaesthesia, especially general anaesthesia, is very difficult to administer. There is a lack of direct visualization of the vocal cords, tongue fall following relaxation, and an already narrowed passage due to a small mandible, which makes even the blind nasal intubation difficult. There are various techniques described in literature to overcome these challenges, failing which, one needs to do tracheostomy. All the risks of difficult intubation and general anaesthesia can be avoided if the surgery is done under local anaesthesia. A simple but effective method of successful local anaesthesia is described, which allows successful temporomandibular joint reconstruction. PMID:19753260

  3. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gnanashanmugham, K.; Saravanan, B.; Sukumar, M. R.; Tajir, T. Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences). This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy PMID:26015741

  4. Temporomandibular Disorders: The Habitual Chewing Side Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Santana-Mora, Urbano; López-Cedrún, José; Mora, María J.; Otero, Xosé L.; Santana-Penín, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain, but, except where they occur subsequent to trauma, their cause remains unknown. This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side) and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder. This is the preliminary report of a randomized trial that aimed to test the effect of a new occlusal adjustment therapy. Methods The masticatory function of 21 randomly selected completely dentate participants with chronic temporomandibular disorders (all but one with unilateral symptoms) was assessed by observing them eat almonds, inspecting the lateral horizontal movement of the jaw, with kinesiography, and by means of interview. The condylar path in the sagittal plane and the lateral anterior guidance angles with respect to the Frankfort horizontal plane in the frontal plane were measured on both sides in each individual. Results Sixteen of 20 participants with unilateral symptoms chewed on the affected side; the concordance (Fisher’s exact test, P = .003) and the concordance-symmetry level (Kappa coefficient κ = 0.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.99; P = .002) were significant. The mean condylar path angle was steeper (53.47(10.88) degrees versus 46.16(7.25) degrees; P = .001), and the mean lateral anterior guidance angle was flatter (41.63(13.35) degrees versus 48.32(9.53) degrees P = .036) on the symptomatic side. Discussion The results of this study support the use of a new term based on etiology, “habitual chewing side syndrome”, instead of the nonspecific symptom-based “temporomandibular joint disorders”; this denomination is characterized in adults by a steeper condylar path, flatter lateral anterior guidance, and habitual chewing on the symptomatic side. PMID:23593156

  5. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction following shotgun injury.

    PubMed

    Taglialatela Scafati, C; Taglialatela Scafati, S; Gargiulo, M; Cassese, M; Parascandolo, S

    2008-04-01

    Shotgun injuries to the maxillofacial region may have minor or, more often, devastating consequences. The most important factor in determining the extent of injury is the distance of the victim from the muzzle of the gun: usually, the longer the distance, the less severe the damage. Here is reported a case of shotgun injury sustained from a distance of approximately 10 m in which the deeper penetration of a single lead pellet led to significant involvement of the temporomandibular joint.

  6. Comprehensive treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Navrátil, Leos; Navratil, Vaclav; Hajkova, Simona; Hlinakova, Petra; Dostalova, Tatjana; Vranová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Changing lifestyles, decreasing physical activity, which is increasing the number of degenerative joint diseases of various etiology, and certain dental procedures are increasing the number of patients complaining of pain in their temporomandibular joints. The aim of the study was to assess the benefits of comprehensive physiotherapy sessions in order to decrease the number of temporomandibular joint problems, thereby improving the patient's quality of life. An examination by a dentist determined each patient's treatment plan, which consisted of a medical exam, physical therapy and education. Each form of treatment was applied 10 times at intervals of 7-14 days. The main goal of the therapeutic physical education was to redress the muscle imbalance in the mandibular joint. This was achieved by restoring balance between the masticatory muscles, along with releasing the spastic shrouds found in the masticatory muscles. The aim of education was to teach the patient exercises focused on the temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscles. The intensity of the exercises and their composition were individually adjusted and adapted to their current state. Physical therapy consisted of the application of pulsed magnetic therapy, laser therapy, and non-invasive positive thermotherapy. The above procedure was conducted on a therapeutic group of 24 patients (3 men and 20 women). In the course of therapy, there were no complications, and all patients adhered to the prescribed regime. None reported any side effects. The mean treatment duration was 123 +/- 66 days. The outcome of the therapy was evaluated as described in the methodology, the degree of pain affecting the joint, and the opening ability of the mouth. In both parameters, there was a significant decline in patient pain. In a study devoted to tactics of rehabilitation treatment for temporomandibular joint disorders, the need for comprehensive long-term therapy, involving education, and learning proper chewing habits

  7. MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vijay M; Bacelar, Maria Teresa

    2002-11-01

    Technologic advances in MR imaging have had a decisive effect on the capacity of investigators to image the TMJ. This article provides a description of the normal anatomy and function of this joint. emphasizing the key imaging findings of internal derangement. A reading algorithm is given to achieve a systematic approach to the interpretation of a temporomandibular MR imaging study. Finally, a summary of key imaging findings of other miscellaneous pathologic processes involving this joint is provided.

  8. Radiation dose in temporomandibular joint zonography

    SciTech Connect

    Coucke, M.E.; Bourgoignie, R.R.; Dermaut, L.R.; Bourgoignie, K.A.; Jacobs, R.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Temporomandibular joint morphology and function can be evaluated by panoramic zonography. Thermoluminescent dosimetry was applied to evaluate the radiation dose to predetermined sites on a phantom eye, thyroid, pituitary, and parotid, and the dose distribution on the skin of the head and neck when the TMJ program of the Zonarc panoramic x-ray unit was used. Findings are discussed with reference to similar radiographic techniques.

  9. Orthognathic surgery and temporomandibular joint symptoms.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hwi-Dong; Kim, Sang Yoon; Park, Hyung-Sik; Jung, Young-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this article is to review temporomandibular joint symptoms as well as the effects of orthognathic surgery(OGS) on temporomandibular joint(TMJ). The causes of temporomandibular joint disease(TMD) are multifactorial, and the symptoms of TMD manifest as a limited range of motion of mandible, pain in masticatory muscles and TMJ, Joint noise (clicking, popping, or crepitus), myofascial pain, and other functional limitations. Treatment must be started based on the proper diagnosis, and almost symptoms could be subsided by reversible options. Minimally invasive options and open arthroplasty are also available following reversible treatment when indicated. TMD manifesting in a variety of symptoms, also can apply abnormal stress to mandibular condyles and affect its growth pattern of mandible. Thus, adaptive developmental changes on mandibular condyles and post-developmental degenerative changes of mandibular condyles can create alteration on facial skeleton and occlusion. The changes of facial skeleton in DFD patients following OGS have an impact on TMJ, masticatory musculature, and surrounding soft tissues, and the changes of TMJ symptoms. Maxillofacial surgeons must remind that any surgical procedures involving mandibular osteotomy can directly affect TMJ symptoms, thus pre-existing TMJ symptoms and diagnoses should be considered prior to treatment planning and OGS.

  10. [Osteo-articular manifestations of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Alaoui, Fatima-Zohra; Talaoui, Maha; Benamour, Saida

    2005-01-15

    Osteo-articular sarcoidosis may be evoked in the presence of peripheral articular manifestations or bone lesions that are sometimes asymptomatic. The aim of this work is to describe clinical and progressive features of sarcoidosis with osteo-articular involvement. Our retrospective study concerned 18 patients presenting with osteo-articular sarcoidosis from 1985 to 1999. We included patients with clinical diagnosis suggestive of sarcoidosis and with at least one positive biopsy. Among 35 cases of sarcoidosis, 18 patients had an osteo-articular manifestation (51.42%), which revealed the disease in 2 patients. The female sex was predominant (sex ratio M/F of 0.12), the mean age was 47 years and the time before diagnosis was 3.6 years. Articular involvement was the most frequent. Inflammatory joint pains were present in 11 cases, a Lofgren syndrome in 2 cases, a chronic arthritis in 4 cases and acute monoarthritis of the elbow in 1 case. A female patient exhibited a probable association with a spondylarthropathy. The bone involvement, revealing the disease in 1 case, was also noted in 5 cases, located exclusively on hands; this sarcoidosal dactyly was represented in 2 cases in the form of phalangeal geodes, in wired form (2 cases) and in large bulla form (1 case). The bone biopsy when it was performed was positive in all 3 cases. The patients responded well to corticosteroids. The osteo-articular involvement of sarcoidosis is polymorphic and can reveal the disease or may appear during the course of its progression.

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen antibodies in the temporomandibular joint disc of human foetuses

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, L.O.C.; Lodi, F.R.; Gomes, T.S.; Marques, S.R.; Oshima, C.T.F.; Lancellotti, C.L.P.; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J.F.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyse the immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen markers in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc of human foetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human foetuses supplied by Universidade Federal de Uberaba with gestational ages from 17 to 24 weeks were studied. The gestational age of the foetuses was determined by measuring the crown-rump (CR) length. Macroscopically, the foetuses were fixed in 10% formalin solution and dissected by removing the skin and subcutaneous tissue and exposing the deep structures. Immunohistochemical markers of type I and III were used to characterize the existence of collagen fibres. Analysis of the immunohistochemical markers of types I and III collagen revealed the presence of heterotypical fibril networks. PMID:22073371

  12. Vertical Craniofacial Morphology and its Relation to Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bavia, Paula Furlan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This study investigated the association between craniofacial morphology and temporomandibular disorders in adults. The influence of different craniofacial morphologies on painful temporomandibular disorders was also evaluated. Material and Methods A total of 200 subjects were selected, including 100 with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and 100 without TMD (control), diagnosed by research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders. All subjects were submitted to lateral cephalometric radiographs, and classified as brachyfacial, mesofacial, or dolichofacial by Ricketts’ analysis. Data were analysed by Tukey-Kramer and Chi-square tests. Results No association between craniofacial morphology and TMD was found (P = 0.6622). However, brachyfacial morphology influences the presence of painful TMD (P = 0.0077). Conclusions Craniofacial morphology is not related to temporomandibular disorders in general. PMID:27489610

  13. Orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders: a curriculum proposal for postgraduate programs.

    PubMed

    Greene, Charles S; Stockstill, John; Rinchuse, Donald; Kandasamy, Sanjivan

    2012-07-01

    In a previous article, we reported the results of a survey of American and Canadian orthodontic postgraduate programs to determine how the topics of occlusion, temporomandibular joint, and temporomandibular disorders were currently being taught. Based on the finding of considerable diversity among those programs, we decided to write a curriculum proposal for temporomandibular disorders that would be compatible with and satisfy the current curriculum guidelines for postgraduate orthodontic programs. These guidelines arose from a combination of the requirements published by the American Dental Association's Commission on Dental Accreditation and the written guide (July 2010) of the American Board of Orthodontics for the its clinical examination. The proposed curriculum, based on the latest scientific evidence in the temporomandibular disorder field, gives program directors a template for covering these subjects thoroughly. At the same time, they can focus on related orthodontic issues, so that their future graduates will be prepared to deal with patients who either have or later develop temporomandibular disorder problems.

  14. Spatial analysis of mandibular condyles in patients with temporomandibular disorders and normal controls using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rawi, Natheer Hashim; Uthman, Asmaa Tahseen; Sodeify, Sahar M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study is to investigate the condylar position and its relation to articular eminence and axial condylar angle in temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) patients and in normal controls using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: CBCT temporomandibular joint (TMJ) images of 70 participants (38 males and 32 females, mean age 26.4 years) were analyzed. They were divided into control group (including 35 subjects) and study group (including 35 subjects). Linear measurements of joint space and condyle determined the condylar position of each TMJ. Articular eminence height and inclination were also measured with axial condylar angle to determine its relation to condylar position. Independent and paired sample t-test was applied to compare between the groups and TMJ sides of the same group at significance level of 0.05. Results: Statistical significant differences were found between males and females of both groups regarding superior joint space (SJS), lateral joint space, A-P, and M-L condyle distance (P < 0.05). SJS, medial joint space (MJS), and eminence angle were greater (P < 0.01) in male's joints with TMD with flatter axial condylar angle (P < 0.05), when compared with normal TMJ counterpart. Females TMJs showed significantly higher values of MJS of affected side when compared with normal counterpart with flatter axial condylar angle (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Superior and MJS parameters were the ones that showed significant differences between affected and nonaffected joints. The mean axial condylar angle was smaller in joints with abnormal TMJ. This indicates that the condyles of the affected joints may rotate inward. PMID:28435374

  15. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  16. Effect of dexamethasone prodrug on inflamed temporomandibular joints in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Mitchell; Bury, Matthew; Holwegner, Callie; Reinhardt, Adam L; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Yijia; Giannini, Peter; Marx, David B; Wang, Dong; Reinhardt, Richard A

    2015-09-24

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) often causes inflammation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and has been treated with both systemic and intra-articular steroids, with concerns about effects on growing bones. In this study, we evaluated the impact of a macromolecular prodrug of dexamethasone (P-DEX) with inflammation-targeting potential applied systemically or directly to the TMJ. Joint inflammation was initiated by injecting two doses of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) at 1-month intervals into the right TMJs of 24 growing Sprague-Dawley male rats (controls on left side). Four additional rats were not manipulated. With the second CFA injection, animals received (1) 5 mg of P-DEX intra-articularly (n = 9), (2) 15 mg of P-DEX into the tail vein (n = 7), or (3) nothing in addition to CFA (n = 8). The rats were killed 28 days later and measured by radiography for ramus height (condylar superior to gonion inferior [CsGoInf]), by micro-computed tomography for condylar width (CW) and bone volume/standardized condylar volume (BV/CV), and by histology for retrodiscal inflammatory cells. Inflammation targeting of systemic P-DEX was confirmed by IVIS infrared dye imaging. Inflammation and bone growth were compared between groups using analysis of variance and Pearson's correlations. CFA caused a significant reduction in CsGoInf (p < 0.05), but neither route of P-DEX administration had an effect on CsGoInf or CW at CFA injection sites. BV/CV was significantly reduced in both inflamed and control condyles as a result of either steroid application (p < 0.05). The inflammatory infiltrate was overwhelmingly lymphocytic, comprising 16.4 ± 1.3 % of the field in CFA alone vs. <0.01 % lymphocytes in contralateral controls (p < 0.0001). Both P-DEX TMJ (10.1 ± 1.2 %) and systemic P-DEX (8.9 ± 1.7 %) reduced lymphocytes (p < 0.002). The total area of inflammatory infiltrate was significantly less in the systemic injection group than in the group that received CFA injections

  17. Influence of unilateral disc displacement on the stress response of the temporomandibular joint discs during opening and mastication

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Palomar, A; Doblaré, M

    2007-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint plays a crucial role in human mastication acting as a guide of jaw movements. During these movements, the joint is subjected to loads which cause stresses and deformations in its cartilaginous structures. A perfect balance between the two sides of the joint is essential to maintain the physiological stress level within the tissues. Therefore, it has been suggested that a derangement of the joint is a contributing factor in the development of mandibular asymmetry, especially if problems of the temporomandibular joint start in childhood or adolescence. To analyze the movement of the mandible and the stresses undergone by the discs, two finite element models of the human temporomandibular joint including the masticatory system were developed, one corresponding to a healthy joint and the other with a unilateral anterior disc displacement with their movement controlled by muscle activation. A fibre-reinforced porohyperelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the articular discs. The stress distribution was analyzed in both models during free opening and closing, and during the introduction of a resistant force between incisors or molars. It was found that a slight unilateral anterior disc displacement does not lead to mandibular asymmetry but to a slight decrease of the maximum gape. With the introduction of a restriction between incisors, the maximum stresses moved to the anterior band in contrast to what happened if the restriction was imposed between molars where maximum stresses were located more posteriorly. Finally, the presence of a unilateral displacement of the disc involved a strong change in the overall behaviour of the joint including also the healthy side, where the maximum stresses moved to the posterior part. PMID:17725577

  18. Progress in intra-articular therapy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Setton, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Diarthrodial joints are well suited to intra-articular injection, and the local delivery of therapeutics in this fashion brings several potential advantages to the treatment of a wide range of arthropathies. Possible benefits include increased bioavailability, reduced systemic exposure, fewer adverse events, and lower total drug costs. Nevertheless, intra-articular therapy is challenging because of the rapid egress of injected materials from the joint space; this elimination is true of both small molecules, which exit via synovial capillaries, and of macromolecules, which are cleared by the lymphatic system. In general, soluble materials have an intra-articular dwell time measured only in hours. Corticosteroids and hyaluronate preparations constitute the mainstay of FDA-approved intra-articular therapeutics. Recombinant proteins, autologous blood products and analgesics have also found clinical use via intra-articular delivery. Several alternative approaches, such as local delivery of cell and gene therapy, as well as the use of microparticles, liposomes, and modified drugs, are in various stages of preclinical development. PMID:24189839

  19. Temporomandibular joint injury potential imposed by the low-velocity extension-flexion maneuver.

    PubMed

    Howard, R P; Hatsell, C P; Guzman, H M

    1995-03-01

    It has been proposed that significant temporomandibular joint injury can occur as a result of rapid extension-flexion motion of the neck (whip-lash). This motion, which is experienced by passengers in vehicles that undergo rear-end collisions, has been described as causing rapid protrusion and opening of the mandible. It has been speculated that this relative motion between the mandible and the cranium produces forces at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that injure the articular elements. The objective of this study was to measure these forces by an experimental method. Accelerometer sensor and high-speed cinematographic data were obtained from the kinematic responses of live human test subjects positioned as occupants in motor vehicles that underwent staged low-velocity rear-end collisions. Linear and moment forces generated at the TMJs were obtained from the resultant acceleration pulse at the craniomandibular complex, estimation of the mass properties of the mandible and its appended soft tissues, and the application of Newton's Second Law of motion. The maximum linear forces generated at the TMJ in a rear-end collision resulting in a velocity change of the test subject of 8 km/h (5 mph) were in the 7 to 10 N (1.6 to 2.2 lb) range. Moment forces at the joint peaked briefly at 0.55 N.m (4.81 lb-in). These force magnitudes generated at the TMJ constitute a minor fraction of the forces experienced at the joint during normal physiologic function. It is a conclusion of this study that injuries to the TMJ attributed to low-velocity "whiplash" cannot be accounted for by the joint forces produced by this maneuver.

  20. Myogenic temporomandibular disorders: Clinical systemic comorbidities in a female population sample

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Jiménez, Juan; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; de-la-Hoz-Aizpurua, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Myogenic temporomandibular disorders (MTMD) frequently coexist with other clinical conditions in the same individual. In the last decades, several authors have analyzed these comorbidities looking for the origin of this overlapping. Objetives The aim of this study was to perform a comparative anaylisis between a group of patients with MTMD and a control group of dental patients without dysfunctional pathology to assess whether there are significant differences in the presence of systemic medical comorbidities between the two groups. Material and Methods Restrospective epidemiological analysis, based on medical questionnaires in a group of 31 patients, women, aged from 24 to 58 (average 39.96 years), diagnosed with MTMD (Masticatory Myofascial Pain), with a control group with the same number of individuals, gender and age range to evaluate if there is a significant statistical difference in the presence of medical comorbidities in this group of patients with MTMD and if they are in a higher risk of suffering different pathological conditions. Results It was found that the group affected by MTMD presented many more associated medical conditions than the control group: health changes during the last year, medical evaluations and treatments, presence of pain, sinus disease, tinnitus, headache, joint pain, ocular disorders, fatigue, dizziness, genitourinary disorders and xerostomia among others; and they were also in a higher risk to suffer other pathological entities as headaches and articular pain. Conclusions These results reinforce our hypothesis that MTMD belong to a group of medical conditions triggered by a loss of equilibrium of the individual’s Psycho-Neuro-Endocrine-Immune (PNEI) Axis that produces alterations in the response against external stimuli in some genetically predisposed individuals. It is, therefore, necessary to change the way of diagnosing and managing these individual’s medical conditions, being mandatory to look from a more

  1. Temporomandibular joint involvement in rheumatoid arthritis patients: association between clinical and tomographic data.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Patrícia Cf; Guimaraes, Josemar P; de Souza, Viviane A; Dias, Isabela M; Silva, Jesca Nn; Devito, Karina L; Bonato, Leticia L

    2016-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia, which usually affects multiple joints. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) becomes susceptible to the development of changes resulting from RA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of TMD and degenerative bone changes in TMJ in patients diagnosed with RA (rheumatoid arthritis). The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/ TMD) questionnaire was used for clinical evaluation of the TMJ and for TMD classification of 49 patients of both sexes and all ages. Individuals who had already undergone prior treatment for TMD and/or with a history of craniofacial trauma were excluded. The participants underwent cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) exams to assess possible degenerative changes in the mandibular condyle and the articular eminence. The frequencies of the changes found are presented and the possible associations between clinical and CT findings analyzed using the chisquare test. It was found that 75% of the patients had complaints of pain in the orofacial region, including arthralgia, myalgia or both. As for the diagnoses, 100% of the sample was diagnosed as RDC/TMD Group III (arthralgia, osteoarthritis or osteoarthrosis). The presence of degenerative bone changes was found in 90% of the subjects, the most prevalent being flattening (78.7%) and osteophytes (39.3%). The association test suggested a greater tendency to develop degenerative changes in asymptomatic individuals (p = 0.01). The asymptomatic nature of the involvement of the TMJ in RA can hide structural damage seen in imaging. Thus, the importance of early diagnosis and treatment to reduce structural and functional damage is emphasized.

  2. Relationship between self-reported sleep bruxism and pain in patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Blanco Aguilera, A; Gonzalez Lopez, L; Blanco Aguilera, E; De la Hoz Aizpurua, J L; Rodriguez Torronteras, A; Segura Saint-Gerons, R; Blanco Hungría, A

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between self-reported sleep bruxism and the age, gender, clinical subtypes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), pain intensity and grade of chronic pain in patients previously diagnosed with TMD. Thousand two-hundred and twenty patients of the Andalusian Health Service were examined using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) questionnaire. The inclusion and exclusion criteria were those included in the RDC/TMD criteria. The bruxism diagnosis was drawn from the question, 'Have you been told, or do you notice that you grind your teeth or clench your jaw while sleeping at night?' in the anamnestic portion of the questionnaire. A bivariate analysis was conducted, comparing the presence of perceived parafunctional activity with age (over age 60 and under age 60), gender, different subtypes of TMD, pain intensity, grade of chronic pain and presence of self-perceived locked joints. The overall prevalence of self-reported sleep bruxism (SB) was 54.51%. A statistically significant association was found between the presence of SB and patients under age 60, women, greater pain intensity, greater pain interference with activities of daily living, and the axis-I groups affected by both muscular and articular pathology. There is a statistically significant association between self-reported sleep bruxism and women under age 60 who have painful symptoms of TMD. There is also a positive association between this parafunctional habit and the presence of chronic pain. However, more studies that cover larger samples and differentiate between sleep bruxism and awake bruxism are needed.

  3. [Habitual dislocation of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Hjortdal, O

    1975-02-01

    A case of recurrent dislocation of the left temporamandibular joint is reported. Different methods of treatment are reviewed. The present case was successfully treated with a combination of two methods: 1. Restriction of excessive condylar movement by means of continuous loop wiring and intermaxillary monofilament fishing line. 2. Intra-articular injections of autologous blood.

  4. The biomechanical ambiguity of the articular surface.

    PubMed Central

    Kamalanathan, S; Broom, N D

    1993-01-01

    A series of micromechanical tests carried out on the articular surface of cartilage have provided an accurate description of the mechanical properties of any one site with respect to the orientation framework obtained from its characteristic split-line direction. Ultrastructural studies revealed little evidence that the split-line direction correlated strongly with any preferred alignment of fibrils. This paper therefore offers a new interpretation of the biomechanical significance of the widely used split-line test for the articular surface of cartilage. Images Fig. 9 Fig. 2 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 PMID:8300433

  5. [Conservative management of articular metacarpophalangeal joint fractures].

    PubMed

    Ebinger, T; Kinzl, L; Mentzel, M

    2000-10-01

    We present a splint system for a protected mobilization program after closed reduction of articular proximal phalangeal base fractures. This therapy consists of the periarticular soft tissue and functional anatomy. The soft-tissue around the base of the proximal phalanx leads to a circular stabilization effect. This so called Zancolli Complex (Metacarpophalangeal Retention Apparatus) can be used with the effect of a brace treatment. Treating 31 patients with articular fractures of the proximal phalanx way we found good functional results within a mean follow up period of 2 years after the accident.

  6. Preparation of Articular Cartilage Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stupina, T A

    2016-08-01

    We developed and adapted a technology for preparation of articular cartilage specimens for scanning electron microscopy. The method includes prefixation processing, fixation, washing, and dehydration of articular cartilage specimens with subsequent treatment in camphene and air-drying. The technological result consists in prevention of deformation of the articular cartilage structures. The method is simpler and cheaper than the known technologies.

  7. Effect of methylprednisolone, hyaluronic acid and pioglitazone on histological remodeling of temporomandibular joint cartilage in rabbits affected by drug-induced osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kałużyński, Krzysztof; Trybek, Grzegorz; Smektała, Tomasz; Masiuk, Marek; Myśliwiec, Leszek; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna

    2016-02-11

    The aims of this study were to assess the anti-degenerative effects of pioglitazone and to compare these effects with those of methylprednisolone and hyaluronic acid on drug-induced osteoarthritis in rabbits' temporomandibular joint cartilage. The experiment was conducted on 40 Californian white rabbits. Degenerative changes were induced by intra-articular injections of papain. Subsequently, all of the animals were randomly assigned to one of four groups: 1) a control group that received no medications; 2) a group treated with 4 intra-articular injections of 2 mg (0.2 ml) of hyaluronic acid at weekly intervals; 3) a group treated with 4 intra-articular injections of 2 mg (0.1 ml) of methylprednisolone at weekly intervals; 4) a group administered pioglitazone orally in daily doses of 2 mg/kg of body weight. Four weeks after the beginning of drug administration, the rabbits were sacrificed. Sagittal sections of the intra-articular cartilage (discs) and mandibular condyles were stained with hematoxylin and eosin by the PAS technique and with van Gieson's solution. Histologic examinations, as well as cartilage thickness and number of cell layers measurements, were performed. Histologic assessment in cases of arthritis-associated pathologies revealed that changes occurred most frequently in the control group and least frequently in the pioglitazone group. There were no differences in the histological structures of the intra-articular discs. Cartilage thickness measurements demonstrated the thinnest cartilage in group 2 and the thickest in group 3. Analysis of cell layer numbers showed the most numerous layers in the pioglitazone group and the least in the control group. Pioglitazone and hyaluronic acid showed anti-degenerative properties compared to methylprednisolone in an animal model.

  8. Mandibular tori, migraine and temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Clifford, T; Lamey, P J; Fartash, L

    1996-05-25

    In this study the presence of mandibular tori was related to conditions associated with parafunctional activity. Parafunction in the form of tooth clenching or grinding has been associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and recently migraine. Patients attending a facial pain clinic in Belfast were assessed for the presence of tori and results compared to age and gender matched controls. The findings were that mandibular tori were present significantly more commonly in both migraineurs and TMD patients. The results support an association with parafunction in the aetiology of mandibular tori and suggest that tori are a useful marker of past or present parafunction in some patients.

  9. Myogenous temporomandibular disorders: diagnostic and management considerations.

    PubMed

    Fricton, James

    2007-01-01

    Myogenous temporomandibular disorders (or masticatory myalgia) are characterized by pain and dysfunction that arise from pathologic and functional processes in the masticatory muscles. There are several distinct muscle disorder subtypes in the masticatory system, including myofascial pain, myositis, muscle spasm, and muscle contracture. The major characteristics of masticatory myalgia include pain, muscle tenderness, limited range of motion, and other symptoms (eg, fatigability, stiffness, subjective weakness). Comorbid conditions and complicating factors also are common and are discussed. Management follows with stretching, posture, and relaxation exercises, physical therapy, reduction of contributing factors, and as necessary, muscle injections.

  10. Quantitative Radiological Diagnosis Of The Temporomandibular Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Steven L.; Heffez, Leslie B.

    1989-05-01

    Recent impressive technological advances in imaging techniques for the human temporomandibular (tm) joint, and in enabling geometric algorithms have outpaced diagnostic analyses. The authors present a basis for systematic quantitative diagnoses that exploit the imaging advancements. A reference line, coordinate system, and transformations are described that are appropriate for tomography of the tm joint. These yield radiographic measurements (disk displacement) and observations (beaking of radiopaque dye and disk shape) that refine diagnostic classifications of anterior displacement of the condylar disk. The relevance of these techniques has been clinically confirmed. Additional geometric invariants and procedures are proposed for future clinical verification.

  11. Imaging Approach to Temporomandibular Joint Disorders.

    PubMed

    Morales, H; Cornelius, R

    2016-03-01

    Internal derangement is the most common temporomandibular joint disorder. Degenerative osteoarthritis and trauma are next in frequency. Less common pathology includes rheumatoid arthritis, synovial chondromatosis, calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate deposition disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, tumors, infection, and osteonecrosis. We provide a systematic approach to facilitate interpretation based on major anatomic structures: disc-attachments, joint space, condyle, and lateral pterygoid muscle. Relevant graphic anatomy and state of the art imaging are discussed in correlation with current clinical and therapeutic highlights of pathologic entities affecting the joint.

  12. Nasal obstruction may alleviate bruxism related temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Devrim; Cankaya, Mustafa; Livaoglu, Murat

    2011-02-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a collective term used to identify a group of musculoskeletal conditions of the temporomandibular region. Bruxism is a non-functional activity characterized by repeated tooth clenching or grinding in an unconscious manner. Over the time bruxism may lead to TMD by the uploading it causes. Nasal obstruction is a common complaint that necessitates mouth breathing when severe. The treatment of bruxism is frequently performed by oral appliances, which induce occlusal disengagement and relax jaw musculature and therefore reduce the force on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We believe that nasal obstruction may indirectly have a preemptive and therapeutic effect on sleep bruxism related TMD by causing mouth breathing.

  13. Assessing the reliability of MRI-CBCT image registration to visualize temporomandibular joints

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, J L; Alsufyani, N; Jibri, Z; Lai, H; Major, P W

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate image quality of two methods of registering MRI and CBCT images of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), particularly regarding TMJ articular disc–condyle relationship and osseous abnormality. Methods: MR and CBCT images for 10 patients (20 TMJs) were obtained and co-registered using two methods (non-guided and marker guided) using Mirada XD software (Mirada Medical Ltd, Oxford, UK). Three radiologists independently and blindly evaluated three types of images (MRI, CBCT and registered MRI-CBCT) at two times (T1 and T2) on two criteria: (1) quality of MRI-CBCT registrations (excellent, fair or poor) and (2) TMJ disc–condylar position and articular osseous abnormalities (osteophytes, erosions and subcortical cyst, surface flattening, sclerosis). Results: 75% of the non-guided registered images showed excellent quality, and 95% of the marker-guided registered images showed poor quality. Significant difference was found between the non-guided and marker-guided registration (χ2 = 108.5; p < 0.01). The interexaminer variability of the disc position in MRI [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.50 at T1, 0.56 at T2] was lower than that in MRI-CBCT registered images [ICC = 0.80 (0.52–0.92) at T1, 0.84 (0.62–0.93) at T2]. Erosions and subcortical cysts were noticed less frequently in the MRI-CBCT images than in CBCT images. Conclusions: Non-guided registration proved superior to marker-guided registration. Although MRI-CBCT fused images were slightly more limited than CBCT alone to detect osseous abnormalities, use of the fused images improved the consistency among examiners in detecting disc position in relation to the condyle. PMID:25734241

  14. Ultrasonographic imaging of the temporomandibular joint in healthy cattle and pathological findings in one clinical case.

    PubMed

    Borges, N C; Weissengruber, G E; Huber, J; Kofler, J

    2016-11-01

    To describe the normal ultrasonographic appearance of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in cattle, and to describe the ultrasonographic pathology of the TMJ as assessed in one cow with TMJ disease. The TMJ of 12 healthy Holstein-Friesian cows were examined using a portable ultrasonographic unit with a 7.5 MHz linear probe and a 6.0 MHz convex probe. Each TMJ was scanned in a rostrolateral, lateral and caudolateral plane. In addition, the TMJ of one 2-year-old cow with clinical signs of food retention in the mouth, head tilt, swelling and pain in the right TMJ region and an infected horn fracture was examined ultrasonographically. The bone surfaces of the temporal process, the zygomatic process and the temporal bone, the larger muscles of the TMJ region, the superficial temporal vein, and the parotid salivary gland could be imaged in all normal healthy cattle. Using the linear probe, the joint capsule was visible in 17/24 (71%) cases in the caudolateral plane, but the articular disc could not be visualised. With the convex probe, the joint capsule could be imaged in all cases in the caudolateral plane, and the articular disc in 13/24 (54%) cases in the caudolateral plane. It was never possible to see the synovial pouch in healthy cattle using either probe. By contrast, in the cow diagnosed with septic arthritis of the right TMJ, a marked anechoic and heterogeneous hypoechoic effusion of the TMJ with distension of the joint capsule was visualised. The results of this descriptive study serve to provide a reference for ultrasonography of pathological conditions of the TMJ region in cattle. As many veterinarians are equipped with ultrasound machines with 5-8 MHz linear rectal probes, the authors recommend using these probes for further investigation of clinical cases with swelling of the TMJ region and/or masticatory problems of unclear origin to exclude or diagnose TMJ disorders.

  15. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT IN 1018 ASYMPTOMATIC HORSES: A MULTI-INSTITUTION STUDY.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Kneissl, Sibylle; Rawlinson, Jennifer E; Zwick, Timo; Zekas, Lisa; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Bienert-Zeit, Astrid

    2016-05-01

    Published descriptions of nonseptic arthritis of the equine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare and large studies investigating variations in the TMJ for asymptomatic horses are lacking. The objectives of this cross-sectional, retrospective, multi-institutional study were to describe anatomical variations in the TMJ detected using computed tomography (CT) in an equid population asymptomatic for TMJ disease and determine whether these variations were associated with patient signalment, reason for CT examination, or CT slice width. Medical records at eight hospitals were searched for horses that had head/neck CT scans and no clinical signs of TMJ disease. Age, breed, sex, clinical presentation, and CT slice width data were recorded. Alterations in CT contour and density of the mandibular condyles, mandibular fossae, and TMJ intra-articular discs were described for each horse. Generalized logistic regression was used to test associations between anatomical variations and horse age. A total of 1018 horses were sampled. Anatomical variations were found in TMJ CT images for 40% of horses and 29% of joints. These were dichotomous with regard to age. Horses <1 year old commonly had alterations in the shape and density of the mandibular condyle. Older horses commonly had spherical hypodensities within the mandibular condyles consistent with bone cysts; and hyperdense regions of the intra-articular disc consistent with dystrophic mineralization. Findings indicated that TMJ anatomic variations were common in CT images of younger and older horses asymptomatic for TMJ disease. Future studies are needed to more definitively characterize these CT variations using gross pathology and histopathology. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  16. Temporomandibular joint in miniature pigs: anatomy, cell replication, and relation to loading.

    PubMed

    Herring, Susan W; Decker, Jay D; Liu, Zi-Jun; Ma, Tsun

    2002-03-01

    The mechanical environment is a regulator of growth and adaptation of the musculoskeletal system, including joints. Although pigs (Sus scrofa) are used frequently as models for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction, no systematic description of microanatomy exists for this species. We injected the thymidine analog 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) into 10- to 11-month-old miniature pigs that were undergoing measurements of TMJ bone strain. Ten hr later, the animals were sacrificed and their heads were perfused. Histological sections were used to map the distribution of replicating cells. Additional observations were made on gross dissections of jaw joints obtained from an abattoir. The pig TMJ is better supported than that of humans laterally and medially, but more vulnerable posteriorly. The posterior attachment area of the intra-articular disc is fibro-fatty rather than vascular, as in humans. Cartilage lines the articular eminence as well as the condylar surface. At the posterosuperior region of the condyle, the cartilage ends abruptly and is replaced by an invaginating, actively replicating periosteum. Almost all of the BrdU-labeled cells resided in the prechondroblastic zones. The condyle had more replicating cells than did the eminence (P < 0.02), but lateral and medial locations did not differ in either element. In sagittal sections, the condyle had more replicating cells posteriorly (P < 0.001), but no A-P differences were seen in the eminence. Comparisons of these data with data on bone strain indicate that increased loading is negatively associated with cell replication. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Intra-articular therapies for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shirley P; Hunter, David J

    2016-10-01

    Conventional medical therapies for osteoarthritis are mainly palliative in nature, aiming to control pain and symptoms. Traditional intra-articular therapies are not recommended in guidelines as first line therapy, but are potential alternatives, when conventional therapies have failed. Current and future intra-articular drug therapies for osteoarthritis are highlighted, including corticosteroids, hyaluronate, and more controversial treatments marketed commercially, namely platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal cell therapy. Intraarticular disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs are the future of osteoarthritis treatments, aiming at structural modification and altering the disease progression. Interleukin-1β inhibitor, bone morphogenic protein-7, fibroblast growth factor 18, bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, human serum albumin, and gene therapy are discussed in this review. The evolution of drug development in osteoarthritis is limited by the ability to demonstrate effect. High quality trials are required to justify the use of existing intra-articular therapies and to advocate for newer, promising therapies. Challenges in osteoarthritis therapy research are fundamentally related to the complexity of the pathological mechanisms of osteoarthritis. Novel drugs offer hope in a disease with limited medical therapy options. Whether these future intra-articular therapies will provide clinically meaningful benefits, remains unknown.

