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Sample records for complement factors induced

  1. Essential Role of Surface-Bound Complement Factor H in Controlling Immune Complex–Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Gaurav; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Cortes, Claudio; Pickering, Matthew C.; Pangburn, Michael K.; Arend, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Factor H (fH) is an endogenous negative regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) that binds polyanions as well as complement activation fragments C3b and C3d. The AP is both necessary and sufficient to develop collagen Ab–induced arthritis (CAIA) in mice; the mechanisms whereby normal control of the AP is overcome and injury develops are unknown. Although primarily a soluble circulating protein, fH can also bind to tissues in a manner dependent on the carboxyl-terminal domain containing short consensus repeats 19 and 20. We examined the role of fH in CAIA by blocking its binding to tissues through administration of a recombinant negative inhibitor containing short consensus repeats 19 and 20 (rfH19-20), which impairs fH function and amplifies surface AP activation in vitro. Administration of rfH19-20, but not control rfH3-5, significantly worsened clinical disease activity, histopathologic injury, and C3 deposition in the synovium and cartilage in wild-type and fH+/− mice. In vitro studies demonstrated that rfH19-20 increased complement activation on cartilage extracts and injured fibroblast-like synoviocytes, two major targets of complement deposition in the joint. We conclude that endogenous fH makes a significant contribution to inhibition of the AP in CAIA through binding to sites of immune complex formation and complement activation. PMID:23436934

  2. Zinc-induced Self-association of Complement C3b and Factor H

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Ruodan; Tetchner, Stuart; Rodriguez, Elizabeth; Pao, Po-Jung; Gor, Jayesh; Lengyel, Imre; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    The sub-retinal pigment epithelial deposits that are a hallmark of age-related macular degeneration contain both C3b and millimolar levels of zinc. C3 is the central protein of complement, whereas C3u is formed by the spontaneous hydrolysis of the thioester bridge in C3. During activation, C3 is cleaved to form active C3b, then C3b is inactivated by Factor I and Factor H to form the C3c and C3d fragments. The interaction of zinc with C3 was quantified using analytical ultracentrifugation and x-ray scattering. C3, C3u, and C3b associated strongly in >100 μm zinc, whereas C3c and C3d showed weak association. With zinc, C3 forms soluble oligomers, whereas C3u and C3b precipitate. We conclude that the C3, C3u, and C3b association with zinc depended on the relative positions of C3d and C3c in each protein. Computational predictions showed that putative weak zinc binding sites with different capacities exist in all five proteins, in agreement with experiments. Factor H forms large oligomers in >10 μm zinc. In contrast to C3b or Factor H alone, the solubility of the central C3b-Factor H complex was much reduced at 60 μm zinc and even more so at >100 μm zinc. The removal of the C3b-Factor H complex by zinc explains the reduced C3u/C3b inactivation rates by zinc. Zinc-induced precipitation may contribute to the initial development of sub-retinal pigment epithelial deposits in the retina as well as reducing the progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration in higher risk patients. PMID:23661701

  3. The alternative complement component factor B regulates UV-induced oedema, systemic suppression of contact and delayed hypersensitivity, and mast cell infiltration into the skin.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Scott N; Hammond, Kirsten J L; Chan, Carling Y-Y; Rogers, Linda J; Beaugie, Clare; Rana, Sabita; Marsh-Wakefield, Felix; Thurman, Joshua M; Halliday, Gary M

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths in sunlight are the prime cause of skin cancer in humans with both the UVA and UVB wavebands making a contribution to photocarcinogenesis. UV has many different biological effects on the skin that contribute to carcinogenesis, including suppression of adaptive immunity, sunburn and altering the migration of mast cells into and away from irradiated skin. Many molecular mechanisms have been identified as contributing to skin responses to UV. Recently, using gene set enrichment analysis of microarray data, we identified the alternative complement pathway with a central role for factor B (fB) in UVA-induced immunosuppression. In the current study we used mice genetically deficient in fB (fB-/- mice) to study the functional role of the alternative complement pathway in skin responses to UV. We found that fB is required for not only UVA but also UVB-induced immunosuppression and solar-simulated UV induction of the oedemal component of sunburn. Factor B-/- mice had a larger number of resident skin mast cells than control mice, but unlike the controls did not respond to UV by increasing mast cell infiltration into the skin. This study provides evidence for a function role for fB in skin responses to UV radiation. Factor B regulates UVA and UVB induced immunosuppression, UV induced oedema and mast cell infiltration into the skin. The alternative complement pathway is therefore an important regulator of skin responses to UV.

  4. Iron-induced Local Complement Component 3 (C3) Up-regulation via Non-canonical Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β Signaling in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Li, Yafeng; Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Zhao, Liangliang; Wolkow, Natalie; Tobias, John W; Song, Wenchao; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2015-05-08

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis may be a pathogenic factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, the formation of complement-containing deposits under the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer is a pathognomonic feature of AMD. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which complement component 3 (C3), a central protein in the complement cascade, is up-regulated by iron in RPE cells. Modulation of TGF-β signaling, involving ERK1/2, SMAD3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, is responsible for iron-induced C3 expression. The differential effects of spatially distinct SMAD3 phosphorylation sites at the linker region and at the C terminus determined the up-regulation of C3. Pharmacologic inhibition of either ERK1/2 or SMAD3 phosphorylation decreased iron-induced C3 expression levels. Knockdown of SMAD3 blocked the iron-induced up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, a transcription factor that has been shown previously to bind the basic leucine zipper 1 domain in the C3 promoter. We show herein that mutation of this domain reduced iron-induced C3 promoter activity. In vivo studies support our in vitro finding of iron-induced C3 up-regulation. Mice with a mosaic pattern of RPE-specific iron overload demonstrated co-localization of iron-induced ferritin and C3d deposits. Humans with aceruloplasminemia causing RPE iron overload had increased RPE C3d deposition. The molecular events in the iron-C3 pathway represent therapeutic targets for AMD or other diseases exacerbated by iron-induced local complement dysregulation.

  5. SIGN-R1 and complement factors are involved in the systemic clearance of radiation-induced apoptotic cells in whole-body irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-Yeon; Loh, SoHee; Cho, Eun-hee; Choi, Hyeong-Jwa; Na, Tae-Young; Nemeno, Judee Grace E.; Lee, Jeong Ik; Yoon, Taek Joon; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Jae-Seon; Kang, Young-Sun

    2015-08-07

    Although SIGN-R1-mediated complement activation pathway has been shown to enhance the systemic clearance of apoptotic cells, the role of SIGN-R1 in the clearance of radiation-induced apoptotic cells has not been characterized and was investigated in this study. Our data indicated that whole-body γ-irradiation of mice increased caspase-3{sup +} apoptotic lymphocyte numbers in secondary lymphoid organs. Following γ-irradiation, SIGN-R1 and complements (C4 and C3) were simultaneously increased only in the mice spleen tissue among the assessed tissues. In particular, C3 was exclusively activated in the spleen. The delayed clearance of apoptotic cells was markedly prevalent in the spleen and liver of SIGN-R1 KO mice, followed by a significant increase of CD11b{sup +} cells. These results indicate that SIGN-R1 and complement factors play an important role in the systemic clearance of radiation-induced apoptotic innate immune cells to maintain tissue homeostasis after γ-irradiation. - Highlights: • Splenic SIGN-R1{sup +} macrophages are activated after γ-irradiation. • C3 and C4 levels increased and C3 was activated in the spleen after γ-irradiation. • SIGN-R1 mediated the systemic clearance of radiation-induced apoptotic cells in spleen and liver.

  6. BIMOLECULAR FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION ANALYSIS OF INDUCIBLE PROTEIN INTERACTIONS: EFFECTS OF FACTORS AFFECTING PROTEIN FOLDING ON FLUORESCENT PROTEIN FRAGMENT ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Robida, Aaron M; Kerppola, Tom K

    2009-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis enables visualization of the subcellular locations of protein interactions in living cells. We investigated the temporal resolution and the quantitative accuracy of BiFC analysis using fragments of different fluorescent proteins. We determined the kinetics of BiFC complex formation in response to the rapamycin-inducible interaction between the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) and the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain (FRB). Fragments of YFP fused to FKBP and FRB produced detectable BiFC complex fluorescence 10 minutes after rapamycin addition and a ten-fold increase in the mean fluorescence intensity in 8 hours. The N-terminal fragment of the Venus fluorescent protein fused to FKBP produced constitutive BiFC complexes with several C-terminal fragments fused to FRB. A chimeric N-terminal fragment containing residues from Venus and YFP produced either constitutive or inducible BiFC complexes depending on the temperature at which the cells were cultured. The concentrations of inducers required for half-maximal induction of BiFC complex formation by all fluorescent protein fragments tested were consistent with the affinities of the inducers for unmodified FKBP and FRB. Treatment of the FK506 inhibitor of FKBP-FRB interaction prevented the formation of BiFC complexes by FKBP and FRB fusions, but did not disrupt existing BiFC complexes. Proteins synthesized prior to rapamycin addition formed BiFC complexes with the same efficiency as newly synthesized proteins. Inhibitors of protein synthesis attenuated BiFC complex formation independent of their effects on fusion protein synthesis. The kinetics at which they inhibited BiFC complex formation suggest that they prevented association of the fluorescent protein fragments, but not the slow maturation of BiFC complex fluorescence. Agents that induce the unfolded protein response also reduced formation of BiFC complexes. The effects of these agents were suppressed by cellular

  7. Generation of a complement-derived chemotactic factor for tumor cells in experimentally induced peritoneal exudates and its effect on the local metastasis of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Orr, F. W.; Mokashi, S.; Delikatny, J.

    1982-01-01

    A chemotactic factor for tumor cells was found in inflammatory exudate fluids induced by giving intraperitoneal injections of glycogen to Sprague-Dawley rats. The quantity of chemotactic activity and the period of time during which it could be detected correlated with the inflammatory reaction, measured by the cellular composition of the exudates and their content of protein and lysosomal enzymes. In gel filtration the chemotactic factor behaved mainly as a molecule having a molecular weight of approximately 6000 daltons. Its biologic activity was blocked by antiserums directed against C5 but not by antiserums against C3 or C4. In these two respects, the factor generated in vivo has the same properties as a previously described chemotactic factor that can be generated in vitro by proteolysis of purified C5 or C5a. Chemotactic activity was not detected in the glycogen-induced peritoneal exudates of rats depleted of serum complement by cobra venom factor. Intravenously injected Walker tumor cells arrested and formed metastases in the mesenteries of rats with peritonitis in greater numbers than in normal controls, animals depleted of complement during the experimental period, or animals given intraperitoneal injections of the vasopermeability agent, histamine. The growth of tumor cells in vitro was not promoted by peritoneal exudate fluids, nor was the number of metastases on vivo greater than in negative controls, in animals in which peritonitis was induced 24 hours after the intravenous injection of tumor cells. It is argued that chemotactic mechanisms can contribute to the formation of metastases at sites of tissue injury. PMID:7091299

  8. Blast-Induced Moderate Neurotrauma (BINT) Elicits Early Complement Activation and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNFalpha) Release in a Rat Brain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-25

    Morganti-Kossmann MC, Jones JL, Barnum SR. Elevated levels of the complement components C3 and factor B in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid of patients with...Ingersoll SA, Martin CB, Barnum SR, Martin BK. CNS-specific expression of C3a and C5a exacerbate demyelination severity in the cuprizone model. Mol Immunol

  9. Human monocyte spreading induced by factor Bb of the alternative pathway of complement activation. A possible role for C5 in monocyte spreading

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The central serine esterase of the alternative pathway of complement (APC) activation, activated factor B (Bb), has been shown recently to induce murine macrophages and human monocytes to become spread on a glass substrata. It has also been established that to induce the spreading reaction, the catalytic site of the Bb enzyme must be structurally intact since treatment of Bb with heat (56 degrees C for 30 min) or diisopropylfluorophosphate (10(-3) M) destroyed both enzymatic and spreading activities. In the C3b,Bb complex, Bb exhibits restricted substrate specificity for C3 and C5. With this in mind, the role of C3 and C5 in the monocyte spreading reaction was explored in the present study. Expression of C3 and C5 on the surface of human peripheral blood monocytes was investigated by the direct fluorescent antibody technique employing fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated anti- C3 or C5 F(ab')2 antibody fragments. It was found that C3 and C5 were present on 6 +/- 7% of freshly prepared monocytes and that expression of C5, but not C3, increased to 70 +/- 6% when monocytes were incubated for 3 d in serum-free medium. Biosynthesis of C5 was indicated when it was found that under serum-free conditions, monocytes incorporated [3H]leucine into immunoprecipitable C5 with an apparent mol wt of 180,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The role of C3 and C5 in the monocyte spreading reaction induced by factor Bb was explored by testing for the ability of anti-C3 and anti- C5 Fab' antibody fragments to block monocyte spreading. It was found that anti-C5 Fab' inhibited by up to 100% the 3-h human monocyte spreading reaction induced by Bb; in contrast, anti-C3 Fab' or anti-C4 Fab' inhibited by less than 10%. That the inhibitory effect of anti-C5 Fab' was exerted directly on the monocyte was established when it was found that the 3-h monocyte spreading reaction was significantly inhibited by pretreating monocytes with anti-C5 Fab' for 20 min and then

  10. Complement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fungal infections and some parasitic infections such as malaria . Normal Results Total blood complement level: 41 to ... Glomerulonephritis Hepatitis Hereditary angioedema Kidney transplant Lupus nephritis Malaria Protein in diet Rheumatoid arthritis Septicemia Shock Systemic ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: complement factor I deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... factor I deficiency can also be associated with autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system malfunctions and attacks ...

  12. Complement factor B expression profile in a spontaneous uveitis model.

    PubMed

    Zipplies, Johanna K; Kirschfink, Michael; Amann, Barbara; Hauck, Stefanie M; Stangassinger, Manfred; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2010-12-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis serves as a spontaneous model for human autoimmune uveitis. Unpredictable relapses and ongoing inflammation in the eyes of diseased horses as well as in humans lead to destruction of the retina and finally result in blindness. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to inflammation and retinal degeneration are not well understood. An initial screening for differentially regulated proteins in sera of uveitic cases compared to healthy controls revealed an increase of the alternative pathway complement component factor B in ERU cases. To determine the activation status of the complement system, sera were subsequently examined for complement split products. We could demonstrate a significant higher concentration of the activation products B/Ba, B/Bb, Bb neoantigen, iC3b and C3d in uveitic condition compared to healthy controls, whereas for C5b-9 no differences were detected. Additionally, we investigated complement activation directly in the retina by immunohistochemistry, since it is the main target organ of this autoimmune disease. Interestingly, infiltrating cells co-expressed activated factor Bb neoantigen, complement split product C3d as well as CD68, a macrophage marker. In this study, we could demonstrate activation of the complement system both systemically as well as in the eye, the target organ of spontaneous recurrent uveitis. Based on these novel findings, we postulate a novel role for macrophages in connection with complement synthesis at the site of inflammation.

  13. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system.

  14. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Michal; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Manandhar, Surya P; Popadiak, Katarzyna; Riesbeck, Kristian; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M

    2009-02-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A) resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  15. Complement factor H in host defense and immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Parente, Raffaella; Clark, Simon J; Inforzato, Antonio; Day, Anthony J

    2016-12-10

    Complement is the major humoral component of the innate immune system. It recognizes pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns, and initiates the immune response in coordination with innate and adaptive immunity. When activated, the complement system unleashes powerful cytotoxic and inflammatory mechanisms, and thus its tight control is crucial to prevent damage to host tissues and allow restoration of immune homeostasis. Factor H is the major soluble inhibitor of complement, where its binding to self markers (i.e., particular glycan structures) prevents complement activation and amplification on host surfaces. Not surprisingly, mutations and polymorphisms that affect recognition of self by factor H are associated with diseases of complement dysregulation, such as age-related macular degeneration and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. In addition, pathogens (i.e., non-self) and cancer cells (i.e., altered-self) can hijack factor H to evade the immune response. Here we review recent (and not so recent) literature on the structure and function of factor H, including the emerging roles of this protein in the pathophysiology of infectious diseases and cancer.

  16. Complement activation is critical for placental ischemia-induced hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lillegard, Kathryn E; Johnson, Alex C; Lojovich, Sarah J; Bauer, Ashley J; Marsh, Henry C; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Regal, Jean F

    2013-11-01

    Preeclampsia is a major obstetric problem defined by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria associated with compromised placental perfusion. Although activation of the complement system is increased in preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy, it remains unclear whether excess complement activation is a cause or consequence of placental ischemia. Therefore, we hypothesized that complement activation is critical for placental ischemia-induced hypertension. We employed the reduced utero-placental perfusion pressure (RUPP) model of placental ischemia in the rat to induce hypertension in the third trimester and evaluated the effect of inhibiting complement activation with a soluble recombinant form of an endogenous complement regulator, human complement receptor 1 (sCR1; CDX-1135). On day 14 of a 21-day gestation, rats received either RUPP or Sham surgery and 15 mg/kg/day sCR1 or saline intravenously on days 14-18. Circulating complement component 3 decreased and complement activation product C3a increased in RUPP vs. Sham (p<0.05), indicating complement activation had occurred. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) measured on day 19 increased in RUPP vs. Sham rats (109.8±2.8 mmHg vs. 93.6±1.6 mmHg). Treatment with sCR1 significantly reduced elevated MAP in RUPP rats (98.4±3.6 mmHg, p<0.05) and reduced C3a production. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) decreased in RUPP compared to Sham rats, and the decrease in VEGF was not affected by sCR1 treatment. Thus, these studies have identified a mechanistic link between complement activation and the pregnancy complication of hypertension apart from free plasma VEGF and have identified complement inhibition as a potential treatment strategy for placental ischemia-induced hypertension in preeclampsia.

  17. Activated Complement Factors as Disease Markers for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflieh, Jean; Rushbrook, Julie; Worah, Samrat; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Early recognition and effective management are essential for improved outcome. However, early recognition is impeded by lack of clinically utilized biomarkers. Complement factors play important roles in the mechanisms leading to sepsis and can potentially serve as early markers of sepsis and of sepsis severity and outcome. This review provides a synopsis of recent animal and clinical studies of the role of complement factors in sepsis development, together with their potential as disease markers. In addition, new results from our laboratory are presented regarding the involvement of the complement factor, mannose-binding lectin, in septic shock patients. Future clinical studies are needed to obtain the complete profiles of complement factors/their activated products during the course of sepsis development. We anticipate that the results of these studies will lead to a multipanel set of sepsis biomarkers which, along with currently used laboratory tests, will facilitate earlier diagnosis, timely treatment, and improved outcome. PMID:26420913

  18. Activation of complement pathways after contusion-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Aileen J; Robert, Stephanie; Huang, Wencheng; Young, Wise; Cotman, Carl W

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that a cellular inflammatory response is initiated, and inflammatory cytokines are synthesized, following experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the complement cascade, a major component of both the innate and adaptive immune response, is also activated following experimental SCI. We investigated the pathways, cellular localization, timecourse, and degree of complement activation in rat spinal cord following acute contusion-induced SCI using the New York University (NYU) weight drop impactor. Mild and severe injuries (12.5 and 50 mm drop heights) at 1, 7, and 42 days post injury time points were evaluated. Classical (C1q and C4), alternative (Factor B) and terminal (C5b-9) complement pathways were strongly activated within 1 day of SCI. Complement protein immunoreactivity was predominantly found in cell types vulnerable to degeneration, neurons and oligodendrocytes, and was not generally observed in inflammatory or astroglial cells. Surprisingly, immunoreactivity for complement proteins was also evident 6 weeks after injury, and complement activation was observed as far as 20 mm rostral to the site of injury. Axonal staining by C1q and Factor B was also observed, suggesting a potential role for the complement cascade in demyelination or axonal degeneration. These data support the hypothesis that complement activation plays a role in SCI.

  19. Annexin A2 Enhances Complement Activation by Inhibiting Factor H1

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Brandon; Tong, Hua Hua; Laskowski, Jennifer; Jonscher, Karen; Goetz, Lindsey; Woolaver, Rachel; Hannan, Jonathan; Li, Yong Xing; Hourcade, Dennis; Pickering, Matthew C.; Holers, V. Michael; Thurman, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H is a circulating protein that regulates activation of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement. Mutations and genetic variations of factor H are associated with several AP-mediated diseases, highlighting the critical role of factor H in AP regulation. AP-mediated inflammation is typically triggered by illness or tissue injury, however, and tissue injury can trigger AP activation in individuals with fully functional factor H. This suggests that factor H function is affected by local conditions within tissues. We hypothesized that inducible proteins impair the ability of factor H to locally control the AP, thereby increasing AP activation. We used purified murine factor H to immunoprecipitate binding partners from mouse kidneys. Using immunoaffinity liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry we then identified annexin A2 as a factor H binding partner. Further experiments showed that annexin A2 reduces the binding of factor H to cell surfaces. Recombinant annexin A2 impaired complement regulation by factor H, and increased complement activation on renal cell surfaces in vitro and in vivo. In a murine model of acute pneumococcal otitis media the administration of annexin A2 increased AP-mediated bacterial opsonization and clearance. In conclusion, the local production of annexin A2 within tissues suppresses regulation of the AP by factor H. Annexin A2 can contribute to AP-mediated tissue inflammation by locally impairing factor H function, but annexin A2 can also improve complement-mediated bacterial clearance. PMID:26729803

  20. Moss-Produced, Glycosylation-Optimized Human Factor H for Therapeutic Application in Complement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Michelfelder, Stefan; Parsons, Juliana; Bohlender, Lennard L; Hoernstein, Sebastian N W; Niederkrüger, Holger; Busch, Andreas; Krieghoff, Nicola; Koch, Jonas; Fode, Benjamin; Schaaf, Andreas; Frischmuth, Thomas; Pohl, Martin; Zipfel, Peter F; Reski, Ralf; Decker, Eva L; Häffner, Karsten

    2016-12-08

    Genetic defects in complement regulatory proteins can lead to severe renal diseases, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathies, and age-related macular degeneration. The majority of the mutations found in patients with these diseases affect the glycoprotein complement factor H, the main regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation. Therapeutic options are limited, and novel treatments, specifically those targeting alternative pathway activation, are highly desirable. Substitution with biologically active factor H could potentially treat a variety of diseases that involve increased alternative pathway activation, but no therapeutic factor H is commercially available. We recently reported the expression of full-length recombinant factor H in moss (Physcomitrella patens). Here, we present the production of an improved moss-derived recombinant human factor H devoid of potentially immunogenic plant-specific sugar residues on protein N-glycans, yielding approximately 1 mg purified moss-derived human factor H per liter of initial P. patens culture after a multistep purification process. This glycosylation-optimized factor H showed full in vitro complement regulatory activity similar to that of plasma-derived factor H and efficiently blocked LPS-induced alternative pathway activation and hemolysis induced by sera from patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Furthermore, injection of moss-derived factor H reduced C3 deposition and increased serum C3 levels in a murine model of C3 glomerulopathy. Thus, we consider moss-produced recombinant human factor H a promising pharmaceutical product for therapeutic intervention in patients suffering from complement dysregulation.

  1. Factor C acts as a lipopolysaccharide-responsive C3 convertase in horseshoe crab complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ariki, Shigeru; Takahara, Shusaku; Shibata, Toshio; Fukuoka, Takaaki; Ozaki, Aya; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2008-12-01

    The complement system in vertebrates plays an important role in host defense against and clearance of invading microbes, in which complement component C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. In an effort to understand the molecular activation mechanism of invertebrate C3, we isolated and characterized an ortholog of C3 (designated TtC3) from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Flow cytometric analysis using an Ab against TtC3 revealed that the horseshoe crab complement system opsonizes both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Evaluation of the ability of various pathogen-associated molecular patterns to promote the proteolytic conversion of TtC3 to TtC3b in hemocyanin-depleted plasma indicated that LPS, but not zymosan, peptidoglycan, or laminarin, strongly induces this conversion, highlighting the selective response of the complement system to LPS stimulation. Although originally characterized as an LPS-sensitive initiator of hemolymph coagulation stored within hemocytes, we identified factor C in hemolymph plasma. An anti-factor C Ab inhibited various LPS-induced phenomena, including plasma amidase activity, the proteolytic activation of TtC3, and the deposition of TtC3b on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, activated factor C present on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria directly catalyzed the proteolytic conversion of the purified TtC3, thereby promoting TtC3b deposition. We conclude that factor C acts as an LPS-responsive C3 convertase on the surface of invading Gram-negative bacteria in the initial phase of horseshoe crab complement activation.

  2. CTRP6 is an endogenous complement regulator that can effectively treat induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Masanori A.; Kakuta, Shigeru; Inoue, Asuka; Umeda, Naoto; Yonezawa, Tomo; Maruhashi, Takumi; Tateishi, Koichiro; Ishigame, Harumichi; Yabe, Rikio; Ikeda, Satoshi; Seno, Akimasa; Chi, Hsi-Hua; Hashiguchi, Yuriko; Kurata, Riho; Tada, Takuya; Kubo, Sachiko; Sato, Nozomi; Liu, Yang; Hattori, Masahira; Saijo, Shinobu; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita, Teizo; Sumida, Takayuki; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is important for the host defence against infection as well as for the development of inflammatory diseases. Here we show that C1q/TNF-related protein 6 (CTRP6; gene symbol C1qtnf6) expression is elevated in mouse rheumatoid arthritis (RA) models. C1qtnf6−/− mice are highly susceptible to induced arthritis due to enhanced complement activation, whereas C1qtnf6-transgenic mice are refractory. The Arthus reaction and the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis are also enhanced in C1qtnf6−/− mice and C1qtnf6−/− embryos are semi-lethal. We find that CTRP6 specifically suppresses the alternative pathway of the complement system by competing with factor B for C3(H2O) binding. Furthermore, treatment of arthritis-induced mice with intra-articular injection of recombinant human CTRP6 cures the arthritis. CTRP6 is expressed in human synoviocytes, and CTRP6 levels are increased in RA patients. These results indicate that CTRP6 is an endogenous complement regulator and could be used for the treatment of complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26404464

  3. Complement factor B activation in patients with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, Ivan; Dalloul, Mudar; Wong, Karen A; Bakare, Olufunke; Schweis, Franz; Garala, Maya; Alam, Amit; Medranda, Giorgio; Lekovic, Jovana; Shuaib, Waqas; Tedjasukmana, Andreas; Little, Perry; Hanono, Daniel; Wijetilaka, Ruvini; Weedon, Jeremy; Lin, Jun; Toledano, Roulhac d'Arby; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Bb, the active fragment of complement factor B (fB), has been reported to be a predictor of preeclampsia. However, conflicting results have been found by some investigators. We hypothesized that the disagreement in findings may be due to the racial/ethnic differences among various study groups, and that fB activation is significant in women of an ethnic minority with preeclampsia. We investigated the maternal and fetal levels of Bb (the activated fB fragment) in pregnant women of an ethnic minority with or without preeclampsia. We enrolled 291 pregnant women (96% of an ethnic minority, including 78% African-American). Thirteen percent of these were diagnosed with preeclampsia. Maternal venous blood was collected from all participants together with fetal umbilical cord blood samples from 154 deliveries in the 291 women. The results were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and multivariate analyses. Maternal Bb levels were significantly higher in the preeclamptic group than in the nonpreeclamptic group. Levels of Bb in fetal cord blood were similar in both groups. Subgroup analyses of African-American patients' results confirmed the study hypothesis that there would be a significant increase in Bb in the maternal blood of the preeclamptic group and no increase in Bb in the fetal cord blood of this group. These results suggest that a maternal immune response through complement fB might play a role in the development of preeclampsia, particularly in African-American patients.

  4. Complement Evasion Mediated by Enhancement of Captured Factor H: Implications for Protection of Self-Surfaces from Complement

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew P.; Makou, Elisavet; Chen, Zhuo A.; Kerr, Heather; Richards, Anna; Rappsilber, Juri

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to evade annihilation by the vertebrate complement system, many microbes capture factor H (FH), the key soluble complement-regulating protein in human plasma. However, FH is normally an active complement suppressor exclusively on self-surfaces and this selective action of FH is pivotal to self versus non-self discrimination by the complement system. We investigated whether the bacterially captured FH becomes functionally enhanced and, if so, how this is achieved at a structural level. We found, using site-directed and truncation mutagenesis, surface plasmon resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cross-linking and mass spectrometry, that the N-terminal domain of Streptococcus pneumoniae protein PspC (PspCN) not only binds FH extraordinarily tightly but also holds it in a previously uncharacterized conformation. Functional enhancement arises from exposure of a C-terminal cryptic second binding site in FH for C3b, the activation-specific fragment of the pivotal complement component, C3. This conformational change of FH doubles its affinity for C3b and increases 5-fold its ability to accelerate decay of the binary enzyme (C3bBb) responsible for converting C3 to C3b in an amplification loop. Despite not sharing critical FH-binding residues, PspCNs from D39 and Tigr4 S. pneumoniae exhibit similar FH-anchoring and enhancing properties. We propose that these bacterial proteins mimic molecular markers of self-surfaces, providing a compelling hypothesis for how FH prevents complement-mediated injury to host tissue while lacking efficacy on virtually all other surfaces. In hemolysis assays with 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide–treated erythrocytes that recapitulate paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, PspCN enhanced protection of cells by FH, suggesting a new paradigm for therapeutic complement suppression. PMID:26459349

  5. Complement depletion with humanised cobra venom factor: efficacy in preclinical models of vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Fritzinger, David C; Gorsuch, W Brian; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-03-01

    The complement system is an intrinsic part of the immune system and has important functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, inadvertent or misdirected complement activation is also involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, contributing solely or significantly to tissue injury and disease development. Multiple approaches to develop pharmacological agents to inhibit complement are currently being pursued. We have developed a conceptually different approach of not inhibiting but depleting complement, based on the complement-depleting activities of cobra venom factor (CVF), a non-toxic cobra venom component with structural and functional homology to complement component C3. We developed a humanised version of CVF by creating human complement component C3 derivatives with complement-depleting activities of CVF (humanised CVF) as a promising therapeutic agent for diseases with complement pathogenesis. Here we review the beneficial therapeutic effect of humanised CVF in several murine models of vascular diseases such as reperfusion injury.

  6. Complement Factor H Inhibits CD47-Mediated Resolution of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Calippe, Bertrand; Augustin, Sebastien; Beguier, Fanny; Charles-Messance, Hugo; Poupel, Lucie; Conart, Jean-Baptiste; Hu, Shulong J; Lavalette, Sophie; Fauvet, Alexandre; Rayes, Julie; Levy, Olivier; Raoul, William; Fitting, Catherine; Denèfle, Thomas; Pickering, Matthew C; Harris, Claire; Jorieux, Sylvie; Sullivan, Patrick M; Sahel, José-Alain; Karoyan, Philippe; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Guillonneau, Xavier; Gautier, Emmanuel L; Sennlaub, Florian

    2017-02-21

    Variants of the CFH gene, encoding complement factor H (CFH), show strong association with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major cause of blindness. Here, we used murine models of AMD to examine the contribution of CFH to disease etiology. Cfh deletion protected the mice from the pathogenic subretinal accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes (MP) that characterize AMD and showed accelerated resolution of inflammation. MP persistence arose secondary to binding of CFH to CD11b, which obstructed the homeostatic elimination of MPs from the subretinal space mediated by thrombospsondin-1 (TSP-1) activation of CD47. The AMD-associated CFH(H402) variant markedly increased this inhibitory effect on microglial cells, supporting a causal link to disease etiology. This mechanism is not restricted to the eye, as similar results were observed in a model of acute sterile peritonitis. Pharmacological activation of CD47 accelerated resolution of both subretinal and peritoneal inflammation, with implications for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease.

  7. Regulation of age-related macular degeneration-like pathology by complement factor H.

    PubMed

    Toomey, Christopher B; Kelly, Una; Saban, Daniel R; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2015-06-09

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a major susceptibility gene for age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, its impact on AMD pathobiology is unresolved. Here, the role of CFH in the development of AMD pathology in vivo was interrogated by analyzing aged Cfh(+/-) and Cfh(-/-) mice fed a high-fat, cholesterol-enriched diet. Strikingly, decreased levels of CFH led to increased sub-retinal pigmented epithelium (sub-RPE) deposit formation, specifically basal laminar deposits, following high-fat diet. Mechanistically, our data show that deposits are due to CFH competition for lipoprotein binding sites in Bruch's membrane. Interestingly and despite sub-RPE deposit formation occurring in both Cfh(+/-) and Cfh(-/-) mice, RPE damage accompanied by loss of vision occurred only in old Cfh(+/-) mice. We demonstrate that such pathology is a function of excess complement activation in Cfh(+/-) mice versus complement deficiency in Cfh(-/-) animals. Due to the CFH-dependent increase in sub-RPE deposit height, we interrogated the potential of CFH as a previously unidentified regulator of Bruch's membrane lipoprotein binding and show, using human Bruch's membrane explants, that CFH removes endogenous human lipoproteins in aged donors. Thus, advanced age, high-fat diet, and decreased CFH induce sub-RPE deposit formation leading to complement activation, which contributes to RPE damage and visual function impairment. This new understanding of the complicated interactions of CFH in AMD-like pathology provides an improved foundation for the development of targeted therapies for AMD.

  8. The role of complement in age-related macular degeneration: heparan sulphate, a ZIP code for complement factor H?

    PubMed

    Langford-Smith, Alex; Keenan, Tiarnan D L; Clark, Simon J; Bishop, Paul N; Day, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed nations and has been associated with complement dysregulation in the central retina. The Y402H polymorphism in the complement regulatory protein factor H (CFH) can confer a >5-fold increased risk of developing AMD and is present in approximately 30% of people of European descent. CFH, in conjunction with other factors, regulates complement activation in host tissues, and the Y402H polymorphism has been found to alter the protein's specificity for heparan sulphate (HS) - a complex polysaccharide found ubiquitously in mammals. HS, which is present on the cell surface and also in the extracellular matrix, exhibits huge structural diversity due to variations in the level/pattern of sulphation, where particular structures may act as 'ZIP codes' for different tissue/cellular locations. Recent work has demonstrated that CFH contains two HS-binding domains that each recognize specific HS ZIP codes, allowing differential recognition of Bruch's membrane (in the eye) or the glomerular basement membrane (in the kidney). Importantly, the Y402H polymorphism impairs the binding of CFH to the HS in Bruch's membrane, which could result in increased complement activation and chronic local inflammation (in 402H individuals) and thereby contribute to AMD pathology.

  9. Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP

    PubMed Central

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Granados Martinez, Adriana Patricia; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections. PMID:25347183

  10. A teleost complement factor Ba possesses antimicrobial activity and inhibits bacterial infection in fish.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Peng; Sun, Li

    2017-01-24

    Complement factor B (Bf) is a component of the complement system. Following activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system, factor B is cleaved into Ba and Bb fragments. In fish, the Bf of rainbow trout is known to act as a C3 convertase, but the function of the Ba fragment is essentially unknown. In this study, we examined the expression patterns of tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis Bf (named CsBf) and the biological activity of the Ba fragment of CsBf (named CsBa). CsBf possesses the conserved domains of Bf and shares 39.9%-56.4% sequence identities with other fish Bf. CsBf expression was high in liver, muscle, and heart, and low in intestine, blood, and kidney. Bacterial infection significantly induced CsBf expression in kidney, spleen, and liver in a time-dependent manner. Recombinant CsBa (rCsBa) exhibited apparent binding capacities to bacteria and tongue sole peripheral blood leukocytes, and binding of rCsBa to bacteria inhibited bacterial growth. When overexpressed in tongue sole, CsBa significantly reduced bacterial dissemination in fish tissues. Together these results indicate for the first time that a fish Ba possesses antibacterial effect as well as immune cell-binding capacity, and thus probably plays a role in host immune defense against bacterial infection.

  11. Complement Factor H Binds to Human Serum Apolipoprotein E and Mediates Complement Regulation on High Density Lipoprotein Particles.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Karita; van Kessel, Kok; Nissilä, Eija; Metso, Jari; Johansson, Tiira; Miettinen, Sini; Varjosalo, Markku; Kirveskari, Juha; Kuusela, Pentti; Chroni, Angelika; Jauhiainen, Matti; van Strijp, Jos; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2015-11-27

    The alternative pathway of complement is an important part of the innate immunity response against foreign particles invading the human body. To avoid damage to host cells, it needs to be efficiently down-regulated by plasma factor H (FH) as exemplified by various diseases caused by mutations in its domains 19-20 (FH19-20) and 5-7 (FH5-7). These regions are also the main interaction sites for microbial pathogens that bind host FH to evade complement attack. We previously showed that inhibition of FH binding by a recombinant FH5-7 construct impairs survival of FH binding pathogens in human blood. In this study we found that upon exposure to full blood, the addition of FH5-7 reduces survival of, surprisingly, also those microbes that are not able to bind FH. This effect was mediated by inhibition of complement regulation and subsequently enhanced neutrophil phagocytosis by FH5-7. We found that although FH5-7 does not reduce complement regulation in the actual fluid phase of plasma, it reduces regulation on HDL particles in plasma. Using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry we revealed that FH interacts with serum apolipoprotein E (apoE) via FH5-7 domains. Furthermore, binding of FH5-7 to HDL was dependent on the concentration of apoE on the HDL particles. These findings explain why the addition of FH5-7 to plasma leads to excessive complement activation and phagocytosis of microbes in full anticoagulated blood. In conclusion, our data show how FH interacts with apoE molecules via domains 5-7 and regulates alternative pathway activation on plasma HDL particles.

  12. Deficiency of human complement factor I associated with lowered factor H.

    PubMed

    Naked, G M; Florido, M P; Ferreira de Paula, P; Vinet, A M; Inostroza, J S; Isaac, L

    2000-08-01

    Deficiencies of factor I and/or factor H result in an increased consumption of C3 and higher susceptibility to recurrent infections. Here we describe a case of human factor I deficiency and lowered factor H levels. C3 concentration was 50% lower than normal, the classical pathway-dependent hemolytic activity was reduced to almost 30% of normal, and alternative pathway-dependent activity was completely absent. The killing by peripheral leukocytes of Candida albicans treated with deficient serum and the production of complement-dependent chemotactic factors were reduced in the proband's serum when compared with normal serum. Finally, we observed that C3 antigen present in the proband's serum has a different electrophoretic mobility than native C3 (most likely C3b), confirming the deregulation of complement activation due to the lack of regulatory proteins factors I and H. The impaired complement system described in this case, the first of its kind described in a Chile, explains the higher susceptibility to infections found in the proband.

  13. Generation of Viable Mice from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) Through Tetraploid Complementation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lan; Gao, Shaorong

    2015-01-01

    Tetraploid complementation assay is the most rigorous criteria for pluripotency characterization of pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Pluripotent stem cells could complement the developmental deficiency of tetraploid embryos and thus support the full-term mice development. Here we describe the protocol for tetraploid complementation using iPSCs to produce viable all-iPSC mice.

  14. Variants in Complement Factor H and Complement Factor H-Related Protein Genes, CFHR3 and CFHR1, Affect Complement Activation in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Zhai, Ya-Ling; Wang, Feng-Mei; Hou, Ping; Lv, Ji-Cheng; Xu, Da-Min; Shi, Su-Fang; Liu, Li-Jun; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Novak, Jan; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation is common in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and associated with disease severity. Our recent genome-wide association study of IgAN identified susceptibility loci on 1q32 containing the complement regulatory protein-encoding genes CFH and CFHR1–5, with rs6677604 in CFH as the top single-nucleotide polymorphism and CFHR3–1 deletion (CFHR3–1∆) as the top signal for copy number variation. In this study, to explore the clinical effects of variation in CFH, CFHR3, and CFHR1 on IgAN susceptibility and progression, we enrolled two populations. Group 1 included 1178 subjects with IgAN and available genome-wide association study data. Group 2 included 365 subjects with IgAN and available clinical follow-up data. In group 1, rs6677604 was associated with mesangial C3 deposition by genotype–phenotype correlation analysis. In group 2, we detected a linkage between the rs6677604-A allele and CFHR3–1∆ and found that the rs6677604-A allele was associated with higher serum levels of CFH and lower levels of the complement activation split product C3a. Furthermore, CFH levels were positively associated with circulating C3 levels and negatively associated with mesangial C3 deposition. Moreover, serum levels of the pathogenic galactose-deficient glycoform of IgA1 were also associated with the degree of mesangial C3 deposition in patients with IgAN. Our findings suggest that genetic variants in CFH, CFHR3, and CFHR1 affect complement activation and thereby, predispose patients to develop IgAN. PMID:25205734

  15. Upregulation of complement inhibitors in association with vulnerable cells following contusion-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Aileen J; Najbauer, Joseph; Huang, Wencheng; Young, Wise; Robert, Stephanie

    2005-03-01

    We have previously described the activation of the classical, alternative, and terminal complement cascade pathways after acute contusion spinal cord injury using the New York University (NYU) weight-drop impactor. In the present study, we examined the induction of protein regulators of the complement cascade, factor H (FH), and clusterin, in the same experimental paradigm. The spinal cord of laminectomized adult rats was subjected to mild or severe injury using impactor weight-drop heights of 12.5 and 50 mm, respectively. The spinal cords of control and injured animals were evaluated at 1, 7, and 42 days after injury. Immunocytochemistry revealed a robust increase in the numbers and intensity of staining of FH, and clusterin-positive cells in the injured cord at all three time points, with the highest increases observed at 1 and 42 days after injury. FH and clusterin-positive cells were observed among neurons as well as oligodendrocytes. The increased expression was detected both rostrally and caudally from the injury site, in the latter case at distances up to 20 mm. The precise biological significance of injury-induced upregulation of these proteins remains to be determined. However, FH and clusterin are potent regulators of complement activity targeting upstream (FH) and downstream (clusterin) molecules of the pro-inflammatory cascade, which could be of vital importance in preventing a "runaway" inflammatory reaction in the injured spinal cord.

  16. Methods for Quantitative Detection of Antibody-induced Complement Activation on Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M.; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies against red blood cells (RBCs) can lead to complement activation resulting in an accelerated clearance via complement receptors in the liver (extravascular hemolysis) or leading to intravascular lysis of RBCs. Alloantibodies (e.g. ABO) or autoantibodies to RBC antigens (as seen in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, AIHA) leading to complement activation are potentially harmful and can be - especially when leading to intravascular lysis - fatal1. Currently, complement activation due to (auto)-antibodies on RBCs is assessed in vitro by using the Coombs test reflecting complement deposition on RBC or by a nonquantitative hemolytic assay reflecting RBC lysis1-4. However, to assess the efficacy of complement inhibitors, it is mandatory to have quantitative techniques. Here we describe two such techniques. First, an assay to detect C3 and C4 deposition on red blood cells that is induced by antibodies in patient serum is presented. For this, FACS analysis is used with fluorescently labeled anti-C3 or anti-C4 antibodies. Next, a quantitative hemolytic assay is described. In this assay, complement-mediated hemolysis induced by patient serum is measured making use of spectrophotometric detection of the released hemoglobin. Both of these assays are very reproducible and quantitative, facilitating studies of antibody-induced complement activation. PMID:24514151

  17. Decay-accelerating factor protects human tumor cells from complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, N K; Walter, E I; Smith-Mensah, W H; Ratnoff, W D; Tykocinski, M L; Medof, M E

    1988-01-01

    The disialoganglioside GD2 is expressed on a wide spectrum of human tumor types, including neuroblastomas and melanomas. Upon binding of 3F8, a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for GD2, neuroblastomas and some melanomas are sensitive to killing by human complement, whereas some melanomas are not. To investigate the mechanism underlying these differences in complement mediated cytotoxicity, complement-insensitive melanoma cell lines were compared with respect to expression of the decay-accelerating factor (DAF), a membrane regulatory protein that protects blood cells from autologous complement attack. While DAF was undetectable among neuroblastomas, it was present in complement-insensitive melanomas. When the function of DAF was blocked by anti-DAF MAb, C3 uptake and complement-mediated lysis of the insensitive melanoma lines were markedly enhanced. F(ab')2 fragments were as effective in enhancing lysis as intact anti-DAF MAb. The DAF-negative and DAF-positive melanoma cell lines were comparably resistant to passive lysis by cobra venom factor-treated serum. The data suggest that in some tumors, DAF activity accounts for their resistance to complement-mediated killing. The ability to render these cells complement-sensitive by blocking DAF function may have implications for immunotherapy. PMID:2450893

  18. Gain-of-function mutations in complement factor B are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Jorge, Elena Goicoechea; Harris, Claire L.; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Carreras, Luis; Arranz, Elena Aller; Garrido, Cynthia Abarrategui; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B. Paul; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an important cause of acute renal failure in children. Mutations in one or more genes encoding complement-regulatory proteins have been reported in approximately one-third of nondiarrheal, atypical HUS (aHUS) patients, suggesting a defect in the protection of cell surfaces against complement activation in susceptible individuals. Here, we identified a subgroup of aHUS patients showing persistent activation of the complement alternative pathway and found within this subgroup two families with mutations in the gene encoding factor B (BF), a zymogen that carries the catalytic site of the complement alternative pathway convertase (C3bBb). Functional analyses demonstrated that F286L and K323E aHUS-associated BF mutations are gain-of-function mutations that result in enhanced formation of the C3bBb convertase or increased resistance to inactivation by complement regulators. These data expand our understanding of the genetic factors conferring predisposition to aHUS, demonstrate the critical role of the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of aHUS, and provide support for the use of complement-inhibition therapies to prevent or reduce tissue damage caused by dysregulated complement activation. PMID:17182750

  19. [The role of complement factor H in the pathogenesis of Borrelia infection].

    PubMed

    Gęca, Aleksandra; Mazurek, Urszula; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Niedworok, Elżbieta; Ziółko, Ewa; Kokot, Teresa

    2012-07-20

    Complement factor H (CFH) is one of the most important negative regulators of the alternative pathway of the complement system. It is a glycoprotein belonging to the protein H family, which is synthesized mainly in the liver and is composed into a globular protein consisting of 60 amino acid domains in the serum. It shows specificity for C3b molecule of the complement system present in the serum or bound to the cell surface. It inhibits the steady formation of C3 convertase enzymes and the binding of C2 to C4b and factor B to C3b. It accelerates the decomposition of C2a into C4b and the displacement of Bb from C3b. The present paper discusses the composition, properties and functions of the complement factor and the family it belongs to. The paper focuses in particular on its role in the pathogenesis of an infection caused by the spirochetes of the Borrelia genus. Through binding CFH and other related proteins, bacteria of the Borrelia species inhibit the key effect of the alternative pathway of the complement system - the lysis of spirochete cells dependent on the complement's activation. The mechanism enables pathogens to spread in the host organism and facilitates the evolution of the disease. Discovering the immune mechanisms of the infection caused by the spirochetes of the Borrelia genus may allow for implementing a therapy blocking the binding of complement factor H early enough, apart from the standard treatment of the disease.

  20. The Cholesky Factorization, Schur Complements, Correlation Coefficients, Angles between Vectors, and the QR Factorization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    using the superscript + to denote the Moore - Penrose generalized inverse , = a2 + CT (UT)+(XI - al) can be defined as the regression of z 2 on z ([1... generalized Schur complement S = (EIE) = H - GE-F, EE-E =E. (1.5) When E is symmetric nonnegative definite and possibly singular, this generalized Schur...working with E. In §8 we try to summarize the various results of the paper and emphasize the relations among them. 2. Cholesky Factors and Generalized

  1. The human complement factor H: functional roles, genetic variations and disease associations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Lopez-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar

    2004-06-01

    Factor H is an essential regulatory protein that plays a critical role in the homeostasis of the complement system in plasma and in the protection of bystander host cells and tissues from damage by complement activation. Genetic and structural data generated during recent years have been instrumental to delineate the functional domains responsible for these regulatory activities in factor H, which is helping to understand the molecular basis underlying the different pathologies associated to factor H. This review summarises our current knowledge of the role of factor H in health and disease.

