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Sample records for complement component c3

  1. Complement component 3 (C3)

    MedlinePlus

    C3 and C4 are the most commonly measured complement components. A complement test may be used to monitor people with an ... normal levels of the complement proteins C3 and C4 . Complement activity varies throughout the body. For example, ...

  2. Engineering of human complement component C3 for catalytic inhibition of complement.

    PubMed

    Kölln, Johanna; Bredehorst, Reinhard; Spillner, Edzard

    2005-04-15

    As a novel therapeutic approach in complement-mediated pathologies, we recently developed a human C3 derivative capable of obliterating functional complement by a catalytic, non-inhibitory mechanism. In this derivative, the C-terminal region of hC3 was substituted by a 275 amino acid sequence derived from the corresponding sequence of cobra venom factor (CVF), a complement-activating C3b homologue from snake venom. In this study, we replaced shorter C-terminal sequences of hC3 by corresponding CVF sequences to further reduce potential immunogenicity and to identify domains essential for the formation of functionally stable C3 convertases. In one of these derivatives that is still capable of obliterating functional complement in vitro, the non-human portion could be reduced to a small domain located in the C-terminus of different complement proteins. This conserved NTR/C345C motif is known to be involved in assembly of different convertases of the complement system. These results suggest a major role of the C345C domain in the regulation of the half-life of the C3 convertase. Moreover, its overall identity of 96% to human C3 renders this derivative a promising candidate for therapeutic intervention in complement-mediated pathologies. PMID:15790508

  3. Complement Component C3 Binds to Activated Normal Platelets without Preceding Proteolytic Activation and Promotes Binding to Complement Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Osama A.; Nilsson, Per H.; Wouters, Diana; Lambris, John D.; Ekdahl, Kristina N.; Nilsson, Bo

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that complement is activated on the surface of activated platelets, despite the presence of multiple regulators of complement activation. To reinvestigate the mechanisms by which activated platelets bind to complement components, the presence of complement proteins on the surfaces of nonactivated and thrombin receptor-activating peptide-activated platelets was analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot analyses. C1q, C4, C3, and C9 were found to bind to thrombin receptor-activating peptide-activated platelets in lepirudin-anticoagulated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood. However, inhibiting complement activation at the C1q or C3 level did not block the binding of C3 to activated platelets. Diluting PRP and chelating divalent cations also had no effect, further indicating that the deposition of complement components was independent of complement activation. Furthermore, washed, activated platelets bound added C1q and C3 to the same extent as platelets in PRP. The use of mAbs against different forms of C3 demonstrated that the bound C3 consisted of C3(H2O). Furthermore, exogenously added soluble complement receptor 1 was shown to bind to this form of platelet-bound C3. These observations indicate that there is no complement activation on the surface of platelets under physiological conditions. This situation is in direct contrast to a number of pathological conditions in which regulators of complement activation are lacking and thrombocytopenia and thrombotic disease are the ultimate result. However, the generation of C3(H2O) represents nonproteolytic activation of C3 and after factor I cleavage may act as a ligand for receptor binding. PMID:20139276

  4. Functional Characterization of Autoantibodies against Complement Component C3 in Patients with Lupus Nephritis*

    PubMed Central

    Vasilev, Vasil V.; Noe, Remi; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnes; Chauvet, Sophie; Lazarov, Valentin J.; Deliyska, Boriana P.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Dimitrov, Jordan D.; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a complication of the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Because the complement system plays a critical role in orchestrating inflammatory and immune responses as well as in the clearance of immune complexes, autoreactivity to complement components may have considerable pathological consequences. Autoantibodies against the central complement component C3 have been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus, but their molecular mechanism and functional relevance are not well understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and the functional properties of the anti-C3 autoantibodies. Anti-C3 autoantibodies were measured in plasma of 39 LN patients, and identification of their epitopes on the C3 molecule was performed. By using surface plasmon resonance, we analyzed the influence of patient-derived IgG antibodies on the interaction of C3b with Factor B, Factor H, and complement receptor 1. The capacity of these antibodies to dysregulate the C3 convertase on the surface of endothelial cell was measured by flow cytometry. Here we report that the frequency of anti-C3 autoantibodies in LN is ∼30%. They inhibited interactions of the negative complement regulators Factor H and complement receptor 1 with C3b. An enhanced C3 deposition was also observed on human endothelial cells in the presence of C3 autoantibodies. In addition, anti-C3 autoantibody levels correlated with disease activity. In conclusion, the anti-C3 autoantibodies in LN may contribute to the autoimmune pathology by their capacity to overactivate the complement system. PMID:26245903

  5. Characterization of the third component of complement (C3) after activation by cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Kew, R.R.; Ghebrehiwet, B.; Janoff, A.

    1987-08-01

    Activation of lung complement by tobacco smoke may be an important pathogenetic factor in the development of pulmonary emphysema in smokers. We previously showed that cigarette smoke can modify C3 and activate the alternative pathway of complement in vitro. However, the mechanism of C3 activation was not fully delineated in these earlier studies. In the present report, we show that smoke-treated C3 induces cleavage of the alternative pathway protein, Factor B, when added to serum containing Mg-EGTA. This effect of cigarette smoke is specific for C3 since smoke-treated C4, when added to Mg-EGTA-treated serum, fails to activate the alternative pathway and fails to induce Factor B cleavage. Smoke-modified C3 no longer binds significant amounts of (/sup 14/C)methylamine (as does native C3), and relatively little (/sup 14/C)methylamine is incorporated into its alpha-chain. Thus, prior internal thiolester bond cleavage appears to have occurred in C3 activated by cigarette smoke. Cigarette smoke components also induce formation of noncovalently associated, soluble C3 multimers, with a Mr ranging from 1 to 10 million. However, prior cleavage of the thiolester bond in C3 with methylamine prevents the subsequent formation of these smoke-induced aggregates. These data indicate that cigarette smoke activates the alternative pathway of complement by specifically modifying C3 and that these modifications include cleavage of the thiolester bond in C3 and formation of noncovalently linked C3 multimers.

  6. Characterization of the third component of complement (C3) after activation by cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Kew, R R; Ghebrehiwet, B; Janoff, A

    1987-08-01

    Activation of lung complement by tobacco smoke may be an important pathogenetic factor in the development of pulmonary emphysema in smokers. We previously showed that cigarette smoke can modify C3 and activate the alternative pathway of complement in vitro. However, the mechanism of C3 activation was not fully delineated in these earlier studies. In the present report, we show that smoke-treated C3 induces cleavage of the alternative pathway protein, Factor B, when added to serum containing Mg-EGTA. This effect of cigarette smoke is specific for C3 since smoke-treated C4, when added to Mg-EGTA-treated serum, fails to activate the alternative pathway and fails to induce Factor B cleavage. Smoke-modified C3 no longer binds significant amounts of [14C]methylamine (as does native C3), and relatively little [14C]methylamine is incorporated into its alpha-chain. Thus, prior internal thiolester bond cleavage appears to have occurred in C3 activated by cigarette smoke. Cigarette smoke components also induce formation of noncovalently associated, soluble C3 multimers, with a Mr ranging from 1 to 10 million. However, prior cleavage of the thiolester bond in C3 with methylamine prevents the subsequent formation of these smoke-induced aggregates. These data indicate that cigarette smoke activates the alternative pathway of complement by specifically modifying C3 and that these modifications include cleavage of the thiolester bond in C3 and formation of noncovalently linked C3 multimers.

  7. Functions of the complement components C3 and C5 during sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Flierl, Michael A.; Rittirsch, Daniel; Nadeau, Brian A.; Day, Danielle E.; Zetoune, Firas S.; Sarma, J. Vidya; Huber-Lang, Markus S.; Ward, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the complement system is a key event in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms remain inadequately understood. In the current study, we examined the role of complement C3 and C5 in sepsis in wild-type and C3- or C5-deficient mice induced by cecal ligation and puncture. When compared to wild-type mice, C5−/− showed identical survival, and C3−/− presented significantly reduced survival. Interestingly, this was associated with significant decreases in plasma levels of proinflammatory mediators. Moreover, although septic C3−/− animals displayed a 10-fold increase of blood-borne bacteria, C5−/− animals exhibited a 400-fold increase in bacteremia when compared to wild-type mice. These effects were linked to the inability of C5−/− mice to assemble the terminal membrane attack complex (MAC), as determined by complement hemolytic activity (CH-50). Surprisingly, although negative control C3−/− mice failed to generate the MAC, significant increases of MAC formation was found in septic C3−/− mice. In conclusion, our data corroborate that hemolytic complement activity is essential for control of bacteremia in septic mice. Thus, during sepsis, blockade of C5a or its receptors (rather than C5) seems a more promising strategy, because C5a-blockade still allows for MAC formation while the adverse effects of C5a are prevented.—Flierl, M. A., Rittirsch, D., Nadeau, B. A., Day, D. E., Zetoune, F. S., Sarma, J. V., Huber-Lang, M. S., Ward, P. A. Functions of the complement components C3 and C5 during sepsis. PMID:18587006

  8. Structural transitions of complement component C3 and its activation products

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Noritaka; Walz, Thomas; Springer, Timothy A.

    2006-01-01

    Complement sensitizes pathogens for phagocytosis and lysis. We use electron microscopy to examine the structural transitions in the activation of the pivotal protein in the complement pathway, C3. In the cleavage product C3b, the position of the thioester domain moves ≈100 Å, which becomes covalently coupled to antigenic surfaces. In the iC3b fragment, cleavage in an intervening domain creates a long flexible linker between the thioester domain and the macroglobulin domain ring of C3. Studies on two products of nucleophile addition to C3 reveal a structural intermediate in activation, and a final product, in which the anaphylatoxin domain has undergone a remarkable movement through the macroglobulin ring. PMID:17172439

  9. Halogenation and proteolysis of complement component C3 on Salmonella typhimurium during phagocytosis by human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, K.A.; Schweinle, J.E.

    1989-05-01

    We examined the fate of C component C3 on the surface of Salmonella typhimurium during ingestion by human neutrophils. Initial experiments showed that C3 fragments and C3-acceptor complexes were the major serum ligands which were surface iodinated by canine myeloperoxidase on serum-incubated rough and smooth isolates of S. typhimurium. In contrast, labeled C3 was not identified when the same organisms were ingested by neutrophils in the presence of 125I-Na, a situation previously shown to iodinate particulate targets via the neutrophil myeloperoxidase-halide-H2O2 system. Pretreatment of neutrophils before phagocytosis with the lipid-soluble protease inhibitor diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), but not with other protease inhibitors (p-nitrophenylguanidinobenzoate, leupeptin, pepstatin), substantially blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 on S. typhimurium strain RG108 during ingestion by neutrophils. Purification of neutrophil phagosomes containing S. typhimurium-bearing 125I-C3 showed that DFP but no other protease inhibitors blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 within phagosomes. Iodinated C3-acceptor complexes were identified by immunoprecipitation from the detergent-insoluble fraction of phagosomes prepared from DFP-treated cells ingesting S. typhimurium in the presence of 125I-Na. These results show that C3 fragments on the surface of S. typhimurium are the major serum ligands which are halogenated and degraded by proteolysis during phagocytosis by human neutrophils, and suggest that the majority of proteolysis on the ingested target occurs within the neutrophil phagosome.

  10. Comparison of a fluorometric method with radial immunodiffusion assays for determination of complement components C3 and C4.

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, M; Bartholomew, W R

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of patient serum complement components C3 and C4 are useful indicators of complement consumption in immune complex diseases. A fluorometric quantitative immunofluorescence system was evaluated in terms of measuring these complement components, and the results were compared with those of radial immunodiffusion assays. For comparison of the two systems, 232 patient sera were evaluated for C3, and 202 specimens were tested for C4. Analysis of the data by linear regression indicated a proportional difference between the methods. C3 and C4 concentrations measured by the fluorometric method were lower than those measured by radial immunodiffusion, especially concentrations exceeding the normal ranges. In detecting lower concentrations (less than 120 mg/dl for C3 and less than 25 mg/dl for C4), the two methods showed better agreement. Each assay system was reproducible and could be used to evaluate changes that occur in concentrations of complement components during therapeutic treatment. However, the ease in processing a large volume of specimens and the short time needed to complete the assay are advantages that make the fluorometric method more suitable than radial immunodiffusion for use in a large clinical laboratory. PMID:6811611

  11. The activation of the C3b feedback cycle with human complement components. I. Through the classical pathway.

    PubMed

    Mak, L W; Lachmann, P J; Majewski, J

    1977-11-01

    Reaction between the fourth, the oxidized second and the activated first components of human complement generated the stable enzyme C4oxy2 capable of cleaving the third component and depleting total complement in human serum. This enzyme was shown further to activate the C3b feedback cycle as shown by its ability to consume factor B in serum and the reduction in the extent of complement consumption in the presence of EDTA. OxyC2 on its own gave rise to C3 cleavage in normal human serum by a pathway needing classical pathway components. This unexpected finding suggests that there may be a 'C-1 tickover' in serum analogous to the 'C3b tickover'; the presence of oxyC2 allowing the 'capture' of the trivial amounts of C42 normally formed. In preliminary experiments in the rat, C4oxy2 was successfully formed in vivo, where it gave rise to cleavage of C3, consumption of C5, depletion of cobra venom factor cofactors and a biphasic change in the neutrophil count.

  12. Choroidal neovascularization is inhibited via an intraocular decrease of inflammatory cells in mice lacking complement component C3

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xue; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Manabe, Ichiro; Nishida, Junko; Yamagishi, Reiko; Nagai, Ryozo; Yanagi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    In early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), complement component C3 can be observed in drusen, which is the accumulation of material beneath the retinal pigment epithelium. The complement pathways, via the activation of C3, can upregulate the expression of cytokines and their receptors and the recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes, both of which play an important role in the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in exudative AMD. Laser-induced CNV lesions were found to be significantly smaller in C3−/− mice than in wild-type mice. By using flow cytometry, we demonstrated that the proportions of intraocular granulocytes, CD11b+F4/80+Ly6Chi and CD11b+F4/80+Ly6Clo cells, were lower in C3−/− mice than in wild-type mice as early as day 1 after laser injury, and the proportions of granulocytes and three macrophage/monocyte subsets were significantly lower on day 3. In contrast, C3−/− mice had more granulocytes and CD11b+F4/80+Ly6Chi cells in peripheral blood than wild-type mice after injury. Further, the expression levels of Vegfa164 were upregulated in intraocular Ly6Chi macrophages/monocytes of C3−/− mice, but not as much as in wild-type mice. Collectively, our data demonstrate that despite a more pronounced induction of systemic inflammation, inhibition of complement factor C3 suppresses CNV by decreasing the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the lesion. PMID:26507897

  13. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of Pleurodeles waltl complement component C3 under normal physiological conditions and environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Guéguinou, Nathan; Huin-Schohn, Cécile; Ouzren-Zarhloul, Nassima; Ghislin, Stéphanie; Frippiat, Jean-Pol

    2014-10-01

    C3 is a component of the complement system that plays a central role in immunity, development and tissue regeneration. In this study, we isolated the C3 cDNA of the Iberian ribbed newt Pleurodeles waltl. This cDNA encodes a 1637 amino acid protein with an estimated molecular mass of 212.5 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that P. waltl C3 contains all the conserved domains known to be critical for C3 function. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that under normal physiological conditions, P. waltl C3 mRNA is expressed early during development because it is likely required for neurulation. Then, its expression increased as the immune system developed. In adults, the liver is the richest source of C3, though other tissues can also contribute. Further analysis of C3 expression demonstrated that C3 transcription increased when P. waltl larvae were exposed to pH or temperature stress, suggesting that environmental modifications might affect this animal's defenses against pathogens.

  14. Complement-dependent cellular cytotoxicity: lymphoblastoid lines that activate complement component 3 (C3) and express C3 receptors have increased sensitivity to lymphocyte-mediated lysis in the presence of fresh human serum.

    PubMed

    Ramos, O F; Sármay, G; Klein, E; Yefenof, E; Gergely, J

    1985-08-01

    Lymphocyte-mediated lysis of cells of the Raji, Daudi, Jijoye, and Bjab lines was elevated when fresh human serum was added to the assay. A higher proportion of effector-target conjugates was observed in the presence of human serum. In similar experiments lysis of 1301, Rael, and P3HR-1 cells was unaltered. All cell lines activated the alternative pathway of complement but they varied in the expression of receptors for complement component 3 (C3) and in the ability to fix the C3 cleavage products on their membrane. The enhancement of lysis in the presence of human serum occurred only with those cells that bound C3. This characteristic was correlated to the expression of C3 receptors. Analysis of the nature of the deposited C3 was performed with Raji cells. Raji cells exposed to human serum bound C3b as indicated by the immunoadherence test. The C3b was further processed to C3bi, because the immunoadherence declined with time and conjugate formation increased with Daudi cells, which carry the C3 receptors CR2 and CR3. This suggests that in the lytic assay lymphocytes with C3bi receptors are recruited in the presence of human serum. We assume that the bridge of C3 molecules between targets and effectors increases the avidity of their interaction. PMID:3895232

  15. Contribution of complement component C3 and complement receptor type 3 to carbohydrate-dependent uptake of oligomannose-coated liposomes by peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yu; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Kuboki, Noritaka; Matsushita, Misao; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Kojima, Naoya

    2008-11-01

    Peritoneal macrophages (PEMs) preferentially and rapidly take up oligomannose-coated liposomes (OMLs) and subsequently mature to induce a Th-1 immune response following administration of OMLs into the peritoneal cavity. Here, we examine the contributions of complement component C3 and complement receptor type 3 (CR3) to carbohydrate-dependent uptake of OMLs by PEMs. Effective uptake of OMLs into PEMs in vitro was observed only in the presence of peritoneal fluid (PF), and OMLs incubated with PF were incorporated by PEMs in vitro in the absence of PF. These phenomena were inhibited by methyl-alpha-mannoside, N-acetylglucosamine or EDTA, but not by galactose. Pull-down analysis followed by peptide mass fingerprinting of PF-treated OMLs indicated that the OMLs were opsonized with complement fragment iC3b. In vivo uptake of OMLs by PEMs was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of an antibody against CR3, a receptor for iC3b, and OML uptake by PEMs in the peritoneal cavity was not observed in C3-deficient mice. Thus, our results indicate that OMLs are opsonized with iC3b in a mannose-dependent manner in the peritoneal cavity and then incorporated into PEMs via CR3. PMID:18694897

  16. The structure of C2b, a fragment of complement component C2 produced during C3 convertase formation

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Vengadesan; Xu, Yuanyuan; Macon, Kevin; Volanakis, John E.; Narayana, Sthanam V. L.

    2009-03-01

    The crystal structure of C2b has been determined at 1.8 Å resolution, which reveals the arrangement of its three complement control protein (CCP) modules. A model for complement component C2 is presented and its conformational changes during the C3-convertase formation are also discussed. The second component of complement (C2) is a multi-domain serine protease that provides catalytic activity for the C3 and C5 convertases of the classical and lectin pathways of human complement. The formation of these convertases requires the Mg{sup 2+}-dependent binding of C2 to C4b and the subsequent cleavage of C2 by C1s or MASP2, respectively. The crystal structure of full-length C2 is not yet available, although the structure of its C-terminal catalytic segment C2a has been determined. The crystal structure of the N-terminal segment C2b of C2 determined to 1.8 Å resolution presented here reveals the arrangement of its three CCP domains. The domains are arranged differently compared with most other CCP-domain assemblies, but their arrangement is similar to that found in the Ba part of the full-length factor B structure. The crystal structures of C2a, C2b and full-length factor B are used to generate a model for C2 and a discussion of the domain association and possible interactions with C4b during formation of the C4b–C2 complex is presented. The results of this study also suggest that upon cleavage by C1s, C2a domains undergo conformational rotation while bound to C4b and the released C2b domains may remain folded together similar to as observed in the intact protein.

  17. Human α2-macroglobulin is composed of multiple domains, as predicted by homology with complement component C3

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Gettins, Peter G. W.

    2007-01-01

    Human α2M (α2-macroglobulin) and the complement components C3 and C4 are thiol ester-containing proteins that evolved from the same ancestral gene. The recent structure determination of human C3 has allowed a detailed prediction of the location of domains within human α2M to be made. We describe here the expression and characterization of three α2M domains predicted to be involved in the stabilization of the thiol ester in native α2M and in its activation upon bait region proteolysis. The three newly expressed domains are MG2 (macroglobulin domain 2), TED (thiol ester-containing domain) and CUB (complement protein subcomponents C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein 1) domain. Together with the previously characterized RBD (receptor-binding domain), they represent approx. 42% of the α2M polypeptide. Their expression as folded domains strongly supports the predicted domain organization of α2M. An X-ray crystal structure of MG2 shows it to have a fibronectin type-3 fold analogous to MG1–MG8 of C3. TED is, as predicted, an α-helical domain. CUB is a spliced domain composed of two stretches of polypeptide that flank TED in the primary structure. In intact C3 TED interacts with RBD, where it is in direct contact with the thiol ester, and with MG2 and CUB on opposite, flanking sides. In contrast, these α2M domains, as isolated species, show negligible interaction with one another, suggesting that the native conformation of α2M, and the consequent thiol ester-stabilizing domain–domain interactions, result from additional restraints imposed by the physical linkage of these domains or by additional domains in the protein. PMID:17608619

  18. Identification of OprF as a Complement Component C3 Binding Acceptor Molecule on the Surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Meenu; Ressler, Adam; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a versatile opportunistic pathogen that can cause devastating persistent infections. Complement is a highly conserved pathway of the innate immune system, and its role in the first line of defense against pathogens is widely appreciated. One of the earliest events in the complement cascade is the conversion of C3 to C3a and C3b, the latter typically binds to one or more acceptor molecules on the pathogen surface. We previously demonstrated that complement C3b binding acceptors exist on the P. aeruginosa surface. In the current study, we utilized either C3 polyclonal or C3b monoclonal antibodies in a far-Western technique followed by mass spectroscopy to identify the C3b acceptor molecule(s) on the P. aeruginosa surface. Our data provide evidence that OprF (an outer membrane porin, highly conserved in the Pseudomonadaceae) binds C3b. An oprF-deficient P. aeruginosa strain exhibits reduced C3 deposition compared to the wild type. We observed reduced internalization of oprF-deficient bacteria by neutrophils after opsonization compared with wild-type P. aeruginosa. Heterologous expression of OprF significantly enhanced C3b binding and increased serum-mediated bactericidal effects in complement-susceptible Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the predicted secondary structure of the C-terminal, surface-exposed region of OprF has high structural identity to the OmpA domain of several other Gram-negative bacteria, one of which is known to bind C3b. Therefore, these findings provide new insights into the biology of complement interactions with P. aeruginosa and other Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25964476

  19. Complement Component C3 and Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Are Associated with Neurodegeneration and Clinical Disability in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Al Nimer, Faiez; Vijayaraghavan, Swetha; Sandholm, Kerstin; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Nilsson, Bo; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson; Darreh-Shori, Taher; Piehl, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the complement system is evident in many CNS diseases but mechanisms regulating complement activation in the CNS remain unclear. In a recent large rat genome-wide expression profiling and linkage analysis we found co-regulation of complement C3 immediately downstream of butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), an enzyme hydrolyzing acetylcholine (ACh), a classical neurotransmitter with immunoregulatory effects. We here determined levels of neurofilament-light (NFL), a marker for ongoing nerve injury, C3 and activity of the two main ACh hydrolyzing enzymes, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and BuChE, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with MS (n = 48) and non-inflammatory controls (n = 18). C3 levels were elevated in MS patients compared to controls and correlated both to disability and NFL. C3 levels were not induced by relapses, but were increased in patients with ≥9 cerebral lesions on magnetic resonance imaging and in patients with progressive disease. BuChE activity did not differ at the group level, but was correlated to both C3 and NFL levels in individual samples. In conclusion, we show that CSF C3 correlates both to a marker for ongoing nerve injury and degree of disease disability. Moreover, our results also suggest a potential link between intrathecal cholinergic activity and complement activation. These results motivate further efforts directed at elucidating the regulation and effector functions of the complement system in MS, and its relation to cholinergic tone. PMID:25835709

  20. Complement component C3b and immunoglobulin Fc receptors on neutrophils from calves with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Worku, M; Paape, M J; Di Carlo, A; Kehrli, M E; Marquardt, W W

    1995-04-01

    Receptors for opsonins, such as complement component C3b (CR1) and immunoglobulins, Fc receptors, interact with adhesion glycoproteins in mediating immune functions. Defects in expression of the adhesion glycoproteins CD11/CD18 results in severely hampered in vitro and in vivo adherence-related functions of leukocytes. Little is known regarding the effect of leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) on ligand binding and receptor expression. We investigated the binding and expression of CR1 and Fc receptors by bovine neutrophils isolated from dairy calves suffering from LAD, compared with clinically normal (hereafter referred to as normal) age-matched calves. Neutrophils were also assayed for endogenously bound IgG and IgM and for exogenous binding of C3b, IgG1, IgG2, IgM, and aggregated IgG (aIgG), using flow cytometry. Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) production in response to IgG2 opsonized zymosan was studied, and specific inhibition of CL was used to determine the specificity of IgG2 binding. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol myristate acetate was used to determine the effect of cellular activation on expression of CR1. A greater percentage of neutrophils from normal calves bound C3b than did neutrophils from LAD-affected calves. Receptor expression was similar. Activation with phorbol myristate acetate resulted in increased expression of CR1 on neutrophils from normal and LAD-affected calves, but expression was almost twofold greater on neutrophils from normal calves. There was no difference between LAD-affected and normal calves in percentage of neutrophils that bound endogenous IgG and IgM. A greater percentage of neutrophils from normal calves bound exogenous IgM than did neutrophils from LAD-affected calves.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7785817

  1. Characterization of the gene encoding component C3 of the complement system from the spider Loxosceles laeta venom glands: Phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Myamoto, D T; Pidde-Queiroz, G; Pedroso, A; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, R M; van den Berg, C W; Tambourgi, D V

    2016-09-01

    A transcriptome analysis of the venom glands of the spider Loxosceles laeta, performed by our group, in a previous study (Fernandes-Pedrosa et al., 2008), revealed a transcript with a sequence similar to the human complement component C3. Here we present the analysis of this transcript. cDNA fragments encoding the C3 homologue (Lox-C3) were amplified from total RNA isolated from the venom glands of L. laeta by RACE-PCR. Lox-C3 is a 5178 bps cDNA sequence encoding a 190kDa protein, with a domain configuration similar to human C3. Multiple alignments of C3-like proteins revealed two processing sites, suggesting that Lox-C3 is composed of three chains. Furthermore, the amino acids consensus sequences for the thioester was found, in addition to putative sequences responsible for FB binding. The phylogenetic analysis showed that Lox-C3 belongs to the same group as two C3 isoforms from the spider Hasarius adansoni (Family Salcitidae), showing 53% homology with these. This is the first characterization of a Loxosceles cDNA sequence encoding a human C3 homologue, and this finding, together with our previous finding of the expression of a FB-like molecule, suggests that this spider species also has a complement system. This work will help to improve our understanding of the innate immune system in these spiders and the ancestral structure of C3.

  2. Characterization of the gene encoding component C3 of the complement system from the spider Loxosceles laeta venom glands: Phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Myamoto, D T; Pidde-Queiroz, G; Pedroso, A; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, R M; van den Berg, C W; Tambourgi, D V

    2016-09-01

    A transcriptome analysis of the venom glands of the spider Loxosceles laeta, performed by our group, in a previous study (Fernandes-Pedrosa et al., 2008), revealed a transcript with a sequence similar to the human complement component C3. Here we present the analysis of this transcript. cDNA fragments encoding the C3 homologue (Lox-C3) were amplified from total RNA isolated from the venom glands of L. laeta by RACE-PCR. Lox-C3 is a 5178 bps cDNA sequence encoding a 190kDa protein, with a domain configuration similar to human C3. Multiple alignments of C3-like proteins revealed two processing sites, suggesting that Lox-C3 is composed of three chains. Furthermore, the amino acids consensus sequences for the thioester was found, in addition to putative sequences responsible for FB binding. The phylogenetic analysis showed that Lox-C3 belongs to the same group as two C3 isoforms from the spider Hasarius adansoni (Family Salcitidae), showing 53% homology with these. This is the first characterization of a Loxosceles cDNA sequence encoding a human C3 homologue, and this finding, together with our previous finding of the expression of a FB-like molecule, suggests that this spider species also has a complement system. This work will help to improve our understanding of the innate immune system in these spiders and the ancestral structure of C3. PMID:27259372

  3. Iron-induced Local Complement Component 3 (C3) Up-regulation via Non-canonical Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β Signaling in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yafeng; Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Zhao, Liangliang; Wolkow, Natalie; Tobias, John W.; Song, Wenchao; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis may be a pathogenic factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, the formation of complement-containing deposits under the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer is a pathognomonic feature of AMD. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which complement component 3 (C3), a central protein in the complement cascade, is up-regulated by iron in RPE cells. Modulation of TGF-β signaling, involving ERK1/2, SMAD3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, is responsible for iron-induced C3 expression. The differential effects of spatially distinct SMAD3 phosphorylation sites at the linker region and at the C terminus determined the up-regulation of C3. Pharmacologic inhibition of either ERK1/2 or SMAD3 phosphorylation decreased iron-induced C3 expression levels. Knockdown of SMAD3 blocked the iron-induced up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, a transcription factor that has been shown previously to bind the basic leucine zipper 1 domain in the C3 promoter. We show herein that mutation of this domain reduced iron-induced C3 promoter activity. In vivo studies support our in vitro finding of iron-induced C3 up-regulation. Mice with a mosaic pattern of RPE-specific iron overload demonstrated co-localization of iron-induced ferritin and C3d deposits. Humans with aceruloplasminemia causing RPE iron overload had increased RPE C3d deposition. The molecular events in the iron-C3 pathway represent therapeutic targets for AMD or other diseases exacerbated by iron-induced local complement dysregulation. PMID:25802332

  4. [Complement system regulation and C3 glomerulopathy].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hui-jie; He, Rui-juan

    2013-04-18

    Complement system is a key system for immune surveillance and homeostasis. Excessive activation of complement system,especially the activation of alternative pathway may play a very important role in the pathogenesis of primary and secondary glomerulonephritis. C3 glomerulopathy is a newly named disease characterized by evident C3 deposition in the glomeruli with little or no immunoglobulin under immunofluorescence (IF). Its clinical and pathological manifestations vary a lot. The decreased plasma C3 and Factor H(FH)suggest that abnormal regulation of complement system plays an importment role in its pathogenesis. C3 glomerulopathy varies a lot as to its clinical manifestation, treatment and prognosis. The inhibition of excessive complement activation might be the key to treating C3 glomerulopathy.

  5. Complement component C3 mediates Th1/Th17 polarization in human T cell activation and cutaneous Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qing; Li, Dan; Carreño, Roberto; Patenia, Rebecca; Tsai, Kenneth Y.; Xydes-Smith, Marika; Alousi, Amin M.; Champlin, Richard E.; Sale, George E.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been shown to regulate T cell activation and alloimmune responses in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Mice deficient in the central component of complement system C3 have significantly lower GVHD-related mortality/morbidity and C3 modulates Th1/Th17 polarization in mouse GVHD. To investigate whether anti-complement therapy has any impact on human T cell activation, a drug candidate Compstatin was used to inhibit C3 activation in this study. We found the frequency of IFN-γ (Th1), IL-4 (Th2), IL-17 (Th17), IL-2 and TNF-α producing cells were significantly reduced among activated CD4+ cells in the presence of Compstatin. Compstatin treatment decreased the proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells upon TCR stimulation. However, Compstatin does not affect the production of IL-2 and TNF-α in activated CD8+ T cells, and the differentiation of CD8+ T cells into distinct memory and effector subsets remained intact. Furthermore, we examined complement deposition in the skin and lip biopsy samples of patients diagnosed with cutaneous GVHD. C3 deposition was detected in the squamous epithelium and dermis, blood vessels and damaged sweat glands, and associated with gland damage and regeneration. We conclude that C3 mediates Th1/Th17 polarization in human T cell activation and skin GVHD in patients. PMID:24777193

  6. Complement inhibition in C3 glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    Nester, Carla M; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-06-01

    C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) describes a spectrum of glomerular diseases defined by shared renal biopsy pathology: a predominance of C3 deposition on immunofluorescence with electron microscopy permitting disease sub-classification. Complement dysregulation underlies the observed pathology, a causal relationship that is supported by well described studies of genetic and acquired drivers of disease. In this article, we provide an overview of the features of C3G, including a discussion of disease definition and a review of the causal role of complement. We discuss molecular markers of disease and how biomarkers are informing our evolving understanding of underlying pathology. Research advances are laying the foundation for complement inhibition as a targeted approach to treatment of C3G. PMID:27402056

  7. Complement metabolism in man: hypercatabolism of the fourth (C4) and third (C3) components in patients with renal allograft rejection and hereditary angioedema (HAE)

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Charles B.; Ruddy, Shaun; Shehadeh, Isam H.; Müller-Eberhard, Hans J.; Merrill, John P.; Austen, K. Frank

    1969-01-01

    Highly purified and radioiodinated human C4 and (or) C3 were administered to patients with renal allografts in rejection, with hereditary angioedema (HAE), with chronic glomerulonephritis, and to control subjects. The latter group included normal individuals, anephric patients before transplantation, and stable renal allograft recipients. The catabolic rates of these complement proteins were determined by analysis of the disappearance of plasma protein-bound radioactivity (km), and by direct measurement of urinary excretion of radioactivity (ku). The correlation coefficient between these two methods was 0.96. The mean ±2 SD for catabolic rates in the control subjects was 0.9-2.7% plasma pool/hr for C4 and 0.9-2.0% plasma pool/hr for C3. Patients experiencing renal allograft rejection had unstable levels of C4 and C3, and exhibited moderate hypercatabolism of both proteins. One patient with chronic glomerulonephritis had hypercatabolism of C4 and C3 in the presence of stable normal serum levels. In patients with HAE who had extremely low levels of C4, catabolic rates for C4 were markedly elevated (3.7, 5.8, 7.0 and 8.8%/hr). Analysis of plasma curves in HAE revealed a three component disappearance curve instead of the two component curve in control subjects receiving the same preparation. Even though C3 levels were normal, moderate hypercatabolism of C3 was also present in HAE (2.6, 2.8, 2.8, and 3.2% of pool/hr). The marked hypercatabolism of C4 in HAE constitutes the first direct evidence for the in vivo destruction by uninhibited C1 esterase of its natural substrate C4. The moderate hypercatabolism of C3 is consistent with the in vivo formation of C3-convertase. Images PMID:4894302

  8. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the complement component-3 (C3) inhibitory domain of Efb from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, Michal; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Spencer, Charles T.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2006-03-01

    The crystallization and results of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction studies of a recombinant C3-inhibitory fragment of Efb from S. aureus are reported. The extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) of Staphylococcus aureus is a multifunctional virulence factor capable of potent inhibition of complement component-3 (C3) activity in addition to its previously described fibrinogen-binding properties. A truncated recombinant form of Efb (Efb-C) that binds C3 has been overexpressed and purified and has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion technique. Crystals of native Efb-C grew in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3} (unit-cell parameters a = b = 59.53, c = 46.63 Å) with two molecules in the asymmetric unit and diffracted well beyond 1.25 Å limiting Bragg spacing. To facilitate de novo phasing of the Efb-C crystals, two independent site-directed mutants were engineered in which either residue Ile112 or Val140 was replaced with methionine and crystals isomorphous to those of native Efb-C were reproduced using a seleno-l-methionine-labeled form of each mutant protein. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) data were collected on both mutants and analyzed for their phasing power toward solution and refinement of a high-resolution Efb-C crystal structure.

  9. Effect of sulfide ions on complement factor C3.

    PubMed Central

    Granlund-Edstedt, M; Johansson, E; Claesson, R; Carlsson, J

    1991-01-01

    In infected sites such as the gingival pockets of patients with periodontal disease, sulfide levels up to 1 mmol/liter may be reached. There is little information, however, on how sulfide may interact with the host defense. In a previous study (R. Claesson, M. Granlund-Edstedt, S. Persson, and J. Carlsson, Infect. Immun. 57:2776-2781, 1989), it was shown that polymorphonuclear leukocytes were able to kill bacteria in the presence of 1 mM sulfide. However, sulfide seemed to interfere with the opsonization of the bacteria. It has been claimed that sulfide may be toxic by splitting disulfide bonds of proteins. In the present study, serum was exposed to 2 mM sulfide under anaerobic conditions, and the capacity of sulfide to split disulfide bonds of 10 serum proteins involved in opsonization was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunodetection of the proteins after blotting. Sulfide had a low capacity to split the disulfide bonds of most proteins. Sulfide had, however, a pronounced effect on the complement component C3 in the form of C3bi. Sulfide released the C-terminal region of the alpha chain from C3bi. When C3 opsonizes bacteria, it is this region of C3bi which binds to complement receptor 3 (CR3) of the polymorphonuclear leukocytes. If sulfide has the same effect on C3bi deposited on the bacterial surface as it has on C3bi in solution, it will annihilate the very important contribution of C3bi to opsonization. Images PMID:1987085

  10. Molecular Basis for Complement Recognition and Inhibition Determined by Crystallographic Studies of the Staphylococcal Complement Inhibitor (SCIN) Bound to C3c and C3b

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Brandon L.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Tzekou, Apostolia; Ricklin, Daniel; McWhorter, William J.; Lambris, John D.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2010-10-22

    The human complement system plays an essential role in innate and adaptive immunity by marking and eliminating microbial intruders. Activation of complement on foreign surfaces results in proteolytic cleavage of complement component 3 (C3) into the potent opsonin C3b, which triggers a variety of immune responses and participates in a self-amplification loop mediated by a multi-protein assembly known as the C3 convertase. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus has evolved a sophisticated and potent complement evasion strategy, which is predicated upon an arsenal of potent inhibitory proteins. One of these, the staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), acts at the level of the C3 convertase (C3bBb) and impairs downstream complement function by trapping the convertase in a stable but inactive state. Previously, we have shown that SCIN binds C3b directly and competitively inhibits binding of human factor H and, to a lesser degree, that of factor B to C3b. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of SCIN bound to C3b and C3c at 7.5 and 3.5 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively, and show that SCIN binds a critical functional area on C3b. Most significantly, the SCIN binding site sterically occludes the binding sites of both factor H and factor B. Our results give insight into SCIN binding to activated derivatives of C3, explain how SCIN can recognize C3b in the absence of other complement components, and provide a structural basis for the competitive C3b-binding properties of SCIN. In the future, this may suggest templates for the design of novel complement inhibitors based upon the SCIN structure.

  11. Efficacy of Targeted Complement Inhibition in Experimental C3 Glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ruseva, Marieta M.; Peng, Tao; Lasaro, Melissa A.; Bouchard, Keith; Liu-Chen, Susan; Sun, Fang; Yu, Zhao-Xue; Marozsan, Andre; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy refers to renal disorders characterized by abnormal accumulation of C3 within the kidney, commonly along the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). C3 glomerulopathy is associated with complement alternative pathway dysregulation, which includes functional defects in complement regulator factor H (FH). There is no effective treatment for C3 glomerulopathy. We investigated the efficacy of a recombinant mouse protein composed of domains from complement receptor 2 (CR2) and FH (CR2-FH) in two models of C3 glomerulopathy with either preexisting or triggered C3 deposition along the GBM. FH-deficient mice spontaneously develop renal pathology associated with abnormal C3 accumulation along the GBM and secondary plasma C3 deficiency. CR2-FH partially restored plasma C3 levels in FH-deficient mice 2 hours after intravenous injection. CR2-FH specifically targeted glomerular C3 deposits, reduced the linear C3 reactivity assessed with anti-C3 and anti-C3b/iC3b/C3c antibodies, and prevented further spontaneous accumulation of C3 fragments along the GBM. Reduction in glomerular C3d and C9/C5b-9 reactivity was observed after daily administration of CR2-FH for 1 week. In a second mouse model with combined deficiency of FH and complement factor I, CR2-FH prevented de novo C3 deposition along the GBM. These data show that CR2-FH protects the GBM from both spontaneous and triggered C3 deposition in vivo and indicate that this approach should be tested in C3 glomerulopathy. PMID:26047789

  12. Intracellular sensing of complement C3 activates cell autonomous immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Jerry C.H.; Bidgood, Susanna R.; McEwan, William A.; James, Leo C.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens traverse multiple barriers during infection including cell membranes. Here we show that during this transition pathogens carry covalently attached complement C3 into the cell, triggering immediate signalling and effector responses. Sensing of C3 in the cytosol activates MAVS-dependent signalling cascades and induces proinflammatory cytokine secretion. C3 also flags viruses for rapid proteasomal degradation, thereby preventing their replication. This system can detect both viral and bacterial pathogens but is antagonized by enteroviruses, such as rhinovirus and poliovirus, which cleave C3 using their 3C protease. The antiviral Rupintrivir inhibits 3C protease and prevents C3 cleavage, rendering enteroviruses susceptible to intracellular complement sensing. Thus, complement C3 allows cells to detect and disable pathogens that have invaded the cytosol. PMID:25190799

  13. Complement as a mediator of inflammation. 3. Purification of the activity with anaphylatoxin properties generated by interaction of the first four components of complement and its identification as a cleavage product of C'3.

    PubMed

    da Silva, W D; Eisele, J W; Lepow, I H

    1967-12-01

    Purified preparations of human C'1 esterase, C'4, C'2, C'3, and C'5 were labeled with (125)I. Reaction mixtures were prepared containing a single labeled component and other unlabled components. After incubation at 37 degrees C for 10 min at pH 7.4 in the presence of 5 x 10(-4)M Mg(2+), they were adjusted to pH 3.5 and subjected to sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and gel filtration at pH 3.5. In all cases, an activity capable of contracting guinea pig ileum with tachyphylaxis was obtained in low molecular weight fractions. However, these fractions were labeled only when (125)I-C'3 was employed, indicating that biological activity was associated with a cleavage product of C'3. This fragment has been designated F(a)C'3 in a nomenclature consistent with that of immunoglobulin degradation products. The much larger, residual portion of the C'3 molecule has been designated F(b)C'3. The biochemical characteristics of generation of F(a)C'3 were consistent with a mechanism involving action of C'1 esterase on C'4 and C'2, activation of C'2, and cleavage of C'3. F(a)C'3 had a molecular weight by gel filtration techniques of 6800 or less. It was thermostable and susceptible to inactivation by endo- and exopeptidases. The isolated fragment possessed all of the biological properties of unfractionated mixtures of C'1 esterase, C'4, C'2, and C'3. In addition to contraction of guinea pig ileum, these included failure to contract rat uterus, enhancement of vascular permeability in guinea pig skin, degranulation of mast cells in guinea pig mesentery, and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells. F(a)C'3 did not cross-desensitize guinea pig ileum to rat agar anaphylatoxin and vice versa. The existence of different protein fragments with anaphylatoxin properties has been discussed. Distinctive characteristics of F(a)C'3 from classical anaphylatoxin generated by treatment of fresh rat serum with agar have been indicated.

  14. Disruption of the internal thioester bond in the third component of complement (C3) results in the exposure of neodeterminants also present on activation products of C3. An analysis with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Paardekooper, J; Smeenk, R J; Abbink, J; Eerenberg, A J; Nuijens, J H

    1988-09-01

    Hydrolysis of the internal thioester bond in native C3 is thought to be a key event in initiating the alternative pathway of C activation, because the resulting C3(H2O) acquires "C3b-like" properties. Therefore, disruption of the internal thioester bond is probably accompanied by conformational changes in the C3 molecule. In this study, we demonstrate that such conformational changes indeed occur; 7 of the 19 mAb raised against C3 or C3 activation products recognized epitopes exposed on C3(H2O) but not on native C3. One of these epitopes is located on the C3a part, three on the C3c part, and another three on the C3d,g part. Because the 7 mAb bound equally well to C3 incubated either with MgCl2 or with methylamine (which primarily disrupts the thioester), the conformational changes detected by the mAb apparently occur after disruption of the thioester. Furthermore, the epitopes were also present on the corresponding C3 activation products. Immunoblotting experiments revealed that the epitopes for the three anti-C3d,g mAb were located on the C3d part, C-terminal to the thioester. The epitopes for 2 of the 3 anti-C3c mAb were located on the C-terminal alpha-chain fragment of C3c. Thus, this study provides immunochemical evidence for the biologic resemblance between C3(H2O) and C3 activation products. Implications of these findings for the activation process of C3 are discussed.

  15. Mutations in complement C3 predispose to development of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth C.; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Strain, Lisa; Blouin, Jacques; Brown, Alison L.; Moghal, Nadeem; Kaplan, Bernard S.; Weiss, Robert A.; Lhotta, Karl; Kapur, Gaurav; Mattoo, Tej; Nivet, Hubert; Wong, William; Gie, Sophie; de Ligny, Bruno Hurault; Fischbach, Michel; Gupta, Ritu; Hauhart, Richard; Meunier, Vincent; Loirat, Chantal; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnès; Fridman, Wolf H.; Janssen, Bert J. C.

    2008-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a disease of complement dysregulation. In approximately 50% of patients, mutations have been described in the genes encoding the complement regulators factor H, MCP, and factor I or the activator factor B. We report here mutations in the central component of the complement cascade, C3, in association with aHUS. We describe 9 novel C3 mutations in 14 aHUS patients with a persistently low serum C3 level. We have demonstrated that 5 of these mutations are gain-of-function and 2 are inactivating. This establishes C3 as a susceptibility factor for aHUS. PMID:18796626

  16. Complement (C3) metabolism in systemic lupus erythematosus in relation to the disease course.

    PubMed

    Swaak, A J; van Rooyen, A; Vogelaar, C; Pillay, M; Hack, E

    1986-01-01

    Metabolic turnover studies of complement components (C3) provide a direct insight into the dynamics of the complement regulation (synthesis and catabolism). To obtain information about the role of the complement system in relation to the disease course in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prospective study was performed. The results of the C3 turnover studies were also correlated to the complement levels (C3) and to the presence of C3 conversion products (C3d) in circulation. In nearly all SLE patients (in 21 of the 26 metabolic turnover studies) a C3 hypercatabolism was found, with a quantitative difference depending on the disease phase. In the period preceding an exacerbation an impaired C3 synthesis was observed (in three of the four studies), in contrast to SLE patients in stable disease phase where in one case only a decrease C3 synthesis was calculated (1 out of 15 observations). A linear correlation was found between the serum C3-levels and the ratio of C3d/C3, suggesting that both serologic parameters are quantitatively indicative for C3 hypercatabolism. The study shows that in all SLE patients, irrespective of the disease stage, an increased C3 consumption is found, which supports the concept that a chronic inflammatory process is constantly present.

  17. Complement (C3) metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis in relation to the disease course.

    PubMed

    Swaak, A J; Han, H; van Rooyen, A; Pillay, M; Hack, C E

    1988-01-01

    Metabolic turnover studies of the third component of complement, C3, were performed in 23 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to get a direct insight in the dynamics of complement synthesis and catabolism. Results of these turnover studies were related to the serum level of the total amount of C3 as well as to that of the activation product C3d. A hypercatabolism of C3 was observed in 12 of the 23 patients studied. Six of these 12 patients showed signs of extra-articular RA; only one patient with extra-articular manifestations had a normal catabolism of C3. Decreased serum levels of C3 were not found in any of the patients with a hypercatabolism of C3, indicating that the accelerated turnover was compensated by an increased synthesis. In RA patients levels of the activation product C3d could not correlate with the turnover of C3. However, in selected RA patients without signs of nodules or extra-articular manifestations, they could. Thus, our results indicate that serum levels of C3 and C3d do not reflect C3 metabolism in RA patients. Furthermore, the existence of extra-articular manifestations is accompanied by a more pronounced activation of the complement system.

  18. Factor C acts as a lipopolysaccharide-responsive C3 convertase in horseshoe crab complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ariki, Shigeru; Takahara, Shusaku; Shibata, Toshio; Fukuoka, Takaaki; Ozaki, Aya; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2008-12-01

    The complement system in vertebrates plays an important role in host defense against and clearance of invading microbes, in which complement component C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. In an effort to understand the molecular activation mechanism of invertebrate C3, we isolated and characterized an ortholog of C3 (designated TtC3) from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Flow cytometric analysis using an Ab against TtC3 revealed that the horseshoe crab complement system opsonizes both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Evaluation of the ability of various pathogen-associated molecular patterns to promote the proteolytic conversion of TtC3 to TtC3b in hemocyanin-depleted plasma indicated that LPS, but not zymosan, peptidoglycan, or laminarin, strongly induces this conversion, highlighting the selective response of the complement system to LPS stimulation. Although originally characterized as an LPS-sensitive initiator of hemolymph coagulation stored within hemocytes, we identified factor C in hemolymph plasma. An anti-factor C Ab inhibited various LPS-induced phenomena, including plasma amidase activity, the proteolytic activation of TtC3, and the deposition of TtC3b on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, activated factor C present on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria directly catalyzed the proteolytic conversion of the purified TtC3, thereby promoting TtC3b deposition. We conclude that factor C acts as an LPS-responsive C3 convertase on the surface of invading Gram-negative bacteria in the initial phase of horseshoe crab complement activation.

  19. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the complement C3b inactivator (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement is a group of serum proteins that destroy infectious agents. Measurement of complement C3b inactivator aids in...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the complement C3b inactivator (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement is a group of serum proteins that destroy infectious agents. Measurement of complement C3b inactivator aids in...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the complement C3b inactivator (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement is a group of serum proteins that destroy infectious agents. Measurement of complement C3b inactivator aids in...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the complement C3b inactivator (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement is a group of serum proteins that destroy infectious agents. Measurement of complement C3b inactivator aids in...

  3. Complement C3-Deficient Mice Fail to Display Age-Related Hippocampal Decline.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiaoqiao; Colodner, Kenneth J; Matousek, Sarah B; Merry, Katherine; Hong, Soyon; Kenison, Jessica E; Frost, Jeffrey L; Le, Kevin X; Li, Shaomin; Dodart, Jean-Cosme; Caldarone, Barbara J; Stevens, Beth; Lemere, Cynthia A

    2015-09-23

    The complement system is part of the innate immune response responsible for removing pathogens and cellular debris, in addition to helping to refine CNS neuronal connections via microglia-mediated pruning of inappropriate synapses during brain development. However, less is known about the role of complement during normal aging. Here, we studied the role of the central complement component, C3, in synaptic health and aging. We examined behavior as well as electrophysiological, synaptic, and neuronal changes in the brains of C3-deficient male mice (C3 KO) compared with age-, strain-, and gender-matched C57BL/6J (wild-type, WT) control mice at postnatal day 30, 4 months, and 16 months of age. We found the following: (1) region-specific and age-dependent synapse loss in aged WT mice that was not observed in C3 KO mice; (2) age-dependent neuron loss in hippocampal CA3 (but not in CA1) that followed synapse loss in aged WT mice, neither of which were observed in aged C3 KO mice; and (3) significantly enhanced LTP and cognition and less anxiety in aged C3 KO mice compared with aged WT mice. Importantly, CA3 synaptic puncta were similar between WT and C3 KO mice at P30. Together, our results suggest a novel and prominent role for complement protein C3 in mediating aged-related and region-specific changes in synaptic function and plasticity in the aging brain. Significance statement: The complement cascade, part of the innate immune response to remove pathogens, also plays a role in synaptic refinement during brain development by the removal of weak synapses. We investigated whether complement C3, a central component, affects synapse loss during aging. Wild-type (WT) and C3 knock-out (C3 KO) mice were examined at different ages. The mice were similar at 1 month of age. However, with aging, WT mice lost synapses in specific brain regions, especially in hippocampus, an area important for memory, whereas C3 KO mice were protected. Aged C3 KO mice also performed better on

  4. Complement C3 gene: Expression characterization and innate immune response in razor clam Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Peng, Maoxiao; Niu, Donghong; Wang, Fei; Chen, Zhiyi; Li, Jiale

    2016-08-01

    Complement component 3 (C3) is central to the complement system, playing an important role in immune defense, immune regulation and immune pathology. Several C3 genes have been characterized in invertebrates but very few in shellfish. The C3 gene was identified from the razor clam Sinonovacula constricta, referred to here as Sc-C3. It was found to be highly homologous with the C3 gene of Ruditapes decussatus. All eight model motifs of the C3 gene were found to be included in the thiolester bond and the C345C region. Sc-C3 was widely expressed in all healthy tissues with expression being highest in hemolymph. A significant difference in expression was revealed at the umbo larvae development stage. The expression of Sc-C3 was highly regulated in the hemolymph and liver, with a distinct response pattern being noted after a challenge with Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Vibrio parahemolyticus. It is therefore suggested that a complicated and unique response pathway may be present in S. constricta. Further, serum of S. constricta containing Sc-C3 was extracted. This was activated by LPS or bacterium for verification for function. The more obvious immune function of Sc-C3 was described as an effective membrane rupture in hemocyte cells of rabbit, V. parahemolyticus and Vibrio anguillarum. Thus, Sc-C3 plays an essential role in the immune defense of S. constricta. PMID:27231190

  5. Regulators of complement activity mediate inhibitory mechanisms through a common C3b-binding mode.

    PubMed

    Forneris, Federico; Wu, Jin; Xue, Xiaoguang; Ricklin, Daniel; Lin, Zhuoer; Sfyroera, Georgia; Tzekou, Apostolia; Volokhina, Elena; Granneman, Joke Cm; Hauhart, Richard; Bertram, Paula; Liszewski, M Kathryn; Atkinson, John P; Lambris, John D; Gros, Piet

    2016-05-17

    Regulators of complement activation (RCA) inhibit complement-induced immune responses on healthy host tissues. We present crystal structures of human RCA (MCP, DAF, and CR1) and a smallpox virus homolog (SPICE) bound to complement component C3b. Our structural data reveal that up to four consecutive homologous CCP domains (i-iv), responsible for inhibition, bind in the same orientation and extended arrangement at a shared binding platform on C3b. Large sequence variations in CCP domains explain the diverse C3b-binding patterns, with limited or no contribution of some individual domains, while all regulators show extensive contacts with C3b for the domains at the third site. A variation of ~100° rotation around the longitudinal axis is observed for domains binding at the fourth site on C3b, without affecting the overall binding mode. The data suggest a common evolutionary origin for both inhibitory mechanisms, called decay acceleration and cofactor activity, with variable C3b binding through domains at sites ii, iii, and iv, and provide a framework for understanding RCA disease-related mutations and immune evasion. PMID:27013439

  6. The complement fragment C3d facilitates phagocytosis by monocytes.

    PubMed

    Gaither, T A; Vargas, I; Inada, S; Frank, M M

    1987-11-01

    Two receptors for fragments of C3 are described for human monocytes: CR1 and CR3, which bind C3b and iC3b, respectively. Recently a leucocyte receptor that binds C3dg has also been described, designated CR4. We previously reported that IgM-sensitized sheep erythrocytes that are heavily coated with C3d (EAC3d) can bind to human monocytes that have been cultured in fetal calf serum (FCS). Here we determine whether such binding of C3d-coated targets can lead to phagocytosis, and identify the specific monocyte receptor involved in C3d binding. We confirm that EAC3d bearing greater than 10,000 C3d/cell bind to FCS-cultured monocytes. Furthermore, using non-cultured monocytes, we demonstrate that C3d enhances rosette formation of IgG-coated E and, like C3b and iC3b, C3d augments IgG Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Less than 100 C3d/cell are capable of enhancing phagocytosis, whereas 10,000 or more C3d/cell are required for rosette formation with cultured cells. These results indicate that the C3d-binding receptor is present on peripheral blood monocytes but has poor affinity for target particles coated only with C3d. Anti-CR2 monoclonal antibodies, which recognize the C3d receptor of lymphocytes, do not block EAC3d rosette formation with monocytes. In contrast anti-Mol, a monoclonal antibody against CR3, inhibits EAC3d rosettes by approximately 42%. Anti-CR1 increases this effect, but complete inhibition is not achieved. Ethylenediamine tetraacetate also markedly reduces EAC3d rosetting, reducing the numbers to less than 5%. Thus, the C3d-binding receptor on monocytes, unlike CR4, is metal dependent. Together these data indicate that CR3 is predominantly responsible for C3d binding to monocytes. PMID:3499379

  7. 21 CFR 866.5260 - Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5260 Complement C3b inactivator immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Complement C3b inactivator immunological...

  8. Platelet-associated complement C3 in immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Kim, B.K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1982-05-01

    Platelet-associated C3 (PA-C3) was measured with a quantitative immunofluorescence assay. With this assay, PA-C3 levels were determined for 78 normal volunteers, 30 patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), and 20 patients with nonimmune thrombocytopenias. Platelet-associatd IgG (PA-lgG) levels were also measured with our standard quantitative immunofluorescence assay. All patients with nonimmune thrombocytopenias and ITP in remission had normal PA-C3 levels. Twenty-four patients with active ITP wre classified into 3 groups: 9 (38%) with increased PA-IgG and normal PA-C3 levels, 10 (42%) with elevated PA-C3 and PA-IgG levels, and 5 (20%) with increased PA-C3 values only. A direct correlation was found between PA-C3 and PA-IgG levels. PA-IgG levels were higher in the group of patients with elevated PA-C3 levels than in those with normal values. Platelet survival studies showed reduced survival times of 1.5-2.5 days for the 5 patients with elevated PA-C3 levels only. Elevated PA-C3 levels returned to normal in 7 ITP patients whose platelet counts increased in response to corticosteriod therapy or to splenectomy. Therefore, PA-C3 and PA-IgG assays can be used to identify patients with ITP, to follow their response to therapy, and to classify them into immunologic subgroups similar to red cell classifiation by Coombs' testing in immune hemolytic anemia.

  9. The Expression Profile of Complement Components in Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejuan; Ding, Fangrui; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Baihong; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Podocytes are critical for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and are injured in many renal diseases, especially proteinuric kidney diseases. Recently, reports suggested that podocytes are among the renal cells that synthesize complement components that mediate glomerular diseases. Nevertheless, the profile and extent of complement component expression in podocytes remain unclear. This study examined the expression profile of complement in podocytes under physiological conditions and in abnormal podocytes induced by multiple stimuli. In total, 23/32 complement component components were detected in podocyte by conventional RT-PCR. Both primary cultured podocytes and immortalized podocytes expressed the complement factors C1q, C1r, C2, C3, C7, MASP, CFI, DAF, CD59, C4bp, CD46, Protein S, CR2, C1qR, C3aR, C5aR, and Crry (17/32), whereas C4, CFB, CFD, C5, C6, C8, C9, MBL1, and MBL2 (9/32) complement factors were not expressed. C3, Crry, and C1q-binding protein were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Podocyte complement gene expression was affected by several factors (puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN), angiotensin II (Ang II), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)). Representative complement components were detected using fluorescence confocal microscopy. In conclusion, primary podocytes express various complement components at the mRNA and protein levels. The complement gene expressions were affected by several podocyte injury factors. PMID:27043537

  10. The Expression Profile of Complement Components in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejuan; Ding, Fangrui; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Baihong; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Podocytes are critical for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and are injured in many renal diseases, especially proteinuric kidney diseases. Recently, reports suggested that podocytes are among the renal cells that synthesize complement components that mediate glomerular diseases. Nevertheless, the profile and extent of complement component expression in podocytes remain unclear. This study examined the expression profile of complement in podocytes under physiological conditions and in abnormal podocytes induced by multiple stimuli. In total, 23/32 complement component components were detected in podocyte by conventional RT-PCR. Both primary cultured podocytes and immortalized podocytes expressed the complement factors C1q, C1r, C2, C3, C7, MASP, CFI, DAF, CD59, C4bp, CD46, Protein S, CR2, C1qR, C3aR, C5aR, and Crry (17/32), whereas C4, CFB, CFD, C5, C6, C8, C9, MBL1, and MBL2 (9/32) complement factors were not expressed. C3, Crry, and C1q-binding protein were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Podocyte complement gene expression was affected by several factors (puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN), angiotensin II (Ang II), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)). Representative complement components were detected using fluorescence confocal microscopy. In conclusion, primary podocytes express various complement components at the mRNA and protein levels. The complement gene expressions were affected by several podocyte injury factors. PMID:27043537

  11. Evolution of the complement system C3 gene in Antarctic teleosts.

    PubMed

    Melillo, Daniela; Varriale, Sonia; Giacomelli, Stefano; Natale, Lenina; Bargelloni, Luca; Oreste, Umberto; Pinto, Maria Rosaria; Coscia, Maria Rosaria

    2015-08-01

    Notothenioidei are typical Antarctic teleosts evolved to adapt to the very low temperatures of the Antarctic seas. Aim of the present paper is to investigate sequence and structure of C3, the third component of the complement system of the notothenioid Trematomus bernacchii and Chionodraco hamatus. We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of two C3 isoforms of T. bernacchii and a single C3 isoform of C. hamatus. These sequences were aligned against other homologous teleost sequences to check for the presence of diversifying selection. Evidence for positive selection was observed in the evolutionary lineage of Antarctic teleost C3 sequences, especially in that of C. hamatus, the most recently diverged species. Adaptive selection affected numerous amino acid positions including three residues located in the anaphylatoxin domain. In an attempt to evaluate the link between sequence variants and specific structural features, we constructed molecular models of Antarctic teleost C3s, of their proteolytic fragments C3b and C3a, and of the corresponding molecules of the phylogenetically related temperate species Epinephelus coioides, using human crystallographic structures as templates. Subsequently, we compared dynamic features of these models by molecular dynamics simulations and found that the Antarctic C3s models show higher flexibility, which likely allows for more pronounced movements of both the TED domain in C3b and the carboxyl-terminal region of C3a. As such dynamic features are associated to positively selected sites, it appears that Antarctic teleost C3 molecules positively evolved toward an increased flexibility, to cope with low kinetic energy levels of the Antarctic marine environment.

  12. Human complement C3 deficiency: Th1 induction requires T cell-derived complement C3a and CD46 activation.

    PubMed

    Ghannam, Arije; Fauquert, Jean-Luc; Thomas, Caroline; Kemper, Claudia; Drouet, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Human T helper type 1 (Th1) responses are essential in defense. Although T cell receptor (TCR) and co-stimulator engagement are indispensable for T cell activation, stimulation of additional receptor pathways are also necessary for effector induction. For example, engagement of the complement regulator CD46 by its ligand C3b generated upon TCR activation is required for IFN-γ production as CD46-deficient patients lack Th1 responses. Utilizing T cells from two C3-deficient patients we demonstrate here that normal Th1 responses also depend on signals mediated by the anaphylatoxin C3a receptor (C3aR). Importantly, and like in CD46-deficient patients, whilst Th1 induction are impaired in C3-deficient patients in vitro, their Th2 responses are unaffected. Furthermore, C3-deficient CD4(+) T cells present with reduced expression of CD25 and CD122, further substantiating the growing notion that complement fragments regulate interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) assembly and that disturbance of complement-guided IL-2R assembly contributes to aberrant Th1 effector responses. Lastly, sustained intrinsic production of complement fragments may participate in the Th1 contraction phase as both C3a and CD46 engagement regulate IL-10 co-expression in Th1 cells. These data suggest that C3aR and CD46 activation via intrinsic generation of their respective ligands is an integral part of human Th1 (but not Th2) immunity. PMID:24321396

  13. The evolutionary analysis on complement genes reveals that fishes C3 and C9 experience different evolutionary patterns.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanchen; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2013-12-01

    Complement is a humoral factor of innate immunity and plays an essential role in altering the host of the presence of potential pathogens and clearing of invading microorganisms. The third complement component (C3) not only is regarded as the crossing of the three pathways of complement activation, but also serves one of the bridges linking innate and acquired immunity. The nine complement component (C9) can combine with C5b, C6, C7 and C8 to form MAC which bounds to the surface of microorganisms to kill them. The evidence of evolution on C3 genes which have multiple functions and plays central role in innate immunity was documented in our previous study. Now we were interested in the evolution of C9 genes which were the terminal complement components. For these reasons, we want to explore the evolutionary patterns of C9 and whether C3 and C9 experience different evolutionary patterns. In our study, we used the sliding window method to separately calculate the values of ω among fishes and mammals of C3 and C9 codons. In order to detect the positive selection sites, we used the maximum likelihood (ML) method to study the evolutionary pattern on C3 and C9 genes. Positive selection sites were detected in mammalian C9 genes and no positive selection sites were detected in fishes C9 genes. However, no positive selection sites were detected in mammalian C3 genes and positive selection sites were detected in fishes C3 genes. The result indicated that C3 and C9 had different evolutionary patterns on mammals and fishes. In conclusion, different living environments lead to different evolutionary patterns on C3 and C9 in mammals and fishes. Besides, different complement components may have different evolutionary patterns on mammals and fishes.

