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Sample records for complement factors induced

  1. Complement factor C5a induces atherosclerotic plaque disruptions

    PubMed Central

    Wezel, Anouk; de Vries, Margreet R; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Foks, Amanda C; Kuiper, Johan; Quax, Paul HA; Bot, Ilze

    2014-01-01

    Complement factor C5a and its receptor C5aR are expressed in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques; however, a causal relation between C5a and plaque rupture has not been established yet. Accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by placing vein grafts in male apoE−/− mice. After 24 days, when advanced plaques had developed, C5a or PBS was applied locally at the lesion site in a pluronic gel. Three days later mice were killed to examine the acute effect of C5a on late stage atherosclerosis. A significant increase in C5aR in the plaque was detectable in mice treated with C5a. Lesion size and plaque morphology did not differ between treatment groups, but interestingly, local treatment with C5a resulted in a striking increase in the amount of plaque disruptions with concomitant intraplaque haemorrhage. To identify the potential underlying mechanisms, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were treated in vitro with C5a. Both cell types revealed a marked increase in apoptosis after stimulation with C5a, which may contribute to lesion instability in vivo. Indeed, apoptosis within the plaque was seen to be significantly increased after C5a treatment. We here demonstrate a causal role for C5a in atherosclerotic plaque disruptions, probably by inducing apoptosis. Therefore, intervention in complement factor C5a signalling may be a promising target in the prevention of acute atherosclerotic complications. PMID:25124749

  2. Artificial Surface-Induced Inflammation Relies on Complement Factor 5: Proof From a Deficient Person

    PubMed Central

    Bergseth, Grethe; Lambris, John D.; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Lappegård, Knut Tore

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposing blood to artificial surfaces results in an inflammatory response, including complement activation and cytokine release. The aim of this investigation was to study complement-dependency and independency in artificial surface-induced inflammation in human whole blood from a patient with a genetic deficiency of complement factor 5 (C5). Methods Whole blood from a C5-deficient patient, C5 protein reconstituted blood, and blood from a control subject was used. The complement inhibitor compstatin (C3 inhibitor) and a C5a receptor antagonist were used to block complement. Blood was circulated in closed loops of polyvinyl chloride tubing. Leukocyte CD11b expression and release of granule enzymes (myeloperoxidase, elastase, lactoferrin), cytokines (interleukins, chemokines, and growth factors; n = 27) as well as complement activation were measured after incubation. Results In C5-deficient blood, there was no formation of the terminal complement complex, as opposed to reconstituted or control blood. Release of granule enzymes was partly dependent on C3, revealed by a compstatin-dependent effect in C5-deficient blood, and partly C5a-dependent as evident from the reconstitution and control blood. The chemokines interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were also highly complement dependent, the effect being C5a-mediated, whereas platelet-derived and vascular endothelial growth factors were partly complement dependent. Interferon-γ increased in a complement-independent manner, whereas the rest of the cytokines did not respond to the surface. Leukocyte expression of CD11b was only marginally increased in deficient blood exposed to the surface, whereas reconstitution induced a considerable, C5a-dependent increase, comparable with that of the control. Conclusions The polyvinyl chloride surface induced a defined inflammatory response, which largely depended on C5. PMID:21256307

  3. Virus-induced gene complementation reveals a transcription factor network in modulation of tomato fruit ripening

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Hang; Lai, Tongfei; Qin, Cheng; Shi, Nongnong; Wang, Huizhong; Jin, Mingfei; Zhong, Silin; Fan, Zaifeng; Liu, Yule; Wu, Zirong; Jackson, Stephen; Giovannoni, James J.; Rolin, Dominique; Gallusci, Philippe; Hong, Yiguo

    2012-01-01

    Plant virus technology, in particular virus-induced gene silencing, is a widely used reverse- and forward-genetics tool in plant functional genomics. However the potential of virus technology to express genes to induce phenotypes or to complement mutants in order to understand the function of plant genes is not well documented. Here we exploit Potato virus X as a tool for virus-induced gene complementation (VIGC). Using VIGC in tomato, we demonstrated that ectopic viral expression of LeMADS-RIN, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor (TF), resulted in functional complementation of the non-ripening rin mutant phenotype and caused fruits to ripen. Comparative gene expression analysis indicated that LeMADS-RIN up-regulated expression of the SBP-box (SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein-like) gene LeSPL-CNR, but down-regulated the expression of LeHB-1, an HD-Zip homeobox TF gene. Our data support the hypothesis that a transcriptional network may exist among key TFs in the modulation of fruit ripening in tomato. PMID:23150786

  4. Essential role of surface-bound complement factor H in controlling immune complex-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Banda, Nirmal K; Mehta, Gaurav; Ferreira, Viviana P; Cortes, Claudio; Pickering, Matthew C; Pangburn, Michael K; Arend, William P; Holers, V Michael

    2013-04-01

    Factor H (fH) is an endogenous negative regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) that binds polyanions as well as complement activation fragments C3b and C3d. The AP is both necessary and sufficient to develop collagen Ab-induced arthritis (CAIA) in mice; the mechanisms whereby normal control of the AP is overcome and injury develops are unknown. Although primarily a soluble circulating protein, fH can also bind to tissues in a manner dependent on the carboxyl-terminal domain containing short consensus repeats 19 and 20. We examined the role of fH in CAIA by blocking its binding to tissues through administration of a recombinant negative inhibitor containing short consensus repeats 19 and 20 (rfH19-20), which impairs fH function and amplifies surface AP activation in vitro. Administration of rfH19-20, but not control rfH3-5, significantly worsened clinical disease activity, histopathologic injury, and C3 deposition in the synovium and cartilage in wild-type and fH(+/-) mice. In vitro studies demonstrated that rfH19-20 increased complement activation on cartilage extracts and injured fibroblast-like synoviocytes, two major targets of complement deposition in the joint. We conclude that endogenous fH makes a significant contribution to inhibition of the AP in CAIA through binding to sites of immune complex formation and complement activation.

  5. Essential Role of Surface-Bound Complement Factor H in Controlling Immune Complex–Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Gaurav; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Cortes, Claudio; Pickering, Matthew C.; Pangburn, Michael K.; Arend, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Factor H (fH) is an endogenous negative regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) that binds polyanions as well as complement activation fragments C3b and C3d. The AP is both necessary and sufficient to develop collagen Ab–induced arthritis (CAIA) in mice; the mechanisms whereby normal control of the AP is overcome and injury develops are unknown. Although primarily a soluble circulating protein, fH can also bind to tissues in a manner dependent on the carboxyl-terminal domain containing short consensus repeats 19 and 20. We examined the role of fH in CAIA by blocking its binding to tissues through administration of a recombinant negative inhibitor containing short consensus repeats 19 and 20 (rfH19-20), which impairs fH function and amplifies surface AP activation in vitro. Administration of rfH19-20, but not control rfH3-5, significantly worsened clinical disease activity, histopathologic injury, and C3 deposition in the synovium and cartilage in wild-type and fH+/− mice. In vitro studies demonstrated that rfH19-20 increased complement activation on cartilage extracts and injured fibroblast-like synoviocytes, two major targets of complement deposition in the joint. We conclude that endogenous fH makes a significant contribution to inhibition of the AP in CAIA through binding to sites of immune complex formation and complement activation. PMID:23436934

  6. Zinc-induced Self-association of Complement C3b and Factor H

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Ruodan; Tetchner, Stuart; Rodriguez, Elizabeth; Pao, Po-Jung; Gor, Jayesh; Lengyel, Imre; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    The sub-retinal pigment epithelial deposits that are a hallmark of age-related macular degeneration contain both C3b and millimolar levels of zinc. C3 is the central protein of complement, whereas C3u is formed by the spontaneous hydrolysis of the thioester bridge in C3. During activation, C3 is cleaved to form active C3b, then C3b is inactivated by Factor I and Factor H to form the C3c and C3d fragments. The interaction of zinc with C3 was quantified using analytical ultracentrifugation and x-ray scattering. C3, C3u, and C3b associated strongly in >100 μm zinc, whereas C3c and C3d showed weak association. With zinc, C3 forms soluble oligomers, whereas C3u and C3b precipitate. We conclude that the C3, C3u, and C3b association with zinc depended on the relative positions of C3d and C3c in each protein. Computational predictions showed that putative weak zinc binding sites with different capacities exist in all five proteins, in agreement with experiments. Factor H forms large oligomers in >10 μm zinc. In contrast to C3b or Factor H alone, the solubility of the central C3b-Factor H complex was much reduced at 60 μm zinc and even more so at >100 μm zinc. The removal of the C3b-Factor H complex by zinc explains the reduced C3u/C3b inactivation rates by zinc. Zinc-induced precipitation may contribute to the initial development of sub-retinal pigment epithelial deposits in the retina as well as reducing the progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration in higher risk patients. PMID:23661701

  7. Small Molecule-Induced Complement Factor D (Adipsin) Promotes Lipid Accumulation and Adipocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Song, No-Joon; Kim, Suji; Jang, Byung-Hyun; Chang, Seo-Hyuk; Yun, Ui Jeong; Park, Ki-Moon; Waki, Hironori; Li, Dean Y; Tontonoz, Peter; Park, Kye Won

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are differentiated by various transcriptional cascades integrated on the master regulator, Pparγ. To discover new genes involved in adipocyte differentiation, preadipocytes were treated with three newly identified pro-adipogenic small molecules and GW7845 (a Pparγ agonist) for 24 hours and transcriptional profiling was analyzed. Four genes, Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (Pparγ), human complement factor D homolog (Cfd), Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 9 (Ccl9), and GIPC PDZ Domain Containing Family Member 2 (Gipc2) were induced by at least two different small molecules but not by GW7845. Cfd and Ccl9 expressions were specific to adipocytes and they were altered in obese mice. Small hairpin RNA (shRNA) mediated knockdown of Cfd in preadipocytes inhibited lipid accumulation and expression of adipocyte markers during adipocyte differentiation. Overexpression of Cfd promoted adipocyte differentiation, increased C3a production, and led to induction of C3a receptor (C3aR) target gene expression. Similarly, treatments with C3a or C3aR agonist (C4494) also promoted adipogenesis. C3aR knockdown suppressed adipogenesis and impaired the pro-adipogenic effects of Cfd, further suggesting the necessity for C3aR signaling in Cfd-mediated pro-adipogenic axis. Together, these data show the action of Cfd in adipogenesis and underscore the application of small molecules to identify genes in adipocytes.

  8. Small Molecule-Induced Complement Factor D (Adipsin) Promotes Lipid Accumulation and Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Byung-Hyun; Chang, Seo-Hyuk; Yun, Ui Jeong; Park, Ki-Moon; Waki, Hironori; Li, Dean Y.; Tontonoz, Peter; Park, Kye Won

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are differentiated by various transcriptional cascades integrated on the master regulator, Pparγ. To discover new genes involved in adipocyte differentiation, preadipocytes were treated with three newly identified pro-adipogenic small molecules and GW7845 (a Pparγ agonist) for 24 hours and transcriptional profiling was analyzed. Four genes, Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (Pparγ), human complement factor D homolog (Cfd), Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 9 (Ccl9), and GIPC PDZ Domain Containing Family Member 2 (Gipc2) were induced by at least two different small molecules but not by GW7845. Cfd and Ccl9 expressions were specific to adipocytes and they were altered in obese mice. Small hairpin RNA (shRNA) mediated knockdown of Cfd in preadipocytes inhibited lipid accumulation and expression of adipocyte markers during adipocyte differentiation. Overexpression of Cfd promoted adipocyte differentiation, increased C3a production, and led to induction of C3a receptor (C3aR) target gene expression. Similarly, treatments with C3a or C3aR agonist (C4494) also promoted adipogenesis. C3aR knockdown suppressed adipogenesis and impaired the pro-adipogenic effects of Cfd, further suggesting the necessity for C3aR signaling in Cfd-mediated pro-adipogenic axis. Together, these data show the action of Cfd in adipogenesis and underscore the application of small molecules to identify genes in adipocytes. PMID:27611793

  9. Imaging of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and septin 9 interaction by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in live cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Golan, Maya; Mabjeesh, Nicola J

    2017-05-09

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a major mediator of the hypoxic response involved in tumor progression. We had earlier described the interaction between septin 9 isoform 1 (SEPT9_i1) protein and the oxygen-regulated subunit, HIF-1α. SEPT9_i1 is a member of the conserved family of GTP-binding cytoskeleton septins. SEPT9_i1 stabilizes HIF-1α and facilitates its cytoplasmic-nuclear translocation. We utilized split yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) methodology to monitor the interaction between HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1 in live cells. N-terminal (YN) and C-terminal (YC) split YFP chimeras with HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1 on both their amino and carboxyl termini were generated. HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1 chimeras were expressed in cancer cells and screened for functional complementation. SEPT9_i1-YN and YC-HIF-1α formed a long-lived highly stable complex upon interaction. The BiFC signal was increased in the presence of hypoxia-mimicking agents. In contrast, YC-ΔHLH-HIF-1α chimera, which lacked the helix-loop-helix domain that is essential for the interaction with SEPT9_i1 as well as the expression of SEPT9_i1 252-379 amino acids fragment required for the interaction with HIF-1α, significantly reduced the BiFC signal. The signal was also reduced when cells were treated with 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, an HSP90 inhibitor that inhibits HIF-1α. It was increased with fourchlorfenuron, a small molecule that increases the interaction between HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1. These results reconfirmed the interaction between HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1 that was imaged in live cells. This BiFC system represents a novel approach for studying the real-time interaction between these two proteins and will allow high-throughput drug screening to identity compounds that disrupt this interaction.

  10. Milk immunoglobulins and complement factors.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, H; Marnila, P; Gill, H S

    2000-11-01

    The importance of colostrum for the growth and health of newborn offspring is well known. In bovine colostrum, the antibody (immunoglobulin) complement system provides a major antimicrobial effect against a wide range of microbes and confers passive immunity until the calf's own immune system has matured. Bovine serum and lacteal secretions contain three major classes of immunoglobulins: IgG, IgM and IgA. The immunoglobulins are selectively transported from the serum into the mammary gland, as a result of which the first colostrum contains very high concentrations of immunoglobulins (40-200 mg/ml). IgG1 accounts for over 75 % of the immunoglobulins in colostral whey, followed by IgM, IgA and IgG2. All these immunoglobulins decrease within a few days to a total immunoglobulin concentration of 0.7-1.0 mg/ml, with IgG1 representing the major Ig class in milk throughout the lactation period. Together with the antibodies absorbed from colostrum after birth, the complement system plays a crucial role in the passive immunisation of the newborn calf. The occurrence of haemolytic or bactericidal complement activity in bovine colostrum and milk has been demonstrated in several studies. This review deals with the characteristics of bovine Igs and the complement system to be exploited as potential ingredients for health-promoting functional foods.

  11. Association Between Microglia, Inflammatory Factors, and Complement with Loss of Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses Induced by Trimethyltin.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Andrew D; McPherson, Christopher A; Harry, G Jean

    2016-07-01

    Complement-associated factors are implicated in pathogen presentation, neurodegeneration, and microglia resolution of tissue injury. To characterize complement activation with microglial clearance of degenerating mossy fiber boutons, hippocampal dentate granule neurons were ablated in CD-1 mice with trimethyltin (TMT; 2.2 mg/kg, i.p.). Neuronal apoptosis was accompanied by amoeboid microglia and elevations in tumor necrosis factor [Tnfa], interleukin 1β [Il1b], and Il6 mRNA and C1q protein. Inos mRNA levels were unaltered. Silver degeneration and synaptophysin staining indicated loss of synaptic innervation to CA3 pyramidal neurons. Reactive microglia with thickened bushy morphology showed co-localization of synaptophysin+ fragments. The initial response at 2 days post-TMT included transient elevations in Tnfa, Il1b, Il6, and Inos mRNA levels. A concurrent increase at 2 days was observed in arginase-1 [Arg1], Il10, transforming growth factor β1 [Tgfb1], and chitinase 3 like-3 [Ym1] mRNA levels. At 2 days, C1q protein was evident in the CA3 with elevated C1qa, C1qb, C3, Cr3a, and Cr3b mRNA levels. mRNA levels remained elevated at 5 days, returning to control by 14 days, corresponding to silver degeneration. mRNA levels for pentraxin3 (Ptx3) were elevated on day 2 and Ptx1 was not altered. Our data suggest an association between microglia reactivity, the induction of anti-inflammatory genes concurrent with pro-inflammatory genes and the expression of complement-associated factors with the degeneration of synapses following apoptotic neuronal loss.

  12. The alternative complement component factor B regulates UV-induced oedema, systemic suppression of contact and delayed hypersensitivity, and mast cell infiltration into the skin.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Scott N; Hammond, Kirsten J L; Chan, Carling Y-Y; Rogers, Linda J; Beaugie, Clare; Rana, Sabita; Marsh-Wakefield, Felix; Thurman, Joshua M; Halliday, Gary M

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths in sunlight are the prime cause of skin cancer in humans with both the UVA and UVB wavebands making a contribution to photocarcinogenesis. UV has many different biological effects on the skin that contribute to carcinogenesis, including suppression of adaptive immunity, sunburn and altering the migration of mast cells into and away from irradiated skin. Many molecular mechanisms have been identified as contributing to skin responses to UV. Recently, using gene set enrichment analysis of microarray data, we identified the alternative complement pathway with a central role for factor B (fB) in UVA-induced immunosuppression. In the current study we used mice genetically deficient in fB (fB-/- mice) to study the functional role of the alternative complement pathway in skin responses to UV. We found that fB is required for not only UVA but also UVB-induced immunosuppression and solar-simulated UV induction of the oedemal component of sunburn. Factor B-/- mice had a larger number of resident skin mast cells than control mice, but unlike the controls did not respond to UV by increasing mast cell infiltration into the skin. This study provides evidence for a function role for fB in skin responses to UV radiation. Factor B regulates UVA and UVB induced immunosuppression, UV induced oedema and mast cell infiltration into the skin. The alternative complement pathway is therefore an important regulator of skin responses to UV.

  13. Iron-induced Local Complement Component 3 (C3) Up-regulation via Non-canonical Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β Signaling in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Li, Yafeng; Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Zhao, Liangliang; Wolkow, Natalie; Tobias, John W; Song, Wenchao; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2015-05-08

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis may be a pathogenic factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, the formation of complement-containing deposits under the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer is a pathognomonic feature of AMD. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which complement component 3 (C3), a central protein in the complement cascade, is up-regulated by iron in RPE cells. Modulation of TGF-β signaling, involving ERK1/2, SMAD3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, is responsible for iron-induced C3 expression. The differential effects of spatially distinct SMAD3 phosphorylation sites at the linker region and at the C terminus determined the up-regulation of C3. Pharmacologic inhibition of either ERK1/2 or SMAD3 phosphorylation decreased iron-induced C3 expression levels. Knockdown of SMAD3 blocked the iron-induced up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, a transcription factor that has been shown previously to bind the basic leucine zipper 1 domain in the C3 promoter. We show herein that mutation of this domain reduced iron-induced C3 promoter activity. In vivo studies support our in vitro finding of iron-induced C3 up-regulation. Mice with a mosaic pattern of RPE-specific iron overload demonstrated co-localization of iron-induced ferritin and C3d deposits. Humans with aceruloplasminemia causing RPE iron overload had increased RPE C3d deposition. The molecular events in the iron-C3 pathway represent therapeutic targets for AMD or other diseases exacerbated by iron-induced local complement dysregulation.

  14. Iron-induced Local Complement Component 3 (C3) Up-regulation via Non-canonical Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β Signaling in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yafeng; Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Zhao, Liangliang; Wolkow, Natalie; Tobias, John W.; Song, Wenchao; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis may be a pathogenic factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, the formation of complement-containing deposits under the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer is a pathognomonic feature of AMD. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which complement component 3 (C3), a central protein in the complement cascade, is up-regulated by iron in RPE cells. Modulation of TGF-β signaling, involving ERK1/2, SMAD3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, is responsible for iron-induced C3 expression. The differential effects of spatially distinct SMAD3 phosphorylation sites at the linker region and at the C terminus determined the up-regulation of C3. Pharmacologic inhibition of either ERK1/2 or SMAD3 phosphorylation decreased iron-induced C3 expression levels. Knockdown of SMAD3 blocked the iron-induced up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, a transcription factor that has been shown previously to bind the basic leucine zipper 1 domain in the C3 promoter. We show herein that mutation of this domain reduced iron-induced C3 promoter activity. In vivo studies support our in vitro finding of iron-induced C3 up-regulation. Mice with a mosaic pattern of RPE-specific iron overload demonstrated co-localization of iron-induced ferritin and C3d deposits. Humans with aceruloplasminemia causing RPE iron overload had increased RPE C3d deposition. The molecular events in the iron-C3 pathway represent therapeutic targets for AMD or other diseases exacerbated by iron-induced local complement dysregulation. PMID:25802332

  15. SIGN-R1 and complement factors are involved in the systemic clearance of radiation-induced apoptotic cells in whole-body irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-Yeon; Loh, SoHee; Cho, Eun-hee; Choi, Hyeong-Jwa; Na, Tae-Young; Nemeno, Judee Grace E.; Lee, Jeong Ik; Yoon, Taek Joon; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Jae-Seon; Kang, Young-Sun

    2015-08-07

    Although SIGN-R1-mediated complement activation pathway has been shown to enhance the systemic clearance of apoptotic cells, the role of SIGN-R1 in the clearance of radiation-induced apoptotic cells has not been characterized and was investigated in this study. Our data indicated that whole-body γ-irradiation of mice increased caspase-3{sup +} apoptotic lymphocyte numbers in secondary lymphoid organs. Following γ-irradiation, SIGN-R1 and complements (C4 and C3) were simultaneously increased only in the mice spleen tissue among the assessed tissues. In particular, C3 was exclusively activated in the spleen. The delayed clearance of apoptotic cells was markedly prevalent in the spleen and liver of SIGN-R1 KO mice, followed by a significant increase of CD11b{sup +} cells. These results indicate that SIGN-R1 and complement factors play an important role in the systemic clearance of radiation-induced apoptotic innate immune cells to maintain tissue homeostasis after γ-irradiation. - Highlights: • Splenic SIGN-R1{sup +} macrophages are activated after γ-irradiation. • C3 and C4 levels increased and C3 was activated in the spleen after γ-irradiation. • SIGN-R1 mediated the systemic clearance of radiation-induced apoptotic cells in spleen and liver.

  16. BIMOLECULAR FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION ANALYSIS OF INDUCIBLE PROTEIN INTERACTIONS: EFFECTS OF FACTORS AFFECTING PROTEIN FOLDING ON FLUORESCENT PROTEIN FRAGMENT ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Robida, Aaron M; Kerppola, Tom K

    2009-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis enables visualization of the subcellular locations of protein interactions in living cells. We investigated the temporal resolution and the quantitative accuracy of BiFC analysis using fragments of different fluorescent proteins. We determined the kinetics of BiFC complex formation in response to the rapamycin-inducible interaction between the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) and the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain (FRB). Fragments of YFP fused to FKBP and FRB produced detectable BiFC complex fluorescence 10 minutes after rapamycin addition and a ten-fold increase in the mean fluorescence intensity in 8 hours. The N-terminal fragment of the Venus fluorescent protein fused to FKBP produced constitutive BiFC complexes with several C-terminal fragments fused to FRB. A chimeric N-terminal fragment containing residues from Venus and YFP produced either constitutive or inducible BiFC complexes depending on the temperature at which the cells were cultured. The concentrations of inducers required for half-maximal induction of BiFC complex formation by all fluorescent protein fragments tested were consistent with the affinities of the inducers for unmodified FKBP and FRB. Treatment of the FK506 inhibitor of FKBP-FRB interaction prevented the formation of BiFC complexes by FKBP and FRB fusions, but did not disrupt existing BiFC complexes. Proteins synthesized prior to rapamycin addition formed BiFC complexes with the same efficiency as newly synthesized proteins. Inhibitors of protein synthesis attenuated BiFC complex formation independent of their effects on fusion protein synthesis. The kinetics at which they inhibited BiFC complex formation suggest that they prevented association of the fluorescent protein fragments, but not the slow maturation of BiFC complex fluorescence. Agents that induce the unfolded protein response also reduced formation of BiFC complexes. The effects of these agents were suppressed by cellular

  17. Generation of a complement-derived chemotactic factor for tumor cells in experimentally induced peritoneal exudates and its effect on the local metastasis of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Orr, F. W.; Mokashi, S.; Delikatny, J.

    1982-01-01

    A chemotactic factor for tumor cells was found in inflammatory exudate fluids induced by giving intraperitoneal injections of glycogen to Sprague-Dawley rats. The quantity of chemotactic activity and the period of time during which it could be detected correlated with the inflammatory reaction, measured by the cellular composition of the exudates and their content of protein and lysosomal enzymes. In gel filtration the chemotactic factor behaved mainly as a molecule having a molecular weight of approximately 6000 daltons. Its biologic activity was blocked by antiserums directed against C5 but not by antiserums against C3 or C4. In these two respects, the factor generated in vivo has the same properties as a previously described chemotactic factor that can be generated in vitro by proteolysis of purified C5 or C5a. Chemotactic activity was not detected in the glycogen-induced peritoneal exudates of rats depleted of serum complement by cobra venom factor. Intravenously injected Walker tumor cells arrested and formed metastases in the mesenteries of rats with peritonitis in greater numbers than in normal controls, animals depleted of complement during the experimental period, or animals given intraperitoneal injections of the vasopermeability agent, histamine. The growth of tumor cells in vitro was not promoted by peritoneal exudate fluids, nor was the number of metastases on vivo greater than in negative controls, in animals in which peritonitis was induced 24 hours after the intravenous injection of tumor cells. It is argued that chemotactic mechanisms can contribute to the formation of metastases at sites of tissue injury. PMID:7091299

  18. The membrane attack complex of complement contributes to plasmin-induced synthesis of platelet-activating factor by endothelial cells and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lupia, Enrico; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Bergerone, Serena; Emanuelli, Giorgio; Camussi, Giovanni; Montrucchio, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Thrombolytic agents, used to restore blood flow to ischaemic tissues, activate several enzymatic systems with pro-inflammatory effects, thus potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of ischaemia–reperfusion injury. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a phospholipid mediator of inflammation, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of this process. We previously showed that the infusion of streptokinase (SK) induces the intravascular release of PAF in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and that cultured human endothelial cells (EC) synthesized PAF in response to SK and plasmin (PLN). In the present study, we investigated the role of the membrane attack complex (MAC) of complement in the PLN-induced synthesis of PAF. In vivo, we showed a correlation between the levels of soluble terminal complement components (sC5b-9) and the concentrations of PAF detected in blood of patients with AMI infused with SK. In vitro both EC and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), incubated in the presence of PLN and normal human serum, showed an intense staining for the MAC neoepitope, while no staining was detected when they were incubated with PLN in the presence of heat-inactivated normal human serum. Moreover, the insertion of MAC on EC and PMN plasmamembrane elicited the synthesis of PAF. In conclusion, our results elucidate the mechanisms involved in PAF production during the activation of the fibrinolytic system, showing a role for complement products in this setting. The release of PAF may increase the inflammatory response, thus limiting the beneficial effects of thrombolytic therapy. Moreover, it may have a pathogenic role in other pathological conditions, such as transplant rejection, tumoral angiogenesis, and septic shock, where fibrinolysis is activated. PMID:12871223

  19. Complement Activation in Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Rohit; Ganey, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    Overdose with acetaminophen (APAP) results in acute liver failure in humans and experimental animals. Complement comprises more than 30 proteins that can participate in tissue injury and/or repair, but the role of complement activation in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity has not been evaluated. Treatment of male, C57BL6J mice with APAP (200–400 mg/kg) resulted in liver injury as evidenced by increased activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in plasma and hepatocellular necrosis. Plasma concentration of the complement component C3 was significantly reduced 6 h after treatment with APAP, indicating complement activation, and C3b (detected by immunostaining) accumulated in the centrilobular areas of liver lobules. Pretreatment with cobra venom factor (CVF; 15 U/mouse) to deplete complement components abolished APAP-mediated C3b accumulation, and this was accompanied by reductions in plasma ALT activity, hepatocellular necrosis, hepatic neutrophil accumulation, and expression of inflammatory genes (interleukin-6, interleukin-10, and plasminogen activation inhibitor-1) at 24 h after APAP treatment. Loss of hepatocellular GSH was similar in APAP-treated mice pretreated with either saline or CVF, suggesting that CVF pretreatment did not affect APAP bioactivation. Mice with a genetic deficiency in C3 had reduced ALT activity 6 and 12 h after APAP administration compared with wild-type animals. These results reveal a key role for complement activation in hepatic inflammation and progression of injury during the pathogenesis of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:22319198

  20. Blast-Induced Moderate Neurotrauma (BINT) Elicits Early Complement Activation and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNFalpha) Release in a Rat Brain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-25

    Morganti-Kossmann MC, Jones JL, Barnum SR. Elevated levels of the complement components C3 and factor B in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid of patients with...Ingersoll SA, Martin CB, Barnum SR, Martin BK. CNS-specific expression of C3a and C5a exacerbate demyelination severity in the cuprizone model. Mol Immunol

  1. Human monocyte spreading induced by factor Bb of the alternative pathway of complement activation. A possible role for C5 in monocyte spreading

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The central serine esterase of the alternative pathway of complement (APC) activation, activated factor B (Bb), has been shown recently to induce murine macrophages and human monocytes to become spread on a glass substrata. It has also been established that to induce the spreading reaction, the catalytic site of the Bb enzyme must be structurally intact since treatment of Bb with heat (56 degrees C for 30 min) or diisopropylfluorophosphate (10(-3) M) destroyed both enzymatic and spreading activities. In the C3b,Bb complex, Bb exhibits restricted substrate specificity for C3 and C5. With this in mind, the role of C3 and C5 in the monocyte spreading reaction was explored in the present study. Expression of C3 and C5 on the surface of human peripheral blood monocytes was investigated by the direct fluorescent antibody technique employing fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated anti- C3 or C5 F(ab')2 antibody fragments. It was found that C3 and C5 were present on 6 +/- 7% of freshly prepared monocytes and that expression of C5, but not C3, increased to 70 +/- 6% when monocytes were incubated for 3 d in serum-free medium. Biosynthesis of C5 was indicated when it was found that under serum-free conditions, monocytes incorporated [3H]leucine into immunoprecipitable C5 with an apparent mol wt of 180,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The role of C3 and C5 in the monocyte spreading reaction induced by factor Bb was explored by testing for the ability of anti-C3 and anti- C5 Fab' antibody fragments to block monocyte spreading. It was found that anti-C5 Fab' inhibited by up to 100% the 3-h human monocyte spreading reaction induced by Bb; in contrast, anti-C3 Fab' or anti-C4 Fab' inhibited by less than 10%. That the inhibitory effect of anti-C5 Fab' was exerted directly on the monocyte was established when it was found that the 3-h monocyte spreading reaction was significantly inhibited by pretreating monocytes with anti-C5 Fab' for 20 min and then

  2. Complement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fungal infections and some parasitic infections such as malaria . Normal Results Total blood complement level: 41 to ... Glomerulonephritis Hepatitis Hereditary angioedema Kidney transplant Lupus nephritis Malaria Protein in diet Rheumatoid arthritis Septicemia Shock Systemic ...

  3. Sodium butyrate blocks interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-induced biosynthesis of MHC class III gene products (complement C4 and factor B) in human fetal intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, K; Andoh, A; Inoue, T; Amakata, Y; Hodohara, K; Fujiyama, Y; Bamba, T

    1999-01-01

    Human intestinal epithelial cells have been established as local sites for complement biosynthesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of IFN-γ and sodium butyrate on biosynthesis of MHC class III gene products (complement C4 and factor B) in the human fetal intestinal epithelial cell line INT-407. IFN-γ induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in C4 and factor B secretion. However, sodium butyrate dose-dependently inhibited IFN-γ-induced C4 and factor B secretion. These effects were also observed at the mRNA level. Immunoblotting indicated that IFN-γ induced a rapid activation of Stat1α, and fluorescence immunohistochemistry detected a translocation of Stat1α into the nucleus within 1 h. However, the translocation of Stat1α was not affected by the addition of sodium butyrate. Nuclear run-on assay indicated that IFN-γ induced a weak increase in the transcription rate of factor B gene, and sodium butyrate did not affect this response. IFN-γ and sodium butyrate induced a counter-regulatory effect on C4 and factor B secretion: IFN-γ acted as a potent inducer, but sodium butyrate potently abrogated these responses. These are mainly regulated through the post-transcriptional mechanism. PMID:10540154

  4. An Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Patient Specific Model of Complement Factor H (Y402H) Polymorphism Displays Characteristic Features of Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Indicates a Beneficial Role for UV Light Exposure.

    PubMed

    Hallam, Dean; Collin, Joseph; Bojic, Sanja; Chichagova, Valeria; Buskin, Adriana; Xu, Yaobo; Lafage, Lucia; Otten, Elsje G; Anyfantis, George; Mellough, Carla; Przyborski, Stefan; Alharthi, Sameer; Korolchuk, Viktor; Lotery, Andrew; Saretzki, Gabriele; McKibbin, Martin; Armstrong, Lyle; Steel, David; Kavanagh, David; Lako, Majlinda

    2017-09-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness, accounting for 8.7% of all blindness globally. Vision loss is caused ultimately by apoptosis of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and overlying photoreceptors. Treatments are evolving for the wet form of the disease; however, these do not exist for the dry form. Complement factor H polymorphism in exon 9 (Y402H) has shown a strong association with susceptibility to AMD resulting in complement activation, recruitment of phagocytes, RPE damage, and visual decline. We have derived and characterized induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from two subjects without AMD and low-risk genotype and two patients with advanced AMD and high-risk genotype and generated RPE cells that show local secretion of several proteins involved in the complement pathway including factor H, factor I, and factor H-like protein 1. The iPSC RPE cells derived from high-risk patients mimic several key features of AMD including increased inflammation and cellular stress, accumulation of lipid droplets, impaired autophagy, and deposition of "drüsen"-like deposits. The low- and high-risk RPE cells respond differently to intermittent exposure to UV light, which leads to an improvement in cellular and functional phenotype only in the high-risk AMD-RPE cells. Taken together, our data indicate that the patient specific iPSC model provides a robust platform for understanding the role of complement activation in AMD, evaluating new therapies based on complement modulation and drug testing. Stem Cells 2017. © 2017 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  5. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: complement factor I deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... factor I deficiency can also be associated with autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system malfunctions and attacks ...

  7. Complement factor B expression profile in a spontaneous uveitis model.

    PubMed

    Zipplies, Johanna K; Kirschfink, Michael; Amann, Barbara; Hauck, Stefanie M; Stangassinger, Manfred; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2010-12-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis serves as a spontaneous model for human autoimmune uveitis. Unpredictable relapses and ongoing inflammation in the eyes of diseased horses as well as in humans lead to destruction of the retina and finally result in blindness. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to inflammation and retinal degeneration are not well understood. An initial screening for differentially regulated proteins in sera of uveitic cases compared to healthy controls revealed an increase of the alternative pathway complement component factor B in ERU cases. To determine the activation status of the complement system, sera were subsequently examined for complement split products. We could demonstrate a significant higher concentration of the activation products B/Ba, B/Bb, Bb neoantigen, iC3b and C3d in uveitic condition compared to healthy controls, whereas for C5b-9 no differences were detected. Additionally, we investigated complement activation directly in the retina by immunohistochemistry, since it is the main target organ of this autoimmune disease. Interestingly, infiltrating cells co-expressed activated factor Bb neoantigen, complement split product C3d as well as CD68, a macrophage marker. In this study, we could demonstrate activation of the complement system both systemically as well as in the eye, the target organ of spontaneous recurrent uveitis. Based on these novel findings, we postulate a novel role for macrophages in connection with complement synthesis at the site of inflammation.

  8. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Michal; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Manandhar, Surya P; Popadiak, Katarzyna; Riesbeck, Kristian; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M

    2009-02-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A) resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  9. Complement factor H in host defense and immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Parente, Raffaella; Clark, Simon J; Inforzato, Antonio; Day, Anthony J

    2017-05-01

    Complement is the major humoral component of the innate immune system. It recognizes pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns, and initiates the immune response in coordination with innate and adaptive immunity. When activated, the complement system unleashes powerful cytotoxic and inflammatory mechanisms, and thus its tight control is crucial to prevent damage to host tissues and allow restoration of immune homeostasis. Factor H is the major soluble inhibitor of complement, where its binding to self markers (i.e., particular glycan structures) prevents complement activation and amplification on host surfaces. Not surprisingly, mutations and polymorphisms that affect recognition of self by factor H are associated with diseases of complement dysregulation, such as age-related macular degeneration and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. In addition, pathogens (i.e., non-self) and cancer cells (i.e., altered-self) can hijack factor H to evade the immune response. Here we review recent (and not so recent) literature on the structure and function of factor H, including the emerging roles of this protein in the pathophysiology of infectious diseases and cancer.

  10. Complement activation is critical for placental ischemia-induced hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lillegard, Kathryn E; Johnson, Alex C; Lojovich, Sarah J; Bauer, Ashley J; Marsh, Henry C; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Regal, Jean F

    2013-11-01

    Preeclampsia is a major obstetric problem defined by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria associated with compromised placental perfusion. Although activation of the complement system is increased in preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy, it remains unclear whether excess complement activation is a cause or consequence of placental ischemia. Therefore, we hypothesized that complement activation is critical for placental ischemia-induced hypertension. We employed the reduced utero-placental perfusion pressure (RUPP) model of placental ischemia in the rat to induce hypertension in the third trimester and evaluated the effect of inhibiting complement activation with a soluble recombinant form of an endogenous complement regulator, human complement receptor 1 (sCR1; CDX-1135). On day 14 of a 21-day gestation, rats received either RUPP or Sham surgery and 15 mg/kg/day sCR1 or saline intravenously on days 14-18. Circulating complement component 3 decreased and complement activation product C3a increased in RUPP vs. Sham (p<0.05), indicating complement activation had occurred. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) measured on day 19 increased in RUPP vs. Sham rats (109.8±2.8 mmHg vs. 93.6±1.6 mmHg). Treatment with sCR1 significantly reduced elevated MAP in RUPP rats (98.4±3.6 mmHg, p<0.05) and reduced C3a production. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) decreased in RUPP compared to Sham rats, and the decrease in VEGF was not affected by sCR1 treatment. Thus, these studies have identified a mechanistic link between complement activation and the pregnancy complication of hypertension apart from free plasma VEGF and have identified complement inhibition as a potential treatment strategy for placental ischemia-induced hypertension in preeclampsia.

  11. Activated Complement Factors as Disease Markers for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflieh, Jean; Rushbrook, Julie; Worah, Samrat; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Early recognition and effective management are essential for improved outcome. However, early recognition is impeded by lack of clinically utilized biomarkers. Complement factors play important roles in the mechanisms leading to sepsis and can potentially serve as early markers of sepsis and of sepsis severity and outcome. This review provides a synopsis of recent animal and clinical studies of the role of complement factors in sepsis development, together with their potential as disease markers. In addition, new results from our laboratory are presented regarding the involvement of the complement factor, mannose-binding lectin, in septic shock patients. Future clinical studies are needed to obtain the complete profiles of complement factors/their activated products during the course of sepsis development. We anticipate that the results of these studies will lead to a multipanel set of sepsis biomarkers which, along with currently used laboratory tests, will facilitate earlier diagnosis, timely treatment, and improved outcome. PMID:26420913

  12. Activation of complement pathways after contusion-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Aileen J; Robert, Stephanie; Huang, Wencheng; Young, Wise; Cotman, Carl W

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that a cellular inflammatory response is initiated, and inflammatory cytokines are synthesized, following experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the complement cascade, a major component of both the innate and adaptive immune response, is also activated following experimental SCI. We investigated the pathways, cellular localization, timecourse, and degree of complement activation in rat spinal cord following acute contusion-induced SCI using the New York University (NYU) weight drop impactor. Mild and severe injuries (12.5 and 50 mm drop heights) at 1, 7, and 42 days post injury time points were evaluated. Classical (C1q and C4), alternative (Factor B) and terminal (C5b-9) complement pathways were strongly activated within 1 day of SCI. Complement protein immunoreactivity was predominantly found in cell types vulnerable to degeneration, neurons and oligodendrocytes, and was not generally observed in inflammatory or astroglial cells. Surprisingly, immunoreactivity for complement proteins was also evident 6 weeks after injury, and complement activation was observed as far as 20 mm rostral to the site of injury. Axonal staining by C1q and Factor B was also observed, suggesting a potential role for the complement cascade in demyelination or axonal degeneration. These data support the hypothesis that complement activation plays a role in SCI.

  13. Role of complement in porphyrin-induced photosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.W.; Gigli, I.

    1981-01-01

    Addition of porphyrins to sera of guinea pigs in vitro, followed by irradiation with 405 nm light, resulted in dose-dependent inhibitions of hemolytic activity of complement. With guinea pig as an animal model, we also found that systemically administered porphyrins, followed by irradiation with 405 nm light, resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of CH50 in vivo. The erythrocytes from porphyrin-treated guinea pigs showed an increased susceptibility to hemolysis induced by 405 nm irradiation in vitro. Clinical changes in these animals were limited to light-exposed areas and consisted of erythema, crusting, and delayed growth of hair. Histologically, dermal edema, dilation of blood vessels, and infiltration of mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells were observed. Guinea pigs irradiated with ultraviolet-B developed erythema, but had no alteration of their complement profiles. It is suggested that complement products may play a specific role in the pathogenesis of the cutaneous lesions of some porphyrias.

  14. Annexin A2 Enhances Complement Activation by Inhibiting Factor H1

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Brandon; Tong, Hua Hua; Laskowski, Jennifer; Jonscher, Karen; Goetz, Lindsey; Woolaver, Rachel; Hannan, Jonathan; Li, Yong Xing; Hourcade, Dennis; Pickering, Matthew C.; Holers, V. Michael; Thurman, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H is a circulating protein that regulates activation of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement. Mutations and genetic variations of factor H are associated with several AP-mediated diseases, highlighting the critical role of factor H in AP regulation. AP-mediated inflammation is typically triggered by illness or tissue injury, however, and tissue injury can trigger AP activation in individuals with fully functional factor H. This suggests that factor H function is affected by local conditions within tissues. We hypothesized that inducible proteins impair the ability of factor H to locally control the AP, thereby increasing AP activation. We used purified murine factor H to immunoprecipitate binding partners from mouse kidneys. Using immunoaffinity liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry we then identified annexin A2 as a factor H binding partner. Further experiments showed that annexin A2 reduces the binding of factor H to cell surfaces. Recombinant annexin A2 impaired complement regulation by factor H, and increased complement activation on renal cell surfaces in vitro and in vivo. In a murine model of acute pneumococcal otitis media the administration of annexin A2 increased AP-mediated bacterial opsonization and clearance. In conclusion, the local production of annexin A2 within tissues suppresses regulation of the AP by factor H. Annexin A2 can contribute to AP-mediated tissue inflammation by locally impairing factor H function, but annexin A2 can also improve complement-mediated bacterial clearance. PMID:26729803

  15. Moss-Produced, Glycosylation-Optimized Human Factor H for Therapeutic Application in Complement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Michelfelder, Stefan; Parsons, Juliana; Bohlender, Lennard L; Hoernstein, Sebastian N W; Niederkrüger, Holger; Busch, Andreas; Krieghoff, Nicola; Koch, Jonas; Fode, Benjamin; Schaaf, Andreas; Frischmuth, Thomas; Pohl, Martin; Zipfel, Peter F; Reski, Ralf; Decker, Eva L; Häffner, Karsten

    2016-12-08

    Genetic defects in complement regulatory proteins can lead to severe renal diseases, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathies, and age-related macular degeneration. The majority of the mutations found in patients with these diseases affect the glycoprotein complement factor H, the main regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation. Therapeutic options are limited, and novel treatments, specifically those targeting alternative pathway activation, are highly desirable. Substitution with biologically active factor H could potentially treat a variety of diseases that involve increased alternative pathway activation, but no therapeutic factor H is commercially available. We recently reported the expression of full-length recombinant factor H in moss (Physcomitrella patens). Here, we present the production of an improved moss-derived recombinant human factor H devoid of potentially immunogenic plant-specific sugar residues on protein N-glycans, yielding approximately 1 mg purified moss-derived human factor H per liter of initial P. patens culture after a multistep purification process. This glycosylation-optimized factor H showed full in vitro complement regulatory activity similar to that of plasma-derived factor H and efficiently blocked LPS-induced alternative pathway activation and hemolysis induced by sera from patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Furthermore, injection of moss-derived factor H reduced C3 deposition and increased serum C3 levels in a murine model of C3 glomerulopathy. Thus, we consider moss-produced recombinant human factor H a promising pharmaceutical product for therapeutic intervention in patients suffering from complement dysregulation.

  16. Regulation of immunoglobulin secretion by factor H of human complement.

    PubMed Central

    Tsokos, G C; Inghirami, G; Tsoukas, C D; Balow, J E; Lambris, J D

    1985-01-01

    As human B lymphocytes and macrophages carry surface receptors for Factor H (B1H), we investigated the possibility that this complement component regulates their function. Factor H inhibits immunoglobulin secretion by peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) stimulated with pokeweed mitogen if present at the initiation of the cultures and at concentrations greater than 50 micrograms/ml. Factor H also inhibited stimulation and differentiation of purified B cells into immunoglobulin-secreting cells by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The inhibitory effect of Factor H was abrogated if anti-Factor H antibody was present in the cultures. EBV-transformed B-cell lines secreted less immunoglobulin if Factor H was present in the culture for at least 4 days. Culture of MNC with Factor H did not lead to the generation of suppressor T cells or macrophages. In contrast, Factor H did not cause proliferation of human peripheral total MNC or enriched T-cell or B-cell subpopulations. Also, Factor H did not inhibit the proliferation of MNC in response to several mitogens and antigens. Our results strongly indicate that Factor H is able to block human B-cell differentiation in vitro without blocking the proliferative ability of the cells. Factor H seems to act directly on the B cells through its receptor on their surface, since it inhibited T-dependent and T-independent B-cell differentiation but generated no suppressor cells. Images Figure 1 PMID:2991125

  17. Regulation of immunoglobulin secretion by factor H of human complement.

    PubMed

    Tsokos, G C; Inghirami, G; Tsoukas, C D; Balow, J E; Lambris, J D

    1985-07-01

    As human B lymphocytes and macrophages carry surface receptors for Factor H (B1H), we investigated the possibility that this complement component regulates their function. Factor H inhibits immunoglobulin secretion by peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) stimulated with pokeweed mitogen if present at the initiation of the cultures and at concentrations greater than 50 micrograms/ml. Factor H also inhibited stimulation and differentiation of purified B cells into immunoglobulin-secreting cells by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The inhibitory effect of Factor H was abrogated if anti-Factor H antibody was present in the cultures. EBV-transformed B-cell lines secreted less immunoglobulin if Factor H was present in the culture for at least 4 days. Culture of MNC with Factor H did not lead to the generation of suppressor T cells or macrophages. In contrast, Factor H did not cause proliferation of human peripheral total MNC or enriched T-cell or B-cell subpopulations. Also, Factor H did not inhibit the proliferation of MNC in response to several mitogens and antigens. Our results strongly indicate that Factor H is able to block human B-cell differentiation in vitro without blocking the proliferative ability of the cells. Factor H seems to act directly on the B cells through its receptor on their surface, since it inhibited T-dependent and T-independent B-cell differentiation but generated no suppressor cells.

  18. CTRP6 is an endogenous complement regulator that can effectively treat induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Masanori A.; Kakuta, Shigeru; Inoue, Asuka; Umeda, Naoto; Yonezawa, Tomo; Maruhashi, Takumi; Tateishi, Koichiro; Ishigame, Harumichi; Yabe, Rikio; Ikeda, Satoshi; Seno, Akimasa; Chi, Hsi-Hua; Hashiguchi, Yuriko; Kurata, Riho; Tada, Takuya; Kubo, Sachiko; Sato, Nozomi; Liu, Yang; Hattori, Masahira; Saijo, Shinobu; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita, Teizo; Sumida, Takayuki; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is important for the host defence against infection as well as for the development of inflammatory diseases. Here we show that C1q/TNF-related protein 6 (CTRP6; gene symbol C1qtnf6) expression is elevated in mouse rheumatoid arthritis (RA) models. C1qtnf6−/− mice are highly susceptible to induced arthritis due to enhanced complement activation, whereas C1qtnf6-transgenic mice are refractory. The Arthus reaction and the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis are also enhanced in C1qtnf6−/− mice and C1qtnf6−/− embryos are semi-lethal. We find that CTRP6 specifically suppresses the alternative pathway of the complement system by competing with factor B for C3(H2O) binding. Furthermore, treatment of arthritis-induced mice with intra-articular injection of recombinant human CTRP6 cures the arthritis. CTRP6 is expressed in human synoviocytes, and CTRP6 levels are increased in RA patients. These results indicate that CTRP6 is an endogenous complement regulator and could be used for the treatment of complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26404464

  19. Factor C acts as a lipopolysaccharide-responsive C3 convertase in horseshoe crab complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ariki, Shigeru; Takahara, Shusaku; Shibata, Toshio; Fukuoka, Takaaki; Ozaki, Aya; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2008-12-01

    The complement system in vertebrates plays an important role in host defense against and clearance of invading microbes, in which complement component C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. In an effort to understand the molecular activation mechanism of invertebrate C3, we isolated and characterized an ortholog of C3 (designated TtC3) from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Flow cytometric analysis using an Ab against TtC3 revealed that the horseshoe crab complement system opsonizes both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Evaluation of the ability of various pathogen-associated molecular patterns to promote the proteolytic conversion of TtC3 to TtC3b in hemocyanin-depleted plasma indicated that LPS, but not zymosan, peptidoglycan, or laminarin, strongly induces this conversion, highlighting the selective response of the complement system to LPS stimulation. Although originally characterized as an LPS-sensitive initiator of hemolymph coagulation stored within hemocytes, we identified factor C in hemolymph plasma. An anti-factor C Ab inhibited various LPS-induced phenomena, including plasma amidase activity, the proteolytic activation of TtC3, and the deposition of TtC3b on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, activated factor C present on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria directly catalyzed the proteolytic conversion of the purified TtC3, thereby promoting TtC3b deposition. We conclude that factor C acts as an LPS-responsive C3 convertase on the surface of invading Gram-negative bacteria in the initial phase of horseshoe crab complement activation.

  20. Shiga toxin-induced complement-mediated hemolysis and release of complement-coated red blood cell-derived microvesicles in hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Ida; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Hedström, Minola Manea; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Rylander, Christian; Westman, Julia S; Storry, Jill R; Olsson, Martin L; Karpman, Diana

    2015-03-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This study investigated whether Stx2 induces hemolysis and whether complement is involved in the hemolytic process. RBCs and/or RBC-derived microvesicles from patients with STEC-HUS (n = 25) were investigated for the presence of C3 and C9 by flow cytometry. Patients exhibited increased C3 deposition on RBCs compared with controls (p < 0.001), as well as high levels of C3- and C9-bearing RBC-derived microvesicles during the acute phase, which decreased after recovery. Stx2 bound to P1 (k) and P2 (k) phenotype RBCs, expressing high levels of the P(k) Ag (globotriaosylceramide), the known Stx receptor. Stx2 induced the release of hemoglobin and lactate dehydrogenase in whole blood, indicating hemolysis. Stx2-induced hemolysis was not demonstrated in the absence of plasma and was inhibited by heat inactivation, as well as by the terminal complement pathway Ab eculizumab, the purinergic P2 receptor antagonist suramin, and EDTA. In the presence of whole blood or plasma/serum, Stx2 induced the release of RBC-derived microvesicles coated with C5b-9, a process that was inhibited by EDTA, in the absence of factor B, and by purinergic P2 receptor antagonists. Thus, complement-coated RBC-derived microvesicles are elevated in HUS patients and induced in vitro by incubation of RBCs with Stx2, which also induced hemolysis. The role of complement in Stx2-mediated hemolysis was demonstrated by its occurrence only in the presence of plasma and its abrogation by heat inactivation, EDTA, and eculizumab. Complement activation on RBCs could play a role in the hemolytic process occurring during STEC-HUS. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Complement factor B activation in patients with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, Ivan; Dalloul, Mudar; Wong, Karen A; Bakare, Olufunke; Schweis, Franz; Garala, Maya; Alam, Amit; Medranda, Giorgio; Lekovic, Jovana; Shuaib, Waqas; Tedjasukmana, Andreas; Little, Perry; Hanono, Daniel; Wijetilaka, Ruvini; Weedon, Jeremy; Lin, Jun; Toledano, Roulhac d'Arby; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Bb, the active fragment of complement factor B (fB), has been reported to be a predictor of preeclampsia. However, conflicting results have been found by some investigators. We hypothesized that the disagreement in findings may be due to the racial/ethnic differences among various study groups, and that fB activation is significant in women of an ethnic minority with preeclampsia. We investigated the maternal and fetal levels of Bb (the activated fB fragment) in pregnant women of an ethnic minority with or without preeclampsia. We enrolled 291 pregnant women (96% of an ethnic minority, including 78% African-American). Thirteen percent of these were diagnosed with preeclampsia. Maternal venous blood was collected from all participants together with fetal umbilical cord blood samples from 154 deliveries in the 291 women. The results were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and multivariate analyses. Maternal Bb levels were significantly higher in the preeclamptic group than in the nonpreeclamptic group. Levels of Bb in fetal cord blood were similar in both groups. Subgroup analyses of African-American patients' results confirmed the study hypothesis that there would be a significant increase in Bb in the maternal blood of the preeclamptic group and no increase in Bb in the fetal cord blood of this group. These results suggest that a maternal immune response through complement fB might play a role in the development of preeclampsia, particularly in African-American patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Complement Factor D in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Chloe M.; Yates, John R.W.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Seddon, Johanna M.; Swaroop, Anand; Stambolian, Dwight; Fauser, Sascha; Hoyng, Carel; Yu, Yi; Atsuhiro, Kanda; Branham, Kari; Othman, Mohammad; Chen, Wei; Kortvely, Elod; Chalmers, Kevin; Hayward, Caroline; Moore, Anthony T.; Dhillon, Baljean; Ueffing, Marius

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the role of complement factor D (CFD) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by analysis of genetic association, copy number variation, and plasma CFD concentrations. Methods. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CFD gene were genotyped and the results analyzed by binary logistic regression. CFD gene copy number was analyzed by gene copy number assay. Plasma CFD was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. Genetic association was found between CFD gene SNP rs3826945 and AMD (odds ratio 1.44; P = 0.028) in a small discovery case-control series (462 cases and 325 controls) and replicated in a combined cohorts meta-analysis of 4765 cases and 2693 controls, with an odds ratio of 1.11 (P = 0.032), with the association almost confined to females. Copy number variation in the CFD gene was identified in 13 out of 640 samples examined but there was no difference in frequency between AMD cases (1.3%) and controls (2.7%). Plasma CFD concentration was measured in 751 AMD cases and 474 controls and found to be elevated in AMD cases (P = 0.00025). The odds ratio for those in the highest versus lowest quartile for plasma CFD was 1.81. The difference in plasma CFD was again almost confined to females. Conclusions. CFD regulates activation of the alternative complement pathway, which is implicated in AMD pathogenesis. The authors found evidence for genetic association between a CFD gene SNP and AMD and a significant increase in plasma CFD concentration in AMD cases compared with controls, consistent with a role for CFD in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:22003108

  3. Microbial Neuraminidase Induces a Moderate and Transient Myelin Vacuolation Independent of Complement System Activation.

    PubMed

    Granados-Durán, Pablo; López-Ávalos, María Dolores; Cifuentes, Manuel; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Fernández-Arjona, María Del Mar; Hughes, Timothy R; Johnson, Krista; Morgan, B Paul; Fernández-Llebrez, Pedro; Grondona, Jesús M

    2017-01-01

    Some central nervous system pathogens express neuraminidase (NA) on their surfaces. In the rat brain, a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of NA induces myelin vacuolation in axonal tracts. Here, we explore the nature, the time course, and the role of the complement system in this damage. The spatiotemporal analysis of myelin vacuolation was performed by optical and electron microscopy. Myelin basic protein-positive area and oligodendrocyte transcription factor (Olig2)-positive cells were quantified in the damaged bundles. Neuronal death in the affected axonal tracts was assessed by Fluoro-Jade B and anti-caspase-3 staining. To evaluate the role of the complement, membrane attack complex (MAC) deposition on damaged bundles was analyzed using anti-C5b9. Rats ICV injected with the anaphylatoxin C5a were studied for myelin damage. In addition, NA-induced vacuolation was studied in rats with different degrees of complement inhibition: normal rats treated with anti-C5-blocking antibody and C6-deficient rats. The stria medullaris, the optic chiasm, and the fimbria were the most consistently damaged axonal tracts. Vacuolation peaked 7 days after NA injection and reverted by day 15. Olig2+ cell number in the damaged tracts was unaltered, and neurodegeneration associated with myelin alterations was not detected. MAC was absent on damaged axonal tracts, as revealed by C5b9 immunostaining. Rats ICV injected with the anaphylatoxin C5a displayed no myelin injury. When the complement system was experimentally or constitutively inhibited, NA-induced myelin vacuolation was similar to that observed in normal rats. Microbial NA induces a moderate and transient myelin vacuolation that is not caused either by neuroinflammation or complement system activation.

  4. Complement Evasion Mediated by Enhancement of Captured Factor H: Implications for Protection of Self-Surfaces from Complement

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew P.; Makou, Elisavet; Chen, Zhuo A.; Kerr, Heather; Richards, Anna; Rappsilber, Juri

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to evade annihilation by the vertebrate complement system, many microbes capture factor H (FH), the key soluble complement-regulating protein in human plasma. However, FH is normally an active complement suppressor exclusively on self-surfaces and this selective action of FH is pivotal to self versus non-self discrimination by the complement system. We investigated whether the bacterially captured FH becomes functionally enhanced and, if so, how this is achieved at a structural level. We found, using site-directed and truncation mutagenesis, surface plasmon resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cross-linking and mass spectrometry, that the N-terminal domain of Streptococcus pneumoniae protein PspC (PspCN) not only binds FH extraordinarily tightly but also holds it in a previously uncharacterized conformation. Functional enhancement arises from exposure of a C-terminal cryptic second binding site in FH for C3b, the activation-specific fragment of the pivotal complement component, C3. This conformational change of FH doubles its affinity for C3b and increases 5-fold its ability to accelerate decay of the binary enzyme (C3bBb) responsible for converting C3 to C3b in an amplification loop. Despite not sharing critical FH-binding residues, PspCNs from D39 and Tigr4 S. pneumoniae exhibit similar FH-anchoring and enhancing properties. We propose that these bacterial proteins mimic molecular markers of self-surfaces, providing a compelling hypothesis for how FH prevents complement-mediated injury to host tissue while lacking efficacy on virtually all other surfaces. In hemolysis assays with 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide–treated erythrocytes that recapitulate paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, PspCN enhanced protection of cells by FH, suggesting a new paradigm for therapeutic complement suppression. PMID:26459349

  5. Complement depletion with humanised cobra venom factor: efficacy in preclinical models of vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Fritzinger, David C; Gorsuch, W Brian; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-03-01

    The complement system is an intrinsic part of the immune system and has important functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, inadvertent or misdirected complement activation is also involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, contributing solely or significantly to tissue injury and disease development. Multiple approaches to develop pharmacological agents to inhibit complement are currently being pursued. We have developed a conceptually different approach of not inhibiting but depleting complement, based on the complement-depleting activities of cobra venom factor (CVF), a non-toxic cobra venom component with structural and functional homology to complement component C3. We developed a humanised version of CVF by creating human complement component C3 derivatives with complement-depleting activities of CVF (humanised CVF) as a promising therapeutic agent for diseases with complement pathogenesis. Here we review the beneficial therapeutic effect of humanised CVF in several murine models of vascular diseases such as reperfusion injury.

  6. The role of heparan sulfate as determining pathogenic factor in complement factor H-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Loeven, Markus A; Rops, Angelique L W M M; Berden, Jo H M; Daha, Mohamed R; Rabelink, Ton J; van der Vlag, Johan

    2015-02-01

    Complement factor H (FH) systemically inhibits excessive complement activation in the microenvironment of host cells, but for instance not on microbes. This self-recognition is mediated by two binding sites that recognize distinctly sulfated heparan sulfate (HS) domains. The interaction with HS not only concentrates FH on host cells, but directly affects its activity, evoking novel models of conformational activation. Genetic aberrations in the HS-binding domains systemically disturb the protective function of FH, yet the resulting loss of complement control affects mainly ocular and renal tissues. Recent results suggest that the specific expression of HS domains in these tissues restricts the interaction of HS to a single binding site within FH. This lack of redundancy could predispose eyes and kidneys to complement-mediated damage, making HS a central determinant for FH-associated diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Complement Factor H Inhibits CD47-Mediated Resolution of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Calippe, Bertrand; Augustin, Sebastien; Beguier, Fanny; Charles-Messance, Hugo; Poupel, Lucie; Conart, Jean-Baptiste; Hu, Shulong J; Lavalette, Sophie; Fauvet, Alexandre; Rayes, Julie; Levy, Olivier; Raoul, William; Fitting, Catherine; Denèfle, Thomas; Pickering, Matthew C; Harris, Claire; Jorieux, Sylvie; Sullivan, Patrick M; Sahel, José-Alain; Karoyan, Philippe; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Guillonneau, Xavier; Gautier, Emmanuel L; Sennlaub, Florian

    2017-02-21

    Variants of the CFH gene, encoding complement factor H (CFH), show strong association with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major cause of blindness. Here, we used murine models of AMD to examine the contribution of CFH to disease etiology. Cfh deletion protected the mice from the pathogenic subretinal accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes (MP) that characterize AMD and showed accelerated resolution of inflammation. MP persistence arose secondary to binding of CFH to CD11b, which obstructed the homeostatic elimination of MPs from the subretinal space mediated by thrombospsondin-1 (TSP-1) activation of CD47. The AMD-associated CFH(H402) variant markedly increased this inhibitory effect on microglial cells, supporting a causal link to disease etiology. This mechanism is not restricted to the eye, as similar results were observed in a model of acute sterile peritonitis. Pharmacological activation of CD47 accelerated resolution of both subretinal and peritoneal inflammation, with implications for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease.

  8. Regulation of age-related macular degeneration-like pathology by complement factor H.

    PubMed

    Toomey, Christopher B; Kelly, Una; Saban, Daniel R; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2015-06-09

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a major susceptibility gene for age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, its impact on AMD pathobiology is unresolved. Here, the role of CFH in the development of AMD pathology in vivo was interrogated by analyzing aged Cfh(+/-) and Cfh(-/-) mice fed a high-fat, cholesterol-enriched diet. Strikingly, decreased levels of CFH led to increased sub-retinal pigmented epithelium (sub-RPE) deposit formation, specifically basal laminar deposits, following high-fat diet. Mechanistically, our data show that deposits are due to CFH competition for lipoprotein binding sites in Bruch's membrane. Interestingly and despite sub-RPE deposit formation occurring in both Cfh(+/-) and Cfh(-/-) mice, RPE damage accompanied by loss of vision occurred only in old Cfh(+/-) mice. We demonstrate that such pathology is a function of excess complement activation in Cfh(+/-) mice versus complement deficiency in Cfh(-/-) animals. Due to the CFH-dependent increase in sub-RPE deposit height, we interrogated the potential of CFH as a previously unidentified regulator of Bruch's membrane lipoprotein binding and show, using human Bruch's membrane explants, that CFH removes endogenous human lipoproteins in aged donors. Thus, advanced age, high-fat diet, and decreased CFH induce sub-RPE deposit formation leading to complement activation, which contributes to RPE damage and visual function impairment. This new understanding of the complicated interactions of CFH in AMD-like pathology provides an improved foundation for the development of targeted therapies for AMD.

  9. The role of complement in age-related macular degeneration: heparan sulphate, a ZIP code for complement factor H?

    PubMed

    Langford-Smith, Alex; Keenan, Tiarnan D L; Clark, Simon J; Bishop, Paul N; Day, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed nations and has been associated with complement dysregulation in the central retina. The Y402H polymorphism in the complement regulatory protein factor H (CFH) can confer a >5-fold increased risk of developing AMD and is present in approximately 30% of people of European descent. CFH, in conjunction with other factors, regulates complement activation in host tissues, and the Y402H polymorphism has been found to alter the protein's specificity for heparan sulphate (HS) - a complex polysaccharide found ubiquitously in mammals. HS, which is present on the cell surface and also in the extracellular matrix, exhibits huge structural diversity due to variations in the level/pattern of sulphation, where particular structures may act as 'ZIP codes' for different tissue/cellular locations. Recent work has demonstrated that CFH contains two HS-binding domains that each recognize specific HS ZIP codes, allowing differential recognition of Bruch's membrane (in the eye) or the glomerular basement membrane (in the kidney). Importantly, the Y402H polymorphism impairs the binding of CFH to the HS in Bruch's membrane, which could result in increased complement activation and chronic local inflammation (in 402H individuals) and thereby contribute to AMD pathology.

  10. Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP

    PubMed Central

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Granados Martinez, Adriana Patricia; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections. PMID:25347183

  11. A teleost complement factor Ba possesses antimicrobial activity and inhibits bacterial infection in fish.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Peng; Sun, Li

    2017-01-24

    Complement factor B (Bf) is a component of the complement system. Following activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system, factor B is cleaved into Ba and Bb fragments. In fish, the Bf of rainbow trout is known to act as a C3 convertase, but the function of the Ba fragment is essentially unknown. In this study, we examined the expression patterns of tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis Bf (named CsBf) and the biological activity of the Ba fragment of CsBf (named CsBa). CsBf possesses the conserved domains of Bf and shares 39.9%-56.4% sequence identities with other fish Bf. CsBf expression was high in liver, muscle, and heart, and low in intestine, blood, and kidney. Bacterial infection significantly induced CsBf expression in kidney, spleen, and liver in a time-dependent manner. Recombinant CsBa (rCsBa) exhibited apparent binding capacities to bacteria and tongue sole peripheral blood leukocytes, and binding of rCsBa to bacteria inhibited bacterial growth. When overexpressed in tongue sole, CsBa significantly reduced bacterial dissemination in fish tissues. Together these results indicate for the first time that a fish Ba possesses antibacterial effect as well as immune cell-binding capacity, and thus probably plays a role in host immune defense against bacterial infection.

  12. Complement Factor H Binds to Human Serum Apolipoprotein E and Mediates Complement Regulation on High Density Lipoprotein Particles.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Karita; van Kessel, Kok; Nissilä, Eija; Metso, Jari; Johansson, Tiira; Miettinen, Sini; Varjosalo, Markku; Kirveskari, Juha; Kuusela, Pentti; Chroni, Angelika; Jauhiainen, Matti; van Strijp, Jos; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2015-11-27

    The alternative pathway of complement is an important part of the innate immunity response against foreign particles invading the human body. To avoid damage to host cells, it needs to be efficiently down-regulated by plasma factor H (FH) as exemplified by various diseases caused by mutations in its domains 19-20 (FH19-20) and 5-7 (FH5-7). These regions are also the main interaction sites for microbial pathogens that bind host FH to evade complement attack. We previously showed that inhibition of FH binding by a recombinant FH5-7 construct impairs survival of FH binding pathogens in human blood. In this study we found that upon exposure to full blood, the addition of FH5-7 reduces survival of, surprisingly, also those microbes that are not able to bind FH. This effect was mediated by inhibition of complement regulation and subsequently enhanced neutrophil phagocytosis by FH5-7. We found that although FH5-7 does not reduce complement regulation in the actual fluid phase of plasma, it reduces regulation on HDL particles in plasma. Using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry we revealed that FH interacts with serum apolipoprotein E (apoE) via FH5-7 domains. Furthermore, binding of FH5-7 to HDL was dependent on the concentration of apoE on the HDL particles. These findings explain why the addition of FH5-7 to plasma leads to excessive complement activation and phagocytosis of microbes in full anticoagulated blood. In conclusion, our data show how FH interacts with apoE molecules via domains 5-7 and regulates alternative pathway activation on plasma HDL particles.

  13. Complement Factor H Is Expressed in Adipose Tissue in Association With Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Catalán, Victoria; Sabater, Mònica; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Ortega, Francisco José; Ricart, Wifredo; Blüher, Mathias; Frühbeck, Gema; Rodríguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system, in which factor H (fH; complement fH [CFH]) is a key regulatory component, has been suggested as a link between obesity and metabolic disorders. Our objective was to study the associations between circulating and adipose tissue gene expressions of CFH and complement factor B (fB; CFB) with obesity and insulin resistance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Circulating fH and fB were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 398 subjects. CFH and CFB gene expressions were evaluated in 76 adipose tissue samples, in isolated adipocytes, and in stromovascular cells (SVC) (n = 13). The effects of weight loss and rosiglitazone were investigated in independent cohorts. RESULTS Both circulating fH and fB were associated positively with BMI, waist circumference, triglycerides, and inflammatory parameters and negatively with insulin sensitivity and HDL cholesterol. For the first time, CFH gene expression was detected in human adipose tissue (significantly increased in subcutaneous compared with omental fat). CFH gene expression in omental fat was significantly associated with insulin resistance. In contrast, CFB gene expression was significantly increased in omental fat but also in association with fasting glucose and triglycerides. The SVC fraction was responsible for these differences, although isolated adipocytes also expressed fB and fH at low levels. Both weight loss and rosiglitazone led to significantly decreased circulating fB and fH levels. CONCLUSIONS Increased circulating fH and fB concentrations in subjects with altered glucose tolerance could reflect increased SVC-induced activation of the alternative pathway of complement in omental adipose tissue linked to insulin resistance and metabolic disturbances. PMID:19833879

  14. Complement factor H is expressed in adipose tissue in association with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Catalán, Victoria; Sabater, Mònica; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Ortega, Francisco José; Ricart, Wifredo; Blüher, Mathias; Frühbeck, Gema; Rodríguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system, in which factor H (fH; complement fH [CFH]) is a key regulatory component, has been suggested as a link between obesity and metabolic disorders. Our objective was to study the associations between circulating and adipose tissue gene expressions of CFH and complement factor B (fB; CFB) with obesity and insulin resistance. Circulating fH and fB were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 398 subjects. CFH and CFB gene expressions were evaluated in 76 adipose tissue samples, in isolated adipocytes, and in stromovascular cells (SVC) (n = 13). The effects of weight loss and rosiglitazone were investigated in independent cohorts. Both circulating fH and fB were associated positively with BMI, waist circumference, triglycerides, and inflammatory parameters and negatively with insulin sensitivity and HDL cholesterol. For the first time, CFH gene expression was detected in human adipose tissue (significantly increased in subcutaneous compared with omental fat). CFH gene expression in omental fat was significantly associated with insulin resistance. In contrast, CFB gene expression was significantly increased in omental fat but also in association with fasting glucose and triglycerides. The SVC fraction was responsible for these differences, although isolated adipocytes also expressed fB and fH at low levels. Both weight loss and rosiglitazone led to significantly decreased circulating fB and fH levels. Increased circulating fH and fB concentrations in subjects with altered glucose tolerance could reflect increased SVC-induced activation of the alternative pathway of complement in omental adipose tissue linked to insulin resistance and metabolic disturbances.