  18. [Biogenic stimulants of metabolism in articular cartilage].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V E; Novikova, A V

    2011-01-01

    The review considers issues of pharmacodynamics and clinical applications of drugs with the metabolic type of action, which stimulate regeneration and provide the protective action on articular cartilage in cases of osteoarthritis. Published data of the experimental and clinical trials of the main chondroprotective agents are analyzed.

  19. Equine Models of Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Fortier, Lisa A.; Frisbie, David D.; Nixon, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage injuries of the knee and ankle are common, and a number of different methods have been developed in an attempt to improve their repair. Clinically, there are 2 distinct aims of cartilage repair: 1) restoration of joint function and 2) prevention or at least delay of the onset of osteoarthritis. These goals can potentially be achieved through replacement of damaged or lost articular cartilage with tissue capable of functioning under normal physiological environments for an extended period, but limitations of the final repair product have long been recognized and still exist today. Screening of potential procedures for human clinical use is done by preclinical studies using animal models. This article reviews equine chondral defect models that have been recently recognized to have specific advantages for translation into human articular cartilage regeneration. Defect models in the femoropatellar, femorotibial, and tibiotalar joints have been developed. The horse provides the closest approximation to humans in terms of articular cartilage and subchondral bone thickness, and it is possible to selectively leave the entire calcified cartilage layer or completely remove it. The defect on the equine medial femoral condyle emulates medial femoral condylar lesions in humans. Other advantages of the equine model include an ability to use an arthroscope to create lesions and perform second-look arthroscopies, the large lesion size allowing for more tissue for evaluation, and the ability to have controlled exercise and test the ability of the repair to cope with athletic exercise as well as institute rehabilitation regimens. PMID:26069590

  20. Intra-articular risks of suprapatellar nailing.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Michael J; Collinge, Cory A; Patzkowski, Jeanne C; Masini, Brendan D; Blease, Robert E; Hsu, Joseph R

    2012-12-01

    To determine the risks to local anatomy near the starting point for tibial nailing during suprapatellar nailing, 15 fresh-frozen hemipelvis specimens were nailed using a suprapatellar technique. After nail passage, the menisci and articular surfaces, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertion, intermeniscal ligament, and fat pad were assessed for injury. The distance from the entry portal to the menisci, articular surfaces, and ACL insertion was determined. Medial meniscus injury occurred in 1 (6.7%) specimen and medial articular injury in 2 (13%). Nails passed through the fat pad in all specimens; intermeniscal ligament injury occurred in 3 (20%) specimens. The ACL insertion and lateral structures were not injured in any specimen. The distance from the entry portal margin to the lateral and medial menisci was 6.46±2.47 mm and 4.74±3.17 mm, respectively. The distances to the lateral and medial articular margins measured 10.33±3.62 mm and 6.54±3.57 mm, respectively. The distance to the ACL insertion averaged 5.80±3.94 mm. Suprapatellar nailing is associated with a risk of injury to anterior knee structures comparable to other nailing techniques. Additional clinical studies are warranted to further define the role of this technique in the management of tibial fractures.

  1. Cryoprotectant agent toxicity in porcine articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jomha, Nadr M; Weiss, Andrew D H; Fraser Forbes, J; Law, Garson K; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2010-12-01

    Large articular cartilage defects have proven difficult to treat and often result in osteoarthritis of the affected joint. Cryopreservation of articular cartilage can provide an increased supply of tissues for osteochondral allograft but cryoprotective agents are required; however, few studies have been performed on the toxicity of these agents. This study was designed to determine the order of toxicity of five commonly used cryoprotectant agents as well as interactions that occur between them. Isolated porcine articular chondrocytes were exposed to individual cryoprotectant agents and combinations of these agents at 1M and 3M concentrations for 5 min and 120 min. Cell viability was determined using membrane integrity dyes and a metabolic activity assay. Subsequently, a regression analysis based study was undertaken to extract the maximum amount of information from this data. Results of this study demonstrated that all 1M solutions were minimally toxic. The 3M solutions demonstrated varying toxicity after 120 min. Ethylene glycol and glycerol were less toxic than propylene glycol, dimethyl sulfoxide, and formamide. Combinations of cryoprotectant agents were less toxic than single cryoprotectant agents at the same concentration. This is the most comprehensive study investigating cryoprotectant agent toxicity in articular chondrocytes and has resulted in important information regarding the order of toxicity and interactions that occur between these agents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Body Weight Independently Affects Articular Cartilage Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Denning, W. Matt; Winward, Jason G.; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J. Ty; Seeley, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key points Walking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration. Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  3. Emerging intra-articular causes of groin pain in athletes.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, Prajyot; Shetty, Gautam; Mane, Prashant; Shetty, Vijay

    2014-12-01

    Groin pain remains one of the most poorly understood conditions in clinical sports medicine. It may be caused by either extra-articular or intra-articular conditions. While extra-articular causes have been extensively studied and reasonably understood, a number of elusive intra-articular causes are emerging, many of which were previously unknown and therefore undiagnosed, leading to premature ending of many competitive careers. This article makes an attempt to look at various, elusive intra-articular causes of groin pain in athletes. This article also analyses the currently available evidence on trends in diagnosis and treatment for these conditions.

  4. Development of an artificial articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Oka, M; Noguchi, T; Kumar, P; Ikeuchi, K; Yamamuro, T; Hyon, S H; Ikada, Y

    1990-01-01

    We have attempted to develop an artificial articular cartilage on the basis of a new viewpoint of joint biomechanics in which lubrication and load-bearing mechanisms of natural and artificial joints are compared. We investigated poly(vinyl alcohol)-hydrogel (PVA-H) which has been recognized as a rubber-like gel and have improved the mechanical properties of this gel through a new synthetic process. In this article we report the biocompatibility and various mechanical properties of the new, improved PVA-H from the aspect of its usefulness as artificial articular cartilage. As regards the lubrication, we measured the change of thickness and fluid pressure of the gap formed between a glass plate and the specimen under loading and found that the PVA-H had a thicker fluid film under higher pressure than polyethylene (PE). The momentary stress transmitted through the specimen revealed that PVA-H had a lower peak stress and a longer duration of sustained stress than PE, suggesting a better damping effect. The wear factor of PVA-H was approximately five times as large as that of PE. Histological findings of the articular cartilage and synovial membranes around the PVA-H implanted for 8-52 weeks showed neither inflammatory nor degenerative changes. The PVA-H artificial articular cartilage could be attached to the underlying bone using an osteochondral composite material. Although there remain still some problems to solve, PVA-H seems to be a very interesting and promising material which meets the requirements of artificial articular cartilage.

  5. The role of orthodontics in temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Michelotti, A; Iodice, G

    2010-05-01

    Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD) is the main cause of pain of non-dental origin in the oro-facial region including head, face and related structures. The aetiology and the pathophysiology of TMD is poorly understood. It is generally accepted that the aetiology is multifactorial, involving a large number of direct and indirect causal factors. Among such factors, occlusion is frequently cited as one of the major aetiological factors causing TMD. It is well known from epidemiologic studies that TMD-related signs and symptoms, particularly temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds, are frequently found in children and adolescents and show increased prevalence among subjects between 15 and 45 years old. Aesthetic awareness, the development of new aesthetic orthodontic techniques and the possibility of improving prosthetic rehabilitation has increased the number of adults seeking orthodontic treatment. The shift in patient age also has increased the likelihood of patients presenting with signs and symptoms of TMD. Because orthodontic treatment lasts around 2 years, orthodontic patients may complain about TMD during or after treatment and orthodontists may be blamed for causing TMD by unsatisfied patients. This hypothesis of causality has led to legal problems for dentists and orthodontists. For these reasons, the interest in the relationship between occlusal factors, orthodontic treatment and TMD has grown and many studies have been conducted. Indeed, claims that orthodontic treatment may cause or cure TMD should be supported by good evidence. Hence, the aim of this article is to critically review evidence for a possible association between malocclusion, orthodontic treatment and TMD.

  6. Temporomandibular disorders. Part 2: conservative management

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate management of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) requires an understanding of the underlying dysfunction associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding structures. A comprehensive examination process, as described in part 1 of this series, can reveal underlying clinical findings that assist in the delivery of comprehensive physical therapy services for patients with TMD. Part 2 of this series focuses on management strategies for TMD. Physical therapy is the preferred conservative management approach for TMD. Physical therapists are professionally well-positioned to step into the void and provide clinical services for patients with TMD. Clinicians should utilize examination findings to design rehabilitation programs that focus on addressing patient-specific impairments. Potentially appropriate plan of care components include joint and soft tissue mobilization, trigger point dry needling, friction massage, therapeutic exercise, patient education, modalities, and outside referral. Management options should address both symptom reduction and oral function. Satisfactory results can often be achieved when management focuses on patient-specific clinical variables. PMID:24976744

  7. Temporomandibular joint: disorders, treatments, and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Ingawalé, Shirish; Goswami, Tarun

    2009-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a complex, sensitive, and highly mobile joint. Millions of people suffer from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in USA alone. The TMD treatment options need to be looked at more fully to assess possible improvement of the available options and introduction of novel techniques. As reconstruction with either partial or total joint prosthesis is the potential treatment option in certain TMD conditions, it is essential to study outcomes of the FDA approved TMJ implants in a controlled comparative manner. Evaluating the kinetics and kinematics of the TMJ enables the understanding of structure and function of normal and diseased TMJ to predict changes due to alterations, and to propose more efficient methods of treatment. Although many researchers have conducted biomechanical analysis of the TMJ, many of the methods have certain limitations. Therefore, a more comprehensive analysis is necessary for better understanding of different movements and resulting forces and stresses in the joint components. This article provides the results of a state-of-the-art investigation of the TMJ anatomy, TMD, treatment options, a review of the FDA approved TMJ prosthetic devices, and the TMJ biomechanics.

  8. Extraction techniques for the decellularization of tissue engineered articular cartilage constructs.

    PubMed

    Elder, Benjamin D; Eleswarapu, Sriram V; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2009-08-01

    Several prior studies have been performed to determine the feasibility of tissue decellularization to create a non-immunogenic xenogenic tissue replacement for bladder, vasculature, heart valves, knee meniscus, temporomandibular joint disc, ligament, and tendon. However, limited work has been performed with articular cartilage, and no studies have examined the decellularization of tissue engineered constructs. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of different decellularization treatments on articular cartilage constructs, engineered using a scaffoldless approach, after 4wks of culture, using a two-phased approach. In the first phase, five different treatments were examined: 1) 1% SDS, 2) 2% SDS, 3) 2% Tributyl Phosphate, 4) 2% Triton X-100, and 5) Hypotonic followed by hypertonic solution. These treatments were applied for either 1h or 8h, followed by a 2h wash in PBS. Following this wash, the constructs were assessed histologically, biochemically for cellularity, GAG, and collagen content, and biomechanically for compressive and tensile properties. In phase II, the best treatment from phase I was applied for 1, 2, 4, 6, or 8h in order to optimize the application time. Treatment with 2% SDS for 1h or 2h significantly reduced the DNA content of the tissue, while maintaining the biochemical and biomechanical properties. On the other hand, 2% SDS for 6h or 8h resulted in complete histological decellularization, with complete elimination of cell nuclei on histological staining, although GAG content and compressive properties were significantly decreased. Overall, 2% SDS, for 1 or 2h, appeared to be the most effective agent for cartilage decellularization, as it resulted in decellularization while maintaining the functional properties. The results of this study are exciting as they indicate the feasibility of creating engineered cartilage that may be non-immunogenic as a replacement tissue.

  9. Unexpected temporomandibular joint findings during fixed appliance therapy.

    PubMed

    Owen, A H

    1998-06-01

    Six hundred consecutively debonded patients were retrospectively examined for the development of any temporomandibular joint signs or symptoms that developed during orthopedic/orthodontic treatment. Sixteen (2.6%) patients were found to have developed unexpected temporomandibular joint findings during treatment. Considering such a small sample, no conclusive results could be found, but several tendencies seemed to be apparent. Those types of patients who seemed to be most predisposed to developing temporomandibular joint problems included female Class II patients with excessive overjet and overbite and moderate to severe crowding of the lower arch. Ninety-three percent of the patients experienced posterior net condylar change in spite of using several different treatment mechanics. The types of treatments used included FJO appliances, headgear, Class II and Class III elastics, no elastics of any kind, extraction and nonextraction. This small study seems to suggest that temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms are changing, inconsistent, and ephemeral in many orthodontic patients regardless of the treatment mechanics.

  10. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint... implanted in the human jaw to replace the mandibular condyle and augment the glenoid fossa to functionally...

  11. Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: description of clinical syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, H C; Kendrick, R W

    1984-07-01

    Clinical findings and diagnostic criteria for internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint are outlined. Pathophysiology is discussed, including the role of predisposing factors and the relationship with myofascial pain-dysfunction syndrome.

  12. A new approach to arthrocentesis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Alkan, A; Kilic, E

    2009-01-01

    We describe a new temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthrocentesis technique using the irrigation pump from a surgical and dental implant motor, providing the highest hydraulic pressure reported in the literature for TMJ lavage.

  13. Temporomandibular joint and 3.0 T pseudodynamic magnetic resonance imaging. Part 1: evaluation of condylar and disc dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, H; Kubo, H; Harada, M; Nishitani, H

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study describes an improved method for examining and diagnosing temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dynamics by 3.0 T pseudodynamic MRI. Methods Clinical observation and conventional static MRI of volunteers (one without and eight with TMJ arthrosis) were followed by 3.0 T pseudodynamic MRI in positions ranging from the mouth closed to mouth fully opened. Condylar head (Cd), articular disc anterior border (Da) and articular disc posterior border (Dp) were digitized on sagittal images to determine trajectory and velocity patterns. Results Patients were divided into three groups based on the presence or absence of dysfunction: Group 1, no dysfunction on the right or left side of the TMJ; Group 2, dysfunction on the right or left side of the TMJ; and Group 3, dysfunction on both the right and left sides of the TMJs. In 75% of patients (12 of 16 joints), pseudodynamic TMJ analysis was useful for determining a functional abnormality. Using a points system based on three trajectory and seven velocity patterns, discs with adhesion and perforation had significantly fewer points than discs with anterior displacement (with and without reduction) and discs with no abnormality (P = 0.019 < 0.05). Conclusions Trajectory and velocity patterns based on 3.0 T pseudodynamic MRI identified the affected side and determined the extent of morbidity in the Cd as well as the Da and Dp. The typical abnormal movement pattern of discs with anterior displacement (with and without reduction) and pathological structural changes of the articular disc (such as adhesion and perforation) could be identified. PMID:21062941

  14. Current panorama of temporomandibular disorders' field in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; LIMA, Fernanda Ferruzzi; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the recognition of the specialty of Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain completed ten years. Given this scenario, it is extremely important to track the current situation of this field of knowledge in Brazil, specifically in the area of research and training. We hope to discuss the importance of the recognition of this specialty and the inclusion of these subjects in undergraduate programs in Dentistry. Objective The objective of this study is to perform a bibliometric survey of researches regarding Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain conducted in the country, determine the number of specialization courses in Orofacial Pain and the number of specialists in the field. Methods The bibliometric survey was conducted based on the Dissertations Portal of Coordination for the Improvement of Higher education Personnel (CAPES) and on PubMed. The panorama of the field of Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular disorders in Brazil was determined by searching on the website of the Brazilian Council of Dentistry. Results We found 731 theses and dissertations with Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain as the main subjects; 81 accredited/recognized Courses on Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction completed; 8 accredited/recognized Specialization Courses on Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction still in progress, and 1,064 registered specialists in Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction in the Brazilian Council of Dentistry. Search in the PUBMED database yielded 576 articles published with the participation of Brazilian researchers as first authors and/or co-authors in the period from 2000 to 2013. From this amount, only 5 were published in Portuguese, while all the others were published in english. We can also notice that the number of published articles increases over time. Conclusion The number of researches related to temporomandibular disorders has increased over the last ten years, as well as the number of

  15. Temporomandibular joint: true sagittal computed tomography with meniscus visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Sartorix, D.J.; Neumann, C.H.; Riley, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Accessory patient support equipment was constructed that allows patient positioning for true sagittal projection of the temporomandibular joint using a GE 8800 CT/T scanner. Range of motion abnormalities, osseous alterations of the mandibular condyle and temporal bone, joint-space narrowing, and meniscal configuration may be demonstrated. The technique has potential advantages over other CT projections and sagittal reconstruction for evaluation of temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

  16. A retrospective study of temporomandibular joint ankylosis secondary to surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guo-lin; Long, Xing; Deng, Mo-hong; Han, Qian-chao; Meng, Qing-gong; Li, Bo

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the incidence of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) after open operations for fractures of the mandibular condyle, and analysed possible risk factors in a total of 385 patients with 492 condylar fractures who had been operated on in our department from 2001 to 2010. Sixteen patients developed postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ with 26 joints (5%) affected during a follow-up of 6 months-10 years. Of the 492 condylar fractures, the most common ones that were associated with postoperative ankylosis were those of the condylar head (20/248), followed by the condylar neck (6/193). Subcondylar fractures did not cause postoperative ankylosis (0/51). Among the 16 patients with postoperative ankylosis, 13 had associated anterior mandibular fractures. Long-screw (bicortical screw) fixation of fractures of the condylar head seemed to be associated with a lower incidence of postoperative ankylosis than fixation by miniplate and wire or removal of the fractured fragment. The articular discs were damaged in all ankylosed joints, and the remaining fractured fragment was found in 10 ankylosed joints after fractures of the condylar head. The results suggest that fractures of the condylar head are more prone to lead to postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ, and that the possible risk factors seem to include the technique used for fixation and damage to the disc, together with an anterior mandibular fracture with the fractured fragment remaining.

  17. Occlusal changes secondary to temporomandibular joint conditions: a critical review and implications for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    CALDAS, Waleska; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; JANSON, Guilherme; Paulo César Rodrigues, CONTI

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and malocclusion is an extremely critical issue in dentistry. Contrary to the old concept that malocclusion causes TMD, occlusal changes, especially those observed as sudden, may be secondary and reflect joint or muscle disorders due to the obvious connection between these structures and the dental occlusion. Objectives The aim of this article is to present the most commonly occlusal changes secondary to TMD. Methods The clinical presentation of these conditions is discussed. Details regarding diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients presenting TMD prior or during treatment are also presented. Conclusions All plans for irreversible therapy should be preceded by a meticulous analysis of TMD signs and symptoms in such a way that patients are not submitted to irreversible treatment, based on an untrue occlusal relationship, secondary to articular and/or muscular disorders. When present, TMD symptoms must always be controlled to reestablish a “normal” occlusion and allow proper treatment strategy. PMID:27556214

  18. A comparison of primary and passaged chondrocytes for use in engineering the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Johns, D.E.; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study examines the tissue engineering potential of passaged (P3) and primary (P0) articular chondrocytes (ACs) and costal chondrocytes (CCs) from skeletally-mature goats for use in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Design These four cell types were assembled into scaffoldless tissue engineered constructs and cultured for 4 wks. The constructs were then tested for cell, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content with biochemical assays, and collagen types I and II with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Constructs were also tested under tension and compression to determine biomechanical properties. Results Both primary and passaged CC constructs had greater GAG/wet weight than AC constructs. Primary AC constructs had significantly less total collagen and contained no collagen type I. AC P3 constructs had the largest collagen I/collagen II ratio, which was also greater in passaged CC constructs relative to primary groups. Primary AC constructs were not mechanically testable, while passaged AC and CC constructs had significantly greater tensile properties than primary CC constructs. Conclusions Primary CCs are considerably better than primary ACs and have potential use in tissue engineering when larger quantities of collagen type II are desired. The poor performance of the ACs, in this study, which contradicts the results seen with previous studies using immature bovine ACs, may thus be attributed to the animals’ maturity. However, CC P3 cells appear particularly well-suited for tissue engineering fibrocartilage of the TMJ due to the high quantity of collagen and GAG, and tensile and compressive mechanical properties. PMID:19013549

  19. The prevalence of clinical diagnostic groups in patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Machado, Luciana Pimenta e Silva; Nery, Cláudio de Góis; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Nery, Marianita Batista de Macedo; Okeson, Jeffrey P

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the prevalence of diagnostic groups of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients who were referred or sought treatment for TMD and/or orofacial pain in a private clinic. The clinical records of 357 patients were evaluated and selected based on inclusion/exclusion criteria; the mean age was 32 years. A clinical examination was performed and the diagnosis was based on the American Academy of Orofacial Pain criteria. Results showed that 86.8% of patients were women and 93.3% of the patients presented more than one diagnosis. The most frequent chief complaint (n = 216, chi2 = 30.68, p = 0.001) and total diagnosis realized (n = 748, chi2 = 14.14, p = 0.001) were muscle related. We concluded that women seek treatment for dysfunction/disorders of orofacial structures more than men do; patients seeking specialized treatment have more than one diagnosis and muscle dysfunction is more prevalent than intra-articular disorders.

  20. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis after condylar dislocation into the middle cranial fossa: A case report.

    PubMed

    Zamorano, G M; Nuñez, L F; Alvarez, L A; Otayza, F A; Fernández, M A; Donoso-Hofer, F

    2016-11-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa after a trauma is a rare event. The lack of appropriate treatment can lead to ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We report about a case of TMJ ankylosis following intracranial dislocation of the mandibular condyle through the roof of the articular fossa. A 9-year-old patient was referred for a severe limitation of mouth opening that began progressively one year before. A history of chin injury due to an accidental fall was found. Preoperative CT scan showed a TMJ ankylosis on the right side combined with a dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa. Treatment consisted in an intracranial resection of the mandibular condyle, partial removal of the ankylosis block and TMJ arthroplasty. Our case is the second case of TMJ ankylosis following intracranial dislocation of the mandibular condyle and treated with arthroplasty alone published in the English literature. There is no consensus regarding the pathophysiology of TMJ ankylosis and regarding the attitude towards the ankylosis block. In our case, no recurrence was noticed after a one-year follow-up. An interdisciplinary approach is needed, including maxillofacial surgeon, neurosurgeon, physiotherapist and orthodontist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis: cone beam computed tomography findings, clinical features, and correlations.

    PubMed

    Cömert Kiliç, S; Kiliç, N; Sümbüllü, M A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and associations between clinical signs and symptoms and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) findings of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). Seventy-six patients (total 117 TMJ) with osteoarthritis were included in this study. Clinical signs and symptoms and CBCT findings were reviewed retrospectively. A considerable decrease in mandibular motions and mastication efficiency, and considerable increase in joint sounds and general pain complaints were observed. The most frequent condylar bony changes were erosion (110 joints, 94.0%), followed by flattening (108 joints, 92.3%), osteophytes (93 joints, 79.5%), hypoplasia (22 joints, 18.8%), sclerosis (14 joints, 12.0%), and subchondral cyst (four joints, 3.4%). Flattening of the articular eminence and pneumatization were each observed in five joints. Forty-one patients had bilateral degeneration and 35 had unilateral degeneration. Hypermobility was detected in 47 degenerative joints. Masticatory efficiency was negatively correlated with both condylar flattening and sclerosis, and general pain complaints was positively correlated with condylar flattening. Condylar erosion, flattening, osteophytes, pain, joint sounds, reduced jaw movements, and worsened mastication were common findings in TMJ-OA in the present study. Poor correlations were found between osseous changes and clinical signs and symptoms of TMJ-OA. CBCT is a powerful diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of TMJ-OA. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genes that regulate morphogenesis and growth of the temporomandibular joint: a review.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    Compared with the joints of the limbs, our understanding of the genes that regulate development and growth in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is fairly limited. Because the morphogenesis of the secondary cartilage and other intra-articular structures in the TMJ occurs later and in a different manner than in the limbs, the genetic control of TMJ development might reasonably be assumed to differ from that in the limbs. However, studies of the specific genes regulating TMJ morphogenesis and growth have only begun to appear in the literature within the last decade. This review attempts to survey and interpret the existing knowledge on this topic and to suggest fruitful avenues of investigation for the future. Studies to date using knockout and over-expression of candidate genes suggest that a developmental hierarchy of joint structures exists, with condyle development primary. A hierarchy of gene expression also exists: Runx2 and Sox9 expression is critical for condylar cartilage formation. Several of the other genes discussed in this report may regulate TMJ morphogenesis by affecting Sox9 and Runx2 expression and control the ihh-PTHrP axis by means of these genes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Histological study of the human temporo-mandibular joint and its surrounding muscles.

    PubMed

    Bravetti, P; Membre, H; El Haddioui, A; Gérard, H; Fyard, J P; Mahler, P; Gaudy, J F

    2004-10-01

    This is a histological study of the human temporo-mandibular joint and its surrounding muscles. Using a microscopic study of serial sections from anatomical specimens from six subjects, the detailed anatomy of the joint is presented with particular regard to the histology. This study has allowed, in particular, the description of the ligaments and capsule as well as the insertions of the masticatory muscles (temporalis, masseter, lateral pterygoid) on this joint. These observations are then compared with the anatomical and histological data already reported on this subject. This study shows that the bulk of the muscular fibres of the lateral pterygoid passes under the foot of the disc is attached over the whole height of the condylar, unite and extend as far as the medial pole of the joint under the insertion of the articular disc. An insertion of the temporo-masseter musculo-tendinous complex on the anterior and lateral capsulo-discal structures was observed. The lateral pterygoid is composed of a succession of tendinous and fleshy fibres. This study confirms the thickening of the lateral capsule that corresponds to a lateral collateral ligament, and the absence of a medial collateral ligament. Medial stability is conferred by the lateral ligament of the contralateral joint.

  4. Psoriatic arthritis and temporomandibular joint involvement - literature review with a reported case.

    PubMed

    Badel, Tomislav; Savić Pavičin, Ivana; Krapac, Ladislav; Zadravec, Dijana; Rosić, Davorka

    2014-01-01

    In addition to psoriasis, between 5% and 24% of patients will develop psoriatic arthritis simultaneously after or even prior to skin manifestations. Psoriatic arthritis belongs to the group of seronegative spondyloarthritis. Collaboration between a dermatologist and a rheumatologist plays a more important role in cases where there is a complete absence of clinical signs of psoriasis. Since rheumatic diseases may also involve the temporomandibular joints (TMJ), psoriatic arthritis can cause problems that are an aspect of systemic disease. In general, the clinical and radiological description of a population of patients suffering from psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis does not mention TMJ involvement. However, as is the case with intraoral psoriasis, psoriatic changes to the TMJ also show characteristic signs of erosion, deplaned condyles, and articular effusion. Magnetic resonance imaging has shown itself to be the gold standard in the diagnostics of joints afflicted by psoriatic arthritis and TMJ disorders, regardless of the existence of a systemic disease. This paper aims to present a review of the relevant literature describing different epidemiological, clinical, and radiological characteristics of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, with emphasis on the involvement of TMJs in the general manifestation of the disease, illustrated by a description of the clinical case of a 77-year-old female patient.

  5. Finite element analysis of a condylar support prosthesis to replace the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Abel, Eric W; Hilgers, André; McLoughlin, Philip M

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a finite element study of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis in which the mandibular component sits on the condyle after removal of only the diseased articular surface and minimal amount of condylar bone. The condylar support prosthesis (CSP) is customised to fit the patient and allows a large part of the joint force to be transmitted through the condyle to the ramus, rather than relying only on transfer of the load by the screws that fix the prosthesis to the ramus. The 3-dimensional structural finite element analysis compared a design of CSP with a standard commercial prosthesis and one that was modified to fit the ramus, to relate the findings to the different designs and geometrical features. The models simulated an incisal bite under high loading. In the CSP and in its fixation screws, the stresses were much lower than those in the other 2 prostheses and the bone strains were at physiological levels. The CSP gives a more physiological form of load transfer than is possible without the condylar contact, and considerably reduces the amount of strain on the bone around the screws.

  6. Overexpression of Shox2 leads to congenital dysplasia of the temporomandibular joint in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xihai; Liang, Wenna; Ye, Hongzhi; Weng, Xiaping; Liu, Fayuan; Liu, Xianxiang

    2014-07-24

    Our previous study reported that inactivation of Shox2 led to dysplasia and ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and that replacing Shox2 with human Shox partially rescued the phenotype with a prematurely worn out articular disc. However, the mechanisms of Shox2 activity in TMJ development remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the molecular and cellular basis for the congenital dysplasia of TMJ in Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop Shox2 mice. We found that condyle and glenoid fossa dysplasia occurs primarily in the second week after the birth. The dysplastic TMJ of Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop Shox2 mice exhibits a loss of Collagen type I, Collagen type II, Ihh and Gli2. In situ zymography and immunohistochemistry further demonstrate an up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP9 and MMP13, accompanied by a significantly increased cell apoptosis. In addition, the cell proliferation and expressions of Sox9, Runx2 and Ihh are no different in the embryonic TMJ between the wild type and mutant mice. Our results show that overexpression of Shox2 leads to the loss of extracellular matrix and the increase of cell apoptosis in TMJ dysplasia by up-regulating MMPs and down-regulating the Ihh signaling pathway.

  7. Cytopathologic diagnosis on joint lavage fluid for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Toshinari; Kumagai, Akiko; Aomura, Tomoyuki; Javed, Fawad; Sugiyama, Yoshiki; Mizuki, Harumi; Takeda, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders (TMD) are usually diagnosed based on the patient's clinical findings and the results of image investigations; however, understanding of the inflammatory process in TMJ is difficult. In addition, many of the TMJ disease types share common principal symptoms. Therefore, TMJ diseases in the early stage can be misdiagnosed with TMD. It is hypothesized that cytopathologic examination of the joint lavage fluids is useful in interpreting the TMD-associated inflammatory process from a cellular aspect. The aim of this study was to assess the TMJ lavage fluid cytopathologically in TMD patients. Thirty-nine patients, clinically diagnosed as TMD, were included in the present study. Clinical symptoms of the patients were recorded. Forty-four samples of TMJ lavage fluid were collected and paraffin-embedded cell sections were made by cell block tissue array method. Cytologic conditions in upper articular cavity of TMJ were cytopathologically diagnosed and were compared with the clinical symptoms of each patient. Cell components were detected in 22 of the 44 analyzed joint lavage fluids. There was a correlation between cytopathologic findings and clinical symptoms. Variety of cytopathology and inflammatory conditions in patients with similar clinical symptoms were also found. The results suggested that cytopathologic examination of the joint lavage fluids from TMD patients is helpful for gaining an understanding of the inner local conditions of TMJ at the cellular level.

  8. Bilateral asymptomatic fibrous-ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint associated with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Carolina Ortigosa; Pinto, Lívia Maria Sales; de Mendonça, Luana Menezes; Saldanha, Aline Dantas Diógenes; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    The American Academy of Orofacial Pain (AAOP) defines ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) as a restriction of movements due to intracapsular fibrous adhesions, fibrous changes in capsular ligaments (fibrous-ankylosis) and osseous mass formation resulting in the fusion of the articular components (osseous-ankylosis). The clinical features of the fibrous-ankylosis are severely limited mouth-opening capacity (limited range of motion during the opening), usually no pain and no joint sounds, marked deflection to the affected side and marked limitation of movement to the contralateral side. A variety of factors may cause TMJ ankylosis, such as trauma, local and systemic inflammatory conditions, neoplasms and TMJ infection. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the systemic inflammatory conditions that affect the TMJ and can cause ankylosis. The aim of this study is to present a case of a female patient diagnosed with bilateral asymptomatic fibrous-ankylosis of the TMJ associated with asymptomatic rheumatoid arthritis. This case illustrates the importance of a comprehensive clinical examination and correct diagnosis of an unusual condition causing severe mouth opening limitation.

  9. Effectiveness of treatment with viscosupplementation in temporomandibular joints with or without effusion.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, L; Rossi, A; Ramonda, R; Punzi, L; Ferronato, G; Manfredini, D

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the effectiveness of viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA) in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) degenerative disorders depends on the presence of intra-articular effusion. In this study of case-control design, two groups of 25 patients were recruited: patients with a clinical diagnosis of painful chronic TMJ osteoarthritis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs of TMJ degeneration, with (effusion group) or without (no effusion group) MRI evidence of TMJ effusion. All patients underwent five weekly single-needle arthrocenteses plus medium molecular weight HA and 6 months of follow-up. Several clinical outcome parameters were assessed. For all variables, analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures was performed to assess the existence of significant within-group and between-group treatment effects. Over time, both groups showed significant improvements in all outcome parameters, which were maintained at the 6-month follow-up (P<0.05). Between-group comparisons showed that the treatment effects did not differ significantly for either the primary outcome variable (pain levels: F=0.849, P=0.548) or secondary outcome variables (chewing efficiency: F=0.854, P=0.544; functional limitation: F=1.35, P=0.226; mouth opening: F=0.658, P=0.707). The null hypothesis that there are no differences in treatment effectiveness between patients with and without effusion could not be rejected.

  10. Attenuation of the progression of articular cartilage degeneration by inhibition of TGF-β1 signaling in a mouse model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rebecca; Mian, Michelle; Fu, Martin; Zhao, Jing Ying; Yang, Liang; Li, Yefu; Xu, Lin

    2015-11-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) is implicated in osteoarthritis. We therefore studied the role of TGF-β1 signaling in the development of osteoarthritis in a developmental stage-dependent manner. Three different mouse models were investigated. First, the Tgf-β receptor II (Tgfbr2) was specifically removed from the mature cartilage of joints. Tgfbr2-deficient mice were grown to 12 months of age and were then euthanized for collection of knee and temporomandibular joints. Second, Tgfbr2-deficient mice were subjected to destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Knee joints were then collected from the mice at 8 and 16 weeks after the surgery. Third, wild-type mice were subjected to DMM at the age of 8 weeks. Immediately after the surgery, these mice were treated with the Tgfbr2 inhibitor losartan for 8 weeks and then euthanized for collection of knee joints. All joints were characterized for evidences of articular cartilage degeneration. Initiation or acceleration of articular cartilage degeneration was not observed by the genetic inactivation of Tgfbr2 in the joints at the age of 12 months. In fact, the removal of Tgfbr2 and treatment with losartan both delayed the progression of articular cartilage degeneration induced by DMM compared with control littermates. Therefore, we conclude that inhibition of Tgf-β1 signaling protects adult knee joints in mice against the development of osteoarthritis.