  2. Rapid activation of monocyte tissue factor by antithymocyte globulin is dependent on complement and protein disulfide isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Spath, Brigitte; Fischer, Cornelia; Stolz, Moritz; Ayuk, Francis A.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Ruf, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Lymphocyte depletion with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) can be complicated by systemic coagulation activation. We found that ATG activated tissue factor procoagulant activity (TF PCA) on monocytic cells more potently than other stimuli that decrypt TF, including cell disruption, TF pathway inhibitor inhibition, and calcium ionophore treatment. Induction of TF PCA by ATG was dependent on lipid raft integrity and complement activation. We showed that ATG-mediated TF activation required complement activation until assembly of the C5b-7 membrane insertion complex, but not lytic pore formation by the membrane attack complex C5b-9. Consistently, induction of TF PCA by ATG did not require maximal phosphatidylserine membrane exposure and was not correlated with the magnitude of complement-induced lytic cell injury. Blockade of free thiols, an inhibitory monoclonal antibody to protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and the small-molecule PDI antagonist quercetin-3-rutinoside prevented ATG-mediated TF activation, and C5 complement activation resulted in oxidation of cell surface PDI. This rapid and potent mechanism of cellular TF activation represents a novel connection between the complement system and cell surface PDI-mediated thiol-disulfide exchange. Delineation of this clinically relevant mechanism of activation of the extrinsic coagulation pathway during immunosuppressive therapy with ATG may have broader implications for vascular thrombosis associated with inflammatory disorders. PMID:23315166

  3. In vitro inactivation of complement by a serum factor present in Junin-virus infected guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Rimoldi, M T; de Bracco, M M

    1980-01-01

    A serum factor(s) of guinea-pigs infected with Junin virus, the etiological agent of Argentine haemorrhagic fever, is endowed with a potent anticomplementary activity. It is resistant to heat (56 degrees, 30 min) and elutes from a Sephadex G-200 column between albumin and haemoglobin. It is ineffective in the presence of EDTA or EGTA and does not sediment at 82,000 g. It has no direct effect on C4 unless functional Cl is present. However, it induces Cl activation that consumes C4 haemolytic activity in normal human and guinea-pig sera. The evidence presented in this report demonstrates that the complement activation observed in experimental Argentine haemorrhagic fever is at least in part due to a direct effect of this serum factor on the classical complement pathway. PMID:6247264

  4. Factor H in Porcine Seminal Plasma Protects Sperm against Complement Attack in Genital Tracts*

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Tomohisa; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Maeda, Toshinaga; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Nishi, Katsuji; Ohkubo, Iwao

    2010-01-01

    We found that factor H (FH) exists in porcine seminal plasma. Purified FH strongly inhibited serum alternative pathway complement activation against lipopolysaccharide. The molecular weight, pI, and heparin-binding activity of the purified protein were different from those of purified FH from porcine serum. The complement regulatory activity of seminal plasma FH was ∼2-fold stronger than that of serum FH. Treatment of purified serum FH with sialidase and N-glycosidase F gave almost the same results as those of seminal plasma FH. The deletion of sialic acid from the carbohydrate chains of both FHs contributed to heparin-binding and complement regulatory activities. Results of reverse transcriptase-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry showed that seminal plasma FH is mainly secreted from epithelial cells of the seminal vesicle in male genital tracts. FH was also detected in the outer acrosomal region of ejaculated sperm by immunofluorescence staining, and found that the purified FH from the sperm membrane has the same complement regulatory activity as that of seminal plasma FH. The ejaculated sperm possessing FH in the outer acrosomal region considerably evaded complement attack. We also found that there is strong complement activity in fluids from female genital tract ducts. These findings indicate that FH bound to the outer acrosomal region and soluble FH play important roles in protecting sperm against complement attack in male and female genital tracts. PMID:19920146

  5. Anopheles Midgut Epithelium Evades Human Complement Activity by Capturing Factor H from the Blood Meal

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ayman; Barroso, Marta; Miettinen, Tiera; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Hematophagous vectors strictly require ingesting blood from their hosts to complete their life cycles. Exposure of the alimentary canal of these vectors to the host immune effectors necessitates efficient counteractive measures by hematophagous vectors. The Anopheles mosquito transmitting the malaria parasite is an example of hematophagous vectors that within seconds can ingest human blood double its weight. The innate immune defense mechanisms, like the complement system, in the human blood should thereby immediately react against foreign cells in the mosquito midgut. A prerequisite for complement activation is that the target cells lack complement regulators on their surfaces. In this work, we analyzed whether human complement is active in the mosquito midgut, and how the mosquito midgut cells protect themselves against complement attack. We found that complement remained active for a considerable time and was able to kill microbes within the mosquito midgut. However, the Anopheles mosquito midgut cells were not injured. These cells were found to protect themselves by capturing factor H, the main soluble inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway. Factor H inhibited complement on the midgut cells by promoting inactivation of C3b to iC3b and preventing the activity of the alternative pathway amplification C3 convertase enzyme. An interference of the FH regulatory activity by monoclonal antibodies, carried to the midgut via blood, resulted in increased mosquito mortality and reduced fecundity. By using a ligand blotting assay, a putative mosquito midgut FH receptor could be detected. Thereby, we have identified a novel mechanism whereby mosquitoes can tolerate human blood. PMID:25679788

  6. Complement-induced equine neutrophil adhesiveness and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Slauson, D O; Skrabalak, D S; Neilsen, N R; Zwahlen, R D

    1987-05-01

    Equine neutrophils (PMN) were isolated from citrated normal blood by density gradient separation on Ficoll-Hypaque to greater than 96% purity and 98% viability and an average of 3.78 x 10(7) PMN/ml. The agonist C5a des Arg was used in serial dilutions of whole zymosan-activated equine plasma (ZAP) or was partially purified from ZAP by column chromatography. Purified equine PMN exhibited rapid aggregation following incubation with C5a des Arg which was further dependent on the availability of divalent cations, especially Mg++. The microfilament disruptive agent cytochalasin B (5 micrograms/50 microliters) greatly augmented aggregation responses to C5a des Arg. Subaggregating doses of C5a des Arg promoted PMN adhesiveness as assayed on 0.5 x 10 cm borosilicate glass columns containing a 2.0 cm bed of Sephadex G-25. This C5a des Arg-induced increased adhesiveness was inhibitable by prior incubation of the PMN with either non-steroidal (0.065 M phenylbutazone) or steroidal (0.005 M dexamethasone) anti-inflammatory agents. Ultrastructural studies correlated well with functional assays and revealed marked organelle-free lamellipodia formation without PMN-PMN contact at subaggregating doses of the agonist and progressive PMN-PMN contact at aggregating doses. Equine PMN are responsive to C5a des Arg, and induced adhesiveness responses can be manipulated by anti-inflammatory agents.

  7. Protection of Nonself Surfaces from Complement Attack by Factor H-Binding Peptides: Implications for Therapeutic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, You-Qiang; Qu, Hongchang; Sfyroera, Georgia; Tzekou, Apostolia; Kay, Brian K.; Nilsson, Bo; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of nonself surfaces such as those of biomaterials or transplanted cells and organs to host blood frequently triggers innate immune responses, thereby affecting both their functionality and tolerability. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement plays a decisive role in this unfavorable reaction. Whereas previous studies demonstrated that immobilization of physiological regulators of complement activation (RCA) can attenuate this foreign body-induced activation, simple and efficient approaches for coating artificial surfaces with intact RCA are still missing. The conjugation of small molecular entities that capture RCA with high affinity is an intriguing alternative, as this creates a surface with autoregulatory activity upon exposure to blood. We therefore screened two variable cysteine-constrained phage-displayed peptide libraries for factor H-binding peptides. We discovered three peptide classes that differed with respect to their main target binding areas. Peptides binding to the broad middle region of factor H (domains 5–18) were of particular interest, as they do not interfere with either regulatory or binding activities. One peptide in this group (5C6) was further characterized and showed high factor H-capturing activity while retaining its functional integrity. Most importantly, when 5C6 was coated to a model polystyrene surface and exposed to human lepirudin-anticoagulated plasma, the bound peptide captured factor H and substantially inhibited complement activation by the alternative pathway. Our study therefore provides a promising and novel approach to produce therapeutic materials with enhanced biocompatibility. PMID:21339361

  8. Alternative Complement Pathway Deficiency Ameliorates Chronic Smoke-Induced Functional and Morphological Ocular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodell, Alex; Coughlin, Beth; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Casey, Sarah; Williamson, Tucker; Ferrell, W. Drew; Atkinson, Carl; Jones, Bryan W.; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2013-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a complex disease involving genetic variants and environmental insults, is among the leading causes of blindness in Western populations. Genetic and histologic evidence implicate the complement system in AMD pathogenesis; and smoking is the major environmental risk factor associated with increased disease risk. Although previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke exposure (CE) causes retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) defects in mice, and smoking leads to complement activation in patients, it is unknown whether complement activation is causative in the development of CE pathology; and if so, which complement pathway is required. Methods Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or clean, filtered air for 6 months. The effects of CE were analyzed in wildtype (WT) mice or mice without a functional complement alternative pathway (AP; CFB−/−) using molecular, histological, electrophysiological, and behavioral outcomes. Results CE in WT mice exhibited a significant reduction in function of both rods and cones as determined by electroretinography and contrast sensitivity measurements, concomitant with a thinning of the nuclear layers as measured by SD-OCT imaging and histology. Gene expression analyses suggested that alterations in both photoreceptors and RPE/choroid might contribute to the observed loss of function, and visualization of complement C3d deposition implies the RPE/Bruch's membrane (BrM) complex as the target of AP activity. RPE/BrM alterations include an increase in mitochondrial size concomitant with an apical shift in mitochondrial distribution within the RPE and a thickening of BrM. CFB−/− mice were protected from developing these CE-mediated alterations. Conclusions Taken together, these findings provide clear evidence that ocular pathology generated in CE mice is dependent on complement activation and requires the AP. Identifying animal models with RPE/BrM damage and verifying which

  9. Competition between antagonistic complement factors for a single protein on N. meningitidis rules disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Caesar, Joseph JE; Lavender, Hayley; Ward, Philip N; Exley, Rachel M; Eaton, Jack; Chittock, Emily; Malik, Talat H; Goiecoechea De Jorge, Elena; Pickering, Matthew C; Tang, Christoph M; Lea, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have found variation within the complement factor H gene family links to host susceptibility to meningococcal disease caused by infection with Neisseria meningitidis (Davila et al., 2010). Mechanistic insights have been challenging since variation within this locus is complex and biological roles of the factor H-related proteins, unlike factor H, are incompletely understood. N. meningitidis subverts immune responses by hijacking a host-immune regulator, complement factor H (CFH), to the bacterial surface (Schneider et al., 2006; Madico et al., 2007; Schneider et al., 2009). We demonstrate that complement factor-H related 3 (CFHR3) promotes immune activation by acting as an antagonist of CFH. Conserved sequences between CFH and CFHR3 mean that the bacterium cannot sufficiently distinguish between these two serum proteins to allow it to hijack the regulator alone. The level of protection from complement attack achieved by circulating N. meningitidis therefore depends on the relative levels of CFH and CFHR3 in serum. These data may explain the association between genetic variation in both CFH and CFHR3 and susceptibility to meningococcal disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04008.001 PMID:25534642

  10. Potential influences of complement factor H in autoimmune inflammatory and thrombotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ferluga, Janez; Kouser, Lubna; Murugaiah, Valarmathy; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2017-04-01

    Complement system homeostasis is important for host self-protection and anti-microbial immune surveillance, and recent research indicates roles in tissue development and remodelling. Complement also appears to have several points of interaction with the blood coagulation system. Deficiency and altered function due to gene mutations and polymorphisms in complement effectors and regulators, including Factor H, have been associated with familial and sporadic autoimmune inflammatory - thrombotic disorders, in which autoantibodies play a part. These include systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, anti-phospholipid syndrome and age-related macular degeneration. Such diseases are generally complex - multigenic and heterogeneous in their symptoms and predisposition/susceptibility. They usually need to be triggered by vascular trauma, drugs or infection and non-complement genetic factors also play a part. Underlying events seem to include decline in peripheral regulatory T cells, dendritic cell, and B cell tolerance, associated with alterations in lymphoid organ microenvironment. Factor H is an abundant protein, synthesised in many cell types, and its reported binding to many different ligands, even if not of high affinity, may influence a large number of molecular interactions, together with the accepted role of Factor H within the complement system. Factor H is involved in mesenchymal stem cell mediated tolerance and also contributes to self-tolerance by augmenting iC3b production and opsonisation of apoptotic cells for their silent dendritic cell engulfment via complement receptor CR3, which mediates anti-inflammatory-tolerogenic effects in the apoptotic cell context. There may be co-operation with other phagocytic receptors, such as complement C1q receptors, and the Tim glycoprotein family, which specifically bind phosphatidylserine expressed on the apoptotic cell surface. Factor H is able to discriminate between self and

  11. Nerve Growth Factor Secretion From Pulp Fibroblasts is Modulated by Complement C5a Receptor and Implied in Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chmilewsky, Fanny; Ayaz, Warda; Appiah, James; About, Imad; Chung, Seung-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of sensory innervation in tooth vitality, the identification of signals that control nerve regeneration and the cellular events they induce is essential. Previous studies demonstrated that the complement system, a major component of innate immunity and inflammation, is activated at the injured site of human carious teeth and plays an important role in dental-pulp regeneration via interaction of the active Complement C5a fragment with pulp progenitor cells. In this study, we further determined the role of the active fragment complement C5a receptor (C5aR) in dental nerve regeneration in regards to local secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) upon carious injury. Using ELISA and AXIS co-culture systems, we demonstrate that C5aR is critically implicated in the modulation of NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts. The NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts, which is negatively regulated by C5aR activation, has a role in the control of the neurite outgrowth length in our axon regeneration analysis. Our data provide a scientific step forward that can guide development of future therapeutic tools for innovative and incipient interventions targeting the dentin-pulp regeneration process by linking the neurite outgrowth to human pulp fibroblast through complement system activation. PMID:27539194

  12. c-Jun and c-Fos regulate the complement factor H promoter in murine astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fraczek, Laura A.; Martin, Carol B.; Martin, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The complement system is a critical component of innate immunity that requires regulation to avoid inappropriate activation. This regulation is provided by many proteins, including complement factor H (CFH), a critical regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation. Given its regulatory function, mutations in CFH have been implicated in diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and central nervous system diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and a demyelinating murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). There have been few investigations on the transcriptional regulation of CFH in the brain and CNS. Our studies show that CFH mRNA is present in several CNS cell types. The murine CFH (mCFH) promoter was cloned and examined through truncation constructs and we show that specific regions throughout the promoter contain enhancers and repressors that are positively regulated by inflammatory cytokines in astrocytes. Database mining of these regions indicated transcription factor binding sites conserved between different species, which led to the investigation of specific transcription factor binding interactions in a 241 base pair (bp) region at −416 bp to −175 bp that showed the strongest activity. Through supershift analysis it was determined that c-Jun and c-Fos interact with the CFH promoter in astrocytes in this region. These results suggest a relationship between cell cycle and complement regulation, and how these transcription factors and CFH affect disease will be a valuable area of investigation. PMID:21920606

  13. c-Jun and c-Fos regulate the complement factor H promoter in murine astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Laura A; Martin, Carol B; Martin, Brian K

    2011-10-01

    The complement system is a critical component of innate immunity that requires regulation to avoid inappropriate activation. This regulation is provided by many proteins, including complement factor H (CFH), a critical regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation. Given its regulatory function, mutations in CFH have been implicated in diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and central nervous system diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and a demyelinating murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). There have been few investigations on the transcriptional regulation of CFH in the brain and CNS. Our studies show that CFH mRNA is present in several CNS cell types. The murine CFH (mCFH) promoter was cloned and examined through truncation constructs and we show that specific regions throughout the promoter contain enhancers and repressors that are positively regulated by inflammatory cytokines in astrocytes. Database mining of these regions indicated transcription factor binding sites conserved between different species, which led to the investigation of specific transcription factor binding interactions in a 241 base pair (bp) region at -416 bp to -175 bp that showed the strongest activity. Through supershift analysis, it was determined that c-Jun and c-Fos interact with the CFH promoter in astrocytes in this region. These results suggest a relationship between cell cycle and complement regulation, and how these transcription factors and CFH affect disease will be a valuable area of investigation.

  14. Regulatory components of the alternative complement pathway in endothelial cell cytoplasm, factor H and factor I, are not packaged in Weibel-Palade bodies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy A; Sartain, Sarah E; Hui, Shiu-Ki; Moake, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that factor H, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway, is stored with von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. If this were to be the case, it would have therapeutic importance for patients with the atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome that can be caused either by a heterozygous defect in the factor H gene or by the presence of an autoantibody against factor H. The in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP), would be expected to increase transiently the circulating factor H levels, in addition to increasing the circulating levels of VWF. We describe experiments demonstrating that factor H is released from endothelial cell cytoplasm without a secondary storage site. These experiments showed that factor H is not stored with VWF in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies, and is not secreted in response in vitro in response to the Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, histamine. Furthermore, the in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, DDAVP does not increase the circulating factor H levels concomitantly with DDAVP-induced increased VWF. Factor I, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway that is functionally related to factor H, is also located in endothelial cell cytoplasm, and is also not present in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies. Our data demonstrate that the factor H and factor I regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway are not stored in Weibel-Palade bodies. DDAVP induces the secretion into human plasma of VWF--but not factor H.

  15. Comparative study of binding of ovine complement factor H with different Borrelia genospecies.

    PubMed

    Kišová-Vargová, Lucia; Cerňanská, Dana; Bhide, Mangesh

    2012-03-01

    This study presents the binding of ovine factor H (fH) by various serotypes of Borrelia and simultaneously correlates their complement resistance to sheep serum. Affinity ligand binding assay was employed to study the binding of borrelial proteins to ovine recombinant fH and its truncated forms (short consensus repeat, SCR 7 and SCRs 19-20). From a repertoire of 17 borrelial strains, only two strains showed affinity to sheep fH. A ~28-kDa protein of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (B. burgdorferi s.s., strain SKT-2) bound full-length fH as well as SCRs 19-20. This fH-binding protein was further identified as complement regulator-acquiring surface protein of B. burgdorferi (BbCRASP-1) by MALDI-TOF analysis. Surprisingly, a ~26-kDa protein of Borrelia bissettii (DN127) showed affinity to full-length fH but not to SCR 7 and SCRs19-20. In complement sensitivity assay, both strains-SKT-2 and DN127-were resistant to normal sheep serum. Significant complement resistance of two Borrelia garinii strains (G117 and T25) was also observed; however, none of those strains was able to bind sheep fH. Our study underscores the need of further exploration of fH-mediated evasion of complement system by Borrelia in domestic animals.

  16. Secretion of soluble complement inhibitors factor H and factor H-like protein (FHL-1) by ovarian tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Junnikkala, S; Hakulinen, J; Jarva, H; Manuelian, T; Bjørge, L; Bützow, R; Zipfel, P F; Meri, S

    2002-11-04

    We observed that the soluble complement regulators factor H and factor H-like protein were abundantly present in ascites samples as well as in primary tumours of patients with ovarian cancer. RT-PCR and immunoblotting analyses showed that the two complement inhibitors were constitutively produced by the ovarian tumour cell lines SK-OV-3 and Caov-3, but not PA-1 or SW626 cells. The amounts of factor H-like protein secreted were equal to those of factor H. This is exceptional, because e.g. in normal human serum the concentration of factor H-like protein is below 1/10th of that of factor H. In ascites samples the mean level of factor H-like protein (130+/-55 microg ml(-1)) was 5.5-fold higher than in normal human serum (24+/-3 microg ml(-1)). Ovarian tumour cells thus preferentially synthesise factor H-like protein, the alternatively spliced short variant of factor H. The tumour cells were found to bind both (125)I-labelled factor H and recombinant factor H-like protein to their surfaces. Surprisingly, the culture supernatants of all of the ovarian tumour cell lines studied, including those of PA-1 and SW626 that did not produce factor H/factor H-like protein, promoted factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b to inactive iC3b. Subsequently, the PA-1 and SW626 cell lines were found to secrete a soluble form of the membrane cofactor protein (CD46). Thus, our studies reveal two novel complement resistance mechanisms of ovarian tumour cells: (i) production of factor H-like protein and factor H and (ii) secretion of soluble membrane cofactor protein. Secretion of soluble complement inhibitors could protect ovarian tumour cells against humoral immune attack and pose an obstacle for therapy with monoclonal antibodies.

  17. Systemic Administration of Induced Neural Stem Cells Regulates Complement Activation in Mouse Closed Head Injury Models

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mou; Dong, Qin; Yao, Hui; Lu, Yingzhou; Ji, Xinchao; Zou, Mingming; Yang, Zhijun; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2017-01-01

    Complement activation plays important roles in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Patients face neurological disorders due to the development of complement activation, which contributes to cell apoptosis, brain edema, blood-brain barrier dysfunction and inflammatory infiltration. We previously reported that induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) can promote neurological functional recovery in closed head injury (CHI) animals. Remarkably, we discovered that local iNSC grafts have the potential to modulate CNS inflammation post-CHI. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of systemically delivered iNSCs in complement activation following CNS injury. Our data showed that iNSC grafts decreased the levels of sera C3a and C5a and down-regulated the expression of C3d, C9, active Caspase-3 and Bax in the brain, kidney and lung tissues of CHI mice. Furthermore, iNSC grafts decreased the levels of C3d+/NeuN+, C5b-9+/NeuN+, C3d+/Map2+ and C5b-9+/Map2+ neurons in the injured cortices of CHI mice. Subsequently, we explored the mechanisms underlying these effects. With flow cytometry analysis, we observed a dramatic increase in complement receptor type 1-related protein y (Crry) expression in iNSCs after CHI mouse serum treatment. Moreover, both in vitro and in vivo loss-of-function studies revealed that iNSCs could modulate complement activation via Crry expression. PMID:28383046

  18. Complement is a central mediator of radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and clinical response.

    PubMed

    Surace, Laura; Lysenko, Veronika; Fontana, Andrea Orlando; Cecconi, Virginia; Janssen, Hans; Bicvic, Antonela; Okoniewski, Michal; Pruschy, Martin; Dummer, Reinhard; Neefjes, Jacques; Knuth, Alexander; Gupta, Anurag; van den Broek, Maries

    2015-04-21

    Radiotherapy induces DNA damage and cell death, but recent data suggest that concomitant immune stimulation is an integral part of the therapeutic action of ionizing radiation. It is poorly understood how radiotherapy supports tumor-specific immunity. Here we report that radiotherapy induced tumor cell death and transiently activated complement both in murine and human tumors. The local production of pro-inflammatory anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a was crucial to the tumor response to radiotherapy and concomitant stimulation of tumor-specific immunity. Dexamethasone, a drug frequently given during radiotherapy, limited complement activation and the anti-tumor effects of the immune system. Overall, our findings indicate that anaphylatoxins are key players in radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and the ensuing clinical responses.

  19. Complement-induced thrombus formation on the surface of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-grafted polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, H; Hayashi, K; Yoshikawa, S; Miya, M; Yamamoto, N; Yamashita, I

    1987-01-01

    The role of complement activation in thrombogenesis was investigated on the surface of hydrophilic monomer-graft copolymerized polyethylene (PE) tubes. N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP)-grafted tubes activated in an in vitro complement system of canine serum; but no activation occurred in 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-grafted tubes. The relative patent time for NVP-grafted tubes implanted in canine peripheral veins was shorter than that for HEMA-grafted tubes and adhesion of numerous leucocytes was observed on the luminal surfaces of the NVP-grafted tubes. Decomplementation by prior administration of cobra venom factor elongated the relative patent time for NVP-grafted tubes only and also inhibited the adhesion of leucocytes onto them. These results suggest that the complement activation participates in thrombus formation on the polymer surfaces in canine veins.

  20. The role of complement, platelet-activating factor and leukotriene B4 in a reversed passive Arthus reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A. G.; Norman, K. E.; Donigi-Gale, D.; Shoupe, T. S.; Edwards, R.; Williams, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanisms underlying oedema formation induced in a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction and, for comparison, in response to zymosan in rabbit skin were investigated. 2. Oedema formation at skin sites was quantified by the accumulation of intravenously-injected 125I-labelled human serum albumin. 3. Recombinant soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), administered locally in rabbit skin, suppressed oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by zymosan. 4. The platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonists, WEB 2086 and PF10040 administered locally, inhibited oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by PAF but not by zymosan. 5. A locally administered leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonist, LY-255283, inhibited oedema formation induced by LTB4 but did not inhibit oedema responses to PAF, zymosan or the RPA reaction. 6. The results demonstrate a role for complement in oedema formation in both the RPA reaction and in response to zymosan. An important contribution by PAF is indicated in the RPA reaction but not in response to zymosan whereas no evidence was obtained to suggest a role for LTB4 in either inflammatory response. PMID:1330163

  1. Complement-fixing properties of antinuclear antibodies distinguish drug-induced lupus from systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, R L; Teodorescu, M; Beutner, E H; Plunkett, R W

    2004-01-01

    The immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody (ANA) test has been widely used to monitor autoimmune disease, but its value for diagnostic purposes is compromised by low specificity and high prevalence in disease-free individuals. The capacity of autoantibodies to fix serum complement proteins when bound to antigen is an important effector function because this property is associated with acute and chronic inflammatory processes. The current study evaluates the complement-fixing properties of antinuclear antibodies (CANA) in three well-defined and clinically-related patient groups: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), drug-induced lupus (DIL) and drug-induced autoimmunity (DIA). Of 20 patients diagnosed with SLE, 90% displayed complement-fixing ANA while this feature was present in only two of 18 patients with DIL and no patients with DIA without associated disease even though the mean ANA titres were similar among these patient groups. CANA was significantly correlated with anti-Sm activity. Because SLE but not DIL or DIA can be a life-threatening disease associated with complement consumption in vivo, these results demonstrate that measurement of CANA is a diagnostically useful tool and may have immunopathologic implications.

  2. Structural basis for conserved complement factor-like function in the antimalarial protein TEP1

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Richard H. G.; Chang, Chung-I; Chelliah, Yogarany; Blandin, Stéphanie; Levashina, Elena A.; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2007-01-01

    Thioester-containing proteins (TEPs) are a major component of the innate immune response of insects to invasion by bacteria and protozoa. TEPs form a distinct clade of a superfamily that includes the pan-protease inhibitors α2-macroglobulins and vertebrate complement factors. The essential feature of these proteins is a sequestered thioester bond that, after cleavage in a protease-sensitive region of the protein, is activated and covalently binds to its target. Recently, TEP1 from the malarial vector Anopheles gambiae was shown to mediate recognition and killing of ookinetes from the malarial parasite Plasmodium berghei, a model for the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Here, we present the crystal structure of the TEP1 isoform TEP1r. Although the overall protein fold of TEP1r resembles that of complement factor C3, the TEP1r domains are repositioned to stabilize the inactive conformation of the molecule (containing an intact thioester) in the absence of the anaphylotoxin domain, a central component of complement factors. The structure of TEP1r provides a molecular basis for the differences between TEP1 alleles TEP1r and TEP1s, which correlate with resistance of A. gambiae to infection by P. berghei. PMID:17606907

  3. Expression and Subcellular Targeting of Human Complement Factor C5a in Nicotiana species

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Henrik; Mischofsky, Heike; Koslowski, Roswitha; Meyer, Udo; Broer, Inge; Huckauf, Jana

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated transgenic tobacco plants as an alternative to Escherichia coli for the production of recombinant human complement factor 5a (C5a). C5a has not been expressed in plants before and is highly unstable in vivo in its native form, so it was necessary to establish the most suitable subcellular targeting strategy. We used the strong and constitutive CaMV 35S promoter to drive transgene expression and compared three different subcellular compartments. The yields of C5a in the T0 transgenic plants were low in terms of the proportion of total soluble protein (TSP) when targeted to the apoplast (0.0002% TSP) or endoplasmic reticulum (0.0003% TSP) but was one order of magnitude higher when targeted to the vacuole (0.001% TSP). The yields could be increased by conventional breeding (up to 0.014% TSP in the T2 generation). C5a accumulated to the same level in seeds and leaves when targeted to the apoplast but was up to 1.7-fold more abundant in the seeds when targeted to the ER or vacuole, although this difference was less striking in the better-performing lines. When yields were calculated as an amount per gram fresh weight of transgenic plant tissue, the vacuole targeting strategy was clearly more efficient in seeds, reaching 35.8 µg C5a per gram of fresh seed weight compared to 10.62 µg C5a per gram fresh weight of leaves. Transient expression of C5aER and C5aVac in N. benthamiana, using MagnICON vectors, reached up to 0.2% and 0.7% of TSP, respectively, but was accompanied by cytotoxic effects and induced leaf senescence. Western blot of the plant extracts revealed a band matching the corresponding glycosylated native protein and the bioassay demonstrated that recombinant C5a was biologically active. PMID:23285250

  4. A complement-microglial axis drives synapse loss during virus-induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Vasek, Michael J; Garber, Charise; Dorsey, Denise; Durrant, Douglas M; Bollman, Bryan; Soung, Allison; Yu, Jinsheng; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Frouin, Arnaud; Wilton, Daniel K; Funk, Kristen; DeMasters, Bette K; Jiang, Xiaoping; Bowen, James R; Mennerick, Steven; Robinson, John K; Garbow, Joel R; Tyler, Kenneth L; Suthar, Mehul S; Schmidt, Robert E; Stevens, Beth; Klein, Robyn S

    2016-06-23

    Over 50% of patients who survive neuroinvasive infection with West Nile virus (WNV) exhibit chronic cognitive sequelae. Although thousands of cases of WNV-mediated memory dysfunction accrue annually, the mechanisms responsible for these impairments are unknown. The classical complement cascade, a key component of innate immune pathogen defence, mediates synaptic pruning by microglia during early postnatal development. Here we show that viral infection of adult hippocampal neurons induces complement-mediated elimination of presynaptic terminals in a murine WNV neuroinvasive disease model. Inoculation of WNV-NS5-E218A, a WNV with a mutant NS5(E218A) protein leads to survival rates and cognitive dysfunction that mirror human WNV neuroinvasive disease. WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice (recovery defined as survival after acute infection) display impaired spatial learning and persistence of phagocytic microglia without loss of hippocampal neurons or volume. Hippocampi from WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice with poor spatial learning show increased expression of genes that drive synaptic remodelling by microglia via complement. C1QA was upregulated and localized to microglia, infected neurons and presynaptic terminals during WNV neuroinvasive disease. Murine and human WNV neuroinvasive disease post-mortem samples exhibit loss of hippocampal CA3 presynaptic terminals, and murine studies revealed microglial engulfment of presynaptic terminals during acute infection and after recovery. Mice with fewer microglia (Il34(-/-) mice with a deficiency in IL-34 production) or deficiency in complement C3 or C3a receptor were protected from WNV-induced synaptic terminal loss. Our study provides a new murine model of WNV-induced spatial memory impairment, and identifies a potential mechanism underlying neurocognitive impairment in patients recovering from WNV neuroinvasive disease.

  5. Cysteine Proteinase from Streptococcus pyogenes Enables Evasion of Innate Immunity via Degradation of Complement Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Ogawa, Taiji; Terao, Yutaka; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Ikebe, Kazunori; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen that causes invasive diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis, sepsis, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. We investigated the function of a major cysteine protease from S. pyogenes that affects the amount of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) and other complement factors and aimed to elucidate the mechanism involved in occurrence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome from the aspect of the complement system. First, we revealed that culture supernatant of a given S. pyogenes strain and recombinant SpeB degraded the C1-INH. Then, we determined the N-terminal sequence of the C1-INH fragment degraded by recombinant SpeB. Interestingly, the region containing one of the identified cleavage sites is not present in patients with C1-INH deficiency. Scanning electron microscopy of the speB mutant incubated in human serum showed the abnormal superficial architecture and irregular oval structure. Furthermore, unlike the wild-type strain, that mutant strain showed lower survival capacity than normal as compared with heat-inactivated serum, whereas it had a significantly higher survival rate in serum without the C1-INH than in normal serum. Also, SpeB degraded multiple complement factors and the membrane attack complex. Flow cytometric analyses revealed deposition of C9, one of the components of membrane the attack complex, in greater amounts on the surface of the speB mutant, whereas lower amounts of C9 were bound to the wild-type strain surface. These results suggest that SpeB can interrupt the human complement system via degrading the C1-INH, thus enabling S. pyogenes to evade eradication in a hostile environment. PMID:23589297

  6. Complement factor I from flatfish half-smooth tongue (Cynoglossus semilaevis) exhibited anti-microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jinsong; Li, Xihong; Chen, Yadong; Lu, Yang; Yu, Mengjun; Chen, Xuejie; Zhang, Wenting; Zeng, Yan; Sun, Luming; Chen, Songlin; Sha, Zhenxia

    2015-11-01

    Complement factor I (Cfi) is a soluble serine protease which plays a crucial role in the modulation of complement cascades. In the presence of substrate modulating cofactors (such as complement factor H, C4bp, CR1, etc), Cfi cleaves and inactivates C3b and C4b, thereby controlling the complement-mediated processes. In this study, we sequenced and characterized Cfi gene from Cynoglossus Semilaevis (designated as CsCfi) for the first time. The full-length cDNA of CsCfi was 2230 bp in length, including a 98 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 164 bp 3'-UTR and a 1968 bp open reading frame (ORF). It encoded a polypeptide of 656 amino acids, with a molecular mass of 72.28 kDa and an isoelectric point of 7.71. A signal peptide was defined at N-terminus, resulting in a 626-residue mature protein. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that Cfi proteins were well conserved with the typical modular architecture and identical active sites throughout the vertebrates, which suggested the conserved function of Cfi. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CsCfi and the homologous Cfi sequences from teleosts clustered into a clade, separating from another clade from the cartilaginous fish and other vertebrates. Tissue expression profile analysis by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that CsCfi mRNA constitutively expressed in all tested tissues, with the predominant expression in liver and the lowest in stomach. Temporal expression levels of CsCfi after challenging with Vibrio anguillarum showed different expression patterns in intestine, spleen, skin, blood, head kidney and liver. The recombinant CsCfi (rCsCfi) protein showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities against the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shewanella putrefaciens. The research revealed that CsCfi plays an important role in C. Semilaevis immunity.

  7. Cysteine proteinase from Streptococcus pyogenes enables evasion of innate immunity via degradation of complement factors.

    PubMed

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Ogawa, Taiji; Terao, Yutaka; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Ikebe, Kazunori; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-05-31

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen that causes invasive diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis, sepsis, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. We investigated the function of a major cysteine protease from S. pyogenes that affects the amount of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) and other complement factors and aimed to elucidate the mechanism involved in occurrence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome from the aspect of the complement system. First, we revealed that culture supernatant of a given S. pyogenes strain and recombinant SpeB degraded the C1-INH. Then, we determined the N-terminal sequence of the C1-INH fragment degraded by recombinant SpeB. Interestingly, the region containing one of the identified cleavage sites is not present in patients with C1-INH deficiency. Scanning electron microscopy of the speB mutant incubated in human serum showed the abnormal superficial architecture and irregular oval structure. Furthermore, unlike the wild-type strain, that mutant strain showed lower survival capacity than normal as compared with heat-inactivated serum, whereas it had a significantly higher survival rate in serum without the C1-INH than in normal serum. Also, SpeB degraded multiple complement factors and the membrane attack complex. Flow cytometric analyses revealed deposition of C9, one of the components of membrane the attack complex, in greater amounts on the surface of the speB mutant, whereas lower amounts of C9 were bound to the wild-type strain surface. These results suggest that SpeB can interrupt the human complement system via degrading the C1-INH, thus enabling S. pyogenes to evade eradication in a hostile environment.

  8. Targeting Complement in Treatment of Intestinal Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    Polysaccharide Factor D sCR1 Crry-Ig C1 Inh sCR1 Crry-Ig C5a Anti-C5 C5aRa FIGURE 4. MESENTERIC IR STUDIES USING COMPLEMENT INHIBITORS. 6.0...summarized in Fig.4). Using a rat model of intestinal IR, several groups showed that administration of sCR1 , a regulator of both classical and alternative

  9. Complement component C5 deficiency reduces edema formation in murine ligation-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Merriam, L T; Webster, C; Joehl, R J

    1997-01-01

    The complement cascade is activated in humans and animals with acute pancreatitis. Activation of complement component C5 liberates C5a, C5a-desarg, and terminal complement complexes (TCCs) that increase capillary permeability, edema, and leukocyte chemotaxis at injured sites. Complement activation plays a major role in pathogenesis of capillary leak and edema formation in severe acute pancreatitis; however, the contribution of C5 (C5a/C5a-desarg, TCCs) has not been defined. Using He gene mutant mice lacking circulating C5, the role of C5 in ligation-induced acute pancreatitis was evaluated. We performed the following experiments: C5-sufficient (Hc1/Hc1) and C5-deficient (Hc0/Hc0) mice had bile and pancreatic ducts ligated. Sham-operated mice had ducts dissected but not ligated. Mice were killed at 4, 8, and 24 hr after bilepancreatic duct ligation. Serologic and morphologic evidences of acute pancreatitis were evaluated. Pancreatic edema was assessed using analysis of pancreatic water content, histologic edema score, and determination of wet weight ratio. After 4, 8, and 24 hr of bile-pancreatic duct ligation, hyperamylasemia and histologic changes of acute pancreatitis were observed in both C5-deficient and C5-sufficient mice. Edema developed in all mice with acute pancreatitis. However, when compared to C5-sufficient mice, mice deficient in C5 developed significantly less pancreatic edema at both 8 and 24 hr of bile-pancreatic duct ligation. This difference was not observed 4 hr after induction of acute pancreatitis. We conclude that C5 contributes to edema formation in murine ligation-induced acute pancreatitis. The presence of an early C5-independent phase, in conjunction with the observation of significant edema in mice deficient in C5, suggests there are other mediators of edema formation in this acute pancreatitis model.

  10. Inhibition of the activation of Hageman factor (factor XII) by complement subcomponent C1q.

    PubMed

    Rehmus, E H; Greene, B M; Everson, B A; Ratnoff, O D

    1987-08-01

    Hageman factor (HF, Factor XII) is activated by glass, collagen, and ellagic acid, and initiates blood coagulation via the intrinsic pathway. C1q inhibits collagen-induced platelet aggregation and adherence of platelets to glass, effects attributable to the collagen-like region of C1q. We examined the actions of C1q on HF activation. Incubation of C1q with HF before addition of HF-deficient plasma extended the activated partial thromboplastin time. Similarly, when glass tubes were coated with C1q before testing, the partial thromboplastin time of normal plasma was increased. C1q reduced the activation of HF by ellagic acid, as measured by the release of p-nitroaniline from the synthetic substrate H-D-prolyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide dihydrochloride, an effect inhibited by monoclonal anti-human C1q murine IgG and by digestion of C1q by collagenase. Thus, C1q inhibits activation of HF in vitro in clot-promoting and amidolytic assays and suggests a regulatory mechanism for the inhibition of coagulation.

  11. Inhibition of the activation of Hageman factor (factor XII) by complement subcomponent C1q.

    PubMed Central

    Rehmus, E H; Greene, B M; Everson, B A; Ratnoff, O D

    1987-01-01

    Hageman factor (HF, Factor XII) is activated by glass, collagen, and ellagic acid, and initiates blood coagulation via the intrinsic pathway. C1q inhibits collagen-induced platelet aggregation and adherence of platelets to glass, effects attributable to the collagen-like region of C1q. We examined the actions of C1q on HF activation. Incubation of C1q with HF before addition of HF-deficient plasma extended the activated partial thromboplastin time. Similarly, when glass tubes were coated with C1q before testing, the partial thromboplastin time of normal plasma was increased. C1q reduced the activation of HF by ellagic acid, as measured by the release of p-nitroaniline from the synthetic substrate H-D-prolyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide dihydrochloride, an effect inhibited by monoclonal anti-human C1q murine IgG and by digestion of C1q by collagenase. Thus, C1q inhibits activation of HF in vitro in clot-promoting and amidolytic assays and suggests a regulatory mechanism for the inhibition of coagulation. PMID:3038961

  12. Complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation successfully treated with eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Akira; Ueda, Taichiro; Miyakawa, Yoshitaka; Ochiai, Hidenobu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Secondary thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) are induced by several underlying conditions; most are resolved by treating background disease. Eculizumab is a human monoclonal antibody that blocks the final stage of the complement system and effectively treats atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). In this report, we present a patient with TMA secondary to sepsis- induced coagulopathy, who was successfully treated with eculizumab. A 44-year-old woman, who had no special medical history or familial history of TMAs, was admitted on suspicion of septic shock. Physical examination revealed gangrene on her soles. Blood tests revealed a decreased platelet count, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), renal dysfunction, hemolysis, and infection. Although the coagulation disorder improved with intensive care, the low platelet count, elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels, and renal dysfunction persisted. Our investigations subsequently excluded thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli-induced HUS. Plasma exchange only improved lactate dehydrogenase levels. We clinically diagnosed this case as atypical HUS and started eculizumab treatment. The patient's platelet count increased, her renal dysfunction improved, and the gangrene on her feet was ameliorated. The patient was discharged without maintenance dialysis therapy after approximately 3 months. Subsequent tests revealed elevated serum levels of soluble C5b-9, and genetic testing revealed compound heterozygous c.184G > A (Val62Ile) and c.1204T > C (Tyr402His) single-nucleotide polymorphisms in complement factor H. We encountered a case of complement-mediated TMA accompanied by DIC, which was successfully treated with eculizumab. Further studies are necessary to support the optimal use of eculizumab for TMA with background diseases. PMID:28178155

  13. Complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation successfully treated with eculizumab: A case report.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Akira; Ueda, Taichiro; Miyakawa, Yoshitaka; Ochiai, Hidenobu

    2017-02-01

    Secondary thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) are induced by several underlying conditions; most are resolved by treating background disease. Eculizumab is a human monoclonal antibody that blocks the final stage of the complement system and effectively treats atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). In this report, we present a patient with TMA secondary to sepsis- induced coagulopathy, who was successfully treated with eculizumab.A 44-year-old woman, who had no special medical history or familial history of TMAs, was admitted on suspicion of septic shock. Physical examination revealed gangrene on her soles. Blood tests revealed a decreased platelet count, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), renal dysfunction, hemolysis, and infection. Although the coagulation disorder improved with intensive care, the low platelet count, elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels, and renal dysfunction persisted. Our investigations subsequently excluded thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli-induced HUS. Plasma exchange only improved lactate dehydrogenase levels. We clinically diagnosed this case as atypical HUS and started eculizumab treatment. The patient's platelet count increased, her renal dysfunction improved, and the gangrene on her feet was ameliorated. The patient was discharged without maintenance dialysis therapy after approximately 3 months. Subsequent tests revealed elevated serum levels of soluble C5b-9, and genetic testing revealed compound heterozygous c.184G > A (Val62Ile) and c.1204T > C (Tyr402His) single-nucleotide polymorphisms in complement factor H.We encountered a case of complement-mediated TMA accompanied by DIC, which was successfully treated with eculizumab. Further studies are necessary to support the optimal use of eculizumab for TMA with background diseases.

  14. Association Between Growth of Geographic Atrophy and the Complement Factor I Locus.

    PubMed

    Yehoshua, Zohar; de Amorim Garcia Filho, Carlos Alexandre; Nunes, Renata Portella; Gregori, Giovanni; Penha, Fernando M; Moshfeghi, Andrew A; Luo, Hongrong; Kang, Zhang; Sadda, SriniVas; Feuer, William; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    The association between the growth of geographic atrophy (GA) and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the complement factor I (CFI) locus was investigated in the COMPLETE trial. Growth of GA at 52 weeks in eyes without the CFI at-risk allele was slightly faster than the growth in eyes with the CFI at-risk allele (P ≥ .72). The authors of the current study found that in contrast to the faster growth rate reported in CFI-positive eyes from the MAHALO trial, the CFI positive eyes in the COMPLETE trial did not grow faster, and this analysis included 24 eyes that met the MAHALO eligibility criteria.

  15. Insights into complement convertase formation based on the structure of the factor B-cobra venom factor complex.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Bert J C; Gomes, Lucio; Koning, Roman I; Svergun, Dmitri I; Koster, Abraham J; Fritzinger, David C; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Gros, Piet

    2009-08-19

    Immune protection by the complement system critically depends on assembly of C3 convertases on the surface of pathogens and altered host cells. These short-lived protease complexes are formed through pro-convertases, which for the alternative pathway consist of the complement component C3b and the pro-enzyme factor B (FB). Here, we present the crystal structure at 2.2-A resolution, small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy (EM) data of the pro-convertase formed by human FB and cobra venom factor (CVF), a potent homologue of C3b that generates more stable convertases. FB is loaded onto CVF through its pro-peptide Ba segment by specific contacts, which explain the specificity for the homologous C3b over the native C3 and inactive products iC3b and C3c. The protease segment Bb binds the carboxy terminus of CVF through the metal-ion dependent adhesion site of the Von Willebrand factor A-type domain. A possible dynamic equilibrium between a 'loading' and 'activation' state of the pro-convertase may explain the observed difference between the crystal structure of CVFB and the EM structure of C3bB. These insights into formation of convertases provide a basis for further development of complement therapeutics.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of a complement-depleting factor from king cobra, Ophiophagus hannah.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Sun, Qian-Yun; Jin, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2012-09-01

    Cobra venom factor (CVF) is an anti-complement factor existing in cobra venom. CVF proteins have been purified from the venoms of Naja haje, Naja siamensis, Naja atra, Naja kaouthia, Naja naja, Naja melanoleuca and Austrelaps superbus, but only three full-length cDNA sequences of CVF are available. In the present work, a cobra venom factor termed OVF was purified from the crude venom of Ophiophagus hannah by successive gel filtration, ion-exchange and heparin affinity chromatography steps. The purified OVF was homogenous on the SDS-PAGE gel with an apparent molecular weight of 140 kDa under non-reducing conditions. Under reducing conditions, OVF was divided into three bands with apparent molecular weight of 72 kDa (α chain), 45 kDa (β chain) and 32 kDa (γ chain), respectively. OVF consumed complement components with anti-complement activity of 154 units per mg. By using Reverse transcription-PCR and 5'-RACE assay, the open reading frame of OVF was obtained. MALDI-TOF and protein sequencing assays confirmed the cloned cDNA coding for OVF protein. The cDNA sequence of OVF is conservative when aligned with that of other CVFs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed OVF is closer to CVF from N. kaouthia than to AVF-1 and AVF-2 from A. superbus. Our results demonstrated that OVF has its unique features as following: 1) The N-terminal amino acid sequence of OVF γ chain is different from that of other known CVFs, suggesting that the OVF γ chain might be further processed; 2) Unlike N. kaouthia CVF and A. superbus AVF-1, which have potential N-linked glycosylation sites located in both α and β chain, OVF only has N-linked glycosylation site in its α chain as revealed by Schiff's reagent staining and protein sequence analysis; 3) In addition to the 27 well conserved cysteine residues in all known CVFs, OVF have an additional cysteine residue in its γ chain. Understanding the importance of above mentioned specific characteristics might provide useful information on structure

  17. New complementation constructs for inducible and constitutive gene expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Meghan E; Hackett, Kathleen T; Kotha, Chaitra; Dillard, Joseph P

    2012-05-01

    We have created new complementation constructs for use in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis. The constructs contain regions of homology with the chromosome and direct the insertion of a gene of interest into the intergenic region between the genes iga and trpB. In order to increase the available options for gene expression in Neisseria, we designed the constructs to contain one of three different promoters. One of the constructs contains the isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside-inducible lac promoter, which has been widely used in Neisseria. We also designed a construct that contains the strong, constitutive promoter from the gonococcal opaB gene. The third construct contains a tetracycline-inducible promoter, a novel use of this promoter in Neisseria. We demonstrate that anhydrotetracycline can be used to induce gene expression in the pathogenic Neisseria at very low concentrations and without negatively affecting the growth of the organisms. We use these constructs to complement an arginine auxotrophy in N. gonorrhoeae as well as to express a translational fusion of alkaline phosphatase with TraW. TraW is a component of the gonococcal type IV secretion system, and we demonstrate that TraW localizes to the periplasm.

  18. Single channel currents induced by complement in antibody-coated cell membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M B; Stephens, C L; Lecar, H

    1981-01-01

    An extracellular patch electrode was used to record ionic currents from individual complement-induced channels in the membranes of antibody-coated skeletal muscle. The amplitude of the single-channel currents leads to an estimate of 90 pS for the unit conductance. The kinetics of channel opening and closing show marked variability and complexity. Channels flicker open and closed repeatedly, indicating that once these lesions form, they undergo rapid structural transitions between discrete conducting and nonconducting states. Images PMID:6273870

  19. Activation of the endothelium by IL-1 alpha and glucocorticoids results in major increase of complement C3 and factor B production and generation of C3a.

    PubMed Central

    Coulpier, M; Andreev, S; Lemercier, C; Dauchel, H; Lees, O; Fontaine, M; Ripoche, J

    1995-01-01

    Constitutive secretion of complement C3 and factor B by the endothelial cell (EC) is lowered by therapeutic concentrations of glucocorticoids such as hydrocortisone or dexamethasone, whereas regulatory protein factor H production is increased by these hormones. In contrast, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 alpha has a stimulatory effect on C3 and factor B secretion by the endothelium and an inhibitory effect on factor H secretion. In this study, we examined the combined effect of IL-1 alpha and glucocorticoids on C3 and factor B expression by the endothelial cell. When dexamethasone or hydrocortisone were added to IL-1 alpha, significant potentialization of IL-1 alpha-induced stimulation of C3 and factor B production was observed, occurring at various concentrations of either stimuli. Dose-response experiments indicate that, in vitro, optimal concentrations are in the range of 10(-7) to 10(-5) M for dexamethasone and 50-200 U for IL-1 alpha. In contrast, dexamethasone counteracts, in an additive way, the inhibitory effect of IL-1 alpha on regulatory complement protein factor H production by EC. Such a potentialization between glucocorticoids and IL-1 alpha was not observed for another marker of endothelial activation, IL-1 alpha-induced stimulation of coagulation tissue factor expression. The association of glucocorticoids and IL-1 alpha therefore appears to be a specific and major stimulus for the secretion of complement C3 and factor B, two acute-phase proteins, by the endothelium. As a result of the in vitro endothelium stimulation by glucocorticoids and IL-1 alpha, C3a is generated in the vicinity of the endothelial cell. This study further suggests that complement activation, with its deleterious consequences, may result from the stimulation of endothelium in situations where high levels of IL-1 alpha and endogenous glucocorticoids coexist, such as in septic shock. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:7621583

  20. Maternal Haploids Are Preferentially Induced by CENH3-tailswap Transgenic Complementation in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Kelliher, Timothy; Starr, Dakota; Wang, Wenling; McCuiston, Jamie; Zhong, Heng; Nuccio, Michael L.; Martin, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Doubled haploid plants are invaluable breeding tools but many crop species are recalcitrant to available haploid induction techniques. To test if haploid inducer lines can be engineered into crops, CENH3−∕− and CENH3:RNAi lines were complemented by AcGREEN-tailswap-CENH3 or AcGREEN-CENH3 transgenes. Haploid induction rates were determined following testcrosses to wild-type plants after independently controlling for inducer parent sex and transgene zygosity. CENH3 fusion proteins were localized to centromeres and did not cause vegetative defects or male sterility. CENH3:RNAi lines did not demonstrate consistent knockdown and rarely produced haploids. In contrast, many of the complemented CENH3−∕− lines produced haploids at low frequencies. The rate of gynogenic haploid induction reached a maximum of 3.6% in several hemizygous individuals when backcrossed as males. These results demonstrate that CENH3-tailswap transgenes can be used to engineer in vivo haploid induction systems into maize plants. PMID:27066050

  1. Regulation of Cre recombinase by ligand-induced complementation of inactive fragments

    PubMed Central

    Jullien, Nicolas; Sampieri, François; Enjalbert, Alain; Herman, Jean-Paul

    2003-01-01

    Cre recombinase is extensively used to engineer the genome of experimental animals. However, its usefulness is still limited by the lack of an efficient temporal control over its activity. To overcome this, we have developed DiCre, a regulatable fragment complementation system for Cre. The enzyme was split into two moieties that were fused to FKBP12 (FK506-binding protein) and FRB (binding domain of the FKBP12–rapamycin-associated protein), respectively. These can be efficiently heterodimerized by rapamycin. Several variants, based on splitting Cre at different sites and using different linker peptides, were tested in an indicator cell line. The fusion proteins, taken separately, had no recombinase activity. Stable transformants, co-expressing complementing fragments based on splitting Cre between Asn59 and Asn60, displayed low background activity affecting 0.05–0.4% of the cells. Rapamycin induced a rapid recombination, reaching 100% by 48–72 h, with an EC50 of 0.02 nM. Thus, ligand-induced dimerization can efficiently regulate Cre, and should be useful to achieve a tight temporal control of its activity, such as in the case of the creation of conditional knock-out animals. PMID:14576331

  2. Regulation of Cre recombinase by ligand-induced complementation of inactive fragments.

    PubMed

    Jullien, Nicolas; Sampieri, François; Enjalbert, Alain; Herman, Jean-Paul

    2003-11-01

    Cre recombinase is extensively used to engineer the genome of experimental animals. However, its usefulness is still limited by the lack of an efficient temporal control over its activity. To overcome this, we have developed DiCre, a regulatable fragment complementation system for Cre. The enzyme was split into two moieties that were fused to FKBP12 (FK506-binding protein) and FRB (binding domain of the FKBP12-rapamycin-associated protein), respectively. These can be efficiently heterodimerized by rapamycin. Several variants, based on splitting Cre at different sites and using different linker peptides, were tested in an indicator cell line. The fusion proteins, taken separately, had no recombinase activity. Stable transformants, co-expressing complementing fragments based on splitting Cre between Asn59 and Asn60, displayed low background activity affecting 0.05-0.4% of the cells. Rapamycin induced a rapid recombination, reaching 100% by 48-72 h, with an EC50 of 0.02 nM. Thus, ligand-induced dimerization can efficiently regulate Cre, and should be useful to achieve a tight temporal control of its activity, such as in the case of the creation of conditional knock-out animals.