  15. A Familial C3GN Secondary to Defective C3 Regulation by Complement Receptor 1 and Complement Factor H

    PubMed Central

    Roumenina, Lubka T.; Bruneau, Sarah; Marinozzi, Maria Chiara; Rybkine, Tania; Schramm, Elizabeth C.; Java, Anuja; Atkinson, John P.; Aldigier, Jean Claude; Bridoux, Frank; Touchard, Guy; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy is a recently described form of CKD. C3GN is a subtype of C3 glomerulopathy characterized by predominant C3 deposits in the glomeruli and is commonly the result of acquired or genetic abnormalities in the alternative pathway (AP) of the complement system. We identified and characterized the first mutation of the C3 gene (p. I734T) in two related individuals diagnosed with C3GN. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy studies showed C3 deposits in the subendothelial space, associated with unusual deposits located near the complement receptor 1 (CR1)-expressing podocytes. In vitro, this C3 mutation exhibited decreased binding to CR1, resulting in less CR1-dependent cleavage of C3b by factor 1. Both patients had normal plasma C3 levels, and the mutant C3 interacted with factor B comparably to wild-type (WT) C3 to form a C3 convertase. Binding of mutant C3 to factor H was normal, but mutant C3 was less efficiently cleaved by factor I in the presence of factor H, leading to enhanced C3 fragment deposition on glomerular cells. In conclusion, our results reveal that a CR1 functional deficiency is a mechanism of intraglomerular AP dysregulation and could influence the localization of the glomerular C3 deposits. PMID:26471127

  16. Deficiency of human complement factor I associated with lowered factor H.

    PubMed

    Naked, G M; Florido, M P; Ferreira de Paula, P; Vinet, A M; Inostroza, J S; Isaac, L

    2000-08-01

    Deficiencies of factor I and/or factor H result in an increased consumption of C3 and higher susceptibility to recurrent infections. Here we describe a case of human factor I deficiency and lowered factor H levels. C3 concentration was 50% lower than normal, the classical pathway-dependent hemolytic activity was reduced to almost 30% of normal, and alternative pathway-dependent activity was completely absent. The killing by peripheral leukocytes of Candida albicans treated with deficient serum and the production of complement-dependent chemotactic factors were reduced in the proband's serum when compared with normal serum. Finally, we observed that C3 antigen present in the proband's serum has a different electrophoretic mobility than native C3 (most likely C3b), confirming the deregulation of complement activation due to the lack of regulatory proteins factors I and H. The impaired complement system described in this case, the first of its kind described in a Chile, explains the higher susceptibility to infections found in the proband.

  17. Small-molecule factor D inhibitors targeting the alternative complement pathway.

    PubMed

    Maibaum, Jürgen; Liao, Sha-Mei; Vulpetti, Anna; Ostermann, Nils; Randl, Stefan; Rüdisser, Simon; Lorthiois, Edwige; Erbel, Paul; Kinzel, Bernd; Kolb, Fabrice A; Barbieri, Samuel; Wagner, Julia; Durand, Corinne; Fettis, Kamal; Dussauge, Solene; Hughes, Nicola; Delgado, Omar; Hommel, Ulrich; Gould, Ty; Mac Sweeney, Aengus; Gerhartz, Bernd; Cumin, Frederic; Flohr, Stefanie; Schubart, Anna; Jaffee, Bruce; Harrison, Richard; Risitano, Antonio Maria; Eder, Jörg; Anderson, Karen

    2016-12-01

    Complement is a key component of the innate immune system, recognizing pathogens and promoting their elimination. Complement component 3 (C3) is the central component of the system. Activation of C3 can be initiated by three distinct routes-the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathways-with the alternative pathway also acting as an amplification loop for the other two pathways. The protease factor D (FD) is essential for this amplification process, which, when dysregulated, predisposes individuals to diverse disorders including age-related macular degeneration and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). Here we describe the identification of potent and selective small-molecule inhibitors of FD. These inhibitors efficiently block alternative pathway (AP) activation and prevent both C3 deposition onto, and lysis of, PNH erythrocytes. Their oral administration inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced AP activation in FD-humanized mice. These data demonstrate the feasibility of inhibiting the AP with small-molecule antagonists and support the development of FD inhibitors for the treatment of complement-mediated diseases.

  18. Generation of Viable Mice from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) Through Tetraploid Complementation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lan; Gao, Shaorong

    2015-01-01

    Tetraploid complementation assay is the most rigorous criteria for pluripotency characterization of pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Pluripotent stem cells could complement the developmental deficiency of tetraploid embryos and thus support the full-term mice development. Here we describe the protocol for tetraploid complementation using iPSCs to produce viable all-iPSC mice.

  19. Complement anaphylatoxin C3a is a potent inducer of embryonic chick retina regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Tracy; Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Reis, Edimara S.; Echeverri Ruiz, Nancy P.; Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Tzekou, Apostolia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.; Lambris, John D.; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the initiation signals for tissue regeneration in vertebrates is one of the major challenges in regenerative biology. Much of the research thus far has indicated that certain growth factors have key roles. Here we show that complement fragment C3a is sufficient to induce complete regeneration of the embryonic chick retina from stem/progenitor cells present in the eye, independent of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling. Instead, C3a induces retina regeneration via STAT3 activation, which in turn activates the injury- and inflammation-responsive factors, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. This activation sets forth regulation of Wnt2b, Six3 and Sox2, genes associated with retina stem and progenitor cells. Thus, our results establish a mechanism for retina regeneration based on injury and inflammation signals. Furthermore, our results indicate a unique function for complement anaphylatoxins that implicate these molecules in the induction and complete regeneration of the retina, opening new avenues of experimentation in the field. PMID:23942241

  20. Cholesterol crystals induce complement-dependent inflammasome activation and cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Samstad, Eivind O; Niyonzima, Nathalie; Nymo, Stig; Aune, Marie H; Ryan, Liv; Bakke, Siril S; Lappegård, Knut T; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Lambris, John D; Damås, Jan K; Latz, Eicke; Mollnes, Tom E; Espevik, Terje

    2014-03-15

    Inflammation is associated with development of atherosclerosis, and cholesterol crystals (CC) have long been recognized as a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions. CC appear early in the atheroma development and trigger inflammation by NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In this study we hypothesized whether CC employ the complement system to activate inflammasome/caspase-1, leading to release of mature IL-1β, and whether complement activation regulates CC-induced cytokine production. In this study we describe that CC activated both the classical and alternative complement pathways, and C1q was found to be crucial for the activation. CC employed C5a in the release of a number of cytokines in whole blood, including IL-1β and TNF. CC induced minimal amounts of cytokines in C5-deficient whole blood, until reconstituted with C5. Furthermore, C5a and TNF in combination acted as a potent primer for CC-induced IL-1β release by increasing IL-1β transcripts. CC-induced complement activation resulted in upregulation of complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18), leading to phagocytosis of CC. Also, CC mounted a complement-dependent production of reactive oxygen species and active caspase-1. We conclude that CC employ the complement system to induce cytokines and activate the inflammasome/caspase-1 by regulating several cellular responses in human monocytes. In light of this, complement inhibition might be an interesting therapeutic approach for treatment of atherosclerosis.

  1. Regulation of age-related macular degeneration-like pathology by complement factor H

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, Christopher B.; Kelly, Una; Saban, Daniel R.; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a major susceptibility gene for age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, its impact on AMD pathobiology is unresolved. Here, the role of CFH in the development of AMD pathology in vivo was interrogated by analyzing aged Cfh+/− and Cfh−/− mice fed a high-fat, cholesterol-enriched diet. Strikingly, decreased levels of CFH led to increased sub-retinal pigmented epithelium (sub-RPE) deposit formation, specifically basal laminar deposits, following high-fat diet. Mechanistically, our data show that deposits are due to CFH competition for lipoprotein binding sites in Bruch’s membrane. Interestingly and despite sub-RPE deposit formation occurring in both Cfh+/− and Cfh−/− mice, RPE damage accompanied by loss of vision occurred only in old Cfh+/− mice. We demonstrate that such pathology is a function of excess complement activation in Cfh+/− mice versus complement deficiency in Cfh−/− animals. Due to the CFH-dependent increase in sub-RPE deposit height, we interrogated the potential of CFH as a previously unidentified regulator of Bruch’s membrane lipoprotein binding and show, using human Bruch’s membrane explants, that CFH removes endogenous human lipoproteins in aged donors. Thus, advanced age, high-fat diet, and decreased CFH induce sub-RPE deposit formation leading to complement activation, which contributes to RPE damage and visual function impairment. This new understanding of the complicated interactions of CFH in AMD-like pathology provides an improved foundation for the development of targeted therapies for AMD. PMID:25991857

  2. Upregulation of complement inhibitors in association with vulnerable cells following contusion-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Aileen J; Najbauer, Joseph; Huang, Wencheng; Young, Wise; Robert, Stephanie

    2005-03-01

    We have previously described the activation of the classical, alternative, and terminal complement cascade pathways after acute contusion spinal cord injury using the New York University (NYU) weight-drop impactor. In the present study, we examined the induction of protein regulators of the complement cascade, factor H (FH), and clusterin, in the same experimental paradigm. The spinal cord of laminectomized adult rats was subjected to mild or severe injury using impactor weight-drop heights of 12.5 and 50 mm, respectively. The spinal cords of control and injured animals were evaluated at 1, 7, and 42 days after injury. Immunocytochemistry revealed a robust increase in the numbers and intensity of staining of FH, and clusterin-positive cells in the injured cord at all three time points, with the highest increases observed at 1 and 42 days after injury. FH and clusterin-positive cells were observed among neurons as well as oligodendrocytes. The increased expression was detected both rostrally and caudally from the injury site, in the latter case at distances up to 20 mm. The precise biological significance of injury-induced upregulation of these proteins remains to be determined. However, FH and clusterin are potent regulators of complement activity targeting upstream (FH) and downstream (clusterin) molecules of the pro-inflammatory cascade, which could be of vital importance in preventing a "runaway" inflammatory reaction in the injured spinal cord.

  3. Variants in Complement Factor H and Complement Factor H-Related Protein Genes, CFHR3 and CFHR1, Affect Complement Activation in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Zhai, Ya-Ling; Wang, Feng-Mei; Hou, Ping; Lv, Ji-Cheng; Xu, Da-Min; Shi, Su-Fang; Liu, Li-Jun; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Novak, Jan; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation is common in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and associated with disease severity. Our recent genome-wide association study of IgAN identified susceptibility loci on 1q32 containing the complement regulatory protein-encoding genes CFH and CFHR1–5, with rs6677604 in CFH as the top single-nucleotide polymorphism and CFHR3–1 deletion (CFHR3–1∆) as the top signal for copy number variation. In this study, to explore the clinical effects of variation in CFH, CFHR3, and CFHR1 on IgAN susceptibility and progression, we enrolled two populations. Group 1 included 1178 subjects with IgAN and available genome-wide association study data. Group 2 included 365 subjects with IgAN and available clinical follow-up data. In group 1, rs6677604 was associated with mesangial C3 deposition by genotype–phenotype correlation analysis. In group 2, we detected a linkage between the rs6677604-A allele and CFHR3–1∆ and found that the rs6677604-A allele was associated with higher serum levels of CFH and lower levels of the complement activation split product C3a. Furthermore, CFH levels were positively associated with circulating C3 levels and negatively associated with mesangial C3 deposition. Moreover, serum levels of the pathogenic galactose-deficient glycoform of IgA1 were also associated with the degree of mesangial C3 deposition in patients with IgAN. Our findings suggest that genetic variants in CFH, CFHR3, and CFHR1 affect complement activation and thereby, predispose patients to develop IgAN. PMID:25205734

  4. The Yeast Candida albicans Binds Complement Regulators Factor H and FHL-1

    PubMed Central

    Meri, T.; Hartmann, A.; Lenk, D.; Eck, R.; Würzner, R.; Hellwage, J.; Meri, S.; Zipfel, P. F.

    2002-01-01

    The human facultative pathogenic yeast Candida albicans causes mucocutaneous infections and is the major cause of opportunistic fungal infections in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans activates both the alternative and classical pathway of the complement system. The aim of this study was to assay whether C. albicans binds human complement regulators in order to control complement activation at its surface. We observed binding of two central complement regulators, factor H and FHL-1, from normal human serum to C. albicans by adsorption assays, immunostaining, and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analyses. Specificity of acquisition was further confirmed in direct binding assays with purified proteins. The surface-attached regulators maintained their complement regulatory activities and mediated factor I-dependent cleavage of C3b. Adsorption assays with recombinant deletion mutant proteins were used to identify binding domains. Two binding sites were localized. One binding domain common to both factor H and FHL-1 is located in the N-terminal short consensus repeat domains (SCRs) 6 and 7, and the other one located in C-terminal SCRs 19 and 20 is unique to factor H. These data indicate that by surface acquisition of host complement regulators, the human pathogenic yeast C. albicans is able to regulate alternative complement activation at its surface and to inactivate toxic complement activation products. PMID:12183569

  5. The yeast Candida albicans binds complement regulators factor H and FHL-1.

    PubMed

    Meri, T; Hartmann, A; Lenk, D; Eck, R; Würzner, R; Hellwage, J; Meri, S; Zipfel, P F

    2002-09-01

    The human facultative pathogenic yeast Candida albicans causes mucocutaneous infections and is the major cause of opportunistic fungal infections in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans activates both the alternative and classical pathway of the complement system. The aim of this study was to assay whether C. albicans binds human complement regulators in order to control complement activation at its surface. We observed binding of two central complement regulators, factor H and FHL-1, from normal human serum to C. albicans by adsorption assays, immunostaining, and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analyses. Specificity of acquisition was further confirmed in direct binding assays with purified proteins. The surface-attached regulators maintained their complement regulatory activities and mediated factor I-dependent cleavage of C3b. Adsorption assays with recombinant deletion mutant proteins were used to identify binding domains. Two binding sites were localized. One binding domain common to both factor H and FHL-1 is located in the N-terminal short consensus repeat domains (SCRs) 6 and 7, and the other one located in C-terminal SCRs 19 and 20 is unique to factor H. These data indicate that by surface acquisition of host complement regulators, the human pathogenic yeast C. albicans is able to regulate alternative complement activation at its surface and to inactivate toxic complement activation products.

  6. Methods for Quantitative Detection of Antibody-induced Complement Activation on Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M.; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies against red blood cells (RBCs) can lead to complement activation resulting in an accelerated clearance via complement receptors in the liver (extravascular hemolysis) or leading to intravascular lysis of RBCs. Alloantibodies (e.g. ABO) or autoantibodies to RBC antigens (as seen in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, AIHA) leading to complement activation are potentially harmful and can be - especially when leading to intravascular lysis - fatal1. Currently, complement activation due to (auto)-antibodies on RBCs is assessed in vitro by using the Coombs test reflecting complement deposition on RBC or by a nonquantitative hemolytic assay reflecting RBC lysis1-4. However, to assess the efficacy of complement inhibitors, it is mandatory to have quantitative techniques. Here we describe two such techniques. First, an assay to detect C3 and C4 deposition on red blood cells that is induced by antibodies in patient serum is presented. For this, FACS analysis is used with fluorescently labeled anti-C3 or anti-C4 antibodies. Next, a quantitative hemolytic assay is described. In this assay, complement-mediated hemolysis induced by patient serum is measured making use of spectrophotometric detection of the released hemoglobin. Both of these assays are very reproducible and quantitative, facilitating studies of antibody-induced complement activation. PMID:24514151

  7. Decay-accelerating factor protects human tumor cells from complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, N K; Walter, E I; Smith-Mensah, W H; Ratnoff, W D; Tykocinski, M L; Medof, M E

    1988-01-01

    The disialoganglioside GD2 is expressed on a wide spectrum of human tumor types, including neuroblastomas and melanomas. Upon binding of 3F8, a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for GD2, neuroblastomas and some melanomas are sensitive to killing by human complement, whereas some melanomas are not. To investigate the mechanism underlying these differences in complement mediated cytotoxicity, complement-insensitive melanoma cell lines were compared with respect to expression of the decay-accelerating factor (DAF), a membrane regulatory protein that protects blood cells from autologous complement attack. While DAF was undetectable among neuroblastomas, it was present in complement-insensitive melanomas. When the function of DAF was blocked by anti-DAF MAb, C3 uptake and complement-mediated lysis of the insensitive melanoma lines were markedly enhanced. F(ab')2 fragments were as effective in enhancing lysis as intact anti-DAF MAb. The DAF-negative and DAF-positive melanoma cell lines were comparably resistant to passive lysis by cobra venom factor-treated serum. The data suggest that in some tumors, DAF activity accounts for their resistance to complement-mediated killing. The ability to render these cells complement-sensitive by blocking DAF function may have implications for immunotherapy. PMID:2450893

  8. Gain-of-function mutations in complement factor B are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Jorge, Elena Goicoechea; Harris, Claire L.; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Carreras, Luis; Arranz, Elena Aller; Garrido, Cynthia Abarrategui; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B. Paul; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an important cause of acute renal failure in children. Mutations in one or more genes encoding complement-regulatory proteins have been reported in approximately one-third of nondiarrheal, atypical HUS (aHUS) patients, suggesting a defect in the protection of cell surfaces against complement activation in susceptible individuals. Here, we identified a subgroup of aHUS patients showing persistent activation of the complement alternative pathway and found within this subgroup two families with mutations in the gene encoding factor B (BF), a zymogen that carries the catalytic site of the complement alternative pathway convertase (C3bBb). Functional analyses demonstrated that F286L and K323E aHUS-associated BF mutations are gain-of-function mutations that result in enhanced formation of the C3bBb convertase or increased resistance to inactivation by complement regulators. These data expand our understanding of the genetic factors conferring predisposition to aHUS, demonstrate the critical role of the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of aHUS, and provide support for the use of complement-inhibition therapies to prevent or reduce tissue damage caused by dysregulated complement activation. PMID:17182750

  9. [The role of complement factor H in the pathogenesis of Borrelia infection].

    PubMed

    Gęca, Aleksandra; Mazurek, Urszula; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Niedworok, Elżbieta; Ziółko, Ewa; Kokot, Teresa

    2012-07-20

    Complement factor H (CFH) is one of the most important negative regulators of the alternative pathway of the complement system. It is a glycoprotein belonging to the protein H family, which is synthesized mainly in the liver and is composed into a globular protein consisting of 60 amino acid domains in the serum. It shows specificity for C3b molecule of the complement system present in the serum or bound to the cell surface. It inhibits the steady formation of C3 convertase enzymes and the binding of C2 to C4b and factor B to C3b. It accelerates the decomposition of C2a into C4b and the displacement of Bb from C3b. The present paper discusses the composition, properties and functions of the complement factor and the family it belongs to. The paper focuses in particular on its role in the pathogenesis of an infection caused by the spirochetes of the Borrelia genus. Through binding CFH and other related proteins, bacteria of the Borrelia species inhibit the key effect of the alternative pathway of the complement system - the lysis of spirochete cells dependent on the complement's activation. The mechanism enables pathogens to spread in the host organism and facilitates the evolution of the disease. Discovering the immune mechanisms of the infection caused by the spirochetes of the Borrelia genus may allow for implementing a therapy blocking the binding of complement factor H early enough, apart from the standard treatment of the disease.

  10. The Cholesky Factorization, Schur Complements, Correlation Coefficients, Angles between Vectors, and the QR Factorization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    using the superscript + to denote the Moore - Penrose generalized inverse , = a2 + CT (UT)+(XI - al) can be defined as the regression of z 2 on z ([1... generalized Schur complement S = (EIE) = H - GE-F, EE-E =E. (1.5) When E is symmetric nonnegative definite and possibly singular, this generalized Schur...working with E. In §8 we try to summarize the various results of the paper and emphasize the relations among them. 2. Cholesky Factors and Generalized

  11. Human SAP is a novel peptidoglycan recognition protein that induces complement- independent phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    An, Jang-Hyun; Kurokawa, Kenji; Jung, Dong-Jun; Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Chan-Hee; Fujimoto, Yukari; Fukase, Koichi; Coggeshall, K. Mark; Lee, Bok Luel

    2014-01-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for many community-acquired and hospital-associated infections and is associated with high mortality. Concern over the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains has renewed interest in the elucidation of host mechanisms that defend against S. aureus infection. We recently demonstrated that human serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) binds to S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA), a cell wall glycopolymer, a discovery that prompted further screening to identify additional serum proteins that recognize S. aureus cell wall components. In this report, we incubated human serum with 10 different S. aureus mutants and determined that serum amyloid P component (SAP) bound specifically to a WTA-deficient S. aureus ΔtagO mutant, but not to tagO-complemented, WTA-expressing cells. Biochemical characterization revealed that SAP recognizes bacterial peptidoglycan as a ligand and that WTA inhibits this interaction. Although SAP binding to peptidoglycan was not observed to induce complement activation, SAP-bound ΔtagO cells were phagocytosed by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in an Fcγ receptor-dependent manner. These results indicate that SAP functions as a host defense factor, similar to other peptidoglycan recognition proteins and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors. PMID:23966633

  12. The human complement factor H: functional roles, genetic variations and disease associations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Lopez-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar

    2004-06-01

    Factor H is an essential regulatory protein that plays a critical role in the homeostasis of the complement system in plasma and in the protection of bystander host cells and tissues from damage by complement activation. Genetic and structural data generated during recent years have been instrumental to delineate the functional domains responsible for these regulatory activities in factor H, which is helping to understand the molecular basis underlying the different pathologies associated to factor H. This review summarises our current knowledge of the role of factor H in health and disease.

  13. Rapid activation of monocyte tissue factor by antithymocyte globulin is dependent on complement and protein disulfide isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Spath, Brigitte; Fischer, Cornelia; Stolz, Moritz; Ayuk, Francis A.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Ruf, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Lymphocyte depletion with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) can be complicated by systemic coagulation activation. We found that ATG activated tissue factor procoagulant activity (TF PCA) on monocytic cells more potently than other stimuli that decrypt TF, including cell disruption, TF pathway inhibitor inhibition, and calcium ionophore treatment. Induction of TF PCA by ATG was dependent on lipid raft integrity and complement activation. We showed that ATG-mediated TF activation required complement activation until assembly of the C5b-7 membrane insertion complex, but not lytic pore formation by the membrane attack complex C5b-9. Consistently, induction of TF PCA by ATG did not require maximal phosphatidylserine membrane exposure and was not correlated with the magnitude of complement-induced lytic cell injury. Blockade of free thiols, an inhibitory monoclonal antibody to protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and the small-molecule PDI antagonist quercetin-3-rutinoside prevented ATG-mediated TF activation, and C5 complement activation resulted in oxidation of cell surface PDI. This rapid and potent mechanism of cellular TF activation represents a novel connection between the complement system and cell surface PDI-mediated thiol-disulfide exchange. Delineation of this clinically relevant mechanism of activation of the extrinsic coagulation pathway during immunosuppressive therapy with ATG may have broader implications for vascular thrombosis associated with inflammatory disorders. PMID:23315166

  14. In vitro inactivation of complement by a serum factor present in Junin-virus infected guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Rimoldi, M T; de Bracco, M M

    1980-01-01

    A serum factor(s) of guinea-pigs infected with Junin virus, the etiological agent of Argentine haemorrhagic fever, is endowed with a potent anticomplementary activity. It is resistant to heat (56 degrees, 30 min) and elutes from a Sephadex G-200 column between albumin and haemoglobin. It is ineffective in the presence of EDTA or EGTA and does not sediment at 82,000 g. It has no direct effect on C4 unless functional Cl is present. However, it induces Cl activation that consumes C4 haemolytic activity in normal human and guinea-pig sera. The evidence presented in this report demonstrates that the complement activation observed in experimental Argentine haemorrhagic fever is at least in part due to a direct effect of this serum factor on the classical complement pathway. PMID:6247264

  15. Factor H in Porcine Seminal Plasma Protects Sperm against Complement Attack in Genital Tracts*

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Tomohisa; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Maeda, Toshinaga; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Nishi, Katsuji; Ohkubo, Iwao

    2010-01-01

    We found that factor H (FH) exists in porcine seminal plasma. Purified FH strongly inhibited serum alternative pathway complement activation against lipopolysaccharide. The molecular weight, pI, and heparin-binding activity of the purified protein were different from those of purified FH from porcine serum. The complement regulatory activity of seminal plasma FH was ∼2-fold stronger than that of serum FH. Treatment of purified serum FH with sialidase and N-glycosidase F gave almost the same results as those of seminal plasma FH. The deletion of sialic acid from the carbohydrate chains of both FHs contributed to heparin-binding and complement regulatory activities. Results of reverse transcriptase-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry showed that seminal plasma FH is mainly secreted from epithelial cells of the seminal vesicle in male genital tracts. FH was also detected in the outer acrosomal region of ejaculated sperm by immunofluorescence staining, and found that the purified FH from the sperm membrane has the same complement regulatory activity as that of seminal plasma FH. The ejaculated sperm possessing FH in the outer acrosomal region considerably evaded complement attack. We also found that there is strong complement activity in fluids from female genital tract ducts. These findings indicate that FH bound to the outer acrosomal region and soluble FH play important roles in protecting sperm against complement attack in male and female genital tracts. PMID:19920146

  16. Complement-induced equine neutrophil adhesiveness and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Slauson, D O; Skrabalak, D S; Neilsen, N R; Zwahlen, R D

    1987-05-01

    Equine neutrophils (PMN) were isolated from citrated normal blood by density gradient separation on Ficoll-Hypaque to greater than 96% purity and 98% viability and an average of 3.78 x 10(7) PMN/ml. The agonist C5a des Arg was used in serial dilutions of whole zymosan-activated equine plasma (ZAP) or was partially purified from ZAP by column chromatography. Purified equine PMN exhibited rapid aggregation following incubation with C5a des Arg which was further dependent on the availability of divalent cations, especially Mg++. The microfilament disruptive agent cytochalasin B (5 micrograms/50 microliters) greatly augmented aggregation responses to C5a des Arg. Subaggregating doses of C5a des Arg promoted PMN adhesiveness as assayed on 0.5 x 10 cm borosilicate glass columns containing a 2.0 cm bed of Sephadex G-25. This C5a des Arg-induced increased adhesiveness was inhibitable by prior incubation of the PMN with either non-steroidal (0.065 M phenylbutazone) or steroidal (0.005 M dexamethasone) anti-inflammatory agents. Ultrastructural studies correlated well with functional assays and revealed marked organelle-free lamellipodia formation without PMN-PMN contact at subaggregating doses of the agonist and progressive PMN-PMN contact at aggregating doses. Equine PMN are responsive to C5a des Arg, and induced adhesiveness responses can be manipulated by anti-inflammatory agents.

  17. Anopheles Midgut Epithelium Evades Human Complement Activity by Capturing Factor H from the Blood Meal

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ayman; Barroso, Marta; Miettinen, Tiera; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Hematophagous vectors strictly require ingesting blood from their hosts to complete their life cycles. Exposure of the alimentary canal of these vectors to the host immune effectors necessitates efficient counteractive measures by hematophagous vectors. The Anopheles mosquito transmitting the malaria parasite is an example of hematophagous vectors that within seconds can ingest human blood double its weight. The innate immune defense mechanisms, like the complement system, in the human blood should thereby immediately react against foreign cells in the mosquito midgut. A prerequisite for complement activation is that the target cells lack complement regulators on their surfaces. In this work, we analyzed whether human complement is active in the mosquito midgut, and how the mosquito midgut cells protect themselves against complement attack. We found that complement remained active for a considerable time and was able to kill microbes within the mosquito midgut. However, the Anopheles mosquito midgut cells were not injured. These cells were found to protect themselves by capturing factor H, the main soluble inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway. Factor H inhibited complement on the midgut cells by promoting inactivation of C3b to iC3b and preventing the activity of the alternative pathway amplification C3 convertase enzyme. An interference of the FH regulatory activity by monoclonal antibodies, carried to the midgut via blood, resulted in increased mosquito mortality and reduced fecundity. By using a ligand blotting assay, a putative mosquito midgut FH receptor could be detected. Thereby, we have identified a novel mechanism whereby mosquitoes can tolerate human blood. PMID:25679788

  18. Alternative Complement Pathway Deficiency Ameliorates Chronic Smoke-Induced Functional and Morphological Ocular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodell, Alex; Coughlin, Beth; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Casey, Sarah; Williamson, Tucker; Ferrell, W. Drew; Atkinson, Carl; Jones, Bryan W.; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2013-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a complex disease involving genetic variants and environmental insults, is among the leading causes of blindness in Western populations. Genetic and histologic evidence implicate the complement system in AMD pathogenesis; and smoking is the major environmental risk factor associated with increased disease risk. Although previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke exposure (CE) causes retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) defects in mice, and smoking leads to complement activation in patients, it is unknown whether complement activation is causative in the development of CE pathology; and if so, which complement pathway is required. Methods Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or clean, filtered air for 6 months. The effects of CE were analyzed in wildtype (WT) mice or mice without a functional complement alternative pathway (AP; CFB−/−) using molecular, histological, electrophysiological, and behavioral outcomes. Results CE in WT mice exhibited a significant reduction in function of both rods and cones as determined by electroretinography and contrast sensitivity measurements, concomitant with a thinning of the nuclear layers as measured by SD-OCT imaging and histology. Gene expression analyses suggested that alterations in both photoreceptors and RPE/choroid might contribute to the observed loss of function, and visualization of complement C3d deposition implies the RPE/Bruch's membrane (BrM) complex as the target of AP activity. RPE/BrM alterations include an increase in mitochondrial size concomitant with an apical shift in mitochondrial distribution within the RPE and a thickening of BrM. CFB−/− mice were protected from developing these CE-mediated alterations. Conclusions Taken together, these findings provide clear evidence that ocular pathology generated in CE mice is dependent on complement activation and requires the AP. Identifying animal models with RPE/BrM damage and verifying which

  19. Complement Factor C4d Is a Common Denominator in Thrombotic Microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Baelde, Hans J.; Zandbergen, Malu; Wilhelmus, Suzanne; van Es, Leendert A.; de Fijter, Johan W.; Bruijn, Jan A.; Bajema, Ingeborg M.; Cohen, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has a major role in thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), a disorder that can occur in a variety of clinical conditions. Promising results of recent trials with terminal complement-inhibiting drugs call for biomarkers identifying patients who might benefit from this treatment. The primary aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and localization of complement factor C4d in kidneys of patients with TMA. The secondary aims were to determine which complement pathways lead to C4d deposition and to determine whether complement activation results in deposition of the terminal complement complex. We examined 42 renal sections with histologically confirmed TMA obtained from a heterogeneous patient group. Deposits of C4d, mannose-binding lectin, C1q, IgM, and C5b-9 were scored in the glomeruli, peritubular capillaries, and arterioles. Notably, C4d deposits were present in 88.1% of TMA cases, and the various clinical conditions had distinct staining patterns within the various compartments of the renal vasculature. Classical pathway activation was observed in 90.5% of TMA cases. C5b-9 deposits were present in 78.6% of TMA cases and in 39.6% of controls (n=53), but the staining pattern differed between cases and controls. In conclusion, C4d is a common finding in TMA, regardless of the underlying clinical condition. Moreover, C5b-9 was present in >75% of the TMA samples, suggesting that terminal complement inhibitors may have a beneficial effect in these patients. C4d and C5b-9 should be investigated as possible diagnostic biomarkers in the clinical work-up of patients suspected of having complement-mediated TMA. PMID:25573909

  20. Protection of nonself surfaces from complement attack by factor H-binding peptides: implications for therapeutic medicine.

    PubMed

    Wu, You-Qiang; Qu, Hongchang; Sfyroera, Georgia; Tzekou, Apostolia; Kay, Brian K; Nilsson, Bo; Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2011-04-01

    Exposure of nonself surfaces such as those of biomaterials or transplanted cells and organs to host blood frequently triggers innate immune responses, thereby affecting both their functionality and tolerability. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement plays a decisive role in this unfavorable reaction. Whereas previous studies demonstrated that immobilization of physiological regulators of complement activation (RCA) can attenuate this foreign body-induced activation, simple and efficient approaches for coating artificial surfaces with intact RCA are still missing. The conjugation of small molecular entities that capture RCA with high affinity is an intriguing alternative, as this creates a surface with autoregulatory activity upon exposure to blood. We therefore screened two variable cysteine-constrained phage-displayed peptide libraries for factor H-binding peptides. We discovered three peptide classes that differed with respect to their main target binding areas. Peptides binding to the broad middle region of factor H (domains 5-18) were of particular interest, as they do not interfere with either regulatory or binding activities. One peptide in this group (5C6) was further characterized and showed high factor H-capturing activity while retaining its functional integrity. Most importantly, when 5C6 was coated to a model polystyrene surface and exposed to human lepirudin-anticoagulated plasma, the bound peptide captured factor H and substantially inhibited complement activation by the alternative pathway. Our study therefore provides a promising and novel approach to produce therapeutic materials with enhanced biocompatibility.

  1. Protection of Nonself Surfaces from Complement Attack by Factor H-Binding Peptides: Implications for Therapeutic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, You-Qiang; Qu, Hongchang; Sfyroera, Georgia; Tzekou, Apostolia; Kay, Brian K.; Nilsson, Bo; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of nonself surfaces such as those of biomaterials or transplanted cells and organs to host blood frequently triggers innate immune responses, thereby affecting both their functionality and tolerability. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement plays a decisive role in this unfavorable reaction. Whereas previous studies demonstrated that immobilization of physiological regulators of complement activation (RCA) can attenuate this foreign body-induced activation, simple and efficient approaches for coating artificial surfaces with intact RCA are still missing. The conjugation of small molecular entities that capture RCA with high affinity is an intriguing alternative, as this creates a surface with autoregulatory activity upon exposure to blood. We therefore screened two variable cysteine-constrained phage-displayed peptide libraries for factor H-binding peptides. We discovered three peptide classes that differed with respect to their main target binding areas. Peptides binding to the broad middle region of factor H (domains 5–18) were of particular interest, as they do not interfere with either regulatory or binding activities. One peptide in this group (5C6) was further characterized and showed high factor H-capturing activity while retaining its functional integrity. Most importantly, when 5C6 was coated to a model polystyrene surface and exposed to human lepirudin-anticoagulated plasma, the bound peptide captured factor H and substantially inhibited complement activation by the alternative pathway. Our study therefore provides a promising and novel approach to produce therapeutic materials with enhanced biocompatibility. PMID:21339361

  2. Competition between antagonistic complement factors for a single protein on N. meningitidis rules disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Caesar, Joseph JE; Lavender, Hayley; Ward, Philip N; Exley, Rachel M; Eaton, Jack; Chittock, Emily; Malik, Talat H; Goiecoechea De Jorge, Elena; Pickering, Matthew C; Tang, Christoph M; Lea, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have found variation within the complement factor H gene family links to host susceptibility to meningococcal disease caused by infection with Neisseria meningitidis (Davila et al., 2010). Mechanistic insights have been challenging since variation within this locus is complex and biological roles of the factor H-related proteins, unlike factor H, are incompletely understood. N. meningitidis subverts immune responses by hijacking a host-immune regulator, complement factor H (CFH), to the bacterial surface (Schneider et al., 2006; Madico et al., 2007; Schneider et al., 2009). We demonstrate that complement factor-H related 3 (CFHR3) promotes immune activation by acting as an antagonist of CFH. Conserved sequences between CFH and CFHR3 mean that the bacterium cannot sufficiently distinguish between these two serum proteins to allow it to hijack the regulator alone. The level of protection from complement attack achieved by circulating N. meningitidis therefore depends on the relative levels of CFH and CFHR3 in serum. These data may explain the association between genetic variation in both CFH and CFHR3 and susceptibility to meningococcal disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04008.001 PMID:25534642

  3. Potential influences of complement factor H in autoimmune inflammatory and thrombotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ferluga, Janez; Kouser, Lubna; Murugaiah, Valarmathy; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2017-04-01

    Complement system homeostasis is important for host self-protection and anti-microbial immune surveillance, and recent research indicates roles in tissue development and remodelling. Complement also appears to have several points of interaction with the blood coagulation system. Deficiency and altered function due to gene mutations and polymorphisms in complement effectors and regulators, including Factor H, have been associated with familial and sporadic autoimmune inflammatory - thrombotic disorders, in which autoantibodies play a part. These include systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, anti-phospholipid syndrome and age-related macular degeneration. Such diseases are generally complex - multigenic and heterogeneous in their symptoms and predisposition/susceptibility. They usually need to be triggered by vascular trauma, drugs or infection and non-complement genetic factors also play a part. Underlying events seem to include decline in peripheral regulatory T cells, dendritic cell, and B cell tolerance, associated with alterations in lymphoid organ microenvironment. Factor H is an abundant protein, synthesised in many cell types, and its reported binding to many different ligands, even if not of high affinity, may influence a large number of molecular interactions, together with the accepted role of Factor H within the complement system. Factor H is involved in mesenchymal stem cell mediated tolerance and also contributes to self-tolerance by augmenting iC3b production and opsonisation of apoptotic cells for their silent dendritic cell engulfment via complement receptor CR3, which mediates anti-inflammatory-tolerogenic effects in the apoptotic cell context. There may be co-operation with other phagocytic receptors, such as complement C1q receptors, and the Tim glycoprotein family, which specifically bind phosphatidylserine expressed on the apoptotic cell surface. Factor H is able to discriminate between self and

  4. Nerve Growth Factor Secretion From Pulp Fibroblasts is Modulated by Complement C5a Receptor and Implied in Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chmilewsky, Fanny; Ayaz, Warda; Appiah, James; About, Imad; Chung, Seung-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of sensory innervation in tooth vitality, the identification of signals that control nerve regeneration and the cellular events they induce is essential. Previous studies demonstrated that the complement system, a major component of innate immunity and inflammation, is activated at the injured site of human carious teeth and plays an important role in dental-pulp regeneration via interaction of the active Complement C5a fragment with pulp progenitor cells. In this study, we further determined the role of the active fragment complement C5a receptor (C5aR) in dental nerve regeneration in regards to local secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) upon carious injury. Using ELISA and AXIS co-culture systems, we demonstrate that C5aR is critically implicated in the modulation of NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts. The NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts, which is negatively regulated by C5aR activation, has a role in the control of the neurite outgrowth length in our axon regeneration analysis. Our data provide a scientific step forward that can guide development of future therapeutic tools for innovative and incipient interventions targeting the dentin-pulp regeneration process by linking the neurite outgrowth to human pulp fibroblast through complement system activation. PMID:27539194

  5. Targeting Complement in Treatment of Intestinal Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    determine the role of MBL in myocardial IR-induced injury [ Wetsel 2000]. These studies indicate that the lectin pathway is activated during the...neutrophils and the alternative complement pathway. Journal of Applied Physiology 83:1090- 1095. [ Wetsel 2000] R.A. Wetsel , J. Kildsgaard, and D. L

  6. c-Jun and c-Fos regulate the complement factor H promoter in murine astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fraczek, Laura A.; Martin, Carol B.; Martin, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The complement system is a critical component of innate immunity that requires regulation to avoid inappropriate activation. This regulation is provided by many proteins, including complement factor H (CFH), a critical regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation. Given its regulatory function, mutations in CFH have been implicated in diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and central nervous system diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and a demyelinating murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). There have been few investigations on the transcriptional regulation of CFH in the brain and CNS. Our studies show that CFH mRNA is present in several CNS cell types. The murine CFH (mCFH) promoter was cloned and examined through truncation constructs and we show that specific regions throughout the promoter contain enhancers and repressors that are positively regulated by inflammatory cytokines in astrocytes. Database mining of these regions indicated transcription factor binding sites conserved between different species, which led to the investigation of specific transcription factor binding interactions in a 241 base pair (bp) region at −416 bp to −175 bp that showed the strongest activity. Through supershift analysis it was determined that c-Jun and c-Fos interact with the CFH promoter in astrocytes in this region. These results suggest a relationship between cell cycle and complement regulation, and how these transcription factors and CFH affect disease will be a valuable area of investigation. PMID:21920606

  7. c-Jun and c-Fos regulate the complement factor H promoter in murine astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Laura A; Martin, Carol B; Martin, Brian K

    2011-10-01

    The complement system is a critical component of innate immunity that requires regulation to avoid inappropriate activation. This regulation is provided by many proteins, including complement factor H (CFH), a critical regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation. Given its regulatory function, mutations in CFH have been implicated in diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and central nervous system diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and a demyelinating murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). There have been few investigations on the transcriptional regulation of CFH in the brain and CNS. Our studies show that CFH mRNA is present in several CNS cell types. The murine CFH (mCFH) promoter was cloned and examined through truncation constructs and we show that specific regions throughout the promoter contain enhancers and repressors that are positively regulated by inflammatory cytokines in astrocytes. Database mining of these regions indicated transcription factor binding sites conserved between different species, which led to the investigation of specific transcription factor binding interactions in a 241 base pair (bp) region at -416 bp to -175 bp that showed the strongest activity. Through supershift analysis, it was determined that c-Jun and c-Fos interact with the CFH promoter in astrocytes in this region. These results suggest a relationship between cell cycle and complement regulation, and how these transcription factors and CFH affect disease will be a valuable area of investigation.

  8. Mutations in Complement Factor H Impair Alternative Pathway Regulation on Mouse Glomerular Endothelial Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Loeven, Markus A; Rops, Angelique L; Lehtinen, Markus J; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Daha, Mohamed R; Smith, Richard J; Bakker, Marinka; Berden, Jo H; Rabelink, Ton J; Jokiranta, T Sakari; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-03-04

    Complement factor H (FH) inhibits complement activation and interacts with glomerular endothelium via its complement control protein domains 19 and 20, which also recognize heparan sulfate (HS). Abnormalities in FH are associated with the renal diseases atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and dense deposit disease and the ocular disease age-related macular degeneration. Although FH systemically controls complement activation, clinical phenotypes selectively manifest in kidneys and eyes, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific determinants of disease development. Recent results imply the importance of tissue-specifically expressed, sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), like HS, in determining FH binding to and activity on host tissues. Therefore, we investigated which GAGs mediate human FH and recombinant human FH complement control proteins domains 19 and 20 (FH19-20) binding to mouse glomerular endothelial cells (mGEnCs) in ELISA. Furthermore, we evaluated the functional defects of FH19-20 mutants during complement activation by measuring C3b deposition on mGEnCs using flow cytometry. FH and FH19-20 bound dose-dependently to mGEnCs and TNF-α treatment increased binding of both proteins, whereas heparinase digestion and competition with heparin/HS inhibited binding. Furthermore, 2-O-, and 6-O-, but not N-desulfation of heparin, significantly increased the inhibitory effect on FH19-20 binding to mGEnCs. Compared with wild type FH19-20, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated mutants were less able to compete with FH in normal human serum during complement activation on mGEnCs, confirming their potential glomerular pathogenicity. In conclusion, our study shows that FH and FH19-20 binding to glomerular endothelial cells is differentially mediated by HS but not other GAGs. Furthermore, we describe a novel, patient serum-independent competition assay for pathogenicity screening of FH19-20 mutants. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular

  9. Mutations in Complement Factor H Impair Alternative Pathway Regulation on Mouse Glomerular Endothelial Cells in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Loeven, Markus A.; Rops, Angelique L.; Lehtinen, Markus J.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Daha, Mohamed R.; Smith, Richard J.; Bakker, Marinka; Berden, Jo H.; Rabelink, Ton J.; Jokiranta, T. Sakari; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (FH) inhibits complement activation and interacts with glomerular endothelium via its complement control protein domains 19 and 20, which also recognize heparan sulfate (HS). Abnormalities in FH are associated with the renal diseases atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and dense deposit disease and the ocular disease age-related macular degeneration. Although FH systemically controls complement activation, clinical phenotypes selectively manifest in kidneys and eyes, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific determinants of disease development. Recent results imply the importance of tissue-specifically expressed, sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), like HS, in determining FH binding to and activity on host tissues. Therefore, we investigated which GAGs mediate human FH and recombinant human FH complement control proteins domains 19 and 20 (FH19–20) binding to mouse glomerular endothelial cells (mGEnCs) in ELISA. Furthermore, we evaluated the functional defects of FH19–20 mutants during complement activation by measuring C3b deposition on mGEnCs using flow cytometry. FH and FH19–20 bound dose-dependently to mGEnCs and TNF-α treatment increased binding of both proteins, whereas heparinase digestion and competition with heparin/HS inhibited binding. Furthermore, 2-O-, and 6-O-, but not N-desulfation of heparin, significantly increased the inhibitory effect on FH19–20 binding to mGEnCs. Compared with wild type FH19–20, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated mutants were less able to compete with FH in normal human serum during complement activation on mGEnCs, confirming their potential glomerular pathogenicity. In conclusion, our study shows that FH and FH19–20 binding to glomerular endothelial cells is differentially mediated by HS but not other GAGs. Furthermore, we describe a novel, patient serum-independent competition assay for pathogenicity screening of FH19–20 mutants. PMID:26728463

  10. Release of endogenous anti-inflammatory complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H protects synovial fibroblasts during rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    FRIESE, M A; MANUELIAN, T; JUNNIKKALA, S; HELLWAGE, J; MERI, S; PETER, H H; GORDON, D L; EIBEL, H; ZIPFEL, P F

    2003-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology predominantly affecting cells and tissues of synovial joints. Here we show that the two important complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H play a protective anti-inflammatory role in rheumatoid arthritis. Expression analyses at the mRNA- and protein level show in vitro expression and secretion of both regulators by synovial fibroblasts derived from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Similarly the two regulators are synthesized in vivo in diseased synovial tissue, and in particular synovial lining cells express high levels of FHL-1. The anti-inflammatory role of these regulators in rheumatoid arthritis is highlighted by their induction with IFN-γ and dexamethasone, whilst the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α had no effect. Transient transfection experiments with various FHL-1/factor H promoter-luciferase reporter constructs into cells of distinct origin show independent cell and tissue specific promoter regulated transcription of these two regulators. The inducible expression, specifically of FHL-1 has physiological consequences. By binding directly to surfaces the released proteins protect cells from inflammatory damage and complement-mediated cell lysis. This study shows a novel protective and anti-inflammatory role of the two important complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H in rheumatoid arthritis and suggests a disease controlling role of the two proteins. PMID:12780697

  11. Release of endogenous anti-inflammatory complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H protects synovial fibroblasts during rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Friese, M A; Manuelian, T; Junnikkala, S; Hellwage, J; Meri, S; Peter, H H; Gordon, D L; Eibel, H; Zipfel, P F

    2003-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology predominantly affecting cells and tissues of synovial joints. Here we show that the two important complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H play a protective anti-inflammatory role in rheumatoid arthritis. Expression analyses at the mRNA- and protein level show in vitro expression and secretion of both regulators by synovial fibroblasts derived from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Similarly the two regulators are synthesized in vivo in diseased synovial tissue, and in particular synovial lining cells express high levels of FHL-1. The anti-inflammatory role of these regulators in rheumatoid arthritis is highlighted by their induction with IFN-gamma and dexamethasone, whilst the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha had no effect. Transient transfection experiments with various FHL-1/factor H promoter-luciferase reporter constructs into cells of distinct origin show independent cell and tissue specific promoter regulated transcription of these two regulators. The inducible expression, specifically of FHL-1 has physiological consequences. By binding directly to surfaces the released proteins protect cells from inflammatory damage and complement-mediated cell lysis. This study shows a novel protective and anti-inflammatory role of the two important complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H in rheumatoid arthritis and suggests a disease controlling role of the two proteins.

  12. Design of Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Mutant Vaccines That Do Not Bind Human Complement Factor H

    PubMed Central

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a human species-specific ligand for the complement regulator, factor H (fH). In recent studies, fHbp vaccines in which arginine at position 41 was replaced by serine (R41S) had impaired fH binding. The mutant vaccines elicited bactericidal responses in human fH transgenic mice superior to those elicited by control fHbp vaccines that bound human fH. Based on sequence similarity, fHbp has been classified into three variant groups. Here we report that although R41 is present in fHbp from variant groups 1 and 2, the R41S substitution eliminated fH binding only in variant group 1 proteins. To identify mutants in variant group 2 with impaired fH binding, we generated fHbp structural models and predicted 63 residues influencing fH binding. From these, we created 11 mutants with one or two amino acid substitutions in a variant group 2 protein and identified six that decreased fH binding. Three of these six mutants retained conformational epitopes recognized by all six anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested and elicited serum complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titers in wild-type mice that were not significantly different from those obtained with the control vaccine. Thus, fHbp amino acid residues that affect human fH binding differ across variant groups. This result suggests that fHbp sequence variation induced by immune selection also affects fH binding motifs via coevolution. The three new fHbp mutants from variant group 2, which do not bind human fH, retained important epitopes for eliciting bactericidal antibodies and may be promising vaccine candidates. PMID:22615247

  13. Design of meningococcal factor H binding protein mutant vaccines that do not bind human complement factor H.

    PubMed

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-08-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a human species-specific ligand for the complement regulator, factor H (fH). In recent studies, fHbp vaccines in which arginine at position 41 was replaced by serine (R41S) had impaired fH binding. The mutant vaccines elicited bactericidal responses in human fH transgenic mice superior to those elicited by control fHbp vaccines that bound human fH. Based on sequence similarity, fHbp has been classified into three variant groups. Here we report that although R41 is present in fHbp from variant groups 1 and 2, the R41S substitution eliminated fH binding only in variant group 1 proteins. To identify mutants in variant group 2 with impaired fH binding, we generated fHbp structural models and predicted 63 residues influencing fH binding. From these, we created 11 mutants with one or two amino acid substitutions in a variant group 2 protein and identified six that decreased fH binding. Three of these six mutants retained conformational epitopes recognized by all six anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested and elicited serum complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titers in wild-type mice that were not significantly different from those obtained with the control vaccine. Thus, fHbp amino acid residues that affect human fH binding differ across variant groups. This result suggests that fHbp sequence variation induced by immune selection also affects fH binding motifs via coevolution. The three new fHbp mutants from variant group 2, which do not bind human fH, retained important epitopes for eliciting bactericidal antibodies and may be promising vaccine candidates.

  14. Comparative study of binding of ovine complement factor H with different Borrelia genospecies.

    PubMed

    Kišová-Vargová, Lucia; Cerňanská, Dana; Bhide, Mangesh

    2012-03-01

    This study presents the binding of ovine factor H (fH) by various serotypes of Borrelia and simultaneously correlates their complement resistance to sheep serum. Affinity ligand binding assay was employed to study the binding of borrelial proteins to ovine recombinant fH and its truncated forms (short consensus repeat, SCR 7 and SCRs 19-20). From a repertoire of 17 borrelial strains, only two strains showed affinity to sheep fH. A ~28-kDa protein of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (B. burgdorferi s.s., strain SKT-2) bound full-length fH as well as SCRs 19-20. This fH-binding protein was further identified as complement regulator-acquiring surface protein of B. burgdorferi (BbCRASP-1) by MALDI-TOF analysis. Surprisingly, a ~26-kDa protein of Borrelia bissettii (DN127) showed affinity to full-length fH but not to SCR 7 and SCRs19-20. In complement sensitivity assay, both strains-SKT-2 and DN127-were resistant to normal sheep serum. Significant complement resistance of two Borrelia garinii strains (G117 and T25) was also observed; however, none of those strains was able to bind sheep fH. Our study underscores the need of further exploration of fH-mediated evasion of complement system by Borrelia in domestic animals.

  15. Regulatory components of the alternative complement pathway in endothelial cell cytoplasm, factor H and factor I, are not packaged in Weibel-Palade bodies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy A; Sartain, Sarah E; Hui, Shiu-Ki; Moake, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that factor H, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway, is stored with von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. If this were to be the case, it would have therapeutic importance for patients with the atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome that can be caused either by a heterozygous defect in the factor H gene or by the presence of an autoantibody against factor H. The in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP), would be expected to increase transiently the circulating factor H levels, in addition to increasing the circulating levels of VWF. We describe experiments demonstrating that factor H is released from endothelial cell cytoplasm without a secondary storage site. These experiments showed that factor H is not stored with VWF in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies, and is not secreted in response in vitro in response to the Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, histamine. Furthermore, the in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, DDAVP does not increase the circulating factor H levels concomitantly with DDAVP-induced increased VWF. Factor I, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway that is functionally related to factor H, is also located in endothelial cell cytoplasm, and is also not present in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies. Our data demonstrate that the factor H and factor I regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway are not stored in Weibel-Palade bodies. DDAVP induces the secretion into human plasma of VWF--but not factor H.

  16. Streptococcus pyogenes Endopeptidase O Contributes to Evasion from Complement-mediated Bacteriolysis via Binding to Human Complement Factor C1q.

    PubMed

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Mori, Yasushi; Hamd, Dalia Talat; Ogawa, Taiji; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Nakata, Masanobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2017-03-10

    Streptococcus pyogenes secretes various virulence factors for evasion from complement-mediated bacteriolysis. However, full understanding of the molecules possessed by this organism that interact with complement C1q, an initiator of the classical complement pathway, remains elusive. In this study, we identified an endopeptidase of S. pyogenes, PepO, as an interacting molecule, and investigated its effects on complement immunity and pathogenesis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance analysis findings revealed that S. pyogenes recombinant PepO bound to human C1q in a concentration-dependent manner under physiological conditions. Sites of inflammation are known to have decreased pH levels, thus the effects of PepO on bacterial evasion from complement immunity was analyzed in a low pH condition. Notably, under low pH conditions, PepO exhibited a higher affinity for C1q as compared with IgG, and PepO inhibited the binding of IgG to C1q. In addition, pepO deletion rendered S. pyogenes more susceptible to the bacteriocidal activity of human serum. Also, observations of the morphological features of the pepO mutant strain (ΔpepO) showed damaged irregular surfaces as compared with the wild-type strain (WT). WT-infected tissues exhibited greater severity and lower complement activity as compared with those infected by ΔpepO in a mouse skin infection model. Furthermore, WT infection resulted in a larger accumulation of C1q than that with ΔpepO. Our results suggest that interaction of S. pyogenes PepO with C1q interferes with the complement pathway, which enables S. pyogenes to evade complement-mediated bacteriolysis under acidic conditions, such as seen in inflammatory sites. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Aged complement factor H knockout mice kept in a clean barriered environment have reduced retinal pathology.

    PubMed

    Hoh Kam, Jaimie; Morgan, James E; Jeffery, Glen

    2016-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the largest cause of visual loss in those over 60 years in the West and is a condition increasing in prevalence. Many diseases result from genetic/environmental interactions and 50% of AMD cases have an association with polymorphisms of the complement system including complement factor H. Here we explore interactions between genetic predisposition and environmental conditions in triggering retinal pathology in two groups of aged complement factor H knock out (Cfh(-/-)) mice. Mice were maintained over 9 months in either a conventional open environment or a barriered pathogen free environment. Open environment Cfh(-/-) mice had significant increases in subretinal macrophage numbers, inflammatory and stress responses and reduced photoreceptor numbers over mice kept in a pathogen free environment. Hence, environmental factors can drive retinal disease in these mice when linked to complement deficits impairing immune function. Both groups of mice had similar levels of retinal amyloid beta accumulation. Consequently there is no direct link between this and inflammation in Cfh(-/-) mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sleep and circadian rhythm regulate circulating complement factors and immunoregulatory properties of C5a.

    PubMed

    Reis, Edimara S; Lange, Tanja; Köhl, Gabriele; Herrmann, Anne; Tschulakow, Alexander V; Naujoks, Julius; Born, Jan; Köhl, Jörg

    2011-10-01

    The sleep-wake cycle is characterized by complex interactions among the central nervous, the endocrine and the immune systems. Continuous 24-h wakefulness prevents sleep-associated hormone regulation resulting in impaired pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Importantly, cytokines and hormones also modulate the complement system, which in turn regulates several adaptive immune responses. However, it is unknown whether sleep affects the activation and the immunoregulatory properties of the complement system. Here, we determined whether the 24-h sleep-wake cycle has an impact on: (i) the levels of circulating complement factors; and (ii) TLR4-mediated IL-12 production from human IFN-γ primed monocytes in the presence or absence of C5a receptor signaling. For this purpose, we analyzed the blood and blood-derived monocytes of 13 healthy donors during a regular sleep-wake cycle in comparison to 24 h of continuous wakefulness. We found decreased plasma levels of C3 and C4 during nighttime hours that were not affected by sleep. In contrast, sleep was associated with increased complement activation as reflected by elevated C3a plasma levels during nighttime sleep. Sleep deprivation prevented such activation. At the cellular level, C5a negatively regulated TLR4-mediated IL-12p40 and p70 production from human monocytes. Importantly, this regulatory effect of C5a on IL-12p70 production was effective only during daytime hours. Thus, similar to hormones, some complement factors and immunoregulatory properties of C5a are influenced by sleep and the circadian rhythm. Our findings that continuous wakefulness has a negative impact on complement activation may provide a rationale for the immunosupportive functions of sleep. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Systemic Administration of Induced Neural Stem Cells Regulates Complement Activation in Mouse Closed Head Injury Models

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mou; Dong, Qin; Yao, Hui; Lu, Yingzhou; Ji, Xinchao; Zou, Mingming; Yang, Zhijun; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2017-01-01

    Complement activation plays important roles in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Patients face neurological disorders due to the development of complement activation, which contributes to cell apoptosis, brain edema, blood-brain barrier dysfunction and inflammatory infiltration. We previously reported that induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) can promote neurological functional recovery in closed head injury (CHI) animals. Remarkably, we discovered that local iNSC grafts have the potential to modulate CNS inflammation post-CHI. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of systemically delivered iNSCs in complement activation following CNS injury. Our data showed that iNSC grafts decreased the levels of sera C3a and C5a and down-regulated the expression of C3d, C9, active Caspase-3 and Bax in the brain, kidney and lung tissues of CHI mice. Furthermore, iNSC grafts decreased the levels of C3d+/NeuN+, C5b-9+/NeuN+, C3d+/Map2+ and C5b-9+/Map2+ neurons in the injured cortices of CHI mice. Subsequently, we explored the mechanisms underlying these effects. With flow cytometry analysis, we observed a dramatic increase in complement receptor type 1-related protein y (Crry) expression in iNSCs after CHI mouse serum treatment. Moreover, both in vitro and in vivo loss-of-function studies revealed that iNSCs could modulate complement activation via Crry expression. PMID:28383046

  20. Complement is a central mediator of radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and clinical response.

    PubMed

    Surace, Laura; Lysenko, Veronika; Fontana, Andrea Orlando; Cecconi, Virginia; Janssen, Hans; Bicvic, Antonela; Okoniewski, Michal; Pruschy, Martin; Dummer, Reinhard; Neefjes, Jacques; Knuth, Alexander; Gupta, Anurag; van den Broek, Maries

    2015-04-21

    Radiotherapy induces DNA damage and cell death, but recent data suggest that concomitant immune stimulation is an integral part of the therapeutic action of ionizing radiation. It is poorly understood how radiotherapy supports tumor-specific immunity. Here we report that radiotherapy induced tumor cell death and transiently activated complement both in murine and human tumors. The local production of pro-inflammatory anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a was crucial to the tumor response to radiotherapy and concomitant stimulation of tumor-specific immunity. Dexamethasone, a drug frequently given during radiotherapy, limited complement activation and the anti-tumor effects of the immune system. Overall, our findings indicate that anaphylatoxins are key players in radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and the ensuing clinical responses.

  1. Complement-fixing properties of antinuclear antibodies distinguish drug-induced lupus from systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, R L; Teodorescu, M; Beutner, E H; Plunkett, R W

    2004-01-01

    The immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody (ANA) test has been widely used to monitor autoimmune disease, but its value for diagnostic purposes is compromised by low specificity and high prevalence in disease-free individuals. The capacity of autoantibodies to fix serum complement proteins when bound to antigen is an important effector function because this property is associated with acute and chronic inflammatory processes. The current study evaluates the complement-fixing properties of antinuclear antibodies (CANA) in three well-defined and clinically-related patient groups: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), drug-induced lupus (DIL) and drug-induced autoimmunity (DIA). Of 20 patients diagnosed with SLE, 90% displayed complement-fixing ANA while this feature was present in only two of 18 patients with DIL and no patients with DIA without associated disease even though the mean ANA titres were similar among these patient groups. CANA was significantly correlated with anti-Sm activity. Because SLE but not DIL or DIA can be a life-threatening disease associated with complement consumption in vivo, these results demonstrate that measurement of CANA is a diagnostically useful tool and may have immunopathologic implications.

  2. Complement-induced thrombus formation on the surface of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-grafted polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, H; Hayashi, K; Yoshikawa, S; Miya, M; Yamamoto, N; Yamashita, I

    1987-01-01

    The role of complement activation in thrombogenesis was investigated on the surface of hydrophilic monomer-graft copolymerized polyethylene (PE) tubes. N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP)-grafted tubes activated in an in vitro complement system of canine serum; but no activation occurred in 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-grafted tubes. The relative patent time for NVP-grafted tubes implanted in canine peripheral veins was shorter than that for HEMA-grafted tubes and adhesion of numerous leucocytes was observed on the luminal surfaces of the NVP-grafted tubes. Decomplementation by prior administration of cobra venom factor elongated the relative patent time for NVP-grafted tubes only and also inhibited the adhesion of leucocytes onto them. These results suggest that the complement activation participates in thrombus formation on the polymer surfaces in canine veins.

  3. The role of complement, platelet-activating factor and leukotriene B4 in a reversed passive Arthus reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A. G.; Norman, K. E.; Donigi-Gale, D.; Shoupe, T. S.; Edwards, R.; Williams, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanisms underlying oedema formation induced in a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction and, for comparison, in response to zymosan in rabbit skin were investigated. 2. Oedema formation at skin sites was quantified by the accumulation of intravenously-injected 125I-labelled human serum albumin. 3. Recombinant soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), administered locally in rabbit skin, suppressed oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by zymosan. 4. The platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonists, WEB 2086 and PF10040 administered locally, inhibited oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by PAF but not by zymosan. 5. A locally administered leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonist, LY-255283, inhibited oedema formation induced by LTB4 but did not inhibit oedema responses to PAF, zymosan or the RPA reaction. 6. The results demonstrate a role for complement in oedema formation in both the RPA reaction and in response to zymosan. An important contribution by PAF is indicated in the RPA reaction but not in response to zymosan whereas no evidence was obtained to suggest a role for LTB4 in either inflammatory response. PMID:1330163

  4. The role of complement Factor H in age-related macular degeneration: a review.

    PubMed

    Donoso, Larry A; Vrabec, Tamara; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Factor H is a 155kDa sialic acid containing glycoprotein that plays an integral role in the regulation of the complement-mediated immune system that is involved in microbial defense, immune complex processing, and programmed cell death. These events take place primarily in fluid phase and on the cell surface and are particularly important in the context of distinguishing self from non-self. Activation of the complement system occurs within seconds and results in a proteolytic cascade eventually forming the membrane attack complex leading to cell lysis. Factor H protects host cells from injury resulting from unrestrained complement activation. Mutations and SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) in Factor H have been implicated in a variety of human conditions including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and membranoproliferative glomuleronephritis type II or dense deposit disease. It should not be surprising that these seemingly unrelated diseases involving mutations in Factor H may share common features. Because the immune process involves, in part, an inflammatory response and common or similar surface antigens, it is also not unexpected to observe features of inflammation, including deposition of bioactive complement fragments such as C3a and C5a, a cellular influx of immune related cells such as lymphocytes, and the potential for multiple organ involvement. We review recent developments in molecular genetics; SNPs, including Y402H; the three-dimensional structure; and mass spectroscopy of Factor H as it relates to the pathogenesis of eye disease. In addition, we discuss the concepts of molecular mimicry, sequestered or hidden antigens, and antigenic cross reactivity, and propose that AMD should not simply be considered to be an eye disease, but rather a systemic vascular disease where the eye has the ability to self regulate a local immune response. Identification of the initial event or inciting antigen has yet to be

  5. [Study of functional activity of components and factors of the human complement system].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, L V

    2002-01-01

    Development suitable for clinical researches of hemolytic methods of determination of functional activity of the first components of a complement has allowed to show diagnostic value of testing activity of complement components in comparison with their contents as antigens. It has predetermined necessity for building modern ELISA tests-systems for quantitative determination of functional activity of complement components. Such methods built for the first time allow to determine activity of components C1q, C2, C3, C4 (and a ratio of isotypes C4A and C4B), C1-inhibitor, factors B and D. Addition of these tests-systems ELISA systems for quantitative determination of components, and in case of C1-inhibitor of presence IgG, IgA and IgM autoantibodies against C1-inhibitor frames opportunities of an evaluation complement status of the patient, hereditary predisposition to such diseases as a stomach ulcer, the glaucoma, a clamidiosis, bacteroidosis, allows to carry out differential diagnostics of angioedema. Inhibition of covalent linkage C4b or C3b various endogenic and exogenous effectors during formation C3- and C5-convertases allows to understand processes of a regulation of a homeostasis, and also the mechanism of action of drugs.

  6. Complement-activating rheumatoid-factor-containing complexes in patients with rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Elson, C J; Scott, D G; Blake, D R; Bacon, P A; Holt, P D

    1983-04-01

    The role of complement and rheumatoid factor in immune complexes was examined in patients with a variety of rheumatic diseases. This was done by assessing the amount of rheumatoid factor (RF) bound from sera by F(ab)2 anti-C3 attached to a solid matrix. High levels of RF bound to C3 were detected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by vasculitis but rarely and in lower levels in patients with synovitis, ankylosing spondylitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The activity was bound to anti-C3 through anti-C3 antibodies because little was bound by normal F(ab)2 and was evidently complexed in the sera before in-vitro testing, since it was precipitated by 2 . 5% polyethylene glycol and sedimented with high molecular weight material on sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. It is considered that RF-containing complexes are present in vasculitic sera and have the potential to bind complement in vivo.