  14. The Staphylococcus aureus Protein Sbi Acts as a Complement Inhibitor and Forms a Tripartite Complex with Host Complement Factor H and C3b

    PubMed Central

    van den Elsen, Jean; Burman, Julia; Hälbich, Steffi; Richter, Julia; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2008-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, similar to other pathogens, binds human complement regulators Factor H and Factor H related protein 1 (FHR-1) from human serum. Here we identify the secreted protein Sbi (Staphylococcus aureus binder of IgG) as a ligand that interacts with Factor H by a—to our knowledge—new type of interaction. Factor H binds to Sbi in combination with C3b or C3d, and forms tripartite Sbi∶C3∶Factor H complexes. Apparently, the type of C3 influences the stability of the complex; surface plasmon resonance studies revealed a higher stability of C3d complexed to Sbi, as compared to C3b or C3. As part of this tripartite complex, Factor H is functionally active and displays complement regulatory activity. Sbi, by recruiting Factor H and C3b, acts as a potent complement inhibitor, and inhibits alternative pathway-mediated lyses of rabbit erythrocytes by human serum and sera of other species. Thus, Sbi is a multifunctional bacterial protein, which binds host complement components Factor H and C3 as well as IgG and β2-glycoprotein I and interferes with innate immune recognition. PMID:19112495

  15. Novel function of complement C3d as an autologous helper T-cell target.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Paul M; Rivera, Daniel S; Hai, Si-Han; McMurry, Julie; Martin, William; De Groot, Anne S

    2008-01-01

    The C3d fragment of complement component C3 has been shown to enhance immune responses to antigens that lack T-cell epitopes such as bacterial polysaccharides. C3d binds to the B-cell complement receptor 2 (CR2 or CD21); this binding serves as a co-activation signal to the B cell when the polysaccharide antigen portion binds simultaneously to the B-cell receptor (surface Ig). Bringing together receptor-associated signal transduction molecules CD19 and Igalpha/beta, respectively, results in a lower threshold of activation. Paradoxically, C3d has also been shown to enhance antibody titers in the CD21 knockout (KO) mouse model as well as increase Th1 and Th2 cytokine secretion, suggesting that that an auxiliary CR2-independent pathway of immune activation may exist. We hypothesized that in addition to its molecular adjuvant property that enhances signal 1 during B-cell activation (co-signal 1), C3d also contains T-cell epitopes that are able to stimulate autoreactive C3d peptide-specific helper T cells which we term 'co-signal 2'. Using the EpiMatrix T-cell epitope-mapping algorithm, we identified 11 putative T-cell epitopes in C3d, a very high epitope density for a 302 amino-acid sequence. Eight of these epitope candidates were synthesized and shown to bind a variety of class II HLA-DR molecules of different haplotypes, and to stimulate C3d peptide-specific T cells to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro. Further, we demonstrate a C3d-peptide specific increase in CD4(+) intracellular IFN-gamma(+) T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to C3d peptides in vitro. We believe that the discovery of these autologous T cells autoreactive for C3d provides evidence supporting the 'co-signal 2' hypothesis and may offer a novel explanation of the CD21 KO paradox. PMID:18180801

  16. Dual interaction of factor H with C3d and glycosaminoglycans in host-nonhost discrimination by complement.

    PubMed

    Kajander, Tommi; Lehtinen, Markus J; Hyvärinen, Satu; Bhattacharjee, Arnab; Leung, Elisa; Isenman, David E; Meri, Seppo; Goldman, Adrian; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2011-02-15

    The alternative pathway of complement is important in innate immunity, attacking not only microbes but all unprotected biological surfaces through powerful amplification. It is unresolved how host and nonhost surfaces are distinguished at the molecular level, but key components are domains 19-20 of the complement regulator factor H (FH), which interact with host (i.e., nonactivator surface glycosaminoglycans or sialic acids) and the C3d part of C3b. Our structure of the FH19-20:C3d complex at 2.3-Å resolution shows that FH19-20 has two distinct binding sites, FH19 and FH20, for C3b. We show simultaneous binding of FH19 to C3b and FH20 to nonactivator surface glycosaminoglycans, and we show that both of these interactions are necessary for full binding of FH to C3b on nonactivator surfaces (i.e., for target discrimination). We also show that C3d could replace glycosaminoglycan binding to FH20, thus providing a feedback control for preventing excess C3b deposition and complement amplification. This explains the molecular basis of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, where mutations on the binding interfaces between FH19-20 and C3d or between FH20 and glycosaminoglycans lead to complement attack against host surfaces.

  17. Early complement components in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    PubMed

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1996-01-01

    Activation products of the early complement components C1, C4 and C3 can be found colocalized with diffuse and fibrillar beta-amyloid (beta/A4) deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Immunohistochemically, C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh) and the C1 subcomponents C1s and C1r can not, or only occasionally, be detected in plaques or in astrocytes. The present finding that C1q, C1s and C1-Inh mRNA are present in both AD and control brains suggests that the variable immunohistochemical staining results for C1r, C1s and C1-Inh are due to a rapid consumption, and that the inability to detect C1s, C1r or C1-Inh is probably due to the dissociation of C1s-C1-Inh and C1r-C1-Inh complexes from the activator-bound C1q into the fluid phase. Employing monoclonal antibodies specific for different forms of C1-Inh, no complexed C1-Inh could be found, whereas inactivated C1-Inh seems to be present in astrocytes surrounding beta/A4 plaques in AD brains. These findings, together with our finding (using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) that C1-Inh is locally produced in the brain, suggest that in the brain complement activation at the C1 level is regulated by C1-Inh. Immunohistochemically, no evidence for the presence of the late complement components C5, C7 and C9, or of the membrane attack complex (MAC), was found in beta/A4 plaques. In contrast to the mRNA encoding the early components, that of the late complement components appears to be hardly detectable (C7) or absent (C9). Thus, without blood-brain-barrier impairment, the late complement components are probably present at too low a concentration to allow the formation of the MAC, which is generally believed to be responsible for at least some of the neurodegenerative effects observed in AD. Therefore, the present findings support the idea that in AD, complement does not function as an inflammatory mediator through MAC formation, but through the action of early component activation products.

  18. Compstatin analog Cp40 inhibits complement dysregulation in vitro in C3 glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuzhou; Shao, Dingwu; Ricklin, Daniel; Hilkin, Brieanna M.; Nester, Carla M.; Lambris, John D.; Smith, Richard J. H.

    2015-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) defines a group of untreatable ultra-rare renal diseases caused by uncontrolled activation of the alternative complement pathway. Nearly half of patients progress to end stage renal failure within 10 years. Cp40, a second-generation compstatin analog in clinical development, is a 14 amino-acid cyclic peptide that selectively inhibits complement activation in humans and non-human primates by binding to C3 and C3b. We hypothesized that by targeting C3 Cp40 would provide an effective treatment for C3G. By investigating its effects in vitro using multiple assays of complement activity, we show that Cp40 prevents complement-mediated lysis of sheep erythrocytes in sera from C3G patients, prevents complement dysregulation in the presence of patient-derived autoantibodies to the C3 and C5 convertases, and prevents complement dysregulation associated with disease-causing genetic mutations. In aggregate, these data suggest that Cp40 may offer a novel and promising therapeutic option to C3G patients as a disease-specific, targeted therapy. As such, Cp40 could represent a major advance in the treatment of this disease. PMID:25982307

  19. Electroluminescent TCC, C3dg and fB/Bb epitope assays for profiling complement cascade activation in vitro using an activated complement serum calibration standard.

    PubMed

    van Vuuren, B Jansen; Bergseth, G; Mollnes, T E; Shaw, A M

    2014-01-15

    Electroluminescent assays for epitopes on the complement components C3dg, terminal complement complex (TCC) and factor B/Bb (fB/Bb) have been developed with capture and detection antibodies to produce detection limits C3dg=91±9ng/mL, TCC=3±0.1ng/mL and fB=55.7±0.1ng/mL. The assay performance was assessed against a series of zymosan and heat aggregated IgG (HAIgG) in vitro activations of complement using a calibrated activated complement serum (ACS) as calibration standard. The ACS standard was stable within 20% accuracy over a 6-month period with freeze-thaw cycles as required. Differential activation of the complement cascade was observed for TCC showing a pseudo-first order formation half-life of 3.5h after activation with zymosan. The C3dg activation fragment indicates a 10% total activation for both activation agents. The kinetic-epitope analysis for fB indicates that the capture epitope is on the fB/Bb protein fragment which can then become covered by the formation of C3bBb or C3bBbP complexes during the time course of the cascade.

  20. Detection of complement activation using monoclonal antibodies against C3d

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Kulik, Liudmila; Orth, Heather; Wong, Maria; Renner, Brandon; Sargsyan, Siranush A.; Mitchell, Lynne M.; Hourcade, Dennis E.; Hannan, Jonathan P.; Kovacs, James M.; Coughlin, Beth; Woodell, Alex S.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Rohrer, Bärbel; Holers, V. Michael

    2013-01-01

    During complement activation the C3 protein is cleaved, and C3 activation fragments are covalently fixed to tissues. Tissue-bound C3 fragments are a durable biomarker of tissue inflammation, and these fragments have been exploited as addressable binding ligands for targeted therapeutics and diagnostic agents. We have generated cross-reactive murine monoclonal antibodies against human and mouse C3d, the final C3 degradation fragment generated during complement activation. We developed 3 monoclonal antibodies (3d8b, 3d9a, and 3d29) that preferentially bind to the iC3b, C3dg, and C3d fragments in solution, but do not bind to intact C3 or C3b. The same 3 clones also bind to tissue-bound C3 activation fragments when injected systemically. Using mouse models of renal and ocular disease, we confirmed that, following systemic injection, the antibodies accumulated at sites of C3 fragment deposition within the glomerulus, the renal tubulointerstitium, and the posterior pole of the eye. To detect antibodies bound within the eye, we used optical imaging and observed accumulation of the antibodies within retinal lesions in a model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Our results demonstrate that imaging methods that use these antibodies may provide a sensitive means of detecting and monitoring complement activation–associated tissue inflammation. PMID:23619360

  1. Polysomnographic correlates of inflammatory complement components in young healthy males.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Ejaz; Golam Sarwar, Abu Hasnath M; Alam, Mohd Shoeb; Noohu, Majumi M; Zannat, Wassilatul; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Bahammam, Ahmed S; Manzar, Md Dilshad

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has delineated the predominant role of humoral mediators of inflammation in linking sleep with immunity. Nonetheless, characterization of the relationship between complement components with inflammatory functions and objective sleep measures has not been performed. In this study we investigated the relationships between objective measures of sleep and complement components with inflammatory functions. Thirty-six healthy male university students (age, 23.94±4.23 years; BMI, 23.44±2.67 kg/m(2)) completed the study. An RMS Quest 32 polysomnograph (PSG) was used for sleep recording. Non-fasting blood was collected before subjects went to bed on the second night in the sleep laboratory to estimate complement component 3 (C-3), complement component 4 (C-4), complement factor-H (Factor-H), C1-inhibitor (C1INH), complement factor I (CFI) and other inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6 and sICAM-1. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between PSG sleep measures and inflammatory mediators. Higher values of C-3 and lower values of sICAM-1, C1INH, and CFI (adjusted model, R2=0.211, p<0.041) predicted longer sleep duration. Lower C-3 (adjusted model, R2=0.078, p<0.055) predicted higher N1 (%). Higher levels of C1INH and CFI and lower values of C-4 (model adjusted R2=0.269, p<0.008) predicted higher N3 (%). Higher C-3, higher C-4, lower IL-6, lower C1INH and lower CFI (model adjusted R2=0.296, p<0.007) predicted higher REM (%). Poor sleep measures were associated with increased levels of pro-inflammatory complement components and decreased anti-inflammatory complement components. PMID:27656278

  2. Discovery of Small Molecules for Fluorescent Detection of Complement Activation Product C3d.

    PubMed

    Gorham, Ronald D; Nuñez, Vicente; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Vullev, Valentine I; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2015-12-24

    Complement activation plays a major role in many acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. C3d, a terminal product of complement activation, remains covalently attached to cells and is an excellent biomarker of complement-mediated inflammation. We employed a virtual high-throughput screening protocol to identify molecules with predicted binding to complement C3d and with intrinsic fluorescence properties to enable detection. Pharmacophore models were developed based on known C3d-ligand interactions and information from computational analysis of structural and molecular dynamics data. Iterative pharmacophore-based virtual screening was performed to identify druglike molecules with physicochemical similarity to the natural C3d ligand CR2. Hits from the pharmacophore screens were docked to C3d and ranked based on predicted binding free energies. Top-ranked molecules were selected for experimental validation of binding affinity to C3d, using microscale thermophoresis, and for their suitability to become molecular imaging agents, using fluorescence spectroscopy. This work serves as a foundation for identifying additional fluorescent molecules with high-affinity for C3d that will subsequently be explored as noninvasive in vivo diagnostics of complement-mediated inflammation, for spatiotemporal monitoring of disease progression, and for targeting therapeutics to sites of inflammation.

  3. Discovery of Small Molecules for Fluorescent Detection of Complement Activation Product C3d.

    PubMed

    Gorham, Ronald D; Nuñez, Vicente; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Vullev, Valentine I; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2015-12-24

    Complement activation plays a major role in many acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. C3d, a terminal product of complement activation, remains covalently attached to cells and is an excellent biomarker of complement-mediated inflammation. We employed a virtual high-throughput screening protocol to identify molecules with predicted binding to complement C3d and with intrinsic fluorescence properties to enable detection. Pharmacophore models were developed based on known C3d-ligand interactions and information from computational analysis of structural and molecular dynamics data. Iterative pharmacophore-based virtual screening was performed to identify druglike molecules with physicochemical similarity to the natural C3d ligand CR2. Hits from the pharmacophore screens were docked to C3d and ranked based on predicted binding free energies. Top-ranked molecules were selected for experimental validation of binding affinity to C3d, using microscale thermophoresis, and for their suitability to become molecular imaging agents, using fluorescence spectroscopy. This work serves as a foundation for identifying additional fluorescent molecules with high-affinity for C3d that will subsequently be explored as noninvasive in vivo diagnostics of complement-mediated inflammation, for spatiotemporal monitoring of disease progression, and for targeting therapeutics to sites of inflammation. PMID:26613117

  4. C3 glomerulopathy–associated CFHR1 mutation alters FHR oligomerization and complement regulation

    PubMed Central

    Tortajada, Agustín; Yébenes, Hugo; Abarrategui-Garrido, Cynthia; Anter, Jaouad; García-Fernández, Jesús M.; Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Alba-Domínguez, María; Malik, Talat H.; Bedoya, Rafael; Pérez, Rocío Cabrera; Trascasa, Margarita López; Pickering, Matthew C.; Harris, Claire L.; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Llorca, Oscar; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathies (C3G) are a group of severe renal diseases with distinct patterns of glomerular inflammation and C3 deposition caused by complement dysregulation. Here we report the identification of a familial C3G-associated genomic mutation in the gene complement factor H–related 1 (CFHR1), which encodes FHR1. The mutation resulted in the duplication of the N-terminal short consensus repeats (SCRs) that are conserved in FHR2 and FHR5. We determined that native FHR1, FHR2, and FHR5 circulate in plasma as homo- and hetero-oligomeric complexes, the formation of which is likely mediated by the conserved N-terminal domain. In mutant FHR1, duplication of the N-terminal domain resulted in the formation of unusually large multimeric FHR complexes that exhibited increased avidity for the FHR1 ligands C3b, iC3b, and C3dg and enhanced competition with complement factor H (FH) in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies and hemolytic assays. These data revealed that FHR1, FHR2, and FHR5 organize a combinatorial repertoire of oligomeric complexes and demonstrated that changes in FHR oligomerization influence the regulation of complement activation. In summary, our identification and characterization of a unique CFHR1 mutation provides insights into the biology of the FHRs and contributes to our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying C3G. PMID:23728178

  5. Mapping interactions between complement C3 and regulators using mutations in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Elizabeth C.; Roumenina, Lubka T.; Rybkine, Tania; Chauvet, Sophie; Vieira-Martins, Paula; Hue, Christophe; Maga, Tara; Valoti, Elisabetta; Wilson, Valerie; Jokiranta, Sakari; Smith, Richard J. H.; Noris, Marina; Goodship, Tim; Atkinson, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is strongly linked to dysregulation of the alternative pathway of the complement system. Mutations in complement genes have been identified in about two-thirds of cases, with 5% to 15% being in C3. In this study, 23 aHUS-associated genetic changes in C3 were characterized relative to their interaction with the control proteins factor H (FH), membrane cofactor protein (MCP; CD46), and complement receptor 1 (CR1; CD35). In surface plasmon resonance experiments, 17 mutant recombinant proteins demonstrated a defect in binding to FH and/or MCP, whereas 2 demonstrated reduced binding to CR1. In the majority of cases, decreased binding affinity translated to a decrease in proteolytic inactivation (known as cofactor activity) of C3b via FH and MCP. These results were used to map the putative binding regions of C3b involved in the interaction with MCP and CR1 and interrogated relative to known FH binding sites. Seventy-six percent of patients with C3 mutations had low C3 levels that correlated with disease severity. This study expands our knowledge of the functional consequences of aHUS-associated C3 mutations relative to the interaction of C3 with complement regulatory proteins mediating cofactor activity. PMID:25608561

  6. Nociceptive sensitization by complement C5a and C3a in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun Ho; Clark, J. David; Li, Xiangqi; Yorek, Matthew S.; Usachev, Yuriy M.; Brennan, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the complement system by injury increases inflammation by producing complement fragments C5a and C3a which are able to recruit and activate immune cells. Complement activation may contribute to pain after inflammation and injury. In the present study, we examined whether C5a and C3a elicit nociception when injected into mouse hind paws in vivo, and whether C5a and C3a activate and/or sensitize mechanosensitive nociceptors when applied on peripheral terminals in vitro. We also examined the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) for C5a receptor (C5aR) mRNA and effects of C5a and C3a on intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) using Ca2+ imaging. Heat hyperalgesia was elicited by intraplantar injection of C5a, and mechanical hyperalgesia by C5a and C3a. After exposure to either C5a or C3a, C-nociceptors were sensitized to heat as evidenced by an increased proportion of heat responsive fibers, lowered response threshold to heat and increased action potentials during and after heat stimulation. A-nociceptors were activated by complement. However, no change was observed in mechanical responses of A- and C- nociceptors after C5a and C3a application. The presence of C5aR mRNA was detected in DRG. C5a and C3a application elevated [Ca2+]i and facilitated capsaicin-induced [Ca2+]i responses in DRG neurons. The results suggest a potential role for complement fragments C5a and C3a in nociception by activating and sensitizing cutaneous nociceptors. PMID:20031321

  7. Potent complement C3a receptor agonists derived from oxazole amino acids: Structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranee; Reed, Anthony N; Chu, Peifei; Scully, Conor C G; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Suen, Jacky Y; Durek, Thomas; Reid, Robert C; Fairlie, David P

    2015-12-01

    Potent ligands for the human complement C3a receptor (C3aR) were developed from the almost inactive tripeptide Leu-Ala-Arg corresponding to the three C-terminal residues of the endogenous peptide agonist C3a. The analogous Leu-Ser-Arg was modified by condensing the serine side chain with the leucine carbonyl with elimination of water to form leucine-oxazole-arginine. Subsequent elaboration with a variety of N-terminal amide capping groups produced agonists as potent as human C3a itself in stimulating Ca(2+) release from human macrophages. Structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  8. Compstatin: a C3-targeted complement inhibitor reaching its prime for bedside intervention

    PubMed Central

    Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Yancopoulou, Despina; Kokkinos, Petros; Huber-Lang, Markus; Hajishengallis, George; Biglarnia, Ali Reza; Lupu, Florea; Nilsson, Bo; Risitano, Antonio M.; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing awareness that complement plays an integral role in human physiology and disease, transcending its traditional perception as an accessory system for pathogen clearance and opsonic cell killing. As the list of pathologies linked to dysregulated complement activation grows longer, it has become clear that targeted modulation of this innate immune system opens new windows of therapeutic opportunity for anti-inflammatory drug design. Indeed, the introduction of the first complement-targeting drugs has reignited a vibrant interest in the clinical translation of complement-based inhibitors. Compstatin was discovered as a cyclic peptide that inhibits complement activation by binding C3 and interfering with convertase formation and C3 cleavage. As the convergence point of all activation pathways and a molecular hub for crosstalk with multiple pathogenic pathways, C3 represents an attractive target for therapeutic modulation of the complement cascade. A multidisciplinary drug optimization effort encompassing rational “wet” and in silico synthetic approaches and an array of biophysical, structural, and analytical tools has culminated in an impressive structure-function refinement of compstatin, yielding a series of analogs that show promise for a wide spectrum of clinical applications. These new derivatives have improved inhibitory potency and pharmacokinetic profiles and show efficacy in clinically relevant primate models of disease. This review provides an up-to-date survey of the drug design effort placed on the compstatin family of C3 inhibitors, highlighting the most promising drug candidates. It also discusses translational challenges in complement drug discovery and peptide drug development and reviews concerns related to systemic C3 interception. PMID:25678219

  9. Role of complement receptor type 2 and endogenous complement in the humoral immune response to conjugates of complement C3d and pneumococcal serotype 14 capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Mitsuyoshi, Joyce K; Hu, Yong; Test, Samuel T

    2005-11-01

    Conjugation of the complement fragment C3d to both T-cell-dependent (TD) protein and T-cell-independent type 2 (TI-2) polysaccharide antigens enhances the humoral immune response in mice immunized with either type of antigen. However, the ability of C3d-protein conjugates to enhance the antibody response in mice deficient in complement receptor types 1 and 2 (CR1 and CR2) has raised questions about the role of C3d-CR2 interactions in the adjuvant effect of C3d. In this study, we examined the role of CR2 binding and endogenous complement activation in the antibody response to conjugates of C3d and serotype 14 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS14). To block binding of PPS14-C3d conjugates to CR2, mice were immunized with a mixture of vaccine and (CR2)2-immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). Mice receiving (CR2)2-IgG1 at the time of primary immunization had a marked reduction in the primary anti-PPS14 antibody response but an enhanced secondary anti-PPS14 response, suggesting that C3d-CR2 interactions are required for the primary response but can have negative effects on the memory response. Further, compared with mice receiving PPS14-C3d having a high C3d/PPS14 ratio, mice immunized with PPS14-C3d with low C3d/PPS14 ratios had an enhanced secondary antibody response. Treatment of mice with cobra venom factor to deplete complement had insignificant effects on the antibody response to PPS14-C3d. Experiments with CBA/N xid mice confirmed that PPS14-C3d conjugates retain the characteristics of TI-2 rather than TD antigens. Thus, the adjuvant effect of C3d conjugated to PPS14 requires C3d-CR2 interactions, does not require activation of endogenous complement, and is not mediated by TD carrier effects. PMID:16239528

  10. Role of complement receptor type 2 and endogenous complement in the humoral immune response to conjugates of complement C3d and pneumococcal serotype 14 capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Mitsuyoshi, Joyce K; Hu, Yong; Test, Samuel T

    2005-11-01

    Conjugation of the complement fragment C3d to both T-cell-dependent (TD) protein and T-cell-independent type 2 (TI-2) polysaccharide antigens enhances the humoral immune response in mice immunized with either type of antigen. However, the ability of C3d-protein conjugates to enhance the antibody response in mice deficient in complement receptor types 1 and 2 (CR1 and CR2) has raised questions about the role of C3d-CR2 interactions in the adjuvant effect of C3d. In this study, we examined the role of CR2 binding and endogenous complement activation in the antibody response to conjugates of C3d and serotype 14 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS14). To block binding of PPS14-C3d conjugates to CR2, mice were immunized with a mixture of vaccine and (CR2)2-immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). Mice receiving (CR2)2-IgG1 at the time of primary immunization had a marked reduction in the primary anti-PPS14 antibody response but an enhanced secondary anti-PPS14 response, suggesting that C3d-CR2 interactions are required for the primary response but can have negative effects on the memory response. Further, compared with mice receiving PPS14-C3d having a high C3d/PPS14 ratio, mice immunized with PPS14-C3d with low C3d/PPS14 ratios had an enhanced secondary antibody response. Treatment of mice with cobra venom factor to deplete complement had insignificant effects on the antibody response to PPS14-C3d. Experiments with CBA/N xid mice confirmed that PPS14-C3d conjugates retain the characteristics of TI-2 rather than TD antigens. Thus, the adjuvant effect of C3d conjugated to PPS14 requires C3d-CR2 interactions, does not require activation of endogenous complement, and is not mediated by TD carrier effects.

  11. The relationship between complement factor C3, APOE ε4, amyloid and tau in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Luke W; Desikan, Rahul S; Yokoyama, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is becoming increasingly recognized as an important contributor to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. As a part of the innate immune system, the complement cascade enhances the body's ability to destroy and remove pathogens and has recently been shown to influence Alzheimer's associated amyloid and tau pathology. However, little is known in humans about the effects of the complement system and genetic modifiers of AD risk like the ε4 allele of apolioprotein E (APOE ε4) on AD pathobiology. We evaluated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein levels from 267 individuals clinically diagnosed as cognitively normal, mild cognitive impairment, and AD. Using linear models, we assessed the relationship between APOE ε4 genotype, CSF Complement 3 (C3), CSF amyloid-β (amyloid) and CSF hyperphosphorylated tau (ptau). We found a significant interaction between APOE ε4 and CSF C3 on both CSF amyloid and CSF ptau. We also found that CSF C3 is only associated with CSF ptau after accounting for CSF amyloid. Our results support a conceptual model of the AD pathogenic cascade where a synergistic relationship between the complement cascade (C3) and APOE ε4 results in elevated Alzheimer's neurodegeneration and in turn, amyloid further regulates the effect of the complement cascade on downstream tau pathology. PMID:27357286

  12. An extended mini-complement factor H molecule ameliorates experimental C3 glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Eva-Maria; Barbour, Thomas D; Pappworth, Isabel Y; Wong, Edwin K S; Palmer, Jeremy M; Sheerin, Neil S; Pickering, Matthew C; Marchbank, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal regulation of the complement alternative pathway is associated with C3 glomerulopathy. Complement factor H is the main plasma regulator of the alternative pathway and consists of 20 short consensus repeat (SCR) domains. Although recombinant full-length factor H represents a logical treatment for C3 glomerulopathy, its production has proved challenging. We and others have designed recombinant mini-factor H proteins in which ‘non-essential' SCR domains have been removed. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo effects of a mini-complement factor H protein, FH1–5^18–20, using the unique factor H–deficient (Cfh−/−) mouse model of C3 glomerulopathy. FH1–5^18–20 is comprised of the key complement regulatory domains (SCRs 1–5) linked to the surface recognition domains (SCRs 18–20). Intraperitoneal injection of FH1–5^18–20 in Cfh−/− mice reduced abnormal glomerular C3 deposition, similar to full-length factor H. Systemic effects on plasma alternative pathway control were comparatively modest, in association with a short half-life. Thus, FH1–5^18–20 is a potential therapeutic agent for C3 glomerulopathy and other renal conditions with alternative pathway-mediated tissue injury. PMID:26221753

  13. Complement C3dg-mediated erythrophagocytosis: implications for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhuoer; Schmidt, Christoph Q.; Koutsogiannaki, Sophia; Ricci, Patrizia; Risitano, Antonio M.; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), a rare but life-threatening hematologic disease, has fundamentally improved with the introduction of a therapeutic that prevents complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis. However, a considerable fraction of PNH patients show insufficient treatment response and remain transfusion dependent. Because the current treatment only prevents C5-induced lysis but not upstream C3 activation, it has been speculated that ongoing opsonization with C3 fragments leads to recognition and phagocytosis of PNH erythrocytes by immune cells. Here, for the first time, we provide experimental evidence for such extravascular hemolysis and demonstrate that PNH erythrocytes from anti–C5-treated patients are phagocytosed by activated monocytes in vitro. Importantly, we show that this uptake can be mediated by the end-stage opsonin C3dg, which is not traditionally considered a phagocytic marker, via interaction with complement receptor 3 (CR3). Interaction studies confirmed that C3dg itself can act as a ligand for the binding domain of CR3. The degree of C3dg-mediated erythrophagocytosis in samples from different PNH patients correlated well with the individual level of C3dg opsonization. This finding may guide future treatment options for PNH but also has potential implications for the description and management of other complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26082452

  14. Complement C3 is expressed by mast cells in cutaneous vasculitis and is degraded by chymase.

    PubMed

    Lipitsä, Tiina; Naukkarinen, Anita; Laitala, Joel; Harvima, Ilkka T

    2016-10-01

    The complement factor C3 and chymase released from tryptase(+), chymase(+) mast cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. To study whether mast cells contain C3 in vasculitis and whether chymase interacts with C3, cryosections from vasculitis biopsies were double-stained histochemically for C3c in tryptase(+) mast cells, as well as for chymase and vessel wall C3c, or they were treated with 5 µg/ml rh-chymase for 24 h followed by immunofluorescence (IF) analysis of C3c, IgG, IgM and IgA. The effect of rh-chymase on purified human C3, C3a and IgG was studied using SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and LAD2 mast cell cultures. The results show that 34.2 ± 17.9, 37.4 ± 15.5 and 43.4 ± 18.6 % (mean ± SD) of the mast cells express C3c immunoreactivity in the healthy skin, initial petechial (IP) and palpable purpura (PP) lesions, respectively. About 9.4-12.1 % of the chymase(+) mast cells were in apparent contact with C3c(+) vessels in IP and PP. The treatment of cryosections with rh-chymase decreased the IF staining of C3c, but not that of immunoglobulins. In SDS-PAGE, 1-10 µg/ml rh-chymase degraded the alpha- and beta-chains of C3, but did not degrade IgG. Unexpectedly, the rh-chymase treatment of C3 produced fragments that resulted in the release of tryptase and histamine from LAD2 cells. However, rh-chymase degraded C3a and consequently inhibited C3a activity on LAD2. In conclusion, mast cells can be one source for C3 in the early and late phases of vasculitis pathogenesis. However, rh-chymase degraded native C3, vessel wall C3c, and biologically active C3a. Therefore, chymase may control C3-related pathology. PMID:27465068

  15. Complement C3 Is the Strongest Predictor of Whole-Body Insulin Sensitivity in Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Salvatore; Russo, Emilio; Nicolosi, Kassandra; Gallucci, Antonio; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Bruno, Caterina; Naty, Saverio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Olivieri, Ignazio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the correlation between inflammatory measures and whole-body insulin sensitivity in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. Methods For the present study, 40 nondiabetic PsA patients were recruited. A standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. The insulin sensitivity index (ISI), insulinogenic index (IGI) and oral disposition index (ODI) were calculated from dynamic values of glucose and insulin obtained during OGTT. Results In our study population, mean ISI was 3.5 ± 2.5, median IGI was 1.2 (0.7–1.8), mean ODI 4.5 ± 4.5. In univariate correlation analysis, ISI correlated inversely with systolic blood pressure (sBP) (R = -0.52, p = 0.001), diastolic blood pressure (dBP) (R = -0.45, p = 0.004) and complement C3 (R = -0.43, p = 0.006) and ODI correlated inversely with sBP (R = -0.38, p = 0.02), dBP (R = -0.35, p = 0.03) and complement C3 (R = -0.37, p = 0.02). No significant correlations were found between analyzed variables and IGI. In a stepwise multiple regression, only complement C3 entered in the regression equation and accounted for approximately 50% of the variance of ISI. Using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve we identified the best cut-off for complement C3 of 1.32 g/L that yielded a sensitivity of 56% and a specificity of 96% for classification of insulin resistant patients. Conclusions In conclusion, our data suggest that serum complement C3 could represent a useful marker of whole-body insulin sensitivity in PsA patients. PMID:27656896

  16. Structure of complement receptor 2 in complex with its C3d ligand.

    PubMed

    Szakonyi, G; Guthridge, J M; Li, D; Young, K; Holers, V M; Chen, X S

    2001-06-01

    Complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) is an important receptor that amplifies B lymphocyte activation by bridging the innate and adaptive immune systems. CR2 ligands include complement C3d and Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein 350/220. We describe the x-ray structure of this CR2 domain in complex with C3d at 2.0 angstroms. The structure reveals extensive main chain interactions between C3d and only one short consensus repeat (SCR) of CR2 and substantial SCR side-side packing. These results provide a detailed understanding of receptor-ligand interactions in this protein family and reveal potential target sites for molecular drug design. PMID:11387479

  17. Regulation by retinoic acid of acylation-stimulating protein and complement C3 in human adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Scantlebury, T; Sniderman, A D; Cianflone, K

    2001-01-01

    Acylation-stimulating protein (ASP), a product of complement C3, stimulates triacylglycerol synthesis in adipocytes. Previous studies have identified transthyretin, associated with chylomicrons, as a stimulator of C3 and ASP production. Since both transthyretin and chylomicrons transport retinyl ester/retinol, our goal was to investigate whether retinoic acid (RA) could be a potential hormonal mediator of the effect. Inhibitors of protein synthesis and protein secretion eliminated the stimulatory effects of chylomicrons on both C3 and ASP production in human differentiated adipocytes, suggesting that de novo protein synthesis and secretion are both required. Incubation with chylomicrons increased C3 mRNA levels (37+/-1.5%). RA alone or with chylomicrons had a stimulatory effect on C3 production (29-fold at 16.6 nM RA) and ASP production. An RA receptor antagonist blocked stimulation of C3 mRNA and C3 secretion by both RA and chylomicrons. Finally, RA and chylomicrons activated a 1.8 kb C3-promoter-luciferase construct transfected into 3T3-F442 and 3T3-L1 cells (by 41+/-0.2% and 69+/-0.3% respectively), possibly via RA receptor half-sites identified by sequence analysis. This is the first evidence documenting stimulation by RA of the C3 gene. Thus we propose RA as a novel cellular trigger in chylomicrons that subsequently results in increased ASP production by adipocytes after a meal. PMID:11368771

  18. Osteoclast-derived complement component 3a stimulates osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Kazuhiko; Park, Kyoung-Ae; Ito, Masako; Ikeda, Kyoji; Takeshita, Sunao

    2014-07-01

    Bone remodeling is regulated by a coupling of resorption to subsequent formation; however, the "coupling factor" and underlying mechanism are not fully understood. Here, we found that the condition medium (CM) of mature osteoclasts contains a humoral factor that stimulates the differentiation of primary osteoblasts, as determined by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. We purified osteoblastogenesis-stimulating activity from 3 L of osteoclast CM through successive ion exchange chromatographies by monitoring the ALP activity of osteoblasts and identified complement component 3 (C3). Expression of the C3 gene increased during osteoclastogenesis, and the cleavage product C3a was detected by ELISA in the CM of osteoclasts but not in that of bone marrow macrophages. The osteoblastogenesis-stimulating activity present in osteoclast CM was inhibited by a specific antagonist of the C3a receptor (C3aR), SB290157. Conversely, the retroviral expression of C3a as well as treatment with the C3aR agonist, benzeneacetamide, stimulated osteoblast differentiation. C3 gene expression in bone was increased in the high bone turnover states of ovariectomy (OVX) or a receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) injection, and blocking the action of C3a with the daily administration of SB290157 resulted in the attenuation of bone formation elevated by OVX and the exacerbation of bone loss. These results suggest that osteoclast-derived C3a functions in the relay from bone resorption to formation and may be a candidate for a coupling factor.

  19. Effects of a recombinant complement component C3b functional fragment α2MR (α2-macroglobulin receptor) additive on the immune response of juvenile orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) after the exposure to cold shock challenge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng-Wei; Cai, Luo; Qi, Zeng-Hua; Wang, Cong; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Wei-Na

    2015-08-01

    The effects of Ec-α2MR (Epinephelus coiodes-α2-macroglobulin receptor) on growth performance, enzymatic activity, respiratory burst, MDA level, total antioxidant capacity, DPPH radical scavenging percentage and immune-related gene expressions of the juvenile orange-spotted grouper were evaluated. The commercial diet supplemented with α2MR additive was used to feed the orange-spotted grouper for six weeks. Although a slight increase was observed in the specific growth rate, survival rate and weight gain, no significance was observed among different group. After the feeding trial, the groupers were exposed to cold stress. Respiratory burst activity and MDA level decreased significantly in α2MR additive group by comparing with the control and additive control group, while a sharp increase of ACP activity, ALP activity, total antioxidant capacity and DPPH radial scavenging percentage was observed in α2MR additive group. qRT-PCR analyses confirmed that the up-regulated mRNA expressions of C3, TNF1, TNF2, IL-6, CTL, LysC, SOD1 and SOD2 were observed in α2MR additive group at 20 °C. These results showed that α2MR additive may moderate the immune response in grouper following cold shock challenge. PMID:25917969

  20. Effects of a recombinant complement component C3b functional fragment α2MR (α2-macroglobulin receptor) additive on the immune response of juvenile orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) after the exposure to cold shock challenge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng-Wei; Cai, Luo; Qi, Zeng-Hua; Wang, Cong; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Wei-Na

    2015-08-01

    The effects of Ec-α2MR (Epinephelus coiodes-α2-macroglobulin receptor) on growth performance, enzymatic activity, respiratory burst, MDA level, total antioxidant capacity, DPPH radical scavenging percentage and immune-related gene expressions of the juvenile orange-spotted grouper were evaluated. The commercial diet supplemented with α2MR additive was used to feed the orange-spotted grouper for six weeks. Although a slight increase was observed in the specific growth rate, survival rate and weight gain, no significance was observed among different group. After the feeding trial, the groupers were exposed to cold stress. Respiratory burst activity and MDA level decreased significantly in α2MR additive group by comparing with the control and additive control group, while a sharp increase of ACP activity, ALP activity, total antioxidant capacity and DPPH radial scavenging percentage was observed in α2MR additive group. qRT-PCR analyses confirmed that the up-regulated mRNA expressions of C3, TNF1, TNF2, IL-6, CTL, LysC, SOD1 and SOD2 were observed in α2MR additive group at 20 °C. These results showed that α2MR additive may moderate the immune response in grouper following cold shock challenge.

  1. Isolation and analysis of complement activating aggregates from synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis using monoclonal anti-C3d antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Bedwell, A E; Elson, C J; Carter, S D; Dieppe, P A; Hutton, C W; Czudek, R

    1987-01-01

    The complement activating aggregates in synovial fluids of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been isolated using monoclonal IgM anti-C3d antibodies attached to solid phases, and the content of the material bound has been analysed. High levels of aggregated IgG bearing C3d were found in RA synovial fluids, and IgG was the major immunoglobulin bound from such synovial fluids by anti-C3d Sepharose. A strong correlation was shown between levels of aggregated IgG bearing C3d and complement activation, as judged by C3d levels. Significant (but less strong) relationships were also observed between C3d levels and both complement consuming and C1q binding activity. C3d levels and levels of aggregated IgG bearing C3d were both significantly associated with the numbers of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) found in RA synovial fluids. From these results it is concluded that the aggregated immunoglobulins bearing C3d (particularly IgG) isolated from RA synovial fluids are responsible for activating complement and attracting PMNs into the joint space. Radioimmunoassay showed no correlation, however, between levels of aggregated IgG (or IgM) bearing C3d and rheumatoid factor (RF) activity bound by anti-C3d. In addition, the material bound by anti-C3d Sepharose from most synovial fluid polyethylene glycol precipitates did not contain either IgM or IgG RF. Thus both techniques show that the majority of complexes bearing C3d do not contain RF. As the complement fixing aggregates apparently contain only immunoglobulin and complement components the results raise the problem of how the aggregates are formed. It is suggested that RA IgG may remain aggregated after either antigen or antibody (RF) has dissociated from the complex. Images PMID:3492971

  2. Correlation between circulating schistosomal antigen, schistosomal complement C3 and intensity of infection.

    PubMed

    Rashed, S M; Khashaba, A; Madwar, M A; Rafik, M M; Abul Fadl, A A; Shash, A M

    1990-06-01

    53.7% of the already parasitologically proved schistosomiasis cases showed circulating schistosomal antigen (C.S.A.) in their sera with significantly higher levels than the controls, with no correlation between the level of C.S.A. and the foecal egg count. Significant higher levels of schistosomal complement C3 were found in schistosomiasis patients as compared to the control group, with no significant difference in the mean level of C3 between patients with positive and negative C.S.A.

  3. A structural basis for Staphylococcal complement subversion: X-ray structure of the complement-binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein Sbi in complex with ligand C3d.

    PubMed

    Clark, Elizabeth A; Crennell, Susan; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Zozulya, Alexey V; Mackay, Julia D; Svergun, Dmitri I; Bagby, Stefan; van den Elsen, Jean M H

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the complement-binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein Sbi (Sbi-IV) in complex with ligand C3d is presented. The 1.7Å resolution structure reveals the molecular details of the recognition of thioester-containing fragment C3d of the central complement component C3, involving interactions between residues of Sbi-IV helix α2 and the acidic concave surface of C3d. The complex provides a structural basis for the binding preference of Sbi for native C3 over C3b and explains how Sbi-IV inhibits the interaction between C3d and complement receptor 2. A second C3d binding site on Sbi-IV is identified in the crystal structure that is not observed in related S. aureus C3 inhibitors Efb-C and Ehp. This binding mode perhaps hints as to how Sbi-IV, as part of Sbi, forms a C3b-Sbi adduct and causes futile consumption of C3, an extraordinary aspect of Sbi function that is not shared by any other known Staphylococcal complement inhibitor.

  4. Capillary Deposition of Complement C4d and C3d in Chinese Renal Allograft Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Rong; Zhang, Wei; Han, Fei; Liu, Guangjun; Xie, Wenqing

    2015-01-01

    Background. C3d is a product of both the classic and the alternative complement cascades; however, few studies have addressed the role of C3d in renal biopsies and its relationship with long-term graft survival rate is not very clear. Methods. 94 patients with biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes were included in the study. We investigated the associations between histological findings, clinical examinations, and outcome. Results. The overall prevalence for C4dPTC and C3dPTC was 42.6% and 29.8%. There was a significant association between C3dPTC and C4dPTC (P < 0.001). C3dPTC and C4dPTC were related with histological types (P = 0.024 and P < 0.001, resp.). The long-term survival rate for C4dPTC positive transplants was lower than that of C4dPTC negative transplants, but it was not statistic significant in our study (P = 0.150). The survival rate of C3dPTC positive group was much lower than the negative group (P = 0.014). Patients with double positives for C4dPTC and C3dPTC exhibited the lowest survival rate significantly different from those of the C3dPTC only and C4dPTC only groups (P = 0.01 and P = 0.0037). Conclusions. This longitudinal cohort study has demonstrated that C3d deposition in the PTC was closely related to renal dysfunction and pathological changes. PMID:25821339

  5. Association of complement C3 and interleukin-1 with foot infections in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Kheiralla, Z. M. H.; Maklad, S. S.; Ashour, S. M.; El-Sayed Moustafa, E.

    2012-01-01

    The study of the bacteriological profile, the association of complement C3, interleukin-1beta, and zinc therapy of diabetic foot ulcers (type two) was investigated. Twenty diabetics without foot ulcers (group I), 50 diabetics with foot ulcers (group II), and 10 matched normal controls (group III) were enrolled in this study. Diabetic foot ulcers were mostly of grade 2. The most frequent organisms were Clostridium spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, respectively. Vancomycin, Imipenem, and Meropenem were the most effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobes, while Imipenem, Meropenem and Chloramphenicol for Gram-positive anaerobes. Group II had abnormal levels of C3 (72%). A significant higher concentration of C3 was found in group II. Group II had abnormal levels of IL-1β (60%). A significant higher concentration of IL-1β was found in group II. Zinc therapy (25 mg/day/oral) induced a highly significant decrease in the frequency of Gram-positive anaerobes and levels of IL-1β. Significantly increases all mineral concentrations in serum level except Mn+2. The study highlights the prevalence of antibiotic multi-drug resistant bacteria causing foot infections in diabetics which require combined antimicrobial therapy. Altered levels of serum complement C3 and IL-1β might be responsible for depressed immune response which might be causes for delayed wound healing and repeated infections. Zinc supplementation may help in healing the wounds by enhancing the immune response. PMID:24688769

  6. Therapeutic concentration of lithium stimulates complement C3 production in dendritic cells and microglia via GSK-3 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiqian; Ono, Chiaki; Aiba, Setsuya; Kikuchi, Yoshie; Sora, Ichiro; Matsuoka, Hiroo; Tomita, Hiroaki

    2015-02-01

    Evidence indicates that widely prescribed mood stabilizer, lithium (Li), mediates cellular functions of differentiated monocytic cells, including microglial migration, monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDC) differentiation, and amelioration of monocytic malfunctions observed in neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we surveyed molecules which take major roles in regulating these monocytic cellular functions. MoDCs treated with 1 and 5 mM Li, and microglia separated from Li-treated mice were subjected to microarray-based comprehensive gene expression analyses. Findings were validated using multiple experiments, including quantitative PCR, ELISA and immunostaining studies. Differing effects of Li on the two cell types were observed. Inflammation- and chemotaxis-relevant genes were significantly over-represented among Li-induced genes in MoDCs, whereas no specific category of genes was over-represented in microglia. The third component of complement (C3) was the only gene which was significantly induced by a therapeutic concentration of Li in both MoDCs and microglia. C3 production was increased by Li via GSK-3 inhibition. Li-induced C3 production was seen only in differentiated monocytic cells, but not in circulating monocytes. Our findings highlight a link between Li treatment and C3 production in differentiated monocytic cells, and reveal a regulatory role of GSK-3 in C3 production. Induction of microglial C3 production might be a novel neuroprotective mechanism of Li via regulating interactions between microglia and neurons. GLIA 2015;63:257-270.

  7. Regulation of C3 Activation by the Alternative Complement Pathway in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jennifer A. E.; Stampoulis, Dimitris; Gunter, Chloe E.; Greenwood, John; Adamson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the retinas of mice carrying hemizygous and null double deletions of Cfb-/- and Cfh-/-, and to compare these with the single knockouts of Cfb, Cfh and Cfd. Retinas were isolated from wild type (WT), Cfb-/-/Cfh-/-, Cfb-/-/Cfh+/-, Cfh-/-/Cfb+/-, Cfb-/-, Cfh-/- Cfd-/-, and Cfd+/- mice. Complement proteins were evaluated by western blotting, ELISA and immunocytochemistry, and retinal morphology was assessed using toluidine blue stained semi-thin sections. WT mice showed staining for C3 and its breakdown products in the retinal vasculature and the basal surface of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Cfb-/- mice exhibited a similar C3 staining pattern to WT in the retinal vessels but a decrease in C3 and its breakdown products at the basal surface of the RPE. Deletion of both Cfb and Cfh restored C3 to levels similar to those observed in WT mice, however this reversal of phenotype was not observed in Cfh-/-/Cfb+/- or Cfb-/-/Cfh+/- mice. Loss of CFD caused an increase in C3 and a decrease in C3 breakdown products along the basal surface of the RPE. Overall the retinal morphology and retinal vasculature did not appear different across the various genotypes. We observed that C3 accumulates at the basal RPE in Cfb-/-, Cfb-/-/Cfh-/-, Cfb-/-/Cfh+/-, Cfd-/- and WT mice, but is absent in Cfh-/- and Cfh-/-/Cfb+/- mice, consistent with its consumption in the serum of mice lacking CFH when CFB is present. C3 breakdown products along the surface of the RPE were either decreased or absent when CFB, CFH or CFD was deleted or partially deleted. PMID:27564415

  8. Regulation of C3 Activation by the Alternative Complement Pathway in the Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jennifer A E; Stampoulis, Dimitris; Gunter, Chloe E; Greenwood, John; Adamson, Peter; Moss, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the retinas of mice carrying hemizygous and null double deletions of Cfb-/- and Cfh-/-, and to compare these with the single knockouts of Cfb, Cfh and Cfd. Retinas were isolated from wild type (WT), Cfb-/-/Cfh-/-, Cfb-/-/Cfh+/-, Cfh-/-/Cfb+/-, Cfb-/-, Cfh-/- Cfd-/-, and Cfd+/- mice. Complement proteins were evaluated by western blotting, ELISA and immunocytochemistry, and retinal morphology was assessed using toluidine blue stained semi-thin sections. WT mice showed staining for C3 and its breakdown products in the retinal vasculature and the basal surface of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Cfb-/- mice exhibited a similar C3 staining pattern to WT in the retinal vessels but a decrease in C3 and its breakdown products at the basal surface of the RPE. Deletion of both Cfb and Cfh restored C3 to levels similar to those observed in WT mice, however this reversal of phenotype was not observed in Cfh-/-/Cfb+/- or Cfb-/-/Cfh+/- mice. Loss of CFD caused an increase in C3 and a decrease in C3 breakdown products along the basal surface of the RPE. Overall the retinal morphology and retinal vasculature did not appear different across the various genotypes. We observed that C3 accumulates at the basal RPE in Cfb-/-, Cfb-/-/Cfh-/-, Cfb-/-/Cfh+/-, Cfd-/- and WT mice, but is absent in Cfh-/- and Cfh-/-/Cfb+/- mice, consistent with its consumption in the serum of mice lacking CFH when CFB is present. C3 breakdown products along the surface of the RPE were either decreased or absent when CFB, CFH or CFD was deleted or partially deleted. PMID:27564415

  9. Insights into the Effects of Complement Factor H on the Assembly and Decay of the Alternative Pathway C3 Proconvertase and C3 Convertase.

    PubMed

    Bettoni, Serena; Bresin, Elena; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Noris, Marina; Donadelli, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    The activated fragment of C3 (C3b) and factor B form the C3 proconvertase (C3bB), which is cleaved by factor D to C3 convertase (C3bBb). Older studies (Conrad, D. H., Carlo, J. R., and Ruddy, S. (1978)J. Exp. Med.147, 1792-1805; Pangburn, M. K., and Müller-Eberhard, H. J. (1978)Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.75, 2416-2420; Kazatchkine, M. D., Fearon, D. T., and Austen, K. F. (1979)J. Immunol.122, 75-81) indicated that the complement alternative pathway regulator factor H (FH) competes with factor B for C3b binding; however, the capability of FH to prevent C3bB assembly has not been formally investigated. Moreover, in the few published studies FH did not favor C3bB dissociation. Whether FH may affect C3bBb formation from C3bB is unknown. We set up user-friendly assays based on combined microplate/Western blotting techniques that specifically detect either C3bB or C3bBb, with the aim of investigating the effect of FH on C3bB assembly and decay and C3bBb formation and decay. We document that FH does not affect C3bB assembly, indicating that FH does not efficiently compete with factor B for C3b binding. We also found that FH does not dissociate C3bB. FH showed a strong C3bBb decay-accelerating activity, as reported previously, and also exerted an apparent inhibitory effect on C3bBb formation. The latter effect was not fully attributable to a rapid FH-mediated dissociation of C3bBb complexes, because blocking decay with properdin and C3 nephritic factor did not restore C3bBb formation. FH almost completely prevented release of the smaller cleavage subunit of FB (Ba), without modifying the amount of C3bB complexes, suggesting that FH inhibits the conversion of C3bB to C3bBb. Thus, the inhibitory effect of FH on C3bBb formation is likely the sum of inhibition of C3bB conversion to C3bBb and of C3bBb decay acceleration. Further studies are required to confirm these findings in physiological cell-based settings.

  10. Increased Immunogenicity and Induction of Class Switching by Conjugation of Complement C3d to Pneumococcal Serotype 14 Capsular Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Test, Samuel T.; Mitsuyoshi, Joyce; Connolly, Charles C.; Lucas, Alexander H.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an adjuvant effect for the C3d fragment of complement C3 when coupled to T-dependent protein antigens. In this study, we examined the antibody response to covalent conjugates of C3d and a T-independent antigen, the capsular polysaccharide of serotype 14 Streptococcus pneumoniae (PPS14). We prepared a conjugate of mouse C3d and PPS14 and compared its immunogenicity with that of a conjugate of PPS14 and ovalbumin (OVA). When BALB/c mice were immunized with PPS14-C3d, there was a significant increase in serum anti-PPS14 concentrations compared with either native PPS14 or control PPS14-glycine conjugates. This was accompanied by a switch in anti-PPS14 from predominantly immunoglobulin M (IgM) to IgG1 by day 25 following primary immunization. Following secondary immunization with PPS14-C3d, there was a marked booster response and a further increase in the ratio of IgG1 to IgM anti-PPS14. Although the primary antibody response to the PPS14-OVA conjugate exceeded that induced by immunization with PPS14-C3d, serum anti-PPS14 concentrations after a second injection of PPS14-C3d were nearly identical to those induced by secondary immunization with PPS14-OVA. Experiments with athymic nude mice suggested that T cells were not required for the adjuvant effect of C3d on the primary immune response to PPS14 but were necessary for enhancement of the memory response after a second injection of PPS14-C3d. These studies show that the adjuvant effects of C3d extend to T-independent antigens as well as T-dependent antigens. As a means of harnessing the adjuvant potential of the innate immune system, C3d conjugates may prove useful as a component of vaccines against encapsulated bacteria. PMID:11292721

  11. Complement component 3: a new paradigm in tuberculosis vaccine.

    PubMed

    De La Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian; Juste, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines are critical for the control of tuberculosis (TB) affecting humans and animals worldwide. First-generation vaccines protect from active TB but new vaccines are required to protect against pulmonary disease and infection. Recent advances in post-genomics technologies have allowed the characterization of host-pathogen interactions to discover new protective antigens and mechanisms to develop more effective vaccines against TB. Studies in the wild boar model resulted in the identification of complement component 3 (C3) as a natural correlate of protection against TB. Oral immunization with heat-inactivated mycobacteria protected wild boar against TB and showed that C3 plays a central role in protection. These results point at C3 as a target to develop novel vaccine formulations for more effective protection against TB in humans and animals. PMID:26605515

  12. Complement C3 Mediated Targeting of Liposomes to Granulocytic Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kullberg, Max; Martinson, Holly; Mann, Kristine; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    In cancer patients, granulocytic myeloid derived suppressor cells (G-MDSCs) expand in number, infiltrating tumor and lymphatic tissues where they suppress an anti-tumor immune response. We report here the development of a liposomal drug delivery system that selectively targets GMDSCs. The liposomes form a disulfide bond with activated complement C3 after intravenous injection and are taken up by G-MDSCs, which express the receptor for activated C3. In vitro experiments utilizing serum from a C3 knockout mouse demonstrate that G-MDSCs take up these liposomes in a C3-dependent manner. After systemic administration to tumor bearing mice, liposomes were incorporated by 22% of G-MDSCs in the blood and were also present in a percentage of G-MDSCs in the tumor (11%), spleen (22%), liver (35%) and lungs (26%). This liposomal system offers a versatile means of targeted drug delivery to G-MDSCs and could be an important tool for restoring anti-tumor immunity in cancer patients. PMID:25839391

  13. Complement anaphylatoxin C3a is a potent inducer of embryonic chick retina regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Tracy; Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Reis, Edimara S.; Echeverri Ruiz, Nancy P.; Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Tzekou, Apostolia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.; Lambris, John D.; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the initiation signals for tissue regeneration in vertebrates is one of the major challenges in regenerative biology. Much of the research thus far has indicated that certain growth factors have key roles. Here we show that complement fragment C3a is sufficient to induce complete regeneration of the embryonic chick retina from stem/progenitor cells present in the eye, independent of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling. Instead, C3a induces retina regeneration via STAT3 activation, which in turn activates the injury- and inflammation-responsive factors, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. This activation sets forth regulation of Wnt2b, Six3 and Sox2, genes associated with retina stem and progenitor cells. Thus, our results establish a mechanism for retina regeneration based on injury and inflammation signals. Furthermore, our results indicate a unique function for complement anaphylatoxins that implicate these molecules in the induction and complete regeneration of the retina, opening new avenues of experimentation in the field. PMID:23942241

  14. The internal thioester and the covalent binding properties of the complement proteins C3 and C4.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S. K.; Dodds, A. W.

    1997-01-01

    The covalent binding of complement components C3 and C4 is critical for their activities. This reaction is made possible by the presence of an internal thioester in the native protein. Upon activation, which involves a conformational change initiated by the cleavage of a single peptide bond, the thioester becomes available to react with molecules with nucleophilic groups. This description is probably sufficient to account for the binding of the C4A isotype of human C4 to amino nucleophiles. The binding of the C4B isotype, and most likely C3, to hydroxyl nucleophiles, however, involves a histidine residue, which attacks the thioester to form an intramolecular acyl-imidazole bond. The released thiolate anion then acts as a base to catalyze the binding of hydroxyl nucleophiles, including water, to the acyl function. This mechanism allows the complement proteins to bind to the hydroxyl groups of carbohydrates found on all biological surfaces, including the components of bacterial cell walls. In addition, the fast hydrolysis of the thioester provides a means to contain this very damaging reaction to the immediate proximity of the site of activation. PMID:9041627

  15. Complement fragments C3b and iC3b coupled to latex induce a respiratory burst in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hoogerwerf, M; Weening, R S; Hack, C E; Roos, D

    1990-02-01

    The complement fragments C3b and iC3b were purified from human serum by affinity chromatography with Sepharose-coupled monoclonal antibody against the C3d region of C3. The resulting preparations were more than 95% pure and contained less than 0.1% native IgG. Purified C3b and iC3b were coupled to latex beads (0.8 micron diameter) by means of F(ab')2 fragments of monoclonal antibodies against the beta chain or the C3d region of C3, thus orienting the C3b and the iC3b on the latex with the C3b- and iC3b-specific regions outwards. These particles were found to activate the respiratory burst of freshly isolated human neutrophils to 20-30% of the maximal capacity. Latex particles randomly coated with C3b or iC3b were about 3 times less stimulatory. C3b, iC3b and IgG coupled to latex in an oriented fashion were about equally effective in stimulating the respiratory burst. Neutrophils from a patient with a total deficiency of CR3 responded normally to C3b-coated latex but did not respond to iC3b-coated latex. A monoclonal antibody against the alpha chain of CR3 inhibited the activation by iC3b-coated latex and a polyclonal antibody against CR1 partially inhibited the activation by C3b-coated latex. We found an additive effect between IgG-coated latex and C3b-coated latex, regardless of the presence of IgG and C3b on the same particle or on different particles. Thus, binding of ligands to either CR1 or CR3 per se is sufficient to induce an activating signal to the NADPH oxidase in human neutrophils.

  16. Structure of Complement C3(H2O) Revealed By Quantitative Cross-Linking/Mass Spectrometry And Modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Pellarin, Riccardo; Sali, Andrej; Barlow, Paul N.

    2016-01-01

    The slow but spontaneous and ubiquitous formation of C3(H2O), the hydrolytic and conformationally rearranged product of C3, initiates antibody-independent activation of the complement system that is a key first line of antimicrobial defense. The structure of C3(H2O) has not been determined. Here we subjected C3(H2O) to quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry (QCLMS). This revealed details of the structural differences and similarities between C3(H2O) and C3, as well as between C3(H2O) and its pivotal proteolytic cleavage product, C3b, which shares functionally similarity with C3(H2O). Considered in combination with the crystal structures of C3 and C3b, the QCMLS data suggest that C3(H2O) generation is accompanied by the migration of the thioester-containing domain of C3 from one end of the molecule to the other. This creates a stable C3b-like platform able to bind the zymogen, factor B, or the regulator, factor H. Integration of available crystallographic and QCLMS data allowed the determination of a 3D model of the C3(H2O) domain architecture. The unique arrangement of domains thus observed in C3(H2O), which retains the anaphylatoxin domain (that is excised when C3 is enzymatically activated to C3b), can be used to rationalize observed differences between C3(H2O) and C3b in terms of complement activation and regulation. PMID:27250206

  17. Complement split products c3a and c4a in chronic lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Stricker, R B; Savely, V R; Motanya, N C; Giclas, P C

    2009-01-01

    Complement split products C3a and C4a are reportedly elevated in patients with acute Lyme disease. We have now examined these immunologic markers in patients with chronic Lyme disease compared to appropriate disease controls. The study population consisted of 29 healthy controls, 445 patients with chronic Lyme disease, 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and six patients with AIDS. The Lyme disease patients were divided according to predominant musculoskeletal symptoms (324 patients) or predominant neurologic symptoms (121 patients). C3a and C4a levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. All patients with chronic Lyme disease and AIDS had normal C3a levels compared to controls, whereas patients with SLE had significantly increased levels of this marker. Patients with predominant musculoskeletal symptoms of Lyme disease and AIDS patients had significantly increased levels of C4a compared to either controls, patients with predominant neurologic symptoms of Lyme disease or SLE patients. Response to antibiotic therapy in chronic Lyme disease was associated with a significant decrease in the C4a level, whereas lack of response was associated with a significant increase in this marker. In contrast, AIDS patients had persistently increased C4a levels despite antiretroviral therapy. Lyme patients with positive single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scans had significantly lower C4a levels compared to Lyme patients with normal SPECT scan results. Patients with predominant musculoskeletal symptoms of Lyme disease have normal C3a and increased C4a levels. This pattern differs from the increase in both markers seen in acute Lyme disease, and C4a changes correlate with the response to therapy in chronic Lyme disease. C4a appears to be a valuable immunologic marker in patients with persistent symptoms of Lyme disease.

  18. Immunofluorescence staining for the detection of immunoglobulins and complement (C3) in dogs with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Aresu, L; Pregel, P; Bollo, E; Palmerini, D; Sereno, A; Valenza, F

    2008-12-01

    Renal cortical biopsies from 74 dogs with different degrees of renal failure were studied by immunofluorescence to assess the frequency and extent of the deposition of immunoglobulins G, M and A (IgG, IgM, IgA) and complement C3. The dogs were divided into two groups on the basis of their clinical signs, and standard histological and electron microscopical examinations, according to whether their disease was an immune-mediated nephropathy (IMN) or a non-immune-mediated nephropathy (NIMN). In the dogs with an imn there was strong immunofluorescence due to IgG in the mesangium and the glomerular basement membrane and to IgM in the mesangium. The mechanism of immune complex trapping in the glomerulus also resulted in positive reactions to IgM in the dogs with an NIMN.

  19. The molecular and structural bases for the association of complement C3 mutations with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Heurich, Meike; López-Perrote, Andrés; Tortajada, Agustin; Pinto, Sheila; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B Paul; Llorca, Oscar; Harris, Claire L; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) associates with complement dysregulation caused by mutations and polymorphisms in complement activators and regulators. However, the reasons why some mutations in complement proteins predispose to aHUS are poorly understood. Here, we have investigated the functional consequences of three aHUS-associated mutations in C3, R592W, R161W and I1157T. First, we provide evidence that penetrance and disease severity for these mutations is modulated by inheritance of documented "risk" haplotypes as has been observed with mutations in other complement genes. Next, we show that all three mutations markedly reduce the efficiency of factor I-mediated C3b cleavage when catalyzed by membrane cofactor protein (MCP), but not when catalyzed by factor H. Biacore analysis showed that each mutant C3b bound sMCP (recombinant soluble MCP; CD46) at reduced affinity, providing a molecular basis for its reduced cofactor activity. Lastly, we show by electron microscopy structural analysis a displacement of the TED domain from the MG ring in C3b in two of the C3 mutants that explains these defects in regulation. As a whole our data suggest that aHUS-associated mutations in C3 selectively affect regulation of complement on surfaces and provide a structural framework to predict the functional consequences of the C3 genetic variants found in patients.

  20. The molecular and structural bases for the association of complement C3 mutations with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Heurich, Meike; López-Perrote, Andrés; Tortajada, Agustin; Pinto, Sheila; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B. Paul; Llorca, Oscar; Harris, Claire L.; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) associates with complement dysregulation caused by mutations and polymorphisms in complement activators and regulators. However, the reasons why some mutations in complement proteins predispose to aHUS are poorly understood. Here, we have investigated the functional consequences of three aHUS-associated mutations in C3, R592W, R161W and I1157T. First, we provide evidence that penetrance and disease severity for these mutations is modulated by inheritance of documented “risk” haplotypes as has been observed with mutations in other complement genes. Next, we show that all three mutations markedly reduce the efficiency of factor I-mediated C3b cleavage when catalyzed by membrane cofactor protein (MCP), but not when catalyzed by factor H. Biacore analysis showed that each mutant C3b bound sMCP (recombinant soluble MCP; CD46) at reduced affinity, providing a molecular basis for its reduced cofactor activity. Lastly, we show by electron microscopy structural analysis a displacement of the TED domain from the MG ring in C3b in two of the C3 mutants that explains these defects in regulation. As a whole our data suggest that aHUS-associated mutations in C3 selectively affect regulation of complement on surfaces and provide a structural framework to predict the functional consequences of the C3 genetic variants found in patients. PMID:25879158

  1. Intravenous and standard immune serum globulin preparations interfere with uptake of /sup 125/I-C3 onto sensitized erythrocytes and inhibit hemolytic complement activity

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.; Rosenkranz, P.; Brown, C.Y.