  3. Malaria parasites co-opt human factor H to prevent complement-mediated lysis in the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Simon, Nina; Lasonder, Edwin; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Kuehn, Andrea; Tews, Sabrina; Fischer, Rainer; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Pradel, Gabriele

    2013-01-16

    Human complement is a first line defense against infection in which circulating proteins initiate an enzyme cascade on the microbial surface that leads to phagocytosis and lysis. Various pathogens evade complement recognition by binding to regulator proteins that protect host cells from complement activation. We show that emerging gametes of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum bind the host complement regulator factor H (FH) following transmission to the mosquito to protect from complement-mediated lysis by the blood meal. Human complement is active in the mosquito midgut for approximately 1 hr postfeeding. During this period, the gamete surface protein PfGAP50 binds to FH and uses surface-bound FH to inactivate the complement protein C3b. Loss of FH-mediated protection, either through neutralization of FH or blockade of PfGAP50, significantly impairs gametogenesis and inhibits parasite transmission to the mosquito. Thus, Plasmodium co-opts the protective host protein FH to evade complement-mediated lysis within the mosquito midgut.

  4. Complement and the Alternative Pathway Play an Important Role in LPS/D-GalN-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangyu; Zhou, Xiaojun; Li, Junfeng; Hu, Jingya; Yu, Hong; Chen, Yu; Song, Hongbin; Qiao, Fei; Xu, Guilian; Yang, Fei; Wu, Yuzhang; Tomlinson, Stephen; Duan, Zhongping; Zhou, Yusen

    2011-01-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is a clinically severe type of liver injury with an extremely high mortality rate. Although the pathological mechanisms of FHF are not well understood, evidence suggests that the complement system is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders. In the present study, to investigate the role of complement in FHF, we examined groups of mice following intraperitoneal injection of LPS/D-GalN: wild-type C57BL/6 mice, wild-type mice treated with a C3aR antagonist, C5aR monoclonal antibody (C5aRmAb) or CR2-Factor H (CR2-fH, an inhibitor of the alternative pathway), and C3 deficient mice (C3−/− mice). The animals were euthanized and samples analyzed at specific times after LPS/D-GalN injection. The results show that intraperitoneal administration of LPS/D-GalN activated the complement pathway, as evidenced by the hepatic deposition of C3 and C5b-9 and elevated serum levels of the complement activation product C3a, the level of which was associated with the severity of the liver damage. C3a receptor (C3aR) and C5a receptor (C5aR) expression was also upregulated. Compared with wild-type mice, C3−/− mice survived significantly longer and displayed reduced liver inflammation and attenuated pathological damage following LPS/D-GalN injection. Similar levels of protection were seen in mice treated with C3aR antagonist,C5aRmAb or CR2-fH. These data indicate an important role for the C3a and C5a generated by the alternative pathway in LPS/D-GalN-induced FHF. The data further suggest that complement inhibition may be an effective strategy for the adjunctive treatment of fulminant hepatic failure. PMID:22069473

  5. Isolation of two molecular populations of human complement factor H by hydrophobic affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Ripoche, J; Al Salihi, A; Rousseaux, J; Fontaine, M

    1984-01-01

    Human complement factor H was prepared in highly purified form from fresh serum by euglobulin precipitation, DEAE-Sephacel chromatography and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration. This preparation allowed the recovery of 37% of the initial factor H. Sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis revealed that factor H was homogeneous both in reduced and non-reduced media and exhibited a molecular mass of 150 kDa. Charge-shift experiments clearly showed the presence of hydrophobic sites in the factor H molecule. Charge shifts were observed with two detergent systems (Triton/sodium deoxycholate and Triton/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide). Factor H was able to bind to phenyl-Sepharose. This property allowed us to study two populations of factor H. These two populations exhibited the same physicochemical parameters, but revealed differences in their ability to aggregate in low- and iso-ionic-strength media. The molecular basis and biological significance of this heterogeneity are discussed. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6235808

  6. Structural basis for complement factor H–linked age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Beverly E.; Johnson, Steven; Roversi, Pietro; Herbert, Andrew P.; Blaum, Bärbel S.; Tyrrell, Jess; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Clark, Simon J.; Tarelli, Edward; Uhrín, Dušan; Barlow, Paul N.; Sim, Robert B.; Day, Anthony J.; Lea, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Nearly 50 million people worldwide suffer from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which causes severe loss of central vision. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the gene for the complement regulator factor H (FH), which causes a Tyr-to-His substitution at position 402, is linked to ∼50% of attributable risks for AMD. We present the crystal structure of the region of FH containing the polymorphic amino acid His402 in complex with an analogue of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) that localize the complement regulator on the cell surface. The structure demonstrates direct coordination of ligand by the disease-associated polymorphic residue, providing a molecular explanation of the genetic observation. This glycan-binding site occupies the center of an extended interaction groove on the regulator's surface, implying multivalent binding of sulfated GAGs. This finding is confirmed by structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, nuclear magnetic resonance–monitored binding experiments performed for both H402 and Y402 variants with this and another model GAG, and analysis of an extended GAG–FH complex. PMID:17893204

  7. Interaction of Leptospira elongation factor Tu with plasminogen and complement factor H: a metabolic leptospiral protein with moonlighting activities.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Danielly G; Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica M; Abe, Cecília M; Monaris, Denize; Morais, Zenaide M; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Sílvio A; Isaac, Lourdes; Abreu, Patrícia A E; Barbosa, Angela S

    2013-01-01

    The elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), an abundant bacterial protein involved in protein synthesis, has been shown to display moonlighting activities. Known to perform more than one function at different times or in different places, it is found in several subcellular locations in a single organism, and may serve as a virulence factor in a range of important human pathogens. Here we demonstrate that Leptospira EF-Tu is surface-exposed and performs additional roles as a cell-surface receptor for host plasma proteins. It binds plasminogen in a dose-dependent manner, and lysine residues are critical for this interaction. Bound plasminogen is converted to active plasmin, which, in turn, is able to cleave the natural substrates C3b and fibrinogen. Leptospira EF-Tu also acquires the complement regulator Factor H (FH). FH bound to immobilized EF-Tu displays cofactor activity, mediating C3b degradation by Factor I (FI). In this manner, EF-Tu may contribute to leptospiral tissue invasion and complement inactivation. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a leptospiral protein exhibiting moonlighting activities.

  8. Characterization of a Factor H Mutation That Perturbs the Alternative Pathway of Complement in a Family with Membranoproliferative GN

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Edwin K.S.; Anderson, Holly E.; Herbert, Andrew P.; Challis, Rachel C.; Brown, Paul; Reis, Geisilaine S.; Tellez, James O.; Strain, Lisa; Fluck, Nicholas; Humphrey, Ann; Macleod, Alison; Richards, Anna; Ahlert, Daniel; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Barlow, Paul N.; Marchbank, Kevin J.; Harris, Claire L.; Goodship, Timothy H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Complement C3 activation is a characteristic finding in membranoproliferative GN (MPGN). This activation can be caused by immune complex deposition or an acquired or inherited defect in complement regulation. Deficiency of complement factor H has long been associated with MPGN. More recently, heterozygous genetic variants have been reported in sporadic cases of MPGN, although their functional significance has not been assessed. We describe a family with MPGN and acquired partial lipodystrophy. Although C3 nephritic factor was shown in family members with acquired partial lipodystrophy, it did not segregate with the renal phenotype. Genetic analysis revealed a novel heterozygous mutation in complement factor H (R83S) in addition to known risk polymorphisms carried by individuals with MPGN. Patients with MPGN had normal levels of factor H, and structural analysis of the mutant revealed only subtle alterations. However, functional analysis revealed profoundly reduced C3b binding, cofactor activity, and decay accelerating activity leading to loss of regulation of the alternative pathway. In summary, this family showed a confluence of common and rare functionally significant genetic risk factors causing disease. Data from our analysis of these factors highlight the role of the alternative pathway of complement in MPGN. PMID:24722444

  9. Activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 signaling induces CD46 expression and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Ralf; Huang, Mei; Gritsko, Tanya; Karras, Jim; Enkemann, Steve; Mesa, Tania; Nam, Sangkil; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard

    2007-08-01

    CD46 is one of the complement-regulatory proteins expressed on the surface of normal and tumor cells for protection against complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Cancer cells need to access the blood circulation for continued growth and metastasis, thus exposing themselves to destruction by complement system components. Previous studies have established that the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor is persistently activated in a wide variety of human cancer cells and primary tumor tissues compared with their normal counterparts. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we identified the CD46 gene as a target for activated STAT3 signaling in human breast and prostate cancer cells. The CD46 promoter contains two binding sites for activated STAT3 and mutations introduced into the major site abolished STAT3 binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirms binding of STAT3 to the CD46 promoter. CD46 promoter activity is induced by activation of STAT3 and blocked by a dominant-negative form of STAT3 in luciferase reporter assays. CD46 mRNA expression is induced by interleukin-6 and by transient transfection of normal human epithelial cells with a persistently active mutant construct of STAT3, STAT3C. Furthermore, we show that inhibition of STAT3-mediated CD46 cell surface expression sensitizes DU145 prostate cancer cells to cytotoxicity in an in vitro complement lysis assay using rabbit anti-DU145 antiserum and rabbit complement. These results show that activated STAT3 signaling induces the CD46 promoter and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity, suggesting a potential mechanism whereby oncogenic signaling contributes to tumor cell evasion of antibody-mediated immunity.

  10. Production and functional activity of a recombinant von Willebrand factor-A domain from human complement factor B.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S C; Hinshelwood, J; Perkins, S J; Sim, R B

    1999-01-01

    Factor B is a five-domain 90 kDa serine protease proenzyme which is part of the human serum complement system. It binds to other complement proteins C3b and properdin, and is activated by the protease factor D. The fourth domain of factor B is homologous to the type A domain of von Willebrand Factor (vWF-A). A full-length human factor B cDNA clone was used to amplify the region encoding the vWF-A domain (amino acids 229-444 of factor B). A fusion protein expression system was then used to generate it in high yield in Escherichia coli, where thrombin cleavage was used to separate the vWF-A domain from its fusion protein partner. A second vWF-A domain with improved stability and solubility was created using a Cys(267)-->Ser mutation and a four-residue C-terminal extension of the first vWF-A domain. The recombinant domains were investigated by analytical gel filtration, sucrose density centrifugation and analytical ultracentrifugation, in order to show that both domains were monomeric and possessed compact structures that were consistent with known vWF-A crystal structures. This expression system and its characterization permitted the first investigation of the function of the isolated vWF-A domain. It was able to inhibit substantially the binding of (125)I-labelled factor B to immobilized C3b. This demonstrated both the presence of a C3b binding site in this portion of factor B and a ligand-binding property of the vWF-A domain. The site at which factor D cleaves factor B is close to the N-terminus of both recombinant vWF-A domains. Factor D was shown to cleave the vWF-A domain in the presence or absence of C3b, whereas the cleavage of intact factor B under the same conditions occurs only in the presence of C3b. PMID:10477273

  11. Complement factor 5 blockade reduces porcine myocardial infarction size and improves immediate cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Pischke, Soeren E; Gustavsen, A; Orrem, H L; Egge, K H; Courivaud, F; Fontenelle, H; Despont, A; Bongoni, A K; Rieben, R; Tønnessen, T I; Nunn, M A; Scott, H; Skulstad, H; Barratt-Due, A; Mollnes, T E

    2017-05-01

    Inhibition of complement factor 5 (C5) reduced myocardial infarction in animal studies, while no benefit was found in clinical studies. Due to lack of cross-reactivity of clinically used C5 antibodies, different inhibitors were used in animal and clinical studies. Coversin (Ornithodoros moubata complement inhibitor, OmCI) blocks C5 cleavage and binds leukotriene B4 in humans and pigs. We hypothesized that inhibition of C5 before reperfusion will decrease infarct size and improve ventricular function in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. In pigs (Sus scrofa), the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded (40 min) and reperfused (240 min). Coversin or placebo was infused 20 min after occlusion and throughout reperfusion in 16 blindly randomized pigs. Coversin significantly reduced myocardial infarction in the area at risk by 39% (p = 0.03, triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining) and by 19% (p = 0.02) using magnetic resonance imaging. The methods correlated significantly (R = 0.92, p < 0.01). Tissue Doppler echocardiography showed increased systolic displacement (31%, p < 0.01) and increased systolic velocity (29%, p = 0.01) in coversin treated pigs. Interleukin-1β in myocardial microdialysis fluid was significantly reduced (31%, p < 0.05) and tissue E-selectin expression was significantly reduced (p = 0.01) in the non-infarcted area at risk by coversin treatment. Coversin ablated plasma C5 activation throughout the reperfusion period and decreased myocardial C5b-9 deposition, while neither plasma nor myocardial LTB4 were significantly reduced. Coversin substantially reduced the size of infarction, improved ventricular function, and attenuated interleukin-1β and E-selectin in this porcine model by inhibiting C5. We conclude that inhibition of C5 in myocardial infarction should be reconsidered.

  12. Tumor-Derived Tissue Factor Aberrantly Activates Complement and Facilitates Lung Tumor Progression via Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Zha, Haoran; Yang, Fei; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The initiator of extrinsic coagulation, tissue factor (TF), and its non-coagulant isoform alternatively spliced TF (asTF) are closely associated with tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, the role of TF-induced coagulation in tumor progression remains to be fully elucidated. Using TF-knockdown lung tumor cells, we showed that TF is the dominant component of procoagulant activity but is dispensable in the cellular biology of tumor cells. In a xenograft model, using immunohistochemical analysis and flow cytometry analysis of the tumor microenvironment, we demonstrated that TF-induced fibrin deposition, which is correlated with complement activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) recruitment, is positively associated with tumor progression. C5aR antagonism blunted the effect of TF on tumor progression and decreased MDSC recruitment. In conclusion, our data suggested that in tumor microenvironment, TF-induced coagulation activated the complement system and subsequently recruited myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumor growth, which brings new insights into the coagulation-induced complement activation within the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression. PMID:28106852

  13. Tumor-Derived Tissue Factor Aberrantly Activates Complement and Facilitates Lung Tumor Progression via Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao; Zha, Haoran; Yang, Fei; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2017-01-19

    The initiator of extrinsic coagulation, tissue factor (TF), and its non-coagulant isoform alternatively spliced TF (asTF) are closely associated with tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, the role of TF-induced coagulation in tumor progression remains to be fully elucidated. Using TF-knockdown lung tumor cells, we showed that TF is the dominant component of procoagulant activity but is dispensable in the cellular biology of tumor cells. In a xenograft model, using immunohistochemical analysis and flow cytometry analysis of the tumor microenvironment, we demonstrated that TF-induced fibrin deposition, which is correlated with complement activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) recruitment, is positively associated with tumor progression. C5aR antagonism blunted the effect of TF on tumor progression and decreased MDSC recruitment. In conclusion, our data suggested that in tumor microenvironment, TF-induced coagulation activated the complement system and subsequently recruited myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumor growth, which brings new insights into the coagulation-induced complement activation within the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression.

  14. Alkylglycerols reduce serum complement and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Parri, A; Fitó, Montserrat; Torres, C F; Muñoz-Aguayo, D; Schröder, H; Cano, J F; Vázquez, L; Reglero, G; Covas, María-Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Alkylglycerols (AKGs), isolated or present in shark liver oil have anti-inflammatory properties. Complement 3 (C3) and 4 (C4) participate in lipid metabolism and in obesity, contributing to the metabolic syndrome and to the low-grade inflammation associated with obesity. In a randomized, controlled, crossover study, 26 non-diabetes obese individuals were assigned two preparations with low (LAC, 10 mg AKGs) and high (HAC, 20 mg AKGs) AKG content. Intervention periods were of 3 weeks preceded by 2-week washout periods in which shark liver oil was avoided. Cholesterol, C3, C4, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) decreased in a linear trend (P < 0.01) from baseline (control) to LAC and HAC. Values after HAC were significantly lower (P < 0.05) versus both baseline and after LAC. No adverse effects were observed or reported. Data from this pilot study open a promising field for the study of the beneficial effects of AKGs on cardiovascular risk factors in obese individuals.

  15. Complementing mutations in core binding factor leukemias: from mouse models to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Müller, A M S; Duque, J; Shizuru, J A; Lübbert, M

    2008-10-02

    A great proportion of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) display cytogenetic abnormalities including chromosomal aberrations and/or submicroscopic mutations. These abnormalities significantly influence the prognosis of the disease. Hence, a thorough genetic work-up is an essential constituent of standard diagnostic procedures. Core binding factor (CBF) leukemias denote AMLs with chromosomal aberrations disrupting one of the CBF transcription factor genes; the most common examples are translocation t(8;21) and inversion inv(16), which result in the generation of the AML1-ETO and CBFbeta-MYH11 fusion proteins, respectively. However, in murine models, these alterations alone do not suffice to generate full-blown leukemia, but rather, complementary events are required. In fact, a substantial proportion of primary CBF leukemias display additional activating mutations, mostly of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) c-KIT. The awareness of the impact and prognostic relevance of these 'second hits' is increasing with a wider range of mutations tested in clinical trials. Furthermore, novel agents targeting RTKs are emanating rapidly and entering therapeutic regimens. Here, we present a concise review on complementing mutations in CBF leukemias including pathophysiology, mouse models, and clinical implications.

  16. Development of a Sterne-Based Complement Fixation Test to Monitor the Humoral Response Induced by Anthrax Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Adone, Rosanna; Sali, Michela; Francia, Massimiliano; Iatarola, Michela; Donatiello, Adelia; Fasanella, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis spore-forming bacterium. Since it is primarily a disease of animals, the control in animals, and humans depend on the prevention in livestock, principally cattle, sheep, and goats. Most veterinary vaccines utilize the toxigenic, uncapsulated (pXO1+/pXO2–) B. anthracis strain 34F2 which affords protection through the production of neutralizing antibodies directed to the toxin components Protective Antigen (PA), Lethal Factor (LF), and Edema Factor (EF). The titration of specific antibodies in sera of vaccinated animals is crucial to evaluate the efficacy of the vaccination and to obtain epidemiological information for an effective anthrax surveillance. In this study, we developed a Sterne-based Complement Fixation Test (CFT) to detect specific antibodies induced in animals vaccinated with Sterne 34F2. We assessed its efficacy in laboratory animals and under field conditions by monitoring the humoral response induced by vaccination in cattle. The results indicated that the Sterne-based CFT is able to correctly identify vaccinated animals. It proved to be a very sensitive and specific test. Moreover, the Sterne-based CFT offers many benefits with regard to costs, standardization and reproducibility of the assay procedure. PMID:26858700

  17. Association of genetic variants in complement factor H and factor H-related genes with systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Wu, Hui; Khosravi, Melanie; Cui, Huijuan; Qian, Xiaoxia; Kelly, Jennifer A; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Langefeld, Carl D; Williams, Adrienne H; Comeau, Mary E; Ziegler, Julie T; Marion, Miranda C; Adler, Adam; Glenn, Stuart B; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Harley, John B; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Bang, So-Young; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Jacob, Chaim O; Vyse, Timothy J; Niewold, Timothy B; Gaffney, Patrick M; Moser, Kathy L; Kimberly, Robert P; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Brown, Elizabeth E; Alarcon, Graciela S; Petri, Michelle A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Vilá, Luis M; Reveille, John D; James, Judith A; Gilkeson, Gary S; Kamen, Diane L; Freedman, Barry I; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Merrill, Joan T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Scofield, R Hal; Stevens, Anne M; Guthridge, Joel M; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Park, Ji Ah; Lee, Eun Young; Boackle, Susan A; Grossman, Jennifer M; Hahn, Bevra H; Goodship, Timothy H J; Cantor, Rita M; Yu, Chack-Yung; Shen, Nan; Tsao, Betty P

    2011-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex polygenic autoimmune disease, is associated with increased complement activation. Variants of genes encoding complement regulator factor H (CFH) and five CFH-related proteins (CFHR1-CFHR5) within the chromosome 1q32 locus linked to SLE, have been associated with multiple human diseases and may contribute to dysregulated complement activation predisposing to SLE. We assessed 60 SNPs covering the CFH-CFHRs region for association with SLE in 15,864 case-control subjects derived from four ethnic groups. Significant allelic associations with SLE were detected in European Americans (EA) and African Americans (AA), which could be attributed to an intronic CFH SNP (rs6677604, in intron 11, P(meta) = 6.6×10(-8), OR = 1.18) and an intergenic SNP between CFHR1 and CFHR4 (rs16840639, P(meta) = 2.9×10(-7), OR = 1.17) rather than to previously identified disease-associated CFH exonic SNPs, including I62V, Y402H, A474A, and D936E. In addition, allelic association of rs6677604 with SLE was subsequently confirmed in Asians (AS). Haplotype analysis revealed that the underlying causal variant, tagged by rs6677604 and rs16840639, was localized to a ~146 kb block extending from intron 9 of CFH to downstream of CFHR1. Within this block, the deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 (CFHR3-1Δ), a likely causal variant measured using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, was tagged by rs6677604 in EA and AS and rs16840639 in AA, respectively. Deduced from genotypic associations of tag SNPs in EA, AA, and AS, homozygous deletion of CFHR3-1Δ (P(meta) = 3.2×10(-7), OR = 1.47) conferred a higher risk of SLE than heterozygous deletion (P(meta) = 3.5×10(-4), OR = 1.14). These results suggested that the CFHR3-1Δ deletion within the SLE-associated block, but not the previously described exonic SNPs of CFH, might contribute to the development of SLE in EA, AA, and AS, providing new insights into the role of

  18. Resistance to Streptozotocin-Induced Autoimmune Diabetes in Absence of Complement C3: Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Play a Role.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaogang; Liu, Huanhai; He, Bin; Fu, Zhiren

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of complement to the development of autoimmune diabetes has been proposed recently. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. We hypothesize that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which act as regulators in autoimmunity, play a role in resistance to diabetes in absence of complement C3. Indeed, MDSC number was increased significantly in STZ-treated C3-/- mice. These cells highly expressed arginase I and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Importantly, depletion of MDSC led to the occurrence of overt diabetes in C3-/- mice after STZ. Furthermore, C3-/- MDSC actively suppressed diabetogenic T cell proliferation and prevented/delayed the development of diabetes in arginase and/or iNOS-dependent manner. Both Tregs and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) are crucial for MDSC induction in STZ-treated C3-/- mice as depletion of Tregs or blocking TGF-β bioactivity dramatically decreased MDSC number. These findings indicate that MDSC are implicated in resistance to STZ-induced diabetes in the absence of complement C3, which may be helpful for understanding of mechanisms underlying preventive effects of complement deficiency on autoimmune diseases.

  19. Fanconi anemia complementation group A cells are hypersensitive to chromium(VI)-induced toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Vilcheck, Susan K; O'Brien, Travis J; Pritchard, Daryl E; Ha, Linan; Ceryak, Susan; Fornsaglio, Jamie L; Patierno, Steven R

    2002-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diverse developmental abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure, and a markedly increased incidence of malignancy. FA cells are hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agents, suggesting a general defect in the repair of DNA cross-links. Some forms of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] are implicated as respiratory carcinogens and induce several types of DNA lesions, including ternary DNA-Cr-DNA interstrand cross-links (Cr-DDC). We hypothesized that human FA complementation group A (FA-A) cells would be hypersensitive to Cr(VI) and Cr(VI)-induced apoptosis. Using phosphatidylserine translocation and caspase-3 activation, human FA-A fibroblasts were found to be markedly hypersensitive to chromium-induced apoptosis compared with CRL-1634 cells, which are normal human foreskin fibroblasts (CRL). The clonogenicity of FA-A cells was also significantly decreased compared with CRL cells after Cr(VI) treatment. There was no significant difference in either Cr(VI) uptake or Cr-DNA adduct formation between FA-A and CRL cells. These results show that FA-A cells are hypersensitive to Cr(VI) and Cr-induced apoptosis and that this hypersensitivity is not due to increased Cr(VI) uptake or increased Cr-DNA adduct formation. The results also suggest that Cr-DDC may be proapoptotic lesions. These results are the first to show that FA cells are hypersensitive to an environmentally relevant DNA cross-linking agent. PMID:12426130

  20. Surfactant prevents quartz induced down-regulation of complement receptor 1 in human granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, G; Lundahl, J; Curstedt, T; Eklund, A

    1997-02-01

    Quartz is known to induce an inflammatory response in the alveolar space by recruitment of different effector cells. We investigated the interaction between granulocytes and quartz with respect to expression of complement receptor type 1 (CR1) and CR3, with and without the presence of surfactant. Granulocytes from hemolyzed blood were stimulated by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), which mobilize the intracellular pool of CR1 to the surface, and the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) measured by cytofluorometry was 47.4 (46-63.6) (median; interquartile range). Quartz exposure reduced the CR1 expression to 23.2 (22.8-30.6) MFI units (P < 0.01), a porcine surfactant preparation added during quartz exposure abolished the down-regulation completely, 47.7 (43.2-62.3) MFI units (P < 0.001). Similar results were obtained after preincubation of the cells with surfactant followed by quartz exposure. No significant influence on CR1 expression was found by a synthetic lipid mixture, nor was the CR3 expression affected. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the presence of surfactant inhibits quartz induced down-regulation of CR1 on activated granulocytes.

  1. Complement Factor B Mutations in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome—Disease-Relevant or Benign?

    PubMed Central

    Marinozzi, Maria Chiara; Vergoz, Laura; Rybkine, Tania; Ngo, Stephanie; Bettoni, Serena; Pashov, Anastas; Cayla, Mathieu; Tabarin, Fanny; Jablonski, Mathieu; Hue, Christophe; Smith, Richard J.; Noris, Marina; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Donadelli, Roberta; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a genetic ultrarare renal disease associated with overactivation of the alternative pathway of complement. Four gain-of-function mutations that form a hyperactive or deregulated C3 convertase have been identified in Factor B (FB) ligand binding sites. Here, we studied the functional consequences of 10 FB genetic changes recently identified from different aHUS cohorts. Using several tests for alternative C3 and C5 convertase formation and regulation, we identified two gain-of-function and potentially disease-relevant mutations that formed either an overactive convertase (M433I) or a convertase resistant to decay by FH (K298Q). One mutation (R178Q) produced a partially cleaved protein with no ligand binding or functional activity. Seven genetic changes led to near-normal or only slightly reduced ligand binding and functional activity compared with the most common polymorphism at position 7, R7. Notably, none of the algorithms used to predict the disease relevance of FB mutations agreed completely with the experimental data, suggesting that in silico approaches should be undertaken with caution. These data, combined with previously published results, suggest that 9 of 15 FB genetic changes identified in patients with aHUS are unrelated to disease pathogenesis. This study highlights that functional assessment of identified nucleotide changes in FB is mandatory to confirm disease association. PMID:24652797

  2. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein acts as a processivity factor.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M W; Yang, L

    2000-05-19

    We have previously shown that endonucleases present in a protein complex, which has specificity for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, locate sites of damage in DNA by a processive mechanism of action in normal human lymphoblastoid cells. In contrast, the endonucleases present in this complex from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) cells locate damage sites by a distributive or significantly less processive mechanism. Since the XPA protein has been shown to be responsible for the DNA repair defect in XPA cells, this protein was examined for involvement in the mechanism of target site location of these endonucleases. A recombinant XPA protein, produced by expression of the normal XPA cDNA in E. coli, was isolated and purified. The results show that the recombinant XPA protein was able to correct the defect in ability of the XPA endonucleases to act by a processive mechanism of action on UVC irradiated DNA. These studies indicate that the XPA protein, in addition to a role in damage recognition or damage verification, may function as a processivity factor.

  3. Complement deposition induced by binding of anti-contactin-1 auto-antibodies is modified by immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Appeltshauser, Luise; Weishaupt, Andreas; Sommer, Claudia; Doppler, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory neuropathies associated with auto-antibodies against paranodal proteins like contactin-1 are reported to respond poorly to treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG). A reason might be that IVIG interacts with the complement pathway and these auto-antibodies often belong to the IgG4 subclass that does not activate complement. However, some patients do show a response to IVIG, especially at the beginning of the disease. This corresponds with the finding of coexisting IgG subclasses IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3. We therefore aimed to investigate complement deposition and activation by samples of three patients with anti-contactin-1 IgG auto-antibodies of different subclasses as a potential predictor for response to IVIG. Complement deposition and activation was measured by cell binding and ELISA based assays, and the effect of IVIG on complement deposition was assessed by addition of different concentrations of IVIG. Binding of anti-contactin-1 auto-antibodies of all three patients induced complement deposition and activation with the strongest effect shown by the serum of a patient with predominance of IgG3 auto-antibodies. IVIG led to a reduction of complement deposition in a dose-dependent manner, but did not reduce binding of auto-antibodies to contactin-1. We conclude that complement deposition may contribute to the pathophysiology of anti-contactin-1 associated neuropathy, particularly in patients with predominance of the IgG3 subclass. The proportion of different auto-antibody subclasses may be a predictor for the response to IVIG in patients with auto-antibodies against paranodal proteins.

  4. Complement factor H and hemicentin-1 in age-related macular degeneration and renal phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cheryl L; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Xu, Zhiying; Capriotti, Jennifer; Joshi, Tripti; Leontiev, Dmitry; Lee, Kristine E; Elston, Robert C; Iyengar, Sudha K

    2007-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the associations of complement factor H (CFH) and hemicentin-1 (HMCN1) with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and renal function. Three scales, measuring the course of AMD and drusen development, were examined in two samples: the Family Age-Related Macular degeneration Study (FARMS), consisting of families ascertained through a single individual with severe AMD, and an unascertained population-based family cohort, the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), which was also used to assess longitudinal changes in AMD and associations with renal function. Associations were performed by a regression accounting for known risk factors as well as familial and sibling effects. Strong evidence of the association of rs1061170 (Y402H) variation with AMD was confirmed (P = 9.15 x 10(-5) in BDES, P = 0.016 in FARMS). This association was observed in multiple AMD scales, suggesting that its role is not phenotype-specific. Polymorphisms in both CFH and HMCN1 appeared to influence the longitudinal rate of change of AMD. The rs1061170 polymorphism was also associated with a reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (P = 0.046). Another CFH polymorphism, rs800292, was similarly associated with eGFR [beta = -0.90 (P = 0.022)]. Associations between rs743137 (P = 0.05) and rs680638 (P = 0.022) in HMCN1 with calculated creatinine clearance progression were also observed. Both genes appear to play a role in both AMD and renal pathophysiology. These findings support evidence for common pathways influencing ocular and renal function and suggest that further work is required on their common determinants.

  5. Impaired Immunogenicity of Meningococcal Neisserial Surface Protein A in Human Complement Factor H Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Eduardo; Pajon, Rolando; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-11-23

    Neisserial surface protein A (NspA) is a highly conserved outer membrane protein previously investigated as a meningococcal vaccine candidate. Despite eliciting serum bactericidal activity in mice, a recombinant NspA vaccine failed to elicit serum bactericidal antibodies in a phase 1 clinical trial in humans. The discordant results may be explained by the recent discovery that NspA is a human-specific ligand of the complement inhibitor factor H (FH). Therefore, in humans but not mice, NspA would be expected to form a complex with FH, which could impair human anti-NspA protective antibody responses. To investigate this question, we immunized human FH transgenic BALB/c mice with three doses of recombinant NspA expressed in Escherichia coli microvesicles, with each dose being separated by 3 weeks. Three of 12 (25%) transgenic mice and 13 of 14 wild-type mice responded with bactericidal titers of ≥1:10 in postimmunization sera (P = 0.0008, Fisher's exact test). In contrast, human FH transgenic and wild-type mice immunized with a control meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccine had similar serum bactericidal antibody responses directed at PorA, which is not known to bind human FH, and a mutant factor H binding protein (FHbp) antigen with a >50-fold lower level of FH binding than wild-type FHbp antigen binding.Thus, human FH can impair anti-NspA serum bactericidal antibody responses, which may explain the poor immunogenicity of the NspA vaccine previously tested in humans. A mutant NspA vaccine engineered to have decreased binding to human FH may increase protective antibody responses in humans.

  6. Ensemble refinement shows conformational flexibility in crystal structures of human complement factor D

    SciTech Connect

    Forneris, Federico; Burnley, B. Tom; Gros, Piet

    2014-03-01

    Ensemble-refinement analysis of native and mutant factor D (FD) crystal structures indicates a dynamical transition in FD from a self-inhibited inactive conformation to a substrate-bound active conformation that is reminiscent of the allostery in thrombin. Comparison with previously observed dynamics in thrombin using NMR data supports the crystallographic ensembles. Human factor D (FD) is a self-inhibited thrombin-like serine proteinase that is critical for amplification of the complement immune response. FD is activated by its substrate through interactions outside the active site. The substrate-binding, or ‘exosite’, region displays a well defined and rigid conformation in FD. In contrast, remarkable flexibility is observed in thrombin and related proteinases, in which Na{sup +} and ligand binding is implied in allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity through protein dynamics. Here, ensemble refinement (ER) of FD and thrombin crystal structures is used to evaluate structure and dynamics simultaneously. A comparison with previously published NMR data for thrombin supports the ER analysis. The R202A FD variant has enhanced activity towards artificial peptides and simultaneously displays active and inactive conformations of the active site. ER revealed pronounced disorder in the exosite loops for this FD variant, reminiscent of thrombin in the absence of the stabilizing Na{sup +} ion. These data indicate that FD exhibits conformational dynamics like thrombin, but unlike in thrombin a mechanism has evolved in FD that locks the unbound native state into an ordered inactive conformation via the self-inhibitory loop. Thus, ensemble refinement of X-ray crystal structures may represent an approach alternative to spectroscopy to explore protein dynamics in atomic detail.

  7. Mapping the Complement Factor H-Related Protein 1 (CFHR1):C3b/C3d Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Jennifer; Thurman, Joshua M.; Hageman, Gregory S.; Holers, V. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H-related protein 1 (CFHR1) is a complement regulator which has been reported to regulate complement by blocking C5 convertase activity and interfering with C5b surface association. CFHR1 also competes with complement factor H (CFH) for binding to C3b, and may act as an antagonist of CFH-directed regulation on cell surfaces. We have employed site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with ELISA-based and functional assays to isolate the binding interaction that CFHR1 undertakes with complement components C3b and C3d to a single shared interface. The C3b/C3d:CFHR1 interface is identical to that which occurs between the two C-terminal domains (SCR19-20) of CFH and C3b. Moreover, we have been able to corroborate that dimerization of CFHR1 is necessary for this molecule to bind effectively to C3b and C3d, or compete with CFH. Finally, we have established that CFHR1 competes with complement factor H-like protein 1 (CFHL-1) for binding to C3b. CFHL-1 is a CFH gene splice variant, which is almost identical to the N-terminal 7 domains of CFH (SCR1-7). CFHR1, therefore, not only competes with the C-terminus of CFH for binding to C3b, but also sterically blocks the interaction that the N-terminus of CFH undertakes with C3b, and which is required for CFH-regulation. PMID:27814381

  8. Soluble complement receptor one (sCR1) inhibits the development and progression of rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, R M; Williams, A S; Levin, J L; Williams, B D; Morgan, B P

    2000-01-01

    We set out to determine whether inhibition of complement using sCR1 could influence the development and progression of collagen arthritis in the Lewis rat. Collagen arthritis was successfully established in the Lewis rat, using a novel immunization schedule. In separate experiments, cobra venom factor (CVF) and sCR1 were used to achieve systemic complement inhibition. Their respective effects on disease onset and on the progression of established disease compared with saline-treated control animals was explored. Arthritis was assessed by measurement of clinical score, paw diameter and paw volume. Complement inhibition using either CVF or sCR1, prior to the onset of clinical signs of inflammation, delayed the development of disease. CVF was ineffective in the treatment of established disease, whereas sCR1 delayed the progression of disease in affected joints and prevented the recruitment of further joints while the animals were complement-depleted. In the control saline-treated groups the disease continued to progress relentlessly. We conclude that complement activation is important in the initiation and maintenance of inflammation in collagen arthritis. The potent disease-modulating effect of sCR1 provides persuasive evidence that specific complement inhibiting agents may be an effective approach to the treatment of inflammatory joint diseases

  9. Expression, purification, cocrystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of sucrose octasulfate/human complement regulator factor H SCRs 6–8

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, Beverly E.; Johnson, Steven; Roversi, Pietro; Clark, Simon J.; Tarelli, Edward; Sim, Robert B.; Day, Antony J.; Lea, Susan M.

    2007-06-01

    The crystallization of human complement regulator FH-678{sub 402H} with a glycosaminoglycan analogue is described. Human plasma protein complement factor H (FH) is an inhibitor of the spontaneously activated alternative complement pathway. An allotypic variant of FH, 402His, has been associated with age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Crystals of FH domains 6–8 (FH678) containing 402His have been grown in the presence of a polyanionic sucrose octasulfate ligand (an analogue of the natural glycosaminoglycan ligands of FH) using both native and selenomethionine-derivatized protein. Native data sets diffracting to 2.3 Å and SeMet data sets of up to 2.8 Å resolution have been collected. An anomalous difference Patterson map reveals self- and cross-peaks from two incorporated Se atoms. The corresponding selenium substructure has been solved.

  10. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela; Jin, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3(-/-)), complement factor B (fB(-/-)), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3(-/-)mice than in WT controls, whereas fB(-/-)mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3(-/-)sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB(-/-)sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus.

  11. Soluble complement receptor 1 is increased in patients with leukemia and after administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Sadallah, S; Lach, E; Schwarz, S; Gratwohl, A; Spertini, O; Schifferli, J A

    1999-01-01

    Complement receptor type 1 is expressed by erythrocytes and most leukocytes. A soluble form is shed from the leukocytes and found in plasma (sCR1). sCR1 is a powerful inhibitor of complement. We report an increased sCR1 in the plasma of leukemia patients, up to levels producing measurable complement inhibition. Half of the 180 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) had sCR1 levels above the normal range. The highest levels were observed in T-ALL (17 patients). The complement function of a T-ALL serum was improved by blocking sCR1 with a specific mAb (3D9). Measurements in 16 peripheral stein cell donors before and after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration showed an increase in sCR1 (before, 43.8+/-15.4; at day 5, 118.3+/-44.7 ng/mL; P < 0.0001). This increase paralleled the increase in total leukocyte counts and was concomitant with de novo leukocyte mRNA CR1 expression in all three individuals tested. Whether pharmacological intervention may be used to up-regulate sCR1 so as to inhibit complement in vivo should be further investigated.

  12. Visualizing K48 Ubiquitination during Presynaptic Formation By Ubiquitination-Induced Fluorescence Complementation (UiFC)

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria J.; Pedro, Joana R.; Costa, Rui O.; Almeida, Ramiro D.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, signaling through ubiquitin has been shown to be of great importance for normal brain development. Indeed, fluctuations in ubiquitin levels and spontaneous mutations in (de)ubiquitination enzymes greatly perturb synapse formation and neuronal transmission. In the brain, expression of lysine (K) 48-linked ubiquitin chains is higher at a developmental stage coincident with synaptogenesis. Nevertheless, no studies have so far delved into the involvement of this type of polyubiquitin chains in synapse formation. We have recently proposed a role for polyubiquitinated conjugates as triggering signals for presynaptic assembly. Herein, we aimed at characterizing the axonal distribution of K48 polyubiquitin and its dynamics throughout the course of presynaptic formation. To accomplish so, we used an ubiquitination-induced fluorescence complementation (UiFC) strategy for the visualization of K48 polyubiquitin in live hippocampal neurons. We first validated its use in neurons by analyzing changing levels of polyubiquitin. UiFC signal is diffusely distributed with distinct aggregates in somas, dendrites and axons, which perfectly colocalize with staining for a K48-specific antibody. Axonal UiFC aggregates are relatively stable and new aggregates are formed as an axon grows. Approximately 65% of UiFC aggregates colocalize with synaptic vesicle clusters and they preferentially appear in the axonal domains of axo-somatodendritic synapses when compared to isolated axons. We then evaluated axonal accumulation of K48 ubiquitinated signals in bead-induced synapses. We observed rapid accumulation of UiFC signal and endogenous K48 ubiquitin at the sites of newly formed presynapses. Lastly, we show by means of a microfluidic platform, for the isolation of axons, that presynaptic clustering on beads is dependent on E1-mediated ubiquitination at the axonal level. Altogether, these results indicate that enrichment of K48 polyubiquitin at the site of nascent presynaptic

  13. Interaction of Complement Factor H and Fibulin3 in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, M. Keith; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Mishra, Sanghamitra; Campos, Maria; Jaworski, Cynthia; Fariss, Robert N.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Wistow, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of vision loss. It is associated with development of characteristic plaque-like deposits (soft drusen) in Bruch’s membrane basal to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). A sequence variant (Y402H) in short consensus repeat domain 7 (SCR7) of complement factor H (CFH) is associated with risk for “dry” AMD. We asked whether the eye-targeting of this disease might be related to specific interactions of CFH SCR7 with proteins expressed in the aging human RPE/choroid that could contribute to protein deposition in drusen. Yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) screens of a retinal pigment epithelium/choroid library derived from aged donors using CFH SCR7 baits detected an interaction with EFEMP1/Fibulin 3 (Fib3), which is the locus for an inherited macular degeneration and also accumulates basal to macular RPE in AMD. The CFH/Fib3 interaction was validated by co-immunoprecipitation of native proteins. Quantitative Y2H and ELISA assays with different recombinant protein constructs both demonstrated higher affinity for Fib3 for the disease-related CFH 402H variant. Immuno-labeling revealed colocalization of CFH and Fib3 in globular deposits within cholesterol-rich domains in soft drusen in two AMD donors homozygous for CFH 402H (H/H). This pattern of labeling was quite distinct from those seen in examples of eyes with Y/Y and H/Y genotypes. The CFH 402H/Fib3 interaction could contribute to the development of pathological aggregates in soft drusen in some patients and as such might provide a target for therapeutic intervention in some forms of AMD. PMID:23840815

  14. Complement activation pathways in murine immune complex-induced arthritis and in C3a and C5a generation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Banda, N K; Levitt, B; Wood, A K; Takahashi, K; Stahl, G L; Holers, V M; Arend, W P

    2010-01-01

    The alternative pathway (AP) of complement alone is capable of mediating immune complex-induced arthritis in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model in mice. Whether the classical pathway (CP) or lectin pathway (LP) alone can mediate CAIA is not known. Using mice genetically deficient in different complement components, our results reported herein establish that the CP and LP alone are each incapable of mediating CAIA. A lower level or absence of C3 and/or C5 activation by the CP may be possible explanations for the importance of the AP in CAIA and in many murine models of disease. In addition, other investigators have reported that CP C5 convertase activity is absent in mouse sera. To address these questions, we employed an in vitro system of adherent immunoglobulin (Ig)G-induced complement activation using plates coated with murine anti-collagen monoclonal antibody (mAb). These experiments used complement-deficient mouse sera and wild-type mouse or normal human sera under conditions inactivating either the CP (Ca++ deficiency) or the AP (mAb inhibitory to factor B). Robust generation of both C3a and C5a by either the AP or CP alone were observed with both mouse and human sera, although there were some small differences between the species of sera. We conclude that neither the CP nor LP alone is capable of mediating CAIA in vivo and that mouse sera exhibits a high level of IgG-induced C5a generation in vitro through either the CP or AP. PMID:19843088

  15. Polydom: a secreted protein with pentraxin, complement control protein, epidermal growth factor and von Willebrand factor A domains.

    PubMed Central

    Gilgès, D; Vinit, M A; Callebaut, I; Coulombel, L; Cacheux, V; Romeo, P H; Vigon, I

    2000-01-01

    To identify extracellular proteins with epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains that are potentially involved in the control of haemopoiesis, we performed degenerate reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR on the murine bone-marrow stromal cell line MS-5 and isolated a new partial cDNA encoding EGF-like domains related to those in the Notch proteins. Cloning and sequencing of the full-length cDNA showed that it encoded a new extracellular multi-domain protein that we named polydom. This 387 kDa mosaic protein contained a signal peptide followed by a new association of eight different protein domains, including a pentraxin domain and a von Willebrand factor type A domain, ten EGF domains, and 34 complement control protein modules. The human polydom mRNA is strongly expressed in placenta, its expression in the other tissues being weak or undetectable. The particular multidomain structure of the encoded protein suggests an important biological role in cellular adhesion and/or in the immune system. PMID:11062057

  16. Interleukin-22 regulates the complement system to promote resistance against pathobionts after pathogen-induced intestinal damage.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mizuho; Yada, Shoko; Liu, Meng Zhen; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Do, Nhu; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro

    2014-10-16

    Pathobionts play a critical role in disease development, but the immune mechanisms against pathobionts remain poorly understood. Here, we report a critical role for interleukin-22 (IL-22) in systemic protection against bacterial pathobionts that translocate into the circulation after infection with the pathogen Clostridium difficile. Infection with C. difficile induced IL-22, and infected Il22(-/-) mice harbored high numbers of pathobionts in extraintestinal organs despite comparable pathogen load and intestinal damage in mutant and wild-type mice. Pathobionts exhibited increased resistant against complement-mediated phagocytosis, and their intravenous administration resulted in high animal mortality. Selective removal of translocated commensals rescued Il22(-/-) mice, and IL-22 administration enhanced the elimination of pathobionts. Mechanistically, IL-22 augmented bacterial phagocytosis by increasing the expression and bacterial binding of complement C3. Our study demonstrates an unexpected role for IL-22 in controlling the elimination of pathobionts that enter the systemic circulation through the regulation of the complement system.

  17. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  18. Reprogramming with defined factors: from induced pluripotency to induced transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Masip, Manuel; Veiga, Anna; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Simón, Carlos

    2010-11-01

    Ever since work on pluripotency induction was originally published, reporting the reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) by the ectopic expression of the four transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, high expectations regarding their potential use for regenerative medicine have emerged. Very recently, the direct conversion of fibroblasts into functional neurons with no prior pluripotent stage has been described. Interconversion between adult cells from ontogenically different lineages by an induced transdifferentiation process based on the overexpression of a cocktail of transcription factors, while avoiding transition through an embryonic stem cell-like state, provides a new impetus in the field of regenerative medicine. Here, we review the induced reprogramming of somatic cells with defined factors and analyze their potential clinical use. Beginning with induced pluripotency, we summarize the initial objections including their extremely low efficiency and the risk of tumor generation. We also review recent reports describing iPS cells' capacity to generate viable offspring through tetraploid complementation, the most restrictive pluripotency criterion. Finally, we explore the available evidence for 'induced transdifferentiated cells' as a novel tool for adult cell fate modification.

  19. Structure-Based Library Design and Fragment Screening for the Identification of Reversible Complement Factor D Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vulpetti, Anna; Randl, Stefan; Rüdisser, Simon; Ostermann, Nils; Erbel, Paul; Mac Sweeney, Aengus; Zoller, Thomas; Salem, Bahaa; Gerhartz, Bernd; Cumin, Frederic; Hommel, Ulrich; Dalvit, Claudio; Lorthiois, Edwige; Maibaum, Jürgen

    2017-03-09

    Chronic dysregulation of alternative complement pathway activation has been associated with diverse clinical disorders including age-related macular degeneration and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinurea. Factor D is a trypsin-like serine protease with a narrow specificity for arginine in the P1 position, which catalyzes the first enzymatic reaction of the amplification loop of the alternative pathway. In this article, we describe two hit finding approaches leading to the discovery of new chemical matter for this pivotal protease of the complement system: in silico active site mapping for hot spot identification to guide rational structure-based design and NMR screening of focused and diverse fragment libraries. The wealth of information gathered by these complementary approaches enabled the identification of ligands binding to different subpockets of the latent Factor D conformation and was instrumental for understanding the binding requirements for the generation of the first known potent noncovalent reversible Factor D inhibitors.