  7. Complement C1q Activates Tumor Suppressor WWOX to Induce Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Qunying; Sze, Chun-I; Lin, Sing-Ru; Lee, Ming-Hui; He, Ruei-Yu; Schultz, Lori; Chang, Jean-Yun; Chen, Shean-Jen; Boackle, Robert J.; Hsu, Li-Jin; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2009-01-01

    Background Tissue exudates contain low levels of serum complement proteins, and their regulatory effects on prostate cancer progression are largely unknown. We examined specific serum complement components in coordinating the activation of tumor suppressors p53 and WWOX (also named FOR or WOX1) and kinases ERK, JNK1 and STAT3 in human prostate DU145 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings DU145 cells were cultured overnight in 1% normal human serum, or in human serum depleted of an indicated complement protein. Under complement C1q- or C6-free conditions, WOX1 and ERK were mainly present in the cytoplasm without phosphorylation, whereas phosphorylated JNK1 was greatly accumulated in the nuclei. Exogenous C1q rapidly restored the WOX1 activation (with Tyr33 phosphorylation) in less than 2 hr. Without serum complement C9, p53 became activated, and hyaluronan (HA) reversed the effect. Under C6-free conditions, HA induced activation of STAT3, an enhancer of metastasis. Notably, exogenous C1q significantly induced apoptosis of WOX1-overexpressing DU145 cells, but not vehicle-expressing cells. A dominant negative and Y33R mutant of WOX1 blocked the apoptotic effect. C1q did not enhance p53-mediated apoptosis. By total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, it was determined that C1q destabilized adherence of WOX1-expressing DU145 cells by partial detaching and inducing formation of clustered microvilli for focal adhesion particularly in between cells. These cells then underwent shrinkage, membrane blebbing and death. Remarkably, as determined by immunostaining, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer were shown to have a significantly reduced expression of tissue C1q, compared to age-matched normal prostate tissues. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that complement C1q may induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating WOX1 and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q enhances prostate hyperplasia and cancerous formation due to

  8. Effect of complement depletion by cobra venom factor on fowlpox virus infection in chickens and chicken embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Yoshikawa, Y; Kai, C; Yamanouchi, K; Taniguchi, H; Komine, K; Ishijima, Y; Okada, H

    1986-01-01

    The course of infection with an attenuated strain of fowlpox virus (FPV), which is known to induce antibody-independent activation of complement via the alternative pathway, was investigated in 1- to 3-day-old chickens and 14-day-old chicken embryos by treatment with cobra venom factor (CVF). CVF was found to inhibit complement activity transiently via the alternative pathway but not via the classical pathway. In chickens treated with CVF, virus growth in the skin was enhanced, and pock lesions tended to disseminate, leading to fatal infection in some birds. Histologically, an acute inflammation at an early stage of infection (within 3 days) was inhibited, and virus content in the pock lesion was increased. In chicken embryos with immature immune capacities, CVF treatment caused changes in pock morphology from clear pocks to diffuse ones, an increase in virus content in the pock, and inhibition of cell infiltration. Thus, FPV infection was aggravated in both CVF-treated chickens and chicken embryos. These results are discussed in relation to roles of complement in the elimination of virus at an early stage of FPV infection. Images PMID:3003397

  9. Structural basis for conserved complement factor-like function in the antimalarial protein TEP1

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Richard H. G.; Chang, Chung-I; Chelliah, Yogarany; Blandin, Stéphanie; Levashina, Elena A.; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2007-01-01

    Thioester-containing proteins (TEPs) are a major component of the innate immune response of insects to invasion by bacteria and protozoa. TEPs form a distinct clade of a superfamily that includes the pan-protease inhibitors α2-macroglobulins and vertebrate complement factors. The essential feature of these proteins is a sequestered thioester bond that, after cleavage in a protease-sensitive region of the protein, is activated and covalently binds to its target. Recently, TEP1 from the malarial vector Anopheles gambiae was shown to mediate recognition and killing of ookinetes from the malarial parasite Plasmodium berghei, a model for the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Here, we present the crystal structure of the TEP1 isoform TEP1r. Although the overall protein fold of TEP1r resembles that of complement factor C3, the TEP1r domains are repositioned to stabilize the inactive conformation of the molecule (containing an intact thioester) in the absence of the anaphylotoxin domain, a central component of complement factors. The structure of TEP1r provides a molecular basis for the differences between TEP1 alleles TEP1r and TEP1s, which correlate with resistance of A. gambiae to infection by P. berghei. PMID:17606907

  10. Reduction in ocular complement factor B protein in mice and monkeys by systemic administration of factor B antisense oligonucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Carrer, Michele; Shen, Lijiang; Johnson, Robert B.; Hettrick, Lisa A.; Henry, Scott P.; Monia, Brett P.; McCaleb, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of permanent vision loss among the elderly in many industrialized countries, and the complement system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AMD. Inhibition of complement factor B, a key regulator of the alternative pathway, is implicated as a potential therapeutic intervention for AMD. Here we investigated the effect of liver factor B reduction on systemic and ocular factor B levels. Methods Second-generation antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting mouse and monkey factor B mRNA were administered by subcutaneous injection to healthy mice or monkeys, and the level of factor B mRNA was assessed in the liver and the eye. In addition, the factor B protein level was determined in plasma and whole eyes from the treated animals. Results Mice and monkeys treated with factor B ASOs demonstrated a robust reduction in liver factor B mRNA levels with no change in ocular factor B mRNA levels. Plasma factor B protein levels were significantly reduced in mice and monkeys treated with factor B ASOs, leading to a dramatic reduction in ocular factor B protein, below the assay detection levels. Conclusions The results add to the increasing evidence that the liver is the main source of plasma and ocular factor B protein, and demonstrate that reduction of liver factor B mRNA by an ASO results in a significant reduction in plasma and ocular factor B protein levels. The results suggest that inhibition of liver factor B mRNA by factor B ASOs would reduce systemic alternative complement pathway activation and has potential to be used as a novel therapy for AMD. PMID:28855795

  11. Reduction in ocular complement factor B protein in mice and monkeys by systemic administration of factor B antisense oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Tamar R; Carrer, Michele; Shen, Lijiang; Johnson, Robert B; Hettrick, Lisa A; Henry, Scott P; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of permanent vision loss among the elderly in many industrialized countries, and the complement system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AMD. Inhibition of complement factor B, a key regulator of the alternative pathway, is implicated as a potential therapeutic intervention for AMD. Here we investigated the effect of liver factor B reduction on systemic and ocular factor B levels. Second-generation antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting mouse and monkey factor B mRNA were administered by subcutaneous injection to healthy mice or monkeys, and the level of factor B mRNA was assessed in the liver and the eye. In addition, the factor B protein level was determined in plasma and whole eyes from the treated animals. Mice and monkeys treated with factor B ASOs demonstrated a robust reduction in liver factor B mRNA levels with no change in ocular factor B mRNA levels. Plasma factor B protein levels were significantly reduced in mice and monkeys treated with factor B ASOs, leading to a dramatic reduction in ocular factor B protein, below the assay detection levels. The results add to the increasing evidence that the liver is the main source of plasma and ocular factor B protein, and demonstrate that reduction of liver factor B mRNA by an ASO results in a significant reduction in plasma and ocular factor B protein levels. The results suggest that inhibition of liver factor B mRNA by factor B ASOs would reduce systemic alternative complement pathway activation and has potential to be used as a novel therapy for AMD.

  12. A complement-microglial axis drives synapse loss during virus-induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Vasek, Michael J; Garber, Charise; Dorsey, Denise; Durrant, Douglas M; Bollman, Bryan; Soung, Allison; Yu, Jinsheng; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Frouin, Arnaud; Wilton, Daniel K; Funk, Kristen; DeMasters, Bette K; Jiang, Xiaoping; Bowen, James R; Mennerick, Steven; Robinson, John K; Garbow, Joel R; Tyler, Kenneth L; Suthar, Mehul S; Schmidt, Robert E; Stevens, Beth; Klein, Robyn S

    2016-06-23

    Over 50% of patients who survive neuroinvasive infection with West Nile virus (WNV) exhibit chronic cognitive sequelae. Although thousands of cases of WNV-mediated memory dysfunction accrue annually, the mechanisms responsible for these impairments are unknown. The classical complement cascade, a key component of innate immune pathogen defence, mediates synaptic pruning by microglia during early postnatal development. Here we show that viral infection of adult hippocampal neurons induces complement-mediated elimination of presynaptic terminals in a murine WNV neuroinvasive disease model. Inoculation of WNV-NS5-E218A, a WNV with a mutant NS5(E218A) protein leads to survival rates and cognitive dysfunction that mirror human WNV neuroinvasive disease. WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice (recovery defined as survival after acute infection) display impaired spatial learning and persistence of phagocytic microglia without loss of hippocampal neurons or volume. Hippocampi from WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice with poor spatial learning show increased expression of genes that drive synaptic remodelling by microglia via complement. C1QA was upregulated and localized to microglia, infected neurons and presynaptic terminals during WNV neuroinvasive disease. Murine and human WNV neuroinvasive disease post-mortem samples exhibit loss of hippocampal CA3 presynaptic terminals, and murine studies revealed microglial engulfment of presynaptic terminals during acute infection and after recovery. Mice with fewer microglia (Il34(-/-) mice with a deficiency in IL-34 production) or deficiency in complement C3 or C3a receptor were protected from WNV-induced synaptic terminal loss. Our study provides a new murine model of WNV-induced spatial memory impairment, and identifies a potential mechanism underlying neurocognitive impairment in patients recovering from WNV neuroinvasive disease.

  13. A complement-microglial axis drives synapse loss during virus-induced memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Vasek, Michael J.; Garber, Charise; Dorsey, Denise; Durrant, Douglas M.; Bollman, Bryan; Soung, Allison; Yu, Jinsheng; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Frouin, Arnaud; Wilton, Daniel K.; Funk, Kristen; DeMasters, Bette K.; Jiang, Xiaoping; Bowen, James R.; Mennerick, Steven; Robinson, John K.; Garbow, Joel R.; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Suthar, Mehul S.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Stevens, Beth; Klein, Robyn S.

    2017-01-01

    Over 50% of patients who survive neuroinvasive infection with West Nile virus (WNV) exhibit chronic cognitive sequelae1,2. Although thousands of cases of WNV-mediated memory dysfunction accrue annually3, the mechanisms responsible for these impairments are unknown. The classical complement cascade, a key component of innate immune pathogen defence, mediates synaptic pruning by microglia during early postnatal development4,5. Here we show that viral infection of adult hippocampal neurons induces complement-mediated elimination of presynaptic terminals in a murine WNV neuroinvasive disease model. Inoculation of WNV-NS5-E218A, a WNV with a mutant NS5(E218A) protein6,7 leads to survival rates and cognitive dysfunction that mirror human WNV neuroinvasive disease. WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice (recovery defined as survival after acute infection) display impaired spatial learning and persistence of phagocytic microglia without loss of hippocampal neurons or volume. Hippocampi from WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice with poor spatial learning show increased expression of genes that drive synaptic remodelling by microglia via complement. C1QA was upregulated and localized to microglia, infected neurons and presynaptic terminals during WNV neuroinvasive disease. Murine and human WNV neuroinvasive disease post-mortem samples exhibit loss of hippocampal CA3 presynaptic terminals, and murine studies revealed microglial engulfment of presynaptic terminals during acute infection and after recovery. Mice with fewer microglia (Il34−/− mice with a deficiency in IL-34 production) or deficiency in complement C3 or C3a receptor were protected from WNV-induced synaptic terminal loss. Our study provides a new murine model of WNV-induced spatial memory impairment, and identifies a potential mechanism underlying neurocognitive impairment in patients recovering from WNV neuroinvasive disease. PMID:27337340

  14. Expression and Subcellular Targeting of Human Complement Factor C5a in Nicotiana species

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Henrik; Mischofsky, Heike; Koslowski, Roswitha; Meyer, Udo; Broer, Inge; Huckauf, Jana

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated transgenic tobacco plants as an alternative to Escherichia coli for the production of recombinant human complement factor 5a (C5a). C5a has not been expressed in plants before and is highly unstable in vivo in its native form, so it was necessary to establish the most suitable subcellular targeting strategy. We used the strong and constitutive CaMV 35S promoter to drive transgene expression and compared three different subcellular compartments. The yields of C5a in the T0 transgenic plants were low in terms of the proportion of total soluble protein (TSP) when targeted to the apoplast (0.0002% TSP) or endoplasmic reticulum (0.0003% TSP) but was one order of magnitude higher when targeted to the vacuole (0.001% TSP). The yields could be increased by conventional breeding (up to 0.014% TSP in the T2 generation). C5a accumulated to the same level in seeds and leaves when targeted to the apoplast but was up to 1.7-fold more abundant in the seeds when targeted to the ER or vacuole, although this difference was less striking in the better-performing lines. When yields were calculated as an amount per gram fresh weight of transgenic plant tissue, the vacuole targeting strategy was clearly more efficient in seeds, reaching 35.8 µg C5a per gram of fresh seed weight compared to 10.62 µg C5a per gram fresh weight of leaves. Transient expression of C5aER and C5aVac in N. benthamiana, using MagnICON vectors, reached up to 0.2% and 0.7% of TSP, respectively, but was accompanied by cytotoxic effects and induced leaf senescence. Western blot of the plant extracts revealed a band matching the corresponding glycosylated native protein and the bioassay demonstrated that recombinant C5a was biologically active. PMID:23285250

  15. An Anti-C1s Monoclonal, TNT003, Inhibits Complement Activation Induced by Antibodies Against HLA

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, K A; Valenzuela, N M; Gjertson, D; Mulder, A; Fishbein, M C; Parry, G C; Panicker, S; Reed, E F

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants (SOT) is characterized by damage triggered by donor-specific antibodies (DSA) binding donor Class I and II HLA (HLA-I and HLA-II) expressed on endothelial cells. While F(ab′)2 portions of DSA cause cellular activation and proliferation, Fc regions activate the classical complement cascade, resulting in complement deposition and leukocyte recruitment, both hallmark features of AMR. We characterized the ability of an anti-C1s monoclonal antibody, TNT003, to inhibit HLA antibody (HLA-Ab)-induced complement activation. Complement deposition induced by HLA-Ab was evaluated using novel cell- and bead-based assays. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured with HLA-Ab and human complement; production of activated complement proteins was measured by flow cytometry. Additionally, C3d deposition was measured on single antigen beads (SAB) mixed with HLA-Ab and human complement. TNT003 inhibited HLA-Ab mediated complement deposition on HAEC in a concentration-dependent manner; C3a, C4a and C5a anaphylatoxin production was also diminished by TNT003. Finally, TNT003 blocked C3d deposition induced by Class I (HLAI-Ab)- and Class II (HLAII-Ab)-specific antibodies on SAB. These data suggest TNT003 may be useful for modulating the effects of DSA, as TNT003 inhibits complement deposition and split product formation generated by HLA-I/II-Ab in vitro. PMID:25904443

  16. Complement complex C5b-8 induces PGI/sub 2/ formation in culture endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suttorp, N.; Seeger, W.; Zinsky, S.; Bhakdi, S.

    1987-07-01

    The effects of the terminal complement sequence on prostacyclin (PGI/sub 2/) generation in antibody-sensitized pulmonary arterial endothelial cells were examined. Whereas C5b-7 complement complexes induced no PGI/sub 2/ formation, addition of purified complement component C8 resulted in a time- and dose-dependent burst of PGI/sub 2/ release in the absence of overt cell damage. Formation of the complete terminal complement complex C5b-9 enhanced PGI/sub 2/ release but was accompanied by cytolysis. Extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ was required for C5b-8-dependent PGI/sub 2/ formation. Three different blockers of physiological calcium channels failed to suppress the observed stimulatory effect. In contrast, W7 (N-(6-amino-hexyl)-5-chloro-1-napththalene sulfonamide) and trifluoperazine, inhibitors of calmodulin activity, all reduced the C5b-8-dependent PGI/sub 2/ generation. None of the inhibitors used impaired Ca/sup 2 +/ flux into the cells. One minute after addition of C8 to endothelial cells carrying C5b-7 complexes, a six- to seven-fold enhanced passive influx of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ into the cells was noted. An enhanced passive influx was also observed for /sup 51/CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, (/sup H/) aminobutyric acid, and (/sup 3/H) sucrose, but not for (/sup 3/H)inulin and (/sup 3/H)dextran. These data together suggest that complement C5b-8 complexes may serve as Ca/sup 2 +/bypass gates in endothelial cells, the ensuring influx of Ca/sup 2 +/ leading to subsequent activation of the arachiodonic acid pathway.

  17. Cysteine Proteinase from Streptococcus pyogenes Enables Evasion of Innate Immunity via Degradation of Complement Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Ogawa, Taiji; Terao, Yutaka; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Ikebe, Kazunori; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen that causes invasive diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis, sepsis, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. We investigated the function of a major cysteine protease from S. pyogenes that affects the amount of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) and other complement factors and aimed to elucidate the mechanism involved in occurrence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome from the aspect of the complement system. First, we revealed that culture supernatant of a given S. pyogenes strain and recombinant SpeB degraded the C1-INH. Then, we determined the N-terminal sequence of the C1-INH fragment degraded by recombinant SpeB. Interestingly, the region containing one of the identified cleavage sites is not present in patients with C1-INH deficiency. Scanning electron microscopy of the speB mutant incubated in human serum showed the abnormal superficial architecture and irregular oval structure. Furthermore, unlike the wild-type strain, that mutant strain showed lower survival capacity than normal as compared with heat-inactivated serum, whereas it had a significantly higher survival rate in serum without the C1-INH than in normal serum. Also, SpeB degraded multiple complement factors and the membrane attack complex. Flow cytometric analyses revealed deposition of C9, one of the components of membrane the attack complex, in greater amounts on the surface of the speB mutant, whereas lower amounts of C9 were bound to the wild-type strain surface. These results suggest that SpeB can interrupt the human complement system via degrading the C1-INH, thus enabling S. pyogenes to evade eradication in a hostile environment. PMID:23589297

  18. Cysteine proteinase from Streptococcus pyogenes enables evasion of innate immunity via degradation of complement factors.

    PubMed

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Ogawa, Taiji; Terao, Yutaka; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Ikebe, Kazunori; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-05-31

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen that causes invasive diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis, sepsis, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. We investigated the function of a major cysteine protease from S. pyogenes that affects the amount of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) and other complement factors and aimed to elucidate the mechanism involved in occurrence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome from the aspect of the complement system. First, we revealed that culture supernatant of a given S. pyogenes strain and recombinant SpeB degraded the C1-INH. Then, we determined the N-terminal sequence of the C1-INH fragment degraded by recombinant SpeB. Interestingly, the region containing one of the identified cleavage sites is not present in patients with C1-INH deficiency. Scanning electron microscopy of the speB mutant incubated in human serum showed the abnormal superficial architecture and irregular oval structure. Furthermore, unlike the wild-type strain, that mutant strain showed lower survival capacity than normal as compared with heat-inactivated serum, whereas it had a significantly higher survival rate in serum without the C1-INH than in normal serum. Also, SpeB degraded multiple complement factors and the membrane attack complex. Flow cytometric analyses revealed deposition of C9, one of the components of membrane the attack complex, in greater amounts on the surface of the speB mutant, whereas lower amounts of C9 were bound to the wild-type strain surface. These results suggest that SpeB can interrupt the human complement system via degrading the C1-INH, thus enabling S. pyogenes to evade eradication in a hostile environment.

  19. Complement factor I from flatfish half-smooth tongue (Cynoglossus semilaevis) exhibited anti-microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jinsong; Li, Xihong; Chen, Yadong; Lu, Yang; Yu, Mengjun; Chen, Xuejie; Zhang, Wenting; Zeng, Yan; Sun, Luming; Chen, Songlin; Sha, Zhenxia

    2015-11-01

    Complement factor I (Cfi) is a soluble serine protease which plays a crucial role in the modulation of complement cascades. In the presence of substrate modulating cofactors (such as complement factor H, C4bp, CR1, etc), Cfi cleaves and inactivates C3b and C4b, thereby controlling the complement-mediated processes. In this study, we sequenced and characterized Cfi gene from Cynoglossus Semilaevis (designated as CsCfi) for the first time. The full-length cDNA of CsCfi was 2230 bp in length, including a 98 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 164 bp 3'-UTR and a 1968 bp open reading frame (ORF). It encoded a polypeptide of 656 amino acids, with a molecular mass of 72.28 kDa and an isoelectric point of 7.71. A signal peptide was defined at N-terminus, resulting in a 626-residue mature protein. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that Cfi proteins were well conserved with the typical modular architecture and identical active sites throughout the vertebrates, which suggested the conserved function of Cfi. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CsCfi and the homologous Cfi sequences from teleosts clustered into a clade, separating from another clade from the cartilaginous fish and other vertebrates. Tissue expression profile analysis by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that CsCfi mRNA constitutively expressed in all tested tissues, with the predominant expression in liver and the lowest in stomach. Temporal expression levels of CsCfi after challenging with Vibrio anguillarum showed different expression patterns in intestine, spleen, skin, blood, head kidney and liver. The recombinant CsCfi (rCsCfi) protein showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities against the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shewanella putrefaciens. The research revealed that CsCfi plays an important role in C. Semilaevis immunity.

  20. Complement component C5 deficiency reduces edema formation in murine ligation-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Merriam, L T; Webster, C; Joehl, R J

    1997-01-01

    The complement cascade is activated in humans and animals with acute pancreatitis. Activation of complement component C5 liberates C5a, C5a-desarg, and terminal complement complexes (TCCs) that increase capillary permeability, edema, and leukocyte chemotaxis at injured sites. Complement activation plays a major role in pathogenesis of capillary leak and edema formation in severe acute pancreatitis; however, the contribution of C5 (C5a/C5a-desarg, TCCs) has not been defined. Using He gene mutant mice lacking circulating C5, the role of C5 in ligation-induced acute pancreatitis was evaluated. We performed the following experiments: C5-sufficient (Hc1/Hc1) and C5-deficient (Hc0/Hc0) mice had bile and pancreatic ducts ligated. Sham-operated mice had ducts dissected but not ligated. Mice were killed at 4, 8, and 24 hr after bilepancreatic duct ligation. Serologic and morphologic evidences of acute pancreatitis were evaluated. Pancreatic edema was assessed using analysis of pancreatic water content, histologic edema score, and determination of wet weight ratio. After 4, 8, and 24 hr of bile-pancreatic duct ligation, hyperamylasemia and histologic changes of acute pancreatitis were observed in both C5-deficient and C5-sufficient mice. Edema developed in all mice with acute pancreatitis. However, when compared to C5-sufficient mice, mice deficient in C5 developed significantly less pancreatic edema at both 8 and 24 hr of bile-pancreatic duct ligation. This difference was not observed 4 hr after induction of acute pancreatitis. We conclude that C5 contributes to edema formation in murine ligation-induced acute pancreatitis. The presence of an early C5-independent phase, in conjunction with the observation of significant edema in mice deficient in C5, suggests there are other mediators of edema formation in this acute pancreatitis model.

  1. NMO sera down-regulate AQP4 in human astrocyte and induce cytotoxicity independent of complement.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Hiroyo; Sano, Yasuteru; Shimizu, Fumitaka; Omoto, Masatoshi; Tasaki, Ayako; Oishi, Mariko; Koga, Michiaki; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Nakada, Tsutomu; Kanda, Takashi

    2013-08-15

    Autoantibodies against astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are highly specific for neuromyelitis optica (NMO). However, the molecular mechanism of NMO still remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify the possible humoral mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of astrocytic damage. Human primary astrocytes (AST) were immortalized by retroviral vectors harboring temperature-sensitive SV40 T antigen gene and AQP4 cDNA (M23), designated as hAST-AQP4. The effects of NMO sera on the content and localization of AQP4, including cytotoxicity and astrocytic morphology, were evaluated. In addition, this study examined whether the amount and localization of AQP4 protein in astrocytes were influenced by direct contact with the immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial cell line, TY09. NMO sera alone induced cytotoxicity and addition of complement had a more harmful effect on hAST-AQP4. NMO sera also decreased AQP4 mRNA and protein. NMO sera alone up-regulated TNFα and IL-6 in astrocytes and co-incubation with anti-TNFα and anti-IL-6 neutralizing antibodies blocked both the cytotoxicity and reduction of AQP4 in astrocytes. In the experiment using the in vitro BBB models, AQP4 protein mainly localized at the astrocytic membrane after co-culture with TY09, in contact with TY09. The future elucidation of factors that up-regulate AQP4 in astrocytes presumably released by blood brain barrier forming endothelial cells and that block the production of inflammatory cytokines may therefore lead to the development of a novel therapeutic strategy.

  2. Complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation successfully treated with eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Akira; Ueda, Taichiro; Miyakawa, Yoshitaka; Ochiai, Hidenobu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Secondary thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) are induced by several underlying conditions; most are resolved by treating background disease. Eculizumab is a human monoclonal antibody that blocks the final stage of the complement system and effectively treats atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). In this report, we present a patient with TMA secondary to sepsis- induced coagulopathy, who was successfully treated with eculizumab. A 44-year-old woman, who had no special medical history or familial history of TMAs, was admitted on suspicion of septic shock. Physical examination revealed gangrene on her soles. Blood tests revealed a decreased platelet count, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), renal dysfunction, hemolysis, and infection. Although the coagulation disorder improved with intensive care, the low platelet count, elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels, and renal dysfunction persisted. Our investigations subsequently excluded thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli-induced HUS. Plasma exchange only improved lactate dehydrogenase levels. We clinically diagnosed this case as atypical HUS and started eculizumab treatment. The patient's platelet count increased, her renal dysfunction improved, and the gangrene on her feet was ameliorated. The patient was discharged without maintenance dialysis therapy after approximately 3 months. Subsequent tests revealed elevated serum levels of soluble C5b-9, and genetic testing revealed compound heterozygous c.184G > A (Val62Ile) and c.1204T > C (Tyr402His) single-nucleotide polymorphisms in complement factor H. We encountered a case of complement-mediated TMA accompanied by DIC, which was successfully treated with eculizumab. Further studies are necessary to support the optimal use of eculizumab for TMA with background diseases. PMID:28178155

  3. Complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation successfully treated with eculizumab: A case report.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Akira; Ueda, Taichiro; Miyakawa, Yoshitaka; Ochiai, Hidenobu

    2017-02-01

    Secondary thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) are induced by several underlying conditions; most are resolved by treating background disease. Eculizumab is a human monoclonal antibody that blocks the final stage of the complement system and effectively treats atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). In this report, we present a patient with TMA secondary to sepsis- induced coagulopathy, who was successfully treated with eculizumab.A 44-year-old woman, who had no special medical history or familial history of TMAs, was admitted on suspicion of septic shock. Physical examination revealed gangrene on her soles. Blood tests revealed a decreased platelet count, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), renal dysfunction, hemolysis, and infection. Although the coagulation disorder improved with intensive care, the low platelet count, elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels, and renal dysfunction persisted. Our investigations subsequently excluded thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli-induced HUS. Plasma exchange only improved lactate dehydrogenase levels. We clinically diagnosed this case as atypical HUS and started eculizumab treatment. The patient's platelet count increased, her renal dysfunction improved, and the gangrene on her feet was ameliorated. The patient was discharged without maintenance dialysis therapy after approximately 3 months. Subsequent tests revealed elevated serum levels of soluble C5b-9, and genetic testing revealed compound heterozygous c.184G > A (Val62Ile) and c.1204T > C (Tyr402His) single-nucleotide polymorphisms in complement factor H.We encountered a case of complement-mediated TMA accompanied by DIC, which was successfully treated with eculizumab. Further studies are necessary to support the optimal use of eculizumab for TMA with background diseases.

  4. Prolonged cardiac allograft survival in mouse model after complement depletion with Yunnan cobra venom factor.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Wang, H-D; Zhu, X-X; Lan, G; Yang, K

    2009-12-01

    Activation of the complement system is the leading mechanism that causes antibody-mediated acute rejection and hyperacute rejection after xenotransplantation. The major cause of acute rejection in allogeneic transplantation is the T cell-mediated specific immune response. We studied the effects of complement on acute rejection after cardiac allotransplantation using complement depletion with cobra venom factor (CVF) in the mouse. The Balb/c-C57 mouse model of heterotopic cardiac allograft was used. The mice were divided into 2 groups, a control group and a CVF-treated group. After intravenous injection of CVF, the experimental group was observed for allograft survival time. Twelve mice from the control and experimental groups were sacrificed on days 3, 5, and 7 after the operation. The pathologic grade of acute rejection, deposition of C3 in tissue, extent of infiltration by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and expression of MHC-II, B7-1, and B7-2 were compared between the 2 groups. In the CVF-treated group, mean (SD) survival of the cardiac allograft was 26.2 (1.7) days, and in the control group was 8.4 (0.4) days (P < .01). Pathologic examination and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the grade of acute rejection, deposition of C3 in tissue, extent of infiltration of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and expression of MHC-II, B7-1, and B7-2 were significantly decreased in the CVF-treated group. Depletion of complement in the serum with CVF inhibits acute cardiac allograft rejection in the mouse.

  5. Inhibition of the activation of Hageman factor (factor XII) by complement subcomponent C1q.

    PubMed

    Rehmus, E H; Greene, B M; Everson, B A; Ratnoff, O D

    1987-08-01

    Hageman factor (HF, Factor XII) is activated by glass, collagen, and ellagic acid, and initiates blood coagulation via the intrinsic pathway. C1q inhibits collagen-induced platelet aggregation and adherence of platelets to glass, effects attributable to the collagen-like region of C1q. We examined the actions of C1q on HF activation. Incubation of C1q with HF before addition of HF-deficient plasma extended the activated partial thromboplastin time. Similarly, when glass tubes were coated with C1q before testing, the partial thromboplastin time of normal plasma was increased. C1q reduced the activation of HF by ellagic acid, as measured by the release of p-nitroaniline from the synthetic substrate H-D-prolyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide dihydrochloride, an effect inhibited by monoclonal anti-human C1q murine IgG and by digestion of C1q by collagenase. Thus, C1q inhibits activation of HF in vitro in clot-promoting and amidolytic assays and suggests a regulatory mechanism for the inhibition of coagulation.

  6. Inhibition of the activation of Hageman factor (factor XII) by complement subcomponent C1q.

    PubMed Central

    Rehmus, E H; Greene, B M; Everson, B A; Ratnoff, O D

    1987-01-01

    Hageman factor (HF, Factor XII) is activated by glass, collagen, and ellagic acid, and initiates blood coagulation via the intrinsic pathway. C1q inhibits collagen-induced platelet aggregation and adherence of platelets to glass, effects attributable to the collagen-like region of C1q. We examined the actions of C1q on HF activation. Incubation of C1q with HF before addition of HF-deficient plasma extended the activated partial thromboplastin time. Similarly, when glass tubes were coated with C1q before testing, the partial thromboplastin time of normal plasma was increased. C1q reduced the activation of HF by ellagic acid, as measured by the release of p-nitroaniline from the synthetic substrate H-D-prolyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide dihydrochloride, an effect inhibited by monoclonal anti-human C1q murine IgG and by digestion of C1q by collagenase. Thus, C1q inhibits activation of HF in vitro in clot-promoting and amidolytic assays and suggests a regulatory mechanism for the inhibition of coagulation. PMID:3038961

  7. New complementation constructs for inducible and constitutive gene expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Meghan E; Hackett, Kathleen T; Kotha, Chaitra; Dillard, Joseph P

    2012-05-01

    We have created new complementation constructs for use in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis. The constructs contain regions of homology with the chromosome and direct the insertion of a gene of interest into the intergenic region between the genes iga and trpB. In order to increase the available options for gene expression in Neisseria, we designed the constructs to contain one of three different promoters. One of the constructs contains the isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside-inducible lac promoter, which has been widely used in Neisseria. We also designed a construct that contains the strong, constitutive promoter from the gonococcal opaB gene. The third construct contains a tetracycline-inducible promoter, a novel use of this promoter in Neisseria. We demonstrate that anhydrotetracycline can be used to induce gene expression in the pathogenic Neisseria at very low concentrations and without negatively affecting the growth of the organisms. We use these constructs to complement an arginine auxotrophy in N. gonorrhoeae as well as to express a translational fusion of alkaline phosphatase with TraW. TraW is a component of the gonococcal type IV secretion system, and we demonstrate that TraW localizes to the periplasm.

  8. Single channel currents induced by complement in antibody-coated cell membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M B; Stephens, C L; Lecar, H

    1981-01-01

    An extracellular patch electrode was used to record ionic currents from individual complement-induced channels in the membranes of antibody-coated skeletal muscle. The amplitude of the single-channel currents leads to an estimate of 90 pS for the unit conductance. The kinetics of channel opening and closing show marked variability and complexity. Channels flicker open and closed repeatedly, indicating that once these lesions form, they undergo rapid structural transitions between discrete conducting and nonconducting states. Images PMID:6273870

  9. Association Between Growth of Geographic Atrophy and the Complement Factor I Locus.

    PubMed

    Yehoshua, Zohar; de Amorim Garcia Filho, Carlos Alexandre; Nunes, Renata Portella; Gregori, Giovanni; Penha, Fernando M; Moshfeghi, Andrew A; Luo, Hongrong; Kang, Zhang; Sadda, SriniVas; Feuer, William; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    The association between the growth of geographic atrophy (GA) and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the complement factor I (CFI) locus was investigated in the COMPLETE trial. Growth of GA at 52 weeks in eyes without the CFI at-risk allele was slightly faster than the growth in eyes with the CFI at-risk allele (P ≥ .72). The authors of the current study found that in contrast to the faster growth rate reported in CFI-positive eyes from the MAHALO trial, the CFI positive eyes in the COMPLETE trial did not grow faster, and this analysis included 24 eyes that met the MAHALO eligibility criteria.

  10. Insights into complement convertase formation based on the structure of the factor B-cobra venom factor complex.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Bert J C; Gomes, Lucio; Koning, Roman I; Svergun, Dmitri I; Koster, Abraham J; Fritzinger, David C; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Gros, Piet

    2009-08-19

    Immune protection by the complement system critically depends on assembly of C3 convertases on the surface of pathogens and altered host cells. These short-lived protease complexes are formed through pro-convertases, which for the alternative pathway consist of the complement component C3b and the pro-enzyme factor B (FB). Here, we present the crystal structure at 2.2-A resolution, small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy (EM) data of the pro-convertase formed by human FB and cobra venom factor (CVF), a potent homologue of C3b that generates more stable convertases. FB is loaded onto CVF through its pro-peptide Ba segment by specific contacts, which explain the specificity for the homologous C3b over the native C3 and inactive products iC3b and C3c. The protease segment Bb binds the carboxy terminus of CVF through the metal-ion dependent adhesion site of the Von Willebrand factor A-type domain. A possible dynamic equilibrium between a 'loading' and 'activation' state of the pro-convertase may explain the observed difference between the crystal structure of CVFB and the EM structure of C3bB. These insights into formation of convertases provide a basis for further development of complement therapeutics.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a complement-depleting factor from king cobra, Ophiophagus hannah.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Sun, Qian-Yun; Jin, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2012-09-01

    Cobra venom factor (CVF) is an anti-complement factor existing in cobra venom. CVF proteins have been purified from the venoms of Naja haje, Naja siamensis, Naja atra, Naja kaouthia, Naja naja, Naja melanoleuca and Austrelaps superbus, but only three full-length cDNA sequences of CVF are available. In the present work, a cobra venom factor termed OVF was purified from the crude venom of Ophiophagus hannah by successive gel filtration, ion-exchange and heparin affinity chromatography steps. The purified OVF was homogenous on the SDS-PAGE gel with an apparent molecular weight of 140 kDa under non-reducing conditions. Under reducing conditions, OVF was divided into three bands with apparent molecular weight of 72 kDa (α chain), 45 kDa (β chain) and 32 kDa (γ chain), respectively. OVF consumed complement components with anti-complement activity of 154 units per mg. By using Reverse transcription-PCR and 5'-RACE assay, the open reading frame of OVF was obtained. MALDI-TOF and protein sequencing assays confirmed the cloned cDNA coding for OVF protein. The cDNA sequence of OVF is conservative when aligned with that of other CVFs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed OVF is closer to CVF from N. kaouthia than to AVF-1 and AVF-2 from A. superbus. Our results demonstrated that OVF has its unique features as following: 1) The N-terminal amino acid sequence of OVF γ chain is different from that of other known CVFs, suggesting that the OVF γ chain might be further processed; 2) Unlike N. kaouthia CVF and A. superbus AVF-1, which have potential N-linked glycosylation sites located in both α and β chain, OVF only has N-linked glycosylation site in its α chain as revealed by Schiff's reagent staining and protein sequence analysis; 3) In addition to the 27 well conserved cysteine residues in all known CVFs, OVF have an additional cysteine residue in its γ chain. Understanding the importance of above mentioned specific characteristics might provide useful information on structure

  12. Leukotrienes but not complement mediate limb ischemia-induced lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Klausner, J M; Paterson, I S; Kobzik, L; Valeri, C R; Shepro, D; Hechtman, H B

    1989-01-01

    Reperfusion after limb ischemia leads to sequestration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in the lungs and to leukocyte- (WBC) and thromboxane- (Tx) dependent respiratory dysfunction. This study examines the intermediary role of the chemoattractants leukotriene (LT)B4 and complement (C) fragments. Anesthetized sheep with chronic lung lymph fistulae underwent 2 hours of tourniquet ischemia of both hind limbs. In untreated controls (n = 7), 1 minute after tourniquet release, mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) rose from 13 to 38 mmHg (p less than 0.05) and returned to baseline within 30 minutes. Pulmonary artery wedge pressure was unchanged from 3.6 mmHg. There were increases in plasma LTB4 levels from 2.46 to 9.34 ng/ml (p less than 0.01), plasma TxB2 levels from 211 to 735 pg/ml (p less than 0.05), and lung lymph TxB2 from 400 to 1005 pg/ml (p less than 0.05). C3 levels were 96% of baseline values. Thirty minutes after reperfusion, lung lymph flow (QL) increased from 4.3 to 8.3 ml/30 minutes (p less than 0.05), lymph/plasma protein ratio was unchanged from 0.6, and the lymph protein clearance increased from 2.6 to 4.6 ml/30 minutes (p less than 0.05), data consistent with increased microvascular permeability. WBC count fell within the first hour from 6853 to 3793/mm3 (p less than 0.01). Lung histology showed leukosequestration, 62 PMN/10 high-power fields (HPF) and proteinaceous exudates. In contrast to this untreated ischemic group, animals treated with the lypoxygenase inhibitor diethylcarbamazine (n = 5) demonstrated a blunted reperfusion-induced rise in MPAP to 17 mmHg (p less than 0.05). There were no increases in LTB4, TxB2, QL or lymph protein clearance (p less than 0.05). WBC count was unchanged and lung leukosequestration was reduced to 40 PMN/10 HPF (p less than 0.05). Decomplementation with cobra venom factor (n = 4) resulted in plasma C3 levels, 10% of baseline, but tourniquet release still led to pulmonary hypertension, elevated LTB4, TxB2 levels

  13. Regulation of Cre recombinase by ligand-induced complementation of inactive fragments

    PubMed Central

    Jullien, Nicolas; Sampieri, François; Enjalbert, Alain; Herman, Jean-Paul

    2003-01-01

    Cre recombinase is extensively used to engineer the genome of experimental animals. However, its usefulness is still limited by the lack of an efficient temporal control over its activity. To overcome this, we have developed DiCre, a regulatable fragment complementation system for Cre. The enzyme was split into two moieties that were fused to FKBP12 (FK506-binding protein) and FRB (binding domain of the FKBP12–rapamycin-associated protein), respectively. These can be efficiently heterodimerized by rapamycin. Several variants, based on splitting Cre at different sites and using different linker peptides, were tested in an indicator cell line. The fusion proteins, taken separately, had no recombinase activity. Stable transformants, co-expressing complementing fragments based on splitting Cre between Asn59 and Asn60, displayed low background activity affecting 0.05–0.4% of the cells. Rapamycin induced a rapid recombination, reaching 100% by 48–72 h, with an EC50 of 0.02 nM. Thus, ligand-induced dimerization can efficiently regulate Cre, and should be useful to achieve a tight temporal control of its activity, such as in the case of the creation of conditional knock-out animals. PMID:14576331

  14. Regulation of Cre recombinase by ligand-induced complementation of inactive fragments.

    PubMed

    Jullien, Nicolas; Sampieri, François; Enjalbert, Alain; Herman, Jean-Paul

    2003-11-01

    Cre recombinase is extensively used to engineer the genome of experimental animals. However, its usefulness is still limited by the lack of an efficient temporal control over its activity. To overcome this, we have developed DiCre, a regulatable fragment complementation system for Cre. The enzyme was split into two moieties that were fused to FKBP12 (FK506-binding protein) and FRB (binding domain of the FKBP12-rapamycin-associated protein), respectively. These can be efficiently heterodimerized by rapamycin. Several variants, based on splitting Cre at different sites and using different linker peptides, were tested in an indicator cell line. The fusion proteins, taken separately, had no recombinase activity. Stable transformants, co-expressing complementing fragments based on splitting Cre between Asn59 and Asn60, displayed low background activity affecting 0.05-0.4% of the cells. Rapamycin induced a rapid recombination, reaching 100% by 48-72 h, with an EC50 of 0.02 nM. Thus, ligand-induced dimerization can efficiently regulate Cre, and should be useful to achieve a tight temporal control of its activity, such as in the case of the creation of conditional knock-out animals.

  15. TLR-Induced Murine Dendritic Cell (DC) Activation Requires DC-Intrinsic Complement.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Joong-Hyuk; Strainic, Michael G; Liu, Jinbo; Zhang, Weijia; Yi, Zhengzi; Medof, M Edward; Heeger, Peter S

    2017-07-01

    Induction of proinflammatory T cell immunity is augmented by innate dendritic cell (DC) maturation commonly initiated by TLR signaling. We demonstrate that ligation of TLR3, TLR4, and TLR9 induces murine DC production of complement components and local production of the anaphylatoxin C5a. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo analyses show that TLR-induced DC maturation, as assessed by surface phenotype, expression profiling by gene array, and functional ability to stimulate T cell responses, requires autocrine C3a receptor and C5a receptor (C3ar1/C5ar1) signaling. Studies using bone marrow chimeric animals and Foxp3-GFP/ERT2-Cre/dTomato fate-mapping mice show that TLR-initiated DC autocrine C3ar1/C5ar1 signaling causes expansion of effector T cells and instability of regulatory T cells and contributes to T cell-dependent transplant rejection. Together, our data position immune cell-derived complement production and autocrine/paracrine C3ar1/C5ar1 signaling as crucial intermediary processes that link TLR stimulation to DC maturation and the subsequent development of effector T cell responses. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Maternal Haploids Are Preferentially Induced by CENH3-tailswap Transgenic Complementation in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Kelliher, Timothy; Starr, Dakota; Wang, Wenling; McCuiston, Jamie; Zhong, Heng; Nuccio, Michael L.; Martin, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Doubled haploid plants are invaluable breeding tools but many crop species are recalcitrant to available haploid induction techniques. To test if haploid inducer lines can be engineered into crops, CENH3−∕− and CENH3:RNAi lines were complemented by AcGREEN-tailswap-CENH3 or AcGREEN-CENH3 transgenes. Haploid induction rates were determined following testcrosses to wild-type plants after independently controlling for inducer parent sex and transgene zygosity. CENH3 fusion proteins were localized to centromeres and did not cause vegetative defects or male sterility. CENH3:RNAi lines did not demonstrate consistent knockdown and rarely produced haploids. In contrast, many of the complemented CENH3−∕− lines produced haploids at low frequencies. The rate of gynogenic haploid induction reached a maximum of 3.6% in several hemizygous individuals when backcrossed as males. These results demonstrate that CENH3-tailswap transgenes can be used to engineer in vivo haploid induction systems into maize plants. PMID:27066050

  17. A method of purifying intact complement factor H from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Mei; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a method of purifying intact complement factor H (CFH) from human plasma. CFH was isolated from human plasma by polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation, following three sequential chromatographic columns, which consisted of l-lysine Sepharose column, Resource Q column and Sephacryl S-300 High Resolution HiPrep 16/60 column. All the above steps were performed at 4°C by Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC) AKTA Purifier 10 with Frac-900. Identification of the purified CFH was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The following functions of the purified CFH were further analyzed compared with the commercial CFH in vitro: (1) binding ability with C3b; (2) binding ability with mCRP; (3) the protecting function of the hemolysis of sheep red blood cells; (4) the cofactor role for complement factor I-mediated proteolytic inactivation of C3b. Homogeneous CFH was purified from the plasma fraction through the above four steps. The purity and the functions of the purified CFH were comparable to the commercial CFH. The yield of CFH was 26±3% in our study. Compared with previous methods, our method was high yield with high purity. We established a stable and feasible system for purifying intact CFH, which could be used in the lab and clinical investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interaction of Human Complement Factor H Variants Tyr402 and His402 with Leptospira spp.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Aldacilene Souza; Valencia, Mónica Marcela Castiblanco; Cianciarullo, Aurora Marques; Vasconcellos, Sílvio Arruda; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by pathogenic bacteria from the genus Leptospira. The disease represents a serious public health problem in underdeveloped tropical countries. Leptospires infect hosts through small abrasions in the skin or mucous membranes and they rapidly disseminate to target organs. The capacity of some pathogenic leptospiral strains to acquire the negative complement regulators factor H (FH) and C4b binding protein correlates with their ability to survive in human serum. In this study we assessed the functional consequences of the age macular degeneration-associated polymorphism FH His402 or FH Tyr402 on FH–Leptospira interactions. In binding assays using sub-saturating amounts of FH, the FH Tyr402 variant interacted with all the strains tested more strongly than the FH His402 variant. At higher concentrations, differences tended to disappear. We then compared cofactor activities displayed by FH His402 and FH Tyr402 bound to the surface of L. interrogans. Both variants exhibit similar activity as cofactors for Factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b, thus indicating that they do not differ in their capacity to regulate the complement cascade. PMID:22566834

  19. Complement and the Alternative Pathway Play an Important Role in LPS/D-GalN-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangyu; Zhou, Xiaojun; Li, Junfeng; Hu, Jingya; Yu, Hong; Chen, Yu; Song, Hongbin; Qiao, Fei; Xu, Guilian; Yang, Fei; Wu, Yuzhang; Tomlinson, Stephen; Duan, Zhongping; Zhou, Yusen

    2011-01-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is a clinically severe type of liver injury with an extremely high mortality rate. Although the pathological mechanisms of FHF are not well understood, evidence suggests that the complement system is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders. In the present study, to investigate the role of complement in FHF, we examined groups of mice following intraperitoneal injection of LPS/D-GalN: wild-type C57BL/6 mice, wild-type mice treated with a C3aR antagonist, C5aR monoclonal antibody (C5aRmAb) or CR2-Factor H (CR2-fH, an inhibitor of the alternative pathway), and C3 deficient mice (C3−/− mice). The animals were euthanized and samples analyzed at specific times after LPS/D-GalN injection. The results show that intraperitoneal administration of LPS/D-GalN activated the complement pathway, as evidenced by the hepatic deposition of C3 and C5b-9 and elevated serum levels of the complement activation product C3a, the level of which was associated with the severity of the liver damage. C3a receptor (C3aR) and C5a receptor (C5aR) expression was also upregulated. Compared with wild-type mice, C3−/− mice survived significantly longer and displayed reduced liver inflammation and attenuated pathological damage following LPS/D-GalN injection. Similar levels of protection were seen in mice treated with C3aR antagonist,C5aRmAb or CR2-fH. These data indicate an important role for the C3a and C5a generated by the alternative pathway in LPS/D-GalN-induced FHF. The data further suggest that complement inhibition may be an effective strategy for the adjunctive treatment of fulminant hepatic failure. PMID:22069473

  20. Staphylococcus aureus SdrE captures complement factor H's C-terminus via a novel 'close, dock, lock and latch' mechanism for complement evasion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Wu, Minhao; Hang, Tianrong; Wang, Chengliang; Yang, Ye; Pan, Weimin; Zang, Jianye; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Xuan

    2017-05-04

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a soluble complement regulatory protein essential for the down-regulation of the alternative pathway on interaction with specific markers on the host cell surface. It recognizes the complement component 3b (C3b) and 3d (C3d) fragments in addition to self cell markers (i.e. glycosaminoglycans, sialic acid) to distinguish host cells that deserve protection from pathogens that should be eliminated. The Staphylococcus aureus surface protein serine-aspartate repeat protein E (SdrE) was previously reported to bind human CFH as an immune-evasion tactic. However, the molecular mechanism underlying SdrE-CFH-mediated immune evasion remains unknown. In the present study, we identified a novel region at CFH's C-terminus (CFH(1206-1226)), which binds SdrE N2 and N3 domains (SdrEN2N3) with high affinity, and determined the crystal structures of apo-SdrEN2N3 and the SdrEN2N3-CFH(1206-1226) complex. Comparison of the structure of the CFH-SdrE complex with other CFH structures reveals that CFH's C-terminal tail flips from the main body to insert into the ligand-binding groove of SdrE. In addition, SdrEN2N3 adopts a 'close' state in the absence of CFH, which undergoes a large conformational change on CFH binding, suggesting a novel 'close, dock, lock and latch' (CDLL) mechanism for SdrE to recognize its ligand. Our findings imply that SdrE functions as a 'clamp' to capture CFH's C-terminal tail via a unique CDLL mechanism and sequesters CFH on the surface of S. aureus for complement evasion. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Malaria parasites co-opt human factor H to prevent complement-mediated lysis in the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Simon, Nina; Lasonder, Edwin; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Kuehn, Andrea; Tews, Sabrina; Fischer, Rainer; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Pradel, Gabriele

    2013-01-16

    Human complement is a first line defense against infection in which circulating proteins initiate an enzyme cascade on the microbial surface that leads to phagocytosis and lysis. Various pathogens evade complement recognition by binding to regulator proteins that protect host cells from complement activation. We show that emerging gametes of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum bind the host complement regulator factor H (FH) following transmission to the mosquito to protect from complement-mediated lysis by the blood meal. Human complement is active in the mosquito midgut for approximately 1 hr postfeeding. During this period, the gamete surface protein PfGAP50 binds to FH and uses surface-bound FH to inactivate the complement protein C3b. Loss of FH-mediated protection, either through neutralization of FH or blockade of PfGAP50, significantly impairs gametogenesis and inhibits parasite transmission to the mosquito. Thus, Plasmodium co-opts the protective host protein FH to evade complement-mediated lysis within the mosquito midgut.

  2. Activation of the endothelium by IL-1 alpha and glucocorticoids results in major increase of complement C3 and factor B production and generation of C3a.

    PubMed Central

    Coulpier, M; Andreev, S; Lemercier, C; Dauchel, H; Lees, O; Fontaine, M; Ripoche, J

    1995-01-01

    Constitutive secretion of complement C3 and factor B by the endothelial cell (EC) is lowered by therapeutic concentrations of glucocorticoids such as hydrocortisone or dexamethasone, whereas regulatory protein factor H production is increased by these hormones. In contrast, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 alpha has a stimulatory effect on C3 and factor B secretion by the endothelium and an inhibitory effect on factor H secretion. In this study, we examined the combined effect of IL-1 alpha and glucocorticoids on C3 and factor B expression by the endothelial cell. When dexamethasone or hydrocortisone were added to IL-1 alpha, significant potentialization of IL-1 alpha-induced stimulation of C3 and factor B production was observed, occurring at various concentrations of either stimuli. Dose-response experiments indicate that, in vitro, optimal concentrations are in the range of 10(-7) to 10(-5) M for dexamethasone and 50-200 U for IL-1 alpha. In contrast, dexamethasone counteracts, in an additive way, the inhibitory effect of IL-1 alpha on regulatory complement protein factor H production by EC. Such a potentialization between glucocorticoids and IL-1 alpha was not observed for another marker of endothelial activation, IL-1 alpha-induced stimulation of coagulation tissue factor expression. The association of glucocorticoids and IL-1 alpha therefore appears to be a specific and major stimulus for the secretion of complement C3 and factor B, two acute-phase proteins, by the endothelium. As a result of the in vitro endothelium stimulation by glucocorticoids and IL-1 alpha, C3a is generated in the vicinity of the endothelial cell. This study further suggests that complement activation, with its deleterious consequences, may result from the stimulation of endothelium in situations where high levels of IL-1 alpha and endogenous glucocorticoids coexist, such as in septic shock. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:7621583

  3. Isolation of two molecular populations of human complement factor H by hydrophobic affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Ripoche, J; Al Salihi, A; Rousseaux, J; Fontaine, M

    1984-01-01

    Human complement factor H was prepared in highly purified form from fresh serum by euglobulin precipitation, DEAE-Sephacel chromatography and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration. This preparation allowed the recovery of 37% of the initial factor H. Sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis revealed that factor H was homogeneous both in reduced and non-reduced media and exhibited a molecular mass of 150 kDa. Charge-shift experiments clearly showed the presence of hydrophobic sites in the factor H molecule. Charge shifts were observed with two detergent systems (Triton/sodium deoxycholate and Triton/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide). Factor H was able to bind to phenyl-Sepharose. This property allowed us to study two populations of factor H. These two populations exhibited the same physicochemical parameters, but revealed differences in their ability to aggregate in low- and iso-ionic-strength media. The molecular basis and biological significance of this heterogeneity are discussed. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6235808

  4. Structural basis for complement factor H–linked age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Beverly E.; Johnson, Steven; Roversi, Pietro; Herbert, Andrew P.; Blaum, Bärbel S.; Tyrrell, Jess; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Clark, Simon J.; Tarelli, Edward; Uhrín, Dušan; Barlow, Paul N.; Sim, Robert B.; Day, Anthony J.; Lea, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Nearly 50 million people worldwide suffer from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which causes severe loss of central vision. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the gene for the complement regulator factor H (FH), which causes a Tyr-to-His substitution at position 402, is linked to ∼50% of attributable risks for AMD. We present the crystal structure of the region of FH containing the polymorphic amino acid His402 in complex with an analogue of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) that localize the complement regulator on the cell surface. The structure demonstrates direct coordination of ligand by the disease-associated polymorphic residue, providing a molecular explanation of the genetic observation. This glycan-binding site occupies the center of an extended interaction groove on the regulator's surface, implying multivalent binding of sulfated GAGs. This finding is confirmed by structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, nuclear magnetic resonance–monitored binding experiments performed for both H402 and Y402 variants with this and another model GAG, and analysis of an extended GAG–FH complex. PMID:17893204

  5. Interaction of Leptospira elongation factor Tu with plasminogen and complement factor H: a metabolic leptospiral protein with moonlighting activities.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Danielly G; Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica M; Abe, Cecília M; Monaris, Denize; Morais, Zenaide M; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Sílvio A; Isaac, Lourdes; Abreu, Patrícia A E; Barbosa, Angela S

    2013-01-01

    The elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), an abundant bacterial protein involved in protein synthesis, has been shown to display moonlighting activities. Known to perform more than one function at different times or in different places, it is found in several subcellular locations in a single organism, and may serve as a virulence factor in a range of important human pathogens. Here we demonstrate that Leptospira EF-Tu is surface-exposed and performs additional roles as a cell-surface receptor for host plasma proteins. It binds plasminogen in a dose-dependent manner, and lysine residues are critical for this interaction. Bound plasminogen is converted to active plasmin, which, in turn, is able to cleave the natural substrates C3b and fibrinogen. Leptospira EF-Tu also acquires the complement regulator Factor H (FH). FH bound to immobilized EF-Tu displays cofactor activity, mediating C3b degradation by Factor I (FI). In this manner, EF-Tu may contribute to leptospiral tissue invasion and complement inactivation. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a leptospiral protein exhibiting moonlighting activities.

  6. A Targeted Inhibitor of the Alternative Complement Pathway Accelerates Recovery From Smoke-Induced Ocular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodell, Alex; Jones, Bryan W.; Williamson, Tucker; Schnabolk, Gloriane; Tomlinson, Stephen; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Morphologic and genetic evidence exists that an overactive complement system driven by the complement alternative pathway (AP) is involved in pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Smoking is the only modifiable risk factor for AMD. As we have shown that smoke-related ocular pathology can be prevented in mice that lack an essential activator of AP, we ask here whether this pathology can be reversed by increasing inhibition in AP. Methods Mice were exposed to either cigarette smoke (CS) or filtered air (6 hours/day, 5 days/week, 6 months). Smoke-exposed animals were then treated with the AP inhibitor (CR2-fH) or vehicle control (PBS) for the following 3 months. Spatial frequency and contrast sensitivity were assessed by optokinetic response paradigms at 6 and 9 months; additional readouts included assessment of retinal morphology by electron microscopy (EM) and gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The CS mice treated with CR2-fH showed significant improvement in contrast threshold compared to PBS-treated mice, whereas spatial frequency was unaffected by CS or pharmacologic intervention. Treatment with CR2-fH in CS animals reversed thinning of the retina observed in PBS-treated mice as analyzed by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and reversed most morphologic changes in RPE and Bruch's membrane seen in CS animals by EM. Conclusions Taken together, these findings suggest that AP inhibitors not only prevent, but have the potential to accelerate the clearance of complement-mediated ocular injury. Improving our understanding of the regulation of the AP is paramount to developing novel treatment approaches for AMD. PMID:27064393

  7. Activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 signaling induces CD46 expression and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Ralf; Huang, Mei; Gritsko, Tanya; Karras, Jim; Enkemann, Steve; Mesa, Tania; Nam, Sangkil; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard

    2007-08-01

    CD46 is one of the complement-regulatory proteins expressed on the surface of normal and tumor cells for protection against complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Cancer cells need to access the blood circulation for continued growth and metastasis, thus exposing themselves to destruction by complement system components. Previous studies have established that the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor is persistently activated in a wide variety of human cancer cells and primary tumor tissues compared with their normal counterparts. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we identified the CD46 gene as a target for activated STAT3 signaling in human breast and prostate cancer cells. The CD46 promoter contains two binding sites for activated STAT3 and mutations introduced into the major site abolished STAT3 binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirms binding of STAT3 to the CD46 promoter. CD46 promoter activity is induced by activation of STAT3 and blocked by a dominant-negative form of STAT3 in luciferase reporter assays. CD46 mRNA expression is induced by interleukin-6 and by transient transfection of normal human epithelial cells with a persistently active mutant construct of STAT3, STAT3C. Furthermore, we show that inhibition of STAT3-mediated CD46 cell surface expression sensitizes DU145 prostate cancer cells to cytotoxicity in an in vitro complement lysis assay using rabbit anti-DU145 antiserum and rabbit complement. These results show that activated STAT3 signaling induces the CD46 promoter and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity, suggesting a potential mechanism whereby oncogenic signaling contributes to tumor cell evasion of antibody-mediated immunity.

  8. Characterization of a Factor H Mutation That Perturbs the Alternative Pathway of Complement in a Family with Membranoproliferative GN

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Edwin K.S.; Anderson, Holly E.; Herbert, Andrew P.; Challis, Rachel C.; Brown, Paul; Reis, Geisilaine S.; Tellez, James O.; Strain, Lisa; Fluck, Nicholas; Humphrey, Ann; Macleod, Alison; Richards, Anna; Ahlert, Daniel; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Barlow, Paul N.; Marchbank, Kevin J.; Harris, Claire L.; Goodship, Timothy H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Complement C3 activation is a characteristic finding in membranoproliferative GN (MPGN). This activation can be caused by immune complex deposition or an acquired or inherited defect in complement regulation. Deficiency of complement factor H has long been associated with MPGN. More recently, heterozygous genetic variants have been reported in sporadic cases of MPGN, although their functional significance has not been assessed. We describe a family with MPGN and acquired partial lipodystrophy. Although C3 nephritic factor was shown in family members with acquired partial lipodystrophy, it did not segregate with the renal phenotype. Genetic analysis revealed a novel heterozygous mutation in complement factor H (R83S) in addition to known risk polymorphisms carried by individuals with MPGN. Patients with MPGN had normal levels of factor H, and structural analysis of the mutant revealed only subtle alterations. However, functional analysis revealed profoundly reduced C3b binding, cofactor activity, and decay accelerating activity leading to loss of regulation of the alternative pathway. In summary, this family showed a confluence of common and rare functionally significant genetic risk factors causing disease. Data from our analysis of these factors highlight the role of the alternative pathway of complement in MPGN. PMID:24722444

  9. Complement haemolytic activity (classical and alternative pathways), C3, C4 and factor B titres in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Ferriani, V P; Barbosa, J E; de Carvalho, I F

    1999-10-01

    Values of complement lytic activity of classical and alternative pathways, assessed by measuring the time required to lyse 50% of target red blood cells, and the concentration of complement components C3, C4 and factor B were estimated in the sera of 103 healthy children aged 3 to 14 y. Age-dependent variations were seen in the C3 and factor B concentrations, but not in C4, with the highest values found among 5-6-y-old children. Variations in classical and alternative lytic activity were not detected in this group of children, although the values are significantly different from our previously published data on adults, using the same kinetic assay (1). We also evaluated the relationship between the lytic activity of the classical (CPT) and alternative pathways (APT) and the levels of complement components. There were significant correlations between: APT and factor B, APT and C3, C3 and C4, C3 and factor B, and C4 and factor B concentrations. The normal ranges measured here can be used in the initial screening of Brazilian children presenting diseases involving the complement system. This study also contributes to a better understanding of the complement system ontogeny.

  10. Complement factor 5 blockade reduces porcine myocardial infarction size and improves immediate cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Pischke, Soeren E; Gustavsen, A; Orrem, H L; Egge, K H; Courivaud, F; Fontenelle, H; Despont, A; Bongoni, A K; Rieben, R; Tønnessen, T I; Nunn, M A; Scott, H; Skulstad, H; Barratt-Due, A; Mollnes, T E

    2017-05-01

    Inhibition of complement factor 5 (C5) reduced myocardial infarction in animal studies, while no benefit was found in clinical studies. Due to lack of cross-reactivity of clinically used C5 antibodies, different inhibitors were used in animal and clinical studies. Coversin (Ornithodoros moubata complement inhibitor, OmCI) blocks C5 cleavage and binds leukotriene B4 in humans and pigs. We hypothesized that inhibition of C5 before reperfusion will decrease infarct size and improve ventricular function in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. In pigs (Sus scrofa), the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded (40 min) and reperfused (240 min). Coversin or placebo was infused 20 min after occlusion and throughout reperfusion in 16 blindly randomized pigs. Coversin significantly reduced myocardial infarction in the area at risk by 39% (p = 0.03, triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining) and by 19% (p = 0.02) using magnetic resonance imaging. The methods correlated significantly (R = 0.92, p < 0.01). Tissue Doppler echocardiography showed increased systolic displacement (31%, p < 0.01) and increased systolic velocity (29%, p = 0.01) in coversin treated pigs. Interleukin-1β in myocardial microdialysis fluid was significantly reduced (31%, p < 0.05) and tissue E-selectin expression was significantly reduced (p = 0.01) in the non-infarcted area at risk by coversin treatment. Coversin ablated plasma C5 activation throughout the reperfusion period and decreased myocardial C5b-9 deposition, while neither plasma nor myocardial LTB4 were significantly reduced. Coversin substantially reduced the size of infarction, improved ventricular function, and attenuated interleukin-1β and E-selectin in this porcine model by inhibiting C5. We conclude that inhibition of C5 in myocardial infarction should be reconsidered.

  11. Production and functional activity of a recombinant von Willebrand factor-A domain from human complement factor B.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S C; Hinshelwood, J; Perkins, S J; Sim, R B

    1999-01-01

    Factor B is a five-domain 90 kDa serine protease proenzyme which is part of the human serum complement system. It binds to other complement proteins C3b and properdin, and is activated by the protease factor D. The fourth domain of factor B is homologous to the type A domain of von Willebrand Factor (vWF-A). A full-length human factor B cDNA clone was used to amplify the region encoding the vWF-A domain (amino acids 229-444 of factor B). A fusion protein expression system was then used to generate it in high yield in Escherichia coli, where thrombin cleavage was used to separate the vWF-A domain from its fusion protein partner. A second vWF-A domain with improved stability and solubility was created using a Cys(267)-->Ser mutation and a four-residue C-terminal extension of the first vWF-A domain. The recombinant domains were investigated by analytical gel filtration, sucrose density centrifugation and analytical ultracentrifugation, in order to show that both domains were monomeric and possessed compact structures that were consistent with known vWF-A crystal structures. This expression system and its characterization permitted the first investigation of the function of the isolated vWF-A domain. It was able to inhibit substantially the binding of (125)I-labelled factor B to immobilized C3b. This demonstrated both the presence of a C3b binding site in this portion of factor B and a ligand-binding property of the vWF-A domain. The site at which factor D cleaves factor B is close to the N-terminus of both recombinant vWF-A domains. Factor D was shown to cleave the vWF-A domain in the presence or absence of C3b, whereas the cleavage of intact factor B under the same conditions occurs only in the presence of C3b. PMID:10477273

  12. Immune evasion of Borrelia burgdorferi by acquisition of human complement regulators FHL-1/reconectin and Factor H.

    PubMed

    Kraiczy, P; Skerka, C; Kirschfink, M; Brade, V; Zipfel, P F

    2001-06-01

    To understand immune evasion mechanisms of Borrelia burgdorferi we compared serum-resistant B. afzelii and serum-sensitive B. garinii isolates for their capacity toacquire human complement regulators. Here we demonstrate that the two borrelial genospecies show different binding of the two important human complement regulators, FHL-1/reconectin and Factor H. All serum-resistant B. afzelii isolates bound FHL-1/reconectin and also Factor H, and all analyzed serum-sensitive B. garinii isolates showed no or a significantly lower binding activity. Using recombinant deletion mutants, the binding domains were localized to the C terminus of FHL-1/reconectin to short consensus repeats 5-7. The borrelial binding proteins were located in the surface of the bacteria as demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining of intact, serum-exposed bacteria and by enrichment of outer membrane proteins. The surface-attached complement regulators maintained complement regulatory activity as demonstrated in a cofactor assay. By ligand blotting two different borrelial binding proteins were identified that were responsible for the surface attachment of FHL-1/reconectin and Factor H. These borrelial complement regulators acquiring surface proteins (CRASP) were further characterized as either CRASP-1, a 27.5-kDa molecule which preferentially binds FHL-1/reconectin and which was present in all serum-resistant borreliae, or CRASP-2, a 20/21-kDa protein which interacts preferentially with Factor H and the expression of which was more restricted, being detected in four of the six isolates analyzed. In summary, we describe a new immune evasion mechanism of B. burgdorferi, as these bacteria acquire human complement regulators to control complement activation on their surface and to prevent formation of toxic activation products.

  13. Development of a Sterne-Based Complement Fixation Test to Monitor the Humoral Response Induced by Anthrax Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Adone, Rosanna; Sali, Michela; Francia, Massimiliano; Iatarola, Michela; Donatiello, Adelia; Fasanella, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis spore-forming bacterium. Since it is primarily a disease of animals, the control in animals, and humans depend on the prevention in livestock, principally cattle, sheep, and goats. Most veterinary vaccines utilize the toxigenic, uncapsulated (pXO1+/pXO2–) B. anthracis strain 34F2 which affords protection through the production of neutralizing antibodies directed to the toxin components Protective Antigen (PA), Lethal Factor (LF), and Edema Factor (EF). The titration of specific antibodies in sera of vaccinated animals is crucial to evaluate the efficacy of the vaccination and to obtain epidemiological information for an effective anthrax surveillance. In this study, we developed a Sterne-based Complement Fixation Test (CFT) to detect specific antibodies induced in animals vaccinated with Sterne 34F2. We assessed its efficacy in laboratory animals and under field conditions by monitoring the humoral response induced by vaccination in cattle. The results indicated that the Sterne-based CFT is able to correctly identify vaccinated animals. It proved to be a very sensitive and specific test. Moreover, the Sterne-based CFT offers many benefits with regard to costs, standardization and reproducibility of the assay procedure. PMID:26858700

  14. Tumor-Derived Tissue Factor Aberrantly Activates Complement and Facilitates Lung Tumor Progression via Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Zha, Haoran; Yang, Fei; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The initiator of extrinsic coagulation, tissue factor (TF), and its non-coagulant isoform alternatively spliced TF (asTF) are closely associated with tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, the role of TF-induced coagulation in tumor progression remains to be fully elucidated. Using TF-knockdown lung tumor cells, we showed that TF is the dominant component of procoagulant activity but is dispensable in the cellular biology of tumor cells. In a xenograft model, using immunohistochemical analysis and flow cytometry analysis of the tumor microenvironment, we demonstrated that TF-induced fibrin deposition, which is correlated with complement activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) recruitment, is positively associated with tumor progression. C5aR antagonism blunted the effect of TF on tumor progression and decreased MDSC recruitment. In conclusion, our data suggested that in tumor microenvironment, TF-induced coagulation activated the complement system and subsequently recruited myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumor growth, which brings new insights into the coagulation-induced complement activation within the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression. PMID:28106852

  15. Tumor-Derived Tissue Factor Aberrantly Activates Complement and Facilitates Lung Tumor Progression via Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao; Zha, Haoran; Yang, Fei; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2017-01-19

    The initiator of extrinsic coagulation, tissue factor (TF), and its non-coagulant isoform alternatively spliced TF (asTF) are closely associated with tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, the role of TF-induced coagulation in tumor progression remains to be fully elucidated. Using TF-knockdown lung tumor cells, we showed that TF is the dominant component of procoagulant activity but is dispensable in the cellular biology of tumor cells. In a xenograft model, using immunohistochemical analysis and flow cytometry analysis of the tumor microenvironment, we demonstrated that TF-induced fibrin deposition, which is correlated with complement activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) recruitment, is positively associated with tumor progression. C5aR antagonism blunted the effect of TF on tumor progression and decreased MDSC recruitment. In conclusion, our data suggested that in tumor microenvironment, TF-induced coagulation activated the complement system and subsequently recruited myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumor growth, which brings new insights into the coagulation-induced complement activation within the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression.

  16. Resistance to Streptozotocin-Induced Autoimmune Diabetes in Absence of Complement C3: Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Play a Role.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaogang; Liu, Huanhai; He, Bin; Fu, Zhiren

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of complement to the development of autoimmune diabetes has been proposed recently. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. We hypothesize that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which act as regulators in autoimmunity, play a role in resistance to diabetes in absence of complement C3. Indeed, MDSC number was increased significantly in STZ-treated C3-/- mice. These cells highly expressed arginase I and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Importantly, depletion of MDSC led to the occurrence of overt diabetes in C3-/- mice after STZ. Furthermore, C3-/- MDSC actively suppressed diabetogenic T cell proliferation and prevented/delayed the development of diabetes in arginase and/or iNOS-dependent manner. Both Tregs and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) are crucial for MDSC induction in STZ-treated C3-/- mice as depletion of Tregs or blocking TGF-β bioactivity dramatically decreased MDSC number. These findings indicate that MDSC are implicated in resistance to STZ-induced diabetes in the absence of complement C3, which may be helpful for understanding of mechanisms underlying preventive effects of complement deficiency on autoimmune diseases.