    1985-02-01

    Antibody-sensitized sheep erythrocytes were used as a model to determine the effects of therapeutic immune serum globulin (ISG) preparations on the ability of this particulate activator to fix C3 and initiate hemolysis. Both standard and intravenous forms of ISG inhibit uptake of /sup 125/I-C3, presumably by competing for the deposition of ''nascent'' C3b molecules onto the erythrocytes. Both forms of ISG also inhibit hemolytic activity of whole serum or purified complement components. The inhibition appears to be a specific property of IgG itself, since similar inhibition was not caused by equivalent concentrations of human serum albumin, and was not affected by the buffer in which the ISG was dissolved. Interference with C3 uptake onto antibody-sensitized platelets and/or inhibition of hemolytic complement activity could contribute to the efficacy of high dose intravenous ISG in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

  2. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5240 Complement components immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement components... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Complement components immunological test...

  3. Human C3 mutation reveals a mechanism of dense deposit disease pathogenesis and provides insights into complement activation and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Heurich, Meike; Valdes-Cañedo, Francisco; Vazquez-Martul, Eduardo; Torreira, Eva; Montes, Tamara; Tortajada, Agustín; Pinto, Sheila; Lopez-Trascasa, Margarita; Morgan, B. Paul; Llorca, Oscar; Harris, Claire L.; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    Dense deposit disease (DDD) is a severe renal disease characterized by accumulation of electron-dense material in the mesangium and glomerular basement membrane. Previously, DDD has been associated with deficiency of factor H (fH), a plasma regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement activation, and studies in animal models have linked pathogenesis to the massive complement factor 3 (C3) activation caused by this deficiency. Here, we identified a unique DDD pedigree that associates disease with a mutation in the C3 gene. Mutant C3923ΔDG, which lacks 2 amino acids, could not be cleaved to C3b by the AP C3-convertase and was therefore the predominant circulating C3 protein in the patients. However, upon activation to C3b by proteases, or to C3(H2O) by spontaneous thioester hydrolysis, C3923ΔDG generated an active AP C3-convertase that was regulated normally by decay accelerating factor (DAF) but was resistant to decay by fH. Moreover, activated C3b923ΔDG and C3(H2O)923ΔDG were resistant to proteolysis by factor I (fI) in the presence of fH, but were efficiently inactivated in the presence of membrane cofactor protein (MCP). These characteristics cause a fluid phase–restricted AP dysregulation in the patients that continuously activated and consumed C3 produced by the normal C3 allele. These findings expose structural requirements in C3 that are critical for recognition of the substrate C3 by the AP C3-convertase and for the regulatory activities of fH, DAF, and MCP, all of which have implications for therapeutic developments. PMID:20852386

  4. Delineation of the complement receptor type 2-C3d complex by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Craig D; Storek, Michael J; Young, Kendra A; Kovacs, James M; Thurman, Joshua M; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2010-12-10

    The interactions between the complement receptor type 2 (CR2) and the C3 complement fragments C3d, C3dg, and iC3b are essential for the initiation of a normal immune response. A crystal-derived structure of the two N-terminal short consensus repeat (SCR1-2) domains of CR2 in complex with C3d has previously been elucidated. However, a number of biochemical and biophysical studies targeting both CR2 and C3d appear to be in conflict with these structural data. Previous mutagenesis and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy studies directed toward the C3d-binding site on CR2 have indicated that the CR2-C3d cocrystal structure may represent an encounter/intermediate or nonphysiological complex. With regard to the CR2-binding site on C3d, mutagenesis studies by Isenman and coworkers [Isenman, D. E., Leung, E., Mackay, J. D., Bagby, S. & van den Elsen, J. M. H. (2010). Mutational analyses reveal that the staphylococcal immune evasion molecule Sbi and complement receptor 2 (CR2) share overlapping contact residues on C3d: Implications for the controversy regarding the CR2/C3d cocrystal structure. J. Immunol. 184, 1946-1955] have implicated an electronegative "concave" surface on C3d in the binding process. This surface is discrete from the CR2-C3d interface identified in the crystal structure. We generated a total of 18 mutations targeting the two (X-ray crystallographic- and mutagenesis-based) proposed CR2 SCR1-2 binding sites on C3d. Using ELISA analyses, we were able to assess binding of mutant forms of C3d to CR2. Mutations directed toward the concave surface of C3d result in substantially compromised CR2 binding. By contrast, targeting the CR2-C3d interface identified in the cocrystal structure and the surrounding area results in significantly lower levels of disruption in binding. Molecular modeling approaches used to investigate disparities between the biochemical data and the X-ray structure of the CR2-C3d cocrystal result in highest-scoring solutions in which CR2 SCR1-2 is

  5. Delineation of the complement receptor type 2-C3d complex by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Craig D; Storek, Michael J; Young, Kendra A; Kovacs, James M; Thurman, Joshua M; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2010-12-10

    The interactions between the complement receptor type 2 (CR2) and the C3 complement fragments C3d, C3dg, and iC3b are essential for the initiation of a normal immune response. A crystal-derived structure of the two N-terminal short consensus repeat (SCR1-2) domains of CR2 in complex with C3d has previously been elucidated. However, a number of biochemical and biophysical studies targeting both CR2 and C3d appear to be in conflict with these structural data. Previous mutagenesis and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy studies directed toward the C3d-binding site on CR2 have indicated that the CR2-C3d cocrystal structure may represent an encounter/intermediate or nonphysiological complex. With regard to the CR2-binding site on C3d, mutagenesis studies by Isenman and coworkers [Isenman, D. E., Leung, E., Mackay, J. D., Bagby, S. & van den Elsen, J. M. H. (2010). Mutational analyses reveal that the staphylococcal immune evasion molecule Sbi and complement receptor 2 (CR2) share overlapping contact residues on C3d: Implications for the controversy regarding the CR2/C3d cocrystal structure. J. Immunol. 184, 1946-1955] have implicated an electronegative "concave" surface on C3d in the binding process. This surface is discrete from the CR2-C3d interface identified in the crystal structure. We generated a total of 18 mutations targeting the two (X-ray crystallographic- and mutagenesis-based) proposed CR2 SCR1-2 binding sites on C3d. Using ELISA analyses, we were able to assess binding of mutant forms of C3d to CR2. Mutations directed toward the concave surface of C3d result in substantially compromised CR2 binding. By contrast, targeting the CR2-C3d interface identified in the cocrystal structure and the surrounding area results in significantly lower levels of disruption in binding. Molecular modeling approaches used to investigate disparities between the biochemical data and the X-ray structure of the CR2-C3d cocrystal result in highest-scoring solutions in which CR2 SCR1-2 is

  6. The complement receptor 2/factor H fusion protein TT30 protects paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria erythrocytes from complement-mediated hemolysis and C3 fragment.

    PubMed

    Risitano, Antonio M; Notaro, Rosario; Pascariello, Caterina; Sica, Michela; del Vecchio, Luigi; Horvath, Christopher J; Fridkis-Hareli, Masha; Selleri, Carmine; Lindorfer, Margaret A; Taylor, Ronald P; Luzzatto, Lucio; Holers, V Michael

    2012-06-28

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis because of the lack from erythrocyte surface of the complement regulators CD55 and CD59, with subsequent uncontrolled continuous spontaneous activation of the complement alternative pathway (CAP), and at times of the complement classic pathway. Here we investigate in an in vitro model the effect on PNH erythrocytes of a novel therapeutic strategy for membrane-targeted delivery of a CAP inhibitor. TT30 is a 65 kDa recombinant human fusion protein consisting of the iC3b/C3d-binding region of complement receptor 2 (CR2) and the inhibitory domain of the CAP regulator factor H (fH). TT30 completely inhibits in a dose-dependent manner hemolysis of PNH erythrocytes in a modified extended acidified serum assay, and also prevents C3 fragment deposition on surviving PNH erythrocytes. The efficacy of TT30 derives from its direct binding to PNH erythrocytes; if binding to the erythrocytes is disrupted, only partial inhibition of hemolysis is mediated by TT30 in solution, which is similar to that produced by the fH moiety of TT30 alone, or by intact human fH. TT30 is a membrane-targeted selective CAP inhibitor that may prevent both intravascular and C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis of PNH erythrocytes and warrants consideration for the treatment of PNH patients.

  7. Targeted complement inhibition by C3d recognition ameliorates tissue injury without apparent increase in susceptibility to infection.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Carl; Song, Hongbin; Lu, Bo; Qiao, Fei; Burns, Tara A; Holers, V Michael; Tsokos, George C; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies indicate a pivotal role for complement in mediating both local and remote injury following ischemia and reperfusion of the intestine. Here, we report on the use of a mouse model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury to investigate the strategy of targeting complement inhibition to sites of complement activation by linking an iC3b/C3dg-binding fragment of mouse complement receptor 2 (CR2) to a mouse complement-inhibitory protein, Crry. We show that the novel CR2-Crry fusion protein targets sites of local and remote (lung) complement activation following intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury and that CR2-Crry requires a 10-fold lower dose than its systemic counterpart, Crry-Ig, to provide equivalent protection from both local and remote injury. CR2-Crry has a significantly shorter serum half-life than Crry-Ig and, unlike Crry-Ig, had no significant effect on serum complement activity at minimum effective therapeutic doses. Furthermore, the minimum effective dose of Crry-Ig significantly enhanced susceptibility to infection in a mouse model of acute septic peritonitis, whereas the effect of CR2-Crry on susceptibility to infection was indistinguishable from that of PBS control. Thus, compared with systemic inhibition, CR2-mediated targeting of a complement inhibitor of activation improved bioavailability, significantly enhanced efficacy, and maintained host resistance to infection.

  8. Targeted complement inhibition by C3d recognition ameliorates tissue injury without apparent increase in susceptibility to infection.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Carl; Song, Hongbin; Lu, Bo; Qiao, Fei; Burns, Tara A; Holers, V Michael; Tsokos, George C; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies indicate a pivotal role for complement in mediating both local and remote injury following ischemia and reperfusion of the intestine. Here, we report on the use of a mouse model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury to investigate the strategy of targeting complement inhibition to sites of complement activation by linking an iC3b/C3dg-binding fragment of mouse complement receptor 2 (CR2) to a mouse complement-inhibitory protein, Crry. We show that the novel CR2-Crry fusion protein targets sites of local and remote (lung) complement activation following intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury and that CR2-Crry requires a 10-fold lower dose than its systemic counterpart, Crry-Ig, to provide equivalent protection from both local and remote injury. CR2-Crry has a significantly shorter serum half-life than Crry-Ig and, unlike Crry-Ig, had no significant effect on serum complement activity at minimum effective therapeutic doses. Furthermore, the minimum effective dose of Crry-Ig significantly enhanced susceptibility to infection in a mouse model of acute septic peritonitis, whereas the effect of CR2-Crry on susceptibility to infection was indistinguishable from that of PBS control. Thus, compared with systemic inhibition, CR2-mediated targeting of a complement inhibitor of activation improved bioavailability, significantly enhanced efficacy, and maintained host resistance to infection. PMID:16127466

  9. Fibronectin and serum amyloid P component stimulate C3b- and C3bi- mediated phagocytosis in cultured human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) and serum amyloid P component (SAP) markedly enhance phagocytosis mediated by the C3b and C3bi receptors of cultured human monocytes but not of granulocytes. (The C3b and C3bi receptors of granulocytes can be activated by treatment of these phagocytes with PMA.) Activation of monocyte C3 receptors by FN is developmentally regulated: Freshly explanted monocytes respond to FN with a small increase in C3 receptor-mediated phagocytosis while monocytes matured in culture exhibit a much greater response. The mechanism of action of FN on C3 receptors of cultured monocytes is unique in two respects. First, while substrate-bound FN or SAP activate monocyte C3 receptors, soluble FN does not. Second, stimulation of the basal surface of monocyte plasma membranes by substrate-bound FN activates C3b and C3bi receptors on the apical surface of the plasma membrane, i.e., at sites remote from the segments of membrane in contact with the FN or SAP. PMID:6225825

  10. Construction, expression and immunoassay detection of recombinant plasmid encoding fusion protein of Roman chicken complement C3d and Newcastle disease virus F gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, D; Niu, Z-X

    2008-12-01

    The terminal degradation product (C3d) of mammalian complement component C3 plays an important role in modulation of the adaptive immune response through the interaction with complement receptor type 2 (CR2) on B cells. In this study, the gene fragment coding for the complement protein C3d (chC3d) from Roman chicken was cloned and expressed as a fusion protein for its application in the vaccine study of chicken, and for in vitro experiments. The chC3d fragment strengthened B-cell responses when complexed with antigen. Three potential vaccine construct units were engineered to contain two, four and six copies of chC3d coding gene linked to the F gene of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an economically important pathogen of chicken that is classified as a list A contagious disease of poultry by the Office International des Epizooties. The cloned chC3d protein and different repeats of C3d proteins in addition to the F gene of NDV were generated separately in Escherichia coli and chicken embryo fibroblast cells with the help of expression vectors. All recombinant proteins were analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Analysis of the immunogenicity of different repeats of C3d revealed that chC3d had an enhancing effect on the immunogenicity of antigens, and that six or more repeats of C3d may be necessary for efficient enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses. To date, published research into the adjuvant activities of C3d has been limited to experiments in mice, rabbits and cattle. The adjuvant properties of C3d have not been assessed in poultry using homologous C3d in association with antigens relevant to the target species. The Roman chicken C3d fusion proteins described in this study is the first report and will provide a basis for immunization trials in chicken, studies of receptor binding and cell activation of chicken lymphocytes, and investigations of new types of vaccines, including recombinant vaccines and DNA vaccines for future use against other

  11. Structural Basis for the Function of Complement Component C4 within the Classical and Lectin Pathways of Complement.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Sofia; Kidmose, Rune T; Petersen, Steen V; Szilágyi, Ágnes; Prohászka, Zoltan; Andersen, Gregers R

    2015-06-01

    Complement component C4 is a central protein in the classical and lectin pathways within the complement system. During activation of complement, its major fragment C4b becomes covalently attached to the surface of pathogens and altered self-tissue, where it acts as an opsonin marking the surface for removal. Moreover, C4b provides a platform for assembly of the proteolytically active convertases that mediate downstream complement activation by cleavage of C3 and C5. In this article, we present the crystal and solution structures of the 195-kDa C4b. Our results provide the molecular details of the rearrangement accompanying C4 cleavage and suggest intramolecular flexibility of C4b. The conformations of C4b and its paralogue C3b are shown to be remarkably conserved, suggesting that the convertases from the classical and alternative pathways are likely to share their overall architecture and mode of substrate recognition. We propose an overall molecular model for the classical pathway C5 convertase in complex with C5, suggesting that C3b increases the affinity for the substrate by inducing conformational changes in C4b rather than a direct interaction with C5. C4b-specific features revealed by our structural studies are probably involved in the assembly of the classical pathway C3/C5 convertases and C4b binding to regulators.

  12. Mutational analysis of the complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21)-C3d interaction reveals a putative charged SCR1 binding site for C3d.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Jonathan P; Young, Kendra A; Guthridge, Joel M; Asokan, Rengasamy; Szakonyi, Gerda; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael

    2005-02-25

    We have characterized the interaction between the first two short consensus repeats (SCR1-2) of complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) and C3d in solution, by utilising the available crystal structures of free and C3d-bound forms of CR2 to create a series of informative mutations targeting specific areas of the CR2-C3d complex. Wild-type and mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on the surface of K562 erythroleukemia cells and their binding ability assessed using C3dg-biotin tetramers complexed to fluorochrome conjugated streptavidin and measured by flow cytometry. Mutations directed at the SCR2-C3d interface (R83A, R83E, G84Y) were found to strongly disrupt C3dg binding, supporting the conclusion that the SCR2 interface reflected in the crystal structure is correct. Previous epitope and peptide mapping studies have also indicated that the PILN11GR13IS sequence of the first inter-cysteine region of SCR1 is essential for the binding of iC3b. Mutations targeting residues within or in close spatial proximity to this area (N11A, N11E, R13A, R13E, Y16A, S32A, S32E), and a number of other positively charged residues located primarily on a contiguous face of SCR1 (R28A, R28E, R36A, R36E, K41A, K41E, K50A, K50E, K57A, K57E, K67A, K67E), have allowed us to reassess those regions on SCR1 that are essential for CR2-C3d binding. The nature of this interaction and the possibility of a direct SCR1-C3d association are discussed extensively. Finally, a D52N mutant was constructed introducing an N-glycosylation sequence at an area central to the CR2 dimer interface. This mutation was designed to disrupt the CR2-C3d interaction, either directly through steric inhibition, or indirectly through disruption of a physiological dimer. However, no difference in C3dg binding relative to wild-type CR2 could be observed for this mutant, suggesting that the dimer may only be found in the crystal form of CR2.

  13. Mutational analysis of the complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21)-C3d interaction reveals a putative charged SCR1 binding site for C3d.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Jonathan P; Young, Kendra A; Guthridge, Joel M; Asokan, Rengasamy; Szakonyi, Gerda; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael

    2005-02-25

    We have characterized the interaction between the first two short consensus repeats (SCR1-2) of complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) and C3d in solution, by utilising the available crystal structures of free and C3d-bound forms of CR2 to create a series of informative mutations targeting specific areas of the CR2-C3d complex. Wild-type and mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on the surface of K562 erythroleukemia cells and their binding ability assessed using C3dg-biotin tetramers complexed to fluorochrome conjugated streptavidin and measured by flow cytometry. Mutations directed at the SCR2-C3d interface (R83A, R83E, G84Y) were found to strongly disrupt C3dg binding, supporting the conclusion that the SCR2 interface reflected in the crystal structure is correct. Previous epitope and peptide mapping studies have also indicated that the PILN11GR13IS sequence of the first inter-cysteine region of SCR1 is essential for the binding of iC3b. Mutations targeting residues within or in close spatial proximity to this area (N11A, N11E, R13A, R13E, Y16A, S32A, S32E), and a number of other positively charged residues located primarily on a contiguous face of SCR1 (R28A, R28E, R36A, R36E, K41A, K41E, K50A, K50E, K57A, K57E, K67A, K67E), have allowed us to reassess those regions on SCR1 that are essential for CR2-C3d binding. The nature of this interaction and the possibility of a direct SCR1-C3d association are discussed extensively. Finally, a D52N mutant was constructed introducing an N-glycosylation sequence at an area central to the CR2 dimer interface. This mutation was designed to disrupt the CR2-C3d interaction, either directly through steric inhibition, or indirectly through disruption of a physiological dimer. However, no difference in C3dg binding relative to wild-type CR2 could be observed for this mutant, suggesting that the dimer may only be found in the crystal form of CR2. PMID:15713467

  14. Bead arrays for antibody and complement profiling reveal joint contribution of antibody isotypes to C3 deposition.

    PubMed

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Szarka, Eszter; Huber, Krisztina; Orosz, Anita; Babos, Fruzsina; Magyar, Anna; Hudecz, Ferenc; Rojkovich, Bernadette; Gáti, Tamás; Nagy, György; Schwenk, Jochen M; Sármay, Gabriella; Prechl, József; Nilsson, Peter; Papp, Krisztián

    2014-01-01

    The development of antigen arrays has provided researchers with great tools to identify reactivities against self or foreign antigens from body fluids. Yet, these approaches mostly do not address antibody isotypes and their effector functions even though these are key points for a more detailed understanding of disease processes. Here, we present a bead array-based assay for a multiplexed determination of antigen-specific antibody levels in parallel with their properties for complement activation. We measured the deposition of C3 fragments from serum samples to reflect the degree of complement activation via all three complement activation pathways. We utilized the assay on a bead array containing native and citrullinated peptide antigens to investigate the levels of IgG, IgM and IgA autoantibodies along with their complement activating properties in serum samples of 41 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 40 controls. Our analysis revealed significantly higher IgG reactivity against the citrullinated fibrinogen β and filaggrin peptides as well as an IgA reactivity that was exclusive for citrullinated fibrinogen β peptide and C3 deposition in rheumatoid arthritis patients. In addition, we characterized the humoral immune response against the viral EBNA-1 antigen to demonstrate the applicability of this assay beyond autoimmune conditions. We observed that particular buffer compositions were demanded for separate measurement of antibody reactivity and complement activation, as detection of antigen-antibody complexes appeared to be masked due to C3 deposition. We also found that rheumatoid factors of IgM isotype altered C3 deposition and introduced false-positive reactivities against EBNA-1 antigen. In conclusion, the presented bead-based assay setup can be utilized to profile antibody reactivities and immune-complex induced complement activation in a high-throughput manner and could facilitate the understanding and diagnosis of several diseases where complement

  15. Bead Arrays for Antibody and Complement Profiling Reveal Joint Contribution of Antibody Isotypes to C3 Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Szarka, Eszter; Huber, Krisztina; Orosz, Anita; Babos, Fruzsina; Magyar, Anna; Hudecz, Ferenc; Rojkovich, Bernadette; Gáti, Tamás; Nagy, György; Schwenk, Jochen M.; Sármay, Gabriella; Prechl, József

    2014-01-01

    The development of antigen arrays has provided researchers with great tools to identify reactivities against self or foreign antigens from body fluids. Yet, these approaches mostly do not address antibody isotypes and their effector functions even though these are key points for a more detailed understanding of disease processes. Here, we present a bead array-based assay for a multiplexed determination of antigen-specific antibody levels in parallel with their properties for complement activation. We measured the deposition of C3 fragments from serum samples to reflect the degree of complement activation via all three complement activation pathways. We utilized the assay on a bead array containing native and citrullinated peptide antigens to investigate the levels of IgG, IgM and IgA autoantibodies along with their complement activating properties in serum samples of 41 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 40 controls. Our analysis revealed significantly higher IgG reactivity against the citrullinated fibrinogen β and filaggrin peptides as well as an IgA reactivity that was exclusive for citrullinated fibrinogen β peptide and C3 deposition in rheumatoid arthritis patients. In addition, we characterized the humoral immune response against the viral EBNA-1 antigen to demonstrate the applicability of this assay beyond autoimmune conditions. We observed that particular buffer compositions were demanded for separate measurement of antibody reactivity and complement activation, as detection of antigen-antibody complexes appeared to be masked due to C3 deposition. We also found that rheumatoid factors of IgM isotype altered C3 deposition and introduced false-positive reactivities against EBNA-1 antigen. In conclusion, the presented bead-based assay setup can be utilized to profile antibody reactivities and immune-complex induced complement activation in a high-throughput manner and could facilitate the understanding and diagnosis of several diseases where complement

  16. Administration of a soluble recombinant complement C3 inhibitor protects against renal disease in MRL/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lihua; Haas, Mark; Kraus, Damian M; Hack, Bradley K; Rakstang, Jonathan K; Holers, V Michael; Quigg, Richard J

    2003-03-01

    Complement receptor 1-related gene/protein y (Crry) in rodents is a potent membrane complement regulator that inhibits complement C3 activation by both classical and alternative pathways. To clarify the role of complement in lupus nephritis, MRL/lpr mice were given Crry as a recombinant protein (Crry-Ig) from 12 to 24 wk of age. Control groups were given saline or normal mouse IgG. Sera and urine were collected biweekly. Only 1 of 20 (5%) Crry-Ig-treated mice developed renal failure (BUN > 50 mg/dl) compared with 18 of 38 (47.4%) mice in control groups (P = 0.001). BUN levels at 24 wk were reduced from 68.8 +/- 9.7 mg/dl in control groups to 38.5 +/- 3.9 mg/dl in the Crry-Ig-treated group (P < 0.01). Urinary albumin excretion at 24 wk was also significantly reduced from 5.3 +/- 1.4 mg/mg creatinine in the control groups to 0.5 +/- 0.2 mg/mg creatinine in the Crry-Ig-treated group (P < 0.05). Of the histologic data at 24 wk, there was a significant reduction in scores for glomerulosclerosis and C3d, IgG, IgG3, and IgA staining intensity in glomeruli in complement-inhibited animals. Crry-Ig-treated animals were also protected from vasculitic lesions. Although there was no effect on relevant autoimmune manifestations such as anti-double stranded DNA titers or cryoglobulin IgG3 levels, circulating immune complex levels were markedly higher in complement-inhibited animals. Thus, inhibition of complement activation with Crry-Ig significantly reduces renal disease in MRL/lpr lupus mice. The data support the strategy of using recombinant complement C3 inhibitors to treat human lupus nephritis.

  17. A novel antibody against human factor B that blocks formation of the C3bB proconvertase and inhibits complement activation in disease models.

    PubMed

    Subías, Marta; Tortajada, Agustín; Gastoldi, Sara; Galbusera, Miriam; López-Perrote, Andrés; Lopez, Lucia de Juana; González-Fernández, Fernando Ataúlfo; Villegas-Martínez, Ana; Dominguez, Mercedes; Llorca, Oscar; Noris, Marina; Morgan, B Paul; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2014-12-01

    The alternative pathway (AP) is critical for the efficient activation of complement regardless of the trigger. It is also a major player in pathogenesis, as illustrated by the long list of diseases in which AP activation contributes to pathology. Its relevance to human disease is further emphasized by the high prevalence of pathogenic inherited defects and acquired autoantibodies disrupting components and regulators of the AP C3-convertase. Because pharmacological downmodulation of the AP emerges as a broad-spectrum treatment alternative, there is a powerful interest in developing new molecules to block formation and/or activity of the AP C3-convertase. In this paper, we describe the generation of a novel mAb targeting human factor B (FB). mAb FB48.4.2, recognizing with high affinity an evolutionary-conserved epitope in the Ba fragment of FB, very efficiently inhibited formation of the AP C3-proconvertase by blocking the interaction between FB and C3b. In vitro assays using rabbit and sheep erythrocytes demonstrated that FB28.4.2 was a potent AP inhibitor that blocked complement-mediated hemolysis in several species. Using ex vivo models of disease we demonstrated that FB28.4.2 protected paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria erythrocytes from complement-mediated hemolysis and inhibited both C3 fragment and C5b-9 deposition on ADP-activated HMEC-1 cells, an experimental model for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Moreover, i.v. injection of FB28.4.2 in rats blocked complement activation in rat serum and prevented the passive induction of experimental autoimmune Myasthenia gravis. As a whole, these data demonstrate the potential value of FB28.4.2 for the treatment of disorders associated with AP complement dysregulation in man and animal models.

  18. Electrostatic contributions drive the interaction between Staphylococcus aureus protein Efb-C and its complement target C3d

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Nurit; Ricklin, Daniel; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Kavraki, Lydia E.; Lambris, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The C3–inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb-C) defines a novel three-helix bundle motif that regulates complement activation. Previous crystallographic studies of Efb-C bound to its cognate subdomain of human C3 (C3d) identified Arg-131 and Asn-138 of Efb-C as key residues for its activity. In order to characterize more completely the physical and chemical driving forces behind this important interaction, we employed in this study a combination of structural, biophysical, and computational methods to analyze the interaction of C3d with Efb-C and the single-point mutants R131A and N138A. Our results show that while these mutations do not drastically affect the structure of the Efb-C/C3d recognition complex, they have significant adverse effects on both the thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of the resulting complexes. We also characterized other key interactions along the Efb-C/C3d binding interface and found an intricate network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that anchor Efb-C to C3d, resulting in its potent complement inhibitory properties. PMID:18687868

  19. Electrostatic Contributions Drive the Interaction Between Staphylococcus aureus Protein Efb-C and its Complement Target C3d

    SciTech Connect

    Haspel, N.; Ricklin, D.; Geisbrecht, B.V.; Kavraki, L.E.; Lambris, J.D.

    2008-11-13

    The C3-inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb-C) defines a novel three-helix bundle motif that regulates complement activation. Previous crystallographic studies of Efb-C bound to its cognate subdomain of human C3 (C3d) identified Arg-131 and Asn-138 of Efb-C as key residues for its activity. In order to characterize more completely the physical and chemical driving forces behind this important interaction, we employed in this study a combination of structural, biophysical, and computational methods to analyze the interaction of C3d with Efb-C and the single-point mutants R131A and N138A. Our results show that while these mutations do not drastically affect the structure of the Efb-C/C3d recognition complex, they have significant adverse effects on both the thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of the resulting complexes. We also characterized other key interactions along the Efb-C/C3d binding interface and found an intricate network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that anchor Efb-C to C3d, resulting in its potent complement inhibitory properties.

  20. Complement Receptor 2 is increased in cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients and regulates C3 function.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Rickard P F; Aeinehband, Shahin; Ström, Mikael; Al Nimer, Faiez; Sandholm, Kerstin; Khademi, Mohsen; Nilsson, Bo; Piehl, Fredrik; Ekdahl, Kristina N

    2016-05-01

    Besides its vital role in immunity, the complement system also contributes to the shaping of the synaptic circuitry of the brain. We recently described that soluble Complement Receptor 2 (sCR2) is part of the nerve injury response in rodents. We here study CR2 in context of multiple sclerosis (MS) and explore the molecular effects of CR2 on C3 activation. Significant increases in sCR2 levels were evident in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from both patients with relapsing-remitting MS (n=33; 6.2ng/mL) and secondary-progressive MS (n=9; 7.0ng/mL) as compared to controls (n=18; 4.1ng/mL). Furthermore, CSF sCR2 levels correlated significantly both with CSF C3 and C1q as well as to a disease severity measure. In vitro, sCR2 inhibited the cleavage and down regulation of C3b to iC3b, suggesting that it exerts a modulatory role in complement activation downstream of C3. These results propose a novel function for CR2/sCR2 in human neuroinflammatory conditions. PMID:27085202

  1. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Jönsson G, Sjöholm AG, Truedsson L, Bengtsson AA, Braconier JH, Sturfelt G. Rheumatological manifestations, organ damage ... 31. Review. Citation on PubMed Truedsson L, Bengtsson AA, Sturfelt G. Complement deficiencies and systemic lupus erythematosus. ...

  2. Complexes between C1q and C3 or C4: novel and specific markers for classical complement pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Diana; Wiessenberg, Hans D; Hart, Margreet; Bruins, Peter; Voskuyl, Alexandre; Daha, Mohamed R; Hack, C Erik

    2005-03-01

    Classical pathway activation is often assessed by measuring circulating levels of activated C4. However, this parameter does not discriminate between activation through the classical or the lectin pathway. We hypothesized that during classical pathway activation, complexes are formed between C1q and activated C4 or C3. Using ELISA, we investigated whether such complexes constitute specific markers for classical pathway activation. In vitro, C1q-C3d/C4d complexes were generated upon incubation of normal recalcified plasma with aggregated IgG or an anti-C1q mAb that activates C1 (mAb anti-C1q-130). In contrast, during incubation with C1s or trypsin, C1q-C3d/C4d complexes were not generated, which excludes an innocent bystander effect. Additionally, C1q-C3d/C4d complexes were not generated during activation of the alternative or the lectin pathway. Repeated freezing and thawing did not influence levels of C1q-C3d/C4d complexes in recalcified plasma. To measure C1q-complement complexes in plasma samples, we separated unbound complement proteins from C1q-C3d/C4d complexes in the samples prior to testing with ELISA. In samples from patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery or suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, we found higher levels of C1q-C4 complexes than in samples from healthy individuals. We conclude that complexes between C1q and C4 or C3 are specific markers of classical complement pathway activation.

  3. Sushi domain-containing protein 4 (SUSD4) inhibits complement by disrupting the formation of the classical C3 convertase.

    PubMed

    Holmquist, Emelie; Okroj, Marcin; Nodin, Björn; Jirström, Karin; Blom, Anna M

    2013-06-01

    Recently discovered Sushi domain-containing protein 4 (SUSD4) contains several Sushi or complement control protein domains; therefore, we hypothesized that it may act as complement inhibitor. Two isoforms of human SUSD4, fused to the Fc part of human IgG, were recombinantly expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The secreted soluble isoform of SUSD4 (SUSD4b) inhibited the classical and lectin complement pathways by 50% at a concentration of 0.5 μM. This effect was due to the fact that 1 μM SUSD4b inhibited the formation of the classical C3 convertase by 90%. The membrane-bound isoform (SUSD4a) inhibited the classical and alternative complement pathways when expressed on the surface of CHO cells but not when expressed as a soluble, truncated protein. In all functional studies, we used known complement inhibitors as positive controls, while Coxsackie adenovirus receptor, which has no effect on complement, expressed with Fc tag, was a negative control. We also studied the mRNA expression of both isoforms of SUSD4 in a panel of human tissues using quantitative PCR and primarily found SUSD4a in esophagus and brain, while SUSD4b was highly expressed in esophagus, ovary, and heart. Overall, our results show that SUSD4 is a novel complement inhibitor with restricted expression.

  4. Using an in vitro xenoantibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity model to evaluate the complement inhibitory activity of the peptidic C3 inhibitor Cp40

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junxiang; Wang, Lu; Xiang, Ying; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Simple and reliable methods for evaluating the inhibitory effects of drug candidates on complement activation are essential for preclinical development. Here, using an immortalized porcine aortic endothelial cell line (iPEC) as target, we evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of an in vitro xenoantibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) model for evaluating the complement inhibitory activity of Cp40, a potent analog of the peptidic C3 inhibitor compstatin. The binding of human xenoantibodies to iPECs led to serum dilution-dependent cell death. Pretreatment of the human serum with Cp40 almost completely inhibited the deposition of C3 fragments and C5b-9 on the cells, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition of CDC against the iPECs. Using the same method to compare the effects of Cp40 on complement activation in humans, rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys, we found that the inhibitory patterns were similar overall. Thus, the in vitro xenoantibody-mediated CDC assay may have considerable potential for future clinical use. PMID:26548839

  5. Differential Complement Activation Pathways Promote C3b Deposition on Native and Acetylated LDL thereby Inducing Lipoprotein Binding to the Complement Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Klop, Boudewijn; van der Pol, Pieter; van Bruggen, Robin; Wang, Yanan; de Vries, Marijke A.; van Santen, Selvetta; O'Flynn, Joseph; van de Geijn, Gert-Jan M.; Njo, Tjin L.; Janssen, Hans W.; de Man, Peter; Jukema, J. Wouter; Rabelink, Ton J.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; van Kooten, Cees; Cabezas, Manuel Castro

    2014-01-01

    Lipoproteins can induce complement activation resulting in opsonization and binding of these complexes to complement receptors. We investigated the binding of opsonized native LDL and acetylated LDL (acLDL) to the complement receptor 1 (CR1). Binding of complement factors C3b, IgM, C1q, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), and properdin to LDL and acLDL were investigated by ELISA. Subsequent binding of opsonized LDL and acLDL to CR1 on CR1-transfected Chinese Hamster Ovarian cells (CHO-CR1) was tested by flow cytometry. Both native LDL and acLDL induced complement activation with subsequent C3b opsonization upon incubation with normal human serum. Opsonized LDL and acLDL bound to CR1. Binding to CHO-CR1 was reduced by EDTA, whereas MgEGTA only reduced the binding of opsonized LDL, but not of acLDL suggesting involvement of the alternative pathway in the binding of acLDL to CR1. In vitro incubations showed that LDL bound C1q, whereas acLDL bound to C1q, IgM, and properdin. MBL did neither bind to LDL nor to acLDL. The relevance of these findings was demonstrated by the fact that ex vivo up-regulation of CR1 on leukocytes was accompanied by a concomitant increased binding of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins to leukocytes without changes in LDL-receptor expression. In conclusion, CR1 is able to bind opsonized native LDL and acLDL. Binding of LDL to CR1 is mediated via the classical pathway, whereas binding of acLDL is mediated via both the classical and alternative pathways. Binding of lipoproteins to CR1 may be of clinical relevance due to the ubiquitous cellular distribution of CR1. PMID:25349208

  6. A complement C3 inhibitor specifically targeted to sites of complement activation effectively ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongbin; Qiao, Fei; Atkinson, Carl; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2007-12-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) represents an animal model of autoimmune polyarthritis with similarities to human rheumatoid arthritis, and therapy with various systemic complement-inhibitory proteins has been investigated in this model with varying results. We investigated the use of complement receptor 2 (CR2)-Crry, a complement inhibitor with the ability to target C3 breakdown products deposited in a rheumatic joint. Following induction of CIA in DBA/1J mice, animals were treated with either PBS or CR2-Crry (every other day, every 4 days, or with a single injection). The severity of clinical disease was significantly reduced in all CR2-Crry-treated groups compared with controls. Joints from mice receiving multiple doses of CR2-Crry showed significantly decreased inflammatory cell infiltrate, cartilage damage, pannus formation, and bone damage. CR2-Crry treatment also significantly decreased production of anti-collagen IgG and the inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. IL-10 and IL-1Ra levels were increased in CR2-Crry-treated mice. CR2-Crry localized preferentially in the joints of mice with CIA. Analysis of IgG and C3 deposition in the joints of treated animals indicated that both complement regulation and the modulation of anti-collagen Ab production contributed to the protective effects of CR2-Crry. Of interest, a previous study reported that Crry-Ig, an untargeted counterpart of CR2-Crry, had minimal effect on disease, even when administered at a sufficiently high dose to maintain chronic complement inhibition. PMID:18025232

  7. Gene array analysis of a rat model of liver transplant tolerance identifies increased complement C3 and the STAT-1/IRF-1 pathway during tolerance induction.

    PubMed

    Cordoba, Shaun P; Wang, Chuanmin; Williams, Rohan; Li, Jian; Smit, Lynn; Sharland, Alexandra; Allen, Richard; McCaughan, Geoffrey; Bishop, Alex

    2006-04-01

    This study aimed to define the molecular mechanism during induction of spontaneous liver transplant tolerance using microarrays and to focus on molecular pathways associated with tolerance by meta-analysis with published studies. The differences in the early immune response between PVG to DA liver transplant recipients that are spontaneously tolerant (TOL) and PVG to Lewis liver transplants that reject (REJ) were examined. Spleens from TOL and REJ on days 1 and 3 were compared by 2 color microarray. Forty-six of 199 genes differentially expressed between TOL and REJ had an immunological function. More immune genes were increased in TOL vs. REJ on day 1, including STAT-1, IRF-1 and complement C3. Differential expression of selected genes was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. The results were compared to two published high-throughput studies of rat liver transplant tolerance and showed that C3 was increased in all three models, while STAT-1 and IRF-1 were increased in two models. The early increases in immune genes in TOL confirmed previous reports of an active early immune response in TOL. In conclusion, the increase in STAT-1, IRF-1 and complement component C3 in several models of liver transplant tolerance suggests that the STAT-1/IRF-1 apoptotic pathway and C3 may be involved in the tolerogenic mechanism.

  8. Localization of the expression of complement component 3 in the human endometrium by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sayegh, R.A.; Tao, Xiao Jing; Awwad, J.T.

    1996-04-01

    C3 production by the human endometrium has been previously described. The objective of the current study was to localize the site of expression and regulation of the third component of complement, C3, in the endometrium. Eight secretory and eight proliferative archival endometrial samples from hysterectomy and endometrial biopsy specimens were used for in situ hybridization analysis. This analysis was performed with a radiolabeled riboprobe synthesized from a 736-bp template representing sequence 1944-2680 of the human C3 complementary DNA. Duplicate sections were hybridized with sense and antisense riboprobes. Resultant autoradiograms were analyzed qualitatively by light- and darkfield microscopy. In proliferative endometrium, minimal expression of C3 was observed and was limited to a few stromal patches and glands throughout the section. In the secretory samples, prominent C3 expression was observed in both the glands and stroma of the basalis layer. Endometrial lymphocytes did not express C3. Endometrial stromal and glandular cells express the C3 gene. Endometrial lymphocytes did not express C3, but other nondistinct lymphoid elements scattered in the stroma may be expressing C3. There was a visibly more intense expression of C3 in the basalis layer of the secretory endometrium than in proliferative endometrium. The spatial and temporal pattern of C3 expression may have implications in normal menstrual physiology and in the immunological response of the endometrium to the invading trophoblast during placentation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid influence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang-shuai; Li, Qing-feng; Dong, Ming-min; Zan, Tao; Ding, Shuang; Liu, Lin-bo

    2016-01-01

    Nerve regeneration conditioned fluid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the proteinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis confirmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8β and complement factor D) in the nerve regeneration conditioned fluid and each varied at different time points. These findings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration. PMID:27212935

  10. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela; Jin, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3(-/-)), complement factor B (fB(-/-)), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3(-/-)mice than in WT controls, whereas fB(-/-)mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3(-/-)sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB(-/-)sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus.

  11. The role of complement C3 and fibrinogen in monocyte adhesion to PEO like plasma deposited tetraglyme

    PubMed Central

    Szott, Luisa M.; Horbett, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The role of complement C3 in mediating adhesion of monocytes to plasma deposited tetraglyme surfaces was studied. Although fibrinogen (Fg) is usually considered the main factor in mediating phagocyte attachment, plasma deposited PEO-like tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (tetraglyme) coatings that have ultra-low Fg adsorption (< 10 ng/cm2) from low concentration solutions and low monocyte adhesion in vitro still show high phagocyte adhesion after short implantations and later become encapsulated when tested in vivo. To test whether higher Fg adsorption under in vivo conditions could explain the higher in vivo reactivity, we again measured the resistance of tetraglyme films to Fg adsorption. We found a surprising and previously unreported increased amount of adsorbed Fg on tetraglyme surfaces from higher concentration protein solutions. However, monocyte adhesion to tetraglyme did not markedly increase despite the increased Fg adsorption. We thus suspected proteins other than Fg must be responsible for the increased in vivo reactivity. We found that on tetraglyme pre-adsorbed with C3-depleted serum, monocyte adhesion was greatly reduced as compared to samples adsorbed with normal serum. Addition of exogenous pure C3 to the serum used to pre-adsorb the surfaces restored monocyte adhesion to tetraglyme coatings. While Fg clearly plays an important role in mediating monocyte adhesion to tetraglyme surfaces, the results show an additional role for adsorbed C3 in monocyte adhesion. PMID:20939050

  12. Antibody-mediated complement C3b/iC3b binding to group B Streptococcus in paired mother and baby serum samples in a refugee population on the Thailand-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Jenny; Thomas, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Turner, Claudia; Turner, Paul; Nosten, Francois; Le Doare, Kirsty; Hudson, Michael; Heath, Paul T; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. In this study, we determined antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b onto the bacterial cell surface of GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V. This was determined for 520 mother and umbilical cord serum sample pairs obtained at the time of birth from a population on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b was detected to at least one serotype in 91% of mothers, despite a known carriage rate in this population of only 12%. Antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition corresponded to known carriage rates, with the highest levels of complement deposition observed onto the most prevalent serotype (serotype II) followed by serotypes Ia, III, V, and Ib. Finally, neonates born to mothers carrying serotype II GBS at the time of birth showed higher antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against serotype II GBS than neonates born to mothers with no serotype II carriage. Assessment of antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against GBS may provide insights into the seroepidemiology of anti-GBS antibodies in mothers and infants in different populations. PMID:25589553

  13. Antibody-Mediated Complement C3b/iC3b Binding to Group B Streptococcus in Paired Mother and Baby Serum Samples in a Refugee Population on the Thailand-Myanmar Border

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Jenny; Thomas, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Turner, Claudia; Turner, Paul; Nosten, Francois; Le Doare, Kirsty; Hudson, Michael; Heath, Paul T.; Gorringe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. In this study, we determined antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b onto the bacterial cell surface of GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V. This was determined for 520 mother and umbilical cord serum sample pairs obtained at the time of birth from a population on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Antibody-mediated deposition of complement C3b/iC3b was detected to at least one serotype in 91% of mothers, despite a known carriage rate in this population of only 12%. Antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition corresponded to known carriage rates, with the highest levels of complement deposition observed onto the most prevalent serotype (serotype II) followed by serotypes Ia, III, V, and Ib. Finally, neonates born to mothers carrying serotype II GBS at the time of birth showed higher antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against serotype II GBS than neonates born to mothers with no serotype II carriage. Assessment of antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition against GBS may provide insights into the seroepidemiology of anti-GBS antibodies in mothers and infants in different populations. PMID:25589553

  14. Solution structure of the complex between CR2 SCR 1-2 and C3d of human complement: an X-ray scattering and sedimentation modelling study.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Hannah E; Eaton, Julian T; Hannan, Jonathan P; Holers, V Michael; Perkins, Stephen J

    2005-02-25

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) forms a tight complex with C3d, a fragment of C3, the major complement component. Previous crystal structures of the C3d-CR2 SCR 1-2 complex and free CR2 SCR 1-2 showed that the two SCR domains of CR2 form contact with each other in a closed V-shaped structure. SCR 1 and SCR 2 are connected by an unusually long eight-residue linker peptide. Medium-resolution solution structures for CR2 SCR 1-2, C3d, and their complex were determined by X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation. CR2 SCR 1-2 is monomeric. For CR2 SCR 1-2, its radius of gyration R(G) of 2.12(+/-0.05) nm, its maximum length of 10nm and its sedimentation coefficient s20,w(o) of 1.40(+/-0.03) S do not agree with those calculated from the crystal structures, and instead suggest an open structure. Computer modelling of the CR2 SCR1-2 solution structure was based on the structural randomisation of the eight-residue linker peptide joining SCR 1 and SCR 2 to give 9950 trial models. Comparisons with the X-ray scattering curve indicated that the most favoured arrangements for the two SCR domains corresponded to an open V-shaped structure with no contacts between the SCR domains. For C3d, X-ray scattering and sedimentation velocity experiments showed that it exists as a monomer-dimer equilibrium with a dissociation constant of 40 microM. The X-ray scattering curve for monomeric C3d gave an R(G) value of 1.95 nm, and this together with its s20,w(o) value of 3.17 S gave good agreement with the monomeric C3d crystal structure. Modelling of the C3d dimer gave good agreements with its scattering and ultracentrifugation parameters. For the complex, scattering and ultracentrifugation experiments showed that there was no dimerisation, indicating that the C3d dimerisation site was located close to the CR2 SCR 1-2 binding site. The R(G) value of 2.44(+/-0.1) nm, its length of 9 nm and its s20,w(o) value of 3.45(+/-0.01) S showed that its structure was not much more

  15. Complement-coated antibody-transfer (CCAT); serum IgA1 antibodies intercept and transport C4 and C3 fragments and preserve IgG1 deployment (PGD).

    PubMed

    Boackle, Robert J; Nguyen, Quang L; Leite, Renata S; Yang, Xiaofeng; Vesely, Jana

    2006-02-01

    In periodontal disease, IgG1 and IgA1 antibodies produced in situ deposit on antigens in the affected tissues. Thus, there is an interest in the effect of co-deposited IgA1 antibodies on complement activation by IgG1-immune complexes. In the present study, we first analyzed the effect of IgA1-immune complexes on complement using human IgA1 antibodies to dansyl (with dansylated human serum albumin serving as the immobilized antigen). It was observed that these IgA1-immune complexes when incubated for prolonged times with 33% human serum as a source of complement received C4b and C3b deposition. As C4b and C3b deposited on the IgA1 antibodies and on the antigenic surface, the complement-coated IgA1 antibodies departed. These fluid-phase complement-coated IgA1 antibodies were transferred to antigen-coated microtiter-ELISA plates, where they became bound to the antigens. Thus, the complement-coated IgA1 antibodies retained their antigen-binding function, especially as a proportion of their covalently bound C3b progressively degraded to iC3b and C3d. Genetically engineered carbohydrate-deficient mutant human IgA1 antibodies were used to assess the role of carbohydrate in accepting the C4b and C3b depositions, and these studies indicated that the carbohydrate on the Fc-region of IgA1 played a positive role. Another interesting finding generated by this study was that when IgA1 was co-deposited with IgG1 antibodies, and serum complement was added, the IgG1 antibodies tended to remain on the antigenic surface. The co-deposited IgA1 antibodies not only controlled (reduced) the rate of the consumption of the first component of complement (C1) and of classical complement pathway activation by IgG1-immune complexes (and therein reduced the rate of complement-mediated dissolution of the IgG1-immune complexes), but also the co-deposited IgA1 antibodies simultaneously intercepted/accepted C4b and C3b, then departed, as complement began to cover the antigenic surfaces. The process

  16. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity

    PubMed Central

    Khoa, D. V. A.; Wimmers, K.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative) leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS), Duroc (DU), Berlin miniature pig (BMP), German Landrace (LR), Pietrain (PIE), and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig). Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP) that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE) show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK). Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9) as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future. PMID:26194222

  17. The novel complement inhibitor human CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) protein promotes factor I-mediated degradation of C4b and C3b and inhibits the membrane attack complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Esparza, Astrid; Kalchishkova, Nikolina; Kurbasic, Emila; Jiang, Wen G; Blom, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) is a transmembrane protein containing 15 consecutive complement control protein (CCP) domains, which are characteristic for complement inhibitors. We expressed a membrane-bound fragment of human CSMD1 composed of the 15 C-terminal CCP domains and demonstrated that it inhibits deposition of C3b by the classical pathway on the surface of Chinese hamster ovary cells by 70% at 6% serum and of C9 (component of membrane attack complex) by 90% at 1.25% serum. Furthermore, this fragment of CSMD1 served as a cofactor to factor I-mediated degradation of C3b. In all functional assays performed, well-characterized complement inhibitors were used as positive controls, whereas Coxsackie adenovirus receptor, a protein with no effect on complement, was a negative control. Moreover, attenuation of expression in human T47 breast cancer cells that express endogenous CSMD1 significantly increased C3b deposition on these cells by 45% at 8% serum compared with that for the controls. Furthermore, by expressing a soluble 17-21 CCP fragment of CSMD1, we found that CSMD1 inhibits complement by promoting factor I-mediated C4b/C3b degradation and inhibition of MAC assembly at the level of C7. Our results revealed a novel complement inhibitor for the classical and lectin pathways.

  18. The novel complement inhibitor human CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) protein promotes factor I-mediated degradation of C4b and C3b and inhibits the membrane attack complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Esparza, Astrid; Kalchishkova, Nikolina; Kurbasic, Emila; Jiang, Wen G; Blom, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) is a transmembrane protein containing 15 consecutive complement control protein (CCP) domains, which are characteristic for complement inhibitors. We expressed a membrane-bound fragment of human CSMD1 composed of the 15 C-terminal CCP domains and demonstrated that it inhibits deposition of C3b by the classical pathway on the surface of Chinese hamster ovary cells by 70% at 6% serum and of C9 (component of membrane attack complex) by 90% at 1.25% serum. Furthermore, this fragment of CSMD1 served as a cofactor to factor I-mediated degradation of C3b. In all functional assays performed, well-characterized complement inhibitors were used as positive controls, whereas Coxsackie adenovirus receptor, a protein with no effect on complement, was a negative control. Moreover, attenuation of expression in human T47 breast cancer cells that express endogenous CSMD1 significantly increased C3b deposition on these cells by 45% at 8% serum compared with that for the controls. Furthermore, by expressing a soluble 17-21 CCP fragment of CSMD1, we found that CSMD1 inhibits complement by promoting factor I-mediated C4b/C3b degradation and inhibition of MAC assembly at the level of C7. Our results revealed a novel complement inhibitor for the classical and lectin pathways. PMID:23964079

  19. Immunological studies of human placentae: complement components in immature and mature chorionic villi.

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, W P; Jarret, R; Keane, M; Johnson, P M; Boackle, R J

    1980-01-01

    The localization and distribution of complement components in term and pre-term normal human placentae have been studied by using haemadsorption and immunofluorescence experiments. The components Clq, C4, C5, C6 and C9 were identified in characteristic locations. Receptors for C3 and C4 were not found. Complement was associated with certain stromal cells, areas of fibrinoid necrosis within the trophoblastic mantle, and in the walls and endothelia of foetal stem vessels. Activation of the complement system on trophoblastic basement membranes (TBM) did not appear to involve the early reacting components of the classical pathway of complement activation, because C1q, C4 and C2 could not be identified on TBM. The C6 component was identified within cytoplasmic granules of foetal stem vessel endothelia, suggesting that it may be synthesized by these cells. These findings put forward the possibility that complement may play an immunobiological role in the materno-foetal relationship during normal human pregnancy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7002386

  20. Selectivity of C3-opsonin targeted complement inhibitors: A distinct advantage in the protection of erythrocytes from paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria patients.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christoph Q; Harder, Markus J; Nichols, Eva-Maria; Hebecker, Mario; Anliker, Markus; Höchsmann, Britta; Simmet, Thomas; Csincsi, Ádám I; Uzonyi, Barbara; Pappworth, Isabel Y; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Józsi, Mihály; Marchbank, Kevin J

    2016-04-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is characterized by complement-mediated cell lysis due to deficiency of GPI-anchored complement regulators. Blockage of the lytic pathway by eculizumab is the only available therapy for PNH patients and shows remarkable benefits, but regularly yields PNH erythrocytes opsonized with fragments of complement protein C3, rendering such erythrocytes prone to extravascular hemolysis. This effect is associated with insufficient responsiveness seen in a subgroup of PNH patients. Novel C3-opsonin targeted complement inhibitors act earlier in the cascade, at the level of activated C3 and are engineered from parts of the natural complement regulator Factor H (FH) or complement receptor 2 (CR2). This inhibitor class comprises three variants of "miniFH" and the clinically developed "FH-CR2" fusion-protein (TT30). We show that the approach of FH-CR2 to target C3-opsonins was more efficient in preventing complement activation induced by foreign surfaces, whereas the miniFH variants were substantially more active in controlling complement on PNH erythrocytes. Subtle differences were noted in the ability of each version of miniFH to protect human PNH cells. Importantly, miniFH and FH-CR2 interfered only minimally with complement-mediated serum killing of bacteria when compared to untargeted inhibition of all complement pathways by eculizumab. Thus, the molecular design of each C3-opsonin targeted complement inhibitor determines its potency in respect to the nature of the activator/surface providing potential functionality in PNH. PMID:26792457

  1. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system. 866.5240 Section 866.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system. 866.5240 Section 866.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  3. Complement component 3 is necessary to preserve myocardium and myocardial function in chronic myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wysoczynski, Marcin; Solanki, Mitesh; Borkowska, Sylwia; van Hoose, Patrick; Brittian, Kenneth R; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Rokosh, Gregg

    2014-09-01

    Activation of the complement cascade (CC) with myocardial infarction (MI) acutely initiates immune cell infiltration, membrane attack complex formation on injured myocytes, and exacerbates myocardial injury. Recent studies implicate the CC in mobilization of stem/progenitor cells and tissue regeneration. Its role in chronic MI is unknown. Here, we consider complement component C3, in the chronic response to MI. C3 knockout (KO) mice were studied after permanent coronary artery ligation. C3 deficiency exacerbated myocardial dysfunction 28 days after MI compared to WT with further impaired systolic function and LV dilation despite similar infarct size 24 hours post-MI. Morphometric analysis 28 days post-MI showed C3 KO mice had more scar tissue with less viable myocardium within the infarct zone which correlated with decreased c-kit(pos) cardiac stem/progenitor cells (CPSC), decreased proliferating Ki67(pos) CSPCs and decreased formation of new BrdU(pos) /α-sarcomeric actin(pos) myocytes, and increased apoptosis compared to WT. Decreased CSPCs and increased apoptosis were evident 7 days post-MI in C3 KO hearts. The inflammatory response with MI was attenuated in the C3 KO and was accompanied by attenuated hematopoietic, pluripotent, and cardiac stem/progenitor cell mobilization into the peripheral blood 72 hours post-MI. These results are the first to demonstrate that CC, through C3, contributes to myocardial preservation and regeneration in response to chronic MI. Responses in the C3 KO infer that C3 activation in response to MI expands the resident CSPC population, increases new myocyte formation, increases and preserves myocardium, inflammatory response, and bone marrow stem/progenitor cell mobilization to preserve myocardial function.

  4. Design and development of TT30, a novel C3d-targeted C3/C5 convertase inhibitor for treatment of human complement alternative pathway-mediated diseases.

    PubMed

    Fridkis-Hareli, Masha; Storek, Michael; Mazsaroff, Istvan; Risitano, Antonio M; Lundberg, Ante S; Horvath, Christopher J; Holers, V Michael

    2011-10-27

    To selectively modulate human complement alternative pathway (CAP) activity implicated in a wide range of acute and chronic inflammatory conditions and to provide local cell surface and tissue-based inhibition of complement-induced damage, we developed TT30, a novel therapeutic fusion protein linking the human complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21) C3 fragment (C3frag = iC3b, C3dg, C3d)-binding domain with the CAP inhibitory domain of human factor H (fH). TT30 efficiently blocks ex vivo CAP-dependent C3frag accumulation on activated surfaces, membrane attack complex (MAC) formation and hemolysis of RBCs in a CR2-dependent manner, and with a ∼ 150-fold potency gain over fH, without interference of C3 activation or MAC formation through the classic and lectin pathways. TT30 protects RBCs from hemolysis and remains bound and detectable for at least 24 hours. TT30 selectively inhibits CAP in cynomolgus monkeys and is bioavailable after subcutaneous injection. Using a unique combination of targeting and effector domains, TT30 controls cell surface CAP activation and has substantial potential utility for the treatment of human CAP-mediated diseases.

  5. Design and development of TT30, a novel C3d-targeted C3/C5 convertase inhibitor for treatment of human complement alternative pathway-mediated diseases.

    PubMed

    Fridkis-Hareli, Masha; Storek, Michael; Mazsaroff, Istvan; Risitano, Antonio M; Lundberg, Ante S; Horvath, Christopher J; Holers, V Michael

    2011-10-27

    To selectively modulate human complement alternative pathway (CAP) activity implicated in a wide range of acute and chronic inflammatory conditions and to provide local cell surface and tissue-based inhibition of complement-induced damage, we developed TT30, a novel therapeutic fusion protein linking the human complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21) C3 fragment (C3frag = iC3b, C3dg, C3d)-binding domain with the CAP inhibitory domain of human factor H (fH). TT30 efficiently blocks ex vivo CAP-dependent C3frag accumulation on activated surfaces, membrane attack complex (MAC) formation and hemolysis of RBCs in a CR2-dependent manner, and with a ∼ 150-fold potency gain over fH, without interference of C3 activation or MAC formation through the classic and lectin pathways. TT30 protects RBCs from hemolysis and remains bound and detectable for at least 24 hours. TT30 selectively inhibits CAP in cynomolgus monkeys and is bioavailable after subcutaneous injection. Using a unique combination of targeting and effector domains, TT30 controls cell surface CAP activation and has substantial potential utility for the treatment of human CAP-mediated diseases. PMID:21860027

  6. Stringent Regulation of Complement Lectin Pathway C3/C5 Convertase By C4b-Binding Protein (C4bp)

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Nenoo; Rajagopalan, Rema; Salvi, Veena P.

    2009-01-01

    The complement lectin pathway, an essential component of the innate immune system, is geared for rapid recognition of infections as each C4b deposited via this pathway is capable of forming a C3/C5 convertase. In the present study, role of C4b-binding protein (C4BP) in regulating the lectin pathway C3/C5 convertase assembled on zymosan and sheep erythrocytes coated with mannan (EMan) was examined. While the C4BP concentration for inhibiting 50% (IC50) formation of surface-bound C3 convertase on the two surfaces was similar to that obtained for the soluble C3 convertase (1.05 nM), ∼3- and 41-fold more was required to inhibit assembly of the C5 convertase on zymosan (2.81 nM) and EMan (42.66 nM). No difference in binding interactions between C4BP and surface-bound C4b alone or in complex with C3b was observed. Increasing the C4b density on zymosan (14,000-431,000 C4b/Zym) increased the number of C4b bound per C4BP from 2.87 to 8.23 indicating that at high C4b density all seven α-chains of C4BP are engaged in C4b-binding. In contrast, the number of C4b bound per C4BP remained constant (3.79 ± 0.60) when the C4b density on EMan was increased. The data also show that C4BP regulates assembly and decay of the lectin pathway C3/C5 convertase more stringently than the classical pathway C3/C5 convertase because of a ∼7 to 13-fold greater affinity for C4b deposited via the lectin pathway than the classical pathway. C4BP thus regulates efficiently the four times greater potential of the lectin pathway than the classical pathway in generating the C3/C5 convertase and hence production of pro-inflammatory products, which are required to fight infections but occasionally cause pathological inflammatory reactions. PMID:19660812

  7. An analysis of the levels of complement components in the synovial fluid in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Swaak, A J; Van Rooyen, A; Planten, O; Han, H; Hattink, O; Hack, E

    1987-09-01

    A linear relationship between the synovial fluid to serum concentration ratios and log molecular weight was found for six plasma proteins, which are largely synthesized by the liver. Production or utilization of a given protein in the joint can, therefore, be determined by its deviation from the calculated diffusion line. Based on this diffusion model the role of the complement system was investigated in the joint effusions of 48 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 6 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and 7 patients with meniscus lesions (ML). Among these three groups quantitative differences were found in the metabolism or utilization of several complement components, based on the fact that the ratios were lower than expected for diffusion of proteins of similar molecular weight. The ratios for the RA group were the lowest. In the three patient groups, results showed increased consumption mainly of C3 and C4 locally in the joint. The existence of a real complement activation in the joints of the three different patient groups was further proved by the elevated levels of C3 breakdown products (C3d). Overall this kind of calculation provides us with a method for studying the role of other proteins which may be important in the inflammatory process of the joint.

  8. Segment spanning residues 727-768 of the complement C3 sequence contains a neoantigenic site and accommodates the binding of CR1, factor H, and factor B.

    PubMed

    Becherer, J D; Alsenz, J; Esparza, I; Hack, C E; Lambris, J D

    1992-02-18

    CR1, CR2, DAF, MCP, factor H, C4bp, factor B, and C3 are members of a family of structurally related molecules, the majority of which belong to the complement system. Several of these molecules also share functional features such as cofactor and decay/dissociation activity and compete with one another in binding to C3b. Since factor H appears to bind to multiple sites in C3, we investigated the relationship between the factor H- and CR1-binding sites in C3b. Factor H binding to C3b is inhibited by either the C3c or C3d fragments, and addition of both fragments together augments this inhibition. One monoclonal anti-C3c antibody, anti-C3-9, which recognizes a neoantigenic epitope expressed upon cleavage to C3 to C3b, inhibited both factor H and CR1 binding to EC3b cells. This monoclonal antibody (MoAb) also inhibited factor B binding to EC3b. Two observations further supported our hypothesis that these molecules bind to proximal sites in C3b. First, a synthetic peptide spanning this region of C3b (C3(727-768)) inhibited factor H binding. Second, antibodies raised against this peptide inhibited binding to CR1, factor H, and factor B to C3b. These data show that H binds to at least two sites in C3b: the site in the C3c fragment is within the identified CR1-binding domain while the site in the C3d fragment surrounds the CR2-binding site.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R; de Rivera, Heather; Davis, Avery; Hammond, Timothy R; Kamitaki, Nolan; Tooley, Katherine; Presumey, Jessy; Baum, Matthew; Van Doren, Vanessa; Genovese, Giulio; Rose, Samuel A; Handsaker, Robert E; Daly, Mark J; Carroll, Michael C; Stevens, Beth; McCarroll, Steven A

    2016-02-11

    Schizophrenia is a heritable brain illness with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Schizophrenia's strongest genetic association at a population level involves variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, but the genes and molecular mechanisms accounting for this have been challenging to identify. Here we show that this association arises in part from many structurally diverse alleles of the complement component 4 (C4) genes. We found that these alleles generated widely varying levels of C4A and C4B expression in the brain, with each common C4 allele associating with schizophrenia in proportion to its tendency to generate greater expression of C4A. Human C4 protein localized to neuronal synapses, dendrites, axons, and cell bodies. In mice, C4 mediated synapse elimination during postnatal development. These results implicate excessive complement activity in the development of schizophrenia and may help explain the reduced numbers of synapses in the brains of individuals with schizophrenia.