  20. Detection of IgG rheumatoid factor by concanavalin A treatment and complement fixation with IgG rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, K; Moritoh, T; Azuma, T; Horiuchi, Y

    1976-01-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A) froms precipitates with carbohydrate-rich protein such as IgM, IgD, IgE, and IgA. Since IgG contains little carbohydrate and does not react with Con A, the activity of IgG-rheumatoid factor (RF) can be measured in the supernate of the Con A-treated serum. When the latex fixation test (LFT) and the sensitized sheep cell agglutination test (SSCA) were perfromed in the supernate for the detection of IgG-RF, LFT was positive in 32-1% of sera, out of 137 sera originally positive for LFT, and SSCA was positive in 18-5% of sera, out of 119 sera originally positive for SSCA. IgG-RF exhibited lower complement fixing ability than IgM-RF and correlated with agglutination titres of IgG-RF, while the CH50 of the original serum did not correlate with haemolytic activities of either IgM-RF or IgG-RF. PMID:984904

  1. MASP-1 Induces a Unique Cytokine Pattern in Endothelial Cells: A Novel Link between Complement System and Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Péter K.; Kajdácsi, Erika; Megyeri, Márton; Dobó, József; Doleschall, Zoltán; Futosi, Krisztina; Tímár, Csaba I.; Mócsai, Attila; Makó, Veronika; Gál, Péter; Cervenak, László

    2014-01-01

    Microbial infection urges prompt intervention by the immune system. The complement cascade and neutrophil granulocytes are the predominant contributors to this immediate anti-microbial action. We have previously shown that mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1), the most abundant enzyme of the complement lectin pathway, can induce p38-MAPK activation, NFkappaB signaling, and Ca2+-mobilization in endothelial cells. Since neutrophil chemotaxis and transmigration depends on endothelial cell activation, we aimed to explore whether recombinant MASP-1 (rMASP-1) is able to induce cytokine production and subsequent neutrophil chemotaxis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). We found that HUVECs activated by rMASP-1 secreted IL-6 and IL-8, but not IL-1alpha, IL-1ra, TNFalpha and MCP-1. rMASP-1 induced dose-dependent IL-6 and IL-8 production with different kinetics. rMASP-1 triggered IL-6 and IL-8 production was regulated predominantly by the p38-MAPK pathway. Moreover, the supernatant of rMASP-1-stimulated HUVECs activated the chemotaxis of neutrophil granulocytes as an integrated effect of cytokine production. Our results implicate that besides initializing the complement lectin pathway, MASP-1 may activate neutrophils indirectly, via the endothelial cells, which link these effective antimicrobial host defense mechanisms. PMID:24489848

  2. Comparative analysis of novel complement-targeted inhibitors, miniFH, and the natural regulators Factor H and Factor H-like protein 1 reveal functional determinants of complement regulation

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Markus J.; Anliker, Markus; Höchsmann, Britta; Simmet, Thomas; Huber-Lang, Markus; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.; Barlow, Paul N.; Schmidt, Christoph Q.

    2015-01-01

    The serum proteins Factor H (FH), consisting of 20 complement control protein modules (CCPs), and its splice product Factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1; consisting of CCPs 1–7) are major regulators of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement activation. The engineered version of FH, miniFH, contains only the N- and C-terminal portions of FH linked by an optimized peptide and shows ~10-fold higher ex vivo potency. We explored the hypothesis that regulatory potency is enhanced by unmasking of a ligand-binding site in the C-terminal CCPs (19–20) that is cryptic in full-length native FH. Therefore we produced a FH variant lacking the central domains 10–15 (FHΔ10–15). To explore how avidity affects regulatory strength, we generated a duplicated version of miniFH, termed midiFH. We compared activities of FHΔ10–15 and midiFH to miniFH, FH and FHL-1. Relative to FH, FHΔ10–15 exhibited an altered binding profile toward C3 activation products and a 5-fold-enhanced complement regulation on PNH patient’s erythrocytes. Contrary to dogma, FHL-1 and FH exhibited equal regulatory activity, suggesting that the role of FHL-1 in AP regulation has been underestimated. Unexpectedly, a substantially increased avidity for complement opsonins, as seen in midiFH, did not potentiate the inhibitory potential on host cells. In conclusion, comparisons of engineered and native FH-based regulators have identified features that determine high AP regulatory activity on host cells. Unrestricted availability of FH CCPs 19–20 and an optimal spatial orientation between the N- and C-terminal FH regions are key. PMID:26643478

  3. Staphylococcal Ecb protein and host complement regulator factor H enhance functions of each other in bacterial immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Amdahl, Hanne; Jongerius, Ilse; Meri, Taru; Pasanen, Tanja; Hyvärinen, Satu; Haapasalo, Karita; van Strijp, Jos A; Rooijakkers, Suzan H; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2013-08-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing more than a tenth of all septicemia cases and often superficial and deep infections in various tissues. One of the immune evasion strategies of S. aureus is to secrete proteins that bind to the central complement opsonin C3b. One of these, extracellular complement binding protein (Ecb), is known to interfere directly with functions of C3b. Because C3b is also the target of the physiological plasma complement regulator, factor H (FH), we studied the effect of Ecb on the complement regulatory functions of FH. We show that Ecb enhances acquisition of FH from serum onto staphylococcal surfaces. Ecb and FH enhance mutual binding to C3b and also the function of each other in downregulating complement activation. Both Ecb and the C-terminal domains 19-20 of FH bind to the C3d part of C3b. We show that the mutual enhancing effect of Ecb and FH on binding to C3b depends on binding of the FH domain 19 to the C3d part of C3b next to the binding site of Ecb on C3d. Our results show that Ecb, FH, and C3b form a tripartite complex. Upon exposure of serum-sensitive Haemophilus influenzae to human serum, Ecb protected the bacteria, and this effect was enhanced by the addition of the C-terminal domains 19-20 of FH. This finding indicates that the tripartite complex formation could give additional protection to bacteria and that S. aureus is thereby able to use host FH and bacterial Ecb in a concerted action to eliminate C3b at the site of infection.

  4. Human pathogenic Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. resists complement-mediated killing by direct binding of immune regulators factor H and factor H-like protein 1.

    PubMed

    Herzberger, Pia; Siegel, Corinna; Skerka, Christine; Fingerle, Volker; Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; van Dam, Alje; Wilske, Bettina; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter

    2007-10-01

    Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. has recently been shown to be a novel human pathogenic genospecies that causes Lyme disease in Europe. In order to elucidate the immune evasion mechanisms of B. spielmanii, we compared the abilities of isolates obtained from Lyme disease patients and tick isolate PC-Eq17 to escape from complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Using a growth inhibition assay, we show that four B. spielmanii isolates, including PC-Eq17, are serum resistant, whereas a single isolate, PMew, was more sensitive to complement-mediated lysis. All isolates activated complement in vitro, as demonstrated by covalent attachment of C3 fragments; however, deposition of the later activation products C6 and C5b-9 was restricted to the moderately serum-resistant isolate PMew and the serum-sensitive B. garinii isolate G1. Furthermore, serum adsorption experiments revealed that all B. spielmanii isolates acquired the host alternative pathway regulators factor H and factor H-like protein (FHL-1) from human serum. Both complement regulators retained their factor I-mediated C3b inactivation activities when bound to spirochetes. In addition, two distinct factor H and FHL-1 binding proteins, BsCRASP-1 and BsCRASP-2, were identified, which we estimated to be approximately 23 to 25 kDa in mass. A further factor H binding protein, BsCRASP-3, was found exclusively in the tick isolate, PC-Eq17. This is the first report describing an immune evasion mechanism utilized by B. spielmanii sp. nov., and it demonstrates the capture of human immune regulators to resist complement-mediated killing.

  5. Alternative complement pathway of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus: molecular characterization and expression analysis of factors Bf/C2 and Df

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complement system important in both innate and adaptive host defense against microbial infection in vertebrates. It contains three pathways: the classical, alternative, and lectin pathways. Complement component factors B and D are two crucial proteases in the alternative pathway. In this study,...

  6. Targeted organ generation using Mixl1-inducible mouse pluripotent stem cells in blastocyst complementation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-15

    Generation of functional organs from patients' own cells is one of the ultimate goals of regenerative medicine. As a novel approach to creation of organs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), we employed blastocyst complementation in organogenesis-disabled animals and successfully generated PSC-derived pancreas and kidneys. Blastocyst complementation, which exploits the capacity of PSCs to participate in forming chimeras, does not, however, exclude contribution of PSCs to the development of tissues-including neural cells or germ cells-other than those specifically targeted by disabling of organogenesis. This fact provokes ethical controversy if human PSCs are to be used. In this study, we demonstrated that forced expression of Mix-like protein 1 (encoded by Mixl1) can be used to guide contribution of mouse embryonic stem cells to endodermal organs after blastocyst injection. We then succeeded in applying this method to generate functional pancreas in pancreatogenesis-disabled Pdx1 knockout mice using a newly developed tetraploid-based organ-complementation method. These findings hold promise for targeted organ generation from patients' own PSCs in livestock animals.

  7. Complement associated pathogenic mechanisms in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Erdem; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody (Ab) related myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). The most characteristic finding of muscle pathology in both MG and EAMG is the abundance of IgG and complement deposits at the nerve-muscle junction (NMJ), suggesting that AChR-Ab induces muscle weakness by complement pathway activation and consequent membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. This assumption has been supported with EAMG resistance of complement factor C3 knockout (KO), C4 KO and C5 deficient mice and amelioration of EAMG symptoms following treatment with complement inhibitors such as cobra venom factor, soluble complement receptor 1, anti-C1q, anti-C5 and anti-C6 Abs. Moreover, the complement inhibitor decay accelerating factor (DAF) KO mice exhibit increased susceptibility to EAMG. These findings have brought forward improvisation of novel therapy methods based on inhibition of classical and common complement pathways in MG treatment.

  8. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins.

  9. Complement factor H and age-related macular degeneration: the role of glycosaminoglycan recognition in disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon J; Bishop, Paul N; Day, Anthony J

    2010-10-01

    AMD (age-related macular degeneration) is the major cause of blindness in the western world, associated with the formation of extracellular deposits called drusen in the macula, i.e. the central region of the retina. These drusen contain cellular debris and proteins, including components of the complement system such as the regulator CFH (complement factor H); dysregulation of complement is thought to play a major role in the development of AMD. CFH acts through its capacity to recognize polyanionic structures [e.g. sulfated GAGs (glycosaminoglycans)] found on host tissues, and thereby inactivates any C3b that becomes deposited. Importantly, a common polymorphism in CFH (Y402H) has been strongly associated with an increased risk of AMD. This polymorphism, which causes a tyrosine to histidine coding change, has been shown to alter the binding of CFH to sulfated GAGs, as well as to other ligands including C-reactive protein, necrotic cells and bacterial coat proteins. Of these, the change in the GAG-recognition properties of CFH is likely to be of most significance to AMD. Recent research has revealed that the disease-associated 402H allotype interacts less well (compared with 402Y) with binding sites within the macula (e.g. Bruch's membrane), where the GAGs heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate play a major role in mediating the interaction with CFH. Reduced binding of the 402H allotype could result in impaired regulation of complement leading to chronic local inflammation that may contribute to the accumulation of drusen and thus the initiation, development and progression of AMD.

  10. The Effect of Lutein Supplementation on Blood Plasma Levels of Complement Factor D, C5a and C3d

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Kijlstra, Aize; van der Veen, Rob L. P.; Makridaki, Maria; Murray, Ian J.; Berendschot, Tos T. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Lutein is selectively taken up by the primate retina and plays an important role as a filter for harmful blue light and as an antioxidant. Recent studies have shown that lutein has systemic anti-inflammatory properties. Dietary lutein has been associated with reduced circulating levels of inflammatory biomarkers such as CRP and sICAM. Whether lutein also affects activation of the complement system has not yet been addressed and was the purpose of the study described here. Seventy-two subjects with signs of early macular degeneration were randomly assigned to receive either a 10 mg lutein supplement or a placebo during one year. EDTA blood samples were collected at 0, 4, 8 and 12 months. Complement factor D (CFD), a rate limiting component of the alternative pathway of complement activation and the complement activation products C5a and C3d were determined in the plasma samples by ELISA. A significant 0.11 µg/ml monthly decrease in plasma CFD concentration was observed in the lutein group (p<0.001), resulting in a 51% decrease from 2.3 µg/ml at baseline to 1.0 µg/ml at 12 months. The C5a concentration showed a significant 0.063ng/ml monthly decrease in the lutein group (p<0.001) resulting in a 36% decrease from 2.2ng/ml at baseline to 1.6ng/ml at 12 months. The C3d concentration showed a significant 0.19µg/ml monthly decrease in the lutein group (p=0.004) that gave rise to a 9% decrease from 15.4µg/ml at baseline to 14.4µg/ml at 12 months. In the placebo group we found a significant 0.04 µg/ml monthly decrease in plasma CFD concentration, whereas no changes were observed for C5a and C3d. Lutein supplementation markedly decreases circulating levels of the complement factors CFD, C5a and C3d levels, which might allow a simple method to control this inflammatory pathway of the innate immune system. PMID:24009749

  11. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Malm, Sven; Jusko, Monika; Eick, Sigrun; Potempa, Jan; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI) is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and Factor H (FH). Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125)I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  12. Complementation Plasmids, Inducible Gene-Expression Systems, and Reporters for Staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    A cornucopia of methods and molecular tools is available for genetic modification of staphylococci, as shown for at least ten different species to date (Prax et al. Microbiology 159:421-435, 2013). This chapter reviews a number of frequently used vectors for complementation purposes that usually replicate in E. coli and staphylococci and differ in parameters including copy number, mode of replication, and sequence length. Systems for the artificial control of gene expression are described that are modulated by low-molecular-weight effectors such as metal cations, carbohydrates, and antibiotics. Finally, the usefulness of reporter proteins that exhibit enzymatic or autofluorescent characteristics in staphylococci is highlighted.

  13. Target deletion of complement component 9 attenuates antibody-mediated hemolysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Ju, Jiyu; Lin, Zhijuan; Xiao, Weiling; Li, Xiaofang; Zhuang, Baoxiang; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Xiangyu; Ma, Chao; Su, Weiliang; Wang, Yuqi; Qin, Xuebin; Liang, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Terminal complement membrane attack complex (MAC) formation is induced initially by C5b, followed by the sequential condensation of the C6, C7, C8. Polymerization of C9 to the C5b-8 complex forms the C5b-9 (or MAC). The C5b-9 forms lytic or non lytic pores in the cell membrane destroys membrane integrity. The biological functionalities of MAC has been previously investigated by using either the mice deficient in C5 and C6, or MAC’s regulator CD59. However, there is no available C9 deficient mice (mC9−/−) for directly dissecting the role of C5b-9 in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Further, since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes form non lytic pore, it may also plays biological functionality. To better understand the role of terminal complement cascades, here we report a successful generation of mC9−/−. We demonstrated that lack of C9 attenuates anti-erythrocyte antibody-mediated hemolysis or LPS-induced acute shock. Further, the rescuing effect on the acute shock correlates with the less release of IL-1β in mC9−/−, which is associated with suppression of MAC-mediated inflammasome activation in mC9−/−. Taken together, these results not only confirm the critical role of C5b-9 in complement-mediated hemolysis and but also highlight the critical role of C5b-9 in inflammasome activation. PMID:27444648

  14. Engineering a ribozyme cleavage-induced split fluorescent aptamer complementation assay

    PubMed Central

    Ausländer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Hürlemann, Samuel; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hammerhead ribozymes are self-cleaving RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression in living cells. Their cleavage performance is strongly influenced by intra-molecular loop–loop interactions, a feature not readily accessible through modern prediction algorithms. Ribozyme engineering and efficient implementation of ribozyme-based genetic switches requires detailed knowledge of individual self-cleavage performances. By rational design, we devised fluorescent aptamer-ribozyme RNA architectures that allow for the real-time measurement of ribozyme self-cleavage activity in vitro. The engineered nucleic acid molecules implement a split Spinach aptamer sequence that is made accessible for strand displacement upon ribozyme self-cleavage, thereby complementing the fluorescent Spinach aptamer. This fully RNA-based ribozyme performance assay correlates ribozyme cleavage activity with Spinach fluorescence to provide a rapid and straightforward technology for the validation of loop–loop interactions in hammerhead ribozymes. PMID:26939886

  15. Factor H and factor H-related protein 1 bind to human neutrophils via complement receptor 3, mediate attachment to Candida albicans, and enhance neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Losse, Josephine; Zipfel, Peter F; Józsi, Mihály

    2010-01-15

    The host complement system plays an important role in protection against infections. Several human-pathogenic microbes were shown to acquire host complement regulators, such as factor H (CFH), that downregulate complement activation at the microbial surface and protect the pathogens from the opsonic and lytic effects of complement. Because CFH can also bind to host cells, we addressed the role of CFH and CFH-related proteins as adhesion ligands in host-pathogen interactions. We show that the CFH family proteins CFH, CFH-like protein 1 (CFHL1), CFH-related protein (CFHR) 1, and CFHR4 long isoform bind to human neutrophil granulocytes and to the opportunistic human-pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Two major binding sites, one within the N-terminus and one in the C-terminus of CFH, were found to mediate binding to neutrophils. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18; alpha(M)beta2 integrin) was identified as the major cellular receptor on neutrophils for CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1, but not for CFHR4 long isoform. CFH and CFHR1 supported cell migration. Furthermore, CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1 increased attachment of neutrophils to C. albicans. Adhesion of neutrophils to plasma-opsonized yeasts was reduced when CFH binding was inhibited by specific Abs or when using CFH-depleted plasma. Yeast-bound CFH and CFHR1 enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species and the release of the antimicrobial protein lactoferrin by human neutrophils, and resulted in a more efficient killing of the pathogen. Thus, CFH and CFHR1, when bound on the surface of C. albicans, enhance antimicrobial activity of human neutrophils.

  16. Expression of two molecular forms of the complement decay-accelerating factor in the eye and lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Lass, J H; Walter, E I; Burris, T E; Grossniklaus, H E; Roat, M I; Skelnik, D L; Needham, L; Singer, M; Medof, M E

    1990-06-01

    Complement is present in ocular fluids, but the molecular mechanism(s) restricting its activation to exogenous targets and not to autologous ocular cells are currently unknown. To clarify how this control is achieved, monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based techniques were used to examine the eye, the lacrimal gland, and ocular fluids for the decay-accelerating factor (DAF), a membrane regulatory protein which protects blood cells from autologous complement activation on their surfaces. Immunohistochemical staining of tissue sections revealed DAF antigen on corneal and conjunctival epithelia, corneal endothelium, trabecular meshwork, and retina, as well as on lacrimal gland acinar cells and in adjacent lumens. By flow cytometry, cultures of conjunctival epithelium exhibited the highest DAF levels and levels on corneal epithelium greater than corneal endothelium greater than conjunctival fibroblasts. Biosynthetic labeling of corneal endothelium yielded de novo DAF protein with an apparent molecular weight (Mr) of 75 kD, approximating that of blood cell DAF protein, and digestions of conjunctival epithelium with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), an enzyme which cleaves glycoinositolphospholipid membrane anchors, released approximately 70% of the ocular surface DAF protein similar to leukocyte surface DAF protein. Quantitations of DAF by radioimmunometric assay employing mAbs against two DAF epitopes revealed 325 ng/ml (n = 12), 4.8 ng/ml (n = 10), and 22.0 ng/ml (n = 8) of soluble DAF antigen in tears, aqueous humor, and vitreous humor, respectively. Western blot analyses of the tear DAF antigen revealed two DAF forms, one with an apparent Mr of 72 kD resembling membrane DAF forms in other sites, and a second with an apparent Mr of 100 kD, which is previously undescribed. Since DAF activity is essential physiologically in protecting blood cells from autologous complement attack, the identification of DAF on the ocular surface, intraocularly, in the

  17. Targeting complement in therapy.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M

    2001-04-01

    With increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases, strategies that interfere with its deleterious action have become a major focus in pharmacological research. Endogenous soluble complement inhibitors (C1 inhibitor, recombinant soluble complement receptor 1, antibodies) blocking key proteins of the cascade reaction, neutralizing the action of the complement-derived anaphylatoxin C5a, or interfering with complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD18/11b)-mediated adhesion of inflammatory cells to the vascular endothelium have successfully been tested in various animal models over the past years. Promising results consequently led to clinical trials. Furthermore, incorporation of membrane-bound complement regulators (decay-accelerating factor (CD55), membrane co-factor protein (CD46), CD59) in transgenic animals has provided a major step forward in protecting xenografts from hyperacute rejection. At the same time, the poor contribution of complement to the antitumor response, which is caused by multiple resistance mechanisms that hamper the efficacy of antibody-based tumor therapy, is increasingly recognized and requires pharmacologic intervention. First attempts have now been made to interfere with the resistance mechanisms, thereby improving complement-mediated tumor cell destruction.

  18. Prostacyclin biosynthesis and reduced 5-HT uptake after complement-induced endothelial injury in the dog isolated lung.

    PubMed Central

    Bult, H.; Heiremans, J. J.; Herman, A. G.; Malcorps, C. M.; Peeters, F. A.

    1988-01-01

    1. Pulmonary prostacyclin (PGI2) biosynthesis was evaluated in relation to endothelial integrity before and after complement activation in isolated plasma-perfused lung lobes of the dog. 2. The plasma was activated with zymosan (ZAP, n = 4), yeast cells (YAP, n = 4) or yeast with 3 microM indomethacin (Indo + YAP, n = 3). Immunoreactive 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha (i-6-oxo-PGF1 alpha) and thromboxane B2 (iTXB2) were measured to monitor PGI2 and TXA2 biosynthesis. 3. The kinetic parameters Km and Vmax of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake were calculated on the basis of multiple indicator diffusion data to evaluate endothelial integrity. 4. YAP and ZAP induced a biphasic increase of the arterial perfusion pressure. The immediate pressure peak was partly mediated by TXA2 and the TXB2 was subsequently cleared by the lung. 5. The apparent Vmax of 5-HT uptake remained constant throughout the experiment. Thus, complement activation did not affect the number of endothelial 5-HT carrier sites available to the perfusate. 6. The apparent Km of 5-HT uptake was enhanced in 9 lungs exposed to activated plasma complement for 20 min. This decreased affinity for 5-HT probably reflects endothelial injury. It was transient as the apparent Km had returned to the baseline value after 60 min. 7. PGI2 clearance and biosynthesis were virtually absent in the control period. PGI2 formation increased drastically after infusion of ZAP or YAP and was proportional to the endothelial injury expressed as elevated Km or pulmonary oedema. Thus, PGI2 biosynthesis might be a marker of severe endothelial distress. PMID:3291998

  19. Complement C5a regulates IL-17 by affecting the crosstalk between DC and gammadelta T cells in CLP-induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruonan; Wang, Renxi; Han, Gencheng; Wang, Jianan; Chen, Guojiang; Wang, Liyan; Li, Xia; Guo, Renfeng; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan

    2010-04-01

    Complement 5a (C5a) and Interleukin-17 (IL-17) are two important inflammatory mediators in sepsis. Here we studied the mechanisms underlying regulation of IL-17 by anaphylatoxin C5a. We found that C5a blockade increased the survival rate of mice following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis and decreased IL-17 expression in vivo. IL-17 was secreted mainly by gammadelta T cells in this model. Importantly, our data suggest that C5a participates in the regulation of IL-17 secretion by gammadelta T cells. Dendritic cells (DC) were found to act as a "bridge" between C5a and gammadelta T cells in a mechanism involving IL-6 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). These results imply that C5a affects the crosstalk between DC and gammadelta T cells during sepsis development, and this may result in a large production of inflammatory mediators such as IL-17.

  20. Decay-accelerating factor (CD55), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored complement regulatory protein, is a receptor for several echoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Bergelson, J M; Chan, M; Solomon, K R; St John, N F; Lin, H; Finberg, R W

    1994-01-01

    Echoviruses are human pathogens belonging to the picornavirus family. Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored surface protein that protects cells from lysis by autologous complement. Anti-DAF monoclonal antibodies prevented echovirus 7 attachment to susceptible cells and protected cells from infection. HeLa cells specifically lost the capacity to bind echovirus 7 when treated with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, an enzyme that releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface, indicating that the virus receptor, like DAF, is a GPI-anchored protein. Although Chinese hamster ovary cells do not bind echovirus 7, transfectants expressing human DAF bound virus efficiently, and binding was prevented by pretreatment with an anti-DAF monoclonal antibody. Anti-DAF antibodies prevented infection by at least six echovirus serotypes. These results indicate that DAF is the receptor mediating attachment and infection by several echoviruses. Images PMID:7517044

  1. Serum proteomics of methamphetamine addicts and up-regulation of complement factor H related to methamphetamine addiction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wan-Lu; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Min; Zhou, Bing-Ying; Pu, Xiao-Ping

    2012-09-06

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a new type of drug with strong tolerance and addiction. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the processes of METH addiction are still not fully understood. To determine possible biomarkers and mechanisms that are responsible for METH addiction, a 2-DE based proteomics approach was used to evaluate the changes in protein expression of the serum in Chinese patients addicted to METH, which to the best of our knowledge is the first study of its kind. We identified five proteins that were markedly altered and complement factor H (CFH), the most stably up-expressed protein in each 2-DE experiment, was further studied using the rat conditioned place preference (CPP) model to detect any changes to its expression in the sera and six brain regions of interest. We report, for the first time, that CFH was positive related to METH addiction.

  2. Inherited factor H dysfunction and complement-associated glomerulonephritis in renal grafts of first and second transplantations.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Suzuki, T; Ikezoe, M; Matsumoto, N; Chikamoto, H; Nagafuchi, H; Horita, S; Hattori, M; Shiraga, H; Tokumoto, T; Tanabe, K; Toma, H; Ito, K

    2001-01-01

    A 38-yr-old man with factor H dysfunction and unknown glomerular disease received first and second renal transplantations (Tx) from living-related donors. His examination showed a low percentage activity of factor H (31%). Factor H dysfunction has been known to be associated with type II or III membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), haemolytic uraemic syndrome and IgA GN. The first graft from his mother showed diffuse mesangial deposit of IgA. His son has had IgA GN and his data also revealed a low percentage activity of factor H (33%). He and his son both showed a low activity of C3. Moreover, his father, who was the donor of the second Tx, had a low percentage activity of factor H (25%), and presented with mild glomerular deposit of C3 at operation, while he has been healthy through his entire 67 yr of life. Each of them had a low percentage activity of factor H. These findings through three generations suggested the inheritance of factor H dysfunction. The patient presented with proteinuria 3 months after the first Tx. At the first biopsy 30 months after the first Tx, light microscopy revealed minor glomerular abnormalities with electron dense deposits in subepithelial, intramembranous and mesangial regions, while immunofluorescence showed massive glomerular deposits of C3. In the second biopsy 51 months after the first Tx, the glomerulonephritis developed mesangial proliferation and crescent formation, accompanied by more massive C3 deposit and intramembranous, mesangial and subepithelial dense deposits. He then required redialysis. At the second and third biopsies within 2 months after the second Tx, the renal graft showed similar findings to the first biopsy after the first Tx. He perhaps presented with a recurrence of complement-associated GN, showing an atypical form of MPGN after Tx. These findings suggest that factor H dysfunction may play an important role of a certain pathogenesis of GN.

  3. Plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor does not prevent mechanical ventilation-induced pulmonary complement activation in a rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de Beer, F M; Aslami, H; Hoeksma, J; van Mierlo, G; Wouters, D; Zeerleder, S; Roelofs, J J T H; Juffermans, N P; Schultz, M J; Lagrand, W K

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical ventilation has the potential to cause lung injury, and the role of complement activation herein is uncertain. We hypothesized that inhibition of the complement cascade by administration of plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) prevents ventilation-induced pulmonary complement activation, and as such attenuates lung inflammation and lung injury in a rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Forty hours after intratracheal challenge with S. pneumoniae causing pneumonia rats were subjected to ventilation with lower tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or high tidal volumes without PEEP, after an intravenous bolus of C1-INH (200 U/kg) or placebo (saline). After 4 h of ventilation blood, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were collected. Non-ventilated rats with S. pneumoniae pneumonia served as controls. While ventilation with lower tidal volumes and PEEP slightly amplified pneumonia-induced complement activation in the lungs, ventilation with higher tidal volumes without PEEP augmented local complement activation more strongly. Systemic pre-treatment with C1-INH, however, failed to alter ventilation-induced complement activation with both ventilation strategies. In accordance, lung inflammation and lung injury were not affected by pre-treatment with C1-INH, neither in rats ventilated with lower tidal volumes and PEEP, nor rats ventilated with high tidal volumes without PEEP. Ventilation augments pulmonary complement activation in a rat model of S. pneumoniae pneumonia. Systemic administration of C1-INH, however, does not attenuate ventilation-induced complement activation, lung inflammation, and lung injury.

  4. Complement Factor H Binds at Two Independent Sites to C-reactive Protein in Acute Phase Concentrations*♦

    PubMed Central

    Okemefuna, Azubuike I.; Nan, Ruodan; Miller, Ami; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Factor H (FH) regulates the activation of C3b in the alternative complement pathway, both in serum and at host cell surfaces. It is composed of 20 short complement regulator (SCR) domains. The Y402H polymorphism in FH is a risk factor for age-related macular degeneration. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein that binds Ca2+. We established the FH-CRP interaction using improved analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and synchrotron x-ray scattering methods. Physiological FH and CRP concentrations were used in 137 mm NaCl and 2 mm Ca2+, in which the occurrence of denatured CRP was avoided. In solution, AUC revealed FH-CRP binding. The FH-CRP interaction inhibited the formation of higher FH oligomers, indicating that CRP blocked FH dimerization sites at both SCR-6/8 and SCR-16/20. SPR confirmed the FH-CRP interaction and its NaCl concentration dependence upon using either immobilized FH or CRP. The SCR-1/5 fragment of FH did not bind to CRP. In order of increasing affinity, SCR-16/20, SCR-6/8 (His-402), and SCR-6/8 (Tyr-402) fragments bound to CRP. X-ray scattering showed that FH became more compact when binding to CRP, which is consistent with CRP binding at two different FH sites. We concluded that FH and CRP bind at elevated acute phase concentrations of CRP in physiological buffer. The SCR-16/20 site is novel and indicates the importance of the FH-CRP interaction for both age-related macular degeneration and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:19850925

  5. Generation of embryos directly from embryonic stem cells by tetraploid embryo complementation reveals a role for GATA factors in organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duncan, S A

    2005-12-01

    Gene targeting in ES (embryonic stem) cells has been used extensively to study the role of proteins during embryonic development. In the traditional procedure, this requires the generation of chimaeric mice by introducing ES cells into blastocysts and allowing them to develop to term. Once chimaeric mice are produced, they are bred into a recipient mouse strain to establish germline transmission of the allele of interest. Although this approach has been used very successfully, the breeding cycles involved are time consuming. In addition, genes that are essential for organogenesis often have roles in the formation of extra-embryonic tissues that are essential for early stages of post-implantation development. For example, mice lacking the GATA transcription factors, GATA4 or GATA6, arrest during gastrulation due to an essential role for these factors in differentiation of extra-embryonic endoderm. This lethality has frustrated the study of these factors during the development of organs such as the liver and heart. Extraembryonic defects can, however, be circumvented by generating clonal mouse embryos directly from ES cells by tetraploid complementation. Here, we describe the usefulness and efficacy of this approach using GATA factors as an example.

  6. Extracellular stimulation of VSIG4/complement receptor Ig suppresses intracellular bacterial infection by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang H; Choi, Beom K; Kim, Young H; Han, Chungyong; Oh, Ho S; Lee, Don G; Kwon, Byoung S

    2016-09-01

    VSIG4/CRIg (V-set and immunoglobulin domain containing 4) is a transmembrane receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is expressed specifically on macrophages and mature dendritic cells. VSIG4 signaling accelerates phagocytosis of C3-opsonized bacteria, thereby efficiently clearing pathogens within macrophages. We found that VSIG4 signaling triggered by C3-opsonized Listeria (opLM) or by agonistic anti-VSIG4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) induced macrophages to form autophagosomes. VSIG4-induced autophagosomes were selectively colocalized with the intracellular LM while starvation-induced autophagosomes were not. Consistent with these results, the frequency of autophagosomes induced by infection with opLM was lower in VSIG4-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) than in WT BMDMs. Furthermore, when VSIG4 molecules were overexpressed in HeLa cells, which are non-macrophage cells, VSIG4 triggering led to efficient uptake of LM, autophagosome formation, and killing of the infected LM. These findings suggest that VSIG4 signaling not only promotes rapid phagocytosis and killing of C3-opsonized intracellular bacteria, as previously reported, but also induces autophagosome formation, eliminating the LM that have escaped from phagosomes. We conclude that VSIG4 signaling provides an anti-immune evasion mechanism that prevents the outgrowth of intracellular bacteria in macrophages.

  7. Structures of native and complexed complement factor D: implications of the atypical His57 conformation and self-inhibitory loop in the regulation of specific serine protease activity.

    PubMed

    Jing, H; Babu, Y S; Moore, D; Kilpatrick, J M; Liu, X Y; Volanakis, J E; Narayana, S V

    1998-10-09

    Factor D is a serine protease essential for the activation of the alternative pathway of complement. The structures of native factor D and a complex formed with isatoic anhydride inhibitor were determined at resolution of 2.3 and 1.5 A, respectively, in an isomorphous monoclinic crystal form containing one molecule per asymmetric unit. The native structure was compared with structures determined previously in a triclinic cell containing two molecules with different active site conformations. The current structure shows greater similarity with molecule B in the triclinic cell, suggesting that this may be the dominant factor D conformation in solution. The major conformational differences with molecule A in the triclinic cell are located in four regions, three of which are close to the active site and include some of the residues shown to be critical for factor D catalytic activity. The conformational flexibility associated with these regions is proposed to provide a structural basis for the previously proposed substrate-induced reversible conformational changes in factor D. The high-resolution structure of the factor D/isatoic anhydride complex reveals the binding mode of the mechanism-based inhibitor. The higher specificity towards factor D over trypsin and thrombin is based on hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitor benzyl ring and the aliphatic side-chain of Arg218 that is salt bridged with Asp189 at the bottom of the primary specificity (S1) pocket. Comparison of factor D structural variants with other serine protease structures revealed the presence of a unique "self-inhibitory loop". This loop (214-218) dictates the resting-state conformation of factor D by (1) preventing His57 from adopting active tautomer conformation, (2) preventing the P1 to P3 residues of the substrate from forming anti-parallel beta-sheets with the non-specific substrate binding loop, and (3) blocking the accessibility of Asp189 to the positive1y charged P1 residue of the

  8. Two additional human serum proteins structurally related to complement factor H: Evidence for a family of factor H-related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Skerka, C.; Timmann, C.; Horstmann, R.D. ); Zipfel, P.F.

    1992-05-15

    The authors identify and characterize two human serum proteins with an apparent molecular mass of 24 and 29 kDa, which are antigenically related to complement factor H. These proteins represent differently glycosylated forms and are encoded by the same mRNA. The corresponding cDNA clone is 1051 bp in size and hybridized to a 1.4-kb mRNA derived from human liver. The predicted translation product represents a protein of 270 amino acids, which displays a hydrophobic leader sequence, indicative of a secreted protein. The secreted part is organized in four short consensus repeats (SCR) and has a single putative N-linked glycosylation site. The predicted sequence is closely related to that of the previously described factor H-related proteins h37 and h42, which are also derived from a 1.4-kb mRNA. Amino acid comparison of these factor H-related proteins showed identical leader sequences, an exchange of three amino acids in SCR1, identical sequences of SCR2, and a lower degree of homology between SCR3-4 (h24 and h29) and SCR4-5 (h37 and h42). In addition, SCR3-4 of h24 and h29 display homology to SCR19-20 of human complement factor H. The relatedness of structural elements of the factor H-related proteins h24, h29, h37, and h42 and of factor H, suggests a function common to these proteins and indicates the existence of a gene family consisting of factor H and at least two factor H-related genes. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Angioedema induced by a peptide derived from complement component C2

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Synthetic peptides that correspond to the COOH-terminal portion of C2b enhance vascular permeability in human and guinea pig skin. In human studies, 1 nmol of the most active peptide of 25-amino acid residues produced substantial local edema. A pentapeptide and a heptapeptide corresponding to the COOH-terminal sequence of C2b each induced contraction of estrous rat uterus in the micromole range; a peptide of 25 amino acids from this region induced a like contraction of rat uterus at a concentration 20-fold lower than the smaller peptides. The vascular permeability of guinea pig skin was enhanced by doses of these synthetic peptides in a similar fashion as that observed for the concentration of rat uterus. The induction of localized edema by intradermal injection in both the guinea pig and the human proceeds in the presence of antihistaminic drugs, suggesting that there is a histamine-independent component to the observed increase in vascular permeability. Cleavage of C2 with the enzymic subcomponent of C1, C1s, yields only C2a and C2b, and no small peptides, whereas cleavage of C2 with C1s and plasmin yields a set of small peptides. These plasmin- cleaved peptides are derived from the COOH terminus of C2b, and they induce the contraction of estrous rat uterus. PMID:2972793

  10. New insights into disease-specific absence of complement factor H related protein C in mouse models of spontaneous autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Gaurav; Ferreira, Viviana P; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Banda, Nirmal K

    2014-11-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) protein is an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement (AP) both in the fluid phase and on the surface of host cells. Mouse and human complement factor H-related (CFHR) proteins also belong to the fH family of plasma glycoproteins. The main goal of the current study was to compare the presence of mRNA for two mCFHR proteins in spontaneously developing autoimmune diseases in mice such as dense deposit disease (DDD), diabetes mellitus (DM), basal laminar deposits (BLD), collagen antibody-induced arthrits (CAIA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we report for the first time that the CFHR-C mRNA was universally absent in the liver from three strains of lupus-prone mice and in a diabetic-prone mouse strain. The mRNA levels (pg/ng) for CFH and CFHR-B in MRL-lpr/lpr, at 9 wks and 23 wks were 707.2±44.4, 54.5±5.75 and 729±252.9, 74.04±22.76, respectively. The mRNA levels for CFH and CFHR-B in NZB/NZW mice, at 9 wks and 54 wks were 579.9±23.8, 58.8±1.41 and 890.3±135.2, 63.30±9.2, respectively. CFHR-C protein was absent in the circulation of MRL-lpr/lpr and NZB/NZW mice before and after the development of lupus. Similarly, mRNA and protein for CFHR-C was universally absent in liver and other organs and in the circulation of NOD mice before and after the development of DM. In contrast, the mRNAs for CFH, CFHR-B and CFHR-C were universally present in the liver from mice with and without DDD, BLD and CAIA. The levels of mRNA for CFHR-B in mice with and without BLD were ∼4 times higher than the mice with lupus. The complete absence of mRNA for CFHR-C in lupus and diabetic-prone strains indicates that polymorphic variation within the mouse CFHR family exists and raises the possibility that such variation contributes to lupus and diabetic phenotypes.

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies against Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Acquire an Ability To Kill Tumor Cells through Complement Activation by Mutations That Selectively Facilitate the Hexamerization of IgG on Opsonized Cells.

    PubMed

    Tammen, Annalina; Derer, Stefanie; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Rösner, Thies; Kretschmer, Anna; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I; Valerius, Thomas

    2017-02-15

    Triggering of the complement cascade induces tumor cell lysis via complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and attracts and activates cytotoxic cells. It therefore represents an attractive mechanism for mAb in cancer immunotherapy development. The classical complement pathway is initiated by IgG molecules that have assembled into ordered hexamers after binding their Ag on the tumor cell surface. The requirements for CDC are further impacted by factors such as Ab epitope, valency, and affinity. Thus, mAb against well-validated solid tumor targets, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) that effectively induces complement activation and CDC, are highly sought after. The potency of complement activation by IgG Abs can be increased via several strategies. We identified single-point mutations in the Fc domain (e.g., E345K or E430G) enhancing Fc:Fc interactions, hexamer formation, and CDC after Ab binds cell-surface Ag. We show that EGFR Abs directed against clinically relevant epitopes can be converted into mAb with unprecedented CDC activity. Alternative strategies rely on increasing the affinity of monomeric IgG for C1q by introduction of a quadruple mutation at the C1q binding site or via generation of an IgG1/IgG3 chimera. In this study we show that selective enhancement of C1q binding via avidity modulation is superior to the unattended increase in C1q binding via affinity approaches, particularly for target cells with reduced EGFR expression levels. Improving Fc:Fc interactions of Ag-bound IgG therefore represents a highly promising and novel approach for potentiating the anti-tumor activity of therapeutic mAb against EGFR and potentially other tumor targets.

  12. Susceptibility to Invasive Meningococcal Disease: Polymorphism of Complement System Genes and Neisseria meningitidis Factor H Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Declan T.; Bourke, Thomas W.; Fairley, Derek J.; Borrow, Raymond; Shields, Michael D.; Zipfel, Peter F.; Hughes, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neisseria meningitidis can cause severe infection in humans. Polymorphism of Complement Factor H (CFH) is associated with altered risk of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). We aimed to find whether polymorphism of other complement genes altered risk and whether variation of N. meningitidis factor H binding protein (fHBP) affected the risk association. Methods We undertook a case-control study with 309 European cases and 5,200 1958 Birth Cohort and National Blood Service cohort controls. We used additive model logistic regression, accepting P<0.05 as significant after correction for multiple testing. The effects of fHBP subfamily on the age at infection and severity of disease was tested using the independent samples median test and Student’s T test. The effect of CFH polymorphism on the N. meningitidis fHBP subfamily was investigated by logistic regression and Chi squared test. Results Rs12085435 A in C8B was associated with odds ratio (OR) of IMD (0.35 [95% CI 0.19–0.67]; P = 0.03 after correction). A CFH haplotype tagged by rs3753396 G was associated with IMD (OR 0.56 [95% CI 0.42–0.76], P = 1.6x10−4). There was no bacterial load (CtrA cycle threshold) difference associated with carriage of this haplotype. Host CFH haplotype and meningococcal fHBP subfamily were not associated. Individuals infected with meningococci expressing subfamily A fHBP were younger than those with subfamily B fHBP meningococci (median 1 vs 2 years; P = 0.025). Discussion The protective CFH haplotype alters odds of IMD without affecting bacterial load for affected heterozygotes. CFH haplotype did not affect the likelihood of infecting meningococci having either fHBP subfamily. The association between C8B rs12085435 and IMD requires independent replication. The CFH association is of interest because it is independent of known functional polymorphisms in CFH. As fHBP-containing vaccines are now in use, relationships between CFH polymorphism and vaccine effectiveness and

  13. Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell research trends: complementation and diversification of the field.

    PubMed

    Kobold, Sabine; Guhr, Anke; Kurtz, Andreas; Löser, Peter

    2015-05-12

    Research in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is rapidly developing and there are expectations that this research may obviate the need to use human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), the ethics of which has been a subject of controversy for more than 15 years. In this study, we investigated approximately 3,400 original research papers that reported an experimental use of these types of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and were published from 2008 to 2013. We found that research into both cell types was conducted independently and further expanded, accompanied by a growing intersection of both research fields. Moreover, an in-depth analysis of papers that reported the use of both cell types indicates that hESCs are still being used as a "gold standard," but in a declining proportion of publications. Instead, the expanding research field is diversifying and hESC and hiPSC lines are increasingly being used in more independent research and application areas.

  14. RXFP1 is Targeted by Complement C1q Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Factor 8 in Brain Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Glogowska, Aleksandra; Burg, Maxwell; Wong, G. William; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Klonisch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The relaxin-like RXFP1 ligand–receptor system has important functions in tumor growth and tissue invasion. Recently, we have identified the secreted protein, CTRP8, a member of the C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein (CTRP) family, as a novel ligand of the relaxin receptor, RXFP1, with functions in brain cancer. Here, we review the role of CTRP members in cancers cells with particular emphasis on CTRP8 in glioblastoma. PMID:26322020

  15. MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-factor D activator in resting blood: the lectin and the alternative complement pathways are fundamentally linked

    PubMed Central

    Dobó, József; Szakács, Dávid; Oroszlán, Gábor; Kortvely, Elod; Kiss, Bence; Boros, Eszter; Szász, Róbert; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Pál, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    MASP-3 was discovered 15 years ago as the third mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease of the complement lectin pathway. Lacking any verified substrate its role remained ambiguous. MASP-3 was shown to compete with a key lectin pathway enzyme MASP-2 for MBL binding, and was therefore considered to be a negative complement regulator. Later, knock-out mice experiments suggested that MASP-1 and/or MASP-3 play important roles in complement pro-factor D (pro-FD) maturation. However, studies on a MASP-1/MASP-3-deficient human patient produced contradicting results. In normal resting blood unperturbed by ongoing coagulation or complement activation, factor D is present predominantly in its active form, suggesting that resting blood contains at least one pro-FD activating proteinase that is not a direct initiator of coagulation or complement activation. We have recently showed that all three MASPs can activate pro-FD in vitro. In resting blood, however, using our previously evolved MASP-1 and MASP-2 inhibitors we proved that neither MASP-1 nor MASP-2 activates pro-FD. Other plasma proteinases, particularly MASP-3, remained candidates for that function. For this study we evolved a specific MASP-3 inhibitor and unambiguously proved that activated MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-FD activator in resting blood, which demonstrates a fundamental link between the lectin and alternative pathways. PMID:27535802

  16. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy to Complement Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission in the Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safiq, Alexandrea; Ali, Salina; Nadarski, Benjamin; Smith, Jeremy; Yoskowitz, Josh; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael; Union College Team

    2013-10-01

    There is an active research program in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory on proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of atmospheric aerosols. PIXE is a powerful tool for the study of airborne pollution because it provides information on a broad range of elements simultaneously, has low detection limits, is nondestructive, does not require large samples, and the analysis can be performed in a short amount of time. However, PIXE provides only elemental information. We are investigating the use of Micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) to complement PIXE analysis of aerosol samples by providing chemical information. In MRS, laser light is inelastically scattered from a sample and the vibrational spectrum of the scattered light is used to identify molecules and their functional groups. We are focusing on aerosol samples collected in the Adirondack Mountains that have considerable concentrations of sulfur that may contribute to acid rain. The MRS spectra collected on aerosol samples are being compared with a library of standards to try to determine the molecular structures in which the sulfur is bound. We will describe the analysis and present preliminary results. Union College Undergraduate Research Program.

  17. APOBEC1 complementation factor (A1CF) is dispensable for C-to-U RNA editing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Elizabeth M; McCarty, Christopher; Mehalow, Adrienne; Svenson, Karen L; Murray, Stephen A; Korstanje, Ron; Braun, Robert E

    2017-04-01

    Editing of the human and murine ApoB mRNA by APOBEC1, the catalytic enzyme of the protein complex that catalyzes C-to-U RNA editing, creates an internal stop codon within the APOB coding sequence, generating two protein isoforms. It has been long held that APOBEC1-mediated editing activity is dependent on the RNA binding protein A1CF. The function of A1CF in adult tissues has not been reported because a previously reported null allele displays embryonic lethality. This work aimed to address the function of A1CF in adult mouse tissues using a conditional A1cf allele. Unexpectedly, A1cf-null mice were viable and fertile with modest defects in hematopoietic, immune, and metabolic parameters. C-to-U RNA editing was quantified for multiple targets, including ApoB, in the small intestine and liver. In all cases, no changes in RNA editing efficiency were observed. Blood plasma analysis demonstrated a male-specific increase in solute concentration and increased cellularity in the glomeruli of male A1cf-null mice. Urine analysis showed a reduction in solute concentration, suggesting abnormal water homeostasis and possible kidney abnormalities exclusive to the male. Computational identification of kidney C-to-U editing sites from polyadenylated RNA-sequencing identified a number of editing sites exclusive to the kidney. However, molecular analysis of kidney C-to-U editing showed no changes in editing efficiency with A1CF loss. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that A1CF does not act as the APOBEC1 complementation factor in vivo under normal physiological conditions and suggests new roles for A1CF, specifically within the male adult kidney.

  18. APOBEC1 complementation factor (A1CF) is dispensable for C-to-U RNA editing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Elizabeth M.; McCarty, Christopher; Mehalow, Adrienne; Svenson, Karen L.; Murray, Stephen A.; Korstanje, Ron; Braun, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Editing of the human and murine ApoB mRNA by APOBEC1, the catalytic enzyme of the protein complex that catalyzes C-to-U RNA editing, creates an internal stop codon within the APOB coding sequence, generating two protein isoforms. It has been long held that APOBEC1-mediated editing activity is dependent on the RNA binding protein A1CF. The function of A1CF in adult tissues has not been reported because a previously reported null allele displays embryonic lethality. This work aimed to address the function of A1CF in adult mouse tissues using a conditional A1cf allele. Unexpectedly, A1cf-null mice were viable and fertile with modest defects in hematopoietic, immune, and metabolic parameters. C-to-U RNA editing was quantified for multiple targets, including ApoB, in the small intestine and liver. In all cases, no changes in RNA editing efficiency were observed. Blood plasma analysis demonstrated a male-specific increase in solute concentration and increased cellularity in the glomeruli of male A1cf-null mice. Urine analysis showed a reduction in solute concentration, suggesting abnormal water homeostasis and possible kidney abnormalities exclusive to the male. Computational identification of kidney C-to-U editing sites from polyadenylated RNA-sequencing identified a number of editing sites exclusive to the kidney. However, molecular analysis of kidney C-to-U editing showed no changes in editing efficiency with A1CF loss. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that A1CF does not act as the APOBEC1 complementation factor in vivo under normal physiological conditions and suggests new roles for A1CF, specifically within the male adult kidney. PMID:28069890

  19. Soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) is not as effective as cobra venom factor in the treatment of experimental allergic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Vriesendorp, F J; Flynn, R E; Pappolla, M A; Koski, C L

    1997-12-01

    To further investigate the role of complement activation in Experimental Allergic Neuritis (EAN), the effect of systemic complement blockade by soluble CR1 (sCR1) was compared to complement depletion by Cobra Venom Factor (CVF) in EAN rats immunized with bovine peripheral nerve myelin. EAN rats treated with CVF (n = 10) had significantly reduced clinical scores compared to rats treated with sCR1 (n = 9) or saline (n = 10) (score: sCR1 0.66 +/- 0.7; CVF 0; saline 0.6 +/- 0.8; mean +/- SD). CVF treatment more effectively decreased inflammation and demyelination compared to sCR1 treatment which had only a partial effect (inflammation: sCR1 1.8 +/- 1.4; CVF 0.3 +/- 0.7; saline 1.9 +/- 1.2; demyelination; sCR1 1.3 +/- 1; CVF 0.1 +/- 0.6; saline 1.7 +/- 1.2). In lumbosacral nerve roots significantly less infiltrating ED1 positive macrophages and CD11bc (expressing complement receptor 3 or CR3) positive inflammatory cells were present in CVF treated EAN rats while there was a limited decrease in inflammation in the sCR1 treated animals compared to the saline treated rats (ED1: sCR1 1.4 +/- 1.2; CVF 0.5 +/- 0.6; saline 1.7 +/- 1.2; CD11bc: sCR1 1.9 +/- 1.2; CVF 0.9 +/- 1; saline 2.1 +/- 1.2). Our findings suggest that complement depletion by CVF is more effective than complement blockade by sCR1 in reducing the severity of inflammatory peripheral nerve demyelination.