  17. Fanconi anemia complementation group A cells are hypersensitive to chromium(VI)-induced toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Vilcheck, Susan K; O'Brien, Travis J; Pritchard, Daryl E; Ha, Linan; Ceryak, Susan; Fornsaglio, Jamie L; Patierno, Steven R

    2002-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diverse developmental abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure, and a markedly increased incidence of malignancy. FA cells are hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agents, suggesting a general defect in the repair of DNA cross-links. Some forms of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] are implicated as respiratory carcinogens and induce several types of DNA lesions, including ternary DNA-Cr-DNA interstrand cross-links (Cr-DDC). We hypothesized that human FA complementation group A (FA-A) cells would be hypersensitive to Cr(VI) and Cr(VI)-induced apoptosis. Using phosphatidylserine translocation and caspase-3 activation, human FA-A fibroblasts were found to be markedly hypersensitive to chromium-induced apoptosis compared with CRL-1634 cells, which are normal human foreskin fibroblasts (CRL). The clonogenicity of FA-A cells was also significantly decreased compared with CRL cells after Cr(VI) treatment. There was no significant difference in either Cr(VI) uptake or Cr-DNA adduct formation between FA-A and CRL cells. These results show that FA-A cells are hypersensitive to Cr(VI) and Cr-induced apoptosis and that this hypersensitivity is not due to increased Cr(VI) uptake or increased Cr-DNA adduct formation. The results also suggest that Cr-DDC may be proapoptotic lesions. These results are the first to show that FA cells are hypersensitive to an environmentally relevant DNA cross-linking agent. PMID:12426130

  18. Surfactant prevents quartz induced down-regulation of complement receptor 1 in human granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, G; Lundahl, J; Curstedt, T; Eklund, A

    1997-02-01

    Quartz is known to induce an inflammatory response in the alveolar space by recruitment of different effector cells. We investigated the interaction between granulocytes and quartz with respect to expression of complement receptor type 1 (CR1) and CR3, with and without the presence of surfactant. Granulocytes from hemolyzed blood were stimulated by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), which mobilize the intracellular pool of CR1 to the surface, and the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) measured by cytofluorometry was 47.4 (46-63.6) (median; interquartile range). Quartz exposure reduced the CR1 expression to 23.2 (22.8-30.6) MFI units (P < 0.01), a porcine surfactant preparation added during quartz exposure abolished the down-regulation completely, 47.7 (43.2-62.3) MFI units (P < 0.001). Similar results were obtained after preincubation of the cells with surfactant followed by quartz exposure. No significant influence on CR1 expression was found by a synthetic lipid mixture, nor was the CR3 expression affected. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the presence of surfactant inhibits quartz induced down-regulation of CR1 on activated granulocytes.

  19. Complementing mutations in core binding factor leukemias: from mouse models to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Müller, A M S; Duque, J; Shizuru, J A; Lübbert, M

    2008-10-02

    A great proportion of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) display cytogenetic abnormalities including chromosomal aberrations and/or submicroscopic mutations. These abnormalities significantly influence the prognosis of the disease. Hence, a thorough genetic work-up is an essential constituent of standard diagnostic procedures. Core binding factor (CBF) leukemias denote AMLs with chromosomal aberrations disrupting one of the CBF transcription factor genes; the most common examples are translocation t(8;21) and inversion inv(16), which result in the generation of the AML1-ETO and CBFbeta-MYH11 fusion proteins, respectively. However, in murine models, these alterations alone do not suffice to generate full-blown leukemia, but rather, complementary events are required. In fact, a substantial proportion of primary CBF leukemias display additional activating mutations, mostly of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) c-KIT. The awareness of the impact and prognostic relevance of these 'second hits' is increasing with a wider range of mutations tested in clinical trials. Furthermore, novel agents targeting RTKs are emanating rapidly and entering therapeutic regimens. Here, we present a concise review on complementing mutations in CBF leukemias including pathophysiology, mouse models, and clinical implications.

  20. Alkylglycerols reduce serum complement and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Parri, A; Fitó, Montserrat; Torres, C F; Muñoz-Aguayo, D; Schröder, H; Cano, J F; Vázquez, L; Reglero, G; Covas, María-Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Alkylglycerols (AKGs), isolated or present in shark liver oil have anti-inflammatory properties. Complement 3 (C3) and 4 (C4) participate in lipid metabolism and in obesity, contributing to the metabolic syndrome and to the low-grade inflammation associated with obesity. In a randomized, controlled, crossover study, 26 non-diabetes obese individuals were assigned two preparations with low (LAC, 10 mg AKGs) and high (HAC, 20 mg AKGs) AKG content. Intervention periods were of 3 weeks preceded by 2-week washout periods in which shark liver oil was avoided. Cholesterol, C3, C4, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) decreased in a linear trend (P < 0.01) from baseline (control) to LAC and HAC. Values after HAC were significantly lower (P < 0.05) versus both baseline and after LAC. No adverse effects were observed or reported. Data from this pilot study open a promising field for the study of the beneficial effects of AKGs on cardiovascular risk factors in obese individuals.

  1. Association of Genetic Variants in Complement Factor H and Factor H-Related Genes with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian; Wu, Hui; Khosravi, Melanie; Cui, Huijuan; Qian, Xiaoxia; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Williams, Adrienne H.; Comeau, Mary E.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Marion, Miranda C.; Adler, Adam; Glenn, Stuart B.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Harley, John B.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Bang, So-Young; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Jacob, Chaim O.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Moser, Kathy L.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Alarcon, Graciela S.; Petri, Michelle A.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Vilá, Luis M.; Reveille, John D.; James, Judith A.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Freedman, Barry I.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Merrill, Joan T.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Scofield, R. Hal; Stevens, Anne M.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Park, Ji Ah; Lee, Eun Young; Boackle, Susan A.; Grossman, Jennifer M.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Goodship, Timothy H. J.; Cantor, Rita M.; Yu, Chack-Yung; Shen, Nan; Tsao, Betty P.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex polygenic autoimmune disease, is associated with increased complement activation. Variants of genes encoding complement regulator factor H (CFH) and five CFH-related proteins (CFHR1-CFHR5) within the chromosome 1q32 locus linked to SLE, have been associated with multiple human diseases and may contribute to dysregulated complement activation predisposing to SLE. We assessed 60 SNPs covering the CFH-CFHRs region for association with SLE in 15,864 case-control subjects derived from four ethnic groups. Significant allelic associations with SLE were detected in European Americans (EA) and African Americans (AA), which could be attributed to an intronic CFH SNP (rs6677604, in intron 11, P meta = 6.6×10−8, OR = 1.18) and an intergenic SNP between CFHR1 and CFHR4 (rs16840639, P meta = 2.9×10−7, OR = 1.17) rather than to previously identified disease-associated CFH exonic SNPs, including I62V, Y402H, A474A, and D936E. In addition, allelic association of rs6677604 with SLE was subsequently confirmed in Asians (AS). Haplotype analysis revealed that the underlying causal variant, tagged by rs6677604 and rs16840639, was localized to a ∼146 kb block extending from intron 9 of CFH to downstream of CFHR1. Within this block, the deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 (CFHR3-1Δ), a likely causal variant measured using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, was tagged by rs6677604 in EA and AS and rs16840639 in AA, respectively. Deduced from genotypic associations of tag SNPs in EA, AA, and AS, homozygous deletion of CFHR3-1Δ (P meta = 3.2×10−7, OR = 1.47) conferred a higher risk of SLE than heterozygous deletion (P meta = 3.5×10−4, OR = 1.14). These results suggested that the CFHR3-1Δ deletion within the SLE-associated block, but not the previously described exonic SNPs of CFH, might contribute to the development of SLE in EA, AA, and AS, providing new insights into the role of complement

  2. Association of genetic variants in complement factor H and factor H-related genes with systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Wu, Hui; Khosravi, Melanie; Cui, Huijuan; Qian, Xiaoxia; Kelly, Jennifer A; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Langefeld, Carl D; Williams, Adrienne H; Comeau, Mary E; Ziegler, Julie T; Marion, Miranda C; Adler, Adam; Glenn, Stuart B; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Harley, John B; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Bang, So-Young; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Jacob, Chaim O; Vyse, Timothy J; Niewold, Timothy B; Gaffney, Patrick M; Moser, Kathy L; Kimberly, Robert P; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Brown, Elizabeth E; Alarcon, Graciela S; Petri, Michelle A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Vilá, Luis M; Reveille, John D; James, Judith A; Gilkeson, Gary S; Kamen, Diane L; Freedman, Barry I; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Merrill, Joan T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Scofield, R Hal; Stevens, Anne M; Guthridge, Joel M; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Park, Ji Ah; Lee, Eun Young; Boackle, Susan A; Grossman, Jennifer M; Hahn, Bevra H; Goodship, Timothy H J; Cantor, Rita M; Yu, Chack-Yung; Shen, Nan; Tsao, Betty P

    2011-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex polygenic autoimmune disease, is associated with increased complement activation. Variants of genes encoding complement regulator factor H (CFH) and five CFH-related proteins (CFHR1-CFHR5) within the chromosome 1q32 locus linked to SLE, have been associated with multiple human diseases and may contribute to dysregulated complement activation predisposing to SLE. We assessed 60 SNPs covering the CFH-CFHRs region for association with SLE in 15,864 case-control subjects derived from four ethnic groups. Significant allelic associations with SLE were detected in European Americans (EA) and African Americans (AA), which could be attributed to an intronic CFH SNP (rs6677604, in intron 11, P(meta) = 6.6×10(-8), OR = 1.18) and an intergenic SNP between CFHR1 and CFHR4 (rs16840639, P(meta) = 2.9×10(-7), OR = 1.17) rather than to previously identified disease-associated CFH exonic SNPs, including I62V, Y402H, A474A, and D936E. In addition, allelic association of rs6677604 with SLE was subsequently confirmed in Asians (AS). Haplotype analysis revealed that the underlying causal variant, tagged by rs6677604 and rs16840639, was localized to a ~146 kb block extending from intron 9 of CFH to downstream of CFHR1. Within this block, the deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 (CFHR3-1Δ), a likely causal variant measured using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, was tagged by rs6677604 in EA and AS and rs16840639 in AA, respectively. Deduced from genotypic associations of tag SNPs in EA, AA, and AS, homozygous deletion of CFHR3-1Δ (P(meta) = 3.2×10(-7), OR = 1.47) conferred a higher risk of SLE than heterozygous deletion (P(meta) = 3.5×10(-4), OR = 1.14). These results suggested that the CFHR3-1Δ deletion within the SLE-associated block, but not the previously described exonic SNPs of CFH, might contribute to the development of SLE in EA, AA, and AS, providing new insights into the role of

  3. Common polymorphisms in C3, factor B, and factor H collaborate to determine systemic complement activity and disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Heurich, Meike; Martínez-Barricarte, Ruben; Francis, Nigel J.; Roberts, Dawn L.; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Morgan, B. Paul; Harris, Claire L.

    2011-01-01

    Common polymorphisms in complement alternative pathway (AP) proteins C3 (C3R102G), factor B (fBR32Q), and factor H (fHV62I) are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other pathologies. Our published work showed that fBR32Q influences C3 convertase formation, whereas fHV62I affects factor I cofactor activity. Here we show how C3R102G (C3S/F) influences AP activity. In hemolysis assays, C3102G activated AP more efficiently (EC50 C3102G: 157 nM; C3102R: 191 nM; P < 0.0001). fB binding kinetics and convertase stability were identical, but native and recombinant fH bound more strongly to C3b102R (KD C3b102R: 1.0 μM; C3b102G: 1.4 μM; P < 0.0001). Accelerated decay was unaltered, but fH cofactor activity was reduced for C3b102G, favoring AP amplification. Combining disease “risk” variants (C3102G, fB32R, and fH62V) in add-back assays yielded sixfold higher hemolytic activity compared with “protective” variants (C3102R, fB32Q, and fH62I; P < 0.0001). These data introduce the concept of a functional complotype (combination of polymorphisms) defining complement activity in an individual, thereby influencing susceptibility to AP-driven disease. PMID:21555552

  4. Complement deposition induced by binding of anti-contactin-1 auto-antibodies is modified by immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Appeltshauser, Luise; Weishaupt, Andreas; Sommer, Claudia; Doppler, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory neuropathies associated with auto-antibodies against paranodal proteins like contactin-1 are reported to respond poorly to treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG). A reason might be that IVIG interacts with the complement pathway and these auto-antibodies often belong to the IgG4 subclass that does not activate complement. However, some patients do show a response to IVIG, especially at the beginning of the disease. This corresponds with the finding of coexisting IgG subclasses IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3. We therefore aimed to investigate complement deposition and activation by samples of three patients with anti-contactin-1 IgG auto-antibodies of different subclasses as a potential predictor for response to IVIG. Complement deposition and activation was measured by cell binding and ELISA based assays, and the effect of IVIG on complement deposition was assessed by addition of different concentrations of IVIG. Binding of anti-contactin-1 auto-antibodies of all three patients induced complement deposition and activation with the strongest effect shown by the serum of a patient with predominance of IgG3 auto-antibodies. IVIG led to a reduction of complement deposition in a dose-dependent manner, but did not reduce binding of auto-antibodies to contactin-1. We conclude that complement deposition may contribute to the pathophysiology of anti-contactin-1 associated neuropathy, particularly in patients with predominance of the IgG3 subclass. The proportion of different auto-antibody subclasses may be a predictor for the response to IVIG in patients with auto-antibodies against paranodal proteins.

  5. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein acts as a processivity factor.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M W; Yang, L

    2000-05-19

    We have previously shown that endonucleases present in a protein complex, which has specificity for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, locate sites of damage in DNA by a processive mechanism of action in normal human lymphoblastoid cells. In contrast, the endonucleases present in this complex from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) cells locate damage sites by a distributive or significantly less processive mechanism. Since the XPA protein has been shown to be responsible for the DNA repair defect in XPA cells, this protein was examined for involvement in the mechanism of target site location of these endonucleases. A recombinant XPA protein, produced by expression of the normal XPA cDNA in E. coli, was isolated and purified. The results show that the recombinant XPA protein was able to correct the defect in ability of the XPA endonucleases to act by a processive mechanism of action on UVC irradiated DNA. These studies indicate that the XPA protein, in addition to a role in damage recognition or damage verification, may function as a processivity factor.

  6. Complement Factor B Mutations in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome—Disease-Relevant or Benign?

    PubMed Central

    Marinozzi, Maria Chiara; Vergoz, Laura; Rybkine, Tania; Ngo, Stephanie; Bettoni, Serena; Pashov, Anastas; Cayla, Mathieu; Tabarin, Fanny; Jablonski, Mathieu; Hue, Christophe; Smith, Richard J.; Noris, Marina; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Donadelli, Roberta; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a genetic ultrarare renal disease associated with overactivation of the alternative pathway of complement. Four gain-of-function mutations that form a hyperactive or deregulated C3 convertase have been identified in Factor B (FB) ligand binding sites. Here, we studied the functional consequences of 10 FB genetic changes recently identified from different aHUS cohorts. Using several tests for alternative C3 and C5 convertase formation and regulation, we identified two gain-of-function and potentially disease-relevant mutations that formed either an overactive convertase (M433I) or a convertase resistant to decay by FH (K298Q). One mutation (R178Q) produced a partially cleaved protein with no ligand binding or functional activity. Seven genetic changes led to near-normal or only slightly reduced ligand binding and functional activity compared with the most common polymorphism at position 7, R7. Notably, none of the algorithms used to predict the disease relevance of FB mutations agreed completely with the experimental data, suggesting that in silico approaches should be undertaken with caution. These data, combined with previously published results, suggest that 9 of 15 FB genetic changes identified in patients with aHUS are unrelated to disease pathogenesis. This study highlights that functional assessment of identified nucleotide changes in FB is mandatory to confirm disease association. PMID:24652797

  7. Is complement good, bad, or both? New functions of the complement factors associated with inflammation mechanisms in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tahtouh, Muriel; Croq, Françoise; Lefebvre, Christophe; Pestel, Joël

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is well known as an enzyme cascade that helps to defend against infections. Indeed, this ancestral system bridges innate and adaptive immunity. Its implication in diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), has led to an increased number of studies. Complement activation in the CNS has been generally considered to contribute to tissue damage. However, recent studies suggest that complement may be neuroprotective, and can participate in maintenance and repair of the adult brain. Here, we will review this dual role of complement proteins and some of their functional interactions with part of the chemokine and cytokine network associated with the protection of CNS integrity.

  8. Soluble complement receptor one (sCR1) inhibits the development and progression of rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, R M; Williams, A S; Levin, J L; Williams, B D; Morgan, B P

    2000-01-01

    We set out to determine whether inhibition of complement using sCR1 could influence the development and progression of collagen arthritis in the Lewis rat. Collagen arthritis was successfully established in the Lewis rat, using a novel immunization schedule. In separate experiments, cobra venom factor (CVF) and sCR1 were used to achieve systemic complement inhibition. Their respective effects on disease onset and on the progression of established disease compared with saline-treated control animals was explored. Arthritis was assessed by measurement of clinical score, paw diameter and paw volume. Complement inhibition using either CVF or sCR1, prior to the onset of clinical signs of inflammation, delayed the development of disease. CVF was ineffective in the treatment of established disease, whereas sCR1 delayed the progression of disease in affected joints and prevented the recruitment of further joints while the animals were complement-depleted. In the control saline-treated groups the disease continued to progress relentlessly. We conclude that complement activation is important in the initiation and maintenance of inflammation in collagen arthritis. The potent disease-modulating effect of sCR1 provides persuasive evidence that specific complement inhibiting agents may be an effective approach to the treatment of inflammatory joint diseases

  9. Change of immunoglobulins and complement factors in patients with self-injurious behaviour.

    PubMed

    Moe, T J; Mykletun, A; Matre, R; Skovlund, E; Bassøe, C-F; Dahl, A A

    2003-02-01

    As stress activates the inflammatory response system, and attempted suicide is connected with severe stress, we hypothesized that patients hospitalized for self-injurious behaviour have changed immunocompetence. The concentration of immunoglobulins IgG, IgA, IgM, and the complement components C3 and C4 in 73 patients hospitalized for self-injurious behaviour was compared with those of 122 healthy controls. The immunoglobulins and complement were quantified by nephelometric technique. The levels of IgG and IgM were significantly lower, and the complement C3 and C4 were significantly higher in self-injurious patients compared with controls. This was valid in both genders and the effects did not interact with gender. This controlled study showed that the concentrations of immunoglobulins were reduced and complement components were increased in patients who are admitted to hospital for self-injurious behaviour.

  10. Sex differences in body fluid homeostasis: Sex chromosome complement influences on bradycardic baroreflex response and sodium depletion induced neural activity.

    PubMed

    Vivas, L; Dadam, F M; Caeiro, X E

    2015-12-01

    Clinical and basic findings indicate that angiotensin II (ANG II) differentially modulates hydroelectrolyte and cardiovascular responses in male and female. But are only the activational and organizational hormonal effects to blame for such differences? Males and females not only differ in their sex (males are born with testes and females with ovaries) but also carry different sex chromosome complements and are thus influenced throughout life by different genomes. In this review, we discuss our recent studies in order to evaluate whether sex chromosome complement is in part responsible for gender differences previously observed in ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex response and sodium depletion-induced sodium appetite and neural activity. To test the hypothesis that XX or XY contributes to the dimorphic ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex response, we used the four core genotype mouse model, in which the effects of gonadal sex (testes or ovaries) and sex chromosome complement (XX or XY) are dissociated. The results indicate that ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex sexual dimorphic response may be ascribed to differences in sex chromosomes, indicating an XX-sex chromosome complement facilitatory bradycardic-baroreflex control of heart rate. Furthermore, we evaluated whether genetic differences within the sex chromosome complement may differentially modulate the known sexually dimorphic sodium appetite as well as basal or induced brain activity due to physiological stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system by furosemide and low-sodium treatment. Our studies demonstrate an organizational hormonal effect on sexually dimorphic induced sodium intake in mice, while at the brain level (subfornical organ and area postrema) we showed a sex chromosome complement effect in sodium-depleted mice, suggesting a sex chromosome gene participation in the modulation of neural pathways underlying regulatory response to renin-angiotensin stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical significance of serum complement factor 3 in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Itoh, Yoshihisa; Yamashita, Shigeo; Koide, Keiko; Harada, Noriaki; Yano, Yasuo; Ikeda, Nobuko; Azuma, Koichiro; Atsumi, Yoshihito

    2017-05-01

    Although serum complement factor 3 (C3) is an acute phase reactant mainly synthesized in the liver, several recent studies have shown high C3 gene expression in adipose tissue (AT). However, the relationship between C3 and AT levels has not been fully clarified in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. A total of 164 T2DM patients (109men and 55 women) participated in this cross-sectional study. A computed tomography scan was performed to measure visceral, subcutaneous, and total AT. The correlation between these factors and C3 levels was examined using Pearson's correlation analysis. A multivariate regression model was used to assess an independent determinant associated with C3 levels after adjusting the explanatory variables (i.e., all ATs [visceral, subcutaneous, and total], and clinical features [sex, age, body mass index, waist circumference, glycated hemoglobin, duration of diabetes, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, aspartate aminotransferase levels, alanine aminotransferase levels, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, log(triglyceride levels), estimated glomerular filtration rate, and log(high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels)]). Serum C3 levels were correlated with visceral, subcutaneous, and total AT among both men (r=0.505, p<0.001; r=0.545, p<0.001; r=0.617, p<0.001, respectively) and women (r=0.396, p=0.003; r=0.517, p<0.001; r=0.548, p<0.001, respectively). In the multivariate regression model, the association between total AT and C3 levels remained significantly positive (β=0.490, p<0.001). Serum C3 levels are associated with visceral, subcutaneous, and total AT in T2DM patients. Furthermore, C3 levels seem to be a marker for overall adiposity rather than regional adiposity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Complement factor H and hemicentin-1 in age-related macular degeneration and renal phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cheryl L; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Xu, Zhiying; Capriotti, Jennifer; Joshi, Tripti; Leontiev, Dmitry; Lee, Kristine E; Elston, Robert C; Iyengar, Sudha K

    2007-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the associations of complement factor H (CFH) and hemicentin-1 (HMCN1) with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and renal function. Three scales, measuring the course of AMD and drusen development, were examined in two samples: the Family Age-Related Macular degeneration Study (FARMS), consisting of families ascertained through a single individual with severe AMD, and an unascertained population-based family cohort, the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), which was also used to assess longitudinal changes in AMD and associations with renal function. Associations were performed by a regression accounting for known risk factors as well as familial and sibling effects. Strong evidence of the association of rs1061170 (Y402H) variation with AMD was confirmed (P = 9.15 x 10(-5) in BDES, P = 0.016 in FARMS). This association was observed in multiple AMD scales, suggesting that its role is not phenotype-specific. Polymorphisms in both CFH and HMCN1 appeared to influence the longitudinal rate of change of AMD. The rs1061170 polymorphism was also associated with a reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (P = 0.046). Another CFH polymorphism, rs800292, was similarly associated with eGFR [beta = -0.90 (P = 0.022)]. Associations between rs743137 (P = 0.05) and rs680638 (P = 0.022) in HMCN1 with calculated creatinine clearance progression were also observed. Both genes appear to play a role in both AMD and renal pathophysiology. These findings support evidence for common pathways influencing ocular and renal function and suggest that further work is required on their common determinants.

  13. Ensemble refinement shows conformational flexibility in crystal structures of human complement factor D

    SciTech Connect

    Forneris, Federico; Burnley, B. Tom; Gros, Piet

    2014-03-01

    Ensemble-refinement analysis of native and mutant factor D (FD) crystal structures indicates a dynamical transition in FD from a self-inhibited inactive conformation to a substrate-bound active conformation that is reminiscent of the allostery in thrombin. Comparison with previously observed dynamics in thrombin using NMR data supports the crystallographic ensembles. Human factor D (FD) is a self-inhibited thrombin-like serine proteinase that is critical for amplification of the complement immune response. FD is activated by its substrate through interactions outside the active site. The substrate-binding, or ‘exosite’, region displays a well defined and rigid conformation in FD. In contrast, remarkable flexibility is observed in thrombin and related proteinases, in which Na{sup +} and ligand binding is implied in allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity through protein dynamics. Here, ensemble refinement (ER) of FD and thrombin crystal structures is used to evaluate structure and dynamics simultaneously. A comparison with previously published NMR data for thrombin supports the ER analysis. The R202A FD variant has enhanced activity towards artificial peptides and simultaneously displays active and inactive conformations of the active site. ER revealed pronounced disorder in the exosite loops for this FD variant, reminiscent of thrombin in the absence of the stabilizing Na{sup +} ion. These data indicate that FD exhibits conformational dynamics like thrombin, but unlike in thrombin a mechanism has evolved in FD that locks the unbound native state into an ordered inactive conformation via the self-inhibitory loop. Thus, ensemble refinement of X-ray crystal structures may represent an approach alternative to spectroscopy to explore protein dynamics in atomic detail.

  14. Impaired Immunogenicity of Meningococcal Neisserial Surface Protein A in Human Complement Factor H Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Eduardo; Pajon, Rolando; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-11-23

    Neisserial surface protein A (NspA) is a highly conserved outer membrane protein previously investigated as a meningococcal vaccine candidate. Despite eliciting serum bactericidal activity in mice, a recombinant NspA vaccine failed to elicit serum bactericidal antibodies in a phase 1 clinical trial in humans. The discordant results may be explained by the recent discovery that NspA is a human-specific ligand of the complement inhibitor factor H (FH). Therefore, in humans but not mice, NspA would be expected to form a complex with FH, which could impair human anti-NspA protective antibody responses. To investigate this question, we immunized human FH transgenic BALB/c mice with three doses of recombinant NspA expressed in Escherichia coli microvesicles, with each dose being separated by 3 weeks. Three of 12 (25%) transgenic mice and 13 of 14 wild-type mice responded with bactericidal titers of ≥1:10 in postimmunization sera (P = 0.0008, Fisher's exact test). In contrast, human FH transgenic and wild-type mice immunized with a control meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccine had similar serum bactericidal antibody responses directed at PorA, which is not known to bind human FH, and a mutant factor H binding protein (FHbp) antigen with a >50-fold lower level of FH binding than wild-type FHbp antigen binding.Thus, human FH can impair anti-NspA serum bactericidal antibody responses, which may explain the poor immunogenicity of the NspA vaccine previously tested in humans. A mutant NspA vaccine engineered to have decreased binding to human FH may increase protective antibody responses in humans.

  15. Visualizing K48 Ubiquitination during Presynaptic Formation By Ubiquitination-Induced Fluorescence Complementation (UiFC)

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria J.; Pedro, Joana R.; Costa, Rui O.; Almeida, Ramiro D.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, signaling through ubiquitin has been shown to be of great importance for normal brain development. Indeed, fluctuations in ubiquitin levels and spontaneous mutations in (de)ubiquitination enzymes greatly perturb synapse formation and neuronal transmission. In the brain, expression of lysine (K) 48-linked ubiquitin chains is higher at a developmental stage coincident with synaptogenesis. Nevertheless, no studies have so far delved into the involvement of this type of polyubiquitin chains in synapse formation. We have recently proposed a role for polyubiquitinated conjugates as triggering signals for presynaptic assembly. Herein, we aimed at characterizing the axonal distribution of K48 polyubiquitin and its dynamics throughout the course of presynaptic formation. To accomplish so, we used an ubiquitination-induced fluorescence complementation (UiFC) strategy for the visualization of K48 polyubiquitin in live hippocampal neurons. We first validated its use in neurons by analyzing changing levels of polyubiquitin. UiFC signal is diffusely distributed with distinct aggregates in somas, dendrites and axons, which perfectly colocalize with staining for a K48-specific antibody. Axonal UiFC aggregates are relatively stable and new aggregates are formed as an axon grows. Approximately 65% of UiFC aggregates colocalize with synaptic vesicle clusters and they preferentially appear in the axonal domains of axo-somatodendritic synapses when compared to isolated axons. We then evaluated axonal accumulation of K48 ubiquitinated signals in bead-induced synapses. We observed rapid accumulation of UiFC signal and endogenous K48 ubiquitin at the sites of newly formed presynapses. Lastly, we show by means of a microfluidic platform, for the isolation of axons, that presynaptic clustering on beads is dependent on E1-mediated ubiquitination at the axonal level. Altogether, these results indicate that enrichment of K48 polyubiquitin at the site of nascent presynaptic

  16. Mapping the Complement Factor H-Related Protein 1 (CFHR1):C3b/C3d Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Jennifer; Thurman, Joshua M.; Hageman, Gregory S.; Holers, V. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H-related protein 1 (CFHR1) is a complement regulator which has been reported to regulate complement by blocking C5 convertase activity and interfering with C5b surface association. CFHR1 also competes with complement factor H (CFH) for binding to C3b, and may act as an antagonist of CFH-directed regulation on cell surfaces. We have employed site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with ELISA-based and functional assays to isolate the binding interaction that CFHR1 undertakes with complement components C3b and C3d to a single shared interface. The C3b/C3d:CFHR1 interface is identical to that which occurs between the two C-terminal domains (SCR19-20) of CFH and C3b. Moreover, we have been able to corroborate that dimerization of CFHR1 is necessary for this molecule to bind effectively to C3b and C3d, or compete with CFH. Finally, we have established that CFHR1 competes with complement factor H-like protein 1 (CFHL-1) for binding to C3b. CFHL-1 is a CFH gene splice variant, which is almost identical to the N-terminal 7 domains of CFH (SCR1-7). CFHR1, therefore, not only competes with the C-terminus of CFH for binding to C3b, but also sterically blocks the interaction that the N-terminus of CFH undertakes with C3b, and which is required for CFH-regulation. PMID:27814381

  17. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  18. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  19. Complement activation pathways in murine immune complex-induced arthritis and in C3a and C5a generation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Banda, N K; Levitt, B; Wood, A K; Takahashi, K; Stahl, G L; Holers, V M; Arend, W P

    2010-01-01

    The alternative pathway (AP) of complement alone is capable of mediating immune complex-induced arthritis in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model in mice. Whether the classical pathway (CP) or lectin pathway (LP) alone can mediate CAIA is not known. Using mice genetically deficient in different complement components, our results reported herein establish that the CP and LP alone are each incapable of mediating CAIA. A lower level or absence of C3 and/or C5 activation by the CP may be possible explanations for the importance of the AP in CAIA and in many murine models of disease. In addition, other investigators have reported that CP C5 convertase activity is absent in mouse sera. To address these questions, we employed an in vitro system of adherent immunoglobulin (Ig)G-induced complement activation using plates coated with murine anti-collagen monoclonal antibody (mAb). These experiments used complement-deficient mouse sera and wild-type mouse or normal human sera under conditions inactivating either the CP (Ca++ deficiency) or the AP (mAb inhibitory to factor B). Robust generation of both C3a and C5a by either the AP or CP alone were observed with both mouse and human sera, although there were some small differences between the species of sera. We conclude that neither the CP nor LP alone is capable of mediating CAIA in vivo and that mouse sera exhibits a high level of IgG-induced C5a generation in vitro through either the CP or AP. PMID:19843088

  20. Complement inhibition reduces material-induced leukocyte activation with PEG modified polystyrene beads (Tentagel) but not polystyrene beads.

    PubMed

    Gorbet, M B; Sefton, M V

    2005-09-15

    With isolated leukocytes, inhibiting complement reduced material-induced leukocyte activation (CD11b) with polyethylene glycol modified polystyrene beads (PS-PEG), but not with polystyrene beads (PS). The PS-PEG beads (TentaGel) were complement activating as measured by SC5b-9 levels consistent with the sensitivity of these beads to leukocyte inhibition with complement inhibitors. Following contact with PS and PS-PEG beads, isolated leukocytes in plasma and in the absence in platelets were found to significantly upregulate CD11b, while TF expression and exposure of phosphatidylserine remained at background levels. Complement inhibition by means of sCR1 partially reduced CD11b upregulation on PS-PEG beads, but had no effect with PS beads. Pyridoxal-5-phosphate (P5P) was able to significantly reduce both CD11b upregulation and exposure of phosphatidylserine with PS-PEG beads, although it did not appear to inhibit SC5b-9 production. Pentamidine and NAAGA inhibited complement and were effective in reducing CD11b upregulation with both PS and PS-PEG. However, they also had an inhibitory effect on leukocyte signaling mechanisms, precluding their utility for further study in this context. Leukocyte adhesion occurred to similar extents on both PS and PS-PEG beads. While sCR1 and P5P blocked adhesion and activation (for adherent leukocytes) on PS-PEG beads, they had no effect on leukocytes adherent to PS beads. The role of complement in leukocyte activation and adhesion was found to be material-dependent. Thus, leukocyte-material compatibility may be resolved by complement inhibition in some but not all cases. For these other materials (example here was PS), other mechanisms, such as fibrinogen adsorption and direct leukocyte release, may need exploitation to minimize leukocyte activation and adhesion. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2005.

  1. Interleukin-22 regulates the complement system to promote resistance against pathobionts after pathogen-induced intestinal damage.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mizuho; Yada, Shoko; Liu, Meng Zhen; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Do, Nhu; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro

    2014-10-16

    Pathobionts play a critical role in disease development, but the immune mechanisms against pathobionts remain poorly understood. Here, we report a critical role for interleukin-22 (IL-22) in systemic protection against bacterial pathobionts that translocate into the circulation after infection with the pathogen Clostridium difficile. Infection with C. difficile induced IL-22, and infected Il22(-/-) mice harbored high numbers of pathobionts in extraintestinal organs despite comparable pathogen load and intestinal damage in mutant and wild-type mice. Pathobionts exhibited increased resistant against complement-mediated phagocytosis, and their intravenous administration resulted in high animal mortality. Selective removal of translocated commensals rescued Il22(-/-) mice, and IL-22 administration enhanced the elimination of pathobionts. Mechanistically, IL-22 augmented bacterial phagocytosis by increasing the expression and bacterial binding of complement C3. Our study demonstrates an unexpected role for IL-22 in controlling the elimination of pathobionts that enter the systemic circulation through the regulation of the complement system.

  2. Expression, purification, cocrystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of sucrose octasulfate/human complement regulator factor H SCRs 6–8

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, Beverly E.; Johnson, Steven; Roversi, Pietro; Clark, Simon J.; Tarelli, Edward; Sim, Robert B.; Day, Antony J.; Lea, Susan M.

    2007-06-01

    The crystallization of human complement regulator FH-678{sub 402H} with a glycosaminoglycan analogue is described. Human plasma protein complement factor H (FH) is an inhibitor of the spontaneously activated alternative complement pathway. An allotypic variant of FH, 402His, has been associated with age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Crystals of FH domains 6–8 (FH678) containing 402His have been grown in the presence of a polyanionic sucrose octasulfate ligand (an analogue of the natural glycosaminoglycan ligands of FH) using both native and selenomethionine-derivatized protein. Native data sets diffracting to 2.3 Å and SeMet data sets of up to 2.8 Å resolution have been collected. An anomalous difference Patterson map reveals self- and cross-peaks from two incorporated Se atoms. The corresponding selenium substructure has been solved.

  3. Characterization of shark complement factor I gene(s): genomic analysis of a novel shark-specific sequence.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Ho; Webb, Barbara M; Nakao, Miki; Smith, Sylvia L

    2009-07-01

    Complement factor I is a crucial regulator of mammalian complement activity. Very little is known of complement regulators in non-mammalian species. We isolated and sequenced four highly similar complement factor I cDNAs from the liver of the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum), designated as GcIf-1, GcIf-2, GcIf-3 and GcIf-4 (previously referred to as nsFI-a, -b, -c and -d) which encode 689, 673, 673 and 657 amino acid residues, respectively. They share 95% (factor I of mammals and banded houndshark (Triakis scyllium), respectively. The modular structure of the GcIf is similar to that of mammals with one notable exception, the presence of a novel shark-specific sequence between the leader peptide (LP) and the factor I membrane attack complex (FIMAC) domain. The cDNA sequences differ only in the size and composition of the shark-specific region (SSR). Sequence analysis of each SSR has identified within the region two novel short sequences (SS1 and SS2) and three repeat sequences (RS1-3). Genomic analysis has revealed the existence of three introns between the leader peptide and the FIMAC domain, tentatively designated intron 1, intron 2, and intron 3 which span 4067, 2293 and 2082bp, respectively. Southern blot analysis suggests the presence of a single gene copy for each cDNA type. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that complement factor I of cartilaginous fish diverged prior to the emergence of mammals. All four GcIf cDNA species are expressed in four different tissues and the liver is the main tissue in which expression level of all four is high. This suggests that the expression of GcIf isotypes is tissue-dependent.

  4. Characterization of shark complement factor I gene(s): genomic analysis of a novel shark-specific sequence

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-Ho; Webb, Barbara M.; Nakao, Miki; Smith, Sylvia L.

    2009-01-01

    Complement factor I is a crucial regulator of mammalian complement activity. Very little is known of complement regulators in non-mammalian species. We isolated and sequenced four highly similar complement factor I cDNAs from the liver of the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum), designated as GcIf-1, GcIf-2, GcIf-3 and GcIf-4 (previously referred to as nsFI-a, -b, -c and –d) which encode 689, 673, 673 and 657 amino acid residues, respectively. They share 95% (≤) amino acid identities with each other, 35.4 ~ 39.6% and 62.8 ~ 65.9% with factor I of mammals and banded houndshark (Triakis scyllium), respectively. The modular structure of the GcIf is similar to that of mammals with one notable exception, the presence of a novel shark-specific sequence between the leader peptide (LP) and the factor I membrane attack complex (FIMAC) domain. The cDNA sequences differ only in the size and composition of the shark-specific region (SSR). Sequence analysis of each SSR has identified within the region two novel short sequences (SS1 and SS2) and three repeat sequences (RS1, 2 and 3). Genomic analysis has revealed the existence of three introns between the leader peptide and the FIMAC domain, tentatively designated intron 1, intron 2, and intron 3 which span 4067, 2293 and 2082 bp, respectively. Southern blot analysis suggests the presence of a single gene copy for each cDNA type. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that complement factor I of cartilaginous fish diverged prior to the emergence of mammals. All four GcIf cDNA species are expressed in four different tissues and the liver is the main tissue in which expression level of all four is high. This suggests that the expression of GcIf isotypes is tissue-dependent. PMID:19423168

  5. Bacillus anthracis Spore Surface Protein BclA Mediates Complement Factor H Binding to Spores and Promotes Spore Persistence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyu; Jenkins, Sarah A; Gu, Chunfang; Shree, Ankita; Martinez-Moczygemba, Margarita; Herold, Jennifer; Botto, Marina; Wetsel, Rick A; Xu, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Spores of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, are known to persist in the host lungs for prolonged periods of time, however the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that BclA, a major surface protein of B. anthracis spores, mediated direct binding of complement factor H (CFH) to spores. The surface bound CFH retained its regulatory cofactor activity resulting in C3 degradation and inhibition of downstream complement activation. By comparing results from wild type C57BL/6 mice and complement deficient mice, we further showed that BclA significantly contributed to spore persistence in the mouse lungs and dampened antibody responses to spores in a complement C3-dependent manner. In addition, prior exposure to BclA deletion spores (ΔbclA) provided significant protection against lethal challenges by B. anthracis, whereas the isogenic parent spores did not, indicating that BclA may also impair protective immunity. These results describe for the first time an immune inhibition mechanism of B. anthracis mediated by BclA and CFH that promotes spore persistence in vivo. The findings also suggested an important role of complement in persistent infections and thus have broad implications.

  6. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela; Jin, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3(-/-)), complement factor B (fB(-/-)), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3(-/-)mice than in WT controls, whereas fB(-/-)mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3(-/-)sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB(-/-)sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus.

  7. Soluble complement receptor 1 is increased in patients with leukemia and after administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Sadallah, S; Lach, E; Schwarz, S; Gratwohl, A; Spertini, O; Schifferli, J A

    1999-01-01

    Complement receptor type 1 is expressed by erythrocytes and most leukocytes. A soluble form is shed from the leukocytes and found in plasma (sCR1). sCR1 is a powerful inhibitor of complement. We report an increased sCR1 in the plasma of leukemia patients, up to levels producing measurable complement inhibition. Half of the 180 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) had sCR1 levels above the normal range. The highest levels were observed in T-ALL (17 patients). The complement function of a T-ALL serum was improved by blocking sCR1 with a specific mAb (3D9). Measurements in 16 peripheral stein cell donors before and after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration showed an increase in sCR1 (before, 43.8+/-15.4; at day 5, 118.3+/-44.7 ng/mL; P < 0.0001). This increase paralleled the increase in total leukocyte counts and was concomitant with de novo leukocyte mRNA CR1 expression in all three individuals tested. Whether pharmacological intervention may be used to up-regulate sCR1 so as to inhibit complement in vivo should be further investigated.

  8. Quiescent complement in nonhuman primates during E coli Shiga toxin-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Benjamin C.; Mayer, Chad L.; Leibowitz, Caitlin S.

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) produce ribosome-inactivating Shiga toxins (Stx1, Stx2) responsible for development of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Some patients show complement activation during EHEC infection, raising the possibility of therapeutic targeting of complement for relief. Our juvenile nonhuman primate (Papio baboons) models of endotoxin-free Stx challenge exhibit full spectrum HUS, including thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and AKI with glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy. There were no significant increases in soluble terminal complement complex (C5b-9) levels after challenge with lethal Stx1 (n = 6) or Stx2 (n = 5) in plasma samples from T0 to euthanasia at 49.5 to 128 hours post-challenge. d-dimer and cell injury markers (HMGB1, histones) confirmed coagulopathy and cell injury. Thus, complement activation is not required for the development of thrombotic microangiopathy and HUS induced by EHEC Shiga toxins in these preclinical models, and benefits or risks of complement inhibition should be studied further for this infection. PMID:23733336

  9. Interaction of Complement Factor H and Fibulin3 in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, M. Keith; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Mishra, Sanghamitra; Campos, Maria; Jaworski, Cynthia; Fariss, Robert N.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Wistow, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of vision loss. It is associated with development of characteristic plaque-like deposits (soft drusen) in Bruch’s membrane basal to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). A sequence variant (Y402H) in short consensus repeat domain 7 (SCR7) of complement factor H (CFH) is associated with risk for “dry” AMD. We asked whether the eye-targeting of this disease might be related to specific interactions of CFH SCR7 with proteins expressed in the aging human RPE/choroid that could contribute to protein deposition in drusen. Yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) screens of a retinal pigment epithelium/choroid library derived from aged donors using CFH SCR7 baits detected an interaction with EFEMP1/Fibulin 3 (Fib3), which is the locus for an inherited macular degeneration and also accumulates basal to macular RPE in AMD. The CFH/Fib3 interaction was validated by co-immunoprecipitation of native proteins. Quantitative Y2H and ELISA assays with different recombinant protein constructs both demonstrated higher affinity for Fib3 for the disease-related CFH 402H variant. Immuno-labeling revealed colocalization of CFH and Fib3 in globular deposits within cholesterol-rich domains in soft drusen in two AMD donors homozygous for CFH 402H (H/H). This pattern of labeling was quite distinct from those seen in examples of eyes with Y/Y and H/Y genotypes. The CFH 402H/Fib3 interaction could contribute to the development of pathological aggregates in soft drusen in some patients and as such might provide a target for therapeutic intervention in some forms of AMD. PMID:23840815

  10. Rare complement factor H variant associated with age-related macular degeneration in the Amish.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joshua D; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N; D'Aoust, Laura; Cade, William; Ayala-Haedo, Juan; Fuzzell, Denise; Laux, Renee; Adams, Larry D; Reinhart-Mercer, Lori; Caywood, Laura; Whitehead-Gay, Patrice; Agarwal, Anita; Wang, Gaofeng; Scott, William K; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Haines, Jonathan L

    2014-06-06

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness among the adult population in the developed world. To further the understanding of this disease, we have studied the genetically isolated Amish population of Ohio and Indiana. Cumulative genetic risk scores were calculated using the 19 known allelic associations. Exome sequencing was performed in three members of a small Amish family with AMD who lacked the common risk alleles in complement factor H (CFH) and ARMS2/HTRA1. Follow-up genotyping and association analysis was performed in a cohort of 973 Amish individuals, including 95 with self-reported AMD. The cumulative genetic risk score analysis generated a mean genetic risk score of 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10, 1.13) in the Amish controls and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.22) in the Amish cases. This mean difference in genetic risk scores is statistically significant (P = 0.0042). Exome sequencing identified a rare variant (P503A) in CFH. Association analysis in the remainder of the Amish sample revealed that the P503A variant is significantly associated with AMD (P = 9.27 × 10(-13)). Variant P503A was absent when evaluated in a cohort of 791 elderly non-Amish controls, and 1456 non-Amish cases. Data from the cumulative genetic risk score analysis suggests that the variants reported by the AMDGene consortium account for a smaller genetic burden of disease in the Amish compared with the non-Amish Caucasian population. Using exome sequencing data, we identified a novel missense mutation that is shared among a densely affected nuclear Amish family and located in a gene that has been previously implicated in AMD risk. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  11. Rare Complement Factor H Variant Associated With Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the Amish

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joshua D.; CookeBailey, Jessica N.; D'Aoust, Laura; Cade, William; Ayala-Haedo, Juan; Fuzzell, Denise; Laux, Renee; Adams, Larry D.; Reinhart-Mercer, Lori; Caywood, Laura; Whitehead-Gay, Patrice; Agarwal, Anita; Wang, Gaofeng; Scott, William K.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness among the adult population in the developed world. To further the understanding of this disease, we have studied the genetically isolated Amish population of Ohio and Indiana. Methods. Cumulative genetic risk scores were calculated using the 19 known allelic associations. Exome sequencing was performed in three members of a small Amish family with AMD who lacked the common risk alleles in complement factor H (CFH) and ARMS2/HTRA1. Follow-up genotyping and association analysis was performed in a cohort of 973 Amish individuals, including 95 with self-reported AMD. Results. The cumulative genetic risk score analysis generated a mean genetic risk score of 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10, 1.13) in the Amish controls and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.22) in the Amish cases. This mean difference in genetic risk scores is statistically significant (P = 0.0042). Exome sequencing identified a rare variant (P503A) in CFH. Association analysis in the remainder of the Amish sample revealed that the P503A variant is significantly associated with AMD (P = 9.27 × 10−13). Variant P503A was absent when evaluated in a cohort of 791 elderly non-Amish controls, and 1456 non-Amish cases. Conclusions. Data from the cumulative genetic risk score analysis suggests that the variants reported by the AMDGene consortium account for a smaller genetic burden of disease in the Amish compared with the non-Amish Caucasian population. Using exome sequencing data, we identified a novel missense mutation that is shared among a densely affected nuclear Amish family and located in a gene that has been previously implicated in AMD risk. PMID:24906858

  12. Complexity of Complement Resistance Factors Expressed by Acinetobacter baumannii Needed for Survival in Human Serum.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Larrayoz, Amaro F; Elhosseiny, Noha M; Chevrette, Marc G; Fu, Yang; Giunta, Peter; Spallanzani, Raúl G; Ravi, Keerthikka; Pier, Gerald B; Lory, Stephen; Maira-Litrán, Tomás

    2017-08-30

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a bacterial pathogen with increasing impact in healthcare settings, due in part to this organism's resistance to many antimicrobial agents, with pneumonia and bacteremia as the most common manifestations of disease. A significant proportion of clinically relevant A. baumannii strains are resistant to killing by normal human serum (NHS), an observation supported in this study by showing that 12 out of 15 genetically diverse strains of A. baumannii are resistant to NHS killing. To expand our understanding of the genetic basis of A. baumannii serum resistance, a transposon (Tn) sequencing (Tn-seq) approach was used to identify genes contributing to this trait. An ordered Tn library in strain AB5075 with insertions in every nonessential gene was subjected to selection in NHS. We identified 50 genes essential for the survival of A. baumannii in NHS, including already known serum resistance factors, and many novel genes not previously associated with serum resistance. This latter group included the maintenance of lipid asymmetry genetic pathway as a key determinant in protecting A. baumannii from the bactericidal activity of NHS via the alternative complement pathway. Follow-up studies validated the role of eight additional genes identified by Tn-seq in A. baumannii resistance to killing by NHS but not by normal mouse serum, highlighting the human species specificity of A. baumannii serum resistance. The identification of a large number of genes essential for serum resistance in A. baumannii indicates the degree of complexity needed for this phenotype, which might reflect a general pattern that pathogens rely on to cause serious infections. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Complement factor H interferes with Mycobacterium bovis BCG entry into macrophages and modulates the pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Aziz, Munirah; Tsolaki, Anthony G; Kouser, Lubna; Carroll, Maria V; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an accomplished intracellular pathogen, particularly within the macrophage and this is of the utmost importance in the host-pathogen stand-off observed in the granuloma during latent tuberculosis. Contact with innate immune molecules is one of the primary interactions that can occur with the pathogen M. tuberculosis once inhaled. Complement proteins may play a role in facilitating M. tuberculosis interactions with macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that factor H, a complement regulatory protein that down-regulates complement alternative pathway activation, binds directly to the model organism M. bovis BCG. Binding of factor H reaches saturation at 5-10μg of factor H/ml, well below the plasma level. C4 binding protein (C4BP) competed with factor H for binding to mycobacteria. Factor H was also found to inhibit uptake of M. bovis BCG by THP-1 macrophage cells in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time qPCR analysis showed stark differential responses of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during the early stages of phagocytosis, as evident from elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and a concomitant decrease in IL-10, TGF-β and IL-12 levels, when THP-1:BCG interaction took place in the presence of factor H. Our results suggest that factor H can interfere with mycobacterial entry into macrophages and modulate inflammatory cytokine responses, particularly during the initial stages of infection, thus affecting the extracellular survival of the pathogen. Our results offer novel insights into complement activation-independent functions of factor H during the host-pathogen interaction in tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  14. Polydom: a secreted protein with pentraxin, complement control protein, epidermal growth factor and von Willebrand factor A domains.

    PubMed Central

    Gilgès, D; Vinit, M A; Callebaut, I; Coulombel, L; Cacheux, V; Romeo, P H; Vigon, I

    2000-01-01

    To identify extracellular proteins with epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains that are potentially involved in the control of haemopoiesis, we performed degenerate reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR on the murine bone-marrow stromal cell line MS-5 and isolated a new partial cDNA encoding EGF-like domains related to those in the Notch proteins. Cloning and sequencing of the full-length cDNA showed that it encoded a new extracellular multi-domain protein that we named polydom. This 387 kDa mosaic protein contained a signal peptide followed by a new association of eight different protein domains, including a pentraxin domain and a von Willebrand factor type A domain, ten EGF domains, and 34 complement control protein modules. The human polydom mRNA is strongly expressed in placenta, its expression in the other tissues being weak or undetectable. The particular multidomain structure of the encoded protein suggests an important biological role in cellular adhesion and/or in the immune system. PMID:11062057

  15. Defective complement control of factor H (Y402H) and FHL-1 in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Skerka, Christine; Lauer, Nadine; Weinberger, Andreas A W A; Keilhauer, Claudia N; Sühnel, Jürgen; Smith, Richard; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Fritsche, Lars; Heinen, Stefan; Hartmann, Andrea; Weber, Bernhard H F; Zipfel, Peter F

    2007-07-01

    The common variant in the human complement Factor H gene (CFH), with Tyr402His, is linked to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a prevalent disorder leading to visual impairment and irreversible blindness in elderly patients. Here we show that the risk variant CFH 402His displays reduced binding to C reactive protein (CRP), heparin and retinal pigment epithelial cells. This reduced binding can cause inefficient complement regulation at the cell surface, particularly when CRP is recruited to injured sites and tissue. In addition, we identify the Factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), an alternative splice product of the CFH gene as an additional protein that includes the risk residue 402, and thus confers risk for AMD. FHL-1 is expressed in the eye and the FHL-1 402His risk variant shows similar reduced cell binding and likely reduced complement regulatory functions on the cell surface. CFH and FHL-1 may act in concert in the eye and the reduced surface binding may result in inappropriate local complement control, which in turn can lead to inflammation, disturbance of local physiological homeostasis and progression to cell damage. As a consequence, these processes may lead to AMD pathogenesis.

  16. Structure-Based Library Design and Fragment Screening for the Identification of Reversible Complement Factor D Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vulpetti, Anna; Randl, Stefan; Rüdisser, Simon; Ostermann, Nils; Erbel, Paul; Mac Sweeney, Aengus; Zoller, Thomas; Salem, Bahaa; Gerhartz, Bernd; Cumin, Frederic; Hommel, Ulrich; Dalvit, Claudio; Lorthiois, Edwige; Maibaum, Jürgen

    2017-03-09

    Chronic dysregulation of alternative complement pathway activation has been associated with diverse clinical disorders including age-related macular degeneration and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinurea. Factor D is a trypsin-like serine protease with a narrow specificity for arginine in the P1 position, which catalyzes the first enzymatic reaction of the amplification loop of the alternative pathway. In this article, we describe two hit finding approaches leading to the discovery of new chemical matter for this pivotal protease of the complement system: in silico active site mapping for hot spot identification to guide rational structure-based design and NMR screening of focused and diverse fragment libraries. The wealth of information gathered by these complementary approaches enabled the identification of ligands binding to different subpockets of the latent Factor D conformation and was instrumental for understanding the binding requirements for the generation of the first known potent noncovalent reversible Factor D inhibitors.

  17. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing the Complement Inhibitor Crry as a Soluble Protein Are Protected from Antibody-induced Glomerular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Quigg, Richard J.; He, Chun; Lim, Alice; Berthiaume, Dawn; Alexander, Jessy J.; Kraus, Damian; Michael Holers, V.

    1998-01-01

    Complement receptor 1–related gene/protein y (Crry) is a potent murine membrane complement regulator that inhibits classical and alternative pathway C3 convertases. In nephrotoxic serum (NTS) nephritis, injected antibodies (Abs) bind to glomeruli, leading to complement activation and subsequent glomerular injury and albuminuria. To study the phenotypic effects of continuous complement pathway blockade, transgenic mice were created that express recombinant soluble (rs) Crry directed by the broadly active and heavy metal-inducible metallothionein-I promoter. One transgenic line expressing high levels of rsCrry was propagated. Serum rsCrry levels were 18.7 ± 2.7 μg/ml (n = 5) at basal level and increased to 118.1 ± 20.6 μg/ml 4 d after addition of zinc to the drinking water. By reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), transgene messenger (m)RNA was present in liver, kidney, brain, lung, and spleen, but not in heart. By in situ RT-PCR analysis of kidneys, transgene mRNA was widely expressed both in renal glomeruli and tubules. Urinary excretion of rsCrry was 113.4 ± 22.4 μg/ml with a fractional excretion relative to creatinine of 13.2 ± 2.7%, consistent with local renal production of rsCrry and secretion into urine. The founder and all transgene positive adult animals have remained healthy with no mortality or apparent phenotypic abnormalities, including infection or immune complex disease. To determine whether rsCrry blocked complement-mediated injury, NTS nephritis was induced by injection of NTS immunoglobulin (Ig)G, followed by an 18-h urine collection to quantitate the excretion of albumin as a measure of glomerular injury. In transgene-negative littermates (n = 15), transgene-positive animals (n = 10), and transgene-positive animals fed zinc (n = 10), albuminuria was 4,393 ± 948, 1,783 ± 454, and 1,057 ± 277 μg/mg creatinine, respectively (P < 0.01 by ANOVA). Glomerular C3 was evident by immunofluorescence staining in 12/15 transgene

  18. The Ba fragment of complement factor B inhibits human B lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, J L; Peters, M G; Fauci, A S; Brown, E J

    1990-03-01

    Normal human B lymphocyte function is finely regulated by both positive and negative signals at each stage of activation, proliferation, and differentiation. Activation signals include antigen and surface Ig cross-linking agents such as anti-mu or anti-delta. Signals inducing proliferation include IL-2, high m.w.-B cell growth factor (BCGF), and low m.w.-BCGF. IL-2 as well as IL-6 and other partially characterized B cell differentiation factors can induce terminal differentiation of proliferating B cells into Ig-secreting plasma cells. Various C components have been described to regulate B cell function including Bb that enhances proliferation, C5a that enhances Ig production, and C3a that inhibits Ig production. In our study, we examined the ability of the factor B cleavage fragment Ba to influence human B cell function. Ba did not affect the activation of resting B cells but inhibited the proliferation of activated B cells stimulated with either high m.w.-BCGF or low m.w.-BCGF. The inhibition occurred with doses of Ba as low as 1 microgram/ml (29 nM). Ba was found to bind to activated human B lymphocytes in a saturable manner with an apparent K of approximately 25 nM and an apparent Bmax of 56,000 sites/cell. A peptide made of the carboxy terminal 10 amino acids of Ba (GHGPGEQQKR), was also found to inhibit growth factor induced proliferation of activated B cells but at an ID50 of approximately 5 microM. Finally, Ba was found to inhibit the terminal differentiation of Staphylococcus aweus Cowan-activated B cells stimulated with B cell differentiation factors but not Ig secretion by the partially differentiated EBV-transformed cell line SKW.6. Thus, concentrations of Ba achievable in vivo at sites of active inflammation were found to act on human B lymphocytes by inhibiting their proliferation. This may act to limit the immune response to a specific antigenic challenge.

  19. Factor H facilitates adherence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to complement receptor 3 on eukaryotic cells1

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sarika; Ram, Sanjay; Ngampasutadol, Jutamas; Gulati, Sunita; Zipfel, Peter F.; Rice, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae can engage human complement receptor 3 (CR3) directly or through surface-bound iC3b. Factor H (fH) that binds to bacteria facilitates conversion of C3b to iC3b. fH also binds directly to CR3 on professional phagocytes. Certain non-professional phagocytes such as primary cervical epithelial cells also express CR3. We hypothesized that fH could bridge bacteria to CR3 and facilitate gonococcal association with host cells. Specificity of the fH-CR3 interaction was confirmed using human CR3-transfected CHO (CHO/CR3) cells. Using recombinant proteins that comprised contiguous fH domains (fH contains 20 short consensus repeat (SCR) domains) fused to murine Fc, we observed strong binding through SCRs 18–20, while weaker binding occurred through SCRs 6–10. Both regions also bound to unsialylated porin (Por) B.1A-expressing N. gonorrhoeae. Accordingly, fH-related protein 1 (CFHR1) (three of its five SCRs are highly homologous to fH SCRs 18–20) bound to CHO-CR3 and to unsialylated PorB.1A gonococci. An alternatively spliced variant of fH called fH-like protein-1 (FHL-1) (contains fH SCRs 1–7) bound to gonococci but minimally to CHO/CR3. A fH SCR 6–20 construct enhanced binding of unsialylated PorB.1A gonococci to CHO/CR3. However, a construct that contained only the apparently relevant SCRs (6–7 and 18–20) bound to CHO/CR3 and to gonococci separately, but did not enhance bacteria-CR3 interactions, suggesting that the intervening SCRs (8–17) may impart a configurational and spatial requirement for fH to bridge gonococci to CR3. These results indicate adherence between fH-coated gonococci and CR3 and may provide a means for gonococci to gain sanctuary into non-professional phagocytes. PMID:20826755

  20. Detection of IgG rheumatoid factor by concanavalin A treatment and complement fixation with IgG rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, K; Moritoh, T; Azuma, T; Horiuchi, Y

    1976-01-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A) froms precipitates with carbohydrate-rich protein such as IgM, IgD, IgE, and IgA. Since IgG contains little carbohydrate and does not react with Con A, the activity of IgG-rheumatoid factor (RF) can be measured in the supernate of the Con A-treated serum. When the latex fixation test (LFT) and the sensitized sheep cell agglutination test (SSCA) were perfromed in the supernate for the detection of IgG-RF, LFT was positive in 32-1% of sera, out of 137 sera originally positive for LFT, and SSCA was positive in 18-5% of sera, out of 119 sera originally positive for SSCA. IgG-RF exhibited lower complement fixing ability than IgM-RF and correlated with agglutination titres of IgG-RF, while the CH50 of the original serum did not correlate with haemolytic activities of either IgM-RF or IgG-RF. PMID:984904

  1. Reprogramming with defined factors: from induced pluripotency to induced transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Masip, Manuel; Veiga, Anna; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Simón, Carlos

    2010-11-01

    Ever since work on pluripotency induction was originally published, reporting the reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) by the ectopic expression of the four transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, high expectations regarding their potential use for regenerative medicine have emerged. Very recently, the direct conversion of fibroblasts into functional neurons with no prior pluripotent stage has been described. Interconversion between adult cells from ontogenically different lineages by an induced transdifferentiation process based on the overexpression of a cocktail of transcription factors, while avoiding transition through an embryonic stem cell-like state, provides a new impetus in the field of regenerative medicine. Here, we review the induced reprogramming of somatic cells with defined factors and analyze their potential clinical use. Beginning with induced pluripotency, we summarize the initial objections including their extremely low efficiency and the risk of tumor generation. We also review recent reports describing iPS cells' capacity to generate viable offspring through tetraploid complementation, the most restrictive pluripotency criterion. Finally, we explore the available evidence for 'induced transdifferentiated cells' as a novel tool for adult cell fate modification.

  2. [IgA rheumatoid factor formation in connection with complement activation and circulating immune complexes in chronic polyarthritis].

    PubMed

    Kullich, W

    1994-01-01

    The IgA-rheumatoid factor (IgA-RF) as well as the complement component C3a in plasma and serum levels of circulating immune complexes (CIC) (C1q binding assay and Raji Cell Replacement assay) were measured with enzyme immunoassays in 81 patients with established rheumatoid arthritis. The serum levels of the complement component C3a were found significantly higher (p < 0.02) in the cases with high IgA-RF (> 6 AU/ml) than in those with low IgA-RF. Distinct significant correlations (r = 0.38; p < 0.001) were observed between production of IgA-RF and activation of the complement fragment C3a, which might be associated with production of antibodies and with complement activation accompanying inflammatory processes. A weaker correlation between CIC and IgA-RF-levels indicates CIC not to be closely related to the production of IgA-RF in the examined R.A.-patients. However, an indirect connection by the way of inflammation and activation of T-cells is possible.

  3. MASP-1 Induces a Unique Cytokine Pattern in Endothelial Cells: A Novel Link between Complement System and Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Péter K.; Kajdácsi, Erika; Megyeri, Márton; Dobó, József; Doleschall, Zoltán; Futosi, Krisztina; Tímár, Csaba I.; Mócsai, Attila; Makó, Veronika; Gál, Péter; Cervenak, László

    2014-01-01

    Microbial infection urges prompt intervention by the immune system. The complement cascade and neutrophil granulocytes are the predominant contributors to this immediate anti-microbial action. We have previously shown that mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1), the most abundant enzyme of the complement lectin pathway, can induce p38-MAPK activation, NFkappaB signaling, and Ca2+-mobilization in endothelial cells. Since neutrophil chemotaxis and transmigration depends on endothelial cell activation, we aimed to explore whether recombinant MASP-1 (rMASP-1) is able to induce cytokine production and subsequent neutrophil chemotaxis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). We found that HUVECs activated by rMASP-1 secreted IL-6 and IL-8, but not IL-1alpha, IL-1ra, TNFalpha and MCP-1. rMASP-1 induced dose-dependent IL-6 and IL-8 production with different kinetics. rMASP-1 triggered IL-6 and IL-8 production was regulated predominantly by the p38-MAPK pathway. Moreover, the supernatant of rMASP-1-stimulated HUVECs activated the chemotaxis of neutrophil granulocytes as an integrated effect of cytokine production. Our results implicate that besides initializing the complement lectin pathway, MASP-1 may activate neutrophils indirectly, via the endothelial cells, which link these effective antimicrobial host defense mechanisms. PMID:24489848

  4. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of the complement factor I (CpFI) in the whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Biao; Ke, Yan; Wang, Conghui; Ye, Boping

    2014-10-01

    Complement factor I (FI) is a plasma serine proteinase that plays an essential role in the modulation of the complement cascade. In the presence of substrate modulating cofactors (Factor H, C4bp, CR1, etc), FI cleaves the activation products of C3 (i.e. C3b) and C4 (i.e. C4b) to limit complement activity. In this study, the full length cDNA of factor I (CpFI) is isolated from the liver of the whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum). The CpFI cDNA is 2326 bp in length, encoding a protein of 671 amino acids, which shares 72-80% identity with FI molecules of other sharks, higher than the teleosts (37-40%) and mammals (44-47%). The sequence alignment and comparative analysis indicates the FI proteins are well conserved, with the typical modular architecture and identical active sites throughout vertebrate evolution, suggesting the conserved function. However, the additional sequence present between the leader peptide (LP) and the factor I membrane attack complex (FIMAC) domain in other fishes is also found in CpFI, which consists of two kind of tandem repeats. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that CpFI belongs to the elasmobranch clade, in parallel with the higher vertebrates, to form a sister taxa to teleosts. Expression analysis revealed that CpFI is ubiquitously distributed in a variety of tissues, with the constitutive expression in liver, which might reflect the species-specific distribution patterns of FI. Together with earlier reports, the presence of FI in various sharks might suggest the existence of a well-developed complement regulation mechanism in cartilaginous fish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Binding of human complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H to CRASP-1 orthologs of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Kraiczy, Peter; Rossmann, Evelyn; Brade, Volker; Simon, Markus M; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard

    2006-11-01

    The complement regulator-acquiring surface protein (CRASP)-1 is a member of the paralogous gene family gbb54 and the dominant FHL-1 and factor H binding protein of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.). It was shown recently that expression of BbCRASP-1 directly correlates with serum resistance of B. burgdorferi s.s. isolates. In the present study we have elucidated the putative potential of other members of the gbb54 paralogous family, including orthologs ZSA66, ZSA69, ZSA70, ZSA71, ZSA72 and ZSA73 of the European B. burgdorferi s.s. strain ZS7, to bind human FHL-1 and factor H. In spite of their overall similarity in protein sequence, between 47% and 67%, and the fact that the C-terminal region of ZSA69 shows 70% similarity with BbCRASP-1, none of the orthologous proteins was able to bind human FHL-1 and/or factor H. BbCRASP-1 is the only member of the paralogous gene family gbb54 that binds to human complement regulators, supporting the notion that BbCRASP-1 plays a critical role in evasion of complement by B. burgdorferi s.s. and thus may be helpful in the development of novel therapeutic strategies against Lyme borreliosis.

  6. Staphylococcal Ecb protein and host complement regulator factor H enhance functions of each other in bacterial immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Amdahl, Hanne; Jongerius, Ilse; Meri, Taru; Pasanen, Tanja; Hyvärinen, Satu; Haapasalo, Karita; van Strijp, Jos A; Rooijakkers, Suzan H; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2013-08-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing more than a tenth of all septicemia cases and often superficial and deep infections in various tissues. One of the immune evasion strategies of S. aureus is to secrete proteins that bind to the central complement opsonin C3b. One of these, extracellular complement binding protein (Ecb), is known to interfere directly with functions of C3b. Because C3b is also the target of the physiological plasma complement regulator, factor H (FH), we studied the effect of Ecb on the complement regulatory functions of FH. We show that Ecb enhances acquisition of FH from serum onto staphylococcal surfaces. Ecb and FH enhance mutual binding to C3b and also the function of each other in downregulating complement activation. Both Ecb and the C-terminal domains 19-20 of FH bind to the C3d part of C3b. We show that the mutual enhancing effect of Ecb and FH on binding to C3b depends on binding of the FH domain 19 to the C3d part of C3b next to the binding site of Ecb on C3d. Our results show that Ecb, FH, and C3b form a tripartite complex. Upon exposure of serum-sensitive Haemophilus influenzae to human serum, Ecb protected the bacteria, and this effect was enhanced by the addition of the C-terminal domains 19-20 of FH. This finding indicates that the tripartite complex formation could give additional protection to bacteria and that S. aureus is thereby able to use host FH and bacterial Ecb in a concerted action to eliminate C3b at the site of infection.

  7. Comparative analysis of novel complement-targeted inhibitors, miniFH, and the natural regulators Factor H and Factor H-like protein 1 reveal functional determinants of complement regulation

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Markus J.; Anliker, Markus; Höchsmann, Britta; Simmet, Thomas; Huber-Lang, Markus; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.; Barlow, Paul N.; Schmidt, Christoph Q.

    2015-01-01

    The serum proteins Factor H (FH), consisting of 20 complement control protein modules (CCPs), and its splice product Factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1; consisting of CCPs 1–7) are major regulators of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement activation. The engineered version of FH, miniFH, contains only the N- and C-terminal portions of FH linked by an optimized peptide and shows ~10-fold higher ex vivo potency. We explored the hypothesis that regulatory potency is enhanced by unmasking of a ligand-binding site in the C-terminal CCPs (19–20) that is cryptic in full-length native FH. Therefore we produced a FH variant lacking the central domains 10–15 (FHΔ10–15). To explore how avidity affects regulatory strength, we generated a duplicated version of miniFH, termed midiFH. We compared activities of FHΔ10–15 and midiFH to miniFH, FH and FHL-1. Relative to FH, FHΔ10–15 exhibited an altered binding profile toward C3 activation products and a 5-fold-enhanced complement regulation on PNH patient’s erythrocytes. Contrary to dogma, FHL-1 and FH exhibited equal regulatory activity, suggesting that the role of FHL-1 in AP regulation has been underestimated. Unexpectedly, a substantially increased avidity for complement opsonins, as seen in midiFH, did not potentiate the inhibitory potential on host cells. In conclusion, comparisons of engineered and native FH-based regulators have identified features that determine high AP regulatory activity on host cells. Unrestricted availability of FH CCPs 19–20 and an optimal spatial orientation between the N- and C-terminal FH regions are key. PMID:26643478

  8. Genetically Determined Partial Complement C4 Deficiency States Are Not Independent Risk Factors for SLE in UK and Spanish Populations

    PubMed Central

    Boteva, Lora; Morris, David L.; Cortés-Hernández, Josefina; Martin, Javier; Vyse, Timothy J.; Fernando, Michelle M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease. Complete deficiency of complement component C4 confers strong genetic risk for SLE. Partial C4 deficiency states have also shown association with SLE, but despite much effort over the last 30 years, it has not been established whether this association is primarily causal or secondary to long-range linkage disequilibrium. The complement C4 locus, located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region, exhibits copy-number variation (CNV) and C4 itself exists as two paralogs, C4A and C4B. In order to determine whether partial C4 deficiency is an independent genetic risk factor for SLE, we investigated C4 CNV in the context of HLA-DRB1 and MHC region SNP polymorphism in the largest and most comprehensive complement C4 study to date. Specifically, we genotyped 2,207 subjects of northern and southern European ancestry (1,028 SLE cases and 1,179 controls) for total C4, C4A, and C4B gene copy numbers, and the loss-of-function C4 exon 29 CT indel. We used multiple logistic regression to determine the independence of C4 CNV from known SNP and HLA-DRB1 associations. We clearly demonstrate that genetically determined partial C4 deficiency states are not independent risk factors for SLE in UK and Spanish populations. These results are further corroborated by the lack of association shown by the C4A exon 29 CT insertion in either cohort. Thus, although complete homozygous deficiency of complement C4 is one of the strongest genetic risk factors for SLE, partial C4 deficiency states do not independently predispose to the disease. PMID:22387014

  9. Targeted organ generation using Mixl1-inducible mouse pluripotent stem cells in blastocyst complementation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-15

    Generation of functional organs from patients' own cells is one of the ultimate goals of regenerative medicine. As a novel approach to creation of organs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), we employed blastocyst complementation in organogenesis-disabled animals and successfully generated PSC-derived pancreas and kidneys. Blastocyst complementation, which exploits the capacity of PSCs to participate in forming chimeras, does not, however, exclude contribution of PSCs to the development of tissues-including neural cells or germ cells-other than those specifically targeted by disabling of organogenesis. This fact provokes ethical controversy if human PSCs are to be used. In this study, we demonstrated that forced expression of Mix-like protein 1 (encoded by Mixl1) can be used to guide contribution of mouse embryonic stem cells to endodermal organs after blastocyst injection. We then succeeded in applying this method to generate functional pancreas in pancreatogenesis-disabled Pdx1 knockout mice using a newly developed tetraploid-based organ-complementation method. These findings hold promise for targeted organ generation from patients' own PSCs in livestock animals.