  11. Prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Sena, Marina Fernandes; de Mesquita, Késsia Suênia F.; Santos, Fernanda Regina R.; Silva, Francisco Wanderley G. P.; Serrano, Kranya Victoria D.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in children and adolescents, verifying the methodological variations. DATA SOURCES: Research conducted in Medline, PubMed, Lilacs and BBO databases, including manuscripts (except reviews and case reports) published from 1990 to 2012. The descriptors were "temporomandibular joint syndrome", "temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome", "temporomandibular joint disorders", "prevalence studies", and "cross-sectional studies"; the words "dysfunction", "disorder", "temporomandibular", "children", "adolescents", "prevalence", "frequency", and "transversal" were used. DATA SYNTHESIS: Seventeen articles were selected, and the TMD frequency varied from 16 to 68%. Regarding the methodological criteria, only three articles (18%) reported sample size determination, three (18%) clearly described the sample selection process by stratified selection technique, and nine studies (53%) carried out the calibration of the examiners. The diagnostic criteria used in the studies were: Helkimo index (n=2; 12%), Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) (n=4; 24%), the jaw index (n=1; 6%), clinical protocols (n=10; 59%), and anamnestic questionnaires (n=6; 35%). CONCLUSIONS: The TMD prevalence in children and adolescents varies in the literature. Appropriate and standardized methods are needed to identify, with greater validity, the presence of TMD in this population, allowing a better understanding of the pathological aspects in order to address more effective preventive and therapeutic procedures. PMID:24473961

  12. Masticatory function and temporomandibular disorders in patients with dentofacial deformities.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    About 30% of individuals in the Swedish population will at some stage during life have treatment with orthodontic appliances. In more severe cases, when orthodontic treatment is not considered sufficient enough to correct the malocclusion, the orthodontic treatment is combined with orthognathic surgery. For these cases, a satisfying jaw relation is achieved by surgically moving the maxilla and/or the mandible into a pre-planned position. Patients due to be treated with orthognathic surgery often suffer from an impaired masticatory function, symptoms from the masticatory muscles or temporomandibular joints (temporomandibular disorders), headaches as well as dissatisfaction with their facial aesthetics. Since orthognathic treatment is expensive, in many cases arduous to the patient and not without complications, it is important to assess the treatment outcome and if this is satisfying for the patients. Previous studies that have examined the outcome after orthognathic treatment have had diverging study designs and have come to different conclusions with regard to both temporomandibular disorders and masticatory function. The overall aim of this thesis was to assess and compare the frequencies of temporomandibular disorders and the masticatory function in patients with dentofacial deformities before and after orthognathic treatment. THE THESIS IS BASED ON THE FOLLOWING STUDIES: Paper I is a systematic literature review aiming to, in an evidence-based approach, answer the question whether orthognathic treatment affects the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. The review encompasses the period from January 1966 to April 2006 and was further extended to May 2013 in the frame story of this thesis. CONCLUSIONS IN PAPER I AND THE COMPLEMENTARY SURVEY: There is insufficient scientific evidence for a decrease of sub diagnoses of temporomandibular disorders after orthognathic treatment. There is limited scientific evidence for a reduction of

  13. Temporomandibular disorders. A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, Jose V.; Sanchis, Jose M.; Carbonell, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the risk factors and clinical manifestations of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) diagnosed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) (axis I) versus an age and gender matched control group. Study Design: A total of 162 patients explored according to the RDC/TMD (mean age 40.6±18.8 years, range 7-90; 11.1% males and 88.9% females) were compared with 119 controls, measuring differences in TMD risk factors (sleep disturbances, stress, psychoactive medication, parafunctions, loss of posterior support, ligament hyperlaxity) and clinical variables (joint sounds, painful muscle and joint palpation, maximum aperture). Results: Myofascial pain (MFP) (single or multiple diagnoses) was the most frequent diagnosis (42%). The most common diagnostic combination was MFP plus arthralgia (16.0%). Statistically significant differences were observed in clenching (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1.4-3.8) and in maximum active aperture (MAA) on comparing the two groups both globally (TMD vs. controls) (patients 36.7±8.6 mm, controls 43.1±5.8 mm; F=45.41, p = 0.000) and on comparing according to diagnostic categories. MFP explained most of the observed differences in the risk factors: stress perception (OR=1.98;I.C.:1.01-3.89), psychoactive medication (OR=2.21; I.C.:1.12-4.37), parafunctions (OR=2.14;I.C.:1.12-4.11), and ligament laxity (OR=2.6;I.C.:1.01-6.68). Joint sounds were more frequent in patients with MFP (39.7% vs. 24.0%; χ2=4.66; p=0.03), and painful joint palpation was more common in patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR)(15.9% vs. 5.0%; χ2 = 5.2; p = 0.02) and osteoarthrosis (20.8% vs. 5.0%; χ2 = 7.0; p = 0.008). Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMDs in the general population. Significant differences are observed in clenching and MAA between patients and controls considered both globally and for each diagnostic category individually. The analyzed risk

  14. Clinical exam and electrovibratography detecting articular disk displacement: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Abrão, André Felipe; Paiva, Guiovaldo; Weffort, Soo Young Kim; de Fantini, Solange Mongelli

    2011-10-01

    The complete evaluation of the stomatognathic system is essential for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. The evaluation should not only include the occlusal static aspects, but also the functional aspects. This is because the latter could be altered and one or more components of the stomatognathic system could be involved, including the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The most usual alteration found is articular disk displacement, which can affect the prognosis, and eventually the result in the need for orthodontic treatment. In order to add to the literature on recognition of these alterations, the purpose of this study was to compare the findings of two calibrated examiners on disk displacement clinical diagnosis, and the possible matching between the clinical examination and the electrovibratography (EVG) as methods of disk displacement detection. The sample was composed of 60 patients, divided equally into four groups of 15 participants each, depending on the presence or absence of disk displacement determined by a clinical examination performed by two trained examiners and according to gender. One of the trained operators used EVG and SonoPAK (BioResearch, Inc., Brown Deer, WI) software. The results of the two examiners' findings, one using clinical examination and the other using EVG and SonoPak software. The results were analyzed by applying the kappa coefficient. The findings of the two examiners were very close, resulting in an excellent agreement, and the comparison between the clinical examination and EVG findings resulted in satisfactory agreement between the methods.

  15. Applied biomechanics in articular injuries: perspectives in the basic investigation of articular injuries and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Olson, Steven A; Brown, Thomas D; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Natoli, Roman M; Dirschl, Douglas R

    2011-01-01

    Joint injury is an important cause of arthritis. Although the treatment of injury, in general, has been widely studied, the contribution of injury to the development of posttraumatic arthritis is still a relatively understudied area. One of the most perplexing aspects of investigating articular injuries is the complex nature of the injury itself and the multiple facets of the injury mechanism that can potentially lead to the development of arthritis. A symposium by the Orthopaedic Research Society and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons was designed to examine the spectrum of basic science to clinical investigation in the role of biomechanics in the study of joint injury and subsequent posttraumatic arthritis. Four perspectives in the clinical aspects of managing articular injuries were investigated, including the clinical applications of basic science findings, the challenges and advancements in measuring and modeling articular fractures, the relationship of articular cartilage mechanical injuries and osteoarthritis, and the controlled creation of an intra-articular fracture to permit observations of the natural history of posttraumatic arthritis.

  16. Recent Advances in MRI of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Garry E.; Chen, Christina A.; Koo, Seungbum; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Bangerter, Neal K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE MRI is the most accurate noninvasive method available to diagnose disorders of articular cartilage. Conventional 2D and 3D approaches show changes in cartilage morphology. Faster 3D imaging methods with isotropic resolution can be reformatted into arbitrary planes for improved detection and visualization of pathology. Unique contrast mechanisms allow us to probe cartilage physiology and detect changes in cartilage macromolecules. CONCLUSION MRI has great promise as a noninvasive comprehensive tool for cartilage evaluation. PMID:19696274

  17. Absorbed doses from temporomandibular joint radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, S.L.; Lanzetta, M.L.

    1985-06-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used in a tissue-equivalent phantom to measure doses of radiation absorbed by various structures in the head when the temporomandibular joint was examined by four different radiographic techniques--the transcranial, transorbital, and sigmoid notch (Parma) projections and the lateral tomograph. The highest doses of radiation occurred at the point of entry for the x-ray beam, ranging from 112 mrad for the transorbital view to 990 mrad for the sigmoid notch view. Only the transorbital projection a radiation dose to the lens of the eye. Of the four techniques evaluated, the lateral tomograph produced the highest doses to the pituitary gland and the bone marrow, while the sigmoid notch radiograph produced the highest doses to the parotid gland.

  18. Temporomandibular disorders in the medical practice.

    PubMed

    Okeson, J P; de Kanter, R J

    1996-10-01

    Patients suffering with various orofacial pain conditions are likely to seek advice and treatment from a family physician. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are common in the general population, and the clinician should be aware of the common associated signs and symptoms so that proper therapy can be provided. The family physician can often provide initial therapies that are effective in reducing TMD symptoms. In some instances, it is appropriate for the family physician to refer the patient to a dentist for a more comprehensive evaluation of the masticatory system. This article describes the common patient complaints associated with TM disorders. A few simple therapies are discussed along with suggestions regarding the appropriate time for referral to a dentist for a thorough dental evaluation.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hayt, M W; Abrahams, J J; Blair, J

    2000-04-01

    The spectrum of disease that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can be varied. To differentiate among the diseases that cause pain and dysfunction, an intimate knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of this region is necessary. Due to the joint's complex anatomy and relationship to the skin, it has been difficult to image in the past. Magnetic resonance imaging is ideally suited for visualizing TMJ because of its superb contrast resolution when imaging soft tissues. Magnetic resonance imaging allows simultaneous bilateral visualization of both joints. The ability to noninvasively resolve anatomic detail can be performed easily and quickly using magnetic resonance imaging. The development of magnetic resonance imaging has greatly aided the diagnosis of TMJ disorders. An understanding of TMJ anatomy and pathogenesis of TMJ pain is crucial for interpretation of magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent treatment.

  20. Mechanobiological implications of articular cartilage crystals.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Alyssa K; McCutchen, Carley N; June, Ronald K

    2017-03-01

    Calcium crystals exist in both pathological and normal articular cartilage. The prevalence of these crystals dramatically increases with age, and crystals are typically found in osteoarthritic cartilage and synovial fluid. Relatively few studies have examined the effects of crystals on cartilage biomechanics or chondrocyte mechanotransduction. The purpose of this review is to describe how crystals could influence cartilage biomechanics and mechanotransduction in osteoarthritis. Crystals are found in both loaded and unloaded regions of articular cartilage. Exogenous crystals, in combination with joint motion, result in substantial joint inflammation. Articular cartilage vesicles promote crystal formation, and these vesicles are found near the periphery of chondrocytes. Crystallographic studies report monoclinic symmetry for synthetic crystals, suggesting that crystals will have a large stiffness compared with the cartilage extracellular matrix, the pericellular matrix, or the chondrocyte. This stiffness imbalance may cause crystal-induced dysregulation of chondrocyte mechanotransduction promoting both aging and osteoarthritis chondrocyte phenotypes. Because of their high stiffness compared with cartilage matrix, crystals likely alter chondrocyte mechanotransduction, and high concentrations of crystals within cartilage may alter macroscale biomechanics. Future studies should focus on understanding the mechanical properties of joint crystals and developing methods to understand how crystals affect chondrocyte mechanotransduction.

  1. Anisotropic hydraulic permeability in compressed articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    The extent to which articular cartilage hydraulic permeability is anisotropic is largely unknown, despite its importance for understanding mechanisms of joint lubrication, load bearing, transport phenomena, and mechanotransduction. We developed and applied new techniques for the direct measurement of hydraulic permeability within statically compressed adult bovine cartilage explant disks, dissected such that disk axes were perpendicular to the articular surface. Applied pressure gradients were kept small to minimize flow-induced matrix compaction, and fluid outflows were measured by observation of a meniscus in a glass capillary under a microscope. Explant disk geometry under radially unconfined axial compression was measured by direct microscopic observation. Pressure, flow, and geometry data were input to a finite element model where hydraulic permeabilities in the disk axial and radial directions were determined. At less than 10% static compression, near free-swelling conditions, hydraulic permeability was nearly isotropic, with values corresponding to those of previous studies. With increasing static compression, hydraulic permeability decreased, but the radially directed permeability decreased more dramatically than the axially directed permeability such that strong anisotropy (a 10-fold difference between axial and radial directions) in the hydraulic permeability tensor was evident for static compression of 20-40%. Results correspond well with predictions of a previous microstructurally-based model for effects of tissue mechanical deformations on glycosaminoglycan architecture and cartilage hydraulic permeability. Findings inform understanding of structure-function relationships in cartilage matrix, and suggest several biomechanical roles for compression-induced anisotropic hydraulic permeability in articular cartilage.

  2. Temporomandibular disorders: Old ideas and new concepts.

    PubMed

    List, Thomas; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2017-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is an umbrella term for pain and dysfunction involving the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMD is the most common orofacial pain condition. Its prominent features include regional pain in the face and preauricular area, limitations in jaw movement, and noise from the TMJs during jaw movements. TMD affects up to 15% of adults and 7% of adolescents. Chronic pain is the overwhelming reason that patients with TMD seek treatment. TMD can associate with impaired general health, depression, and other psychological disabilities, and may affect the quality of life of the patient. Assessment Evaluations indicate that the recently published Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) are reliable and valid. These criteria cover the most common types of TMD, which include pain-related disorders (e.g., myalgia, headache attributable to TMD, and arthralgia) as well as disorders associated with the TMJ (primarily disc displacements and degenerative disease). As peripheral mechanisms most likely play a role in the onset of TMD, a detailed muscle examination is recommended. The persistence of pain involves more central factors, such as sensitization of the supraspinal neurons and second-order neurons at the level of the spinal dorsal horn/trigeminal nucleus, imbalanced antinociceptive activity, and strong genetic predisposition, which also is included in DC/TMD. Conclusion The etiology is complex and still not clearly understood, but several biological and psychosocial risk factors for TMD have been identified. Several studies indicate that patients with TMD improve with a combination of noninvasive therapies, including behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and occlusal appliances. More stringently designed studies, however, are needed to assess treatment efficacy and how to tailor treatment to the individual patient.

  3. Sleep quality in temporomandibular disorder cases

    PubMed Central

    Rener-Sitar, Ksenija; John, Mike T.; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha S.; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Schiffman, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to characterize self-reported sleep quality (SQ) in cases with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and to compare their results with those of healthy controls. Methods The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to measure SQ in a convenience sample of 609 TMD cases and 88 controls. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic nomenclature was used, but Axis I diagnoses were based on the consensus of two reliable criterion examiners and not the RDC/TMD algorithms. The PSQI scores for TMD cases were calculated also for the RDC/TMD Axis II measures assessing chronic pain and disability, depression, and nonspecific physical symptoms. PSQI scores of the TMD cases were compared with those from controls. Results TMD cases with one to five TMD diagnoses (n = 609) had a mean PSQI score of 7.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 6.7–7.4]. In comparison, the mean score was 5.2 (95% CI = 4.6–5.9) for control subjects. For the subset of TMD cases with pain-free diagnoses (n = 113), the PSQI score was similar to controls with 5.1 (95% CI = 4.5–5.6), whereas it was significantly different for cases with pain-related diagnoses 7.5 (95% CI = 6.6–8.3; n = 87). Although the number of TMD diagnoses and participant age had some influence on SQ, psychosocial status, and pain-related impairment assessed with RDC/TMD Axis II measures had the strongest association with SQ, in particular, dysfunctional chronic pain. Conclusion SQ is impaired in TMD patients with pain-related diagnoses, and even more in those with dysfunctional pain. This relationship between sleep and pain suggests that SQ should be assessed in TMD pain patients, especially in those with significant Axis II involvement. PMID:27823702

  4. Quasi-linear viscoelastic properties of normal articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Woo, S L; Simon, B R; Kuei, S C; Akeson, W H

    1980-05-01

    A combined experimental and analytical approach was used to determine the history-dependent viscoelastic properties of normal articular cartilage in tension. Specimens along the surface split line direction, taken from the middle zone of articular cartilage were subjected to relaxation and cyclic tests. A quasi-linear viscoelastic theory proposed by Fung was used in combination with the experimental results to determine the nonlinear viscoelastic properties and the elastic stress-strain relationship of normal articular cartilage.

  5. Metric analysis of loading magnitudes at articular and non-articular weight-bearing surfaces in human calcaneus.

    PubMed

    Mahato, Niladri Kumar; Murthy, S Sathiya Narayana

    2013-03-01

    The calcaneus is axially loaded at its articular interface with the talus. A large bulk of this load is transmitted to the ground across the non-articular tubercles at the plantar surface of the bone. A small part of the incumbent load sustained by the calcaneus is directed towards the forefoot at the calcaneo-cuboid junction. This study investigates the proportion of load distributed across the articular and non-articular surfaces of the calcaneus. The present study demonstrates strong and significant correlation between some of the load bearing variables and suggests the need for further investigations to understand the effect of angular aspects of axial loading on the calcaneus. Accounting for the relative distribution of weight across the articular and non-articular areas may enable us to appreciate the internal trabecular structure of the calcaneus in light of its clinical importance.

  6. Regional differences of type II collagen synthesis in the human temporomandibular joint disc: immunolocalization study of carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (chondrocalcin).

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Toshirou; Hamada, Yoshiki; Iino, Mitsuyoshi; Takahashi, Tetsu; Kikuchi, Toshiyuki; Fujikawa, Kyousuke; Seto, Kannichi

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the regional differences of distribution of the carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (pCOL-II-C; chondrocalcin) as markers of cartilaginous expression in the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc. Twelve human TMJ discs without morphologic abnormalities were obtained from 12 fresh cadavers. All specimens were analysed for pCOL-II-C expression using polyclonal rabbit anti-human pCOL-II-C antibody in avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex staining. The results were demonstrated that the percentage of pCOL-II-C immunoreactive disc cells was significantly higher in the outer part (the articular surfaces) than in the inner part (the deep central areas) of the disc. These findings suggest that the tissue heterogeneity of cartilaginous expression reflects the functional demands of the remodelling process in the human TMJ disc.

  7. Temporomandibular disorder: otologic implications and its relationship to sleep bruxism.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Bruno Gama; Freitas, Jaciel Leandro de Melo; Barbosa, André Cavalcanti da Silva; Gueiros, Maria Cecília Scheidegger Neves; Gomes, Simone Guimarães Farias; Rosenblatt, Aronita; Júnior, Arnaldo de França Caldas

    2017-08-23

    Temporomandibular disorder is an umbrella term for various clinical problems affecting the muscles of mastication, temporomandibular joint and associated structures. This disorder has a multifactor etiology, with oral parafunctional habits considered an important co-factor. Among such habits, sleep bruxism is considered a causal agent involved in the initiation and/or perpetuation of temporomandibular disorder. That condition can result in pain otologic symptoms. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between temporomandibular disorder and both otologic symptoms and bruxism. A total of 776 individuals aged 15 years or older from urban areas in the city of Recife (Brazil) registered at Family Health Units were examined. The diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder was determined using Axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for temporomandibular disorders, addressing questions concerning myofascial pain and joint problems (disk displacement, arthralgia, osteoarthritis and osteoarthrosis). Four examiners had previously undergone training and calibration exercises for the administration of the instrument. Intra-examiner and inter-examiner agreement was determined using the Kappa statistic. Individuals with a diagnosis of at least one of these conditions were classified as having temporomandibular disorder. The diagnosis of otologic symptoms and bruxism was defined using the same instrument and a clinical exam. Among the individuals with temporomandibular disorder, 58.2% had at least one otologic symptom and 52% exhibited bruxism. Statistically significant associations were found between the disorder and both otologic symptoms and bruxism (p<0.01 for both conditions; OR=2.12 and 2.3 respectively). Otologic symptoms and bruxism maintained statistical significance in the binary logistic regression analysis, which demonstrated a 1.7 fold and twofold greater chance of such individuals have temporomandibular disorder, respectively. The logistic

  8. Global Body Posture Evaluation in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Eliza Tiemi; Akashi, Paula Marie Hanai; de Camargo Neves Sacco, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify the relationship between anterior disc displacement and global posture (plantar arches, lower limbs, shoulder and pelvic girdle, vertebral spine, head and mandibles). Common signs and symptoms of anterior disc displacement were also identified. INTRODUCTION: Global posture deviations cause body adaptation and realignment, which may interfere with the organization and function of the temporomandibular joint. METHODS : Global posture evaluation was performed in a group of 10 female patients (20 to 30 years of age) with temporomandibular joint disc displacement and in a control group of 16 healthy female volunteers matched for age, weight and height. Anterior disc displacement signs, symptoms and the presence of parafunctional habits were also identified through interview. RESULTS: Patients with disc displacement showed a higher incidence of pain in the temporomandibular joint area, but there were no differences in parafunctional habits between the groups. In the disc displacement group, postural deviations were found in the pelvis (posterior rotation), lumbar spine (hyperlordosis), thoracic spine (rectification), head (deviation to the right) and mandibles (deviation to the left with open mouth). There were no differences in the longitudinal plantar arches between the groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest a close relationship between body posture and temporomandibular disorder, though it is not possible to determine whether postural deviations are the cause or the result of the disorder. Hence, postural evaluation could be an important component in the overall approach to providing accurate prevention and treatment in the management of patients with temporomandibular disorder. PMID:19142549

  9. A serial study on the development of the temporomandibular joint in the fetal mouse--in particular on the fibrous component in the condylar cartilage.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, M

    1990-06-01

    The development of the temporomandibular joint of 400 fetal mice at stages ranging from the 13th to the 20th day after insemination was investigated under the light, scanning (SEM) and transmission electron (TEM) microscopes. The differentiation and development of a cartilaginous tissue were observed at the supero-posterior end of the mandible at the 13 days after insemination. This tissue grew backward, upward and lateralward continuously and maintained a constant articulation with the squamosal part of the temporal bone. Seventeen days after insemination, cell layers in the condylar process and articular disc were arranged regularly. An supero- and inferno-directional cellular differentiation initiated from the subfibrous (SF) layer toward the articular spaces and cartilaginous layer was observed. The perichondrial ossification had taken place with the invasion of capillaries and the differentiation of osteoblasts in the SF layer, and was followed with a hypertrophic degeneration and endochondral ossification in the condylar process. Such a bi-directional growth of collagen and elastic fibers starting from the SF layer was also observed. Observation under SEM and TEM on the autoclaved condylar process revealed a complicated network consisted of main elastic fibers running in the sagittal direction. These fibers as well as the proteoglycan which contributes to the resilient property of the condylar cartilage and the ability to endure tensile or compressive stress from surrounding tissues during the growth and development of the mandibular condyle. The developing cartilaginous tissue was stimulated with the pressure from the masticatory muscles to initiate an active differentiation of the fibrous layer, which was invaded by the blood capillary system closely related with the subsequent endochondral ossification. These results elucidate that the development of the temporomandibular joint has closely kept relations with the functional influences from surrounding

  10. Temporomandibular joint disorders and maxillomandibular malformations: role of condylar "repositionin" plate.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Noemi; Matteini, Claudio; Incisivo, Veronica; Belli, Evaristo; Evaristo, Belli

    2009-05-01

    Even if the relationship between condylar position and/or temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and dentofacial deformity is controversial in literature, several patients presenting malocclusion refer to pain and TMDs as the main trouble. There are also various opinions concerning the alterations or improvements of temporomandibular joint symptoms after orthognathic surgery. In agreement with the experience of Universität Würzburg, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of splint technique to reproduce centric condyle positioning in bimaxillary osteotomy surgeries for the patients with skeletal-facial disorders and coexisting TMDs. The present study is based on a sample of patients with maxillomandibular malocclusion and coexisting TMDs who underwent bimaxillary osteotomy surgeries with splint technique. All patients underwent a protocol consisting of various steps: Pretreatment evaluation consisted of a questionnaire on subjective symptoms, clinical examinations, photographs of the occlusion, plaster casts, bite registrations, examination of the posture; instrumental examinations; panoramic, teleradiography, and cephalometric analysis; stratigraphy of TMD; and electromyography. Presurgical treatment consisted of therapy by modified Farrar splint associated with a pharmacologic therapy for the acute symptoms; orthodontic treatment associated with a global reeducation of the posture and a pompage of the masticatory muscles; and manufacturing of an occlusal splint in the most posterior asymptomatic position. Surgical treatment consisted of bimaxillary osteotomies performed after registering condyle position by a "repositioning" plate. The condyle position is guided by the intermaxillary fixation with the interposition of the occlusal splint. Surgery on maxillary is performed through Le Fort I osteotomy and fixation. Later, sagittal splint osteotomy of mandible is performed. Position of ramus and TMD complex is guided by the positioning of the plates

  11. The Regional Contribution of Glycosaminoglycans to Temporomandibular Joint Disc Compressive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Willard, Vincent P.; Kalpakci, Kerem N.; Reimer, Andrew J.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding structure-function relationships in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is a critical first step toward creating functional tissue replacements for the large population of patients suffering from TMJ disc disorders. While many of these relationships have been identified for the collagenous fraction of the disc, this same understanding is lacking for the next most abundant extracellular matrix component, sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Though GAGs are known to play a major role in maintaining compressive integrity in GAG-rich tissues such as articular cartilage, their role in fibrocartilaginous tissues in which GAGs are much less abundant is not clearly defined. Therefore, this study investigates the contribution of GAGs to the regional viscoelastic compressive properties of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc. Chondroitinase ABC (C-ABC) was used to deplete GAGs in five different disc regions, and the time course for >95% GAG removal was defined. The compressive properties of GAG depleted regional specimens were then compared to non-treated controls using an unconfined compression stress-relaxation test. Additionally, treated and non-treated specimens were assayed biochemically and histologically to confirm GAG removal. Compared to untreated controls, the only regions affected by GAG removal in terms of biomechanical properties were in the intermediate zone, the most GAG-rich portion of the disc. Without GAGs, all intermediate zone regions showed decreased tissue viscosity, and the intermediate zone lateral region also showed a 12.5% decrease in modulus of relaxation. However, in the anterior and posterior band regions, no change in compressive properties was observed following GAG depletion, though these regions showed the highest compressive properties overall. Although GAGs are not the major extracellular matrix molecule of the TMJ disc, they are responsible for some of the viscoelastic compressive properties of the tissue

  12. Phosphorylation of proteoglycans from human articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.S.; Schwartz, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sulfated proteoglycans from human articular and epiphyseal cartilage were phosphorylated. These macromolecules contribute to the stiffness and resiliency of this tissue. We demonstrate here that the phosphate moieties are an integral part of proteoglycan subunits. Specifically, evidence is presented which indicates that proteoglycan monomers contain 3 to 4 phosphate moieties per core protein and that these appear to exist as phosphoserine residues. Furthermore, the data illustrate that human articular cartilage also contains more than 20 different phosphoproteins, some of which are closely associated with proteoglycan aggregates. Proteoglycan subunits were purified from extracts of articular cartilage or from media fractions which had been used to label tissue specimens with 32P-orthophosphate. Chemical and radiographic analyses revealed that the phosphate concentration with respect to sulfate and uronic acid content remained constant when purified proteoglycan monomers were subjected to equilibrium ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography. That the phosphate moieties were bound to proteoglycan monomers via monoester linkages was indicated by the release of 32P-orthophosphate from proteoglycan subunits incubated under mild alkaline conditions or reacted with acid or alkaline phosphatases. Identification of serine residues in the core protein as the sites of phosphorylation was made by autoradiography of thin layer plates on which hydrolyzed samples of purified 32P-proteoglycan subunits had been subjected to 2-dimensional electrophoresis/chromatography. Quantification of 3 to 4 phosphate moieties per core protein of 200,000 daltons was made by chemical analysis of inorganic phosphate released from proteoglycans by acid hydrolysis.

  13. Perceived pain and temporomandibular disorders in neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael J; Riedlinger, Kathrin; Schoser, Benedikt; Bernateck, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Little is known about pain associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in neuromuscular diseases. Inpatients (N = 134) with neuromuscular disorder diagnoses were given questionnaires to estimate pain localization and intensity. Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and the Temporomandibular Index (TMI) were utilized to assess TMD. Pain was reported by 116 patients (86%). Legs (52%) and arms (33%) were the most common locations for pain localization, but the highest Pearson correlations (TMI vs. perceived pain) appeared for pain located in the trunk and arms (0.861, P < 0.01). No correlation between TMI and diagnosis group existed except for "acquired myopathy" and "miscellaneous neuromuscular diseases." These results suggest that the degree of TMD does not correlate with pain according to disease, although common mechanisms might be responsible for pain development in specific body regions connected with TMD. Most important, higher levels of TMD are associated with higher levels of perceived pain.

  14. An Interesting Case of Gunshot Injury to the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Mário Sergio Medeiros; Giongo, Caroline Comis; Antonello, Guilherme de Marco; Couto, Ricardo Torres do; Filho, Ruy de Oliveira Veras; Junior, Otacílio Luiz Chagas

    2014-01-01

    The head and face are relatively common sites of gunshot injury, and the temporomandibular joint is often affected. These wounds usually produce major deformity and functional impairment, particularly when the temporomandibular joint is affected or when structures such as the facial nerve are damaged. Complications may include mandibular displacement at maximum mouth opening and in protrusion, limited mouth opening, limited lateral movement of the jaw, anterior open bite, and, more rarely, temporomandibular ankylosis. Projectiles that strike the mandible usually cause comminuted fractures; maxillary wounds, in turn, are most commonly perforating. The present report describes a case of gunshot injury in which the projectile lodged within the mandibular fossa but did not cause any fractures. Oral and maxillofacial trauma surgeons must be aware of the different types of gunshot injury, as they produce distinct patterns of tissue destruction due to projectile trajectory and release of kinetic energy into surrounding tissue. PMID:25709756

  15. RANKL synthesized by articular chondrocytes contributes to juxta-articular bone loss in chronic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The receptor activator nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) diffuses from articular cartilage to subchondral bone. However, the role of chondrocyte-synthesized RANKL in rheumatoid arthritis-associated juxta-articular bone loss has not yet been explored. This study aimed to determine whether RANKL produced by chondrocytes induces osteoclastogenesis and juxta-articular bone loss associated with chronic arthritis. Methods Chronic antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) was induced in New Zealand (NZ) rabbits. Osteoarthritis (OA) and control groups were simultaneously studied. Dual X-ray absorptiometry of subchondral knee bone was performed before sacrifice. Histological analysis and protein expression of RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were evaluated in joint tissues. Co-cultures of human OA articular chondrocytes with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors were stimulated with macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), then further stained with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. Results Subchondral bone loss was confirmed in AIA rabbits when compared with controls. The expression of RANKL, OPG and RANKL/OPG ratio in cartilage were increased in AIA compared to control animals, although this pattern was not seen in synovium. Furthermore, RANKL expression and RANKL/OPG ratio were inversely related to subchondral bone mineral density. RANKL expression was observed throughout all cartilage zones of rabbits and was specially increased in the calcified cartilage of AIA animals. Co-cultures demonstrated that PGE2-stimulated human chondrocytes, which produce RANKL, also induce osteoclasts differentiation from PBMCs. Conclusions Chondrocyte-synthesized RANKL may contribute to the development of juxta-articular osteoporosis associated with chronic arthritis, by enhancing osteoclastogenesis. These results point out a new mechanism of bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22709525

  16. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40-70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40–70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. PMID:26096083

  18. Injection in temporomandibular joint of rats. Description of technical protocol.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, R; Veuthey, C; Arias, A; Saravia, D; Ottone, N E

    2017-03-01

    The development of animal models for research has been very diffused. Osteoarthritis is a joint degenerative pathology that induces cartilage erosion, chondrocyte proliferation and osteophyte formation. The aim of this paper is to present a technical procedure to perform the injection of monosodium iodine acetate in the temporomandibular joints of rats to generate osteoarthritis and to contribute to future research analysis related to pathology progression and proper treatment performance. The use of rat models may be a complex process because of their size, but they can be compared to the human temporomandibular joint due to the similar characteristics and the possibility of performing diagnosis and treatment protocols in order to detect this pathology.

  19. Review article: Maxillofacial emergencies: dentoalveolar and temporomandibular joint trauma.

    PubMed

    DeAngelis, Adrian F; Barrowman, Roland A; Harrod, Richard; Nastri, Alf L

    2014-10-01

    Dentoalveolar trauma and dislocations of the temporomandibular joint are common reasons for patients to present to EDs in Australia. The majority of medical practitioners receive very little formal training in the management of these injuries and might not have ready access to dental services out of hours for advice. This article focuses on the emergency assessment, triage and non-specialist management of dentoalveolar trauma and injuries to the temporomandibular joint. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  20. Temporomandibular joint disorder and inner ear pruritus: resolution by eminectomy.

    PubMed

    Pentyala, Sahana; Mysore, Pooja; Moller, Daryn; Pentyala, Srinivas; Kardovich, Richard; Martino, Andrew; Proothi, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Recurrent dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk is caused by many factors. Dislocation can result in an acute or chronic closed lock condition. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is often presented with otalgia symptoms. Other aural symptoms such as deafness, tinnitus, pressure/blockage, and vertigo are also commonly presented together with TMJ dysfunction (Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci. 1980;5:23-36). However, pruritus associated with TMJ dysfunction in the inner ear has never been reported in the literature. We report a case history of TMJ dysfunction and associated inner ear pruritus, which are both resolved by eminectomy.

  1. Sleep bruxism and myofascial temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Karen G.; Sirois, David A.; Janal, Malvin N.; Wigren, Pia E.; Dubrovsky, Boris; Nemelivsky, Lena V.; Klausner, Jack J.; Krieger, Ana C.; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many dentists believe that sleep bruxism (SB) is a pathogenic factor in myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD), but almost all supportive data rely on patients’ self-reports rather than on direct observation. Methods The authors administered a structured self-report interview to determine whether a large and well-characterized sample of patients with myofascial TMD (124 women) experienced SB more often than did matched control participants (46 women). The authors then used data from a two-night laboratory-based polysomnographic (PSG) study to determine whether the case participants exhibited more SB than the control participants. Results The results of independent sample t tests and χ2 analyses showed that, although self-reported rates of SB were significantly higher in case participants (55.3 percent) than in control participants (15.2 percent), PSG-based measures showed much lower and statistically similar rates of SB in the two groups (9.7 percent and 10.9 percent, respectively). Grinding noises were common in both case participants (59.7 percent) and control participants (78.3 percent). Conclusions Most case participants did not exhibit SB, and the common belief that SB is a sufficient explanation for myofascial TMD should be abandoned. Clinical Implications Although other reasons to consider treating SB may exist, misplaced concern about SB’s sustaining or exacerbating a chronic myofascial TMD condition should not be used to justify SB treatment. PMID:23115152

  2. [Total temporomandibular joint replacement with alloplastic prosthesis].

    PubMed

    García-Huerta, Marco Antonio; Romero-Flores, Jovita; Mena-Gómez, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Three total temporomandibular joint (TMJ) replacement surgeries were performed on two patients with TMJ ankylosis using W. Lorenz system. The first surgery was performed on a female patient with osseous ankylosis who had no mandibular movement since she was 18 months old. The second surgery was on a patient with fibrous ankylosis who had an interincisive opening distance of 12 mm. Her condition was the result of a three year old subcondylar fracture which didn't receive any treatment. The first patient had total replacement of both TMJs, while the other just one TMJ. The follow up until today has been of eight months with an interincisive opening of 29 mm in the first patient and 34 mm in the other. There has not been any mandibular deviation during opening, nor postoperative pain in both cases. Facial nerve affection was not permanent in both patients. For all of this, we can conclude that total TMJ replacement is an effective treatment with stable results in patients with TMJ ankylosis.

  3. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  4. Temporomandibular disorders and bruxism. Part I.

    PubMed

    Kevilj, R; Mehulic, K; Dundjer, A

    2007-01-01

    Correct functioning of the entire stomatognathic system is achieved by a compatible relationship of all its parts. Four determinants, by their mutual harmonious activity, dictate the function of the entire system: the teeth, periodontium with supporting structure, muscles, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and CNS. In such a complex system a disorder of any integrative part causes disturbances also in other parts of the system. Changed functions can arise through organic disorder, and also iatrogenically by inadequate conservative, prosthetic, surgical or orthodontic therapy. For this reason it is often difficult to recognise the primary cause. The first responses of the system to the disorder are adaptive mechanisms which occur within one or more integrative parts, and depending on their intensity and duration symptoms grow more prominent. Tissue response can be ortho- or parafunctional. Attempts are made to exclude psychoemotional influences and the obstacle eliminated by either abrasion, clenching or grinding of the teeth. If the obstacle is not eliminated by abrasion, the cause of such functional disorder becomes the trigger for parafunctional activity. From a review of the relevant literature it can be concluded that parafunctional activity is caused by changed occlusion, with determined psychological habits of the patient and specific tissue response of the stomatognathic system. Therefore, therapy of these disorders is made more difficult and includes a multidisciplinary approach.

  5. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis consequent to ear suppuration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Hota, Ashutosh; Sikka, Kapil; Thakar, Alok

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the complication of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis consequent to otitis media. The method applied is prospective case series and data collection done in tertiary referral centre from April 2012 to April 2013. Case description of three adolescent male patients with unilateral TMJ ankylosis consequent to ipsilateral chronic suppurative otitis media. Further literature review of TMJ ankylosis in relation to otitis media for evaluation for predisposing conditions. Surgical treatment by ipsilateral canal wall down mastoidectomy and concurrent TMJ gap arthroplasty. Surgical exposure confirmed ipsilateral bony ankylosis in all three. Two cases with long standing trismus had developed contralateral disuse fibrous ankylosis and required bilateral gap arthroplasty. Relief of trismus achieved in all three cases. Literature review indicated three similar cases secondary to otitis media. A universal feature among all previous case reports and the current case series was the age at onset of trismus, being at 10 years or less in all. TMJ ankylosis is a rare but potential complication of paediatric ear suppuration. Dehiscence along the tympanosquamosal fissure, tympanic plate and the foraminae of Huschke and Santorini in the paediatric population may predispose to extension of tympanic suppuration to the TMJ.

  6. Movements, lumbar and temporomandibular pain and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Sundsvold, M O; Vaglum, P; Ostberg, B

    1981-01-01

    157 males and females divided into four psychodiagnostic groups have been examined according to a specially defined physiotherapeutic (ad modum Sundsvold). In this paper, results from the evaluation of passive and active movements in five body significant differences concerning inhibited movements between the four groups were found, the psychotic group being most inhibited followed by the ego-week neurotic group, the substance-abusing group and the healthy control group. With regard to the slack movements, significant differences were found in the two extremity regions. The substance-abusing group had the most slack movements, next came the ego-weak neurotic group, the psychotic group and lastly the control group. Men were more inhibited than women in three regions, mostly in the lumbosacral region. This finding is discussed in relationship to the high frequency of lumbar disc herniation in men. Women were more significantly inhibited in the temporomandibular region, a finding which may explain why mostly women are suffering from the myofacial pain syndrome.