  10. Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R.; de Rivera, Heather; Davis, Avery; Hammond, Timothy R.; Kamitaki, Nolan; Tooley, Katherine; Presumey, Jessy; Baum, Matthew; Van Doren, Vanessa; Genovese, Giulio; Rose, Samuel A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Daly, Mark J.; Carroll, Michael C.; Stevens, Beth; McCarroll, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a heritable brain illness with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Schizophrenia’s strongest genetic association at a population level involves variation in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus, but the genes and molecular mechanisms accounting for this have been challenging to recognize. We show here that schizophrenia’s association with the MHC locus arises in substantial part from many structurally diverse alleles of the complement component 4 (C4) genes. We found that these alleles promoted widely varying levels of C4A and C4B expression and associated with schizophrenia in proportion to their tendency to promote greater expression of C4A in the brain. Human C4 protein localized at neuronal synapses, dendrites, axons, and cell bodies. In mice, C4 mediated synapse elimination during postnatal development. These results implicate excessive complement activity in the development of schizophrenia and may help explain the reduced numbers of synapses in the brains of individuals affected with schizophrenia. PMID:26814963

  11. Protective effects of Ephedra sinica extract on blood-brain barrier integrity and neurological function correlate with complement C3 reduction after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Shilun; Li, Wenyan; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Hengli; Tang, Jun; Chen, Qianwei; Liu, Xin; Zhang, John H; Chen, Yujie; Feng, Hua

    2015-11-16

    Early brain injury, which is associated with brain cell death, blood-brain barrier disruption, brain edema, and other pathophysiological events, is thought to be the main target in the prevention of poor outcomes after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Emerging evidences indicates that complement system, especially complement C3 is detrimental to neurological outcomes of SAH patients. Recently, Ephedra sinica extract was extracted and purified, which exhibits ability to block the activity of the classical and alternative pathways of complement, and improve neurological outcomes after spinal cord injury and ischemic brain injury. However, it is still unclear whether Ephedra sinica extract could attenuate early brain injury after SAH. In the present study, a standard endovascular perforation model was used to produce the experimental SAH in Sprague-Dawley rats. Ephedra sinica extract (15mg/kg) was orally administrated daily and evaluated for effects on modified Garcia score, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation and fluorescence, cortex cell death by TUNEL staining, and the expressions of complement C3/C3b, activated C3, sonic hedgehog, osteopontin and matrix metalloproteinase-9 by western bolt and immunofluorescence staining. We founded that the Ephedra sinica extract alleviated the blood-brain barrier disruption and brain edema, eventually improved neurological functions after SAH in rats. These neuroprotective effects was associated with the inhibition of complement C3, possibly via upregulating sonic hedgehog and osteopontin signal, and reducing the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-9. Taking together, these observations suggested complement C3 inhibition by the Ephedra sinica extract may be a protective factor against early brain injury after SAH. PMID:26518242

  12. Microbe-specific C3b deposition in the horseshoe crab complement system in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Toyoki; Shibata, Toshio; Kitazaki, Kazuki; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens in the mammalian complement system, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. To understand the molecular mechanism of C3b deposition on microbes, we characterized two types of C2/factor B homologs (designated TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2) identified from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Although the domain architectures of TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were identical to those of mammalian homologs, they contained five-repeated and seven-repeated complement control protein domains at their N-terminal regions, respectively. TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were synthesized and glycosylated in hemocytes and secreted to hemolymph plasma, which existed in a complex with C3 (TtC3), and their activation by microbes was absolutely Mg(2+)-dependent. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TtC3b deposition was Mg(2+)-dependent on Gram-positive bacteria or fungi, but not on Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this analysis demonstrated that Ca(2+)-dependent lectins (C-reactive protein-1 and tachylectin-5A) were required for TtC3b deposition on Gram-positive bacteria, and that a Ca(2+)-independent lectin (Tachypleus plasma lectin-1) was definitely indispensable for TtC3b deposition on fungi. In contrast, a horseshoe crab lipopolysaccharide-sensitive protease factor C was necessary and sufficient to deposit TtC3b on Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that plasma lectins and factor C play key roles in microbe-specific TtC3b deposition in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner. PMID:22611464

  13. Microbe-specific C3b deposition in the horseshoe crab complement system in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Toyoki; Shibata, Toshio; Kitazaki, Kazuki; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens in the mammalian complement system, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. To understand the molecular mechanism of C3b deposition on microbes, we characterized two types of C2/factor B homologs (designated TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2) identified from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Although the domain architectures of TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were identical to those of mammalian homologs, they contained five-repeated and seven-repeated complement control protein domains at their N-terminal regions, respectively. TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were synthesized and glycosylated in hemocytes and secreted to hemolymph plasma, which existed in a complex with C3 (TtC3), and their activation by microbes was absolutely Mg(2+)-dependent. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TtC3b deposition was Mg(2+)-dependent on Gram-positive bacteria or fungi, but not on Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this analysis demonstrated that Ca(2+)-dependent lectins (C-reactive protein-1 and tachylectin-5A) were required for TtC3b deposition on Gram-positive bacteria, and that a Ca(2+)-independent lectin (Tachypleus plasma lectin-1) was definitely indispensable for TtC3b deposition on fungi. In contrast, a horseshoe crab lipopolysaccharide-sensitive protease factor C was necessary and sufficient to deposit TtC3b on Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that plasma lectins and factor C play key roles in microbe-specific TtC3b deposition in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

  14. Generation of three different fragments of bound C3 with purified factor I or serum. II. Location of binding sites in the C3 Fragments for Factors B and H, complement receptors , and bovine conglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Ross, GD; Newman, SL; Lambris, JD; Devery-Pocius, JE; Cain, JA; Lackmann, PJ

    1983-01-01

    The many different recognized functions of C3 are dependent upon the ability of the activated C3 molecule both to bind covalently to protein and carbohydrate surfaces and to provide binding sites for as many as eleven different proteins. The location of the binding sites for six of these different proteins (factors B and H, complement receptors CR(1), CR(2) and CR(3) and conglutinin) was examined in the naturally occurring C3-fragments generated by C3 activation (C3b) and degradation by Factor I (iC3b, C3c, C3d,g) and trypsin (C3d). Evidence was obtained for at least four distinct binding sites in C3 for these six different C3 ligands. One binding site for B was detectable only in C3b, whereas a second binding site for H and CR(1) was detectable in both C3b and iC3b. The affinity of the binding site for H and CR(1) was charge dependent and considerably reduced in iC3b as compared to C3b. H binding to iC3b-coated sheep erythrocytes (EC3bi) was measurable only in low ionic strength buffer (4 mS). The finding that C3c-coated microspheres bound to CR(1), indicated that this second binding site was still intact in the C3c fragment. However, H binding to C3c was not examined. A third binding site in C3 for CR(2) was exposed in the d region by factor I cleavage of C3b into iC3b, and the activity of this site was unaffected by the further I cleavage of iC3b into C3d,g. Removal of the 8,000-dalton C3g fragment from C3d,g with trypsin forming C3d, resulted in reduced CR2 activity. However, because saturating amounts of monoclonal anti-C3g did not block the CR(2)-binding activity of EC3d,g, it appears unlikely that the g region of C3d,g or iC3b forms a part of the CR(2)-binding site. In addition, detergent-solubilized EC3d (C3d-OR) inhibited the CR(2)-binding activity of EC3d,g. Monocytes and neutrophils, that had been previously thought to lack CR(2) because of their inability to form EC3d rosettes, did bind EC3d,g containing greater than 5 × 10(4) C3d,g molecules per E

  15. Hereditary deficiency of the seventh component of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, J T; Gall, E P; Norman, M E; Nilsson, U R; Zimmerman, T S

    1975-01-01

    Deficiency of the seventh component of complement has been found in the serum of a 42-yr-old Caucasian woman who has Raynaud's phenomenon, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia. Partial deficiency was found in the serum of the patient's parents and children, indicating a pattern of inheritance of autosomal codominance. Transfusion experiments indicated that exogenous C7 had a 91-h halk-life in the patient. There was no evidence for C7 synthesis after transfusion. No C7 inhibitors were detected in the patient's serum. The patient's serum was found to support the activation of complement by both the classical and properdin pathways to the C7 stage. The addition of C7 to the patient's serum permitted it to support hemolytic reactions initiated by either pathway. No defects could be detected in plasma or whole blood coagulation. The patient's serum was deficient in opsonizing unsensitized yeast particles in serum and in the generation of chemotactic factor by antigen-antibody complexes and endotoxin. Both deficiencies were corrected by the addition of C7. These observations suggest a key role for C7 for in vitro yeast phagocytosis and chemotaxis generation. However, the patient's lack of infections indicates a relatively minor role for C7 in human resistance to infection. PMID:1099121

  16. Identification of three physically and functionally distinct binding sites for C3b in human complement factor H by deletion mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, A K; Pangburn, M K

    1996-01-01

    Human complement factor H controls spontaneous activation of complement in plasma and appears to play a role in distinguishing host cells from activators of the alternative pathway of complement. In both mice and humans, the protein is composed of 20 homologous short consensus repeat (SCR) domains. The size of the protein suggests that portions of the structure outside the known C3b binding site (SCR 1-4) possess a significant biological role. We have expressed the full-length cDNA of factor H in the baculovirus system and have shown the recombinant protein to be fully active. Mutants of this full-length protein have now been prepared, purified, and examined for cofactor activity and binding to C3b and heparin. The results demonstrate (i) that factor H has at least three sites that bind C3b, (ii) that one of these sites is located in SCR domains 1-4, as has been shown by others, (iii) that a second site exists in the domain 6-10 region, (iv) that a third site resides in the SCR 16-20 region, and (v) that two heparin binding sites exist in factor H, one near SCR 13 and another in the SCR 6-10 region. Functional assays demonstrated that only the first C3b site located in SCR 1-4 expresses factor I cofactor activity. Mutant proteins lacking any one of the three C3b binding sites exhibited 6- to 8-fold reductions in affinity for C3b on sheep erythrocytes, indicating that all three sites contribute to the control of complement activation on erythrocytes. The identification of multiple functionally distinct sites on factor H clarifies many of the heretofore unexplainable behaviors of this protein, including the heterogeneous binding of factor H to surface-bound C3b, the effects of trypsin cleavage, and the differential control of complement activation on activators and nonactivators of the alternative pathway of complement. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8855297

  17. Formation of C3-IgG complexes in serum by aggregated IgG and by non-immunoglobulin activators of complement.

    PubMed

    van Dam, A P; Hack, C E

    1987-06-01

    We studied the generation of C3-IgG complexes during the activation of C3 in serum by aggregated human IgG (AHG), zymosan or cobra venom factor (CVF). C3-IgG complexes were detected by specific radioimmunoassays: samples to be tested were incubated with anti-IgG Sepharose, and complexes that had bound to the Sepharose were detected by incubation with either 125I-anti-C3c or 125I-anti-C3d, g. Incubation of serum with as little as 6 micrograms AHG per ml, for 30 min at 37 degrees, resulted in the generation of C3-IgG complexes. When serum was incubated with zymosan or CVF, C3-IgG complexes were also generated. AHG appeared to be more effective in the generation of C3-IgG complexes than CVF. We calculated that AHG (2 mg/ml) caused about 36% of the C3 to be fixed to IgG, CVF (400 micrograms/ml) about 14%. Finally, the presence of C3 fixed to IgG in serum incubated with CVF was demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), followed by immunoblotting. This study indicates that the formation of C3-IgG complexes in serum is not only induced by immune complexes but also by non-immunoglobulin activators. Therefore, C3-IgG complexes might be considered as complement activation products, and their detection in patients' samples should not be considered as conclusive evidence for the presence of immune complexes.

  18. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D.; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cad-herin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cad-herin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27041467

  19. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cadherin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cadherin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders.

  20. Complement

    MedlinePlus

    ... in: Cancer Certain infections Ulcerative colitis Decreased complement activity may be seen in: Cirrhosis Glomerulonephritis Hereditary angioedema Hepatitis Kidney transplant rejection Lupus nephritis Malnutrition Systemic lupus erythematosis

  1. Survivin, p53, MAC, Complement/C3, fibrinogen and HLA-ABC within hair follicles in central and centrifugal cicatricial alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Velez, Ana Maria; Klein, A. Deo; Howard, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Context: Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA; originally entitled follicular degeneration syndrome, or hot comb alopecia) was first described in African American women utilizing hot combs and/or strong chemical hair care products. Case Report: A 67 year old African American female was evaluated for the presence of alopecic areas occurring on the scalp vertex, and spreading centrifugally. The alopecic lesions appeared as diffuse patches, including atrophic small areas surrounding individual hair follicles. Patients and Methods: Skin biopsies for hematoxylin and eosin examination, as well as for direct immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analyses were performed. Results: hematoxylin and eosin staining demonstrated histopathologic findings of premature desquamation of the inner root sheath and eccentric thinning of the follicular epithelium, supporting the diagnosis of CCCA. Direct immunofluorescence revealed strong depositions of Complement/C3, fibrinogen and kappa light chains around the hair follicles. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated increased expressions of HLA-ABC (as in African American patients with insulin independent diabetes mellitus). We also detected positive p53, bcl-2 and MAC staining in the hair follicle areas. Conclusions: Follicular degeneration syndrome may have an important immunological component previously not described, and multicolor immunofluorescence may be useful in establishing an early diagnosis. PMID:22540101

  2. cDNA sequence coding for the alpha'-chain of the third complement component in the African lungfish.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Sültmann, H; Mayer, W E; Figueroa, F; Tichy, H; Klein, J

    1999-04-01

    cDNA clones coding for almost the entire C3 alpha-chain of the African lungfish (Protopterus aethiopicus), a representative of the Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes), were sequenced and characterized. From the sequence it is deduced that the lungfish C3 molecule is probably a disulphide-bonded alpha:beta dimer similar to that of the C3 components of other jawed vertebrates. The deduced sequence contains conserved sites presumably recognized by proteolytic enzymes (e.g. factor I) involved in the activation and inactivation of the component. It also contains the conserved thioester region and the putative site for binding properdin. However, the site for the interaction with complement receptor 2 and factor H are poorly conserved. Either complement receptor 2 and factor H are not present in the lungfish or they bind to different residues at the same or a different site than mammalian complement receptor 2 and factor H. The C3 alpha-chain sequences faithfully reflect the phylogenetic relationships among vertebrate classes and can therefore be used to help to resolve the long-standing controversy concerning the origin of the tetrapods. PMID:10219761

  3. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... tissues. Complement is a group of serum proteins which destroy infectious agents. Measurements of these proteins aids in the diagnosis of immunologic disorders, especially those associated with deficiencies...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... tissues. Complement is a group of serum proteins which destroy infectious agents. Measurements of these proteins aids in the diagnosis of immunologic disorders, especially those associated with deficiencies...

  5. Cutting edge: members of the Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein family inhibit the interaction of C3d with complement receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel; Ricklin-Lichtsteiner, Salome K; Markiewski, Maciej M; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Lambris, John D

    2008-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus expresses a highly diversified arsenal of immune evasion proteins, many of which target the complement system. The extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) and the Efb homologous protein (Ehp) have previously been demonstrated to bind to C3 and inhibit complement activation and amplification. In this study we present the first evidence that Efb and Ehp are also capable of inhibiting the interaction of C3d with complement receptor 2 (CR2), which plays an important role in B cell activation and maturation. The C-terminal domain of Efb efficiently blocked this interaction both in surface plasmon resonance-based competition studies and cellular assays and prevented the CR2-mediated stimulation of B cells. Furthermore, analyses of the available structural data were consistent with a molecular mechanism that reflects both steric and electrostatic effects on the C3d-CR2 interaction. Our study therefore suggests that S. aureus may disrupt both the innate and adaptive immune responses with a single protein module. PMID:19017934

  6. Complement component 3 inhibition by an antioxidant is neuroprotective after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiwon; Ahn, Hye-na; Chang, Minsun; Narasimhan, Purnima; Chan, Pak H.; Song, Yun Seon

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress after stroke is associated with the inflammatory system activation in the brain. The complement cascade, especially the degradation products of complement component 3, is a key inflammatory mediator of cerebral ischemia. We have shown that proinflammatory complement component 3 is increased by oxidative stress after ischemic stroke in mice using DNA array. In this study, we investigated whether up-regulation of complement component 3 is directly related to oxidative stress after transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice and oxygen-glucose deprivation in brain cells. Persistent up-regulation of complement component 3 expression was reduced in copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase transgenic mice, and manganese-superoxide dismutase knockout mice showed highly increased complement component 3 levels after transient focal cerebral ischemia. Antioxidant N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone treatment suppressed complement component 3 expression after transient focal cerebral ischemia. Accumulation of complement component 3 in neurons and microglia was decreased by N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone, which reduced infarct volume and impaired neurological deficiency after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in mice. Small interfering RNA specific for complement component 3 transfection showed a significant increase in brain cells viability after oxygen-glucose deprivation. Our study suggests that the neuroprotective effect of antioxidants through complement component 3 suppression is a new strategy for potential therapeutic approaches in stroke. PMID:23199288

  7. The extracellular adherence protein from Staphylococcus aureus inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement by blocking formation of the C3 proconvertase.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Jordan L; Stapels, Daphne A C; Garcia, Brandon L; Ramyar, Kasra X; Keightley, Andrew; Ruyken, Maartje; Syriga, Maria; Sfyroera, Georgia; Weber, Alexander B; Zolkiewski, Michal; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2014-12-15

    The pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus actively evades many aspects of human innate immunity by expressing a series of small inhibitory proteins. A number of these proteins inhibit the complement system, which labels bacteria for phagocytosis and generates inflammatory chemoattractants. Although the majority of staphylococcal complement inhibitors act on the alternative pathway to block the amplification loop, only a few proteins act on the initial recognition cascades that constitute the classical pathway (CP) and lectin pathway (LP). We screened a collection of recombinant, secreted staphylococcal proteins to determine whether S. aureus produces other molecules that inhibit the CP and/or LP. Using this approach, we identified the extracellular adherence protein (Eap) as a potent, specific inhibitor of both the CP and LP. We found that Eap blocked CP/LP-dependent activation of C3, but not C4, and that Eap likewise inhibited deposition of C3b on the surface of S. aureus cells. In turn, this significantly diminished the extent of S. aureus opsonophagocytosis and killing by neutrophils. This combination of functional properties suggested that Eap acts specifically at the level of the CP/LP C3 convertase (C4b2a). Indeed, we demonstrated a direct, nanomolar-affinity interaction of Eap with C4b. Eap binding to C4b inhibited binding of both full-length C2 and its C2b fragment, which indicated that Eap disrupts formation of the CP/LP C3 proconvertase (C4b2). As a whole, our results demonstrate that S. aureus inhibits two initiation routes of complement by expression of the Eap protein, and thereby define a novel mechanism of immune evasion.

  8. Polymorphism of the fourth component of complement in Turks.

    PubMed

    Metin, A; Sanal, O; Ersoy, F; Tezcan, I; Berkel, A I; Irkeç, C

    2000-06-01

    An analysis of polymorphism in the fourth component of human complement (C4) was performed on EDTA-plasma from 142 unrelated, randomly selected Turks without collagen-vascular disease or recurrent infections. Plasma samples treated with neuraminidase and carboxypeptidase-B were subjected to high-voltage agarose gel electrophoresis followed by immunofixation. C4B allotypes were further detected in some samples by Western blots with monoclonal antibody 1228 (anti-C4B/Ch1 reactivity). The frequencies of C4A and C4B alleles were determined. Allele C4B*5, which has been found to be relatively common in Asian (Oriental) populations, was not detected in this study. No specific predilection could be noted among the rare variants. C4A*3-C4B*1 was the most common haplotype (n = 40/142, or 28%) but was found less frequently than in Caucasian populations. This finding may be the result of the limited number of samples examined. C4A and/or C4B null allotypes were seen in 49 of 142 (34.6%) subjects. The most frequent C4 null allotype seen was C4B null (37/142, or 26%): 28 subjects had one C4B null allele; 1 had a homozygous deficiency of C4B (C4B*QO, *QO) and 7 had C4A*QO C4B*QO, a double heterozygous haplotype. Frequencies of homozygous haplotype C4A*Q0-C4B*Q0 in the population studied were found to be 0.007. The results of this study demonstrate that the genetic composition of the Turkish population exhibits both similarities and differences with the European population, and ranges between Caucasian and Mongoloid (Asian) populations.

  9. Complement component C7 deficiency in two Spanish families

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Sonia; Sánchez, Berta; Álvarez, Antonia José; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Lanuza, Amparo; Luque, Rafael; Wichmann, Ingeborg; Núñez-Roldán, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Different genetic mutations have been described in complement component C7 deficiency, a molecular defect clinically associated with an increased susceptibility to neisserial recurrent infections. In this work we report the genetic basis of C7 deficiency in two different Spanish families (family 1 and family 2). In family 1, of Gypsy ethnical background, exon-specific polymerase chain reaction and sequencing revealed a not previously described single base deletion of nucleotide 1309 (exon 10) in the patient, as well as in her father, leading to a stop codon that causes the premature truncation of the C7 protein (K416 X 419). Additionally, the patient and her mother displayed a missense mutation at position 1135 (exon 9) located in the first nucleotide of the codon GGG (CGG), resulting in a change of amino acid (G357R). This mutation was firstly described in individuals of Moroccan Sephardic Jewish ancestry and has been also reported among Spaniards. In family 2, another novel mutation was found in homozygosity in two siblings; a two base-pair deletion of nucleotides 1922 and 1923 in exon 14 leading to the generation of a downstream stop codon causing the truncation of the C7 protein product (S620 X 630). Our results provide more evidence for the heterogeneous molecular basis of C7 deficiency as well as for the subsequent susceptibility to meningococcal disease, since different families carry different molecular defects. On the other hand, certain C7 defects appear to be prevalent in individuals from certain populations or living in defined geographical areas. PMID:15554930

  10. Characterization and expression analysis of a complement component gene in sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Zhou, Zunchun; Yang, Aifu; Dong, Ying; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-12-01

    The complement system plays a crucial role in the innate immune system of animals. It can be activated by distinct yet overlapping classical, alternative and lectin pathways. In the alternative pathway, complement factor B (Bf) serves as the catalytic subunit of complement component 3 (C3) convertase, which plays the central role among three activation pathways. In this study, the Bf gene in sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus), termed AjBf, was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of AjBf was 3231 bp in length barring the poly (A) tail. It contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 2742 bp encoding 913 amino acids, a 105 bp 5'-UTR (5'-terminal untranslated region) and a 384 bp 3'-UTR. AjBf was a mosaic protein with six CCP (complement control protein) domains, a VWA (von Willebrand factor A) domain, and a serine protease domain. The deduced molecular weight of AjBf protein was 101 kDa. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the expression level of AjBf in A. japonicus was obviously higher at larval stage than that at embryonic stage. Expression detection in different tissues showed that AjBf expressed higher in coelomocytes than in other four tissues. In addation, AjBf expression in different tissues was induced significantly after LPS or PolyI:C challenge. These results indicated that AjBf plays an important role in immune responses to pathogen infection.

  11. C3d-defined complement receptor-binding peptide p28 conjugated to circumsporozoite protein provides protection against Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Duncan, Elizabeth H; Leitner, Wolfgang W; Neutzner, Albert; Savranskaya, Tatyana; Angov, Evelina; Tsokos, George C

    2007-11-01

    Immune response against circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium berghei, a major surface protein on the sporozoite, confers protection in various murine malaria models. Engineered DNA vaccine encoding CSP and 3 copies of C3d caused an unexpected loss in protection attributed to the binding of C3d to the C-terminal region of CSP. Because the C3d region known as p28 represents the complement receptor (CR) 2-binding motif, we developed a CSP-3 copies of p28 DNA construct (CSP-3p28). CSP-3p28-immunized mice were better protected against P. berghei sporozoites than CSP-immunized mice 6 weeks after the 2nd boost, produced sufficient IgG1 anti-CSP and CSP C-terminus antibody and failed to produce IgG2a. CSP-3C3d-immunized mice were not protected, failed to produce IgG1 and produced high amounts of IgG2a. We conclude that use of the CR2-binding motif of C3d as molecular adjuvant to CSP results in anti-malaria protective immune response probably by targeting the chimeric protein to CR2.

  12. C3d-defined complement receptor-binding peptide p28 conjugated to circumsporozoite protein provides protection against Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Duncan, Elizabeth H; Leitner, Wolfgang W; Neutzner, Albert; Savranskaya, Tatyana; Angov, Evelina; Tsokos, George C

    2007-11-01

    Immune response against circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium berghei, a major surface protein on the sporozoite, confers protection in various murine malaria models. Engineered DNA vaccine encoding CSP and 3 copies of C3d caused an unexpected loss in protection attributed to the binding of C3d to the C-terminal region of CSP. Because the C3d region known as p28 represents the complement receptor (CR) 2-binding motif, we developed a CSP-3 copies of p28 DNA construct (CSP-3p28). CSP-3p28-immunized mice were better protected against P. berghei sporozoites than CSP-immunized mice 6 weeks after the 2nd boost, produced sufficient IgG1 anti-CSP and CSP C-terminus antibody and failed to produce IgG2a. CSP-3C3d-immunized mice were not protected, failed to produce IgG1 and produced high amounts of IgG2a. We conclude that use of the CR2-binding motif of C3d as molecular adjuvant to CSP results in anti-malaria protective immune response probably by targeting the chimeric protein to CR2. PMID:17931754

  13. Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Inactivation of Complement Components and Complement-Derived Chemotactic and Phagocytic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Duane R.; Miller, Kent D.

    1974-01-01

    A purified elastase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was highly destructive for fluid-phase and cell-bound C1 and C3 and fluid-phase C5, C8, and C9. Inactivation of C4, C2, C6, and C7 by the enzyme varied from 0 to 67%. Low concentrations of elastase generated, then inactivated, a chemotactic factor from human C5 but not from C3. Higher enzyme concentrations inactivated the C5 chemotactic activity at a faster rate. Elastase treatment of sensitized pseudomonads containing cell-bound C3 reduced the phagocytic indexes of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The data support the proposed chemopathogenic role of the elastase in generation of the characteristic non-inflammatory Pseudomonas vasculitis. Images PMID:4210424

  14. The Group B Streptococcus–Secreted Protein CIP Interacts with C4, Preventing C3b Deposition via the Lectin and Classical Complement Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Giampiero; Rindi, Simonetta; Rosini, Roberto; Buccato, Scilla

    2016-01-01

    The group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal invasive disease. GBS bacteria are surrounded by a thick capsular polysaccharide that is a potent inhibitor of complement deposition via the alternative pathway. Several of its surface molecules can however activate the classical and lectin complement pathways, rendering this species still vulnerable to phagocytic killing. In this study we have identified a novel secreted protein named complement interfering protein (CIP) that downregulates complement activation via the classical and lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway. The CIP protein showed high affinity toward C4b and inhibited its interaction with C2, presumably preventing the formation of the C4bC2a convertase. Addition of recombinant CIP to GBS cip-negative bacteria resulted in decreased deposition of C3b on their surface and in diminished phagocytic killing in a whole-blood assay. Our data reveal a novel strategy exploited by GBS to counteract innate immunity and could be valuable for the development of anti-infective agents against this important pathogen. PMID:26608922

  15. New inhibitors of the complement system inspired in K76-COOH. A SAR study of filifolinol derivatives through modifications of the C3' position.

    PubMed

    Larghi, Enrique L; Operto, María A; Torres, Rene; Kaufman, Teodoro S

    2009-11-01

    A new series of tricyclic carboxylic acids with a 3H-spiro[benzofuran-2,10-cyclohexane] skeleton were synthesized from filifolinol, as analogs of the natural complement inhibitor K76-COOH. Their complement inhibitory activity was determined aiming to probe the importance of structural characteristics of the alicyclic part of K76-COOH. The presence and stereochemistry of O- and N-functionalities on C3' of the filifolinol derivatives are relevant for biological activity. The IC50 values of the most potent compounds were comparable or surpassed the activity of K76-COOH. The results also suggest that the diol moiety of the natural product may be useful for improving compound solubility.

  16. IgG Suppresses Antibody Responses in Mice Lacking C1q, C3, Complement Receptors 1 and 2, or IgG Fc-Receptors.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Joakim J E; Heyman, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-specific IgG antibodies, passively administered to mice or humans together with large particulate antigens like erythrocytes, can completely suppress the antibody response against the antigen. This is used clinically in Rhesus prophylaxis, where administration of IgG anti-RhD prevents RhD-negative women from becoming immunized against RhD-positive fetal erythrocytes aquired transplacentally. The mechanisms by which IgG suppresses antibody responses are poorly understood. We have here addressed whether complement or Fc-receptors for IgG (FcγRs) are required for IgG-mediated suppression. IgG, specific for sheep red blood cells (SRBC), was administered to mice together with SRBC and the antibody responses analyzed. IgG was able to suppress early IgM- as well as longterm IgG-responses in wildtype mice equally well as in mice lacking FcγRIIB (FcγRIIB knockout mice) or FcγRI, III, and IV (FcRγ knockout mice). Moreover, IgG was able to suppress early IgM responses equally well in mice lacking C1q (C1qA knockout mice), C3 (C3 knockout mice), or complement receptors 1 and 2 (Cr2 knockout mice) as in wildtype mice. Owing to the previously described severely impaired IgG responses in the complement deficient mice, it was difficult to assess whether passively administered IgG further decreased their IgG response. In conclusion, Fc-receptor binding or complement-activation by IgG does not seem to be required for its ability to suppress antibody responses to xenogeneic erythrocytes. PMID:26619292

  17. Complement component 3 deficiency prolongs MHC-II disparate skin allograft survival by increasing the CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells population.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Quan-You; Liang, Shen-Ju; Li, Gui-Qing; Lv, Yan-Bo; Li, You; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Gui-Lian; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that complement system contributes to allograft rejection. However, its underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Herein, we investigate the role of complement component 3 (C3) in a single MHC-II molecule mismatched murine model of allograft rejection using C3 deficient mice (C3(-/-)) as skin graft donors or recipients. Compared with C3(+/+) B6 allografts, C3(-/-) B6 grafts dramatically prolonged survival in MHC-II molecule mismatched H-2(bm12) B6 recipients, indicating that C3 plays a critical role in allograft rejection. Compared with C3(+/+) allografts, both Th17 cell infiltration and Th1/Th17 associated cytokine mRNA levels were clearly reduced in C3(-/-) allografts. Moreover, C3(-/-) allografts caused attenuated Th1/Th17 responses, but increased CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell expression markedly in local intragraft and H-2(bm12) recipients. Depletion of Treg cells by anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody (mAb) negated the survival advantages conferred by C3 deficiency. Our results indicate for the first time that C3 deficiency can prolong MHC-II molecule mismatched skin allograft survival, which is further confirmed to be associated with increased CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg cell population expansion and attenuated Th1/Th17 response. PMID:27641978

  18. Complement component 3 deficiency prolongs MHC-II disparate skin allograft survival by increasing the CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells population

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Quan-you; Liang, Shen-ju; Li, Gui-qing; Lv, Yan-bo; Li, You; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Gui-lian; Zhang, Ke-qin

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that complement system contributes to allograft rejection. However, its underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Herein, we investigate the role of complement component 3 (C3) in a single MHC-II molecule mismatched murine model of allograft rejection using C3 deficient mice (C3−/−) as skin graft donors or recipients. Compared with C3+/+ B6 allografts, C3−/− B6 grafts dramatically prolonged survival in MHC-II molecule mismatched H-2bm12 B6 recipients, indicating that C3 plays a critical role in allograft rejection. Compared with C3+/+ allografts, both Th17 cell infiltration and Th1/Th17 associated cytokine mRNA levels were clearly reduced in C3−/− allografts. Moreover, C3−/− allografts caused attenuated Th1/Th17 responses, but increased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cell expression markedly in local intragraft and H-2bm12 recipients. Depletion of Treg cells by anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody (mAb) negated the survival advantages conferred by C3 deficiency. Our results indicate for the first time that C3 deficiency can prolong MHC-II molecule mismatched skin allograft survival, which is further confirmed to be associated with increased CD4+ CD25+ Treg cell population expansion and attenuated Th1/Th17 response. PMID:27641978

  19. Mapping of the C3b-binding site of CR1 and construction of a (CR1)2-F(ab')2 chimeric complement inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kalli, K R; Hsu, P H; Bartow, T J; Ahearn, J M; Matsumoto, A K; Klickstein, L B; Fearon, D T

    1991-12-01

    CR1/CR2 chimeric receptors in which various short consensus repeats (SCRs) of CR1 were attached to CR2 were transiently expressed on COS cells, and assessed for the binding of polymerized C3b (pC3b) and anti-CR2 by immunofluorescence. Of COS cells expressing chimeras containing SCR 1-4, 1-3, 2-4, 1-2, and 2-3 of the long homologous repeats (LHRs) -B or -C, 96%, 66%, 23%, 0%, and 0%, respectively, bound pC3b. K562 cells were stably transfected with wild-type CR1, deletion mutants of CR1, and the CR1/CR2 chimeras, respectively, and assayed for binding of 125I-pC3b. The dissociation constants (Kd) for pC3b of wild-type CR1 and the LHR-BD and -CD constructs were in the range of 1.0-2.7 nM, and of the CR1/CR2 chimeras containing SCRs 1-4, 1-3, and 2-4 of LHR-B or -C were 1.8-2.4, 6-9, and 22-36 nM, respectively. The factor I-cofactor function of the CR1/CR2 chimeras paralleled the C3b-binding function of the constructs. A CR1/immunoglobulin (Ig) chimeric protein was prepared by fusing SCRs 1-4 of LHR-B to the heavy chains of a murine F(ab')2 anti-nitrophenacetyl (NP) monoclonal antibody. The (CR1)2-F(ab')2 chimera, which retained its specificity for NP, was as effective as soluble, full-length CR1 in binding pC3b, serving as a cofactor for factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b, and inhibiting activation of the alternative pathway, indicating that the bivalent expression of these SCRs reconstitutes the alternative pathway inhibitory function of CR1. The feasibility of creating CR1/Ig chimeras makes possible a new strategy of targeting complement inhibition by the use of Ig fusion partners having particular antigenic specificities.

  20. Mapping of the C3b-binding site of CR1 and construction of a (CR1)2-F(ab')2 chimeric complement inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kalli, K R; Hsu, P H; Bartow, T J; Ahearn, J M; Matsumoto, A K; Klickstein, L B; Fearon, D T

    1991-12-01

    CR1/CR2 chimeric receptors in which various short consensus repeats (SCRs) of CR1 were attached to CR2 were transiently expressed on COS cells, and assessed for the binding of polymerized C3b (pC3b) and anti-CR2 by immunofluorescence. Of COS cells expressing chimeras containing SCR 1-4, 1-3, 2-4, 1-2, and 2-3 of the long homologous repeats (LHRs) -B or -C, 96%, 66%, 23%, 0%, and 0%, respectively, bound pC3b. K562 cells were stably transfected with wild-type CR1, deletion mutants of CR1, and the CR1/CR2 chimeras, respectively, and assayed for binding of 125I-pC3b. The dissociation constants (Kd) for pC3b of wild-type CR1 and the LHR-BD and -CD constructs were in the range of 1.0-2.7 nM, and of the CR1/CR2 chimeras containing SCRs 1-4, 1-3, and 2-4 of LHR-B or -C were 1.8-2.4, 6-9, and 22-36 nM, respectively. The factor I-cofactor function of the CR1/CR2 chimeras paralleled the C3b-binding function of the constructs. A CR1/immunoglobulin (Ig) chimeric protein was prepared by fusing SCRs 1-4 of LHR-B to the heavy chains of a murine F(ab')2 anti-nitrophenacetyl (NP) monoclonal antibody. The (CR1)2-F(ab')2 chimera, which retained its specificity for NP, was as effective as soluble, full-length CR1 in binding pC3b, serving as a cofactor for factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b, and inhibiting activation of the alternative pathway, indicating that the bivalent expression of these SCRs reconstitutes the alternative pathway inhibitory function of CR1. The feasibility of creating CR1/Ig chimeras makes possible a new strategy of targeting complement inhibition by the use of Ig fusion partners having particular antigenic specificities. PMID:1836011

  1. Complement modulatory activity of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids isolated from Isopyrum thalictroides--II. Influence on C3-9 reactions in vitro and antiinflammatory effect in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ivanovska, N; Hristova, M; Philipov, S

    1999-05-01

    The main alkaloids isopyruthaline (It1), fangchinoline (It2) and isothalictrine (It3), isolated from Isopyrum thalictroides (L.) were investigated in complement-mediated reactions. The alkaloids influenced the alternative pathway (AP) activity in normal human serum (NHS). They enhanced the inhibitory action of complement activators--carrageenan (Car), zymosan (Zy), hydrogen peroxide (HP) and high temperature via classical pathway (CP) in NHS. Substances strongly potentiated the action of zymosan and cobra venom (CV) in guinea pig serum (GPS). It was established that they could provoke C3 conversion in NHS and mouse sera (MS). The antiinflammatory properties of the alkaloids were evaluated in mouse paw oedema induced by CV, Zy and histamine (His). Isopyruthaline and isothalictrine suppressed paw swelling in CV- and Zy-oedema. They were applied in Zy-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in mice. The alkaloids inhibited the increase of the serum complement activity provoked by the injection of zymosan. Itl lowered the mortality rate of mice with MODS if its application proceeded Zy. An increase of the number of mice without tissue injury was established after treatment with It1 and It3. PMID:10408630

  2. Cloning and molecular characterization of complement component 1 inhibitor (C1INH) and complement component 8β (C8β) in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    He, Anyuan; Yang, Jie; Tang, Shoujie; Wang, Chenghui

    2013-09-01

    Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), one of the most important groups of food fishes in the world, has frequently suffered from serious challenge from pathogens in recent years. Immune responses of Nile tilapia should be understood to protect the aquaculture industry of this fish. The complement system has an important function in recognizing bacteria, opsonizing these pathogens by phagocytes, or killing them by direct lysis. In this study, two Nile tilapia complement component genes, complement component 1 inhibitor (C1INH) and complement component 8β subunit (C8β), were cloned and their expression characteristics were analyzed. C1INH cDNA was found containing a 1791 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a putative protein with 597 amino acids, a 101 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and a 236 bp 3'-UTR. The predicted protein structure for this gene consisted of two Ig-like domains and glycosyl hydrolase family-9 active site signature 2. The C8β cDNA consisted of a 1761 bp ORF encoding 587 amino acids, a 15 bp 5'-UTR and a 170 bp 3'-UTR. The predicted protein of C8β contained three motifs, thrombospondin type-1 repeat, membrane attack complex/perforin domain, and LDL-receptor class A. Expression analysis revealed that these two complement genes were highly expressed in the liver, however, were weakly expressed in the gill, heart, brain, kidney, intestine, spleen and dorsal muscle tissues. The present study provided insights into the complement system and immune functions of Nile tilapia.

  3. Disease Recurrence After Early Discontinuation of Eculizumab in a Patient With Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome With Complement C3 I1157T Mutation.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Hidemi; Wada, Hideo; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Amano, Keishiro; Kihira, Kentaro; Iwamoto, Shotaro; Hirayama, Masahiro; Komada, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-01

    Eculizumab, terminal complement inhibitor, has become the frontline treatment for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). However, the optimal treatment schedule has not yet been established. We describe here an aHUS patient with a mutation of C3 I1157T who achieved remission with eculizumab and suffered a recurrence after eculizumab discontinuation, a clinical situation that has not been previously described in patients with C3 mutation. A 9-year-old male experienced an onset of aHUS after viral gastroenteritis and was treated with hemodialysis. At 13 years of age he developed bacterial enterocolitis due to Campylobacter jejuni and experienced a recurrence of aHUS. Eculizumab was initiated on day 4 after disease onset resulting in recovering laboratory parameters. The patient received eculizumab for 5 months before its discontinuation. Second relapse induced by bacterial pharyngitis was confirmed 4 months after eculizumab discontinuation and prompt eculizumab reinitiation resulted in rapid remission. The patients carrying mutations in CFH or C3 have a high frequency of relapse and worse prognosis. More than 50% of aHUS relapses occurred during the first year after the onset. Therefore, long-term treatment with eculizumab is appropriate in patients with aHUS who have experienced a relapse or have mutations associated with poor prognosis. PMID:26840081

  4. Complement activation in amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's dementia.

    PubMed

    Eikelenboom, P; Hack, C E; Rozemuller, J M; Stam, F C

    1989-01-01

    Amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's dementia contain complement factors C1q, C4 and C3. In the present study we demonstrate complement activation in amyloid plaques using immunoenzymatical techniques and specific antibodies against subunits of individual complement components and activated complement products. Amyloid plaques contain C1q and activated C3 fragments (C3c and C3d, g) but no C1s and C3a. These findings demonstrate that the complement components are not passively bound to the amyloid plaque structures but are the result of an activation process. The role of complement activation in the genesis of senile plaques is discussed.

  5. Complement component 3 binding to Haemophilus influenzae type b in the presence of anticapsular and anti-outer membrane antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Hetherington, S V; Patrick, C C

    1992-01-01

    Antibodies directed against the capsular polysaccharide (polyribosyl ribitol phosphate [PRP]) or the outer membrane proteins (OMP) of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) promote bactericidal activity, complement 3 (C3) binding, and ingestion by phagocytic cells. To assess the relative contribution of anti-OMP to host defense against Hib, we compared the opsonic activities of anti-PRP and anti-OMP as reflected by the amounts of C3 bound to the bacterial surface. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) fractions containing either anti-PRP or anti-OMP were incubated with Hib in the presence of a C5-deficient complement source. C3, total IgG, and IgG subclasses bound to the bacteria were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The maximum amount of C3 which could be bound to Hib was greater in the presence of anti-PRP than in the presence of anti-OMP. Also, except at low IgG concentrations, the rate of increase in bound C3 as a function of increasing IgG concentration was greater for anti-PRP than for anti-OMP. Hib-bound anti-OMP consisted primarily of IgG1 and IgG3, whereas bound anti-PRP was primarily IgG1 and IgG2. Thus, the potential for C3 binding to Hib is greater in the presence of anti-PRP than in the presence of anti-OMP, probably because of the larger number of binding sites available to the former. Nonetheless, OMP appear to provide important targets for opsonic antibody and would be logical components of a PRP-conjugate vaccine or may be efficacious as vaccines against nontypeable H. influenzae. Images PMID:1729183

  6. TNF Regulates Essential Alternative Complement Pathway Components and Impairs Activation of Protein C in Human Glomerular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sartain, Sarah E; Turner, Nancy A; Moake, Joel L

    2016-01-15

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy with severe renal injury secondary to an overactive alternative complement pathway (AP). aHUS episodes are often initiated or recur during inflammation. We investigated gene expression of the surface complement regulatory proteins (CD55, CD59, CD46, and CD141 [thrombomodulin]) and AP components in human glomerular microvascular endothelial cells (GMVECs) and in HUVECs, a frequently used investigational model of endothelial cells. Surface complement regulatory proteins were also quantified by flow cytometry. All experiments were done with and without exposure to IL-1β or TNF. Without cytokine stimulation, we found that GMVECs had greater AP activation than did HUVECs. With TNF stimulation, THBD gene expression and corresponding CD141 surface presence in HUVECs and GMVECs were reduced, and gene expression of complement components C3 (C3) and factor B (CFB) was increased. Consequently, AP activation, measured by Ba production, was increased, and conversion of protein C (PC) to activated PC by CD141-bound thrombin was decreased, in GMVECs and HUVECs exposed to TNF. IL-1β had similar, albeit lesser, effects on HUVEC gene expression, and it only slightly affected GMVEC gene expression. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed study of the expression/display of AP components and surface regulatory proteins in GMVECs with and without cytokine stimulation. In aHUS patients with an underlying overactive AP, additional stimulation of the AP and inhibition of activated PC-mediated anticoagulation in GMVECs by the inflammatory cytokine TNF are likely to provoke episodes of renal failure. PMID:26673143

  7. Characterization of a Gene Coding for the Complement System Component FB from Loxosceles laeta Spider Venom Glands.

    PubMed

    Myamoto, Daniela Tiemi; Pidde-Queiroz, Giselle; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute Maria; Pedroso, Aurélio; van den Berg, Carmen W; Tambourgi, Denise V

    2016-01-01

    The human complement system is composed of more than 30 proteins and many of these have conserved domains that allow tracing the phylogenetic evolution. The complement system seems to be initiated with the appearance of C3 and factor B (FB), the only components found in some protostomes and cnidarians, suggesting that the alternative pathway is the most ancient. Here, we present the characterization of an arachnid homologue of the human complement component FB from the spider Loxosceles laeta. This homologue, named Lox-FB, was identified from a total RNA L. laeta spider venom gland library and was amplified using RACE-PCR techniques and specific primers. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence and the domain structure showed significant similarity to the vertebrate and invertebrate FB/C2 family proteins. Lox-FB has a classical domain organization composed of a control complement protein domain (CCP), a von Willebrand Factor domain (vWFA), and a serine protease domain (SP). The amino acids involved in Mg2+ metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) found in the vWFA domain in the vertebrate C2/FB proteins are well conserved; however, the classic catalytic triad present in the serine protease domain is not conserved in Lox-FB. Similarity and phylogenetic analyses indicated that Lox-FB shares a major identity (43%) and has a close evolutionary relationship with the third isoform of FB-like protein (FB-3) from the jumping spider Hasarius adansoni belonging to the Family Salcitidae. PMID:26771533

  8. Characterization of a Gene Coding for the Complement System Component FB from Loxosceles laeta Spider Venom Glands

    PubMed Central

    Myamoto, Daniela Tiemi; Pidde-Queiroz, Giselle; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute Maria; Pedroso, Aurélio; van den Berg, Carmen W.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2016-01-01

    The human complement system is composed of more than 30 proteins and many of these have conserved domains that allow tracing the phylogenetic evolution. The complement system seems to be initiated with the appearance of C3 and factor B (FB), the only components found in some protostomes and cnidarians, suggesting that the alternative pathway is the most ancient. Here, we present the characterization of an arachnid homologue of the human complement component FB from the spider Loxosceles laeta. This homologue, named Lox-FB, was identified from a total RNA L. laeta spider venom gland library and was amplified using RACE-PCR techniques and specific primers. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence and the domain structure showed significant similarity to the vertebrate and invertebrate FB/C2 family proteins. Lox-FB has a classical domain organization composed of a control complement protein domain (CCP), a von Willebrand Factor domain (vWFA), and a serine protease domain (SP). The amino acids involved in Mg2+ metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) found in the vWFA domain in the vertebrate C2/FB proteins are well conserved; however, the classic catalytic triad present in the serine protease domain is not conserved in Lox-FB. Similarity and phylogenetic analyses indicated that Lox-FB shares a major identity (43%) and has a close evolutionary relationship with the third isoform of FB-like protein (FB-3) from the jumping spider Hasarius adansoni belonging to the Family Salcitidae. PMID:26771533

  9. Characterization of a Gene Coding for the Complement System Component FB from Loxosceles laeta Spider Venom Glands.

    PubMed

    Myamoto, Daniela Tiemi; Pidde-Queiroz, Giselle; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute Maria; Pedroso, Aurélio; van den Berg, Carmen W; Tambourgi, Denise V

    2016-01-01

    The human complement system is composed of more than 30 proteins and many of these have conserved domains that allow tracing the phylogenetic evolution. The complement system seems to be initiated with the appearance of C3 and factor B (FB), the only components found in some protostomes and cnidarians, suggesting that the alternative pathway is the most ancient. Here, we present the characterization of an arachnid homologue of the human complement component FB from the spider Loxosceles laeta. This homologue, named Lox-FB, was identified from a total RNA L. laeta spider venom gland library and was amplified using RACE-PCR techniques and specific primers. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence and the domain structure showed significant similarity to the vertebrate and invertebrate FB/C2 family proteins. Lox-FB has a classical domain organization composed of a control complement protein domain (CCP), a von Willebrand Factor domain (vWFA), and a serine protease domain (SP). The amino acids involved in Mg2+ metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) found in the vWFA domain in the vertebrate C2/FB proteins are well conserved; however, the classic catalytic triad present in the serine protease domain is not conserved in Lox-FB. Similarity and phylogenetic analyses indicated that Lox-FB shares a major identity (43%) and has a close evolutionary relationship with the third isoform of FB-like protein (FB-3) from the jumping spider Hasarius adansoni belonging to the Family Salcitidae.

  10. Consequences of synovectomy of the knee joint: clinical, histopathological, and enzymatic changes and changes in 2 components of complement

    PubMed Central

    Myllylä, Timo; Peltonen, Leena; Puranen, Jaakko; Korhonen, L. Kalevi

    1983-01-01

    The state of 36 knee joints of 32 rheumatic patients was evaluated after surgical synovectomy, the follow-up period varying from 2 to 39 months. Synovitis was suspected by arthroscopy in 67% and verified histologically in 52%, although in a milder form than at the time of synovectomy. The regenerated synovial tissue was less permeable to serum proteins and contained lower activities of lysosomal enzymes than the excised synovial tissue. Although the number of leucocytes decreased in the joint fluid after synovectomy, the activities of lysosomal enzymes were lowered only slightly, and there was no change in the amount of C3 and C4 components of complement pathway. PMID:6830323

  11. C3bi-binding protein on Candida albicans: temperature-dependent expression and relationship to human complement receptor type 3.

    PubMed Central

    Eigentler, A; Schulz, T F; Larcher, C; Breitwieser, E M; Myones, B L; Petzer, A L; Dierich, M P

    1989-01-01

    We investigated in detail the previously described capacity of pseudohyphae of Candida albicans to bind C3-coated particles. We show that the expression of the C3bi receptor of C. albicans was dependent upon the growth temperature of the fungi. C. albicans grown at 30 degrees C bound strongly to EAC1423bi, whereas those cells grown at 38.5 degrees C were completely devoid of this capacity. The molecule responsible for the attachment of EAC1423bi was heat labile and trypsin sensitive. Several, but not all, monoclonal antibodies to the alpha-chain of human complement receptor type 3 (CR3) stained C. albicans, and this reactivity was expressed in parallel with the capacity of C. albicans to bind EAC1423bi, i.e., both were dependent on the growth temperature of the fungi and were trypsin sensitive. In contrast to CR3, the binding of EAC1423bi to C. albicans did not require the presence of divalent cations. Rabbit immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against C. albicans inhibited the binding of EAC1423bi to C. albicans but not to human CR3. These inhibiting IgG antibodies recognized antigens expressed on the surface of pseudohyphae but not those of yeast cells. OKM-1, a monoclonal antibody to human CR3 inhibited the attachment of EAC1423bi to CR3 and also to C. albicans. OKM-1 precipitated a 130-kilodalton band from solubilized 125I-labeled C. albicans. We conclude that the complement receptors on C. albicans and human CR3 were antigenically related but not identical and that they differed in their functional characteristics. Images PMID:2521478

  12. Antagonism of the complement component C4 by flavivirus nonstructural protein NS1

    PubMed Central

    Avirutnan, Panisadee; Fuchs, Anja; Hauhart, Richard E.; Somnuke, Pawit; Youn, Soonjeon

    2010-01-01

    The complement system plays an essential protective role in the initial defense against many microorganisms. Flavivirus NS1 is a secreted nonstructural glycoprotein that accumulates in blood, is displayed on the surface of infected cells, and has been hypothesized to have immune evasion functions. Herein, we demonstrate that dengue virus (DENV), West Nile virus (WNV), and yellow fever virus (YFV) NS1 attenuate classical and lectin pathway activation by directly interacting with C4. Binding of NS1 to C4 reduced C4b deposition and C3 convertase (C4b2a) activity. Although NS1 bound C4b, it lacked intrinsic cofactor activity to degrade C4b, and did not block C3 convertase formation or accelerate decay of the C3 and C5 convertases. Instead, NS1 enhanced C4 cleavage by recruiting and activating the complement-specific protease C1s. By binding C1s and C4 in a complex, NS1 promotes efficient degradation of C4 to C4b. Through this mechanism, NS1 protects DENV from complement-dependent neutralization in solution. These studies define a novel immune evasion mechanism for restricting complement control of microbial infection. PMID:20308361

  13. Amniotic fluid embolism pathophysiology suggests the new diagnostic armamentarium: β-tryptase and complement fractions C3-C4 are the indispensable working tools.

    PubMed

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Frati, Paola; Zaami, Simona; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is an uncommon obstetric condition involving pregnant women during labor or in the initial stages after delivery. Its incidence is estimated to be around 5.5 cases per 100,000 deliveries. Therefore, this paper investigated the pathophysiological mechanism, which underlies AFE, in order to evaluate the role of immune response in the development of this still enigmatic clinical entity. The following databases (from 1956 to September 2014) Medline, Cochrane Central, Scopus, Web of Science and Science Direct were used, searching the following key words: AFE, pathophysiology, immune/inflammatory response, complement and anaphylaxis. The main key word "AFE" was searched singularly and associated individually to each of the other keywords. Of the 146 sources found, only 19 were considered appropriate for the purpose of this paper. The clinical course is characterized by a rapid onset of symptoms, which include: acute hypotension and/or cardiac arrest, acute hypoxia (with dyspnoea, cyanosis and/or respiratory arrest), coagulopathies (disseminated intravascular coagulation and/or severe hemorrhage), coma and seizures. The pathology still determines a significant morbidity and mortality and potential permanent neurological sequelae for surviving patients. At this moment, numerous aspects involving the pathophysiology and clinical development are still not understood and several hypotheses have been formulated, in particular the possible role of anaphylaxis and complement. Moreover, the detection of serum tryptase and complement components and the evaluation of fetal antigens can explain several aspects of immune response. PMID:25807263

  14. The phylogeny and evolution of the first component of complement, C1.

    PubMed

    Dodds, A W; Petry, F

    1993-12-01

    Extensive study of the phylogeny and evolution of the complement system has always been hampered by the difficulties involved in functional assays. These tests rely on the compatibility of the components from different species. Whereas all mammalian species appear to have almost identical classical, alternate and lytic pathways, non-mammalian vertebrates show minor differences. The source of the immunoglobulin molecule used to demonstrate classical pathway activation has also been shown to be crucial. The use of antibodies directed against complement components has been beneficial in the study of relationships, but cross-reactivity with non-complement proteins limited their use. The isolation and purification of complement components and the biochemical characterisation including amino acid analysis and peptide sequencing resulted in an enormous increase in our knowledge of the evolution of the complement system. Amino acid sequence analysis together with gene cloning of all human complement components finally revealed a number of sofar unknown features concerning the domain structure of the components and the relation of certain motifs and repeats to other proteins. The use of cDNA probes in Southern blot analysis of chromosomal DNA from various species enabled an extension of our scope of the phylogeny of complement. In this article we summarized the data on the phylogeny and evolution of the first component of complement and the associated molecules. We provide evidence for the conservation of the classical pathway and C1q in particular which appears to predate the divergence of the cartilaginous fish from the higher vertebrates. The possibility that the classical pathway could predate the alternate pathway is discussed.

  15. Studies of the third component of complement in synovial fluid from arthritic patients. II. Conversion and its relation to total complement

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, H.; Lundh, B.; Laurell, Anna-Brita

    1970-01-01

    Plasma and synovial fluid from arthritic patients were studied with antigen–antibody crossed electrophoresis for the conversion of C3. When present, C3 conversion was estimated planimetrically. The material included patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus as well as patients with non-rheumatoid arthritis. C3 conversion was not found in plasma from any of the patients studied. In non-rheumatoid synovial fluids there was no conversion in five and less than 10% in four of the samples. In rheumatoid synovial fluids C3 conversion proved significantly (P<0·01) more pronounced, the degree of conversion exceeding 10% in fourteen out of twenty-three cases. An inverse relationship was found in synovial fluid between the degree of C3 conversion on the one hand, and the total complement activity or the C3 concentration on the other. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5477926

  16. Neoantigen of the polymerized ninth component of complement. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody and immunohistochemical localization in renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, R J; Dalmasso, A P; Kim, Y; Tsai, C H; Scheinman, J I; Gewurz, H; Michael, A F

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to a neoantigen of the C9 portion of the membrane attack complex (MAC) of human complement has been developed and characterized. The distribution of this neoantigen was assessed by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy in nephritic and nonnephritic renal diseases. The antibody (Poly C9-MA) reacted on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a determinant in complement-activated serum that was undetectable in normal human serum (NHS). Zymosan particles incubated in NHS had positive immunofluorescent staining with Poly C9-MA; however, binding of Poly C9-MA was not observed with zymosan particles incubated in sera deficient in individual complement components C3, C5, C6, C7, C8, or C9. Reconstitution of C9-deficient sera with purified C9 restored the fluorescence with Poly C9-MA. Poly C9-MA reacted positively by ELISA in a dose-dependent manner with purified MC5b-9 solubilized from membranes of antibody-coated sheep erythrocytes treated with NHS but not with intermediate complement complexes. Poly C9-MA also reacted in a dose-dependent manner on ELISA and in a radioimmunoassay with polymerized C9 (37 degrees C, 64 h) (poly C9) but not with monomeric C9. Increasing amounts of either unlabeled poly C9 or purified MC5b-9 inhibited the 125I-poly C9 RIA in an identical manner. These studies demonstrate that Poly C9-MA recognizes a neoantigen of C9 common to both the MAC and to poly C9. By immunofluorescence, Poly C9-MA reacted minimally with normal kidney tissue in juxtaglomerular loci, the mesangial stalk, and vessel walls. Poly C9-MA stained kidney tissue from patients with glomerulonephritis in a pattern similar to that seen with polyclonal anti-human C3. In tissue from patients with nonnephritic renal disease--diabetes, hypertension, and obstructive uropathy--Poly C9-MA was strongly reactive in the mesangial stalk and juxtaglomerular regions, tubular basement membranes, and vascular walls. Poly C9-MA binding was especially prominent in

  17. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of complement component C8 beta in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) after the Vibrio alginolyticus challenge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shengwei; Xie, Fuxing; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Wei-Na

    2015-03-10

    Complement component C8 beta was a key molecule in the complement system, mediating the MAC formation and the bacterial lysis. In this study, the full-length C8 beta (EcC8 beta) was obtained, containing a 5'UTR of 25 bp, an ORF of 1764 bp and a 3'UTR of 198 bp. The EcC8 beta gene encoded a protein of 587 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 65.87 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point (pI) of 6.35. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that EcC8 beta consisted of the conserved residues and the domains known to be critical for C8 beta function. The quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that EcC8 beta transcript was expressed in all the examined tissues, while the strong expression was observed in the liver. In addition, complement C3 was the central molecule in the complement system, converging the upstream complement signals and mediating the MAC assembly pathway, while C8 beta was indispensable for active MAC formation. Following the Vibrio challenge, the increased expression of EcC3 transcript and EcC8 beta transcript was observed in the liver and kidney. These results indicated that EcC8 beta may be an important immune-related gene, playing an important role in the immune defense against the bacterial infection via the complement pathway.

  18. Binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae endopeptidase O (PepO) to complement component C1q modulates the complement attack and promotes host cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Sroka, Magdalena; Fulde, Marcus; Bergmann, Simone; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2014-05-30

    The Gram-positive species Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing severe local and life-threatening invasive diseases associated with high mortality rates and death. We demonstrated recently that pneumococcal endopeptidase O (PepO) is a ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional plasminogen and fibronectin-binding protein facilitating host cell invasion and evasion of innate immunity. In this study, we found that PepO interacts directly with the complement C1q protein, thereby attenuating the classical complement pathway and facilitating pneumococcal complement escape. PepO binds both free C1q and C1 complex in a dose-dependent manner based on ionic interactions. Our results indicate that recombinant PepO specifically inhibits the classical pathway of complement activation in both hemolytic and complement deposition assays. This inhibition is due to direct interaction of PepO with C1q, leading to a strong activation of the classical complement pathway, and results in consumption of complement components. In addition, PepO binds the classical complement pathway inhibitor C4BP, thereby regulating downstream complement activation. Importantly, pneumococcal surface-exposed PepO-C1q interaction mediates bacterial adherence to host epithelial cells. Taken together, PepO facilitates C1q-mediated bacterial adherence, whereas its localized release consumes complement as a result of its activation following binding of C1q, thus representing an additional mechanism of human complement escape by this versatile pathogen.

  19. First principles study on the electronic structures and stability of Cr 7C 3 type multi-component carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, B.; Feng, J.; Zhou, C. T.; Xing, J. D.; Xie, X. J.; Chen, Y. H.

    2008-06-01

    First principles calculations were conducted to investigate the stabilities of six multi-component carbides of Cr 7C 3 by calculating the cohesive energy and formation enthalpy of them. The theoretical predictions were compared with the experimental results and they were in agreement with each other. The electronic structures of the six carbides were also calculated in order to provide more information about the relationship between the stability and crystal compositions at atomic scale.

  20. Sequences and expression of pathway-specific complement components in developing red-tailed phascogale (Phascogale calura).

    PubMed

    Ong, Oselyne T W; Young, Lauren J; Old, Julie M

    2016-12-01

    Marsupials are born immunologically premature, relying on cells and molecules in maternal milk for immune protection. Both immunoglobulin and complement proteins have been identified in marsupial milk, but the expression of specific complement proteins remains largely unexplored. We report partial cDNA sequences for two complement-activating proteins, C3, C1r, CFP and MASP2, in liver tissues from red-tailed phascogale (Phascogale calura). Conservation of functionally relevant motifs were identified in the translated cDNA sequences from phascogale C3, CFP and MASP2 and their eutherian homologues. Gene expression of representative molecules from each of the major complement pathways was also investigated in whole body tissues from 1 to 18 day old animals and liver tissues from 31-day to 14-month old animals. Average complement expression in whole bodies and liver tissues of C1r, CFP, MASP2 and C3 increased significantly in juveniles compared to pouch young, presumably due to the maturation of the young's own complement system. Comparing expression in liver tissues only, we found that the average CFP expression were higher in pouch young compared to juveniles, while results were still statistically similar to the average expression of all tissues for C1r, MASP2 and C3. The average complement expression then significantly decreased as the animals aged into adulthood. PMID:27514577

  1. Histopathology of MPGN and C3 glomerulopathies.

    PubMed

    Cook, H Terence; Pickering, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    'Membranoproliferative' describes glomerular injury characterized by capillary wall thickening and mesangial expansion owing to increased matrix deposition and hypercellularity. The presence of immune deposits is indicative of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN). Historically, MPGN was further classified into three types according to the appearance and site of the electron-dense deposits seen by electron microscopy, but it is now recognized that many cases show only deposition of the complement component C3, owing to abnormal control of the alternative pathway of complement activation-these cases are now classified as C3 glomerulopathies. Not all cases of C3 glomerulopathy, however, show an MPGN pattern. C3 glomerulopathies include dense deposit disease, which shows dense osmiophilic deposits, and C3 glomerulonephritis, which shows isolated deposits. In many cases, the genetic mutations or autoantibodies responsible for C3 deposition have been identified. Some patients in whom complement control is abnormal will accumulate small amounts of immunoglobulin in their glomeruli and so, in everyday practice, the morphological diagnosis of 'glomerulonephritis with dominant C3' is useful for identifying patients who require investigation of the complement pathway. The recognition that many cases of MPGN are C3 glomerulopathies and that the underlying cause can often be identified in immunoglobulin-associated cases means that the diagnosis of idiopathic MPGN is now very uncommon.

  2. Complement Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... helpful? Also known as: C1; C1q; C2; C3; C4; CH50; CH100 (among others) Formal name: Complement Activity; ... whether the system is functioning normally. C3 and C4 are the most frequently measured complement proteins. Total ...

  3. The partly folded back solution structure arrangement of the 30 SCR domains in human complement receptor type 1 (CR1) permits access to its C3b and C4b ligands.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Patricia B; Huang, Chen Y; Ihyembe, Demvihin; Hammond, Russell A; Marsh, Henry C; Perkins, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Human complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) is a type I membrane-bound glycoprotein that belongs to the regulators of complement activity (RCA) family. The extra-cellular component of CR1 is comprised of 30 short complement regulator (SCR) domains, whereas complement receptor type 2 (CR2) has 15 SCR domains and factor H (FH) has 20 SCR domains. The domain arrangement of a soluble form of CR1 (sCR1) was studied by X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation. The radius of gyration R(G) of sCR1 of 13.4(+/-1.1) nm is not much greater than those for CR2 and FH, and its R(G)/R(0) anisotropy ratio is 3.76, compared to ratios of 3.67 for FH and 4.1 for CR2. Unlike CR2, but similar to FH, two cross-sectional R(G) ranges were identified that gave R(XS) values of 4.7(+/-0.2) nm and 1.2(+/-0.7) nm, respectively, showing that the SCR domains adopt a range of conformations including folded-back ones. The distance distribution function P(r) showed that the most commonly occurring distance in sCR1 is at 11.5 nm. Its maximum length of 55 nm is less than double those for CR2 or FH, even though sCR1 has twice the number of SCR domains compared to CR2 Sedimentation equilibrium experiments gave a mean molecular weight of 235 kDa for sCR1. This is consistent with the value of 245 kDa calculated from its composition including 14 N-linked oligosaccharide sites, and confirmed that sCR1 is a monomer in solution. Sedimentation velocity experiments gave a sedimentation coefficient of 5.8 S. From this, the frictional ratio (f/f(0)) of sCR1 was calculated to be 2.29, which is greater than those of 1.96 for CR2 and 1.77 for FH. The constrained scattering modelling of the sCR1 solution structure starting from homologous SCR domain structures generated 5000 trial conformationally randomised models, 43 of which gave good scattering fits to show that sCR1 has a partly folded-back structure. We conclude that the inter-SCR linkers show structural features in common with those in FH, but

  4. C3 glomerulopathy: consensus report

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Matthew C; D'Agati, Vivette D; Nester, Carla M; Smith, Richard J; Haas, Mark; Appel, Gerald B; Alpers, Charles E; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bedrosian, Camille; Braun, Michael; Doyle, Mittie; Fakhouri, Fadi; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fogo, Agnes B; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Gale, Daniel P; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Griffin, Gene; Harris, Claire L; Holers, V Michael; Johnson, Sally; Lavin, Peter J; Medjeral-Thomas, Nicholas; Paul Morgan, B; Nast, Cynthia C; Noel, Laure-Hélène; Peters, D Keith; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Servais, Aude; Sethi, Sanjeev; Song, Wen-Chao; Tamburini, Paul; Thurman, Joshua M; Zavros, Michael; Cook, H Terence

    2013-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy is a recently introduced pathological entity whose original definition was glomerular pathology characterized by C3 accumulation with absent or scanty immunoglobulin deposition. In August 2012, an invited group of experts (comprising the authors of this document) in renal pathology, nephrology, complement biology, and complement therapeutics met to discuss C3 glomerulopathy in the first C3 Glomerulopathy Meeting. The objectives were to reach a consensus on: the definition of C3 glomerulopathy, appropriate complement investigations that should be performed in these patients, and how complement therapeutics should be explored in the condition. This meeting report represents the current consensus view of the group. PMID:24172683

  5. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Deficiencies of Early Components of the Complement Classical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Ana Catarina Lunz; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in the innate and acquired immune response against pathogens. It consists of more than 30 proteins found in soluble form or attached to cell membranes. Most complement proteins circulate in inactive forms and can be sequentially activated by the classical, alternative, or lectin pathways. Biological functions, such as opsonization, removal of apoptotic cells, adjuvant function, activation of B lymphocytes, degranulation of mast cells and basophils, and solubilization and clearance of immune complex and cell lysis, are dependent on complement activation. Although the activation of the complement system is important to avoid infections, it also can contribute to the inflammatory response triggered by immune complex deposition in tissues in autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, the deficiency of early complement proteins from the classical pathway (CP) is strongly associated with development of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) – mainly C1q deficiency (93%) and C4 deficiency (75%). The aim of this review is to focus on the deficiencies of early components of the CP (C1q, C1r, C1s, C4, and C2) proteins in SLE patients. PMID:26941740

  6. Amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi escape destruction by the terminal complement components

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, K.; Whitlow, M.B.; Nussenzweig, V.