  10. Complement associated pathogenic mechanisms in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Erdem; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody (Ab) related myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). The most characteristic finding of muscle pathology in both MG and EAMG is the abundance of IgG and complement deposits at the nerve-muscle junction (NMJ), suggesting that AChR-Ab induces muscle weakness by complement pathway activation and consequent membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. This assumption has been supported with EAMG resistance of complement factor C3 knockout (KO), C4 KO and C5 deficient mice and amelioration of EAMG symptoms following treatment with complement inhibitors such as cobra venom factor, soluble complement receptor 1, anti-C1q, anti-C5 and anti-C6 Abs. Moreover, the complement inhibitor decay accelerating factor (DAF) KO mice exhibit increased susceptibility to EAMG. These findings have brought forward improvisation of novel therapy methods based on inhibition of classical and common complement pathways in MG treatment.

  11. Female Mice With an XY Sex Chromosome Complement Develop Severe Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Alsiraj, Yasir; Thatcher, Sean E; Charnigo, Richard; Chen, Kuey; Blalock, Eric; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A

    2017-01-24

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a deadly pathology with strong sexual dimorphism. Similar to humans, female mice exhibit far lower incidences of angiotensin II-induced AAAs than males. In addition to sex hormones, the X and Y sex chromosomes, and their unique complements of genes, may contribute to sexually dimorphic AAA pathology. Here, we defined the effect of female (XX) versus male (XY) sex chromosome complement on angiotensin II-induced AAA formation and rupture in phenotypically female mice. Female low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr) deficient mice with an XX or XY sex chromosome complement were infused with angiotensin II for 28 days to induce AAAs. Abdominal aortic lumen diameters were quantified by ultrasound, whereas AAA diameters were quantified at study end point. DNA microarrays were performed on abdominal aortas. To mimic males, female mice were administered a single dose of testosterone as neonates or as adults before angiotensin II infusions. Female Ldlr(-/-) deficient mice with an XX and XY sex chromosome complement had similar sex organ weights and low serum testosterone concentrations. Abdominal aortas from female XY mice selectively expressed Y chromosome genes, whereas genes known to escape X inactivation were higher in XX females. The majority of aortic gene differences in XY versus XX females fell within inflammatory pathways. AAA incidences doubled and aneurysms ruptured in XY females. AAAs from XY females exhibited inflammation, and plasma interleukin-1β concentrations were increased in XY females. Moreover, aortas from XY females had augmented matrix metalloproteinase activity and increased oxidative stress. Last, testosterone exposure applied chronically, or as a single bolus at postnatal day 1, markedly worsened AAA outcomes in XY in comparison with XX adult females. An XY sex chromosome complement in phenotypic females profoundly influenced aortic gene expression profiles and promoted AAA severity. When XY females were

  12. Alternative complement pathway of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus: molecular characterization and expression analysis of factors Bf/C2 and Df

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The complement system important in both innate and adaptive host defense against microbial infection in vertebrates. It contains three pathways: the classical, alternative, and lectin pathways. Complement component factors B and D are two crucial proteases in the alternative pathway. In this study,...

  13. Human pathogenic Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. resists complement-mediated killing by direct binding of immune regulators factor H and factor H-like protein 1.

    PubMed

    Herzberger, Pia; Siegel, Corinna; Skerka, Christine; Fingerle, Volker; Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; van Dam, Alje; Wilske, Bettina; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter

    2007-10-01

    Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. has recently been shown to be a novel human pathogenic genospecies that causes Lyme disease in Europe. In order to elucidate the immune evasion mechanisms of B. spielmanii, we compared the abilities of isolates obtained from Lyme disease patients and tick isolate PC-Eq17 to escape from complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Using a growth inhibition assay, we show that four B. spielmanii isolates, including PC-Eq17, are serum resistant, whereas a single isolate, PMew, was more sensitive to complement-mediated lysis. All isolates activated complement in vitro, as demonstrated by covalent attachment of C3 fragments; however, deposition of the later activation products C6 and C5b-9 was restricted to the moderately serum-resistant isolate PMew and the serum-sensitive B. garinii isolate G1. Furthermore, serum adsorption experiments revealed that all B. spielmanii isolates acquired the host alternative pathway regulators factor H and factor H-like protein (FHL-1) from human serum. Both complement regulators retained their factor I-mediated C3b inactivation activities when bound to spirochetes. In addition, two distinct factor H and FHL-1 binding proteins, BsCRASP-1 and BsCRASP-2, were identified, which we estimated to be approximately 23 to 25 kDa in mass. A further factor H binding protein, BsCRASP-3, was found exclusively in the tick isolate, PC-Eq17. This is the first report describing an immune evasion mechanism utilized by B. spielmanii sp. nov., and it demonstrates the capture of human immune regulators to resist complement-mediated killing.

  14. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins.

  15. Complement factor H and age-related macular degeneration: the role of glycosaminoglycan recognition in disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon J; Bishop, Paul N; Day, Anthony J

    2010-10-01

    AMD (age-related macular degeneration) is the major cause of blindness in the western world, associated with the formation of extracellular deposits called drusen in the macula, i.e. the central region of the retina. These drusen contain cellular debris and proteins, including components of the complement system such as the regulator CFH (complement factor H); dysregulation of complement is thought to play a major role in the development of AMD. CFH acts through its capacity to recognize polyanionic structures [e.g. sulfated GAGs (glycosaminoglycans)] found on host tissues, and thereby inactivates any C3b that becomes deposited. Importantly, a common polymorphism in CFH (Y402H) has been strongly associated with an increased risk of AMD. This polymorphism, which causes a tyrosine to histidine coding change, has been shown to alter the binding of CFH to sulfated GAGs, as well as to other ligands including C-reactive protein, necrotic cells and bacterial coat proteins. Of these, the change in the GAG-recognition properties of CFH is likely to be of most significance to AMD. Recent research has revealed that the disease-associated 402H allotype interacts less well (compared with 402Y) with binding sites within the macula (e.g. Bruch's membrane), where the GAGs heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate play a major role in mediating the interaction with CFH. Reduced binding of the 402H allotype could result in impaired regulation of complement leading to chronic local inflammation that may contribute to the accumulation of drusen and thus the initiation, development and progression of AMD.

  16. Complementation Plasmids, Inducible Gene-Expression Systems, and Reporters for Staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    A cornucopia of methods and molecular tools is available for genetic modification of staphylococci, as shown for at least ten different species to date (Prax et al. Microbiology 159:421-435, 2013). This chapter reviews a number of frequently used vectors for complementation purposes that usually replicate in E. coli and staphylococci and differ in parameters including copy number, mode of replication, and sequence length. Systems for the artificial control of gene expression are described that are modulated by low-molecular-weight effectors such as metal cations, carbohydrates, and antibiotics. Finally, the usefulness of reporter proteins that exhibit enzymatic or autofluorescent characteristics in staphylococci is highlighted.

  17. The Effect of Lutein Supplementation on Blood Plasma Levels of Complement Factor D, C5a and C3d

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Kijlstra, Aize; van der Veen, Rob L. P.; Makridaki, Maria; Murray, Ian J.; Berendschot, Tos T. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Lutein is selectively taken up by the primate retina and plays an important role as a filter for harmful blue light and as an antioxidant. Recent studies have shown that lutein has systemic anti-inflammatory properties. Dietary lutein has been associated with reduced circulating levels of inflammatory biomarkers such as CRP and sICAM. Whether lutein also affects activation of the complement system has not yet been addressed and was the purpose of the study described here. Seventy-two subjects with signs of early macular degeneration were randomly assigned to receive either a 10 mg lutein supplement or a placebo during one year. EDTA blood samples were collected at 0, 4, 8 and 12 months. Complement factor D (CFD), a rate limiting component of the alternative pathway of complement activation and the complement activation products C5a and C3d were determined in the plasma samples by ELISA. A significant 0.11 µg/ml monthly decrease in plasma CFD concentration was observed in the lutein group (p<0.001), resulting in a 51% decrease from 2.3 µg/ml at baseline to 1.0 µg/ml at 12 months. The C5a concentration showed a significant 0.063ng/ml monthly decrease in the lutein group (p<0.001) resulting in a 36% decrease from 2.2ng/ml at baseline to 1.6ng/ml at 12 months. The C3d concentration showed a significant 0.19µg/ml monthly decrease in the lutein group (p=0.004) that gave rise to a 9% decrease from 15.4µg/ml at baseline to 14.4µg/ml at 12 months. In the placebo group we found a significant 0.04 µg/ml monthly decrease in plasma CFD concentration, whereas no changes were observed for C5a and C3d. Lutein supplementation markedly decreases circulating levels of the complement factors CFD, C5a and C3d levels, which might allow a simple method to control this inflammatory pathway of the innate immune system. PMID:24009749

  18. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Malm, Sven; Jusko, Monika; Eick, Sigrun; Potempa, Jan; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI) is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and Factor H (FH). Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125)I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  19. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like proteins interact with human complement regulators factor H, FHL-1, FHR-1, and C4BP.

    PubMed

    Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Silva, Ludmila Bezerra da; Monaris, Denize; Abreu, Patrícia Antônia Estima; Strobel, Stefanie; Józsi, Mihály; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2012-03-15

    Leptospira, the causative agent of leptospirosis, interacts with several host molecules, including extracellular matrix components, coagulation cascade proteins, and human complement regulators. Here we demonstrate that acquisition of factor H (FH) on the Leptospira surface is crucial for bacterial survival in the serum and that these spirochetes, besides interacting with FH, FH related-1, and C4b binding protein (C4BP), also acquire FH like-1 from human serum. We also demonstrate that binding to these complement regulators is mediated by leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins, previously shown to interact with fibronectin, laminin, collagen, elastin, tropoelastin, and fibrinogen. Factor H binds to Lig proteins via short consensus repeat domains 5 and 20. Competition assays suggest that FH and C4BP have distinct binding sites on Lig proteins. Moreover, FH and C4BP bound to immobilized Ligs display cofactor activity, mediating C3b and C4b degradation by factor I. In conclusion, Lig proteins are multifunctional molecules, contributing to leptospiral adhesion and immune evasion.

  20. Target deletion of complement component 9 attenuates antibody-mediated hemolysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Ju, Jiyu; Lin, Zhijuan; Xiao, Weiling; Li, Xiaofang; Zhuang, Baoxiang; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Xiangyu; Ma, Chao; Su, Weiliang; Wang, Yuqi; Qin, Xuebin; Liang, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Terminal complement membrane attack complex (MAC) formation is induced initially by C5b, followed by the sequential condensation of the C6, C7, C8. Polymerization of C9 to the C5b-8 complex forms the C5b-9 (or MAC). The C5b-9 forms lytic or non lytic pores in the cell membrane destroys membrane integrity. The biological functionalities of MAC has been previously investigated by using either the mice deficient in C5 and C6, or MAC’s regulator CD59. However, there is no available C9 deficient mice (mC9−/−) for directly dissecting the role of C5b-9 in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Further, since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes form non lytic pore, it may also plays biological functionality. To better understand the role of terminal complement cascades, here we report a successful generation of mC9−/−. We demonstrated that lack of C9 attenuates anti-erythrocyte antibody-mediated hemolysis or LPS-induced acute shock. Further, the rescuing effect on the acute shock correlates with the less release of IL-1β in mC9−/−, which is associated with suppression of MAC-mediated inflammasome activation in mC9−/−. Taken together, these results not only confirm the critical role of C5b-9 in complement-mediated hemolysis and but also highlight the critical role of C5b-9 in inflammasome activation. PMID:27444648

  1. Structural characterization of CspZ, a complement regulator factor H and FHL-1 binding protein from Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Brangulis, Kalvis; Petrovskis, Ivars; Kazaks, Andris; Bogans, Janis; Otikovs, Martins; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Ranka, Renate; Tars, Kaspars

    2014-06-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease and is found in two different types of hosts in nature - Ixodes ticks and various mammalian organisms. To initiate disease and survive in mammalian host organisms, B. burgdorferi must be able to transfer to a new host, proliferate, attach to different tissue and resist the immune response. To resist the host's immune response, B. burgdorferi produces at least five different outer surface proteins that can bind complement regulator factor H (CFH) and/or factor H-like protein 1 (CFHL-1). The crystal structures of two uniquely folded complement binding proteins, which belong to two distinct gene families and are not found in other bacteria, have been previously described. The crystal structure of the CFH and CFHL-1 binding protein CspZ (also known as BbCRASP-2 or BBH06) from B. burgdorferi, which belongs to a third gene family, is reported in this study. The structure reveals that the overall fold is different from the known structures of the other complement binding proteins in B. burgdorferi or other bacteria; this structure does not resemble the fold of any known protein deposited in the Protein Data Bank. The N-terminal part of the CspZ protein forms a four-helix bundle and has features similar to the FAT domain (focal adhesion targeting domain) and a related domain found in the vinculin/α-catenin family. By combining our findings from the crystal structure of CspZ with previous mutagenesis studies, we have identified a likely binding surface on CspZ for CFH and CFHL-1. © 2014 FEBS.

  2. The effect of photo-oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine on complement factor H expression in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ling-Ing; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Liu, Catherine Jui-Ling; Yen, May-Yung; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2011-08-29

    Genetic variation in complement factor H (CFH) has been implicated as a major risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The reduction in CFH amount or its complement-modulating activity may lead to inadequate control of complement-driven inflammation at the outer retina. We explored the effect of photo-oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine on the expression of CFH in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Cultured human RPE cells were exposed to blue light in the presence of interferon-γ (IFN-γ). CFH expression in cell lysate was examined by Western blot and the secretory CFH in culture medium was analyzed by ELISA. RPE cells were treated with vitamin C and exogenous superoxide dismutase mimetic (Tempol) before photo-oxidative treatments. The intracellular reactive oxygen species were examined by flow cytometry. IFN-γ increased CFH expression in RPE and the expression was suppressed significantly under concomitant blue light illumination. The secretory CFH level also decreased significantly under blue light illumination, which was related to the decreased intracellular mRNA and protein expressions of CFH. The suppression was mediated through an oxidative mechanism, and was particularly related to superoxide anion generation. The suppression of CFH expression in RPE under blue light illumination was abrogated by vitamin C and Tempol. Photo-oxidative stress reduces the ability of IFN-γ to increase CFH expression in RPE. Apart from reducing the oxidative damage, vitamin C reduces the suppression of CFH under photo-oxidative stress. These results suggest a new perspective of the interaction between oxidative stress and inflammation, and provide a potential novel treatment strategy for age-related macular degeneration.

  3. Engineering a ribozyme cleavage-induced split fluorescent aptamer complementation assay

    PubMed Central

    Ausländer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Hürlemann, Samuel; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hammerhead ribozymes are self-cleaving RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression in living cells. Their cleavage performance is strongly influenced by intra-molecular loop–loop interactions, a feature not readily accessible through modern prediction algorithms. Ribozyme engineering and efficient implementation of ribozyme-based genetic switches requires detailed knowledge of individual self-cleavage performances. By rational design, we devised fluorescent aptamer-ribozyme RNA architectures that allow for the real-time measurement of ribozyme self-cleavage activity in vitro. The engineered nucleic acid molecules implement a split Spinach aptamer sequence that is made accessible for strand displacement upon ribozyme self-cleavage, thereby complementing the fluorescent Spinach aptamer. This fully RNA-based ribozyme performance assay correlates ribozyme cleavage activity with Spinach fluorescence to provide a rapid and straightforward technology for the validation of loop–loop interactions in hammerhead ribozymes. PMID:26939886

  4. Complement 5a induces in vivo synthesis of cysteinyl leukotrienes in rats.

    PubMed

    Gulbins, E; Siow, Y; Vitale, G C

    1993-04-01

    The complement derived anaphylatoxin complement 5a (C5a) is suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of various types of diseases including endotoxic or anaphylactic shock. Studies in our laboratory demonstrated a marked and sustained reduction in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate after infusion of a low dose of recombinant C5a (rC5a). Renal rC5a effects were inhibited by leukotriene (LT) and thromboxane antagonists suggesting that the effects were mediated by LT. To elucidate the mechanisms of C5a effects, we monitored the biliary excretion rate of the stable metabolite, N-acetyl-LTE4, by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Rats in the experimental group were administered rC5a intravenously at 0.5 micrograms/min for 10 min. Biliary N-acetyl-LTE4 excretion was significantly increased following rC5a infusion, 0.03 ng/microliters bile to 0.129 ng/microliters. The bile flow in the experimental group was reduced about 39% by rC5a, while bile flow of the control group increased by 20% during the observation period. Infusion of rC5a resulted in an increase of arterial hematocrit from 44.7% to 48.7%, whereas blood pressure was not significantly altered in experimental and control groups. Our results suggest the in vivo effects of C5a to be mediated by cysteinyl leukotrienes, which may be important in the pathogenesis of septic, anaphylactic or traumatic shock.

  5. Association among Complement Factor H Autoantibodies, Deletions of CFHR, and the Risk of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Fan, Meng-Nan; Yang, Min; Lu, Chao; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Ma, Le

    2016-12-05

    To evaluate the association among complement factor H-related (CFHRs) gene deficiency, complement factor H (CFH) autoantibodies, and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) susceptibility. EMBASE, PubMed, and the ISI Web of Science databases were searched for all eligible studies on the relationship among CFHRs deficiency, anti-FH autoantibodies, and aHUS risk. Eight case-control studies with 927 cases and 1182 controls were included in this study. CFHR1 deficiency was significantly associated with an increased risk of aHUS (odds ratio (OR) = 3.61, 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.96, 6.63, p < 0.001), while no association was demonstrated in individuals with only CFHR1/R3 deficiency (OR = 1.32, 95% CI, 0.50, 3.50, p = 0.56). Moreover, a more significant correlation was observed in people with both FH-anti autoantibodies and CFHR1 deficiency (OR = 11.75, 95% CI, 4.53, 30.44, p < 0.001) in contrast to those with only CFHR1 deficiency. In addition, the results were essentially consistent among subgroups stratified by study quality, ethnicity, and gene detection methods. The present meta-analysis indicated that CFHR1 deletion was significantly associated with the risk of aHUS, particularly when combined with anti-FH autoantibodies, indicating that potential interactions among CFHR1 deficiency and anti-FH autoantibodies might impact the risk of aHUS.

  6. Targeting complement in therapy.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M

    2001-04-01

    With increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases, strategies that interfere with its deleterious action have become a major focus in pharmacological research. Endogenous soluble complement inhibitors (C1 inhibitor, recombinant soluble complement receptor 1, antibodies) blocking key proteins of the cascade reaction, neutralizing the action of the complement-derived anaphylatoxin C5a, or interfering with complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD18/11b)-mediated adhesion of inflammatory cells to the vascular endothelium have successfully been tested in various animal models over the past years. Promising results consequently led to clinical trials. Furthermore, incorporation of membrane-bound complement regulators (decay-accelerating factor (CD55), membrane co-factor protein (CD46), CD59) in transgenic animals has provided a major step forward in protecting xenografts from hyperacute rejection. At the same time, the poor contribution of complement to the antitumor response, which is caused by multiple resistance mechanisms that hamper the efficacy of antibody-based tumor therapy, is increasingly recognized and requires pharmacologic intervention. First attempts have now been made to interfere with the resistance mechanisms, thereby improving complement-mediated tumor cell destruction.

  7. Prostacyclin biosynthesis and reduced 5-HT uptake after complement-induced endothelial injury in the dog isolated lung.

    PubMed Central

    Bult, H.; Heiremans, J. J.; Herman, A. G.; Malcorps, C. M.; Peeters, F. A.

    1988-01-01

    1. Pulmonary prostacyclin (PGI2) biosynthesis was evaluated in relation to endothelial integrity before and after complement activation in isolated plasma-perfused lung lobes of the dog. 2. The plasma was activated with zymosan (ZAP, n = 4), yeast cells (YAP, n = 4) or yeast with 3 microM indomethacin (Indo + YAP, n = 3). Immunoreactive 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha (i-6-oxo-PGF1 alpha) and thromboxane B2 (iTXB2) were measured to monitor PGI2 and TXA2 biosynthesis. 3. The kinetic parameters Km and Vmax of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake were calculated on the basis of multiple indicator diffusion data to evaluate endothelial integrity. 4. YAP and ZAP induced a biphasic increase of the arterial perfusion pressure. The immediate pressure peak was partly mediated by TXA2 and the TXB2 was subsequently cleared by the lung. 5. The apparent Vmax of 5-HT uptake remained constant throughout the experiment. Thus, complement activation did not affect the number of endothelial 5-HT carrier sites available to the perfusate. 6. The apparent Km of 5-HT uptake was enhanced in 9 lungs exposed to activated plasma complement for 20 min. This decreased affinity for 5-HT probably reflects endothelial injury. It was transient as the apparent Km had returned to the baseline value after 60 min. 7. PGI2 clearance and biosynthesis were virtually absent in the control period. PGI2 formation increased drastically after infusion of ZAP or YAP and was proportional to the endothelial injury expressed as elevated Km or pulmonary oedema. Thus, PGI2 biosynthesis might be a marker of severe endothelial distress. PMID:3291998

  8. Factor H and factor H-related protein 1 bind to human neutrophils via complement receptor 3, mediate attachment to Candida albicans, and enhance neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Losse, Josephine; Zipfel, Peter F; Józsi, Mihály

    2010-01-15

    The host complement system plays an important role in protection against infections. Several human-pathogenic microbes were shown to acquire host complement regulators, such as factor H (CFH), that downregulate complement activation at the microbial surface and protect the pathogens from the opsonic and lytic effects of complement. Because CFH can also bind to host cells, we addressed the role of CFH and CFH-related proteins as adhesion ligands in host-pathogen interactions. We show that the CFH family proteins CFH, CFH-like protein 1 (CFHL1), CFH-related protein (CFHR) 1, and CFHR4 long isoform bind to human neutrophil granulocytes and to the opportunistic human-pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Two major binding sites, one within the N-terminus and one in the C-terminus of CFH, were found to mediate binding to neutrophils. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18; alpha(M)beta2 integrin) was identified as the major cellular receptor on neutrophils for CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1, but not for CFHR4 long isoform. CFH and CFHR1 supported cell migration. Furthermore, CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1 increased attachment of neutrophils to C. albicans. Adhesion of neutrophils to plasma-opsonized yeasts was reduced when CFH binding was inhibited by specific Abs or when using CFH-depleted plasma. Yeast-bound CFH and CFHR1 enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species and the release of the antimicrobial protein lactoferrin by human neutrophils, and resulted in a more efficient killing of the pathogen. Thus, CFH and CFHR1, when bound on the surface of C. albicans, enhance antimicrobial activity of human neutrophils.

  9. Expression of two molecular forms of the complement decay-accelerating factor in the eye and lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Lass, J H; Walter, E I; Burris, T E; Grossniklaus, H E; Roat, M I; Skelnik, D L; Needham, L; Singer, M; Medof, M E

    1990-06-01

    Complement is present in ocular fluids, but the molecular mechanism(s) restricting its activation to exogenous targets and not to autologous ocular cells are currently unknown. To clarify how this control is achieved, monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based techniques were used to examine the eye, the lacrimal gland, and ocular fluids for the decay-accelerating factor (DAF), a membrane regulatory protein which protects blood cells from autologous complement activation on their surfaces. Immunohistochemical staining of tissue sections revealed DAF antigen on corneal and conjunctival epithelia, corneal endothelium, trabecular meshwork, and retina, as well as on lacrimal gland acinar cells and in adjacent lumens. By flow cytometry, cultures of conjunctival epithelium exhibited the highest DAF levels and levels on corneal epithelium greater than corneal endothelium greater than conjunctival fibroblasts. Biosynthetic labeling of corneal endothelium yielded de novo DAF protein with an apparent molecular weight (Mr) of 75 kD, approximating that of blood cell DAF protein, and digestions of conjunctival epithelium with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), an enzyme which cleaves glycoinositolphospholipid membrane anchors, released approximately 70% of the ocular surface DAF protein similar to leukocyte surface DAF protein. Quantitations of DAF by radioimmunometric assay employing mAbs against two DAF epitopes revealed 325 ng/ml (n = 12), 4.8 ng/ml (n = 10), and 22.0 ng/ml (n = 8) of soluble DAF antigen in tears, aqueous humor, and vitreous humor, respectively. Western blot analyses of the tear DAF antigen revealed two DAF forms, one with an apparent Mr of 72 kD resembling membrane DAF forms in other sites, and a second with an apparent Mr of 100 kD, which is previously undescribed. Since DAF activity is essential physiologically in protecting blood cells from autologous complement attack, the identification of DAF on the ocular surface, intraocularly, in the

  10. Plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor does not prevent mechanical ventilation-induced pulmonary complement activation in a rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de Beer, F M; Aslami, H; Hoeksma, J; van Mierlo, G; Wouters, D; Zeerleder, S; Roelofs, J J T H; Juffermans, N P; Schultz, M J; Lagrand, W K

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical ventilation has the potential to cause lung injury, and the role of complement activation herein is uncertain. We hypothesized that inhibition of the complement cascade by administration of plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) prevents ventilation-induced pulmonary complement activation, and as such attenuates lung inflammation and lung injury in a rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Forty hours after intratracheal challenge with S. pneumoniae causing pneumonia rats were subjected to ventilation with lower tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or high tidal volumes without PEEP, after an intravenous bolus of C1-INH (200 U/kg) or placebo (saline). After 4 h of ventilation blood, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were collected. Non-ventilated rats with S. pneumoniae pneumonia served as controls. While ventilation with lower tidal volumes and PEEP slightly amplified pneumonia-induced complement activation in the lungs, ventilation with higher tidal volumes without PEEP augmented local complement activation more strongly. Systemic pre-treatment with C1-INH, however, failed to alter ventilation-induced complement activation with both ventilation strategies. In accordance, lung inflammation and lung injury were not affected by pre-treatment with C1-INH, neither in rats ventilated with lower tidal volumes and PEEP, nor rats ventilated with high tidal volumes without PEEP. Ventilation augments pulmonary complement activation in a rat model of S. pneumoniae pneumonia. Systemic administration of C1-INH, however, does not attenuate ventilation-induced complement activation, lung inflammation, and lung injury.

  11. Complement C5a regulates IL-17 by affecting the crosstalk between DC and gammadelta T cells in CLP-induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruonan; Wang, Renxi; Han, Gencheng; Wang, Jianan; Chen, Guojiang; Wang, Liyan; Li, Xia; Guo, Renfeng; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan

    2010-04-01

    Complement 5a (C5a) and Interleukin-17 (IL-17) are two important inflammatory mediators in sepsis. Here we studied the mechanisms underlying regulation of IL-17 by anaphylatoxin C5a. We found that C5a blockade increased the survival rate of mice following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis and decreased IL-17 expression in vivo. IL-17 was secreted mainly by gammadelta T cells in this model. Importantly, our data suggest that C5a participates in the regulation of IL-17 secretion by gammadelta T cells. Dendritic cells (DC) were found to act as a "bridge" between C5a and gammadelta T cells in a mechanism involving IL-6 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). These results imply that C5a affects the crosstalk between DC and gammadelta T cells during sepsis development, and this may result in a large production of inflammatory mediators such as IL-17.

  12. Revertants and Secondary arom-2 Mutants Induced in Non-Complementing Mutants in the arom Gene Cluster of Neurospora Crassa

    PubMed Central

    Case, Mary E.; Giles, Norman H.

    1974-01-01

    Extensive genetical and biochemical studies have been performed with revertants and secondary arom-2 mutants induced in two different primary non-complementing mutants which map within the arom gene cluster of Neurospora crassa. These studies indicate that mutant M54 but not M25 can revert by super-suppressor mutations in unlinked genes, thus confirming previous evidence that M54 contains a nonsense codon. At least three new super suppressors of M54 have been detected. All four super suppressors (including one previously detected) when combined with M54 result in high levels of all five of the arom enzymic activities in the form of arom multienzyme complexes very similar to (but not necessarily identical with) that in wild type (WT).—Evidence has also been obtained that the two non-complementing mutants can yield revertants which appear to result from true back mutations and produce arom aggregates essentially indistinguishable from that of WT. In addition, M25, but not M54, when plated on quinic acid yields revertants (secondary mutants) some of which are phenotypically indistinguishable from arom-2 primary mutants and others of which, although also mapping within the arom-2 gene, exhibit unusual properties. Genetic evidence indicates that the M25 secondary mutants are localized within the arom-2 gene, but that they arise from mutational events more complex than ones resulting in single base pair changes in the M25 codon.—The recovery of secondary arom-2 mutants as revertants of non-complementing arom mutants provides strong evidence, independent of earlier recombination data, that non-complementing arom mutants are located within the arom-2 structural gene of the arom gene cluster. In addition, the occurrence and characteristics of these secondary arom-2 mutants provide strong evidence, independent of the results with nonsense suppressors, that the arom gene cluster is transcribed, beginning with the arom-2 gene, as a single polycistronic messenger

  13. Extracellular stimulation of VSIG4/complement receptor Ig suppresses intracellular bacterial infection by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang H; Choi, Beom K; Kim, Young H; Han, Chungyong; Oh, Ho S; Lee, Don G; Kwon, Byoung S

    2016-09-01

    VSIG4/CRIg (V-set and immunoglobulin domain containing 4) is a transmembrane receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is expressed specifically on macrophages and mature dendritic cells. VSIG4 signaling accelerates phagocytosis of C3-opsonized bacteria, thereby efficiently clearing pathogens within macrophages. We found that VSIG4 signaling triggered by C3-opsonized Listeria (opLM) or by agonistic anti-VSIG4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) induced macrophages to form autophagosomes. VSIG4-induced autophagosomes were selectively colocalized with the intracellular LM while starvation-induced autophagosomes were not. Consistent with these results, the frequency of autophagosomes induced by infection with opLM was lower in VSIG4-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) than in WT BMDMs. Furthermore, when VSIG4 molecules were overexpressed in HeLa cells, which are non-macrophage cells, VSIG4 triggering led to efficient uptake of LM, autophagosome formation, and killing of the infected LM. These findings suggest that VSIG4 signaling not only promotes rapid phagocytosis and killing of C3-opsonized intracellular bacteria, as previously reported, but also induces autophagosome formation, eliminating the LM that have escaped from phagosomes. We conclude that VSIG4 signaling provides an anti-immune evasion mechanism that prevents the outgrowth of intracellular bacteria in macrophages.

  14. Serum proteomics of methamphetamine addicts and up-regulation of complement factor H related to methamphetamine addiction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wan-Lu; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Min; Zhou, Bing-Ying; Pu, Xiao-Ping

    2012-09-06

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a new type of drug with strong tolerance and addiction. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the processes of METH addiction are still not fully understood. To determine possible biomarkers and mechanisms that are responsible for METH addiction, a 2-DE based proteomics approach was used to evaluate the changes in protein expression of the serum in Chinese patients addicted to METH, which to the best of our knowledge is the first study of its kind. We identified five proteins that were markedly altered and complement factor H (CFH), the most stably up-expressed protein in each 2-DE experiment, was further studied using the rat conditioned place preference (CPP) model to detect any changes to its expression in the sera and six brain regions of interest. We report, for the first time, that CFH was positive related to METH addiction.

  15. Decay-accelerating factor (CD55), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored complement regulatory protein, is a receptor for several echoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Bergelson, J M; Chan, M; Solomon, K R; St John, N F; Lin, H; Finberg, R W

    1994-01-01

    Echoviruses are human pathogens belonging to the picornavirus family. Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored surface protein that protects cells from lysis by autologous complement. Anti-DAF monoclonal antibodies prevented echovirus 7 attachment to susceptible cells and protected cells from infection. HeLa cells specifically lost the capacity to bind echovirus 7 when treated with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, an enzyme that releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface, indicating that the virus receptor, like DAF, is a GPI-anchored protein. Although Chinese hamster ovary cells do not bind echovirus 7, transfectants expressing human DAF bound virus efficiently, and binding was prevented by pretreatment with an anti-DAF monoclonal antibody. Anti-DAF antibodies prevented infection by at least six echovirus serotypes. These results indicate that DAF is the receptor mediating attachment and infection by several echoviruses. Images PMID:7517044

  16. Inherited factor H dysfunction and complement-associated glomerulonephritis in renal grafts of first and second transplantations.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Suzuki, T; Ikezoe, M; Matsumoto, N; Chikamoto, H; Nagafuchi, H; Horita, S; Hattori, M; Shiraga, H; Tokumoto, T; Tanabe, K; Toma, H; Ito, K

    2001-01-01

    A 38-yr-old man with factor H dysfunction and unknown glomerular disease received first and second renal transplantations (Tx) from living-related donors. His examination showed a low percentage activity of factor H (31%). Factor H dysfunction has been known to be associated with type II or III membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), haemolytic uraemic syndrome and IgA GN. The first graft from his mother showed diffuse mesangial deposit of IgA. His son has had IgA GN and his data also revealed a low percentage activity of factor H (33%). He and his son both showed a low activity of C3. Moreover, his father, who was the donor of the second Tx, had a low percentage activity of factor H (25%), and presented with mild glomerular deposit of C3 at operation, while he has been healthy through his entire 67 yr of life. Each of them had a low percentage activity of factor H. These findings through three generations suggested the inheritance of factor H dysfunction. The patient presented with proteinuria 3 months after the first Tx. At the first biopsy 30 months after the first Tx, light microscopy revealed minor glomerular abnormalities with electron dense deposits in subepithelial, intramembranous and mesangial regions, while immunofluorescence showed massive glomerular deposits of C3. In the second biopsy 51 months after the first Tx, the glomerulonephritis developed mesangial proliferation and crescent formation, accompanied by more massive C3 deposit and intramembranous, mesangial and subepithelial dense deposits. He then required redialysis. At the second and third biopsies within 2 months after the second Tx, the renal graft showed similar findings to the first biopsy after the first Tx. He perhaps presented with a recurrence of complement-associated GN, showing an atypical form of MPGN after Tx. These findings suggest that factor H dysfunction may play an important role of a certain pathogenesis of GN.

  17. Complement Factor H Binds at Two Independent Sites to C-reactive Protein in Acute Phase Concentrations*♦

    PubMed Central

    Okemefuna, Azubuike I.; Nan, Ruodan; Miller, Ami; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Factor H (FH) regulates the activation of C3b in the alternative complement pathway, both in serum and at host cell surfaces. It is composed of 20 short complement regulator (SCR) domains. The Y402H polymorphism in FH is a risk factor for age-related macular degeneration. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein that binds Ca2+. We established the FH-CRP interaction using improved analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and synchrotron x-ray scattering methods. Physiological FH and CRP concentrations were used in 137 mm NaCl and 2 mm Ca2+, in which the occurrence of denatured CRP was avoided. In solution, AUC revealed FH-CRP binding. The FH-CRP interaction inhibited the formation of higher FH oligomers, indicating that CRP blocked FH dimerization sites at both SCR-6/8 and SCR-16/20. SPR confirmed the FH-CRP interaction and its NaCl concentration dependence upon using either immobilized FH or CRP. The SCR-1/5 fragment of FH did not bind to CRP. In order of increasing affinity, SCR-16/20, SCR-6/8 (His-402), and SCR-6/8 (Tyr-402) fragments bound to CRP. X-ray scattering showed that FH became more compact when binding to CRP, which is consistent with CRP binding at two different FH sites. We concluded that FH and CRP bind at elevated acute phase concentrations of CRP in physiological buffer. The SCR-16/20 site is novel and indicates the importance of the FH-CRP interaction for both age-related macular degeneration and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:19850925

  18. Functional characterization of BbCRASP-2, a distinct outer membrane protein of Borrelia burgdorferi that binds host complement regulators factor H and FHL-1.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Kristina; Corvey, Carsten; Skerka, Christine; Kirschfink, Michael; Karas, Michael; Brade, Volker; Miller, Jennifer C; Stevenson, Brian; Wallich, Reinhard; Zipfel, Peter F; Kraiczy, Peter

    2006-09-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the aetiological agent of Lyme disease, employs sophisticated means to survive in diverse mammalian hosts. Recent studies demonstrated that acquisition of complement regulators factor H and factor H-like protein-1 (FHL-1) allows spirochetes to resist complement-mediated killing. Serum-resistant B. burgdorferi express up to five distinct complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs) that bind factor H and/or FHL-1. In this study we have identified and characterized one of those B. burgdorferi proteins, named BbCRASP-2. BbCRASP-2 is distinct from the four previously identified factor H/FHL-1-binding CRASPs of B. burgdorferi strains. The single copy of the gene encoding BbCRASP-2, cspZ, is located on the linear plasmid lp28-3. BbCRASP-2 is highly divergent from the factor H/FHL-1-binding protein BbCRASP-1 and from members of the factor H-binding Erp (OspE/F-related) protein family. Peptide mapping analysis revealed that the factor H/FHL-1 binding site is discontinuous and it was found that C-terminal truncations abrogate factor H and FHL-1 binding. The predominant BbCRASP-2 binding site of both host complement regulators was mapped to the short consensus repeat 7 (SCR 7). Factor H and FHL-1 bound to BbCRASP-2 maintain cofactor activity for factor I-mediated C3b inactivation and accelerate the decay of the C3 convertase. Expression of BbCRASP-2 in serum-sensitive B. burgdorferi mutant B313 increased resistance to complement-mediated lysis. The characterization of BbCRASP-2 now provides a complete picture of the three diverse complement regulator-binding protein families of B. burgdorferi yielding new insights into the pathogenesis of Lyme disease.

  19. Generation of embryos directly from embryonic stem cells by tetraploid embryo complementation reveals a role for GATA factors in organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duncan, S A

    2005-12-01

    Gene targeting in ES (embryonic stem) cells has been used extensively to study the role of proteins during embryonic development. In the traditional procedure, this requires the generation of chimaeric mice by introducing ES cells into blastocysts and allowing them to develop to term. Once chimaeric mice are produced, they are bred into a recipient mouse strain to establish germline transmission of the allele of interest. Although this approach has been used very successfully, the breeding cycles involved are time consuming. In addition, genes that are essential for organogenesis often have roles in the formation of extra-embryonic tissues that are essential for early stages of post-implantation development. For example, mice lacking the GATA transcription factors, GATA4 or GATA6, arrest during gastrulation due to an essential role for these factors in differentiation of extra-embryonic endoderm. This lethality has frustrated the study of these factors during the development of organs such as the liver and heart. Extraembryonic defects can, however, be circumvented by generating clonal mouse embryos directly from ES cells by tetraploid complementation. Here, we describe the usefulness and efficacy of this approach using GATA factors as an example.

  20. Angioedema induced by a peptide derived from complement component C2

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Synthetic peptides that correspond to the COOH-terminal portion of C2b enhance vascular permeability in human and guinea pig skin. In human studies, 1 nmol of the most active peptide of 25-amino acid residues produced substantial local edema. A pentapeptide and a heptapeptide corresponding to the COOH-terminal sequence of C2b each induced contraction of estrous rat uterus in the micromole range; a peptide of 25 amino acids from this region induced a like contraction of rat uterus at a concentration 20-fold lower than the smaller peptides. The vascular permeability of guinea pig skin was enhanced by doses of these synthetic peptides in a similar fashion as that observed for the concentration of rat uterus. The induction of localized edema by intradermal injection in both the guinea pig and the human proceeds in the presence of antihistaminic drugs, suggesting that there is a histamine-independent component to the observed increase in vascular permeability. Cleavage of C2 with the enzymic subcomponent of C1, C1s, yields only C2a and C2b, and no small peptides, whereas cleavage of C2 with C1s and plasmin yields a set of small peptides. These plasmin- cleaved peptides are derived from the COOH terminus of C2b, and they induce the contraction of estrous rat uterus. PMID:2972793

  1. PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs from Physcomitrella patens are active in Arabidopsis and complement the pif quadruple mutant.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tengfei; Hiltbrunner, Andreas

    2017-10-06

    Phytochromes are red/far-red light receptors in plants involved in the regulation of growth and development in response to changes in the ambient environment. An important mode of action of plant phytochromes depends on their light-regulated relocation from the cytosol into the nucleus and control of gene expression; in addition, there is also evidence for a cytosolic or plasma membrane associated function of phytochromes in different species. The PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs (PIFs) form a subgroup of the bHLH transcription factors and it is well established that PIFs are key components of phytochrome downstream signalling in the nucleus of seed plants. Recent studies identified members of the PIF family also in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha and the moss Physcomitrella patens. Here, we show that all four potential PIF homologs from Physcomitrella have PIF function when expressed in the Arabidopsis pifQ mutant, which is deficient in multiple PIFs. We propose that PIFs are ancient components of nuclear phytochrome signalling that have emerged in the last common ancestor of today's land plants.

  2. Structures of native and complexed complement factor D: implications of the atypical His57 conformation and self-inhibitory loop in the regulation of specific serine protease activity.

    PubMed

    Jing, H; Babu, Y S; Moore, D; Kilpatrick, J M; Liu, X Y; Volanakis, J E; Narayana, S V

    1998-10-09

    Factor D is a serine protease essential for the activation of the alternative pathway of complement. The structures of native factor D and a complex formed with isatoic anhydride inhibitor were determined at resolution of 2.3 and 1.5 A, respectively, in an isomorphous monoclinic crystal form containing one molecule per asymmetric unit. The native structure was compared with structures determined previously in a triclinic cell containing two molecules with different active site conformations. The current structure shows greater similarity with molecule B in the triclinic cell, suggesting that this may be the dominant factor D conformation in solution. The major conformational differences with molecule A in the triclinic cell are located in four regions, three of which are close to the active site and include some of the residues shown to be critical for factor D catalytic activity. The conformational flexibility associated with these regions is proposed to provide a structural basis for the previously proposed substrate-induced reversible conformational changes in factor D. The high-resolution structure of the factor D/isatoic anhydride complex reveals the binding mode of the mechanism-based inhibitor. The higher specificity towards factor D over trypsin and thrombin is based on hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitor benzyl ring and the aliphatic side-chain of Arg218 that is salt bridged with Asp189 at the bottom of the primary specificity (S1) pocket. Comparison of factor D structural variants with other serine protease structures revealed the presence of a unique "self-inhibitory loop". This loop (214-218) dictates the resting-state conformation of factor D by (1) preventing His57 from adopting active tautomer conformation, (2) preventing the P1 to P3 residues of the substrate from forming anti-parallel beta-sheets with the non-specific substrate binding loop, and (3) blocking the accessibility of Asp189 to the positive1y charged P1 residue of the

  3. A novel correction factor based on extended volume to complement the conformity index

    PubMed Central

    Jin, F; Wang, Y; Wu, Y-Z

    2012-01-01

    Objective We propose a modified conformity index (MCI), based on extended volume, that improves on existing indices by correcting for the insensitivity of previous conformity indices to reference dose shape to assess the quality of high-precision radiation therapy and present an evaluation of its application. Methods In this paper, the MCI is similar to the conformity index suggested by Paddick (CIPaddick), but with a different correction factor. It is shown for three cases: with an extended target volume, with an extended reference dose volume and without an extended volume. Extended volume is generated by expanding the original volume by 0.1–1.1 cm isotropically. Focusing on the simulation model, measurements of MCI employ a sphere target and three types of reference doses: a sphere, an ellipsoid and a cube. We can constrain the potential advantage of the new index by comparing MCI with CIPaddick. The measurements of MCI in head–neck cancers treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy provide a window on its clinical practice. Results The results of MCI for a simulation model and clinical practice are presented and the measurements are corrected for limited spatial resolution. The three types of MCI agree with each other, and comparisons between the MCI and CIPaddick are also provided. Conclusion The results from our analysis show that the proposed MCI can provide more objective and accurate conformity measurement for high-precision radiation therapy. In combination with a dose–volume histogram, it will be a more useful conformity index. PMID:22128127

  4. The Meningococcal Vaccine Candidate GNA1870 Binds the Complement Regulatory Protein Factor H and Enhances Serum Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Madico, Guillermo; Welsch, Jo Anne; Lewis, Lisa A.; McNaughton, Anne; Perlman, David H.; Costello, Catherine E.; Ngampasutadol, Jutamas; Vogel, Ulrich; Granoff, Dan M.; Ram, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis binds factor H (fH), a key regulator of the alternative complement pathway. A ~29 kD fH-binding protein expressed in the meningococcal outer membrane was identified by mass spectrometry as GNA1870, a lipoprotein currently under evaluation as a broad-spectrum meningococcal vaccine candidate. GNA1870 was confirmed as the fH ligand on intact bacteria by 1) abrogation of fH binding upon deleting GNA1870, and 2) blocking fH binding by anti-GNA1870 mAbs. fH bound to whole bacteria and purified rGNA1870 representing each of the three variant GNA1870 families. We showed that the amount of fH binding correlated with the level of bacterial GNA1870 expression. High levels of variant 1 GNA1870 expression (either by allelic replacement of gna1870 or by plasmid-driven high-level expression) in strains that otherwise were low-level GNA1870 expressers (and bound low amounts of fH by flow cytometry) restored high levels of fH binding. Diminished fH binding to the GNA1870 deletion mutants was accompanied by enhanced C3 binding and increased killing of the mutants. Conversely, high levels of GNA1870 expression and fH binding enhanced serum resistance. Our findings support the hypothesis that inhibiting the binding of a complement down-regulator protein to the neisserial surface by specific Ab may enhance intrinsic bactericidal activity of the Ab, resulting in two distinct mechanisms of Ab-mediated vaccine efficacy. These data provide further support for inclusion of this molecule in a meningococcal vaccine. To reflect the critical function of this molecule, we suggest calling it fH-binding protein. PMID:16785547

  5. Complement factor H polymorphisms, renal phenotypes and age-related macular degeneration: the Blue Mountains Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Xing, C; Sivakumaran, T A; Wang, J J; Rochtchina, E; Joshi, T; Smith, W; Mitchell, P; Iyengar, S K

    2008-04-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a key regulator of the alternative pathway of complement and its mutations have been associated with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), suggesting that alternative pathway dysregulation is a common pathogenetic feature of these ocular and renal conditions. In this study we tested the hypothesis that common CFH variants have a global role in renal function in the Australian population-based Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES). We replicated the association of I62V with estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR; P=0.017) and creatinine clearance (CRCL; P=0.015). The minor allele of I62V (G) was deleterious: adding one copy of the G allele decreased GFR/CRCL by approximately 0.98 ml min(-1) per 1.73 m(2) (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.97, 0.99). We also replicated the association of Y402H with AMD and provided an unbiased estimate of population attributable risk (PAR). The minor allele of Y402H (C) was deleterious: the odds ratio estimate of CC genotype compared to TT was 1.87 (95% CI: 1.44, 2.45). The PAR of the C allele was estimated as 0.22 (95% CI: 0.15, 0.28). In summary, in the BMES population we confirmed the association between I62V and renal function, as measured by the estimated GFR, plus the association of Y402H with both early- and late-stage AMD.

  6. Two additional human serum proteins structurally related to complement factor H: Evidence for a family of factor H-related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Skerka, C.; Timmann, C.; Horstmann, R.D. ); Zipfel, P.F.

    1992-05-15

    The authors identify and characterize two human serum proteins with an apparent molecular mass of 24 and 29 kDa, which are antigenically related to complement factor H. These proteins represent differently glycosylated forms and are encoded by the same mRNA. The corresponding cDNA clone is 1051 bp in size and hybridized to a 1.4-kb mRNA derived from human liver. The predicted translation product represents a protein of 270 amino acids, which displays a hydrophobic leader sequence, indicative of a secreted protein. The secreted part is organized in four short consensus repeats (SCR) and has a single putative N-linked glycosylation site. The predicted sequence is closely related to that of the previously described factor H-related proteins h37 and h42, which are also derived from a 1.4-kb mRNA. Amino acid comparison of these factor H-related proteins showed identical leader sequences, an exchange of three amino acids in SCR1, identical sequences of SCR2, and a lower degree of homology between SCR3-4 (h24 and h29) and SCR4-5 (h37 and h42). In addition, SCR3-4 of h24 and h29 display homology to SCR19-20 of human complement factor H. The relatedness of structural elements of the factor H-related proteins h24, h29, h37, and h42 and of factor H, suggests a function common to these proteins and indicates the existence of a gene family consisting of factor H and at least two factor H-related genes. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. New Insights into Disease-Specific Absence of Complement Factor H Related Protein C in Mouse Models of Spontaneous Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Gaurav; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.; Banda, Nirmal K.

    2014-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) protein is an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement (AP) both in the fluid phase and on the surface of host cells. Mouse and human complement factor H-related (CFHR) proteins also belong to the fH family of plasma glycoproteins. The main goal of the current study was to compare the presence of mRNA for two mCFHR proteins in spontaneously developing autoimmune diseases in mice such as dense deposit disease (DDD), diabetes mellitus (DM), basal laminar deposits (BLD), collagen antibody-induced arthrits (CAIA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we report for the first time that the CFHR-C mRNA was universally absent in the liver from three strains of lupus-prone mice and in a diabetic-prone mouse strain. The mRNA levels (pg/ng) for CFH and CFHR-B in MRL-lpr/lpr, at 9 wks and 23 wks were 707.2 ± 44.4, 54.5 ± 5.75 and 729 ± 252.9, 74.04 ± 22.76 respectively. The mRNA levels for CFH and CFHR-B in NZB/NZW mice, at 9 wks and 54 wks were 579.9 ± 23.8, 58.8 ± 1.41 and 890.3 ± 135.2, 63.30 ± 9.2 respectively. CFHR-C protein was absent in the circulation of MRL-lpr/lpr and NZB/NZW mice before and after the development of lupus. Similarly, mRNA and protein for CFHR-C was universally absent in liver and other organs and in the circulation of NOD mice before and after the development of DM. In contrast, the mRNAs for CFH, CFHR-B and CFHR-C were universally present in the liver from mice with and without DDD, BLD and CAIA. The levels of mRNA for CFHR-B in mice with and without BLD were ~4 times higher than the mice with lupus. The complete absence of mRNA for CFHR-C in lupus and diabetic-prone strains indicates that polymorphic variation within the mouse CFHR family exists and raises the possibility that such variation contributes to lupus and diabetic phenotypes. PMID:25033230

  8. New insights into disease-specific absence of complement factor H related protein C in mouse models of spontaneous autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Gaurav; Ferreira, Viviana P; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Banda, Nirmal K

    2014-11-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) protein is an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement (AP) both in the fluid phase and on the surface of host cells. Mouse and human complement factor H-related (CFHR) proteins also belong to the fH family of plasma glycoproteins. The main goal of the current study was to compare the presence of mRNA for two mCFHR proteins in spontaneously developing autoimmune diseases in mice such as dense deposit disease (DDD), diabetes mellitus (DM), basal laminar deposits (BLD), collagen antibody-induced arthrits (CAIA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we report for the first time that the CFHR-C mRNA was universally absent in the liver from three strains of lupus-prone mice and in a diabetic-prone mouse strain. The mRNA levels (pg/ng) for CFH and CFHR-B in MRL-lpr/lpr, at 9 wks and 23 wks were 707.2±44.4, 54.5±5.75 and 729±252.9, 74.04±22.76, respectively. The mRNA levels for CFH and CFHR-B in NZB/NZW mice, at 9 wks and 54 wks were 579.9±23.8, 58.8±1.41 and 890.3±135.2, 63.30±9.2, respectively. CFHR-C protein was absent in the circulation of MRL-lpr/lpr and NZB/NZW mice before and after the development of lupus. Similarly, mRNA and protein for CFHR-C was universally absent in liver and other organs and in the circulation of NOD mice before and after the development of DM. In contrast, the mRNAs for CFH, CFHR-B and CFHR-C were universally present in the liver from mice with and without DDD, BLD and CAIA. The levels of mRNA for CFHR-B in mice with and without BLD were ∼4 times higher than the mice with lupus. The complete absence of mRNA for CFHR-C in lupus and diabetic-prone strains indicates that polymorphic variation within the mouse CFHR family exists and raises the possibility that such variation contributes to lupus and diabetic phenotypes.

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies against Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Acquire an Ability To Kill Tumor Cells through Complement Activation by Mutations That Selectively Facilitate the Hexamerization of IgG on Opsonized Cells.

    PubMed

    Tammen, Annalina; Derer, Stefanie; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Rösner, Thies; Kretschmer, Anna; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I; Valerius, Thomas

    2017-02-15

    Triggering of the complement cascade induces tumor cell lysis via complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and attracts and activates cytotoxic cells. It therefore represents an attractive mechanism for mAb in cancer immunotherapy development. The classical complement pathway is initiated by IgG molecules that have assembled into ordered hexamers after binding their Ag on the tumor cell surface. The requirements for CDC are further impacted by factors such as Ab epitope, valency, and affinity. Thus, mAb against well-validated solid tumor targets, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) that effectively induces complement activation and CDC, are highly sought after. The potency of complement activation by IgG Abs can be increased via several strategies. We identified single-point mutations in the Fc domain (e.g., E345K or E430G) enhancing Fc:Fc interactions, hexamer formation, and CDC after Ab binds cell-surface Ag. We show that EGFR Abs directed against clinically relevant epitopes can be converted into mAb with unprecedented CDC activity. Alternative strategies rely on increasing the affinity of monomeric IgG for C1q by introduction of a quadruple mutation at the C1q binding site or via generation of an IgG1/IgG3 chimera. In this study we show that selective enhancement of C1q binding via avidity modulation is superior to the unattended increase in C1q binding via affinity approaches, particularly for target cells with reduced EGFR expression levels. Improving Fc:Fc interactions of Ag-bound IgG therefore represents a highly promising and novel approach for potentiating the anti-tumor activity of therapeutic mAb against EGFR and potentially other tumor targets.

  10. Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell research trends: complementation and diversification of the field.

    PubMed

    Kobold, Sabine; Guhr, Anke; Kurtz, Andreas; Löser, Peter

    2015-05-12

    Research in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is rapidly developing and there are expectations that this research may obviate the need to use human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), the ethics of which has been a subject of controversy for more than 15 years. In this study, we investigated approximately 3,400 original research papers that reported an experimental use of these types of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and were published from 2008 to 2013. We found that research into both cell types was conducted independently and further expanded, accompanied by a growing intersection of both research fields. Moreover, an in-depth analysis of papers that reported the use of both cell types indicates that hESCs are still being used as a "gold standard," but in a declining proportion of publications. Instead, the expanding research field is diversifying and hESC and hiPSC lines are increasingly being used in more independent research and application areas.

  11. Elevated factor H-related protein 1 and factor H pathogenic variants decrease complement regulation in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tortajada, Agustín; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Anter, Jaouad; Segarra, Alfons; Espinosa, Mario; Blasco, Miquel; Roman, Elena; Marco, Helena; Quintana, Luis F; Gutiérrez, Josué; Pinto, Sheila; Lopez-Trascasa, Margarita; Praga, Manuel; Rodriguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2017-10-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN), a frequent cause of chronic kidney disease worldwide, is characterized by mesangial deposition of galactose-deficient IgA1-containing immune complexes. Complement involvement in IgAN pathogenesis is suggested by the glomerular deposition of complement components and the strong protection from IgAN development conferred by the deletion of the CFHR3 and CFHR1 genes (ΔCFHR3-CFHR1). Here we searched for correlations between clinical progression and levels of factor H (FH) and FH-related protein 1 (FHR-1) using well-characterized patient cohorts consisting of 112 patients with IgAN, 46 with non-complement-related autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), and 76 control individuals. Patients with either IgAN or ADPKD presented normal FH but abnormally elevated FHR-1 levels and FHR-1/FH ratios compared to control individuals. Highest FHR-1 levels and FHR-1/FH ratios are found in patients with IgAN with disease progression and in patients with ADPKD who have reached chronic kidney disease, suggesting that renal function impairment elevates the FHR-1/FH ratio, which may increase FHR-1/FH competition for activated C3 fragments. Interestingly, ΔCFHR3-CFHR1 homozygotes are protected from IgAN, but not from ADPKD, and we found five IgAN patients with low FH carrying CFH or CFI pathogenic variants. These data support a decreased FH activity in IgAN due to increased FHR-1/FH competition or pathogenic CFH variants. They also suggest that alternative pathway complement activation in patients with IgAN, initially triggered by galactose-deficient IgA1-containing immune complexes, may exacerbate in a vicious circle as renal function deterioration increase FHR-1 levels. Thus, a role of FHR-1 in IgAN pathogenesis is to compete with complement regulation by FH. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Susceptibility to Invasive Meningococcal Disease: Polymorphism of Complement System Genes and Neisseria meningitidis Factor H Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Declan T.; Bourke, Thomas W.; Fairley, Derek J.; Borrow, Raymond; Shields, Michael D.; Zipfel, Peter F.; Hughes, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neisseria meningitidis can cause severe infection in humans. Polymorphism of Complement Factor H (CFH) is associated with altered risk of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). We aimed to find whether polymorphism of other complement genes altered risk and whether variation of N. meningitidis factor H binding protein (fHBP) affected the risk association. Methods We undertook a case-control study with 309 European cases and 5,200 1958 Birth Cohort and National Blood Service cohort controls. We used additive model logistic regression, accepting P<0.05 as significant after correction for multiple testing. The effects of fHBP subfamily on the age at infection and severity of disease was tested using the independent samples median test and Student’s T test. The effect of CFH polymorphism on the N. meningitidis fHBP subfamily was investigated by logistic regression and Chi squared test. Results Rs12085435 A in C8B was associated with odds ratio (OR) of IMD (0.35 [95% CI 0.19–0.67]; P = 0.03 after correction). A CFH haplotype tagged by rs3753396 G was associated with IMD (OR 0.56 [95% CI 0.42–0.76], P = 1.6x10−4). There was no bacterial load (CtrA cycle threshold) difference associated with carriage of this haplotype. Host CFH haplotype and meningococcal fHBP subfamily were not associated. Individuals infected with meningococci expressing subfamily A fHBP were younger than those with subfamily B fHBP meningococci (median 1 vs 2 years; P = 0.025). Discussion The protective CFH haplotype alters odds of IMD without affecting bacterial load for affected heterozygotes. CFH haplotype did not affect the likelihood of infecting meningococci having either fHBP subfamily. The association between C8B rs12085435 and IMD requires independent replication. The CFH association is of interest because it is independent of known functional polymorphisms in CFH. As fHBP-containing vaccines are now in use, relationships between CFH polymorphism and vaccine effectiveness and

  13. Phenotypic Characterization of Complement Factor H R1210C Rare Genetic Variant in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Daniela; Seddon, Johanna M

    2015-07-01

    The complement factor H R1210C rare variant confers the strongest genetic risk for age-related macular degeneration and earlier age at onset; however, its associated phenotype has not been well characterized. To describe specific fundus features of a white population with the R1210C rare variant. Fundus features specific for diagnosis and disease staging were retrospectively characterized by systematic review of all available fundus images for each patient, including color photography, fluorescein angiography, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography, at a tertiary ophthalmologic referral center. For this retrospective observational study conducted from 2012 to 2014, enrolled patients with the variant and their family members without the variant were identified from the Age-Related Macular Degeneration Study for a family-based study arm. For patients with the variant but without a family member enrolled in the study, age-matched comparison individuals without the variant were selected randomly from the database. The presence of drusen in the macula (macular drusen score) and estimated number (total macular drusen score) were assessed. The presence of drusen in the extramacular regions (extramacular drusen score), pigmentary abnormalities, and disease staging were also evaluated. Binary logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between rare variant status and ocular phenotypes. Images from a total of 143 patients (283 eyes), including 62 patients with the rare variant, were analyzed. Drusen score covariates were associated with the R1210C rare variant. A larger proportion of patients carrying the variant had the highest level of macular and total macular drusen scores compared with those without the variant (57.9% vs 16.7% and 52.9% vs 14.2%, respectively; P for trend < .001 for both scores). Patients carrying the rare variant had a much greater likelihood of having advanced disease (odds ratio, 7.0; 95% CI, 3.1-16.2; P

  14. Depression of Complement Regulatory Factors in Rat and Human Renal Grafts Is Associated with the Progress of Acute T-Cell Mediated Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Kazuaki; Kakuta, Yoichi; Miyagawa, Shuji; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Kato, Taigo; Abe, Toyofumi; Imamura, Ryoichi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Maeda, Akira; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Mizuno, Masashi; Nonomura, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of complement with the progression of acute T cell mediated rejection (ATCMR) is not well understood. We investigated the production of complement components and the expression of complement regulatory proteins (Cregs) in acute T-cell mediated rejection using rat and human renal allografts. Methods We prepared rat allograft and syngeneic graft models of renal transplantation. The expression of Complement components and Cregs was assessed in the rat grafts using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunofluorescent staining. We also administered anti-Crry and anti-CD59 antibodies to the rat allograft model. Further, we assessed the relationship between the expression of membrane cofactor protein (MCP) by immunohistochemical staining in human renal grafts and their clinical course. Results qRT-PCR results showed that the expression of Cregs, CD59 and rodent-specific complement regulator complement receptor 1-related gene/protein-y (Crry), was diminished in the rat allograft model especially on day 5 after transplantation in comparison with the syngeneic model. In contrast, the expression of complement components and receptors: C3, C3a receptor, C5a receptor, Factor B, C9, C1q, was increased, but not the expression of C4 and C5, indicating a possible activation of the alternative pathway. When anti-Crry and anti-CD59 mAbs were administered to the allograft, the survival period for each group was shortened. In the human ATCMR cases, the group with higher MCP expression in the grafts showed improved serum creatinine levels after the ATCMR treatment as well as a better 5-year graft survival rate. Conclusions We conclude that the expression of Cregs in allografts is connected with ATCMR. Our results suggest that controlling complement activation in renal grafts can be a new strategy for the treatment of ATCMR. PMID:26928779

  15. Complement in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Veerhuis, Robert; Nielsen, Henrietta M.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is considered to be an immune privileged site, because the blood-brain barrier limits entry of blood borne cells and proteins into the central nervous system (CNS). As a result, the detection and clearance of invading microorganisms and senescent cells as well as surplus neurotransmitters, aged and glycated proteins, in order to maintain a healthy environment for neuronal and glial cells, is largely confined to the innate immune system. In recent years it has become clear that many factors of innate immunity are expressed throughout the brain. Neuronal and glial cells express Toll like receptors as well as complement receptors, and virtually all complement components can be locally produced in the brain, often in response to injury or developmental cues. However, as inflammatory reactions could interfere with proper functioning of the brain, tight and fine tuned regulatory mechanisms are warranted. In age related diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), accumulating amyloid proteins elicit complement activation and a local, chronic inflammatory response that leads to attraction and activation of glial cells that, under such activation conditions, can produce neurotoxic substances, including pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxygen radicals. This process may be exacerbated by a disturbed balance between complement activators and complement regulatory proteins such as occurs in AD, as the local synthesis of these proteins is differentially regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Much knowledge about the role of complement in neurodegenerative diseases has been derived from animal studies with transgenic overexpressing or knockout mice for specific complement factors or receptors. These studies have provided insight into the potential therapeutic use of complement regulators and complement receptor antagonists in chronic neurodegenerative diseases as well as in acute conditions, such as stroke. Interestingly, recent animal studies have also indicated that

  16. Acute Presentation and Persistent Glomerulonephritis Following Streptococcal Infection in a Patient With Heterozygous Complement Factor H–Related Protein 5 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Katherine A.; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Hall, Angela E.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Aitman, Timothy J.; Cook, H. Terence; Hangartner, Robert; Koziell, Ania; Pickering, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis is a common cause of acute nephritis in children. Transient hypocomplementemia and complete recovery are typical, with only a minority developing chronic disease. We describe a young girl who developed persistent kidney disease and hypocomplementemia after a streptococcal throat infection. Kidney biopsy 1 year after presentation showed isolated glomerular complement C3 deposition, membranoproliferative changes, and subendothelial, intramembranous and occasional subepithelial electron-dense deposits consistent with C3 glomerulopathy. Complement gene screening revealed a heterozygous single nucleotide insertion in exon 4 of the complement factor H–related protein 5 gene (CFHR5), resulting in a premature stop codon. This variant was not detected in 198 controls. Serum CFHR5 levels were reduced. The mother and sister of the index patient were heterozygous for the sequence variant, with no overt evidence of kidney disease. We speculate that this heterozygous CFHR5 sequence variant is a risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease after streptococcal infection. PMID:22503529

  17. MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-factor D activator in resting blood: the lectin and the alternative complement pathways are fundamentally linked

    PubMed Central

    Dobó, József; Szakács, Dávid; Oroszlán, Gábor; Kortvely, Elod; Kiss, Bence; Boros, Eszter; Szász, Róbert; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Pál, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    MASP-3 was discovered 15 years ago as the third mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease of the complement lectin pathway. Lacking any verified substrate its role remained ambiguous. MASP-3 was shown to compete with a key lectin pathway enzyme MASP-2 for MBL binding, and was therefore considered to be a negative complement regulator. Later, knock-out mice experiments suggested that MASP-1 and/or MASP-3 play important roles in complement pro-factor D (pro-FD) maturation. However, studies on a MASP-1/MASP-3-deficient human patient produced contradicting results. In normal resting blood unperturbed by ongoing coagulation or complement activation, factor D is present predominantly in its active form, suggesting that resting blood contains at least one pro-FD activating proteinase that is not a direct initiator of coagulation or complement activation. We have recently showed that all three MASPs can activate pro-FD in vitro. In resting blood, however, using our previously evolved MASP-1 and MASP-2 inhibitors we proved that neither MASP-1 nor MASP-2 activates pro-FD. Other plasma proteinases, particularly MASP-3, remained candidates for that function. For this study we evolved a specific MASP-3 inhibitor and unambiguously proved that activated MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-FD activator in resting blood, which demonstrates a fundamental link between the lectin and alternative pathways. PMID:27535802

  18. RXFP1 is Targeted by Complement C1q Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Factor 8 in Brain Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Glogowska, Aleksandra; Burg, Maxwell; Wong, G. William; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Klonisch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The relaxin-like RXFP1 ligand–receptor system has important functions in tumor growth and tissue invasion. Recently, we have identified the secreted protein, CTRP8, a member of the C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein (CTRP) family, as a novel ligand of the relaxin receptor, RXFP1, with functions in brain cancer. Here, we review the role of CTRP members in cancers cells with particular emphasis on CTRP8 in glioblastoma. PMID:26322020

  19. Phenotype Characteristics of Patients With Age-Related Macular Degeneration Carrying a Rare Variant in the Complement Factor H Gene.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Eveline; Geerlings, Maartje J; den Hollander, Anneke I; de Jong, Eiko K; Fauser, Sascha; Peto, Tunde; Hoyng, Carel B

    2017-10-01

    Rare variants in the complement factor H (CFH) gene and their association with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have been described. However, there is limited literature on the phenotypes accompanying these rare variants. Phenotypical characteristics could help ophthalmologists select patients for additional genetic testing. To describe the phenotypical characteristics of patients with AMD carrying a rare variant in the CFH gene. In this cross-sectional study, we searched the genetic database of the department of ophthalmology at the Radboudumc (tertiary ophthalmologic referral center) and the European Genetic Database for patients with AMD with a rare genetic variant in the CFH gene. Patient recruitment took place from March 30, 2006, to February 18, 2013, and data were analyzed from November 30, 2015, to May 8, 2017. Phenotypical features on fundus photographs of both eyes of patients were graded by 2 independent reading center graders masked for carrier status. Differences in phenotypical characteristics between rare variant carriers and noncarriers were analyzed using univariable generalized estimated equations logistic regression models accounting for intereye correlation. Analyses included 100 eyes of 51 patients with AMD carrying a CFH variant (mean [SD] age, 66.7 [12.1] years; 64.7% female) and 204 eyes of 102 age-matched noncarriers (mean [SD] age, 67.1 [11.8] years; 54.9% female). Carrying a rare pathogenic CFH variant was associated with larger drusen area (odds ratio range, 6.98 [95% CI, 2.04-23.89] to 18.50 [95% CI, 2.19-155.99]; P = .002), presence of drusen with crystalline appearance (odds ratio, 3.24; 95% CI, 1.24-8.50; P = .02), and drusen nasal to the optic disc (odds ratio range, 4.03 [95% CI, 1.70-9.56] to 7.42 [95% CI, 0.65-84.84]; P = .003). Identification of rare CFH variant carriers may be important for upcoming complement-inhibiting therapies. Patients with an extensive drusen area, drusen with crystalline appearance, and

  20. Complement split product C4d deposition in placenta in systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Mikami, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Naoki; Salah, Adeeb; Kondoh, Eiji; Tatsumi, Keiji; Konishi, Ikuo; Haga, Hironori

    2013-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) are related to premature delivery and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and share histological findings of the placenta. Association with complement dysregulation has been reported in pregnancy for both disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of C4d immunohistochemistry for placentas with SLE- and PIH-associated pregnancy. C4d staining was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue of placentas from 26 patients with SLE, 26 with PIH, and 25 control cases. We used the H-score with a range of 0-300 for the evaluation of C4d immunoreactivity. Placentas of SLE and PIH cases showed a higher H-score than control cases (average, SLE, 38.3 (P < 0.05); PIH, 17.8; control, 1.68), with linear staining on the membrane of syncytiotrophoblast. C4d-high groups comprised 50% (12/26) of SLE and 35% (9/26) of PIH cases, with H-scores ranging 14-270 and 15-170. C4d-high groups were significantly associated with low-placental weights and low birth weight in both SLE and PIH (P < 0.05), and lower gestational age (P < 0.05) in PIH cases. These results suggest that C4d might be utilized as a biomarker evaluating the subsequent risk for IUGR and disease control during the gestation period in these patients.