  7. Temporomandibular Joint Anatomy Assessed by CBCT Images

    PubMed Central

    Storti, Ennio; Nota, Alessandro; Ehsani, Shideh; Gatto, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Since cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been used for the study of craniofacial morphology, the attention of orthodontists has also focused on the mandibular condyle. The purpose of this brief review is to summarize the recent 3D CBCT images of mandibular condyle. Material and Methods. The eligibility criteria for the studies are (a) studies aimed at evaluating the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint; (b) studies performed with CBCT images; (c) studies on human subjects; (d) studies that were not clinical case-reports and clinical series; (e) studies reporting data on children, adolescents, or young adults (data from individuals with age ≤ 30 years). Sources included PubMed from June 2008 to June 2016. Results. 43 full-text articles were initially screened for eligibility. 13 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. 11 articles were finally included in qualitative synthesis. The main topics treated in the studies are the volume and surface of the mandibular condyle, the bone changes on cortical surface, the facial asymmetry, and the optimum position of the condyle in the glenoid fossa. Conclusion. Additional studies will be necessary in the future, constructed with longitudinal methodology, especially in growing subjects. The limits of CBCT acquisitions are also highlighted. PMID:28261607

  8. Orthodontics is temporomandibular disorder-neutral.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Daniele; Stellini, Edoardo; Gracco, Antonio; Lombardo, Luca; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    To assess if subjects with a clinical diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have a similar prevalence of orthodontic history as a population of TMD-free individuals and to assess if those subjects who have a history of ideal orthodontics have fewer symptoms than those with a history of nonideal orthodontics. Two groups of age- and sex-matched individuals belonging to either a study ("TMD") or a control group were recruited. Subjects who underwent orthodontic treatment were classified as having a history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics based on the current presence of normal values in five reference occlusal features. The correlation with a history of orthodontic treatment was not clinically significant for any of the TMD diagnoses (ie, muscle pain, joint pain, disc displacement, arthrosis), with Phi (Φ) coefficient values within the -0.120 to 0.058 range. Within the subset of patients with a history of orthodontics, the correlation of ideal or nonideal orthodontic treatment with TMD diagnoses was, in general, not clinically relevant or was weakly relevant. Findings confirmed the substantial absence of clinically significant effects of orthodontics as far as TMD is concerned. The very low correlation values of a negative or positive history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics with the different TMD diagnoses suggest that orthodontic treatment could not have a true role for TMD.

  9. Use of cervical collar in temporomandibular dislocation.

    PubMed

    Jaisani, Mehul R; Pradhan, Leeza; Sagtani, Alok

    2015-06-01

    Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint represents 3 % of all reported dislocated joints. In the last 3 decades many cases of TMJ dislocation have been reported with a wide variety of treatment options ranging from non-surgical conservative approaches to open joint procedures. The question remains whether one method is superior to the others. Conservative treatments are still the option in this part of the continent due to financial constraints and as well as due to availability of skilled manpower. A variety of conservative techniques have been described for reducing dislocations, all of which require 10-14 days of immobilization of the jaw post reduction so as to prevent further episodes of dislocation. Immobilization of the jaw can be done in the form of barrel bandage, barton bandage, head chin cap or maxillomandibular fixation using arch bars. We suggest the use of a cervical collar as a form of post reduction immobilization technique to overcome the inherent disadvantages of conventional forms of immobilization techniques.

  10. Functional reversibility of temporomandibular joint mechanoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Ishida, T; Yabushita, T; Ono, T

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies have reported that the maturation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mechanoreceptors occurs during the early stages of mastication, and indicated that TMJ mechanoreceptors lose their function when masticatory loading is decreased. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the resumption of proper TMJ loading during the early growth period could restore TMJ mechanoreceptor function. Ninety-nine 2-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups and fed either pellets [control group (n=33)] or a liquid diet [experimental group (n=66)]. At 5 weeks of age, the experimental group was split into changing-diet (n=33) and liquid-diet (n=33) groups; the former was fed pellets instead of a liquid diet. TMJ mechanoreceptor activities were recorded from the trigeminal ganglion at 5, 7 and 9 weeks. The firing threshold and maximum instantaneous firing frequency of single TMJ units were measured in each group. In the changing-diet group, the firing properties of TMJ units were recovered at 7 weeks. Proper TMJ loading during the early growth period can lead to the restoration of TMJ mechanoreceptor function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Extra-articular manifestations of seronegative spondylarthritis].

    PubMed

    Cammelli, Daniele

    2006-05-01

    Seronegative spondylarthritis are frequently characterised by extra-articular manifestations. They are frequently in recurrent uveitis. Between the cutaneous manifestations should be mentioned erythema nodosum, typical of inflammatory bowel diseases, and keratoderma blenorrhagicum, in the Reiter's syndrome. Cardiac complications in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) include aortic valvular regurgitation and arrhythmia and, more rarely, mitral valvulopathy, cardiomyopathy and pericarditis. Pulmonary involvement in AS includes ventilatory restrictive syndrome and fibro-bullous disease of the apex. Vertebral osteoporosis is a very important extra-articular manifestation because of the possibility of spontaneous fractures of the vertebrae. Central neurological manifestations include medullary compression from cervical sub-luxation while the most important peripheral involvements are lumbar stenosis and the cauda equina syndrome. Type AA amyloidosis is a rare late complication of the AS, possible cause of death especially in patients with aggressive disease. Kidney complications can be observed as consequences of prolonged anti-inflammatory therapy, but the most frequent renal complications are amyloidosis and mesangial IgA segmental and focal glomerulonephritis.

  12. Locating articular cartilage in MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik; Pettersen, Paola; Olsen, Ole F.; Nielsen, Mads; Christiansen, Claus

    2005-04-01

    Accurate computation of the thickness of the articular cartilage is of great importance when diagnosing and monitoring the progress of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. A fully automated cartilage assessment method is preferable compared to methods using manual interaction in order to avoid inter- and intra-observer variability. As a first step in the cartilage assessment, we present an automatic method for locating articular cartilage in knee MRI using supervised learning. The next step will be to fit a variable shape model to the cartilage, initiated at the location found using the method presented in this paper. From the model, disease markers will be extracted for the quantitative evaluation of the cartilage. The cartilage is located using an ANN-classifier, where every voxel is classified as cartilage or non-cartilage based on prior knowledge of the cartilage structure. The classifier is tested using leave-one-out-evaluation, and we found the average sensitivity and specificity to be 91.0% and 99.4%, respectively. The center of mass calculated from voxels classified as cartilage are similar to the corresponding values calculated from manual segmentations, which confirms that this method can find a good initial position for a shape model.

  13. [The effects of exercise on articular cartilage].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Cenk; Sarpel, Yaman; Biçer, O Sunkar

    2007-01-01

    The effect of exercise on articular cartilage has been assessed on animal models and on humans using various imaging techniques. Joint cartilage, whose water content decreases itself thanks to its unique permeable medium, maintains load distribution and joint function together with the synovial fluid under physiologic conditions and sports activities. The adaptive capacity of joint cartilage is limited under various conditions such as excessive load bearing or prolonged immobilization; however, when these factors are reversed deformed cartilage returns to its former state under normal conditions. Due to its adverse effect on joint cartilage, immobilization period following cartilage damage or operation should be as short as possible for wound healing. It is reported that exercise contributes to cartilage healing and reduces risk for injury, and that moderate exercise can even decrease the number of cases requiring arthroplasty. Conversely, excessive (harsh) exercise may be associated with increased cartilage damage or degenerative changes. Despite the presence of osteophytic changes in joint cartilage of athletes performing mild sports activities, these may not result in osteoarthritis due to the adaptive feature of joint cartilage. In contrast, the risk for osteoarthritis is increased in professional sportsmen exposed to acute repetitive impact and torsional loading. This article reviews the influence of controlled, passive-active exercise on healing, and on the development of osteoarthritis and the short- and long-term changes in articular cartilage associated with exercise and participation in sports of different duration and intensity.

  14. Toward patient-specific articular contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Henak, Corinne R.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanics of contacting cartilage layers is fundamentally important to understanding the development, homeostasis and pathology of diarthrodial joints. Because of the highly nonlinear nature of both the materials and the contact problem itself, numerical methods such as the finite element method are typically incorporated to obtain solutions. Over the course of five decades, we have moved from an initial qualitative understanding of articular cartilage material behavior to the ability to perform complex, three-dimensional contact analysis, including multiphasic material representations. This history includes the development of analytical and computational contact analysis methods that now provide the ability to perform highly nonlinear analyses. Numerical implementations of contact analysis based on the finite element method are rapidly advancing and will soon enable patient-specific analysis of joint contact mechanics using models based on medical image data. In addition to contact stress on the articular surfaces, these techniques can predict variations in strain and strain through the cartilage layers, providing the basis to predict damage and failure. This opens up exciting areas for future research and application to patient-specific diagnosis and treatment planning applied to a variety of pathologies that affect joint function and cartilage homeostasis. PMID:25698236

  15. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo; Michielon, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory. PMID:26075244

  16. Development of the human temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Mérida-Velasco, J R; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J A; Sánchez-Montesinos, I; Espín-Ferra, J; Jiménez-Collado, J

    1999-05-01

    A great deal of research has been published on the development of the human temporomandibularjoint (TMJ). However, there is some discordance about its morphological timing. The most controversial aspects concern the moment of the initial organization of the condyle and the squamous part of the temporal bone, the articular disc and capsule and also the cavitation and onset of condylar chondrogenesis. Serial sections of 70 human specimens between weeks 7 and 17 of development were studied by optical microscopy (25 embryos and 45 fetuses). All specimens were obtained from collections of the Institute of Embryology of the Complutense University of Madrid and the Department of Morphological Sciences of the University of Granada. Three phases in the development of the TMJ were identified. The first is the blastematic stage (weeks 7-8 of development), which corresponds with the onset of the organization of the condyle and the articular disc and capsule. During week 8 intramembranous ossification of the temporal squamous bone begins. The second stage is the cavitation stage (weeks 9-11 of development), corresponding to the initial formation of the inferior joint cavity (week 9) and the start condylar chondrogenesis. Week 11 marks the initiation of organization of the superior joint cavity. And the third stage is the maturation stage (after week 12 of development). This work establishes three phases in TMJ development: 1) the blastematic stage (weeks 7-8 of development); 2) the cavitation stage (weeks 9-11 of development); and 3) the maturation stage (after week 12 of development). This study identifies the critical period of TMJ morphogenesis as occurring between weeks 7 and 11 of development.

  17. Effect of diazepam on temporomandibular joints in rats with increased occlusal vertical dimension.

    PubMed

    Figueroba, S R; Desjardins, M P; Nani, B D; Ferreira, L E N; Rossi, A C; Santos, F A; Venâncio, P C; Aguiar, F H B; Groppo, F C

    2014-05-01

    Anxiolytic agents, mainly benzodiazepines, have been used to treat symptomatic disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Our aim was to evaluate the effect of diazepam on the TMJ of rats with increased occlusal vertical dimension (iOVD). Forty male rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control rats were given sham iOVD plus saline solution daily for 7 days. The first experimental group was given sham iOVD plus diazepam 2.5mg/kg/intramuscularly daily for 7 days (diazepam alone group); the second had iOVD induced in molars for 7 days plus saline daily for 7 days (iOVD alone group); and the third had iOVD induced in molars for 7 days plus diazepam 2.5mg/kg/intramuscularly daily for 7 days (iOVD plus diazepam group). At the end of each experiment the animals were killed and their bilateral TMJs were removed, randomly stained with haematoxylin and eosin and sirius-red, and immunoassayed. The thickness of condylar cartilage and of fibrous, proliferating, mature, and hypertrophic layers, number of collagen fibres, and the articular area were measured. Proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α) were also measured. ANOVA and Tukey's tests or the Kruskal-Wallis test were used to compare data among groups (α=5%). Condylar cartilage was thicker in the control group than in the other groups, the diazepam alone group being thicker than the other 2 experimental groups. There were fewer collagen fibres in the 2 groups given diazepam than in the other 2 groups, and there were no significant differences in the area of cartilage among groups. The controls had lower concentrations of all cytokines (p<0.05) than the 3 experimental groups, except for IL-6. Both iOVD groups had higher concentrations of IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6 than the diazepam alone group. Diazepam alone was associated with increased concentrations of all cytokines except IL-6. We conclude that both iOVD and diazepam induced significant changes in rats

  18. MRI alone versus MRI-CBCT registered images to evaluate temporomandibular joint internal derangement.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed A Q; Alsufyani, Noura A; Lagravere, Manuel; Nebbe, Brian; Lai, Hollis; Jaremko, Jacob L; Major, Paul W

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of magnetic resonance imaging-cone beam computed tomography (MRI-CBCT) image registration on inter- and intraexaminer consistency when evaluating temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement compared to MRI alone. MRI and CBCT images of 25 patients (50 TMJs) were obtained and coregistered using mutual-information rigid image registration via Mirada XD software. Two experienced radiologists independently and blindly evaluated two types of images (MRI alone and MRI-CBCT registered images) at two different times (T1 and T2) for TMJ internal derangement, based on sagittal and coronal articular disc position in relation to the head of the condyle and the posterior slope of the articular eminence. The intraexaminer consistency with MRI alone (examiner 1 = 0.85 [0.74-0.92]; examiner 2 = 0.91 [0.84-0.95]) was lower than for the MRI-CBCT registered images (examiner 1 = 0.95 [0.91-0.97]; examiner 2 = 0.97 [0.96-0.99]). The interexaminer consistency of evaluating internal derangement with MRI alone (0.52 [0.18-0.73] at T1; 0.71 [0.45-0.84] at T2) was lower than for the MRI-CBCT registered images (0.97 [0.95-0.98] at T1; 0.98 [0.96-0.99] at T2). When disc position classification was dichotomized to normal versus anteriorly displaced, intraexaminer agreement for the two examiners was 0.52 and 0.63 for MRI alone, but was 0.91 and 0.92 for MRI-CBCT registered images. Interexaminer agreement for MRI alone was 0.29 at T1 and 0.42 at T2, but was 0.96 at both examination times for MRI-CBCT registered images. The MRI-CBCT registered images improved intra- and interexaminer consistency in the evaluation of internal derangement of TMJ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Chondromatose of the temporomandibular joint: Multicentric study and clarification from 14 cases].

    PubMed

    Massereau, E; Cheynet, F; Bénateau, H; Veyssière, A; Bencheman, Y; Gallucci, A; Hammoutène, S; Chossegros, C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of our study was to analyse a series of patients suffering from temporomandibular joint (TMJ) chondromatosis treated in 2 departments of stomatology and maxillofacial surgery (University hospitals of the Conception in Marseille and of Caen) and to make a general review of this disease. We conducted a retrospective study including all the patients treated for a TMJ chondromatosis in one of these 2 departments. Following parameters were analyzed: sex, ages at discovery and at surgery, symptoms, side, imaging, histology, recurrence and any other events considered as relevant. Fourteen patients could be included: 85.7 % were women. Average age at diagnosis was 40.14 (σ = 13.82; IC95: 32.90-47.38) (41 for women [σ = 14.74; IC95: 33.28-48.72] and 35 years for men [σ = 5.66, IC95: 27.16-42.84]). Average age at surgery was 40.86 (σ = 14.18; IC95: 33.43-48.28). There was no predominance of side; 57.14 % of the patients had a joint syndrome, 57.14 % a tumor syndrome, 28.57 % had pain and 14.29 % had headaches. Panoramic X-ray was informative in 3 cases only. CT scan showed intra-articular calcifications in half of the cases only but arthrosic modifications in all the cases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) constantly showed intra-articular cartilage fragments. When histology was performed, it found the synovial to be normal in one case and multiple nodules with clear cartilaginous differentiation in another case. One patient suffered from a second contralateral localization 10 years later. Chondromatosis has a slow evolution and is asymptomatic for a long time. MRI allows to evoke the diagnosis and to locate precisely the osteochondromas. Diagnosis is confirmed by histology that highlights a synovial metaplasia and more or less calcified chondromas. The main differential diagnosis to be eliminated because of prognostic reasons is the synovial chondrosarcoma. Treatment consists in surgical removing of the chondromas. Evolution is usually

  20. [Evaluation of sagittal temporomandibular condyle position in adolescent Angle Class II division 1 patients by cone-beam CT].

    PubMed

    Fang, Hai-Jun; Tao, Lie

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate condyle-fossa relationship and provide some evidences for functional orthopedic treatment in adolescent Angle Class II division 1 patients. Forty adolescent Angle Class II division 1 patients (18 males, 22 females) who have to temporomandibular symptom were involved in this study and 42 adolescent Angle Class I patients (19 males, 23 females) served as control which had impacted teeth needed to take cone-beam CT (CBCT). Mimics 10.01 software was used to measure the depth of the mandibular fossa, the angulation of the posterior wall of the articular tubercle, anterior joint space, superior joint space, posterior joint space in CBCT imaging. Paired t test was applied for comparison between 2 groups using SPSS 15.0 software package. The measured data on left and right side in both Angle Class II division 1 patients and Angle Class I patients had no significant differences (P>0.05). The depth of the mandibular fossa, the angulation of the posterior wall of the articular tubercle, the superior joint space have no significant difference (P>0.05). The anterior joint space decreased significantly (P<0.05) and posterior joint space increased significantly (P<0.05) in adolescent Angle Class II division 1 patients compared with adolescent Angle Class I patients. In adolescent Angle Class II division 1 patients, anterior joint space decreased and posterior joint space increased compared with Angle Class I patients. And the condyle may move forward for compensation. Orthodontists should pay attention to condyle-fossa relationship in adolescent Angle Class II division 1 patients before functional orthopedic treatment.

  1. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    PubMed Central

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J. M.; Leale, Dustin M.; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure–function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure–function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter’s hard diet and continuous food intake. PMID:26664997

  2. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J M; Leale, Dustin M; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure-function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure-function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter's hard diet and continuous food intake.

  3. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  4. Histological evaluation of the temporomandibular joint after bilateral vertical ramus mandibular distraction in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Eduardo F; Gomez, David F; Polley, John W; Sumner, Rick D; Williams, James M; Figueroa, Alvaro A; Bolognese, Ana Maria

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to histologically evaluate the effect of bilateral vertical mandibular distraction osteogenesis (DO) on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in a canine model. Eight male beagle dogs underwent DO, with the placement of single-vector internal distractors. One unoperated animal served as control. After a latency period of 7 days, distraction was performed at a rate of 1 mm a day for an average of 12 days. The animals were divided into two groups (n = 4) and sacrificed after one or two months of consolidation. Eighteen TMJs were prepared for histological evaluation. Control TMJs surfaces were smooth, with no irregularities and trabecular bone was thick and multiply connected. In the one-month group, thinning of the trabecular bone was evident. The trabeculae were long, not multiply connected, parallel to each other and perpendicular to the articular surface. Although overall fibrous-cartilaginous tissues covering the TMJs were maintained with no signs of degenerative changes, one condyle from the one-month group had depressions and erosions of the fibro-cartilage layer and subcortical bone. In the two-month group, overall bone and cartilage architecture was more similar to the control specimens. This study indicates that, in the short term, gross changes can occur in the TMJ after bilateral mandibular vertical ramus distraction. These changes seem to be a process of biological adaptation to the pressure and functional changes secondary to surgery and distraction. However, long-term studies are needed to confirm whether the changes are completely reversible.

  5. Myogenic temporomandibular disorders: Clinical systemic comorbidities in a female population sample.

    PubMed

    de-Pedro-Herráez, M; Mesa-Jiménez, J; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, C; de-la-Hoz-Aizpurua, J-L

    2016-11-01

    Myogenic temporomandibular disorders (MTMD) frequently coexist with other clinical conditions in the same individual. In the last decades, several authors have analyzed these comorbidities looking for the origin of this overlapping. Objetives: The aim of this study was to perform a comparative anaylisis between a group of patients with MTMD and a control group of dental patients without dysfunctional pathology to assess whether there are significant differences in the presence of systemic medical comorbidities between the two groups. Restrospective epidemiological analysis, based on medical questionnaires in a group of 31 patients, women, aged from 24 to 58 (average 39.96 years), diagnosed with MTMD (Masticatory Myofascial Pain), with a control group with the same number of individuals, gender and age range to evaluate if there is a significant statistical difference in the presence of medical comorbidities in this group of patients with MTMD and if they are in a higher risk of suffering different pathological conditions. It was found that the group affected by MTMD presented many more associated medical conditions than the control group: health changes during the last year, medical evaluations and treatments, presence of pain, sinus disease, tinnitus, headache, joint pain, ocular disorders, fatigue, dizziness, genitourinary disorders and xerostomia among others; and they were also in a higher risk to suffer other pathological entities as headaches and articular pain. These results reinforce our hypothesis that MTMD belong to a group of medical conditions triggered by a loss of equilibrium of the individual's Psycho-Neuro-Endocrine-Immune (PNEI) Axis that produces alterations in the response against external stimuli in some genetically predisposed individuals. It is, therefore, necessary to change the way of diagnosing and managing these individual's medical conditions, being mandatory to look from a more multidisciplinary perspective than the one we are currently

  6. Management of the temporomandibular joint in inflammatory arthritis: Involvement of surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Rory C; Fawthrop, Fiona; Salha, Rami; Sidebottom, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Many conditions may affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), but its incidence in individual joint diseases is low. However, inflammatory arthropathies, particularly rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, appear to have a propensity for affecting the joint. Symptoms include pain, restriction in mouth opening, locking, and noises, which together can lead to significant impairment. Jaw rest, a soft diet, a bite splint, and medical therapy, including disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and simple analgesia, are the bedrock of initial treatment and will improve most symptoms in most patients. Symptom deterioration does not necessarily follow disease progression, but when it does, TMJ arthroscopy and arthrocentesis can help modulate pain, increase mouth opening, and relieve locking. These minimally invasive procedures have few complications and can be repeated. Operations to repair or remove a damaged intra-articular disc or to refine joint anatomy are used in select cases. Total TMJ replacement is reserved for patients where joint collapse or fusion has occurred or in whom other treatments have failed to provide adequate symptomatic control. It yields excellent outcomes and is approved by the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE), UK. Knowledge of the assessment and treatment of the TMJ, which differs from other joints affected by inflammatory arthritis due to its unique anatomy and function, is not widespread outside of the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this article is to highlight the peculiarities of TMJ disease secondary to rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis and how to best manage these ailments, which should help guide when referral to a specialist TMJ surgeon is appropriate. PMID:28638693

  7. The temporomandibular joint of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus): part 2-osteoarthritic changes.

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; Leale, D M; Sinai, N L; Kass, P H; Lin, A; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-01-01

    Following comprehensive characterization of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of the California sea lion, as well demonstrating that TMJ-osteoarthritis (OA) occurs in this species, the objective of this part of the investigation was to describe the macroscopic osteologic findings associated with TMJ-OA in a large museum collection of skull specimens. Museum skull specimens (n=497) of California sea lions were examined macroscopically according to defined criteria for the presence, severity, location and characteristics of TMJ-OA. The specimens, acquired from strandings, varied in age from young adults to mature adults. Overall 63.5% of the specimens had findings consistent with TMJ-OA. Of these, 56.2% were from females 43.8% were from males. Moreover, 71.2% specimens were from mature adults and 28.8% from young adults. However, there was no significant association between age and sex with the presence or severity of TMJ-OA. The most prominent TMJ-OA changes were the presence of subchondral bone defects and abnormal porosity. The majority of the OA present at the mandibular head affected the entire articular surface. In contrast, the OA present on the mandibular fossa of the temporal bone was located primarily on the medial aspect (P<0.001). The incidence of TMJ-OA in California sea lions is high and varies in severity. Although the significance of the high incidence of this disease in the California sea lion remains elusive, the occurrence and severity of TMJ-OA detected in this study may play an important role in the species' morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Incidence and clinical significance of zygomaticomaxillary complex fracture involving the temporomandibular joint with emphasis on trismus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Ko, Edward C; Kao, Chu-Chiang; Chang, Pei-Ying; Chen, Michael Y C

    2012-06-01

    Trismus is frequently a sequel of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in a zygomaticomaxillary complex (ZMC) fracture. Although trismus is commonly observed in patients with ZMC fracture, continuous follow-up examinations of their degree of mouth opening have rarely been documented. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence and clinical significance of ZMC fracture involving the glenoid fossa or articular eminence of the TMJ with an emphasis on trismus. The medical and computed tomography (CT) imaging data of 28 patients with ZMC fracture treated by oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMFSs) (OMFS group) and 174 patients with ZMC fracture treated by surgeons other than OMFSs (non-OMFS group) between May 2002 and May 2006 were reviewed. Maximal interincisal opening (MIO) less than 35 mm or three-finger width was considered limited mouth opening and indicative of trismus. Preoperative CT imaging data indicated that about 64% (18/28) and 50% (87/174) of the patients in the OMFS and non-OMFS groups, respectively, had a ZMC fracture involving the TMJ. Among these OMFS patients, 17 (94.40%) patients had limited mouth opening (MIO range, 7-33 mm) preoperatively, which improved markedly postoperatively. Among the non-OMFS patients with such fractures, 42 (48.3%) patients had trismus preoperatively and two retained trismus postoperatively. Lack of proper preoperative CT images, inadequate postoperative follow-up protocol, and/or neglect by patients and medical staff could influence the outcomes of ZMC fracture involving the TMJ. We make recommendations for reducing the risk of complications subsequent to ZMC fracture involving the TMJ. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. The function of the disco-muscular apparatus in the human temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Bade, H

    1999-01-01

    The morphology and function of the disco-muscular apparatus of the human TMJ is a controversial subject. Connections between the muscles which move the mandible and the "disco-capsular complex" have been described in a contradictory way. The disco-muscular apparatus is also described as being more extensive than that of the M. pterygoideus alone to include to the Mm. temporalis and masseter. However, the involvement of the latter is considered to be a peripheral variation of the normal anatomy and of little, if any, functional significance. The existence of independent relationships between the deep portions of the masseter and temporal muscles and the disco-capsular apparatus of the human TMJ is rarely discussed or explained. The morphologic findings were derived from fixed and unfixed human temporomandibular joints (TMJ) of varying ages and both sexes, whereby the functional maturity of the masticatory apparatus was taken into consideration. The results of the study show that aside from fibers originating from the superior venter of the M. pterygoideus lateralis, additional muscle or connective tissue fibers from the perimysium of the M. masseter are inserted to varying extents into the disc. The same is true for the M. temporalis, which is also directly connected to the disc via muscular or fibrous elements, or indirectly via fibers from the M. masseter. The insertion of the M. pterygoideus lateralis is always in the medial portion of the Discus articularis and those of the Mm. temporalis and masseter in the middle and lateral portions of the disc respectively. It is highly probable that a direct force transfer through the Mm. temporalis and masseter to the articular disc takes place, and that these muscles contribute to the movement of the disc during jaw movement, whereas the size and form of the muscle insertions are subject to a great deal of individual variation.

  10. The effects of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (Hylan G-F 20) on experimentally induced temporomandibular joint osteoartrosis: part II.

    PubMed

    Duygu, G; Güler, N; Cam, B; Kürkçü, M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of Hylan G-F 20 on experimentally induced osteoarthritic changes in rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A 3mg/ml concentration of sodium mono iodoacetate (MIA) had been injected into both joints of 24 rabbits to create osteoartrosis. The study group was injected with Hylan G-F 20 in one joint and saline in the contralateral joint as a control (once a week for 3 weeks). Histological changes in articular cartilage, osteochondral junction, chondrocyte appearance and subchondral bone were determined at 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Regarding cartilage, there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups at 4 weeks. Degenerative bony changes to subchondral bone were significantly higher in the controls. No statistical difference was found in the study group at 6 weeks. A positive correlation was found between osteochondral junction and subchondral bone in the study group at 8 weeks. The changes in chondrocyte appearance were significantly decreased in the study group at all follow-up times. Intra-articular injection of Hylan G-F 20 decreased cartilage changes in early stage TMJ osteoartrosis and clustering of chondrocytes showed the chondroprotective effects of Hylan G-F 20 caused by hypertrophic responses.

  11. Characterization of degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint of the bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Murphy, M K; Arzi, B; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N; Athanasiou, K A

    2013-11-01

    The articulation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is composed of the temporal bone dorsally, the mandibular condyle ventrally and a fibrous articular disc. The TMJ disc plays an essential role in distributing load between the two articular surfaces. Degeneration of the disc in the presence of joint pathology has been shown in man; however, TMJ pathology has not been documented previously in tigers (Panthera tigris). The mandibular condyle and TMJ disc of a Bengal tiger (P. tigris tigris) and a Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica) were evaluated grossly and the TMJ disc was characterized biochemically and mechanically. Characterization of the TMJ disc verified region- and direction-dependent biochemical and mechanical properties, reflective of the functional demands on the joint. Degenerative joint disease was observed in both cases and this was more severe in the Siberian tiger. Simultaneous evaluation of joint pathology, biochemical composition and mechanical properties of the TMJ disc revealed a loss in functional properties (tensile anisotropy) of the disc as joint pathology advanced from moderate to severe. TMJ degeneration may compromise the ability of the animal to eat and thrive and may be a factor contributing to the endangered status of these species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of Degenerative Changes in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica)

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, M. K.; Arzi, B.; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N.; Athanasiou, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The articulation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is composed of the temporal bone dorsally, the mandibular condyle ventrally and a fibrous articular disc. The TMJ disc plays an essential role in distributing load between the two articular surfaces. Degeneration of the disc in the presence of joint pathology has been shown in man; however, TMJ pathology has not been documented previously in tigers (Panthera tigris). The mandibular condyle and TMJ disc of a Bengal tiger (P. tigris tigris) and a Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica) were evaluated grossly and the TMJ disc was characterized biochemically and mechanically. Characterization of the TMJ disc verified region- and direction-dependent biochemical and mechanical properties, reflective of the functional demands on the joint. Degenerative joint disease was observed in both cases and this was more severe in the Siberian tiger. Simultaneous evaluation of joint pathology, biochemical composition and mechanical properties of the TMJ disc revealed a loss in functional properties (tensile anisotropy) of the disc as joint pathology advanced from moderate to severe. TMJ degeneration may compromise the ability of the animal to eat and thrive and may be a factor contributing to the endangered status of these species. PMID:23809909

  13. Association of a temporomandibular disorder and Eagle's syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    de Souza, E A; Hotta, T H; Bataglion, C

    1996-01-01

    We report a clinical case of Eagle's syndrome which required dental intervention due to the presence of exacerbated symptoms indicating an association with a temporomandibular disorder. The therapeutic dental procedures used were an occlusal splint and temporary removable partial dentures. Surgical removal of the styloid process on the left side was later performed as a medical option.

  14. Fibromyalgia syndrome and temporomandibular disorders with muscular pain. A review.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Fernández, Ana Maria; Jiménez-Castellanos, Emilio; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Bueso-Madrid, Débora; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; de Miguel, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) refer to a group of clinical picture affecting the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joint that are characterized by muscular or joint pain, dysfunction (limited or altered functions) and joint noises, as well as other associated symptoms, such as tension headaches, otalgia, dizziness, tinnitus, and others. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome of unknown etiology involving generalized chronic pain accompanied, in a high percentage of cases, by other symptoms such as asthenia, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, and other less frequent symptoms, such as temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Data were compiled by two experienced examiners following a specific form. An electronic search was carried out in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PUBMED, and SCOPUS electronic databases (up to April 2016, unrestricted by date or language). Comparative clinical studies with patients with both clinical pictures involving the study of pathogenic processes. Fibromyalgia and temporomandibular disorders with muscle pain both have profiles that affect the muscular system and therefore share many epidemiological, clinical, and physiopathological symptoms. Because of this, we are led to think that there is, if not a common etiology, at least a common pathogenesis. This article revises the physiopathological processes of both clinical pictures in an attempt to determine their similarities and likenesses. This would undoubtedly help in providing a better therapeutic approach.

  15. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DYSFUNCTION AND HEAD AND CERVICAL POSTURE

    PubMed Central

    Matheus, Ricardo Alves; Ramos-Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes; Menezes, Alynne Vieira; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Haiter, Francisco; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto; de Almeida, Solange Maria

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of any correlation between disc displacement and parameters used for evaluation of skull positioning in relation to the cervical spine: craniocervical angle, suboccipital space between C0-C1, cervical curvature and position of the hyoid bone in individuals with and without symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction. Material and Methods: The patients were evaluated following the guidelines set forth by RDC/TMD. Evaluation was performed by magnetic resonance imaging for establishment of disc positioning in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 30 volunteer patients without temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms and 30 patients with symptoms. Evaluation of skull positioning in relation to the cervical spine was performed on lateral cephalograms achieved with the individual in natural head position. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by Fisher's exact test at 5% significance level. To measure the degree of reproducibility/agreements between surveys, the kappa (K) statistics was used. Results: Significant differences were observed between C0-C1 measurement for both symptomatic (p=0.04) and asymptomatic (p=0.02). No statistical differences were observed regarding craniocervical angle, C1-C2 and hyoid bone position in relation to the TMJs with and without disc displacement. Although statistically significant difference was found in the C0-C1 space, no association between these and internal temporomandibular joint disorder can be considered. Conclusion: Based on the results observed in this study, no direct relationship could be determined between the presence of disc displacement and the variables assessed. PMID:19466252

  16. [Temporomandibular joint septic arthritis with secondary condylar resorption].

    PubMed

    Constant, M; Nicot, R; Maes, J-M; Raoul, G; Ferri, J

    2016-09-01

    Septic arthritis are serious infections rarely observed for the temporomandibular joint. They are mainly hematogenous or transmitted by contiguity. Our patient presents the case of an infection of the temporomandibular joint by maxillary sinusitis of dental origin further complicated by cerebral abscess and empyema. Initial treatment consisted of an endonasal and intraoral drainage, intravenous empirical antibiotic therapy, a close clinicoradiological monitoring, and rehabilitation following a long-term active physiotherapy. Furthermore, the patient reported the onset of a dental articulation disorder with a left side premature contact and right lateral open bite, corresponding to a significant left condylar resorption. This infectious disease is very rare for temporomandibular location; however, its general and functional outcome is determined by the precocity of the treatment. It is important to know the diagnosis and the associated symptoms even if they are not very specifically described. It is essential to consider the diagnosis when facing atypical pain of the temporomandibular joint associated with trismus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Skeletal pattern in subjects with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Almăşan, Oana Cristina; Băciuţ, Mihaela; Almăşan, Horea Artimoniu; Bran, Simion; Lascu, Liana; Iancu, Mihaela; Băciuţ, Grigore

    2013-02-21

    To establish the skeletal pattern in subjects with malocclusions and temporomandibular disorders (TMD); to assess the relationship between craniofacial skeletal structures and TMD in subjects with malocclusions. Sixty-four subjects with malocclusions, over 18 years of age, were included in the study. Temporomandibular disorders were clinically assessed according to the Helkimo Anamnestic Index. Subjects underwent a lateral cephalogram. Subjects were grouped according to the sagittal skeletal pattern (ANB angle) into class I, II and III. Parametric Student tests with equal or unequal variations were used (variations were previously tested with Levene test). Twenty-four patients with TMD (experimental sample); 40 patients without TMD (control group); interincisal angle was higher in class I and II (p < 0.05) experimental subjects; overjet was larger in experimental subjects; midline shift and Wits appraisal were broader in the experimental group in all three classes. In class III subjects, the SNB angle was higher in the experimental group (p = 0.01). Joint noises followed by reduced mandible mobility, muscular pain and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain were the most frequent symptoms in subjects with TMD and malocclusions. Temporomandibular joint status is an important factor to consider when planning orthodontic treatment in patients with severe malocclusions; midline shift, large overjet and deep overbite have been associated with signs and symptoms of TMD.