    1989-03-01

    We studied the effect of complement on two life cycle stages of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi: epimastigotes, found in the insect vector, and amastigotes, found in the mammalian host. We found that while both stages activate vigorously the alternative pathway, only epimastigotes are destroyed. The amounts of C3 and C5b-7 deposited on the amastigotes were similar to those bound to the much larger epimastigotes. Binding of C9 to amastigotes was four to six times less than binding to epimastigotes, resulting in a lower C9/C5b-7 ratio. Although a fairly large amount of C9 bound stably to amastigotes, no functional channels were formed as measured by release of incorporated /sup 86/Rb. The bound C9 had the characteristic properties of poly-C9, that is, it expressed a neo-antigen unique to poly-C9, and migrated in SDS-PAGE with an apparent Mr greater than 10(5). The poly-C9 was removed from the surface of amastigotes by treatment with trypsin, indicating that it was not inserted in the lipid bilayer. Modification of amastigote surface by pronase treatment rendered the parasites susceptible to complement attack. These results suggest that amastigotes have a surface protein that binds to the C5b-9 complex and inhibits membrane insertion, thus protecting the parasites from complement-mediated lysis.

  7. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the complement component C6 gene in grass carp.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu-Bang; Zhang, Jun-Bin; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Jia-Le

    2011-05-15

    The complement system, as a representative of innate immunity, plays a key role in the host defense against infections. C6 is the member of complement components creating the membrane attack complex (MAC). In this study, we cloned and characterized the grass carp complement component C6 (gcC6) gene. Our data showed that gcC6 gene contained a 2724bp open reading frame (ORF), a 237bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and a 219bp 3'-UTR. The deduced amino acid sequence of gcC6 showed 77.6% and 58.9% identity to zebrafish C6 and rainbow trout C6, respectively. GcC6 gene was expressed in a wide range of grass carp tissues, and the highest expression level of gcC6 was detected in the spleen and liver. Upon challenge with Aeromonas hydrophila, its expression was significantly up-regulated in muscle, trunk kidney, liver, head kidney, spleen, heart and intestine, whereas it was down-regulated in the brain and skin. The expression level of gcC6 was high at the unfertilized egg stage. It was significantly increased at 1 day post-hatching, but it was decreased at 10 days post-hatching. This result suggested that the complement C6 transcripts in early embryos were of maternal origin. PMID:21353312

  8. The Serum Complement System: A Simplified Laboratory Exercise to Measure the Activity of an Important Component of the Immune System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, Jordan E.; Radziwon, Kimberly A.; Maniero, Gregory D.

    2008-01-01

    The immune system is a vital physiological component that affords animals protection from disease and is composed of innate and adaptive mechanisms that rely on cellular and dissolved components. The serum complement system is a series of dissolved proteins that protect against a variety of pathogens. The activity of complement in serum can be…

  9. Correlation of disease activity with circulating immune complexes (C1qbA) and complement breakdown products (C3D) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Swaak, A J; Groenwold, J; Hannema, A; Hack, C E

    1985-01-01

    Most biologic effects of immune complexes are mediated through the activation of the complement system. The relationship between lupus disease activity and the presence of C3 breakdown products (C3d) and circulating immune complexes (CIC) as demonstrated with the C1q binding assay (C1qbA), was evaluated. Nearly all 13 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients had a stable disease course in this prospective study, nevertheless, in each patient the profiles of the serologic parameters were quite different. Despite the small number of investigated patients (13), it is concluded that irrespective of the disease activity, the serologic parameters could be either positive or negative. No relationship could be obtained between disease activity and the presence of C3d and/or CIC. Nor was there any evidence that the presence of CIC would indicate increased levels of C3 breakdown products (C3d). This observation argues against a pathogenetic significance of CIC detected by the C1qbA in SLE. In conclusion, the supposed link between the presence of CIC, consumption and activation of the complement system, and the activity of SLE needs further study.

  10. Genotypic diversity of complement component C4 does not predict kidney transplant outcome.

    PubMed

    Wahrmann, Markus; Döhler, Bernd; Ruhenstroth, Andrea; Haslacher, Helmuth; Perkmann, Thomas; Exner, Markus; Rees, Andrew J; Böhmig, Georg A

    2011-02-01

    Gene copy number of complement component C4, which varies among individuals, may determine the intrinsic strength of the classical complement pathway. Presuming a major role of complement as an effector in transplant rejection, we hypothesized that C4 genetic diversity may partially explain the variation in allograft outcomes. This retrospective study included 1969 deceased-donor kidney transplants randomly selected from the Collaborative Transplant Study DNA bank. We determined recipient and donor gene copy number of total C4, C4 isotypes (C4A and C4B), and C4 gene length variants (C4L and C4S) by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Groups defined according to recipient C4 gene copy number (low, intermediate, and high) had similar 10-year allograft survival. Genotypic groups showed comparable rates of graft dysfunction, treatment for rejection, immunological graft loss, hospitalization for infection, malignant disease, and death. Similarly, separate analyses of C4A, C4B, C4L, and C4S; combined evaluation of donor and recipient C4 genotype; or analysis of recipients with higher risk for rejection did not reveal considerable outcome effects. In conclusion, we did not demonstrate that C4 gene copy number associates with transplant outcome, and we found no evidence that the resulting variation in the strength of classical complement activation influences susceptibility to rejection.

  11. Genotypic Diversity of Complement Component C4 Does Not Predict Kidney Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Wahrmann, Markus; Döhler, Bernd; Ruhenstroth, Andrea; Haslacher, Helmuth; Perkmann, Thomas; Exner, Markus; Rees, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Gene copy number of complement component C4, which varies among individuals, may determine the intrinsic strength of the classical complement pathway. Presuming a major role of complement as an effector in transplant rejection, we hypothesized that C4 genetic diversity may partially explain the variation in allograft outcomes. This retrospective study included 1969 deceased-donor kidney transplants randomly selected from the Collaborative Transplant Study DNA bank. We determined recipient and donor gene copy number of total C4, C4 isotypes (C4A and C4B), and C4 gene length variants (C4L and C4S) by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Groups defined according to recipient C4 gene copy number (low, intermediate, and high) had similar 10-year allograft survival. Genotypic groups showed comparable rates of graft dysfunction, treatment for rejection, immunological graft loss, hospitalization for infection, malignant disease, and death. Similarly, separate analyses of C4A, C4B, C4L, and C4S; combined evaluation of donor and recipient C4 genotype; or analysis of recipients with higher risk for rejection did not reveal considerable outcome effects. In conclusion, we did not demonstrate that C4 gene copy number associates with transplant outcome, and we found no evidence that the resulting variation in the strength of classical complement activation influences susceptibility to rejection. PMID:21164027

  12. The purification and characterization of bovine C4, the fourth component of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, N A; Campbell, R D; Fothergill, J E

    1979-01-01

    The fourth component of complement, C4, was isolated from bovine plasma in high yield, by using simple purification techniques. The protein, like human component C4, is a beta-globulin with a mol.wt. of about 200 000 and consists of three polypeptide chains, alpha, beta and gamma, with apparent mol. wts. of 98 000, 82 000 and 32 000 respectively. The chains of C4 have been separated by methods previously used for human C4. Their amino acid compositions are very similar to those of the human component, but differences in carbohydrate distribution have been observed. The haemolytic activity of bovine C4 is totally destroyed by incubation with bovine C1s, the activated subcomponent of the first component of complement. Component C4, treated in this way, was shown to be cleaved in the alpha chain, which was decreased in mol.wt. by about 9000, corresponding to the removal of subcomponent C4a. Images Fig. 3. PMID:312644

  13. The complement component C5a receptor mediates pain and inflammation in a postsurgical pain model.

    PubMed

    Liang, De-Yong; Li, XiangQi; Shi, Xiaoyu; Sun, Yuan; Sahbaie, Peyman; Li, Wen-Wu; Clark, J David

    2012-02-01

    The complement system is an important part of innate immunity. Complement activation generates a set of effector molecules with diverse biological functions. C5a is a crucial terminal component of the complement cascade. Several reports suggest that C5a can support nociceptive sensitization and inflammation in various models, including models of incisional pain. However, information concerning the differential effects of C5a on specific modalities of nociception, the role of C5a in supporting neutrophil infiltration, secondary nociceptive mediator generation, and the location of the relevant populations of C5a receptors supporting incisional sensitization are needed. In these studies we utilized C5a receptor-null mice (C5aR(-/-)) and matched controls to study nociceptive changes after hind paw incision. Heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were measured for 4 days after incision. We also followed hind paw edema, wound area neutrophil infiltration using the myeloperoxidase assay, and interleukin-1β and nerve growth factor levels using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemical techniques. The main findings were: (1) Heat vs mechanical nociceptive sensitization after incision were differentially reduced in C5aR(-/-) mice, with thermal sensitization affected throughout the postincisional period but mechanical sensitization affected only at later time points; (2) Edema developed after incision in wild-type mice but only slightly and transiently in C5aR(-/-) mice, and (3) Deletion of C5aR blocked interleukin-1β and nerve growth factor production near the wound site. These findings demonstrate that the complement system component C5a is a novel biomarker and mediator associated with postsurgical nociceptive processing. C5aR may provide a novel target for the control of pain and inflammation after surgery.

  14. Structure-activity relationships within the N-terminal short consensus repeats (SCR) of human CR1 (C3b/C4b receptor, CD35): SCR 3 plays a critical role in inhibition of the classical and alternative pathways of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Mossakowska, D; Dodd, I; Pindar, W; Smith, R A

    1999-06-01

    Genes coding for between one and four short consensus repeats (SCR) of the N-terminal region of human complement receptor 1 (CR1) were synthesized from oligonucleotides and those encoding SCR(1-2), SCR(1-3), SCR(1-4), SCR3 and SCR(3-4) were expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. Following solubilization in urea, the proteins were partially purified and refolded and the activity of each protein was assessed in both classical and alternative pathway complement assays. All fragments showed a varying degree of activity with the general order being SCR(1-3) = SCR(1-4) > SCR(1-2). Addition of SCR3 to SCR(1-2) significantly improved potency, whereas the addition of SCR4 conferred no additional benefit. This observation, coupled with the ability of the single-domain SCR3 to inhibit classical pathway mediated lysis with an IH50% (inhibition of hemolysis by 50%) of 4.8 microM, demonstrates that SCR3 provides key binding interactions with activated complement components. SCR(1-3) was able to inhibit both classical and alternative pathways of complement activation, showing that the N-terminal SCR of CR1 retain the ability to interact with C3b. Assays for CR1-like cofactor activity for factor I using C4b-like C4 or C3b-like C3 as substrates showed that SCR(1-3) possessed such cofactor activity and that C4b-like C4 was a better substrate. When compared to full-length (30 SCR) soluble CR1 (sCR1), SCR(1-3) was significantly less potent in accord with a model involving multi-valent binding of C3b/C4b to CR1.

  15. Early Components of the Complement Classical Activation Pathway in Human Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Katherine E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Yang, Yan; Spencer, Charles H.; Hauptmann, Georges; Hebert, Lee A.; Atkinson, John P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2016-01-01

    The complement system consists of effector proteins, regulators, and receptors that participate in host defense against pathogens. Activation of the complement system, via the classical pathway (CP), has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated tissue injury, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Paradoxically, a complete deficiency of an early component of the CP, as evidenced by homozygous genetic deficiencies reported in human, are strongly associated with the risk of developing SLE or a lupus-like disease. Similarly, isotype deficiency attributable to a gene copy-number (GCN) variation and/or the presence of autoantibodies directed against a CP component or a regulatory protein that result in an acquired deficiency are relatively common in SLE patients. Applying accurate assay methodologies with rigorous data validations, low GCNs of total C4, and heterozygous and homozygous deficiencies of C4A have been shown as medium to large effect size risk factors, while high copy numbers of total C4 or C4A as prevalent protective factors, of European and East-Asian SLE. Here, we summarize the current knowledge related to genetic deficiency and insufficiency, and acquired protein deficiencies for C1q, C1r, C1s, C4A/C4B, and C2 in disease pathogenesis and prognosis of SLE, and, briefly, for other systemic autoimmune diseases. As the complement system is increasingly found to be associated with autoimmune diseases and immune-mediated diseases, it has become an attractive therapeutic target. We highlight the recent developments and offer a balanced perspective concerning future investigations and therapeutic applications with a focus on early components of the CP in human systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26913032

  16. Genomic characterization and expression analysis of complement component 9 in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus).

    PubMed

    Wickramaarachchi, Wickramaarachchige Don Niroshana; Wan, Qiang; Lee, Youngdeuk; Lim, Bong-Soo; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Oh, Myung-Joo; Jung, Sung-Ju; Kim, Hyun Chul; Whang, Ilson; Lee, Jehee

    2012-10-01

    The complement component 9 (C9) is a single-chain glycoprotein that mediates formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC) on the surface of target cells. Full-length C9 sequence was identified from a cDNA library of rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus), and its genomic sequence was obtained by screening and sequencing of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomic DNA library of rock bream. The rock bream complement component 9 (Rb-C9) gene contains 11 exons and 10 introns and is composed of a 1782 bp complete open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a polypeptide of 593 amino acids. Sequence analysis revealed that the Rb-C9 protein contains two thrombospondin type-1domains, a low-density lipoprotein receptor domain class A, a membrane attack complex & perforin (MACPF) domain, and an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain. Important putative transcription factor binding sites, including those for NF-κB, SP-1, C/EBP, AP-1 and OCT-1, were found in the 5' flanking region. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close proximity of Rb-C9 with the orthologues in puffer fish, and Japanese flounder. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis confirmed that Rb-C9 was constitutively expressed in all the examined tissues isolated from healthy rock bream, with highest expression occurring in liver. Pathogen challenge, including Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae, lipopolysaccharide endotoxin and rock bream iridovirus led to up-regulation of Rb-C9 in liver but no change in peripheral blood cells. The observed response to bacterial and viral challenges and high degree of evolutionary relationship to respective orthologues, confirmed that Rb-C9 is an important immune gene, likely involved in the complement system lytic pathway of rock bream. PMID:22796422

  17. The isolation and structure of C4, the fourth component of human complement.

    PubMed Central

    Gigli, I; von Zabern, I; Porter, R R

    1977-01-01

    The fourth component of complement, C4, was isolated from human serum in good yield, and in confirmation of previous reports was shown to be formed from three peptide chains, alpha, beta and gamma, with apparent mol.wts. 90 000, 80 000 and 30 000 respectively. Preparative methods are described for the isolation of the three peptide chains and their amino acid analyses reported. Component C4 contains 7.0% carbohydrate, alpha-chain 8.6% and the beta-chain 5.6%. The N-terminal amino acid sequences are given for 12 residues of the alpha-chain, eight of the beta-chain and 19 of the gamma-chain. Images PLATE 1 PMID:921758

  18. Function of the factor I modules (FIMS) of human complement component C6.

    PubMed

    DiScipio, R G; Linton, S M; Rushmere, N K

    1999-11-01

    In order to elucidate the function of complement component C6, truncated C6 molecules were expressed recombinantly. These were either deleted of the factor I modules (FIMs) (C6des-748-913) or both complement control protein (CCP) modules and FIMs (C6des-611-913). C6des-748-913 exhibited approximately 60-70% of the hemolytic activity of full-length C6 when assayed for Alternative Pathway activity, but when measured for the Classical Pathway, C6des-748-914 was only 4-6% as effective as C6. The activity difference between C6 and C6des-748-913 for the two complement pathways can be explained by a greater stability of newly formed metastable C5b* when produced by the Alternative Pathway compared with that made by the Classical Pathway. The half-lives of metastable C5b* and the decay of (125)I-C5b measured from cells used to activate the Alternative Pathway were found to be about 5-12-fold longer than those same parameters derived from cells that had activated the Classical Pathway. (125)I-C5 binds reversibly to C6 in an ionic strength-dependent fashion, but (125)I-C5 binds only weakly to C6des-FIMs and not at all to C6des-CCP/FIMs. Therefore, although the FIMs are not required absolutely for C6 activity, these modules promote interaction of C6 with C5 enabling a more efficient bimolecular coupling ultimately leading to the formation of the C5b-6 complex. PMID:10542204

  19. The Complement Component 5 gene and Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Baas, Dominique C.; Ho, Lintje; Ennis, Sarah; Merriam, Joanna E.; Tanck, Michael W.T.; Uitterlinden, André G.; de Jong, Paulus T.V.M.; Cree, Angela J.; Griffiths, Helen L.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia; Smith, R. Theodore; Barile, Gaetano R.; Gorgels, Theo G.M.F.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Lotery, Andrew J.; Allikmets, Rando; Bergen, Arthur A.B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between variants in the complement component 5 (C5) gene and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Separate and combined data from three large AMD case-control studies and a prospective population-based study (The Rotterdam Study). Participants A total of 2599 AMD cases and 3458 ethnically matched controls. Methods Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the C5 gene were initially genotyped in 375 cases and 199 controls from the Netherlands (The AMRO-NL study population). Replication testing of selected SNPs was performed in the Rotterdam Study (NL) and study populations from Southampton, United Kingdom (UK) and New York, United States (US). Main Outcome Measures Early and late stages of prevalent and incident AMD, graded according to (a modification of) the international grading and classification system of AMD. Results Significant allelic or genotypic associations between eight C5 SNPs and AMD were found in the AMRO-NL study and this risk appeared independently of CFH Y402H, LOC387715 A69S, age and gender. None of these findings could be confirmed consistently in three replication populations. Conclusions Although the complement pathway, including C5, plays a crucial role in AMD, and the C5 protein is present in drusen, no consistent significant associations between C5 SNPs and AMD were found in all studies. The implications for genetic screening of AMD are discussed. PMID:20022638

  20. Structure of the poly-C9 component of the complement membrane attack complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkina, Natalya V.; Spicer, Bradley A.; Reboul, Cyril F.; Conroy, Paul J.; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Elmlund, Hans; Law, Ruby H. P.; Ekkel, Susan M.; Kondos, Stephanie C.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Ramm, Georg; Whisstock, James C.; Saibil, Helen R.; Dunstone, Michelle A.

    2016-02-01

    The membrane attack complex (MAC)/perforin-like protein complement component 9 (C9) is the major component of the MAC, a multi-protein complex that forms pores in the membrane of target pathogens. In contrast to homologous proteins such as perforin and the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), all of which require the membrane for oligomerisation, C9 assembles directly onto the nascent MAC from solution. However, the molecular mechanism of MAC assembly remains to be understood. Here we present the 8 Å cryo-EM structure of a soluble form of the poly-C9 component of the MAC. These data reveal a 22-fold symmetrical arrangement of C9 molecules that yield an 88-strand pore-forming β-barrel. The N-terminal thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) domain forms an unexpectedly extensive part of the oligomerisation interface, thus likely facilitating solution-based assembly. These TSP1 interactions may also explain how additional C9 subunits can be recruited to the growing MAC subsequent to membrane insertion.

  1. Structure of the poly-C9 component of the complement membrane attack complex

    PubMed Central

    Dudkina, Natalya V.; Spicer, Bradley A.; Reboul, Cyril F.; Conroy, Paul J.; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Elmlund, Hans; Law, Ruby H. P.; Ekkel, Susan M.; Kondos, Stephanie C.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Ramm, Georg; Whisstock, James C.; Saibil, Helen R.; Dunstone, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    The membrane attack complex (MAC)/perforin-like protein complement component 9 (C9) is the major component of the MAC, a multi-protein complex that forms pores in the membrane of target pathogens. In contrast to homologous proteins such as perforin and the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), all of which require the membrane for oligomerisation, C9 assembles directly onto the nascent MAC from solution. However, the molecular mechanism of MAC assembly remains to be understood. Here we present the 8 Å cryo-EM structure of a soluble form of the poly-C9 component of the MAC. These data reveal a 22-fold symmetrical arrangement of C9 molecules that yield an 88-strand pore-forming β-barrel. The N-terminal thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) domain forms an unexpectedly extensive part of the oligomerisation interface, thus likely facilitating solution-based assembly. These TSP1 interactions may also explain how additional C9 subunits can be recruited to the growing MAC subsequent to membrane insertion. PMID:26841934

  2. Multiple sedimenting species of properdin in human serum and interaction of purified properdin with the third component of complement

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Normal human serum subjected to sucrose density gradient analysis exhibited multiple sedimenting species of properdin antigen. Properdin antigen distribution was dependent on serum concentration, ionic strength, temperature, and the presence of C3, and was not dependent on the presence of divalent metal cations or blood coagulation. In mixtures of purified components, properdin sedimented heavier in the presence of C3, C3b, or C3c. Addition of factor B to mixtures containing C3 and properdin was without effect. These data provide insights into earlier discrepancies concerning the sedimentation behavior of partially purified properdin, indicate a propensity of some constituents of the alternative pathway to form protein-protein complexes, and suggest caution in interpretation of immunopathological studies in which properdin deposits are found in the presence of C3. PMID:2647

  3. Evolution of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian complement system constitutes a highly sophisticated body defense machinery comprising more than 30 components. Research into the evolutionary origin of the complement system has identified a primitive version composed of the central component C3 and two activation proteases Bf and MASP in cnidaria. This suggests that the complement system was established in the common ancestor of eumetazoa more than 500 million years ago. The original activation mechanism of the original complement system is believed to be close to the mammalian lectin and alternative activation pathways, and its main role seems to be opsonization and induction of inflammation. This primitive complement system has been retained by most deuterostomes without major change until the appearance of jawed vertebrates. At this stage, duplication of the C3, Bf and MASP genes as well as recruitment of membrane attack components added the classical and lytic pathways to the primitive complement system, converting it to the modern complement system. In contrast, the complement system was lost multiple times independently in the protostome lineage.

  4. Genetic association of complement component 2 polymorphism with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chen, H-H; Tsai, L-J; Lee, K-R; Chen, Y-M; Hung, W-T; Chen, D-Y

    2015-08-01

    Complement component 2 (C2), an early member of the classical pathway, mainly participates in apoptotic cell clearance. We hypothesize that C2 polymorphism may confer genetic susceptibility to complement dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The major aim of our study was to investigate the clinical and serological associations of C2 variants in Chinese patients with SLE. The single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs2844455, G/A SNP) located in the intron region of C2 gene was genotyped by direct sequencing in 95 SLE patients and 95 matched normal control subjects. The gene expression profiles were generated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription PCR. Our results showed that the AA genotype was observed more frequently in SLE patients than in normal control subjects (22.1% vs 9.5%, P < 0.05). The A allele was strongly associated with the occurrence of hair loss, photosensitivity and anti-cardiolipin antibodies; whereas, the G allele was associated with lower frequencies of these clinical presentations. Relative expression levels were significantly lower in patients with the AA genotype [median: 18.86, interquartile range (IQR) 11.36-22.43, P = 0.002] than in those with the GG genotype (35.76, IQR: 19.33-49.71). As expected, we confirmed the A allele as a risk factor for SLE development in a Chinese population, in contrast, the G allele might be a protective factor against the pathogenic autoantibody formation and cutaneous manifestations in SLE patients.

  5. Novel ternary component Ag-SrTa2O6/g-C3N4 photocatalyst: Synthesis, optical properties and visible light photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yiguo; Zhao, Yanxia; Zhao, Yingjie; Lang, Junyu; Xin, Xin; Wang, Xiaojing

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we report on the synthesis of a novel ternary component Ag-SrTa2O6/g-C3N4 photocatalytic system with efficient visible light photocatalytic activity toward Cr(VI) photoreduction and methyl orange degradation. The samples were carefully characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and photocatalytic test. It is found that SrTa2O6 was deposited on the surface of g-C3N4 and that obtained SrTa2O6/g-C3N4 heterojunction photocatalyst showed strong absorption in the visible light region. Photocatalytic test indicated that the as-prepared SrTa2O6/g-C3N4 heterojunction showed increased photocatalytic activity toward Cr(VI) photoreduction and methyl orange degradation in comparison with the bare SrTa2O6 and g-C3N4 under visible light irradiation. The matching of the band structure between SrTa2O6 and g-C3N4 induced an efficient photogenerated electron transfer from the conduction band of g-C3N4 to the conduction band of SrTa2O6, resulting in efficient separation of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs and the subsequent promotion of photocatalytic activity. Moreover, the decoration of Ag on SrTa2O6/g-C3N4 led to the formation of ternary component Ag-SrTa2O6/g-C3N4 photocatalyst, which can highly enhance the visible light absorption efficiency and robustlypromote the photocatalytic activity by a factor of 2.8 for Cr(VI) photoreduction and 4.6 for methyl orange degradation, respectively. Ag decoration on SrTa2O6/g-C3N4 can not only extend the visible light absorption region due to surface plasmon resonance effects, but also act as an electron mediator for efficient migration of photogenerated electrons and simultaneously prevent the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs as much as possible. Finally, a possible photocatalytic mechanism of the charge transfer in Ag-SrTa2O6/g-C3N4 photocatalyst was proposed.

  6. CYP4F18-Deficient Neutrophils Exhibit Increased Chemotaxis to Complement Component C5a

    PubMed Central

    Vaivoda, Rachel; Vaine, Christine; Boerstler, Cassandra; Galloway, Kristy; Christmas, Peter

    2015-01-01

    CYP4Fs were first identified as enzymes that catalyze hydroxylation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4). CYP4F18 has an unusual expression in neutrophils and was predicted to play a role in regulating LTB4-dependent inflammation. We compared chemotaxis of wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout neutrophils using an in vitro assay. There was no significant difference in the chemotactic response to LTB4, but the response to complement component C5a increased 1.9–2.25-fold in knockout cells compared to wild-type (P < 0.01). This increase was still observed when neutrophils were treated with inhibitors of eicosanoid synthesis. There were no changes in expression of other CYP4 enzymes in knockout neutrophils that might compensate for loss of CYP4F18 or lead to differences in activity. A mouse model of dextran sodium sulfate colitis was used to investigate the consequences of increased C5a-dependent chemotaxis in vivo, but there was no significant difference in weight loss, disease activity, or colonic tissue myeloperoxidase between wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout mice. This study demonstrates the limitations of inferring CYP4F function based on an ability to use LTB4 as a substrate, points to expanding roles for CYP4F enzymes in immune regulation, and underscores the in vivo challenges of CYP knockout studies. PMID:26613087

  7. CYP4F18-Deficient Neutrophils Exhibit Increased Chemotaxis to Complement Component C5a.

    PubMed

    Vaivoda, Rachel; Vaine, Christine; Boerstler, Cassandra; Galloway, Kristy; Christmas, Peter

    2015-01-01

    CYP4Fs were first identified as enzymes that catalyze hydroxylation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4). CYP4F18 has an unusual expression in neutrophils and was predicted to play a role in regulating LTB4-dependent inflammation. We compared chemotaxis of wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout neutrophils using an in vitro assay. There was no significant difference in the chemotactic response to LTB4, but the response to complement component C5a increased 1.9-2.25-fold in knockout cells compared to wild-type (P < 0.01). This increase was still observed when neutrophils were treated with inhibitors of eicosanoid synthesis. There were no changes in expression of other CYP4 enzymes in knockout neutrophils that might compensate for loss of CYP4F18 or lead to differences in activity. A mouse model of dextran sodium sulfate colitis was used to investigate the consequences of increased C5a-dependent chemotaxis in vivo, but there was no significant difference in weight loss, disease activity, or colonic tissue myeloperoxidase between wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout mice. This study demonstrates the limitations of inferring CYP4F function based on an ability to use LTB4 as a substrate, points to expanding roles for CYP4F enzymes in immune regulation, and underscores the in vivo challenges of CYP knockout studies.

  8. Overview of C3 Glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Master Sankar Raj, Vimal; Gordillo, Roberto; Chand, Deepa H.

    2016-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy is an umbrella term, which includes several rare forms of glomerulonephritis (GN) with underlying defects in the alternate complement cascade. A common histological feature noted in all these GN is dominant C3 deposition in the glomerulus. In this review, we will provide an overview of the complement system as well as mediators, with an introduction to pharmaceutical agents that can alter the pathway. PMID:27200326

  9. Complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein is a marker for proliferation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jane Scully, Olivia; Yu, Yingnan; Salim, Agus; Aye Thike, Aye; Wai-Cheong Yip, George; Hun Baeg, Gyeong; Tan, Puay-Hoon; Matsumoto, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP), is a multi-compartmental protein with higher mRNA expression reported in breast cancer tissues. This study evaluated the association between immunohistochemical expression of the C1QBP protein in breast cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs) and clinicopathological parameters, in particular tumor size. In addition, an in vitro study was conducted to substantiate the breast cancer TMA findings. Breast cancer TMAs were constructed from pathological specimens of patients diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. C1QBP protein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemical analyses were subsequently performed in the TMAs. C1QBP immunostaining was detected in 131 out of 132 samples examined. The C1QBP protein was predominantly localized in the cytoplasm of the breast cancer cells. Univariate analysis revealed that a higher C1QBP protein expression was significantly associated with older patients (P = 0.001) and increased tumor size (P = 0.002). Multivariate analysis showed that C1QBP is an independent predictor of tumor size in progesterone-positive tumors. Furthermore, C1QBP was also significantly correlated with expression of PCNA, a known marker of proliferation. Inhibition of C1QBP expression was performed by transfecting C1QBP siRNA into T47D breast cancer cells, a progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer cell line. C1QBP gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR, and protein expression by Western blot. Cell proliferation assays were also performed by commercially available assays. Down-regulation of C1QBP expression significantly decreased cell proliferation and growth in T47D cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that the C1QBP protein could be a potential proliferative marker in breast cancer. PMID:25573962

  10. Studies on the mechanism of bacterial resistance to complement-mediated killing. I. Terminal complement components are deposited and released from salmonella minnesota S218 without causing bacterial death

    PubMed Central

    Joiner, KA; Hammer, CH; Brown, EJ; Cole, RJ; Frank, MM

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of resistance of gram-negative bacteria to killing by complement was investigated. Complement consumption and uptake of purified, radiolabeled complement components on bacteria was studied using a serum- sensitive and a serum-resistant strain of Salmonella minnesota. Twice as many molecules of (125)I C3 were bound per colony-forming unit (CFU) of the smooth, serum-resistant S. minnesota S218 as were bound per CFU of the rough, serum-sensitive S. minnesota Re595 in 10 percent pooled normal human serum (PNHS), although 75-80 percent of C3 was consumed by both organisms. Hemolytic titrations documented total consumption of C9 by 5 min and more than 95 percent consumption of C5 and C7 by 15 min in the reaction with S218 with 10 percent PNHS. In contrast, negligible C5 depletion, 10 percent C7 consumption, and only a 26 percent decrease in C9 titer occurred with the serum-sensitive Re595. Binding of (125)I C5, (125)I C7, and (125)I C9 to S218 and Re595 was measured in 10 percent PNHS. A total of 6,600 molecules C5/CFU, 5,200 molecules C7/CFU, and 3,100 molecules C9/CFU bound to S218 after 5-10 min of incubation at 37 degrees C, but 50-70 percent of the C5, C7, and C9 bound to S218 was released from the organism during incubation at 37 degrees C for 60 min. Binding of 2,000 molecules C5/CFU, 1,900 molecules C7/CFU, and 9,000 molecules C9/CFU to Re595 was achieved by 20 min and was stable. The ratio of bound C9 molecules to bound C7 molecules, measured using (131)I C9 and (125)I C7, was constant for both organisms after 15 min and was 4.3:1 on Re595 and 0.65:1 on S218 in 10 percent PNHS. With addition of increasing amounts of purified, unlabeled (29 to 10 percent PNHS, there was no change in the C9:C7 ratio on Re595. However, with S218 there was a linear increase of the C9:C7 ratio, which approached the ratio on Re595. There was no (14)C release from S218 incubated in PNHS, nor was there evidence by electron microscopy of outer membrane damage to S218

  11. The complement system in human cardiometabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Hertle, E; Stehouwer, C D A; van Greevenbroek, M M J

    2014-10-01

    The complement system has been implicated in obesity, fatty liver, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Complement factors are produced in adipose tissue and appear to be involved in adipose tissue metabolism and local inflammation. Thereby complement links adipose tissue inflammation to systemic metabolic derangements, such as low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, complement has been implicated in pathophysiological mechanisms of diet- and alcohol induced liver damage, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and fibrinolysis. In this review, we summarize current evidence on the role of the complement system in several processes of human cardiometabolic disease. C3 is the central component in complement activation, and has most widely been studied in humans. C3 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, liver dysfunction, risk of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. C3 can be activated by the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathway of complement activation; and downstream activation of C3 activates the terminal pathway. Complement may also be activated via extrinsic proteases of the coagulation, fibrinolysis and the kinin systems. Studies on the different complement activation pathways in human cardiometabolic disease are limited, but available evidence suggests that they may have distinct roles in processes underlying cardiometabolic disease. The lectin pathway appeared beneficial in some studies on type 2 diabetes and CVD, while factors of the classical and the alternative pathway were related to unfavourable cardiometabolic traits. The terminal complement pathway was also implicated in insulin resistance and liver disease, and appears to have a prominent role in acute and advanced CVD. The available human data suggest a complex and potentially causal role for the complement system in human cardiometabolic disease. Further, preferably longitudinal studies are needed to

  12. Detection of complement activation by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE).

    PubMed

    Arroyave, C M; Tan, E M

    1976-01-01

    Counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) was used as a method of detecting activation of the third component of the complement system (C3). Highly purified C3, normal human serum (NHS), EDTA-treated plasma and serum activated with aggregated human immunoglobulin (agg-IgG) or inulin were used as sources of C3 and/or C3 split products. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement was assayed in the presence of EGTA (10 mM) and MgCl2 (0.3 mM), conditions which block activation of the classical pathway. When purified native C3, fresh NHS and fresh EDTA-plasma were tested in CIE against either antisera to whole C3 or to C3 split products, only one precipitin line was found, which was identified as native C3. However, when serum activated with agg-IgG or inulin were tested against the same reagents, two precipitin lines were seen. The first, with more cathodal mobility was identical to that of native C3. The second line had a more anodal mobility, was distinctly separated from the first and contained C3c and C3d as shown immunochemically with specific antisera. Native C3 and split products of C3 were identified by this CIE method in patients showing evidence of activated complement by having subnormal total complement (CH50) levels. When C3 split products were identified, the C3c-C3d precipitin line could always be distinguished from native C3 by its different electrophoretic mobility, even when C3 concentrations in serum varied from 0.25 mg/ml to 1.5 mg/ml. The sensitivity of CIE was compared to that of CH50 by asssaying at different time intervals after agg-IgG was added to fresh NHS. C3c-C3d split products were detected by CIE before any fall in CH50 and at all times when a significant decrease in CH50 was present. This study shows that the CIE technique is a highly sensitive, specific and rapid method for detecting activation of the complement system via classical or alternative pathways in human disease.

  13. Complement depletion with humanised cobra venom factor: efficacy in preclinical models of vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Fritzinger, David C; Gorsuch, W Brian; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-03-01

    The complement system is an intrinsic part of the immune system and has important functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, inadvertent or misdirected complement activation is also involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, contributing solely or significantly to tissue injury and disease development. Multiple approaches to develop pharmacological agents to inhibit complement are currently being pursued. We have developed a conceptually different approach of not inhibiting but depleting complement, based on the complement-depleting activities of cobra venom factor (CVF), a non-toxic cobra venom component with structural and functional homology to complement component C3. We developed a humanised version of CVF by creating human complement component C3 derivatives with complement-depleting activities of CVF (humanised CVF) as a promising therapeutic agent for diseases with complement pathogenesis. Here we review the beneficial therapeutic effect of humanised CVF in several murine models of vascular diseases such as reperfusion injury.

  14. Update on C3 glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Thomas D.; Ruseva, Marieta M.; Pickering, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy refers to a disease process in which abnormal control of complement activation, degradation or deposition results in predominant C3 fragment deposition within the glomerulus and glomerular damage. Recent studies have improved our understanding of its pathogenesis. The key abnormality is uncontrolled C3b amplification in the circulation and/or along the glomerular basement membrane. Family studies in which disease segregates with structurally abnormal complement factor H-related (CFHR) proteins demonstrate that abnormal CFHR proteins are important in some types of C3 glomerulopathy. This is currently thought to be due to the ability of these proteins to antagonize the major negative regulator of C3 activation, complement factor H (CFH), a process termed ‘CFH de-regulation’. Recent clinicopathological cohort studies have led to further refinements in case definition, culminating in a 2013 consensus report, which provides recommendations regarding investigation and treatment. Early clinical experience with complement-targeted therapeutics, notably C5 inhibitors, has also now been published. Here, we summarize the latest developments in C3 glomerulopathy. PMID:25326473

  15. Atomic resolution model of the antibody Fc interaction with the complement C1q component.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sebastian; Zacharias, Martin

    2012-05-01

    The globular C1q heterotrimer is a subunit of the C1 complement factor. Binding of the C1q subunit to the constant (Fc) part of antibody molecules is a first step and key event of complement activation. Although three-dimensional structures of C1q and antibody Fc subunits have been determined experimentally no atomic resolution structure of the C1q-Fc complex is known so far. Based on systematic protein-protein docking searches and Molecular Dynamics simulations a structural model of the C1q-IgG1-Fc-binding geometry has been obtained. The structural model is compatible with available experimental data on the interaction between the two partner proteins. It predicts a binding geometry that involves mainly the B-subunit of the C1q-trimer and both subunits of the IgG1-Fc-dimer with small conformational adjustments with respect to the unbound partners to achieve high surface complementarity. In addition to several charge-charge and polar contacts in the rim region of the interface it also involves nonpolar contacts between the two proteins and is compatible with the carbohydrate moiety of the Fc subunit. The model for the complex structure provides a working model for rationalizing available biochemical data on this important interaction and can form the basis for the design of Fc variants with a greater capacity to activate the complement system for example on binding to cancer cells or other target structures.

  16. Complement fixation by rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, K; Cooper, N R; Johnson, J S; Vaughan, J H

    1975-01-01

    The capacity for fixation and activation of hemolytic complement by polyclonal IgM rheumatoid factors (RF) isolated from sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and monoclonal IgM-RF isolated from the cryoprecipitates of patients with IgM-IgG mixed cryoglobulinemia was examined. RF mixed with aggregated, reduced, and alkylated human IgG (Agg-R/A-IgG) in the fluid phase failed to significantly reduce the level of total hemolytic complement, CH50, or of individual complement components, C1, C2, C3, and C5. However, sheep erythrocytes (SRC) coated with Agg-R/A-IgG or with reduced and alkylated rabbit IgG anti-SRC antibody were hemolyzed by complement in the presence of polyclonal IgM-RF. Human and guinea pig complement worked equally well. The degree of hemolysis was in direct proportion to the hemagglutination titer of the RF against the same coated cells. Monoclonal IgM-RF, normal human IgM, and purified Waldenström macroglobulins without antiglobulin activity were all inert. Hemolysis of coated SRC by RF and complement was inhibited by prior treatment of the complement source with chelating agents, hydrazine, cobra venom factor, specific antisera to C1q, CR, C5, C6, or C8, or by heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min. Purified radiolabeled C4, C3, and C8 included in the complement source were bound to hemolysed SRC in direct proportion to the degree of hemolysis. These data indicate that polyclonal IgM-RF fix and activate complement via the classic pathway. The system described for assessing complement fixation by isolated RF is readily adaptable to use with whole human serum. PMID:1078825

  17. Complement activation in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, L E; De Villiers, D; Markham, D; Whaley, K; Thomas, H C

    1982-01-01

    Patients with HBsAg positive chronic active liver disease (CALD) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) exhibit increased C3d concentrations and changes in the serum concentrations of the complement components consistent with activation of the classical and alternative pathways. In these patients the concentrations of the regulatory proteins, C3b inactivator (C3bINA) and beta IH globulin, are normal. Patients with HBsAg negative CALD and alcohol induced liver disease (ALD) exhibit no evidence of an increased level of complement system activation. In these patients diminished serum concentrations of complement components appear to be related to diminished hepatic synthetic function. C4 synthesis may be specifically reduced in autoimmune chronic active liver disease. PMID:7083631

  18. Heat differentiated complement factor profiling.

    PubMed

    Hamsten, Carl; Skattum, Lillemor; Truedsson, Lennart; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Uhlén, Mathias; Schwenk, Jochen M; Hammarström, Lennart; Nilsson, Peter; Neiman, Maja

    2015-08-01

    Complement components and their cascade of reactions are important defense mechanisms within both innate and adaptive immunity. Many complement deficient patients still remain undiagnosed because of a lack of high throughput screening tools. Aiming towards neonatal proteome screening for immunodeficiencies, we used a multiplex profiling approach with antibody bead arrays to measure 9 complement proteins in serum and dried blood spots. Several complement components have been described as heat sensitive, thus their heat-dependent detectability was investigated. Using sera from 16 patients with complement deficiencies and 23 controls, we confirmed that the proteins C1q, C2, C3, C6, C9 and factor H were positively affected by heating, thus the identification of deficient patients was improved when preheating samples. Measurements of C7, C8 and factor I were negatively affected by heating and non-heated samples should be used in analysis of these components. In addition, a proof of concept study demonstrated the feasibility of labeling eluates from dried blood spots to perform a subsequent correct classification of C2-deficiencies. Our study demonstrates the potential of using multiplexed single binder assays for screening of complement components that open possibilities to expand such analysis to other forms of deficiencies.

  19. Transcriptome Characterization by RNA-Seq Reveals the Involvement of the Complement Components in Noise-Traumatized Rat Cochleae

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Minal; Hu, Zihua; Bard, Jonathan; Jamison, Jennifer; Cai, Qunfeng; Hu, Bo Hua

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic trauma, a leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss in adults, induces a complex degenerative process in the cochlea. Although previous investigations have identified multiple stress pathways, a comprehensive analysis of cochlear responses to acoustic injury is still lacking. In the current study, we used the next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) technique to sequence the whole transcriptome of the normal and noise-traumatized cochlear sensory epithelia (CSE). CSE tissues were collected from rat inner ears 1 d after the rats were exposed to a 120-dB (sound pressure level) noise for 2 h. The RNA-seq generated over 176 million sequence reads for the normal CSE and over 164 million reads for the noise-traumatized CSE. Alignment of these sequences with the rat Rn4 genome revealed the expression of over 17000 gene transcripts in the CSE, over 2000 of which were exclusively expressed in either the normal or noise-traumatized CSE. Seventy-eight gene transcripts were differentially expressed (70 upregulated and 8 downregulated) after acoustic trauma. Many of the differentially expressed genes are related to the innate immune system. Further expression analyses using qRT-PCR confirmed the constitutive expression of multiple complement genes in the normal organ of Corti and the changes in the expression levels of the complement factor I (Cfi) and complement component 1, s subcomponent (C1s) after acoustic trauma. Moreover, protein expression analysis revealed strong expression of Cfi and C1s proteins in the organ of Corti. Importantly, these proteins exhibited expression changes following acoustic trauma. Collectively, the results of the current investigation suggest the involvement of the complement components in cochlear responses to acoustic trauma. PMID:23727008

  20. Transcriptome characterization by RNA-Seq reveals the involvement of the complement components in noise-traumatized rat cochleae.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; Hu, Z; Bard, J; Jamison, J; Cai, Q; Hu, B H

    2013-09-17

    Acoustic trauma, a leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss in adults, induces a complex degenerative process in the cochlea. Although previous investigations have identified multiple stress pathways, a comprehensive analysis of cochlear responses to acoustic injury is still lacking. In the current study, we used the next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) technique to sequence the whole transcriptome of the normal and noise-traumatized cochlear sensory epithelia (CSE). CSE tissues were collected from rat inner ears 1d after the rats were exposed to a 120-dB (sound pressure level) noise for 2 h. The RNA-Seq generated over 176 million sequence reads for the normal CSE and over 164 million reads for the noise-traumatized CSE. Alignment of these sequences with the rat Rn4 genome revealed the expression of over 17,000 gene transcripts in the CSE, over 2000 of which were exclusively expressed in either the normal or noise-traumatized CSE. Seventy-eight gene transcripts were differentially expressed (70 upregulated and 8 downregulated) after acoustic trauma. Many of the differentially expressed genes are related to the innate immune system. Further expression analyses using quantitative real time PCR confirmed the constitutive expression of multiple complement genes in the normal organ of Corti and the changes in the expression levels of the complement factor I (Cfi) and complement component 1, s subcomponent (C1s) after acoustic trauma. Moreover, protein expression analysis revealed strong expression of Cfi and C1s proteins in the organ of Corti. Importantly, these proteins exhibited expression changes following acoustic trauma. Collectively, the results of the current investigation suggest the involvement of the complement components in cochlear responses to acoustic trauma. PMID:23727008

  1. Complement component 6 deficiency increases susceptibility to dextran sulfate sodium-induced murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Peipei; Li, Ling; Huang, Tianbao; Yang, Chaoqun; Xu, Enjie; Wang, Na; Zhang, Long; Gu, Hongyu; Yao, Xudong; Zhou, Xuhui; Hu, Weiguo

    2016-11-01

    As a potent effector of innate immunity, the complement system has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the role of the membrane attack complex (MAC) in the development of IBD is still largely unknown. Here, we used C6-deficient mice in which MAC formation was blocked due to the absence of C6 to develop an acute colitis model by the administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). The results showed that DSS-induced colitis was aggravated in C6-deficient mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice, as represented by the markedly greater weight loss, higher disease activity index (DAI), shortened colon length, more severe histological injury with increased epithelial ulcerations, and massively increased infiltration of leukocytes accompanied by much higher myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in local inflammatory colonic sites. In addition, the DSS-induced colitis in C6-deficient mice could be significantly ameliorated by the exogenous C6 from WT sera. Furthermore, the significantly enhanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators, including IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL-1, CCL-3, TGF-β1 and IL-17F, was also observed in C6-deficient mice. Unexpectedly, the aggravated colitis in C6-deficient mice may be not due to the increase of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels in serum. Overall, we demonstrated that MAC exerts a protective role in acute colitis, strongly highlighting the host defense function of the complement system. PMID:27316715

  2. Functional analysis of Cobra Venom Factor/human C3 chimeras transiently expressed in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kölln, Johanna; Matzas, Mark; Jänner, Nathalie; Mix, Thorsten; Klensang, Katrin; Bredehorst, Reinhard; Spillner, Edzard

    2004-05-01

    The complement activating venom component Cobra Venom Factor (CVF), a functional and structural homologue of the human complement component C3, forms a stable CVF-dependent C3 convertase complex, which, in contrast to C3-dependent convertase effects continuous activation of the complement and, thereby, decomplementation. In order to elucidate the mechanism underlying the enhanced activity of CVF compared to human C3, we generated two CVF/C3 chimeras and established different affinity-based assay systems for functional analysis of these constructs. To allow for convenient expression and subsequent functional characterisation, the CVF/C3 chimeras as well as CVF and C3 were transiently expressed in mammalian cells. Problems due to the low concentration of the recombinant proteins in the supernatants of transient expressions were circumvented by fusion to peptide tags enabling their efficient immobilisation onto suitable surfaces and subsequent characterisation. In an alternative approach monoclonal antibody fragments generated from a semisynthetic phage display scFv library were employed for concentrating the recombinant proteins by immunoprecipitation. Utilising both approaches all transiently expressed proteins could be characterised for their complement consumption activity. The data obtained with the CVF/C3 chimeras demonstrate that the increased stability of the CVFBb complex is independent of the domains in CVF corresponding to binding sites of factor B and H and the cleavage sites of factor I in the human C3 molecule. PMID:15140572

  3. Molecules Great and Small: The Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Mathern, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    The complement cascade, traditionally considered an effector arm of innate immunity required for host defense against pathogens, is now recognized as a crucial pathogenic mediator of various kidney diseases. Complement components produced by the liver and circulating in the plasma undergo activation through the classical and/or mannose-binding lectin pathways to mediate anti-HLA antibody-initiated kidney transplant rejection and autoantibody-initiated GN, the latter including membranous glomerulopathy, antiglomerular basement membrane disease, and lupus nephritis. Inherited and/or acquired abnormalities of complement regulators, which requisitely limit restraint on alternative pathway complement activation, contribute to the pathogenesis of the C3 nephropathies and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Increasing evidence links complement produced by endothelial cells and/or tubular cells to the pathogenesis of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and progressive kidney fibrosis. Data emerging since the mid-2000s additionally show that immune cells, including T cells and antigen-presenting cells, produce alternative pathway complement components during cognate interactions. The subsequent local complement activation yields production of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, which bind to their respective receptors (C3aR and C5aR) on both partners to augment effector T-cell proliferation and survival, while simultaneously inhibiting regulatory T-cell induction and function. This immune cell–derived complement enhances pathogenic alloreactive T-cell immunity that results in transplant rejection and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of other T cell–mediated kidney diseases. C5a/C5aR ligations on neutrophils have additionally been shown to contribute to vascular inflammation in models of ANCA-mediated renal vasculitis. New translational immunology efforts along with the development of pharmacologic agents that block human complement components and receptors now permit

  4. Molecules Great and Small: The Complement System.

    PubMed

    Mathern, Douglas R; Heeger, Peter S

    2015-09-01

    The complement cascade, traditionally considered an effector arm of innate immunity required for host defense against pathogens, is now recognized as a crucial pathogenic mediator of various kidney diseases. Complement components produced by the liver and circulating in the plasma undergo activation through the classical and/or mannose-binding lectin pathways to mediate anti-HLA antibody-initiated kidney transplant rejection and autoantibody-initiated GN, the latter including membranous glomerulopathy, antiglomerular basement membrane disease, and lupus nephritis. Inherited and/or acquired abnormalities of complement regulators, which requisitely limit restraint on alternative pathway complement activation, contribute to the pathogenesis of the C3 nephropathies and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Increasing evidence links complement produced by endothelial cells and/or tubular cells to the pathogenesis of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and progressive kidney fibrosis. Data emerging since the mid-2000s additionally show that immune cells, including T cells and antigen-presenting cells, produce alternative pathway complement components during cognate interactions. The subsequent local complement activation yields production of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, which bind to their respective receptors (C3aR and C5aR) on both partners to augment effector T-cell proliferation and survival, while simultaneously inhibiting regulatory T-cell induction and function. This immune cell-derived complement enhances pathogenic alloreactive T-cell immunity that results in transplant rejection and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of other T cell-mediated kidney diseases. C5a/C5aR ligations on neutrophils have additionally been shown to contribute to vascular inflammation in models of ANCA-mediated renal vasculitis. New translational immunology efforts along with the development of pharmacologic agents that block human complement components and receptors now permit

  5. Genetic polymorphism of the third component of human complement (C′3)

    PubMed Central

    Alper, Chester A.; Propp, Richard P.

    1968-01-01

    Polymorphism of human C′3 has been defined by prolonged agarose electrophoresis of fresh serum. At least four, and probably five, alleles have been identified by the electrophoretic mobilities of gene products. Inheritance of three alleles, F1 F, and S, is consistent with the autosomal condominant type. The inheritance of S1 is probably codominant and that of F0·8 is not known. Of the 15 phenotypes predicted by these alleles, eight have been observed. The allotypes appear to differ in net surface charge at pH 8.6, but show no obvious differences in complement activity, in molecular size, or in binding of Ca++. The concentrations of the two gene products in serum from all known heterozygotes are approximately equal. The S gene is most common in the three major races of man. The F gene is relatively common in Caucasians, less common in American Negroes, and relatively uncommon in Orientals. Images PMID:5675433

  6. Phenotyping of human complement component C4, a class-III HLA antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, E; Cross, S J

    1986-01-01

    The plasma complement protein C4 is encoded at two highly polymorphic loci, A and B, within the class-III region of the major histocompatibility complex. At least 34 different polymorphic variants of human C4 have been identified, including non-expressed or 'null' alleles. The main method of identification of C4 polymorphic allotypes is separation on the basis of charge by agarose-gel electrophoresis of plasma. On staining by immunofixation with anti-C4 antibodies, each C4 type gives three major bands, but, since individuals can have up to five allotypes, the overlapping banding pattern is difficult to interpret. We show that digestion of plasma samples with carboxypeptidase B, which removes C-terminal basic amino acids, before electrophoresis, produces a single, sharp, distinct band for each allotype and allows identification of the biochemical basis of the multiple banding pattern previously observed in C4 phenotype determination. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3103606

  7. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-07-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies.

  8. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-01-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies. PMID

  9. Netrin-1 Reduces Monocyte and Macrophage Chemotaxis towards the Complement Component C5a.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lewis; Brodermann, Maximillian Hugo; McCaffary, David; Iqbal, Asif Jilani; Greaves, David R

    2016-01-01

    Netrin-1, acting at its cognate receptor UNC5b, has been previously demonstrated to inhibit CC chemokine-induced immune cell migration. In line with this, we found that netrin-1 was able to inhibit CCL2-induced migration of bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs). However, whether netrin-1 is capable of inhibiting chemotaxis to a broader range of chemoattractants remains largely unexplored. As our initial experiments demonstrated that RAW264.7 and BMDMs expressed high levels of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1) on their surface, we aimed to determine the effect of netrin-1 exposure on monocyte/macrophage cell migration induced by C5a, a complement peptide that plays a major role in multiple inflammatory pathologies. Treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages, BMDMs and human monocytes with netrin-1 inhibited their chemotaxis towards C5a, as measured using two different real-time methods. This inhibitory effect was found to be dependent on netrin-1 receptor signalling, as an UNC5b blocking antibody was able to reverse netrin-1 inhibition of C5a induced BMDM migration. Treatment of BMDMs with netrin-1 had no effect on C5aR1 proximal signalling events, as surface C5aR1 expression, internalisation and intracellular Ca2+ release following C5aR1 ligation remained unaffected after netrin-1 exposure. We next examined receptor distal events that occur following C5aR1 activation, but found that netrin-1 was unable to inhibit C5a induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt and p38, pathways important for cellular migration. Furthermore, netrin-1 treatment had no effect on BMDM cytoskeletal rearrangement following C5a stimulation as determined by microscopy and real-time electrical impedance sensing. Taken together these data highlight that netrin-1 inhibits monocyte and macrophage cell migration, but that the mechanism behind this effect remains unresolved. Nevertheless, netrin-1 and its cognate receptors warrant further investigation as they may represent a potential avenue for the development of

  10. Netrin-1 Reduces Monocyte and Macrophage Chemotaxis towards the Complement Component C5a

    PubMed Central

    McCaffary, David; Iqbal, Asif Jilani; Greaves, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Netrin-1, acting at its cognate receptor UNC5b, has been previously demonstrated to inhibit CC chemokine-induced immune cell migration. In line with this, we found that netrin-1 was able to inhibit CCL2-induced migration of bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs). However, whether netrin-1 is capable of inhibiting chemotaxis to a broader range of chemoattractants remains largely unexplored. As our initial experiments demonstrated that RAW264.7 and BMDMs expressed high levels of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1) on their surface, we aimed to determine the effect of netrin-1 exposure on monocyte/macrophage cell migration induced by C5a, a complement peptide that plays a major role in multiple inflammatory pathologies. Treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages, BMDMs and human monocytes with netrin-1 inhibited their chemotaxis towards C5a, as measured using two different real-time methods. This inhibitory effect was found to be dependent on netrin-1 receptor signalling, as an UNC5b blocking antibody was able to reverse netrin-1 inhibition of C5a induced BMDM migration. Treatment of BMDMs with netrin-1 had no effect on C5aR1 proximal signalling events, as surface C5aR1 expression, internalisation and intracellular Ca2+ release following C5aR1 ligation remained unaffected after netrin-1 exposure. We next examined receptor distal events that occur following C5aR1 activation, but found that netrin-1 was unable to inhibit C5a induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt and p38, pathways important for cellular migration. Furthermore, netrin-1 treatment had no effect on BMDM cytoskeletal rearrangement following C5a stimulation as determined by microscopy and real-time electrical impedance sensing. Taken together these data highlight that netrin-1 inhibits monocyte and macrophage cell migration, but that the mechanism behind this effect remains unresolved. Nevertheless, netrin-1 and its cognate receptors warrant further investigation as they may represent a potential avenue for the development of

  11. Human seminal plasma inhibition of complement.

    PubMed

    Petersen, B H; Lammel, C J; Stites, D P; Brooks, G F

    1980-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that human seminal plasma contains chemically and biologically distinct factors which inhibit lymphocyte functions and the serum bactericidal and opsonic activities associated with the killing of gram-negative organisms. Because of the direct association between complement action and serum bactericidal and opsonic activities, inhibition of complement may be one of the possible mechanisms of action of seminal plasma immunoinhibitory factors. Complement hemolytic activity was measured for C3 and C4 in serum Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Escherichia coli bactericidal reaction mixtures with and without addition of seminal plasma. In the presence of seminal plasma, where there was no bactericidal action, C3 and titers were reduced to approximately 50% of the titers in the reactions with complement donor serum. The C3 titers were lower than in the reaction mixtures with immune serum and complement donor serum, where N. gonorrhoeae bactericidal activity occurred. Individual human seminal plasma specimens depressed CH50 activity of pooled normal human sera up to 50% of normal levels. There were no differences in inhibition by seminal plasma specimens from normal or vasectomized men. Treatment with seminal plasma depressed the functional activity of complement components C1 and C3 by more than 50%. Seminal plasma also inhibited alternate pathway activity. Cleavage of factor B was demonstrated. The seminal plasma factor which inhibited complement was of low molecular weight. DPF blocked the seminal plasma complement-inhibitory factor. However, amidolytic activity for serine protease substrates could not be demonstrated. It is likely that the seminal plasma complement inhibitor is a protease inhibitor acting singly or in combination.

  12. Principal component regression and linear mixed model in association analysis of structured samples: competitors or complements?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiwei; Pan, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been established as a major tool to identify genetic variants associated with complex traits, such as common diseases. However, GWAS may suffer from false positives and false negatives due to confounding population structures, including known or unknown relatedness. Another important issue is unmeasured environmental risk factors. Among many methods for adjusting for population structures, two approaches stand out: one is principal component regression (PCR) based on principal component analysis, which is perhaps the most popular due to its early appearance, simplicity, and general effectiveness; the other is based on a linear mixed model (LMM) that has emerged recently as perhaps the most flexible and effective, especially for samples with complex structures as in model organisms. As shown previously, the PCR approach can be regarded as an approximation to an LMM; such an approximation depends on the number of the top principal components (PCs) used, the choice of which is often difficult in practice. Hence, in the presence of population structure, the LMM appears to outperform the PCR method. However, due to the different treatments of fixed vs. random effects in the two approaches, we show an advantage of PCR over LMM: in the presence of an unknown but spatially confined environmental confounder (e.g., environmental pollution or lifestyle), the PCs may be able to implicitly and effectively adjust for the confounder whereas the LMM cannot. Accordingly, to adjust for both population structures and nongenetic confounders, we propose a hybrid method combining the use and, thus, strengths of PCR and LMM. We use real genotype data and simulated phenotypes to confirm the above points, and establish the superior performance of the hybrid method across all scenarios.

  13. Prosteatotic and Protective Components in a Unique Model of Fatty Liver: Gut Microbiota and Suppressed Complement System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Zhao, Xing; Wang, Qian; Sun, Xiaoxian; Xia, Lili; Wang, Qianqian; Yang, Biao; Zhang, Yihui; Montgomery, Sean; Meng, He; Geng, Tuoyu; Gong, Daoqing

    2016-01-01

    Goose can develop severe hepatic steatosis without overt injury, thus it may serve as a unique model for uncovering how steatosis-related injury is prevented. To identify the markedly prosteatotic and protective mechanisms, we performed an integrated analysis of liver transcriptomes and gut microbial metagenomes using samples collected from overfed and normally-fed geese at different time points. The results indicated that the fatty liver transcriptome, initially featuring a 'metabolism' pathway, was later joined by 'cell growth and death' and 'immune diseases' pathways. Gut microbiota played a synergistic role in the liver response as microbial and hepatic genes affected by overfeeding shared multiple pathways. Remarkably, the complement system, an inflammatory component, was comprehensively suppressed in fatty liver, which was partially due to increased blood lactic acid from enriched Lactobacillus. Data from in vitro studies suggested that lactic acid suppressed TNFα via the HNF1α/C5 pathway. In conclusion, gut microbes and their hosts respond to excess energy influx as an organic whole, severe steatosis and related tolerance of goose liver may be partially attributable to gut microbiotic products and suppressed complement system, and lactic acid from gut microbiota participates in the suppression of hepatic TNFα/inflammation through the HNF1α/C5 pathway. PMID:27550859

  14. Prosteatotic and Protective Components in a Unique Model of Fatty Liver: Gut Microbiota and Suppressed Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Zhao, Xing; Wang, Qian; Sun, Xiaoxian; Xia, Lili; Wang, Qianqian; Yang, Biao; Zhang, Yihui; Montgomery, Sean; Meng, He; Geng, Tuoyu; Gong, Daoqing

    2016-01-01

    Goose can develop severe hepatic steatosis without overt injury, thus it may serve as a unique model for uncovering how steatosis-related injury is prevented. To identify the markedly prosteatotic and protective mechanisms, we performed an integrated analysis of liver transcriptomes and gut microbial metagenomes using samples collected from overfed and normally-fed geese at different time points. The results indicated that the fatty liver transcriptome, initially featuring a ‘metabolism’ pathway, was later joined by ‘cell growth and death’ and ‘immune diseases’ pathways. Gut microbiota played a synergistic role in the liver response as microbial and hepatic genes affected by overfeeding shared multiple pathways. Remarkably, the complement system, an inflammatory component, was comprehensively suppressed in fatty liver, which was partially due to increased blood lactic acid from enriched Lactobacillus. Data from in vitro studies suggested that lactic acid suppressed TNFα via the HNF1α/C5 pathway. In conclusion, gut microbes and their hosts respond to excess energy influx as an organic whole, severe steatosis and related tolerance of goose liver may be partially attributable to gut microbiotic products and suppressed complement system, and lactic acid from gut microbiota participates in the suppression of hepatic TNFα/inflammation through the HNF1α/C5 pathway. PMID:27550859

  15. High temperature stress and its effect on pollen development and morphological components of harvest index in the C3 model grass Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Harsant, Jeffrey; Pavlovic, Lazar; Chiu, Greta; Sultmanis, Stefanie; Sage, Tammy L

    2013-07-01

    The effect of high temperatures on harvest index (HI) and morphological components that contribute to HI was investigated in two lines (Bd21 and Bd21-3) of Brachypodium distachyon, a C3 grass recognized as a tractable plant, to address critical issues associated with enhancing cereal crop yields in the presence of global climate change. The results demonstrated that temperatures ≥32 °C eliminated HI. Reductions in yield at 32 °C were due primarily to declines in pollen viability, retention of pollen in anthers, and pollen germination, while abortion of microspores by the uninucleate stage that was correlated with abnormal tapetal development resulted in yield failure at 36 °C. Increasing temperatures from 24 to 32 °C resulted in reductions in tiller numbers but had no impact on axillary branch numbers per tiller. Grain developed at 24 and 28 °C primarily in tiller spikes, although spikes on axillary branches also formed grain. Grain quantity decreased in tiller spikes but increased in axillary branch spikes as temperatures rose from 24 to 28 °C. Differential patterns of axillary branching and floret development within spikelets between Bd21 and Bd21-3 resulted in higher grain yield in axillary branches of Bd21-3 at 28 °C. The response of male reproductive development and tiller branching patterns in B. distachyon to increasing temperatures mirrors that in other cereal crops, providing support for the use of this C3 grass in assessing the molecular control of HI in the presence of global warming.