  1. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy to Complement Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission in the Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safiq, Alexandrea; Ali, Salina; Nadarski, Benjamin; Smith, Jeremy; Yoskowitz, Josh; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael; Union College Team

    2013-10-01

    There is an active research program in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory on proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of atmospheric aerosols. PIXE is a powerful tool for the study of airborne pollution because it provides information on a broad range of elements simultaneously, has low detection limits, is nondestructive, does not require large samples, and the analysis can be performed in a short amount of time. However, PIXE provides only elemental information. We are investigating the use of Micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) to complement PIXE analysis of aerosol samples by providing chemical information. In MRS, laser light is inelastically scattered from a sample and the vibrational spectrum of the scattered light is used to identify molecules and their functional groups. We are focusing on aerosol samples collected in the Adirondack Mountains that have considerable concentrations of sulfur that may contribute to acid rain. The MRS spectra collected on aerosol samples are being compared with a library of standards to try to determine the molecular structures in which the sulfur is bound. We will describe the analysis and present preliminary results. Union College Undergraduate Research Program.

  2. Species Specificity of Vaccinia Virus Complement Control Protein for the Bovine Classical Pathway Is Governed Primarily by Direct Interaction of Its Acidic Residues with Factor I.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Phulera, Swastik; Kamble, Ashish; Gautam, Avneesh Kumar; Panwar, Hemendra Singh; Sahu, Arvind

    2017-10-01

    Poxviruses display species tropism-variola virus is a human-specific virus, while vaccinia virus causes repeated outbreaks in dairy cattle. Consistent with this, variola virus complement regulator SPICE (smallpox inhibitor of complement enzymes) exhibits selectivity in inhibiting the human alternative complement pathway and vaccinia virus complement regulator VCP (vaccinia virus complement control protein) displays selectivity in inhibiting the bovine alternative complement pathway. In the present study, we examined the species specificity of VCP and SPICE for the classical pathway (CP). We observed that VCP is ∼43-fold superior to SPICE in inhibiting bovine CP. Further, functional assays revealed that increased inhibitory activity of VCP for bovine CP is solely due to its enhanced cofactor activity, with no effect on decay of bovine CP C3-convertase. To probe the structural basis of this specificity, we utilized single- and multi-amino-acid substitution mutants wherein 1 or more of the 11 variant VCP residues were substituted in the SPICE template. Examination of these mutants for their ability to inhibit bovine CP revealed that E108, E120, and E144 are primarily responsible for imparting the specificity and contribute to the enhanced cofactor activity of VCP. Binding and functional assays suggested that these residues interact with bovine factor I but not with bovine C4(H2O) (a moiety conformationally similar to C4b). Mapping of these residues onto the modeled structure of bovine C4b-VCP-bovine factor I supported the mutagenesis data. Taken together, our data help explain why the vaccine strain of vaccinia virus was able to gain a foothold in domesticated animals.IMPORTANCE Vaccinia virus was used for smallpox vaccination. The vaccine-derived virus is now circulating and causing outbreaks in dairy cattle in India and Brazil. However, the reason for this tropism is unknown. It is well recognized that the virus is susceptible to neutralization by the complement

  3. Universal pooled plasma (Uniplas(®)) does not induce complement-mediated hemolysis of human red blood cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Heger, Andrea; Brandstätter, Hubert; Prager, Bettina; Brainovic, Janja; Cortes, Rhoda; Römisch, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Pooling of plasma of different blood groups before large scale manufacturing of Uniplas(®) results in the formation of low levels of soluble immune complexes (CIC). The aim of this study was to investigate the level and removal of CIC during Uniplas(®) manufacturing. In addition, an in vitro hemolysis assay should be developed and investigate if Uniplas(®) does induce complement-mediated hemolysis of human red blood cells (RBC). In-process samples from Uniplas(®) (universal plasma) and Octaplas(LG)(®) (blood group specific plasma) routine manufacturing batches were tested on CIC using commercially available ELISA test kits. In addition, CIC was produced by admixing heat-aggregated immunoglobulins or monoclonal anti-A/anti-B antibodies to plasma and removal of CIC was followed in studies of the Uniplas(®) manufacturing process under down-scale conditions. The extent of RBC lysis was investigated in plasma samples using the in-house hemolysis assay. Levels of CIC in Uniplas(®) are within the normal ranges for plasma and comparable to that found in Octaplas(LG)(®). Down-scale experiments showed that both IgG/IgM-CIC levels are significantly removed on average by 40-50% during Uniplas(®) manufacturing. Uniplas(®) does not induce hemolysis of RBCs in vitro. Hemolysis occurs only after spiking with high titers of anti-A/anti-B antibodies and depends on the antibody specificity (i.e. titer) in the plasma sample. The results of this study confirm the safety of Uniplas(®) regarding transfusion to patients of all ABO blood groups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Small-molecule factor D inhibitors selectively block the alternative pathway of complement in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xuan; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Thanassi, Jane A; Yang, Guangwei; Baines, Andrea C; Podos, Steven D; Huang, Yongqing; Huang, Mingjun; Brodsky, Robert A

    2017-03-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome are diseases of excess activation of the alternative pathway of complement that are treated with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the terminal complement component C5. Eculizumab must be administered intravenously, and moreover some patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria on eculizumab have symptomatic extravascular hemolysis, indicating an unmet need for additional therapeutic approaches. We report the activity of two novel small-molecule inhibitors of the alternative pathway component Factor D using in vitro correlates of both paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Both compounds bind human Factor D with high affinity and effectively inhibit its proteolytic activity against purified Factor B in complex with C3b. When tested using the traditional Ham test with cells from paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria patients, the Factor D inhibitors significantly reduced complement-mediated hemolysis at concentrations as low as 0.01 μM. Additionally the compound ACH-4471 significantly decreased C3 fragment deposition on paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria erythrocytes, indicating a reduced potential relative to eculizumab for extravascular hemolysis. Using the recently described modified Ham test with serum from patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, the compounds reduced the alternative pathway-mediated killing of PIGA-null reagent cells, thus establishing their potential utility for this disease of alternative pathway of complement dysregulation and validating the modified Ham test as a system for pre-clinical drug development for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, ACH-4471 blocked alternative pathway activity when administered orally to cynomolgus monkeys. In conclusion, the small-molecule Factor D inhibitors show potential as oral therapeutics for human diseases driven by the alternative pathway of complement

  5. APOBEC1 complementation factor (A1CF) is dispensable for C-to-U RNA editing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Elizabeth M.; McCarty, Christopher; Mehalow, Adrienne; Svenson, Karen L.; Murray, Stephen A.; Korstanje, Ron; Braun, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Editing of the human and murine ApoB mRNA by APOBEC1, the catalytic enzyme of the protein complex that catalyzes C-to-U RNA editing, creates an internal stop codon within the APOB coding sequence, generating two protein isoforms. It has been long held that APOBEC1-mediated editing activity is dependent on the RNA binding protein A1CF. The function of A1CF in adult tissues has not been reported because a previously reported null allele displays embryonic lethality. This work aimed to address the function of A1CF in adult mouse tissues using a conditional A1cf allele. Unexpectedly, A1cf-null mice were viable and fertile with modest defects in hematopoietic, immune, and metabolic parameters. C-to-U RNA editing was quantified for multiple targets, including ApoB, in the small intestine and liver. In all cases, no changes in RNA editing efficiency were observed. Blood plasma analysis demonstrated a male-specific increase in solute concentration and increased cellularity in the glomeruli of male A1cf-null mice. Urine analysis showed a reduction in solute concentration, suggesting abnormal water homeostasis and possible kidney abnormalities exclusive to the male. Computational identification of kidney C-to-U editing sites from polyadenylated RNA-sequencing identified a number of editing sites exclusive to the kidney. However, molecular analysis of kidney C-to-U editing showed no changes in editing efficiency with A1CF loss. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that A1CF does not act as the APOBEC1 complementation factor in vivo under normal physiological conditions and suggests new roles for A1CF, specifically within the male adult kidney. PMID:28069890

  6. APOBEC1 complementation factor (A1CF) is dispensable for C-to-U RNA editing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Elizabeth M; McCarty, Christopher; Mehalow, Adrienne; Svenson, Karen L; Murray, Stephen A; Korstanje, Ron; Braun, Robert E

    2017-04-01

    Editing of the human and murine ApoB mRNA by APOBEC1, the catalytic enzyme of the protein complex that catalyzes C-to-U RNA editing, creates an internal stop codon within the APOB coding sequence, generating two protein isoforms. It has been long held that APOBEC1-mediated editing activity is dependent on the RNA binding protein A1CF. The function of A1CF in adult tissues has not been reported because a previously reported null allele displays embryonic lethality. This work aimed to address the function of A1CF in adult mouse tissues using a conditional A1cf allele. Unexpectedly, A1cf-null mice were viable and fertile with modest defects in hematopoietic, immune, and metabolic parameters. C-to-U RNA editing was quantified for multiple targets, including ApoB, in the small intestine and liver. In all cases, no changes in RNA editing efficiency were observed. Blood plasma analysis demonstrated a male-specific increase in solute concentration and increased cellularity in the glomeruli of male A1cf-null mice. Urine analysis showed a reduction in solute concentration, suggesting abnormal water homeostasis and possible kidney abnormalities exclusive to the male. Computational identification of kidney C-to-U editing sites from polyadenylated RNA-sequencing identified a number of editing sites exclusive to the kidney. However, molecular analysis of kidney C-to-U editing showed no changes in editing efficiency with A1CF loss. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that A1CF does not act as the APOBEC1 complementation factor in vivo under normal physiological conditions and suggests new roles for A1CF, specifically within the male adult kidney. © 2017 Snyder et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  7. Inflammation, complement factor h, and age-related macular degeneration: the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ronald; Knudtson, Michael D; Klein, Barbara E K; Wong, Tien Y; Cotch, Mary Frances; Liu, Kiang; Cheng, Ching Y; Burke, Gregory L; Saad, Mohammed F; Jacobs, David R; Sharrett, A Richey

    2008-10-01

    To describe the relationship of systemic inflammatory disease, complement factor H (CFH) Y402H (1277T-->C) genotype status and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) prevalence in a multiethnic population of whites, blacks, Hispanics, and Chinese. Population-based, cross-sectional study. We included 5887 persons aged 45 to 84 years with gradable AMD. Digital fundus photographs were used to measure AMD. Two years earlier, biomarkers of inflammation were measured and history of inflammatory disease and use of antiinflammatory agents obtained. Prevalence of AMD. While controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and study site, there were no associations between systemic inflammatory factors and AMD severity. Higher levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (odds ratio [OR] per standard deviation [SD] increase in natural log [ln] units, 2.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-4.13) and interleukin-6 (OR per SD in ln, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.21-3.49) were associated with geographic atrophy but not other AMD end points. History of periodontal disease (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.14-2.47) was related to increased retinal pigment. A history of arthritis was associated with soft distinct drusen (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.06-1.46). A history of oral steroid use was related to large drusen (OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.14-3.97) and soft distinct drusen (OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.00-3.10) and history of cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor use were associated with large drusen (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.10-2.04), soft indistinct drusen (OR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.09-3.10), and large drusen area (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.02-2.71). Whites, blacks, and Hispanics with CFH Y402H CC variant genotype had the highest frequency of early AMD compared with those with wild TT genotype. The frequency of CFH did explain some of the difference in AMD prevalence between Chinese and Hispanics compared with whites, but did not explain the difference in prevalence between whites and blacks. This study confirmed associations of the Y402H CFH gene variant

  8. Complement inhibition in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pio, Ruben; Ajona, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2013-02-01

    For decades, complement has been recognized as an effector arm of the immune system that contributes to the destruction of tumor cells. In fact, many therapeutic strategies have been proposed that are based on the intensification of complement-mediated responses against tumors. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm by demonstrating a tumor-promoting role for complement. Cancer cells seem to be able to establish a convenient balance between complement activation and inhibition, taking advantage of complement initiation without suffering its deleterious effects. Complement activation may support chronic inflammation, promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment, induce angiogenesis, and activate cancer-related signaling pathways. In this context, inhibition of complement activation would be a therapeutic option for treating cancer. This concept is relatively new and deserves closer attention. In this article, we summarize the mechanisms of complement activation on cancer cells, the cancer-promoting effect of complement initiation, and the rationale behind the use of complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against cancer.

  9. Soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) is not as effective as cobra venom factor in the treatment of experimental allergic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Vriesendorp, F J; Flynn, R E; Pappolla, M A; Koski, C L

    1997-12-01

    To further investigate the role of complement activation in Experimental Allergic Neuritis (EAN), the effect of systemic complement blockade by soluble CR1 (sCR1) was compared to complement depletion by Cobra Venom Factor (CVF) in EAN rats immunized with bovine peripheral nerve myelin. EAN rats treated with CVF (n = 10) had significantly reduced clinical scores compared to rats treated with sCR1 (n = 9) or saline (n = 10) (score: sCR1 0.66 +/- 0.7; CVF 0; saline 0.6 +/- 0.8; mean +/- SD). CVF treatment more effectively decreased inflammation and demyelination compared to sCR1 treatment which had only a partial effect (inflammation: sCR1 1.8 +/- 1.4; CVF 0.3 +/- 0.7; saline 1.9 +/- 1.2; demyelination; sCR1 1.3 +/- 1; CVF 0.1 +/- 0.6; saline 1.7 +/- 1.2). In lumbosacral nerve roots significantly less infiltrating ED1 positive macrophages and CD11bc (expressing complement receptor 3 or CR3) positive inflammatory cells were present in CVF treated EAN rats while there was a limited decrease in inflammation in the sCR1 treated animals compared to the saline treated rats (ED1: sCR1 1.4 +/- 1.2; CVF 0.5 +/- 0.6; saline 1.7 +/- 1.2; CD11bc: sCR1 1.9 +/- 1.2; CVF 0.9 +/- 1; saline 2.1 +/- 1.2). Our findings suggest that complement depletion by CVF is more effective than complement blockade by sCR1 in reducing the severity of inflammatory peripheral nerve demyelination.

  10. Ultraviolet light-induced chromosomal aberrations in cultured cells from Cockayne syndrome and complementation group C xeroderma pigmentosum patients: lack of correlation with cancer susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Seguin, L.R.; Tarone, R.E.; Liao, K.H.; Robbins, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    Both Cockayne syndrome (CS) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are inherited diseases with defective repair of damage induced in DNA by UV. Patients with XP, but not those with CS, have an increased susceptibility to formation of sunlight-induced skin tumors. We determined the frequency of UV-induced chromosomal aberrations in cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines from five CS patients and three complementation-group-C XP patients to determine whether such aberrations were abnormally increased only in the XP cells. We found that CS cells had the same abnormally increased number of induced aberrations as the XP cells, indicating that the number of UV-induced aberrations in XP group C cells does not account for the susceptibility of these XP patients to sunlight-induced skin cancer.

  11. The Borrelia hermsii factor H binding protein FhbA is not required for infectivity in mice or for resistance to human complement in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fine, Lindy M; Miller, Daniel P; Mallory, Katherine L; Tegels, Brittney K; Earnhart, Christopher G; Marconi, Richard T

    2014-08-01

    The primary causative agent of tick-borne relapsing fever in North America is Borrelia hermsii. It has been hypothesized that B. hermsii evades complement-mediated destruction by binding factor H (FH), a host-derived negative regulator of complement. In vitro, B. hermsii produces a single FH binding protein designated FhbA (FH binding protein A). The properties and ligand binding activity of FhbA suggest that it plays multiple roles in pathogenesis. It binds plasminogen and has been identified as a significant target of a B1b B cell-mediated IgM response in mice. FhbA has also been explored as a potential diagnostic antigen for B. hermsii infection in humans. The ability to test the hypothesis that FhbA is a critical virulence factor in vivo has been hampered by the lack of well-developed systems for the genetic manipulation of the relapsing fever spirochetes. In this report, we have successfully generated a B. hermsii fhbA deletion mutant (the B. hermsii YORΔfhbA strain) through allelic exchange mutagenesis. Deletion of fhbA abolished FH binding by the YORΔfhbA strain and eliminated cleavage of C3b on the cell surface. However, the YORΔfhbA strain remained infectious in mice and retained resistance to killing in vitro by human complement. Collectively, these results indicate that B. hermsii employs an FhbA/FH-independent mechanism of complement evasion that allows for resistance to killing by human complement and persistence in mice. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. The Borrelia hermsii Factor H Binding Protein FhbA Is Not Required for Infectivity in Mice or for Resistance to Human Complement In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Lindy M.; Miller, Daniel P.; Mallory, Katherine L.; Tegels, Brittney K.; Earnhart, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    The primary causative agent of tick-borne relapsing fever in North America is Borrelia hermsii. It has been hypothesized that B. hermsii evades complement-mediated destruction by binding factor H (FH), a host-derived negative regulator of complement. In vitro, B. hermsii produces a single FH binding protein designated FhbA (FH binding protein A). The properties and ligand binding activity of FhbA suggest that it plays multiple roles in pathogenesis. It binds plasminogen and has been identified as a significant target of a B1b B cell-mediated IgM response in mice. FhbA has also been explored as a potential diagnostic antigen for B. hermsii infection in humans. The ability to test the hypothesis that FhbA is a critical virulence factor in vivo has been hampered by the lack of well-developed systems for the genetic manipulation of the relapsing fever spirochetes. In this report, we have successfully generated a B. hermsii fhbA deletion mutant (the B. hermsii YORΔfhbA strain) through allelic exchange mutagenesis. Deletion of fhbA abolished FH binding by the YORΔfhbA strain and eliminated cleavage of C3b on the cell surface. However, the YORΔfhbA strain remained infectious in mice and retained resistance to killing in vitro by human complement. Collectively, these results indicate that B. hermsii employs an FhbA/FH-independent mechanism of complement evasion that allows for resistance to killing by human complement and persistence in mice. PMID:24866803

  13. Protection of germinal centres from complement attack: decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a constitutive protein on follicular dendritic cells. A study in reactive and neoplastic follicles.

    PubMed

    Lampert, I A; Schofield, J B; Amlot, P; Van Noorden, S

    1993-06-01

    The development of B-cell memory is linked to the presence of germinal centres. This process is dependent on the presence of antigen, usually in the form of immune complexes with antibody, on the surface of the follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) that form a network in the germinal centre. The presence of immune complexes poses a constant danger of activating complement. Decay accelerating factor (DAF, CD55) and the membrane attack complex (MAC) inhibitor (CD59) are two cell proteins whose sole function is to protect cells from the action of complement, the former affecting the earlier components of the complement cascade, and the latter the terminal ones; both are bound to the cell surface via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol link. DAF but not CD59 could be demonstrated on FDCs. DAF is also present on the FDCs in follicular lymphomas despite the absence of complement (C3) in neoplastic follicles. This indicates that DAF is constitutive to FDCs but does not preclude the possibility that its expression is increased when immune complexes are deposited.

  14. Identification and characterization of the factor H and FHL-1 binding complement regulator-acquiring surface protein 1 of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Herzberger, Pia; Siegel, Corinna; Skerka, Christine; Fingerle, Volker; Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; Wilske, Bettina; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Borrelia spielmanii, one of the etiological agents of Lyme disease found in Europe, evades host complement-mediated killing by recruitment of the immune regulators factor H and FHL-1 from human serum. Serum-resistant and intermediate serum-resistant isolates express up to 3 distinct complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs) that bind factor H and/or FHL-1. The present study describes identification and functional characterization of BsCRASP-1 as the dominant factor H and FHL-1 binding protein of B. spielmanii. BsCRASP-1 is a 27.7kDa outer surface lipoprotein, which after processing has a predicted mass of 24.9kDa. BsCRASP-1 is encoded by a single copy gene, cspA, that maps to a linear plasmid of approximately 55kb. Ligand affinity blot techniques revealed that both native and recombinant BsCRASP-1 from different isolates can strongly bind FHL-1, but only weakly factor H. Deletion mutants of recombinant BsCRASP-1 were generated and a high-affinity binding site for factor H and FHL-1 was mapped to its carboxy-terminal 10-amino-acid residue domain. Similarly, the dominant binding site of factor H and FHL-1 was localized to short consensus repeats (SCRs) 5-7. Factor H and FHL-1 maintained cofactor activity for factor I-mediated C3b inactivation when bound to full-length BsCRASP-1 but not to a deletion mutant lacking the carboxy-terminal 10-amino-acid residue domain. In conclusion, BsCRASP-1 binds the host immune regulators factor H and FHL-1, and is suggested to represent a key molecule of B. spielmanii for complement resistance. Thus, BsCRASP-1 most likely contributes to persistence of B. spielmanii and to pathogenesis of Lyme disease.

  15. The calcium-sensing receptor complements parathyroid hormone-induced bone turnover in discrete skeletal compartments in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yingben; Xiao, Yongjun; Liu, Jingning; Karaplis, Andrew C.; Pollak, Martin R.; Brown, Edward M.; Miao, Dengshun

    2012-01-01

    Although the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) may each exert skeletal effects, it is uncertain how CaSR and PTH interact at the level of bone in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Therefore, we simulated PHPT with 2 wk of continuous PTH infusion in adult mice with deletion of the PTH gene (Pth−/− mice) and with deletion of both PTH and CaSR genes (Pth−/−-Casr −/− mice) and compared skeletal phenotypes. PTH infusion in Pth−/− mice increased cortical bone turnover, augmented cortical porosity, and reduced cortical bone volume, femoral bone mineral density (BMD), and bone mineral content (BMC); these effects were markedly attenuated in PTH-infused Pth−/−-Casr−/− mice. In the absence of CaSR, the PTH-stimulated expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and PTH-stimulated osteoclastogenesis was also reduced. In trabecular bone, PTH-induced increases in bone turnover, trabecular bone volume, and trabecular number were lower in Pth−/−-Casr−/− mice than in Pth−/− mice. PTH-stimulated genetic markers of osteoblast activity were also lower. These results are consistent with a role for CaSR in modulating both PTH-induced bone resorption and PTH-induced bone formation in discrete skeletal compartments. PMID:22275754

  16. Properdin deficiency protects from 5-fluorouracil-induced small intestinal mucositis in a complement activation-independent, interleukin-10-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jain, U; Midgen, C A; Woodruff, T M; Schwaeble, W J; Stover, C M; Stadnyk, A W

    2017-04-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a serious complication of chemotherapy that leads to significant morbidity that may require dose or drug adjustments. Specific mitigating strategies for mucositis are unavailable, due partly to an incomplete understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms. We have previously shown an effect of properdin, a positive regulator of complement activation, in models of colitis. Here we use properdin-deficient (P(KO) ) mice to interrogate the role of properdin and complement in small intestinal mucositis. Mucositis was induced by five daily injections of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in wild-type (WT), P(KO) , interleukin (IL)-10(-/-) and properdin/IL-10(-/-) double knock-out (DKO) mice. At the time of euthanasia their jejunum was collected for histology, immunohistochemistry and cytokine and complement activation measurements. Complement became activated in mice receiving 5-FU, indicated by increased intestinal levels of C3a and C5a. Compared to WT, P(KO) mice experienced significantly less mucositis, despite C3a levels as high as inflamed WT mice and slightly less C5a. Conversely, P(KO) mice had higher intestinal levels of IL-10. IL-10 expression was mainly by epithelial cells in both uninflamed and inflamed P(KO) mice. IL-10(-/-) mice proved to be highly susceptible to mucositis and DKO mice were equally susceptible, demonstrating that a lack of properdin does not protect mice lacking IL-10. We interpret our findings to indicate that, to a significant extent, the inflammation of mucositis is properdin-dependent but complement activation-independent. Additionally, the benefit achieved in the absence of properdin is associated with increased IL-10 levels, and IL-10 is important in limiting mucositis. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  17. Receptor complementation and mutagenesis reveal SR-BI as an essential HCV entry factor and functionally imply its intra- and extra-cellular domains.

    PubMed

    Dreux, Marlène; Dao Thi, Viet Loan; Fresquet, Judith; Guérin, Maryse; Julia, Zélie; Verney, Géraldine; Durantel, David; Zoulim, Fabien; Lavillette, Dimitri; Cosset, François-Loïc; Bartosch, Birke

    2009-02-01

    HCV entry into cells is a multi-step and slow process. It is believed that the initial capture of HCV particles by glycosaminoglycans and/or lipoprotein receptors is followed by coordinated interactions with the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), a major receptor of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the CD81 tetraspanin, and the tight junction protein Claudin-1, ultimately leading to uptake and cellular penetration of HCV via low-pH endosomes. Several reports have indicated that HDL promotes HCV entry through interaction with SR-BI. This pathway remains largely elusive, although it was shown that HDL neither associates with HCV particles nor modulates HCV binding to SR-BI. In contrast to CD81 and Claudin-1, the importance of SR-BI has only been addressed indirectly because of lack of cells in which functional complementation assays with mutant receptors could be performed. Here we identified for the first time two cell types that supported HCVpp and HCVcc entry upon ectopic SR-BI expression. Remarkably, the undetectable expression of SR-BI in rat hepatoma cells allowed unambiguous investigation of human SR-BI functions during HCV entry. By expressing different SR-BI mutants in either cell line, our results revealed features of SR-BI intracellular domains that influence HCV infectivity without affecting receptor binding and stimulation of HCV entry induced by HDL/SR-BI interaction. Conversely, we identified positions of SR-BI ectodomain that, by altering HCV binding, inhibit entry. Finally, we characterized alternative ectodomain determinants that, by reducing SR-BI cholesterol uptake and efflux functions, abolish HDL-mediated infection-enhancement. Altogether, we demonstrate that SR-BI is an essential HCV entry factor. Moreover, our results highlight specific SR-BI determinants required during HCV entry and physiological lipid transfer functions hijacked by HCV to favor infection.

  18. Impaired binding of the age-related macular degeneration-associated complement factor H 402H allotype to Bruch's membrane in human retina.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon J; Perveen, Rahat; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Morgan, B Paul; Sim, Robert B; Bishop, Paul N; Day, Anthony J

    2010-09-24

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the predominant cause of blindness in the industrialized world where destruction of the macula, i.e. the central region of the retina, results in loss of vision. AMD is preceded by the formation of deposits in the macula, which accumulate between the Bruch's membrane and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These deposits are associated with complement-mediated inflammation and perturb retinal function. Recent genetic association studies have demonstrated that a common allele (402H) of the complement factor H (CFH) gene is a major risk factor for the development of AMD; CFH suppresses complement activation on host tissues where it is believed to bind via its interaction with polyanionic structures. We have shown previously that this coding change (Y402H; from a tyrosine to histidine residue) alters the binding of the CFH protein to sulfated polysaccharides. Here we demonstrate that the AMD-associated polymorphism profoundly affects CFH binding to sites within human macula. Notably, the AMD-associated 402H variant binds less well to heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate glycosaminoglycans within Bruch's membrane when compared with the 402Y form; both allotypes exhibit a similar level of binding to the RPE. We propose that the impaired binding of the 402H variant to Bruch's membrane results in an overactivation of the complement pathway leading to local chronic inflammation and thus contributes directly to the development and/or progression of AMD. These studies therefore provide a putative disease mechanism and add weight to the genetic association studies that implicate the 402H allele as an important risk factor in AMD.

  19. Interaction between complement regulators and Streptococcus pyogenes: binding of C4b-binding protein and factor H/factor H-like protein 1 to M18 strains involves two different cell surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Caballero, David; García-Laorden, Isabel; Cortés, Guadalupe; Wessels, Michael R; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez; Albertí, Sebastián

    2004-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus, is one of the most frequent causes of pharyngitis and skin infections in humans. Many virulence mechanisms have been suggested to be involved in the infectious process. Among them is the binding to the bacterial cell surface of the complement regulatory proteins factor H, factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), and C4b-binding protein. Previous studies indicate that binding of these three regulators to the streptococcal cell involves the M protein encoded by the emm gene. M-type 18 strains are prevalent among clinical isolates and have been shown to interact with all three complement regulators simultaneously. Using isogenic strains lacking expression of the Emm18 or the Enn18 proteins, we demonstrate in this study that, in contradistinction to previously described S. pyogenes strains, M18 strains bind the complement regulators factor H, FHL-1, and C4b-binding protein through two distinct cell surface proteins. Factor H and FHL-1 bind to the Emm18 protein, while C4BP binds to the Enn18 protein. We propose that expression of two distinct surface structures that bind complement regulatory proteins represents a unique adaptation of M18 strains that enhances their resistance to opsonization by human plasma and increases survival of this particular S. pyogenes strain in the human host. These new findings illustrate that S. pyogenes has evolved diverse mechanisms for recruitment of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface to evade immune clearance in the human host.

  20. Identification of factor H-like protein 1 as the predominant complement regulator in Bruch’s membrane: implications for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Simon J.; Schmidt, Christoph Q.; White, Anne M.; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Morgan, B. Paul; Bishop, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    The tight regulation of innate immunity on extracellular matrix (ECM) is a vital part of immune homeostasis throughout the human body and disruption to this regulation in the eye is thought to contribute directly to the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The plasma complement regulator factor H (FH) is believed to be the main regulator that protects ECM against damaging complement activation. However, here we demonstrate that a truncated form of FH, called factor-H like protein 1 (FHL-1), is the main regulatory protein in the layer of ECM under human retina, called Bruch’s membrane. Bruch’s membrane is a major site of AMD disease pathogenesis and where drusen, the hallmark lesions of AMD, form. We show that FHL-1 can passively diffuse through Bruch’s membrane, whereas the full sized, glycosylated, FH cannot. FHL-1 is largely bound to Bruch’s membrane through interactions with heparan sulfate and we show that the common Y402H polymorphism in the CFH gene, associated with an increased risk of AMD, reduces the binding of FHL-1 to this heparan sulfate. We also show that FHL-1 is retained in drusen while FH coats the periphery of the lesions, perhaps inhibiting their clearance. Our results identify a novel mechanism of complement regulation in the human eye, which highlights potential new avenues for therapeutic strategies. PMID:25305316

  1. Expression of Human Complement Factor H Prevents Age-Related Macular Degeneration–Like Retina Damage and Kidney Abnormalities in Aged Cfh Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jin-Dong; Kelly, Una; Landowski, Michael; Toomey, Christopher B.; Groelle, Marybeth; Miller, Chelsey; Smith, Stephanie G.; Klingeborn, Mikael; Singhapricha, Terry; Jiang, Haixiang; Frank, Michael M.; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is an important regulatory protein in the alternative pathway of the complement system, and CFH polymorphisms increase the genetic risk of age-related macular degeneration dramatically. These same human CFH variants have also been associated with dense deposit disease. To mechanistically study the function of CFH in the pathogenesis of these diseases, we created transgenic mouse lines using human CFH bacterial artificial chromosomes expressing full-length human CFH variants and crossed these to Cfh knockout (Cfh−/−) mice. Human CFH protein inhibited cleavage of mouse complement component 3 and factor B in plasma and in retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera, establishing that human CFH regulates activation of the mouse alternative pathway. One of the mouse lines, which express relatively higher levels of CFH, demonstrated functional and structural protection of the retina owing to the Cfh deletion. Impaired visual function, detected as a deficit in the scotopic electroretinographic response, was improved in this transgenic mouse line compared with Cfh−/− mice, and transgenics had a thicker outer nuclear layer and less sub–retinal pigment epithelium deposit accumulation. In addition, expression of human CFH also completely protected the mice from developing kidney abnormalities associated with loss of CFH. These humanized CFH mice present a valuable model for study of the molecular mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration and dense deposit disease and for testing therapeutic targets. PMID:25447048

  2. Conserved structural complement component C3 in miiuy croaker Miichthys miiuy and their involvement in pathogenic bacteria induced immunity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yueyan; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2013-07-01

    Complement component C3 is a key protein in the complement system whose activation is essential for all the important functions performed by this system. In this study, the complete C3 cDNA sequence was isolated from the miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy), which was high similarity to other complement C3. In this study, we report the primary sequence, the tissue expression profile, the polypeptide domain architecture and the phylogenetic analysis of miiuy croaker C3 gene. Rapid amplification of the cDNA ends (RACE) yielded the full open reading frame of this protein (4974 bp), and subsequent analysis indicated that the M. miiuy C3 gene encoded a protein of 1657 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that M. miiuy C3 has conserved residues and domains known to be critical for C3 function. Phylogenetic analysis showed that miiuy croaker was most closely related to Epinephelus coioides. Expression analysis showed that C3 was expressed differentially in miiuy croaker tissues, while liver was the main source of C3 expression. Infection of miiuy croaker with Vibrio anguillarum resulted in significant changes expression of C3 gene in the immune-related tissues. These results showed that C3 gene might play an important role in immune mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of laser-induced plasmas as a complement to high-explosive large-scale detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimblin, Clare; Trainham, Rusty; Capelle, Gene A.; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2017-09-01

    Experimental investigations into the characteristics of laser-induced plasmas indicate that LIBS provides a relatively inexpensive and easily replicable laboratory technique to isolate and measure reactions germane to understanding aspects of high-explosive detonations under controlled conditions. Spectral signatures and derived physical parameters following laser ablation of aluminum, graphite and laser-sparked air are examined as they relate to those observed following detonation of high explosives and as they relate to shocked air. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) reliably correlates reactions involving atomic Al and aluminum monoxide (AlO) with respect to both emission spectra and temperatures, as compared to small- and large-scale high-explosive detonations. Atomic Al and AlO resulting from laser ablation and a cited small-scale study, decay within ˜10-5 s, roughly 100 times faster than the Al and AlO decay rates (˜10-3 s) observed following the large-scale detonation of an Al-encased explosive. Temperatures and species produced in laser-sparked air are compared to those produced with laser ablated graphite in air. With graphite present, CN is dominant relative to N2+. In studies where the height of the ablating laser's focus was altered relative to the surface of the graphite substrate, CN concentration was found to decrease with laser focus below the graphite surface, indicating that laser intensity is a critical factor in the production of CN, via reactive nitrogen.

  4. FHL-1/reconectin and factor H: two human complement regulators which are encoded by the same gene are differently expressed and regulated.

    PubMed

    Friese, M A; Hellwage, J; Jokiranta, T S; Meri, S; Peter, H H; Eibel, H; Zipfel, P F

    1999-01-01

    FHL-1/reconectin and factor H are two human complement regulators which are encoded by a single gene. FHL-1/reconectin contains the first 7 of 20 SCR protein domains of factor H and has four unique residues attached to its C-terminal end. The overlapping region of 445 amino acids explains the related complement regulatory functions of the two proteins. However, unique biological functions have also been reported for FHL-1/reconectin, such as cell adhesion and binding to microbial surfaces. Both proteins are synthesised and secreted by the liver. Extrahepatic synthesis occurs in a wide variety of cells, e.g. in monocytes, fibroblasts or neuronal cells. Unexpectedly, FHL-1/reconectin and factor H exhibit distinct expression patterns. This is also observed in disease situations such as in rheumatoid arthritis or malignancies. In rheumatoid arthritis a potentially protective role is suggested by the local synthesis of both FHL-1/reconectin and factor H in synovial fibroblasts and their induction by the anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone and the cytokine IFN-gamma, but not by TNF-alpha. FHL-1/reconectin is overexpressed in certain tumor cells such as glioblastoma, conferring an exceptional resistance to such cells against complement mediated lysis. Although FHL-1/reconectin and factor H are encoded by a single gene, regulated by the same gene promoter and initiate transcription at the same start site, their transcripts are differently regulated. The putative control levels, which are responsible for this complex regulation, include transcript elongation, RNA processing, alternative splicing and differential poly(A) site selection.

  5. C1q acts in the tumour microenvironment as a cancer-promoting factor independently of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Bulla, Roberta; Tripodo, Claudio; Rami, Damiano; Ling, Guang Sheng; Agostinis, Chiara; Guarnotta, Carla; Zorzet, Sonia; Durigutto, Paolo; Botto, Marina; Tedesco, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Complement C1q is the activator of the classical pathway. However, it is now recognized that C1q can exert functions unrelated to complement activation. Here we show that C1q, but not C4, is expressed in the stroma and vascular endothelium of several human malignant tumours. Compared with wild-type (WT) or C3- or C5-deficient mice, C1q-deficient (C1qa(-/-)) mice bearing a syngeneic B16 melanoma exhibit a slower tumour growth and prolonged survival. This effect is not attributable to differences in the tumour-infiltrating immune cells. Tumours developing in WT mice display early deposition of C1q, higher vascular density and an increase in the number of lung metastases compared with C1qa(-/-) mice. Bone marrow (BM) chimeras between C1qa(-/-) and WT mice identify non-BM-derived cells as the main local source of C1q that can promote cancer cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. Together these findings support a role for locally synthesized C1q in promoting tumour growth.

  6. Microbe-specific C3b deposition in the horseshoe crab complement system in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Toyoki; Shibata, Toshio; Kitazaki, Kazuki; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens in the mammalian complement system, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. To understand the molecular mechanism of C3b deposition on microbes, we characterized two types of C2/factor B homologs (designated TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2) identified from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Although the domain architectures of TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were identical to those of mammalian homologs, they contained five-repeated and seven-repeated complement control protein domains at their N-terminal regions, respectively. TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were synthesized and glycosylated in hemocytes and secreted to hemolymph plasma, which existed in a complex with C3 (TtC3), and their activation by microbes was absolutely Mg(2+)-dependent. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TtC3b deposition was Mg(2+)-dependent on Gram-positive bacteria or fungi, but not on Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this analysis demonstrated that Ca(2+)-dependent lectins (C-reactive protein-1 and tachylectin-5A) were required for TtC3b deposition on Gram-positive bacteria, and that a Ca(2+)-independent lectin (Tachypleus plasma lectin-1) was definitely indispensable for TtC3b deposition on fungi. In contrast, a horseshoe crab lipopolysaccharide-sensitive protease factor C was necessary and sufficient to deposit TtC3b on Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that plasma lectins and factor C play key roles in microbe-specific TtC3b deposition in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

  7. Structure-function mapping of BbCRASP-1, the key complement factor H and FHL-1 binding protein of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Frank S; Kraiczy, Peter; Roversi, Pietro; Simon, Markus M; Brade, Volker; Jahraus, Oliver; Wallis, Russell; Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Lea, Susan M

    2006-05-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, a spirochaete transmitted to human hosts during feeding of infected Ixodes ticks, is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most frequent vector-borne disease in Eurasia and North America. Sporadically Lyme disease develops into a chronic, multisystemic disorder. Serum-resistant B. burgdorferi strains bind complement factor H (FH) and FH-like protein 1 (FHL-1) on the spirochaete surface. This binding is dependent on the expression of proteins termed complement-regulator acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs). The atomic structure of BbCRASP-1, the key FHL-1/FH-binding protein of B. burgdorferi, has recently been determined. Our analysis indicates that its protein topology apparently evolved to provide a high affinity interaction site for FH/FHL-1 and leads to an atomic-level hypothesis for the functioning of BbCRASP-1. This work demonstrates that pathogens interact with complement regulators in ways that are distinct from the mechanisms used by the host and are thus obvious targets for drug design.

  8. Identification of factor H-like protein 1 as the predominant complement regulator in Bruch's membrane: implications for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon J; Schmidt, Christoph Q; White, Anne M; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Morgan, B Paul; Bishop, Paul N

    2014-11-15

    The tight regulation of innate immunity on extracellular matrix (ECM) is a vital part of immune homeostasis throughout the human body, and disruption to this regulation in the eye is thought to contribute directly to the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The plasma complement regulator factor H (FH) is thought to be the main regulator that protects ECM against damaging complement activation. However, in the present study we demonstrate that a truncated form of FH, called FH-like protein 1 (FHL-1), is the main regulatory protein in the layer of ECM under human retina, called Bruch's membrane. Bruch's membrane is a major site of AMD disease pathogenesis and where drusen, the hallmark lesions of AMD, form. We show that FHL-1 can passively diffuse through Bruch's membrane, whereas the full sized, glycosylated, FH cannot. FHL-1 is largely bound to Bruch's membrane through interactions with heparan sulfate, and we show that the common Y402H polymorphism in the CFH gene, associated with an increased risk of AMD, reduces the binding of FHL-1 to this heparan sulfate. We also show that FHL-1 is retained in drusen whereas FH coats the periphery of the lesions, perhaps inhibiting their clearance. Our results identify a novel mechanism of complement regulation in the human eye, which highlights potential new avenues for therapeutic strategies.

  9. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced prenatally lethal mutations define at least two complementation groups within the embryonic ectoderm development (eed) locus in mouse chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Carpenter, D A

    1993-01-01

    Two loci [l(7)5Rn and l(7)6Rn] defined by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced, prenatally lethal mutations were mapped by means of trans complementation crosses to mice carrying lethal deletions of the albino (c) locus in Chromosome (Chr) 7. Both loci were found to map to the subregion of the Mod-2-sh-1 interval that contains the eed (embryonic ectoderm development) locus, eed has been defined by the inability of embryos homozygous for certain c deletions to develop beyond the early stages of gastrulation. Evidence for at least two loci necessary for normal prenatal development, rather than one locus, that map within the eed interval came from the observation that two prenatally lethal mutations, 3354SB [l(7)5Rn3354SB] and 4234SB [l(7)6Rn4234SB], could complement each other in trans, but could not each be complemented individually by c deletions known to include the eed locus. A somewhat leaky allele of l(7)5Rn [l(7)5Rn1989SB] was also recovered, in which hemizygotes are often stillborn and homozygotes exhibit variable fitness and survival. The mapping of the loci defined by these mutations is likely to be useful for genetic, molecular, and phenotypic characterization of the eed region, and mutations at either locus (or both loci) may contribute to the eed phenotype.

  10. Complement C3 and Decay-Accelerating Factor Expression Levels Are Modulated by Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Endometrial Compartments During the Implantation Window

    PubMed Central

    Argandoña, Felipe; Azúa, Rodrigo; Kohen, Paulina; Devoto, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The control of complement activation in the embryo–maternal environment has been demonstrated to be critical for embryo survival. Complement proteins are expressed in the human endometrium; however, the modulation of this expression by embryo signals has not been explored. To assess the expression of complement proteins in response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), we designed an experimental study using in vivo and in vitro models. Twelve fertile women were treated with hCG or left untreated during the mid-luteal phase, and an endometrial biopsy was performed 24 hours later. The localizations of C3, membrane cofactor protein (MCP; CD46), decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55), and protectin (CD59) were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of these proteins were quantified by real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in cells harvested from endometrial compartments using laser capture microdissection. Endometrial explants were cultured with or without hCG for 24 hours, and the C3 and DAF protein levels were measured by Western blotting. Elevated C3 mRNA levels in stromal cells and elevated DAF levels in epithelial luminal cells were detected after hCG treatment. In the endometrial explant model, the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 inhibited the increases in the levels of C3 and DAF in response to hCG. The findings of this study indicate that hCG plays a role in embryo–endometrium communication and affects the expression of complement proteins in endometrial compartments during the implantation window. PMID:23427180

  11. The complement anaphylatoxin C3a receptor (C3aR) contributes to the inflammatory response in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Wende, Elisabeth; Laudeley, Robert; Bleich, André; Bleich, Eva; Wetsel, Rick A; Glage, Silke; Klos, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are a critical public health issue, and as treatment options remain limited, there is a need to unravel the underlying pathomechanisms in order to identify new therapeutic targets. Complement activation was found in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease, and the complement anaphylatoxin C5a and its receptor C5aR have been implicated in disease pathogenesis in animal models of bowel inflammation. To further characterize complement-related pathomechanisms in inflammatory bowel disease, we have investigated the role of the anaphylatoxin C3a receptor in acute dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice. For this, colitis was induced in C3a receptor-deficient BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, and disease severity was evaluated by clinical and histological examination, and by measuring the mRNA expression or protein levels of inflammatory mediators in the tissue. C3a receptor deficiency was partially protective in BALB/c mice, which had significantly reduced weight loss, clinical and histological scores, colon shortening, and CXCL-1/KC mRNA, myeloperoxidase and interleukin-6 tissue levels compared to the corresponding wild type mice. In C57BL/6 mice the differences between wild type and C3a receptor-deficient animals were much smaller and reached no significance. Our data demonstrate that the contribution of C3a receptor to disease pathogenesis and severity of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice depends on the genetic background. Further studies will be required to clarify whether targeting of C3a receptor, possibly in combination with C5a receptor, might be considered as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Human IgG1 monoclonal antibody against human collagen 17 noncollagenous 16A domain induces blisters via complement activation in experimental bullous pemphigoid model.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Ujiie, Hideyuki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Wang, Gang; Moriuchi, Reine; Qiao, Hong-jiang; Morioka, Hiroshi; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Long, Heather A; Nishie, Wataru; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2010-12-15

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease caused by IgG autoantibodies targeting the noncollagenous 16A (NC16A) domain of human collagen 17 (hCOL17), which triggers blister formation via complement activation. Previous in vitro analysis demonstrated that IgG1 autoantibodies showed much stronger pathogenic activity than IgG4 autoantibodies; however, the exact pathogenic role of IgG1 autoantibodies has not been fully demonstrated in vivo. We constructed a recombinant IgG1 mAb against hCOL17 NC16A from BP patients. In COL17-humanized mice, this mAb effectively reproduced a BP phenotype that included subepidermal blisters, deposition of IgG1, C1q and C3, neutrophil infiltration, and mast cell degranulation. Subsequently, alanine substitutions at various C1q binding sites were separately introduced to the Fc region of the IgG1 mAb. Among these mutated mAbs, the one that was mutated at the P331 residue completely failed to activate the complement in vitro and drastically lost pathogenic activity in COL17-humanized mice. These findings indicate that P331 is a key residue required for complement activation and that IgG1-dependent complement activation is essential for blister formation in BP. This study is, to our knowledge, the first direct evidence that IgG1 Abs to hCOL17 NC16A can induce blister formation in vivo, and it raises the possibility that IgG1 mAbs with Fc modification may be used to block pathogenic epitopes in autoimmune diseases.

  13. Complement regulates conventional DC-mediated NK-cell activation by inducing TGF-β1 in Gr-1+ myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Qing, Xiaoping; Koo, Gloria C; Salmon, Jane E

    2012-07-01

    Complement activation modulates DC-mediated T-cell activation, but whether complement affects DC-mediated priming of NK cells is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that conventional DCs (cDCs) from C3(-/-) and C5aR(-/-) mice are hyperresponsive to polyI:C, a TLR3 ligand, leading to enhanced NK-cell activation. We found that cDCs lack C5a receptor (C5aR) and do not respond to C5a directly. Depletion of Gr-1(+) myeloid cells augments polyI:C-induced cDC activation in WT but not in C3(-/-) or C5aR(-/-) mice, indicating that the effect of complement activation on cDCs is indirectly mediated through C5aR-expressing Gr-1(+) myeloid cells. We further demonstrated that the mechanism by which Gr-1(+) myeloid cells regulate the activity of cDCs involves C5a-dependent TGF-β1 production in Gr-1(+) myeloid cells. C5a enhances and blocking C5aR decreases TGF-β1 production in cultured bone marrow Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells. C5aR deficiency is associated with reduced circulating TGF-β1 levels, while depleting Gr-1(+) myeloid cells abrogates this difference between WT and C5aR(-/-) mice. Lastly, we showed that enhanced cDC-NK-cell activity in C3(-/-) mice led to delayed melanoma tumor growth. Thus, complement activation indirectly regulates cDC-NK-cell activation in response to inflammatory stimuli such as TLR3 by promoting TGF-β1 production in Gr-1(+) myeloid cells at steady state.

  14. Very low residual concentrations of rituximab long after infusion still induce positive B-cell complement-dependent cytotoxicity-crossmatch.

    PubMed

    Gatault, Philippe; Philippe, Gatault; Jollet, Isabelle; Isabelle, Jollet; Paintaud, Gilles; Gilles, Paintaud; Magdelaine, Charlotte; Charlotte, Magdelaine; Bridoux, Franck; Franck, Bridoux; Lebranchu, Yvon; Yvon, Lebranchu; Büchler, Matthias; Matthias, Büchler; Touchard, Guy; Guy, Touchard; Thierry, Antoine; Antoine, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    Rituximab may induce positive B-cell complement-dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch (CDC-XM) in the absence of donor-specific antibodies, as we report in these two cases. We retrospectively assessed the in vitro concentration-effect relationship of rituximab in sera. B-cell CDC-XM results were positive only in the presence of rituximab, even with low concentrations (inferior to 1 μg/mL). Moreover, rituximab neutralization with increasing concentration of an anti-rituximab-idiotype monoclonal antibody progressively reduced B-cell lysis. In conclusion, measurement of rituximab content may be useful to identify sera at risk of misinterpretation in immunized patients.

  15. Inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide are amplified in primary human monocytes but suppressed in macrophages by complement protein C5a.

    PubMed

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Iyer, Abishek; Suen, Jacky Y; Ariffin, Juliana K; Hohenhaus, Daniel M; Sweet, Matthew J; Fairlie, David P

    2013-10-15

    Monocytes and macrophages are important innate immune cells equipped with danger-sensing receptors, including complement and Toll-like receptors. Complement protein C5a, acting via C5aR, is shown in this study to differentially modulate LPS-induced inflammatory responses in primary human monocytes versus macrophages. Whereas C5a enhanced secretion of LPS-induced IL-6 and TNF from primary human monocytes, C5a inhibited these responses while increasing IL-10 secretion in donor-matched human monocyte-derived macrophages differentiated by GM-CSF or M-CSF. Gαi/c-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling induced by C5a was amplified in macrophages but not in monocytes by LPS. Accordingly, the Gαi inhibitor pertussis toxin and MEK inhibitor U0126 blocked C5a inhibition of LPS-induced IL-6 and TNF production from macrophages. This synergy was independent of IL-10, PI3K, p38, JNK, and the differentiating agent. Furthermore, C5a did not inhibit IL-6 production from macrophages induced by other TLR agonists that are selective for Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β (polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid) or MyD88 (imiquimod), demonstrating selectivity for C5a regulation of LPS responses. Finally, suppression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF in macrophages did not compromise antimicrobial activity; instead, C5a enhanced clearance of the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from macrophages. C5aR is thus a regulatory switch that modulates TLR4 signaling via the Gαi/c-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling axis in human macrophages but not monocytes. The differential effects of C5a are consistent with amplifying monocyte proinflammatory responses to systemic danger signals, but attenuating macrophage cytokine responses (without compromising microbicidal activity), thereby restraining inflammatory responses to localized infections.

  16. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host. PMID:28066433

  17. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host.

  18. Complement activation in diseases presenting with thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Meri, Seppo

    2013-09-01

    The complement system contains a great deal of biological "energy". This is demonstrated by the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), which is a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) characterized by endothelial and blood cell damage and thrombotic vascular occlusions. Kidneys and often also other organs (brain, lungs and gastrointestinal tract) are affected. A principal pathophysiological feature in aHUS is a complement attack against endothelial cells and blood cells. This leads to platelet activation and aggregation, hemolysis, prothrombotic and inflammatory changes. The attacks can be triggered by infections, pregnancy, drugs or trauma. Complement-mediated aHUS is distinct from bacterial shiga-toxin (produced e.g. by E. coli O:157 or O:104 serotypes) induced "typical" HUS, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) associated with ADAMTS13 (an adamalysin enzyme) dysfunction and from a recently described disease related to mutations in intracellular diacylglycerol kinase ε (DGKE). Mutations in proteins that regulate complement (factor H, factor I, MCP/CD46, thrombomodulin) or promote (C3, factor B) amplification of its alternative pathway or anti-factor H antibodies predispose to aHUS. The fundamental defect in aHUS is an excessive complement attack against cellular surfaces. This can be due to 1) an inability to regulate complement on self cell surfaces, 2) hyperactive C3 convertases or 3) complement activation and coagulation promoting changes on cell surfaces. The most common genetic cause is in factor H, where aHUS mutations disrupt its ability to recognize protective polyanions on surfaces where C3b has become attached. Most TMAs are thus characterized by misdirected complement activation affecting endothelial cell and platelet integrity. Copyright © 2013 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Complement C4-derived monocyte-directed chemotaxis-inhibitory factor. A molecular mechanism to cause polymorphonuclear leukocyte-predominant infiltration in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cavities.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Tsuruta, T.; Takagi, K.; Kambara, T.

    1991-01-01

    To reveal the mechanism of the lesser infiltration of monocytes in synovial cavities with rheumatoid arthritis despite the presence of chronic inflammation, the synovial fluid from 15 rheumatoid arthritis patients was analyzed with respect to leukocyte chemotaxis. The synovial fluid possessed strong chemotactic activity to polymorphonuclear leukocytes but rather suppressed one to monocytes. The synovial fluid contained two different inhibitory activities in monocyte chemotaxis. One, which also suppressed polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis, was identified as alpha 1 protease inhibitor. The other, with molecular weight of 8 kd, possessed the specificity to monocytes and shared the antigenicity with complement C4 but not with C3 or C5. A similar inhibitor was generated in normal human plasma when the classical pathway of the complement system was initiated with aggregated human IgG, while it was not when alternative pathway was initiated with zymosan. The small size factor in the synovial fluid, apparently derived from C4, seemed to be a cyto-directed factor that might block an early part of signal transduction system of monocytes in the chemotaxis. After removal of the small-size inhibitor, the synovial fluid exhibited chemotactic ability to monocytes. Therefore the apparent C4-derived factor might play a key role in the polymorphonuclear leukocyte-predominant infiltration in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:2024711

  20. Production and interferon-gamma-mediated regulation of complement component C2 and factors B and D by the astroglioma cell line U105-MG.

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, S R; Ishii, Y; Agrawal, A; Volanakis, J E

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the synthesis of the complement component C2 and factors B and D by the human astroglioma cell line U105-MG. All three components were structurally and antigenically similar to their serum counterparts, as determined by biosynthetic labelling studies or Western blot analysis. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the mRNAs of all three components had the same apparent sizes as the equivalent mRNAs from hepatocyte and monocyte cell lines. Interestingly, U105-MG cells produce two C2 transcripts with sizes of approximately 2.8 and 2.3 kb. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) enhanced the expression of C2 and factor B mRNA and protein in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, while factor D expression was refractory to IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma appeared to predominantly enhance the expression of the large (2.8 kb) C2 transcript. Kinetic studies demonstrated peak C2 and factor B expression in 48 h in response to IFN-gamma, similar to the acute-phase response of factor B in serum. These data are the first to demonstrate the synthesis of C2 and factor D by astroglioma cells. Combined with previous reports documenting the synthesis of C3 by astrocytes, our data suggest that endogenous synthesis of complement proteins, and particularly of alternative pathway activation components (C3, factors B and D), may play an important role in host defence in the central nervous system. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1445220

  1. The Meningococcal Vaccine Candidate Neisserial Surface Protein A (NspA) Binds to Factor H and Enhances Meningococcal Resistance to Complement

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lisa A.; Ngampasutadol, Jutamas; Wallace, Ruth; Reid, Jane E. A.; Vogel, Ulrich; Ram, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Complement forms an important arm of innate immunity against invasive meningococcal infections. Binding of the alternative complement pathway inhibitor factor H (fH) to fH-binding protein (fHbp) is one mechanism meningococci employ to limit complement activation on the bacterial surface. fHbp is a leading vaccine candidate against group B Neisseria meningitidis. Novel mechanisms that meningococci employ to bind fH could undermine the efficacy of fHbp-based vaccines. We observed that fHbp deletion mutants of some meningococcal strains showed residual fH binding suggesting the presence of a second receptor for fH. Ligand overlay immunoblotting using membrane fractions from one such strain showed that fH bound to a ∼17 kD protein, identified by MALDI-TOF analysis as Neisserial surface protein A (NspA), a meningococcal vaccine candidate whose function has not been defined. Deleting nspA, in the background of fHbp deletion mutants, abrogated fH binding and mAbs against NspA blocked fH binding, confirming NspA as a fH binding molecule on intact bacteria. NspA expression levels vary among strains and expression correlated with the level of fH binding; over-expressing NspA enhanced fH binding to bacteria. Progressive truncation of the heptose (Hep) I chain of lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or sialylation of lacto-N-neotetraose LOS both increased fH binding to NspA-expressing meningococci, while expression of capsule reduced fH binding to the strains tested. Similar to fHbp, binding of NspA to fH was human-specific and occurred through fH domains 6–7. Consistent with its ability to bind fH, deleting NspA increased C3 deposition and resulted in increased complement-dependent killing. Collectively, these data identify a key complement evasion mechanism with important implications for ongoing efforts to develop meningococcal vaccines that employ fHbp as one of its components. PMID:20686663

  2. Complement and Immunoregulation in Tissue Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    19), T cells (20, 21), neutrophils (22), endothelial cells and platelets (23). Deposition of natural antibodies, subsequent complement activation ...of the ischemic cells to which natural IgM bind and subsequently activate complement (27, 28). Deficiency of complement factors has been shown to be...expression by damaged cells of antigens that are recognized by circulating natural antibodies, which fix and activate complement. This is supported by

  3. Environmental Factors Inducing Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, N

    2012-01-01

    Background An explosion of research has been done in discovering how human health is affected by environmental factors. I will discuss the impacts of environmental cancer causing factors and how they continue to cause multiple disruptions in cellular networking. Some risk factors may not cause cancer. Other factors initiate consecutive genetic mutations that would eventually alter the normal pathway of cellular proliferations and differentiation. Genetic mutations in four groups of genes; (Oncogenes, Tumor suppressor genes, Apoptosis genes and DNA repairing genes) play a vital role in altering the normal cell division. In recent years, molecular genetics have greatly increased our understanding of the basic mechanisms in cancer development and utilizing these molecular techniques for cancer screening, diagnosis, prognosis and therapies. Inhibition of carcinogenic exposures wherever possible should be the goal of cancer prevention programs to reduce exposures from all environmental carcinogens. PMID:23304670

  4. Active invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis and infection-induced complement activation in ApoE-/- mice brains.

    PubMed

    Poole, Sophie; Singhrao, Sim K; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Rivera, Mercedes; Velsko, Irina; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Crean, StJohn

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

  5. Complement Factor 3 Could Be an Independent Risk Factor for Mortality in Patients with HBV Related Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Geng-lin; Zhang, Ting; Ye, Yi-nong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Xie, Chan; Peng, Liang; Gao, Zhi-liang

    2016-01-01

    The complement is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple liver disorders. However, its role in patients with HBV related acute-on-chronic liver failure (HBV-ACLF) remains unclear. Serum levels of the third and fourth complement components (C3, C4) and complement function (CH50) were examined in this prospective, observational study. Associations between their expression and disease activity were analyzed. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves. Predictors of clinical outcome were determined by Cox regression analysis. C3, C4, and CH50 levels were significantly lower in HBV-ACLF patients compared to controls. C3, C4, and CH50 levels were negatively correlated with Tbil levels but positively associated with PTA levels. C3 levels were negatively associated with MELD-Na. C3 levels were significantly lower in HBV-ACLF patients who died compared to patients who survived. In a median hospital stay of 39 days, mortality occurred in 41 patients with a progressive increase based on C3 grade (P = 0.008). The actuarial probability of developing mortality was significantly higher in patients with low C3 grade compared to those with high C3 grade (P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that C3 levels were an independent predictor of mortality. Complement played a pathogenic role in HBV-ACLF patients and C3 was an independent predictor of mortality. PMID:27144164

  6. Plasminogen Is a Complement Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Diana; Schindler, Susann; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Plasminogen is a 92-kDa single chain glycoprotein that circulates in plasma as a zymogen and when converted to proteolytically active plasmin dissolves preformed fibrin clots and extracellular matrix components. Here, we characterize the role of plasmin(ogen) in the complement cascade. Plasminogen binds the central complement protein C3, the C3 cleavage products C3b and C3d, and C5. Plasminogen binds to C3, C3b, C3d, and C5 via lysine residues, and the interaction is ionic strength-dependent. Plasminogen and Factor H bind C3b; however, the two proteins bind to different sites and do not compete for binding. Plasminogen affects complement action in multiple ways. Plasminogen enhanced Factor I-mediated C3b degradation in the presence of the cofactor Factor H. Plasminogen when activated to plasmin inhibited complement as demonstrated by hemolytic assays using either rabbit or sheep erythrocytes. Similarly, plasmin either in the fluid phase or attached to surfaces inhibited complement that was activated via the alternative and classical pathways and cleaved C3b to fragments of 68, 40, 30, and 17 kDa. The C3b fragments generated by plasmin differ in size from those generated by the complement protease Factor I, suggesting that plasmin-mediated C3b cleavage fragments lack effector function. Plasmin also cleaved C5 to products of 65, 50, 30, and 25 kDa. Thus, plasmin(ogen) regulates both complement and coagulation, the two central cascade systems of a vertebrate organism. This complement-inhibitory activity of plasmin provides a new explanation why pathogenic microbes utilize plasmin(ogen) for immune evasion and tissue penetration. PMID:22451663

  7. N-Terminal Prodomain of Pfs230 Synthesized Using a Cell-Free System Is Sufficient To Induce Complement-Dependent Malaria Transmission-Blocking Activity▿

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Mayumi; Wu, Yimin; Iriko, Hideyuki; Muratova, Olga; MacDonald, Nicholas J.; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Takeo, Satoru; Otsuki, Hitoshi; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine is to block the development of malaria parasites in the mosquito and thus prevent subsequent infection of the human host. Previous studies have demonstrated that the gametocyte/gamete surface protein Pfs230 can induce transmission-blocking immunity and have evaluated Escherichia coli-produced Pfs230 as a transmission-blocking vaccine candidate. In this study, we used the wheat germ cell-free expression system to produce N-terminal fragments of Pfs230 and evaluated the transmission-blocking activity of antisera raised against the recombinant Pfs230 protein. The rabbit antisera reacted to the surface of cultured gametocytes and gametes of the Plasmodium falciparum NF54 line, recognized the 360-kDa form of parasite-produced Pfs230 by Western blot assay, and reduced the infectivity of NF54 parasites to Anopheles stefensi mosquitoes in the presence of complement in a standard membrane feeding assay. Thus, our data demonstrate that the N-terminal pro domain of Pfs230 is sufficient to induce complement-dependent transmission-blocking activity against P. falciparum. PMID:21715579

  8. Citrate confers less filter-induced complement activation and neutrophil degranulation than heparin when used for anticoagulation during continuous venovenous haemofiltration in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During continuous venovenous haemofiltration (CVVH), regional anticoagulation with citrate may be superior to heparin in terms of biocompatibility, since heparin as opposed to citrate may activate complement (reflected by circulating C5a) and induce neutrophil degranulation in the filter and myeloperoxidase (MPO) release from endothelium. Methods No anticoagulation (n = 13), unfractionated heparin (n = 8) and trisodium citrate (n = 17) regimens during CVVH were compared. Blood samples were collected pre- and postfilter; C5a, elastase and MPO were determined by ELISA. Additionally, C5a was also measured in the ultrafiltrate. Results In the heparin group, there was C5a production across the filter which most decreased over time as compared to other groups (P = 0.007). There was also net production of elastase and MPO across the filter during heparin anticoagulation (P = 0.049 or lower), while production was minimal and absent in the no anticoagulation and citrate group, respectively. During heparin anticoagulation, plasma concentrations of MPO at the inlet increased in the first 10 minutes of CVVH (P = 0.024). Conclusion Citrate confers less filter-induced, potentially harmful complement activation and neutrophil degranulation and less endothelial activation than heparin when used for anticoagulation during continuous venovenous haemofiltration in critically ill patients. PMID:24438360

  9. Derivatives of human complement component C3 for therapeutic complement depletion: a novel class of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Fritzinger, David C; Hew, Brian E; Lee, June Q; Newhouse, James; Alam, Maqsudul; Ciallella, John R; Bowers, Mallory; Gorsuch, William B; Guikema, Benjamin J; Stahl, Gregory L; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    To obtain proteins with the complement-depleting activity of Cobra Venom Factor (CVF), but with less immunogenicity, we have prepared human C3/CVF hybrid proteins, in which the C-terminus of the alpha-chain of human C3 is exchanged with homologous regions of the C-terminus of the beta-chain of CVF. We show that these hybrid proteins are able to deplete complement, both in vitro and in vivo. One hybrid protein, HC3-1496, is shown to be effective in reducing complement-mediated damage in two disease models in mice, collagen-induced arthritis and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Human C3/CVF hybrid proteins represent a novel class ofbiologicals as potential therapeutic agents in many diseases where complement is involved in the pathogenesis.

  10. Kinetics of acute inflammation induced by Escherichia coli in rabbits. II. The effect of hyperimmunization, complement depletion, and depletion of leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kopaniak, M. M.; Movat, H. Z.

    1983-01-01

    The inflammatory response to Escherichia coli was quantitated in the skin of normal rabbits and the kinetics established as described previously. Hyperemia, measured with radiolabeled microspheres; vascular permeability, estimated with 125 I-albumin; and leukocyte infiltration, quantitated with 51Cr-labeled autologous leukocytes, reached maximal values 3 hours after the injection of bacteria and subsided almost completely by 6 hours. Hemorrhage, measured with homologous 59Fe-erythrocytes, continued to increase between 1 and 6 hours after injection and then reached plateau levels. The lesions were studied up to 8 hours, since in the previous study no changes were observed beyond that time. In the study described in this paper, the host mediation systems were manipulated in various groups of rabbits in order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of the inflammatory reaction. One group of animals was hyperimmunized with the E coli organisms, another was partially depleted of hemolytic complement with cobra venom factor, and yet another was rendered leukopenic with nitrogen mustard. In hyperimmunized animals hyperemia in the dermal lesions induced by the microorganisms was significantly more intense than in normal rabbits. Vascular permeability increase occurred earlier in hyperimmunized rabbits and at 1 hour was significantly greater than in normals. Decomplemented rabbits had significantly less vascular permeability than normal animals, whereas in leukopenic rabbits no increase in vascular permeability could be elicited. Leukocyte accumulation was increased over the normal animals in the lesions of hyperimmunized rabbits. Hemorrhage was significantly decreased in leukopenic rabbits. Histologic examination of the lesions revealed that whereas in normal animals the infiltrating neutrophils ingested most of the bacteria and formed definite abscesses by 6-8 hours, these abscesses were absent in leukopenic animals, and free-lying bacteria were

  11. Effect of analytical factors on immunochemical reference limits for complement component C3 in serum of a reference pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Buffone, G J; Lewis, S A

    1977-06-01

    We evaluated analytical factors such as antibody specificity, standard materials, and methodology for the measurement of C3. Mancini-type radial immunodiffusion and immunonephelometry were shown to give comparable data if variables other than procedural variables are eliminated. The most significant analytical factors affecting the measurement were antiserum specificity and source of standard material.

  12. Detection of a complement-derived chemotactic factor for tumor cells in human inflammatory and neoplastic effusions.

    PubMed Central

    Orr, F. W.; Delikatny, E. J.; Mokashi, S.; Krepart, G. V.; Stiver, H. G.

    1983-01-01

    A chemotactic factor for neoplastic cells can be generated in vitro by incubating human C5 or C5a with leukocytic or pancreatic lysosomal enzymes and is also detectable in experimental inflammatory exudates. The authors therefore sought evidence for the existence of this factor in human effusions. Using the Boyden chamber assay, they detected chemotactic activity for MB-MDA-231 human breast carcinoma cells and Walker ascites tumor cells in human inflammatory and neoplastic exudates, including ascites, pleural effusions, synovial fluids and cerebrospinal fluids. Chemotactic activity was not found in transudates, normal cerebrospinal fluid, or normal serum. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells from one of the effusions migrated toward autologous ascites and towards the C5-derived chemotactic factor that had been prepared in vitro. In gel filtration the chemotactic factor behaved generally as a molecule having a molecular weight of approximately 6000 daltons. The activity was blocked after incubation with antiserums directed against C5 but not by antiserums directed against C3 or C4. In vitro, chemotactic activity for tumor cells could be generated by incubating extracts of exudate cells with autologous plasma or with purified C5. The authors conclude that a chemotactic factor for tumor cells can be formed in human effusions and that this factor has properties similar to those of a previously described C5-derived chemotactic factor. PMID:6185003

  13. Complement factors C1q, C3 and C5b-9 in the posterior sclera of guinea pigs with negative lens-defocused myopia

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ting-Ting; Long, Qin; Yang, Xue

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the expression of complement factors in the posterior scleral fibroblasts of guinea pigs with negative lens-defocused myopia. METHODS Eighteen guinea pigs were assigned randomly to two groups: the negative lens-defocused group (NLD group, n=9) and the normal control without treatment group (NC group, n=9). The effect of myopic induction was compared in three subgroups: eyes treated with a -10.00 D negative lens in the NLD group (NL group), eyes treated with a plano (0 D) lens in the NLD group (PL group), and untreated right eyes in the NC group (NC group). The following analyses were conducted at four weeks: examination of the refractive error via retinoscopy, assessment of complement C5b-9 expression in the posterior scleral fibroblasts using immunohistochemistry, and measurements of complement C1q and C3 protein levels in the posterior sclera by Western blot. RESULTS After an induction period of four weeks, a significant myopic shift was detected in the eyes of the NL group, relative to that of the PL and NC groups (P<0.05). Data analysis showed a significant increase in the percentage of C5b-9 immunopositive fibroblasts in the posterior sclera of the NL group eyes, compared to the PL group (q=11.50, P<0.001). Significantly higher levels of C1q (q=4.94, P=0.01) and C3 (q=4.07, P=0.03) protein were detected in the posterior sclera of NL group eyes, compared to the PL group. There were no significant difference between the PL and NC groups for C5b-9 (q=2.44, P=0.10), C1q (q=1.55, P=0.53) and C3 (q=0.98, P=0.77) in the posterior sclera. CONCLUSION The data from present study provide evidence of the up-regulation of C5b-9, C1q and C3 in the posterior scleral fibroblasts in a NLD myopic animal model. The results suggest that the complement system may be involved in the development of myopia. PMID:26309860

  14. Activation of bovine monocytes and neutrophils by the Bb fragment of complement factor B: demonstration by the uptake of 3H-deoxyglucose.