  20. Complement inhibition in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pio, Ruben; Ajona, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2013-02-01

    For decades, complement has been recognized as an effector arm of the immune system that contributes to the destruction of tumor cells. In fact, many therapeutic strategies have been proposed that are based on the intensification of complement-mediated responses against tumors. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm by demonstrating a tumor-promoting role for complement. Cancer cells seem to be able to establish a convenient balance between complement activation and inhibition, taking advantage of complement initiation without suffering its deleterious effects. Complement activation may support chronic inflammation, promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment, induce angiogenesis, and activate cancer-related signaling pathways. In this context, inhibition of complement activation would be a therapeutic option for treating cancer. This concept is relatively new and deserves closer attention. In this article, we summarize the mechanisms of complement activation on cancer cells, the cancer-promoting effect of complement initiation, and the rationale behind the use of complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against cancer.

  1. Ultraviolet light-induced chromosomal aberrations in cultured cells from Cockayne syndrome and complementation group C xeroderma pigmentosum patients: lack of correlation with cancer susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Seguin, L.R.; Tarone, R.E.; Liao, K.H.; Robbins, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    Both Cockayne syndrome (CS) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are inherited diseases with defective repair of damage induced in DNA by UV. Patients with XP, but not those with CS, have an increased susceptibility to formation of sunlight-induced skin tumors. We determined the frequency of UV-induced chromosomal aberrations in cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines from five CS patients and three complementation-group-C XP patients to determine whether such aberrations were abnormally increased only in the XP cells. We found that CS cells had the same abnormally increased number of induced aberrations as the XP cells, indicating that the number of UV-induced aberrations in XP group C cells does not account for the susceptibility of these XP patients to sunlight-induced skin cancer.

  2. Interaction between complement regulators and Streptococcus pyogenes: binding of C4b-binding protein and factor H/factor H-like protein 1 to M18 strains involves two different cell surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Caballero, David; García-Laorden, Isabel; Cortés, Guadalupe; Wessels, Michael R; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez; Albertí, Sebastián

    2004-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus, is one of the most frequent causes of pharyngitis and skin infections in humans. Many virulence mechanisms have been suggested to be involved in the infectious process. Among them is the binding to the bacterial cell surface of the complement regulatory proteins factor H, factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), and C4b-binding protein. Previous studies indicate that binding of these three regulators to the streptococcal cell involves the M protein encoded by the emm gene. M-type 18 strains are prevalent among clinical isolates and have been shown to interact with all three complement regulators simultaneously. Using isogenic strains lacking expression of the Emm18 or the Enn18 proteins, we demonstrate in this study that, in contradistinction to previously described S. pyogenes strains, M18 strains bind the complement regulators factor H, FHL-1, and C4b-binding protein through two distinct cell surface proteins. Factor H and FHL-1 bind to the Emm18 protein, while C4BP binds to the Enn18 protein. We propose that expression of two distinct surface structures that bind complement regulatory proteins represents a unique adaptation of M18 strains that enhances their resistance to opsonization by human plasma and increases survival of this particular S. pyogenes strain in the human host. These new findings illustrate that S. pyogenes has evolved diverse mechanisms for recruitment of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface to evade immune clearance in the human host.

  3. Impaired binding of the age-related macular degeneration-associated complement factor H 402H allotype to Bruch's membrane in human retina.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon J; Perveen, Rahat; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Morgan, B Paul; Sim, Robert B; Bishop, Paul N; Day, Anthony J

    2010-09-24

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the predominant cause of blindness in the industrialized world where destruction of the macula, i.e. the central region of the retina, results in loss of vision. AMD is preceded by the formation of deposits in the macula, which accumulate between the Bruch's membrane and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These deposits are associated with complement-mediated inflammation and perturb retinal function. Recent genetic association studies have demonstrated that a common allele (402H) of the complement factor H (CFH) gene is a major risk factor for the development of AMD; CFH suppresses complement activation on host tissues where it is believed to bind via its interaction with polyanionic structures. We have shown previously that this coding change (Y402H; from a tyrosine to histidine residue) alters the binding of the CFH protein to sulfated polysaccharides. Here we demonstrate that the AMD-associated polymorphism profoundly affects CFH binding to sites within human macula. Notably, the AMD-associated 402H variant binds less well to heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate glycosaminoglycans within Bruch's membrane when compared with the 402Y form; both allotypes exhibit a similar level of binding to the RPE. We propose that the impaired binding of the 402H variant to Bruch's membrane results in an overactivation of the complement pathway leading to local chronic inflammation and thus contributes directly to the development and/or progression of AMD. These studies therefore provide a putative disease mechanism and add weight to the genetic association studies that implicate the 402H allele as an important risk factor in AMD.

  4. Expression of Human Complement Factor H Prevents Age-Related Macular Degeneration–Like Retina Damage and Kidney Abnormalities in Aged Cfh Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jin-Dong; Kelly, Una; Landowski, Michael; Toomey, Christopher B.; Groelle, Marybeth; Miller, Chelsey; Smith, Stephanie G.; Klingeborn, Mikael; Singhapricha, Terry; Jiang, Haixiang; Frank, Michael M.; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is an important regulatory protein in the alternative pathway of the complement system, and CFH polymorphisms increase the genetic risk of age-related macular degeneration dramatically. These same human CFH variants have also been associated with dense deposit disease. To mechanistically study the function of CFH in the pathogenesis of these diseases, we created transgenic mouse lines using human CFH bacterial artificial chromosomes expressing full-length human CFH variants and crossed these to Cfh knockout (Cfh−/−) mice. Human CFH protein inhibited cleavage of mouse complement component 3 and factor B in plasma and in retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera, establishing that human CFH regulates activation of the mouse alternative pathway. One of the mouse lines, which express relatively higher levels of CFH, demonstrated functional and structural protection of the retina owing to the Cfh deletion. Impaired visual function, detected as a deficit in the scotopic electroretinographic response, was improved in this transgenic mouse line compared with Cfh−/− mice, and transgenics had a thicker outer nuclear layer and less sub–retinal pigment epithelium deposit accumulation. In addition, expression of human CFH also completely protected the mice from developing kidney abnormalities associated with loss of CFH. These humanized CFH mice present a valuable model for study of the molecular mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration and dense deposit disease and for testing therapeutic targets. PMID:25447048

  5. Microbe-specific C3b deposition in the horseshoe crab complement system in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Toyoki; Shibata, Toshio; Kitazaki, Kazuki; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens in the mammalian complement system, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. To understand the molecular mechanism of C3b deposition on microbes, we characterized two types of C2/factor B homologs (designated TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2) identified from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Although the domain architectures of TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were identical to those of mammalian homologs, they contained five-repeated and seven-repeated complement control protein domains at their N-terminal regions, respectively. TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were synthesized and glycosylated in hemocytes and secreted to hemolymph plasma, which existed in a complex with C3 (TtC3), and their activation by microbes was absolutely Mg(2+)-dependent. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TtC3b deposition was Mg(2+)-dependent on Gram-positive bacteria or fungi, but not on Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this analysis demonstrated that Ca(2+)-dependent lectins (C-reactive protein-1 and tachylectin-5A) were required for TtC3b deposition on Gram-positive bacteria, and that a Ca(2+)-independent lectin (Tachypleus plasma lectin-1) was definitely indispensable for TtC3b deposition on fungi. In contrast, a horseshoe crab lipopolysaccharide-sensitive protease factor C was necessary and sufficient to deposit TtC3b on Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that plasma lectins and factor C play key roles in microbe-specific TtC3b deposition in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

  6. Identification of factor H-like protein 1 as the predominant complement regulator in Bruch's membrane: implications for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon J; Schmidt, Christoph Q; White, Anne M; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Morgan, B Paul; Bishop, Paul N

    2014-11-15

    The tight regulation of innate immunity on extracellular matrix (ECM) is a vital part of immune homeostasis throughout the human body, and disruption to this regulation in the eye is thought to contribute directly to the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The plasma complement regulator factor H (FH) is thought to be the main regulator that protects ECM against damaging complement activation. However, in the present study we demonstrate that a truncated form of FH, called FH-like protein 1 (FHL-1), is the main regulatory protein in the layer of ECM under human retina, called Bruch's membrane. Bruch's membrane is a major site of AMD disease pathogenesis and where drusen, the hallmark lesions of AMD, form. We show that FHL-1 can passively diffuse through Bruch's membrane, whereas the full sized, glycosylated, FH cannot. FHL-1 is largely bound to Bruch's membrane through interactions with heparan sulfate, and we show that the common Y402H polymorphism in the CFH gene, associated with an increased risk of AMD, reduces the binding of FHL-1 to this heparan sulfate. We also show that FHL-1 is retained in drusen whereas FH coats the periphery of the lesions, perhaps inhibiting their clearance. Our results identify a novel mechanism of complement regulation in the human eye, which highlights potential new avenues for therapeutic strategies.

  7. Environmental Factors Inducing Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, N

    2012-01-01

    Background An explosion of research has been done in discovering how human health is affected by environmental factors. I will discuss the impacts of environmental cancer causing factors and how they continue to cause multiple disruptions in cellular networking. Some risk factors may not cause cancer. Other factors initiate consecutive genetic mutations that would eventually alter the normal pathway of cellular proliferations and differentiation. Genetic mutations in four groups of genes; (Oncogenes, Tumor suppressor genes, Apoptosis genes and DNA repairing genes) play a vital role in altering the normal cell division. In recent years, molecular genetics have greatly increased our understanding of the basic mechanisms in cancer development and utilizing these molecular techniques for cancer screening, diagnosis, prognosis and therapies. Inhibition of carcinogenic exposures wherever possible should be the goal of cancer prevention programs to reduce exposures from all environmental carcinogens. PMID:23304670

  8. Complement C3 and Decay-Accelerating Factor Expression Levels Are Modulated by Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Endometrial Compartments During the Implantation Window

    PubMed Central

    Argandoña, Felipe; Azúa, Rodrigo; Kohen, Paulina; Devoto, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The control of complement activation in the embryo–maternal environment has been demonstrated to be critical for embryo survival. Complement proteins are expressed in the human endometrium; however, the modulation of this expression by embryo signals has not been explored. To assess the expression of complement proteins in response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), we designed an experimental study using in vivo and in vitro models. Twelve fertile women were treated with hCG or left untreated during the mid-luteal phase, and an endometrial biopsy was performed 24 hours later. The localizations of C3, membrane cofactor protein (MCP; CD46), decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55), and protectin (CD59) were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of these proteins were quantified by real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in cells harvested from endometrial compartments using laser capture microdissection. Endometrial explants were cultured with or without hCG for 24 hours, and the C3 and DAF protein levels were measured by Western blotting. Elevated C3 mRNA levels in stromal cells and elevated DAF levels in epithelial luminal cells were detected after hCG treatment. In the endometrial explant model, the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 inhibited the increases in the levels of C3 and DAF in response to hCG. The findings of this study indicate that hCG plays a role in embryo–endometrium communication and affects the expression of complement proteins in endometrial compartments during the implantation window. PMID:23427180

  9. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced prenatally lethal mutations define at least two complementation groups within the embryonic ectoderm development (eed) locus in mouse chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Carpenter, D A

    1993-01-01

    Two loci [l(7)5Rn and l(7)6Rn] defined by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced, prenatally lethal mutations were mapped by means of trans complementation crosses to mice carrying lethal deletions of the albino (c) locus in Chromosome (Chr) 7. Both loci were found to map to the subregion of the Mod-2-sh-1 interval that contains the eed (embryonic ectoderm development) locus, eed has been defined by the inability of embryos homozygous for certain c deletions to develop beyond the early stages of gastrulation. Evidence for at least two loci necessary for normal prenatal development, rather than one locus, that map within the eed interval came from the observation that two prenatally lethal mutations, 3354SB [l(7)5Rn3354SB] and 4234SB [l(7)6Rn4234SB], could complement each other in trans, but could not each be complemented individually by c deletions known to include the eed locus. A somewhat leaky allele of l(7)5Rn [l(7)5Rn1989SB] was also recovered, in which hemizygotes are often stillborn and homozygotes exhibit variable fitness and survival. The mapping of the loci defined by these mutations is likely to be useful for genetic, molecular, and phenotypic characterization of the eed region, and mutations at either locus (or both loci) may contribute to the eed phenotype.

  10. Production and interferon-gamma-mediated regulation of complement component C2 and factors B and D by the astroglioma cell line U105-MG.

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, S R; Ishii, Y; Agrawal, A; Volanakis, J E

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the synthesis of the complement component C2 and factors B and D by the human astroglioma cell line U105-MG. All three components were structurally and antigenically similar to their serum counterparts, as determined by biosynthetic labelling studies or Western blot analysis. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the mRNAs of all three components had the same apparent sizes as the equivalent mRNAs from hepatocyte and monocyte cell lines. Interestingly, U105-MG cells produce two C2 transcripts with sizes of approximately 2.8 and 2.3 kb. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) enhanced the expression of C2 and factor B mRNA and protein in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, while factor D expression was refractory to IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma appeared to predominantly enhance the expression of the large (2.8 kb) C2 transcript. Kinetic studies demonstrated peak C2 and factor B expression in 48 h in response to IFN-gamma, similar to the acute-phase response of factor B in serum. These data are the first to demonstrate the synthesis of C2 and factor D by astroglioma cells. Combined with previous reports documenting the synthesis of C3 by astrocytes, our data suggest that endogenous synthesis of complement proteins, and particularly of alternative pathway activation components (C3, factors B and D), may play an important role in host defence in the central nervous system. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1445220

  11. Complement C4-derived monocyte-directed chemotaxis-inhibitory factor. A molecular mechanism to cause polymorphonuclear leukocyte-predominant infiltration in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cavities.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Tsuruta, T.; Takagi, K.; Kambara, T.

    1991-01-01

    To reveal the mechanism of the lesser infiltration of monocytes in synovial cavities with rheumatoid arthritis despite the presence of chronic inflammation, the synovial fluid from 15 rheumatoid arthritis patients was analyzed with respect to leukocyte chemotaxis. The synovial fluid possessed strong chemotactic activity to polymorphonuclear leukocytes but rather suppressed one to monocytes. The synovial fluid contained two different inhibitory activities in monocyte chemotaxis. One, which also suppressed polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis, was identified as alpha 1 protease inhibitor. The other, with molecular weight of 8 kd, possessed the specificity to monocytes and shared the antigenicity with complement C4 but not with C3 or C5. A similar inhibitor was generated in normal human plasma when the classical pathway of the complement system was initiated with aggregated human IgG, while it was not when alternative pathway was initiated with zymosan. The small size factor in the synovial fluid, apparently derived from C4, seemed to be a cyto-directed factor that might block an early part of signal transduction system of monocytes in the chemotaxis. After removal of the small-size inhibitor, the synovial fluid exhibited chemotactic ability to monocytes. Therefore the apparent C4-derived factor might play a key role in the polymorphonuclear leukocyte-predominant infiltration in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:2024711

  12. Complement regulates conventional DC-mediated NK-cell activation by inducing TGF-β1 in Gr-1+ myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Qing, Xiaoping; Koo, Gloria C; Salmon, Jane E

    2012-07-01

    Complement activation modulates DC-mediated T-cell activation, but whether complement affects DC-mediated priming of NK cells is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that conventional DCs (cDCs) from C3(-/-) and C5aR(-/-) mice are hyperresponsive to polyI:C, a TLR3 ligand, leading to enhanced NK-cell activation. We found that cDCs lack C5a receptor (C5aR) and do not respond to C5a directly. Depletion of Gr-1(+) myeloid cells augments polyI:C-induced cDC activation in WT but not in C3(-/-) or C5aR(-/-) mice, indicating that the effect of complement activation on cDCs is indirectly mediated through C5aR-expressing Gr-1(+) myeloid cells. We further demonstrated that the mechanism by which Gr-1(+) myeloid cells regulate the activity of cDCs involves C5a-dependent TGF-β1 production in Gr-1(+) myeloid cells. C5a enhances and blocking C5aR decreases TGF-β1 production in cultured bone marrow Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells. C5aR deficiency is associated with reduced circulating TGF-β1 levels, while depleting Gr-1(+) myeloid cells abrogates this difference between WT and C5aR(-/-) mice. Lastly, we showed that enhanced cDC-NK-cell activity in C3(-/-) mice led to delayed melanoma tumor growth. Thus, complement activation indirectly regulates cDC-NK-cell activation in response to inflammatory stimuli such as TLR3 by promoting TGF-β1 production in Gr-1(+) myeloid cells at steady state.

  13. Human IgG1 monoclonal antibody against human collagen 17 noncollagenous 16A domain induces blisters via complement activation in experimental bullous pemphigoid model.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Ujiie, Hideyuki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Wang, Gang; Moriuchi, Reine; Qiao, Hong-jiang; Morioka, Hiroshi; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Long, Heather A; Nishie, Wataru; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2010-12-15

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease caused by IgG autoantibodies targeting the noncollagenous 16A (NC16A) domain of human collagen 17 (hCOL17), which triggers blister formation via complement activation. Previous in vitro analysis demonstrated that IgG1 autoantibodies showed much stronger pathogenic activity than IgG4 autoantibodies; however, the exact pathogenic role of IgG1 autoantibodies has not been fully demonstrated in vivo. We constructed a recombinant IgG1 mAb against hCOL17 NC16A from BP patients. In COL17-humanized mice, this mAb effectively reproduced a BP phenotype that included subepidermal blisters, deposition of IgG1, C1q and C3, neutrophil infiltration, and mast cell degranulation. Subsequently, alanine substitutions at various C1q binding sites were separately introduced to the Fc region of the IgG1 mAb. Among these mutated mAbs, the one that was mutated at the P331 residue completely failed to activate the complement in vitro and drastically lost pathogenic activity in COL17-humanized mice. These findings indicate that P331 is a key residue required for complement activation and that IgG1-dependent complement activation is essential for blister formation in BP. This study is, to our knowledge, the first direct evidence that IgG1 Abs to hCOL17 NC16A can induce blister formation in vivo, and it raises the possibility that IgG1 mAbs with Fc modification may be used to block pathogenic epitopes in autoimmune diseases.

  14. Very low residual concentrations of rituximab long after infusion still induce positive B-cell complement-dependent cytotoxicity-crossmatch.

    PubMed

    Gatault, Philippe; Philippe, Gatault; Jollet, Isabelle; Isabelle, Jollet; Paintaud, Gilles; Gilles, Paintaud; Magdelaine, Charlotte; Charlotte, Magdelaine; Bridoux, Franck; Franck, Bridoux; Lebranchu, Yvon; Yvon, Lebranchu; Büchler, Matthias; Matthias, Büchler; Touchard, Guy; Guy, Touchard; Thierry, Antoine; Antoine, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    Rituximab may induce positive B-cell complement-dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch (CDC-XM) in the absence of donor-specific antibodies, as we report in these two cases. We retrospectively assessed the in vitro concentration-effect relationship of rituximab in sera. B-cell CDC-XM results were positive only in the presence of rituximab, even with low concentrations (inferior to 1 μg/mL). Moreover, rituximab neutralization with increasing concentration of an anti-rituximab-idiotype monoclonal antibody progressively reduced B-cell lysis. In conclusion, measurement of rituximab content may be useful to identify sera at risk of misinterpretation in immunized patients.

  15. Inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide are amplified in primary human monocytes but suppressed in macrophages by complement protein C5a.

    PubMed

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Iyer, Abishek; Suen, Jacky Y; Ariffin, Juliana K; Hohenhaus, Daniel M; Sweet, Matthew J; Fairlie, David P

    2013-10-15

    Monocytes and macrophages are important innate immune cells equipped with danger-sensing receptors, including complement and Toll-like receptors. Complement protein C5a, acting via C5aR, is shown in this study to differentially modulate LPS-induced inflammatory responses in primary human monocytes versus macrophages. Whereas C5a enhanced secretion of LPS-induced IL-6 and TNF from primary human monocytes, C5a inhibited these responses while increasing IL-10 secretion in donor-matched human monocyte-derived macrophages differentiated by GM-CSF or M-CSF. Gαi/c-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling induced by C5a was amplified in macrophages but not in monocytes by LPS. Accordingly, the Gαi inhibitor pertussis toxin and MEK inhibitor U0126 blocked C5a inhibition of LPS-induced IL-6 and TNF production from macrophages. This synergy was independent of IL-10, PI3K, p38, JNK, and the differentiating agent. Furthermore, C5a did not inhibit IL-6 production from macrophages induced by other TLR agonists that are selective for Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β (polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid) or MyD88 (imiquimod), demonstrating selectivity for C5a regulation of LPS responses. Finally, suppression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF in macrophages did not compromise antimicrobial activity; instead, C5a enhanced clearance of the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from macrophages. C5aR is thus a regulatory switch that modulates TLR4 signaling via the Gαi/c-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling axis in human macrophages but not monocytes. The differential effects of C5a are consistent with amplifying monocyte proinflammatory responses to systemic danger signals, but attenuating macrophage cytokine responses (without compromising microbicidal activity), thereby restraining inflammatory responses to localized infections.

  16. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host.

  17. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host. PMID:28066433

  18. Complement Factor 3 Could Be an Independent Risk Factor for Mortality in Patients with HBV Related Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Geng-lin; Zhang, Ting; Ye, Yi-nong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Xie, Chan; Peng, Liang; Gao, Zhi-liang

    2016-01-01

    The complement is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple liver disorders. However, its role in patients with HBV related acute-on-chronic liver failure (HBV-ACLF) remains unclear. Serum levels of the third and fourth complement components (C3, C4) and complement function (CH50) were examined in this prospective, observational study. Associations between their expression and disease activity were analyzed. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves. Predictors of clinical outcome were determined by Cox regression analysis. C3, C4, and CH50 levels were significantly lower in HBV-ACLF patients compared to controls. C3, C4, and CH50 levels were negatively correlated with Tbil levels but positively associated with PTA levels. C3 levels were negatively associated with MELD-Na. C3 levels were significantly lower in HBV-ACLF patients who died compared to patients who survived. In a median hospital stay of 39 days, mortality occurred in 41 patients with a progressive increase based on C3 grade (P = 0.008). The actuarial probability of developing mortality was significantly higher in patients with low C3 grade compared to those with high C3 grade (P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that C3 levels were an independent predictor of mortality. Complement played a pathogenic role in HBV-ACLF patients and C3 was an independent predictor of mortality. PMID:27144164

  19. N-Terminal Prodomain of Pfs230 Synthesized Using a Cell-Free System Is Sufficient To Induce Complement-Dependent Malaria Transmission-Blocking Activity▿

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Mayumi; Wu, Yimin; Iriko, Hideyuki; Muratova, Olga; MacDonald, Nicholas J.; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Takeo, Satoru; Otsuki, Hitoshi; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine is to block the development of malaria parasites in the mosquito and thus prevent subsequent infection of the human host. Previous studies have demonstrated that the gametocyte/gamete surface protein Pfs230 can induce transmission-blocking immunity and have evaluated Escherichia coli-produced Pfs230 as a transmission-blocking vaccine candidate. In this study, we used the wheat germ cell-free expression system to produce N-terminal fragments of Pfs230 and evaluated the transmission-blocking activity of antisera raised against the recombinant Pfs230 protein. The rabbit antisera reacted to the surface of cultured gametocytes and gametes of the Plasmodium falciparum NF54 line, recognized the 360-kDa form of parasite-produced Pfs230 by Western blot assay, and reduced the infectivity of NF54 parasites to Anopheles stefensi mosquitoes in the presence of complement in a standard membrane feeding assay. Thus, our data demonstrate that the N-terminal pro domain of Pfs230 is sufficient to induce complement-dependent transmission-blocking activity against P. falciparum. PMID:21715579

  20. Effect of analytical factors on immunochemical reference limits for complement component C3 in serum of a reference pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Buffone, G J; Lewis, S A

    1977-06-01

    We evaluated analytical factors such as antibody specificity, standard materials, and methodology for the measurement of C3. Mancini-type radial immunodiffusion and immunonephelometry were shown to give comparable data if variables other than procedural variables are eliminated. The most significant analytical factors affecting the measurement were antiserum specificity and source of standard material.

  1. Derivatives of human complement component C3 for therapeutic complement depletion: a novel class of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Fritzinger, David C; Hew, Brian E; Lee, June Q; Newhouse, James; Alam, Maqsudul; Ciallella, John R; Bowers, Mallory; Gorsuch, William B; Guikema, Benjamin J; Stahl, Gregory L; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    To obtain proteins with the complement-depleting activity of Cobra Venom Factor (CVF), but with less immunogenicity, we have prepared human C3/CVF hybrid proteins, in which the C-terminus of the alpha-chain of human C3 is exchanged with homologous regions of the C-terminus of the beta-chain of CVF. We show that these hybrid proteins are able to deplete complement, both in vitro and in vivo. One hybrid protein, HC3-1496, is shown to be effective in reducing complement-mediated damage in two disease models in mice, collagen-induced arthritis and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Human C3/CVF hybrid proteins represent a novel class ofbiologicals as potential therapeutic agents in many diseases where complement is involved in the pathogenesis.

  2. Kinetics of acute inflammation induced by Escherichia coli in rabbits. II. The effect of hyperimmunization, complement depletion, and depletion of leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kopaniak, M. M.; Movat, H. Z.

    1983-01-01

    The inflammatory response to Escherichia coli was quantitated in the skin of normal rabbits and the kinetics established as described previously. Hyperemia, measured with radiolabeled microspheres; vascular permeability, estimated with 125 I-albumin; and leukocyte infiltration, quantitated with 51Cr-labeled autologous leukocytes, reached maximal values 3 hours after the injection of bacteria and subsided almost completely by 6 hours. Hemorrhage, measured with homologous 59Fe-erythrocytes, continued to increase between 1 and 6 hours after injection and then reached plateau levels. The lesions were studied up to 8 hours, since in the previous study no changes were observed beyond that time. In the study described in this paper, the host mediation systems were manipulated in various groups of rabbits in order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of the inflammatory reaction. One group of animals was hyperimmunized with the E coli organisms, another was partially depleted of hemolytic complement with cobra venom factor, and yet another was rendered leukopenic with nitrogen mustard. In hyperimmunized animals hyperemia in the dermal lesions induced by the microorganisms was significantly more intense than in normal rabbits. Vascular permeability increase occurred earlier in hyperimmunized rabbits and at 1 hour was significantly greater than in normals. Decomplemented rabbits had significantly less vascular permeability than normal animals, whereas in leukopenic rabbits no increase in vascular permeability could be elicited. Leukocyte accumulation was increased over the normal animals in the lesions of hyperimmunized rabbits. Hemorrhage was significantly decreased in leukopenic rabbits. Histologic examination of the lesions revealed that whereas in normal animals the infiltrating neutrophils ingested most of the bacteria and formed definite abscesses by 6-8 hours, these abscesses were absent in leukopenic animals, and free-lying bacteria were

  3. Factors that modify radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R

    2009-11-01

    It is known that numerous factors can influence radiation carcinogenesis in animals; these factors include the specific characteristics of the radiation (radiation type and dose, dose-rate, dose-fractionation, dose distribution, etc.) as well as many other contributing elements that are not specific to the radiation exposure, such as animal genetic characteristics and age, the environment of the animal, dietary factors and whether specific modifying agents for radiation carcinogenesis have been utilized in the studies. This overview focuses on the modifying factors for radiation carcinogenesis, in both in vivo and in vitro systems, and includes a discussion of agents that enhance (e.g., promoting agents) or suppress (e.g., cancer preventive agents) radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The agents that enhance or suppress radiation carcinogenesis in experimental model systems have been shown to lead to effects equally as large as other known modifying factors for radiation-induced carcinogenesis (e.g., dose-rate, dose-fractionation, linear energy transfer). It is known that dietary factors play an important role in determining the yields of radiation-induced cancers in animal model systems, and it is likely that they also influence radiation-induced cancer risks in human populations.

  4. Activation of bovine monocytes and neutrophils by the Bb fragment of complement factor B: demonstration by the uptake of 3H-deoxyglucose.

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, M S; Tabel, H; Misra, V

    1990-01-01

    The Bb fragment is the enzymatically active split product of bovine complement factor B. The Bb fragment was obtained after zymosan treatment of fresh bovine serum and fractionation of the treated serum, first over diethylaminoethyl-Sephacel and then over an affinity column made up of monoclonal antibody to bovine Bb, coupled to cyanogen-bromide-activated Sepharose. Purified Bb has a molecular weight of 64,000, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The ability of purified Bb to activate phagocytes was assessed. The activation assay was based on the principle that the primary source of energy for the phagocytes is obtained from glucose. 3H-deoxyglucose, a nonmetabolizable analogue of glucose, was used to obtain the quantitative measurement of the activation process. The activation by Bb was shown by the uptake of the labelled deoxyglucose in the phagocytic cells and was comparable to the activation caused by phorbol myristate acetate and N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine, run in parallel. These data showed that fragment Bb activates bovine monocytes and neutrophils and also suggested that, when generated after complement activation, Bb may stimulate monocytes and neutrophils for enhanced phagocytosis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2306658

  5. Immunization with LytB protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae activates complement-mediated phagocytosis and induces protection against pneumonia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Bruno; Aguinagalde, Leire; Ruiz, Susana; Domenech, Mirian; Antequera, María Luisa; Fenoll, Asunción; García, Pedro; García, Ernesto; Yuste, Jose

    2016-12-07

    The cell wall glucosaminidase LytB of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a surface exposed protein involved in daughter cell separation, biofilm formation and contributes to different aspects of the pathogenesis process. In this study we have characterized the antibody responses after immunization of mice with LytB in the presence of alhydrogel as an adjuvant. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays measuring different subclasses of immunoglobulin G, demonstrated that the antibody responses to LytB were predominantly IgG1 and IgG2b, followed by IgG3 and IgG2a subclasses. Complement-mediated immunity against two different pneumococcal serotypes was investigated using sera from immunized mice. Immunization with LytB increased the recognition of S. pneumoniae by complement components C1q and C3b demonstrating that anti-LytB antibodies trigger activation of the classical pathway. Phagocytosis assays showed that serum containing antibodies to LytB stimulates neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis against S. pneumoniae. Animal models of infection including invasive pneumonia and sepsis were performed with two different clinical isolates. Vaccination with LytB increased bacterial clearance and induced protection demonstrating that LytB might be a good candidate to be considered in a future protein-based vaccine against S. pneumoniae.

  6. Transcriptional Regulation by Hypoxia Inducible Factors

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Joaquín M.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular response to oxygen deprivation is governed largely by a family of transcription factors known as Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs). This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms by which HIFs regulate the transcriptional apparatus to enable the cellular and organismal response to hypoxia. We discuss here how the various HIF polypeptides, their post-translational modifications, binding partners and transcriptional cofactors affect RNA polymerase II activity to drive context-dependent transcriptional programs during hypoxia. PMID:24099156

  7. Tumor necrosis factor-inducing activities of Cryptococcus neoformans components.

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, D; Cianci, L; Migliardo, M; Mancuso, G; Cusumano, V; Corradini, C; Teti, G

    1996-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production may lead to increased human immunodeficiency virus replication in patients with AIDS. In order to identify cryptococcal components that are predominantly responsible for stimulating TNF production, various concentrations of glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), galactoxylomannan (GalXM), mannoproteins (MP), and alpha(1-3) [corrected] glucan were added to whole-blood cultures. All of the cryptococcal components tested, as well as whole heat-killed cryptococci, were capable of inducing TNF-alpha release in a dose-dependent manner. MP were significantly more potent than any of the other cryptococcal components tested or heat-killed cryptococci in stimulating TNF-alpha production (P < 0.05). GXM, in contrast, was significantly less potent in this activity than either GalXM or MP (P < 0.05). As little as 0.5 microg of MP per ml was sufficient to produce moderate but significant elevations of TNF-alpha release. Maximal MP-induced TNF-alpha levels were similar to those induced by Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide, our positive control. Further experiments using isolated leukocytes suggested that monocytes were the cell population mainly responsible for TNF-alpha production, although the participation of other cell types could not be excluded. The presence of complement-sufficient plasma was a necessary requirement for TNF-alpha induction by GXM, GalXM, and low doses of MP. High MP concentrations (100 microg/ml) were also capable of stimulating TNF-alpha production in the absence of plasma. These data indicate that soluble products released by C. neoformans are capable of inducing TNF-alpha secretion in human leukocytes. This may be clinically relevant, since high concentrations of such products are frequently found in the body fluids of AIDS patients infected with C. neoformans. PMID:8945566

  8. The chromosomal order of genes controlling the major histocompatibility complex, properdin factor B, and deficiency of the second component of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Raum, D; Glass, D; Carpenter, C B; Alper, C A; Schur, P H

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of the genes coding for HLA to those coding for properdin Factor B allotypes and for deficiency of the second component of complement (C2) was studied in families of patients with connective tissue disorders. Patients were selected because they were heterozygous or homozygous for C2 deficiency. 12 families with 15 matings informative for C2 deficiency were found. Of 57 informative meioses, two crossovers were noted between the C2 deficiency gene and the HLA-B gene, with a recombinant fraction of 0.035. A lod score of 13 was calculated for linkage between C2 deficiency and HLA-B at a maximum likelihood value of the recombinant fraction of 0.04. 18 families with 21 informative matings for both properdin Factor B allotype and HLA-B were found. Of 72 informative meioses, three recombinants were found, giving a recombinant fraction of 0.042. A lod score of 16 between HLA-B and Factor B allotypes was calculated at a maximum likelihood value of the recombinant fraction of 0.04. A crossover was shown to have occurred between genes for Factor B and HLA-D, in which HLA-D segregared with HLA-A and B. These studies suggest that the genes for Factor B and C2 deficiency are located outside those for HLA, that the order of genese is HLA-A, -B, -D, Factor B allotype, C2 deficiency, that the genes coding for C2 deficiency and Factor B allotypes are approximately 3--5 centimorgans from the HLA-A and HLA-B loci, and that the apparent lack of recombinants between the Factor B gene and C2 deficiency gene suggests that these two genes lie in close proximity to one another. PMID:993342

  9. Modelling of the serine-proteinase fold by X-ray and neutron scattering and sedimentation analyses: occurrence of the fold in factor D of the complement system.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, S J; Smith, K F; Kilpatrick, J M; Volanakis, J E; Sim, R B

    1993-01-01

    directly utilized to calculate sedimentation coefficients. X-ray scattering on factor D showed from its RG of 1.78 nm that this is monomeric and very similar in structure to beta-trypsin. The X-ray-scattering curve of factor D was readily modelled using the beta-trypsin crystal structure after allowance for sequence changes. The success of these modellings provides a basis for the constrained modelling of solution scattering data for the multidomain proteins of complement. PMID:8216242

  10. Complement inhibition in cynomolgus monkeys by anti-factor d antigen-binding fragment for the treatment of an advanced form of dry age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Loyet, Kelly M; Good, Jeremy; Davancaze, Teresa; Sturgeon, Lizette; Wang, Xiangdan; Yang, Jihong; Le, Kha N; Wong, Maureen; Hass, Philip E; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Haughney, Peter C; Morimoto, Alyssa; Damico-Beyer, Lisa A; DeForge, Laura E

    2014-12-01

    Anti-factor D (AFD; FCFD4514S, lampalizumab) is a humanized IgG Fab fragment directed against factor D (fD), a rate-limiting serine protease in the alternative complement pathway (AP). Evaluation of AFD as a potential intravitreal (IVT) therapeutic for dry age-related macular degeneration patients with geographic atrophy (GA) is ongoing. However, it is unclear whether IVT administration of AFD can affect systemic AP activation and potentially compromise host-immune responses. We characterized the pharmacologic properties of AFD and assessed the effects of AFD administered IVT (2 or 20 mg) or intravenous (0.2, 2, or 20 mg) on systemic complement activity in cynomolgus monkeys. For the IVT groups, serum AP activity was reduced for the 20 mg dose group between 2 and 6 hours postinjection. For the intravenous groups, AFD inhibited systemic AP activity for periods of time ranging from 5 minutes (0.2 mg group) to 3 hours (20 mg group). Interestingly, the concentrations of total serum fD increased up to 10-fold relative to predose levels following administration of AFD. Furthermore, AFD was found to inhibit systemic AP activity only when the molar concentration of AFD exceeded that of fD. This occurred in cynomolgus monkeys at serum AFD levels ≥2 µg/ml, a concentration 8-fold greater than the maximum serum concentration observed following a single 10 mg IVT dose in a clinical investigation in patients with GA. Based on these findings, the low levels of serum AFD resulting from IVT administration of a clinically relevant dose are not expected to appreciably affect systemic AP activity.

  11. Tonsillolith as a halitosis-inducing factor.

    PubMed

    Ansai, T; Takehara, T

    2005-03-12

    Halitosis, or bad breath, is a common concern for many people. The main causes are known to be periodontal disease and tongue coating. We present a case of an incidental tonsillolith occurrence, which was a halitosis-inducing factor. Our results show that tonsilloliths should be considered as a possible cause of halitosis.

  12. Essential Role for the Lectin Pathway in Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis Revealed Through Use of Adenovirus Programming Complement Inhibitor MAp44 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Nirmal K.; Mehta, Gaurav; Kjaer, Troels R.; Takahashi, Minoru; Schaack, Jerome; Morrison, Thomas E.; Thiel, Steffen; Arend, William P.; Holers, V. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies using mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and complement C4 deficient mice have suggested that the lectin pathway (LP) is not required for the development of inflammatory arthritis in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. MBL, ficolins and collectin-11 are key LP pattern recognition molecules that associate with three serine proteases, MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3, and also with two MBL-associated proteins designated sMAP and MAp44. Recent studies have shown that MAp44, an alternatively spliced product of the MASP-1/3 gene, is a competitive inhibitor of the binding of the recognition molecules to all three MASPs. In these studies we examined the effect of treatment of mice with adenovirus (Ad) programmed to express human MAp44 (AdhMAp44) on the development of CAIA. AdhMAp44 and Ad programming Green fluorescent protein (AdGFP) expression were injected intraperitoneally in C57BL/6 wild-type mice prior to the induction of CAIA. AdhMAp44 significantly reduced the clinical disease activity score (CDA) by 81% compared to mice injected with AdGFP. Similarly, histopathologic injury scores for inflammation, pannus, cartilage and bone damage, as well as C3 deposition in the cartilage and synovium, were significantly reduced by AdhMAp44 pretreatment. Mice treated with AdmMAp44, programming expression of mouse MAp44, also showed significantly decreased CDA and histopathologic injury scores. Additionally, administration of AdhMAp44 significantly diminished the severity of Ross River Virus-induced arthritis, a LP-dependent model. Our study provides conclusive evidence that an intact complement LP is essential to initiate CAIA, and that MAp44 may be an appropriate treatment for inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25070856

  13. Gene expression profiling of Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammation in human whole blood: The role of complement and CD14-mediated innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lau, Corinna; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Holden, Marit; Nygård, Ståle; Fure, Hilde; Lappegård, Knut Tore; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Hovig, Eivind; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-09-01

    Non-sterile pathogen-induced sepsis and sterile inflammation like in trauma or ischemia-reperfusion injury may both coincide with the life threatening systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multi-organ failure. Consequently, there is an urgent need for specific biomarkers in order to distinguish sepsis from sterile conditions. The overall aim of this study was to uncover putative sepsis biomarkers and biomarker pathways, as well as to test the efficacy of combined inhibition of innate immunity key players complement and Toll-like receptor co-receptor CD14 as a possible therapeutic regimen for sepsis. We performed whole blood gene expression analyses using microarray in order to profile Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammatory responses in an ex vivo human whole blood model. The experiments were performed in the presence or absence of inhibitors of complement proteins (C3 and CD88 (C5a receptor 1)) and CD14, alone or in combination. In addition, we used blood from a C5-deficient donor. Anti-coagulated whole blood was challenged with heat-inactivated Escherichia coli for 2 h, total RNA was isolated and microarray analyses were performed on the Affymetrix GeneChip Gene 1.0 ST Array platform. The initial experiments were performed in duplicates using blood from two healthy donors. C5-deficiency is very rare, and only one donor could be recruited. In order to increase statistical power, a technical replicate of the C5-deficient samples was run. Subsequently, log2-transformed intensities were processed by robust multichip analysis and filtered using a threshold of four. In total, 73 microarray chips were run and analyzed. The normalized and filtered raw data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and are accessible with GEO Series accession number GSE55537. Linear models for microarray data were applied to estimate fold changes between data sets and the respective multiple testing adjusted p-values (FDR q-values). The interpretation of the

  14. Zinc Binding to the Tyr402 and His402 Allotypes of Complement Factor H: Possible Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Ruodan; Farabella, Irene; Schumacher, Felix F.; Miller, Ami; Gor, Jayesh; Martin, Andrew C.R.; Jones, David T.; Lengyel, Imre; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    The Tyr402His polymorphism of complement factor H (FH) with 20 short complement regulator (SCR) domains is associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). How FH contributes to disease pathology is not clear. Both FH and high concentrations of zinc are found in drusen deposits, the key feature of AMD. Heterozygous FH is inhibited by zinc, which causes FH to aggregate. Here, zinc binding to homozygous FH was studied. By analytical ultracentrifugation, large amounts of oligomers were observed with both the native Tyr402 and the AMD-risk His402 homozygous allotypes of FH and both the recombinant SCR-6/8 allotypes with Tyr/His402. X-ray scattering also showed that both FH and SCR-6/8 allotypes strongly aggregated at > 10 μM zinc. The SCR-1/5 and SCR-16/20 fragments were less likely to bind zinc. These observations were supported by bioinformatics predictions. Starting from known zinc binding sites in crystal structures, we predicted 202 putative partial surface zinc binding sites in FH, most of which were in SCR-6. Metal site prediction web servers also suggested that SCR-6 and other domains bind zinc. Predicted SCR-6/8 dimer structures showed that zinc binding sites could be formed at the protein–protein interface that would lead to daisy-chained oligomers. It was concluded that zinc binds weakly to FH at multiple surface locations, most probably within the functionally important SCR-6/8 domains, and this explains why zinc inhibits FH activity. Given the high pathophysiological levels of bioavailable zinc present in subretinal deposits, we discuss how zinc binding to FH may contribute to deposit formation and inflammation associated with AMD. PMID:21396937

  15. Oleic-acid-induced lung injury in the rat. Failure of indomethacin treatment or complement depletion to ablate lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, B. F.; Thrall, R. S.; McCormick, J. R.; Ward, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a rat animal model of acute respiratory distress syndrome using the intravenous injection of oleic acid. Further, we attempted to inhibit the development of lung injury by pretreatment of the rats with indomethacin or cobra venom factor. Histologic evidence of lung injury was apparent within hours after the administration of a single intravenous injection of oleic acid. By 24 hours, interstitial and intraalveolar edema and hemorrhage were noted with vascular congestion and an extensive interstitial infiltrate. The lungs appeared virtually normal by 12 days, with no evidence of chronic lung injury. Multiple injections of oleic acid also did not progress into chronic pulmonary inflammation. Treatment of the rats with indomethacin or cobra venom factor had no effect on ablating acute lung injury. An animal model of adult respiratory distress syndrome is presented which does not progress to chronic lung injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7234970

  16. The role of complement in AMD.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Peter F; Lauer, Nadine; Skerka, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common form of blindness in the western world and genetic variations of several complement genes, including the complement regulator Factor H, the central complement component C3, Factor B, C2, and also Factor I confer a risk for the disease. However deletion of a chromosomal segment in the Factor H gene cluster on human chromosome 1, which results in the deficiency of the terminal pathway regulator CFHR1, and of the putative complement regulator CFHR3 has a protective effect for development of AMD. The Factor H gene encodes two proteins Factor H and FHL1 which are derived from alternatively processed transcripts. In particular a sequence variation at position 402 of both Factor H and FHL1 is associated with a risk for AMD. A tyrosine residue at position 402 represents the protective and a histidine residue the risk variant. AMD is considered a chronic inflammatory disease, which can be caused by defective and inappropriate regulation of the continuously activated alternative complement pathway. This activation generates complement effector products and inflammatory mediators that stimulate further inflammatory reactions. Defective regulation can lead to formation of immune deposits, drusen and ultimately translate into damage of retinal pigment epithelial cells, rupture of the interface between these epithelial cells and the Bruch's membrane and vision loss. Here we describe the role of complement in the retina and summarize the current concept how defective or inappropriate local complement control contributes to inflammation and the pathophysiology of AMD.

  17. Biologic effects of microwave exposure. II. Studies on the mechanisms controlling susceptibility to microwave-induced increases in complement receptor-positive spleen cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlagel, C.J.; Sulek, K.; Ho, H.S.; Leach, W.M.; Ahmed, A.; Woody, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    In attempting to evaluate the mechanisms responsible for susceptibility to the inductive increase in splenic complement receptor-positive (CR+) cells following exposure to 2450-MHz microwaves, it was found that sensitivity to microwave-induced CR+ cell increases was under genetic control. In particular, evidence was accumulated suggesting that regulation was under the control of a gene or genes closely associated with but outside of the mouse major histocompatibility complex (H-2). All responsive strains of mice tested were of the H-2k haplotype, while mice of the H-2a, H-2b, H-2d and H-1i5 haplotypes were refractory to the microwave-induced increases in CR+ cells. By utilizing certain H-2k strains of mice that were genetically unable to respond to endotoxin, we were able to show that these strains of mice responded to microwaves, but not to endotoxin, by increasing CR+ cells. Microwave-induced increases in CR+ cells were not mimicked by the intraperitoneal injection of hydrocortisone. Athymic mice responded to microwave exposure, indicating that this event was not regulated by the T-cell population. Mice less than eight weeks old were found not to be susceptible to exposure to 2450-MHz microwaves. These studies indicate that microwaves do induce changes in the population of cells with specific cell-surface receptors, that susceptibility to these changes is under genetic control, and that it is unlikely that endotoxin, corticosteroids, or regulatory T cells play a significant role in the mechanisms regulating these increases.

  18. Effect of repetitive high-dose treatment with soluble complement receptor type 1 and cobra venom factor on discordant xenograft survival.

    PubMed

    Candinas, D; Lesnikoski, B A; Robson, S C; Miyatake, T; Scesney, S M; Marsh, H C; Ryan, U S; Dalmasso, A P; Hancock, W W; Bach, F H

    1996-08-15

    Hyperacute xenograft rejection may be modified by the activation and depletion of complement (C) using cobra venom factor (CVF). This method of prolonging xenograft survival is toxic and associated with systemic inflammation, which may potentially contribute to the pathologic features of delayed xenograft rejection. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) inhibits both the classical and alternative C pathways and thus limits the production of proinflammatory products such as the anaphylatoxins. Hence, we investigated the effects of various sCR1 and CVF regimens, and combinations thereof, in the discordant guinea pig-to-Lewis rat cardiac xenograft model. Mean graft survival time (MST) was significantly prolonged with repetitive dosing (MST=22 hr) or continuous infusion of sCR1 (MST=32 hr) as compared with unmodified controls (MST=15 min). However, sCR1 did not prevent intragraft deposition of C3 or neutrophil infiltration and resulted in only partial inhibition of C-mediated hemolytic activity in vitro. Grafts in rats treated with a single dose of CVF (MST=67 hr) or repetitive doses of CVF (MST=69 hr) survived significantly longer than those treated with sCR1 alone, and lacked C3 deposition or neutrophil accumulation. Sera from these animals were completely depleted of C-mediated hemolytic activity. Animals treated with a single dose of CVF, or sCRI plus a single dose of CVF (MST=64 hr), had similar xenograft survival times. However, immunohistologic studies showed that addition of sCR1 to a single dose of CVF resulted in decreased macrophage activation and reduced levels of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta) within xenografts as compared with that in recipients treated with CVF alone. Such decreased macrophage activation may result from the binding of C4b by sCR1, since combination therapy was associated with decreased intragraft C4b as compared with either therapy alone. High doses of sCR1 were well tolerated by rats and significantly

  19. Modulation of miR-146a/complement factor H-mediated inflammatory responses in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    He, Fang; Liu, Bei; Meng, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Wang, Weiwen; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports the involvement of inflammatory and immune processes in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). miRNAs represent small regulatory RNA molecules that have been shown to act as negative regulators of gene expression controlling different biological processes, including immune system homoeostasis and function. We investigated the expression and cellular distribution of miRNA-146a (miR-146a) in a rat model of TLE. Prominent up-regulation of miR-146a activation was evident in 1 week after status epilepticus (SE) and persisted in the chronic phase. The predicted miR-146a's target complement factor H (CFH) mRNA and protein expression was also down-regulated in TLE rat model. Furthermore, transfection of miR-146a mimics in neuronal and glial cells down-regulated CFH mRNA and protein levels respectively. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-146a down-regulated CFH mRNA expression via 3′-UTR pairing. Down-regulating miR-146a by intracerebroventricular injection of antagomir-146a enhanced the hippocampal expression of CFH in TLE model and decreased seizure susceptibility. These findings suggest that immunopathological deficits associated with TLE can in part be explained by a generalized miR-146a-mediated down-regulation of CFH that may contribute to epileptogenesis in a rat model of TLE. PMID:27852797

  20. Complement factor H binding of monomeric C-reactive protein downregulates proinflammatory activity and is impaired with at risk polymorphic CFH variants

    PubMed Central

    Molins, Blanca; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Adán, Alfredo; Antón, Rosa; Arostegui, Juan I.; Yagüe, Jordi; Dick, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and immune-mediated processes are pivotal to the pathogenic progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been shown to be associated with an increased risk for AMD, the pathophysiological importance of the prototypical acute-phase reactant in the etiology of the disease is unknown, and data regarding the exact role of CRP in ocular inflammation are limited. In this study, we provide mechanistic insight into how CRP contributes to the development of AMD. In particular, we show that monomeric CRP (mCRP) but not the pentameric form (pCRP) upregulates IL-8 and CCL2 levels in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Further, we show that complement factor H (FH) binds mCRP to dampen its proinflammatory activity. FH from AMD patients carrying the “risk” His402 polymorphism displays impaired binding to mCRP, and therefore proinflammatory effects of mCRP remain unrestrained. PMID:26961257

  1. NETosing Neutrophils Activate Complement Both on Their Own NETs and Bacteria via Alternative and Non-alternative Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Joshua; Pluthero, Fred G.; Douda, David N.; Riedl, Magdalena; Cherry, Ahmed; Ulanova, Marina; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils deposit antimicrobial proteins, such as myeloperoxidase and proteases on chromatin, which they release as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Neutrophils also carry key components of the complement alternative pathway (AP) such as properdin or complement factor P (CFP), complement factor B (CFB), and C3. However, the contribution of these complement components and complement activation during NET formation in the presence and absence of bacteria is poorly understood. We studied complement activation on NETs and a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01, PAKwt, and PAKgfp). Here, we show that anaphylatoxin C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which activates NADPH oxidase, induce the release of CFP, CFB, and C3 from neutrophils. In response to PMA or P. aeruginosa, neutrophils secrete CFP, deposit it on NETs and bacteria, and induce the formation of terminal complement complexes (C5b–9). A blocking anti-CFP antibody inhibited AP-mediated but not non-AP-mediated complement activation on NETs and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, NET-mediated complement activation occurs via both AP- and non AP-based mechanisms, and AP-mediated complement activation during NETosis is dependent on CFP. These findings suggest that neutrophils could use their “AP tool kit” to readily activate complement on NETs and Gram-negative bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa, whereas additional components present in the serum help to fix non-AP-mediated complement both on NETs and bacteria. This unique mechanism may play important roles in host defense and help to explain specific roles of complement activation in NET-related diseases. PMID:27148258

  2. Synergic effect of polymorphisms in ERCC6 5' flanking region and complement factor H on age-related macular degeneration predisposition.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Jingsheng; Ning, Baitang; Bojanowski, Christine M; Lin, Zhong-Ning; Ross, Robert J; Reed, George F; Shen, Defen; Jiao, Xiaodong; Zhou, Min; Chew, Emily Y; Kadlubar, Fred F; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2006-06-13

    This study investigates age-related macular degeneration (AMD) genetic risk factors through identification of a functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and its disease association. We chose ERCC6 because of its roles in the aging process, DNA repair, and ocular degeneration from the gene disruption. Bioinformatics indicated a putative binding-element alteration on the sequence containing C-6530>G SNP in the 5' flanking region of ERCC6 from Sp1 on the C allele to SP1, GATA-1, and OCT-1 on the G allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays displayed distinctive C and G allele-binding patterns to nuclear proteins. Luciferase expression was higher in the vector construct containing the G allele than that containing the C allele. A cohort of 460 advanced AMD cases and 269 age-matched controls was examined along with pathologically diagnosed 57 AMD and 18 age-matched non-AMD archived cases. ERCC6 C-6530>G was associated with AMD susceptibility, both independently and through interaction with an SNP (rs380390) in the complement factor H (CFH) intron reported to be highly associated with AMD. A disease odds ratio of 23 was conferred by homozygozity for risk alleles at both ERCC6 and CFH compared with homozygozity for nonrisk alleles. Enhanced ERCC6 expression was observed in lymphocytes from healthy donors bearing ERCC6 C-6530>G alleles. Intense immunostaining of ERCC6 was also found in AMD eyes from ERCC6 C-6530>G carriers. The strong AMD predisposition conferred by the ERCC6 and CFH SNPs may result from biological epistasis, because ERCC6 functions in universal transcription as a component of RNA pol I transcription complex.