  16. High temperature stress and its effect on pollen development and morphological components of harvest index in the C3 model grass Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Harsant, Jeffrey; Pavlovic, Lazar; Chiu, Greta; Sultmanis, Stefanie; Sage, Tammy L

    2013-07-01

    The effect of high temperatures on harvest index (HI) and morphological components that contribute to HI was investigated in two lines (Bd21 and Bd21-3) of Brachypodium distachyon, a C3 grass recognized as a tractable plant, to address critical issues associated with enhancing cereal crop yields in the presence of global climate change. The results demonstrated that temperatures ≥32 °C eliminated HI. Reductions in yield at 32 °C were due primarily to declines in pollen viability, retention of pollen in anthers, and pollen germination, while abortion of microspores by the uninucleate stage that was correlated with abnormal tapetal development resulted in yield failure at 36 °C. Increasing temperatures from 24 to 32 °C resulted in reductions in tiller numbers but had no impact on axillary branch numbers per tiller. Grain developed at 24 and 28 °C primarily in tiller spikes, although spikes on axillary branches also formed grain. Grain quantity decreased in tiller spikes but increased in axillary branch spikes as temperatures rose from 24 to 28 °C. Differential patterns of axillary branching and floret development within spikelets between Bd21 and Bd21-3 resulted in higher grain yield in axillary branches of Bd21-3 at 28 °C. The response of male reproductive development and tiller branching patterns in B. distachyon to increasing temperatures mirrors that in other cereal crops, providing support for the use of this C3 grass in assessing the molecular control of HI in the presence of global warming. PMID:23771979

  17. High temperature stress and its effect on pollen development and morphological components of harvest index in the C3 model grass Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Harsant, Jeffrey; Pavlovic, Lazar; Chiu, Greta; Sultmanis, Stefanie; Sage, Tammy L.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of high temperatures on harvest index (HI) and morphological components that contribute to HI was investigated in two lines (Bd21 and Bd21-3) of Brachypodium distachyon, a C3 grass recognized as a tractable plant, to address critical issues associated with enhancing cereal crop yields in the presence of global climate change. The results demonstrated that temperatures ≥32 °C eliminated HI. Reductions in yield at 32 °C were due primarily to declines in pollen viability, retention of pollen in anthers, and pollen germination, while abortion of microspores by the uninucleate stage that was correlated with abnormal tapetal development resulted in yield failure at 36 °C. Increasing temperatures from 24 to 32 °C resulted in reductions in tiller numbers but had no impact on axillary branch numbers per tiller. Grain developed at 24 and 28 °C primarily in tiller spikes, although spikes on axillary branches also formed grain. Grain quantity decreased in tiller spikes but increased in axillary branch spikes as temperatures rose from 24 to 28 °C. Differential patterns of axillary branching and floret development within spikelets between Bd21 and Bd21-3 resulted in higher grain yield in axillary branches of Bd21-3 at 28 °C. The response of male reproductive development and tiller branching patterns in B. distachyon to increasing temperatures mirrors that in other cereal crops, providing support for the use of this C3 grass in assessing the molecular control of HI in the presence of global warming. PMID:23771979

  18. Interactions of PLGA nanoparticles with blood components: protein adsorption, coagulation, activation of the complement system and hemolysis studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Calderó, Gabriela; Mitjans, Montserrat; Vinardell, Maria Pilar; Solans, Conxita; Vauthier, Christine

    2015-03-01

    The intravenous administration of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles has been widely reported as a promising alternative for delivery of drugs to specific cells. However, studies on their interaction with diverse blood components using different techniques are still lacking. Therefore, in the present work, the interaction of PLGA nanoparticles with blood components was described using different complementary techniques. The influence of different encapsulated compounds/functionalizing agents on these interactions was also reported. It is worth noting that all these techniques can be simply performed, without the need for highly sophisticated apparatus or skills. Moreover, their transference to industries and application of quality control could be easily performed. Serum albumin was adsorbed onto all types of tested nanoparticles. The saturation concentration was dependent on the nanoparticle size. In contrast, fibrinogen aggregation was dependent on nanoparticle surface charge. The complement activation was also influenced by the nanoparticle functionalization; the presence of a functionalizing agent increased complement activation, while the addition of an encapsulated compound only caused a slight increase. None of the nanoparticles influenced the coagulation cascade at low concentrations. However, at high concentrations, cationized nanoparticles did activate the coagulation cascade. Interactions of nanoparticles with erythrocytes did not reveal any hemolysis. Interactions of PLGA nanoparticles with blood proteins depended both on the nanoparticle properties and the protein studied. Independent of their loading/surface functionalization, PLGA nanoparticles did not influence the coagulation cascade and did not induce hemolysis of erythrocytes; they could be defined as safe concerning induction of embolization and cell lysis.The intravenous administration of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles has been widely reported as a promising

  19. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Engage Complement and Complement Receptor Bearing Innate Effector Cells to Modulate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Guido; Jitschin, Regina; von Bahr, Lena; Rasmusson-Duprez, Ida; Sundberg, Berit; Lönnies, Lena; Elgue, Graciela; Nilsson-Ekdahl, Kristina; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Lambris, John D.; Ringdén, Olle; Le Blanc, Katarina; Nilsson, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Infusion of human third-party mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) appears to be a promising therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD). To date, little is known about how MSCs interact with the body's innate immune system after clinical infusion. This study shows, that exposure of MSCs to blood type ABO-matched human blood activates the complement system, which triggers complement-mediated lymphoid and myeloid effector cell activation in blood. We found deposition of complement component C3-derived fragments iC3b and C3dg on MSCs and fluid-phase generation of the chemotactic anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. MSCs bound low amounts of immunoglobulins and lacked expression of complement regulatory proteins MCP (CD46) and DAF (CD55), but were protected from complement lysis via expression of protectin (CD59). Cell-surface-opsonization and anaphylatoxin-formation triggered complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18)-mediated effector cell activation in blood. The complement-activating properties of individual MSCs were furthermore correlated with their potency to inhibit PBMC-proliferation in vitro, and both effector cell activation and the immunosuppressive effect could be blocked either by using complement inhibitor Compstatin or by depletion of CD14/CD11b-high myeloid effector cells from mixed lymphocyte reactions. Our study demonstrates for the first time a major role of the complement system in governing the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs and elucidates how complement activation mediates the interaction with other immune cells. PMID:21747949

  20. Complement system in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shicui; Cui, Pengfei

    2014-09-01

    Zebrafish is recently emerging as a model species for the study of immunology and human diseases. Complement system is the humoral backbone of the innate immune defense, and our knowledge as such in zebrafish has dramatically increased in the recent years. This review summarizes the current research progress of zebrafish complement system. The global searching for complement components in genome database, together with published data, has unveiled the existence of all the orthologues of mammalian complement components identified thus far, including the complement regulatory proteins and complement receptors, in zebrafish. Interestingly, zebrafish complement components also display some distinctive features, such as prominent levels of extrahepatic expression and isotypic diversity of the complement components. Future studies should focus on the following issues that would be of special importance for understanding the physiological role of complement components in zebrafish: conclusive identification of complement genes, especially those with isotypic diversity; analysis and elucidation of function and mechanism of complement components; modulation of innate and adaptive immune response by complement system; and unconventional roles of complement-triggered pathways.

  1. Complement binding to Leishmania donovani promastigotes (LD)

    SciTech Connect

    Puentes, S.M.; Bates, P.A.; Dwyer, D.M.; Joiner, K.A.

    1986-03-01

    To study the binding and processing of C3 on LD, parasites in various phases of growth were incubated in human serum deficient in complement component 8 containing /sup 125/I-C3. Uptake of /sup 125/I-C3 is rapid, peaking at 1.7-2.1 x 10/sup 6/ C3 molecules bound per parasite at 15 minutes for all growth phases, and decreases thereafter with continued incubation. One half of total C3 bound is spontaneously released by 90 minutes of incubation with all LD phases and occurs at a similar rate for LD washed free of serum and incubated at 37/sup 0/ C in buffer. As assessed by SDS-PAGE autoradiography, C3 on the surface of LD is present as C3b (36 to 50%) and iC3b (50 to 65%), linked covalently via a bond resistant to hydroxylamine treatment, presumably an amide linkage. Immunoblot analysis of purified membranes from serum-incubated LD, using rabbit antibody to C3 and LD surface constituents, strongly suggests that a major C3 acceptor is the LD acid phosphatase (AP). These results, in conjunction with recent studies, suggest a previously unrecognized role of AP as a C3 acceptor and, thus, as a molecule potentially involved in parasite binding and uptake.

  2. Genomic characterization and expression analysis of complement component 8α and 8β in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus).

    PubMed

    Wickramaarachchi, W D Niroshana; Whang, Ilson; Wan, Qiang; Bathige, S D N K; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Lim, Bong-Soo; Yeo, Sang-Yeob; Park, Myoung-Ae; Lee, Jehee

    2013-03-01

    The complement component 8α and 8β are glycoproteins that mediate formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC) on the surface of target cells. Full-length complement C8α (Rb-C8α) and C8β (Rb-C8β) sequences were identified from a cDNA library of rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus), and their genomic sequences were obtained by screening and sequencing of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomic DNA library of rock bream. The Rb-C8α gene contains 64bp of 5'-UTR, open reading frame (ORF) of 1794bp, which encodes a polypeptide of 598 amino acids, 212bp of 3'-UTR. The Rb-C8β gene contains 5'-UTR of 27bp, open reading frame (ORF) of 1761bp, which encodes a polypeptide of 587 amino acids, 3'-UTR of 164bp. Rb-C8α consists of 11 exons interrupted by 10 introns and Rb-C8β consists of 12 exons interrupted by 11 introns. Sequence analysis revealed that both Rb-C8α and Rb-C8β contain thrombospondin type-1, a low-density lipoprotein receptor domain class A, membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain and epidermal growth factor like domain. The promoter regions of both genes contain important putative transcription factor binding sites including those for NF-κB, SP-1, C/EBP, AP-1, and OCT-1. Rb-C8α and Rb-C8β showed the highest amino acid identity of 62% and 83% to rainbow trout C8α and Japanese flounder C8β respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed that Rb-C8α and Rb-C8β were constitutively expressed in all examined tissues, isolated from healthy rock bream, with highest expression occurring in liver. Pathogen challenge, including Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae, and rock bream iridovirus led to up regulation of Rb-C8α and Rb-C8β in liver. Positive regulations upon bacterial and viral challenges, and high degree of evolutionary relationship to respective orthologues, confirmed that Rb-C8α and Rb-C8β important immune genes, likely involved in the complement system lytic pathway of rock bream. PMID:23059376

  3. Cleavage of the second component of complement by plasma proteases: implications in hereditary C1-inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M A; Kerr, M A

    1985-01-01

    EDTA plasma from patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE), the genetic deficiency of C1-inhibitor, when incubated at 37 degrees produces a kinin-like activity which can induce contraction of oestrus rat uterus. The second component of complement (C2) has previously been suggested to be the source of this kinin-like activity, with the implication that C2-kinin is a normal product of complement activation. Our results show that purified human C2 is cleaved rapidly to C2a and C2b when added to HAE plasma, but not normal plasma or plasma from a danazol-treated HAE patient. However, the addition to HAE plasma of C2 at 20 X normal plasma concentration had no effect on the kinin activity generated on incubation at 37 degrees. In the presence of soya bean trypsin inhibitor, the rate of C2 cleavage and products were unaltered but no kinin activity was generated. C2 was cleaved by purified C1s to C2a and C2b. Incubation of C2 with trypsin resulted in cleavage to C2a and C2b followed by more extensive cleavage of both C2a and C2b. Kallikrein cleaved C2 to C2a and C2b but plasmin had no effect on C2. In no case was kinin activity generated. When C2 was cleaved by C1s to C2a and C2b then incubated with trypsin, kallikrein, or plasmin, no kinin activity was generated: only trypsin cleaved the C2 fragments further. The results suggest that C2 is not the source of the kinin-like activity generated in hereditary angioedema plasma. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2934317

  4. Genomic characterization and transcriptional evidence for the involvement of complement component 7 in immune response of rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus).

    PubMed

    Wickramaarachchi, W D Niroshana; Whang, Ilson; Kim, Eunmi; Lim, Bong-Soo; Jeong, Hyung-Bok; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Oh, Myung-Joo; Jung, Sung-Ju; Yeo, Sang-Yeob; Kim, Sung Yeon; Park, Hae-Chul; Lee, Jehee

    2013-09-01

    The complement component 7 (C7) is the central mediator of pathogenic attack at the membrane surface and its binding to the C5b-7 complex triggers cytolytic signaling. In this study, C7 of rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) was identified (Rb-C7) and characterized at the genomic level. The Rb-C7 gene contains 18 exons and 17 introns and is composed of a 2490 bp complete open reading frame (ORF). The encoded polypeptide (830 amino acids) contains a number of well-conserved C7 signature domains. Important putative transcription factor binding sites, including those for NF-κB, SP-1, C/EBP, AP-1 and OCT-1, are present in the 5'-flanking region of Rb-C7. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close proximity of Rb-C7 with the orthologues in tilapia and Japanese flounder. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis confirmed constitutive Rb-C7 expression throughout all the examined tissue of healthy rock bream, with highest expression in liver. In immune challenge experiment, Rb-C7 expression was up-regulated in head kidney and liver in response to Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae, lipopolysaccharide and rock bream iridovirus (RBIV). Furthermore, significant increases of both intracellular expression level and the number of Rb-C7-expressing cells were detected by in situ hybridization assay in head kidney and liver tissues upon E. tarda infection. These results suggested that Rb-C7 is lytic pathway gene in complement system and its transcriptional regulation may be an important immune response in pathogenic defense mechanism of rock bream.

  5. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with isolated C3 deposits: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Darouich, Sihem; Goucha, Rym; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Zekri, Semy; Kheder, Adel; Ben Maiz, Hédi

    2011-02-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with isolated C3 deposits (MPGNC3) is an uncommon condition characterized by overt glomerular C3 deposits in the absence of immunoglobulins and intramembranous dense deposits. Here the authors describe the clinical and morphological features of primary MPGNC3 in a 13-year-old boy and critically review the previously published cases. The patient presented with nephrotic syndrome and microscopic hematuria. Blood tests revealed very low circulating C3 levels. The renal biopsy exhibited subendothelial, subepithelial, and mesangial deposits, with C3 but not immunoglobulins seen on immunofluorescence. This case and the review of the literature indicate that the serum complement profile with decreased levels of C3 and normal levels of classical pathway components together with glomerular deposits containing exclusively complement C3 is highly suggestive of alternative pathway activation. The diagnosis of acquired and/or genetic complement abnormalities in some cases supports that complement dysregulation is implicated in the pathogenesis of MPGNC3. Such data show great promise to provide new therapy strategies based on modulation of the complement system activity.

  6. Alternative Complement Pathway Deregulation Is Correlated with Dengue Severity

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Silva, Ana M.; Cordeiro, Marli T.; Brito, Carlos A.; Gil, Laura H. V. G.; Braga-Neto, Ulisses; Marques, Ernesto T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The complement system, a key component that links the innate and adaptive immune responses, has three pathways: the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. In the present study, we have analyzed the levels of various complement components in blood samples from dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients and found that the level of complement activation is associated with disease severity. Methods and Results Patients with DHF had lower levels of complement factor 3 (C3; p = 0.002) and increased levels of C3a, C4a and C5a (p<0.0001) when compared to those with the less severe form, DF. There were no significant differences between DF and DHF patients in the levels of C1q, immunocomplexes (CIC-CIq) and CRP. However, small but statistically significant differences were detected in the levels of MBL. In contrast, the levels of two regulatory proteins of the alternative pathway varied widely between DF and DHF patients: DHF patients had higher levels of factor D (p = 0.01), which cleaves factor B to yield the active (C3bBb) C3 convertase, and lower levels of factor H (p = 0.03), which inactivates the (C3bBb) C3 convertase, than did DF patients. When we considered the levels of factors D and H together as an indicator of (C3bBb) C3 convertase regulation, we found that the plasma levels of these regulatory proteins in DHF patients favored the formation of the (C3bBb) C3 convertase, whereas its formation was inhibited in DF patients (p<0.0001). Conclusion The data suggest that an imbalance in the levels of regulatory factors D and H is associated with an abnormal regulation of complement activity in DHF patients. PMID:19707565

  7. Acidosis activates complement system in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Emeis, M; Sonntag, J; Willam, C; Strauss, E; Walka, M M; Obladen, M

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro effect of different forms of acidosis (pH 7.0) on the formation of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Metabolic acidosis due to addition of hydrochloric acid (10 micromol/ml blood) or lactic acid (5.5 micromol/ml) to heparin blood (N=12) caused significant activation of C3a and C5a compared to control (both p=0.002). Respiratory acidosis activated C3a (p=0.007) and C5a (p=0.003) compared to normocapnic controls. Making blood samples with lactic acidosis hypocapnic resulted in a median pH of 7.37. In this respiratory compensated metabolic acidosis, C3a and C5a were not increased. These experiments show that acidosis itself and not lactate trigger for activation of complement components C3 and C5. PMID:9927235

  8. C3 Polymorphism Influences Circulating Levels of C3, ASP and Lipids in Schizophrenic Patients.

    PubMed

    Nsaiba, Mohamed Jalloul; Lapointe, Marc; Mabrouk, Hajer; Douki, Wahiba; Gaha, Lotfi; Pérusse, Louis; Bouchard, Claude; Jrad, Besma Bel Hadj; Cianflone, Katherine

    2015-05-01

    Excessive activation of complement is associated with many diseases including schizophrenia. Investigation of C3 polymorphisms, circulating C3, cleavage product ASP/C3adesArg, and lipid metabolism. Cross-sectional analysis. C3 genotyping (CC vs GG for R102L) was performed on 434 Tunisian people consisting of 272 schizophrenic (SZ) patients and 162 control subjects. In a age- and gender-matched subgroups of the three genotypes (131 SZ and 112 NOR), plasma triglycerides, total cholesterol (C), LDL-C, HDL-C, ASP, and complement C3 were measured. C3 gene polymorphism influences BMI and plasma C3, ASP, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL-C and HDL-C among SZ patients (p < 0.05-0.0001), with increasing values demonstrated from CC (common form) to CG (heterozygote form) to GG (rare homozygote) forms. Significant correlations between plasma C3 and BMI, triglyceride, HDL-C and ASP (p < 0.05-0.0001) were observed, while ASP correlated with BMI and LDL-C (p = 0.005, p = 0.001, respectively) in SZ patients. Further, proportional conversion of C3 to ASP (%ASP/C3) also increased (p < 0.0001, GG>CG>CC). C3 polymorphisms and plasma C3, ASP and %ASP/C3 correlated with lipid parameters in this SZ population, suggesting that factors predisposing patients to schizophrenia are permissive for complement pathway activation and dyslipidemic influences.

  9. Dense Deposit Disease and C3 Glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Thomas D.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Terence Cook, H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary C3 glomerulopathy refers to those renal lesions characterized histologically by predominant C3 accumulation within the glomerulus, and pathogenetically by aberrant regulation of the alternative pathway of complement. Dense deposit disease is distinguished from other forms of C3 glomerulopathy by its characteristic appearance on electron microscopy. The extent to which dense deposit disease also differs from other forms of C3 glomerulopathy in terms of clinical features, natural history, and outcomes of treatment including renal transplantation is less clear. We discuss the pathophysiology of C3 glomerulopathy, with evidence for alternative pathway dysregulation obtained from affected individuals and complement factor H (Cfh)-deficient animal models. Recent linkage studies in familial C3 glomerulopathy have shown genomic rearrangements in the Cfh-related genes, for which the novel pathophysiologic concept of Cfh deregulation has been proposed. PMID:24161036

  10. Transcript encoded on the opposite strand of the human steroid 21-hydroxylase/complement component C4 gene locus.

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Y; Bristow, J; Gitelman, S E; Miller, W L

    1989-01-01

    The gene encoding human adrenal steroid 21-hydroxylase (P450c21) and its highly similar pseudogene are duplicated in tandem with the two genes encoding the fourth component of human serum hemolytic complement (C4). This 60-kilobase gene complex, which lies within the major histocompatibility complex on the short arm of human chromosome 6, has been studied in considerable detail because genetic disorders in steroid 21-hydroxylation and in C4 are common. We have cloned a cDNA encoded by a previously unidentified gene in this region. This gene lies on the strand of DNA opposite from the strand containing the P450c21 and C4 genes, and it overlaps the last exon of P450c21. The newly identified gene encodes mRNAs of 3.5 and 1.8 kilobases that are expressed in the adrenal and in a Leydig cell tumor but are not expressed in nonsteroidogenic tissues. The sequence of the longest cDNA (2.7 kilobases) shows no similarity to known sequences available in two computerized data bases. The 5' end of this sequence is characterized by three repeats, each encoding about 100 amino acids flanked by potential sites for proteolytic cleavage. Although numerous studies have shown that gene deletions causing congenital adrenal hyperplasia occur in this region, none of these gene deletions extends into this newly identified gene, suggesting that it encodes an essential function. Images PMID:2475872

  11. Isolation of cDNA clones specifying the fourth component of mouse complement and its isotype, sex-limited protein.

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, M; Takahashi, M; Natsuume-Sakai, S; Nonaka, M; Tanaka, S; Shimizu, A; Honjo, T

    1984-01-01

    cDNA clones specific for the fourth component of mouse complement (C4) and its hormonally regulated isotype, sex-linked protein (Slp), were isolated using as a probe a 20-mer synthetic oligonucleotide corresponding to a known sequence of human C4 cDNA. Two types of clones, one specific for C4 (pFC4/10, with a 3.7 kilobase insert) and one specific for Slp (pFSlp/1, with a 4.7 kilobase insert), were isolated from liver cDNA libraries constructed from the Slp-producing FM mouse strain. The cDNA inserts of these clones shared 70% of the restriction sites determined. Only one type of clone was isolated from the Slp-negative DBA/1 strain; this type showed restriction maps indistinguishable from that of pFC4/10. pFC4/10 and pFSlp/1 displayed extensive homology: 94% nucleotide homology and 89% derived amino acid homology in the C4a region and 92% nucleotide homology and 89% derived amino acid homology in the thiol-ester region. An Arg-Gln-Lys-Arg sequence in the beta-alpha junction and a Cys-Ala-Glu-Gln sequence in the thiol-ester site were identified for both proteins. A remarkable divergency between C4 and Slp sequences was recognized in the region immediately following the C4a sequence. PMID:6208559

  12. Molecular intercommunication between the complement and coagulation systems.

    PubMed

    Amara, Umme; Flierl, Michael A; Rittirsch, Daniel; Klos, Andreas; Chen, Hui; Acker, Barbara; Brückner, Uwe B; Nilsson, Bo; Gebhard, Florian; Lambris, John D; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2010-11-01

    The complement system as well as the coagulation system has fundamental clinical implications in the context of life-threatening tissue injury and inflammation. Associations between both cascades have been proposed, but the precise molecular mechanisms remain unknown. The current study reports multiple links for various factors of the coagulation and fibrinolysis cascades with the central complement components C3 and C5 in vitro and ex vivo. Thrombin, human coagulation factors (F) XIa, Xa, and IXa, and plasmin were all found to effectively cleave C3 and C5. Mass spectrometric analyses identified the cleavage products as C3a and C5a, displaying identical molecular weights as the native anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Cleavage products also exhibited robust chemoattraction of human mast cells and neutrophils, respectively. Enzymatic activity for C3 cleavage by the investigated clotting and fibrinolysis factors is defined in the following order: FXa > plasmin > thrombin > FIXa > FXIa > control. Furthermore, FXa-induced cleavage of C3 was significantly suppressed in the presence of the selective FXa inhibitors fondaparinux and enoxaparin in a concentration-dependent manner. Addition of FXa to human serum or plasma activated complement ex vivo, represented by the generation of C3a, C5a, and the terminal complement complex, and decreased complement hemolytic serum activity that defines exact serum concentration that results in complement-mediated lysis of 50% of sensitized sheep erythrocytes. Furthermore, in plasma from patients with multiple injuries (n = 12), a very early appearance and correlation of coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin complexes) and the complement activation product C5a was found. The present data suggest that coagulation/fibrinolysis proteases may act as natural C3 and C5 convertases, generating biologically active anaphylatoxins, linking both cascades via multiple direct interactions in terms of a complex serine protease system.

  13. Biosynthesis of normal and low-molecular-mass complement component C1q by cultured human monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, R; Brouwer, M C; de Graeff-Meeder, E R; van Helden, H P; Hack, C E

    1989-01-15

    High levels of low-molecular-mass complement component C1q (LMM-C1q), a haemolytically inactive form of C1q, are found in serum of individuals with inherited complete (functional) C1q deficiency and in serum of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, whereas lower levels are present in normal serum [Hoekzema, Hannema, Swaak, Paardekooper & Hack (1985) J. Immunol. 135, 265-271]. To investigate whether LMM-C1q is a (by-)product of C1q synthesis or the result of degradation of C1q, cultures of blood monocytes and of alveolar macrophages, which secrete functional C1q, were studied. A considerable portion of C1q-like protein secreted by these cells was found to be LMM-C1q. In contrast with the C1q fragments that resulted from degradation of normal C1q during phagocytosis, culture-derived LMM-C1q appeared to be identical with LMM-C1q found in serum, as judged by sedimentation behaviour, subunit structure and recognition by poly- and mono-clonal antibodies raised against C1q. The presence of LMM-C1q in cytoplasmic organelles compatible with the Golgi apparatus and the inability to generate LMM-C1q by impeding hydroxylation and triple-helix formation of C1q further argues against degradation as its source. Monocyte cultures of homozygous probands from two families with complete functional C1q deficiency reflected the abnormalities in serum, i.e. absence of functional C1q, but increased levels of LMM-C1q. By contrast, secretion of C1q and LMM-C1q by cells from healthy individuals was clearly co-ordinate, indicating that LMM-C1q in serum may provide a unique marker of C1q synthesis in vivo.

  14. Human genes for complement components C1r and C1s in a close tail-to-tail arrangement.

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto, H; Hirosawa, S; Salier, J P; Hagen, F S; Kurachi, K

    1988-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones for human C1s were isolated from cDNA libraries that were prepared with poly(A)+ RNAs of human liver and HepG2 cells. A clone with the largest cDNA insert of 2664 base pairs (bp) was analyzed for its complete nucleotide sequence. It contained 202 bp of a 5' untranslated region, 45 bp of coding for a signal peptide (15 amino acid residues), 2019 bp for complement component C1s zymogen (673 amino acid residues), 378 bp for a 3' untranslated region, a stop codon, and 17 bp of a poly(A) tail. The amino acid sequence of C1s was 40.5% identical to that of C1r, with excellent matches of tentative disulfide bond locations conserving the overall domain structure of C1r. DNA blotting and sequencing analyses of genomic DNA and of an isolated genomic DNA clone clearly showed that the human genes for C1r and C1s are closely located in a "tail-to-tail" arrangement at a distance of about 9.5 kilobases. Furthermore, RNA blot analyses showed that both C1r and C1s genes are primarily expressed in liver, whereas most other tissues expressed both C1r and C1s genes at much lower levels (less than 10% of that in liver). Multiple molecular sizes of specific mRNAs were observed in the RNA blot analyses for both C1r and C1s, indicating that alternative RNA processing(s), likely an alternative polyadenylylation, might take place for both genes. Images PMID:2459702

  15. Salivary agglutinin is the major component in human saliva that modulates the lectin pathway of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Gunput, Sabrina Tg; Wouters, Diana; Nazmi, Kamran; Cukkemane, Nivedita; Brouwer, Mieke; Veerman, Enno Ci; Ligtenberg, Antoon Jm

    2016-05-01

    Saliva interacts with blood after mucosal damage or leakage of gingival crevicular fluid. Surface-adsorbed salivary agglutinin (SAG) activates the lectin pathway (LP) of the complement system via mannose-binding lectin, while SAG in solution inhibits complement activation. In the present study we investigated if, next to SAG, whole and glandular saliva itself and other salivary glycoproteins activate or inhibit the LP. Complement activation was measured by detecting C4 deposition on microtiter plates coated with saliva or purified proteins. Complement inhibition was measured after incubating serum with saliva or proteins in microtiter plates coated with mannan, an LP activator. Adsorbed whole, sublingual and submandibular saliva showed LP-dependent complement activation. Blood group secretors, but not non-secretors, activated the LP. Saliva of both secretors and non-secretors inhibited C4 deposition on mannan. After depletion of SAG, saliva no longer inhibited the LP. Other salivary proteins, including amylase, MUC5B and histatin 2, did not activate or inhibit the LP. Surface-adsorbed whole saliva and glandular saliva samples activate the LP of complement, depending on the presence of SAG and the secretor status of the donor. In solution, saliva inhibits the LP, depending on the presence of SAG, but independent of the secretor status. PMID:27048414

  16. Intracellular Complement Activation Sustains T Cell Homeostasis and Mediates Effector Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Leung, Marilyn; Bertram, Paula G.; Fara, Antonella F.; Subias, Marta; Pickering, Matthew C.; Drouet, Christian; Meri, Seppo; Arstila, T. Petteri; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T.; Ma, Margaret; Cope, Andrew; Reinheckel, Thomas; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Afzali, Behdad; Atkinson, John P.; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Complement is viewed as a critical serum-operative component of innate immunity, with processing of its key component, C3, into activation fragments C3a and C3b confined to the extracellular space. We report here that C3 activation also occurred intracellularly. We found that the T cell-expressed protease cathepsin L (CTSL) processed C3 into biologically active C3a and C3b. Resting T cells contained stores of endosomal and lysosomal C3 and CTSL and substantial amounts of CTSL-generated C3a. While “tonic” intracellular C3a generation was required for homeostatic T cell survival, shuttling of this intracellular C3-activation-system to the cell surface upon T cell stimulation induced autocrine proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, T cells from patients with autoimmune arthritis demonstrated hyperactive intracellular complement activation and interferon-γ production and CTSL inhibition corrected this deregulated phenotype. Importantly, intracellular C3a was observed in all examined cell populations, suggesting that intracellular complement activation might be of broad physiological significance. PMID:24315997

  17. Intracellular complement activation sustains T cell homeostasis and mediates effector differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liszewski, M Kathryn; Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Leung, Marilyn; Bertram, Paula G; Fara, Antonella F; Subias, Marta; Pickering, Matthew C; Drouet, Christian; Meri, Seppo; Arstila, T Petteri; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T; Ma, Margaret; Cope, Andrew; Reinheckel, Thomas; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Afzali, Behdad; Atkinson, John P; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-12-12

    Complement is viewed as a critical serum-operative component of innate immunity, with processing of its key component, C3, into activation fragments C3a and C3b confined to the extracellular space. We report here that C3 activation also occurred intracellularly. We found that the T cell-expressed protease cathepsin L (CTSL) processed C3 into biologically active C3a and C3b. Resting T cells contained stores of endosomal and lysosomal C3 and CTSL and substantial amounts of CTSL-generated C3a. While "tonic" intracellular C3a generation was required for homeostatic T cell survival, shuttling of this intracellular C3-activation-system to the cell surface upon T cell stimulation induced autocrine proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, T cells from patients with autoimmune arthritis demonstrated hyperactive intracellular complement activation and interferon-γ production and CTSL inhibition corrected this deregulated phenotype. Importantly, intracellular C3a was observed in all examined cell populations, suggesting that intracellular complement activation might be of broad physiological significance. PMID:24315997

  18. Immunogenetic evidence for the phylogenetic sister group relationship of dogs and bears (Mammalia, Carnivora: Canidae and Crsidae). a comparative determinant analysis of carnivoran albumin, c3 complement and immunoglobulin micro-chain.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, A; Eulenberger, K; Bauer, K

    1998-01-01

    Thirty-seven antigenic determinants were identified in the albumins, the immunoglobulin micro- and IgG(Fc) chains, and the C3 proteins of 51 carnivoran (sub)species from 31 genera, and in 12 noncarnivoran mammals. In addition to 19 determinants plesiomorphic for Carnivora as an order, 18 synapomorphic epitopes of carnivoran families revealed nine phylogenetic reaction groups: (1) canids, (2) ursids, (3) the racoon, (4) the Weddell seal, (5) the lesser panda, (6) the harbour seal, (7) mustelids, (8) viverrids and hyaenas, and (9) felids. These data identify Canoidea (Canidae, Ursidae, Phocidae, Procyonidae, Ailuridae, Mustelidae) and Feloidea (Viverridae, Hyaenidae, Felidae) as two fundamentally differentiated lineages of Carnivora, and confirm the inclusion of seals among the former. The Ursidae are the sister group of the Canidae. The antigenic determinants in the studied proteins do not subdivide the Canidae, Ursidae and Felidae into immunologically differentiated lineages. PMID:9813413

  19. Activation of human complement by immunoglobulin G antigranulocyte antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, P K; Currie, M S; Logue, G L

    1982-01-01

    The ability of antigranulocyte antibody to fix the third component of complement (C3) to the granulocyte surface was investigated by an assay that quantitates the binding of monoclonal anti-C3 antibody to paraformaldehyde-fixed cells preincubated with Felty's syndrome serum in the presence of human complement. The sera from 7 of 13 patients with Felty's syndrome bound two to three times as much C3 to granulocytes as sera from patients with uncomplicated rheumatoid arthritis. The complement-activating ability of Felty's syndrome serum seemed to reside in the monomeric IgG-containing serum fraction. For those sera capable of activating complement, the amount of C3 fixed to granulocytes was proportional to the amount of granulocyte-binding IgG present in the serum. Thus, complement fixation appeared to be a consequence of the binding of antigranulocyte antibody to the cell surface. These studies suggest a role for complement-mediated injury in the pathophysiology of immune granulocytopenia, as has been demonstrated for immune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:7174786

  20. Recent Developments in Low Molecular Weight Complement Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hongchang; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2009-01-01

    As a key part of the innate immune system, complement plays an important role not only in defending invading pathogens but also in many other biological processes. Inappropriate or excessive activation of complement has been linked to many autoimmune, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as ischemia-reperfusion injury and cancer. A wide array of low molecular weight complement inhibitors has been developed to target various components of the complement cascade. Their efficacy has been demonstrated in numerous in vitro and in vivo experiments. Though none of these inhibitors has reached the market so far, some of them have entered clinical trials and displayed promising results. This review provides a brief overview of the currently developed low molecular weight complement inhibitors, including short peptides and synthetic small molecules, with an emphasis on those targeting components C1 and C3, and the anaphylatoxin receptors. PMID:19800693

  1. Eculizumab and Recurrent C3 Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Gurkan, Sevgi; Fyfe, Billie; Weiss, Lynne; Xiao, Xue; Zhang, Yuzhou; Smith, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Hyperactivity of the alternative complement pathway is the principle defect in the C3 glomerulopathies (C3G). Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to C5 to prevent formation of the membrane attack complex, has been shown to be beneficial in some patients with this disease. Design, setting, participants & measurements In this open-label, proof-of-concept efficacy-and-safety study, a patient with the initial diagnosis of Dense Deposit Disease (DDD) and allograft recurrence of C3 (C3GN) glomerulonephritis was treated with eculizumab every-other-week for 1 year. The patient had pathological evidence of C3GN and proteinuria >1 g/d at enrollment. He underwent graft biopsy before enrollment and repeat biopsy at 6 months and 12 months. Results Although no mutations were identified in complement genes, functional studies were positive for C3 nephritic factors and elevated levels of soluble membrane attack complex (sMAC). On therapy, sMAC levels normalized and although proteinuria initially decreased, during therapy it increased reaching pre-treatment levels at 12 months. Although serum creatinine remained stable, repeat allograft biopsies showed progression of disease. Conclusions Clinical and histopathologic data suggest a partial response to eculizumab in this patient. While eculizumab blocked activation of the terminal complement cascade, persistent dysregulation of alternative pathway remained, showing that eculizumab alone cannot control disease in this patient. Additional research is required to identify effective anticomplement therapy for this group of C3G patients. PMID:23689905

  2. Complement-mediated opsonization of invasive group A Streptococcus pyogenes strain AP53 is regulated by the bacterial two-component cluster of virulence responder/sensor (CovRS) system.

    PubMed

    Agrahari, Garima; Liang, Zhong; Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Balsara, Rashna D; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2013-09-20

    Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) strain AP53 is a primary isolate from a patient with necrotizing fasciitis. These AP53 cells contain an inactivating mutation in the sensor component of the cluster of virulence (cov) responder (R)/sensor (S) two-component gene regulatory system (covRS), which enhances the virulence of the primary strain, AP53/covR(+)S(-). However, specific mechanisms by which the covRS system regulates the survival of GAS in humans are incomplete. Here, we show a key role for covRS in the regulation of opsonophagocytosis of AP53 by human neutrophils. AP53/covR(+)S(-) cells displayed potent binding of host complement inhibitors of C3 convertase, viz. Factor H (FH) and C4-binding protein (C4BP), which concomitantly led to minimal C3b deposition on AP53 cells, further showing that these plasma protein inhibitors are active on GAS cells. This resulted in weak killing of the bacteria by human neutrophils and a corresponding high death rate of mice after injection of these cells. After targeted allelic alteration of covS(-) to wild-type covS (covS(+)), a dramatic loss of FH and C4BP binding to the AP53/covR(+)S(+) cells was observed. This resulted in elevated C3b deposition on AP53/covR(+)S(+) cells, a high level of opsonophagocytosis by human neutrophils, and a very low death rate of mice infected with AP53/covR(+)S(+). We show that covRS is a critical transcriptional regulator of genes directing AP53 killing by neutrophils and regulates the levels of the receptors for FH and C4BP, which we identify as the products of the fba and enn genes, respectively.

  3. The ancestral complement system in sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Smith, L C; Clow, L A; Terwilliger, D P

    2001-04-01

    The origin of adaptive immunity in the vertebrates can be traced to the appearance of the ancestral RAG genes in the ancestral jawed vertebrate; however, the innate immune system is more ancient. A central subsystem within innate immunity is the complement system, which has been identified throughout and seems to be restricted to the deuterostomes. The evolutionary history of complement can be traced from the sea urchins (members of the echinoderm phylum), which have a simplified system homologous to the alternative pathway, through the agnathans (hagfish and lamprey) and the elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) to the teleosts (bony fish) and tetrapods, with increases in the numbers of complement components and duplications in complement pathways. Increasing complexity in the complement system parallels increasing complexity in the deuterostome animals. This review focuses on the simplest of the complement systems that is present in the sea urchin. Two components have been identified that show significant homology to vertebrate C3 and factor B (Bf), called SpC3 and SpBf, respectively. Sequence analysis from both molecules reveals their ancestral characteristics. Immune challenge of sea urchins indicates that SpC3 is inducible and is present in coelomic fluid (the body fluids) in relatively high concentrations, while SpBf expression is constitutive and is present in much lower concentrations. Opsonization of foreign cells and particles followed by augmented uptake by phagocytic coelomocytes appears to be a central function for this simpler complement system and important for host defense in the sea urchin. These activities are similar to some of the functions of the homologous proteins in the vertebrate complement system. The selective advantage for the ancestral deuterostome may have been the amplification feedback loop that is still of central importance in the alternative pathway of complement in higher vertebrates. Feedback loop functions would quickly coat

  4. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  5. Mechanisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae resistance to complement-mediated killing.

    PubMed Central

    Merino, S; Camprubí, S; Albertí, S; Benedí, V J; Tomás, J M

    1992-01-01

    The different mechanisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae resistance to complement-mediated killing were investigated by using different strains and isogenic mutants previously characterized for their surface components. We found that strains from serotypes whose K antigen masks the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules (such as serotypes K1, K10, and K16) fail to activate complement, while strains with smooth LPS exposed at the cell surface (with or without K antigen) activate complement but are resistant to complement-mediated killing. The reasons for this resistance are that C3b binds far from the cell membrane and that the lytic final complex C5b-9 (membrane attack complex) is not formed. Isogenic rough mutants (K+ or K-) are serum sensitive because they bind C3b close to the cell membrane and the lytic complex (C5b-9) is formed. Images PMID:1587619

  6. [Modification of complement factors and their inhibitors during meningococcal sepsis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Blanco, A; Solís, P; Alvarez Guisasola, F J; Valbuena, C; Gómez, C; Prieto, P; Ruíz, C

    1980-08-01

    Various complement components (C'1s, C'3, C'4, C'5, C'8, C'9, C'3 act., C'1 inh., C'3b inact.) and seric immunocomplexes (by polyethylene glycol, PEG) were evaluated in 43 children with meningococcal sepsis. 28 patients had disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), group I, and 15 did not show it, group II; 14 patients died in group I and none of group II. In 21 cases studies were repeated 24 hours later. In group I all complement components were decreased, specially C'3 (x: 67 mg./100 ml., p < 0.01) and C'5 (x: 8 mg./100 ml., p < 0.01) and they were lower 24 h. later. Results of group II were normal, except a decrease of C'5. Catabolic products of C'3 were founded in 11/14 cases of group I and two/nine of group II and products of C'3 act. in four/14 and one/10. PEG precipitation was positive in 10/14 cases of group I and 10/12 of group II and IgG, IgM, C'3 and C'4 were found in precipitations. This complement components were more frequently present in sepsis without DIC and after 24 h. of evolution. C'1 and C'3b inhibitors decreased after evolution in group I and by contrast increased in group II. This fall enhances complement activation.

  7. Expression of complement 3 and complement 5 in newt limb and lens regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuko; Madhavan, Mayur; Call, Mindy K; Santiago, William; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Lambris, John D; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2003-03-01

    Some urodele amphibians possess the capacity to regenerate their body parts, including the limbs and the lens of the eye. The molecular pathway(s) involved in urodele regeneration are largely unknown. We have previously suggested that complement may participate in limb regeneration in axolotls. To further define its role in the regenerative process, we have examined the pattern of distribution and spatiotemporal expression of two key components, C3 and C5, during limb and lens regeneration in the newt Notophthalmus viridescens. First, we have cloned newt cDNAs encoding C3 and C5 and have generated Abs specifically recognizing these molecules. Using these newt-specific probes, we have found by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analysis that these molecules are expressed during both limb and lens regeneration, but not in the normal limb and lens. The C3 and C5 proteins were expressed in a complementary fashion during limb regeneration, with C3 being expressed mainly in the blastema and C5 exclusively in the wound epithelium. Similarly, during the process of lens regeneration, C3 was detected in the iris and cornea, while C5 was present in the regenerating lens vesicle as well as the cornea. The distinct expression profile of complement proteins in regenerative tissues of the urodele lens and limb supports a nonimmunologic function of complement in tissue regeneration and constitutes the first systematic effort to dissect its involvement in regenerative processes of lower vertebrate species. PMID:12594255

  8. Complement and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ballanti, Eleonora; Perricone, Carlo; Greco, Elisabetta; Ballanti, Marta; Di Muzio, Gioia; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Perricone, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is a component of the innate immune system. Its main function was initially believed to be limited to the recognition and elimination of pathogens through direct killing or stimulation of phagocytosis. However, in recent years, the immunoregulatory functions of the complement system were demonstrated and it was determined that the complement proteins play an important role in modulating adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. When the delicate mechanisms that regulate this sophisticated enzymatic system are unbalanced, the complement system may cause damage, mediating tissue inflammation. Dysregulation of the complement system has been involved in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, Sjögren's syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Complement deficiencies have been associated with an increased risk to develop autoimmune disorders. Because of its functions, the complement system is an attractive therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. Up to date, several compounds interfering with the complement cascade have been studied in experimental models for autoimmune diseases. The main therapeutic strategies are inhibition of complement activation components, inhibition of complement receptors, and inhibition of membrane attack complex. At present, none of the available agents was proven to be both safe and effective for treatment of autoimmune diseases in humans. Nonetheless, data from preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the modulation of the complement system could constitute a viable strategy for the treatment of autoimmune conditions in the decades to come.

  9. Complement Evasion Mediated by Enhancement of Captured Factor H: Implications for Protection of Self-Surfaces from Complement

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew P.; Makou, Elisavet; Chen, Zhuo A.; Kerr, Heather; Richards, Anna; Rappsilber, Juri

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to evade annihilation by the vertebrate complement system, many microbes capture factor H (FH), the key soluble complement-regulating protein in human plasma. However, FH is normally an active complement suppressor exclusively on self-surfaces and this selective action of FH is pivotal to self versus non-self discrimination by the complement system. We investigated whether the bacterially captured FH becomes functionally enhanced and, if so, how this is achieved at a structural level. We found, using site-directed and truncation mutagenesis, surface plasmon resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cross-linking and mass spectrometry, that the N-terminal domain of Streptococcus pneumoniae protein PspC (PspCN) not only binds FH extraordinarily tightly but also holds it in a previously uncharacterized conformation. Functional enhancement arises from exposure of a C-terminal cryptic second binding site in FH for C3b, the activation-specific fragment of the pivotal complement component, C3. This conformational change of FH doubles its affinity for C3b and increases 5-fold its ability to accelerate decay of the binary enzyme (C3bBb) responsible for converting C3 to C3b in an amplification loop. Despite not sharing critical FH-binding residues, PspCNs from D39 and Tigr4 S. pneumoniae exhibit similar FH-anchoring and enhancing properties. We propose that these bacterial proteins mimic molecular markers of self-surfaces, providing a compelling hypothesis for how FH prevents complement-mediated injury to host tissue while lacking efficacy on virtually all other surfaces. In hemolysis assays with 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide–treated erythrocytes that recapitulate paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, PspCN enhanced protection of cells by FH, suggesting a new paradigm for therapeutic complement suppression. PMID:26459349

  10. Dietary β-glucan enhances the contents of complement component 3 and factor B in eggs of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chengyan; Wang, Peng; Li, Mengyang; Liu, Shousheng; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-12-01

    β-glucan has been shown to increase non-specific immunity and resistance against infections or pathogenic bacteria in several fish species, but no information is available regarding its trans-generational effects to date. Here we clearly demonstrated that β-glucan enhanced the contents of immune-relevant molecules C3 and Bf in eggs of zebrafish, and the embryos derived from β-1,3 glucan-treated zebrafish were more resistant to bacterial challenge than control embryos. Moreover, the transferred C3 and Bf were directly associated with the antimicrobial defense of early embryos. In addition, feeding female zebrafish with β-glucan had little detrimental effects on the number of spawned eggs and their embryonic development. Collectively, these data show for the first time that β-glucan can be safely used to promote the non-specific immunity in offspring of fishes. PMID:27375187

  11. Target deletion of complement component 9 attenuates antibody-mediated hemolysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Ju, Jiyu; Lin, Zhijuan; Xiao, Weiling; Li, Xiaofang; Zhuang, Baoxiang; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Xiangyu; Ma, Chao; Su, Weiliang; Wang, Yuqi; Qin, Xuebin; Liang, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Terminal complement membrane attack complex (MAC) formation is induced initially by C5b, followed by the sequential condensation of the C6, C7, C8. Polymerization of C9 to the C5b-8 complex forms the C5b-9 (or MAC). The C5b-9 forms lytic or non lytic pores in the cell membrane destroys membrane integrity. The biological functionalities of MAC has been previously investigated by using either the mice deficient in C5 and C6, or MAC’s regulator CD59. However, there is no available C9 deficient mice (mC9−/−) for directly dissecting the role of C5b-9 in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Further, since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes form non lytic pore, it may also plays biological functionality. To better understand the role of terminal complement cascades, here we report a successful generation of mC9−/−. We demonstrated that lack of C9 attenuates anti-erythrocyte antibody-mediated hemolysis or LPS-induced acute shock. Further, the rescuing effect on the acute shock correlates with the less release of IL-1β in mC9−/−, which is associated with suppression of MAC-mediated inflammasome activation in mC9−/−. Taken together, these results not only confirm the critical role of C5b-9 in complement-mediated hemolysis and but also highlight the critical role of C5b-9 in inflammasome activation. PMID:27444648

  12. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition.

  13. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition. PMID:12813023

  14. Increased expression of a novel splice variant of the complement component 4 (C4A) gene in mastitis-infected dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Huang, J M; Ju, Z H; Li, Q L; Zhou, L; Li, R L; Li, J B; Shi, F X; Zhong, J F; Wang, C F

    2012-08-29

    The complement system helps in the direct lysis of invading pathogens and modulates phagocytic, humoral and cellular immune responses. Complement 4 is a critical component in complement activity and protection against many bacterial pathogens because it is essential to classical and lectin activation pathways. We used reverse transcription and PCR to investigate alternative splicing and expression of the complement component 4 (C4A) gene in Chinese Holstein cattle. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced. A novel splice variant involving intron 10 was identified, which we named C4A-AS. To examine how C4A gene activity is affected by bovine mastitis, six Chinese Holstein cattle were divided into healthy (non-mastitic) and Staphylococcus aureus-induced mastitic groups. Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that the C4A-complete and C4A-AS transcripts are expressed at significantly different levels in healthy cows, while there were no significant differences in the mastitic group (P = 0.257). Expression of C4A-AS increased significantly when mastitis developed. We also examined the expression of C4A-complete and C4A-AS in several tissues (liver, heart, spleen, lung, kidney, tongue, and muscle). The two transcripts were expressed in all of these tissues but there were no significant differences in expression between healthy and mastitic cows. We therefore conclude that the C4A-complete transcript is the main transcript under normal physiological conditions, while C4A-AS is augmented when mastitis develops.

  15. On the Functional Overlap between Complement and Anti-Microbial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Jana; Hobkirk, James; Mohamed, Fatima; Browning, Michael J; Stover, Cordula M

    2014-01-01

    Intriguingly, activated complement and anti-microbial peptides share certain functionalities; lytic, phagocytic, and chemo-attractant activities and each may, in addition, exert cell instructive roles. Each has been shown to have distinct LPS detoxifying activity and may play a role in the development of endotoxin tolerance. In search of the origin of complement, a functional homolog of complement C3 involved in opsonization has been identified in horseshoe crabs. Horseshoe crabs possess anti-microbial peptides able to bind to acyl chains or phosphate groups/saccharides of endotoxin, LPS. Complement activity as a whole is detectable in marine invertebrates. These are also a source of anti-microbial peptides with potential pharmaceutical applicability. Investigating the locality for the production of complement pathway proteins and their role in modulating cellular immune responses are emerging fields. The significance of local synthesis of complement components is becoming clearer from in vivo studies of parenchymatous disease involving specifically generated, complement-deficient mouse lines. Complement C3 is a central component of complement activation. Its provision by cells of the myeloid lineage varies. Their effector functions in turn are increased in the presence of anti-microbial peptides. This may point to a potentiating range of activities, which should serve the maintenance of health but may also cause disease. Because of the therapeutic implications, this review will consider closely studies dealing with complement activation and anti-microbial peptide activity in acute inflammation (e.g., dialysis-related peritonitis, appendicitis, and ischemia). PMID:25646095

  16. On the Functional Overlap between Complement and Anti-Microbial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jana; Hobkirk, James; Mohamed, Fatima; Browning, Michael J.; Stover, Cordula M.

    2015-01-01

    Intriguingly, activated complement and anti-microbial peptides share certain functionalities; lytic, phagocytic, and chemo-attractant activities and each may, in addition, exert cell instructive roles. Each has been shown to have distinct LPS detoxifying activity and may play a role in the development of endotoxin tolerance. In search of the origin of complement, a functional homolog of complement C3 involved in opsonization has been identified in horseshoe crabs. Horseshoe crabs possess anti-microbial peptides able to bind to acyl chains or phosphate groups/saccharides of endotoxin, LPS. Complement activity as a whole is detectable in marine invertebrates. These are also a source of anti-microbial peptides with potential pharmaceutical applicability. Investigating the locality for the production of complement pathway proteins and their role in modulating cellular immune responses are emerging fields. The significance of local synthesis of complement components is becoming clearer from in vivo studies of parenchymatous disease involving specifically generated, complement-deficient mouse lines. Complement C3 is a central component of complement activation. Its provision by cells of the myeloid lineage varies. Their effector functions in turn are increased in the presence of anti-microbial peptides. This may point to a potentiating range of activities, which should serve the maintenance of health but may also cause disease. Because of the therapeutic implications, this review will consider closely studies dealing with complement activation and anti-microbial peptide activity in acute inflammation (e.g., dialysis-related peritonitis, appendicitis, and ischemia). PMID:25646095

  17. The alternative complement component factor B regulates UV-induced oedema, systemic suppression of contact and delayed hypersensitivity, and mast cell infiltration into the skin.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Scott N; Hammond, Kirsten J L; Chan, Carling Y-Y; Rogers, Linda J; Beaugie, Clare; Rana, Sabita; Marsh-Wakefield, Felix; Thurman, Joshua M; Halliday, Gary M

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths in sunlight are the prime cause of skin cancer in humans with both the UVA and UVB wavebands making a contribution to photocarcinogenesis. UV has many different biological effects on the skin that contribute to carcinogenesis, including suppression of adaptive immunity, sunburn and altering the migration of mast cells into and away from irradiated skin. Many molecular mechanisms have been identified as contributing to skin responses to UV. Recently, using gene set enrichment analysis of microarray data, we identified the alternative complement pathway with a central role for factor B (fB) in UVA-induced immunosuppression. In the current study we used mice genetically deficient in fB (fB-/- mice) to study the functional role of the alternative complement pathway in skin responses to UV. We found that fB is required for not only UVA but also UVB-induced immunosuppression and solar-simulated UV induction of the oedemal component of sunburn. Factor B-/- mice had a larger number of resident skin mast cells than control mice, but unlike the controls did not respond to UV by increasing mast cell infiltration into the skin. This study provides evidence for a function role for fB in skin responses to UV radiation. Factor B regulates UVA and UVB induced immunosuppression, UV induced oedema and mast cell infiltration into the skin. The alternative complement pathway is therefore an important regulator of skin responses to UV.

  18. Complement component C5a Promotes Expression of IL-22 and IL-17 from Human T cells and its Implication in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in elderly populations worldwide. Inflammation, among many factors, has been suggested to play an important role in AMD pathogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated a strong genetic association between AMD and complement factor H (CFH), the down-regulatory factor of complement activation. Elevated levels of complement activating molecules including complement component 5a (C5a) have been found in the serum of AMD patients. Our aim is to study whether C5a can impact human T cells and its implication in AMD. Methods Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from the blood of exudative form of AMD patients using a Ficoll gradient centrifugation protocol. Intracellular staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to measure protein expression. Apoptotic cells were detected by staining of cells with the annexin-V and TUNEL technology and analyzed by a FACS Caliber flow cytometer. SNP genotyping was analyzed by TaqMan genotyping assay using the Real-time PCR system 7500. Results We show that C5a promotes interleukin (IL)-22 and IL-17 expression by human CD4+ T cells. This effect is dependent on B7, IL-1β and IL-6 expression from monocytes. We have also found that C5a could protect human CD4+ cells from undergoing apoptosis. Importantly, consistent with a role of C5a in promoting IL-22 and IL-17 expression, significant elevation in IL-22 and IL-17 levels was found in AMD patients as compared to non-AMD controls. Conclusions Our results support the notion that C5a may be one of the factors contributing to the elevated serum IL-22 and IL-17 levels in AMD patients. The possible involvement of IL-22 and IL-17 in the inflammation that contributes to AMD may herald a new approach to treat AMD. PMID:21762495

  19. In vitro and in vivo changes in human complement caused by silage.

    PubMed Central

    Olenchock, S A; May, J J; Pratt, D S; Lewis, D M; Mull, J C; Stallones, L

    1986-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of silage samples from four farms in up-state New York were reacted in vitro with normal human serum. Hemolytic levels of complement component C3 were consumed in a dose-dependent fashion, and the four extracts differed in their relative activity rankings. Studies with chelated serum indicate that the alternative complement pathway is involved in the activation, and the active fragment C3b was demonstrated. Serum levels of hemolytic C3 and C4 in vivo were quantified before and after farmers performed their normal silo unloading operations. Although the study groups were small, suggestive evidence of in vivo complement consumption was found. IgE-related allergy did not appear to be of significance to the study groups. Complement activation may be an initiator of or contributor to adverse reactions in farmers who are exposed to airborne silage dusts. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. PMID:3709488

  20. Interaction of toxic venoms with the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Birdsey, Vanessa; Lindorfer, Jean; Gewurz, H.

    1971-01-01

    Thirty-nine venoms from various vertebrate and invertebrate species were tested for their ability to consume haemolytic complement (C) activity upon incubation in fresh guinea-pig serum. Nineteen had `anti-complementary' activity, and these were provisionally sorted into the following groups: Pattern I—exemplified by the Naja haje (Egyptian cobra) and six other Elapidae species (all cobras), which induced selective consumption of C3—C9, and led to formation of a stable C3—C9-consuming intermediate; Pattern II—exemplified by the Agkistrodon rhodostoma (Malayan pit viper), Bitis arietans (puff adder), Bothrops jararaca (South American pit viper), Bothrops atrox (Fer de Lance) and three other species, which induced marked consumption of C4 and C2, as well as C3—C9, but did not form a stable C3—C9-consuming intermediate; and individual animals, e.g. the Lachesis muta (bushmaster), which induced other patterns (III—VI) of complement component consumption. Active fractions of representative venoms were partially purified by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography and their interactions with the complement system characterized further. It is anticipated that these enzymes, with a capacity to activate the complement system in unique ways, will prove to be of further experimental usefulness. PMID:4398349

  1. Human L-ficolin, a recognition molecule of the lectin activation pathway of complement, activates complement by binding to pneumolysin, the major toxin of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ali, Youssif M; Kenawy, Hany I; Muhammad, Adnan; Sim, Robert B; Andrew, Peter W; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is an essential component of the immune response, providing a critical line of defense against different pathogens including S. pneumoniae. Complement is activated via three distinct pathways: the classical (CP), the alternative (AP) and the lectin pathway (LP). The role of Pneumolysin (PLY), a bacterial toxin released by S. pneumoniae, in triggering complement activation has been studied in vitro. Our results demonstrate that in both human and mouse sera complement was activated via the CP, initiated by direct binding of even non-specific IgM and IgG3 to PLY. Absence of CP activity in C1q(-/-) mouse serum completely abolished any C3 deposition. However, C1q depleted human serum strongly opsonized PLY through abundant deposition of C3 activation products, indicating that the LP may have a vital role in activating the human complement system on PLY. We identified that human L-ficolin is the critical LP recognition molecule that drives LP activation on PLY, while all of the murine LP recognition components fail to bind and activate complement on PLY. This work elucidates the detailed interactions between PLY and complement and shows for the first time a specific role of the LP in PLY-mediated complement activation in human serum.

  2. Evolution of the complement system in protostomes revealed by de novo transcriptome analysis of six species of Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Reo; Nonaka, Masaru

    2015-05-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary history of the complement system in Arthropoda, de novo transcriptome analysis was performed with six species among the Chelicerata, Myriapoda, and Crustacea, and complement genes were identified based on their characteristic domain structures. Complement C3 and factor B (FB) were identified from a sea spider, a jumping spider, and a centipede, but not from a sea firefly or two millipede species. No additional complement components identifiable by their characteristic domain structures were found from any of these six species. These results together with genome sequence information for several species of the Hexapoda suggest that the common ancestor of the Arthropoda possessed a simple complement system comprising C3 and FB, and thus resembled the alternative pathway of the mammalian complement system. It was lost at least twice independently during the evolution of Arthropoda in the millipede lineage and in the common ancestor of Crustacea and Hexapoda. PMID:25530095

  3. Evolution of the complement system in protostomes revealed by de novo transcriptome analysis of six species of Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Reo; Nonaka, Masaru

    2015-05-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary history of the complement system in Arthropoda, de novo transcriptome analysis was performed with six species among the Chelicerata, Myriapoda, and Crustacea, and complement genes were identified based on their characteristic domain structures. Complement C3 and factor B (FB) were identified from a sea spider, a jumping spider, and a centipede, but not from a sea firefly or two millipede species. No additional complement components identifiable by their characteristic domain structures were found from any of these six species. These results together with genome sequence information for several species of the Hexapoda suggest that the common ancestor of the Arthropoda possessed a simple complement system comprising C3 and FB, and thus resembled the alternative pathway of the mammalian complement system. It was lost at least twice independently during the evolution of Arthropoda in the millipede lineage and in the common ancestor of Crustacea and Hexapoda.

  4. Milk production and nutrient partitioning as measured by (13)C enrichment of milk components during C3 and C4 plant feeding in purebred Holstein and in Charolais × Holstein F2 crossbred cows.

    PubMed

    Hillal, Hany; Voigt, Jürgen; Metges, Cornelia C; Hammon, Harald M

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient partitioning was investigated in cows with different genetic merits for milk production by measuring (13)C/(12)C ratios (reported by delta values δ(13)C) in milk components in response to C3 (grass silage) and C4 diets (corn silage). We hypothesised that changes of δ(13)C in milk differ between Holstein (HOL; high milk production) and Charolais × Holstein cows with medium (CHM) and low (CHL) milk production. Changes of δ(13)C (Δδ(13)C) in milk components were estimated by calculating differences of δ(13)C due to switch from C3 to C4 feeding. After switch to C4 feeding, Δδ(13)C of lactose was greater in HOL than in CHL. Immediate Δδ(13)C of milk fat was the lowest in CHL. The maximal Δδ(13)C of casein was the lowest in HOL. The proportion of carbon in milk derived from diet increased with milk yield, indicating the main impact of the milk production level, but minor impact of breed, on nutrient partitioning towards the mammary gland.

  5. Reduced GVHD in C3-deficient mice is associated with the decrease of donor Th1/Th17 differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qing; Li, Dan; Nurieva, Roza; Patenia, Rebecca; Bassett, Roland; Cao, Wei; Alekseev, Andrei M.; He, Hong; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Kroll, Michael H.; Champlin, Richard E.; Sale, George E.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2012-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is mediated by the activation of recipient dendritic cells (DCs) and subsequent proliferation of donor T cells. Recently complement system has been shown to modulate adaptive immunity through the interaction between the complement system and lymphocytes. Complement proteins participate in the activation of DCs, antigen presentation to T cells, and proliferation of T cells. Our studies with a murine model of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) demonstrate that complement system regulates alloimmune responses in GVHD. Mice deficient in the central component of the complement system (C3−/−) had significantly lower GVHD-related mortality and morbidity compared to the wild type (WT) recipient mice. The number of donor-derived T cells including IFNγ+, IL17+ and IL17+IFNγ+ subsets was decreased in secondary lymphoid organs of C3−/− recipients. Furthermore, there was a reduction of recipient CD8α+CD11c+ in lymphoid organs. We conclude C3 regulates Th1/17 differentiation in BMT, and define a novel function of the complement system in GVHD. PMID:22664751

  6. Dissection of CR1, factor H, membrane cofactor protein, and factor B binding and functional sites in the third complement component.

    PubMed

    Lambris, J D; Lao, Z; Oglesby, T J; Atkinson, J P; Hack, C E; Becherer, J D

    1996-06-15

    Previous studies have suggested that the residues 727-768 of human (Hu) C3 contain the binding sites for CR1, factor H, and factor B. Here, we have (1) characterized further some of the C3 structural requirements for its binding to CR1, H, and B, (2) investigated the functions associated with these C3-ligand interactions, and (3) studied the relationship of MCP-binding sites in C3 with those for CR1, H, and B. Hu C3 molecules in which residues 727-768 were deleted (designated C3delta727-768) or substituted with the corresponding segment of cobra venom factor, Xenopus, or trout C3 (chimeric C3s) were expressed in the baculovirus system and analyzed for their reactivity with C3-binding proteins. In contrast to wild-type iC3 which, in the presence of CR1, is cleaved by factor I to iC3b-a and C3c-a and C3dg, all chimeric C3s were cleaved only to iC3b-a. In addition, the cleavage of deleted (C3delta727-768) iC3 to iC3b-a by factor I in the presence of CR1 was significantly reduced, whereas it remained unaltered in the presence of MCP. Cleavage of iC3 to iC3b-a by factor I and H was similar in all expressed C3s except C3delta727-768, whose cleavage was significantly reduced. All of the expressed molecules except C3delta727-768 were capable of forming the fluid-phase alternative pathway C3 convertase, and all reacted with properdin. These results suggest that during cleavage of iC3 by factor I and CR1, or H, CR1 and H bind to at least two sites on C3 and that the MCP binding site(s) on C3b are different from those for CR1. They also indicate that some or all of the C3 residues that are directly involved in, or contribute to, the structure of one of the CR1 and H binding sites are located within residues 727-768. These studies also demonstrate that, although this segment of C3 may be involved in C3-factor B interaction, other residues in addition to 736EE (previously implicated in B binding) must also contribute significantly to this interaction.