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, M S; Tabel, H; Misra, V

    1990-01-01

    The Bb fragment is the enzymatically active split product of bovine complement factor B. The Bb fragment was obtained after zymosan treatment of fresh bovine serum and fractionation of the treated serum, first over diethylaminoethyl-Sephacel and then over an affinity column made up of monoclonal antibody to bovine Bb, coupled to cyanogen-bromide-activated Sepharose. Purified Bb has a molecular weight of 64,000, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The ability of purified Bb to activate phagocytes was assessed. The activation assay was based on the principle that the primary source of energy for the phagocytes is obtained from glucose. 3H-deoxyglucose, a nonmetabolizable analogue of glucose, was used to obtain the quantitative measurement of the activation process. The activation by Bb was shown by the uptake of the labelled deoxyglucose in the phagocytic cells and was comparable to the activation caused by phorbol myristate acetate and N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine, run in parallel. These data showed that fragment Bb activates bovine monocytes and neutrophils and also suggested that, when generated after complement activation, Bb may stimulate monocytes and neutrophils for enhanced phagocytosis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2306658

  15. Immunization with LytB protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae activates complement-mediated phagocytosis and induces protection against pneumonia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Bruno; Aguinagalde, Leire; Ruiz, Susana; Domenech, Mirian; Antequera, María Luisa; Fenoll, Asunción; García, Pedro; García, Ernesto; Yuste, Jose

    2016-12-07

    The cell wall glucosaminidase LytB of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a surface exposed protein involved in daughter cell separation, biofilm formation and contributes to different aspects of the pathogenesis process. In this study we have characterized the antibody responses after immunization of mice with LytB in the presence of alhydrogel as an adjuvant. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays measuring different subclasses of immunoglobulin G, demonstrated that the antibody responses to LytB were predominantly IgG1 and IgG2b, followed by IgG3 and IgG2a subclasses. Complement-mediated immunity against two different pneumococcal serotypes was investigated using sera from immunized mice. Immunization with LytB increased the recognition of S. pneumoniae by complement components C1q and C3b demonstrating that anti-LytB antibodies trigger activation of the classical pathway. Phagocytosis assays showed that serum containing antibodies to LytB stimulates neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis against S. pneumoniae. Animal models of infection including invasive pneumonia and sepsis were performed with two different clinical isolates. Vaccination with LytB increased bacterial clearance and induced protection demonstrating that LytB might be a good candidate to be considered in a future protein-based vaccine against S. pneumoniae.

  16. white anther: A Petunia Mutant That Abolishes Pollen Flavonol Accumulation, Induces Male Sterility, and Is Complemented by a Chalcone Synthase Transgene1

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Carolyn A.; Fahy, Deirdre; Wang, Huai-Yu; Taylor, Loverine P.

    1999-01-01

    A mutation in an inbred line of petunia (Petunia hybrida) produces a reduction in the deep-purple corolla pigmentation and changes the anther color from yellow to white. In addition, the mutant, designated white anther (wha), is functionally male sterile. The inability of pollen from wha plants to germinate in vitro provides a physiological basis for the lack of seed set observed in self-crosses of the mutant. Biochemical complementation with nanomolar amounts of kaempferol, a flavonol aglycone, confirms that the inability of the wha pollen to germinate is due to a lack of this essential compound. Transgenic complementation with a functional ChsA (Chalcone synthase A) cDNA suggests that the genetic lesion responsible for the wha phenotype is in Chs, the gene for the first enzyme in the flavonol biosynthesis pathway. The genetic background of the parental line, as well as the pollen phenotype, allowed us to deduce that the wha mutation is in ChsA. To our knowledge, wha is the first induced, nontransgenic Chs mutant described in petunia, and analysis of the mutation confirms earlier molecular and genetic observations that only two Chs genes (A and J) are expressed in reproductive tissues and that they are differentially regulated in corolla and anther. PMID:10364414

  17. white anther: A petunia mutant that abolishes pollen flavonol accumulation, induces male sterility, and is complemented by a chalcone synthase transgene

    PubMed

    Napoli; Fahy; Wang; Taylor

    1999-06-01

    A mutation in an inbred line of petunia (Petunia hybrida) produces a reduction in the deep-purple corolla pigmentation and changes the anther color from yellow to white. In addition, the mutant, designated white anther (wha), is functionally male sterile. The inability of pollen from wha plants to germinate in vitro provides a physiological basis for the lack of seed set observed in self-crosses of the mutant. Biochemical complementation with nanomolar amounts of kaempferol, a flavonol aglycone, confirms that the inability of the wha pollen to germinate is due to a lack of this essential compound. Transgenic complementation with a functional ChsA (Chalcone synthase A) cDNA suggests that the genetic lesion responsible for the wha phenotype is in Chs, the gene for the first enzyme in the flavonol biosynthesis pathway. The genetic background of the parental line, as well as the pollen phenotype, allowed us to deduce that the wha mutation is in ChsA. To our knowledge, wha is the first induced, nontransgenic Chs mutant described in petunia, and analysis of the mutation confirms earlier molecular and genetic observations that only two Chs genes (A and J) are expressed in reproductive tissues and that they are differentially regulated in corolla and anther.

  18. Complement component 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003354.htm Complement component 4 To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Complement component 4 is a blood test that measures the ...

  19. Role of complement in experiment silicosis

    SciTech Connect

    Callis, A.H.; Sohnle, P.G.; Mandel, G.S.; Mandel, N.S.

    1986-08-01

    The role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of crystal-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis was evaluated using a mouse model of silicosis and congenitally complement-deficient mice. Mice lacking the fifth component of complement (B10.D2/o) were compared to C5-sufficient animals (B10.D2/n) for pulmonary changes following intratracheal instillation of silica crystals. Complement-deficient mice demonstrated a significant reduction compared to complement-sufficient mice in both cell number and protein content of lung lavage fluid throughout the 12 weeks following silica exposure. Lung hydroxyproline content (indicative of collagen deposition) was equivalent for both strains and significantly higher than controls at all times points following silica instillation. Moreover, studies in vitro have shown that silica crystals are capable of activating complement via the alternative pathway. These studies indicate that the complement system may be responsible for some of the pulmonary inflammation, but not fibrosis elicited by silica exposure.

  20. Essential Role for the Lectin Pathway in Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis Revealed Through Use of Adenovirus Programming Complement Inhibitor MAp44 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Nirmal K.; Mehta, Gaurav; Kjaer, Troels R.; Takahashi, Minoru; Schaack, Jerome; Morrison, Thomas E.; Thiel, Steffen; Arend, William P.; Holers, V. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies using mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and complement C4 deficient mice have suggested that the lectin pathway (LP) is not required for the development of inflammatory arthritis in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. MBL, ficolins and collectin-11 are key LP pattern recognition molecules that associate with three serine proteases, MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3, and also with two MBL-associated proteins designated sMAP and MAp44. Recent studies have shown that MAp44, an alternatively spliced product of the MASP-1/3 gene, is a competitive inhibitor of the binding of the recognition molecules to all three MASPs. In these studies we examined the effect of treatment of mice with adenovirus (Ad) programmed to express human MAp44 (AdhMAp44) on the development of CAIA. AdhMAp44 and Ad programming Green fluorescent protein (AdGFP) expression were injected intraperitoneally in C57BL/6 wild-type mice prior to the induction of CAIA. AdhMAp44 significantly reduced the clinical disease activity score (CDA) by 81% compared to mice injected with AdGFP. Similarly, histopathologic injury scores for inflammation, pannus, cartilage and bone damage, as well as C3 deposition in the cartilage and synovium, were significantly reduced by AdhMAp44 pretreatment. Mice treated with AdmMAp44, programming expression of mouse MAp44, also showed significantly decreased CDA and histopathologic injury scores. Additionally, administration of AdhMAp44 significantly diminished the severity of Ross River Virus-induced arthritis, a LP-dependent model. Our study provides conclusive evidence that an intact complement LP is essential to initiate CAIA, and that MAp44 may be an appropriate treatment for inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25070856

  1. Mechanism of promoter melting by the xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group B helicase of transcription factor IIH revealed by protein-DNA photo-cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Douziech, M; Coin, F; Chipoulet, J M; Arai, Y; Ohkuma, Y; Egly, J M; Coulombe, B

    2000-11-01

    The p89/xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group B (XPB) ATPase-helicase of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) is essential for promoter melting prior to transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). By studying the topological organization of the initiation complex using site-specific protein-DNA photo-cross-linking, we have shown that p89/XPB makes promoter contacts both upstream and downstream of the initiation site. The upstream contact, which is in the region where promoter melting occurs (positions -9 to +2), requires tight DNA wrapping around RNAPII. The addition of hydrolyzable ATP tethers the template strand at positions -5 and +1 to RNAPII subunits. A mutation in p89/XPB found in a xeroderma pigmentosum patient impairs the ability of TFIIH to associate correctly with the complex and thereby melt promoter DNA. A model for open complex formation is proposed.

  2. Mechanism of Promoter Melting by the Xeroderma Pigmentosum Complementation Group B Helicase of Transcription Factor IIH Revealed by Protein-DNA Photo-Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Douziech, Maxime; Coin, Frédéric; Chipoulet, Jean-Marc; Arai, Yoko; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki; Egly, Jean-Marc; Coulombe, Benoit

    2000-01-01

    The p89/xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group B (XPB) ATPase-helicase of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) is essential for promoter melting prior to transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). By studying the topological organization of the initiation complex using site-specific protein-DNA photo-cross-linking, we have shown that p89/XPB makes promoter contacts both upstream and downstream of the initiation site. The upstream contact, which is in the region where promoter melting occurs (positions −9 to +2), requires tight DNA wrapping around RNAPII. The addition of hydrolyzable ATP tethers the template strand at positions −5 and +1 to RNAPII subunits. A mutation in p89/XPB found in a xeroderma pigmentosum patient impairs the ability of TFIIH to associate correctly with the complex and thereby melt promoter DNA. A model for open complex formation is proposed. PMID:11027286

  3. Successful simultaneous liver-kidney transplant in an adult with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with a mutation in complement factor H.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Colin; Torpey, Nick; Jaques, Bryon; Strain, Lisa; Talbot, David; Manas, Derek; Goodship, Tim

    2011-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome was diagnosed in a 62-year-old man. Sequencing of the CFH gene, which encodes complement factor H, revealed a heterozygous adenine to guanine mutation at nucleotide 3550 of the complementary DNA, leading to a predicted substitution of alanine for threonine at amino acid position 1184 in the protein (c.3550A>G, p.Thr1184Ala). Three years later, he received a simultaneous liver-kidney transplant with plasmapheresis and intratransplant plasma infusion. The postoperative course was complicated by an anastomotic biliary stricture that was treated successfully using endoscopic stenting. One year later, he has excellent function of both transplants, emphasizing that simultaneous liver-kidney transplant is a valuable treatment option in the management of adult patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene expression profiling of Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammation in human whole blood: The role of complement and CD14-mediated innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lau, Corinna; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Holden, Marit; Nygård, Ståle; Fure, Hilde; Lappegård, Knut Tore; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Hovig, Eivind; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-09-01

    Non-sterile pathogen-induced sepsis and sterile inflammation like in trauma or ischemia-reperfusion injury may both coincide with the life threatening systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multi-organ failure. Consequently, there is an urgent need for specific biomarkers in order to distinguish sepsis from sterile conditions. The overall aim of this study was to uncover putative sepsis biomarkers and biomarker pathways, as well as to test the efficacy of combined inhibition of innate immunity key players complement and Toll-like receptor co-receptor CD14 as a possible therapeutic regimen for sepsis. We performed whole blood gene expression analyses using microarray in order to profile Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammatory responses in an ex vivo human whole blood model. The experiments were performed in the presence or absence of inhibitors of complement proteins (C3 and CD88 (C5a receptor 1)) and CD14, alone or in combination. In addition, we used blood from a C5-deficient donor. Anti-coagulated whole blood was challenged with heat-inactivated Escherichia coli for 2 h, total RNA was isolated and microarray analyses were performed on the Affymetrix GeneChip Gene 1.0 ST Array platform. The initial experiments were performed in duplicates using blood from two healthy donors. C5-deficiency is very rare, and only one donor could be recruited. In order to increase statistical power, a technical replicate of the C5-deficient samples was run. Subsequently, log2-transformed intensities were processed by robust multichip analysis and filtered using a threshold of four. In total, 73 microarray chips were run and analyzed. The normalized and filtered raw data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and are accessible with GEO Series accession number GSE55537. Linear models for microarray data were applied to estimate fold changes between data sets and the respective multiple testing adjusted p-values (FDR q-values). The interpretation of the

  5. Modelling of the serine-proteinase fold by X-ray and neutron scattering and sedimentation analyses: occurrence of the fold in factor D of the complement system.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, S J; Smith, K F; Kilpatrick, J M; Volanakis, J E; Sim, R B

    1993-01-01

    directly utilized to calculate sedimentation coefficients. X-ray scattering on factor D showed from its RG of 1.78 nm that this is monomeric and very similar in structure to beta-trypsin. The X-ray-scattering curve of factor D was readily modelled using the beta-trypsin crystal structure after allowance for sequence changes. The success of these modellings provides a basis for the constrained modelling of solution scattering data for the multidomain proteins of complement. PMID:8216242

  6. Factors that modify radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R

    2009-11-01

    It is known that numerous factors can influence radiation carcinogenesis in animals; these factors include the specific characteristics of the radiation (radiation type and dose, dose-rate, dose-fractionation, dose distribution, etc.) as well as many other contributing elements that are not specific to the radiation exposure, such as animal genetic characteristics and age, the environment of the animal, dietary factors and whether specific modifying agents for radiation carcinogenesis have been utilized in the studies. This overview focuses on the modifying factors for radiation carcinogenesis, in both in vivo and in vitro systems, and includes a discussion of agents that enhance (e.g., promoting agents) or suppress (e.g., cancer preventive agents) radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The agents that enhance or suppress radiation carcinogenesis in experimental model systems have been shown to lead to effects equally as large as other known modifying factors for radiation-induced carcinogenesis (e.g., dose-rate, dose-fractionation, linear energy transfer). It is known that dietary factors play an important role in determining the yields of radiation-induced cancers in animal model systems, and it is likely that they also influence radiation-induced cancer risks in human populations.

  7. The chromosomal order of genes controlling the major histocompatibility complex, properdin factor B, and deficiency of the second component of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Raum, D; Glass, D; Carpenter, C B; Alper, C A; Schur, P H

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of the genes coding for HLA to those coding for properdin Factor B allotypes and for deficiency of the second component of complement (C2) was studied in families of patients with connective tissue disorders. Patients were selected because they were heterozygous or homozygous for C2 deficiency. 12 families with 15 matings informative for C2 deficiency were found. Of 57 informative meioses, two crossovers were noted between the C2 deficiency gene and the HLA-B gene, with a recombinant fraction of 0.035. A lod score of 13 was calculated for linkage between C2 deficiency and HLA-B at a maximum likelihood value of the recombinant fraction of 0.04. 18 families with 21 informative matings for both properdin Factor B allotype and HLA-B were found. Of 72 informative meioses, three recombinants were found, giving a recombinant fraction of 0.042. A lod score of 16 between HLA-B and Factor B allotypes was calculated at a maximum likelihood value of the recombinant fraction of 0.04. A crossover was shown to have occurred between genes for Factor B and HLA-D, in which HLA-D segregared with HLA-A and B. These studies suggest that the genes for Factor B and C2 deficiency are located outside those for HLA, that the order of genese is HLA-A, -B, -D, Factor B allotype, C2 deficiency, that the genes coding for C2 deficiency and Factor B allotypes are approximately 3--5 centimorgans from the HLA-A and HLA-B loci, and that the apparent lack of recombinants between the Factor B gene and C2 deficiency gene suggests that these two genes lie in close proximity to one another. PMID:993342

  8. Complement inhibition in cynomolgus monkeys by anti-factor d antigen-binding fragment for the treatment of an advanced form of dry age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Loyet, Kelly M; Good, Jeremy; Davancaze, Teresa; Sturgeon, Lizette; Wang, Xiangdan; Yang, Jihong; Le, Kha N; Wong, Maureen; Hass, Philip E; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Haughney, Peter C; Morimoto, Alyssa; Damico-Beyer, Lisa A; DeForge, Laura E

    2014-12-01

    Anti-factor D (AFD; FCFD4514S, lampalizumab) is a humanized IgG Fab fragment directed against factor D (fD), a rate-limiting serine protease in the alternative complement pathway (AP). Evaluation of AFD as a potential intravitreal (IVT) therapeutic for dry age-related macular degeneration patients with geographic atrophy (GA) is ongoing. However, it is unclear whether IVT administration of AFD can affect systemic AP activation and potentially compromise host-immune responses. We characterized the pharmacologic properties of AFD and assessed the effects of AFD administered IVT (2 or 20 mg) or intravenous (0.2, 2, or 20 mg) on systemic complement activity in cynomolgus monkeys. For the IVT groups, serum AP activity was reduced for the 20 mg dose group between 2 and 6 hours postinjection. For the intravenous groups, AFD inhibited systemic AP activity for periods of time ranging from 5 minutes (0.2 mg group) to 3 hours (20 mg group). Interestingly, the concentrations of total serum fD increased up to 10-fold relative to predose levels following administration of AFD. Furthermore, AFD was found to inhibit systemic AP activity only when the molar concentration of AFD exceeded that of fD. This occurred in cynomolgus monkeys at serum AFD levels ≥2 µg/ml, a concentration 8-fold greater than the maximum serum concentration observed following a single 10 mg IVT dose in a clinical investigation in patients with GA. Based on these findings, the low levels of serum AFD resulting from IVT administration of a clinically relevant dose are not expected to appreciably affect systemic AP activity.

  9. Complement resistance of Borrelia burgdorferi correlates with the expression of BbCRASP-1, a novel linear plasmid-encoded surface protein that interacts with human factor H and FHL-1 and is unrelated to Erp proteins.

    PubMed

    Kraiczy, Peter; Hellwage, Jens; Skerka, Christine; Becker, Heiko; Kirschfink, Michael; Simon, Markus M; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard

    2004-01-23

    The etiologic agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, is capable of circumventing the immune defense of a variety of potential vertebrate hosts. Previous work has shown that interaction of host-derived complement regulators, factor H and factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), with up to five complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs) expressed by resistant B. burgdorferi sensu lato isolates conferred complement resistance. In addition expression of CRASP-1 is directly correlated with complement resistance of Borrelia species. This work describes the functional characterization of BbCRASP-1 as the dominant factor H and FHL-1-binding protein of B. burgdorferi. The corresponding gene, zs7.a68, is located on the linear plasmid lp54 and is different from factor H-binding Erp proteins that are encoded by genes localized on circular plasmids (cp32). Deletion mutants of BbCRASP-1 were generated, and a high affinity binding site for factor H and FHL-1 was mapped to the C terminus of BbCRASP-1. Similarly, the predominant binding site of factor H and FHL-1 was localized to the short consensus repeat 7. Factor H and FHL-1 maintain their cofactor activity for factor I-mediated C3b inactivation when bound to BbCRASP-1, and factor H is up to 6-fold more efficient in mediating C3b conversion than FHL-1. In conclusion, BbCRASP-1 (i). binds the host complement regulators factor H and FHL-1 with high affinity, (ii). is the key molecule of the complement resistance of spirochetes, and (iii). is distinct from the Erp protein family. Thus, BbCRASP-1 most likely contributes to persistence of B. burgdorferi and to pathogenesis of Lyme disease.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-inducing activities of Cryptococcus neoformans components.

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, D; Cianci, L; Migliardo, M; Mancuso, G; Cusumano, V; Corradini, C; Teti, G

    1996-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production may lead to increased human immunodeficiency virus replication in patients with AIDS. In order to identify cryptococcal components that are predominantly responsible for stimulating TNF production, various concentrations of glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), galactoxylomannan (GalXM), mannoproteins (MP), and alpha(1-3) [corrected] glucan were added to whole-blood cultures. All of the cryptococcal components tested, as well as whole heat-killed cryptococci, were capable of inducing TNF-alpha release in a dose-dependent manner. MP were significantly more potent than any of the other cryptococcal components tested or heat-killed cryptococci in stimulating TNF-alpha production (P < 0.05). GXM, in contrast, was significantly less potent in this activity than either GalXM or MP (P < 0.05). As little as 0.5 microg of MP per ml was sufficient to produce moderate but significant elevations of TNF-alpha release. Maximal MP-induced TNF-alpha levels were similar to those induced by Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide, our positive control. Further experiments using isolated leukocytes suggested that monocytes were the cell population mainly responsible for TNF-alpha production, although the participation of other cell types could not be excluded. The presence of complement-sufficient plasma was a necessary requirement for TNF-alpha induction by GXM, GalXM, and low doses of MP. High MP concentrations (100 microg/ml) were also capable of stimulating TNF-alpha production in the absence of plasma. These data indicate that soluble products released by C. neoformans are capable of inducing TNF-alpha secretion in human leukocytes. This may be clinically relevant, since high concentrations of such products are frequently found in the body fluids of AIDS patients infected with C. neoformans. PMID:8945566

  11. Transcriptional Regulation by Hypoxia Inducible Factors

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Joaquín M.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular response to oxygen deprivation is governed largely by a family of transcription factors known as Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs). This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms by which HIFs regulate the transcriptional apparatus to enable the cellular and organismal response to hypoxia. We discuss here how the various HIF polypeptides, their post-translational modifications, binding partners and transcriptional cofactors affect RNA polymerase II activity to drive context-dependent transcriptional programs during hypoxia. PMID:24099156

  12. Leishmania spp: Delta-aminolevulinate-inducible neogenesis of porphyria by genetic complementation of incomplete heme biosynthesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sujoy; Furuyama, Kazumichi; Sassa, Shigeru; Chang, Kwang-Poo Chang

    2008-01-01

    To further develop the Leishmania model for porphyria based on their deficiencies in heme biosynthesis, three Old World species were doubly transfected as before for Leishmania amazonensis with cDNAs, encoding the 2nd and 3rd enzymes in the pathway. Expression of the transgenes was verified immunologically at the protein level and functionally by uroporphyrin neogenesis that occurs only after exposure of the double-transfectants to delta-aminolevulinate. All species examined were equally deficient in heme biosynthesis, as indicated by the accumulation of uroporphyrin as the sole porphyrin and the production of coproporphyrin upon further transfection of one representative species with the downstream gene. The results obtained thus demonstrate that at least the first five enzymes for heme biosynthesis are absent in all species examined, rendering their transfectants inducible with aminolevulinate to accumulate porphyrins and thus useful as cellular models for human porphyrias. PMID:18164705

  13. A modified portfolio diet complements medical management to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Keith, Mary; Kuliszewski, Michael A; Liao, Christine; Peeva, Valentina; Ahmed, Mavra; Tran, Susan; Sorokin, Kevin; Jenkins, David J; Errett, Lee; Leong-Poi, Howard

    2015-06-01

    Secondary prevention can improve outcomes in high risk patients. This study investigated the magnitude of cardiovascular risk reduction associated with consumption of a modified portfolio diet in parallel with medical management. 30 patients with type II diabetes, 6 weeks post bypass surgery received dietary counseling on a Modified Portfolio Diet (MPD) (low fat, 8 g/1000 kcal viscous fibres, 17 g/1000 kcal soy protein and 22 g/1000 kcal almonds). Lipid profiles, endothelial function and markers of glycemic control, oxidative stress and inflammation were measured at baseline and following two and four weeks of intervention. Seven patients with no diet therapy served as time controls. Consumption of the MPD resulted in a 19% relative reduction in LDL (1.9 ± 0.8 vs 1.6 ± 0.6 mmol/L, p < 0.001) with no change in HDL cholesterol. Homocysteine levels dropped significantly (10.1 ± 2.7 vs 7.9 ± 4 μmol/L, p = 0.006) over the study period. Flow mediated dilatation increased significantly in treated patients (3.8 ± 3.8% to 6.5 ± 3.6%, p = 0.004) while remaining constant in controls (p = 0.6). Endothelial progenitor cells numbers (CD34+, CD 133+ and UEA-1+) increased significantly following MPD consumption (p < 0.02) with no difference in migratory capacity. In contrast, time controls showed no significant changes. Dietary intervention in medically managed, high risk patients resulted in important reductions in risk factors. Clinical Trials registry number NCT00462436. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. Zinc Binding to the Tyr402 and His402 Allotypes of Complement Factor H: Possible Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Ruodan; Farabella, Irene; Schumacher, Felix F.; Miller, Ami; Gor, Jayesh; Martin, Andrew C.R.; Jones, David T.; Lengyel, Imre; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    The Tyr402His polymorphism of complement factor H (FH) with 20 short complement regulator (SCR) domains is associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). How FH contributes to disease pathology is not clear. Both FH and high concentrations of zinc are found in drusen deposits, the key feature of AMD. Heterozygous FH is inhibited by zinc, which causes FH to aggregate. Here, zinc binding to homozygous FH was studied. By analytical ultracentrifugation, large amounts of oligomers were observed with both the native Tyr402 and the AMD-risk His402 homozygous allotypes of FH and both the recombinant SCR-6/8 allotypes with Tyr/His402. X-ray scattering also showed that both FH and SCR-6/8 allotypes strongly aggregated at > 10 μM zinc. The SCR-1/5 and SCR-16/20 fragments were less likely to bind zinc. These observations were supported by bioinformatics predictions. Starting from known zinc binding sites in crystal structures, we predicted 202 putative partial surface zinc binding sites in FH, most of which were in SCR-6. Metal site prediction web servers also suggested that SCR-6 and other domains bind zinc. Predicted SCR-6/8 dimer structures showed that zinc binding sites could be formed at the protein–protein interface that would lead to daisy-chained oligomers. It was concluded that zinc binds weakly to FH at multiple surface locations, most probably within the functionally important SCR-6/8 domains, and this explains why zinc inhibits FH activity. Given the high pathophysiological levels of bioavailable zinc present in subretinal deposits, we discuss how zinc binding to FH may contribute to deposit formation and inflammation associated with AMD. PMID:21396937

  15. The role of complement in AMD.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Peter F; Lauer, Nadine; Skerka, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common form of blindness in the western world and genetic variations of several complement genes, including the complement regulator Factor H, the central complement component C3, Factor B, C2, and also Factor I confer a risk for the disease. However deletion of a chromosomal segment in the Factor H gene cluster on human chromosome 1, which results in the deficiency of the terminal pathway regulator CFHR1, and of the putative complement regulator CFHR3 has a protective effect for development of AMD. The Factor H gene encodes two proteins Factor H and FHL1 which are derived from alternatively processed transcripts. In particular a sequence variation at position 402 of both Factor H and FHL1 is associated with a risk for AMD. A tyrosine residue at position 402 represents the protective and a histidine residue the risk variant. AMD is considered a chronic inflammatory disease, which can be caused by defective and inappropriate regulation of the continuously activated alternative complement pathway. This activation generates complement effector products and inflammatory mediators that stimulate further inflammatory reactions. Defective regulation can lead to formation of immune deposits, drusen and ultimately translate into damage of retinal pigment epithelial cells, rupture of the interface between these epithelial cells and the Bruch's membrane and vision loss. Here we describe the role of complement in the retina and summarize the current concept how defective or inappropriate local complement control contributes to inflammation and the pathophysiology of AMD.

  16. Tonsillolith as a halitosis-inducing factor.

    PubMed

    Ansai, T; Takehara, T

    2005-03-12

    Halitosis, or bad breath, is a common concern for many people. The main causes are known to be periodontal disease and tongue coating. We present a case of an incidental tonsillolith occurrence, which was a halitosis-inducing factor. Our results show that tonsilloliths should be considered as a possible cause of halitosis.

  17. Mutational analyses of the BbCRASP-1 protein of Borrelia burgdorferi identify residues relevant for the architecture and binding of host complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H.

    PubMed

    Kraiczy, Peter; Hanssen-Hübner, Christa; Kitiratschky, Veronique; Brenner, Christiane; Besier, Silke; Brade, Volker; Simon, Markus M; Skerka, Christine; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Stevenson, Brian; Wallich, Reinhard; Zipfel, Peter F

    2009-04-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi exploits multiple strategies to evade host immune responses. One central immune escape mechanism is the inactivation of the host complement attack by acquisition host complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H via complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (BbCRASPs). The BbCRASP-1 protein is the first bacterial factor H/FHL-1-binding protein for which the atomic structure has been solved. Previously, 3 regions including the C terminus were identified as putative contact sites for the two complement regulators by the pepspot analysis. Based on the crystallographic structure an in vitro mutagenesis approach was conducted to identify amino acid residues which are relevant for FHL-1 and factor H binding by exchanging single or multiple residues in region 1 and the C-terminally located region 3. Single changes at 4 positions in region 1 either reduced (Lys136, Lys141, Glu147) or completely eliminated (Leu146) binding of both complement regulators. Substitutions clustered within the C-terminal region decreased (Glu234, Lys238, Tyr239, Lys241, Asp244, Thr245) or abolished binding (Lys240, Asp242, Leu246) of both complement regulators. Mapping the mutations onto the atomic structure of BbCRASP-1 reveals that, in contrast to earlier assumption, the C-terminal mutations act indirectly on FHL-1 and factor H binding, whilst the region 1 mutations map the site of direct complement regulator interaction. The elucidation of BbCRASP-1 structure - function may allow development of novel therapeutic strategies against Lyme disease.

  18. Biologic effects of microwave exposure. II. Studies on the mechanisms controlling susceptibility to microwave-induced increases in complement receptor-positive spleen cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlagel, C.J.; Sulek, K.; Ho, H.S.; Leach, W.M.; Ahmed, A.; Woody, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    In attempting to evaluate the mechanisms responsible for susceptibility to the inductive increase in splenic complement receptor-positive (CR+) cells following exposure to 2450-MHz microwaves, it was found that sensitivity to microwave-induced CR+ cell increases was under genetic control. In particular, evidence was accumulated suggesting that regulation was under the control of a gene or genes closely associated with but outside of the mouse major histocompatibility complex (H-2). All responsive strains of mice tested were of the H-2k haplotype, while mice of the H-2a, H-2b, H-2d and H-1i5 haplotypes were refractory to the microwave-induced increases in CR+ cells. By utilizing certain H-2k strains of mice that were genetically unable to respond to endotoxin, we were able to show that these strains of mice responded to microwaves, but not to endotoxin, by increasing CR+ cells. Microwave-induced increases in CR+ cells were not mimicked by the intraperitoneal injection of hydrocortisone. Athymic mice responded to microwave exposure, indicating that this event was not regulated by the T-cell population. Mice less than eight weeks old were found not to be susceptible to exposure to 2450-MHz microwaves. These studies indicate that microwaves do induce changes in the population of cells with specific cell-surface receptors, that susceptibility to these changes is under genetic control, and that it is unlikely that endotoxin, corticosteroids, or regulatory T cells play a significant role in the mechanisms regulating these increases.

  19. Identification of a gene product induced by hard-surface contact of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides conidia as a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme by yeast complementation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z M; Kolattukudy, P E

    1998-07-01

    The germinating conidia of many phytopathogenic fungi on hosts must differentiate into an infection structure called the appressorium in order to penetrate their hosts. Chemical signals, such as the host's surface wax or fruit ripening hormone, ethylene, trigger germination and appressorium formation of the avocado pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides only after the conidia are in contact with a hard surface. What role this contact plays is unknown. Here, we describe isolation of genes expressed during the early stage of hard-surface treatment by a differential-display method and report characterization of one of these cloned genes, chip1 (Colletotrichum hard-surface induced protein 1 gene), which encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. RNA blots clearly showed that it is induced by hard-surface contact and that ethylene treatment enhanced this induction. The predicted open reading frame (ubc1Cg) would encode a 16.2-kDa ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which shows 82% identity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae UBC4-UBC5 E2 enzyme, comprising a major part of total ubiquitin-conjugating activity in stressed yeast cells. UBC1Cg can complement the proteolysis deficiency of the S. cerevisiae ubc4 ubc5 mutant, indicating that ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation is involved in conidial germination and appressorial differentiation.

  20. Complement-targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2010-01-01

    The complement system is a central component of innate immunity and bridges the innate to the adaptive immune response. However, it can also turn its destructive capabilities against host cells and is involved in numerous diseases and pathological conditions. Modulation of the complement system has been recognized as a promising strategy in drug discovery, and a large number of therapeutic modalities have been developed. However, successful marketing of complement-targeted drugs has proved to be more difficult than initially expected, and many strategies have been discontinued. The US Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the first complement-specific drug, an antibody against complement component C5 (eculizumab; Soliris), in March 2007, was a long-awaited breakthrough in the field. Approval of eculizumab validates the complement system as therapeutic target and might facilitate clinical development of other promising drug candidates. PMID:17989689

  1. Pharmacogenetics of Complement Factor H Y402H Polymorphism and Treatment of Neovascular AMD with Anti-VEGF Agents: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guohai; Tzekov, Radouil; Li, Wensheng; Jiang, Fangzheng; Mao, Sihong; Tong, Yuhua

    2015-09-28

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the Y402H polymorphism (rs1061170, a T-to-C transition at amino acid position 402) in the complement factor H (CFH) gene have a pharmacogenetics effect on the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We performed a meta-analysis using databases including PubMed and EMBASE to find relevant studies. 13 published association studies were selected for this meta-analysis, including 2704 patients. For the CFH Y402H polymorphism, anti-VEGF treatment was much less effective in AMD patients with the CFH CC genotype (CC versus TT: odds ratio (OR) = 55, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.31 to 0.95, P = 0.03; CC versus CT: OR = 0.60, 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.91, P = 0.02; and CC versus CT + TT: OR = 0.59, 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.90, P = 0.02, respectively). In subgroup analysis, CFH Y402H polymorphism was more likely to be a predictor of response for Caucasians (CC versus CT+TT: OR = 0.63, 95% CI, 0.42 to 0.95, P = 0.03). In conclusion, pharmacogenetics of CFH Y402H polymorphism may play a role in response to anti-VEGF treatment for neovascular AMD, especially for Caucasians.

  2. Differential contribution of complement receptor C5aR in myeloid and non-myeloid cells in chronic ethanol-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Rebecca L; McMullen, Megan R; Das, Dola; Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; Strainic, Michael G; Medof, M Edward; Nagy, Laura E

    2016-07-01

    Complement is implicated in the development of alcoholic liver disease. C3 and C5 contribute to ethanol-induced liver injury; however, the role of C5a receptor (C5aR) on myeloid and non-myeloid cells to progression of injury is not known. C57BL/6 (WT), global C5aR-/-, myeloid-specific C5aR-/-, and non-myeloid-specific C5aR-/- mice were fed a Lieber-DeCarli diet (32%kcal EtOH) for 25 days. Cultured hepatocytes were challenged with ethanol, TNFα, and C5a. Chronic ethanol feeding increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in livers of WT mice; this response was completely blunted in C5aR-/- mice. However, C5aR-/- mice were not protected from other measures of hepatocellular damage, including ethanol-induced increases in hepatic triglycerides, plasma alanine aminotransferase and hepatocyte apoptosis. CYP2E1 and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts were induced in WT and C5aR-/- mice. Myeloid-specific C5aR-/- mice were protected from ethanol-induced increases in hepatic TNFα, whereas non-myeloid-specific C5aR-/- displayed increased hepatocyte apoptosis and inflammation after chronic ethanol feeding. In cultured hepatocytes, cytotoxicity induced by challenge with ethanol and TNFα was completely eliminated by treatment with C5a in cells from WT, but not C5aR-/- mice. Further, treatment with C5a enhanced activation of pro-survival signal AKT in hepatocytes challenged with ethanol and TNFα. Taken together, these data reveal a differential role for C5aR during ethanol-induced liver inflammation and injury, with C5aR on myeloid cells contributing to ethanol-induced inflammatory cytokine expression, while non-myeloid C5aR protects hepatocytes from death after chronic ethanol feeding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of repetitive high-dose treatment with soluble complement receptor type 1 and cobra venom factor on discordant xenograft survival.

    PubMed

    Candinas, D; Lesnikoski, B A; Robson, S C; Miyatake, T; Scesney, S M; Marsh, H C; Ryan, U S; Dalmasso, A P; Hancock, W W; Bach, F H

    1996-08-15

    Hyperacute xenograft rejection may be modified by the activation and depletion of complement (C) using cobra venom factor (CVF). This method of prolonging xenograft survival is toxic and associated with systemic inflammation, which may potentially contribute to the pathologic features of delayed xenograft rejection. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) inhibits both the classical and alternative C pathways and thus limits the production of proinflammatory products such as the anaphylatoxins. Hence, we investigated the effects of various sCR1 and CVF regimens, and combinations thereof, in the discordant guinea pig-to-Lewis rat cardiac xenograft model. Mean graft survival time (MST) was significantly prolonged with repetitive dosing (MST=22 hr) or continuous infusion of sCR1 (MST=32 hr) as compared with unmodified controls (MST=15 min). However, sCR1 did not prevent intragraft deposition of C3 or neutrophil infiltration and resulted in only partial inhibition of C-mediated hemolytic activity in vitro. Grafts in rats treated with a single dose of CVF (MST=67 hr) or repetitive doses of CVF (MST=69 hr) survived significantly longer than those treated with sCR1 alone, and lacked C3 deposition or neutrophil accumulation. Sera from these animals were completely depleted of C-mediated hemolytic activity. Animals treated with a single dose of CVF, or sCRI plus a single dose of CVF (MST=64 hr), had similar xenograft survival times. However, immunohistologic studies showed that addition of sCR1 to a single dose of CVF resulted in decreased macrophage activation and reduced levels of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta) within xenografts as compared with that in recipients treated with CVF alone. Such decreased macrophage activation may result from the binding of C4b by sCR1, since combination therapy was associated with decreased intragraft C4b as compared with either therapy alone. High doses of sCR1 were well tolerated by rats and significantly

  4. Folded-back solution structure of monomeric factor H of human complement by synchrotron X-ray and neutron scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and constrained molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Aslam, M; Perkins, S J

    2001-06-22

    Factor H (FH) is a regulatory cofactor for the protease factor I in the breakdown of C3b in the complement system of immune defence, and binds to heparin and other polyanionic substrates. FH is composed of 20 short consensus/complement repeat (SCR) domains, for which the overall arrangement in solution is unknown. As previous studies had shown that FH can form monomeric or dimeric structures, X-ray and neutron scattering was accordingly performed with FH in the concentration range between 0.7 and 14 mg ml(-1). The radius of gyration of FH was determined to be 11.1-11.3 nm by both methods, and the radii of gyration of the cross-section were 4.4 nm and 1.7 nm. The distance distribution function P(r) showed that the overall length of FH was 38 nm. The neutron data showed that FH was monomeric with a molecular mass of 165,000(+/-17,000) Da. Analytical ultracentrifugation data confirmed this, where sedimentation equilibrium curve fits gave a mean molecular mass of 155,000(+/-3,000) Da. Sedimentation velocity experiments using the g*(s) derivative method showed that FH was monodisperse and had a sedimentation coefficient of 5.3(+/-0.1) S. In order to construct a full model of FH for scattering curve and sedimentation coefficient fits, homology models were constructed for 17 of the 20 SCR domains using knowledge of the NMR structures for FH SCR-5, SCR-15 and SCR-16, and vaccinia coat protein SCR-3 and SCR-4. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to generate a large conformational library for each of the 19 SCR-SCR linker peptides. Peptides from these libraries were combined with the 20 SCR structures in order to generate stereochemically complete models for the FH structure. Using an automated constrained fit procedure, the analysis of 16,752 possible FH models showed that only those models in which the 20 SCR domains were bent back upon themselves were able to account for the scattering and sedimentation data. The best-fit models showed that FH had an overall length

  5. NETosing Neutrophils Activate Complement Both on Their Own NETs and Bacteria via Alternative and Non-alternative Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Joshua; Pluthero, Fred G.; Douda, David N.; Riedl, Magdalena; Cherry, Ahmed; Ulanova, Marina; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils deposit antimicrobial proteins, such as myeloperoxidase and proteases on chromatin, which they release as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Neutrophils also carry key components of the complement alternative pathway (AP) such as properdin or complement factor P (CFP), complement factor B (CFB), and C3. However, the contribution of these complement components and complement activation during NET formation in the presence and absence of bacteria is poorly understood. We studied complement activation on NETs and a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01, PAKwt, and PAKgfp). Here, we show that anaphylatoxin C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which activates NADPH oxidase, induce the release of CFP, CFB, and C3 from neutrophils. In response to PMA or P. aeruginosa, neutrophils secrete CFP, deposit it on NETs and bacteria, and induce the formation of terminal complement complexes (C5b–9). A blocking anti-CFP antibody inhibited AP-mediated but not non-AP-mediated complement activation on NETs and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, NET-mediated complement activation occurs via both AP- and non AP-based mechanisms, and AP-mediated complement activation during NETosis is dependent on CFP. These findings suggest that neutrophils could use their “AP tool kit” to readily activate complement on NETs and Gram-negative bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa, whereas additional components present in the serum help to fix non-AP-mediated complement both on NETs and bacteria. This unique mechanism may play important roles in host defense and help to explain specific roles of complement activation in NET-related diseases. PMID:27148258

  6. Complement in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Rawat, Amit; Sharma, Madhubala; Singh, Surjit

    2017-02-01

    The complement system is an ancient and evolutionary conserved element of the innate immune mechanism. It comprises of more than 20 serum proteins most of which are synthesized in the liver. These proteins are synthesized as inactive precursor proteins which are activated by appropriate stimuli. The activated forms of these proteins act as proteases and cleave other components successively in amplification pathways leading to exponential generation of final effectors. Three major pathways of complement pathways have been described, namely the classical, alternative and lectin pathways which are activated by different stimuli. However, all the 3 pathways converge on Complement C3. Cleavage of C3 and C5 successively leads to the production of the membrane attack complex which is final common effector. Excessive and uncontrolled activation of the complement has been implicated in the host of autoimmune diseases. But the complement has also been bemusedly described as the proverbial "double edged sword". On one hand, complement is the final effector of tissue injury in autoimmune diseases and on the other, deficiencies of some components of the complement can result in autoimmune diseases. Currently available tools such as enzyme based immunoassays for functional assessment of complement pathways, flow cytometry, next generation sequencing and proteomics-based approaches provide an exciting opportunity to study this ancient yet mysterious element of innate immunity.

  7. Neutrophil extracellular traps can activate alternative complement pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, C; Zhao, M-H; Chen, M

    2015-09-01

    The interaction between neutrophils and activation of alternative complement pathway plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs activate primed neutrophils to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which have recently gathered increasing attention in the development of AAV. The relationship between NETs and alternative complement pathway has not been elucidated. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between NETs and alternative complement pathway. Detection of components of alternative complement pathway on NETs in vitro was assessed by immunostain and confocal microscopy. Complement deposition on NETs were detected after incubation with magnesium salt ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid (Mg-EGTA)-treated human serum. After incubation of serum with supernatants enriched in ANCA-induced NETs, levels of complement components in supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Complement factor B (Bb) and properdin deposited on NETs in vitro. The deposition of C3b and C5b-9 on NETs incubated with heat-inactivated normal human serum (Hi-NHS) or EGTA-treated Hi-NHS (Mg-EGTA-Hi-NHS) were significantly less than that on NETs incubated with NHS or EGTA-treated NHS (Mg-EGTA-NHS). NETs induced by ANCA could activate the alternative complement cascade in the serum. In the presence of EGTA, C3a, C5a and SC5b-9 concentration decreased from 800·42 ± 244·81 ng/ml, 7·68 ± 1·50 ng/ml, 382·15 ± 159·75 ng/ml in the supernatants enriched in ANCA induced NETs to 479·07 ± 156·2 ng/ml, 4·86 ± 1·26 ng/ml, 212·65 ± 44·40 ng/ml in the supernatants of DNase I-degraded NETs (P < 0·001, P = 0·008, P < 0·001, respectively). NETs could activate the alternative complement pathway, and might thus participate in the pathogenesis of AAV. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  8. Neutrophil extracellular traps can activate alternative complement pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Wang, C; Zhao, M-H; Chen, M

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between neutrophils and activation of alternative complement pathway plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs activate primed neutrophils to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which have recently gathered increasing attention in the development of AAV. The relationship between NETs and alternative complement pathway has not been elucidated. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between NETs and alternative complement pathway. Detection of components of alternative complement pathway on NETs in vitro was assessed by immunostain and confocal microscopy. Complement deposition on NETs were detected after incubation with magnesium salt ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid (Mg-EGTA)-treated human serum. After incubation of serum with supernatants enriched in ANCA-induced NETs, levels of complement components in supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Complement factor B (Bb) and properdin deposited on NETs in vitro. The deposition of C3b and C5b-9 on NETs incubated with heat-inactivated normal human serum (Hi-NHS) or EGTA-treated Hi-NHS (Mg-EGTA-Hi-NHS) were significantly less than that on NETs incubated with NHS or EGTA-treated NHS (Mg-EGTA-NHS). NETs induced by ANCA could activate the alternative complement cascade in the serum. In the presence of EGTA, C3a, C5a and SC5b-9 concentration decreased from 800·42 ± 244·81 ng/ml, 7·68 ± 1·50 ng/ml, 382·15 ± 159·75 ng/ml in the supernatants enriched in ANCA induced NETs to 479·07 ± 156·2 ng/ml, 4·86 ± 1·26 ng/ml, 212·65 ± 44·40 ng/ml in the supernatants of DNase I-degraded NETs (P < 0·001, P = 0·008, P < 0·001, respectively). NETs could activate the alternative complement pathway, and might thus participate in the pathogenesis of AAV PMID:25963026

  9. Complement factor H binding of monomeric C-reactive protein downregulates proinflammatory activity and is impaired with at risk polymorphic CFH variants

    PubMed Central

    Molins, Blanca; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Adán, Alfredo; Antón, Rosa; Arostegui, Juan I.; Yagüe, Jordi; Dick, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and immune-mediated processes are pivotal to the pathogenic progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been shown to be associated with an increased risk for AMD, the pathophysiological importance of the prototypical acute-phase reactant in the etiology of the disease is unknown, and data regarding the exact role of CRP in ocular inflammation are limited. In this study, we provide mechanistic insight into how CRP contributes to the development of AMD. In particular, we show that monomeric CRP (mCRP) but not the pentameric form (pCRP) upregulates IL-8 and CCL2 levels in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Further, we show that complement factor H (FH) binds mCRP to dampen its proinflammatory activity. FH from AMD patients carrying the “risk” His402 polymorphism displays impaired binding to mCRP, and therefore proinflammatory effects of mCRP remain unrestrained. PMID:26961257

  10. Modulation of miR-146a/complement factor H-mediated inflammatory responses in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    He, Fang; Liu, Bei; Meng, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Wang, Weiwen; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports the involvement of inflammatory and immune processes in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). miRNAs represent small regulatory RNA molecules that have been shown to act as negative regulators of gene expression controlling different biological processes, including immune system homoeostasis and function. We investigated the expression and cellular distribution of miRNA-146a (miR-146a) in a rat model of TLE. Prominent up-regulation of miR-146a activation was evident in 1 week after status epilepticus (SE) and persisted in the chronic phase. The predicted miR-146a's target complement factor H (CFH) mRNA and protein expression was also down-regulated in TLE rat model. Furthermore, transfection of miR-146a mimics in neuronal and glial cells down-regulated CFH mRNA and protein levels respectively. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-146a down-regulated CFH mRNA expression via 3′-UTR pairing. Down-regulating miR-146a by intracerebroventricular injection of antagomir-146a enhanced the hippocampal expression of CFH in TLE model and decreased seizure susceptibility. These findings suggest that immunopathological deficits associated with TLE can in part be explained by a generalized miR-146a-mediated down-regulation of CFH that may contribute to epileptogenesis in a rat model of TLE. PMID:27852797

  11. An extremely rare splice site mutation in the gene encoding complement factor I in a patient with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Tina S; Lim, Jooeun; Reyes, Meredith Anne; Ero, Mike; Leveque, Christopher; Lewis, Bradley; Kain, Jamey

    2017-04-28

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute kidney failure. The disease is difficult to diagnose due to its similarity with other hematologic disorders, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). However, genetic mutations are found in 50-70% of patients with aHUS and can be useful in its diagnosis. A 40-year-old male presented to our hospital with acute kidney injury, evidenced by high creatinine levels (8.3 mg/dL) and kidney biopsy results. The patient was preliminarily diagnosed with TTP and therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was initiated. After four treatments, TPE was discontinued due to lack of ADAMTS13 activity and inhibitor assay results that were not consistent with TTP, improved hematologic laboratory results, and aHUS genetic testing results. Next-generation sequencing showed a rare mutation at a splice site in the gene encoding complement factor I (CFI). Implication of this mutation in aHUS has not been previously described. Treatment with eculizumab reduced creatinine levels below 4.0 mg/dL, and the patient remained on maintenance dosage of eculizumab (1200 mg/14 days) to prevent aHUS recurrence. An extremely rare, heterozygous mutation in the gene encoding CFI likely affecting splicing was associated for the first time with aHUS. Sequencing was critical for rapid diagnosis and subsequent timely treatment with eculizumab, which resulted in improved renal function. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Insights into the Effects of Complement Factor H on the Assembly and Decay of the Alternative Pathway C3 Proconvertase and C3 Convertase.

    PubMed

    Bettoni, Serena; Bresin, Elena; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Noris, Marina; Donadelli, Roberta

    2016-04-08

    The activated fragment of C3 (C3b) and factor B form the C3 proconvertase (C3bB), which is cleaved by factor D to C3 convertase (C3bBb). Older studies (Conrad, D. H., Carlo, J. R., and Ruddy, S. (1978)J. Exp. Med.147, 1792-1805; Pangburn, M. K., and Müller-Eberhard, H. J. (1978)Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.75, 2416-2420; Kazatchkine, M. D., Fearon, D. T., and Austen, K. F. (1979)J. Immunol.122, 75-81) indicated that the complement alternative pathway regulator factor H (FH) competes with factor B for C3b binding; however, the capability of FH to prevent C3bB assembly has not been formally investigated. Moreover, in the few published studies FH did not favor C3bB dissociation. Whether FH may affect C3bBb formation from C3bB is unknown. We set up user-friendly assays based on combined microplate/Western blotting techniques that specifically detect either C3bB or C3bBb, with the aim of investigating the effect of FH on C3bB assembly and decay and C3bBb formation and decay. We document that FH does not affect C3bB assembly, indicating that FH does not efficiently compete with factor B for C3b binding. We also found that FH does not dissociate C3bB. FH showed a strong C3bBb decay-accelerating activity, as reported previously, and also exerted an apparent inhibitory effect on C3bBb formation. The latter effect was not fully attributable to a rapid FH-mediated dissociation of C3bBb complexes, because blocking decay with properdin and C3 nephritic factor did not restore C3bBb formation. FH almost completely prevented release of the smaller cleavage subunit of FB (Ba), without modifying the amount of C3bB complexes, suggesting that FH inhibits the conversion of C3bB to C3bBb. Thus, the inhibitory effect of FH on C3bBb formation is likely the sum of inhibition of C3bB conversion to C3bBb and of C3bBb decay acceleration. Further studies are required to confirm these findings in physiological cell-based settings.

  13. Insights into the Effects of Complement Factor H on the Assembly and Decay of the Alternative Pathway C3 Proconvertase and C3 Convertase*

    PubMed Central

    Bettoni, Serena; Bresin, Elena; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Noris, Marina; Donadelli, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The activated fragment of C3 (C3b) and factor B form the C3 proconvertase (C3bB), which is cleaved by factor D to C3 convertase (C3bBb). Older studies (Conrad, D. H., Carlo, J. R., and Ruddy, S. (1978) J. Exp. Med. 147, 1792–1805; Pangburn, M. K., and Müller-Eberhard, H. J. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75, 2416–2420; Kazatchkine, M. D., Fearon, D. T., and Austen, K. F. (1979) J. Immunol. 122, 75–81) indicated that the complement alternative pathway regulator factor H (FH) competes with factor B for C3b binding; however, the capability of FH to prevent C3bB assembly has not been formally investigated. Moreover, in the few published studies FH did not favor C3bB dissociation. Whether FH may affect C3bBb formation from C3bB is unknown. We set up user-friendly assays based on combined microplate/Western blotting techniques that specifically detect either C3bB or C3bBb, with the aim of investigating the effect of FH on C3bB assembly and decay and C3bBb formation and decay. We document that FH does not affect C3bB assembly, indicating that FH does not efficiently compete with factor B for C3b binding. We also found that FH does not dissociate C3bB. FH showed a strong C3bBb decay-accelerating activity, as reported previously, and also exerted an apparent inhibitory effect on C3bBb formation. The latter effect was not fully attributable to a rapid FH-mediated dissociation of C3bBb complexes, because blocking decay with properdin and C3 nephritic factor did not restore C3bBb formation. FH almost completely prevented release of the smaller cleavage subunit of FB (Ba), without modifying the amount of C3bB complexes, suggesting that FH inhibits the conversion of C3bB to C3bBb. Thus, the inhibitory effect of FH on C3bBb formation is likely the sum of inhibition of C3bB conversion to C3bBb and of C3bBb decay acceleration. Further studies are required to confirm these findings in physiological cell-based settings. PMID:26903516

  14. Repair of 254 nm ultraviolet-induced (6-4) photoproducts: monoclonal antibody recognition and differential defects in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups A, D, and variant

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramoto, T.; Matsunaga, T.; Ichihashi, M.; Nikaido, O.; Fujiwara, Y.; Mishima, Y. )

    1989-11-01

    Repair kinetics of ultraviolet (UV) light-induced (6-4) photoproducts in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A, D, and variant cells were studied by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a specific monoclonal antibody raised against (6-4) photoproducts, together with unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and loss of T4 endonuclease V-susceptible sites (ESS). Group AXP35KO cells completely failed to repair both ESS (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and antibody-recognizing (6-4) photoproducts until tested 24 h after irradiation, and had 2% early-time UDS. Group DXP43KO cells showed about 10% removal of both (6-4) photoproducts and ESS in 24 h, despite showing a residually higher level of 40% early-time and cumulative UDS. Thus, the results substantiated the extreme UV hypersensitivity of XP group A and D cells. However, XP52KO variant cells exhibited the normal level of UDS and ESS loss, but a slightly reduced repair of antibody-recognizing (6-4) photoproducts at 6 and 12 h after irradiation, which may account for a small UV hypersensitivity of the XP variant cells.

  15. A COMPARISON OF THE SPECIFICITY OF INHIBITION BY PHOSPHONATE ESTERS OF THE FIRST COMPONENT OF COMPLEMENT AND THE ANTIGEN-INDUCED RELEASE OF HISTAMINE FROM GUINEA PIG LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Elmer L.; Austen, K. Frank

    1964-01-01

    The ability of a number p-nitrophenylethyl alkyl, phenyl alkyl, chloroalkyl, and aminoalkyl phosphonates to inhibit the activated first component (C'1a) of guinea pig complement, and the antigen-induced release of histamine from sliced, perfused guinea pig lung has been compared. C'1a in its reactivity with these phosphonates is distinctly more similar to trypsin than to any of the other enzymes studied previously. It is suggested that both trypsin and C'1a possess an anionic group in the active center of the respective enzyme, but the distance between the anionic and esteratic site in C'1a might be less than in trypsin. The pattern of inhibition of histamine relase by the alkyl, phenyl alkyl, and chloroalkyl phosphonates is similar to the inhibition of C'1a by these compounds, although distinct differences are apparent. The aminoalkyl phosphonates are distinctly less active inhibitors of histamine release than the corresponding alkyl phosphonates, whereas the reverse is true of the inhibition of C'1a. On the basis of these differences, it is tentatively concluded that the organophosphorus-inhibitable enzymes in the guinea pig systems studied here are similar but not identical. PMID:14212115

  16. Structural insights on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Alcorlo, Martín; López-Perrote, Andrés; Delgado, Sandra; Yébenes, Hugo; Subías, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, César; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Llorca, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    The proteolytic cleavage of C3 to generate C3b is the central and most important step in the activation of complement, a major component of innate immunity. The comparison of the crystal structures of C3 and C3b illustrates large conformational changes during the transition from C3 to C3b. Exposure of a reactive thio-ester group allows C3b to bind covalently to surfaces such as pathogens or apoptotic cellular debris. The displacement of the thio-ester-containing domain (TED) exposes hidden surfaces that mediate the interaction with complement factor B to assemble the C3-convertase of the alternative pathway (AP). In addition, the displacement of the TED and its interaction with the macroglobulin 1 (MG1) domain generates an extended surface in C3b where the complement regulators factor H (FH), decay accelerating factor (DAF), membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and complement receptor 1 (CR1) can bind, mediating accelerated decay of the AP C3-convertase and proteolytic inactivation of C3b. In the last few years, evidence has accumulated revealing that the structure of C3b in solution is significantly more flexible than anticipated. We review our current knowledge on C3b structural flexibility to propose a general model where the TED can display a collection of conformations around the MG ring, as well as a few specialized positions where the TED is held in one of several fixed locations. Importantly, this conformational heterogeneity in C3b impacts complement regulation by affecting the interaction with regulators.

  17. Comprehensive and comparative transcription analyses of the complement pathway in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Köbis, Judith M; Rebl, Alexander; Kühn, Carsten; Korytář, Tomáš; Köllner, Bernd; Goldammer, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is one of the most ancient and most essential innate immune cascades throughout the animal kingdom. Survival of aquatic animals, such as rainbow trout, depends on this early inducible, efficient immune cascade. Despite increasing research on genes coding for complement components in bony fish, some complement-related genes are still unknown in salmonid fish. In the present study, we characterize the genes encoding complement factor D (CFD), CD93 molecule (CD93), and C-type lectin domain family 4, member M (CLEC4M) from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Subsequently, we performed comprehensive and comparative expression analyses of 36 complement genes including CFD, CD93, and CLEC4M and further putative complement-associated genes to obtain general information about the functional gene interaction within the complement pathway in fish. These quantification analyses were conducted in liver, spleen and gills of healthy fish of two rainbow trout strains, selected for survival (strain BORN) and growth (Import strain), respectively. The present expression study clearly confirms for rainbow trout that liver represents the primary site of complement expression. Spleen and gills also express most complement genes, although the mean transcript levels were generally lower than in liver. The transcription data suggest a contribution of spleen and gills to complement activity. The comparison of the two rainbow trout strains revealed a generally similar complement gene expression. However, a significantly lower expression of numerous genes especially in spleen seems characteristic for the BORN strain. This suggests a strain-specific complement pathway regulation under the selected rearing conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Versatility of the complement system in neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and brain homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Franca; De Blasio, Daiana; Zangari, Rosalia; Zanier, Elisa R.; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2014-01-01

    The immune response after brain injury is highly complex and involves both local and systemic events at the cellular and molecular level. It is associated to a dramatic over-activation of enzyme systems, the expression of proinflammatory genes and the activation/recruitment of immune cells. The complement system represents a powerful component of the innate immunity and is highly involved in the inflammatory response. Complement components are synthesized predominantly by the liver and circulate in the bloodstream primed for activation. Moreover, brain cells can produce complement proteins and receptors. After acute brain injury, the rapid and uncontrolled activation of the complement leads to massive release of inflammatory anaphylatoxins, recruitment of cells to the injury site, phagocytosis and induction of blood brain barrier (BBB) damage. Brain endothelial cells are particularly susceptible to complement-mediated effects, since they are exposed to both circulating and locally synthesized complement proteins. Conversely, during neurodegenerative disorders, complement factors play distinct roles depending on the stage and degree of neuropathology. In addition to the deleterious role of the complement, increasing evidence suggest that it may also play a role in normal nervous system development (wiring the brain) and adulthood (either maintaining brain homeostasis or supporting regeneration after brain injury). This article represents a compendium of the current knowledge on the complement role in the brain, prompting a novel view that complement activation can result in either protective or detrimental effects in brain conditions that depend exquisitely on the nature, the timing and the degree of the stimuli that induce its activation. A deeper understanding of the acute, subacute and chronic consequences of complement activation is needed and may lead to new therapeutic strategies, including the ability of targeting selective step in the complement cascade

  19. Complement and HIV-I infection/ HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengming; Dai, Shen; Gordon, Jennifer; Qin, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    The various neurological complications associated with HIV-1 infection, specifically HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist as a major public health burden worldwide. Despite the widespread use of anti-retroviral therapy, the prevalence of HAND is significantly high. HAND results from the direct effects of an HIV-1 infection as well as secondary effects of HIV-1-induced immune reaction and inflammatory response. Complement, a critical mediator of innate and acquired immunity, plays important roles in defeating many viral infections by the formation of a lytic pore or indirectly by opsonization and recruitment of phagocytes. While the role of complement in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and HAND has been previously recognized for over fifteen years, it has been largely underestimated thus far. Complement can be activated through HIV-1 envelope proteins, mannose binding lectins (MBL) and anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Complement not only fights against HIV-1 infection but also enhances HIV-1 infection. Also, HIV-1 can hijack complement regulators such as CD59 and CD55 and can utilize these regulators and factor H to escape from complement attack. Normally, complement levels in brain are much lower than plasma levels and there is no or little complement deposition in brain cells. Interestingly, local production and deposition of complement are dramatically increased in HIV-1-infected brain, indicating that complement may contribute to the pathogenesis of HAND. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of complement in HIV-1 infection and HAND as well as potential therapeutic approaches targeting to the complement system for the treatment and eradications of HIV-1 infection. PMID:24639397

  20. Complement-Mediated Death of Ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis Caused by Human Blood Serum.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P A; Faktor, M I; Karpova, N S; Cheremnykh, E G; Brusov, O S

    2016-04-01

    Toxicity of human blood serum for ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis is determined by the complement system. When ciliate are dying after being exposed to blood serum, cell membrane permeability for low-molecular-weight compounds significantly increases, probably due to pore formation. Serine protease inhibitors or exposure to physical factors inducing complement inactivation (e.g., heating up to 56°C) completely prevented ciliate death under the effect of human serum. Activation of serum complement upon interaction with Tetrahymena cells occurred by the classical or lectin pathway, while the contribution of the alternative activation pathway was negligible.

  1. The receptor for the complement C3a anaphylatoxin (C3aR) provides host protection against Listeria monocytogenes-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey L; Morales, John E; Wetsel, Rick A

    2014-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive intracellular bacterium that is acquired through tainted food and may lead to systemic infection and possible death. Despite the importance of the innate immune system in fighting L. monocytogenes infection, little is known about the role of complement and its activation products, including the potent C3a anaphylatoxin. In a model of systemic L. monocytogenes infection, we show that mice lacking the receptor for C3a (C3aR(-/-)) are significantly more sensitive to infection compared with wild-type mice, as demonstrated by decreased survival, increased bacterial burden, and increased damage to their livers and spleens. The inability of the C3aR(-/-) mice to clear the bacterial infection was not caused by defective macrophages or by a reduction in cytokines/chemokines known to be critical in the host response to L. monocytogenes, including IFN-γ and TNF-α. Instead, TUNEL staining, together with Fas, active caspase-3, and Bcl-2 expression data, indicates that the increased susceptibility of C3aR(-/-) mice to L. monocytogenes infection was largely caused by increased L. monocytogenes-induced apoptosis of myeloid and lymphoid cells in the spleen that are required for ultimate clearance of L. monocytogenes, including neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and T cells. These findings reveal an unexpected function of C3a/C3aR signaling during the host immune response that suppresses Fas expression and caspase-3 activity while increasing Bcl-2 expression, thereby providing protection to both myeloid and lymphoid cells against L. monocytogenes-induced apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. The Receptor for the Complement C3a Anaphylatoxin (C3aR) Provides Host Protection against Listeria monocytogenes Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey L.; Morales, John E.; Wetsel, Rick A.

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive intracellular bacterium that is acquired through tainted food and may lead to systemic infection and possible death. Despite the importance of the innate immune system in fighting LM infection, little is known about the role of complement and its activation products, including the potent C3a anaphylatoxin. In a model of systemic LM infection, we show here that mice lacking the receptor for C3a (C3aR-/-) are significantly more sensitive to infection compared to WT mice as demonstrated by decreased survival, increased bacterial burden, and increased damage to their livers and spleens. The inability of the C3aR-/- mice to clear the bacterial infection was not caused by defective macrophages or by reduction of cytokines/chemokines known to be critical in the host response to LM, including IFN-γ and TNF-α. Instead, TUNEL staining together with Fas, active caspase-3, and Bcl-2 expression data indicate that the increased susceptibility of C3aR-/- mice to LM infection was largely caused by increased LM-induced apoptosis of myeloid and lymphoid cells in the spleen that are required for ultimate clearance of LM, including neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and T cells. These findings reveal an unexpected function of C3a/C3aR signaling during the host immune response that suppresses Fas expression and caspase-3 activity while increasing Bcl-2 expression, thereby providing protection to both myeloid and lymphoid cells against LM-induced apoptosis. PMID:24981453

  3. Synergic effect of polymorphisms in ERCC6 5' flanking region and complement factor H on age-related macular degeneration predisposition.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Jingsheng; Ning, Baitang; Bojanowski, Christine M; Lin, Zhong-Ning; Ross, Robert J; Reed, George F; Shen, Defen; Jiao, Xiaodong; Zhou, Min; Chew, Emily Y; Kadlubar, Fred F; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2006-06-13

    This study investigates age-related macular degeneration (AMD) genetic risk factors through identification of a functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and its disease association. We chose ERCC6 because of its roles in the aging process, DNA repair, and ocular degeneration from the gene disruption. Bioinformatics indicated a putative binding-element alteration on the sequence containing C-6530>G SNP in the 5' flanking region of ERCC6 from Sp1 on the C allele to SP1, GATA-1, and OCT-1 on the G allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays displayed distinctive C and G allele-binding patterns to nuclear proteins. Luciferase expression was higher in the vector construct containing the G allele than that containing the C allele. A cohort of 460 advanced AMD cases and 269 age-matched controls was examined along with pathologically diagnosed 57 AMD and 18 age-matched non-AMD archived cases. ERCC6 C-6530>G was associated with AMD susceptibility, both independently and through interaction with an SNP (rs380390) in the complement factor H (CFH) intron reported to be highly associated with AMD. A disease odds ratio of 23 was conferred by homozygozity for risk alleles at both ERCC6 and CFH compared with homozygozity for nonrisk alleles. Enhanced ERCC6 expression was observed in lymphocytes from healthy donors bearing ERCC6 C-6530>G alleles. Intense immunostaining of ERCC6 was also found in AMD eyes from ERCC6 C-6530>G carriers. The strong AMD predisposition conferred by the ERCC6 and CFH SNPs may result from biological epistasis, because ERCC6 functions in universal transcription as a component of RNA pol I transcription complex.

  4. Protective effect of membrane cofactor protein against complement-dependent injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Huang, Shou-jian; Wang, Jin-qun; Wu, Chu-kun

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate the protective role of membrane cofactor protein (MCP, CD46) on complement-dependent injury. MCP was separated by ion exchange chromatography on a DEAE sephadex A-50 column from pig erythrocyte ghosts. Its protective effect was tested in models such as cobra venom factor (CVF)-induced platelet metamorphosis and aggregation, human serum-induced injury in isolated working guinea pig heart and reverse passive Arthus reaction. MCP inhibited CVF-induced platelet metamorphosis with an IC50 of 56.7 mg/L+/-2.6 mg/L, and prevented injury induced by activated complement in isolated working guinea pig hearts. In the rat model of reverse Arthus reaction, MCP relieved the skin lesions induced by immune complexes. MCP has a protective effect against complement-dependent injury.

  5. Age-related macular degeneration: Complement in action.

    PubMed

    van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Strauss, Erich C; Yaspan, Brian L

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in host-defense against common pathogens but must be tightly controlled to avoid inflammation and tissue damage. Polymorphisms in genes encoding two important negative regulators of the alternative complement pathway, complement factor H (CFH) and complement factor I (CFI), are associated with the risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population. In this review, we will discuss the genetic basis of AMD and the potential impact of complement de-regulation on disease pathogenesis. Finally, we will highlight recent therapeutic approaches aimed at controlling complement activation in patients with AMD.