  3. Complement in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Rawat, Amit; Sharma, Madhubala; Singh, Surjit

    2017-02-01

    The complement system is an ancient and evolutionary conserved element of the innate immune mechanism. It comprises of more than 20 serum proteins most of which are synthesized in the liver. These proteins are synthesized as inactive precursor proteins which are activated by appropriate stimuli. The activated forms of these proteins act as proteases and cleave other components successively in amplification pathways leading to exponential generation of final effectors. Three major pathways of complement pathways have been described, namely the classical, alternative and lectin pathways which are activated by different stimuli. However, all the 3 pathways converge on Complement C3. Cleavage of C3 and C5 successively leads to the production of the membrane attack complex which is final common effector. Excessive and uncontrolled activation of the complement has been implicated in the host of autoimmune diseases. But the complement has also been bemusedly described as the proverbial "double edged sword". On one hand, complement is the final effector of tissue injury in autoimmune diseases and on the other, deficiencies of some components of the complement can result in autoimmune diseases. Currently available tools such as enzyme based immunoassays for functional assessment of complement pathways, flow cytometry, next generation sequencing and proteomics-based approaches provide an exciting opportunity to study this ancient yet mysterious element of innate immunity.

  4. Comprehensive and comparative transcription analyses of the complement pathway in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Köbis, Judith M; Rebl, Alexander; Kühn, Carsten; Korytář, Tomáš; Köllner, Bernd; Goldammer, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is one of the most ancient and most essential innate immune cascades throughout the animal kingdom. Survival of aquatic animals, such as rainbow trout, depends on this early inducible, efficient immune cascade. Despite increasing research on genes coding for complement components in bony fish, some complement-related genes are still unknown in salmonid fish. In the present study, we characterize the genes encoding complement factor D (CFD), CD93 molecule (CD93), and C-type lectin domain family 4, member M (CLEC4M) from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Subsequently, we performed comprehensive and comparative expression analyses of 36 complement genes including CFD, CD93, and CLEC4M and further putative complement-associated genes to obtain general information about the functional gene interaction within the complement pathway in fish. These quantification analyses were conducted in liver, spleen and gills of healthy fish of two rainbow trout strains, selected for survival (strain BORN) and growth (Import strain), respectively. The present expression study clearly confirms for rainbow trout that liver represents the primary site of complement expression. Spleen and gills also express most complement genes, although the mean transcript levels were generally lower than in liver. The transcription data suggest a contribution of spleen and gills to complement activity. The comparison of the two rainbow trout strains revealed a generally similar complement gene expression. However, a significantly lower expression of numerous genes especially in spleen seems characteristic for the BORN strain. This suggests a strain-specific complement pathway regulation under the selected rearing conditions.

  5. Versatility of the complement system in neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and brain homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Franca; De Blasio, Daiana; Zangari, Rosalia; Zanier, Elisa R.; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2014-01-01

    The immune response after brain injury is highly complex and involves both local and systemic events at the cellular and molecular level. It is associated to a dramatic over-activation of enzyme systems, the expression of proinflammatory genes and the activation/recruitment of immune cells. The complement system represents a powerful component of the innate immunity and is highly involved in the inflammatory response. Complement components are synthesized predominantly by the liver and circulate in the bloodstream primed for activation. Moreover, brain cells can produce complement proteins and receptors. After acute brain injury, the rapid and uncontrolled activation of the complement leads to massive release of inflammatory anaphylatoxins, recruitment of cells to the injury site, phagocytosis and induction of blood brain barrier (BBB) damage. Brain endothelial cells are particularly susceptible to complement-mediated effects, since they are exposed to both circulating and locally synthesized complement proteins. Conversely, during neurodegenerative disorders, complement factors play distinct roles depending on the stage and degree of neuropathology. In addition to the deleterious role of the complement, increasing evidence suggest that it may also play a role in normal nervous system development (wiring the brain) and adulthood (either maintaining brain homeostasis or supporting regeneration after brain injury). This article represents a compendium of the current knowledge on the complement role in the brain, prompting a novel view that complement activation can result in either protective or detrimental effects in brain conditions that depend exquisitely on the nature, the timing and the degree of the stimuli that induce its activation. A deeper understanding of the acute, subacute and chronic consequences of complement activation is needed and may lead to new therapeutic strategies, including the ability of targeting selective step in the complement cascade

  6. Complement and HIV-I infection/ HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengming; Dai, Shen; Gordon, Jennifer; Qin, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    The various neurological complications associated with HIV-1 infection, specifically HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist as a major public health burden worldwide. Despite the widespread use of anti-retroviral therapy, the prevalence of HAND is significantly high. HAND results from the direct effects of an HIV-1 infection as well as secondary effects of HIV-1-induced immune reaction and inflammatory response. Complement, a critical mediator of innate and acquired immunity, plays important roles in defeating many viral infections by the formation of a lytic pore or indirectly by opsonization and recruitment of phagocytes. While the role of complement in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and HAND has been previously recognized for over fifteen years, it has been largely underestimated thus far. Complement can be activated through HIV-1 envelope proteins, mannose binding lectins (MBL) and anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Complement not only fights against HIV-1 infection but also enhances HIV-1 infection. Also, HIV-1 can hijack complement regulators such as CD59 and CD55 and can utilize these regulators and factor H to escape from complement attack. Normally, complement levels in brain are much lower than plasma levels and there is no or little complement deposition in brain cells. Interestingly, local production and deposition of complement are dramatically increased in HIV-1-infected brain, indicating that complement may contribute to the pathogenesis of HAND. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of complement in HIV-1 infection and HAND as well as potential therapeutic approaches targeting to the complement system for the treatment and eradications of HIV-1 infection. PMID:24639397

  7. Structural insights on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Alcorlo, Martín; López-Perrote, Andrés; Delgado, Sandra; Yébenes, Hugo; Subías, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, César; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Llorca, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    The proteolytic cleavage of C3 to generate C3b is the central and most important step in the activation of complement, a major component of innate immunity. The comparison of the crystal structures of C3 and C3b illustrates large conformational changes during the transition from C3 to C3b. Exposure of a reactive thio-ester group allows C3b to bind covalently to surfaces such as pathogens or apoptotic cellular debris. The displacement of the thio-ester-containing domain (TED) exposes hidden surfaces that mediate the interaction with complement factor B to assemble the C3-convertase of the alternative pathway (AP). In addition, the displacement of the TED and its interaction with the macroglobulin 1 (MG1) domain generates an extended surface in C3b where the complement regulators factor H (FH), decay accelerating factor (DAF), membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and complement receptor 1 (CR1) can bind, mediating accelerated decay of the AP C3-convertase and proteolytic inactivation of C3b. In the last few years, evidence has accumulated revealing that the structure of C3b in solution is significantly more flexible than anticipated. We review our current knowledge on C3b structural flexibility to propose a general model where the TED can display a collection of conformations around the MG ring, as well as a few specialized positions where the TED is held in one of several fixed locations. Importantly, this conformational heterogeneity in C3b impacts complement regulation by affecting the interaction with regulators.

  8. A COMPARISON OF THE SPECIFICITY OF INHIBITION BY PHOSPHONATE ESTERS OF THE FIRST COMPONENT OF COMPLEMENT AND THE ANTIGEN-INDUCED RELEASE OF HISTAMINE FROM GUINEA PIG LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Elmer L.; Austen, K. Frank

    1964-01-01

    The ability of a number p-nitrophenylethyl alkyl, phenyl alkyl, chloroalkyl, and aminoalkyl phosphonates to inhibit the activated first component (C'1a) of guinea pig complement, and the antigen-induced release of histamine from sliced, perfused guinea pig lung has been compared. C'1a in its reactivity with these phosphonates is distinctly more similar to trypsin than to any of the other enzymes studied previously. It is suggested that both trypsin and C'1a possess an anionic group in the active center of the respective enzyme, but the distance between the anionic and esteratic site in C'1a might be less than in trypsin. The pattern of inhibition of histamine relase by the alkyl, phenyl alkyl, and chloroalkyl phosphonates is similar to the inhibition of C'1a by these compounds, although distinct differences are apparent. The aminoalkyl phosphonates are distinctly less active inhibitors of histamine release than the corresponding alkyl phosphonates, whereas the reverse is true of the inhibition of C'1a. On the basis of these differences, it is tentatively concluded that the organophosphorus-inhibitable enzymes in the guinea pig systems studied here are similar but not identical. PMID:14212115

  9. Repair of 254 nm ultraviolet-induced (6-4) photoproducts: monoclonal antibody recognition and differential defects in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups A, D, and variant

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramoto, T.; Matsunaga, T.; Ichihashi, M.; Nikaido, O.; Fujiwara, Y.; Mishima, Y. )

    1989-11-01

    Repair kinetics of ultraviolet (UV) light-induced (6-4) photoproducts in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A, D, and variant cells were studied by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a specific monoclonal antibody raised against (6-4) photoproducts, together with unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and loss of T4 endonuclease V-susceptible sites (ESS). Group AXP35KO cells completely failed to repair both ESS (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and antibody-recognizing (6-4) photoproducts until tested 24 h after irradiation, and had 2% early-time UDS. Group DXP43KO cells showed about 10% removal of both (6-4) photoproducts and ESS in 24 h, despite showing a residually higher level of 40% early-time and cumulative UDS. Thus, the results substantiated the extreme UV hypersensitivity of XP group A and D cells. However, XP52KO variant cells exhibited the normal level of UDS and ESS loss, but a slightly reduced repair of antibody-recognizing (6-4) photoproducts at 6 and 12 h after irradiation, which may account for a small UV hypersensitivity of the XP variant cells.

  10. Complement-Mediated Death of Ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis Caused by Human Blood Serum.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P A; Faktor, M I; Karpova, N S; Cheremnykh, E G; Brusov, O S

    2016-04-01

    Toxicity of human blood serum for ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis is determined by the complement system. When ciliate are dying after being exposed to blood serum, cell membrane permeability for low-molecular-weight compounds significantly increases, probably due to pore formation. Serine protease inhibitors or exposure to physical factors inducing complement inactivation (e.g., heating up to 56°C) completely prevented ciliate death under the effect of human serum. Activation of serum complement upon interaction with Tetrahymena cells occurred by the classical or lectin pathway, while the contribution of the alternative activation pathway was negligible.

  11. Age-related macular degeneration: Complement in action.

    PubMed

    van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Strauss, Erich C; Yaspan, Brian L

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in host-defense against common pathogens but must be tightly controlled to avoid inflammation and tissue damage. Polymorphisms in genes encoding two important negative regulators of the alternative complement pathway, complement factor H (CFH) and complement factor I (CFI), are associated with the risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population. In this review, we will discuss the genetic basis of AMD and the potential impact of complement de-regulation on disease pathogenesis. Finally, we will highlight recent therapeutic approaches aimed at controlling complement activation in patients with AMD.

  12. Local Production of the Alternative Pathway Component Factor B Is Sufficient to Promote Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Schnabolk, Gloriane; Coughlin, Beth; Joseph, Kusumam; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; O'Quinn, Elizabeth C.; Nowling, Tamara; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Complement factor B (CFB) is a required component of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, and CFB polymorphisms are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk. Complement factor B is made in the liver, but expression has also been detected in retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid. We investigated whether production of CFB by the RPE can promote AP activation in mouse choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Methods. Transgenic mice expressing CFB under the RPE65 promoter were generated and crossed onto factor B-deficient (CFB-KO) mice. Biological activity was determined in vitro using RPE monolayers and in vivo using laser-induced CNV. Contribution of systemic CFB was investigated using CFB-KO reconstituted with CFB-sufficient serum. Results. Transgenic mice (CFB-tg) expressed CFB in RPE-choroid; no CFB was detected in serum. Cultured CFB-tg RPE monolayers secreted CFB apically and basally upon exposure to oxidative stress that was biologically active. Choroidal neovascularization sizes were comparable between wild-type and CFB-tg mice, but significantly increased when compared to lesions in CFB-KO mice. Injections of CFB-sufficient serum into CFB-KO mice resulted in partial reconstitution of systemic AP activity and significantly increased CNV size. Conclusions. Mouse RPE cells express and secrete CFB sufficient to promote RPE damage and CNV. This further supports that local complement production may regulate disease processes; however, the reconstitution experiments suggest that additional components may be sequestered from the bloodstream. Understanding the process of ocular complement production and regulation will further our understanding of the AMD disease process and the requirements of a complement-based therapeutic. PMID:25593023

  13. Factors inducing falling in schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Yoko; Akezaki, Yoshiteru; Mori, Kohei; Yuri, Yoshimi; Katsumura, Hitomi; Hara, Tomihiro; Usui, Yuki; Fujino, Yoritaka; Nomura, Takuo; Hirao, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors causing falling among patients with schizophrenia hospitalized in psychiatric hospitals. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were divided into either those having experienced a fall within the past one year (Fall group, 12 patients) and those not having experienced a fall (Non-fall group, 7 patients), and we examined differences between the two groups. Assessment items measured included muscle strength, balance ability, flexibility, body composition assessment, Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF), the antipsychotic drug intake, and Drug Induced Extra-Pyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS). [Results] As a result, significant differences were observed in regard to One leg standing time with eyes open, Time Up and Go Test (TUGT), and DIEPSS Sialorrhea between the Fall group and the Non-fall group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that a decrease in balance ability was significantly correlated with falling in schizophrenia patients. PMID:28356628

  14. The bacteria binding glycoprotein salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp340) activates complement via the lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Leito, Jelani T D; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; van Houdt, Michel; van den Berg, Timo K; Wouters, Diana

    2011-10-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG), also known as gp-340 and Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1, is a glycoprotein that is present in tears, lung fluid and mucosal surfaces along the gastrointestinal tract. It is encoded by the Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 gene, a member of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich group B protein superfamily. SAG aggregates bacteria thus promoting their clearance from the oral cavity and activates the complement system. Complement proteins may enter the oral cavity in case of serum leakage, which occurs after mucosal damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mode of complement activation. We showed a dose-dependent C4 deposition on SAG-coated microplates showing that either the classical or lectin pathway of complement was activated. Antibodies against mannose binding lectin inhibited C4 deposition and SAG induced no C4 deposition in MBL deficient sera showing SAG activated complement through the MBL pathway. Periodate treatment of SAG abolished MBL pathway activation consistent with an involvement of SAG glycans in complement activation. This provides the first evidence for a role of SAG in complement activation through the MBL pathway and suggests a potential role of SAG as a complement activating factor at the mucosal epithelia.

  15. Suppression of cytokine-mediated complement factor gene expression through selective activation of the Ah receptor with 3',4'-dimethoxy-α-naphthoflavone.

    PubMed

    Murray, Iain A; Flaveny, Colin A; Chiaro, Christopher R; Sharma, Arun K; Tanos, Rachel S; Schroeder, Jennifer C; Amin, Shantu G; Bisson, William H; Kolluri, Siva K; Perdew, Gary H

    2011-03-01

    We have characterized previously a class of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligand termed selective AHR modulators (SAhRMs). SAhRMs exhibit anti-inflammatory properties, including suppression of cytokine-mediated acute phase genes (e.g., Saa1), through dissociation of non-dioxin-response element (DRE) AHR activity from DRE-dependent xenobiotic gene expression. The partial AHR agonist α-naphthoflavone (αNF) mediates the suppressive, non-DRE dependent effects on SAA1 expression and partial DRE-mediated CYP1A1 induction. These observations suggest that αNF may be structurally modified to a derivative exhibiting only SAhRM activity. A screen of αNF derivatives identifies 3',4'-dimethoxy-αNF (DiMNF) as a candidate SAhRM. Competitive ligand binding validates DiMNF as an AHR ligand, and DRE-dependent reporter assays with quantitative mRNA analysis of AHR target genes reveal minimal agonist activity associated with AHR binding. Consistent with loss of agonist activity, DiMNF fails to promote AHR binding to DRE probes as determined through electromobility shift assay. Importantly, mRNA analysis indicates that DiMNF retains the suppressive capacity of αNF regarding cytokine-mediated SAA1 expression in Huh7 cells. Interestingly, predictive docking modeling suggests that DiMNF adopts a unique orientation within the AHR ligand binding pocket relative to αNF and may facilitate the rational design of additional SAhRMs. Microarray studies with a non-DRE binding but otherwise functional AHR mutant identified complement factor C3 as a potential SAhRM target. We confirmed this observation in Huh7 cells using 10 μM DiMNF, which significantly repressed C3 mRNA and protein. These data expand the classes of AHR ligands exerting DRE-independent anti-inflammatory SAhRM activity, suggesting SAhRMs may have application in the amelioration of inflammatory disorders.

  16. Structural integration in hypoxia-inducible factors

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dalei; Potluri, Nalini; Lu, Jingping; Kim, Youngchang; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2015-08-20

    The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) coordinate cellular adaptations to low oxygen stress by regulating transcriptional programs in erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and metabolism. These programs promote the growth and progression of many tumours, making HIFs attractive anticancer targets. Transcriptionally active HIFs consist of HIF-alpha and ARNT (also called HIF-1 beta) subunits. Here we describe crystal structures for each of mouse HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT heterodimers in states that include bound small molecules and their hypoxia response element. A highly integrated quaternary architecture is shared by HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT, wherein ARNT spirals around the outside of each HIF-alpha subunit. Five distinct pockets are observed that permit small-molecule binding, including PAS domain encapsulated sites and an interfacial cavity formed through subunit heterodimerization. The DNA-reading head rotates, extends and cooperates with a distal PAS domain to bind hypoxia response elements. HIF-alpha mutations linked to human cancers map to sensitive sites that establish DNA binding and the stability of PAS domains and pockets.

  17. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  18. Combined Inhibition of Complement and CD14 Attenuates Bacteria-Induced Inflammation in Human Whole Blood More Efficiently Than Antagonizing the Toll-like Receptor 4–MD2 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsen, Alice; Nymo, Stig; Landsem, Anne; Christiansen, Dorte; Ryan, Liv; Husebye, Harald; Lau, Corinna; Pischke, Søren E.; Lambris, John D.; Espevik, Terje; Mollnes, Tom E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Single inhibition of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)–MD2 complex failed in treatment of sepsis. CD14 is a coreceptor for several TLRs, including TLR4 and TLR2. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of single TLR4-MD2 inhibition by using eritoran, compared with the effect of CD14 inhibition alone and combined with the C3 complement inhibitor compstatin (Cp40), on the bacteria-induced inflammatory response in human whole blood. Methods. Cytokines were measured by multiplex technology, and leukocyte activation markers CD11b and CD35 were measured by flow cytometry. Results. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–induced inflammatory markers were efficiently abolished by both anti-CD14 and eritoran. Anti-CD14 was significantly more effective than eritoran in inhibiting LPS-binding to HEK-293E cells transfected with CD14 and Escherichia coli–induced upregulation of monocyte activation markers (P < .01). Combining Cp40 with anti-CD14 was significantly more effective than combining Cp40 with eritoran in reducing E. coli–induced interleukin 6 (P < .05) and monocyte activation markers induced by both E. coli (P < .001) and Staphylococcus aureus (P < .01). Combining CP40 with anti-CD14 was more efficient than eritoran alone for 18 of 20 bacteria-induced inflammatory responses (mean P < .0001). Conclusions. Whole bacteria–induced inflammation was inhibited more efficiently by anti-CD14 than by eritoran, particularly when combined with complement inhibition. Combined CD14 and complement inhibition may prove a promising treatment strategy for bacterial sepsis. PMID:26977050

  19. Complement factor H, FHR-3 and FHR-1 variants associate in an extended haplotype conferring increased risk of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernabéu-Herrero, Maria E; Jiménez-Alcázar, Miguel; Anter, Jaouad; Pinto, Sheila; Sánchez Chinchilla, Daniel; Garrido, Sofía; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a severe thrombotic microangiopathy affecting the renal microvasculature and is associated with complement dysregulation caused by mutations or autoantibodies. Disease penetrance and severity is modulated by inheritance of "risk" polymorphisms in the complement genes MCP, CFH and CFHR1. We describe the prevalence of mutations, the frequency of risk polymorphisms and the occurrence of anti-FH autoantibodies in a Spanish aHUS cohort (n=367). We also report the identification of a polymorphism in CFHR3 (c.721C>T; rs379370) that is associated with increased risk of aHUS (OR=1.78; CI 1.22-2.59; p=0.002), and is most frequently included in an extended risk haplotype spanning the CFH-CFHR3-CFHR1 genes. This extended haplotype integrates polymorphisms in the promoter region of CFH and CFHR3, and is associated with poorer evolution of renal function and decreased FH levels. The CFH-CFHR3-CFHR1 aHUS-risk haplotype seems to be the same as was previously associated with protection against meningococcal infections, suggesting that the genetic variability in this region is limited to a few extended haplotypes, each with opposite effects in various human diseases. These results suggest that the combination of quantitative and qualitative variations in the complement proteins encoded by CFH, CFHR3 and CFHR1 genes is key for the association of these haplotypes with disease.

  20. Complement facilitates macrophage phagocytosis of inhaled iron particles but has little effect in mediating silica-induced lung inflammatory and clearance responses

    SciTech Connect

    Warheit, D.B.; Carakostas, M.C.; Bamberger, J.R.; Hartsky, M.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The present studies were undertaken to investigate the role of complement in mediating pulmonary inflammation and/or phagocytosis as a function of particle clearance in rats exposed to silica or carbonyl iron (CI) particles. Both particle types were shown to be weak activators of serum complement in vitro. In these studies, normal and complement-depressed (CVFD-treated) rats were exposed to aerosols of Ci or silica particles for 6 hr at 100 mg/m{sup 3}. Following exposure, alveolar fluids and cells from sham and dust-exposed animals were recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at several time periods postexposure and measured for a variety of biochemical and cellular indices. In addition, pulmonary macrophages were cultured and studied for morphology and phagocytosis. The authors results showed that CI exposure did not produce cellular or biochemical indices of pulmonary inflammation, either in normal or complement-depleted rats. However, fewer phagocytic macrophages were recovered from the lungs of CVF-treated, CI-exposed rats than from normal exposed animals. In contrast, silica inhalation produced a sustained PMN inflammatory response in the lungs of exposed rats, measured up through 1 month postexposure, along with significant increases in BAL fluid levels of LDH, protein, and alkaline phosphatase and deficits in pulmonary macrophage phagocytic functions.

  1. Complement expression in the retina is not influenced by short-term pressure elevation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Cecilia Q.; Panagis, Lampros; Kamthan, Gautam; Ren, Lizhen; Rozenboym, Anna; Perera, Tarique D.; Coplan, Jeremy D.; Danias, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether short-term pressure elevation affects complement gene expression in the retina in vitro and in vivo. Methods Muller cell (TR-MUL5) cultures and organotypic retinal cultures from adult mice and monkeys were subjected to either 24-h or 72-h of pressure at 0, 15, 30, and 45 mmHg above ambient. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to microbead-induced intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation for 7 days. RNA and protein were extracted and used for analysis of expression levels of complement component genes and complement component 1, q subcomponent (C1q) and complement factor H (CFH) immunoblotting. Results mRNA levels of complement genes and C1q protein levels in Muller cell cultures remained the same for all pressure levels after exposure for either 24 or 72 h. In primate and murine organotypic cultures, pressure elevation did not produce changes in complement gene expression or C1q and CFH protein levels at either the 24-h or 72-h time points. Pressure-related glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mRNA expression changes were detected in primate retinal organotypic cultures (analysis of variance [ANOVA]; p<0.05). mRNA expression of several other genes changed as a result of time in culture. Eyes subjected to microbead-induced IOP elevation had no differences in mRNA expression of complement genes and C1q protein levels (ANOVA; p>0.05 for both) with contralateral control and naïve control eyes. Conclusions Short-term elevation of pressure in vitro as well as short-term (1 week) IOP elevation in vivo does not seem to dramatically alter complement system gene expression in the retina. Prolonged expression to elevated pressure may be necessary to affect the complement system expression. PMID:24505213

  2. Complement activation of electrogenic ion transport in isolated rat colon.

    PubMed

    McCole, D F; Otti, B; Newsholme, P; Baird, A W

    1997-11-15

    The complement cascade is an important component in many immune and inflammatory reactions and may contribute to both the diarrhoea and inflammation associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Isolated rat colonic mucosae were voltage clamped in Ussing chambers. Basolateral addition of zymosan-activated whole human serum (ZAS) induced a rapid onset, transient inward short circuit current (SCC). This response was concentration dependent and was significantly attenuated by pre-heating ZAS at 60 degrees C for 30 min. Depletion of complement from normal human serum with cobra venom factor (CVF) significantly lowered SCC responses. Chloride was the primary charge carrying ion as responses to ZAS were abolished in the presence of the loop diuretic bumetanide. The complement component C3a stimulated ion transport but not to the same extent as whole serum. Exogenous C5 was without effect. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor piroxicam significantly attenuated the response to ZAS. These findings support the possibility that complement activation may contribute to the pathophysiology of secretory diarrhoea since activation of electrogenic chloride secretion converts intestinal epithelia to a state of net fluid secretion.

  3. Production of Tuber-Inducing Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Yorio, Neil C.

    2006-01-01

    A process for making a substance that regulates the growth of potatoes and some other economically important plants has been developed. The process also yields an economically important by-product: potatoes. The particular growth-regulating substance, denoted tuber-inducing factor (TIF), is made naturally by, and acts naturally on, potato plants. The primary effects of TIF on potato plants are reducing the lengths of the main shoots, reducing the numbers of nodes on the main stems, reducing the total biomass, accelerating the initiation of potatoes, and increasing the edible fraction (potatoes) of the overall biomass. To some extent, these effects of TIF can override environmental effects that typically inhibit the formation of tubers. TIF can be used in the potato industry to reduce growth time and increase harvest efficiency. Other plants that have been observed to be affected by TIF include tomatoes, peppers, radishes, eggplants, marigolds, and morning glories. In the present process, potatoes are grown with their roots and stolons immersed in a nutrient solution in a recirculating hydroponic system. From time to time, a nutrient replenishment solution is added to the recirculating nutrient solution to maintain the required nutrient concentration, water is added to replace water lost from the recirculating solution through transpiration, and an acid or base is added, as needed, to maintain the recirculating solution at a desired pH level. The growing potato plants secrete TIF into the recirculating solution. The concentration of TIF in the solution gradually increases to a range in which the TIF regulates the growth of the plants.

  4. Outline of Hungarian Complementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szamosi, Michael

    This study presents a preliminary analysis of Hungarian complement constructions and the syntactic operations needed to account for them. The expository framework (and the implicit framework of the research itself) is based upon that of Rosenbaum (1967). The aim of the paper is to arrive at a rough picture of the kinds of structures and syntactic…

  5. Verbal Complementizers in Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Hossam Eldin Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    A class of Modern Standard Arabic complementizers known as "'?inna' and its sisters" demonstrate unique case and word order restrictions. While CPs in Arabic allow both Subject-Verb (SV) and Verb-Subject (VS) word order and their subjects show nominative morphology, CPs introduced by "?inna" ban a verb from directly following…

  6. Complement and thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oku, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kono, Michihiro; Ohmura, Kazumasa; Kato, Masaru; Bohgaki, Toshiyuki; Horita, Tetsuya; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Amengual, Olga; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of complement activation in the pathophysiology of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was first reported in murine models of antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-related pregnancy morbidities. We previously reported that complement activation is prevalent and may function as a source of procoagulant cell activation in the sera of APS patients. Recently, autoantibodies against C1q, a component of complement 1, were reported to be correlated with complement activation in systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies target neoepitopes of deformed C1q bound to various molecules (i.e., anionic phospholipids) and induce accelerated complement activation. We found that anti-C1q antibodies are more frequently detected in primary APS patients than in control patients and in refractory APS patients with repeated thrombotic events. The titer of anti-C1q antibodies was significantly higher in refractory APS patients than in APS patients without flare. The binding of C1q to anionic phospholipids may be associated with the surge in complement activation in patients with anti-C1q antibodies when triggered by 'second-hit' biological stressors such as infection. Such stressors will induce overexpression of anionic phospholipids, with subsequent increases in deformed C1q that is targeted by anti-C1q antibodies.

  7. Regulation of humoral immunity by complement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael C; Isenman, David E

    2012-08-24

    The complement system of innate immunity is important in regulating humoral immunity largely through the complement receptor CR2, which forms a coreceptor on B cells during antigen-induced activation. However, CR2 also retains antigens on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs). Display of antigen on FDCs is critical for clonal selection and affinity maturation of activated B cells. This review will discuss the role of complement in adaptive immunity in general with a focus on the interplay between CR2-associated antigen on B cells with CR2 expressed on FDCs. This latter interaction provides an opportunity for memory B cells to sample antigen over prolonged periods. The cocrystal structure of CR2 with its ligand C3d provides insight into how the complement system regulates access of antigen by B cells with implications for therapeutic manipulations to modulate aberrant B cell responses in the case of autoimmunity.

  8. Complement component 5 promotes lethal thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Tomohiro; Yoshioka, Kengo; Mizuno, Masashi; Shimizu, Mie; Nagano, Fumihiko; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Tsuboi, Naotake; Maruyama, Shoichi; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Imai, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular histones promote platelet aggregation and thrombosis; this is followed by induction of coagulation disorder, which results in exhaustion of coagulation factors. Complement component 5 (C5) is known to be associated with platelet aggregation and coagulation system activation. To date, the pathological mechanism underlying liver injury has remained unclear. Here, we investigated whether C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. C5-sufficient and C5-deficient mice received single tail vein injections of purified, unfractionated histones obtained from calf thymus (45–75 μg/g). Subsequently, the mice were monitored for survival for up to 72 h. Based on the survival data, the 45 μg/g dose was used for analysis of blood cell count, liver function, blood coagulation ability, and promotion of platelet aggregation and platelet/leukocyte aggregate (PLA) production by extracellular histones. C5-deficient mice were protected from lethal thrombosis and had milder thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy, and liver injury with embolism and lower PLA production than C5-sufficient mice. These results indicate that C5 is associated with coagulation disorders, PLA production, and embolism-induced liver injury. In conclusion, C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. PMID:28205538

  9. Regulation of Complement and Contact System Activation via C1 Inhibitor Potentiation and Factor XIIa Activity Modulation by Sulfated Glycans – Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Lahrsen, Eric; Alban, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The serpin C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) is the only regulator of classical complement activation as well as the major regulator of the contact system. Its importance is demonstrated by hereditary angioedema (HAE), a severe disease with potentially life-threatening attacks due to deficiency or dysfunction of C1-INH. C1-INH replacement is the therapy of choice in HAE. In addition, C1-INH showed to have beneficial effects in other diseases characterized by inappropriate complement and contact system activation. Due to some limitations of its clinical application, there is a need for improving the efficacy of therapeutically applied C1-INH or to enhance the activity of endogenous C1-INH. Given the known potentiating effect of heparin on C1-INH, sulfated glycans (SG) may be such candidates. The aim of this study was to characterize suitable SG by evaluating structure-activity relationships. For this, more than 40 structurally distinct SG were examined for their effects on C1-INH, C1s and FXIIa. The SG turned out to potentiate the C1s inhibition by C1-INH without any direct influence on C1s. Their potentiating activity proved to depend on their degree of sulfation, molecular mass as well as glycan structure. In contrast, the SG had no effect on the FXIIa inhibition by C1-INH, but structure-dependently modulated the activity of FXIIa. Among the tested SG, β-1,3-glucan sulfates with a Mr ≤ 10 000 were identified as most promising lead candidates for the development of a glycan-based C1-INH amplifier. In conclusion, the obtained information on structural characteristics of SG favoring C1-INH potentiation represent an useful elementary basis for the development of compounds improving the potency of C1-INH in diseases and clinical situations characterized by inappropriate activation of complement and contact system. PMID:27783665

  10. Bioactive Lysophospholipids Generated by Hepatic Lipase Degradation of Lipoproteins Lead to Complement Activation via the Classical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wanchao; Paik, David C.; Barile, Gaetano R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We determined bioactivity of lysophospholipids generated by degradation of the low-density (LDL), very low-density (VLDL), and high-density (HDL) lipoproteins with hepatic lipase (HL), cholesterol esterase (CE), and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2). Methods. The LDL, VLDL, and HDL were treated with HL, CE, and Lp-PLA2 after immobilization on plates, and complement activation studies were performed with diluted human serum. Complement component 3 (C3) fixation, a marker for complement activation, was determined with a monoclonal anti-human C3d antibody. Enzymatic properties of HL and CE were assayed with triglyceride and phosphatidylcholine substrates for triglyceride hydrolase and phospholipase A activities. The ARPE-19 cells were used for viability studies. Results. The HL degradation of human lipoproteins LDL, VLDL, or HDL results in the formation of modified lipoproteins that can activate the complement pathway. Complement activation is dose- and time-dependent upon HL and occurs via the classical pathway. Enzymatic studies suggest that the phospholipase A1 activity of HL generates complement-activating lysophospholipids. C-reactive protein (CRP), known to simultaneously interact with complement C1 and complement factor H (CFH), further enhances HL-induced complement activation. The lysophospholipids, 1-Palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-Oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, can be directly cytotoxic to ARPE-19 cells. Conclusions. The HL degradation of lipoproteins, known to accumulate in the outer retina and in drusen, can lead to the formation of bioactive lysophospholipids that can trigger complement activation and induce RPE cellular dysfunction. Given the known risk associations for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with HL, CRP, and CFH, this study elucidates a possible damage pathway for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in genetically predisposed individuals, that HL activity may lead to accumulation of

  11. Human C1q Induces Apoptosis in an Ovarian Cancer Cell Line via Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Anuvinder; Sultan, Sami H. A.; Murugaiah, Valarmathy; Pathan, Ansar A.; Alhamlan, Fatimah S.; Karteris, Emmanouil; Kishore, Uday

    2016-01-01

    Complement protein C1q is the first recognition subcomponent of the complement classical pathway that plays a vital role in the clearance of immune complexes, pathogens, and apoptotic cells. C1q also has a homeostatic role involving immune and non-immune cells; these functions not necessarily involve complement activation. Recently, C1q has been shown to be expressed locally in the microenvironment of a range of human malignant tumors, where it can promote cancer cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, without involving complement activation. C1q has been shown to be present in the ascitic fluid formed during ovarian cancers. In this study, we have examined the effects of human C1q and its globular domain on an ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3. We show that C1q and the recombinant globular head modules induce apoptosis in SKOV3 cells in a time-dependent manner. C1q expression was not detectable in the SKOV3 cells. Exogenous treatment with C1q and globular head modules at the concentration of 10 µg/ml induced apoptosis in approximately 55% cells, as revealed by immunofluorescence microscopy and FACS. The qPCR and caspase analysis suggested that C1q and globular head modules activated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and upregulated Fas. The genes of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), RICTOR, and RAPTOR survival pathways, which are often overexpressed in majority of the cancers, were significantly downregulated within few hours of the treatment of SKOV3 cells with C1q and globular head modules. In conclusion, C1q, via its globular domain, induced apoptosis in an ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3 via TNF-α induced apoptosis pathway involving upregulation of Bax and Fas. This study highlights a potentially protective role of C1q in certain cancers. PMID:28066412

  12. Complements do not lie.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-12-13

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy.

  13. Complements do not lie

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy. PMID:22674942

  14. Complements do not lie.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-12-01

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy.

  15. IXO: The Instrument Complement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.; IWG, IXO

    2009-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory (IXO) has recently been created as a mission concept by a joint team of NASA, ESA and JAXA scientists, based on the previous Constellation-X and XEUS concepts. Definition of the IXO instruments is still under evolution, but the core instrument complement will include a Wide Field X-ray Imager, an X-ray Calorimeter / Narrow Field X-ray Imager, and an X-ray Grating Spectrometer. Other, modest additional instruments (such as a hard X-ray capability, a polarimeter, and a high time resolution detector) will also be considered. We present the current status of the IXO instrument complement and offer the opportunity for discussion of ideas relevant to the IXO mission concept process.

  16. Recognition of malondialdehyde-modified proteins by the C terminus of complement factor H is mediated via the polyanion binding site and impaired by mutations found in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Satu; Uchida, Koji; Varjosalo, Markku; Jokela, Reija; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2014-02-14

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a severe thrombotic microangiopathy characterized by uncontrolled complement activation against endothelial and blood cells. Mutations in the C-terminal target recognition domains 19-20 of complement regulator factor H (FH) are strongly associated with aHUS, but the mechanisms triggering disease onset have remained unresolved. Here we report that several aHUS-related mutations alter the binding of FH19-20 to proteins where lysines have reacted with malondialdehyde (MDA). Although FH19-20 did not interact with MDA-modified hexylamine, lysine-containing peptides, or a proteolytically degraded protein, it bound to MDA-modified polylysine. This suggests that FH19-20 recognizes only clustered MDA adducts. Binding of MDA-modified BSA to FH19-20 was ionic by nature, depended on positive residues of FH19-20, and competed with the polyanions heparin and DNA. This could not be explained with the mainly neutral adducts known to form in MDA modification. When positive charges of lysines were eliminated by acetic anhydride instead of MDA, the acetylated BSA started to bind FH19-20. Together, these results indicate that negative charges on the modified proteins dominate the interaction with FH19-20. This is beneficial for the physiological function of FH because by binding to the negative charges of the modified target, FH could prevent excess complement activation initiated by naturally occurring antibodies recognizing MDA epitopes with multiple different structures. We propose that oxidative stress leading to formation of MDA adducts is a common feature for triggers of aHUS and that failure of FH in protecting MDA-modified surfaces from complement activation is involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  17. Scatter Factor Induces Blood Vessel Formation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Derrick S.; Kleinman, Hynda K.; Goldberg, Itzhak D.; Bhargava, Mahdu M.; Nickoloff, Brian J.; Kinsella, James L.; Polverini, Peter; Rosen, Eliot M.

    1993-03-01

    Scatter factor (also known as hepatocyte growth factor) is a glycoprotein secreted by stromal cells that stimulates cell motility and proliferation. In vitro, scatter factor stimulates vascular endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and organization into capillary-like tubes. Using two different in vivo assays, we showed that physiologic quantities of purified native mouse scatter factor and recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor induce angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). The angiogenic activity was blocked by specific anti-scatter factor antibodies. Scatter factor induced cultured microvascular endothelial cells to accumulate and secrete significantly increased quantities of urokinase, an enzyme associated with development of an invasive endothelial phenotype during angiogenesis. We further showed that immunoreactive scatter factor is present surrounding sites of blood vessel formation in psoriatic skin. These findings suggest that scatter factor may act as a paracrine mediator in pathologic angiogenesis associated with human inflammatory disease.

  18. Scatter factor induces blood vessel formation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, D S; Kleinman, H K; Goldberg, I D; Bhargava, M M; Nickoloff, B J; Kinsella, J L; Polverini, P; Rosen, E M

    1993-01-01

    Scatter factor (also known as hepatocyte growth factor) is a glycoprotein secreted by stromal cells that stimulates cell motility and proliferation. In vitro, scatter factor stimulates vascular endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and organization into capillary-like tubes. Using two different in vivo assays, we showed that physiologic quantities of purified native mouse scatter factor and recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor induce angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). The angiogenic activity was blocked by specific anti-scatter factor antibodies. Scatter factor induced cultured microvascular endothelial cells to accumulate and secrete significantly increased quantities of urokinase, an enzyme associated with development of an invasive endothelial phenotype during angiogenesis. We further showed that immunoreactive scatter factor is present surrounding sites of blood vessel formation in psoriatic skin. These findings suggest that scatter factor may act as a paracrine mediator in pathologic angiogenesis associated with human inflammatory disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7680481

  19. Complement regulatory proteins in early human fetal life: CD59, membrane co-factor protein (MCP) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF) are differentially expressed in the developing liver.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, K L; Houlihan, J M; Holmes, C H

    1993-01-01

    The human fetus appears to be capable of protecting itself from maternal complement (C) from an early stage in development by expressing the C regulatory proteins decay-accelerating factor (DAF), membrane co-factor protein (MCP) and CD59 on fetally derived trophoblast at the feto-maternal interface. In this study we have examined the ontogeny of these proteins within the fetus itself and have focused on the liver which represents a major site of haemopoiesis during development. Immunostaining revealed that DAF, MCP and CD59 are all expressed from at least 6 weeks of gestation in the liver but that these proteins display distinct distribution patterns. CD59 was broadly distributed both within the epithelial and haemopoietic compartments, but expression of C3 convertase regulators was more restricted. DAF expression was limited to isolated cells within haemopoietic nests and the epithelium was DAF-negative. Although MCP expression on haemopoietic cells was also limited, by contrast with DAF the developing hepatic epithelium was strongly MCP-positive. Typical CD59 and MCP components were observed in fetal liver extracts by immunoblotting, although liver MCP components consistently migrated 4000-5000 MW ahead of those observed on placental trophoblast. Differences in the distribution of these proteins were also observed between the fetal and adult liver. In particular, by comparison with fetal hepatic epithelium, there was an apparent loss of MCP expression from adult hepatocytes. Thus, MCP appears to be developmentally regulated in the human liver and is expressed in the absence of DAF on the early hepatic epithelium. Overall, this study suggests that C regulatory proteins, and in particular CD59 and MCP, are required from the very early stages of gestation within the fetus itself. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7505254

  20. Recombinant generation of two fragments of the rat complement inhibitory factor H [FH(SCR1-7) and FH(SCR1-4)] and their structural and functional characterization in comparison to FH isolated from rat serum.

    PubMed

    Demberg, T; Heine, I; Götze, O; Altermann, W W; Seliger, B; Schlaf, G

    2006-01-01

    Factor H (FH) is the predominant soluble inhibitor of the complement system. With a concentration of 200-800 microg/ml in human and rat plasma it acts as a cofactor for the soluble factor I (FI)-mediated cleavage of the component C3b to iC3b. Furthermore it competes with factor B for binding to C3b and C3(H2O) and promotes the dissociation of the C3bBb complex. FH is a monomer of about 155 kDa which comprises 20 short consensus repeats (SCR), each of which is composed of approximately 60 amino acid (aa) residues. Two functional fragments of FH comprising the SCR1-4 or SCR1-7 were generated using either the Baculovirus system or stably transfected human embryonal kidney cells, respectively. These fragments, as well as FH purified from rat serum, were first analyzed for their relative molecular weights (Mr) using non-reducing or reducing SDS-PAGE. The Mr of the FH variants differed by about 20% depending on the experimental conditions employed. Only the Mr of proteins separated under reducing conditions were in accordance with the MW calculated from the aa sequence. Analyses of the glycosylation patterns using PAS-staining showed a lack of staining of the recombinant variants (SCR1-4 and SCR1-7) in contrast to FH(SCR1-20) from serum. Using a complement hemolysis assay (CH50-assay) all three variants exhibited a molar complement inhibitory activity of FH(1-20)/FH(1-7)/FH(1-4) of about 3/1/1. These data support the postulated model of FH bearing three binding sites for its ligand C3b, from which one is located in the SCR1-4, whereas the other two are located in the SCR8-20.

  1. Inhibition of complement-mediated cytolysis by the terminal complement inhibitor of herpesvirus saimiri.

    PubMed

    Rother, R P; Rollins, S A; Fodor, W L; Albrecht, J C; Setter, E; Fleckenstein, B; Squinto, S P

    1994-02-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) is a lymphotropic herpesvirus that induces T-cell transformation in vitro and causes lymphomas and leukemias in New World primates other than its natural host, the squirrel monkey. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the HVS genome revealed two open reading frames with significant homology to genes for human complement regulatory molecules. One of these genes encodes a predicted protein (designated HVSCD59) with 48% amino acid sequence identity to the human terminal complement regulatory protein CD59 (HuCD59). The CD59 homolog from squirrel monkey (SMCD59) was cloned, and the corresponding amino acid sequence showed 69% identity with HVSCD59. BALB/3T3 cells stably expressing HVSCD59, SMCD59, or HuCD59 were equally protected from complement-mediated lysis by human serum. However, only HVSCD59-expressing cells were effectively protected from complement-mediated lysis when challenged with rat serum, suggesting that HVSCD59 was less species restrictive. The complement regulatory activity of HVSCD59 and SMCD59 occurred after C3b deposition, indicating terminal complement inhibition. Treatment of BALB/3T3 stable transfectants with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C prior to complement attack decreased the complement regulatory function of HVSCD59, suggesting cell surface attachment via a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. Cells expressing HVSCD59 effectively inhibited complement-mediated lysis by squirrel monkey serum in comparison with SMCD59-expressing cells. Finally HVSCD59-specific transcripts were detected in owl monkey cells permissive for lytic HVS replication but not in T cells transformed by HVS, which failed to produce virions. These data are the first to demonstrate a functional, virally encoded terminal complement inhibitor and suggest that HVSCD59 represents a humoral immune evasion mechanism supporting the lytic life cycle of HVS.

  2. There Is a Method to the Madness: Strategies to Study Host Complement Evasion by Lyme Disease and Relapsing Fever Spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Ashley L.; Kraiczy, Peter; Lin, Yi-Pin

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease and relapsing fever are caused by various Borrelia species. Lyme disease borreliae, the most common vector-borne pathogens in both the U.S. and Europe, are transmitted by Ixodes ticks and disseminate from the site of tick bites to tissues leading to erythema migrans skin rash, arthritis, carditis, and neuroborreliosis. Relapsing fever borreliae, carried by ticks and lice, trigger reoccurring fever episodes. Following transmission, spirochetes survive in the blood to induce bacteremia at the early stages of infection, which is thought to promote evasion of the host complement system. The complement system acts as an important innate immune defense mechanism in humans and vertebrates. Upon activation, the cleaved complement components form complexes on the pathogen surface to eventually promote bacteriolysis. The complement system is negatively modulated by a number of functionally diverse regulators to avoid tissue damage. To evade and inhibit the complement system, spirochetes are capable of binding complement components and regulators. Complement inhibition results in bacterial survival in serum (serum resistance) and is thought to promote bloodstream survival, which facilitates spirochete dissemination and disease manifestations. In this review, we discuss current methodologies to elucidate the mechanisms of Borrelia spp. that promote serum resistance and bloodstream survival, as well as novel methods to study factors responsible for bloodstream survival of Lyme disease borreliae that can be applied to relapsing fever borreliae. Understanding the mechanisms these pathogens utilize to evade the complement system will ultimately aid in the development of novel therapeutic strategies and disease prevention to improve human health. PMID:28303129

  3. Complement depletion aggravates Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia and septic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sakiniene, E; Bremell, T; Tarkowski, A

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of the complement system in Staphylococcus aureus arthritis and septicaemia. The murine model of haematogenously acquired septic arthritis was used, injecting intravenously toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), producing S. aureus LS-1. Complement was depleted using cobra venom factor (CVF). Evaluation of arthritis was performed clinically and histopathologically. In addition, the effect of complement depletion on the phagocytic activity of leucocytes was assessed in vivo and in vitro. Six days after inoculation of S. aureus the prevalence of arthritis in decomplemented mice was three-fold higher than that in controls (91% versus 25%). The clinical severity of arthritis at the end of the experiment, expressed as arthritic index, was 7.3 and 1.9, respectively. These findings were confirmed by histological index of synovitis as well as of cartilage and/or bone destruction being significantly higher in decomplemented mice than in controls (9.8 ± 1.7 versus 4.9 ± 1.2, P < 0.05; and 7.9 ± 1.7 versus 3.0 ± 0.9, P < 0.05, respectively). Also, the septicaemia-induced mortality was clearly higher in decomplemented mice compared with the controls. CVF treatment significantly reduced in vivo polymorphonuclear cell-dependent inflammation induced by subcutaneous injection of olive oil and mirroring the capacity of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNC) to migrate and/or extravasate. Besides, the decomplementation procedure significantly impaired phagocytic activity of peripheral blood leucocytes in vitro, since the number of phagocytes being able to ingest bacteria decreased by 50% when the cells were maintained in decomplemented serum compared with those in intact serum. The conclusion is that complement depletion aggravates the clinical course of S. aureus arthritis and septicaemia, possibly by a combination of decreased migration/extravasation of PMNC and an impairment of phagocytosis. PMID:9933426

  4. [Immunological behavior (IgG, IgM, IgA) and total complement (CH50) of newborns infants with risk factors for early onset sepsis. Comparative analysis of newborns with and without infection].