  18. Skeletal pattern in subjects with temporomandibular joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    Almăşan, Oana Cristina; Almăşan, Horea Artimoniu; Bran, Simion; Lascu, Liana; Iancu, Mihaela; Băciuţ, Grigore

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To establish the skeletal pattern in subjects with malocclusions and temporomandibular disorders (TMD); to assess the relationship between craniofacial skeletal structures and TMD in subjects with malocclusions. Material and methods Sixty-four subjects with malocclusions, over 18 years of age, were included in the study. Temporomandibular disorders were clinically assessed according to the Helkimo Anamnestic Index. Subjects underwent a lateral cephalogram. Subjects were grouped according to the sagittal skeletal pattern (ANB angle) into class I, II and III. Parametric Student tests with equal or unequal variations were used (variations were previously tested with Levene test). Results Twenty-four patients with TMD (experimental sample); 40 patients without TMD (control group); interincisal angle was higher in class I and II (p < 0.05) experimental subjects; overjet was larger in experimental subjects; midline shift and Wits appraisal were broader in the experimental group in all three classes. In class III subjects, the SNB angle was higher in the experimental group (p = 0.01). Joint noises followed by reduced mandible mobility, muscular pain and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain were the most frequent symptoms in subjects with TMD and malocclusions. Conclusions Temporomandibular joint status is an important factor to consider when planning orthodontic treatment in patients with severe malocclusions; midline shift, large overjet and deep overbite have been associated with signs and symptoms of TMD. PMID:23515361

  19. The relationship between forward head posture and temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, W Y; Okeson, J P; Lindroth, J

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between forward head posture and temporomandibular disorder symptoms. Thirty-three temporomandibular disorder patients with predominant complaints of masticatory muscle pain were compared with an age- and gender-matched control group. Head position was measured from photographs taken with a plumb line drawn from the ceiling to the lateral malleolus of the ankle and with a horizontal plane that was perpendicular to the plumb line and that passed through the spinous process of the seventh cervical vertebra. The distances from the plumb line to the ear, to the seventh vertebra, and to the shoulder were measured. Two angles were also measured: (1) ear-seventh cervical vertebra-horizontal plane and (2) eye-ear-seventh cervical vertebra. The only measurement that revealed a statistically significant difference was angle ear-seventh cervical vertebra-horizontal plane. This angle was smaller in the patients with temporomandibular disorders than in the control subjects. In other words, when evaluating the ear position with respect to the seventh cervical vertebra, the head was positioned more forward in the group with temporomandibular disorders than in the control group (P < .05).

  20. Case-Based Learning for Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Glenn T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The use of interactive computer-based simulation of cases of chronic orofacial pain and temporomandibular joint disfunction patients for clinical dental education is described. Its application as a voluntary study aid in a third-year dental course is evaluated for effectiveness and for time factors in case completion. (MSE)

  1. Case-Based Learning for Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Glenn T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The use of interactive computer-based simulation of cases of chronic orofacial pain and temporomandibular joint disfunction patients for clinical dental education is described. Its application as a voluntary study aid in a third-year dental course is evaluated for effectiveness and for time factors in case completion. (MSE)

  2. [Temporomandibular injury: a cause of limited mouth opening].

    PubMed

    Luz, J G; Seroli, W; Yamamoto, M K; Pereira, M F

    1990-01-01

    A case of limitation of jaw opening caused by an intentional knife wound to the temporomandibular region is presented. The chief complaint was pain and restricted jaw movement. Treatment consisted of the administration of antiinflammatory agent. Recovery was complete and without complications, normal jaw opening being obtained. The possibility that the inflammatory process stimulates muscular spasm is emphasized.

  3. [The relationship between whiplash injury and temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Barak, Shlomo

    2013-10-01

    This article aims to discuss the possible relationship between rapid extension-flexion of the neck-whiplash injury and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Clinical experience and studies revealed that whiplash injury may cause TMD. The pathophysiology of TMD is described as well as clinical and imaging diagnostic criteria. The treatment modalities for TMD are: physiotherapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and occlusal splints.

  4. Speech evaluation in children with temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    PIZOLATO, Raquel Aparecida; FERNANDES, Frederico Silva de Freitas; GAVIÃO, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the influence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) on speech in children, and to verify the influence of occlusal characteristics. Material and methods Speech and dental occlusal characteristics were assessed in 152 Brazilian children (78 boys and 74 girls), aged 8 to 12 (mean age 10.05 ± 1.39 years) with or without TMD signs and symptoms. The clinical signs were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) (axis I) and the symptoms were evaluated using a questionnaire. The following groups were formed: Group TMD (n=40), TMD signs and symptoms (Group S and S, n=68), TMD signs or symptoms (Group S or S, n=33), and without signs and symptoms (Group N, n=11). Articulatory speech disorders were diagnosed during spontaneous speech and repetition of the words using the "Phonological Assessment of Child Speech" for the Portuguese language. It was also applied a list of 40 phonological balanced words, read by the speech pathologist and repeated by the children. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact or Chi-square tests (α=0.05). Results A slight prevalence of articulatory disturbances, such as substitutions, omissions and distortions of the sibilants /s/ and /z/, and no deviations in jaw lateral movements were observed. Reduction of vertical amplitude was found in 10 children, the prevalence being greater in TMD signs and symptoms children than in the normal children. The tongue protrusion in phonemes /t/, /d/, /n/, /l/ and frontal lips in phonemes /s/ and /z/ were the most prevalent visual alterations. There was a high percentage of dental occlusal alterations. Conclusions There was no association between TMD and speech disorders. Occlusal alterations may be factors of influence, allowing distortions and frontal lisp in phonemes /s/ and /z/ and inadequate tongue position in phonemes /t/; /d/; /n/; /l/. PMID:21986655

  5. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis: the Egyptian experience.

    PubMed Central

    el-Sheikh, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    This is a review of 204 patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis treated according to a definitive protocol in the Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Department of the Alexandria University Hospital during the period 1990-1996 with a follow-up varying from 1.5 to 7 years. A history of trauma was confirmed in 98% of cases. Patients were grouped into: (1) Those with ankylosis not associated with facial deformities. The management involves release of the ankylosed joint(s) and reconstruction of the condyle ramus unit(s) (CRUs) using costochondral graft(s) (CCGs). (2) Those with mandibular ankylosis complicated by facial bone deformities, either asymmetric or bird face. The treatment consists of release of the ankylosis, reconstruction of the CRUs, and correction of jaw deformities--all performed simultaneously. Respiratory embarrassment was an important presenting symptom in the second group, all of whom complained of night snoring, eight of whom had obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). In this latter group, respiratory obstruction improved dramatically after surgical intervention. The degree of mouth opening, monitored as the interincisal distance (IID) improved from a range of 0-12 mm to over 30 mm in 62% of patients and to 20-30 mm in 29% of patients. However, reankylosis was still around 8% and was attributed to lack of patient compliance in 75% and to iatrogenic factors in 25% of patients. CCGs resorption, whether partial or complete, occurred in 27% of patients, resulting in retarded growth, relapse of deformities and night snoring. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10325678

  6. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in various rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Avila, F J; Chávez-López, M; Chavira-González, J R; Ramos-Remus, C

    2013-07-24

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is an inclusive term in which those conditions disturbing the masticatory function are embraced. It has been estimated that 33% of the population have signs of TMD, but less than 5% of the population will require treatment. The objective of this study was to measure the frequency of TMD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthrosis (OA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus, and to define the limitations in everyday's life that patients perceive when present. A six-month survey of consecutive outpatients in a rheumatology clinic in a teaching hospital in Mexico was carried out. We defined TMD as: 1) the presence of pain; 2) difficulty on mouth opening, chewing or speaking; 3) the presence of non-harmonic movements of the temporomaxilar joints. All three characteristics had to be present. Z test was used to define differences between proportions. We present the results of 171 patients. Overall, 50 patients had TMD according to our operational definition (29.24%). Up to 76% of the sample had symptoms associated with the condition. TMD is more frequent in OA and in AS (29.24% vs 38% OA, P=0.009; 39% AS; P=0.005). We found no association between the severity of TMD and the request for specific attention for the discomfort produced by the condition. Only 8 of 50 (16%) patients with TMD had requested medical help for their symptoms, and they were not the most severe cases. TMD is more frequent in RA and OA. Although it may produce severe impairment, patients seem to adapt easily.

  7. Multisystem Dysregulation in Painful Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Nackley, Andrea; Miller, Vanessa; Diatchenko, Luda; Maixner, William

    2013-01-01

    Multiple physiological and psychological regulatory domains may contribute to the pathophysiology of pain in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and other bodily pain conditions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between multisystem dysregulation and the presence of TMD pain, as well as the presence of different numbers of comorbid pain conditions in TMD. Secondary data analysis was conducted in 131 non-TMD (without comorbid pain) controls, 14 TMD subjects without comorbid pain, 78 TMD subjects with 1 comorbid pain, and 67 TMD subjects with multiple comorbid pain conditions who participated in a TMD genetic study. Twenty markers from sensory, autonomic, inflammatory, and psychological domains were evaluated. The results revealed that 1) overall dysregulation in multiple system domains (OR [odds ratio] = 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4–1.8), particularly in the sensory (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.3–2.9) and the psychological (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 2.1–2.7) domains, were associated with increased likelihood of being a painful TMD case; and 2) dysregulations in individual system domains were selectively associated with the increased odds of being a TMD case with different levels of comorbid persistent pain conditions. These outcomes indicate that heterogeneous multisystem dysregulations may exist in painful TMD subgroups, and multidimensional physiological and psychological assessments can provide important information regarding pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of pain in TMD patients. Perspective The concurrent assessment of multiple physiological and psychological systems is critical to our understanding of the pathophysiological processes that contribute to painful TMD and associated comorbid conditions, which will ultimately guide and inform appropriate treatment strategies that address the multisystem dysregulation associated with complex and common persistent pain conditions. PMID:23721875

  8. Speech evaluation in children with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Pizolato, Raquel Aparecida; Fernandes, Frederico Silva de Freitas; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2011-10-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the influence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) on speech in children, and to verify the influence of occlusal characteristics. Speech and dental occlusal characteristics were assessed in 152 Brazilian children (78 boys and 74 girls), aged 8 to 12 (mean age 10.05 ± 1.39 years) with or without TMD signs and symptoms. The clinical signs were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) (axis I) and the symptoms were evaluated using a questionnaire. The following groups were formed: Group TMD (n=40), TMD signs and symptoms (Group S and S, n=68), TMD signs or symptoms (Group S or S, n=33), and without signs and symptoms (Group N, n=11). Articulatory speech disorders were diagnosed during spontaneous speech and repetition of the words using the "Phonological Assessment of Child Speech" for the Portuguese language. It was also applied a list of 40 phonological balanced words, read by the speech pathologist and repeated by the children. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact or Chi-square tests (α=0.05). A slight prevalence of articulatory disturbances, such as substitutions, omissions and distortions of the sibilants /s/ and /z/, and no deviations in jaw lateral movements were observed. Reduction of vertical amplitude was found in 10 children, the prevalence being greater in TMD signs and symptoms children than in the normal children. The tongue protrusion in phonemes /t/, /d/, /n/, /l/ and frontal lips in phonemes /s/ and /z/ were the most prevalent visual alterations. There was a high percentage of dental occlusal alterations. There was no association between TMD and speech disorders. Occlusal alterations may be factors of influence, allowing distortions and frontal lisp in phonemes /s/ and /z/ and inadequate tongue position in phonemes /t/; /d/; /n/; /l/.

  9. Deglutition and temporomandibular disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Pizolato, R A; Silva De Freitas Fernandes, F; Beatriz Duarte Gavião, M

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the characteristics of deglutition in children having or not temporomandibular disorders (TMD) or signs and/or symptoms of TMD. The sample comprised 152 children aged from 8 to 12 years (78 males and 74 females, mean age 10.05+/-1.39 years). The clinical signs were evaluated using the axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) and the symptoms, using a questionnaire. Patients were divided into the following groups: Group TMD (N.=40), signs and symptoms of TMD (Group S and S, N.=68), signs or symptoms of TMD (Group S or S, N.=33) and without signs and symptoms (Group N, N.=11). Characteristics of orofacial structures such as occlusion, tongue, lingual frenulum, lips and mentalis muscle were evaluated. Myofunctional evaluation during deglutition with solid (bread) and liquid (water) was also performed. A high prevalence of abnormal deglutition was found, with similar proportion in groups. Alterations in lips, mentalis muscle and tongue in swallowing was significantly smaller in Group N than in the other groups. The proportions of children with lower lip interposition and lateral tongue thrust, when swallowing liquid, were significantly higher than swallowing solids. There was a smaller proportion of children in Group N with lower lip interposition when swallowing liquids. TMD or presence of signs and/or symptoms of TMD was not associated with an abnormal deglutition. Nevertheless, orofacial myofunctional alterations could be considered influencing factors on TMD, due to the high prevalence of abnormal deglutition pattern. In addition, the abnormal deglutition could be attributed to the malocclusion, mixed dentition phase and orofacial myofunctional characteristics.

  10. Pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint: an uncommon cause of temporomandibular joint pain and swelling.

    PubMed

    Sklenicka, Scott; Dierks, Eric J; Jarmin, Joe; Miles, Cathy

    2011-06-01

    Pseudogout, or calcium pyrophosphate deposition, is a rare cause of pain, swelling, and trismus of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Diagnosis and management of the lesion are discussed. A 58-year-old female had a 2-month history of progressive swelling of right TMJ associated with trismus and facial pain. Imaging of the TMJ revealed a mixed radiolucent and radiopaque lesion associated with the right TMJ joint space. Surgical excision was performed successfully via preauricular approach. Pathology was consistent with calcium pyrophosphate deposition of the TMJ, also known as pseudogout. Surgical excision successfully treated her symptoms as expected. She is now disease free without recurrence. Pseudogout is a rare cause of TMJ pain, swelling, and trismus that should be included in the differential of joint pain and dysfunction. It can be treated successfully with surgery. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Articular cartilage regeneration using stem cells].

    PubMed

    Kanamoto, Takashi; Nakamura, Norimasa; Nakata, Ken; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2008-12-01

    Articular cartilage plays pivotal roles in securing smooth joint kinematics and act as a shock absorber, however, it has minimal healing potential. Chondral injury could lead to the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and therefore is a major clinical concern. There have been marrow stimulating technique and osteochondral transplantation explored to promote cartilage repair. In addition, autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has been developed by Peterson and Brittberg and more than 20,000 cases underwent the procedure all over the world. Recent progress in stem cell research has raised the potential application of stem cell therapy to cartilage repair. In this review, potential application of bone marrow or synovial-derived mesenchymal cells to promote cartilage repair would be discussed.

  12. Association of Temporomandibular Joint Pain According to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Temporomandibular Disorder Patients.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Namiaki; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Sumikura, Kanako; Kabasawa, Yuji; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Harada, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the associations between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The study included 646 TMJs of 323 consecutive patients with temporomandibular disorders; of these, 222 (34.4%) had TMJ pain whereas 424 (65.6%) had no TMJ pain. MRIs were used to evaluate disc position, osteoarthritis, joint fluid, and bone marrow edema. Internal derangement was classified as normal, anterior disc displacement with reduction, and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWOR); condylar morphology was classified as normal, moderate bony change, and severe bony change. The odds ratio (OR) for each MRI variable for nonpainful versus painful TMJs was computed using logistic regression analysis. Compared with joints with normal disc position, the OR of those with ADDWOR was 2.74 (P < .001) for TMJ pain. Similarly, compared with joints with normal condylar morphology, the OR of those with severe bony change was 4.62 (P = .02) for TMJ pain. In addition, the risk of TMJ pain increased by 2.37 in joints with joint fluid (P < .001) and by 2.34 in joints with bone marrow edema (P = .006). The risk of TMJ pain increased significantly with ADDWOR in combination with severe bony change, joint fluid, and bone marrow edema. These results suggest an association between TMJ pain and ADDWOR, severe bony change, joint fluid, and bone marrow edema. Thus, combining various MRI variables may improve the diagnostic accuracy of TMJ pain. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Herniation of the temporomandibular joint into the external auditory canal: a complication of otologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Selesnick, S H; Carew, J F; DiBartolomeo, J R

    1995-11-01

    Herniation of the temporomandibular joint into the external auditory canal has been reported as a result of trauma, neoplasia, infection, inflammatory processes, or developmental malformations. This paper reviews the intimate relation of the temporomandibular joint to the temporal bone as well as the literature describing temporomandibular joint herniation into the external auditory canal. Four cases of temporomandibular joint herniation into the external auditory canal resulting from otologic surgery are presented. Their characteristic location, clinical and radiographic findings are described and contrasted to previously reported cases. Despite striking displacement of the temporomandibular joint into the external auditory canal, there were no clinical symptoms referable to this finding. The absence of symptoms distinguished this postoperative etiology of temporomandibular joint herniation from other etiologies mentioned above.

  14. Quinolone arthropathy--acute toxicity to immature articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Gough, A W; Kasali, O B; Sigler, R E; Baragi, V

    1992-01-01

    A class effect of quinolone antibacterial agents observed during animal toxicity testing is a specific arthropathy (QAP). Despite the growing list of laboratory animals susceptible to QAP and reports of arthralgia in patients treated with quinolones, the potential for QAP development in humans remains unknown. This review discusses current concepts in the biology of articular cartilage and how these concepts elucidate QAP pathogenesis. Biomechanical forces within synovial joints and toxicokinetic properties of quinolones contribute to QAP induction. Since a limited number of mechanistic pathways exist for acute articular damage, QAP may serve as a research tool to probe the pathobiology of injury to articular cartilage.

  15. Conditional Deletion of the Phd2 Gene in Articular Chondrocytes Accelerates Differentiation and Reduces Articular Cartilage Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shaohong; Pourteymoor, Sheila; Alarcon, Catrina; Mohan, Subburaman

    2017-01-01

    Based on our findings that PHD2 is a negative regulator of chondrocyte differentiation and that hypoxia signaling is implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, we investigated the consequence of disruption of the Phd2 gene in chondrocytes on the articular cartilage phenotype in mice. Immunohistochemistry detected high expression of PHD2 in the superficial zone (SZ), while PHD3 and HIF-1α (target of PHD2) are mainly expressed in the middle-deep zone (MDZ). Conditional deletion of the Phd2 gene (cKO) in chondrocytes accelerated the transition of progenitors to hypertrophic (differentiating) chondrocytes as revealed by reduced SZ thickness, and increased MDZ thickness, as well as increased chondrocyte hypertrophy. Immunohistochemistry further revealed decreased levels of progenitor markers but increased levels of hypertrophy markers in the articular cartilage of the cKO mice. Treatment of primary articular chondrocytes, in vitro, with IOX2, a specific inhibitor of PHD2, promoted articular chondrocyte differentiation. Knockdown of Hif-1α expression in primary articular chondrocytes using lentiviral vectors containing Hif-1α shRNA resulted in reduced expression levels of Vegf, Glut1, Pgk1, and Col10 compared to control shRNA. We conclude that Phd2 is a key regulator of articular cartilage development that acts by inhibiting the differentiation of articular cartilage progenitors via modulating HIF-1α signaling. PMID:28349987

  16. [Explanation of some physiological characteristics of homeostasis in elderly patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Babich, V V; Ryzhak, G A; Iordanishvili, A K

    2014-01-01

    Most number of patients, particularly adult and older women with temporomandibular disfunction suffers from pain reaction in maxillofacial area. Pain symptom associated with temporomandibular disfunction is followed by some changes of physiological statistics (high sympathetic level). Temporomandibular disfunction in adult and older women is most pronounced and can serve as an indicator of concomitant chronic diseases among patients with endocrine disorder (hypothyroidism), cardiological pathology (arterial hypertension).

  17. Low-level laser therapy stimulates tissue repair and reduces the extracellular matrix degradation in rats with induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Lemos, George Azevedo; Rissi, Renato; de Souza Pires, Ivan Luiz; de Oliveira, Letícia Prado; de Aro, Andrea Aparecida; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Palomari, Evanisi Teresa

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize morphological and biochemistry action of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into groups with 12 animals each: (AG) group with arthritis induced in the left TMJ and (LG) group with arthritis induced in the left TMJ and treated with LLLT (830 nm, 30 mW, 3 J/cm(2)). Right TMJs in the AG group were used as noninjected control group (CG). Arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of 50 μl Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) and LLLT began 1 week after arthritis induction. Histopathological analysis was performed using sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Toluidine Blue, and picrosirius. Biochemical analysis was determined by the total concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and evaluation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9). Statistical analysis was performed using paired and unpaired t tests, with p < 0.05. Compared to AG, LG had minor histopathological changes in the TMJ, smaller thickness of the articular disc in the anterior (p < 0.0001), middle (p < 0.0001) and posterior regions (p < 0.0001), high birefringence of collagen fibers in the anterior (p < 0.0001), middle (p < 0.0001) and posterior regions (p < 0.0001) on the articular disc, and statistically lower activity of MMP-2 latent (p < 0.0001), MMP-2 active (P = 0.02), MMP-9 latent (p < 0.0001), and MMP-9 active (p < 0.0001). These results suggest that LLLT can increase the remodeling and enhancing tissue repair in TMJ with induced arthritis.

  18. Disc positions and condylar changes induced by different stretching forces in the model for anterior disc displacement of temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Cai, Xieyi; Wang, Shaoyi; Yang, Chi; Song, Hao; Huang, Linjian

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the disc positions and condylar changes induced by different stretching forces in the modified animal model for anterior disc displacement (ADD) of the temporomandibular joint. In the experimental group, 30 rabbits were equally divided into 3 subgroups and underwent surgical ADD via different stretching forces: group A with 0.5 N, group B with 1 N, and group C with 2 N. In the sham group, 6 rabbits underwent the same surgery without the disc being pulled anteriorly. The diagnosis of ADD was made when the anterior band of the disc was located anteriorly to the articular eminence. Histologic and radiographic changes of the condyles were observed under light microscopy and micro-computed tomography scanning 1 week after surgery. The success rates of ADD were both 100% in groups B and C and 70% in group A. The correlations between the stretching force and severity of ADD, the stretching force and severity of cartilage changes, and the severity of ADD and cartilage changes were statistically significant (P < 0.01). The most advanced ADD and severest condylar changes were induced in group C. Condylar remodeling and scleroses were found in micro-computed tomography scans. The rabbit model for ADD has been successfully established in this study, which is feasible and minimally invasive. The stretching force of at least 1 N could induce the disc displaced successfully. Larger stretching force would induce severer ADD and condylar degenerative changes.

  19. Stress distribution in the temporomandibular joint after mandibular protraction: a 3-dimensional finite element method study. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anurag; Kohli, Virender S; Hazarey, Pushpa V; Kharbanda, Om P; Gunjal, Amit

    2009-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate patterns of stress generation in the temporomandibular joint after mandibular protraction, by using a 3-dimensional finite element method. The results of the initial investigation are reported here in Part 1. The effects of varying the construction bite are reported in Part 2. A 3-dimensional computer-aided design model was developed from the magnetic resonance images of a growing boy (age, 12 years), by using I-DEAS NX (version 11.0, Siemens PLM Software, Plano, Tex). The model simulated mandibular protraction, with 5 mm of sagittal advancement and 4 mm of vertical opening. Stress distributions on the condylar neck, the glenoid fossa, and the articular disc in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions were assessed. Tensile stresses were located on the posterosuperior aspects and compressive stresses on the anterior and anterosuperior aspects of the condylar head. Tensile stresses were found in the posterior region of the glenoid fossa near the attachment of the posterior connective tissues. These results suggest that, on mandibular protraction, the mandibular condyle experiences tensile stresses in the posterosuperior aspect that might help explain condylar growth in this direction. Similarly, on the glenoid fossa, tensile stresses are created in the region of posterior connective tissues; this might be correlated with the increased cellular activity in this region. Further study with variable vertical heights of the construction bites is needed.

  20. Rabbit model for osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint as a basis for assessment of outcomes after intervention.

    PubMed

    Artuzi, Felipe Ernesto; Langie, Renan; Abreu, Maíra Cavallet de; Quevedo, Alexandre Silva; Corsetti, Adriana; Ponzoni, Deise; Puricelli, Edela

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis can be induced in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by primary or secondary trauma, or overloading of the joint. We have therefore systematically evaluated the histological progression of experimental osteoarthritis induced by a high concentration of monosodium iodoacetate into the rabbit TMJ. These findings may contribute to the establishment of a protocol to investigate the benefits of treatment of osteoarthritis of the TMJ. We used 21 male New Zealand rabbits; the 15 in the test group were given an intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate 10mg/ml into the right TMJ and were killed after 60 (n=5), 80 (n=5), and 100 days (n=5). The six in the control group were given an injection of saline into the right TMJ. The assessment system for osteoarthritis based on six grades was used for the histological analysis of severity. The model was effective in producing histological changes in the cartilage consistent with those found in osteoarthritis at all time points. The within-group analysis indicated that the disease did not progress after 60 days. The successful induction of osteoarthritis in this way, its stabilisation after 60 days, and the appropriate size of the animal suggest that this experimental model is ideal for future studies of the effectiveness of treatment in osteoarthritis of the TMJ.

  1. Effect of hyaluronic acid on the regulation of inflammatory mediators in osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, V; Bornhardt, T; Manterola, C; Brebi, P

    2017-05-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most frequent pathologies affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). There is evidence that the use of intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA) for the treatment of this disorder achieves positive effects through a reduction in inflammatory mediators. A systematic review of the available evidence regarding the regulation of inflammatory mediators when applying HA in osteoarthritis of the TMJ in humans was performed. The Web of Science, Embase, ScienceDirect, MEDLINE, Scopus, EBSCOhost, and LILACS databases, SciELO library, and search engine Trip Database were searched systematically. Two thousand eight hundred and sixty-three related articles were found, of which only two met the selection criteria (both were clinical trials and evidence level 2b for treatment studies). These two articles represented a population of 87 patients. Both articles reported that the application of HA had a positive effect on the regulation of inflammatory mediators; the mediators studied were those of the plasminogen activator system and levels of nitric oxide. The limited evidence available suggests that the application of HA regulates various inflammatory mediators in osteoarthritic processes in the TMJ. Nevertheless, further evidence in this regard is required, through the study of specific pathologies of the TMJ, complementing the assessment of clinical parameters with molecular studies, and generating good quality clinical studies with larger sample sizes.

  2. Intra-articular corticosteroid for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jüni, Peter; Hari, Roman; Rutjes, Anne W S; Fischer, Roland; Silletta, Maria G; Reichenbach, Stephan; da Costa, Bruno R

    2015-10-22

    Knee osteoarthritis is a leading cause of chronic pain, disability, and decreased quality of life. Despite the long-standing use of intra-articular corticosteroids, there is an ongoing debate about their benefits and safety. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2005. To determine the benefits and harms of intra-articular corticosteroids compared with sham or no intervention in people with knee osteoarthritis in terms of pain, physical function, quality of life, and safety. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and EMBASE (from inception to 3 February 2015), checked trial registers, conference proceedings, reference lists, and contacted authors. We included randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared intra-articular corticosteroids with sham injection or no treatment in people with knee osteoarthritis. We applied no language restrictions. We calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pain, function, quality of life, joint space narrowing, and risk ratios (RRs) for safety outcomes. We combined trials using an inverse-variance random-effects meta-analysis. We identified 27 trials (13 new studies) with 1767 participants in this update. We graded the quality of the evidence as 'low' for all outcomes because treatment effect estimates were inconsistent with great variation across trials, pooled estimates were imprecise and did not rule out relevant or irrelevant clinical effects, and because most trials had a high or unclear risk of bias. Intra-articular corticosteroids appeared to be more beneficial in pain reduction than control interventions (SMD -0.40, 95% CI -0.58 to -0.22), which corresponds to a difference in pain scores of 1.0 cm on a 10-cm visual analogue scale between corticosteroids and sham injection and translates into a number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) of 8 (95% CI 6 to 13). An I(2) statistic of 68

  3. Prevalence of signs of temporomandibular joint dysfunction in asymptomatic edentulous subjects: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Rajesh

    2010-06-01

    Patients having complete dentures with reduced vertical dimension generally do not manifest Temporomandibular Joint problems. It is not understood as to why the closure of jaws in dentulous individuals can predispose to Temporomandibular Joint problems, while the same etiology in edentulous subjects does not cause any concern. This study was planned to find out the prevalence of various Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction signs in subjects who were edentulous for a period of 6 months to 2 year. The various signs were obtained from a population of 100 healthy asymptomatic edentulous subjects by a questionnaire and then were clinically examined for the presence or absence of signs of Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction. 59% of the subjects exhibited one or more signs of Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction, 41% of the subjects did not show any signs of Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction. 56.6% of males reported signs of Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction when compared with females which was 62.5%. 43.3% of males did not show any signs of Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction when compared with those of the females which was 37.5%. The number of subjects who showed two signs was 29%, subjects who had only one sign was 25%. It was found that dysfunction was prevalent among both men and women in more than half of the asymptomatic subjects examined. 59% had one or as many as three signs of Temporomandibular dysfunction. The most commonly seen Joint dysfunction was the joint sounds which was 47%

  4. Correlation of stress and muscle activity of patients with different degrees of temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tosato, Juliana de Paiva; Caria, Paulo Henrique Ferreira; Gomes, Cid Andre Fidelis de Paula; Berzin, Fausto; Politti, Fabiano; Gonzalez, Tabajara de Oliveira; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Temporomandibular disorder is one of the many different adverse health conditions that can be triggered by stress. Therefore, a biopsychosocial model has been proposed to characterize the multifactorial nature of temporomandibular disorder. The aim of the present study was investigate the correlation of salivary cortisol levels with the activities of the masseter and anterior temporal muscles of patients with different degrees of temporomandibular disorder. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-nine women between 18 and 40 years of age with a diagnosis of myogenous temporomandibular disorder based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for temporomandibular disorders were evaluated using the Fonseca Index to determine the degree of the disorder. Salivary cortisol levels were determined and surface electromyography was used to evaluate electrical activity in the masticatory muscles. [Results] Positive correlations were found among the degree of temporomandibular disorder, electromyographic activity and salivary cortisol: as women with more severe temporomandibular disorder had greater electrical activity in the muscles analyzed, especially the anterior temporal muscle, and higher levels of cortisol. [Conclusion] Muscle activity was greater among individuals with severe temporomandibular disorder and positive correlations were found among electromyographic activity, salivary cortisol and the degree of temporomandibular disorder severity. PMID:25995595

  5. Chronic bilateral dislocation of temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Shakya, S; Ongole, R; Sumanth, K N; Denny, C E

    2010-01-01

    Dislocation of the condyle of the mandible is a common condition that may occur in an acute or chronic form. It is characterised by inability to close the mouth with or without pain. Dislocation has to be differentiated from subluxation which is a self reducible condition. Dislocation can occur in any direction with anterior dislocation being the commonest one. Various predisposing factors have been associated with dislocation like muscle fatigue and spasm, the defect in the bony surface like shallow articular eminence, and laxity of the capsular ligament. People with defect in collagen synthesis like Ehler Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome are said to be genetically predisposed to this condition. Various treatment modalities have been used ranging from conservative techniques to surgical methods. Acute dislocations can be reduced manually or with conservative approach and recurrent and chronic cases can be reduced by surgical intervention. Though the dislocation in our case was 4 months a simple manual reduction proved to be successful. We believe that manual reduction can be attempted as first line of treatment prior to surgical intervention.

  6. Simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and consolidation measurement of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Wellard, Robert Mark; Ravasio, Jean-Philippe; Guesne, Samuel; Bell, Christopher; Oloyede, Adekunle; Tevelen, Greg; Pope, James M; Momot, Konstantin I

    2014-05-05

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the opportunity to study biological tissues and processes in a non-disruptive manner. The technique shows promise for the study of the load-bearing performance (consolidation) of articular cartilage and changes in articular cartilage accompanying osteoarthritis. Consolidation of articular cartilage involves the recording of two transient characteristics: the change over time of strain and the hydrostatic excess pore pressure (HEPP). MRI study of cartilage consolidation under mechanical load is limited by difficulties in measuring the HEPP in the presence of the strong magnetic fields associated with the MRI technique. Here we describe the use of MRI to image and characterize bovine articular cartilage deforming under load in an MRI compatible consolidometer while monitoring pressure with a Fabry-Perot interferometer-based fiber-optic pressure transducer.

  7. Fractures of the articular processes of the cervical spine

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, J.H.; Goldstein, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    Fractures of the articular processes occurred in 16 (20.8%) of 77 patients with cervical spine fractures as demonstrated by multidirectional tomography. Plain films demonstrated the fractures in only two patients. Acute cervical radiculopathy occurred in five of the patients with articular process fractures (superior process, two cases; inferior process, three cases). Persistent neck pain occurred in one other patient without radiculopathy. Three patients suffered spinal cord damage at the time of injury, which was not the result of the articular process fracture itself. In the other seven cases, no definite sequelae occurred. However, disruption of the facet joint may predispose to early degenerative joint disease and chronic pain; unilateral or bilateral facet dislocation was present in five patients. In patients with cervical trauma who develop cervical radiculopathy, tomography should be performed to evaluate the articular processes.

  8. Articular cartilage: structural and developmental intricacies and questions

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Eiki; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage has obvious and fundamental roles in joint function and body movement. Much is known about its organization, extracellular matrix and phenotypic properties of its cells, but less is known about its developmental biology. Incipient articular cartilage in late embryos and neonates is a thin tissue with scanty matrix and small cells, while adult tissue is thick and zonal and contains large cells and abundant matrix. What remains unclear is not only how incipient articular cartilage forms, but how it then grows and matures into a functional, complex and multifaceted structure. This review focuses on recent and exciting discoveries on the developmental biology and growth of articular cartilage, frames them within the context of classic studies, and points to lingering questions and research goals. Advances in this research area will have significant relevance to basic science, and also considerable translational value to design superior cartilage repair and regeneration strategies. PMID:26408155

  9. Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Consolidation Measurement of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wellard, Robert Mark; Ravasio, Jean-Philippe; Guesne, Samuel; Bell, Christopher; Oloyede, Adekunle; Tevelen, Greg; Pope, James M.; Momot, Konstantin I.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the opportunity to study biological tissues and processes in a non-disruptive manner. The technique shows promise for the study of the load-bearing performance (consolidation) of articular cartilage and changes in articular cartilage accompanying osteoarthritis. Consolidation of articular cartilage involves the recording of two transient characteristics: the change over time of strain and the hydrostatic excess pore pressure (HEPP). MRI study of cartilage consolidation under mechanical load is limited by difficulties in measuring the HEPP in the presence of the strong magnetic fields associated with the MRI technique. Here we describe the use of MRI to image and characterize bovine articular cartilage deforming under load in an MRI compatible consolidometer while monitoring pressure with a Fabry-Perot interferometer-based fiber-optic pressure transducer. PMID:24803188

  10. Dysthymia increases the risk of temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shang-Lun; Wu, Shang-Liang; Ko, Shun-Yao; Lu, Ching-Hsiang; Wang, Diew-Wei; Ben, Ren-Jy; Horng, Chi-Ting; Yang, Jung-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous studies have investigated the relationship between depression and temporomandibular disorders (TMD), but the conclusions remain vague. The aim of this study was to examine the causal effect between depression and TMD. The reporting of this study conforms to the STROBE statement. In this retrospective cohort study, all samples were recruited from a representative subdataset of 1 million insured persons for the year 2005 Longitudinal Health Insurance Database, who were randomly selected from all beneficiaries enrolled in the National Health Insurance program of Taiwan. We used a propensity score and stratified 926,560 patients into 2 groups (propensity1 = 588,429 and propensity2 = 338,131) and 4 cohorts (propensity1 with depression = 18,038, propensity1 without depression = 570,391, propensity2 with depression = 38,656, propensity2 without depression = 299,475) to detect the development of TMD among the depressive and nondepressive patients between 2004 and 2013. The positive correlative factors of TMD included female, total number of times seeking medical advice (TTSMA) for anxiety state, TTSMA for generalized anxiety disorder, TTSMA for mandible fracture, and TTSMA for unspecified anomaly of jaw size. The propensity2 group was represented by elder and female-predominant patients who used more psychiatric health resources. Among 3 types of depression, only dysthymia (so-called chronic depression) had a causal impact on TMD in the propensity 2 group. In the propensity 2 group, the hazard ratio of dysthymia for TMD measured by Cox's regression was 1.64 (95% confidence interval 1.28–2.09), after adjusting for demographic factors, psychiatric comorbidities, and maxillofacial confounders. The first-onset mean time of TMD as the consequence of dysthymia was 3.56 years (sd = 2.74, min = 0.08, median = 2.99, max = 9.73). This study demonstrates that dysthymia increases the risk of TMD in elderly and female

  11. Blends and Nanocomposite Biomaterials for Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Doulabi, Azadehsadat Hashemi; Mequanint, Kibret; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a comprehensive assessment on polymer blends and nanocomposite systems for articular cartilage tissue engineering applications. Classification of various types of blends including natural/natural, synthetic/synthetic systems, their combination and nanocomposite biomaterials are studied. Additionally, an inclusive study on their characteristics, cell responses ability to mimic tissue and regenerate damaged articular cartilage with respect to have functionality and composition needed for native tissue, are also provided. PMID:28788131

  12. Effect of non-uniform thickness of samples in stress relaxation tests under unconfined compression of samples of articular discs.