  6. CspA from Borrelia burgdorferi Inhibits the Terminal Complement Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hallström, Teresia; Siegel, Corinna; Mörgelin, Matthias; Kraiczy, Peter; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to survive and persist in an immunocompetent human host, Borrelia burgdorferi controls the human immune attack and blocks the damaging effects of the activated complement system. These Gram-negative spirochetes use CspA (CRASP-1) and four additional immune evasion proteins to bind combinations of human plasma regulators, including factor H, factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), complement factor H-related protein 1 (CFHR1), CFHR2, CFHR5, and plasminogen. As many microbial immune evasion proteins have multiple functions, we hypothesized that CspA has additional roles in complement or immune control. Here, we identify CspA as a terminal complement inhibitor. Borrelial CspA binds the human terminal complement components C7 and C9 and blocks assembly and membrane insertion of the terminal complement complex (TCC). CspA inhibits TCC assembly at the level of C7, as revealed by hemolytic assays, and inhibits polymerization of C9. CspA, when ectopically expressed on the surface of serum-sensitive Borrelia garinii, blocks TCC assembly on the level of C7 and induces serum resistance in the transformed bacteria. This CspA-mediated serum resistance and terminal complement pathway inhibition allow B. burgdorferi to survive in the hostile environment of human plasma. PMID:23943762

  7. TMA: beware of complements.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel; Cines, Douglas B

    2013-09-19

    In this issue of Blood, Jodele and colleagues report that defective complement regulation contributes to the development of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with important implications for diagnosis and management of this severe clinical complication.

  8. The bacteria binding glycoprotein salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp340) activates complement via the lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Leito, Jelani T D; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; van Houdt, Michel; van den Berg, Timo K; Wouters, Diana

    2011-10-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG), also known as gp-340 and Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1, is a glycoprotein that is present in tears, lung fluid and mucosal surfaces along the gastrointestinal tract. It is encoded by the Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 gene, a member of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich group B protein superfamily. SAG aggregates bacteria thus promoting their clearance from the oral cavity and activates the complement system. Complement proteins may enter the oral cavity in case of serum leakage, which occurs after mucosal damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mode of complement activation. We showed a dose-dependent C4 deposition on SAG-coated microplates showing that either the classical or lectin pathway of complement was activated. Antibodies against mannose binding lectin inhibited C4 deposition and SAG induced no C4 deposition in MBL deficient sera showing SAG activated complement through the MBL pathway. Periodate treatment of SAG abolished MBL pathway activation consistent with an involvement of SAG glycans in complement activation. This provides the first evidence for a role of SAG in complement activation through the MBL pathway and suggests a potential role of SAG as a complement activating factor at the mucosal epithelia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Complement component 3 (C3)

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003539.htm Complement component 3 (C3) To use the sharing features on ... and C4 are the most commonly measured complement components. A complement test may be used to monitor ...

  10. Local Production of the Alternative Pathway Component Factor B Is Sufficient to Promote Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Schnabolk, Gloriane; Coughlin, Beth; Joseph, Kusumam; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; O'Quinn, Elizabeth C.; Nowling, Tamara; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Complement factor B (CFB) is a required component of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, and CFB polymorphisms are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk. Complement factor B is made in the liver, but expression has also been detected in retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid. We investigated whether production of CFB by the RPE can promote AP activation in mouse choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Methods. Transgenic mice expressing CFB under the RPE65 promoter were generated and crossed onto factor B-deficient (CFB-KO) mice. Biological activity was determined in vitro using RPE monolayers and in vivo using laser-induced CNV. Contribution of systemic CFB was investigated using CFB-KO reconstituted with CFB-sufficient serum. Results. Transgenic mice (CFB-tg) expressed CFB in RPE-choroid; no CFB was detected in serum. Cultured CFB-tg RPE monolayers secreted CFB apically and basally upon exposure to oxidative stress that was biologically active. Choroidal neovascularization sizes were comparable between wild-type and CFB-tg mice, but significantly increased when compared to lesions in CFB-KO mice. Injections of CFB-sufficient serum into CFB-KO mice resulted in partial reconstitution of systemic AP activity and significantly increased CNV size. Conclusions. Mouse RPE cells express and secrete CFB sufficient to promote RPE damage and CNV. This further supports that local complement production may regulate disease processes; however, the reconstitution experiments suggest that additional components may be sequestered from the bloodstream. Understanding the process of ocular complement production and regulation will further our understanding of the AMD disease process and the requirements of a complement-based therapeutic. PMID:25593023

  11. Guilty as charged: all available evidence implicates complement's role in fetal demise.

    PubMed

    Girardi, Guillermina

    2008-03-01

    Appropriate complement inhibition is an absolute requirement for normal pregancy. Uncontrolled complement activation in the maternal-fetal interface leads to fetal death. Here we show that complement activation is a crucial and early mediator of pregnancy loss in two different mouse models of pregnancy loss. Using a mouse model of fetal loss and growth restriction (IUGR) induced by antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), we examined the role of complement activation in fetal loss and IUGR. We found that C5a-C5aR interaction and neutrophils are key mediators of fetal injury. Treatment with heparin, the standard therapy for pregnant patients with aPL, prevents complement activation and protects mice from pregnancy complications induced by aPL, and anticoagulants that do not inhibit complement do not protect pregnancies. In an antibody-independent mouse model of spontaneous miscarriage and IUGR (CBA/JxDBA/2) we also identified C5a as an essential mediator. Complement activation caused dysregulation of the angiogenic factors required for normal placental development. In CBA/JxDBA/2 mice, we observed inflammatory infiltrates in placentas, functional deficiency of free vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), elevated levels of soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1, also known as sFlt-1; a potent anti-angiogenic molecule), and defective placental development. Inhibition of complement activation blocked the increase in sVEGFR-1 and rescued pregnancies. Our studies in antibody-dependent and antibody-independent models of pregnancy complications identified complement activation as the key mediator of damage and will allow development of new interventions to prevent pregnancy loss and IUGR.

  12. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  13. Suppression of cytokine-mediated complement factor gene expression through selective activation of the Ah receptor with 3',4'-dimethoxy-α-naphthoflavone.

    PubMed

    Murray, Iain A; Flaveny, Colin A; Chiaro, Christopher R; Sharma, Arun K; Tanos, Rachel S; Schroeder, Jennifer C; Amin, Shantu G; Bisson, William H; Kolluri, Siva K; Perdew, Gary H

    2011-03-01

    We have characterized previously a class of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligand termed selective AHR modulators (SAhRMs). SAhRMs exhibit anti-inflammatory properties, including suppression of cytokine-mediated acute phase genes (e.g., Saa1), through dissociation of non-dioxin-response element (DRE) AHR activity from DRE-dependent xenobiotic gene expression. The partial AHR agonist α-naphthoflavone (αNF) mediates the suppressive, non-DRE dependent effects on SAA1 expression and partial DRE-mediated CYP1A1 induction. These observations suggest that αNF may be structurally modified to a derivative exhibiting only SAhRM activity. A screen of αNF derivatives identifies 3',4'-dimethoxy-αNF (DiMNF) as a candidate SAhRM. Competitive ligand binding validates DiMNF as an AHR ligand, and DRE-dependent reporter assays with quantitative mRNA analysis of AHR target genes reveal minimal agonist activity associated with AHR binding. Consistent with loss of agonist activity, DiMNF fails to promote AHR binding to DRE probes as determined through electromobility shift assay. Importantly, mRNA analysis indicates that DiMNF retains the suppressive capacity of αNF regarding cytokine-mediated SAA1 expression in Huh7 cells. Interestingly, predictive docking modeling suggests that DiMNF adopts a unique orientation within the AHR ligand binding pocket relative to αNF and may facilitate the rational design of additional SAhRMs. Microarray studies with a non-DRE binding but otherwise functional AHR mutant identified complement factor C3 as a potential SAhRM target. We confirmed this observation in Huh7 cells using 10 μM DiMNF, which significantly repressed C3 mRNA and protein. These data expand the classes of AHR ligands exerting DRE-independent anti-inflammatory SAhRM activity, suggesting SAhRMs may have application in the amelioration of inflammatory disorders.

  14. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between complement factor H I62V polymorphism and risk of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy in Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Yang; Zhao, Keke; Zheng, Jingwei; Rossmiller, Brian; Ildefonso, Cristhian; Biswal, Manas; Zhao, Pei-quan

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether the polymorphism rs800292 (184G>A, I62V) in the complement factor H gene is associated with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) and the genetic difference between PCV and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD), in Asian populations. A comprehensive literature search was performed in PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and reference lists. A system review and meta-analysis of the association between I62V and PCV and/or nAMD were performed from 8 studies involving 5,062 subjects. The following data from individual studies were extracted and analyzed: 1) comparison of I62V polymorphisms between PCV and controls; 2) comparison of I62V polymorphisms between PCV and nAMD. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using fixed-effects models. The Q-statistic test was used to assess heterogeneity, and Egger's test was used to evaluate publication bias. Sensitivity analysis and cumulative meta-analysis were also performed. The I62V polymorphism showed a significant summary OR1 for genotype GA+GG versus homozygous genotype AA was 3.18 (95% CI, 2.51-4.04, P<0.00001), the OR2 of heterozygous genotype GA versus AA was 2.29 (95% CI: 1.79-2.94, P<0.00001), the OR3 of homozygous genotype GG versus AA was 4.42 (95% CI: 3.45-5.67, P<0.00001), and the OR4 of allele G versus A was 2.04 (95% CI: 1.85-2.26, P<0.00001). Sensitivity analysis indicated the robustness of our findings, and evidence of publication bias was not observed in our meta-analysis. Cumulative meta-analysis revealed that the summary ORs were stable. There was no significant difference in every genetic model between PCV and nAMD (n = 5, OR1 = 0.92, OR2 = 0.96, OR3 = 0.90, OR4 = 0.94). Our analysis provides evidence that the I62V polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of PCV. The variant of I62V could be a promising genetic biomarker of PCV in Asian populations.

  15. Factors inducing falling in schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Yoko; Akezaki, Yoshiteru; Mori, Kohei; Yuri, Yoshimi; Katsumura, Hitomi; Hara, Tomihiro; Usui, Yuki; Fujino, Yoritaka; Nomura, Takuo; Hirao, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors causing falling among patients with schizophrenia hospitalized in psychiatric hospitals. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were divided into either those having experienced a fall within the past one year (Fall group, 12 patients) and those not having experienced a fall (Non-fall group, 7 patients), and we examined differences between the two groups. Assessment items measured included muscle strength, balance ability, flexibility, body composition assessment, Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF), the antipsychotic drug intake, and Drug Induced Extra-Pyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS). [Results] As a result, significant differences were observed in regard to One leg standing time with eyes open, Time Up and Go Test (TUGT), and DIEPSS Sialorrhea between the Fall group and the Non-fall group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that a decrease in balance ability was significantly correlated with falling in schizophrenia patients. PMID:28356628

  16. Combined Inhibition of Complement and CD14 Attenuates Bacteria-Induced Inflammation in Human Whole Blood More Efficiently Than Antagonizing the Toll-like Receptor 4–MD2 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsen, Alice; Nymo, Stig; Landsem, Anne; Christiansen, Dorte; Ryan, Liv; Husebye, Harald; Lau, Corinna; Pischke, Søren E.; Lambris, John D.; Espevik, Terje; Mollnes, Tom E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Single inhibition of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)–MD2 complex failed in treatment of sepsis. CD14 is a coreceptor for several TLRs, including TLR4 and TLR2. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of single TLR4-MD2 inhibition by using eritoran, compared with the effect of CD14 inhibition alone and combined with the C3 complement inhibitor compstatin (Cp40), on the bacteria-induced inflammatory response in human whole blood. Methods. Cytokines were measured by multiplex technology, and leukocyte activation markers CD11b and CD35 were measured by flow cytometry. Results. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–induced inflammatory markers were efficiently abolished by both anti-CD14 and eritoran. Anti-CD14 was significantly more effective than eritoran in inhibiting LPS-binding to HEK-293E cells transfected with CD14 and Escherichia coli–induced upregulation of monocyte activation markers (P < .01). Combining Cp40 with anti-CD14 was significantly more effective than combining Cp40 with eritoran in reducing E. coli–induced interleukin 6 (P < .05) and monocyte activation markers induced by both E. coli (P < .001) and Staphylococcus aureus (P < .01). Combining CP40 with anti-CD14 was more efficient than eritoran alone for 18 of 20 bacteria-induced inflammatory responses (mean P < .0001). Conclusions. Whole bacteria–induced inflammation was inhibited more efficiently by anti-CD14 than by eritoran, particularly when combined with complement inhibition. Combined CD14 and complement inhibition may prove a promising treatment strategy for bacterial sepsis. PMID:26977050

  17. Role of C3a receptors, C5a receptors, and complement protein C6 deficiency in collagen antibody-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Banda, Nirmal K; Hyatt, Stephanie; Antonioli, Alexandra H; White, Jason T; Glogowska, Magdalena; Takahashi, Kazue; Merkel, Tod J; Stahl, Gregory L; Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey; Wetsel, Rick; Arend, William P; Holers, V Michael

    2012-02-01

    The complement system, especially the alternative pathway, plays essential roles in the induction of injury in collagen Ab-induced arthritis (CAIA) in mice. The goal of the current study was to directly compare the roles of receptors for C3a and C5a, as well as the membrane attack complex, as effector mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CAIA. Clinical disease activity in C3aR(-/-), C5aR(-/-), and C6-deficient (C6-def) mice was decreased by 52, 94, and 65%, respectively, as compared with wild-type mice. Decreases in histopathologic injury as well as in IgG and C3 deposition paralleled the clinical disease activity. A decrease in the percentage of synovial neutrophils was observed in C3aR(-/-), C5aR(-/-), and C6-def mice, and a decrease in macrophages was observed in C3aR(-/-) and C5aR(-/-), but not in C6-def, mice. Synovial mRNA obtained by laser capture microdissection exhibited a decrease in TNF-α in C5aR(-/-) mice and in IL-1β in both C5aR(-/-) and C6-def mice, whereas C3aR(-/-) mice demonstrated no change in either cytokine. Our findings show that absent C3aR-, C5aR-, or membrane attack complex-initiated effector mechanisms each decrease susceptibility to CAIA, with clinical effects most pronounced in C5aR-deficient mice. Although the absence of C3aR, C5aR, or C6 led to differential deficiencies in effector mechanisms, decreased proximal joint IgG and C3 deposition was common to all three genotypes in comparison with wild-type mice. These data suggest the existence of positive-feedback amplification pathways downstream of all three effectors that promote additional IgG deposition and C3 activation in the joint.

  18. Endocrine targets of hypoxia-inducible factors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiu-Chi; Tsai, Shaw-Jenq

    2017-07-01

    Endocrine is an important and tightly regulated system for maintaining body homeostasis. Endocrine glands produce hormones, which are released into blood stream to guide the target cells responding to all sorts of stimulations. For maintaining body homeostasis, the secretion and activity of a particular hormone needs to be adjusted in responding to environmental challenges such as changes in nutritional status or chronic stress. Hypoxia, a status caused by reduced oxygen availability or imbalance of oxygen consumption/supply in an organ or within a cell, is a stress that affects many physiological and pathological processes. Hypoxic stress in endocrine organs is especially critical because endocrine glands control body homeostasis. Local hypoxia affects not only the particular gland but also the downstream cells/organs regulated by hormones secreted from this gland. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are transcription factors that function as master regulators of oxygen homeostasis. Recent studies report that aberrant expression of HIFs in endocrine organs may result in the development and/or progression of diseases including diabetes, endometriosis, infertility and cancers. In this article, we will review recent findings in HIF-mediated endocrine organ dysfunction and the systemic syndromes caused by these disorders. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  19. Complement facilitates macrophage phagocytosis of inhaled iron particles but has little effect in mediating silica-induced lung inflammatory and clearance responses

    SciTech Connect

    Warheit, D.B.; Carakostas, M.C.; Bamberger, J.R.; Hartsky, M.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The present studies were undertaken to investigate the role of complement in mediating pulmonary inflammation and/or phagocytosis as a function of particle clearance in rats exposed to silica or carbonyl iron (CI) particles. Both particle types were shown to be weak activators of serum complement in vitro. In these studies, normal and complement-depressed (CVFD-treated) rats were exposed to aerosols of Ci or silica particles for 6 hr at 100 mg/m{sup 3}. Following exposure, alveolar fluids and cells from sham and dust-exposed animals were recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at several time periods postexposure and measured for a variety of biochemical and cellular indices. In addition, pulmonary macrophages were cultured and studied for morphology and phagocytosis. The authors results showed that CI exposure did not produce cellular or biochemical indices of pulmonary inflammation, either in normal or complement-depleted rats. However, fewer phagocytic macrophages were recovered from the lungs of CVF-treated, CI-exposed rats than from normal exposed animals. In contrast, silica inhalation produced a sustained PMN inflammatory response in the lungs of exposed rats, measured up through 1 month postexposure, along with significant increases in BAL fluid levels of LDH, protein, and alkaline phosphatase and deficits in pulmonary macrophage phagocytic functions.

  20. Acute Cobalt-Induced Lung Injury and the Role of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α in Modulating Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Yogesh; Greenwood, Krista K.; Merrill, Christian; Kim, Kyung Y.; Patial, Sonika; Parameswaran, Narayanan; Harkema, Jack R.; LaPres, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Air pollution is a critical factor in the development and exacerbation of pulmonary diseases. Ozone, automobile exhaust, cigarette smoke, and metallic dust are among the potentially harmful pollution components that are linked to disease progression. Transition metals, such as cobalt, have been identified at significant levels in air pollution. Cobalt exerts numerous biological effects, including mimicking hypoxia. Similar to hypoxia, cobalt exposure results in the stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), a family of proteins that regulate the cellular response to oxygen deficit. HIFs also play an important role in innate immunity and inflammatory processes. To characterize the role of HIF1α, the most ubiquitously expressed HIF, in the early events during cobalt-induced lung inflammation, an inducible lung-specific HIF1α deletion model was employed. Control mice showed classical signs of metal-induced injury following cobalt exposure, including neutrophilic infiltration and induction of Th1 cytokines. In contrast, HIF1α-deficient mice exhibited pronounced eosinophil counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue complemented with Th2 cytokine induction. The timing of these results suggests that the loss of epithelial-derived HIF1α alters the lung's innate immune response and biases the tissue toward a Th2-mediated inflammation. PMID:20511350

  1. Outline of Hungarian Complementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szamosi, Michael

    This study presents a preliminary analysis of Hungarian complement constructions and the syntactic operations needed to account for them. The expository framework (and the implicit framework of the research itself) is based upon that of Rosenbaum (1967). The aim of the paper is to arrive at a rough picture of the kinds of structures and syntactic…

  2. Verbal Complementizers in Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Hossam Eldin Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    A class of Modern Standard Arabic complementizers known as "'?inna' and its sisters" demonstrate unique case and word order restrictions. While CPs in Arabic allow both Subject-Verb (SV) and Verb-Subject (VS) word order and their subjects show nominative morphology, CPs introduced by "?inna" ban a verb from directly following…

  3. Complement expression in the retina is not influenced by short-term pressure elevation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Cecilia Q.; Panagis, Lampros; Kamthan, Gautam; Ren, Lizhen; Rozenboym, Anna; Perera, Tarique D.; Coplan, Jeremy D.; Danias, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether short-term pressure elevation affects complement gene expression in the retina in vitro and in vivo. Methods Muller cell (TR-MUL5) cultures and organotypic retinal cultures from adult mice and monkeys were subjected to either 24-h or 72-h of pressure at 0, 15, 30, and 45 mmHg above ambient. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to microbead-induced intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation for 7 days. RNA and protein were extracted and used for analysis of expression levels of complement component genes and complement component 1, q subcomponent (C1q) and complement factor H (CFH) immunoblotting. Results mRNA levels of complement genes and C1q protein levels in Muller cell cultures remained the same for all pressure levels after exposure for either 24 or 72 h. In primate and murine organotypic cultures, pressure elevation did not produce changes in complement gene expression or C1q and CFH protein levels at either the 24-h or 72-h time points. Pressure-related glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mRNA expression changes were detected in primate retinal organotypic cultures (analysis of variance [ANOVA]; p<0.05). mRNA expression of several other genes changed as a result of time in culture. Eyes subjected to microbead-induced IOP elevation had no differences in mRNA expression of complement genes and C1q protein levels (ANOVA; p>0.05 for both) with contralateral control and naïve control eyes. Conclusions Short-term elevation of pressure in vitro as well as short-term (1 week) IOP elevation in vivo does not seem to dramatically alter complement system gene expression in the retina. Prolonged expression to elevated pressure may be necessary to affect the complement system expression. PMID:24505213

  4. Complement activation of electrogenic ion transport in isolated rat colon.

    PubMed

    McCole, D F; Otti, B; Newsholme, P; Baird, A W

    1997-11-15

    The complement cascade is an important component in many immune and inflammatory reactions and may contribute to both the diarrhoea and inflammation associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Isolated rat colonic mucosae were voltage clamped in Ussing chambers. Basolateral addition of zymosan-activated whole human serum (ZAS) induced a rapid onset, transient inward short circuit current (SCC). This response was concentration dependent and was significantly attenuated by pre-heating ZAS at 60 degrees C for 30 min. Depletion of complement from normal human serum with cobra venom factor (CVF) significantly lowered SCC responses. Chloride was the primary charge carrying ion as responses to ZAS were abolished in the presence of the loop diuretic bumetanide. The complement component C3a stimulated ion transport but not to the same extent as whole serum. Exogenous C5 was without effect. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor piroxicam significantly attenuated the response to ZAS. These findings support the possibility that complement activation may contribute to the pathophysiology of secretory diarrhoea since activation of electrogenic chloride secretion converts intestinal epithelia to a state of net fluid secretion.

  5. Complement factor H, FHR-3 and FHR-1 variants associate in an extended haplotype conferring increased risk of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernabéu-Herrero, Maria E; Jiménez-Alcázar, Miguel; Anter, Jaouad; Pinto, Sheila; Sánchez Chinchilla, Daniel; Garrido, Sofía; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a severe thrombotic microangiopathy affecting the renal microvasculature and is associated with complement dysregulation caused by mutations or autoantibodies. Disease penetrance and severity is modulated by inheritance of "risk" polymorphisms in the complement genes MCP, CFH and CFHR1. We describe the prevalence of mutations, the frequency of risk polymorphisms and the occurrence of anti-FH autoantibodies in a Spanish aHUS cohort (n=367). We also report the identification of a polymorphism in CFHR3 (c.721C>T; rs379370) that is associated with increased risk of aHUS (OR=1.78; CI 1.22-2.59; p=0.002), and is most frequently included in an extended risk haplotype spanning the CFH-CFHR3-CFHR1 genes. This extended haplotype integrates polymorphisms in the promoter region of CFH and CFHR3, and is associated with poorer evolution of renal function and decreased FH levels. The CFH-CFHR3-CFHR1 aHUS-risk haplotype seems to be the same as was previously associated with protection against meningococcal infections, suggesting that the genetic variability in this region is limited to a few extended haplotypes, each with opposite effects in various human diseases. These results suggest that the combination of quantitative and qualitative variations in the complement proteins encoded by CFH, CFHR3 and CFHR1 genes is key for the association of these haplotypes with disease.

  6. Complement and thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oku, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kono, Michihiro; Ohmura, Kazumasa; Kato, Masaru; Bohgaki, Toshiyuki; Horita, Tetsuya; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Amengual, Olga; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of complement activation in the pathophysiology of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was first reported in murine models of antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-related pregnancy morbidities. We previously reported that complement activation is prevalent and may function as a source of procoagulant cell activation in the sera of APS patients. Recently, autoantibodies against C1q, a component of complement 1, were reported to be correlated with complement activation in systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies target neoepitopes of deformed C1q bound to various molecules (i.e., anionic phospholipids) and induce accelerated complement activation. We found that anti-C1q antibodies are more frequently detected in primary APS patients than in control patients and in refractory APS patients with repeated thrombotic events. The titer of anti-C1q antibodies was significantly higher in refractory APS patients than in APS patients without flare. The binding of C1q to anionic phospholipids may be associated with the surge in complement activation in patients with anti-C1q antibodies when triggered by 'second-hit' biological stressors such as infection. Such stressors will induce overexpression of anionic phospholipids, with subsequent increases in deformed C1q that is targeted by anti-C1q antibodies.

  7. Regulation of humoral immunity by complement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael C; Isenman, David E

    2012-08-24

    The complement system of innate immunity is important in regulating humoral immunity largely through the complement receptor CR2, which forms a coreceptor on B cells during antigen-induced activation. However, CR2 also retains antigens on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs). Display of antigen on FDCs is critical for clonal selection and affinity maturation of activated B cells. This review will discuss the role of complement in adaptive immunity in general with a focus on the interplay between CR2-associated antigen on B cells with CR2 expressed on FDCs. This latter interaction provides an opportunity for memory B cells to sample antigen over prolonged periods. The cocrystal structure of CR2 with its ligand C3d provides insight into how the complement system regulates access of antigen by B cells with implications for therapeutic manipulations to modulate aberrant B cell responses in the case of autoimmunity.

  8. CspA from Borrelia burgdorferi inhibits the terminal complement pathway.

    PubMed

    Hallström, Teresia; Siegel, Corinna; Mörgelin, Matthias; Kraiczy, Peter; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F

    2013-08-13

    In order to survive and persist in an immunocompetent human host, Borrelia burgdorferi controls the human immune attack and blocks the damaging effects of the activated complement system. These Gram-negative spirochetes use CspA (CRASP-1) and four additional immune evasion proteins to bind combinations of human plasma regulators, including factor H, factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), complement factor H-related protein 1 (CFHR1), CFHR2, CFHR5, and plasminogen. As many microbial immune evasion proteins have multiple functions, we hypothesized that CspA has additional roles in complement or immune control. Here, we identify CspA as a terminal complement inhibitor. Borrelial CspA binds the human terminal complement components C7 and C9 and blocks assembly and membrane insertion of the terminal complement complex (TCC). CspA inhibits TCC assembly at the level of C7, as revealed by hemolytic assays, and inhibits polymerization of C9. CspA, when ectopically expressed on the surface of serum-sensitive Borrelia garinii, blocks TCC assembly on the level of C7 and induces serum resistance in the transformed bacteria. This CspA-mediated serum resistance and terminal complement pathway inhibition allow B. burgdorferi to survive in the hostile environment of human plasma. The present study defines a new mechanism by which the pathogenic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi controls the terminal complement pathway of the human host to survive in human serum. The borrelial CspA binds to terminal pathway proteins C7 and C9 and inhibits the terminal complement pathway at the step of C7 and thereby inhibits terminal complement complex (TCC) assembly and membrane insertion. CspA blocks TCC assembly and insertion when expressed at the bacterial surface. CspA is the first TCC inhibitor cloned and functionally characterized from a Gram-negative bacterium. This identification of a bacterial TCC inhibitor of pathogen origin expands our knowledge of complement evasion of pathogenic bacteria and

  9. Systemic and lung physiological changes in rats after intravascular activation of complement.

    PubMed

    Younger, J G; Sasaki, N; Delgado, J; Ko, A C; Nghiem, T X; Waite, M D; Till, G O; Ward, P A

    2001-06-01

    Systemic complement activation has been noted in a variety of shock states, and there is growing evidence that, in addition to being proinflammatory effectors, products of complement activation contribute directly to generalized manifestations of shock, such as hypotension and acidosis. To study the effects of complement activation, we examined responses in rats to systemic activation of complement with cobra venom factor (CVF), including blood pressure, metabolic acidosis, changes in vascular permeability, and lung function. High doses of CVF produced circulatory collapse (mean arterial pressure = 110 +/- 16 and 35 +/- 9 mmHg in control and with CVF, respectively, P < 0.05), metabolic acidosis (HCO concentration = 27.8 +/- 1.7 and 9.6 +/- 3.4 meq/l in control and with CVF, respectively, P < 0.05), extravasation of albumin into the lung and gut, and modest arterial hypoxemia (PO2 = 486 +/- 51 and 201 +/- 36 Torr in control and during 100% O2 breathing, respectively, P < 0.05). Prior depletion of complement protected against these abnormalities. Other interventions, including neutrophil depletion and cyclooxygenase inhibition, prevented lung injury but had much less effect on systemic hemodynamics or gut permeability, suggesting that complement activation products induce injury by neutrophil- and cyclooxygenase-dependent pathways in the lung but not in the gut. These studies underscore the significant systemic abnormalities developing after systemic activation of complement.

  10. Complement component 5 promotes lethal thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Tomohiro; Yoshioka, Kengo; Mizuno, Masashi; Shimizu, Mie; Nagano, Fumihiko; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Tsuboi, Naotake; Maruyama, Shoichi; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Imai, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular histones promote platelet aggregation and thrombosis; this is followed by induction of coagulation disorder, which results in exhaustion of coagulation factors. Complement component 5 (C5) is known to be associated with platelet aggregation and coagulation system activation. To date, the pathological mechanism underlying liver injury has remained unclear. Here, we investigated whether C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. C5-sufficient and C5-deficient mice received single tail vein injections of purified, unfractionated histones obtained from calf thymus (45–75 μg/g). Subsequently, the mice were monitored for survival for up to 72 h. Based on the survival data, the 45 μg/g dose was used for analysis of blood cell count, liver function, blood coagulation ability, and promotion of platelet aggregation and platelet/leukocyte aggregate (PLA) production by extracellular histones. C5-deficient mice were protected from lethal thrombosis and had milder thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy, and liver injury with embolism and lower PLA production than C5-sufficient mice. These results indicate that C5 is associated with coagulation disorders, PLA production, and embolism-induced liver injury. In conclusion, C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. PMID:28205538

  11. Structural integration in hypoxia-inducible factors

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dalei; Potluri, Nalini; Lu, Jingping; Kim, Youngchang; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2015-08-20

    The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) coordinate cellular adaptations to low oxygen stress by regulating transcriptional programs in erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and metabolism. These programs promote the growth and progression of many tumours, making HIFs attractive anticancer targets. Transcriptionally active HIFs consist of HIF-alpha and ARNT (also called HIF-1 beta) subunits. Here we describe crystal structures for each of mouse HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT heterodimers in states that include bound small molecules and their hypoxia response element. A highly integrated quaternary architecture is shared by HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT, wherein ARNT spirals around the outside of each HIF-alpha subunit. Five distinct pockets are observed that permit small-molecule binding, including PAS domain encapsulated sites and an interfacial cavity formed through subunit heterodimerization. The DNA-reading head rotates, extends and cooperates with a distal PAS domain to bind hypoxia response elements. HIF-alpha mutations linked to human cancers map to sensitive sites that establish DNA binding and the stability of PAS domains and pockets.

  12. Bioactive Lysophospholipids Generated by Hepatic Lipase Degradation of Lipoproteins Lead to Complement Activation via the Classical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wanchao; Paik, David C.; Barile, Gaetano R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We determined bioactivity of lysophospholipids generated by degradation of the low-density (LDL), very low-density (VLDL), and high-density (HDL) lipoproteins with hepatic lipase (HL), cholesterol esterase (CE), and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2). Methods. The LDL, VLDL, and HDL were treated with HL, CE, and Lp-PLA2 after immobilization on plates, and complement activation studies were performed with diluted human serum. Complement component 3 (C3) fixation, a marker for complement activation, was determined with a monoclonal anti-human C3d antibody. Enzymatic properties of HL and CE were assayed with triglyceride and phosphatidylcholine substrates for triglyceride hydrolase and phospholipase A activities. The ARPE-19 cells were used for viability studies. Results. The HL degradation of human lipoproteins LDL, VLDL, or HDL results in the formation of modified lipoproteins that can activate the complement pathway. Complement activation is dose- and time-dependent upon HL and occurs via the classical pathway. Enzymatic studies suggest that the phospholipase A1 activity of HL generates complement-activating lysophospholipids. C-reactive protein (CRP), known to simultaneously interact with complement C1 and complement factor H (CFH), further enhances HL-induced complement activation. The lysophospholipids, 1-Palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-Oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, can be directly cytotoxic to ARPE-19 cells. Conclusions. The HL degradation of lipoproteins, known to accumulate in the outer retina and in drusen, can lead to the formation of bioactive lysophospholipids that can trigger complement activation and induce RPE cellular dysfunction. Given the known risk associations for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with HL, CRP, and CFH, this study elucidates a possible damage pathway for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in genetically predisposed individuals, that HL activity may lead to accumulation of

  13. Bioactive lysophospholipids generated by hepatic lipase degradation of lipoproteins lead to complement activation via the classical pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wanchao; Paik, David C; Barile, Gaetano R

    2014-09-09

    We determined bioactivity of lysophospholipids generated by degradation of the low-density (LDL), very low-density (VLDL), and high-density (HDL) lipoproteins with hepatic lipase (HL), cholesterol esterase (CE), and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2). The LDL, VLDL, and HDL were treated with HL, CE, and Lp-PLA2 after immobilization on plates, and complement activation studies were performed with diluted human serum. Complement component 3 (C3) fixation, a marker for complement activation, was determined with a monoclonal anti-human C3d antibody. Enzymatic properties of HL and CE were assayed with triglyceride and phosphatidylcholine substrates for triglyceride hydrolase and phospholipase A activities. The ARPE-19 cells were used for viability studies. The HL degradation of human lipoproteins LDL, VLDL, or HDL results in the formation of modified lipoproteins that can activate the complement pathway. Complement activation is dose- and time-dependent upon HL and occurs via the classical pathway. Enzymatic studies suggest that the phospholipase A1 activity of HL generates complement-activating lysophospholipids. C-reactive protein (CRP), known to simultaneously interact with complement C1 and complement factor H (CFH), further enhances HL-induced complement activation. The lysophospholipids, 1-Palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-Oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, can be directly cytotoxic to ARPE-19 cells. The HL degradation of lipoproteins, known to accumulate in the outer retina and in drusen, can lead to the formation of bioactive lysophospholipids that can trigger complement activation and induce RPE cellular dysfunction. Given the known risk associations for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with HL, CRP, and CFH, this study elucidates a possible damage pathway for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in genetically predisposed individuals, that HL activity may lead to accumulation of lysophospholipids to initiate complement

  14. Complements do not lie.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-12-13

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy.

  15. Complements do not lie

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy. PMID:22674942

  16. Complements do not lie.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-12-01

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy.

  17. IXO: The Instrument Complement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.; IWG, IXO

    2009-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory (IXO) has recently been created as a mission concept by a joint team of NASA, ESA and JAXA scientists, based on the previous Constellation-X and XEUS concepts. Definition of the IXO instruments is still under evolution, but the core instrument complement will include a Wide Field X-ray Imager, an X-ray Calorimeter / Narrow Field X-ray Imager, and an X-ray Grating Spectrometer. Other, modest additional instruments (such as a hard X-ray capability, a polarimeter, and a high time resolution detector) will also be considered. We present the current status of the IXO instrument complement and offer the opportunity for discussion of ideas relevant to the IXO mission concept process.

  18. The XX Sex Chromosome Complement is Required in Male and Female Mice for Enhancement of Immunity Induced by Exposure to 3,4-Dichloropropionanilide.

    PubMed

    Holásková, Ida; Franko, Jennifer; Goodman, Robert L; Arnold, Arthur P; Schafer, Rosana

    2015-08-01

    The chemical propanil enhances antibody responses to a heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae (HKSP) vaccine. The enhanced response is dependent on gonads in females, but independent of gonads in males. The sex differences in the immune response may be due to sexual differentiation of the immune system or sex chromosome complement. To test the hypothesis that the immune system is sexually differentiated, newborn C57BL/6 pups were treated with testosterone propionate (TP) or placebo. The role of sex chromosome complement was investigated using the 4-core genotypes (FCG) model of XXF and XYF gonadal females (ovaries), and XXM and XYM gonadal males (testes). For some experiments, mice were gonadectomized or sham gonadectomized. All mice were vaccinated with HKSP, treated with propanil, and the antibody response determined at day seven. Neonatal TP did not alter the response to HKSP. In FCG mice, propanil significantly enhanced the immune response in XXF females and XXM males, but not in XYF females or XYM males. The immune system of females was not masculinized by neonatal TP treatment. Sex chromosome complement significantly contributes to the sexually dimorphic immune response after propanil exposure. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Formation of prostanoids during intravascular complement activation in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Bult, H.; Herman, A. G.; Laekeman, G. M.; Rampart, M.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-oxo-PGF1 alpha) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) were measured by radioimmunoassay in arterial blood before and after injections of the complement activator, cobra venom factor (CVF). During the control period, the concentration of 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha, which gives the sum of prostacyclin plus 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha, and TXB2 were, respectively, less than 20 pg ml-1 and 70 +/- 15 pg ml-1. Intravenous injections of CVF induced dose-dependent, reversible elevations in the plasma levels of both prostanoids. The time courses for the increases of 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha and TXB2 paralleled the arterial hypotension and thrombocytopenia, suggesting the existence of a causal relationship between these parameters. The results further support our hypothesis that complement-dependent formation of arachidonic acid metabolites contributes to some of the haemodynamic and haematological changes occurring during endotoxin shock. PMID:3884074

  20. Regulation of Complement and Contact System Activation via C1 Inhibitor Potentiation and Factor XIIa Activity Modulation by Sulfated Glycans – Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Lahrsen, Eric; Alban, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The serpin C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) is the only regulator of classical complement activation as well as the major regulator of the contact system. Its importance is demonstrated by hereditary angioedema (HAE), a severe disease with potentially life-threatening attacks due to deficiency or dysfunction of C1-INH. C1-INH replacement is the therapy of choice in HAE. In addition, C1-INH showed to have beneficial effects in other diseases characterized by inappropriate complement and contact system activation. Due to some limitations of its clinical application, there is a need for improving the efficacy of therapeutically applied C1-INH or to enhance the activity of endogenous C1-INH. Given the known potentiating effect of heparin on C1-INH, sulfated glycans (SG) may be such candidates. The aim of this study was to characterize suitable SG by evaluating structure-activity relationships. For this, more than 40 structurally distinct SG were examined for their effects on C1-INH, C1s and FXIIa. The SG turned out to potentiate the C1s inhibition by C1-INH without any direct influence on C1s. Their potentiating activity proved to depend on their degree of sulfation, molecular mass as well as glycan structure. In contrast, the SG had no effect on the FXIIa inhibition by C1-INH, but structure-dependently modulated the activity of FXIIa. Among the tested SG, β-1,3-glucan sulfates with a Mr ≤ 10 000 were identified as most promising lead candidates for the development of a glycan-based C1-INH amplifier. In conclusion, the obtained information on structural characteristics of SG favoring C1-INH potentiation represent an useful elementary basis for the development of compounds improving the potency of C1-INH in diseases and clinical situations characterized by inappropriate activation of complement and contact system. PMID:27783665

  1. Production of Tuber-Inducing Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Yorio, Neil C.

    2006-01-01

    A process for making a substance that regulates the growth of potatoes and some other economically important plants has been developed. The process also yields an economically important by-product: potatoes. The particular growth-regulating substance, denoted tuber-inducing factor (TIF), is made naturally by, and acts naturally on, potato plants. The primary effects of TIF on potato plants are reducing the lengths of the main shoots, reducing the numbers of nodes on the main stems, reducing the total biomass, accelerating the initiation of potatoes, and increasing the edible fraction (potatoes) of the overall biomass. To some extent, these effects of TIF can override environmental effects that typically inhibit the formation of tubers. TIF can be used in the potato industry to reduce growth time and increase harvest efficiency. Other plants that have been observed to be affected by TIF include tomatoes, peppers, radishes, eggplants, marigolds, and morning glories. In the present process, potatoes are grown with their roots and stolons immersed in a nutrient solution in a recirculating hydroponic system. From time to time, a nutrient replenishment solution is added to the recirculating nutrient solution to maintain the required nutrient concentration, water is added to replace water lost from the recirculating solution through transpiration, and an acid or base is added, as needed, to maintain the recirculating solution at a desired pH level. The growing potato plants secrete TIF into the recirculating solution. The concentration of TIF in the solution gradually increases to a range in which the TIF regulates the growth of the plants.

  2. Complement drives Th17 cell differentiation and triggers autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Motomu; Hirota, Keiji; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Shinji; Teradaira, Shin; Akizuki, Shuji; Prieto-Martin, Paz; Nomura, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Noriko; Köhl, Jörg; Heyman, Birgitta; Takahashi, Minoru; Fujita, Teizo; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2010-01-01

    Activation of serum complement triggers Th17 cell–dependent spontaneous autoimmune disease in an animal model. In genetically autoimmune-prone SKG mice, administration of mannan or β-glucan, both of which activate serum complement, evoked Th17 cell–mediated chronic autoimmune arthritis. C5a, a chief component of complement activation produced via all three complement pathways (i.e., lectin, classical, and alternative), stimulated tissue-resident macrophages, but not dendritic cells, to produce inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, in synergy with Toll-like receptor signaling or, notably, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF secreted by activated T cells indeed enhanced in vitro IL-6 production by C5a-stimulated macrophages. In vivo, C5a receptor (C5aR) deficiency in SKG mice inhibited the differentiation/expansion of Th17 cells after mannan or β-glucan treatment, and consequently suppressed the development of arthritis. Transfer of SKG T cells induced Th17 cell differentiation/expansion and produced arthritis in C5aR-sufficient recombination activating gene (RAG)−/− mice but not in C5aR-deficient RAG−/− recipients. In vivo macrophage depletion also inhibited disease development in SKG mice. Collectively, the data suggest that complement activation by exogenous or endogenous stimulation can initiate Th17 cell differentiation and expansion in certain autoimmune diseases and presumably in microbial infections. Blockade of C5aR may thus be beneficial for controlling Th17-mediated inflammation and autoimmune disease. PMID:20457757

  3. C1-inhibitor efficiently inhibits Escherichia coli-induced tissue factor mRNA up-regulation, monocyte tissue factor expression and coagulation activation in human whole blood

    PubMed Central

    Landsem, A; Nielsen, E W; Fure, H; Christiansen, D; Ludviksen, J K; Lambris, J D; Østerud, B; Mollnes, T E; Brekke, O-L

    2013-01-01

    Both the complement system and tissue factor (TF), a key initiating component of coagulation, are activated in sepsis, and cross-talk occurs between the complement and coagulation systems. C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) can act as a regulator in both systems. Our aim in this study was to examine this cross-talk by investigating the effects of C1-INH on Escherichia coli-induced haemostasis and inflammation. Fresh human whole blood collected in lepirudin was incubated with E. coli or ultrapurified E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the absence or presence of C1-INH or protease-inactivated C1-INH. C3 activation was blocked by compstatin, a specific C3 convertase inhibitor. TF mRNA was measured using reverse transcription–quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT–qPCR), and TF surface expression was measured by flow cytometry. In plasma, the terminal complement complex, prothrombin F1·2 (PTF1·2) and long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cytokines were analysed using a multiplex kit. C1-INH (1·25–5 mg/ml) reduced both LPS- and E. coli-induced coagulation, measured as a reduction of PTF1·2 in plasma, efficiently and dose-dependently (P < 0·05). Both LPS and E. coli induced marked up-regulation of TF mRNA levels and surface expression on whole blood monocytes. This up-regulation was reduced efficiently by treatment with C1-INH (P < 0·05). C1-INH reduced the release of PTX3 (P < 0·05) and virtually all cytokines measured (P < 0·05). Complement activation was inhibited more efficiently with compstatin than with C1-INH. C1-INH inhibited most of the other readouts more efficiently, consistent with additional non-complement-dependent effects. These results indicate that complement plays a role in activating coagulation during sepsis and that C1-INH is a broad-spectrum attenuator of the inflammatory and haemostatic responses. PMID:23607270

  4. Human C1q Induces Apoptosis in an Ovarian Cancer Cell Line via Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Anuvinder; Sultan, Sami H. A.; Murugaiah, Valarmathy; Pathan, Ansar A.; Alhamlan, Fatimah S.; Karteris, Emmanouil; Kishore, Uday

    2016-01-01

    Complement protein C1q is the first recognition subcomponent of the complement classical pathway that plays a vital role in the clearance of immune complexes, pathogens, and apoptotic cells. C1q also has a homeostatic role involving immune and non-immune cells; these functions not necessarily involve complement activation. Recently, C1q has been shown to be expressed locally in the microenvironment of a range of human malignant tumors, where it can promote cancer cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, without involving complement activation. C1q has been shown to be present in the ascitic fluid formed during ovarian cancers. In this study, we have examined the effects of human C1q and its globular domain on an ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3. We show that C1q and the recombinant globular head modules induce apoptosis in SKOV3 cells in a time-dependent manner. C1q expression was not detectable in the SKOV3 cells. Exogenous treatment with C1q and globular head modules at the concentration of 10 µg/ml induced apoptosis in approximately 55% cells, as revealed by immunofluorescence microscopy and FACS. The qPCR and caspase analysis suggested that C1q and globular head modules activated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and upregulated Fas. The genes of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), RICTOR, and RAPTOR survival pathways, which are often overexpressed in majority of the cancers, were significantly downregulated within few hours of the treatment of SKOV3 cells with C1q and globular head modules. In conclusion, C1q, via its globular domain, induced apoptosis in an ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3 via TNF-α induced apoptosis pathway involving upregulation of Bax and Fas. This study highlights a potentially protective role of C1q in certain cancers. PMID:28066412

  5. Recognition of Malondialdehyde-modified Proteins by the C Terminus of Complement Factor H Is Mediated via the Polyanion Binding Site and Impaired by Mutations Found in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, Satu; Uchida, Koji; Varjosalo, Markku; Jokela, Reija; Jokiranta, T. Sakari

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a severe thrombotic microangiopathy characterized by uncontrolled complement activation against endothelial and blood cells. Mutations in the C-terminal target recognition domains 19–20 of complement regulator factor H (FH) are strongly associated with aHUS, but the mechanisms triggering disease onset have remained unresolved. Here we report that several aHUS-related mutations alter the binding of FH19–20 to proteins where lysines have reacted with malondialdehyde (MDA). Although FH19–20 did not interact with MDA-modified hexylamine, lysine-containing peptides, or a proteolytically degraded protein, it bound to MDA-modified polylysine. This suggests that FH19–20 recognizes only clustered MDA adducts. Binding of MDA-modified BSA to FH19–20 was ionic by nature, depended on positive residues of FH19–20, and competed with the polyanions heparin and DNA. This could not be explained with the mainly neutral adducts known to form in MDA modification. When positive charges of lysines were eliminated by acetic anhydride instead of MDA, the acetylated BSA started to bind FH19–20. Together, these results indicate that negative charges on the modified proteins dominate the interaction with FH19–20. This is beneficial for the physiological function of FH because by binding to the negative charges of the modified target, FH could prevent excess complement activation initiated by naturally occurring antibodies recognizing MDA epitopes with multiple different structures. We propose that oxidative stress leading to formation of MDA adducts is a common feature for triggers of aHUS and that failure of FH in protecting MDA-modified surfaces from complement activation is involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24344133

  6. Recognition of malondialdehyde-modified proteins by the C terminus of complement factor H is mediated via the polyanion binding site and impaired by mutations found in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Satu; Uchida, Koji; Varjosalo, Markku; Jokela, Reija; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2014-02-14

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a severe thrombotic microangiopathy characterized by uncontrolled complement activation against endothelial and blood cells. Mutations in the C-terminal target recognition domains 19-20 of complement regulator factor H (FH) are strongly associated with aHUS, but the mechanisms triggering disease onset have remained unresolved. Here we report that several aHUS-related mutations alter the binding of FH19-20 to proteins where lysines have reacted with malondialdehyde (MDA). Although FH19-20 did not interact with MDA-modified hexylamine, lysine-containing peptides, or a proteolytically degraded protein, it bound to MDA-modified polylysine. This suggests that FH19-20 recognizes only clustered MDA adducts. Binding of MDA-modified BSA to FH19-20 was ionic by nature, depended on positive residues of FH19-20, and competed with the polyanions heparin and DNA. This could not be explained with the mainly neutral adducts known to form in MDA modification. When positive charges of lysines were eliminated by acetic anhydride instead of MDA, the acetylated BSA started to bind FH19-20. Together, these results indicate that negative charges on the modified proteins dominate the interaction with FH19-20. This is beneficial for the physiological function of FH because by binding to the negative charges of the modified target, FH could prevent excess complement activation initiated by naturally occurring antibodies recognizing MDA epitopes with multiple different structures. We propose that oxidative stress leading to formation of MDA adducts is a common feature for triggers of aHUS and that failure of FH in protecting MDA-modified surfaces from complement activation is involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  7. Inhibition of complement-mediated cytolysis by the terminal complement inhibitor of herpesvirus saimiri.

    PubMed

    Rother, R P; Rollins, S A; Fodor, W L; Albrecht, J C; Setter, E; Fleckenstein, B; Squinto, S P

    1994-02-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) is a lymphotropic herpesvirus that induces T-cell transformation in vitro and causes lymphomas and leukemias in New World primates other than its natural host, the squirrel monkey. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the HVS genome revealed two open reading frames with significant homology to genes for human complement regulatory molecules. One of these genes encodes a predicted protein (designated HVSCD59) with 48% amino acid sequence identity to the human terminal complement regulatory protein CD59 (HuCD59). The CD59 homolog from squirrel monkey (SMCD59) was cloned, and the corresponding amino acid sequence showed 69% identity with HVSCD59. BALB/3T3 cells stably expressing HVSCD59, SMCD59, or HuCD59 were equally protected from complement-mediated lysis by human serum. However, only HVSCD59-expressing cells were effectively protected from complement-mediated lysis when challenged with rat serum, suggesting that HVSCD59 was less species restrictive. The complement regulatory activity of HVSCD59 and SMCD59 occurred after C3b deposition, indicating terminal complement inhibition. Treatment of BALB/3T3 stable transfectants with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C prior to complement attack decreased the complement regulatory function of HVSCD59, suggesting cell surface attachment via a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. Cells expressing HVSCD59 effectively inhibited complement-mediated lysis by squirrel monkey serum in comparison with SMCD59-expressing cells. Finally HVSCD59-specific transcripts were detected in owl monkey cells permissive for lytic HVS replication but not in T cells transformed by HVS, which failed to produce virions. These data are the first to demonstrate a functional, virally encoded terminal complement inhibitor and suggest that HVSCD59 represents a humoral immune evasion mechanism supporting the lytic life cycle of HVS.

  8. Complement regulatory proteins in early human fetal life: CD59, membrane co-factor protein (MCP) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF) are differentially expressed in the developing liver.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, K L; Houlihan, J M; Holmes, C H

    1993-01-01

    The human fetus appears to be capable of protecting itself from maternal complement (C) from an early stage in development by expressing the C regulatory proteins decay-accelerating factor (DAF), membrane co-factor protein (MCP) and CD59 on fetally derived trophoblast at the feto-maternal interface. In this study we have examined the ontogeny of these proteins within the fetus itself and have focused on the liver which represents a major site of haemopoiesis during development. Immunostaining revealed that DAF, MCP and CD59 are all expressed from at least 6 weeks of gestation in the liver but that these proteins display distinct distribution patterns. CD59 was broadly distributed both within the epithelial and haemopoietic compartments, but expression of C3 convertase regulators was more restricted. DAF expression was limited to isolated cells within haemopoietic nests and the epithelium was DAF-negative. Although MCP expression on haemopoietic cells was also limited, by contrast with DAF the developing hepatic epithelium was strongly MCP-positive. Typical CD59 and MCP components were observed in fetal liver extracts by immunoblotting, although liver MCP components consistently migrated 4000-5000 MW ahead of those observed on placental trophoblast. Differences in the distribution of these proteins were also observed between the fetal and adult liver. In particular, by comparison with fetal hepatic epithelium, there was an apparent loss of MCP expression from adult hepatocytes. Thus, MCP appears to be developmentally regulated in the human liver and is expressed in the absence of DAF on the early hepatic epithelium. Overall, this study suggests that C regulatory proteins, and in particular CD59 and MCP, are required from the very early stages of gestation within the fetus itself. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7505254

  9. There Is a Method to the Madness: Strategies to Study Host Complement Evasion by Lyme Disease and Relapsing Fever Spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Ashley L.; Kraiczy, Peter; Lin, Yi-Pin

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease and relapsing fever are caused by various Borrelia species. Lyme disease borreliae, the most common vector-borne pathogens in both the U.S. and Europe, are transmitted by Ixodes ticks and disseminate from the site of tick bites to tissues leading to erythema migrans skin rash, arthritis, carditis, and neuroborreliosis. Relapsing fever borreliae, carried by ticks and lice, trigger reoccurring fever episodes. Following transmission, spirochetes survive in the blood to induce bacteremia at the early stages of infection, which is thought to promote evasion of the host complement system. The complement system acts as an important innate immune defense mechanism in humans and vertebrates. Upon activation, the cleaved complement components form complexes on the pathogen surface to eventually promote bacteriolysis. The complement system is negatively modulated by a number of functionally diverse regulators to avoid tissue damage. To evade and inhibit the complement system, spirochetes are capable of binding complement components and regulators. Complement inhibition results in bacterial survival in serum (serum resistance) and is thought to promote bloodstream survival, which facilitates spirochete dissemination and disease manifestations. In this review, we discuss current methodologies to elucidate the mechanisms of Borrelia spp. that promote serum resistance and bloodstream survival, as well as novel methods to study factors responsible for bloodstream survival of Lyme disease borreliae that can be applied to relapsing fever borreliae. Understanding the mechanisms these pathogens utilize to evade the complement system will ultimately aid in the development of novel therapeutic strategies and disease prevention to improve human health. PMID:28303129

  10. There Is a Method to the Madness: Strategies to Study Host Complement Evasion by Lyme Disease and Relapsing Fever Spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Ashley L; Kraiczy, Peter; Lin, Yi-Pin

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease and relapsing fever are caused by various Borrelia species. Lyme disease borreliae, the most common vector-borne pathogens in both the U.S. and Europe, are transmitted by Ixodes ticks and disseminate from the site of tick bites to tissues leading to erythema migrans skin rash, arthritis, carditis, and neuroborreliosis. Relapsing fever borreliae, carried by ticks and lice, trigger reoccurring fever episodes. Following transmission, spirochetes survive in the blood to induce bacteremia at the early stages of infection, which is thought to promote evasion of the host complement system. The complement system acts as an important innate immune defense mechanism in humans and vertebrates. Upon activation, the cleaved complement components form complexes on the pathogen surface to eventually promote bacteriolysis. The complement system is negatively modulated by a number of functionally diverse regulators to avoid tissue damage. To evade and inhibit the complement system, spirochetes are capable of binding complement components and regulators. Complement inhibition results in bacterial survival in serum (serum resistance) and is thought to promote bloodstream survival, which facilitates spirochete dissemination and disease manifestations. In this review, we discuss current methodologies to elucidate the mechanisms of Borrelia spp. that promote serum resistance and bloodstream survival, as well as novel methods to study factors responsible for bloodstream survival of Lyme disease borreliae that can be applied to relapsing fever borreliae. Understanding the mechanisms these pathogens utilize to evade the complement system will ultimately aid in the development of novel therapeutic strategies and disease prevention to improve human health.

  11. Recombinant generation of two fragments of the rat complement inhibitory factor H [FH(SCR1-7) and FH(SCR1-4)] and their structural and functional characterization in comparison to FH isolated from rat serum.

    PubMed

    Demberg, T; Heine, I; Götze, O; Altermann, W W; Seliger, B; Schlaf, G

    2006-01-01

    Factor H (FH) is the predominant soluble inhibitor of the complement system. With a concentration of 200-800 microg/ml in human and rat plasma it acts as a cofactor for the soluble factor I (FI)-mediated cleavage of the component C3b to iC3b. Furthermore it competes with factor B for binding to C3b and C3(H2O) and promotes the dissociation of the C3bBb complex. FH is a monomer of about 155 kDa which comprises 20 short consensus repeats (SCR), each of which is composed of approximately 60 amino acid (aa) residues. Two functional fragments of FH comprising the SCR1-4 or SCR1-7 were generated using either the Baculovirus system or stably transfected human embryonal kidney cells, respectively. These fragments, as well as FH purified from rat serum, were first analyzed for their relative molecular weights (Mr) using non-reducing or reducing SDS-PAGE. The Mr of the FH variants differed by about 20% depending on the experimental conditions employed. Only the Mr of proteins separated under reducing conditions were in accordance with the MW calculated from the aa sequence. Analyses of the glycosylation patterns using PAS-staining showed a lack of staining of the recombinant variants (SCR1-4 and SCR1-7) in contrast to FH(SCR1-20) from serum. Using a complement hemolysis assay (CH50-assay) all three variants exhibited a molar complement inhibitory activity of FH(1-20)/FH(1-7)/FH(1-4) of about 3/1/1. These data support the postulated model of FH bearing three binding sites for its ligand C3b, from which one is located in the SCR1-4, whereas the other two are located in the SCR8-20.

  12. Complement depletion aggravates Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia and septic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sakiniene, E; Bremell, T; Tarkowski, A

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of the complement system in Staphylococcus aureus arthritis and septicaemia. The murine model of haematogenously acquired septic arthritis was used, injecting intravenously toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), producing S. aureus LS-1. Complement was depleted using cobra venom factor (CVF). Evaluation of arthritis was performed clinically and histopathologically. In addition, the effect of complement depletion on the phagocytic activity of leucocytes was assessed in vivo and in vitro. Six days after inoculation of S. aureus the prevalence of arthritis in decomplemented mice was three-fold higher than that in controls (91% versus 25%). The clinical severity of arthritis at the end of the experiment, expressed as arthritic index, was 7.3 and 1.9, respectively. These findings were confirmed by histological index of synovitis as well as of cartilage and/or bone destruction being significantly higher in decomplemented mice than in controls (9.8 ± 1.7 versus 4.9 ± 1.2, P < 0.05; and 7.9 ± 1.7 versus 3.0 ± 0.9, P < 0.05, respectively). Also, the septicaemia-induced mortality was clearly higher in decomplemented mice compared with the controls. CVF treatment significantly reduced in vivo polymorphonuclear cell-dependent inflammation induced by subcutaneous injection of olive oil and mirroring the capacity of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNC) to migrate and/or extravasate. Besides, the decomplementation procedure significantly impaired phagocytic activity of peripheral blood leucocytes in vitro, since the number of phagocytes being able to ingest bacteria decreased by 50% when the cells were maintained in decomplemented serum compared with those in intact serum. The conclusion is that complement depletion aggravates the clinical course of S. aureus arthritis and septicaemia, possibly by a combination of decreased migration/extravasation of PMNC and an impairment of phagocytosis. PMID:9933426

  13. [A peptide (a magnesium salt of N-acetyl (alpha, beta)-aspartyl-glutamic acid). Demonstration of the protection against local cellular destruction induced by in situ complement activation].

    PubMed

    Chevance, L G; Etiévant, M

    1986-01-01

    A peptide of simple chemical structure has demonstrated its efficiency in preventing the large cellular destruction that locally activated complement produced on the ciliary epithelium of the respiratory tract. Previously (1980), it was demonstrated by the authors that these cellular destructions after sensitization of the epithelium was due to the local activation of the complement (alternate pathway) by immune complexes with secretory IgA. The cellular protection afforded by Naaga was demonstrated by the persistance of a normal ciliary beating when the sensitized mucosa is in contact with the antigen; by electron microscopic studies both in transmission and scanning E.M. contrasting with the complete cellular destructions of the epithelium which appear obvious. The protection appear complete when Naaga (56 mM) is present in the testing solution (or instillated before the test). By in vitro human complement studies; study of the cytolytic sequence inhibition for the classical pathway 1,5.10(-3) M of Naaga produces a 50% inhibition of 1 H50 hemolytic unit. For the alternate pathway, the same inhibition is observed with 1,75.10(-3) M of Naaga; by two-dimensions immuno-electrophoresis: a dilution of 1/2 of C3 in Naaga reduced to 1/10 of its normal value the C3b profile; the "Rockets" technique demonstrated that the same 1/2 dilution of Naaga in complement prevents the clivage of factor B and that this peptide acts by inhibition of the alternate C3 convertase formation (see illustrations). If we consider the subject of this study i.e. the upper respiratory tract mucosa and knowing the physiopathological importance of the muco ciliary complex in preventing dust, microbs and other particulate foreign materiel to penetrate the epithelium, the therapeutic importance of such a simple non toxic and unharmful chemical compound must be stressed.

  14. Proteinase Inhibitor-inducing Factor in Plant Leaves

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Douglas; Ryan, Clarence A.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty-nine plant species representing 20 families from the four major divisions of plants were surveyed for the presence of proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor activity in leaves or other tissues. Tissue juices were assayed for their capacity to induce accumulation of proteinase inhibitor I in excised tomato (Lycopersico esculentum) leaves. In tissues of only 2 of the 39 species was proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor-like activity not found. The activity was absent in cabbage leaves and celery stalks. Fruiting bodies from one of three fungi genera assayed contained exceptionally large quantities of proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor-like activity. Extracts from Agraricus campestris fruiting bodies contained over 20 times more activity than tomato leaf juice. The survey confirms that substances with proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor-like activity are widespread in the plant kingdom. PMID:16658956

  15. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital.

  16. Ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes protects intracellular mature virus and infected cells from mouse complement.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Elizabeth A; Bertram, Paula; Chen, Nanhai; Buller, R Mark L; Atkinson, John P

    2010-09-01

    Poxviruses produce complement regulatory proteins to subvert the host's immune response. Similar to the human pathogen variola virus, ectromelia virus has a limited host range and provides a mouse model where the virus and the host's immune response have coevolved. We previously demonstrated that multiple components (C3, C4, and factor B) of the classical and alternative pathways are required to survive ectromelia virus infection. Complement's role in the innate and adaptive immune responses likely drove the evolution of a virus-encoded virulence factor that regulates complement activation. In this study, we characterized the ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes (EMICE). Recombinant EMICE regulated complement activation on the surface of CHO cells, and it protected complement-sensitive intracellular mature virions (IMV) from neutralization in vitro. It accomplished this by serving as a cofactor for the inactivation of C3b and C4b and by dissociating the catalytic domain of the classical pathway C3 convertase. Infected murine cells initiated synthesis of EMICE within 4 to 6 h postinoculation. The levels were sufficient in the supernatant to protect the IMV, upon release, from complement-mediated neutralization. EMICE on the surface of infected murine cells also reduced complement activation by the alternative pathway. In contrast, classical pathway activation by high-titer antibody overwhelmed EMICE's regulatory capacity. These results suggest that EMICE's role is early during infection when it counteracts the innate immune response. In summary, ectromelia virus produced EMICE within a few hours of an infection, and EMICE in turn decreased complement activation on IMV and infected cells.

  17. Complement activation in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, L E; De Villiers, D; Markham, D; Whaley, K; Thomas, H C

    1982-01-01

    Patients with HBsAg positive chronic active liver disease (CALD) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) exhibit increased C3d concentrations and changes in the serum concentrations of the complement components consistent with activation of the classical and alternative pathways. In these patients the concentrations of the regulatory proteins, C3b inactivator (C3bINA) and beta IH globulin, are normal. Patients with HBsAg negative CALD and alcohol induced liver disease (ALD) exhibit no evidence of an increased level of complement system activation. In these patients diminished serum concentrations of complement components appear to be related to diminished hepatic synthetic function. C4 synthesis may be specifically reduced in autoimmune chronic active liver disease. PMID:7083631

  18. [Immunological behavior (IgG, IgM, IgA) and total complement (CH50) of newborns infants with risk factors for early onset sepsis. Comparative analysis of newborns with and without infection].

    PubMed

    Ceccon, M E; Diníz, E M; Carneiro-Sampaio, M M; Arslanian, C; Diogo, C L; Ramos, J L; Vaz, F A

    1998-01-01

    Immunological behavior (IgG, IgM, IgA) and total Complement (CH50) of newborns infants with risk factors for early onset sepsis. Comparative analysis between newborns with and without infection. Rev. Hosp. Clín. Fac. Med. S. Paulo, 53(6): 303-310, 1998. The objective of this study was to verify the immunological behavior of the newborn infant in front of an infection. We studied 60 newborn infants that had risk factors for early onset sepsis (premature rupture membranes, clinic amnionitis or tract urinary infection) from de immunological and infection point of view. They were classified into three gestational age groups: < 34 weeks, between 34 and 36 6/7 weeks and > or = 37 weeks. Sepsis diagnosis was done through clinical and laboratorial data and we also included the followings exams: Immunological types (IgG, IgM, IgA) and total complement (CH50) obtained from the newborn at birth and on the fifth day of life. We could verify that 15 newborns (25%) presented early sepsis. There was a statistical association between perinatal asfixia and infection in the group with gestational age < 34 weeks and this same group presented statistical association between infection and death. The serical levels of IgG and CH50 were directly related to the gestational age and there were significant statistical differences between levels of IgG, IgM and total Complement between infected and not infected newborns within the same group os gestional age. We observed that the infection was associated to low levels of IgG and CH50, at birth and on the fifth day, mainly in the group of infected newborns with gestional age < 34 weeks, being this group, therefore, the one that would mostly benefit from an immunological support in front of and infection.

  19. Scatter factor induces blood vessel formation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, D S; Kleinman, H K; Goldberg, I D; Bhargava, M M; Nickoloff, B J; Kinsella, J L; Polverini, P; Rosen, E M

    1993-01-01

    Scatter factor (also known as hepatocyte growth factor) is a glycoprotein secreted by stromal cells that stimulates cell motility and proliferation. In vitro, scatter factor stimulates vascular endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and organization into capillary-like tubes. Using two different in vivo assays, we showed that physiologic quantities of purified native mouse scatter factor and recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor induce angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). The angiogenic activity was blocked by specific anti-scatter factor antibodies. Scatter factor induced cultured microvascular endothelial cells to accumulate and secrete significantly increased quantities of urokinase, an enzyme associated with development of an invasive endothelial phenotype during angiogenesis. We further showed that immunoreactive scatter factor is present surrounding sites of blood vessel formation in psoriatic skin. These findings suggest that scatter factor may act as a paracrine mediator in pathologic angiogenesis associated with human inflammatory disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7680481

  20. Scatter Factor Induces Blood Vessel Formation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Derrick S.; Kleinman, Hynda K.; Goldberg, Itzhak D.; Bhargava, Mahdu M.; Nickoloff, Brian J.; Kinsella, James L.; Polverini, Peter; Rosen, Eliot M.

    1993-03-01

    Scatter factor (also known as hepatocyte growth factor) is a glycoprotein secreted by stromal cells that stimulates cell motility and proliferation. In vitro, scatter factor stimulates vascular endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and organization into capillary-like tubes. Using two different in vivo assays, we showed that physiologic quantities of purified native mouse scatter factor and recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor induce angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). The angiogenic activity was blocked by specific anti-scatter factor antibodies. Scatter factor induced cultured microvascular endothelial cells to accumulate and secrete significantly increased quantities of urokinase, an enzyme associated with development of an invasive endothelial phenotype during angiogenesis. We further showed that immunoreactive scatter factor is present surrounding sites of blood vessel formation in psoriatic skin. These findings suggest that scatter factor may act as a paracrine mediator in pathologic angiogenesis associated with human inflammatory disease.

  1. Inhibition of Complement Retards Ankylosing Spondylitis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chaoqun; Ding, Peipei; Wang, Qingkai; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Jianquan; Xu, Enjie; Wang, Na; Chen, Jianfeng; Yang, Guang; Hu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) resulting in back pain and progressive spinal ankyloses. Currently, there are no effective therapeutics targeting AS largely due to elusive pathogenesis mechanisms, even as potential candidates such as HLA-B27 autoantigen have been identified. Herein, we employed a proteoglycan (PG)-induced AS mouse model together with clinical specimens, and found that the complement system was substantially activated in the spinal bone marrow, accompanied by a remarkable proportion alteration of neutrophils and macrophage in bone marrow and spleen, and by the significant increase of TGF-β1 in serum. The combined treatment with a bacteria-derived complement inhibitor Efb-C (C-terminal of extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus) remarkably retarded the progression of mouse AS by reducing osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that two important modulators involved in AS disease, TGF-β1 and RANKL, were elevated upon in vitro complement attack in osteoblast and/or osteoclast cells. These findings further unravel that complement activation is closely related with the pathogenesis of AS, and suggest that complement inhibition may hold great potential for AS therapy. PMID:27698377

  2. Characterization of the complement inhibitory function of rhesus rhadinovirus complement control protein (RCP).

    PubMed

    Okroj, Marcin; Mark, Linda; Stokowska, Anna; Wong, Scott W; Rose, Nicola; Blackbourn, David J; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Spiller, O Brad; Blom, Anna M

    2009-01-02

    Rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV) is currently the closest known, fully sequenced homolog of human Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Both these viruses encode complement inhibitors as follows: Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-complement control protein (KCP) and RRV-complement control protein (RCP). Previously we characterized in detail the functional properties of KCP as a complement inhibitor. Here, we performed comparative analyses for two variants of RCP protein, encoded by RRV strains H26-95 and 17577. Both RCP variants and KCP inhibited human and rhesus complement when tested in hemolytic assays measuring all steps of activation via the classical and the alternative pathway. RCP variants from both RRV strains supported C3b and C4b degradation by factor I and decay acceleration of the classical C3 convertase, similar to KCP. Additionally, the 17577 RCP variant accelerated decay of the alternative C3 convertase, which was not seen for KCP. In contrast to KCP, RCP showed no affinity to heparin and is the first described complement inhibitor in which the binding site for C3b/C4b does not interact with heparin. Molecular modeling shows a structural disruption in the region of RCP that corresponds to the KCP-heparin-binding site. This makes RRV a superior model for future in vivo investigations of complement evasion, as RCP does not play a supportive role in viral attachment as KCP does.

  3. Complement genetics, deficiencies, and disease associations.

    PubMed

    Mayilyan, Karine R

    2012-07-01

    The complement system is a key component of innate immunity. More than 45 genes encoding the proteins of complement components or their isotypes and subunits, receptors, and regulators have been discovered. These genes are distributed throughout different chromosomes, with 19 genes comprising three significant complement gene clusters in the human genome. Genetic deficiency of any early component of the classical pathway (C1q, C1r/s, C2, C4, and C3) is associated with autoimmune diseases due to the failure of clearance of immune complexes (IC) and apoptotic materials, and the impairment of normal humoral response. Deficiencies of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and the early components of the alternative (factor D, properdin) and terminal pathways (from C3 onward components: C5, C6, C7, C8, C9) increase susceptibility to infections and their recurrence. While the association of MBL deficiency