    PubMed

    Ceccon, M E; Diníz, E M; Carneiro-Sampaio, M M; Arslanian, C; Diogo, C L; Ramos, J L; Vaz, F A

    1998-01-01

    Immunological behavior (IgG, IgM, IgA) and total Complement (CH50) of newborns infants with risk factors for early onset sepsis. Comparative analysis between newborns with and without infection. Rev. Hosp. Clín. Fac. Med. S. Paulo, 53(6): 303-310, 1998. The objective of this study was to verify the immunological behavior of the newborn infant in front of an infection. We studied 60 newborn infants that had risk factors for early onset sepsis (premature rupture membranes, clinic amnionitis or tract urinary infection) from de immunological and infection point of view. They were classified into three gestational age groups: < 34 weeks, between 34 and 36 6/7 weeks and > or = 37 weeks. Sepsis diagnosis was done through clinical and laboratorial data and we also included the followings exams: Immunological types (IgG, IgM, IgA) and total complement (CH50) obtained from the newborn at birth and on the fifth day of life. We could verify that 15 newborns (25%) presented early sepsis. There was a statistical association between perinatal asfixia and infection in the group with gestational age < 34 weeks and this same group presented statistical association between infection and death. The serical levels of IgG and CH50 were directly related to the gestational age and there were significant statistical differences between levels of IgG, IgM and total Complement between infected and not infected newborns within the same group os gestional age. We observed that the infection was associated to low levels of IgG and CH50, at birth and on the fifth day, mainly in the group of infected newborns with gestional age < 34 weeks, being this group, therefore, the one that would mostly benefit from an immunological support in front of and infection.

  5. Factors affecting the nature of induced mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.; Russell, W.L.; Rinchik, E.M.; Hunsicker, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The recent considerable expansion of specific-locus-mutation data has made possible an examination of the effects of germ-cell stage on both quantity of mutation yield and nature of mutations. For chemicals mutagenic in poststem-cell stages, three patterns have been identified according to the stages in which they elicit maximum response: (1) early spermatozoa and late spermatids; (2) early spermatids; and (3) differentiating spermatogonia. The majority of chemicals tested fall into Pattern 1. Chemicals that are also mutagenic in stem-cell spermatogonia do not preferentially belong to any one of these three categories. For only one chemical (CHL) has an entire set of mutations been analyzed molecularly. However, the results of genetic and molecular analyses of genomic regions surrounding six of the specific-locus markers allow us to conclude that any mutation that causes lethality of homozygotes (in the case of d, prenatal lethality, specifically) must involve one or more loci in addition to the marked one. Such mutations have been classified as large lesions'' (LL), the remainder as other lesions'' (OL). Analysis of the data shows that, regardless of the nature of the chemical (Pattern-1, -2, or -3), (1) LLs constitute a very low proportion of the mutations induced in either stem-cell or differentiating spermatogonia, and (b) LLs constitute a high proportion of mutations induced in postmeiotic stages. Chemicals that are active in both pre- and postmeiotic stages produce LL or OL mutations depending on cell stage.

  6. Ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes protects intracellular mature virus and infected cells from mouse complement.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Elizabeth A; Bertram, Paula; Chen, Nanhai; Buller, R Mark L; Atkinson, John P

    2010-09-01

    Poxviruses produce complement regulatory proteins to subvert the host's immune response. Similar to the human pathogen variola virus, ectromelia virus has a limited host range and provides a mouse model where the virus and the host's immune response have coevolved. We previously demonstrated that multiple components (C3, C4, and factor B) of the classical and alternative pathways are required to survive ectromelia virus infection. Complement's role in the innate and adaptive immune responses likely drove the evolution of a virus-encoded virulence factor that regulates complement activation. In this study, we characterized the ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes (EMICE). Recombinant EMICE regulated complement activation on the surface of CHO cells, and it protected complement-sensitive intracellular mature virions (IMV) from neutralization in vitro. It accomplished this by serving as a cofactor for the inactivation of C3b and C4b and by dissociating the catalytic domain of the classical pathway C3 convertase. Infected murine cells initiated synthesis of EMICE within 4 to 6 h postinoculation. The levels were sufficient in the supernatant to protect the IMV, upon release, from complement-mediated neutralization. EMICE on the surface of infected murine cells also reduced complement activation by the alternative pathway. In contrast, classical pathway activation by high-titer antibody overwhelmed EMICE's regulatory capacity. These results suggest that EMICE's role is early during infection when it counteracts the innate immune response. In summary, ectromelia virus produced EMICE within a few hours of an infection, and EMICE in turn decreased complement activation on IMV and infected cells.

  7. Complement activation in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, L E; De Villiers, D; Markham, D; Whaley, K; Thomas, H C

    1982-01-01

    Patients with HBsAg positive chronic active liver disease (CALD) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) exhibit increased C3d concentrations and changes in the serum concentrations of the complement components consistent with activation of the classical and alternative pathways. In these patients the concentrations of the regulatory proteins, C3b inactivator (C3bINA) and beta IH globulin, are normal. Patients with HBsAg negative CALD and alcohol induced liver disease (ALD) exhibit no evidence of an increased level of complement system activation. In these patients diminished serum concentrations of complement components appear to be related to diminished hepatic synthetic function. C4 synthesis may be specifically reduced in autoimmune chronic active liver disease. PMID:7083631

  8. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital.

  9. Inhibition of Complement Retards Ankylosing Spondylitis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chaoqun; Ding, Peipei; Wang, Qingkai; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Jianquan; Xu, Enjie; Wang, Na; Chen, Jianfeng; Yang, Guang; Hu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) resulting in back pain and progressive spinal ankyloses. Currently, there are no effective therapeutics targeting AS largely due to elusive pathogenesis mechanisms, even as potential candidates such as HLA-B27 autoantigen have been identified. Herein, we employed a proteoglycan (PG)-induced AS mouse model together with clinical specimens, and found that the complement system was substantially activated in the spinal bone marrow, accompanied by a remarkable proportion alteration of neutrophils and macrophage in bone marrow and spleen, and by the significant increase of TGF-β1 in serum. The combined treatment with a bacteria-derived complement inhibitor Efb-C (C-terminal of extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus) remarkably retarded the progression of mouse AS by reducing osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that two important modulators involved in AS disease, TGF-β1 and RANKL, were elevated upon in vitro complement attack in osteoblast and/or osteoclast cells. These findings further unravel that complement activation is closely related with the pathogenesis of AS, and suggest that complement inhibition may hold great potential for AS therapy. PMID:27698377

  10. Genetic factors and manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pan; Parmalee, Nancy; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn), is a trace metal required for normal physiological processes in humans. Mn levels are tightly regulated, as high levels of Mn result in accumulation in the brain and cause a neurological disease known as manganism. Manganism shares many similarities with Parkinson’s disease (PD), both at the physiological level and the cellular level. Exposure to high Mn-containing environments increases the risk of developing manganism. Mn is absorbed primarily through the intestine and then released in the blood. Excessive Mn is secreted in the bile and excreted in feces. Mn enters and exits cells through a number of non-specific importers localized on the cell membrane. Mutations in one of the Mn exporters, SLC30A10 (solute carrier family 30, member 10), result in Mn induced toxicity with liver impairments and neurological dysfunction. Four PD genes have been identified in connection to regulation of Mn toxicity, shedding new light on potential links between manganism and PD. PMID:25136353

  11. Characterization of the complement inhibitory function of rhesus rhadinovirus complement control protein (RCP).

    PubMed

    Okroj, Marcin; Mark, Linda; Stokowska, Anna; Wong, Scott W; Rose, Nicola; Blackbourn, David J; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Spiller, O Brad; Blom, Anna M

    2009-01-02

    Rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV) is currently the closest known, fully sequenced homolog of human Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Both these viruses encode complement inhibitors as follows: Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-complement control protein (KCP) and RRV-complement control protein (RCP). Previously we characterized in detail the functional properties of KCP as a complement inhibitor. Here, we performed comparative analyses for two variants of RCP protein, encoded by RRV strains H26-95 and 17577. Both RCP variants and KCP inhibited human and rhesus complement when tested in hemolytic assays measuring all steps of activation via the classical and the alternative pathway. RCP variants from both RRV strains supported C3b and C4b degradation by factor I and decay acceleration of the classical C3 convertase, similar to KCP. Additionally, the 17577 RCP variant accelerated decay of the alternative C3 convertase, which was not seen for KCP. In contrast to KCP, RCP showed no affinity to heparin and is the first described complement inhibitor in which the binding site for C3b/C4b does not interact with heparin. Molecular modeling shows a structural disruption in the region of RCP that corresponds to the KCP-heparin-binding site. This makes RRV a superior model for future in vivo investigations of complement evasion, as RCP does not play a supportive role in viral attachment as KCP does.

  12. Complement-dependent acute-phase expression of C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P-component.

    PubMed

    Szalai, A J; van Ginkel, F W; Wang, Y; McGhee, J R; Volanakis, J E

    2000-07-15

    The acute-phase response (APR) is regulated by TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 acting alone, in combination, or in concert with hormones. The anaphylotoxin C5a, generated during complement activation, induces in vitro the synthesis of these cytokines by leukocytes and of acute-phase proteins by HepG2 cells. However, there is no clear evidence for a role of C5a or any other complement activation product in regulation of the APR in vivo. In this study, using human C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic mice deficient in C3 or C5, we investigated whether complement activation contributes to induction of the acute-phase proteins CRP and serum amyloid P-component (SAP). Absence of C3 or C5 resulted in decreased LPS-induced up-regulation of the CRP transgene and the mouse SAP gene. Also, LPS induced both the IL-1beta and IL-6 genes in normocomplementemic mice, but in complement-deficient mice it significantly induced only IL-6. Like LPS injection, activation of complement by cobra venom factor led to significant elevation of serum CRP and SAP in normocomplementemic mice but not in complement-deficient mice. Injection of recombinant human C5a into human CRP transgenic mice induced the IL-1beta gene and caused significant elevation of both serum CRP and SAP. However, in human CRP transgenic IL-6-deficient mice, recombinant human C5a did not induce the CRP nor the SAP gene. Based on these data, we conclude that during the APR, C5a generated as a consequence of complement activation acts in concert with IL-6 and/or IL-1beta to promote up-regulation of the CRP and SAP genes.

  13. Sequence and Role in Virulence of the Three Plasmid Complement of the Model Tumor-Inducing Bacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335

    PubMed Central

    Bardaji, Leire; Pérez-Martínez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Moreno, Luis; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Sundin, George W.; Ramos, Cayo; Murillo, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 is a model for the study of the molecular basis of disease production and tumor formation in woody hosts, and its draft genome sequence has been recently obtained. Here we closed the sequence of the plasmid complement of this strain, composed of three circular molecules of 78,357 nt (pPsv48A), 45,220 nt (pPsv48B), and 42,103 nt (pPsv48C), all belonging to the pPT23A-like family of plasmids widely distributed in the P. syringae complex. A total of 152 coding sequences were predicted in the plasmid complement, of which 38 are hypothetical proteins and seven correspond to putative virulence genes. Plasmid pPsv48A contains an incomplete Type IVB secretion system, the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector gene hopAF1, gene ptz, involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, and three copies of a gene highly conserved in plant-associated proteobacteria, which is preceded by a hrp box motif. A complete Type IVA secretion system, a well conserved origin of transfer (oriT), and a homolog of the T3SS effector gene hopAO1 are present in pPsv48B, while pPsv48C contains a gene with significant homology to isopentenyl-diphosphate delta-isomerase, type 1. Several potential mobile elements were found on the three plasmids, including three types of MITE, a derivative of IS801, and a new transposon effector, ISPsy30. Although the replication regions of these three plasmids are phylogenetically closely related, their structure is diverse, suggesting that the plasmid architecture results from an active exchange of sequences. Artificial inoculations of olive plants with mutants cured of plasmids pPsv48A and pPsv48B showed that pPsv48A is necessary for full virulence and for the development of mature xylem vessels within the knots; we were unable to obtain mutants cured of pPsv48C, which contains five putative toxin-antitoxin genes. PMID:22022435

  14. Complement inhibition: a promising concept for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pio, Ruben; Ajona, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2013-01-01

    For decades, complement has been recognized as an effector arm of the immune system that contributes to the destruction of tumor cells. In fact, many therapeutic strategies have been proposed that are based on the intensification of complement-mediated responses against tumors. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm by demonstrating a tumor-promoting role for complement. Cancer cells seem to be able to establish a convenient balance between complement activation and inhibition, taking advantage of complement initiation without suffering its deleterious effects. Complement activation may support chronic inflammation, promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment, induce angiogenesis, and activate cancer-related signaling pathways. In this context, inhibition of complement activation would be a therapeutic option for treating cancer. This concept is relatively novel and deserves closer attention. In this paper, we will summarize the mechanisms of complement activation on cancer cells, the cancer-promoting effect of complement initiation, and the rationale behind the use of complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against cancer. PMID:23706991

  15. Detection of complement factor B in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy disease using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Unlü, M; de Lange, R P; de Silva, R; Kalaria, R; St Clair, D

    2000-03-24

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a hereditary condition with onset in mid-adulthood and is associated with mutations in the Notch-3 gene. (Joutel, A., Corepechot, C., Ducros, A., Vahedi, K., Chabriat, H., Mouton, P., Alamowitch, S., Domenda, V., Cecilion, M., Marechal, J., Vayssiere, C., Cruaud, C., Cabanis, E.A., Ruchoux, M.M. , Weissenvach, J., Bach, J.F., Bousser, M.G. and Tournier-Lasserve, E., Notch3 mutations in CADASIL, a hereditary adult-onset condition causing stroke and dementia. Nature, 383 (1996) 707-710) Ultrastructural examination of the pathology of the cerebral infarcts reveals deposits in the vascular smooth muscle cells of the small arteries of the brain, but there is no obvious indication how the Notch-3 mutations give rise the observed pathology, nor is there any information on the exact nature of the deposits. We have investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from three CADASIL cases with known mutations in Notch-3 using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. CSF from these patients was compared to that of six controls. We detected a single spot in the protein maps of patients which was absent from all the controls. In-gel tryptic digestion of this protein followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the tryptic fragments and a database search identified the spot as human complement factor B. These preliminary findings suggest that the alternative complement pathway may play a role in the pathogenesis of CADASIL.

  16. Characterization of the third component of complement (C3) after activation by cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Kew, R.R.; Ghebrehiwet, B.; Janoff, A.

    1987-08-01

    Activation of lung complement by tobacco smoke may be an important pathogenetic factor in the development of pulmonary emphysema in smokers. We previously showed that cigarette smoke can modify C3 and activate the alternative pathway of complement in vitro. However, the mechanism of C3 activation was not fully delineated in these earlier studies. In the present report, we show that smoke-treated C3 induces cleavage of the alternative pathway protein, Factor B, when added to serum containing Mg-EGTA. This effect of cigarette smoke is specific for C3 since smoke-treated C4, when added to Mg-EGTA-treated serum, fails to activate the alternative pathway and fails to induce Factor B cleavage. Smoke-modified C3 no longer binds significant amounts of (/sup 14/C)methylamine (as does native C3), and relatively little (/sup 14/C)methylamine is incorporated into its alpha-chain. Thus, prior internal thiolester bond cleavage appears to have occurred in C3 activated by cigarette smoke. Cigarette smoke components also induce formation of noncovalently associated, soluble C3 multimers, with a Mr ranging from 1 to 10 million. However, prior cleavage of the thiolester bond in C3 with methylamine prevents the subsequent formation of these smoke-induced aggregates. These data indicate that cigarette smoke activates the alternative pathway of complement by specifically modifying C3 and that these modifications include cleavage of the thiolester bond in C3 and formation of noncovalently linked C3 multimers.

  17. Monitoring Protein–Protein Interactions Using Split Synthetic Renilla Luciferase Protein-Fragment-Assisted Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Paulmurugan, R.; Gambhir, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we developed an inducible synthetic renilla luciferase protein-fragment-assisted complementation-based bioluminescence assay to quantitatively measure real time protein–protein interactions in mammalian cells. We identified suitable sites to generate fragments of N and C portions of the protein that yield significant recovered activity through complementation. We validate complementation-based activation of split synthetic renilla luciferase protein driven by the interaction of two strongly interacting proteins, MyoD and Id, in five different cell lines utilizing transient transfection studies. The expression level of the system was also modulated by tumor necrosis factor α through NFκB-promoter/enhancer elements used to drive expression of the N portion of synthetic renilla luciferase reporter gene. This new system should help in studying protein–protein interactions and when used with other split reporters (e.g., split firefly luciferase) should help to monitor different components of an intracellular network. PMID:12705589

  18. Risk factors for ganciclovir-induced thrombocytopenia and leukopenia.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Shigemi, Akari; Ikawa, Kazuro; Kanazawa, Naoko; Fujisaki, Yuko; Morikawa, Norifumi; Takeda, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Ganciclovir is a nucleoside guanosine analogue that exhibits therapeutic activity against human cytomegalovirus infection, and is primarily excreted via glomerular filtration and active tubular secretion. The adverse effects induced by ganciclovir therapy are generally of a hematological nature and include thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Low marrow cellularity and elevated serum creatinine have been identified as risk factors for ganciclovir-induced neutropenia. However, the risk factors for thrombocytopenia have yet to be determined. Therefore, this study investigated patients administered ganciclovir to determine the risk factors for thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Thrombocytopenia occurred in 41 of these patients (30.6%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified three independent risk factors for thrombocytopenia: cancer chemotherapy (odds ratio (OR)=3.1), creatinine clearance (<20 mL/min) (OR=12.8), and the ganciclovir dose (≥12 mg/kg/d) (OR=15.1). Leukopenia occurred in 36 patients (28.6%), and white blood cell count (<6000 cells/mm(3)) (OR=3.7) and the ganciclovir dose (≥12 mg/kg/d) (OR=7.8) were identified as risk factors. These results demonstrated that several factors influenced the occurrence of ganciclovir-induced thrombocytopenia and leukopenia, and suggest that special attention should be paid to patients receiving cancer chemotherapy with a low creatinine clearance (<20 mL/min) and high dose (≥12 mg/kg/d) in order to avoid ganciclovir-induced thrombocytopenia.

  19. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Hendrik P N; Charbel Issa, Peter; Walier, Maja; Janzer, Stefanie; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Börncke, Florian; Fritsche, Lars G; Chong, Ngaihang V; Fimmers, Rolf; Wienker, Thomas; Holz, Frank G; Weber, Bernhard H F; Oppermann, Martin

    2008-07-02

    Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112) and controls (n = 67). Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH), factor B-C2 (BF-C2) and complement C3 (C3) genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (p<0.001), were significantly elevated in AMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  20. Complement System in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Pankita H.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to its established contribution to innate immunity, recent studies have suggested novel roles for the complement system in the development of various lung diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that complement may serve as a key link between innate and adaptive immunity in a variety of pulmonary conditions. However, the specific contributions of complement to lung diseases based on innate and adaptive immunity are just beginning to emerge. Elucidating the role of complement-mediated immune regulation in these diseases will help to identify new targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24901241

  1. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor as an Angiogenic Master Switch

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) regulate the transcription of genes that mediate the response to hypoxia. HIFs are constantly expressed and degraded under normoxia, but stabilized under hypoxia. HIFs have been widely studied in physiological and pathological conditions and have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of various vascular diseases. In clinical settings, the HIF pathway has been studied for its role in inhibiting carcinogenesis. HIFs might also play a protective role in the pathology of ischemic diseases. Clinical trials of therapeutic angiogenesis after the administration of a single growth factor have yielded unsatisfactory or controversial results, possibly because the coordinated activity of different HIF-induced factors is necessary to induce mature vessel formation. Thus, manipulation of HIF activity to simultaneously induce a spectrum of angiogenic factors offers a superior strategy for therapeutic angiogenesis. Because HIF-2α plays an essential role in vascular remodeling, manipulation of HIF-2α is a promising approach to the treatment of ischemic diseases caused by arterial obstruction, where insufficient development of collateral vessels impedes effective therapy. Eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunit e (eIF3e)/INT6 interacts specifically with HIF-2α and induces the proteasome inhibitor-sensitive degradation of HIF-2α, independent of hypoxia and von Hippel-Lindau protein. Treatment with eIF3e/INT6 siRNA stabilizes HIF-2α activity even under normoxic conditions and induces the expression of several angiogenic factors, at levels sufficient to produce functional arteries and veins in vivo. We have demonstrated that administration of eIF3e/INT6 siRNA to ischemic limbs or cold-injured brains reduces ischemic damage in animal models. This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between HIFs and vascular diseases. We also discuss novel oxygen-independent regulatory proteins that bind HIF-α and the implications

  2. Complement--tapping into new sites and effector systems.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Kemper, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Complement is traditionally known to be a system of serum proteins that provide protection against pathogens through direct cell lysis and the mobilization of innate and adaptive immunity. However, recent work indicates that the complement system has additional physiological roles beyond those in host defence. In this Opinion article, we describe the new modes and locations of complement activation that enable it to interact with other cell effector systems, such as growth factor receptors, inflammasomes and metabolic pathways. We propose that the location of complement activation dictates its function.

  3. Complement-mediated regulation of metabolism and basic cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Christoph; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Complement is well appreciated as critical arm of innate immunity. It is required for the removal of invading pathogens and functions by direct pathogen destruction and through the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. However, complement activation and function is not confined to the extracellular space but also occurs within cells. Recent work indicates that complement activation regulates key metabolic pathways and thus can impact fundamental processes of the cell, such as survival, proliferation, and autophagy. Novel identified functions of complement include a key role in shaping metabolic reprogramming, which underlies T cell effector differentiation, and a role as a nexus for interactions with other effector systems, in particular the inflammasome and Notch transcription factor networks. This review focuses on the contributions of complement to basic processes of the cell, in particular the integration of complement with cellular metabolism, and the potential implications in infection and other disease settings. PMID:27533012

  4. Complement-Mediated Regulation of Metabolism and Basic Cellular Processes.

    PubMed

    Hess, Christoph; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-08-16

    Complement is well appreciated as a critical arm of innate immunity. It is required for the removal of invading pathogens and works by directly destroying them through the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. However, complement activation and function is not confined to the extracellular space but also occurs within cells. Recent work indicates that complement activation regulates key metabolic pathways and thus can impact fundamental cellular processes, such as survival, proliferation, and autophagy. Newly identified functions of complement include a key role in shaping metabolic reprogramming, which underlies T cell effector differentiation, and a role as a nexus for interactions with other effector systems, in particular the inflammasome and Notch transcription-factor networks. This review focuses on the contributions of complement to basic processes of the cell, in particular the integration of complement with cellular metabolism and the potential implications in infection and other disease settings.

  5. Nouns, Verbs and NP Complements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, J. T.

    This paper investigates restrictions on three types of noun-phrase complements (gerundive, infinitive, clause) in English and seeks to point out some parallels between the occurrence of these three types in object positions. The author first presents a list of verbs which may be followed by noun-phrase complements; he then considers the occurrence…

  6. Complement-mediated cell death induced by rituximab in B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is mediated in vitro by a caspase-independent mechanism involving the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Bellosillo, B; Villamor, N; López-Guillermo, A; Marcé, S; Esteve, J; Campo, E; Colomer, D; Montserrat, E

    2001-11-01

    Mechanisms involving the in vitro effect of rituximab in cells from 55 patients with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders were investigated. No cytotoxic effect was observed when cells were incubated with rituximab alone, but in the presence of human AB serum rituximab induced complement-dependent cell death (R-CDC). A cytotoxic effect was observed in cells from 9 of 33 patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 16 of 16 patients with mantle-cell lymphoma, 4 of 4 patients with follicular lymphoma, and 2 of 2 patients with hairy-cell leukemia. R-CDC was observed in cells from patients expressing more than 50 x 10(3) CD20 molecules per cell, and directly correlated with the number of CD20 molecules per cell. Preincubation with anti-CD59 increased the cytotoxic effect of rituximab and sensitized cells from nonsensitive cases. Neither cleavage of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) nor activation of caspase-3 was observed in R-CDC. In addition, no cells with a hypodiploid DNA content were detected and R-CDC was not prevented by a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, suggesting a caspase-independent mechanism. Incubation with rituximab in the presence of AB serum induced a rapid and intense production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). R-CDC was blocked by the incubation of cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or Tiron, 2 ROS scavengers, indicating that the cytotoxic effect was due to the generation of superoxide (O) radicals. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that CD20, CD59, and complement have a role in the in vitro cytotoxic effect of rituximab, which is mediated by a caspase-independent process that involves ROS generation.

  7. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term manned space travel will require a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy which results from microgravity. Astronaut strength and dexterity must be maintained for normal mission operations and for emergency situations. Although exercise in space slows the rate of muscle loss, it does not prevent it. A biochemical understanding of how gravity/tension/exercise help to maintain muscle size by altering protein synthesis and/or degradation rate should ultimately allow pharmacological intervention to prevent muscle atrophy in microgravity. The overall objective is to examine some of the basic biochemical processes involved in tension-induced muscle growth. With an experimental in vitro system, the role of exogenous and endogenous muscle growth factors in mechanically stimulated muscle growth are examined. Differentiated avian skeletal myofibers can be 'exercised' in tissue culture using a newly developed dynamic mechanical cell stimulator device which simulates different muscle activity patterns. Patterns of mechanical activity which significantly affect muscle growth and metabolic characteristics were found. Both exogenous and endogenous growth factors are essential for tension-induced muscle growth. Exogenous growth factors found in serum, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors, and steroids, are important regulators of muscle protein turnover rates and mechanically-induced muscle growth. Endogenous growth factors are synthesized and released into the culture medium when muscle cells are mechanically stimulated. At least one family of mechanically induced endogenous factors, the prostaglandins, help to regulate the rates of protein turnover in muscle cells. Endogenously synthesized IGF-1 is another. The interaction of muscle mechanical activity and these growth factors in the regulation of muscle protein turnover rates with our in vitro model system is studied.

  8. CLINICAL FACTORS FOR DEVELOPING SHOCK IN RADIOCONTRAST MEDIA INDUCED ANAPHYLAXIS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Min; Ko, Byuk Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Ha, Sang Ook; Ahn, Shin; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Kim, Won Young

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time interval between radiocontrast media (RCM) administration and the development of anaphylactic shock, and risk factors associated with RCM-induced anaphylactic shock. We reviewed the medical records of 154 patients with RCM-induced anaphylaxis presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital between January 2005 and December 2014. Clinical features of RCM-induced anaphylaxis were analyzed, and patients were categorized into shock and non-shock groups to identify associated factors in affected patients. Of the 154 cases of RCM-induced anaphylaxis, 101 (65.9%) patients experienced shock. The median time between RCM exposure and the onset of shock was 11 min (interquartile range, 7.0-18.8). In patients with RCM-induced anaphylaxis accompanying shock, the median time from RCM to the first symptom onset was 6 min (interquartile range, 5.0-10.0). In the multivariate analysis, age, neurological manifestations, and allergy history except RCM were associated with the development of shock. RCM-induced anaphylaxis was commonly accompanied with shock, and the time interval between RCM exposure and the onset of shock was short. Physicians should pay attention to the development of potential cardiovascular collapse in anaphylaxis patients of old age and with neurologic manifestations.

  9. A Metalloproteinase Mirolysin of Tannerella forsythia Inhibits All Pathways of the Complement System.

    PubMed

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Mizgalska, Danuta; Bielecka, Ewa; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Riesbeck, Kristian; Garred, Peter; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M

    2015-09-01

    Recent reports focusing on virulence factors of periodontal pathogens implicated proteinases as major determinants of remarkable pathogenicity of these species, with special emphasis on their capacity to modulate complement activity. In particular, bacteria-mediated cleavage of C5 and subsequent release of C5a seems to be an important phenomenon in the manipulation of the local inflammatory response in periodontitis. In this study, we present mirolysin, a novel metalloproteinase secreted by Tannerella forsythia, a well-recognized pathogen strongly associated with periodontitis. Mirolysin exhibited a strong effect on all complement pathways. It inhibited the classical and lectin complement pathways due to efficient degradation of mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-2, ficolin-3, and C4, whereas inhibition of the alternative pathway was caused by degradation of C5. This specificity toward complement largely resembled the activity of a previously characterized metalloproteinase of T. forsythia, karilysin. Interestingly, mirolysin released the biologically active C5a peptide in human plasma and induced migration of neutrophils. Importantly, we demonstrated that combination of mirolysin with karilysin, as well as a cysteine proteinase of another periodontal pathogen, Prevotella intermedia, resulted in a strong synergistic effect on complement. Furthermore, mutant strains of T. forsythia, devoid of either mirolysin or karilysin, showed diminished survival in human serum, providing further evidence for the synergistic inactivation of complement by these metalloproteinases. Taken together, our findings on interactions of mirolysin with complement significantly add to the understanding of immune evasion strategies of T. forsythia and expand the knowledge on molecular mechanisms driving pathogenic events in the infected periodontium.

  10. The reaction of iodine and thiol-blocking reagents with human complement components C2 and factor B. Purification and N-terminal amino acid sequence of a peptide from C2a containing a free thiol group.

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, C; Gagnon, J; Kerr, M A

    1983-01-01

    Human complement components C2 and Factor B each contain one free thiol group/molecule. Reaction with p-chloromercuribenzoate destroyed the haemolytic activity of C2 but had no effect on Factor B. Reaction of C2 with I2 gave a 16-fold enhancement of its haemolytic activity. The pH optimum for the reaction was 7.0. The I2 reacted at the thiol group in C2 with a stoicheiometry of 1 mol of I2/mol of C2. The product of the reaction was unaffected by millimolar concentrations of dithiothreitol; however, azide and cyanide were inhibitory. Reaction with azide did not result in re-expression of the thiol group. Mild oxidation of the thiol group with m-chloroperbenzoic acid did not enhance the haemolytic activity. The results suggest that reaction with I2 causes intramolecular covalent, but not disulphide, bond formation. I2 reacted with Factor B at the free thiol group without affecting the haemolytic activity. A CNBr-cleavage peptide from C2a (obtained by cleavage of C2 by subcomponent C1s) containing the free thiol group was isolated. Automated Edman degradation of the peptide showed that it was the N-terminal peptide of C2a. The free thiol group was identified at position 18. PMID:6555044

  11. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-11-01

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors).

  12. Complement in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Maria V; Sim, Robert B

    2011-09-16

    The complement system consists of about 35-40 proteins and glycoproteins present in blood plasma or on cell surfaces. Its main biological function is to recognise "foreign" particles and macromolecules, and to promote their elimination either by opsonisation or lysis. Although historically complement has been studied as a system for immune defence against bacteria, it has an important homeostatic role in which it recognises damaged or altered "self" components. Thus complement has major roles in both immune defence against microorganisms, and in clearance of damaged or "used" host components. Since complement proteins opsonise or lyse cells, complement can damage healthy host cells and tissues. The system is regulated by many endogenous regulatory proteins. Regulation is sometimes imperfect and both too much and too little complement activation is associated with many diseases. Excessive or inappropriate activation can cause tissue damage in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), multiple sclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury (e.g. ischemic stroke). Insufficient complement activity is associated with susceptibility to infection (mainly bacterial) and development of autoimmune disease, like SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus).

  13. Complement C5-inhibitor rEV576 (coversin) ameliorates in-vivo effects of antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Romay-Penabad, Z; Carrera Marin, A L; Willis, R; Weston-Davies, W; Machin, S; Cohen, H; Brasier, A; Gonzalez, E B

    2014-10-01

    Activation of the complement cascade is an important mechanism for antiphospholipid antibody-mediated thrombosis. We examined the effects of rEV576 (coversin), a recombinant protein inhibitor of complement factor 5 activation, on antiphospholipid antibody-mediated tissue factor up-regulation and thrombosis. Groups of C57BL/6J mice (n=5) received either IgG from a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) or control IgG from normal human serum (NHS). Each of these groups of mice had IgG administration preceded by either rEV576, or phosphate buffer control. For each of the four treatment groups, the size of induced thrombus, tissue factor activity in carotid homogenates, anticardiolipin and anti-β2glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) levels were measured 72 h after the first injection. Mice treated with IgG-APS had significantly higher titers of anticardiolipin antibodies and anti-β2GPI at thrombus induction compared with those treated with IgG-NHS. The IgG-APS/phosphate buffer treatment induced significantly larger thrombi and tissue factor activity compared with other groups. Mice treated with IgG-APS/rEV576 had significantly smaller thrombi and reduced tissue factor activity than those treated with IgG-APS/phosphate buffer. The data confirm involvement of complement activation in antiphospholipid antibody-mediated thrombogenesis and suggest that complement inhibition might ameliorate this effect.

  14. Placental Growth Factor Administration Abolishes Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Spradley, Frank T; Tan, Adelene Y; Joo, Woo S; Daniels, Garrett; Kussie, Paul; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Granger, Joey P

    2016-04-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder of new-onset hypertension. Unfortunately, the most effective treatment is early delivery of the fetus and placenta. Placental ischemia appears central to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia because placental ischemia/hypoxia induced in animals by reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) or in humans stimulates release of hypertensive placental factors into the maternal circulation. The anti-angiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), which antagonizes and reduces bioavailable vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor (PlGF), is elevated in RUPP rats and preeclampsia. Although PlGF and vascular endothelial growth factor are both natural ligands for sFlt-1, vascular endothelial growth factor also has high affinity to VEGFR2 (Flk-1) causing side effects like edema. PlGF is specific for sFlt-1. We tested the hypothesis that PlGF treatment reduces placental ischemia-induced hypertension by antagonizing sFlt-1 without adverse consequences to the mother or fetus. On gestational day 14, rats were randomized to 4 groups: normal pregnant or RUPP±infusion of recombinant human PlGF (180 μg/kg per day; AG31, a purified, recombinant human form of PlGF) for 5 days via intraperitoneal osmotic minipumps. On day 19, mean arterial blood pressure and plasma sFlt-1 were higher and glomerular filtration rate lower in RUPP than normal pregnant rats. Infusion of recombinant human PlGF abolished these changes seen with RUPP along with reducing oxidative stress. These data indicate that the increased sFlt-1 and reduced PlGF resulting from placental ischemia contribute to maternal hypertension. Our novel finding that recombinant human PlGF abolishes placental ischemia-induced hypertension, without major adverse consequences, suggests a strong therapeutic potential for this growth factor in preeclampsia.

  15. Elastase induces lung epithelial cell autophagy through placental growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hsin-Han; Cheng, Shih-Lung; Chung, Kuei-Pin; Kuo, Mark Yen-Ping; Yeh, Cheng-Chang; Chang, Bei-En; Lu, Hsuan-Hsuan; Wang, Hao-Chien; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a devastating disease, which is associated with increasing mortality and morbidity. Therefore, there is a need to clearly define the COPD pathogenic mechanism and to explore effective therapies. Previous studies indicated that cigarette smoke (CS) induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung epithelial (LE) cells. Excessive ELANE/HNE (elastase, neutrophil elastase), a factor involved in protease-antiprotease imbalance and the pathogenesis of COPD, causes LE cell apoptosis and upregulates the expression of several stimulus-responsive genes. However, whether or not elastase induces autophagy in LE cell remains unknown. The level of PGF (placental growth factor) is higher in COPD patients than non-COPD controls. We hypothesize that elastase induces PGF expression and causes autophagy in LE cells. In this study, we demonstrated that porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) induced PGF expression and secretion in LE cells in vitro and in vivo. The activation of MAPK8/JNK1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase 8) and MAPK14/p38alpha MAPK signaling pathways was involved in the PGF mediated regulation of the TSC (tuberous sclerosis complex) pathway and autophagy in LE cells. Notably, PGF-induced MAPK8 and MAPK14 signaling pathways mediated the inactivation of MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin), the upregulation of MAP1LC3B/LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 β) and the increase of autophagosome formation in mice. Furthermore, the PPE-induced autophagy promotes further apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. In summary, elastase-induced autophagy promotes LE cell apoptosis and pulmonary emphysema through the upregulation of PGF. PGF and its downstream MAPK8 and MAPK14 signaling pathways are potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of emphysema and COPD. PMID:24988221

  16. Genetics of the complement system.

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, P

    1975-01-01

    The complement system, unlike the coagulation system, was largely characterized by in-vitro techniques which did not make use of genetically deficient plasmas. The existence of the genetically deficient plasmas. The existence of the genetically deficient subjects therefore has served largely to increase our knowledge of the in-vivo role of complement. At the present time its clearest role is in the resistance to infection; obviously in the case of C3 deficiency and bacterial infection and possibly more subtly in the case of deficiency of the early active complement components and low virulence organisms. There is so far no evidence that genetic complement deficiency interferes with antibody formation or with the generation of tolerance as has been suggested in the pas (Azar et al, 1968; Dukor and Hartmann, 1973). PMID:768477

  17. Hypoxia inducible factors and the response to hypoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Majmundar, Amar J.; Wong, Waihay J.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen (O2) is an essential nutrient that serves as a key substrate in cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. In a variety of physiological and pathological states, organisms encounter insufficient O2 availability, or hypoxia. In order to cope with this stress, evolutionarily conserved responses are engaged. In mammals, the primary transcriptional response to hypoxic stress is mediated by the Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). While canonically regulated by prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing enzymes (PHDs), the HIFα subunits are intricately responsive to numerous other factors including Factor Inhibiting HIF-1α (FIH1), sirtuins, and metabolites. These transcription factors function in normal tissue homeostasis and impinge on critical aspects of disease progression and recovery. Insights from basic HIF biology are being translated into pharmaceuticals targeting the HIF pathway. PMID:20965423

  18. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mice and mice transfused with Syk inhibitor-treated platelets . Platelet lodging was remarkably decreased in lungs of mice transfused with Syk...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet ...30September2012–29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  19. The low-temperature- and salt-induced RCI2A gene of Arabidopsis complements the sodium sensitivity caused by a deletion of the homologous yeast gene SNA1.

    PubMed

    Nylander, M; Heino, P; Helenius, E; Palva, E T; Ronne, H; Welin, B V

    2001-02-01

    Two closely related, tandemly arranged, low-temperature- and salt-induced Arabidopsis genes, corresponding to the previously isolated cDNAs RCI2A and RCI2B, were isolated and characterized. The RCI2A transcript accumulated primarily in response to low temperature or high salinity, and to a lesser extent in response to ABA treatment or water deficit stress. The RCI2B transcript was present at much lower levels than RCI2A, and could only be detected by reverse transcription-PCR amplification. The predicted 6 kDa RCI2 proteins are highly hydrophobic and contain two putative membrane-spanning regions. The polypeptides exhibit extensive similarity to deduced low-temperature- and/or salt-induced proteins from barley, wheat grass and strawberry, and to predicted proteins from bacteria, fungi, nematodes and yeast. Interestingly, we found that a deletion of the RCI2 homologous gene, SNA1 (YRD276c), in yeast causes a salt-sensitive phenotype. This effect is specific for sodium, since no growth defect was observed for the sna1 mutant on 1.7 M sorbitol, 1 M KCl or 0.6 M LiCl. Finally, we found that the Arabidopsis RCI2A cDNA can complement the sna1 mutant when expressed in yeast, indicating that the plant and yeast proteins have similar functions during high salt stress.

  20. Targeted genes and interacting proteins of hypoxia inducible factor-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Shen, Shao-Ming; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Heterodimeric transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) functions as a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis in almost all nucleated mammalian cells. The fundamental process adapted to cellular oxygen alteration largely depends on the refined regulation on its alpha subunit, HIF-1α. Recent studies have unraveled expanding and critical roles of HIF-1α, involving in a multitude of developmental, physiological, and pathophysiological processes. This review will focus on the current knowledge of HIF-1α-targeting genes and its interacting proteins, as well as the concomitant functional relationships between them. PMID:22773957

  1. Hypoxia-inducible factors as molecular targets for liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Ju, Cynthia; Colgan, Sean P; Eltzschig, Holger K

    2016-06-01

    Liver disease is a growing global health problem, as deaths from end-stage liver cirrhosis and cancer are rising across the world. At present, pharmacologic approaches to effectively treat or prevent liver disease are extremely limited. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a transcription factor that regulates diverse signaling pathways enabling adaptive cellular responses to perturbations of the tissue microenvironment. HIF activation through hypoxia-dependent and hypoxia-independent signals have been reported in liver disease of diverse etiologies, from ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute liver injury to chronic liver diseases caused by viral infection, excessive alcohol consumption, or metabolic disorders. This review summarizes the evidence for HIF stabilization in liver disease, discusses the mechanistic involvement of HIFs in disease development, and explores the potential of pharmacological HIF modifiers in the treatment of liver disease.

  2. Dexamethasone impairs hypoxia-inducible factor-1 function

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A.E.; Huck, G.; Stiehl, D.P.; Jelkmann, W.; Hellwig-Buergel, T.

    2008-07-25

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric transcription-factor composed of {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits. HIF-1 is not only necessary for the cellular adaptation to hypoxia, but it is also involved in inflammatory processes and wound healing. Glucocorticoids (GC) are therapeutically used to suppress inflammatory responses. Herein, we investigated whether GC modulate HIF-1 function using GC receptor (GR) possessing (HepG2) and GR deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cell cultures as model systems. Dexamethasone (DEX) treatment increased HIF-1{alpha} levels in the cytosol of HepG2 cells, while nuclear HIF-1{alpha} levels and HIF-1 DNA-binding was reduced. In addition, DEX dose-dependently lowered the hypoxia-induced luciferase activity in a reporter gene system. DEX suppressed the hypoxic stimulation of the expression of the HIF-1 target gene VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) in HepG2 cultures. DEX did not reduce hypoxically induced luciferase activity in HRB5 cells, a Hep3B derivative lacking GR. Transient expression of the GR in HRB5 cells restored the susceptibility to DEX. Our study discloses the inhibitory action of GC on HIF-1 dependent gene expression, which may be important with respect to the impaired wound healing in DEX-treated patients.

  3. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Transcription Factor Nfatp Controls Superantigen-Induced Lethal Shock

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is the key mediator of superantigen-induced T cell lethal shock. Here, we show that nuclear factor of activated T cells transcription factor, NFATp, controls susceptibility to superantigen-induced lethal shock in mice through its activation of TNF-α gene transcription. In NFATp-deficient mice, T cell stimulation leads to delayed induction and attenuation of TNF-α mRNA levels, decreased TNF-α serum levels, and resistance to superantigen-induced lethal shock. By contrast, after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, serum levels of TNF-α and susceptibility to shock are unaffected. These results demonstrate that NFATp is an essential activator of immediate early TNF-α gene expression in T cells and they present in vivo evidence of the inducer- and cell type–specific regulation of TNF-α gene expression. Furthermore, they suggest NFATp as a potential selective target in the treatment of superantigen-induced lethal shock. PMID:10952728

  4. PLACENTAL GROWTH FACTOR ADMINISTRATION ABOLISHES PLACENTAL ISCHEMIA-INDUCED HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Spradley, Frank T.; Tan, Adelene Y.; Joo, Woo S.; Daniels, Garrett; Kussie, Paul; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Granger, Joey P.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder of new-onset hypertension. Unfortunately, the most effective treatment is early delivery of the fetus and placenta. Placental ischemia appears central to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia as placental ischemia/hypoxia induced in animals by reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) or in humans stimulates release of hypertensive placental factors into the maternal circulation. The anti-angiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), which antagonizes and reduces bioavailable vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PlGF), is elevated in RUPP rats and preeclampsia. Although PlGF and VEGF are both natural ligands for sFlt-1, VEGF also has high affinity to VEGFR2 (Flk-1) causing side effects like edema. PlGF is specific for sFlt-1. We tested the hypothesis that PlGF treatment reduces placental ischemia-induced hypertension by antagonizing sFlt-1 without adverse consequences to the mother or fetus. On gestational day 14, rats were randomized to four groups: normal pregnant (NP) or RUPP ± infusion of rhPlGF (180 μg/kg/day; AG31, a purified, recombinant human form of PlGF) for 5 days via intraperitoneal osmotic minipumps. On day 19, mean arterial blood pressure and plasma sFlt-1 were higher and glomerular filtration rate lower in RUPP than NP rats. Infusion of rhPlGF abolished these changes seen with RUPP along with reducing oxidative stress. These data indicate that the increased sFlt-1 and reduced PlGF resulting from placental ischemia contribute to maternal hypertension. Our novel finding that rhPlGF abolishes placental ischemia-induced hypertension, without major adverse consequences, suggests a strong therapeutic potential for this growth factor in preeclampsia. PMID:26831193

  5. PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF ScFv-DAF FUSION PROTEIN ON THE COMPLEMENT ATTACK TO ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR: A POSSIBLE OPTION FOR TREATMENT OF MYASTHENIA GRAVIS

    PubMed Central

    XU, JIANG; WU, XINGAN; ZHANG, FANGLIN; LIN, HONG; LI, ZHUYI; KAMINSKI, HENRY J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Autoantibody-induced complement activation, which causes disruption of the postsynaptic membrane, is recognized as a key pathogenic factor in myasthenia gravis (MG). Therefore, specific targeting of complement inhibitors to the site of complement activation is a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of MG. Methods We assessed expression of single-chain antibody fragment–decay accelerating factor (scFv-DAF), comprising a single-chain fragment scFv1956 based on the rat complement inhibitor DAF in prokaryotic systems, and studied its inhibitory effect on complement deposition in vitro. Results The recombinant conjugate scFv-DAF completely retained the wild-type binding activity of scFv1956 to AChR and inhibited complement activation of DAF in vitro. Conclusions We found that scFv-DAF could bind specifically to TE671 cells, and it is significantly more potent at inhibiting complement deposition than the untargeted parent molecule DAF. scFv-DAF may be a candidate for in vivo protection of the AChR in MG. PMID:22499093

  6. Minor Role of Plasminogen in Complement Activation on Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, Satu; Jokiranta, T. Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, but severe thrombotic microangiopathy. In roughly two thirds of the patients, mutations in complement genes lead to uncontrolled activation of the complement system against self cells. Recently, aHUS patients were described with deficiency of the fibrinolytic protein plasminogen. This zymogen and its protease form plasmin have both been shown to interact with complement proteins in the fluid phase. In this work we studied the potential of plasminogen to restrict complement propagation. In hemolytic assays, plasminogen inhibited complement activation, but only when it had been exogenously activated to plasmin and when it was used at disproportionately high concentrations compared to serum. Addition of only the zymogen plasminogen into serum did not hinder complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes. Plasminogen could not restrict deposition of complement activation products on endothelial cells either, as was shown with flow cytometry. With platelets, a very weak inhibitory effect on deposition of C3 fragments was observed, but it was considered too weak to be significant for disease pathogenesis. Thus it was concluded that plasminogen is not an important regulator of complement on self cells. Instead, addition of plasminogen was shown to clearly hinder platelet aggregation in serum. This was attributed to plasmin causing disintegration of formed platelet aggregates. We propose that reduced proteolytic activity of plasmin on structures of growing thrombi, rather than on complement activation fragments, explains the association of plasminogen deficiency with aHUS. This adds to the emerging view that factors unrelated to the complement system can also be central to aHUS pathogenesis and suggests that future research on the mechanism of the disease should expand beyond complement dysregulation. PMID:26637181

  7. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  8. Increased expression and secretion of r-Gsp protein, rat counterpart of complement C1s precursor, during cyclic AMP-induced differentiation in rat C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masanori; Nakashima, Shigeru; Banno, Yoshiko; Yamada, Jun; Sawada, Motoshi; Yoshimura, Shin ichi; Kaku, Yasuhiko; Iwama, Toru; Shinoda, Jun; Sakai, Noboru

    2002-10-15

    The gene, termed r-gsp, was originally isolated during identification of differentiation-associated molecules in rat C6 glial cells. Its mRNA expression was markedly increased during cAMP-induced glial cell differentiation. The deduced amino acid sequence of r-gsp was homologous to those of complement C1s precursors of hamsters and humans. In the present study, we raised anti-peptide antibody against r-Gsp protein and analyzed its change during cAMP-induced differentiation. The 90-kDa r-Gsp protein increased time-dependently and reached the maximal level ( approximately 7.6-fold increase) at 24 h in response to dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP) and theophylline. Moreover, it was secreted into the medium and then was cleaved to form disulfide-linked fragments, one of which was 30 kDa, similar to C1s, suggesting its processing in the extracellular space. In fact, the partially purified r-Gsp from culture medium was cleaved by active human C1r to form a 30-kDa polypeptide. Moreover, secreted r-Gsp protein cleaved human C4alpha to yield C4alpha' and associated with human serum C1-esterase inhibitor, strongly suggesting that r-Gsp protein is rat C1s. However, in C6 cells overexpressing r-Gsp, their morphology and proliferation rate were similar to those in parent C6 cells. These results suggest that r-Gsp protein could not induce glial differentiation alone, and suggest that r-Gsp protein was secreted as a proenzyme and processed in culture medium. Its possible role in glial cell differentiation will be discussed.