  7. Mesophilic Aeromonas sp. serogroup O:11 resistance to complement-mediated killing.

    PubMed Central

    Merino, S; Rubires, X; Aguilar, A; Albertí, S; Hernandez-Allés, S; Benedí, V J; Tomas, J M

    1996-01-01

    The complement activation by and resistance to complement-mediated killing of Aeromonas sp. strains from serogroup O:11 were investigated by using different wild-type strains (with an S-layer characteristic of this serogroup) and their isogenic mutants characterized for their surface components (S-layer and lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). All of the Aeromonas sp. serogroup O:11 wild-type strains are unable to activate complement, which suggested that the S-layer completely covered the LPS molecules. We found that the classical complement pathway is involved in serum killing of susceptible Aeromonas sp. mutant strains of serogroup O11, while the alternative complement pathway seems not to be involved, and that the complement activation seems to be independent of antibody. The smooth mutant strains devoid of the S-layer (S-layer isogenic mutants) or isogenic LPS mutant strains with a complete or rather complete LPS core (also without the S-layer) are able to activate complement but are resistant to complement-mediated killing. The reasons for this resistance are that C3b is rapidly degraded, and therefore the lytic membrane attack complex (C5b-9) is not formed. Isogenic LPS rough mutants with an incomplete LPS core are serum sensitive because they bind more C3b than the resistant strains, the C3b is not completely degraded, and therefore the lytic complex (C5b-9) is formed. PMID:8945581

  8. Complement deposition in glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    di Belgiojoso, G B; Tarantino, A; Durante, A; Guerra, L

    1975-01-01

    Biopsies from 400 patients affected by glomerular diseases, both "primary" and secondary to systemic diseases, have been studied by immunofluorescence. Staining was performed for immunoglobulins fibrogen and C1q, C4, C3 and C3A. C1q, C4 and C3 were positive in a high percentage of cases in focal glomerulosclerosis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, lupus nephritis and essential cryoglobulinaemia glomerulonephritis. C1q and C4 were very rarely present in focal proliferative glomerulonephritis and rheumatoid purpura glomerulonephritis. C3A was found frequently only in acute glomerulonephritis. Results are discussed with reference to their diagnostic value and to information about mechanisms of complement activation.

  9. The complement component C5 promotes liver steatosis and inflammation in murine non-alcoholic liver disease model.

    PubMed

    Bavia, Lorena; Cogliati, Bruno; Dettoni, Juliano Bertollo; Ferreira Alves, Venancio Avancini; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-09-01

    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NALD) is considering a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Although the pathogenesis of NALD is not completely understood, insulin resistance and inflammatory cytokines are implicated. Considering that component C5 is a central mediator of inflammation, we investigated the role of C5 in the establishment of NALD. Eight to ten-week old B6 C5(+) and A/J C5(-) male mice were fed a high fat diet containing glucose (HFDG) for 6 and 10 weeks. We observed that B6 C5(+) mice HFDG-fed for 10 weeks developed hepatomegaly, triglycerides (TG) accumulation, steatosis and enhanced liver TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12p70 and IL-17 levels when compared to A/J C5(-) mice. Next, B6 C5(+) mice were compared with congenic B6 C5(-) mice. Again, B6 C5(+) HFDG-fed mice developed more steatosis, liver centro-lobular inflammation and presented higher levels of liver IL-1β, IL-12p70, IL-17 and TFG-β than B6 C5(-) mice under the same conditions. B6 C5(+) mice HFDG-fed also presented lower concentrations of serum albumin, serum cholesterol, blood leukocytes and liver NO production when compared with B6 C5(-) mice. We concluded that murine C5 contributes effectively to liver steatosis and inflammation in NALD pathogenesis. In addition, C5 is also important to control serum cholesterol and albumin levels in the C57BL/6 genetic background. PMID:27477770

  10. The complement component C5 promotes liver steatosis and inflammation in murine non-alcoholic liver disease model.

    PubMed

    Bavia, Lorena; Cogliati, Bruno; Dettoni, Juliano Bertollo; Ferreira Alves, Venancio Avancini; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-09-01

    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NALD) is considering a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Although the pathogenesis of NALD is not completely understood, insulin resistance and inflammatory cytokines are implicated. Considering that component C5 is a central mediator of inflammation, we investigated the role of C5 in the establishment of NALD. Eight to ten-week old B6 C5(+) and A/J C5(-) male mice were fed a high fat diet containing glucose (HFDG) for 6 and 10 weeks. We observed that B6 C5(+) mice HFDG-fed for 10 weeks developed hepatomegaly, triglycerides (TG) accumulation, steatosis and enhanced liver TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12p70 and IL-17 levels when compared to A/J C5(-) mice. Next, B6 C5(+) mice were compared with congenic B6 C5(-) mice. Again, B6 C5(+) HFDG-fed mice developed more steatosis, liver centro-lobular inflammation and presented higher levels of liver IL-1β, IL-12p70, IL-17 and TFG-β than B6 C5(-) mice under the same conditions. B6 C5(+) mice HFDG-fed also presented lower concentrations of serum albumin, serum cholesterol, blood leukocytes and liver NO production when compared with B6 C5(-) mice. We concluded that murine C5 contributes effectively to liver steatosis and inflammation in NALD pathogenesis. In addition, C5 is also important to control serum cholesterol and albumin levels in the C57BL/6 genetic background.

  11. Anti-complement sesquiterpenes from Viola yedoensis.

    PubMed

    Du, Dongsheng; Cheng, Zhihong; Chen, Daofeng

    2015-03-01

    Two new germacrane sesquiterpenes, yedoensins A (1) and B (2), together with 8 known ones (3-10) were isolated from the herb of Viola yedoensis. The structures of the new compounds were established by extensive spectroscopic means including 1D ((1)H and (13)C) and 2D NMR experiments (HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY) as well as HR-ESI-MS analysis. The absolute configurations of the known sesquiterpenes versicolactone B (3) and madolin W (6) were determined by a modified Mosher's method for the first time. The sesquiterpenes 1-3, and 5-9 exhibited anti-complement activity against the classical pathway (CP) and the alternative pathway (AP) with the CH50 and AP50 values ranging from 0.14 to 0.37mg/mL and 0.32 to 0.54mg/mL, respectively. Preliminary mechanism study using complement-depleted sera showed that yedoensin A (1) and versicolactone B (3) acted on C1q, C3 and C9, while madolin W (6), aristoyunnolin E (7) and madolin Y (9) interacted with C1q, C3, C5 and C9 components in the complement activation cascade.

  12. Molecular cloning of the alpha subunit of complement component C8 (CpC8α) of whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Mengmeng; Wang, Conghui; Ye, Boping; Hua, Zichun

    2013-12-01

    Complement-mediated cytolysis is the important effect of immune response, which results from the assembly of terminal complement components (C5b-9). Among them, α subunit of C8 (C8α) is the first protein that traverses the lipid bilayer, and then initiates the recruitment of C9 molecules to form pore on target membranes. In this article, a full-length cDNA of C8α (CpC8α) is identified from the whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) by RACE. The CpC8α cDNA is 2183 bp in length, encoding a protein of 591 amino acids. The deduced CpC8α exhibits 89%, 49% and 44% identity with nurse shark, frog and human orthologs, respectively. Sequence alignment indicates that the C8α is well conserved during the evolution process from sharks to mammals, with the same modular architecture as well as the identical cysteine composition in the mature protein. Phylogenetic analysis places CpC8α and nurse shark C8α in cartilaginous fish clade, in parallel with the teleost taxa, to form the C8α cluster with higher vertebrates. Hydrophobicity analysis also indicates a similar hydrophobicity of CpC8α to mammals. Finally, expression analysis revealed CpC8α transcripts were constitutively highly expressed in shark liver, with much less expression in other tissues. The well conserved structure and properties suggests an analogous function of CpC8α to mammalian C8α, though it remains to be confirmed by further study.

  13. Interplay between invertebrate C3a with vertebrate macrophages: functional characterization of immune activities of amphioxus C3a.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Li, Mengyang; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-10-01

    Our current knowledge of the structure and function of C3a comes from the study of vertebrate C3a anaphylatoxins, virtually nothing is known about the structure and function of C3a molecules in invertebrates. Here we demonstrated that C3a from the invertebrate chordate Branchiostoma japonicum, BjC3a, was similar to vertebrate C3a possessing potential antibacterial activity, as revealed by sequence analysis and computational modeling. The antibacterial activity of BjC3a was definitely confirmed by both antibacterial assay and TEM observation showing that recombinant BjC3a was directly bactericidal. Additionally, recombinant BjC3a, like vertebrate C3a, was capable of inducing sea bass macrophage migration and enhancing macrophage phagocytosis and respiratory burst response. Moreover, recombinant BjC3a-desArg (generated by removal of the C-terminal arginine), like mammalian C3a-desArg, retained the immunological activities of BjC3a such as antibacterial and respiratory burst-stimulating activities, indicating that the immunological functions of C3a-desArg were conserved throughout chordate evolution. Altogether, our findings show that invertebrate (amphioxus) BjC3a is able to interact with vertebrate (sea bass) macrophages and mediate immune activities, suggesting the emergence of the inflammatory pathway of the complement system similar to that of vertebrates in the basal chordate amphioxus.

  14. Interplay between invertebrate C3a with vertebrate macrophages: functional characterization of immune activities of amphioxus C3a.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Li, Mengyang; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-10-01

    Our current knowledge of the structure and function of C3a comes from the study of vertebrate C3a anaphylatoxins, virtually nothing is known about the structure and function of C3a molecules in invertebrates. Here we demonstrated that C3a from the invertebrate chordate Branchiostoma japonicum, BjC3a, was similar to vertebrate C3a possessing potential antibacterial activity, as revealed by sequence analysis and computational modeling. The antibacterial activity of BjC3a was definitely confirmed by both antibacterial assay and TEM observation showing that recombinant BjC3a was directly bactericidal. Additionally, recombinant BjC3a, like vertebrate C3a, was capable of inducing sea bass macrophage migration and enhancing macrophage phagocytosis and respiratory burst response. Moreover, recombinant BjC3a-desArg (generated by removal of the C-terminal arginine), like mammalian C3a-desArg, retained the immunological activities of BjC3a such as antibacterial and respiratory burst-stimulating activities, indicating that the immunological functions of C3a-desArg were conserved throughout chordate evolution. Altogether, our findings show that invertebrate (amphioxus) BjC3a is able to interact with vertebrate (sea bass) macrophages and mediate immune activities, suggesting the emergence of the inflammatory pathway of the complement system similar to that of vertebrates in the basal chordate amphioxus. PMID:23954696

  15. Antibodies That Efficiently Form Hexamers upon Antigen Binding Can Induce Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity under Complement-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Erika M.; Lindorfer, Margaret A.; van der Horst, Hilma; Oostindie, Simone; Beurskens, Frank J.; Schuurman, Janine; Zent, Clive S.; Burack, Richard; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that IgG Abs can organize into ordered hexamers after binding their cognate Ags expressed on cell surfaces. This process is dependent on Fc:Fc interactions, which promote C1q binding, the first step in classical pathway complement activation. We went on to engineer point mutations that stimulated IgG hexamer formation and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). The hexamer formation–enhanced (HexaBody) CD20 and CD38 mAbs support faster, more robust CDC than their wild-type counterparts. To further investigate the CDC potential of these mAbs, we used flow cytometry, high-resolution digital imaging, and four-color confocal microscopy to examine their activity against B cell lines and primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in sera depleted of single complement components. We also examined the CDC activity of alemtuzumab (anti-CD52) and mAb W6/32 (anti-HLA), which bind at high density to cells and promote substantial complement activation. Although we observed little CDC for mAb-opsonized cells reacted with sera depleted of early complement components, we were surprised to discover that the Hexabody mAbs, as well as ALM and W6/32, were all quite effective at promoting CDC in sera depleted of individual complement components C6 to C9. However, neutralization studies conducted with an anti-C9 mAb verified that C9 is required for CDC activity against cell lines. These highly effective complement-activating mAbs efficiently focus activated complement components on the cell, including C3b and C9, and promote CDC with a very low threshold of MAC binding, thus providing additional insight into their enhanced efficacy in promoting CDC. PMID:27474078

  16. Role of Complement on Broken Surfaces After Trauma.

    PubMed

    Huber-Lang, Markus; Ignatius, Anita; Brenner, Rolf E

    2015-01-01

    Activation of both the complement and coagulation cascade after trauma and subsequent local and systemic inflammatory response represent a major scientific and clinical problem. After severe tissue injury and bone fracture, exposure of innate immunity to damaged cells and molecular debris is considered a main trigger of the posttraumatic danger response. However, the effects of cellular fragments (e.g., histones) on complement activation remain enigmatic. Furthermore, direct effects of "broken" bone and cartilage surfaces on the fluid phase response of complement and its interaction with key cells of connective tissues are still unknown. Here, we summarize data suggesting direct and indirect complement activation by extracellular and cellular danger associated molecular patterns. In addition, key complement components and the corresponding receptors (such as C3aR, C5aR) have been detected on "exposed surfaces" of the damaged regions. On a cellular level, multiple effects of complement activation products on osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells have been found.In conclusion, the complement system may be activated by trauma-altered surfaces and is crucially involved in connective tissue healing and posttraumatic systemic inflammatory response. PMID:26306442

  17. Role of Complement on Broken Surfaces After Trauma.

    PubMed

    Huber-Lang, Markus; Ignatius, Anita; Brenner, Rolf E

    2015-01-01

    Activation of both the complement and coagulation cascade after trauma and subsequent local and systemic inflammatory response represent a major scientific and clinical problem. After severe tissue injury and bone fracture, exposure of innate immunity to damaged cells and molecular debris is considered a main trigger of the posttraumatic danger response. However, the effects of cellular fragments (e.g., histones) on complement activation remain enigmatic. Furthermore, direct effects of "broken" bone and cartilage surfaces on the fluid phase response of complement and its interaction with key cells of connective tissues are still unknown. Here, we summarize data suggesting direct and indirect complement activation by extracellular and cellular danger associated molecular patterns. In addition, key complement components and the corresponding receptors (such as C3aR, C5aR) have been detected on "exposed surfaces" of the damaged regions. On a cellular level, multiple effects of complement activation products on osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells have been found.In conclusion, the complement system may be activated by trauma-altered surfaces and is crucially involved in connective tissue healing and posttraumatic systemic inflammatory response.

  18. A modified competitive inhibition radioimmunoassay for the detection of C3a. Use of 125I-C3 instead of 125I-C3a.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Paardekooper, J; Eerenberg, A J; Navis, G O; Nijsten, M W; Thijs, L G; Nuijens, J H

    1988-04-01

    Levels of C3a in plasma are currently measured by a competitive inhibition radioimmunoassay (RIA) in which 125I-C3a is used as a tracer. In this paper, we describe a modification of this RIA: 125I-C3 instead of 125I-C3a is used. The lower limit of detection of this modified RIA is 6 ng of C3a per ml of plasma (i.e. 0.66 nmol/l). This RIA, performed with polyclonal anti-C3a antibodies coupled to a solid phase, appeared to be 30 times more sensitive compared with an RIA in which a monoclonal antibody against C3a is used. In vitro activation of the complement system in serum by aggregated IgG, zymosan, and cobra venom factor resulted in the generation of significant amounts of C3a. Assessment of the C3a levels by the modified RIA in serial plasma samples from patients who underwent cardiopulmonary bypass, yielded results very similar to those described in the literature for the established C3a-RIA. Thus, the modified C3a-RIA offers a convenient alternative for the detection of C3a in plasma samples.

  19. Complement involvement in kidney diseases: From physiopathology to therapeutical targeting

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Rosso, Giuseppina; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Complement cascade is involved in several renal diseases and in renal transplantation. The different components of the complement cascade might represent an optimal target for innovative therapies. In the first section of the paper the authors review the physiopathology of complement involvement in renal diseases and transplantation. In some cases this led to a reclassification of renal diseases moving from a histopathological to a physiopathological classification. The principal issues afforded are: renal diseases with complement over activation, renal diseases with complement dysregulation, progression of renal diseases and renal transplantation. In the second section the authors discuss the several complement components that could represent a therapeutic target. Even if only the anti C5 monoclonal antibody is on the market, many targets as C1, C3, C5a and C5aR are the object of national or international trials. In addition, many molecules proved to be effective in vitro or in preclinical trials and are waiting to move to human trials in the future. PMID:25949931

  20. Staphylococcal proteases aid in evasion of the human complement system.

    PubMed

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz; Bielecka, Ewa; Miller, Halie K; Kalinska, Magdalena; Dubin, Grzegorz; Garred, Peter; Shaw, Lindsey N; Blom, Anna M

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that presents severe health care concerns due to the prevalence of multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. New treatment strategies are urgently needed, which requires an understanding of disease causation mechanisms. Complement is one of the first lines of defense against bacterial pathogens, and S. aureus expresses several specific complement inhibitors. The effect of extracellular proteases from this bacterium on complement, however, has been the subject of limited investigation, except for a recent report regarding cleavage of the C3 component by aureolysin (Aur). We demonstrate here that four major extracellular proteases of S. aureus are potent complement inhibitors. Incubation of human serum with the cysteine proteases staphopain A and staphopain B, the serine protease V8 and the metalloproteinase Aur resulted in a drastic decrease in the hemolytic activity of serum, whereas two staphylococcal serine proteases D and E, had no effect. These four proteases were found to inhibit all pathways of complement due to the efficient degradation of several crucial components. Furthermore, S. aureus mutants lacking proteolytic enzymes were found to be more efficiently killed in human blood. Taken together, the major proteases of S. aureus appear to be important for pathogen-mediated evasion of the human complement system.

  1. Complement Factor 3 Could Be an Independent Risk Factor for Mortality in Patients with HBV Related Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Geng-lin; Zhang, Ting; Ye, Yi-nong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Xie, Chan; Peng, Liang; Gao, Zhi-liang

    2016-01-01

    The complement is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple liver disorders. However, its role in patients with HBV related acute-on-chronic liver failure (HBV-ACLF) remains unclear. Serum levels of the third and fourth complement components (C3, C4) and complement function (CH50) were examined in this prospective, observational study. Associations between their expression and disease activity were analyzed. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves. Predictors of clinical outcome were determined by Cox regression analysis. C3, C4, and CH50 levels were significantly lower in HBV-ACLF patients compared to controls. C3, C4, and CH50 levels were negatively correlated with Tbil levels but positively associated with PTA levels. C3 levels were negatively associated with MELD-Na. C3 levels were significantly lower in HBV-ACLF patients who died compared to patients who survived. In a median hospital stay of 39 days, mortality occurred in 41 patients with a progressive increase based on C3 grade (P = 0.008). The actuarial probability of developing mortality was significantly higher in patients with low C3 grade compared to those with high C3 grade (P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that C3 levels were an independent predictor of mortality. Complement played a pathogenic role in HBV-ACLF patients and C3 was an independent predictor of mortality. PMID:27144164

  2. NETosing Neutrophils Activate Complement Both on Their Own NETs and Bacteria via Alternative and Non-alternative Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Joshua; Pluthero, Fred G.; Douda, David N.; Riedl, Magdalena; Cherry, Ahmed; Ulanova, Marina; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils deposit antimicrobial proteins, such as myeloperoxidase and proteases on chromatin, which they release as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Neutrophils also carry key components of the complement alternative pathway (AP) such as properdin or complement factor P (CFP), complement factor B (CFB), and C3. However, the contribution of these complement components and complement activation during NET formation in the presence and absence of bacteria is poorly understood. We studied complement activation on NETs and a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01, PAKwt, and PAKgfp). Here, we show that anaphylatoxin C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which activates NADPH oxidase, induce the release of CFP, CFB, and C3 from neutrophils. In response to PMA or P. aeruginosa, neutrophils secrete CFP, deposit it on NETs and bacteria, and induce the formation of terminal complement complexes (C5b–9). A blocking anti-CFP antibody inhibited AP-mediated but not non-AP-mediated complement activation on NETs and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, NET-mediated complement activation occurs via both AP- and non AP-based mechanisms, and AP-mediated complement activation during NETosis is dependent on CFP. These findings suggest that neutrophils could use their “AP tool kit” to readily activate complement on NETs and Gram-negative bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa, whereas additional components present in the serum help to fix non-AP-mediated complement both on NETs and bacteria. This unique mechanism may play important roles in host defense and help to explain specific roles of complement activation in NET-related diseases. PMID:27148258

  3. A local complement response by RPE causes early-stage macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Godino, Rosario; Garland, Donita L.; Pierce, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited and age-related macular degenerations (AMDs) are important causes of vision loss. An early hallmark of these disorders is the formation of sub-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) basal deposits. A role for the complement system in MDs was suggested by genetic association studies, but direct functional connections between alterations in the complement system and the pathogenesis of MD remain to be defined. We used primary RPE cells from a mouse model of inherited MD due to a p.R345W mutation in EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) to investigate the role of the RPE in early MD pathogenesis. Efemp1R345W RPE cells recapitulate the basal deposit formation observed in vivo by producing sub-RPE deposits in vitro. The deposits share features with basal deposits, and their formation was mediated by EFEMP1R345W or complement component 3a (C3a), but not by complement component 5a (C5a). Increased activation of complement appears to occur in response to an abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM), generated by the mutant EFEMP1R345W protein and reduced ECM turnover due to inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase 2 by EFEMP1R345W and C3a. Increased production of C3a also stimulated the release of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1B, which appear to have a role in deposit formation, albeit downstream of C3a. These studies provide the first direct indication that complement components produced locally by the RPE are involved in the formation of basal deposits. Furthermore, these results suggest that C3a generated by RPE is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of EFEMP1-associated MD as well as AMD. PMID:26199322

  4. A local complement response by RPE causes early-stage macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Godino, Rosario; Garland, Donita L; Pierce, Eric A

    2015-10-01

    Inherited and age-related macular degenerations (AMDs) are important causes of vision loss. An early hallmark of these disorders is the formation of sub-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) basal deposits. A role for the complement system in MDs was suggested by genetic association studies, but direct functional connections between alterations in the complement system and the pathogenesis of MD remain to be defined. We used primary RPE cells from a mouse model of inherited MD due to a p.R345W mutation in EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) to investigate the role of the RPE in early MD pathogenesis. Efemp1(R345W) RPE cells recapitulate the basal deposit formation observed in vivo by producing sub-RPE deposits in vitro. The deposits share features with basal deposits, and their formation was mediated by EFEMP1(R345W) or complement component 3a (C3a), but not by complement component 5a (C5a). Increased activation of complement appears to occur in response to an abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM), generated by the mutant EFEMP1(R345W) protein and reduced ECM turnover due to inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase 2 by EFEMP1(R345W) and C3a. Increased production of C3a also stimulated the release of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1B, which appear to have a role in deposit formation, albeit downstream of C3a. These studies provide the first direct indication that complement components produced locally by the RPE are involved in the formation of basal deposits. Furthermore, these results suggest that C3a generated by RPE is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of EFEMP1-associated MD as well as AMD.

  5. Artepillin C, a Typical Brazilian Propolis-Derived Component, Induces Brown-Like Adipocyte Formation in C3H10T1/2 Cells, Primary Inguinal White Adipose Tissue-Derived Adipocytes, and Mice.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Sho; Aoyama, Hiroki; Kamiya, Misa; Higuchi, Jun; Kato, Aiko; Soga, Minoru; Kawai, Taeko; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Tsuda, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Induction of brown-like adipocytes (beige/brite cells) in white adipose tissue (WAT) suggests a new approach for preventing and treating obesity via induction of thermogenesis associated with uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). However, whether diet-derived factors can directly induce browning of white adipocytes has not been well established. In addition, the underlying mechanism of induction of brown-like adipocytes by diet-derived factors has been unclear. Here, we demonstrate that artepillin C (ArtC), which is a typical Brazilian propolis-derived component, significantly induces brown-like adipocytes in murine C3H10T1/2 cells and primary inguinal WAT (iWAT)-derived adipocytes. This significant induction is due to activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and stabilization of PRD1-BF-1-RIZ1 homologous domain-containing protein-16 (PRDM16). Furthermore, the oral administration of ArtC (10 mg/kg) for 4 weeks significantly induced brown-like adipocytes accompanied by significant expression of UCP1 and PRDM16 proteins in iWAT of mice, and was independent of the β3-adrenergic signaling pathway via the sympathetic nervous system. These findings may provide insight into browning of white adipocytes including the molecular mechanism mediated by dietary factors and demonstrate that ArtC has a novel biological function with regard to increasing energy expenditure by browning of white adipocytes. PMID:27598888

  6. Artepillin C, a Typical Brazilian Propolis-Derived Component, Induces Brown-Like Adipocyte Formation in C3H10T1/2 Cells, Primary Inguinal White Adipose Tissue-Derived Adipocytes, and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Sho; Aoyama, Hiroki; Kamiya, Misa; Higuchi, Jun; Kato, Aiko; Soga, Minoru; Kawai, Taeko; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Tsuda, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Induction of brown-like adipocytes (beige/brite cells) in white adipose tissue (WAT) suggests a new approach for preventing and treating obesity via induction of thermogenesis associated with uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). However, whether diet-derived factors can directly induce browning of white adipocytes has not been well established. In addition, the underlying mechanism of induction of brown-like adipocytes by diet-derived factors has been unclear. Here, we demonstrate that artepillin C (ArtC), which is a typical Brazilian propolis-derived component, significantly induces brown-like adipocytes in murine C3H10T1/2 cells and primary inguinal WAT (iWAT)-derived adipocytes. This significant induction is due to activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and stabilization of PRD1-BF-1-RIZ1 homologous domain-containing protein-16 (PRDM16). Furthermore, the oral administration of ArtC (10 mg/kg) for 4 weeks significantly induced brown-like adipocytes accompanied by significant expression of UCP1 and PRDM16 proteins in iWAT of mice, and was independent of the β3-adrenergic signaling pathway via the sympathetic nervous system. These findings may provide insight into browning of white adipocytes including the molecular mechanism mediated by dietary factors and demonstrate that ArtC has a novel biological function with regard to increasing energy expenditure by browning of white adipocytes. PMID:27598888

  7. The Pivotal Role of the Complement System in Aging and Age-related Macular Degeneration: Hypothesis Re-visited

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Don H.; Radeke, Monte J.; Gallo, Natasha B.; Chapin, Ethan A.; Johnson, Patrick T.; Curletti, Christy R.; Hancox, Lisa S.; Hu, Jane; Ebright, Jessica N.; Malek, Goldis; Hauser, Michael A.; Rickman, Catherine Bowes; Bok, Dean; Hageman, Gregory S.; Johnson, Lincoln V.

    2009-01-01

    During the past ten years, dramatic advances have been made in unraveling the biological bases of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of irreversible blindness in western populations. In that timeframe, two distinct lines of evidence emerged which implicated chronic local inflammation and activation of the complement cascade in AMD pathogenesis. First, a number of complement system proteins, complement activators, and complement regulatory proteins were identified as molecular constituents of drusen, the hallmark extracellular deposits associated with early AMD. Subsequently, genetic studies revealed highly significant statistical associations between AMD and variants of several complement pathway-associated genes including: Complement factor H (CFH), complement factor H-related 1 and 3 (CFHR1 and CFHR3), complement factor B (CFB), complement component 2 (C2), and complement component 3 (C3). In this article, we revisit our original hypothesis that chronic local inflammatory and immune-mediated events at the level of Bruch’s membrane play critical roles in drusen biogenesis and, by extension, in the pathobiology of AMD. Secondly, we report the results of a new screening for additional AMD-associated polymorphisms in a battery of 63 complement-related genes. Third, we identify and characterize the local complement system in the RPE-choroid complex -- thus adding a new dimension of biological complexity to the role of the complement system in ocular aging and AMD. Finally, we evaluate the most salient, recent evidence that bears directly on the role of complement in AMD pathogenesis and progression. Collectively, these recent findings strongly re-affirm the importance of the complement system in AMD. They lay the groundwork for further studies that may lead to the identification of a transcriptional disease signature of AMD, and hasten the development of new therapeutic approaches that will restore the complement-modulating activity that

  8. The role of complement in the pathogenesis of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is a major component of innate immunity and has been commonly identified as a central element in host defense, clearance of immune complexes, and tissue homeostasis. After ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), the complement system is activated by endogenous ligands that trigger proteolytic cleavage of complement components via the classical, lectin and/or alternative pathway. The result is the formation of terminal complement components C3a, C5a, and the membrane attack complex (C5b-9 or MAC), all of which play pivotal roles in the amplification of the inflammatory response, chemotaxis, neutrophil/monocyte recruitment and activation, and direct tubular cell injury. However, recent evidence suggests that complement activity transcends innate host defense and there is increasing data suggesting complement as a regulator in processes such as allo-immunity, stem cell differentiation, tissue repair, and progression to fibrosis. In this review, we discuss recent advances addressing the role of complement as a regulator of IRI and renal fibrosis after organ donation for transplantation. We will also briefly discuss currently approved therapies that target complement activity in kidney ischemia-reperfusion and transplantation. PMID:25383094

  9. C3 deficiency ameliorates the negative effects of irradiation of the young brain on hippocampal development and learning.

    PubMed

    Kalm, Marie; Andreasson, Ulf; Björk-Eriksson, Thomas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Pekny, Milos; Blennow, Kaj; Pekna, Marcela; Blomgren, Klas

    2016-04-12

    Radiotherapy in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors is often associated with debilitating late-appearing adverse effects, such as intellectual impairment. Areas in the brain harboring stem cells are particularly sensitive to irradiation (IR) and loss of these cells may contribute to cognitive deficits. It has been demonstrated that IR-induced inflammation negatively affects neural progenitor differentiation. In this study, we used mice lacking the third complement component (C3-/-) to investigate the role of complement in a mouse model of IR-induced injury to the granule cell layer (GCL) of the hippocampus. C3-/- and wild type (WT) mice received a single, moderate dose of 8 Gy to the brain on postnatal day 10. The C3-/- mice displayed 55 % more microglia (Iba-1+) and a trend towards increase in proliferating cells in the GCL compared to WT mice 7 days after IR. Importantly, months after IR C3-/- mice made fewer errors than WT mice in a reversal learning test indicating better learning capacity in C3-/- mice after IR. Notably, months after IR C3-/- and WT mice had similar GCL volumes, survival of newborn cells (BrdU), microglia (Iba-1) and astrocyte (S100β) numbers in the GCL. In summary, our data show that the complement system contributes to IR-induced loss of proliferating cells and maladaptive inflammatory responses in the acute phase after IR, leading to impaired learning capacity in adulthood. Targeting the complement system is hence promising for future strategies to reduce the long-term adverse consequences of IR in the young brain. PMID:27029069

  10. C3 deficiency ameliorates the negative effects of irradiation of the young brain on hippocampal development and learning

    PubMed Central

    Kalm, Marie; Andreasson, Ulf; Björk-Eriksson, Thomas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Pekny, Milos; Blennow, Kaj; Pekna, Marcela; Blomgren, Klas

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors is often associated with debilitating late-appearing adverse effects, such as intellectual impairment. Areas in the brain harboring stem cells are particularly sensitive to irradiation (IR) and loss of these cells may contribute to cognitive deficits. It has been demonstrated that IR-induced inflammation negatively affects neural progenitor differentiation. In this study, we used mice lacking the third complement component (C3−/−) to investigate the role of complement in a mouse model of IR-induced injury to the granule cell layer (GCL) of the hippocampus. C3−/− and wild type (WT) mice received a single, moderate dose of 8 Gy to the brain on postnatal day 10. The C3−/− mice displayed 55 % more microglia (Iba-1+) and a trend towards increase in proliferating cells in the GCL compared to WT mice 7 days after IR. Importantly, months after IR C3−/− mice made fewer errors than WT mice in a reversal learning test indicating better learning capacity in C3−/− mice after IR. Notably, months after IR C3−/− and WT mice had similar GCL volumes, survival of newborn cells (BrdU), microglia (Iba-1) and astrocyte (S100β) numbers in the GCL. In summary, our data show that the complement system contributes to IR-induced loss of proliferating cells and maladaptive inflammatory responses in the acute phase after IR, leading to impaired learning capacity in adulthood. Targeting the complement system is hence promising for future strategies to reduce the long-term adverse consequences of IR in the young brain. PMID:27029069

  11. Differential surface deposition of complement proteins on logarithmic and stationary phase Leishmania chagasi promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Lei, Soi Meng; Bellaire, Bryan H; Beetham, Jeffrey K

    2012-12-01

    Previous works demonstrated that various species of Leishmania promastigotes exhibit differential sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis (CML) during development. Upon exposure to normal human serum (NHS), cultures of Leishmania chagasi promastigotes recently isolated from infected hamsters (fewer than 5 in vitro passages) are CML-sensitive when in the logarithmic growth phase but become CML-resistant upon transition to the stationary culture phase. Visualization by light and electron microscopy revealed dramatic morphological differences between promastigotes from the 2 culture phases following exposure to NHS. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that surface deposition of the complement components C3, C5, and C9 correlated inversely with promastigote CML-resistance. The highest levels of complement protein surface accumulation were observed for logarithmic phase promastigotes, while stationary phase promastigotes adsorbed the least amount of complement proteins. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy revealed that C3 and C5 localized in a fairly uniform pattern to the plasma membrane of promastigotes from logarithmic phase cultures, while the staining of promastigotes from stationary phase cultures was indistinguishable from background. By Western blot analysis, high levels of the complement proteins C3, C5, and C9 were detected in the total lysates of NHS-exposed logarithmic phase L. chagasi promastigotes, relative to NHS-exposed stationary phase promastigotes; this finding indicates that the low levels of C3 and C5 seen on the surface of stationary phase promastigotes were not due to protein uptake/internalization. Together, these data demonstrate the differential deposition of complement proteins on the surfaces of logarithmic and stationary phase L. chagasi promastigotes. The data support a model wherein stationary phase L. chagasi promastigotes resist CML by limiting the deposition of C3 and its derivatives, which, in turn, limit surface levels of

  12. The Paramyxoviruses Simian Virus 5 and Mumps Virus Recruit Host Cell CD46 To Evade Complement-Mediated Neutralization ▿

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, John B.; Grant, Ken; Parks, Griffith D.

    2009-01-01

    The complement system is a critical component of the innate immune response that all animal viruses must face during natural infections. Our previous results have shown that treatment of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) with human serum results in deposition of complement C3-derived polypeptides on virion particles. Here, we show that the virion-associated C3 component includes the inactive form iC3b, suggesting that SV5 may have mechanisms to evade the host complement system. Electron microscopy, gradient centrifugation, and Western blot analysis indicated that purified SV5 virions derived from human A549 cells contained CD46, a plasma membrane-expressed regulator of complement that acts as a cofactor for cleavage and inactivation of C3b into iC3b. In vitro cleavage assays with purified complement components showed that SV5 virions had C3b cofactor activity, resulting in specific factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b into inactive iC3b. SV5 particles generated in CHO cells, which do not express CD46, did not have cofactor activity. Conversely, virions derived from a CHO cell line that was engineered to overexpress human CD46 contained elevated levels of virion-associated CD46 and displayed enhanced C3b cofactor activity. In comparison with C3b, purified SV5 virions had very low cofactor activity against C4b, consistent with the known preference of CD46 for C3b versus C4b. Similar results were obtained for the closely related mumps virus (MuV), except that MuV particles derived from CHO-CD46 cells had higher C4b cofactor activity than SV5 virions. In neutralization assays with human serum, SV5 and MuV containing CD46 showed slower kinetics and more resistance to neutralization than SV5 and MuV that lacked CD46. Our results support a model in which the rubulaviruses SV5 and MuV incorporate cell surface complement inhibitors into progeny virions as a mechanism to limit complement-mediated neutralization. PMID:19457998

  13. The Role of Complement System in Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflieh, Jean; Wei, Jiandong; Labaze, Georges; Hou, Yunfang Joan; Babarsh, Benjamin; Stutz, Helen; Lee, Haekyung; Worah, Samrat; Zhang, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Septic shock is a critical clinical condition with a high mortality rate. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to develop effective therapies. Basic and clinical studies suggest that activation of complements in the common cascade, for example, complement component 3 (C3) and C5, is involved in the development of septic shock. The involvement of three upstream complement pathways in septic shock is more complicated. Both the classical and alternative pathways appear to be activated in septic shock, but the alternative pathway may be activated earlier than the classical pathway. Activation of these two pathways is essential to clear endotoxin. Recent investigations have shed light on the role of lectin complement pathway in septic shock. Published reports suggest a protective role of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) against sepsis. Our preliminary study of MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) in septic shock patients indicated that acute decrease of MASP-2 in the early phase of septic shock might correlate with in-hospital mortality. It is unknown whether excessive activation of these three upstream complement pathways may contribute to the detrimental effects in septic shock. This paper also discusses additional complement-related pathogenic mechanisms and intervention strategies for septic shock. PMID:23049598

  14. Complement component 4 copy number variation and CYP21A2 genotype associations in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wuyan; Xu, Zhi; Nishitani, Miki; Van Ryzin, Carol; McDonnell, Nazli B; Merke, Deborah P

    2012-12-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of cortisol biosynthesis caused by CYP21A2 mutations. An increase in gene copy number variation (CNV) exists at the CYP21A2 locus. CNV of C4, a neighboring gene that encodes complement component 4, is associated with autoimmune disease susceptibility. In this study, we performed comprehensive genetic analysis of the RP-C4-CYP21-TNX (RCCX) region in 127 unrelated 21-OHD patients (100 classic, 27 nonclassic). C4 copy number was determined by Southern blot. C4 CNV and serum C4 levels were evaluated in relation to CYP21A2 mutations and relevant phenotypes. We found that the most common CYP21A2 mutation associated with the nonclassic form of CAH, V281L, was associated with high C4 copy number (p = 7.13 × 10(-16)). Large CYP21A2 deletion, a common mutation associated with the classic form of CAH, was associated with low C4 copy number (p = 1.61 × 10(-14)). Monomodular RCCX with a short C4 gene, a risk factor for autoimmune disease, was significantly less frequent in CAH patients compared to population estimates (2.8 vs. 10.6 %; p = 1.08 × 10(-4)). In conclusion, CAH patients have increased C4 CNV, with mutation-specific associations that may be protective for autoimmune disease. The study of CYP21A2 in relation to neighboring genes provides insight into the genetics of CNV hotspots, an important determinant of human health.

  15. Complement Component C1q Programs a Pro-Efferocytic Phenotype while Limiting TNFα Production in Primary Mouse and Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hulsebus, Holly J.; O’Conner, Sean D.; Smith, Emily M.; Jie, Chunfa; Bohlson, Suzanne S.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency in complement component C1q is associated with an inability to clear apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) and aberrant inflammation in lupus, and identification of the pathways involved in these processes should reveal important regulatory mechanisms in lupus and other autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In this study, C1q-dependent regulation of TNFα/IL-6 expression and efferocytosis was investigated using primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. C1q downregulated LPS-dependent TNFα production in mouse and human macrophages. While prolonged stimulation with C1q (18 h) was required to elicit a dampening of TNFα production from mouse macrophages, the human macrophages responded to C1q with immediate downregulation of TNFα. IL-6 production was unchanged in mouse and upregulated by human macrophages following prolonged stimulation with C1q. Our previous studies indicated that C1q programmed enhanced efferocytosis in mouse macrophages by enhancing expression of Mer tyrosine kinase and its ligand Gas6, a receptor–ligand pair that also inhibits proinflammatory signaling. Here, we demonstrated that C1q-dependent programming of human macrophage efferocytosis required protein synthesis; however, neither Mer nor the related receptor Axl was upregulated in human cells. In addition, while the C1q-collagen-like tails are sufficient for promoting C1q-dependent phagocytosis of antibody-coated targets, the C1q-tails failed to program enhanced efferocytosis or dampen TNFα production. These data further elucidate the mechanisms by which C1q regulates proinflammatory signaling and efferocytosis in macrophages, functions that are likely to influence the progression of autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. PMID:27379094

  16. Functional characterization of a ficolin-mediated complement pathway in amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huiqing; Huang, Shengfeng; Yu, Yingcai; Yuan, Shaochun; Li, Rui; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Hongchen; Yu, Yanhong; Li, Jun; Yang, Manyi; Xu, Liqun; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2011-10-21

    The ficolin-mediated complement pathway plays an important role in vertebrate immunity, but it is not clear whether this pathway exists in invertebrates. Here we identified homologs of ficolin pathway components from the cephalochordate amphioxus and investigated whether they had been co-opted into a functional ficolin pathway. Four of these homologs, ficolin FCN1, serine protease MASP1 and MASP3, and complement component C3, were highly expressed in mucosal tissues and gonads, and were significantly up-regulated following bacterial infection. Recombinant FCN1 could induce hemagglutination, discriminate among sugar components, and specifically recognize and aggregate several bacteria (especially gram-positive strains) without showing bactericidal activity. This suggested that FCN1 is a dedicated pattern-recognition receptor. Recombinant serine protease MASP1/3 formed complexes with recombinant FCN1 and facilitated the activation of native C3 protein in amphioxus humoral fluid, in which C3 acted as an immune effector. We conclude that amphioxus have developed a functional ficolin-complement pathway. Because ficolin pathway components have not been reported in non-chordate species, our findings supported the idea that this pathway may represent a chordate-specific innovation in the evolution of the complement system.

  17. Contact activation of C3 enables tethering between activated platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes via CD11b/CD18

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Osama A.; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Fromell, Karin; Kozarcanin, Huda; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.; Ekdahl, Kristina N.; Nilsson, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Complement component C3 has a potential role in thrombotic pathologies. It is transformed, without proteolytic cleavage, into C3(H2O) upon binding to the surface of activated platelets. We hypothesise that C3(H2O) bound to activated platelets and to platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) contributes to platelet-PMN complex (PPC) formation and to the binding of PMPs to PMNs. PAR-1 activation of platelets in human whole blood from normal individuals induced the formation of CD16+/CD42a+ PPC. The complement inhibitor compstatin and a C5a receptor antagonist inhibited PPC formation by 50 %, while monoclonal antibodies to C3(H2O) or anti-CD11b inhibited PPC formation by 75–100 %. Using plasma protein-depleted blood and blood from a C3-deficient patient, we corroborated the dependence on C3, obtaining similar results after reconstitution with purified C3. By analogy with platelets, PMPs isolated from human serum were found to expose C3(H2O) and bind to PMNs. This interaction was also blocked by the anti-C3(H2O) and anti-CD11b monoclonal antibodies, indicating that C3(H2O) and CD11b are involved in tethering PMPs to PMNs. We confirmed the direct interaction between C3(H2O) and CD11b by quartz crystal microbalance analysis using purified native C3 and recombinant CD11b/CD18 and by flow cytometry using PMP and recombinant CD11b. Transfectants expressing CD11b/CD18 were also shown to specifically adhere to surface-bound C3(H2O). We have identified contact-activated C3(H2O) as a novel ligand for CD11b/CD18 that mediates PPC formation and the binding of PMPs to PMNs. Given the various roles of C3 in thrombotic reactions, this finding is likely to have important pathophysiological implications. PMID:26293614

  18. Contact activation of C3 enables tethering between activated platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes via CD11b/CD18.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Osama A; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Fromell, Karin; Kozarcanin, Huda; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Ekdahl, Kristina N; Nilsson, Bo

    2015-11-25

    Complement component C3 has a potential role in thrombotic pathologies. It is transformed, without proteolytic cleavage, into C3(H2O) upon binding to the surface of activated platelets. We hypothesise that C3(H2O) bound to activated platelets and to platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) contributes to platelet-PMN complex (PPC) formation and to the binding of PMPs to PMNs. PAR-1 activation of platelets in human whole blood from normal individuals induced the formation of CD16+/CD42a+ PPC. The complement inhibitor compstatin and a C5a receptor antagonist inhibited PPC formation by 50 %, while monoclonal antibodies to C3(H2O) or anti-CD11b inhibited PPC formation by 75-100 %. Using plasma protein-depleted blood and blood from a C3-deficient patient, we corroborated the dependence on C3, obtaining similar results after reconstitution with purified C3. By analogy with platelets, PMPs isolated from human serum were found to expose C3(H2O) and bind to PMNs. This interaction was also blocked by the anti-C3(H2O) and anti-CD11b monoclonal antibodies, indicating that C3(H2O) and CD11b are involved in tethering PMPs to PMNs. We confirmed the direct interaction between C3(H2O) and CD11b by quartz crystal microbalance analysis using purified native C3 and recombinant CD11b/CD18 and by flow cytometry using PMP and recombinant CD11b. Transfectants expressing CD11b/CD18 were also shown to specifically adhere to surface-bound C3(H2O). We have identified contact-activated C3(H2O) as a novel ligand for CD11b/CD18 that mediates PPC formation and the binding of PMPs to PMNs. Given the various roles of C3 in thrombotic reactions, this finding is likely to have important pathophysiological implications. PMID:26293614

  19. Immune competence of the Ciona intestinalis pharynx: complement system-mediated activity.

    PubMed

    Giacomelli, Stefano; Melillo, Daniela; Lambris, John D; Pinto, Maria Rosaria

    2012-10-01

    In the tunicate Ciona intestinalis, the ciliated pharynx, which connects the external environment to a highly developed and compartmentalized gastrointestinal system, represents the natural portal of entry for a vast and diverse, potentially pathogenic microbial community. To address the role of the pharynx in immune surveillance in Ciona, we asked whether C3, the key component of the complement system, was expressed in this organ and whether the encoded protein was functionally active. We found by real-time PCR that C3, constitutively expressed in the pharynx, is up-regulated by LPS injection. Using two specific anti-CiC3 and anti-CiC3a polyclonal antibodies in immunohistochemical staining of pharynx sections, we found that the gene product was localized to hemocytes of the pharyngeal bars (identified as granular amoebocytes) and in stigmata ciliated cells. Use of the same antibodies in Western blot analysis indicated that CiC3 and its activation products CiC3b and CiC3a are present in pharynx homogenates. Our observation that the amount of the bioactive fragment CiC3a increased in the pharynx of LPS-treated animals provides the first molecular and functional evidence for complement-mediated immunological activity in the tunicate pharynx.

  20. Anti-complementary constituents of Houttuynia cordata and their targets in complement activation cascade.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Yun-Yi; Chen, Dao-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Activity-guided fractionation for complement inhibitors led to the isolation of 23 known compounds from Houttuynia cordata Thunb. Seven flavonoids, two alkaloids, one coumarin and two phenols showed anti-complementary activity. Preliminary inhibitory mechanism of four flavonoids, including quercitrin, afzelin, isoquercitrin and quercetin in the complement activation cascade were examined for the first time. The results indicated that the target components of flavonols are different from those of flavonosides, and the glycoside moieties may be necessary to block C3 and C4 components. PMID:24423008

  1. Complement components C1r/C1s, bone morphogenic protein 1 and Xenopus laevis developmentally regulated protein UVS.2 share common repeats.

    PubMed

    Bork, P

    1991-04-22

    Property patterns were constructed, based on an alignment of related domains in human complement subcomponents C1r and C1s as well as in the sea urchin protein uEGF. This kind of consensus pattern was able to identify similar domains in a human bone morphogenic protein, in a Xenopus laevis embryonal protein involved in dorsoanterior development and in a calcium-dependent serine protease secreted from malignant hamster embryo fibroblast cells. Because of the high level of overall sequence homology this protease may be the hamsters' equivalent of the human complement subcomponent C1s. The resulting multiple alignment of all studied domains suggests functionally and structurally important regions.

  2. Ixodes dammini: salivary anti-complement activity.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, J M

    1987-12-01

    Saliva of the tick Ixodes dammini prevents hemolysis of rabbit erythrocytes by the human alternative pathway of complement. Deposition of C3b to activating surfaces and concomitant C3a release are inhibited. C3b deposition to activating surfaces is inhibited regardless the origin (humans, rat, mouse, guinea pig, and hamster) of the serum. The inhibitor elutes as a single peak upon gel filtration, with an apparent molecular weight of 49,000. Salivary anti-complement may contribute to successful feeding of I. dammini in their natural hosts. PMID:3119364

  3. Electrostatic Steering Accelerates C3d:CR2 Association.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Rohith R; Huber, Gary A; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-25

    Electrostatic effects are ubiquitous in protein interactions and are found to be pervasive in the complement system as well. The interaction between complement fragment C3d and complement receptor 2 (CR2) has evolved to become a link between innate and adaptive immunity. Electrostatic interactions have been suggested to be the driving factor for the association of the C3d:CR2 complex. In this study, we investigate the effects of ionic strength and mutagenesis on the association of C3d:CR2 through Brownian dynamics simulations. We demonstrate that the formation of the C3d:CR2 complex is ionic strength-dependent, suggesting the presence of long-range electrostatic steering that accelerates the complex formation. Electrostatic steering occurs through the interaction of an acidic surface patch in C3d and the positively charged CR2 and is supported by the effects of mutations within the acidic patch of C3d that slow or diminish association. Our data are in agreement with previous experimental mutagenesis and binding studies and computational studies. Although the C3d acidic patch may be locally destabilizing because of unfavorable Coulombic interactions of like charges, it contributes to the acceleration of association. Therefore, acceleration of function through electrostatic steering takes precedence to stability. The site of interaction between C3d and CR2 has been the target for delivery of CR2-bound nanoparticle, antibody, and small molecule biomarkers, as well as potential therapeutics. A detailed knowledge of the physicochemical basis of C3d:CR2 association may be necessary to accelerate biomarker and drug discovery efforts. PMID:27092816

  4. Autocrine effects of tumor-derived complement.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Soon; Vasquez, Hernan G; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Pradeep, Sunila; Wu, Sherry; Zand, Behrouz; Han, Hee-Dong; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Huang, Jie; Miyake, Takahito; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Dalton, Heather J; Ivan, Cristina; Baggerly, Keith; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2014-03-27

    We describe a role for the complement system in enhancing cancer growth. Cancer cells secrete complement proteins that stimulate tumor growth upon activation. Complement promotes tumor growth via a direct autocrine effect that is partially independent of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T cells. Activated C5aR and C3aR signal through the PI3K/AKT pathway in cancer cells, and silencing the PI3K or AKT gene in cancer cells eliminates the progrowth effects of C5aR and C3aR stimulation. In patients with ovarian or lung cancer, higher tumoral C3 or C5aR mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival. These data identify a role for tumor-derived complement proteins in promoting tumor growth, and they therefore have substantial clinical and therapeutic implications.

  5. Effects of complement inhibition with soluble complement receptor-1 on vascular injury and inflammation during renal allograft rejection in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, J. R.; Hibbs, M. J.; Laver, A. J.; Smith, R. A.; Sacks, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    Complement is both an effector of the humoral immune response and a stimulator of leukocyte activation. To examine the influence of complement on the allograft response, we inhibited complement using recombinant human soluble complement receptor-1 (sCR1; TP10), in an unsensitized model of rat renal allograft rejection. Lewis to DA renal transplant recipients were treated daily with 25 mg/kg sCR1 or saline and sacrificed on days 1 to 5 after transplant. Transplanted organs were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for leukocyte subset markers and for the third component of complement, C3, and membrane attack complex deposition. A second set of recipients was followed from day 5 to day 9 to assess graft survival. sCR1-treated recipients displayed > 90% inhibition of plasma complement activity and a marked reduction in tissue C3 and membrane attack complex deposition. Inactivation of complement reduced the vascular injury such that there was almost complete sparing of vascular damage in day 5 sCR1-treated rats. There was a significant reduction in infiltrating leukocytes by day 5 after transplant, and complement inhibition delayed the time to reach a histologically defined end point of graft survival from 5 days in controls to 9 days in the sCR1-treated group. These results imply that the vascular and cell-mediated injury arises, in part, from complement activation. The partial inhibition of these injuries by sCR1 may have functional implications for strategies to inhibit allograft rejection. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8952538

  6. Eculizumab-induced reversal of dialysis-dependent kidney failure from C3 glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Inman, Melissa; Prater, Ginnie; Fatima, Huma; Wallace, Eric

    2015-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) is characterized by C3 deposits with minimal immunoglobulin deposition caused by alternative complement pathway dysregulation. Unfortunately, no therapeutic intervention has consistently improved outcomes for patients with C3G. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody to C5, is currently the only approved complement-specific agent with some efficacy in the treatment of C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN). Here, we describe a patient with acute crescentic C3GN with no identified complement mutation or family history of renal disease who required dialysis for 6 months. Five months after initiation of eculizumab, she became dialysis independent, showing improvement is possible after adequate time on eculizumab. PMID:26251714

  7. Skin Injuries Reduce Survival and Modulate Corticosterone, C-Reactive Protein, Complement Component 3, IgM, and Prostaglandin E2 after Whole-Body Reactor-Produced Mixed Field (n + γ-Photons) Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Kiang, Juliann G.; Ledney, G. David

    2013-01-01

    Skin injuries such as wounds or burns following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury (RCI)) increase mortality more than whole-body γ-irradiation alone. Wound-induced decreases in survival after irradiation are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to systemic bacterial infection. Among these factors, radiation-induced increases in interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations in serum were amplified by skin wound trauma. Herein, the IL-6-induced stress proteins including C-reactive protein (CRP), complement 3 (C3), immunoglobulin M (IgM), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were evaluated after skin injuries given following a mixed radiation environment that might be found after a nuclear incident. In this report, mice received 3 Gy of reactor-produced mixed field (n + γ-photons) radiations at 0.38 Gy/min followed by nonlethal skin wounding or burning. Both wounds and burns reduced survival and increased CRP, C3, and PGE2 in serum after radiation. Decreased IgM production along with an early rise in corticosterone followed by a subsequent decrease was noted for each RCI situation. These results suggest that RCI-induced alterations of corticosterone, CRP, C3, IgM, and PGE2 cause homeostatic imbalance and may contribute to reduced survival. Agents inhibiting these responses may prove to be therapeutic for RCI and improve related survival. PMID:24175013

  8. Complement factor H–related hybrid protein deregulates complement in dense deposit disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Wiesener, Michael; Eberhardt, Hannes U.; Hartmann, Andrea; Uzonyi, Barbara; Kirschfink, Michael; Amann, Kerstin; Buettner, Maike; Goodship, Tim; Hugo, Christian; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    The renal disorder C3 glomerulopathy with dense deposit disease (C3G-DDD) pattern results from complement dysfunction and primarily affects children and young adults. There is no effective treatment, and patients often progress to end-stage renal failure. A small fraction of C3G-DDD cases linked to factor H or C3 gene mutations as well as autoantibodies have been reported. Here, we examined an index family with 2 patients with C3G-DDD and identified a chromosomal deletion in the complement factor H–related (CFHR) gene cluster. This deletion resulted in expression of a hybrid CFHR2-CFHR5 plasma protein. The recombinant hybrid protein stabilized the C3 convertase and reduced factor H–mediated convertase decay. One patient was refractory to plasma replacement and exchange therapy, as evidenced by the hybrid protein quickly returning to pretreatment plasma levels. Subsequently, complement inhibitors were tested on serum from the patient for their ability to block activity of CFHR2-CFHR5. Soluble CR1 restored defective C3 convertase regulation; however, neither eculizumab nor tagged compstatin had any effect. Our findings provide insight into the importance of CFHR proteins for C3 convertase regulation and identify a genetic variation in the CFHR gene cluster that promotes C3G-DDD. Monitoring copy number and sequence variations in the CFHR gene cluster in C3G-DDD and kidney patients with C3G-DDD variations will help guide treatment strategies. PMID:24334459

  9. Anaphylatoxin-mediated regulation of the immune response. I. C3a- mediated suppression of human and murine humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The C3a fragment of the third component of complement was found to have immunosuppressive properties. C3a is capable of suppressing both specific and polyclonal antibody responses. In contrast, C3a had no effect on antigen- or mitogen-induced B or T cell proliferative responses. The carboxy-terminal arginine is essential for C3a to exhibit its immunosuppressive properties. The serum carboxypeptidase inhibitor 2-mercaptomethyl-5-guanodinopentanoic acid, which prevents cleavage of the terminal arginine that would produce C3ades Arg-77, allowed us to assay the effects of C3a on in vitro immune response systems where serum is required. When the terminal arginine is removed from C3a, the resulting C3ades Arg-77 molecule is nonsuppressive. Helper T lymphocytes are the target of C3a-mediated suppression of the immune response. Substitution of T cells by soluble T cell factors was found to abrogate the C3a suppressive activity. PMID:6978374

  10. Interaction between Host Complement and Mosquito-Midgut-Stage Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Margos, Gabriele; Navarette, Sandra; Butcher, Geoff; Davies, Alex; Willers, Christine; Sinden, Robert E.; Lachmann, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    After ingestion by mosquitoes, gametocytes of malaria parasites become activated and form extracellular gametes that are no longer protected by the red blood cell membrane against immune effectors of host blood. We have studied the action of complement on Plasmodium developmental stages in the mosquito blood meal using the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei and rat complement as a model. We have shown that in the mosquito midgut, rat complement components necessary to initiate the alternative pathway (factor B, factor D, and C3) as well as C5 are present for several hours following ingestion of P. berghei-infected rat blood. In culture, 30 to 50% of mosquito midgut stages of P. berghei survived complement exposure during the first 3 h of development. Subsequently, parasites became increasingly sensitive to complement lysis. To investigate the mechanisms involved in their protection, we tested for C3 deposition on parasite surfaces and whether host CD59 (a potent inhibitor of the complement membrane attack complex present on red blood cells) was taken up by gametes while emerging from the host cell. Between 0.5 and 22 h, 90% of Pbs21-positive parasites were positive for C3. While rat red and white blood cells stained positive for CD59, Pbs21-positive parasites were negative for CD59. In addition, exposure of parasites to rat complement in the presence of anti-rat CD59 antibodies did not increase lysis. These data suggest that parasite or host molecules other than CD59 are responsible for the protection of malaria parasites against complement-mediated lysis. Ongoing research aims to identify these molecules. PMID:11447187

  11. Complement System in the Pathogenesis of Benign Lymphoepithelial Lesions of the Lacrimal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Ge, Xin; Wang, Xiaona; Liu, Xiao; Ma, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to examine the potential involvement of local complement system gene expression in the pathogenesis of benign lymphoepithelial lesions (BLEL) of the lacrimal gland. Methods We collected data from 9 consecutive pathologically confirmed patients with BLEL of the lacrimal gland and 9 cases with orbital cavernous hemangioma as a control group, and adopted whole genome microarray to screen complement system-related differential genes, followed by RT-PCR verification and in-depth enrichment analysis (Gene Ontology analysis) of the gene sets. Results The expression of 14 complement system-related genes in the pathologic tissue, including C2, C3, ITGB2, CR2, C1QB, CR1, ITGAX, CFP, C1QA, C4B|C4A, FANCA, C1QC, C3AR1 and CFHR4, were significantly upregulated while 7 other complement system-related genes, C5, CFI, CFHR1|CFH, CFH, CD55, CR1L and CFD were significantly downregulated in the lacrimal glands of BLEL patients. The microarray results were consistent with RT-PCR analysis results. Immunohistochemistry analysis of C3c and C1q complement component proteins in the resected tissue were positive in BLEL patients, while the control group had negative expression of these proteins. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that activation of the genes of complement system-mediated signaling pathways were the most enriched differential gene group in BLEL patients. Conclusions Local expression of complement components is prominently abnormal in BLEL, and may well play a role in its pathogenesis. PMID:26849056

  12. Studies of serum complement in the hypocomplementaemic nephritides

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D. Gwyn; Peters, D. K.; Fallows, Jane; Petrie, Aviva; Kourilsky, O.; Morel-Maroger, Liliane; Cameron, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The sera from forty patients with mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis (MCGN), fifty-two patients with acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) and twenty-five patients with the nephritis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were examined for concentrations of C1q, C4, C3, C5, C6, C7, glycine-rich beta glycoprotein (GBG) and properdin, for their ability to generate cobra factor-dependent convertase, and for the presence of C3 splitting activity. Two types of C3 splitting activity were found. The first, which caused C3 breakdown in normal human serum in the presence of Mg2+–EGTA, was in MCGN and in a minority of patients with AGN. The second, which failed to break down C3 in either Mg2+–EGTA or EDTA, was found in SLE and AGN. In MCGN and AGN low values of C1q and C4 were found, and there was a significant correlation between the concentrations of these components, suggesting activation of the classical pathway. In SLE much greater reduction in C1q and C4 was observed. Significant reduction in GBG was found in each disease with a significant correlation of GBG with C4 and, in MCGN and SLE, with C3. In AGN and SLE there were significant overall reductions in properdin levels and a good correlation between C3 and properdin, whereas in MCGN, although five of the forty patients had a low properdin there was no correlation between C3 and properdin, and no overall reduction in properdin. These data suggest that complement is activated via the classical and C3b-feedback pathways in MCGN, AGN and SLE, but do not provide evidence for a role for properdin in causing hypocomplementaemia in MCGN. The two histological variants of MCGN were found to differ in their complement concentrations; patients with intramembranous deposits had a lower C3 concentration and those with subendothelial deposits a lower C4 concentration, suggesting different pathogenetic mechanisms in these two types of MCGN. PMID:4219908

  13. Versatile roles of CspA orthologs in complement inactivation of serum-resistant Lyme disease spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Claudia; Koenigs, Arno; Siegel, Corinna; Hallström, Teresia; Skerka, Christine; Wallich, Reinhard; Zipfel, Peter F; Kraiczy, Peter

    2014-01-01

    CspA of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi represents a key molecule in immune evasion, protecting borrelial cells from complement-mediated killing. As previous studies focused almost exclusively on CspA of B. burgdorferi, here we investigate the different binding capacities of CspA orthologs of Borrelia burgdorferi, B. afzelii, and B. spielmanii for complement regulator factor H and plasminogen and their ability to inhibit complement activation by either binding these host-derived plasma proteins or independently by direct interaction with components involved in formation of the lethal, pore-like terminal complement complex. To further examine their function in serum resistance in vivo, a serum-sensitive B. garinii strain was used to generate spirochetes, ectopically producing functional CspA orthologs. Irrespective of their species origin, all three CspA orthologs impart resistance to complement-mediated killing when produced in a serum-sensitive B. garinii surrogate strain. To analyze the inhibitory effect on complement activation and to assess the potential to inactivate C3b by binding of factor H and plasminogen, recombinant CspA orthologs were also investigated. All three CspA orthologs simultaneously bound factor H and plasminogen but differed in regard to their capacity to inactivate C3b via bound plasmin(ogen) and inhibit formation of the terminal complement complex. CspA of B. afzelii binds plasmin(ogen) and inhibits the terminal complement complex more efficiently than CspA of B. burgdorferi and B. spielmanii. Taken together, CspA orthologs of serum-resistant Lyme disease spirochetes act as multifunctional evasion molecules that inhibit complement on two central activation levels, C3b generation and assembly of the terminal complement complex.

  14. Versatile Roles of CspA Orthologs in Complement Inactivation of Serum-Resistant Lyme Disease Spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschmidt, Claudia; Koenigs, Arno; Siegel, Corinna; Hallström, Teresia; Skerka, Christine; Wallich, Reinhard; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    CspA of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi represents a key molecule in immune evasion, protecting borrelial cells from complement-mediated killing. As previous studies focused almost exclusively on CspA of B. burgdorferi, here we investigate the different binding capacities of CspA orthologs of Borrelia burgdorferi, B. afzelii, and B. spielmanii for complement regulator factor H and plasminogen and their ability to inhibit complement activation by either binding these host-derived plasma proteins or independently by direct interaction with components involved in formation of the lethal, pore-like terminal complement complex. To further examine their function in serum resistance in vivo, a serum-sensitive B. garinii strain was used to generate spirochetes, ectopically producing functional CspA orthologs. Irrespective of their species origin, all three CspA orthologs impart resistance to complement-mediated killing when produced in a serum-sensitive B. garinii surrogate strain. To analyze the inhibitory effect on complement activation and to assess the potential to inactivate C3b by binding of factor H and plasminogen, recombinant CspA orthologs were also investigated. All three CspA orthologs simultaneously bound factor H and plasminogen but differed in regard to their capacity to inactivate C3b via bound plasmin(ogen) and inhibit formation of the terminal complement complex. CspA of B. afzelii binds plasmin(ogen) and inhibits the terminal complement complex more efficiently than CspA of B. burgdorferi and B. spielmanii. Taken together, CspA orthologs of serum-resistant Lyme disease spirochetes act as multifunctional evasion molecules that inhibit complement on two central activation levels, C3b generation and assembly of the terminal complement complex. PMID:24191298

  15. Differential mechanisms of complement-mediated neutralization of the closely related paramyxoviruses simian virus 5 and mumps virus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, John B.; Capraro, Gerald A.; Parks, Griffith D.

    2008-06-20

    The complement system is an important component of the innate immune response to virus infection. The role of human complement pathways in the in vitro neutralization of three closely related paramyxoviruses, Simian Virus 5 (SV5), Mumps virus (MuV) and Human Parainfluenza virus type 2 (HPIV2) was investigated. Sera from ten donors showed high levels of neutralization against HPIV2 that was largely complement-independent, whereas nine of ten donor sera were found to neutralize SV5 and MuV only in the presence of active complement pathways. SV5 and MuV neutralization proceeded through the alternative pathway of the complement cascade. Electron microscopy studies and biochemical analyses showed that treatment of purified SV5 with human serum resulted in C3 deposition on virions and the formation of massive aggregates, but there was relatively little evidence of virion lysis. Treatment of MuV with human serum also resulted in C3 deposition on virions, however in contrast to SV5, MuV particles were lysed by serum complement and there was relatively little aggregation. Assays using serum depleted of complement factors showed that SV5 and MuV neutralization in vitro was absolutely dependent on complement factor C3, but was not dependent on downstream complement factors C5 or C8. Our results indicate that even though antibodies exist that recognize both SV5 and MuV, they are mostly non-neutralizing and viral inactivation in vitro occurs through the alternative pathway of complement. The implications of our work for development of paramyxovirus vectors and vaccines are discussed.