    PubMed

    Commisso, Maria S; Martínez-Reina, Javier; Mayo, Juana; Domínguez, Jaime; Tanaka, Eiji

    2014-04-11

    A precise information of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues is required to develop a suitable simulation model, with which the distribution of stress and strain in the complex structures can be estimated. Many soft tissues have been mechanically characterized by stress relaxation tests under unconfined or confined compression. In general, full-thickness samples are extracted to reduce the damage in the tissue as much as possible. However, it is not guaranteed that these samples have a uniform thickness or, in other words, planar parallel faces. In particular, in the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint, many studies can be found testing full-thickness samples for which that thickness is known to be non-uniform, while making the assumption of uniaxial stress state to extract the mechanical properties from those tests. That inaccuracy may have a strong influence in some cases and needs a profound revision. The main goal of this work is to quantify the error committed in that assumption and the influence of the variation of thickness on that error in a particular test: stress relaxation tests under unconfined compression. Based on this error and defining an allowable tolerance, a criterion is established to reject samples depending on their aspect ratio. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pendulum mass affects the measurement of articular friction coefficient.

    PubMed

    Akelman, Matthew R; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T; Crisco, Joseph J; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C

    2013-02-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton's equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton's model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n=4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton's equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent.

  14. Pendulum Mass Affects the Measurement of Articular Friction Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Akelman, Matthew R.; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T.; Crisco, Joseph J.; Jay, Gregory D.; Fleming, Braden C.

    2012-01-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton’s equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton’s model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n = 4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton’s equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent. PMID:23122223

  15. Biomechanical Properties of Peripheral Layer in Articular Cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrtyl, M.; Danesova, J.; Lisal, J.; Sejkotova, J.

    2010-05-01

    Articular cartilage as a complex viscohyperelastic biomaterial possessing supporting and protective functions. It transfers dynamic effects into subchondral and spongious bone and protects chondrocytes (and the matrix material) from their destruction. Under cyclic loads, it also ensures regulated long-term protection of articular cartilage plateaus. The viscoelastic properties of the peripheral zone of articular cartilage and its molecular structure ensure the regulation of the transport and accumulation of synovial fluid between articular plateaus. The viscoelastic properties of articular cartilage in the peripheral zone ensure that during cyclic loading some amount of synovial fluid is always retained accumulated between articular plateaus, which were presupplemented with it in the previous loading cycle. During long-term harmonic cyclic loading and unloading, the strains stabilize at limit values. Shortly after loading, the strain rate is always greater than before unloading. In this way, the hydrodynamic lubrication biomechanism quickly presupplements the surface localities with lubrication material. Shortly after unloading, the strain rate is high. During strain relaxation, it slows down.

  16. Arthroscopic transtendinous repair of articular-sided pasta (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Lu, Liangyu; Lu, Zhe; Xiao, Lei; Kang, Yifan; Wang, Zimin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical efficacy of arthroscopic transtendinous repair of partial articular-sided PASTA (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury. Methods: From February 2011 to July 2014, 12 cases of PASTA, aged 29 to 72 years with an average of 52.9 ± 13.3 years, were treated arthoscopically. To repair PASTA, articular-sided rotator cuff tear was explored, injury site was punctured and labeled with PDS absorbable monofilament suture (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA) suture, subacromial bursa was cleaned up with acromioplasty, and integrity of bursa-side rotator cuff was assessed. Then with arthroscope in glenohumeral joint, footprint of the bursa-side supraspinatus tendon was preserved, rivets were introduced into the joint through supraspinatus tendon, joint-side partial tear was sutured, and anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint was established. The patients were followed up post-operatively for 12-36 months, average 22 ± 7.3 months. The clinical outcomes were emulated with ASES (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons) Shoulder Score system and UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) Shoulder rating scale. Results: The post-operative ASES score was 89.7 ± 5.6, higher than the pre-operative one 49.8 ± 9.8 (t = 12.25, P <0.0001). While UCLA scale increased from the pre-operative 17.3, ± 3.3 to the post-operative 30.4 ± 3.2 points (t = 9.87, P <0.0001), with a satisfaction rate of 11/12 (91.7%). Conclusion: Trans-tendon repair is ideal for PASTA with advantage of maximal preservation of the normal rotator cuff tissue, anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint and stable fixation of tendon-bone interface. PMID:25784979

  17. Temporomandibular Disorders in Psoriasis Patients with and without Psoriatic Arthritis: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Fatone, Laura; Favia, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a chronic, remitting and relapsing inflammatory disorder, involving the skin, nails, scalp and mucous membranes, that impairs patients' quality of life to varying degrees. Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic seronegative, inflammatory arthritis, usually preceded by psoriasis. Temporomandibular disorders is a generic term referred to clinical conditions involving the jaw muscles and temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study was to assess symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: The study group included 112 patients (56 men, 56 women; median age 49.7±12 years) with psoriasis, 25 of them were affected by psoriatic arthritis. A group of 112 subjects without psoriasis (56 men, 56 women; median age 47.7±17 years) served as controls. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were evaluated according to the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Psoriasis patients were subgrouped according to the presence/absence of psoriatic arthritis and by gender, to assess the prevalence of traditional symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders. RESULTS: Patients with psoriasis, and to an even greater extent those with psoriatic arthritis, were more frequently affected by symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders, including an internal temporomandibular joint opening derangement than healthy subjects. A statistically significant increase in symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, in opening derangement, bruxism and sounds of temporomandibular joint was found in patients with psoriatic arthritis as compared with psoriasis patients without arthritis and controls. CONCLUSIONS: psoriasis seems to play a role in temporomandibular joint disorders, causing an increase in orofacial pain and an altered chewing function. PMID:26019683

  18. Knee Articular Cartilage Repair and Restoration Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Dustin L.; Schenck, Robert C.; Wascher, Daniel C.; Treme, Gehron

    2015-01-01

    Context: Isolated chondral and osteochondral defects of the knee are a difficult clinical challenge, particularly in younger patients for whom alternatives such as partial or total knee arthroplasty are rarely advised. Numerous surgical techniques have been developed to address focal cartilage defects. Cartilage treatment strategies are characterized as palliation (eg, chondroplasty and debridement), repair (eg, drilling and microfracture [MF]), or restoration (eg, autologous chondrocyte implantation [ACI], osteochondral autograft [OAT], and osteochondral allograft [OCA]). Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched for treatment articles using the keywords knee, articular cartilage, and osteochondral defect, with a focus on articles published in the past 5 years. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: In general, smaller lesions (<2 cm2) are best treated with MF or OAT. Furthermore, OAT shows trends toward greater longevity and durability as well as improved outcomes in high-demand patients. Intermediate-size lesions (2-4 cm2) have shown fairly equivalent treatment results using either OAT or ACI options. For larger lesions (>4 cm2), ACI or OCA have shown the best results, with OCA being an option for large osteochondritis dissecans lesions and posttraumatic defects. Conclusion: These techniques may improve patient outcomes, though no single technique can reproduce normal hyaline cartilage. PMID:26502188

  19. Acute synovitis and intra-articular methylprednisolone acetate in ponies.

    PubMed

    Todhunter, R J; Fubini, S L; Vernier-Singer, M; Wootton, J A; Lust, G; Freeman, K P; MacLeod, J N

    1998-03-01

    To determine how acute synovitis, with and without intra-articular methylprednisolone acetate (MPA), affect synthesis of proteoglycan, total protein, and collagen in articular cartilage and total protein synthesis in synovial membrane. Synovitis was induced in 10 ponies by the injection of 0.5 ng lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the left radiocarpal and midcarpal joints every 2 days for a total of four treatments. Synovitis was documented by clinical examination and synovial fluid analyses. Two days before euthanasia, MPA (0.1 mg/kg) was injected with the last dose of LPS into both the left and right radiocarpal and midcarpal joints of five of these ponies. Proteoglycan synthesis in articular cartilage explants from these joints was measured by incorporation of sodium [35S]sulfate. The size of the proteoglycan monomers and their aggregation with hyaluronan was assessed by size-exclusion chromatography. Protein synthesis in articular cartilage was measured by incorporation of [3H]proline and collagen synthesis by conversion of [3H]proline into [3H]hydroxyproline. Protein synthesis was measured in synovial membrane explants by incorporation of [35S]methionine. Ponies developed carpal effusion and mild lameness accompanied by increased total nucleated cell count and total solids in synovial fluid in response to the LPS injections. Moderate to severe synovial membrane proliferation and inflammation were observed histopathologically in joints injected with LPS but no consistent light-microscopical changes were observed in the articular cartilage from these joints. Intra-articular MPA alone was associated with decreased proteoglycan synthesis and increased protein and collagen synthesis in the cartilage explants. Total protein synthesis by synovial membrane was also increased by MPA alone. In contrast, no differences in protein or proteoglycan synthesis were observed in explants from the joints with synovitis, with or without intra-articular MPA. Treatment with MPA, LPS

  20. [Can orthodontic treatment generate temporomandibular disorders and pain? A review].

    PubMed

    Gebeile-Chauty, Sarah; Robin, Olivier; Messaoudi, Yassine; Aknin, Jean-Jacques

    2010-03-01

    While considered for years to play the primary role in the etiology of temporo-mandibular joint disturbances (TMD), occlusal discrepancies are now considered to be just one causative factor among many. Recent studies, literature reviews or meta-analyses, and longitudinal studies with follow-up of children treated for many years all conclude that there is no risk of orthodontic treatment giving rise to episodes of temporo-mandibular disorders. The signs of TMD appearing during the course of orthodontic treatment should be considered in the context of the epidemiology of the disorder, which is characterized by a strong increase in its occurrence during adolescence. In conclusion, it should be stated that if orthodontic treatment can no longer be considered as one of the etiopathogenic factors in the TMD complex, there are no scientific arguments to justify the converse, that there are indications for orthodontic treatment whose sole goal would be the treatment of TMD.

  1. Surgical management of a projectile within the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Eduardo; Silva, Aurelício Novaes; Collares, Marcus Vinicius Martins

    2012-03-01

    Facial gunshot wounds pose a challenge for head and neck surgeons as it is usually accompanied by significant soft and bone tissue loss and impairment of the stomatognathic system. This article reports the case of a patient who had sustained facial gunshot wound and had the projectile lodged at the upper disk space of the right-side temporomandibular joint, which caused mandible function impairment and pain. The projectile was surgically removed via endaural access, and the patient was later submitted to physiotherapy. After treatment, the function of the joint was reestablished, the pain disappeared, and the aesthetics results were considered excellent, with no sequels. The surgical removal of the projectile of the temporomandibular joint combined with the postsurgical physiotherapy showed to be an efficient treatment to the present case.

  2. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of "TMJ arthroscopic surgery", this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results.

  3. [Surgical treatment results of 52 cases of temporomandibular ankylosis].

    PubMed

    Kimura-Fujikami, Takao

    2003-01-01

    We courried out a retrospective study of 52 surgical cases of temporomandibular joint ankylosis, fibrous types I and II in 19 patients (36.4%) and osseous type III-IV in 33 patients (63.6%). Forty two children and teenagers at the Hospital de Pediatria (1983-1985/1989-1998) and Hospital General La Raza (1985-1989) were included also, 10 adults including those operated on at the Hospital de Especialidades, CMN Siglo XXI (IMSS) from 1998 to 2001 were included. We used Dunn modified method en 37 cases (67%) and 17 patients were with Risdon operated on technique (33%). Etiology of ankylosis were direct trauma to jaw, which affected temporomandibular joint mainly in children, while in adults causes were more varied and included as osteomyelitis, middle ear infection, sequels of hemifacial microsomy, and trauma results were considered as good upon obtaining mouth opening of 35 mm without neo-ankylosis during 1-year postoperative control.

  4. [Displacement and tissue remodeling of temporomandibular joint disc].

    PubMed

    Wang, M Q

    2017-03-09

    Sounding takes the highest prevalence of the signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The well accepted theory of the mechanism for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounding is the internal derangement typically characterized by disc displacement. However, according to literature, there are approximately one third of asymptomatic joints in population had disc displacement, and, on the other hand, there are one fourth of TMJ sounding patients had not signs or very limited signs of disc displacement. Replacing the displaced disc to the normal position via methods like surgical operation did not achieve satisfactory long-term outcomes. In this review, we discuss and analyze the possible remodeling of the joint disc displacement diagnosed with imaging based on the anatomy and pathophysiology.

  5. [Physical therapy for temporomandibular joint anterior disc displacement without reduction].

    PubMed

    Cai, B

    2017-03-09

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) is a common type of temporomandibular joint disorders. Most patients experience limited mouth opening and joint pain at the same time. The standpoint of physical therapy is the function of the joint instead of the displaced disc. The treatment aims to make symptoms disappeared and joint function regained through 3M techniques, including modality, manual and movement. For ADDwoR patients with limited mouth opening within 2 month, manual therapy may reposition disc and the following splint and movement therapy can maintain disc-condyle relationship. Even so, restoring anatomical relationship is not the end of physical therapy. Enhanced health education and multidisciplinary cooperation are important for successful management of the ADDwoR patients.

  6. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rahul; Jyoti, Bhuvan; Devi, Parvathi

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer™, an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient's pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline. PMID:24019797

  7. VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA (ACOUSTIC NEUROMA) MIMICKING TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Bisi, Maurício A.; Selaimen, Caio M. P.; Chaves, Karen D.; Bisi, Melissa C.; Grossi, Márcio L.

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma). Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case. PMID:19089251

  8. Cryosectional observations of functional anatomy of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Westesson, P L; Kurita, K; Eriksson, L; Katzberg, R W

    1989-09-01

    The anatomy and function of the temporomandibular joint are complex, and our understanding about how the retrocondylar tissues change when the condyle translates anteriorly has been incomplete. We therefore examined the sectional anatomy of 24 fresh human temporomandibular joints at different gradations of jaw opening, protrusion, and laterotrusion. We found that the tissues of the posterior disk attachment expanded in volume and occupied the space behind the condyle when the mouth was opened, protruded, or laterotruded to the contralateral side. Volumetric expansion of the tissue seemed to be due mainly to distension of the venous structures in the retrodiskal area. In the lateral region of the joint, tissue from the superior aspect of the parotid gland also seemed to contribute to the filling of the space posterior to the condyle. Thus, the retrodiskal tissue appears to have a substantial capacity to expand and fill the mandibular fossa when the condyle translates anteriorly. The possibility of a dynamic vascular physiology is suggested.

  9. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rahul; Jyoti, Bhuvan; Devi, Parvathi

    2013-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer™, an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient's pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline.

  10. Dimensions and geometry of the temporomandibular joint and masseter muscles.

    PubMed

    Zurowski, R; Gosek, M; Aleksandrowicz, R

    1976-01-01

    The bio-engineering team presents its suggestion of a method for the measurement of the temporomandibular joint and masseter muscles in order to determine the parameters necessary for exact sciences and indispensable for unified and objective cognitive studies. Ten formalin-fixed human cadavers served for the studies. The preparations were prepared by the modified method of anatomical procedure. Linear and angular measurements of temporomandibular joint and masseter muscles were carried out with the use of the three-dimensional Cartesian system of OXYZ coordinates in relation to frontal, sagittal and horizontal planes. The physiological cross-sections of the masseter, temporal, lateral and medial pterygoid muscles were also determined. The collected data make it possible to develop a mathematical three-dimensioned model of the osseo-articulo-muscular system of the mastication organ.

  11. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis can be classified into fibrous, fibro-osseous and bony ankylosis. It is still a huge challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons due to the technical difficulty and high incidence of recurrence. The poor outcome of disease may be partially attributed to the limited understanding of its pathogenesis. The purpose of this article was to comprehensively review the literature and summarise results from both human and animal studies related to the genesis of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25189735

  12. Temporomandibular region in the Franceschetti's Syndrome. Anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Cannistrà, C; Barbet, J P; Houette, A; Iannetti, G

    1999-01-01

    Franceschetti's syndrome is a rare, non-fatal, hereditary malformation, usually bilateral, which symmetrically affects orbits, mandible and ear. The authors propose an anatomical description of the temporomandibular region after the dissection of a newborn baby suffering from Franceschetti's Syndrome, dead soon after the birth. A discussion on the different etiopathogenical theories is made. The authors conclude that an alteration of the development of nerve trigeminal branches is the cause of the malformations.

  13. Arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint-technique and indications.

    PubMed

    Holmlund, A B

    1989-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint arthroscopy has gained wide interest in reviews of recent literature. With this technique a proper understanding of the anatomical landmarks is important to ensure success. The technique for anesthesia, puncture and the arthroscopic examination are fully described. An inferior lateral approach to the joint compartment is advocated. A description of the equipment used for this procedure together with the functional elements of the instruments are emphasised. Indications for diagnostic arthroscopy together with the possible postoperative complications are presented.

  14. The structure and function of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    McKay, G S; Yemm, R; Cadden, S W

    1992-09-05

    Although characterised by having a synovial membrane lining the nonarticulating surfaces within the joint capsule, in some ways the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an atypical joint. This paper highlights the differences between the TMJ and other movable joints with a description of the structure, innervation blood supply and musculature. Also included are details of how the TMJ moves--the effectors of movement and the various reflexes controlling movement of the joint.

  15. Temporomandibular Myofacial Pain Treated with Botulinum Toxin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Niv; Tang, Christropher; Blitzer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and outlines of the role of botulinum toxin (BoNT) in the treatment of myofacial TMD. This manuscript includes a brief history of the use of BoNT in the treatment of pain, the mechanism of action of BoNT, and the techniques for injections, adverse effects and contraindications when using BoNT to treat mayofacial pain caused by TMD. PMID:26213970

  16. Regional 3D superimposition to assess temporomandibular joint condylar morphology

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, J; Gomes, L C R; Benavides, E; Nguyen, T; Paniagua, B; Styner, M; Boen, V; Gonçalves, J R; Cevidanes, L H S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the reliability of regional three-dimensional registration and superimposition methods for assessment of temporomandibular joint condylar morphology across subjects and longitudinally. Methods: The sample consisted of cone beam CT scans of 36 patients. The across-subject comparisons included 12 controls, mean age 41.3 ± 12.0 years, and 12 patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis, mean age 41.3 ± 14.7 years. The individual longitudinal assessments included 12 patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis, mean age 37.8 ± 16.7 years, followed up at pre-operative jaw surgery, immediately after and one-year post-operative. Surface models of all condyles were constructed from the cone beam CT scans. Two previously calibrated observers independently performed all registration methods. A landmark-based approach was used for the registration of across-subject condylar models, and temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis vs control group differences were computed with shape analysis. A voxel-based approach was used for registration of longitudinal scans calculated x, y, z degrees of freedom for translation and rotation. Two-way random intraclass correlation coefficients tested the interobserver reliability. Results: Statistically significant differences between the control group and the osteoarthritis group were consistently located on the lateral and medial poles for both observers. The interobserver differences were ≤0.2 mm. For individual longitudinal comparisons, the mean interobserver differences were ≤0.6 mm in translation errors and 1.2° in rotation errors, with excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.75). Conclusions: Condylar registration for across-subjects and longitudinal assessments is reliable and can be used to quantify subtle bony differences in the three-dimensional condylar morphology. PMID:24170802

  17. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 8. Temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Gray, R; Al-Ani, Z

    2010-11-01

    Temporomandibular disorders can arise apparently idiopathically, as a result of macro-trauma or micro-trauma such as parafunction, as a result of a separate disease process or as a consequence of dental treatment. The objectives of this chapter are to make the practitioner aware of his/her responsibilities in any of these situations. Precise record keeping and careful risk management are essential. Guidelines are given to protect not only the practitioner but also the patient.

  18. Vertiginous crisis following temporomandibular joint athrocentesis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vaira, Luigi Angelo; Soma, Damiano; Meloni, Silvio Mario; Dellàversana Orabona, Giovanni; Piombino, Pasquale; De Riu, Giacomo

    2017-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis and arthroscopy have recently exceeded open surgeries for disorders that failed to respond to conservative treatment. The efficacy of arthrocentesis in reestablishing normal mouth opening and reducing pain and dysfunctions is now commonly accepted, but in contrast to arthroscopy, there are no large series studies on arthrocentesis complications. We report the major complication occurred in our experience: a case of a patient that complained of a violent vertigo, without hearing disorders, following the procedure.

  19. Temporomandibular disorders in fibromyalgia syndrome: a short-communication.

    PubMed

    Gui, Maísa Soares; Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic painful syndrome and the coexistence of a painful condition caused by Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and FMS has been frequently raised for several studies, however, more likely hypothesis is that a set of FMS characteristics may lead to the onset of TMD symptoms and they are not merely coexisting conditions. Therefore, our aim is presenting a review of literature about the relation between fibromyalgia and the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. For this purpose, a bibliographic search was performed of the period of 1990-2013, in the Medline, Pubmed, Lilacs and Scielo databases, using the keywords fibromyalgia, temporomandibular disorders and facial pain. Here we present a set of findings in the literature showing that fibromyalgia can lead to TMD symptoms. These studies demonstrated greater involvement of the stomatognathic system in FMS and myogenic disorders of masticatory system are the most commonly found in those patients. FMS appears to have a series of characteristics that constitute predisposing and triggering factors for TMD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Psycho-education programme for temporomandibular disorders: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Jerjes, Waseem; Madland, Geir; Feinmann, Charlotte; El Maaytah, Mohammed; Kumar, Mahesh; Hopper, Colin; Upile, Tahwinder; Newman, Stanton

    2007-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are by far the most predominant condition affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), however many patients have mild self-limiting symptoms and should not be referred for specialist care. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a simple, cost-effective management programme for TMDs using CD-ROM. 41 patients (age 18–70) participated in this study, patients were divided into three groups: the 1st group were involved in an attention placebo CD-ROM (contain anatomical information about the temporomandibular system), the 2nd group received information on CD-ROM designed to increase their control and self efficacy, while the 3rd group received the same programme of the 2nd group added to it an introduction to self-relaxing techniques followed by audio tape of progressive muscle relaxation exercises. Each of the groups was asked to complete a number of questionnaires on the day of initial consultation and six weeks afterwards. Results The two experimental groups (2nd & 3rd) were equally effective in reducing pain, disability and distress, and both were more effective than the attention placebo group (1st), however the experimental groups appeared to have improved at follow-up relative to the placebo-group in terms of disability, pain and depressed mood. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and acceptability of the design. A full, randomized, controlled trial is required to confirm the efficacy of the interventions developed here. PMID:17381840

  1. Biomechanical and biochemical outcomes of porcine temporomandibular joint disc deformation

    PubMed Central

    Matuska, Andrea M.; Muller, Stephen; Dolwick, M. Franklin; McFetridge, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The structure-function relationship in the healthy temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc has been well established, however the changes in dysfunctional joints has yet to be systematically evaluated. Due to the poor understanding of the etiology of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) this study evaluated naturally occurring degenerative remodeling in aged female porcine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs in order to gain insight into the progression and effects on possible treatment strategies of TMDs. Design Surface and regional biomechanical and biochemical properties of discal tissues were determined in grossly deformed (≥ Wilkes Stage 3) and morphologically normal (≤ Wilkes Stage 2) TMJ discs. Results Compared to normal disc structure the deformed discs lacked a smooth biconcave shape and characteristic ECM organization. Reduction in tensile biomechanical integrity and increased compressive stiffness and cellularity was found in deformed discs. Regionally, the posterior and intermediate zones of the disc were most frequently affected along with the inferior surface. Conclusions The frequency of degeneration observed on the inferior surface of the disc (predominantly posterior), suggests that a disruption in the disc-condyle relationship likely contributes to the progression of joint dysfunction more than the temporodiscal relationship. As such, the inferior joint space may be an important consideration in early clinical diagnosis and treatment of TMDs, as it is overlooked in techniques performed in the upper joint space, including arthroscopy and arthrocentesis. Furthermore, permanent damage to the disc mechanical properties would limit the ability to successfully reposition deformed discs, highlighting the importance of emerging therapies such as tissue engineering. PMID:26774186

  2. Risk factors for temporomandibular disorder: Binary logistic regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Bruno G.; de-Sousa, Stéphanie T.; de Mello, Victor V C.; da-Silva-Barbosa, André C.; de-Assis-Morais, Mariana P L.; Barbosa-Vasconcelos, Márcia M V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the influence of socioeconomic and demographic factors (gender, economic class, age and marital status) on the occurrence of temporomandibular disorder. Study Design: One hundred individuals from urban areas in the city of Recife (Brazil) registered at Family Health Units was examined using Axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) which addresses myofascial pain and joint problems (disc displacement, arthralgia, osteoarthritis and oesteoarthrosis). The Brazilian Economic Classification Criteria (CCEB) was used for the collection of socioeconomic and demographic data. Then, it was categorized as Class A (high social class), Classes B/C (middle class) and Classes D/E (very poor social class). The results were analyzed using Pearson’s chi-square test for proportions, Fisher’s exact test, nonparametric Mann-Whitney test and Binary logistic regression analysis. Results: None of the participants belonged to Class A, 72% belonged to Classes B/C and 28% belonged to Classes D/E. The multivariate analysis revealed that participants from Classes D/E had a 4.35-fold greater chance of exhibiting myofascial pain and 11.3-fold greater chance of exhibiting joint problems. Conclusions: Poverty is a important condition to exhibit myofascial pain and joint problems. Key words:Temporomandibular joint disorders, risk factors, prevalence. PMID:24316706

  3. [Two cases of temporomandibular arthrosis of young children].

    PubMed

    Ono, Y; Lin, Y F; Iijima, H; Miwa, Z; Ono, H

    1989-01-01

    Two cases of temporomandibular arthrosis were reported. Case 1 was a 6 years 4 months old female with pain in her left mandibular region in moving her jaw. Opening of the mouth by herself was slightly limited. Clicking noise was seen and felt from both of her temporomandibular joints. She was in the dental developmental stage IIA by Hellman, and had deep overbite (5mm). Roentogenographic examination revealed a bony defect on her left condylar head. Treatment was performed with an activator. Pain was not felt and the mandibular opening recovered after 2 weeks of treatment. Roetogenographs showed no bony defect on her left condylar head after 5 months of treatment. Case 2 was a 3 years 2 months old male with clicking noise from both of his temporomandibular joints. There was no pain and no limitation of his mouth opening. He was in the dental developmental stage IIA by Hellman, and had large overjet (8mm). He has thumb sucking habit since the age of one year. He is now under regular observation.

  4. Diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders: indication of imaging exams.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Grossmann, Eduardo; Januzzi, Eduardo; de Paula, Marcos Vinicius Queiroz; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the different imaging tests and their appropriate indications is crucial to establish the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders, especially in patients with overlapping signs and symptoms. To present and assess the main diagnostic imaging tests for temporomandibular disorders and rationally discuss their indication criteria, advantages, and disadvantages. Literature review in the Web of Knowledge, PubMed and SciELO databases, as well as manual search for relevant publications in reference lists of the selected articles. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were considered the gold standard assessments for the temporomandibular joint to evaluate hard and soft tissues, respectively. Each diagnostic method exhibited distinct sensitivity and specificity for the different subtypes of joint dysfunction. Selecting an evaluation examination based on its accuracy, safety, and clinical relevance is a rational decision that can help lead to an accurate diagnosis and an optimum treatment plan. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Chiropractic Treatment of Temporomandibular Dysfunction: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Pavia, Steven; Fischer, Rebecca; Roy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to describe chiropractic treatment of 14 patients who presented with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD). Methods This is a retrospective case series of 14 patients, including 13 adults and 1 child. The majority of these patients were undergoing chiropractic care for spine-related conditions when they presented with additional TMD signs and symptoms. They were evaluated and treated with Activator Methods International published protocols relative to the temporomandibular joint before the addition of treatment to the suprahyoid muscles. Results All pre- and postadjustment assessments were recorded using a numeric pain scale. The resulting average showed a reduction in the patients’ pain scores from the initial visit of 8.3 ± 1.6 to the last visit at 1.4 ± 1.1 with an 80.9% ± 15.4% improvement. The average number of visits was 13.6 ± 8.2. Conclusion All patients selected for this case series showed a reduction of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms. PMID:26793040

  6. The Diagnostic Value of Pressure Algometry for Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Lipski, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic value of pressure algometry in temporomandibular disorders. Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 (mean 21.50, SD 0.97) participated in this study. An analogue pressure algometer was used for the evaluation of muscle tenderness of the following masticatory muscles: superficial and deep parts of the masseter muscle; anterior and posterior parts of the temporal muscle; and the tissues adjacent to the lateral and dorsal part of the temporomandibular joint capsule. Each patient described the algometry result for the individual components of the masticatory motor system, by selecting each time the intensity of pain on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) ruler. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, indicating the discriminatory efficiency for asymptomatic subjects and patients with temporomandibular dysfunction according to the dysfunction Di index, was the largest for the mean pain value (AUC = 0.8572; SEM = 0.0531). The 7.4 VAS cut-off point marked 95.3% specificity for this variable in identifying healthy subjects and 58.4% sensitivity in identifying patients with symptoms of dysfunctions (accuracy 68.1%). Assuming comparable sensitivity (74.9%) and specificity (74.2%) for a diagnostic test, there was test accuracy of 74.5% at the 4.2 VAS cut-off point. PMID:25883964

  7. [Diagnosis and treatment of temporo-mandibular disorders in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Bocquet, Emmanuelle; Moreau, Alexis; Danguy, Michel; Danguy, Chantal

    2010-03-01

    Orthodontists are fully prepared to treat the problems of occlusion that they are called upon to deal with every day. On the other hand temporo-mandibular joint disorders present more obscure difficulties from the point of view of detection and diagnosis as well the management of their treatment. That is why a profound understanding of the anatomical and physiological functioning of the temporo-mandibular joint has become indispensable for today's orthodontists who are now asked to detect and diagnose an assortment of TMJ disturbances whose etiology may vary greatly. By performing a rigorous diagnostic procedure, based on a thorough clinical examination supported by careful axiographic and radiological studies, of temporo-mandibular malfunctioning and its underlying etiological causes, which are primarily dento-alveolar and occlusal in nature, orthodontists will be able to adopt an appropriate therapeutic approach that might be purely orthodontic or multi-disciplinary and carried out with the collaboration of specialists in occlusion, oral surgery, and even osteopathy.

  8. Clinical benefits of intra-articular anakinra for arthrofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher A; Toth, Alison P; Magnussen, Bob

    2010-12-01

    Postoperative inflammation and stiffness, as well as the struggle to achieve full range of motion (ROM), following knee surgery is a significant clinical challenge. Interleukin-1 is a crucial mediator of the inflammatory response and development of pathological conditions leading to chronic inflammation. We hypothesized that intra-articular injection of intra-articular anakinra, an IL-1 antagonist, would result in sustained improvements of chronic refractory arthrofibrosis and limited arthrofibrosis of the knee joint. We retrospectively reviewed 8 patients who underwent injection of intra-articular anakinra, 200 mg. Four patients (3 women, 1 man) had intra-articular anakinra for treatment of chronic refractory arthrofibrosis, and 4 patients (4 women) had intra-articular anakinra for limited arthrofibrosis. All 4 of the refractory arthrofibrosis patients had failed conservative treatment with intensive physical therapy, corticosteroid injections, and anti-inflammatory medication. Three of the 4 patients had failed a prior manipulation under anesthesia with lysis of adhesions. All 4 reported improvement in ROM (10°-45°) and swelling, with 75% reporting improvement in pain. Seventy-five percent of these patients returned to prior activity level. All 4 of the limited arthrofibrosis also failed similar attempts at conservative treatment, and 2 of the 4 had failed a prior manipulation under anesthesia with lysis of adhesions. After intra-articular anakinra, all 4 reported improvement in ROM (20°-45°) and swelling, with 80% reporting improvement in pain. Seventy-five percent of these patients were able to return to prior activity level. We found intra-articular anakinra to be effective in this small cohort of patients with refractory arthrofibrosis and limited arthrofibrosis. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Value of the nuclear medical scan in the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disease

    SciTech Connect

    Craemer, T.D.; Ficara, A.J.

    1984-10-01

    A total of 125 patients with temporomandibular joint complaints underwent nuclear medical scans of their joints as part of their diagnostic work-ups. The scan results were compared with the radiographic and arthrogram findings of these patients. The results suggest that the nuclear medical scan is not a highly reliable diagnostic aid for the majority of temporomandibular joint patients.

  10. Temporomandibular degenerative joint disease. Part I. Anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical description.

    PubMed

    Kreutziger, K L; Mahan, P E

    1975-08-01

    The anatomy and function of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are described in the detail needed to evaluate and treat temporomandibular degenerative joint disease (TDJD). Innervation of the joint and the mechanism of arthralgia are described and related to TDJD. The clinical course of TDJD, radiographic evaluation of it, histopathologic description, and etiology are presented.

  11. Temporomandibular joint involvement as a positive clinical prognostic factor in necrotising external otitis.

    PubMed

    Yeheskeli, E; Eta, R Abu; Gavriel, H; Kleid, S; Eviatar, E

    2016-05-01

    Necrotising otitis externa is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This study investigated whether temporomandibular joint involvement had any prognostic effect on the course of necrotising otitis externa in patients who had undergone hyperbaric oxygen therapy after failed medical and sometimes surgical therapy. A retrospective case series was conducted of patients in whom antibiotic treatment and surgery had failed, who had been hospitalised for further treatment and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Twenty-three patients with necrotising otitis externa were identified. The temporomandibular joint was involved in four patients (17 per cent); these patients showed a constant gradual improvement in C-reactive protein and were eventually discharged free of disease, except one patient who was lost to follow up. Four patients (16 per cent) without temporomandibular joint involvement died within 90 days of discharge, while all patients with temporomandibular joint involvement were alive. Three patients (13 per cent) without temporomandibular joint involvement needed recurrent hospitalisation including further hyperbaric oxygen therapy; no patients with temporomandibular joint involvement required such treatment. Patients with temporomandibular joint involvement had lower rates of recurrent disease and no mortality. Therefore, we suggest considering temporomandibular joint involvement as a positive prognostic factor in necrotising otitis externa management.

  12. [Standardizing a protocol of magnetic resonance imaging of temporomandibular joints. Part I].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, T V

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the standard of a procedure for magnetic resonance imaging of temporomandibular joints, which has been used to examine 275 patients. It describes the study projections, that are most significant for visualization, and scanning protocols. Illustrations of magnetic resonance imaging of the structures of the intact temporomandibular joint are presented.

  13. Emotional and physiologic responses to laboratory challenges: patients with temporomandibular disorders versus matched control subjects.

    PubMed

    Curran, S L; Carlson, C R; Okeson, J P

    1996-01-01

    This study explored psychologic and physiologic factors differentiating patients with temporomandibular disorders (n = 23) from sex-, age-, and weight-matched asymptomatic control subjects. Each subject completed several standard psychologic questionnaires and then underwent two laboratory stressors (mental arithmetic and pressure-pain stimulation). Results indicated that patients with temporomandibular disorders had greater resting respiration rates and reported greater anxiety, sadness, and guilt relative to control subjects. In response to the math stressor, patients with temporomandibular disorders reacted with greater anger than did control subjects. There were no differences between patients with temporomandibular disorders and control subjects on pain measures or any other measured variable for the pressure-pain stimulation trial. In addition, there were no differences in electromyography levels between patients with temporomandibular disorders and control subjects. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the etiology and treatment of this common and debilitating set of disorders.

  14. Bilateral Temporomandibular Joint Replacement Using Computer-Assisted Surgical Simulation and Three-Dimensional Printing.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jaeyoung; Cho, Jinyong; Kim, Hyeon Min

    2016-07-01

    The dental occlusion is the important reference for replacement of the temporomandibular joint. If a patient does not have normal occlusion, few considerations are needed for temporomandibular joint replacement. The custom-made prosthesis, typically fabricated with a stereolithographic model, is probably the optimized solution currently available. However the ready-made stock from Biomet Microfixation System (Jacksonville, FL) is the only available product, which is authorized by the government ministry in South Korea, for replacement of the temporomandibular joint. This report presents a patient with the problems that were retrognathic "bird face" profile subsequent to severe bilateral condylar resorption and temporomandibular joint ankylosis without enough natural teeth for occlusion. Bilateral temporomandibular joint replacement using the ready-made prosthesis was done by reestablishing the mandibular position with new occlusion and improved facial profile via the virtual surgical planning and stereolithographic model simulation.

  15. Method of help for the diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint internal derangements. Discriminant analysis applied to the temporomandibular derangements.

    PubMed

    Pesquera-Velasco, Jorge; Casares-García, Guillermo; Jiménez-Pasamontes, Nieves; García-Gómez, Francisco Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to find an objective method of help for the clinician in the diagnosis of the pathology of the temporomandibular joint, different of the image methods habitually utilized until this moment. This study is based initially on the data obtained of a sample of 1164 patients with symptoms and/or signs of pathology of the temporomandibular joint. Nine different and excluding diagnostic groups settled down, according to the classification of the American Academy of Orofacial Pain (AAOP), in collaboration with the International Headache Society (IHS). We realized magnetic resonances to the patients and were selected those that adjust to the clinical criterion and of diagnosis for the image, and could only in a diagnostic group. Finally 449 patients were selected, 390 women and 59 men. The results obtained (expressed in percentage of well classified cases) by means of the proposed method were: Arthrosis 98.9%, Anterior Disk Displacement with Reduction (ADDR) 87.5%, Anterior Disk Displacement without Reduction (ADD) 100%, Capsulitis 100%, Disk Immobile (DIN) 97.9%, Hypermobility Condylar (HC)95.8%, Lateral Displacement Without Reduction (LD) 100%, Pathology Muscular (PM)100%, Disk Hipomobile (DHM) 86.4%. The proposed method reaches a fine percentage of successes in the diagnosis of these processes good enough, through its effectiveness as for its cost and should be considered an alternative in the diagnosis of temporomandibular derangements.

  16. Endogenous versus Exogenous Growth Factor Regulation of Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuiliang; Chan, Albert G.; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J.; Trippel, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic growth factors that regulate the function of articular chondrocytes are candidates for articular cartilage repair. Such factors may be delivered by pharmacotherapy in the form of exogenous proteins, or by gene therapy as endogenous proteins. It is unknown whether delivery method influences growth factor effectiveness in regulating articular chondrocyte reparative functions. We treated adult bovine articular chondrocytes with exogenous recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), or with the genes encoding these growth factors for endogenous production. Treatment effects were measured as change in chondrocyte DNA content, glycosaminoglycan production, and aggrecan gene expression. We found that IGF-I stimulated chondrocyte biosynthesis similarly when delivered by either exogenous or endogenous means. In contrast, exogenous TGF-ß1 stimulated these reparative functions, while endogenous TGF-ß1 had little effect. Endogenous TGF-ß1 became more bioactive following activation of the transgene protein product. These data indicate that effective mechanisms of growth factor delivery for articular cartilage repair may differ for different growth factors. In the case of IGF-I, gene therapy or protein therapy appear to be viable options. In contrast, TGF-ß1 gene therapy may be constrained by a limited ability of chondrocytes to convert latent complexes to an active form. PMID:24105960

  17. The Functions of BMP3 in Rabbit Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Wenyu; Cao, Yiting; Shi, Yanping; Lei, Chen; Du, Bo; Li, Xuemin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2015-10-29

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play important roles in skeletal development and repair. Previously, we found fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) induced up-regulation of BMP2, 3, 4 in the process of rabbit articular cartilage repair, which resulted in satisfactory repair effects. As BMP2/4 show a clearly positive effect for cartilage repair, we investigated the functions of BMP3 in rabbit articular cartilage repair. In this paper, we find that BMP3 inhibits the repair of partial-thickness defect of articular cartilage in rabbit by inducing the degradation of extracellular matrix, interfering with the survival of chondrocytes surrounding the defect, and directly inhibiting the expression of BMP2 and BMP4. Meanwhile BMP3 suppress the repair of full-thickness cartilage defect by destroying the subchondral bone through modulating the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and directly increasing the expression of BMP4. Although BMP3 has different functions in the repair of partial and full-thickness defects of articular cartilage in rabbit, the regulation of BMP expression is involved in both of them. Together with our previous findings, we suggest the regulation of the BMP signaling pathway by BMP3 is essential in articular cartilage repair.

  18. Extra-articular Mimickers of Lateral Meniscal Tears

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Joseph U.; Strauss, Eric J.; Lodha, Sameer; Bach, Bernard R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Lateral meniscus tears are a common entity seen in sports medicine. Although lateral-side knee pain is often the result of a meniscus injury, several extra-articular pathologies share signs and symptoms with a meniscus tear. It is critical for the clinician to be able to identify and understand extra-articular pathologies that can present similar to a lateral meniscus tear. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature conducted through a MEDLINE search for all relevant articles between 1980 and February 2010. Study Type: Clinical review. Results: Common extra-articular pathologies that can mimic lateral meniscal tears include iliotibial band syndrome, proximal tibiofibular joint instability, snapping biceps femoris or popliteus tendons, and peroneal nerve compression syndrome or neuritis. The patient history, physical examination features, and radiographic findings can be used to separate these entities from the more common intra-articular knee pathologies. Conclusions: In treating patients who present with lateral-sided knee pain, clinicians should be able to recognize and treat extra-articular pathologies that can present in a similar fashion as lateral meniscus tears. PMID:23015995

  19. Intra-articular capacity of the elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Van Den Broek, Mathias; Van Riet, Roger

    2017-09-01

    The intra-articular capacity of the elbow joint is reported to be 23 ± 4 ml on cadaveric elbows. During years, this value was the standard. The aim of this observational study was to reanalyze the volume of the elbow joint on live patients. Measurement of the intra-articular capacity and pressure of the elbow joint was performed on 30 patients (mean age: 43.8 years) undergoing elbow arthroscopy. Intra-articular capacity was recorded when the elbow moved to the maximum lose packed position and/or when there was a sudden drop in pressure, indicating a capsular rupture (maximum capacity). Indications for arthroscopy were loose bodies, osteoarthritis, synovitis, radial head resection, and lateral collateral ligament repair. Mean intra-articular capacity and pressure were 35.8 ml and 557.5 mm Hg, respectively. Mean maximal capacity was 40.5 ml. We conclude that the intra-articular capacity of the elbow joint is substantially greater than reported in previous studies. Clin. Anat. 30:795-798, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Multifactorial analysis of differences in temporomandibular joint hard tissue anatomic relationships between disk displacement with and without reduction in women.

    PubMed

    Pullinger, A G; Seligman, D A

    2001-10-01

    Without multifactorial models, it is difficult to resolve whether hard tissue tomographic relationships can distinguish differences between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to use multifactorial models to examine whether there are hard tissue anatomic and orthopedic characteristics that distinguish temporomandibular joints with disk displacement with reduction from disk displacement without reduction. . TMJ tomograms from female patients who had unilateral disk displacement diagnosed with (n = 84) or without (n = 78) reduction were compared with the use of 14 linear and angular measurements and 8 ratios. A representative classification tree model was tested for fit with sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and likelihood accountability, and the results were compared with a multiple stepwise logistic regression model and univariate analysis. Disk displacement without reduction joints had longer mean postglenoid fossa heights (P<.0005), greater mean fossa depth (P<.017), and narrower mean absolute superior joint spaces (P<.041) than disk displacement with reduction joints (univariate t test). The classification tree had 4 terminal nodes; to differentiate the joints, it used the eminence radius and the absolute superior joint space to anterior joint space ratio subordinate to the postglenoid process height. The tree model accounted for 31.4% of the likelihood (Rescaled Cox and Snell R(2)) with 73.5% accuracy (sensitivity 82.6% and specificity 65.4%). Disk displacement without reduction joints had either deeper posterior fossa walls or posterior walls of average length combined with a superior-to-anterior joint space ratio of less than 0.83; this suggests a more open-wedge-shaped anterior joint space combined with a less-rounded articular eminence. In contrast, most disk displacement with reduction joints had shorter posterior fossa wall height combined with more equal or larger superior-to-anterior joint spaces

  1. Depletion of Gangliosides Enhances Articular Cartilage Repair in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Masatake; Onodera, Tomohiro; Homan, Kentaro; Sasazawa, Fumio; Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Momma, Daisuke; Baba, Rikiya; Hontani, Kazutoshi; Joutoku, Zenta; Matsubara, Shinji; Yamashita, Tadashi; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2017-01-01

    Elucidation of the healing mechanisms in damaged tissues is a critical step for establishing breakthroughs in tissue engineering. Articular cartilage is clinically one of the most successful tissues to be repaired with regenerative medicine because of its homogeneous extracellular matrix and few cell types. However, we only poorly understand cartilage repair mechanisms, and hence, regenerated cartilage remains inferior to the native tissues. Here, we show that glycosylation is an important process for hypertrophic differentiation during articular cartilage repair. GM3, which is a precursor molecule for most gangliosides, was transiently expressed in surrounding damaged tissue, and depletion of GM3 synthase enhanced cartilage repair. Gangliosides also regulated chondrocyte hypertrophy via the Indian hedgehog pathway. These results identify a novel mechanism of cartilage healing through chondrocyte hypertrophy that is regulated by glycosylation. Manipulation of gangliosides and their synthases may have beneficial effects on articular cartilage repair. PMID:28252046

  2. Intra-articular clonidine analgesia after knee arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buerkle, H; Huge, V; Wolfgart, M; Steinbeck, J; Mertes, N; Van Aken, H; Prien, T

    2000-05-01

    Recently, it was suggested that peripherally-mediated analgesia can be accomplished by the intra-articular delivery of the mu-opioid morphine or of the a2-agonist clonidine. This clinical study assesses the potential peripheral analgesic effect of the combination of morphine and clonidine after intra-articular administration. Sixty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists status I or II) undergoing arthroscopic repair of the knee during general anaesthesia were randomized to receive after operation, in a double-blind manner, either 1 mg morphine intra-articularly (group 1); 150 microg clonidine intra-articularly (group 2); or 1 mg morphine + 150 microg clonidine intra-articularly (group 3); or normal saline intra-articularly (group 4) in a volume of 30 mL, respectively. Visual analogue pain scores (VAS), duration of analgesia as defined by first demand for supplemental analgesics, subsequent 24 h consumption of postoperative supplementary analgesics, and patient satisfaction were evaluated. Co-administration of morphine + clonidine (group 3) resulted in a significant VAS reduction at 2 h after injection compared with the other groups. There was a tendency towards a lower need for supplementary rescue analgesia and towards a more prolonged analgesia in group 3 (211 min +/- 224 min SD) compared with group 1 (173 min +/- 197 min SD) and group 4 (91 min +/- 21 min SD). More patients were very satisfied with the postoperative analgesic regimen receiving the combination of morphine and clonidine (group 3) at 24 h postoperatively. Thus we conclude, that the peripheral co-delivery of an opioid and an a2-agonist will result in improved postoperative pain relief, when compared with each single agent given alone.

  3. Effect of jaw opening on the stress pattern in a normal human articular disc: finite element analysis based on MRI images.

    PubMed

    Li, Qihong; Ren, Shuang; Ge, Cheng; Sun, Haiyan; Lu, Hong; Duan, Yinzhong; Rong, Qiguo

    2014-06-19

    Excessive compressive and shear stresses are likely related to condylar resorption and disc perforation. Few studies have reported the disc displacement and deformation during jaw opening. The aim of this study was to analyze stress distribution in a normal articular disc during the jaw opening movement. Bilateral MRI images were obtained from the temporomandibular joint of a healthy subject for the jaw opening displacement from 6 to 24 mm with 1 mm increments. The disc contour for the jaw opening at 6 mm was defined as the reference state, and was used to establish a two dimensional finite element model of the disc. The contours of the disc at other degrees of jaw opening were used as the displacement loading. Hyperelastic material models were applied to the anterior, intermediate and posterior parts of the disc. Stress and strain trajectories were calculated to characterize the stress/strain patterns in the disc. Both the maximum and minimum principal stresses were negative in the intermediate zone, therefore, the intermediate zone withstood mainly compressive stress. On the contrary, the maximum and minimum principal stresses were most positive in the anterior and posterior zones, which meant that the anterior and posterior bands suffered higher tensile stresses. The different patterns of stress trajectories between the intermediate zone and the anterior and posterior bands might be attributed to the effect of fiber orientation. The compression of the intermediate zone and stretching of the anterior and posterior bands caused high shear deformation in the transition region, especially at the disc surfaces. The stress and strain remained at a reasonable level during jaw opening, indicating that the disc experiences no injury during functional opening movements in a healthy temporomandibular joint.

  4. ACTIVATION OF B-CATENIN SIGNALLING LEADS TO TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DEFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M.; Li, S.; Xie, W.; Shen, J.; Im, H-J.; Holz, J.D.; Wang, M.; Diekwisch, T.G.H.; Chen, D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive research in knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanism of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the constitutive activation of β-catenin in the middle and deep layers of the articular cartilage can compromise the homeostasis of this tissue in the TMJ. Co12CreERT2 transgenic mice were bred with RosamT/mG reporter mice to determine Cre recombination efficiency. Co12CreERT2 mice were then crossed with β-cateninflox (ex3)/+ mice to generate β-catenin conditional activation mice, β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER. TMJ samples were harvested when the mice were 1-, 3- or 6-month-old and evaluated using histology, histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry. β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice were further crossed with Mmp13flox/flox and Adamts5−/− mice to generate β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)Co12ER and β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER)/Adamts5−/− double mutant mice to investigate the role of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in the development of TMJ disorder. High levels of Cre-recombination were seen in Co12CreERT2;RosamT/mG mice. Progressive TMJ defects developed in 1-, 3- and 6-month-old β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice, as revealed by histology and histomorphometry. Results further demonstrated that the defects observed in β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice were significantly decelerated after deletion of the Mmp13 or Adamts5 gene in (β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)co12ER or β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER/ Adamts5−/− double mutant mice. In summary, we found that β-catenin is a critical gene in the induction of TMJ cartilage degeneration, and over-expressing β-catenin in TMJ cartilage leads to defects assembling an OA-like phenotype. Deletion of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice ameliorates the development of TMJ defects. This study suggests that Mmp13 and Adamts5 could be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of TMJ disorders. PMID:25340802

  5. Contribution of synovial lining cells to synovial vascularization of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Harada, Fumiko; Magara, Jin; Ohazama, Atsushi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2016-03-01

    The lining layer of the synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) contains two types of lining cells: macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells. The type B cells are particularly heterogeneous in their morphology and immunoreactivity, so that details of their functions remain unclear. Some of the type B cells exhibit certain resemblances in their ultrastructure to those of an activated capillary pericyte at the initial stage of the angiogenesis. The articular surface, composed of cartilage and the disc in the TMJ, has few vasculatures, whereas the synovial lining layer is richly equipped with blood capillaries to produce the constituent of synovial fluid. The present study investigated at both the light and electron microscopic levels the immunocytochemical characteristics of the synovial lining cells in the adult rat TMJ, focusing on their contribution to the synovial vascularization. It also employed an intravascular perfusion with Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) lectin to identify functional vessels in vivo. Results showed that several type B cells expressed desmin, a muscle-specific intermediate filament which is known as the earliest protein to appear during myogenesis as well as being a marker for the immature capillary pericyte. These desmin-positive type B cells showed immunoreactions for vimentin and pericyte markers (neuron-glial 2; NG2 and PDGFRβ) but not for the other markers of myogenic cells (MyoD and myogenin) or a contractile apparatus (αSMA and caldesmon). Immunoreactivity for RECA-1, an endothelial marker, was observed in the macrophage-like type A cells. The arterioles and venules inside the synovial folds extended numerous capillaries with RECA-1-positive endothelial cells and desmin-positive pericytes to distribute densely in the lining layer. The distal portion of these capillaries showing RECA-1-immunoreactivity lacked lectin-staining, indicating a loss of blood-circulation due to sprouting or termination in the

  6. Articular Contact Mechanics from an Asymptotic Modeling Perspective: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Argatov, Ivan; Mishuris, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we review the current state-of-the-art in asymptotic modeling of articular contact. Particular attention has been given to the knee joint contact mechanics with a special emphasis on implications drawn from the asymptotic models, including average characteristics for articular cartilage layer. By listing a number of complicating effects such as transverse anisotropy, non-homogeneity, variable thickness, nonlinear deformations, shear loading, and bone deformation, which may be accounted for by asymptotic modeling, some unsolved problems and directions for future research are also discussed. PMID:27847803

  7. Postnatal development of collagen structure in ovine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage (AC) is the layer of tissue that covers the articulating ends of the bones in diarthrodial joints. Across species, adult AC shows an arcade-like structure with collagen predominantly perpendicular to the subchondral bone near the bone, and collagen predominantly parallel to the articular surface near the articular surface. Recent studies into collagen fibre orientation in stillborn and juvenile animals showed that this structure is absent at birth. Since the collagen structure is an important factor for AC mechanics, the absence of the adult Benninghoff structure has implications for perinatal AC mechanobiology. The current objective is to quantify the dynamics of collagen network development in a model animal from birth to maturity. We further aim to show the presence or absence of zonal differentiation at birth, and to assess differences in collagen network development between different anatomical sites of a single joint surface. We use quantitative polarised light microscopy to investigate properties of the collagen network and we use the sheep (Ovis aries) as our model animal. Results Predominant collagen orientation is parallel to the articular surface throughout the tissue depth for perinatal cartilage. This remodels to the Benninghoff structure before the sheep reach sexual maturity. Remodelling of predominant collagen orientation starts at a depth just below the future transitional zone. Tissue retardance shows a minimum near the articular surface at all ages, which indicates the presence of zonal differentiation at all ages. The absolute position of this minimum does change between birth and maturity. Between different anatomical sites, we find differences in the dynamics of collagen remodelling, but no differences in adult collagen structure. Conclusions The collagen network in articular cartilage remodels between birth and sexual maturity from a network with predominant orientation parallel to the articular surface to a

  8. Corrective Osteotomies for Malunited Extra-Articular Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Ketz, John; Clare, Michael; Sanders, Roy

    2016-03-01

    The most effective way to treat calcaneal malunions is avoidance. With any articular fracture, progressive arthrosis and dysfunction are common. By restoring the anatomy initially through reduction, late reconstructive options become less complicated. Numerous studies have shown that restoration of the anatomic alignment either through percutaneous or open techniques is effective. In patients with no or minimal articular degeneration, extrarticular joint-sparing procedures can be performed. This represents a small select group who may benefit from simple osteotomy procedures with associated soft tissue reconstruction, if needed.

  9. Longitudinal changes of symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in Japanese young adults.

    PubMed

    Onizawa, K; Yoshida, H

    1996-01-01

    Longitudinal changes of symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in 275 Japanese university students were investigated through use of questionnaires in 1990 and in 1994. A comparison of the 1990 responses with the 1994 responses revealed that the prevalences of temporomandibular joint sounds, mouth opening restriction, and pain significantly increased from 28.7% to 49.8%, from 12.7% to 22.5%, and from 7.6% to 18.5%, respectively. The increase in the prevalence of symptoms mainly resulted for students who did not have symptoms of temporomandibular disorders at the first examination. Subjects who had been frequently aware of symptoms of temporomandibular disorders showed a tendency toward a decrease in their frequency of awareness. Although 66 students (24.0%) reported discomfort from symptoms of temporomandibular disorders during the period, only three (1.1%) visited medical facilities to receive treatment. These results suggest that symptoms of temporomandibular disorders evaluated through the use of questionnaires are longitudinally fluctuant, and that few students developed temporomandibular disorders.

  10. Ankylosis and pseudoankylosis of the temporomandibular joint in 10 dogs (1993-2015).

    PubMed

    Strøm, Peter C; Arzi, Boaz; Cissell, Derek D; Verstraete, Frank J M

    2016-09-20

    To describe the clinical features and results of treatment of true ankylosis and pseudoankylosis of the temporomandibular joint in dogs. This study was a retrospective case series. Ten client-owned dogs that were presented for inability to open the mouth or a severely decreased range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were included. Information on the surgical procedures performed and the perioperative complications were documented. Three-dimensional printing of the skull was performed in four dogs. Two dogs were diagnosed with temporomandibular joint ankylosis and seven dogs with pseudoankylosis. One dog had evidence of combined temporomandibular joint ankylosis and pseudoankylosis. Of the seven dogs with pseudoankylosis, six had an osseous fusion involving the zygomatic arch and mandible. Surgical treatment was performed in nine dogs and a revision surgery was needed in one dog. Follow-up ranged from five months to eight years (mean: 48.6 months). Eight out of nine dogs that were treated surgically regained the ability to open their mouth, but six dogs never regained a fully normal temporomandibular joint range of motion. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis and pseudoankylosis are uncommon in the dog. Surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint ankylosis or pseudoankylosis in dogs is a successful option and carries a prognosis dependent on patient-specific abnormalities. Computed tomography complemented with three-dimensional printing is valuable for understanding the extent of abnormalities and for preoperative planning.

  11. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Materials and Methods Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. Results The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. Conclusion The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:23525363

  12. [Allograft of cultured chondrocytes into articular cartilage defects in rabbits--experimental study of the repair of articular cartilage injuries].

    PubMed

    Tsuge, H; Sasaki, T; Susuda, K; Abe, K

    1983-08-01

    Articular cartilage defects were created by dill holes, 2 mm wide and 3 mm deep, through the articular cartilage into the subchondral bone in the patellar groove of the femur in mature rabbits. The defects received graft of cultured chondrocytes and the matrix obtained from the primary culture of chondrocytes isolated from the articular cartilage or auricular cartilage in immature rabbits. The isolated cells were cultured for 10 to 14 days. For graft, the cultured chondrocytes together with the matrix were detached from the culture chamber using rubber policemen and centrifuged. The repair of the grafted defects or defects without graft (control) was histologically studied 2 to 12 weeks after operation. The defects without the graft were progressively filled with fibrous tissue containing spindle shaped cells, fibers perpendicular to the surface, and matrix showing weak metachromasia with toluidin blue at 8 weeks. The defects received articular cartilage cell graft were occupied by new cartilage tissue consisting colonylike crumps of chondrocytes 2 weeks after operation. The crumps showed strong metachromasia with toluidin blue and strong stainability for safranin-O. By 4-8 weeks, the defects were filled with homogeneous cartilage. At 12 weeks, arrangement of the chondrocytes of the superficial layer of the new cartilage became columnar as seen in the normal articular cartilage. The defects received elastic cartilage cell graft were filled by reformed cartilage with chondrocytes surrounded by elastic fibers 2-12 weeks after operation. The results indicate that allograft of cultured chondrocytes with matrix into the articular cartilage defects accerated the repair process of the defects by formation of the new cartilage derived from the grafted chondrocytes.

  13. [Orotracheal intubation and temporomandibular disorder: a longitudinal controlled study].

    PubMed

    Battistella, Cláudia Branco; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro; Juliano, Yara; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Tanaka, Cássia Emi; Garbim, Cristina Talá de Souza; Fonseca, Paula de Maria da Rocha; Sanches, Monique Lalue

    2016-01-01

    To determine the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder in elective surgery patients who underwent orotracheal intubation. This was a longitudinal controlled study with two groups. The study group included patients who underwent orotracheal intubation and a control group. We used the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire to assess the temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms one-day postoperatively (T1), and the patients' baseline status prior to surgery (T0) was also recorded. The same questionnaire was used after three months (T2). The mouth opening amplitude was measured at T1 and T2. We considered a p value of less than 0.05 to be significant. We included 71 patients, with 38 in the study group and 33 in the control. There was no significant difference between the groups in age (study group: 66 [52.5-72]; control group: 54 [47-68]; p=0.117) or in their belonging to the female gender (study group: 57.9%; control group: 63.6%; p=0.621). At T1, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in the incidence of mouth opening limitation (study group: 23.7% vs. 18.2%; p=0.570) or in the mouth opening amplitude (study group: 45 [40-47] vs. 46 [40-51]; p=0.278). At T2 we obtained similar findings. There was no significant difference in the affirmative response to all the individual questions in the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire. In our population, the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder of muscular origin was not different between the groups. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Orotracheal intubation and temporomandibular disorder: a longitudinal controlled study.

    PubMed

    Battistella, Cláudia Branco; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro; Juliano, Yara; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Tanaka, Cássia Emi; de Souza Garbim, Cristina Talá; de Maria da Rocha Fonseca, Paula; Sanches, Monique Lalue

    2016-01-01

    To determine the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder in elective surgery patients who underwent orotracheal intubation. This was a longitudinal controlled study with two groups. The study group included patients who underwent orotracheal intubation and a control group. We used the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire to assess the temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms one-day postoperatively (T1), and the patients' baseline status prior to surgery (T0) was also recorded. The same questionnaire was used after three months (T2). The mouth opening amplitude was measured at T1 and T2. We considered a p value of less than 0.05 to be significant. We included 71 patients, with 38 in the study group and 33 in the control. There was no significant difference between the groups in age (study group: 66.0 [52.5-72.0]; control group: 54.0 [47.0-68.0]; p=0.117) or in their belonging to the female gender (study group: 57.9%; control group: 63.6%; p=0.621). At T1, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in the incidence of mouth opening limitation (study group: 23.7% vs. 18.2%; p=0.570) or in the mouth opening amplitude (study group: 45.0 [40.0-47.0] vs. 46.0 [40.0-51.0]; p=0.278). At T2 we obtained similar findings. There was no significant difference in the affirmative response to all the individual questions in the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire. In our population, the incidence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder of muscular origin was not different between the groups. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Biomechanical and biochemical outcomes of porcine temporomandibular joint disc deformation.

    PubMed

    Matuska, Andrea M; Muller, Stephen; Dolwick, M Franklin; McFetridge, Peter S

    2016-04-01

    The structure-function relationship in the healthy temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc has been well established, however the changes in dysfunctional joints has yet to be systematically evaluated. Due to the poor understanding of the etiology of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) this study evaluated naturally occurring degenerative remodeling in aged female porcine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs in order to gain insight into the progression and effects on possible treatment strategies of TMDs. Surface and regional biomechanical and biochemical properties of discal tissues were determined in grossly deformed (≥Wilkes Stage 3) and morphologically normal (≤Wilkes Stage 2) TMJ discs. Compared to normal disc structure the deformed discs lacked a smooth biconcave shape and characteristic ECM organization. Reduction in tensile biomechanical integrity and increased compressive stiffness and cellularity was found in deformed discs. Regionally, the posterior and intermediate zones of the disc were most frequently affected along with the inferior surface. The frequency of degeneration observed on the inferior surface of the disc (predominantly posterior), suggests that a disruption in the disc-condyle relationship likely contributes to the progression of joint dysfunction more than the temporodiscal relationship. As such, the inferior joint space may be an important consideration in early clinical diagnosis and treatment of TMDs, as it is overlooked in techniques performed in the upper joint space, including arthroscopy and arthrocentesis. Furthermore, permanent damage to the disc mechanical properties would limit the ability to successfully reposition deformed discs, highlighting the importance of emerging therapies such as tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Etiologic theory and the prevention of temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Clark, G T

    1991-12-01

    Over the last 75 years, a variety of etiologic factors has been suggested as the cause of pain and dysfunction in the temporomandibular system. The earliest and still-popular etiologic theory proposed that temporomandibular disorders are induced by abnormal structure, usually described as a malocclusion of the teeth or jaws. The fact that this theory was based on mechanical concepts, ignored biologic diversity, and had limited factual experimental evidence to support it as well as extensive evidence in opposition did not seem to matter to its proponents. In the late 1960's and early 1970's, the structural occlusal model for TM Disorders was challenged and has yielded ground to a more multifactorial model of TMD causation. Other etiologic factors for TM disorders--such as anatomical susceptibility of TM tissues to trauma, polyarthritic diseases, joint laxity, repetitive parafunctional behaviors, and stress-related muscle dysfunction--need to be recognized and quantified. Unfortunately, many practicing dentists demonstrate a very poor understanding of and often fail to recognize these etiologic factors as agents that produce TM disorders. This failure is largely due to the fact that the dental profession has spent the last 90 years dealing with a variety of misconceptions about the etiology of temporomandibular disorders. In the 1990's, one of the more formidable challenges we face is acquiring the ability to segregate and define validly the specific TM Disorder of concern and then correctly identify and measure the specific etiologic factors that produce it. Until these problems are solved, it is unlikely that we will be able to prevent disease of the TM apparatus.

  17. Dynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint: an initial assessment with fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition sequence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Dong, Min-jun; Tao, Xiao-feng; Yu, Qiang; Li, Kai-cheng; Yang, Chi

    2015-04-01

    The study was aimed to determine and optimize the parameters for the MR fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequence, which was to obtain an acceptable image to evaluate the value of the movement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this investigation, 20 volunteers were examined to determine and optimize the parameters of the FIESTA sequence. Then, 160 TMJs from 80 patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) of clinical suspicion were consecutively performed by both static MRI and dynamic FIESTA MRI on the oblique sagittal position. The FIESTA MR images of TMJs were obtained from a slow, consecutive, free and open-closed movement. Based on the cycles of TMJ movements during the process of FIESTA MRI (90seconds), we classified all TMJs into 2 groups: cycles of open-closed mouths less than or equal to 3 (group 1) and more than 3 (group 2). Each image was marked level 1-3 by its quality. Meanwhile, the location of articular disc, mandibular condyle, motive artifact, "jumping sign" and the joint effusion in each TMJ were assessed respectively. By dynamic FIESTA MRI among 160 TMJs, 92 TMJs (57.50%) were in group 1, and 68 TMJs were (42.50%) in group 2. There were statistically significant differences between group 1 and group 2(p<0.05). It was shown that the number of "level 3" in group 1 was greater than group 2, and the number of "level 1" in group 1 was less than group 2. The phenomenon of motion artifact and "jumping sign" were much significantly higher in group 2 than those in group 1 (p<0.01). Furthermore, in all of the "jumping sign" cases, the phenomenon of "jumping sign" was significantly higher in group ADDwR than in group ADDw/oR (p<0.01). There was a statistically significant correlation between disc-condyle complex in "jumping sign" phenomenon and group ADDwR (r=0.621, p<0.05). The data with the false matching rate of 31.52% showed that the maximum motion range on the dynamic imaging was greater than the static imaging

  18. Pseudotumor of temporomandibular joint: destructive calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Pritzker, K P; Phillips, H; Luk, S C; Koven, I H; Kiss, A; Houpt, J B

    1976-03-01

    The clinical and pathological features of a tumor of the temporamandibular joint occurring in a 55 year old man, and subsequently identified as a calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) arthropathy, are reported. Crystalline deposits were identified by compensated light microscopy and confirmed with X-ray diffraction, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. The relationship of this unique case to other clinical presentations of CPPD deposition disease and the implications of the histological features to the pathogenesis of pseudogout are discussed. This case demonstrates that CPPD arthropathy should be included in the differential diagnosis of an arthrosis or of a tumor involving the temporomandibular joint.

  19. Why use oral splints for temporomandibular disorders (TMDs)?

    PubMed

    Adibi, Shawn S; Ogbureke, Ezinne I; Minavi, Brian B; Ogbureke, Kalu U

    2014-06-01

    Several etiologic routes have either been determined or proposed for Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD). Notable among these are myofascial, disc displacement, and arthritides disorders. The absence of concrete and universally accepted evidence-based treatment approaches means that debates as to the precise etiology and treatment of TMDs continue while practitioners attempt to treat and improve the lives of patients who present with these debilitating disorders. The use of oral splints (OS) by clinicians with responsibility to manage TMDs is quite popular, even though its mechanism of action and efficacy remains unclear. This article reviews the rationale for the continued use of OS for the management of TMDs.

  20. Differential diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders and other orofacial pain disorders.

    PubMed

    Okeson, Jeffrey P; de Leeuw, Reny

    2011-01-01

    There are many types of pain conditions that are felt in the orofacial structures. Most of the conditions treated by the dentist are associated with the teeth, periodontal structures, and associated mucosal tissues. This article focuses on the differential diagnosis of other common pain conditions the dentist will likely face, such as temporomandibular disorders, neuropathic pain disorders, and common headaches; and the clinical presentation of each. Controlling or reducing pain can be accomplished by controlling perpetuating factors such as parafunctional habits and by some simple behavioral modifications. Finally, this article offers some simple treatment considerations.

  1. Temporomandibular joint disorder in systemic sclerosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chebbi, Raja; Khalifa, Hanen Ben; Dhidah, Monia

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis have several effects on the orofacial region such as widening of the periodontal ligament space, xerostomia and bone resorption of the mandible. We report a case of systemic sclerosis with temporomandibular joint involvement in a 45-year-old female patient accompanied by severe limited mouth opening and pain in the right and left preauricular regions and tenderness in masseter muscles with a morning stiffness of jaws.Magnetic resonance imaging showed a resorption of mandibular condylar process, with disk and joint abnormalities. PMID:28292126

  2. General joint hypermobility and temporomandibular joint derangement in adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Westling, L; Mattiasson, A

    1992-01-01

    Joint mobility was assessed in each member of an epidemiological sample of 96 girls and 97 boys, 17 years old, and graded by means of the hypermobility score of Beighton et al. Twenty two per cent of the girls and 3% of the boys could perform five or more of the nine manoeuvres. The prevalence of symptoms and signs of internal derangement in the temporomandibular joint was higher in adolescents with hypermobility of joints (score greater than or equal to 5/9). In subjects with a high mobility score oral parafunctions (overuse) correlated more strongly with several signs and symptoms of craniomandibular disorder than in those with a low score. PMID:1540046

  3. Scientific methodology in temporomandibular disorders. Part III: Diagnostic reasoning.

    PubMed

    Moses, A J

    1994-10-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD), as a cluster of individual diseases and disorders, pose new intellectual challenges to the diagnostic skills of dentists. New technologies enable dentists to avail themselves of paraclinical data such that diagnosis can and should be disease specific or etiology specific. The importance of logic in diagnostic reasoning is discussed. Studies of the reasoning process of doctors with reputations for having good clinical judgement have resulted in protocols of diagnostic reasoning. Three specific strategies are presented and discussed-probabilistic, causal and deterministic. The difference between intellectual and managerial decisions are explained relative to utility of the strategies.

  4. Differential diagnosis of orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Brennan, Michael T

    2013-07-01

    When a patient complains of orofacial pain, health care providers must make a correct diagnosis. Doing this can be difficult, since various signs and symptoms may not be specific for 1 particular problem or disorder. One initially should formulate a broad differential diagnosis that can be narrowed after analysis of the history and examination. In this article, orofacial pain is categorized as being caused by: intracranial pain, headaches, neuropathic pain, intraoral pain, temporomandibular disorder, cervical pain, pain related to anatomically associated structures, referred pain, or mental illness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [How I Treat. An Anterior Temporomandibular Joint Dislocation].

    PubMed

    Gilon, Y; Johnen, J; Nizet, J L

    2015-09-01

    Anterior dislocation of the temporomandibular joint is not uncommon and requires prompt management. A defect of dislocation reduction can lead to severe functional impairment of a complex, and often active joint. The diagnosis is clinical and relatively obvious. It is made by the frontline medical team, general practitioner or emergency doctor. Recurrent cases are a matter for maxillofacial surgeons. This article describes a conventional technique for anterior dislocation reduction, to achieve urgently. The second part of the article deals with the specialized surgical treatment of relapsing forms.

  6. Neurology of the temporomandibular joints: an experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments on anaesthetized cats are described in which the reflex effects of stimulation of the mechanoreceptors in the temporomandibular joints on the ipsilateral and contralateral mandibular muscles were studied. The effects on this reflex activity and on dynamic manidublar muscle activity of the production of temporary and permanent dysfunction of the mechanoreceptors in different regions of the joint capsule were also studied. The significance of the findings in relation to the maintenance of normal jaw posture and the disturbance of mandibular muscular function by trauma, disease, and malocclusion is discussed. PMID:1259326

  7. [Update on current care guideline: temporomandibular disorders (TMD)].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are common. Usual symptoms are joint noises and pain, pain in masticatory muscles, difficulties in jaw movements and headache. Treatment of TMD includes information on the background and good response to treatment of these disorders. The patient is advised on self-care routines, including relaxing the lower jaw, massaging the masticatory muscles and hot or cold packs on painful sites. Pharmacotherapy consists of paracetamol or anti-inflammatory analgesics. Occlusal appliances, physiotherapy, cognitive therapies and acupuncture are recommended. Complicated cases not responding to treatment are referred to specialized care.