  16. The Vi capsular polysaccharide prevents complement receptor 3-mediated clearance of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R Paul; Winter, Sebastian E; Spees, Alanna M; Winter, Maria G; Nishimori, Jessalyn H; Sanchez, Jesus F; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Crawford, Robert W; Tükel, Çagla; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2011-02-01

    Capsular polysaccharides are important virulence factors of invasive bacterial pathogens. Here we studied the role of the virulence (Vi) capsular polysaccharide of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) in preventing innate immune recognition by complement. Comparison of capsulated S. Typhi with a noncapsulated mutant (ΔtviBCDE vexABCDE mutant) revealed that the Vi capsule interfered with complement component 3 (C3) deposition. Decreased complement fixation resulted in reduced bacterial binding to complement receptor 3 (CR3) on the surface of murine macrophages in vitro and decreased CR3-dependent clearance of Vi capsulated S. Typhi from the livers and spleens of mice. Opsonization of bacteria with immune serum prior to intraperitoneal infection increased clearance of capsulated S. Typhi from the liver. Our data suggest that the Vi capsule prevents CR3-dependent clearance, which can be overcome in part by a specific antibody response.

  17. Inhibition of heparin/protamine complex-induced complement activation by Compstatin in baboons.

    PubMed

    Soulika, A M; Khan, M M; Hattori, T; Bowen, F W; Richardson, B A; Hack, C E; Sahu, A; Edmunds, L H; Lambris, J D

    2000-09-01

    Complement activation products are major components of the inflammatory response induced by cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass which contribute to postoperative organ dysfunction, fluid accumulation, and morbidity. Activation of the complement system occurs during extracorporeal circulation, during reperfusion of ischemic tissue, and after the formation of heparin-protamine complexes. In this study we examine the efficacy of Compstatin, a recently discovered peptide inhibitor of complement, in preventing heparin/protamine-induced complement activation in baboons. The study was performed in baboons because Compstatin binds to baboon C3 and is resistant to proteolytic cleavage in baboon blood (similar to humans); Compstatin inhibits only the activation of primates' complement system. After testing various doses and administration regimens, Compstatin produced complete inhibition at a total dose of 21 mg/kg when given as a combination of bolus injection and infusion. Compstatin completely inhibited in vivo heparin/protamine-induced complement activation without adverse effects on heart rate or systemic arterial, central venous, and pulmonary arterial pressures. This study indicates that Compstatin is a safe and effective complement inhibitor that has the potential to prevent complement activation during and after clinical cardiac surgery. Furthermore, Compstatin can serve as the prototype for designing an orally administrated drug.

  18. C3d adjuvant effects are mediated through the activation of C3d-specific autoreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    De Groot, Anne S; Ross, Ted M; Levitz, Lauren; Messitt, Timothy J; Tassone, Ryan; Boyle, Christine M; Vincelli, Amber J; Moise, Leonard; Martin, William; Knopf, Paul M

    2015-02-01

    Complement fragment C3d covalently attached to antigens enhances immune responses, particularly for antigens lacking T-cell epitopes. Enhancement has been attributed to receptor cross-linking between complement receptor CR2 (CD21) and polysaccharide antigen to surface IgM on naïve B cells. Paradoxically, C3d has still been shown to increase immune responses in CD21 knockout mice, suggesting that an auxiliary activation pathway exists. In prior studies, we demonstrated the CD21-independent C3d adjuvant effect might be due to T-cell recognition of C3d T-helper epitopes processed and presented by major histocompatibility complex class II on the B-cell surface. C3d peptide sequences containing concentrated clusters of putative human C3 T-cell epitopes were identified using the epitope-mapping algorithm, EpiMatrix. These peptide sequences were synthesized and shown in vitro to bind multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR alleles with high affinity, and induce interferon-γ responses in healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In the present studies, we establish further correlations between HLA binding and HLA-specific lymphocyte reactions with select epitope clusters. In addition, we show that the T-cell phenotype of C3d-specific reactive T cells is CD4(+)CD45RO(+) memory T cells. Finally, mutation of a single T-cell epitope residing within the P28 peptide segment of C3d resulted in significantly diminished adjuvant activity in BALB/c mice. Collectively, these studies support the hypothesis that the paradoxical enhancement of immune responses by C3d in the absence of CD21 is due to internalization and processing of C3d into peptides that activate autoreactive CD4(+) T-helper cells in the context of HLA class II.

  19. C3d adjuvant effects are mediated through the activation of C3d-specific autoreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    De Groot, Anne S; Ross, Ted M; Levitz, Lauren; Messitt, Timothy J; Tassone, Ryan; Boyle, Christine M; Vincelli, Amber J; Moise, Leonard; Martin, William; Knopf, Paul M

    2015-02-01

    Complement fragment C3d covalently attached to antigens enhances immune responses, particularly for antigens lacking T-cell epitopes. Enhancement has been attributed to receptor cross-linking between complement receptor CR2 (CD21) and polysaccharide antigen to surface IgM on naïve B cells. Paradoxically, C3d has still been shown to increase immune responses in CD21 knockout mice, suggesting that an auxiliary activation pathway exists. In prior studies, we demonstrated the CD21-independent C3d adjuvant effect might be due to T-cell recognition of C3d T-helper epitopes processed and presented by major histocompatibility complex class II on the B-cell surface. C3d peptide sequences containing concentrated clusters of putative human C3 T-cell epitopes were identified using the epitope-mapping algorithm, EpiMatrix. These peptide sequences were synthesized and shown in vitro to bind multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR alleles with high affinity, and induce interferon-γ responses in healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In the present studies, we establish further correlations between HLA binding and HLA-specific lymphocyte reactions with select epitope clusters. In addition, we show that the T-cell phenotype of C3d-specific reactive T cells is CD4(+)CD45RO(+) memory T cells. Finally, mutation of a single T-cell epitope residing within the P28 peptide segment of C3d resulted in significantly diminished adjuvant activity in BALB/c mice. Collectively, these studies support the hypothesis that the paradoxical enhancement of immune responses by C3d in the absence of CD21 is due to internalization and processing of C3d into peptides that activate autoreactive CD4(+) T-helper cells in the context of HLA class II. PMID:25385064

  20. Phenotypic heterogeneity enables uropathogenic Escherichia coli to evade killing by antibiotics and serum complement.

    PubMed

    Putrinš, Marta; Kogermann, Karin; Lukk, Eliisa; Lippus, Markus; Varik, Vallo; Tenson, Tanel

    2015-03-01

    Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli (UPEC) are the major cause of bacteremic urinary tract infections. Survival in the bloodstream is associated with different mechanisms that help to resist serum complement-mediated killing. While the phenotypic heterogeneity of bacteria has been shown to influence antibiotic tolerance, the possibility that it makes cells refractory to killing by the immune system has not been experimentally tested. In the present study we sought to determine whether the heterogeneity of bacterial cultures is relevant to bacterial targeting by the serum complement system. We monitored cell divisions in the UPEC strain CFT073 with fluorescent reporter protein. Stationary-phase cells were incubated in active or heat-inactivated human serum in the presence or absence of different antibiotics (ampicillin, norfloxacin, and amikacin), and cell division and complement protein C3 binding were measured by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Heterogeneity in the doubling times of CFT073 cells in serum enabled three phenotypically different subpopulations to be distinguished, all of them being recognized by the C3 component of the complement system. The population of rapidly growing cells resists serum complement-mediated lysis. The dominant subpopulation of cells with intermediate growth rate is susceptible to serum. The third population, which does not resume growth upon dilution from stationary phase, is simultaneously protected from serum complement and antibiotics.

  1. Systems Analysis of the Complement-Induced Priming Phase of Liver Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Min, Jun S; DeAngelis, Robert A; Reis, Edimara S; Gupta, Shakti; Maurya, Mano R; Evans, Charles; Das, Arun; Burant, Charles; Lambris, John D; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2016-09-15

    Liver regeneration is a well-orchestrated process in the liver that allows mature hepatocytes to reenter the cell cycle to proliferate and replace lost or damaged cells. This process is often impaired in fatty or diseased livers, leading to cirrhosis and other deleterious phenotypes. Prior research has established the role of the complement system and its effector proteins in the progression of liver regeneration; however, a detailed mechanistic understanding of the involvement of complement in regeneration is yet to be established. In this study, we have examined the role of the complement system during the priming phase of liver regeneration through a systems level analysis using a combination of transcriptomic and metabolomic measurements. More specifically, we have performed partial hepatectomy on mice with genetic deficiency in C3, the major component of the complement cascade, and collected their livers at various time points. Based on our analysis, we show that the C3 cascade activates c-fos and promotes the TNF-α signaling pathway, which then activates acute-phase genes such as serum amyloid proteins and orosomucoids. The complement activation also regulates the efflux and the metabolism of cholesterol, an important metabolite for cell cycle and proliferation. Based on our systems level analysis, we provide an integrated model for the complement-induced priming phase of liver regeneration. PMID:27511733

  2. Deficiencies and excessive human complement system activation in disorders of multifarious etiology.

    PubMed

    Tichaczek-Goska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Complement is an integral part of the immune system protecting the host organism against invasion and proliferation of various microorganisms. It is also involved in the removal of the body's own damaged and altered cells. Activation of the complement system is a very precise process and it is strictly controlled by regulatory proteins present in both plasma and at host cells' surfaces. C3 protein plays a major role in the complement activation and generation of immune responses. Deficiencies of the C3 and other complement components, so-called early and late complement proteins, contribute to the emergence of recurrent bacterial, viral and fungal infections. The low level of mannose-binding lectin is also important. This protein plays a protective role in the early stages of infection and in the control of inflammation. Its deficit is one of the most common reasons for human immunodeficiency, observed in microbial infections as well as in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. On the other hand, the excessive activation of complement proteins is often discovered to be the reason for many diseases. These include e.g. autoimmune diseases, Alzheimer's syndrome, schizophrenia, atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome, angioedema, macular degeneration, and Crohn's disease.

  3. Complement control protein factor H: the good, the bad, and the inadequate

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Viviana P.; Pangburn, Michael K.; Cortés, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    The complement system is an essential component of the innate immune system that participates in elimination of pathogens and altered host cells and comprises an essential link between the innate and adaptive immune system. Soluble and membrane-bound complement regulators protect cells and tissues from unintended complement-mediated injury. Complement factor H is a soluble complement regulator essential for controlling the alternative pathway in blood and on cell surfaces. Normal recognition of self cell markers (i.e. polyanions) and C3b/C3d fragments is necessary for factor H function. Inadequate recognition of host cell surfaces by factor H due to mutations and polymorphisms have been associated with complement-mediated tissue damage and disease. On the other hand, unwanted recognition of pathogens and altered self cells (i.e. cancer) by factor H is used as an immune evasion strategy. This review will focus on the current knowledge related to these versatile recognition properties of factor H. PMID:20580090

  4. Cutting Edge: The NLRP3 Inflammasome Links Complement-Mediated Inflammation and IL-1β Release

    PubMed Central

    Laudisi, Federica; Spreafico, Roberto; Evrard, Maximilien; Hughes, Timothy R.; Mandriani, Barbara; Kandasamy, Matheswaran; Morgan, B. Paul; Sivasankar, Baalasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is a potent component of the innate immune response, promoting inflammation and orchestrating defense against pathogens. However, dysregulation of complement is critical to several autoimmune and inflammatory syndromes. Elevated expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β is often linked to such diseases. In this study, we reveal the mechanistic link between complement and IL-1β secretion using murine dendritic cells. IL-1β secretion occurs following intracellular caspase-1 activation by inflammasomes. We show that complement elicits secretion of both IL-1β and IL-18 in vitro and in vivo via the NLRP3 inflammasome. This effect depends on the inflammasome components NLRP3 and ASC, as well as caspase-1 activity. Interestingly, sublethal complement membrane attack complex formation, but not the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, activated the NLRP3 inflammasome in vivo. These findings provide insight into the molecular processes underlying complement-mediated inflammation and highlight the possibility of targeting IL-1β to control complement-induced disease and pathological inflammation. PMID:23817414

  5. Plasmin(ogen) acquisition by group A Streptococcus protects against C3b-mediated neutrophil killing.

    PubMed

    Ly, Diane; Taylor, Jude M; Tsatsaronis, James A; Monteleone, Mercedes M; Skora, Amanda S; Donald, Cortny A; Maddocks, Tracy; Nizet, Victor; West, Nicholas P; Ranson, Marie; Walker, Mark J; McArthur, Jason D; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2014-01-01

    The globally significant human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) sequesters the host protease plasmin to the cell surface during invasive disease initiation. Recent evidence has shown that localized plasmin activity prevents opsonization of several bacterial species by key components of the innate immune system in vitro. Here we demonstrate that plasmin at the GAS cell surface resulted in degradation of complement factor C3b, and that plasminogen acquisition is associated with a decrease in C3b opsonization and neutrophil-mediated killing in vitro. Furthermore, the ability to acquire cell surface plasmin(ogen) correlates directly with a decrease in C3b opsonization, neutrophil phagocytosis, and increased bacterial survival in a humanized plasminogen mouse model of infection. These findings demonstrate that localized plasmin(ogen) plays an important role in facilitating GAS escape from the host innate immune response and increases bacterial virulence in the early stages of infection.

  6. The Structure-Function Relationships of Complement Receptor Type 2 (CR2; CD21).

    PubMed

    Hannan, Jonathan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Human complement receptor type 2 (CR2; CD21) is a surface-associated glycoprotein which binds to a variety of endogenous ligands, including the complement component C3 fragments iC3b, C3dg and C3d, the low-affinity IgE receptor CD23, and the type I cytokine, interferon-alpha. CR2 links the innate complement-mediated immune response to pathogens and foreign antigens with the adaptive immune response by binding to C3d that is covalently attached to targets, and which results in a cell signalling phenomenon that lowers the threshold for B cell activation. Variations or deletions of the CR2 gene in humans, or the Cr2 gene in mice associate with a variety of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. A number of infectious agents including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and prions also bind to CR2 either directly or indirectly by means of C3d-targeted immune complexes. In this review we discuss the interactions that CR2 undertakes with its best characterized ligands C3d, CD23 and the EBV gp350/220 envelope protein. To date only a single physiologically relevant complex of CR2 with one of its ligands, C3d, has been elucidated. By contrast, the interactions with CD23 and EBV gp350/220, while being important from physiologic and disease-associated standpoints, respectively, are only incompletely understood. A detailed knowledge of the structure-function relationships that CR2 undergoes with its ligands is necessary to understand the implications of using recombinant CR2 in therapeutic or imaging agents, or alternatively targeting CR2 to down-regulate the antibody mediated immune response in cases of autoimmunity.

  7. The Structure-Function Relationships of Complement Receptor Type 2 (CR2; CD21).

    PubMed

    Hannan, Jonathan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Human complement receptor type 2 (CR2; CD21) is a surface-associated glycoprotein which binds to a variety of endogenous ligands, including the complement component C3 fragments iC3b, C3dg and C3d, the low-affinity IgE receptor CD23, and the type I cytokine, interferon-alpha. CR2 links the innate complement-mediated immune response to pathogens and foreign antigens with the adaptive immune response by binding to C3d that is covalently attached to targets, and which results in a cell signalling phenomenon that lowers the threshold for B cell activation. Variations or deletions of the CR2 gene in humans, or the Cr2 gene in mice associate with a variety of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. A number of infectious agents including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and prions also bind to CR2 either directly or indirectly by means of C3d-targeted immune complexes. In this review we discuss the interactions that CR2 undertakes with its best characterized ligands C3d, CD23 and the EBV gp350/220 envelope protein. To date only a single physiologically relevant complex of CR2 with one of its ligands, C3d, has been elucidated. By contrast, the interactions with CD23 and EBV gp350/220, while being important from physiologic and disease-associated standpoints, respectively, are only incompletely understood. A detailed knowledge of the structure-function relationships that CR2 undergoes with its ligands is necessary to understand the implications of using recombinant CR2 in therapeutic or imaging agents, or alternatively targeting CR2 to down-regulate the antibody mediated immune response in cases of autoimmunity. PMID:26916158

  8. Molecular characterization of the alpha subunit of complement component C8 (GcC8alpha) in the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum).

    PubMed

    Aybar, Lydia; Shin, Dong-Ho; Smith, Sylvia L

    2009-09-01

    Target cell lysis by complement is achieved by the assembly and insertion of the membrane attack complex (MAC) composed of glycoproteins C5b through C9. The lytic activity of shark complement involves functional analogues of mammalian C8 and C9. Mammalian C8 is composed of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits. The subunit structure of shark C8 is not known. This report describes a 2341 nucleotide sequence that translates into a polypeptide of 589 amino acid residues, orthologue to mammalian C8alpha and has the same modular architecture with conserved cysteines forming the peptide bond backbone. The C8gamma-binding cysteine is conserved in the perforin-like domain. Hydrophobicity profile indicates the presence of hydrophobic residues essential for membrane insertion. It shares 41.1% and 47.4% identity with human and Xenopus C8alpha respectively. Southern blot analysis showed GcC8alpha exists as a single copy gene expressed in most tissues except the spleen with the liver being the main site of synthesis. Phylogenetic analysis places it in a clade with C8alpha orthologs and as a sister taxa to the Xenopus.

  9. Lifetimes of the {A} States of C_3, C_3-NE, and C_3-AR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Jen; Chen, Chiao-Wei; Zhou, Liuzhu; Merer, Anthony J.; Hsu, Yen-Chu

    2012-06-01

    The fluorescence lifetimes of the ˜{A} states of C_3, C_3-Ne and C_3-Ar have been measured under supersonic molecular beam conditions. To minimize possible collisional quenching, the lifetimes of all three species were measured at a distance of about 42 nozzle diameters from the orifice. For all the vibrational levels of the ˜{A} state of the C_3 monomer, only J'=1 lifetimes were recorded, using R(0) lines. The accuracy of the lifetimes obtained was estimated to be better than 3ns. General features of the lifetimes of the C_3 monomer are as follows: with increasing excitation of the symmetric stretching vibration, the lifetimes increase to a maximum at v_1=4. Bending excitation reduces the lifetimes, though exceptions occur for the 0 v 0 and 1 v 0 levels. Among all the vibrational levels, 0 2^- 0, 0 4^- 0, and 0 2^+ 0 have the shortest lifetimes, similar to that of the origin level. Lifetimes of the ˜{A} state of C_3-Ne and C_3-Ar have only been measured for features 1.5-2 and 11-14 cm-1, respectively, to the red of the R(0) lines of the ˜{A}-˜{X} bands of free C_3. It is not possible to reduce the backing pressure while measuring lifetimes of the complexes; we therefore reduced the average pressure of the chamber to 1-2x10-5 torr by lowering the repetition rate. No sign of predissociation was found in the Ne complex except for the level 0 12^+ 0. The lifetimes of the complexes did not vary with vibration in the manner found for C_3 itself. The lifetime of the 0 2^- 0 level, one of the lowest vibrational levels of the ˜{A} state, was not affected by complexing with either Ne or Ar, consistent with the observation that the least van der Waals shifts were observed for this vibrational level. G. Zhang, K.-S. Chen, A. J. Merer, Y.-C. Hsu, W.-J. Chen, S. Shaji, and Y.-A. Liao, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 244308 (2005). G. Zhang, B.-G. Lin, S.-M. Wen, and Y.-C. Hsu, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 3189 (2004).

  10. Effects of complement activation on allograft injury

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Joong Hyuk; Heeger, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize the current knowledge regarding mechanisms linking the complement system to transplant injury, highlighting findings reported since 2013. Recent findings Building upon the documentation that complement activation is a pathogenic mediator of post-transplant ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, emerging evidence indicates blocking either the classical or lectin pathways attenuates IR injury in animal models. Immune cell-derived and locally activated complement, including intracellular C3 positively modulates allo-reactive T cell activation and expansion, while simultaneously inhibiting regulatory T cell induction and function, together promoting transplant rejection. While alloantibody-initiated complement activation directly injures target cells, complement-dependent signals activate endothelial cells to facilitate T cell dependent inflammation. Complement activation within allografts contributes to progressive chronic injury and fibrosis. Summary The complement cascade, traditionally considered relevant to transplantation only as an effector mechanism of antibody-initiated allograft injury, is now understood to damage the allograft through multiple mechanisms. Complement activation promotes post-transplant IR injury, formation and function of allo-antibody, differentiation and function of alloreactive T cells, and contributes to chronic progressive allograft failure. The recognition that complement impacts transplant injury at many levels provides a foundation for targeting complement as a therapy to prolong transplant survival and improve patient health. PMID:26132735

  11. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  12. Meningococcal disease and the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lisa A; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of meningococcal disease, this infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. The role of the complement system in innate immune defenses against invasive meningococcal disease is well established. Individuals deficient in components of the alternative and terminal complement pathways are highly predisposed to invasive, often recurrent meningococcal infections. Genome-wide analysis studies also point to a central role for complement in disease pathogenesis. Here we review the pathophysiologic events pertinent to the complement system that accompany meningococcal sepsis in humans. Meningococci use several often redundant mechanisms to evade killing by human complement. Capsular polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide glycan composition play critical roles in complement evasion. Some of the newly described protein vaccine antigens interact with complement components and have sparked considerable research interest. PMID:24104403

  13. Mixed chimerism and transplant tolerance are not effectively induced in C3a-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Baśkiewicz-Hałasa, Magdalena; Rogińska, Dorota; Piecyk, Katarzyna; Hałasa, Maciej; Lejkowska, Renata; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Machaliński, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Mixed chimerism, a phenomenon involved in the development of specific alloantigen tolerance, could be achieved through the transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells into properly prepared recipients. Because the C3a complement component modulates hematopoietic cell trafficking after transplantation, in the present study, we investigated the influence of the C3a deficiency on mixed chimerism and alloantigen tolerance induction. To induce mixed chimerism, C57BL/6J (wild-type strain; H-2K(b); I-E(-)) and B6.129S4-C3(tm1Crr)/J (C3a-deficient) mice were exposed to 3 G total body irradiation (day -1). Subsequently, these mice were treated with CD8-blocking (day -2) and CD40L-blocking (days 0 and 4) antibodies, followed by transplantation with 20 × 10(6) Balb/c (H-2K(d); I-E(+)) bone marrow cells (day 0). The degree of mixed chimerism in peripheral blood leukocytes was measured several times during the 20-week experiment. The tolerance to Balb/c mouse antigens was assessed based on the number of lymphocytes expressing Vβ5 and Vβ11 T-cell receptor and on skin-graft (day 0) acceptance. Applying our experimental model, mixed chimerism and alloantigen tolerance were effectively induced in C57BL/6J (wild-type) mice, but not in C3a(-/-) animals. The present study is, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate that C3a is vital for achieving stable mixed chimerism and related to this induction of transplant tolerance.

  14. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  15. The complement system and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Regal, Jean F; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Burwick, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the fetal allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child.

  16. Genetic susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer: complement component C1q and Prnp polymorphisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Scribner, Kim T.; Libants, Scot V.; Johnson, Chad; Aiken, Judd M.; Langenberg, Julia A.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic basis of susceptibility to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids is of great interest. Association studies of disease susceptibility in free-ranging populations, however, face considerable challenges including: the need for large sample sizes when disease is rare, animals of unknown pedigree create a risk of spurious results due to population admixture, and the inability to control disease exposure or dose. We used an innovative matched case–control design and conditional logistic regression to evaluate associations between polymorphisms of complement C1q and prion protein (Prnp) genes and CWD infection in white-tailed deer from the CWD endemic area in south-central Wisconsin. To reduce problems due to admixture or disease-risk confounding, we used neutral genetic (microsatellite) data to identify closely related CWD-positive (n = 68) and CWD-negative (n = 91) female deer to serve as matched cases and controls. Cases and controls were also matched on factors (sex, location, age) previously demonstrated to affect CWD infection risk. For Prnp, deer with at least one Serine (S) at amino acid 96 were significantly less likely to be CWD-positive relative to deer homozygous for Glycine (G). This is the first characterization of genes associated with the complement system in white-tailed deer. No tests for association between any C1q polymorphism and CWD infection were significant at p < 0.05. After controlling for Prnp, we found weak support for an elevated risk of CWD infection in deer with at least one Glycine (G) at amino acid 56 of the C1qC gene. While we documented numerous amino acid polymorphisms in C1q genes none appear to be strongly associated with CWD susceptibility.

  17. Genetic susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer: complement component C1q and Prnp polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Blanchong, Julie A; Heisey, Dennis M; Scribner, Kim T; Libants, Scot V; Johnson, Chad; Aiken, Judd M; Langenberg, Julia A; Samuel, Michael D

    2009-12-01

    The genetic basis of susceptibility to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids is of great interest. Association studies of disease susceptibility in free-ranging populations, however, face considerable challenges including: the need for large sample sizes when disease is rare, animals of unknown pedigree create a risk of spurious results due to population admixture, and the inability to control disease exposure or dose. We used an innovative matched case-control design and conditional logistic regression to evaluate associations between polymorphisms of complement C1q and prion protein (Prnp) genes and CWD infection in white-tailed deer from the CWD endemic area in south-central Wisconsin. To reduce problems due to admixture or disease-risk confounding, we used neutral genetic (microsatellite) data to identify closely related CWD-positive (n=68) and CWD-negative (n=91) female deer to serve as matched cases and controls. Cases and controls were also matched on factors (sex, location, age) previously demonstrated to affect CWD infection risk. For Prnp, deer with at least one Serine (S) at amino acid 96 were significantly less likely to be CWD-positive relative to deer homozygous for Glycine (G). This is the first characterization of genes associated with the complement system in white-tailed deer. No tests for association between any C1q polymorphism and CWD infection were significant at p<0.05. After controlling for Prnp, we found weak support for an elevated risk of CWD infection in deer with at least one Glycine (G) at amino acid 56 of the C1qC gene. While we documented numerous amino acid polymorphisms in C1q genes none appear to be strongly associated with CWD susceptibility.

  18. A novel method for direct measurement of complement convertases activity in human serum.

    PubMed

    Blom, A M; Volokhina, E B; Fransson, V; Strömberg, P; Berghard, L; Viktorelius, M; Mollnes, T E; López-Trascasa, M; van den Heuvel, L P; Goodship, T H; Marchbank, K J; Okroj, M

    2014-10-01

    Complement convertases are enzymatic complexes that play a central role in sustaining and amplification of the complement cascade. Impairment of complement function leads directly or indirectly to pathological conditions, including higher infection rate, kidney diseases, autoimmune- or neurodegenerative diseases and ischaemia-reperfusion injury. An assay for direct measurement of activity of the convertases in patient sera is not available. Existing assays testing convertase function are based on purified complement components and, thus, convertase formation occurs under non-physiological conditions. We designed a new assay, in which C5 blocking compounds enabled separation of the complement cascade into two phases: the first ending at the stage of C5 convertases and the second ending with membrane attack complex formation. The use of rabbit erythrocytes or antibody-sensitized sheep erythrocytes as the platforms for convertase formation enabled easy readout based on measurement of haemolysis. Thus, properties of patient sera could be studied directly regarding convertase activity and membrane attack complex formation. Another advantage of this assay was the possibility to screen for host factors such as C3 nephritic factor and other anti-complement autoantibodies, or gain-of-function mutations, which prolong the half-life of complement convertases. Herein, we present proof of concept, detailed description and validation of this novel assay.

  19. Inhibition of biomaterial-induced complement activation attenuates the inflammatory host response to implantation

    PubMed Central

    Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Rafail, Stavros; DeAngelis, Robert A.; Foukas, Periklis G.; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Although complement is a known contributor to biomaterial-induced complications, pathological implications and therapeutic options remain to be explored. Here we investigated the involvement of complement in the inflammatory response to polypropylene meshes commonly used for hernia repair. In vitro assays revealed deposition of complement activation fragments on the mesh after incubation in plasma. Moreover, significant mesh-induced complement and granulocyte activation was observed in plasma and leukocyte preparations, respectively. Pretreatment of plasma with the complement inhibitor compstatin reduced opsonization >2-fold, and compstatin and a C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRa) impaired granulocyte activation by 50 and 67%, respectively. We established a clinically relevant mouse model of implantation and could confirm deposition of C3 activation fragments on mesh implants in vivo using immunofluorescence. In meshes extracted after subcutaneous or peritoneal implantation, the amount of immune cell infiltrate in mice deficient in key complement components (C3, C5aR), or treated with C5aRa, was approximately half of that observed in wild-type littermates or mice treated with inactive C5aRa, respectively. Our data suggest that implantation of a widely used surgical mesh triggers the formation of an inflammatory cell microenvironment at the implant site through complement activation, and indicates a path for the therapeutic modulation of implant-related complications.—Kourtzelis, I., Rafail, S., DeAngelis, R. A., Foukas, P. G., Ricklin, D., Lambris, J. D. Inhibition of biomaterial-induced complement activation attenuates the inflammatory host response to implantation. PMID:23558338

  20. Systemic complement profiling in multiple sclerosis as a biomarker of disease state

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, G; Hakobyan, S; Hirst, CL; Harris, CL; Loveless, S; Mitchell, JP; Pickersgill, TP; Robertson, NP

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence of significant and dynamic systemic activation and upregulation of complement in multiple sclerosis (MS), which may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Objective: We aimed to investigate the pathological role of complement in MS and the potential role for complement profiling as a biomarker of MS disease state. Methods: Key components of the classical, alternative and terminal pathways of complement were measured in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with MS in different clinical phases of disease and in matched controls. Results: Increased plasma levels of C3 (p<0.003), C4 (p<0.001), C4a (p<0.001), C1 inhibitor (p<0.001), and factor H (p<0.001), and reduced levels of C9 (p<0.001) were observed in MS patients compared with controls. Combined profiling of these analytes produced a statistical model with a predictive value of 97% for MS and 73% for clinical relapse when combined with selected demographic data. CSF-plasma correlations suggested that source of synthesis of these components was both systemic and central. Conclusion: These data provide further evidence of alterations in both local and systemic expression and activation of complement in MS and suggest that complement profiling may be informative as a biomarker of MS disease, although further work is needed to determine its use in distinguishing MS from its differential. PMID:22354735

  1. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  2. Targeted complement inhibition and microvasculature in transplants: a therapeutic perspective.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Hsu, J L; Assiri, A M; Broering, D C

    2016-02-01

    Active complement mediators play a key role in graft-versus-host diseases, but little attention has been given to the angiogenic balance and complement modulation during allograft acceptance. The complement cascade releases the powerful proinflammatory mediators C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins, C3b, C5b opsonins and terminal membrane attack complex into tissues, which are deleterious if unchecked. Blocking complement mediators has been considered to be a promising approach in the modern drug discovery plan, and a significant number of therapeutic alternatives have been developed to dampen complement activation and protect host cells. Numerous immune cells, especially macrophages, develop both anaphylatoxin and opsonin receptors on their cell surface and their binding affects the macrophage phenotype and their angiogenic properties. This review discusses the mechanism that complement contributes to angiogenic injury, and the development of future therapeutic targets by antagonizing activated complement mediators to preserve microvasculature in rejecting the transplanted organ.

  3. Complete complement deficiency in a large cohort of familial systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rachna; Sestak, Andrea L; Souza, Anil D’; Dillon, Skyler P.; Namjou, Bahram; Scofield, R Hal

    2010-01-01

    Genetic complete deficiency of the early complement components such as C1, C2 and C4 commonly results in a monogenetic form of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, previous studies have examined groups of complete complement deficient subjects for SLE, while a familial SLE cohort has not been studied for deficiencies of complement. Thus, we undertook the present study to determine the frequency of hereditary complete complement deficiencies among families with two or more SLE patients. All SLE patients from 544 such families had CH50 determined. Medical records were examined for past CH50 values. There were 66 individuals in whom all available CH50 values were zero. All but four of these had an SLE-affected relative with a non-zero CH50; thus, these families did not have monogenic complement deficient related SLE. The four remaining SLE-affected subjects were in fact two sets of siblings in which 3 of the 4 SLE patients had onset of disease at <18 years of age. Both patients in one of these families had been determined to have C4 deficiency, while the other family had no clinical diagnosis of complement deficiency. In this second family, one of the SLE patients had had normal C4 and C3 values, indicating that either C1q or C2 deficiency was possible. Thus, only 2 of 544 SLE families had definite or possible complement deficiency; however, 1 of 7 families in which all SLE patients had pediatric onset and 2 of 85 families with at least 1 pediatric-onset SLE patent had complete complement deficiency. SLE is found commonly among families with hereditary complement deficiency but the reverse is not true. Complete complement deficiency is rare among families with two or more SLE patients, but is concentrated among families with onset of SLE prior to age 18. PMID:19910391

  4. Complement in the Homeostatic and Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Alawieh, Ali; Elvington, Andrew; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a component of the immune system involved in both recognition and response to pathogens, and it is implicated in an increasing number of homeostatic and disease processes. It is well documented that reperfusion of ischemic tissue results in complement activation and an inflammatory response that causes post-reperfusion injury. This occurs following cerebral ischemia and reperfusion and triggers secondary damage that extends beyond the initial infarcted area, an outcome that has rationalized the use of complement inhibitors as candidate therapeutics after stroke. In the central nervous system, however, recent studies have revealed that complement also has essential roles in synaptic pruning, neurogenesis, and neuronal migration. In the context of recovery after stroke, these apparent divergent functions of complement may account for findings that the protective effect of complement inhibition in the acute phase after stroke is not always maintained in the subacute and chronic phases. The development of effective stroke therapies based on modulation of the complement system will require a detailed understanding of complement-dependent processes in both early neurodegenerative events and delayed neuro-reparatory processes. Here, we review the role of complement in normal brain physiology, the events initiating complement activation after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, and the contribution of complement to both injury and recovery. We also discuss how the design of future experiments may better characterize the dual role of complement in recovery after ischemic stroke. PMID:26322048

  5. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  6. A study of C3HD in cold interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Bell, M B; Avery, L W; Matthews, H E; Feldman, P A; Watson, J K; Madden, S C; Irvine, W M

    1988-03-15

    We have detected the 1(10)-1(01) transition of C3HD at 19.418 GHz at twelve positions in cold, dark clouds and resolved the D hyperfine components in two sources (L1498 and TMC-1C) well enough to derive values for the D quadrupole coupling constants. Simultaneous observations of C3H2 in each source yield relative integrated line intensities in the range 0.10-0.18, from which we derive relative [C3HD]/[C3H2] abundances in the range 0.05-0.15. These are among the highest deuteration ratios yet observed. Within the limits of the observational and modeling uncertainties it is possible to explain the derived [C3HD]/[C3H2] ratios by ion-molecule chemistry if [e-] approximately 3 x 10(-7).

  7. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Enhanced stimulation of platelets by the terminal complement components is related to the lack of C8bp in the membrane.

    PubMed

    Blaas, P; Berger, B; Weber, S; Peter, H H; Hänsch, G M

    1988-05-01

    Recently, a protein isolated from the membrane of human E, the so-called C8 binding protein (C8bp), has been described. C8bp is characterized as a 65-kDa protein that binds to C8 and inhibits the C5b-9-mediated lysis in a homologous system. In the present study, membranes of peripheral blood cells were tested for the presence of C8bp by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. In all cells a protein band reacting with anti-C8bp was seen, the Mr, however, was only about 50 kDa. To further analyze the 50-kDa protein, we isolated the protein by phenol-water extraction and isoelectric focusing from papain-treated platelets. The isolated protein behaved similar to the E-derived C8bp: it inhibited the lysis of model target cells by C5b-9. To examine the function of C8bp in platelets, we tested platelets from patients suffering from paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). These platelets were deficient in C8bp, being in accordance with their higher lytic susceptibility in vitro. In response to sublytic C5b-9 doses, the PNH platelets released considerably more serotonin and thromboxane B2 than normal platelets. By addition of purified C8bp, the thromboxane B2 release was suppressed, indicating that C8bp not only restricts the lytic complement attack, but also regulates the C5b-9-mediated stimulation of target cells. Thus, lack of C8bp might not only result in enhanced hemolysis, but also in enhanced stimulation of platelets, which in turn might contribute to the thrombotic complications seen in some PNH-type III patients.

  8. Role of complement in experiment silicosis

    SciTech Connect

    Callis, A.H.; Sohnle, P.G.; Mandel, G.S.; Mandel, N.S.

    1986-08-01

    The role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of crystal-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis was evaluated using a mouse model of silicosis and congenitally complement-deficient mice. Mice lacking the fifth component of complement (B10.D2/o) were compared to C5-sufficient animals (B10.D2/n) for pulmonary changes following intratracheal instillation of silica crystals. Complement-deficient mice demonstrated a significant reduction compared to complement-sufficient mice in both cell number and protein content of lung lavage fluid throughout the 12 weeks following silica exposure. Lung hydroxyproline content (indicative of collagen deposition) was equivalent for both strains and significantly higher than controls at all times points following silica instillation. Moreover, studies in vitro have shown that silica crystals are capable of activating complement via the alternative pathway. These studies indicate that the complement system may be responsible for some of the pulmonary inflammation, but not fibrosis elicited by silica exposure.

  9. Overview of Complement Activation and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Noris, Marina; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Summary Complement is an important component of the innate immune system that is crucial for defense from microbial infections and for clearance of immune complexes and injured cells. In normal conditions complement is tightly controlled by a number of fluid-phase and cell surface proteins to avoid injury to autologous tissues. When complement is hyperactivated, as occurs in autoimmune diseases or in subjects with dysfunctional regulatory proteins, it drives a severe inflammatory response in numerous organs. The kidney appears to be particularly vulnerable to complement-mediated inflammatory injury. Injury may derive from deposition of circulating active complement fragments in glomeruli, but complement locally produced and activated in the kidney also may have a role. Many kidney disorders have been linked to abnormal complement activation, including immune-complex–mediated glomerulonephritis and rare genetic kidney diseases, but also tubulointerstitial injury associated with progressive proteinuric diseases or ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:24161035

  10. A prevalent C3 mutation in aHUS patients causes a direct C3 convertase gain of function

    PubMed Central

    Roumenina, Lubka T.; Frimat, Marie; Miller, Elizabeth C.; Provot, Francois; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnes; Bordereau, Pauline; Bigot, Sylvain; Hue, Christophe; Satchell, Simon C.; Mathieson, Peter W.; Mousson, Christiane; Noel, Christian; Sautes-Fridman, Catherine; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Atkinson, John P.; Lionet, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare renal thrombotic microangiopathy commonly associated with rare genetic variants in complement system genes, unique to each patient/family. Here, we report 14 sporadic aHUS patients carrying the same mutation, R139W, in the complement C3 gene. The clinical presentation was with a rapid progression to end-stage renal disease (6 of 14) and an unusually high frequency of cardiac (8 of 14) and/or neurologic (5 of 14) events. Although resting glomerular endothelial cells (GEnCs) remained unaffected by R139W-C3 sera, the incubation of those sera with GEnC preactivated with pro-inflammatory stimuli led to increased C3 deposition, C5a release, and procoagulant tissue-factor expression. This functional consequence of R139W-C3 resulted from the formation of a hyperactive C3 convertase. Mutant C3 showed an increased affinity for factor B and a reduced binding to membrane cofactor protein (MCP; CD46), but a normal regulation by factor H (FH). In addition, the frequency of at-risk FH and MCP haplotypes was significantly higher in the R139W-aHUS patients, compared with normal donors or to healthy carriers. These genetic background differences could explain the R139W-aHUS incomplete penetrance. These results demonstrate that this C3 mutation, especially when associated with an at-risk FH and/or MCP haplotypes, becomes pathogenic following an inflammatory endothelium-damaging event. PMID:22246034

  11. Ig-like transcript 4 as a cellular receptor for soluble complement fragment C4d.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Johannes; Forster, Florian; Isenman, David E; Wahrmann, Markus; Leitner, Judith; Hölzl, Markus A; Kovarik, Johannes J; Stockinger, Hannes; Böhmig, Georg A; Steinberger, Peter; Zlabinger, Gerhard J

    2016-04-01

    Complement regulation leads to the generation of complement split products (CSPs) such as complement component (C)4d, a marker for disease activity in autoimmune syndromes or antibody-mediated allograft rejection. However, the physiologic role of C4d has been unknown. By screening murine thymoma BW5147 cells expressing a cDNA library generated from human monocyte-derived dendritic cells with recombinant human C4d, we identified Ig-like transcript (ILT)4 and ILT5v2 as cellular receptors for C4d. Both receptors, expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, also interacted with the CSPs C3d, C4b, C3b, and iC3b. However, C4d did not bind to classic complement receptors (CRs). Interaction between cell surface-resident ILT4 and soluble monomeric C4d resulted in endocytosis of C4d. Surprisingly, binding of soluble ILT4 to C4d covalently immobilized to a cellular surface following classic complement activation could not be detected. Remarkably, C4d immobilized to a solid phaseviaits intrinsic thioester conferred a dose-dependent inhibition of TNF-α and IL-6 secretion in monocytes activatedviaFc-cross-linking of up to 50% as compared to baseline. Similarly, C4d conferred an attenuation of intracellular Ca(2+)flux in monocytes activatedviaFc-cross-linking. In conclusion, ILT4 represents a scavenger-type endocytotic CR for soluble monomeric C4d, whereas attenuation of monocyte activation by physiologically oriented C4d on a surface appears to be dependent on a yet to be identified C4d receptor.-Hofer, J., Forster, F., Isenman, D. E., Wahrmann, M., Leitner, J., Hölzl, M. A., Kovarik, J. K., Stockinger, H., Böhmig, G. A., Steinberger, P., Zlabinger, G. J. Ig-like transcript 4 as a cellular receptor for soluble complement fragment C4d.

  12. Viral complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosengard, A M; Ahearn, J M

    1999-05-01

    The inactivation of complement provides cells and tissues critical protection from complement-mediated attack and decreases the associated recruitment of other inflammatory mediators. In an attempt to evade the host immune response, viruses have evolved two mechanisms to acquire complement regulatory proteins. They can directly seize the host cell complement regulators onto their outer envelope and/or they can produce their own proteins which are either secreted into the neighboring intercellular space or expressed as membrane-bound proteins on the infected host cell. The following review will concentrate on the viral homologues of the mammalian complement regulatory proteins, specifically those containing complement control protein (CCP) repeats. PMID:10408371

  13. An Inhibitor of the Alternative Pathway of Complement in Saliva of New World Anopheline Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Sousa, Antonio F; Queiroz, Daniel C; Vale, Vladimir F; Ribeiro, José M C; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Gontijo, Nelder F; Andersen, John F

    2016-07-15

    The complement system present in circulating blood is an effective mechanism of host defense, responsible for the killing of pathogens and the production of potent anaphylatoxins. Inhibitors of the complement system have been described in the saliva of hematophagous arthropods that are involved in the protection of digestive tissues against complement system-mediated damage. In this study, we describe albicin, a novel inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement from the salivary glands of the malaria vector, Anopheles albimanus The inhibitor was purified from salivary gland homogenates by reverse-phase HPLC and identified by mass spectrometry as a small (13.4-kDa) protein related to the gSG7 protein of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi Recombinant albicin was produced in Escherichia coli and found to potently inhibit lysis of rabbit erythrocytes in assays of the alternative pathway while having no inhibitory effect on the classical or lectin pathways. Albicin also inhibited the deposition of complement components on agarose-coated plates, although it could not remove previously bound components. Antisera produced against recombinant albicin recognized both the native and recombinant inhibitors and also blocked their activities in in vitro assays. Using surface plasmon resonance and enzymatic assays, we found that albicin binds and stabilizes the C3-convertase complex (C3bBb) formed on a properdin surface and inhibits the convertase activity of a reconstituted C3bBb complex in solution. The data indicate that albicin specifically recognizes the activated form of the complex, allowing more efficient inhibition by an inhibitor whose quantity is limited. PMID:27307559

  14. A recombinant two-module form of human properdin is an inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway.

    PubMed

    Kouser, Lubna; Abdul-Aziz, Munirah; Tsolaki, Anthony G; Singhal, Dipti; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Urban, Britta C; Khan, Haseeb A; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2016-05-01

    Properdin upregulates the alternative complement pathway by binding and stabilising the C3 convertase complex (C3bBb). Properdin is a soluble glycoprotein and its flexible rod-like 53kDa monomers form cyclic polymers (dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers). The properdin monomer consists of seven thrombospondin type I repeats (TSR 0-6), which are similar and homologous to domains found in circumsporozoite and thrombospondin-related anonymous proteins of Plasmodium species, ETP100 of Eimeria tenella, various complement components C6-C9, and thrombospondin I and II. Using deletion constructs, TSR4 and TSR5 of human properdin were implicated in C3b binding and stabilising C3 convertase. However, individually expressed TSR4 or TSR5 failed to bind properdin ligands. Here, we have expressed and characterized biologically active TSR4 and TSR5 together (TSR4+5) in tandem in Escherichia coli, fused to maltose-binding protein. MBP-TSR4+5 bind solid-phase C3b, sulfatides and glycosaminoglycans. In addition, functionally active recombinant TSR4+5 modules inhibit the alternative pathway of complement. PMID:27060503

  15. A Molecular Insight into Complement Evasion by the Staphylococcal Complement Inhibitor Protein Family1

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Tzekou, Apostolia; Garcia, Brandon L.; Hammel, Michal; McWhorter, William J.; Sfyroera, Georgia; Wu, You-Qiang; Holers, V. Michael; Herbert, Andrew P.; Barlow, Paul N.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Lambris, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus possesses an impressive arsenal of complement evasion proteins that help the bacterium escape attack of the immune system. The staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN) protein exhibits a particularly high potency and was previously shown to block complement by acting at the level of the C3 convertases. However, many details about the exact binding and inhibitory mechanism remained unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that SCIN directly binds with nanomolar affinity to a functionally important area of C3b that lies near the C terminus of its β-chain. Direct competition of SCIN with factor B for C3b slightly decreased the formation of surface-bound convertase. However, the main inhibitory effect can be attributed to an entrapment of the assembled convertase in an inactive state. Whereas native C3 is still able to bind to the blocked convertase, no generation and deposition of C3b could be detected in the presence of SCIN. Furthermore, SCIN strongly competes with the binding of factor H to C3b and influences its regulatory activities: the SCIN-stabilized convertase was essentially insensitive to decay acceleration by factor H and the factor I- and H-mediated conversion of surface-bound C3b to iC3b was significantly reduced. By targeting a key area on C3b, SCIN is able to block several essential functions within the alternative pathway, which explains the high potency of the inhibitor. Our findings provide an important insight into complement evasion strategies by S. aureus and may act as a base for further functional studies. PMID:19625656

  16. Complement in Lupus Nephritis: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lihua; Cunningham, Patrick N.; Quigg, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder caused by loss of tolerance to self-antigens, the production of autoantibodies and deposition of complement-fixing immune complexes (ICs) in injured tissues. SLE is characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and targeted organs, with lupus nephritis being one of the most serious complications. The complement system consists of three pathways and is tightly controlled by a set of regulatory proteins to prevent injudicious complement activation on host tissue. The involvement of the complement system in the pathogenesis of SLE is well accepted; yet, its exact role is still not clear. Summary Complement plays dual roles in the pathogenesis of SLE. On the one hand, the complement system appears to have protective features in that hereditary homozygous deficiencies of classical pathway components, such as C1q and C4, are associated with an increased risk for SLE. On the other hand, IC-mediated activation of complement in affected tissues is clearly evident in both experimental and human SLE along with pathological features that are logical consequences of complement activation. Studies in genetically altered mice have shown that lack of complement inhibitors, such as complement factor H (CFH) or decay-accelerating factor (DAF) accelerates the development of experimental lupus nephritis, while treatment with recombinant protein inhibitors, such as Crry-Ig, CR2-Crry, CR2-DAF and CR2-CFH, ameliorates the disease development. Complement-targeted drugs, including soluble complement receptor 1 (TP10), C1 esterase inhibitor and a monoclonal anti-C5 antibody (eculizumab), have been shown to inhibit complement safely, and are now being investigated in a variety of clinical conditions. Key Messages SLE is an autoimmune disorder which targets multiple systems. Complement is centrally involved and plays dual roles in the pathogenesis of SLE. Studies from experimental lupus models and clinical

  17. Complement activation promotes colitis-associated carcinogenesis through activating intestinal IL-1β/IL-17A axis.

    PubMed

    Ning, C; Li, Y-Y; Wang, Y; Han, G-C; Wang, R-X; Xiao, H; Li, X-Y; Hou, C-M; Ma, Y-F; Sheng, D-S; Shen, B-F; Feng, J-N; Guo, R-F; Li, Y; Chen, G-J

    2015-11-01

    Colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) is the most serious complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Excessive complement activation has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. However, its role in the development of CAC is largely unknown. Here, using a CAC model induced by combined administration of azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS), we demonstrated that complement activation was required for CAC pathogenesis. Deficiency in key components of complement (e.g., C3, C5, or C5a receptor) rendered tumor repression in mice subjected to AOM/DSS. Mechanistic investigation revealed that complement ablation dramatically reduced proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β levels in the colonic tissues that was mainly produced by infiltrating neutrophils. IL-1β promoted colon carcinogenesis by eliciting IL-17 response in intestinal myeloid cells. Furthermore, complement-activation product C5a represented a potent inducer for IL-1β in neutrophil, accounting for downregulation of IL-1β levels in the employed complement-deficient mice. Overall, our study proposes a protumorigenic role of complement in inflammation-related colorectal cancer and that the therapeutic strategies targeting complement may be beneficial for the treatment of CAC in clinic. PMID:25736459

  18. Complement associated pathogenic mechanisms in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Erdem; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody (Ab) related myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). The most characteristic finding of muscle pathology in both MG and EAMG is the abundance of IgG and complement deposits at the nerve-muscle junction (NMJ), suggesting that AChR-Ab induces muscle weakness by complement pathway activation and consequent membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. This assumption has been supported with EAMG resistance of complement factor C3 knockout (KO), C4 KO and C5 deficient mice and amelioration of EAMG symptoms following treatment with complement inhibitors such as cobra venom factor, soluble complement receptor 1, anti-C1q, anti-C5 and anti-C6 Abs. Moreover, the complement inhibitor decay accelerating factor (DAF) KO mice exhibit increased susceptibility to EAMG. These findings have brought forward improvisation of novel therapy methods based on inhibition of classical and common complement pathways in MG treatment.

  19. Activation of Complement Following Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Thordardottir, S; Vikingsdottir, T; Bjarnadottir, H; Jonsson, H; Gudbjornsson, B

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether complement activation, via the classical and alternative pathways, occurs following a cemented total hip replacement (THR) surgery due to osteoarthritis. Blood samples were collected systematically from 12 patients - six male and six women, with a median age of 75 (range: 59-90 years) - preoperatively, 6 h post-operatively and on the first, second and third post-operative day. Total function of classical (CH50) and alternative pathways (AH50) was evaluated, along with the determination of serum concentrations of the complement proteins C3, C4, C3d, the soluble terminal complement complex (sTCC) sC5b-9, as well as C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin. Measurements of CRP and albumin levels elucidated a marked inflammatory response following the operation. The CH50, AH50 and C3 and C4 levels were significantly lower 6 h after the surgery compared with the preoperative levels, but elevated above the preoperative levels during the following 3 days. The complement activation product C3d levels increased continually during the whole observation period, from 13.5 AU/ml (range: 8-19 AU/ml) preoperative to 20 AU/ml (range: 12-34 AU/ml) on the third post-operative day. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the sC5b-9 levels between the preoperative and the third post-operative day. These results demonstrate a significant activation of the complement system following cemented THR. Further studies are needed to elucidate the time frame and the pathogenic role of this observed complement activation.

  20. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    PubMed

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, complement analysis of body fluids and biopsies, going far beyond C3 and C4, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease process. Such expanded complement analysis allows for a more precise differential diagnosis and for critical monitoring of complement-targeted therapy. These changes are a result of the growing understanding of the involvement of complement in a diverse set of disorders. To appreciate the importance of proper complement analysis, it is important to understand the role it plays in disease. Historically, it was the absence of complement as manifested in severe infection that was noted. Since then complement has been connected to a variety of inflammatory disorders, such as autoimmune diseases and hereditary angioedema. While the role of complement in the rejection of renal grafts has been known longer, the significant impact of complement. In certain nephropathies has now led to the reclassification of some rare kidney diseases and an increased role for complement analysis in diagnosis. Even more unexpected is that complement has also been implicated in neural, ophtalmological and dermatological disorders. With this level of involvement in some varied and impactful health issues proper complement testing is clearly important; however, analysis of the complement system varies widely among laboratories. Except for a few proteins, such as C3 and C4, there are neither well-characterized standard preparations nor calibrated assays available. This is especially true for the inter-laboratory variation of tests which assess classical, alternative, or lectin pathway function. In addition, there is a need for the standardization of the measurement of complement activation products that are so critical in determining whether clinically relevant complement activation has occurred in vivo. Finally, autoantibodies to complement proteins (e.g. anti-C1q), C3 and C4 convertases (C3 and C4 nephritic factor) or to regulatory proteins

  1. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    PubMed

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, complement analysis of body fluids and biopsies, going far beyond C3 and C4, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease process. Such expanded complement analysis allows for a more precise differential diagnosis and for critical monitoring of complement-targeted therapy. These changes are a result of the growing understanding of the involvement of complement in a diverse set of disorders. To appreciate the importance of proper complement analysis, it is important to understand the role it plays in disease. Historically, it was the absence of complement as manifested in severe infection that was noted. Since then complement has been connected to a variety of inflammatory disorders, such as autoimmune diseases and hereditary angioedema. While the role of complement in the rejection of renal grafts has been known longer, the significant impact of complement. In certain nephropathies has now led to the reclassification of some rare kidney diseases and an increased role for complement analysis in diagnosis. Even more unexpected is that complement has also been implicated in neural, ophtalmological and dermatological disorders. With this level of involvement in some varied and impactful health issues proper complement testing is clearly important; however, analysis of the complement system varies widely among laboratories. Except for a few proteins, such as C3 and C4, there are neither well-characterized standard preparations nor calibrated assays available. This is especially true for the inter-laboratory variation of tests which assess classical, alternative, or lectin pathway function. In addition, there is a need for the standardization of the measurement of complement activation products that are so critical in determining whether clinically relevant complement activation has occurred in vivo. Finally, autoantibodies to complement proteins (e.g. anti-C1q), C3 and C4 convertases (C3 and C4 nephritic factor) or to regulatory proteins

  2. Dynamics and reproductive effects of complement factors in the spontaneous abortion model of CBA/J×DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Ai; Kusakabe, Ken Takeshi; Hiyama, Masato; Kuniyoshi, Nobue; Kondo, Tomohiro; Kano, Kiyoshi; Kiso, Yasuo; Okada, Toshiya

    2014-05-01

    The complement system is one component of innate immunity that could participate in fetal loss. We have already reported that adipsin, a complement activator in the alternative pathway, is stably expressed in the placenta and that an increase in this expression is related to spontaneous abortion. However, complement inhibitor Crry was concurrently expressed in the placenta, and the role of complement factors during pregnancy was not clear. In the present study, we examined the endogenous regulation of complement factors in placenta and serum by using another model mouse for spontaneous abortion and studied the effect of exogenous complement disruption on pregnancy. Compared to control mice, the CBA/J×DBA/2 model mice had higher expression levels of adipsin in the placenta and serum. Adipsin and complement C3 were localized in the metrial gland and labyrinth regions, and both positive reactive ranges were limited in the maternal blood current in normal implantation sites. These results suggest that extrauterine adipsin hematogenously reaches the placenta, activates complement C3, and promotes destruction of the feto-maternal barrier in aborted implantation sites. Crry was consistently expressed in the placenta and serum and reduced in the resorption sites of CBA/J×DBA/2 mice as compared to normal sites. Injection of recombinant adipsin increased the resorption rate and changed the expression of Th-type cytokines toward a Th1 bias. The present study indicates that adipsin could induce the fetal loss that accompanies the Th1 bias and may be a crucial cause of spontaneous abortion. In addition, the local expression of Crry prevents complement activation in placenta in response to a systemic increase of adipsin.

  3. Cefditoren and Ceftriaxone Enhance Complement-Mediated Immunity in the Presence of Specific Antibodies against Antibiotic-Resistant Pneumococcal Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Rodríguez-Sosa, Cinthya; Cafini, Fabio; Giménez, Maria-Jose; Navarro, Ana; Sevillano, David; Alou, Luis; García, Ernesto; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Yuste, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Background Specific antibodies mediate humoral and cellular protection against invading pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae by activating complement mediated immunity, promoting phagocytosis and stimulating bacterial clearance. The emergence of pneumococcal strains with high levels of antibiotic resistance is of great concern worldwide and a serious threat for public health. Methodology/Principal Findings Flow cytometry was used to determine whether complement-mediated immunity against three antibiotic-resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates is enhanced in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefditoren and ceftriaxone. The binding of acute phase proteins such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component, and of complement component C1q, to pneumococci was enhanced in the presence of serum plus either of these antibiotics. Both antibiotics therefore trigger the activation of the classical complement pathway against S. pneumoniae. C3b deposition was also increased in the presence of specific anti-pneumococcal antibodies and sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefditoren and ceftriaxone confirming that the presence of these antibiotics enhances complement-mediated immunity to S. pneumoniae. Conclusions/Significance Using cefditoren and ceftriaxone to promote the binding of acute phase proteins and C1q to pneumococci, and to increase C3b deposition, when anti-pneumococcal antibodies are present, might help reduce the impact of antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae infections. PMID:22957048

  4. Commitment and Evidence in Arabic Complementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awad, Maher

    The study examines one component of the system of complementation in Palestinian Arabic. It is argued that the complementizer in question has an inherent semantics capable of influencing the meaning of sentences in which it is embedded. Specifically, its presence in a complex sentence communicates modal meanings distinct from those communicated by…

  5. Alternative pathway of complement activation in full term and premature infants.

    PubMed

    Strunk, R C; Fenton, L J; Gaines, J A

    1979-05-01

    Classical and alternative pathway complement levels were measured in the cord blood sera of 60 newly born infants, with weights ranging from 1200--4165 g. The impact of maternal illness and infant illness on the complement levels was also evaluated. The mean values for CH50, C3, C4, PH50, factor B, and properdin were all significantly less than normal adult levels (P less than 0.0001). All of the above determinations were significantly correlated with one another except for the relationship between properdin and factor B. CH50, PH50, C4, and properdin levels were significantly correlated with birth weight although there was much residual scatter. Neither maternal illness nor mild to moderate illness in the newborn altered the birth weight-complement relationships. Severe infant illness did significantly alter the relationship between birth weight and complement. However, the impact of this variable on the birth weight-complement relationships was not consistent among the various components. These inconsistencies and the small sample size preclude drawing any strong conclusions about severe illness and complement levels. PMID:471596

  6. Alternative pathway of complement activation in full term and premature infants.

    PubMed

    Strunk, R C; Fenton, L J; Gaines, J A

    1979-05-01

    Classical and alternative pathway complement levels were measured in the cord blood sera of 60 newly born infants, with weights ranging from 1200--4165 g. The impact of maternal illness and infant illness on the complement levels was also evaluated. The mean values for CH50, C3, C4, PH50, factor B, and properdin were all significantly less than normal adult levels (P less than 0.0001). All of the above determinations were significantly correlated with one another except for the relationship between properdin and factor B. CH50, PH50, C4, and properdin levels were significantly correlated with birth weight although there was much residual scatter. Neither maternal illness nor mild to moderate illness in the newborn altered the birth weight-complement relationships. Severe infant illness did significantly alter the relationship between birth weight and complement. However, the impact of this variable on the birth weight-complement relationships was not consistent among the various components. These inconsistencies and the small sample size preclude drawing any strong conclusions about severe illness and complement levels.

  7. Complement: an overview for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Varela, Juan Carlos; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    The complement system is an essential component of the immune system. It is a highly integrative system and has a number of functions, including host defense, removal of injured cells and debris, modulation of metabolic and regenerative processes, and regulation of adaptive immunity. Complement is activated via different pathways and it is regulated tightly by several mechanisms to prevent host injury. Imbalance between complement activation and regulation can manifest in disease and injury to self. This article provides an outline of complement activation pathways, regulatory mechanisms, and normal physiologic functions of the system.

  8. ORF2 protein of porcine circovirus type 2 promotes phagocytic activity of porcine macrophages by inhibiting proteasomal degradation of complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) through physical interaction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Yong; Oh, Hae-Na; Lee, Suk Jun; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-11-01

    Defining how each ORF of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) manipulates the host immune system may be helpful to understand the disease progression of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. In this study, we demonstrated a direct interaction between the PCV2 ORF2 and complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) within the cytoplasm of host macrophages. The physical interaction between PCV2 ORF2 and C1QBP inhibited ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of C1QBP in macrophages. Increased stability of C1QBP by the interaction with PCV2 ORF2 further enhanced the phagocytic activity of porcine macrophages through the phosphoinositol 3-kinase signalling pathway. This may explain the molecular basis of how PCV2 ORF2 enhances the phagocytic activity of host macrophages. PMID:26361775

  9. ORF2 protein of porcine circovirus type 2 promotes phagocytic activity of porcine macrophages by inhibiting proteasomal degradation of complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) through physical interaction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Yong; Oh, Hae-Na; Lee, Suk Jun; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-11-01

    Defining how each ORF of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) manipulates the host immune system may be helpful to understand the disease progression of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. In this study, we demonstrated a direct interaction between the PCV2 ORF2 and complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) within the cytoplasm of host macrophages. The physical interaction between PCV2 ORF2 and C1QBP inhibited ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of C1QBP in macrophages. Increased stability of C1QBP by the interaction with PCV2 ORF2 further enhanced the phagocytic activity of porcine macrophages through the phosphoinositol 3-kinase signalling pathway. This may explain the molecular basis of how PCV2 ORF2 enhances the phagocytic activity of host macrophages.

  10. Regulation of humoral immunity by complement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael C; Isenman, David E

    2012-08-24

    The complement system of innate immunity is important in regulating humoral immunity largely through the complement receptor CR2, which forms a coreceptor on B cells during antigen-induced activation. However, CR2 also retains antigens on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs). Display of antigen on FDCs is critical for clonal selection and affinity maturation of activated B cells. This review will discuss the role of complement in adaptive immunity in general with a focus on the interplay between CR2-associated antigen on B cells with CR2 expressed on FDCs. This latter interaction provides an opportunity for memory B cells to sample antigen over prolonged periods. The cocrystal structure of CR2 with its ligand C3d provides insight into how the complement system regulates access of antigen by B cells with implications for therapeutic manipulations to modulate aberrant B cell responses in the case of autoimmunity.

  11. Glycoproteins, antigens, and regulation of complement activation on the surface of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma lewisi: implications for immune evasion

    SciTech Connect

    Sturtevant, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The surface antigens and glycoproteins of the rat parasitic protozoan, Trypanosoma lewisi were characterized. Radioiodination with /sup 125/I identified 10 out of more 40 polypeptides separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All of these components were identified as glycoproteins by peroxidase-conjugated Conconavalin A (HR-Con A) lectin affinoblotting. This analysis detected that quantitative but not qualitative changes occurred during infection. Localization of most of the reactive determinants was indicated by immunoblotting extracts of radioiodinated T. lewisi. Changes in the antigenicity as related to survival in the host are discussed. The presence of IgG and IgM on the surface of T. lewisi isolated from intact and ..gamma..-irradiated rats (irr.) and that determinants bind Ig from uninfected rat sera (NRS) was indicated by flow cytometric analysis. Immunoblotting identified the major NRS IgG binding component as the 74 kd surface glycoprotein. Complement component C3 deposition during infection was indicated by flow cytometric analysis and immunoblotting. Incubation of intact T. lewisi with normal human sera indicated that C3, C5, and factor B deposition was Mg/sup 2 +/ dependent, Ca/sup 2 +/ independent and deposited C3 was rapidly processed to hemolytically inactive fragments. Radioiodination of intact and protease T. lewisi after cultivation identified three components which correlate with resistance to lysis. This suggests that surface moieties on intact T. lewisi modulate host complement activity by restricting C3/C5 convertase activity.

  12. Targeted inhibition of complement using complement receptor 2-conjugated inhibitors attenuates EAE.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R

    2012-11-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. In the last two decades, many therapeutic options for the treatment of MS have become available, however they are limited in terms of effectiveness and some remain plagued by safety issues. The currently available treatment options target relapsing remitting forms of MS and are not effective against the more progressive forms of the disease. These limitations highlight a significant unmet treatment need for MS. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) studies from our laboratory, we have previously shown, using a number of complement mutant and transgenic mice, that inhibition of the alternative complement pathway and the C3 convertase confers significant protection from disease. We report here that targeted inhibition of complement activation using complement receptor 2 (CR2)-conjugated inhibitors significantly attenuates EAE. Administration of CR2-Crry (blocks all complement pathways at C3 activation) and CR2-fH (specifically blocks the alternative pathway) just prior to and during the onset of EAE blocks progression of both acute and chronic disease. These data indicate that inhibition of complement may offer an effective therapeutic approach to treating both acute and chronic forms of demyelinating disease through blocking the alternative pathway or complement convertases. PMID:23079547