  8. Corrective Osteotomy for Intra-Articular Distal Humerus Malunion

    PubMed Central

    Kinaci, Ahmet; Buijze, Geert A.; Leeuwen, Diederik H.van; Jupiter, Jesse B.; Marti, Rene K.; Kloen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: An intra-articular distal humerus malunion can be disabling. To improve function, reduce pain and/or prevent further secondary osteoarthritis an intra-articular corrective osteotomy can be considered. Herein we present the indications, practical guidelines for pre- operative planning and surgical technique. Subsequently, we provide long-term results in a small series. Methods: We included six consecutive patients operated for intra-articular distal humerus malunion. Mean follow-up was 88 months. At lastest follow up elbow function was assessed according to standardized questionnaires and classification systems. Results: All six patients healed their osteotomies. Three patients had a postoperative complication which were treated succesfully. Range of motion improved significantly and all patients were satisfied with the outcome. The elbow performance scores were good to excellent in all. Correlation analyses showed that age and level of osteoarthritis are very strong predictors for the long-term elbow function and quality of life. Conclusion: An intra-articular corrective osteotomy for a malunited distal humerus fracture is a worthwhile procedure. Based on our results it should particularly be considered in young patients with minimal osteoarthritis and moderate to severe functional disability and/or pain. PMID:27200396

  9. Surface fissures in articular cartilage: new concepts, hypotheses and modeling.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Vratislav

    2002-01-01

    Clarification and mesomechanical modeling of the inception of fissures at the surface of articular cartilage. Articular cartilage is described as a macroscopically heterogeneous medium consisting of zones - layers - with different orientation of collagen fibers. Degradation of mechanical properties of cartilage is a serious, still not fully clarified problem that deserves attention. Theoretical analysis based on a survey of known experimental findings related to the subject. The general author's mesomechanical concept of modeling heterogeneous media is applied to the elucidation and description of the formation of fissures at the surface of articular cartilage. Our model clarifies how the high tensile stresses in the collagen fibers of the superficial tangential zone depend on the rate of loading. The superficial cracks are caused predominantly by a very quick loading. This explains among others the high incidence of post-traumatic osteoarthritis of the lower extremity after accidents and injuries in sports. Superficial fissures in articular cartilage are observed in joints with primary osteoarthritis. The current study specifies the kinds of loading that lead to their inception.

  10. Vitamin D and Its Effects on Articular Cartilage and Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Garfinkel, Rachel J; Dilisio, Matthew F; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) currently affects 10% of the American population. There has been a recent push to determine exactly what causes OA and how it can be treated most effectively. Serum vitamin D levels have been associated with OA and may have an effect on articular cartilage remodeling. To critically review the published research on the effect of vitamin D on articular cartilage and the development of OA as well as on the mechanism behind cartilage regeneration and degeneration. Review. A systematic search of PubMed and the Web of Science was performed for relevant studies published in the English language through April 30, 2016, using the terms vitamin D, articular cartilage, and osteoarthritis. On a molecular level, 1α,25(OH)2D3, the activated form of vitamin D, plays a role in articular cartilage degeneration. Vitamin D binds to vitamin D receptors, triggering a signaling cascade that leads to chondrocyte hypertrophy. In clinical trials, vitamin D deficiency poses a risk factor for OA, and those with decreased cartilage thickness are more likely to be vitamin D-insufficient. The role of vitamin D supplementation in the treatment or prevention of OA remains uncertain. More research is needed to reconcile these conflicting findings.

  11. Human patellar articular proportions: recent and Pleistocene patterns

    PubMed Central

    TRINKAUS, ERIK

    2000-01-01

    The degrees of mediolateral asymmetry of the patellar articular facet, as well as the median and lateral articular angles of the facet, were compared across samples of recent humans and of Pleistocene archaic and modern fossil humans. All samples exhibit considerable variability in these patellar proportions. The articular angles are similar across the different samples, but there is a trend towards decreasing lateral angles with decreasing robusticity. The archaic humans exhibit significantly more symmetry of the medial and lateral facets than do any of the recent human samples. However, given the variability in medial versus lateral patellofemoral contact forces documented for extant humans and the roles of the distal oblique portions of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis in patellar stabilisation, it is unclear to what extent this variation in patellar articular proportions may affect knee kinesiology. The contrasts may be related to different levels of patellar stability and/or musculoskeletal hypertrophy, but they appear unlikely to have affected primary knee function. PMID:10853969

  12. Haemorrhoids and joint hypermobility: a new extra-articular association.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Uqba N; Bird, Howard A

    2013-04-01

    An association has been demonstrated between haemorrhoids and joint hypermobility. Reasons for this are discussed. Many performing artists are hypermobile and the extra-articular features of joint hypermobility should not be forgotten or underestimated as a potential constraint upon performance.

  13. Computational aspects in mechanical modeling of the articular cartilage tissue.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Mequanint, Kibret; Herzog, Walter

    2013-04-01

    This review focuses on the modeling of articular cartilage (at the tissue level), chondrocyte mechanobiology (at the cell level) and a combination of both in a multiscale computation scheme. The primary objective is to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of conventional models implemented to study the mechanics of the articular cartilage tissue and chondrocytes. From monophasic material models as the simplest form to more complicated multiscale theories, these approaches have been frequently used to model articular cartilage and have contributed significantly to modeling joint mechanics, addressing and resolving numerous issues regarding cartilage mechanics and function. It should be noted that attentiveness is important when using different modeling approaches, as the choice of the model limits the applications available. In this review, we discuss the conventional models applicable to some of the mechanical aspects of articular cartilage such as lubrication, swelling pressure and chondrocyte mechanics and address some of the issues associated with the current modeling approaches. We then suggest future pathways for a more realistic modeling strategy as applied for the simulation of the mechanics of the cartilage tissue using multiscale and parallelized finite element method.

  14. Transtendon repair in partial articular supraspinatus tendon tear.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Buda, Matteo; Andreotti, Mattia; Osti, Raffaella; Massari, Leo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2017-09-01

    Partial thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are common, with an incidence between 17% and 37%, and a high prevalence in throwing athletes. Different surgical procedures are suggested when partial tears involve the articular portion of the rotator cuff, including arthroscopic debridement of the tear, debridement with acromioplasty, tear completion and repair, and lately transtendon repair. This systematic review describes the transtendon repair and examines indications, contraindications, complications and clinical outcome. We identified clinical studies listed in the Pubmed Google Scholar, CINAHL, Cochrane Central and Embase Biomedical databases in English and Italian concerning the clinical outcomes following treatment of partial articular supraspinatus tendon tear using transtendon surgical repair. Eighteen studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria. All were published between 2005 and 2016, three were retrospective, and 15 prospective. The total number of patients was 507 with a mean age of 50.8 years. Tear completion and repair and transtendon repair alone produce similar results. Transtendon surgical repair allows to obtain good-excellent results in the treatment of partial articular supraspinatus tendon tears. Further studies are needed to produce clear guidelines in the treatment of partial articular supraspinatus tendon tears. IV.

  15. [Articular lesions in Ixodes tick-borne borreliosis (Lyme disease)].

    PubMed

    Anan'eva, L P; Barskova, V G; Koneva, O A; Ushakova, M A; Mach, E S; Pushkova, O V; Guseva, I A; Zakharova, M M; Radenska-Lopovok, S G; Speranskiĭ, A I; Kashnikova, L N

    2003-01-01

    Articular lesions in 157 patients infected with ixodes tick-borne borreliosis (ITB) in a central Russia's region set on, on the average, in 4 months after tick attack; they were associated with systemic signs of an early disseminated infection and set on less seldom in a late period. The most often encountered systemic signs were as follows: secondary erythema (32% of patients), neurological syndrome (13%), cardio-vascular lesions (22%), ocular lesions (13%) and hepatic lesions (8%). The articular syndrome manifested itself through arthralgia (53 patients) and arthritis (104 patients), which set on quite often in the tick-attack area. There was a peculiarity typical of articular lesions, which made it possible to distinguish them from other rheumatic disease. A dynamic follow-up revealed different clinical variations of Lyme's arthritis and peculiarities of the genetic profile, i.e. a higher prevalence of HLA A2, HLA-B15 and HLA-DR4 as well as of haplo-types HLA A2-B15 and HLAB15-DR4. The articular lesions were associated with an intensive specific humoral immune response. The instrumental examination methods, i.e. ultrasonography of joints as well as scintigraphy of bones and joints, did not reveal any qualitative differences between arthralgia and arthritis, which is indicative of a common nature different-intensity manifestations of arthropathy in thick-borne borreliosis.

  16. Biphasic surface amorphous layer lubrication of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Graindorge, Simon; Ferrandez, Wendy; Jin, Zhongmin; Ingham, Eileen; Grant, Colin; Twigg, Peter; Fisher, John

    2005-12-01

    The biphasic nature of articular cartilage has been acknowledged for some time and is known to play an important role in many of the biomechanical functions performed by this unique tissue. From the lubrication point of view however, a simple biphasic model is unable to account for the extremely low friction coefficients that have been recorded experimentally, particularly during start-up. In addition, research over the last decade has indicated the presence of a surface amorphous layer on top of articular cartilage. Here, we present results from a finite element model of articular cartilage that includes a thin, soft, biphasic surface amorphous layer (BSAL). The results of this study show that a thin BSAL, with lower elastic modulus, dramatically altered the load sharing between the solid and liquid phases of articular cartilage, particularly in the near-surface regions of the underlying bulk cartilage and within the surface amorphous layer itself where the fluid load support exceeded 85%. By transferring the load from the solid phase to the fluid phase, the biphasic surface layer improves lubrication and reduces friction, whilst also protecting the underlying cartilage surface by 'shielding' the solid phase from elevated stresses. The increase in lubrication effectiveness is shown to be greatest during short duration loading scenarios, such as shock loads.

  17. Choosing sheep (Ovis aries) as animal model for temporomandibular joint research: Morphological, histological and biomechanical characterization of the joint disc.

    PubMed

    Angelo, D F; Morouço, P; Alves, N; Viana, T; Santos, F; González, R; Monje, F; Macias, D; Carrapiço, B; Sousa, R; Cavaco-Gonçalves, S; Salvado, F; Peleteiro, C; Pinho, M

    2016-12-01

    Preclinical trials are essential to the development of scientific technologies. Remarkable molecular and cellular research has been done using small animal models. However, significant differences exist regarding the articular behavior between these models and humans. Thus, large animal models may be more appropriate to perform trials involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The aim of this work was to make a morphological (anatomic dissection and white light 3D scanning system), histological (TMJ in bloc was removed for histologic analysis) and biomechanical characterization (tension and compression tests) of sheep TMJ comparing the obtained results with human data. Results showed that sheep processus condylaris and fossa mandibularis are anatomically similar to the same human structures. TMJ disc has an elliptical perimeter, thinner in the center than in periphery. Peripheral area acts as a ring structure supporting the central zone. The disc cells display both fibroblast and chondrocyte-like morphology. Marginal area is formed by loose connective tissue, with some chondrocyte-like cells and collagen fibers in diverse orientations. Discs obtained a tensile modulus of 3.97±0.73MPa and 9.39±1.67MPa, for anteroposterior and mediolateral assessment. The TMJ discs presented a compressive modulus (E) of 446.41±5.16MPa and their maximum stress value (σmax) was 18.87±1.33MPa. Obtained results suggest that these animals should be considered as a prime model for TMJ research and procedural training. Further investigations in the field of oromaxillofacial surgery involving TMJ should consider sheep as a good animal model due to its resemblance of the same joint in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Observing the development of the temporomandibular joint in embryonic and post-natal mice using various staining methods

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, WENNA; LI, XIHAI; GAO, BIZHEN; GAN, HUIJUAN; LIN, XUEJUAN; LIAO, LINGHONG; LI, CANDONG

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint that is essential for the movement and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ develops from two mesenchymal condensations, and is composed of the glenoid fossa that originates from the otic capsule by intramembranous ossification, the mandibular condyle of the temporal bone and a fibrocartilagenous articular disc derived from a secondary cartilaginous joint by endochondral ossification. However, the development of the TMJ remains unclear. In the present study, the formation and development of the mouse TMJ was investigated between embryonic day 13.5 and post-natal day 180 in order to elucidate the morphological and molecular alterations that occur during this period. TMJ formation appeared to proceed in three stages: Initiation or blastema stage; growth and cavitation stage; and the maturation or completion stage. In order to investigate the activity of certain transcription factors on TMJ formation and development, the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM), sex determining region Y-box 9, runt-related transcription factor 2, Indian hedgehog homolog, Osterix, collagen I, collagen II, aggrecan, total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), MMP-9 and MMP-13 were detected in the TMJ using in situ and/or immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that the transcription factors, ECM and MMP serve critical functions in the formation and development of the mouse TMJ. In summary, the development of the mouse TMJ was investigated, and the molecular regulation of mouse TMJ formation was partially characterized. The results of the present study may aid the systematic understanding of the physiological processes underlying TMJ formation and development in mice. PMID:26893634

  19. Brother of CDO (BOC) expression in equine articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Vanderman, K S; Tremblay, M; Zhu, W; Shimojo, M; Mienaltowski, M J; Coleman, S J; MacLeod, J N

    2011-04-01

    Brother of CDO (BOC) is a cell surface receptor that derives its name from the structurally related protein, cell adhesion molecule-related/down-regulated by oncogenes (CDO, sometimes CDON). High levels of BOC mRNA and protein expression have been described in embryonic tissues with active cell proliferation and ongoing cellular differentiation(1,2). A microarray-based screen of RNA isolated from 11 different adult equine tissues unexpectedly identified BOC as having an expression pattern restricted to articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to further investigate BOC expression in adult articular cartilage relative to other tissues. Both RT-qPCR and mRNA sequencing confirmed the microarray data. Steady state BOC mRNA levels in articular cartilage were substantially higher than in the other adult tissues tested, neonatal tendon, placenta, and whole embryo. The expression of BOC displayed a pattern of tissue specificity comparable to well established cartilage matrix protein biomarkers. BOC mRNA levels in articular cartilage increased with age, but were rapidly down-regulated when chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from the cartilage matrix and expanded in monolayer culture. Relative expression patterns of CDO were broadly similar, but displayed lower fold change differences. A functional role in articular cartilage that involves Hedgehog signaling is suggested by the known binding affinity of BOC for all three Hedgehog ligands. These data also extend BOC and CDO biology to a post-mitotic and highly differentiated cell type within a mature tissue. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Role of Tissue Engineering in Articular Cartilage Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijie; Hu, Jerry; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair and regeneration continue to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased articular cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving articular cartilage therapy. This review provides an overall description of the current state and progress in articular cartilage repair and regeneration. Traditional therapies and related problems are introduced. More importantly, a variety of promising cell sources, biocompatible tissue engineered scaffolds, scaffoldless techniques, growth factors, and mechanical stimuli used in current articular cartilage tissue engineering are reviewed. Finally, the technical and regulatory challenges of articular cartilage tissue engineering and possible future directions are discussed. PMID:20201770

  1. Treatment of temporomandibular myofascial pain with deep dry needling

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Luis M.; Granados-Nuñez, Mercedes; Urresti-Lopez, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of deep dry needling in the treatment of temporomandibular myofascial pain. Study Design: We selected 36 patients with myofascial pain located in the external pterygoid muscle (30 women/6 men, mean age=27 years with SD±6,5). We studied differences in pain with a visual analog scale and range of mandibular movements before and after intervention. Results: We found a statistically significant relationship (p<0,01) between therapeutic intervention and the improvement of pain and jaw movements, which continued up to 6 months after treatment. Pain reduction was greater the higher was the intensity of pain at baseline. Conclusions: Although further studies are needed, our findings suggest that deep dry needling in the trigger point in the external pterygoid muscle can be effective in the management of patients with myofascial pain located in that muscle. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, myofascial pain, external pterygoid muscle, trigger point, deep dry needling. PMID:22549679

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Hypermobility Manifestation Based on Clinical Observations

    PubMed Central

    Nosouhian, Saeid; Haghighat, Abbas; Mohammadi, Iman; Shadmehr, Elham; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Joint range of motion might affected by some factors like laxity and increase joint mobility. Generalized joint hypermobility and temporomandibular joint hypermobility (TMJH) are reported as risk factors for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to survey the etiological factors of TMJH and its relations to habitual status. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 69 patients with TMJH were involved. After profiling personal information and medical history, the patients were divided into three groups based on their maximum mouth opening (MMO) as follow: (Light) MMO of 50-55 mm, (moderate): MMO between 55 and 65 mm, (severe) MMO >65 mm. For subjective observations, patients were asked to fill the prepared questionnaire. The objective evaluations conducted by a specialist. Finally, all the data subjected Chi-Square test by using SPSS software version 22 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: TMJH was more common in women (74.2%). The light group had significant differences with other groups in the discomfort of TMJ and TMJ sound (P < 0.05). Furthermore, sever group manifested highest percentage of masticatory pains, significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It can be concluded that pain in TMJ would have a correlation with MMO. PMID:26464530

  3. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in women and men.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Claudia Lúcia Pimenta; Silva, Marco Antônio Moreira Rodrigues da; Felício, Cláudia Maria de

    2016-01-01

    Women are more likely to present temporomandibular disorders (TMD); however, studies comparing genders in Brazilian samples are rare. To analyze the proportion of men and women, as well as the association between gender and age, problem duration, and TMD symptoms in patients admitted to an university clinic for treatment. Interview and assessment data of protocols from 1,000 patients diagnosed with TMD were collected and analyzed and then divided into two groups, male (n = 177) and female (n = 823). The exploratory analysis was based on contingency tables and χ2 test was carried out. Subsequently, the logistic regression model was used and the odds ratios (OR) concerning the evaluated comparisons were calculated. Females were more prevalent in the sample, and mean ages and TMD duration were similar between the groups, with higher occurrence in young adults (19 to 40 years old). The OR values showed an association between the female gender and the signs/symptoms of pain in the temporomandibular joint, pain in the facial muscles, neck and shoulders, headache, fatigue in the muscles of mastication, otologic symptoms, and dysphonia. Women had two times higher chances of presenting these symptoms than men. In the sample of Brazilian patients with TMD, the number of women who presented a higher prevalence of painful symptoms was greater, followed by otologic symptoms and complaints of dysphonia. The prevalence of joint noise was similar in both studied groups.

  4. Update on the vitek partial and total temporomandibular joint systems.

    PubMed

    Kent, J N; Block, M S; Halpern, J; Fontenot, M G

    1993-04-01

    A retrospective recall study was done on 262 VK I (N = 138) and VK II (N = 124) (Vitek, Inc, Houston, TX) partial and total temporomandibular joints placed between 1982 and 1990. The cumulative success rate of VK I total joints observed for up to 10 years was approximately 20%, whereas the success rate of VK II total joints observed up to 6 years was approximately 80%. At the 5- to 6-year interval for each, these rates were 44% and 79%, respectively. Wear of the Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene polymer surface was the primary reason for VK I failure; there was no material failure of the VK II prostheses. Slightly better pain relief, increase in interincisal opening, improvement in diet, and greater overall satisfaction were noted with the use of VK II. A highly significant improvement in success data was found if no surgery had been performed before either VK I or VK II total joint placement. Rib grafts were not particularly helpful after removal of total joint prostheses, particularly if the patient had a history of multiple surgeries. Total temporomandibular joint surgery must be reserved for patients in whom alternative surgical methods have failed or are no longer indicated. All total joint implants, particularly the VK I, must be observed closely with clinical examination and imaging and removed at the earliest sign of material failure.

  5. Temporomandibular disorders and functional somatic syndromes: deliberations for the dentist.

    PubMed

    Suma, S; Veerendra Kumar, B

    2012-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is an umbrella term for a collection of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and associated tissues. TMD is not a rare pathology for the dentist. The most common presenting symptom is pain, which causes the patient seek immediate treatment. Management is dictated by the cause. The most 'famed' causes include trauma, inflammation, aging, parafunctional habits, infections, neoplasms, and stress; and these are always considered in the differential diagnosis of TMJ pain. There are some less 'famed' causes of TMD, which are characterized by increased pain sensitivity due to psychosocial factors; these include myofascial pain syndrome and functional somatic syndromes (FSS) such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. They present with chronic pain, fatigue, disability, and impairment in ability to perform daily activities. A non-systematic search in the English literature revealed numerous studies describing the occurrence of TMD in these conditions, along with few other oral manifestations. TMD has been even considered to be a part of the FSS by some. In these patients, TMD remains a recurring problem, and adequate management cannot be achieved by traditional treatment protocols. Awareness of these conditions, with correct diagnosis and modification of management protocols accordingly, may resolve this problem.

  6. Masticatory function in temporomandibular dysfunction patients: electromyographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Berretin-Felix, Giédre; Genaro, Katia Flores; Trindade, Inge Elly Kiemle; Trindade Júnior, Alceu Sergio

    2005-12-01

    Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is a complex disturbance that involves the masticatory muscles and/or temporomandibular joint, causing damage to the masticatory function. This study evaluated the electromyographic activity of the masseter muscle during habitual mastication of bread, apple, banana, cashew nut and paraffin film (Parafilm M) in 25 adult subjects, of both gender, with TMD. The results were compared to those of a control group, composed of 15 adult subjects, of both sexes, free of signs and/or symptoms of TMD. The MYO-TRONICS Inc., K6-I computer software was used for electromyographic processing and analyzed the following parameters: duration of the act, duration of the masticatory cycle and number of cycles. No significant differences were found between subjects in the control group and individuals with TMD as to duration of the masticatory act and of the masticatory cycle, considering all materials used for mastication. The duration of the masticatory act and cycle was longer during mastication of paraffin film in both groups. The number of masticatory cycles was higher for mastication of apple in comparison to mastication of banana, in both groups. It can be concluded that the consistency of foods influences the duration parameters of the act, duration of the cycle and the number of masticatory cycles, and the behavior of the masticatory muscles in individuals with TMD during habitual mastication is similar to that verified in individuals without TMD.

  7. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in adolescent violin players.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M

    1996-08-01

    Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and the frequency of radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of adolescent violin players (VP group) were investigated in a group of 31 music students and in their age- and sex-matched controls (C group). All subjects underwent a routine clinical stomatognathic examination, a standardized interview, and radiography of the condyles. The VP group reported a higher frequency of the subjective symptoms: pain in the TMJ when chewing, a feeling of stiffness in the TMJ, and clenching of the teeth. Clinically, the VP group showed a greater range of maximal protrusion and of maximal laterotrusion to the right, and a greater frequency of deviation to the right on opening. They also showed more palpatory tenderness in the masticatory muscles and pain in the TMJ on maximal opening. The number of playing years and the number of weekly playing hours correlated with several signs and symptoms of TMDs. In terms of radiologic findings in the condyles of the TMJs there was no difference between the groups. It is concluded that intense violin playing may have a predisposing role in the etiology of TMDs in adolescence.

  8. Congenital Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Ryan Chin Taw; Kassam, Karim; Eccles, Simon; Hensher, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is an uncommon condition that presents itself at or soon after birth in the absence of acquired factors that could have contributed to the ankylosis such as infection and trauma. The experience of managing one such case is reported in light of a review of the literature on this condition. Key management principles include adequate removal of the ankylotic mass, costochondral grafting, and post-op physiotherapy. Most patients reported in the literature with the condition experienced relapse. This echoes our own experience where there was recurrence of the ankylosis. However, after removal of the ankylotic mass, the patient maintains a satisfactory maximal incisal opening (MIO) till the present day. The additional challenges faced in the congenital form in addition to the already complex management of acquired paediatric temporomandibular joint ankylosis are (1) much earlier insult to the TMJ, (2) reduced opportunity for neuromuscular development of the muscles of mastication, and (3) reduced compliance with postoperative physiotherapy programmes due to the younger age of these patients. PMID:27190665

  9. Assessing clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders: reliability of clinical examiners.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, S F; LeResche, L; DeRouen, T; Von Korff, M

    1990-05-01

    Data on interrater reliability in assessing a number of clinical signs commonly evaluated in the diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is presented in this article. Four experienced dental hygienists who were field examiners for a large epidemiologic study of TMD and three experienced clinical TMD specialists (dentists) who are coinvestigators in the same study followed carefully detailed specifications and criteria for examination of TMD patients and pain-free controls. Excellent reliability was found for vertical range of motion measures and for summary indices measuring the overall presence of a clinical sign that could arise from several sources (for example, summary indices of muscle palpation pain). However, many clinical signs important in the differential diagnosis of subtypes of TMD were not measured with high reliability. In particular, assessment of pain in response to muscle palpation and identification of specific temporomandibular joint sounds seemed to be possible only with modest, sometimes marginal, reliability. These modest reliabilities could arise from examiner error because the clinical signs are themselves unreliable, changing spontaneously over time and making it difficult to find the same sign on successive examinations. The finding that, without calibration, experienced clinicians showed low reliability with other clinicians suggests the importance of establishing reliable clinical standards for the examination and diagnostic classification of TMD.

  10. Parotid gland squamous cell carcinoma invading the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Klasser, Gary D; Epstein, Joel B; Utsman, Robert; Yao, Mike; Nguyen, Pamela H

    2009-08-01

    Tumor invasion of the temporomandibular joint from the parotid gland is rare. Practitioners should be able to differentiate tumor involvement from temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). . The authors present case reports of two patients with parotid gland masses accompanied by pain, dysfunction and other symptoms not consistent with musculoskeletal disorders. In both cases, clinicians initially reached an incorrect diagnosis and treated the masses as if they were TMDs, which delayed a definitive diagnosis and provision of appropriate treatment. Dentists must take a thorough patient history, perform a detailed clinical examination and request proper radiographic imaging, when necessary, to render an accurate diagnosis and avoid mistreatment. Dentists who treat TMDs must recognize the possibility that a head or neck malignancy may manifest with symptoms and signs that mimic TMDs. If dentists are in doubt about a diagnosis, referral to the appropriate specialist should be considered. A thorough history, a comprehensive clinical examination and an understanding of salivary gland disorders should facilitate an accurate initial diagnosis, allowing delivery of the appropriate and necessary medical treatment.

  11. Diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; List, Thomas; Anderson, Gary; Jensen, Rigmor; John, Mike T; Nixdorf, Donald; Goulet, Jean-Paul; Kang, Wenjun; Truelove, Ed; Clavel, Al; Fricton, James; Look, John

    2015-01-01

    Aims We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Methods In 373 headache subjects with TMD, a TMD headache reference standard was defined as: self-reported temple headache, consensus diagnosis of painful TMD and replication of the temple headache using TMD-based provocation tests. Revised diagnostic criteria for Headache attributed to TMD were selected using the RPART (recursive partitioning and regression trees) procedure, and refined in half of the data set. Using the remaining half of the data, the diagnostic accuracy of the revised criteria was compared to that of the International Headache Society's International Classification of Headache Diseases (ICHD)-II criteria A to C for Headache or facial pain attributed to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder. Results Relative to the TMD headache reference standard, ICHD-II criteria showed sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 33%. The revised criteria for Headache attributed to TMD had sensitivity of 89% with improved specificity of 87% (p < 0.001). These criteria are (1) temple area headache that is changed with jaw movement, function or parafunction and (2) provocation of that headache by temporalis muscle palpation or jaw movement. Conclusion Having significantly better specificity than the ICHD-II criteria A to C, the revised criteria are recommended to diagnose headache secondary to TMD. PMID:22767961

  12. Therapeutic exercises for the control of temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Alberto da Rocha; Sanches, Monique Lalue; Ribeiro, Eduardo Cotecchia; Guimarães, Antonio Sérgio

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial disease. For this reason, it is difficult to obtain an accurate and correct diagnosis. In this context, conservative treatments, including therapeutic exercises classified as stretching, relaxation, coordination, strengthening and endurance, are oftentimes prescribed. Thus, the aim of the present article was to conduct a literature review concerning the types of exercises available and the efficacy for the treatment of muscular TMD. The review included researches carried out between 2000 and 2010, indexed on Web of Science, PubMed, LILACS and BBO. Moreover, the following keywords were used: Exercise, physical therapy, facial pain, myofascial pain syndrome, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome. Studies that did not consider the subject "TMD and exercises", used post-surgery exercises and did not use validated criteria for the diagnosis of TMD (RDC/TMD) were not included. The results comprised seven articles which proved therapeutic exercises to be effective for the treatment of muscular TMD. However, these studies are seen as limited, since therapeutic exercises were not applied alone, but in association with other conservative procedures. In addition, they present some drawbacks such as: Small samples, lack of control group and no detailed exercise description which should have included intensity, repetition, frequency and duration. Although therapeutic exercises are considered effective in the management of muscular TMD, the development of randomized clinical trials is necessary, since many existing studies are still based on the clinical experience of professionals.

  13. Automobilization intervention and exercise for temporomandibular joint open lock

    PubMed Central

    Hoglund, Lisa T; Scott, Brian W

    2012-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) are common and may cause temporomandibular joint (TMJ) locking, pain, and disability. Evidence supports use of manual therapy and exercise for treatment of TMDs including disk displacement limiting full mouth opening, TMJ ‘closed lock’. Only limited case studies describe management of TMJ ‘open lock’, a condition due to posterior disk displacement (PDD) or TMJ anterior dislocation (TMJ-AD). Reported treatment for open lock includes splinting and intraoral joint manipulation. This case report describes a novel extraoral automobilization using the mandibular elevator muscles to treat TMJ open lock in a 22-year-old male after intraoral joint mobilization failed. The exercise program used to restore neuromuscular control for post-reduction management is described. Short term results of automobilization were excellent with restored ability to swallow, speak normally, and achieve occlusion. Long term results at 14 months were good: the patient was pain-free, could swallow and speak normally, had no recurrence of TMJ locking, and minimal disability. Limited right lateral excursion range and left mandibular deviation during mouth opening indicated possible persistence of PDD. This case suggests that mandibular elevator automobilization and masticatory muscle exercise may be useful to treat TMJ open lock and should be considered to treat PDD and TMJ-AD. PMID:24179326

  14. Temporomandibular disorders. Part 1: anatomy and examination/diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a heterogeneous group of diagnoses affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding tissues. A variety of methods for evaluating and managing TMD have been proposed within the physical therapy profession but these sources are not peer-reviewed and lack updates from scientific literature. The dental profession has provided peer-reviewed sources that lack thoroughness with respect to the neuromusculoskeletal techniques utilized by physical therapists. The subsequent void creates the need for a thorough, research informed, and peer-reviewed source regarding TMD evaluation and management for physical therapists. This paper is the first part in a two-part series that seeks to fill the current void by providing a brief but comprehensive outline for clinicians seeking to provide services for patients with TMD. Part one focuses on anatomy and pathology, arthro- and osteokinematics, epidemiology, history taking, and physical examination as they relate to TMD. An appreciation of the anatomical and mechanical features associated with the TMJ can serve as a foundation for understanding a patient’s clinical presentation. Performance of a thorough patient history and clinical examination can guide the clinician toward an improved diagnostic process. PMID:24976743

  15. Temporomandibular joint arthroscopy technique using a single working cannula.

    PubMed

    Srouji, S; Oren, D; Zoabi, A; Ronen, O; Zraik, H

    2016-11-01

    The traditional arthroscopy technique includes the creation of three ports in order to enable visualization, operation, and arthrocentesis. The aim of this study was to assess an advanced temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy technique that requires only a single cannula, through which a one-piece instrument containing a visualization canal, irrigation canal, and a working canal is inserted, as an alternative to the traditional double-puncture technique. This retrospective study assessed eight patients (13 TMJs) with pain and/or limited range of movement that was refractory to conservative therapy, who were treated between June 2015 and December 2015. The temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) was diagnosed by physical examination and mouth opening measurements. The duration of surgery was recorded and compared to that documented for traditional arthroscopies performed by the same surgeon. Operative single-cannula arthroscopy (OSCA) was performed using a holmium YAG (Ho:YAG) 230μm fibre laser for ablation. The OSCA technique proved effective in improving mouth opening in all patients (mean increase 9.12±1.96mm) and in reducing pain (mean visual analogue scale decrease of 3.25±1.28). The operation time was approximately half that of the traditional technique. The OSCA technique is as efficient as the traditional technique, is simple to learn, and is simpler to execute. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Temporomandibular disorders. Part 1: anatomy and examination/diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-02-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a heterogeneous group of diagnoses affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding tissues. A variety of methods for evaluating and managing TMD have been proposed within the physical therapy profession but these sources are not peer-reviewed and lack updates from scientific literature. The dental profession has provided peer-reviewed sources that lack thoroughness with respect to the neuromusculoskeletal techniques utilized by physical therapists. The subsequent void creates the need for a thorough, research informed, and peer-reviewed source regarding TMD evaluation and management for physical therapists. This paper is the first part in a two-part series that seeks to fill the current void by providing a brief but comprehensive outline for clinicians seeking to provide services for patients with TMD. Part one focuses on anatomy and pathology, arthro- and osteokinematics, epidemiology, history taking, and physical examination as they relate to TMD. An appreciation of the anatomical and mechanical features associated with the TMJ can serve as a foundation for understanding a patient's clinical presentation. Performance of a thorough patient history and clinical examination can guide the clinician toward an improved diagnostic process.

  17. Risk factors for temporomandibular disorder: binary logistic regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Bruno-Gama; de-Sousa, Stéphanie-Trajano; de Mello, Victor-Villaça-Cardoso; da-Silva-Barbosa, André-Cavalcante; de-Assis-Morais, Mariana-Pacheco-Lima; Barbosa-Vasconcelos, Márcia-Maria-Vendiciano; Caldas-Júnior, Arnaldo-de-França

    2014-05-01

    To analyze the influence of socioeconomic and demographic factors (gender, economic class, age and marital status) on the occurrence of temporomandibular disorder. One hundred individuals from urban areas in the city of Recife (Brazil) registered at Family Health Units was examined using Axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) which addresses myofascial pain and joint problems (disc displacement, arthralgia, osteoarthritis and oesteoarthrosis). The Brazilian Economic Classification Criteria (CCEB) was used for the collection of socioeconomic and demographic data. Then, it was categorized as Class A (high social class), Classes B/C (middle class) and Classes D/E (very poor social class). The results were analyzed using Pearson's chi-square test for proportions, Fisher's exact test, nonparametric Mann-Whitney test and Binary logistic regression analysis. None of the participants belonged to Class A, 72% belonged to Classes B/C and 28% belonged to Classes D/E. The multivariate analysis revealed that participants from Classes D/E had a 4.35-fold greater chance of exhibiting myofascial pain and 11.3-fold greater chance of exhibiting joint problems. Poverty is a important condition to exhibit myofascial pain and joint problems.

  18. Can pterygoid plate asymmetry be linked to temporomandibular joint disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Beltran, Jorge; de Laat, Antoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between pterygoid plate asymmetry and temporomandibular joint disorders. Materials and Methods Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 60 patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) involving pain were analyzed and compared with images of 60 age- and gender-matched controls. Three observers performed linear measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates. Results Statistically significant differences were found between measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates on the site that had pain and the contralateral site (p<0.05). The average length of the lateral pterygoid plates (LPPs) in patients with TMD was 17.01±3.64 mm on the right side and 16.21±3.51 mm on the left side, and in patients without TMD, it was 11.86±1.97 mm on the right side and 11.98±1.85 mm on the left side. Statistically significant differences in the LPP length, measured on CBCT, were found between patients with and without TMD (p<0.05). The inter-examiner reliability obtained in this study was very high for all the examiners (0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.98-0.99). Conclusion Within the limits of the present study, CBCT lateral pterygoid plate measurements at the side with TMD were found to be significantly different from those on the side without TMD. More research is needed to explore potential etiological correlations and implications for treatment. PMID:26125003

  19. Oral habits of temporomandibular disorder patients with malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yukie; Motegi, Etsuko; Nomura, Mayumi; Kawamura, Sakura; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Hideharu

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between oral habits and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder in patients who had sought orthodontic treatment by analyzing their present and past history. The subjects were 57 female patients (average age: 23 years and 6 months old) who had visited the "Temporomandibular Disorder Section" in our orthodontic department. Their chief complaints were the symptom of TMJ and the abnormalities of occlusion such as maxillary protrusion, open bite, crowding, mandibular protrusion, cross bite, deep bite, edge-to-edge bite, and spacing. Their present conditions and past histories were examined and evaluated. The most typical primary symptom was joint sound (23 patients, 40.0%). The second was joint sound and pain (15 patients, 26.3%). Of the symptoms present at the time of examination, the most prevalent were joint sound and pain (20 patients, 35.1%). The 48 patients (82.8%) had significant oral habits. Unilateral chewing was seen in 35 patients (72.9%), bruxism in 27 (56.3%), abnormality of posture in 14 (29.2%), habitual crunching in 10 (20.8%) and resting the check on the hand in 4 (8.3%), respectively. When comparing the primary symptoms to those at the time of examination, the patients with unilateral chewing and bruxism tended to have more complicated symptoms. In conclusion, the TMD symptoms of the patients with notable oral habits did not change or become worse during a period of about 5 years.

  20. Temporomandibular disorders, otologic symptoms and depression levels in tinnitus patients.

    PubMed

    Hilgenberg, P B; Saldanha, A D D; Cunha, C O; Rubo, J H; Conti, P C R

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and otologic symptoms in patients with and without tinnitus. The influence of the level of depression was also addressed. The tinnitus group was comprised of 100 patients with tinnitus, and control group was comprised of 100 individuals without tinnitus. All subjects were evaluated using the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) to determine the presence of TMD and depression level. Chi-square, Spearman Correlation and Mann-Whitney tests were used in statistical analysis, with a 5% significance level. TMD signs and symptoms were detected in 85% of patients with tinnitus and in 55% of controls (P≤0·001). The severity of pain and higher depression levels were positively associated with tinnitus (P≤0·001). It was concluded that tinnitus is associated with TMD and with otalgia, dizziness/vertigo, stuffy sensations, hypoacusis sensation and hyperacusis, as well as with higher depression levels.