  9. Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    were validated; they induced myeloid colonies in vitro and engrafted in the marrow of SG3, but not NSG mice. Myelodysplastic syndrome , lentivirus...cDNA libraries, complementation The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Cleveland, OH 44195 Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with...Martin-Padura, P. Mancuso, P. Marighetti, C. Rabascio, G. Pruneri, L. D. Shultz, and F. Bertolini. 2008. Human acute leukemia cells injected in NOD

  10. COMPLEMENT REGULATION IN RENAL DISEASE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Abhijit; Sharma, Shweta; Quigg, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the complement system is tightly regulated by plasma and cell-associated complement regulatory proteins (CRPs), such as factor H (fH), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and membrane cofactor protein (MCP). Animal models of disease have provided considerable insights into the important roles for CRPs in the kidney. Mice deficient in fH have excessive fluid phase C3 activation and inactivation leading to deposition of iC3b in glomerular capillary walls (GCW), comparable to dense deposit disease. In contrast, when fH lacks C-terminal surface targeting regions, local activation on the GCW leads to a disease reminiscent of thrombotic microangiopathy. The uniquely rodent protein, CR1-related y (Crry), has features analogous to human MCP. Defective Crry leads to unrestricted alternative pathway activation in the tubulointerstitium (TI) resulting in pathological features ranging from TMA, acute kidney injury and TI nephritis. In the presence of initiators of the classical or lectin pathways, commonly in the form of immune complexes in human glomerular diseases, complement regulation on self is stressed, with the potential for recruitment of the spontaneously active alternative pathway. The threshold for this activation is set by CRPs; pathology is more likely when complement regulation is defective. Within the endocapillary region of the GCW, fH is key, while DAF and Crry are protective on mesangial cells and podocytes. Arguably, acquired alterations in these CRPs is a more common event, extending from pathological states of cellular injury or production of inhibitory antibodies, to physiological fine tuning of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24161042

  11. Mycoplasma polysaccharide protects against complement

    PubMed Central

    Bolland, Jeffrey R.; Simmons, Warren L.; Daubenspeck, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Although they lack a cell wall, mycoplasmas do possess a glycocalyx. The interactions between the glycocalyx, mycoplasmal surface proteins and host complement were explored using the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis as a model. It was previously shown that the length of the tandem repeat region of the surface lipoprotein Vsa is associated with susceptibility to complement-mediated killing. Cells producing a long Vsa containing about 40 repeats are resistant to complement, whereas strains that produce a short Vsa of five or fewer repeats are susceptible. We show here that the length of the Vsa protein modulates the affinity of the M. pulmonis EPS-I polysaccharide for the mycoplasma cell surface, with more EPS-I being associated with mycoplasmas producing a short Vsa protein. An examination of mutants that lack EPS-I revealed that planktonic mycoplasmas were highly susceptible to complement killing even when the Vsa protein was long, demonstrating that both EPS-I and Vsa length contribute to resistance. In contrast, the mycoplasmas were resistant to complement even in the absence of EPS-I when the cells were encased in a biofilm. PMID:22504437

  12. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed.

  13. Genetic control of the alternative pathway of complement in humans and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Laura A; Edwards, Albert O; Ryu, Euijung; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Baratz, Keith H; Brown, William L; Charbel Issa, Peter; Scholl, Hendrik P; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Schmid-Kubista, Katharina E; Bailey, Kent R; Oppermann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the alternative pathway of complement is implicated in common neurodegenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We explored the impact of common variation in genes encoding proteins of the alternative pathway on complement activation in human blood and in AMD. Genetic variation across the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB) and component 3 (C3) was determined. The influence of common haplotypes defining transcriptional and translational units on complement activation in blood was determined in a quantitative genomic association study. Individual haplotypes in CFH and CFB were associated with distinct and novel effects on plasma levels of precursors, regulators and activation products of the alternative pathway of complement in human blood. Further, genetic variation in CFH thought to influence cell surface regulation of complement did not alter plasma complement levels in human blood. Plasma markers of chronic activation (split-products Ba and C3d) and an activating enzyme (factor D) were elevated in AMD subjects. Most of the elevation in AMD was accounted for by the genetic variation controlling complement activation in human blood. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement in blood is under genetic control and increases with age. The genetic variation associated with increased activation of complement in human blood also increased the risk of AMD. Our data are consistent with a disease model in which genetic variation in the complement system increases the risk of AMD by a combination of systemic complement activation and abnormal regulation of complement activation in local tissues.

  14. Noscapine induces apoptosis in human glioma cells by an apoptosis-inducing factor-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Elizabeth W; Lukyanov, Yevgeniy; Smirnova, Iva; Schnee, Tona; Zagzag, David

    2008-07-01

    Previously, we identified noscapine as a small molecule inhibitor of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 pathway in hypoxic human glioma cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Noscapine is a nontoxic ingredient in cough medicine currently used in clinical trials for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia to assess antitumor efficacy. Here, we have evaluated the sensitivity of four human glioma cell lines to noscapine-induced apoptosis. Noscapine was a potent inhibitor of proliferation and inducer of apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis was associated with activation of the c-jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway concomitant with inactivation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase signaling pathway and phosphorylation of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Noscapine-induced apoptosis was associated with the release of mitochondrial proteins apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and/or cytochrome c. In some glioma cell lines, only AIF release occurred without cytochrome c release or poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Knock-down of AIF decreased noscapine-induced apoptosis. Our results suggest the potential importance of noscapine as a novel agent for use in patients with glioblastoma owing to its low toxicity profile and its potent anticancer activity.

  15. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Williams, Vonetta; Filippova, Maria; Filippov, Valery; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer. PMID:25340830

  16. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  17. Multi-faceted proteomic characterization of host protein complement of Rift Valley fever virus virions and identification of specific heat shock proteins, including HSP90, as important viral host factors.

    PubMed

    Nuss, Jonathan E; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Benedict, Ashwini; Costantino, Julie; Ward, Michael; Peyser, Brian D; Retterer, Cary J; Tressler, Lyal E; Wanner, Laura M; McGovern, Hugh F; Zaidi, Anum; Anthony, Scott M; Kota, Krishna P; Bavari, Sina; Hakami, Ramin M

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is a potentially fatal disease of humans and domestic animals caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Infection with RVFV in ruminants can cause near 100% abortion rates and recent outbreaks in naïve human populations have suggested case fatality rates of greater than thirty percent. To elucidate the roles that host proteins play during RVFV infection, proteomic analysis of RVFV virions was conducted using complementary analytical approaches, followed by functional validation studies of select identified host factors. Coupling the more traditional Gel LC/MS/MS approach (SDS PAGE followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry) with an alternative technique that preserves protein complexes allowed the protein complement of these viral particles to be thoroughly examined. In addition to viral proteins present within the virions and virion-associated host proteins, multiple macromolecular complexes were identified. Bioinformatic analysis showed that host chaperones were among over-represented protein families associated with virions, and functional experiments using siRNA gene silencing and small molecule inhibitors identified several of these heat shock proteins, including heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), as important viral host factors. Further analysis indicated that HSP inhibition effects occur during the replication/transcription phase of the virus life cycle, leading to significant lowering of viral titers without compromising the functional capacity of released virions. Overall, these studies provide much needed further insight into interactions between RVFV and host cells, increasing our understanding of the infection process and suggesting novel strategies for anti-viral development. In particular, considering that several HSP90 inhibitors have been advancing through clinical trials for cancer treatment, these results also highlight the exciting potential of repurposing HSP90 inhibitors to treat RVF.

  18. Myeloid hypoxia-inducible factors in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Aragonés, Julian; Elorza, Ainara; Acosta-Iborra, Barbara; Landázuri, Manuel O

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF1 and HIF2) have emerged as central regulators of the activity of myeloid cells at inflammatory sites where O(2) is frequently limited. Novel insights in the field have revealed that the expression of HIFs by myeloid cells is not exclusively induced by hypoxia but also in response to central inflammatory mediators independently of O(2) shortage. This has substantially elevated the biological significance of HIFs in the context of inflammatory diseases. As a consequence, the loss of HIF1 or HIF2 in myeloid cells specifically compro-mises some of the processes driven by myeloid cells, such as bactericidal activity and myeloid invasion, as well as inflammation-associated detrimental consequences.

  19. NIF (neurite-inducing factor): a novel peptide inducing neurite formation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J A

    1986-01-01

    Neurite-inducing factor (NIF) is a novel protein that has been partially purified from mouse submaxillary glands. NIF induces neurite formation in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, and the NIF-induced neurites are indistinguishable from NGF-induced neurites in both their morphology and the time course of their formation. Neurite-inducing activity can be recovered at a position corresponding to a molecular weight of 20,000 Da after fractionation of partially purified preparations via SDS-PAGE. Partially purified preparations of NIF are about half as potent as pure beta NGF, and since the neurite-inducing activity does not correspond to any of the major proteins in this fraction, specific activity of purified NIF will probably be significantly greater than the 60 ng/ml found for our partially purified material. NIF is distinct from beta NGF by four criteria: (1) antibodies to beta NGF can block the activity of beta NGF, but not the activity of NIF; (2) beta NGF can induce ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in PC12 cells at concentrations significantly below those required to induce neurites, while NIF induces ODC only at concentrations greatly in excess of those required to induce neurite formation; (3) by the criterion of SDS-PAGE, there is insufficient beta NGF in our partially purified preparations of NIF to explain the biological activity of this fraction; and (4) the biological activity of NIF has a molecular weight (20,000 Da) that is distinct from beta NGF (13,000 Da). We conclude that NIF is probably a novel peptide that is very active in promoting morphological differentiation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1987-01-01

    Muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow skeletal myofibers which differentiate into more adult-like myofibers. Mechanical simulation studies of these muscle cells in a newly developed mechanical cell simulator can now be performed to study growth processes in skeletal muscle. Conditions in the mechanical cell simulator were defined where mechanical activity can either prevent muscle wasting or stimulate muscle growth. The role of endogenous and exogenous growth factors in tension-induced muscle growth is being investigated under the defined conditions of tissue culture.

  1. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma; Larsson, Marie

    2015-08-15

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection.

  2. Hypoxia-inducible factors as key regulators of tumor inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mamlouk, Soulafa; Wielockx, Ben

    2013-06-15

    Low levels of oxygen or hypoxia is often an obstacle in health, particularly in pathological disorders like cancer. The main family of transcription factors responsible for cell survival and adaptation under strenuous conditions of hypoxia are the "hypoxia-inducible factors" (HIFs). Together with prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs), HIFs regulates tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, metastasis, in addition to resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. Additionally, the entire HIF transcription cascade is involved in the "seventh" hallmark of cancer; inflammation. Studies have shown that hypoxia can influence tumor associated immune cells toward assisting in tumor proliferation, differentiation, vessel growth, distant metastasis and suppression of the immune response via cytokine expression alterations. These changes are not necessarily analogous to HIF's role in non-cancer immune responses, where hypoxia often encourages a strong inflammatory response.

  3. Does transcription factor induced pluripotency accurately mimic embryo derived pluripotency?

    PubMed

    Lowry, William E

    2012-10-01

    When Takahashi and Yamanaka first demonstrated that just four transcription factors could reprogram a fibroblast to a pluripotent state, the first wave of data to emerge focused on how similar these induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were to embryo-derived pluripotent stem cells (ESCs) [1]. The next wave of data focused on determining the degree of difference between iPSCs and ESCs [2]. Now the focus is on tweaking the process to generate iPSCs that are more similar to ESCs [3,4]. Because transcription factor based reprogramming allows for nearly any type of cell to be created from any donor cell, there is obviously enormous interest in this technique as a tool for both basic developmental biology and for clinical applications. In this review, I will attempt to summarize the data that serve to distinguish these types of pluripotent stem cells and speculate on the ramifications of any differences.

  4. Vectorology and Factor Delivery in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) reprogramming requires sustained expression of multiple reprogramming factors for a limited period of time (10–30 days). Conventional iPSC reprogramming was achieved using lentiviral or simple retroviral vectors. Retroviral reprogramming has flaws of insertional mutagenesis, uncontrolled silencing, residual expression and re-activation of transgenes, and immunogenicity. To overcome these issues, various technologies were explored, including adenoviral vectors, protein transduction, RNA transfection, minicircle DNA, excisable PiggyBac (PB) transposon, Cre-lox excision system, negative-sense RNA replicon, positive-sense RNA replicon, Epstein-Barr virus-based episomal plasmids, and repeated transfections of plasmids. This review provides summaries of the main vectorologies and factor delivery systems used in current reprogramming protocols. PMID:24625220

  5. Three-phase power factor controller with induced EMF sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1984-09-01

    A power factor controller for an ac induction motor is provided which is of the type comprising thyristor switches connected in series with the motor, phase detectors for sensing the motor current and voltage and providing an output proportional to the phase difference between the motor voltage and current, and a control circuit, responsive to the output of the phase detector and to a power factor command signal, for controlling switching of the thyristor. The invention involves sensing the induced emf produced by the motor during the time interval when the thyristor is off and for producing a corresponding feedback signal for controlling switching of the thyristor. The sensed emf is also used to enhance soft starting of the motor.

  6. Three-phase power factor controller with induced EMF sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A power factor controller for an ac induction motor is provided which is of the type comprising thyristor switches connected in series with the motor, phase detectors for sensing the motor current and voltage and providing an output proportional to the phase difference between the motor voltage and current, and a control circuit, responsive to the output of the phase detector and to a power factor command signal, for controlling switching of the thyristor. The invention involves sensing the induced emf produced by the motor during the time interval when the thyristor is off and for producing a corresponding feedback signal for controlling switching of the thyristor. The sensed emf is also used to enhance soft starting of the motor.

  7. COMPLEMENT FIXATION TEST IN EXPERIMENTAL CLINICAL AND SUBCLINICAL MELIOIDOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Clara; Johnston, Margaret M.

    1961-01-01

    Nigg, Clara (University of California, Berkeley), and Margaret M. Johnston. Complement fixation test in experimental clinical and subclinical melioidosis. J. Bacteriol. 82:159–168. 1961.—Soluble stable antigens prepared from Pseudomonas pseudomallei gave 4+ complement fixation reactions in a dilution of 1 to 8,000 when tested with specific rabbit antiserum diluted 1 to 10,000. The complement fixation reaction was positive in 100% of experimentally infected rabbits 9 to 11 days postinfection. Infected guinea pigs and monkeys showed similar results. Monkeys inoculated with very small infecting doses of P. pseudomallei developed positive complement fixation reactions in the absence of clinical manifestation of infection. An anamnestic complement-fixing antibody response could be induced in such monkeys, after the titer had dropped to approximately the preinfection level, by inoculating very small doses of viable P. pseudomallei or larger doses of killed melioidosis vaccine. The complement fixation test described appeared to be both sensitive and specific, and should be of value in human melioidosis which cannot be diagnosed on the basis of clinical manifestations alone. It is suggested that subclinical infections may play a role in the epidemiology of human meliodosis. The potential application of the complement fixation test to serological surveys in areas where melioidosis occurs endemically is discussed. PMID:13729013

  8. Eosinophil granule cationic proteins regulate the classical pathway of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, J M; Edens, R E; Bell, C S; Gleich, G J

    1995-01-01

    Major basic protein, the primary constituent of eosinophil granules, regulates the alternative and classical pathways of complement. Major basic protein and other eosinophil granule cationic proteins, which are important in mediating tissue damage in allergic disease, regulate the alternative pathway by interfering with C3b interaction with factor B to assemble an alternative pathway C3 convertase. In the present study, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, as well as major basic protein, were examined for capacity to regulate the classical pathway. Eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and major basic protein inhibited formation of cell-bound classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a), causing 50% inhibition of complement-mediated lysis at about 0.19, 0.75 and 0.5 micrograms/10(7) cellular intermediates, respectively. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin had no activity on this pathway of complement. The eosinophil granule proteins were examined for activity on the formation of the membrane attack complex. Major basic protein and eosinophil cationic protein had no activity on terminal lysis. In contrast, eosinophil peroxidase inhibited lysis of EAC1,4b,2a,3b,5b, but had only minimal activity on later events in complement lysis. These polycations were then examined to determine the site(s) at which they regulated the early classical pathway. Eosinophil granule polycationic proteins: (1) reduced the Zmax at all time points but had only minimal effect on the Tmax during the formation of the classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a); (2) inhibited formation of EAC1,4b,2a proportional to C4 but independent of C2 concentration; (3) inhibited fluid phase formation of C1,4b,2a, as reflected by a decrease in C1-induced consumption of C2 over time; and (4) inhibited C1 activity over time without a direct effect on either C4 or C2. These observations suggest that polycations regulate the early classical pathway by

  9. Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Green A.

    2006-01-01

    With the growth of standardized assessment benchmarks in both the public and private paradigms, testing performance matters to institutions more than ever. In an attempt to take as many hindering variables out of this process, such as test anxiety, socioeconomic influences, and latency in cognition, Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum seeks…

  10. Role of complement in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Fiane, A E

    2002-01-01

    The xenotransplantation research is driven by the increasing gap between the number of patients with end-stage organ failure on waiting lists for transplantation and the supply of allografts. The lack of success in developing suitable artificial organs for permanent treatment of organ failure has further strengthened the need for xenotransplantation research. Pigs are now generally accepted to be the source animal of choice. Transplantation of pig organs to humans faces several barriers which have to be overcome before it comes to clinical application: (1) anatomical and physiological conditions; (2) immunological rejection mechanisms; (3) molecular compatibility between signal molecules of the two species; (4) risk of transmission of microorganisms, particularly pig endogenous retroviruses; and (5) legal and ethical aspects both with respect to the animal and the recipient. Here we will focus on the role of the complement system in the rejection of immediately vascularized pig-to-primate xenografts. The hyperacute rejection occurring within minutes after transplantation is mediated by binding of natural antibodies to the Galalpha(l-3)Gal epitope on the endothelial cells with subsequent complement activation. Whereas inhibition of complement activation protects against hyperacute rejection, the role of complement in the later rejection phases is less clarified.

  11. Sentential Complementation--An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuessel, Frank H., Jr.

    A review of traditional and transformational studies on the phenomenon of sentential complementation (noun clauses) reveals many areas of agreement. Although some adherents of generative grammar may have occasionally obscured this aspect because of the offensive nature of their criticism of other modes of analysis, it is seen that, in several…

  12. Macrophage-secreted factors induce adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Paska A. . E-mail: Paska.Permana@med.va.gov; Menge, Christopher; Reaven, Peter D.

    2006-03-10

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue increases with obesity, a condition associated with low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. We investigated the direct effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance. 3T3-L1 adipocytes incubated with media conditioned by RAW264.7 macrophages (RAW-CM) showed dramatically increased transcription of several inflammation-related genes, greater nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity, and enhanced binding of U937 monocytes. All of these effects were prevented by co-incubation with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, an NF-{kappa}B inhibitor. Adipocytes incubated with RAW-CM also released more non-esterified fatty acids and this increased lipolysis was not suppressed by insulin. In addition, RAW-CM treatment decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that macrophage-secreted factors induce inflammatory responses and reduce insulin responsiveness in adipocytes. These effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocytes may contribute significantly to the systemic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity.

  13. Sulodexide induces hepatocyte growth factor release in humans.

    PubMed

    Borawski, Jacek; Dubowski, Miroslaw; Pawlak, Krystyna; Mysliwiec, Michal

    2007-03-08

    Heparin influences numerous pleiotropic growth factors, including hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), partially by their release from endothelial and extracellular matrix stores. The effects of sulodexide, a heparin-like glycosaminoglycan medication of growing importance in medicine, on HGF liberation are not known. We performed a 2-week open-label sulodexide trial in healthy male volunteers. The drug was initially administered intravenously (i.v.) in a single dose of 1200 Lipoprotein Lipase Releasing Units (LRU), then -- orally for 12 days (500 LRU twice a day), and -- again by i.v. route (1200 LRU) on day 14. Intravenous sulodexide injections were repeatedly found to induce marked and reproducible increases in immunoreactive plasma HGF levels (more than 3500% vs baseline after 10 min, and more than 1200% after 120 min), and remained unchanged when measured 120 min following oral sulodexide administration. The percentage increments in plasma HGF evoked by i.v. sulodexide at both time points and on both days inversely correlated with baseline levels of the growth factor. On day 14, the HGF levels after 120 min and their percentage increase vs baseline were strongly and directly dependent on i.v. sulodexide dose per kg of body weight. This study shows that sulodexide has a novel, remarkable and plausibly biologically important stimulating effect on the release of pleiotropic hepatocyte growth factor in humans.

  14. [Significance of the complement system for xenotransplantation: strategies for therapeutic intervention].

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M; Haferkamp, A; Pomer, S; Chrupcala, M; Wosnik, A; Heckl-Ostreicher, B

    1998-01-01

    Hyperacute graft rejection triggered by the activation of the recipient's complement system represents the major obstacle to successful xenotransplantation. After the binding of preformed antibodies to vascular glycoproteins complement-induced activation and injury of endothelial cells with subsequent thrombosis leads to rapid destruction of foreign tissues. Inhibition of complement activation is therefore considered as a prerequisite for xenograft survival. Recent animal and cell culture experiments suggest that support of the physiological regulation of the complement system appears to be most promising. Besides the application of soluble complement inhibitors (e.g. soluble complement receptor 1, sCR1; C1 inhibitor) the genetic transfer of human membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins (e.g. DAF, CD59) offers new chances to protect the xenograft against the cytolytic complement attack. Results from the authors' experiments shall be included in a short overview to the issue.

  15. Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in Coronary Artery Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Carabello, Blaise; Mehta, Satish; Schlegel, Todd; Pellis, Neal; Ott, Mark; Pierson, Duane

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies on normal human lymphocytes have shown a five-fold increase (p less than 0.001) in angiogenic inducers such as Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in physiologically stressful environments such as modeled microgravity, a space analog. This suggests de-regulation of cardiovascular signalling pathways indicated by upregulation of PIGf. In the current study, we measured PIGf in the plasma of 33 patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) to investigate whether such disease is associated with increased levels of PIGf. A control consisting of 31 sex matched apparently healthy subjects was also included in the study. We observed that the levels of PIGf in CAD patients were significantly increased compared to those in healthy control subjects (p less than 0.001) and usually increased beyond the clinical threshold level (greater than 27ng/L). The mechanisms leading to up-regulation of angiogenic factors and the adaptation of organisms to stressful environments such as isolation, high altitude, hypoxia, ischemia, microgravity, increased radiation, etc are presently unknown and require further investigation in spaceflight and these other physiologically stressed environments.

  16. Transforming growth factor-{beta}-inducible phosphorylation of Smad3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guannan; Matsuura, Isao; He, Dongming; Liu, Fang

    2009-04-10

    Smad proteins transduce the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signal at the cell surface into gene regulation in the nucleus. Upon TGF-beta treatment, the highly homologous Smad2 and Smad3 are phosphorylated by the TGF-beta receptor at the SSXS motif in the C-terminal tail. Here we show that in addition to the C-tail, three (S/T)-P sites in the Smad3 linker region, Ser(208), Ser(204), and Thr(179) are phosphorylated in response to TGF-beta. The linker phosphorylation peaks at 1 h after TGF-beta treatment, behind the peak of the C-tail phosphorylation. We provide evidence suggesting that the C-tail phosphorylation by the TGF-beta receptor is necessary for the TGF-beta-induced linker phosphorylation. Although the TGF-beta receptor is necessary for the linker phosphorylation, the receptor itself does not phosphorylate these sites. We further show that ERK is not responsible for TGF-beta-dependent phosphorylation of these three sites. We show that GSK3 accounts for TGF-beta-inducible Ser(204) phosphorylation. Flavopiridol, a pan-CDK inhibitor, abolishes TGF-beta-induced phosphorylation of Thr(179) and Ser(208), suggesting that the CDK family is responsible for phosphorylation of Thr(179) and Ser(208) in response to TGF-beta. Mutation of the linker phosphorylation sites to nonphosphorylatable residues increases the ability of Smad3 to activate a TGF-beta/Smad-target gene as well as the growth-inhibitory function of Smad3. Thus, these observations suggest that TGF-beta-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 linker sites inhibits its antiproliferative activity.

  17. Protective responses to sublytic complement in the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li Xuan; Toops, Kimberly A.; Lakkaraju, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key site of injury in inherited and age-related macular degenerations. Abnormal activation of the complement system is a feature of these blinding diseases, yet how the RPE combats complement attack is poorly understood. The complement cascade terminates in the cell-surface assembly of membrane attack complexes (MACs), which promote inflammation by causing aberrant signal transduction. Here, we investigated mechanisms crucial for limiting MAC assembly and preserving cellular integrity in the RPE and asked how these are compromised in models of macular degeneration. Using polarized primary RPE and the pigmented Abca4−/− Stargardt disease mouse model, we provide evidence for two protective responses occurring within minutes of complement attack, which are essential for maintaining mitochondrial health in the RPE. First, accelerated recycling of the membrane-bound complement regulator CD59 to the RPE cell surface inhibits MAC formation. Second, fusion of lysosomes with the RPE plasma membrane immediately after complement attack limits sustained elevations in intracellular calcium and prevents mitochondrial injury. Cholesterol accumulation in the RPE, induced by vitamin A dimers or oxidized LDL, inhibits these defense mechanisms by activating acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), which increases tubulin acetylation and derails organelle traffic. Defective CD59 recycling and lysosome exocytosis after complement attack lead to mitochondrial fragmentation and oxidative stress in the RPE. Drugs that stimulate cholesterol efflux or inhibit ASMase restore both these critical safeguards in the RPE and avert complement-induced mitochondrial injury in vitro and in Abca4−/− mice, indicating that they could be effective therapeutic approaches for macular degenerations. PMID:27432952

  18. Developmental Expression and Hypoxic Induction of Hypoxia Inducible Transcription Factors in the Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Köblitz, Louise; Fiechtner, Birgit; Baus, Katharina; Lussnig, Rebecca; Pelster, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible transcription factor (HIF) has been shown to coordinate the hypoxic response of vertebrates and is expressed in three different isoforms, HIF-1α, HIF-2α and HIF-3α. Knock down of either Hif-1α or Hif-2α in mice results in lethality in embryonic or perinatal stages, suggesting that this transcription factor is not only controlling the hypoxic response, but is also involved in developmental phenomena. In the translucent zebrafish embryo the performance of the cardiovascular system is not essential for early development, therefore this study was designed to analyze the expression of the three Hif-isoforms during zebrafish development and to test the hypoxic inducibility of these transcription factors. To complement the existing zfHif-1α antibody we expressed the whole zfHif-2α protein and used it for immunization and antibody generation. Similarly, fragments of the zfHif-3α protein were used for immunization and generation of a zfHif-3α specific antibody. To demonstrate presence of the Hif-isoforms during development [between 1 day post fertilization (1 dpf) and 9 dpf] affinity-purified antibodies were used. Hif-1α protein was present under normoxic conditions in all developmental stages, but no significant differences between the different developmental stages could be detected. Hif-2α was also present from 1 dpf onwards, but in post hatching stages (between 5 and 9 dpf) the expression level was significantly higher than prior to hatching. Similarly, Hif-3α was expressed from 1 dpf onwards, and the expression level significantly increased until 5 dpf, suggesting that Hif-2α and Hif-3α play a particular role in early development. Hypoxic exposure (oxygen partial pressure = 5 kPa) in turn caused a significant increase in the level of Hif-1α protein even at 1 dpf and in later stages, while neither Hif-2α nor Hif-3α protein level were affected. In these early developmental stages Hif-1α therefore appears to be more important for

  19. Growth Factors and Tension-Induced Skeletal Muscle Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1994-01-01

    The project investigated biochemical mechanisms to enhance skeletal muscle growth, and developed a computer based mechanical cell stimulator system. The biochemicals investigated in this study were insulin/(Insulin like Growth Factor) IGF-1 and Steroids. In order to analyze which growth factors are essential for stretch-induced muscle growth in vitro, we developed a defined, serum-free medium in which the differentiated, cultured avian muscle fibers could be maintained for extended periods of time. The defined medium (muscle maintenance medium, MM medium) maintains the nitrogen balance of the myofibers for 3 to 7 days, based on myofiber diameter measurements and myosin heavy chain content. Insulin and IGF-1, but not IGF-2, induced pronounced myofiber hypertrophy when added to this medium. In 5 to 7 days, muscle fiber diameters increase by 71 % to 98% compared to untreated controls. Mechanical stimulation of the avian muscle fibers in MM medium increased the sensitivity of the cells to insulin and IGF-1, based on a leftward shift of the insulin dose/response curve for protein synthesis rates. (54). We developed a ligand binding assay for IGF-1 binding proteins and found that the avian skeletal muscle cultures produced three major species of 31, 36 and 43 kD molecular weight (54) Stretch of the myofibers was found to have no significant effect on the efflux of IGF-1 binding proteins, but addition of exogenous collagen stimulated IGF-1 binding protein production 1.5 to 5 fold. Steroid hormones have a profound effect on muscle protein turnover rates in vivo, with the stress-related glucocorticoids inducing rapid skeletal muscle atrophy while androgenic steroids induce skeletal muscle growth. Exercise in humans and animals reduces the catabolic effects of glucocorticoids and may enhance the anabolic effects of androgenic steroids on skeletal muscle. In our continuing work on the involvement of exogenrus growth factors in stretch-induced avian skeletal muscle growth, we

  20. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 as a Target for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ziyan; Yan, Jingqi; Chang, Yanzhong; Yan, Shirley ShiDu; Shi, Honglian

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a transcriptional factor responsible for cellular and tissue adaption to low oxygen tension. HIF-1, a heterodimer consisting of a constitutively expressed β subunit and an oxygen-regulated α subunit, regulates a series of genes that participate in angiogenesis, iron metabolism, glucose metabolism, and cell proliferation/survival. The activity of HIF-1 is controlled by post-translational modifications on different amino acid residues of its subunits, mainly the alpha subunit. Besides in ischemic stroke (see review [1]), emerging evidence has revealed that HIF-1 activity and expression of its down-stream genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor and erythropoietin, are altered in a range of neurodegenerative diseases. At the same time, experimental and clinical evidence has demonstrated that regulating HIF-1 might ameliorate the cellular and tissue damage in the neurodegenerative diseases. These new findings suggest HIF-1 as a potential medicinal target for the neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on HIF-1α protein modifications and HIF-1’s potential neuroprotective roles in Alzheimer’s (AD), Parkinson’s (PD), Huntington’s diseases (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). PMID:21861815

  1. Growth factor deprivation induces cytosolic translocation of SIRT1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chengbo; Xing, Da; Wu, Shengnan; Huang, Lei

    2010-02-01

    Sirtuin type 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylases, plays a critical role in cellular senescence, aging and longevity. In general, SIRT1 is localized in nucleus and is believed as a nuclear protein. Though overexpression of SIRT1 delays senescence, SIRT1-protein levels decline naturally in thymus and heart during aging. In the present studies, we investigated the subcellular localization of SIRT1 in response to growth factor deprivation in African green monkey SV40-transformed kidney fibroblast cells (COS-7). Using SIRT1-EGFP fluorescence reporter, we found that SIRT1 localized to nucleus in physiological conditions. We devised a model enabling cell senescence via growth factor deprivation, and we found that SIRT1 partially translocated to cytosol under the treatment, suggesting a reduced level of SIRT1's activity. We found PI3K/Akt pathway was involved in the inhibition of SIRT1's cytosolic translocation, because inhibition of these kinases significantly decreased the amount of SIRT1 maintained in nucleus. Taken together, we demonstrated that growth factor deprivation induces cytosolic translocation of SIRT1, which suggesting a possible connection between cytoplasm-localized SIRT1 and the aging process.

  2. Dauricine inhibits insulin-like growth factor-I-induced hypoxia inducible factor 1α protein accumulation and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xu-dong; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Ke-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of dauricine (Dau) on insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-induced hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7). Methods: Serum-starved MCF-7 cells were pretreated for 1 h with different concentrations of Dau, followed by incubation with IGF-I for 6 h. HIF-1α and VEGF protein expression levels were analyzed by Western blotting and ELISA, respectively. HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. In vitro angiogenesis was observed via the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) tube formation assay. An in vitro invasion assay on HUVECs was performed. Results: Dau significantly inhibited IGF-I-induced HIF-1α protein expression but had no effect on HIF-1α mRNA expression. However, Dau remarkably suppressed VEGF expression at both protein and mRNA levels in response to IGF-I. Mechanistically, Dau suppressed IGF-I-induced HIF-1α and VEGF protein expression mainly by blocking the activation of PI-3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. In addition, Dau reduced IGF-I-induced HIF-1α protein accumulation by inhibiting its synthesis as well as by promoting its degradation. Functionally, Dau inhibited angiogenesis in vitro. Moreover, Dau had a direct effect on IGF-I-induced invasion of HUVECs. Conclusion: Dau inhibits human breast cancer angiogenesis by suppressing HIF-1α protein accumulation and VEGF expression, which may provide a novel potential mechanism for the anticancer activities of Dau in human breast cancer. PMID:19349962

  3. Inflammatory Genes and Psychological Factors Predict Induced Shoulder Pain Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    George, Steven Z.; Parr, Jeffrey J.; Wallace, Margaret R.; Wu, Samuel S.; Borsa, Paul A.; Dai, Yunfeng; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The pain experience has multiple influences but little is known about how specific biological and psychological factors interact to influence pain responses. The current study investigated the combined influences of genetic (pro-inflammatory) and psychological factors on several pre-clinical shoulder pain phenotypes. Methods An exercise-induced shoulder injury model was used, and a priori selected genetic (IL1B, TNF/LTA region, IL6 single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) and psychological (anxiety, depressive symptoms, pain catastrophizing, fear of pain, kinesiophobia) factors were included as the predictors of interest. The phenotypes were pain intensity (5-day average and peak reported on numerical rating scale), upper-extremity disability (5-day average and peak reported on the QuickDASH instrument), and duration of shoulder pain (in days). Results After controlling for age, sex, and race, the genetic and psychological predictors were entered separately as main effects and interaction terms in regression models for each pain phenotype. Results from the recruited cohort (n = 190) indicated strong statistical evidence for the interactions between 1) TNF/LTA SNP rs2229094 and depressive symptoms for average pain intensity and duration and 2) IL1B two-SNP diplotype and kinesiophobia for average shoulder pain intensity. Moderate statistical evidence for prediction of additional shoulder pain phenotypes included interactions of kinesiophobia, fear of pain, or depressive symptoms with TNF/LTA rs2229094 and IL1B. Conclusion These findings support the combined predictive ability of specific genetic and psychological factors for shoulder pain phenotypes by revealing novel combinations that may merit further investigation in clinical cohorts, to determine their involvement in the transition from acute to chronic pain conditions. PMID:24598699

  4. Luciferase fragment complementation imaging in preclinical cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Madryn C.; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    The luciferase fragment complementation assay (LFCA) enables molecular events to be non-invasively imaged in live cells in vitro and in vivo in a comparatively cheap and safe manner. It is a development of previous enzyme complementation assays in which reporter genes are split into two, individually enzymatically inactive, fragments that are able to complement one another upon interaction. This complementation can be used to externally visualize cellular activities. In recent years, the number of studies which have used LFCAs to probe questions relevant to cancer have increased, and this review summarizes the most significant and interesting of these. In particular, it focuses on work conducted on the epidermal growth factor, nuclear and chemokine receptor families, and intracellular signaling pathways, including IP3, cAMP, Akt, cMyc, NRF2 and Rho GTPases. LFCAs which have been developed to image DNA methylation and detect RNA transcripts are also discussed. PMID:25594026

  5. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    PubMed

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  6. Proteasome Inhibition by Fellutamide B Induces Nerve Growth Factor Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hines, John; Groll, Michael; Fahnestock, Margaret; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurotrophic small molecules have the potential to aid in the treatment of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases. The natural product fellutamide B, originally isolated from Penicillium fellutanum, potently induces nerve growth factor (NGF) release from fibroblasts and glial-derived cells, although the mechanism for this neurotrophic activity has not been elucidated. Here, we report that fellutamide B potently inhibits proteasome catalytic activity. High resolution structural information obtained from co-crystallization of the 20S proteasome reveals novel aspects regarding β-subunit binding and adduct formation by fellutamide B to inhibit their hydrolytic activity. We demonstrate that fellutamide B and other proteasome inhibitors increased NGF gene transcription via a cis-acting element (or elements) in the promoter. These results demonstrate an unrecognized connection between proteasome inhibition and NGF production, suggesting a possible new strategy in the development of neurotrophic agents. PMID:18482702

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and breast cancer metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao-ji; Semenza, Gregg L.; Zhang, Hua-feng

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that the hypoxic microenvironment, which is critical during cancer development, plays a key role in regulating breast cancer progression and metastasis. The effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), a master regulator of the hypoxic response, have been extensively studied during these processes. In this review, we focus on the roles of HIF-1 in regulating breast cancer cell metastasis, specifically its effects on multiple key steps of metastasis, such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion, extravasation, and metastatic niche formation. We also discuss the roles of HIF-1-regulated non-coding RNAs in breast cancer metastasis, and therapeutic opportunities for breast cancer through targeting the HIF-1 pathway. PMID:25559953

  8. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Induces Angiogenesis in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesano, R.; Vassalli, J.-D.; Baird, A.; Guillemin, R.; Orci, L.

    1986-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are potent mitogens for vascular and capillary endothelial cells in vitro and can stimulate the formation of blood capillaries (angiogenesis) in vivo. A crucial event in this process is the invasion of the perivascular extracellular matrix by sprouting endothelial cells. Using a recently developed in vitro model of angiogenesis, we show here that highly purified basic pituitary FGF can induce capillary endothelial cells to invade a three-dimensional collagen matrix and to organize themselves to form characteristic tubules that resemble blood capillaries. We also show that basic FGF concomitantly stimulates endothelial cells to produce a urokinase-type plasminogen activator, a protease that has been implicated in the neovascular response. The results demonstrate that basic FGF can stimulate processes that are characteristic of angiogenesis in vivo, including endothelial cell migration, invasion, and production of plasminogen activator.

  9. Keratinocyte growth factor induces pancreatic ductal epithelial proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yi, E S; Yin, S; Harclerode, D L; Bedoya, A; Bikhazi, N B; Housley, R M; Aukerman, S L; Morris, C F; Pierce, G F; Ulich, T R

    1994-07-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) causes a proliferation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells in adult rats after daily systemic administration for 1 to 2 weeks. Even before the proliferation of intralobular ducts is histologically evident, KGF also induces proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression within the ductal epithelium of intercalated, intralobular, and interlobular ducts. KGF also causes incorporation of 5-bromodeoxyuridine in ductal epithelial cells. Epithelial cell proliferation is histologically most prominent at the level of the intralobular ducts adjacent to and within the islets of Langerhans. Pancreatic ductal proliferation is not histologically apparent in rats sacrificed 7 to 10 days after the cessation of KGF administration. The pancreatic hormones insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide are normally distributed within islets that demonstrate intrainsular ductal proliferation. The proliferating ductal epithelium does not show endocrine differentiation as evidenced by the lack of immunoreactivity for pancreatic hormones. KGF is a potent in vivo mitogen for pancreatic ductal epithelial cells.

  10. The profile of adsorbed plasma and serum proteins on methacrylic acid copolymer beads: Effect on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Wells, Laura A; Guo, Hongbo; Emili, Andrew; Sefton, Michael V

    2017-02-01

    Polymer beads made of 45% methacrylic acid co methyl methacrylate (MAA beads) promote vascular regenerative responses in contrast to control materials without methacrylic acid (here polymethyl methacrylate beads, PMMA). In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that MAA copolymers induce differences in macrophage phenotype and polarization and inflammatory responses, presumably due to protein adsorption differences between the beads. To explore differences in protein adsorption in an unbiased manner, we used high resolution shotgun mass spectrometry to identify and compare proteins that adsorb from human plasma or serum onto MAA and PMMA beads. From plasma, MAA beads adsorbed many complement proteins, such as C1q, C4-related proteins and the complement inhibitor factor H, while PMMA adsorbed proteins, such as albumin, C3 and apolipoproteins. Because of the differences in complement protein adsorption, follow-up studies focused on using ELISA to assess complement activation. When incubated in serum, MAA beads generated significantly lower levels of soluble C5b9 and C3a/C3adesarg in comparison to PMMA beads, indicating a decrease in complement activation with MAA beads. The differences in adsorbed protein on the two materials likely alter subsequent cell-material interactions that ultimately result in different host responses and local vascularization.

  11. Radiation-induced sarcomas of bone: factors that affect outcome.

    PubMed

    Kalra, S; Grimer, R J; Spooner, D; Carter, S R; Tillman, R M; Abudu, A

    2007-06-01

    We identified 42 patients who presented to our unit over a 27-year period with a secondary radiation-induced sarcoma of bone. We reviewed patient, tumour and treatment factors to identify those that affected outcome. The mean age of the patients at presentation was 45.6 years (10 to 84) and the mean latent interval between radiotherapy and diagnosis of the sarcoma was 17 years (4 to 50). The median dose of radiotherapy given was estimated at 50 Gy (mean 49; 20 to 66). There was no correlation between radiation dose and the time to development of a sarcoma. The pelvis was the most commonly affected site (14 patients (33%)). Breast cancer was the most common primary tumour (eight patients; 19%). Metastases were present at diagnosis of the sarcoma in nine patients (21.4%). Osteosarcoma was the most common diagnosis and occurred in 30 cases (71.4%). Treatment was by surgery and chemotherapy when indicated: 30 patients (71.4%) were treated with the intention to cure. The survival rate was 41% at five years for those treated with the intention to cure but in those treated palliatively the mean survival was only 8.8 months (2 to 22), and all had died by two years. The only factor found to be significant for survival was the ability to completely resect the tumour. Limb sarcomas had a better prognosis (66% survival at five years) than central ones (12% survival at five years) (p = 0.009). Radiation-induced sarcoma is a rare complication of radiotherapy. Both surgical and oncological treatment is likely to be compromised by the treatment received previously by the patient.

  12. Moisture-Induced Alumina Scale Spallation: The Hydrogen Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2010-01-01

    For some time the oxidation community has been concerned with interfacial spallation of protective alumina scales, not just upon immediate cool down, but as a time-delayed phenomenon. Moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) and desktop spallation (DTS) of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) refer to this process. It is most apparent for relatively adherent alumina scales that have survived initial cool down in a dry environment, have built up considerable thickness and strain energy, and have been somewhat damaged, such as by cyclic oxidation cracking. Indeed, a "sensitive zone" can be described that maximizes the observed effect as a function of all the relevant factors. Moisture has been postulated to serve as a source of interfacial hydrogen embrittlement. Hydrogen is derived from reaction with aluminum in the alloy at an exposed interface. The purpose of this monograph is to trace the close analogy of this phenomenon to other hydrogen-induced effects, such as embrittlement of aluminides and blistering of alloys and anodic alumina films. A formalized, top-down, logic-tree structure is presented as a guide to this discussion. A theoretical basis for interfacial weakening by hydrogen is first cited, as are demonstrations of hydrogen detection as a reaction product or interfacial species. Further support is provided by critical experiments that recreate the moisture effect, but by isolating hydrogen from other potential causative factors. These experiments include tests in H 2-containing atmospheres or cathodic hydrogen charging. Accordingly, they strongly indicate that interfacial hydrogen, derived from moisture, is the key chemical species accounting for delayed alumina scale spallation.

  13. Factors Associated with Echinococcosis-Induced Perioperative Anaphylactic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jianrong; Zhang, Qin; Xuan, Yan; Chen, Siyu; Ma, Long; Zhang, Yongqiang; Zheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective case-control study explored the factors associated with anaphylactic shock during surgery for cystic echinococcosis (CE) at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University between October 2008 and September 2013. Patients who suffered from anaphylactic shock (n=16) were age-matched 3:1 to patients who did not (n=43). Multivariate analysis suggested that IL-4 levels (odds ratio=1.096; 95% confidence interval=1.015–1.185; P=0.02) and cyst size (odds ratio=3.028, 95% confidence interval=1.259–7.283, P=0.013) were independently associated with CE-induced perioperative anaphylactic shock. Using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and a cut-off value of 415.7 ng/ml, IL-4 showed an area under the ROC (AUC) of 0.926, sensitivity of 75.0%, and specificity of 97.7%. Using a cut-off value of 7.8 cm, cyst size showed an AUC of 0.828, sensitivity of 81.3%, and specificity of 76.7%. In conclusion, results suggest that levels of IL-4 and cyst size were independently associated with echinococcosis-induced perioperative anaphylactic shock. These results could help identifying patients with echinococcosis at risk of anaphylactic shock in whom appropriate prophylaxis could be undertaken. PMID:28095662

  14. Factors associated with induced abortion among women in Hohoe, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Mote, Charity V; Otupiri, Easmon; Hindin, Michelle J

    2010-12-01

    In Hohoe, Ghana, induced abortion is the second highest cause of hospital admissions. We aimed to describe factors influencing induced abortion among 408 randomly selected women aged 15-49 years. 21% of the women had had an abortion; of those, 36% said they did not want to disrupt their education or employment; 66% of the abortions were performed by doctors. Bivariate logistic regression showed that compared with women with secondary education, women with basic education (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.18-0.54) and uneducated women (OR = 0.24, 95% CI: 0.07-0.70) were significantly less likely to have had an abortion. Women who were married (OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.10-3.04), peri-urban residents (OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 0.95-3.94), and women with formal employment (OR = 2.22, 95% CI: 0.86-5.45) were more likely to have had an abortion. Stakeholders should improve access to effective contraception to lower the chance of needing an abortion and target education programmes at those with unmet need for contraception.

  15. Platelet-activating factor-induced increases in glucose kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Dobrescu, C.; Hargrove, D.M.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1988-02-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a postulated mediator of many of the early hemodynamic effects of endotoxin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether in vivo administration of PAF could produce alterations in whole-body glucose metabolism that would mimic those seen during endotoxemia. Glucose kinetics were assessed in chronically catheterized conscious rats by the constant infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose before and for 4 h after either a bolus injection or a constant infusion of PAF. The bolus injection of PAF elevated the rate of glucose appearance (R{sub a}; 44%) for 1.5 h. The lower PAF infusion rate decreased blood pressure 11% to 104 mmHg, whereas the higher infusion rate decreased pressure 34% to 77 mmHg. Both PAF infusion rates produced elevations in plasma glucose and glucose R{sub a} throughout the 4-h infusion period in a dose-related manner. The PAF infusions also induced dose-related increases in plasma glucagon and catecholamine levels throughout the infusion period. Because the constant infusion of PAF did stimulate many of the hemodynamic and metabolic alterations produced by endotoxin, this study provides additional support for the potential importance of PAF as a mediator of the early hemodynamic and metabolic sequela of endotoxin shock. Furthermore, the PAF-induced changes in glucose metabolism appear to be mediated by the resultant elevation in plasma catecholamines.

  16. Connective tissue growth factor induces cardiac hypertrophy through Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hayata, Nozomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Tomohiko; Obana, Masanori; Takai, Mika; Mohri, Tomomi; Nonen, Shinpei; Maeda, Makiko; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-30

    In the process of cardiac remodeling, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is secreted from cardiac myocytes. Though CTGF is well known to promote fibroblast proliferation, its pathophysiological effects in cardiac myocytes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of CTGF in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cardiac myocytes stimulated with full length CTGF and its C-terminal region peptide showed the increase in cell surface area. Similar to hypertrophic ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, such as endothelin-1, CTGF activated amino acid uptake; however, CTGF-induced hypertrophy is not associated with the increased expression of skeletal actin or BNP, analyzed by Northern-blotting. CTGF treatment activated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and Akt. The inhibition of Akt by transducing dominant-negative Akt abrogated CTGF-mediated increase in cell size, while the inhibition of MAP kinases did not affect the cardiac hypertrophy. These findings indicate that CTGF is a novel hypertrophic factor in cardiac myocytes.

  17. Musashi mediates translational repression of the Drosophila hypoxia inducible factor

    PubMed Central

    Bertolin, Agustina P.; Katz, Maximiliano J.; Yano, Masato; Pozzi, Berta; Acevedo, Julieta M.; Blanco-Obregón, Dalmiro; Gándara, Lautaro; Sorianello, Eleonora; Kanda, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Srebrow, Anabella; Wappner, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to hypoxia depends on a conserved α/β heterodimeric transcription factor called Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), whose α-subunit is regulated by oxygen through different concurrent mechanisms. In this study, we have identified the RNA binding protein dMusashi, as a negative regulator of the fly HIF homologue Sima. Genetic interaction assays suggested that dMusashi participates of the HIF pathway, and molecular studies carried out in Drosophila cell cultures showed that dMusashi recognizes a Musashi Binding Element in the 3′ UTR of the HIFα transcript, thereby mediating its translational repression in normoxia. In hypoxic conditions dMusashi is downregulated, lifting HIFα repression and contributing to trigger HIF-dependent gene expression. Analysis performed in mouse brains revealed that murine Msi1 protein physically interacts with HIF-1α transcript, suggesting that the regulation of HIF by Msi might be conserved in mammalian systems. Thus, Musashi is a novel regulator of HIF that inhibits responses to hypoxia specifically when oxygen is available. PMID:27141964

  18. Prognostic factors of renal dysfunction induced by environmental cadmium pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Nishijo, Muneko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Morikawa, Yuko; Tabata, Masaji; Senma, Masami; Kitagawa, Yumiko; Kawano, Shunichi; Ishizaki, Masao ); Sugita, Naomichi; Nishi, Masami )

    1994-02-01

    To assess the influence of environmental cadmium (Cd) exposure on long-term outcome, a follow-up study was conducted from 1981-1982 to March 1991 on 3178 inhabitants living in the Cd-polluted Kakehashi River basin. The standardized mortality ratios of the urinary [beta][sub 2]-microglobulin ([beta]2-MG)-, protein-, and amino acid-positive subjects of both sexes and the urinary glucose-positive female subjects were higher than those of the subjects with urinary-negative findings or the general Japanese population during the observation period. After adjusting for age using Cox's proportional hazards model, significant associations were found between mortality and urinary indices. In multiple comparisons using all of the indices, urinary protein and [beta]2-MG in the women and urinary protein in the men were the factors most contributing to the mortality rates. In the urinary protein-negative female group as well, as significant association was found between urinary [beta]2-MG and mortality. These results suggest that the prognosis of subjects with Cd-induced renal dysfunction is unfavorable, with the mortality rate increasing even in the early stage of proximal tubular dysfunction. Urinary protein and urinary [beta]2-MG are important prognostic factors, with the latter, in particular, considered to be useful as an early index predictive of premature mortality. 30 refs., 6 tabs.

  19. Moisture-Induced Alumina Scale Spallation: The Hydrogen Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2009-01-01

    For some time our community has been concerned with interfacial spallation of protective alumina scales, not just upon immediate cooldown, but as a time-delayed phenomenon. Moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) and desktop spallation (DTS) of TBC's refer to this process. It is most apparent for relatively adherent alumina scales that have survived cool down in a dry environment, built up considerable thickness and strain energy, and have been somewhat damaged, such as by cyclic oxidation cracking. Indeed, a "sweet zone" can be defined that maximizes the observed effect as a function of all the relevant factors. Moisture has been postulated to serve as a source of interfacial hydrogen embrittlement derived from reaction with aluminum in the alloy at an exposed interface. The purpose of this monograph is to trace the close analogy of this phenomenon to other hydrogen effects, such as embrittlement of aluminides and blistering of alloys and anodic alumina films. A formalized, top-down, logic tree structure is presented as a guide to this discussion. A theoretical basis for interfacial weakening by hydrogen is first cited, as are demonstrations of hydrogen as a reaction product or detected interfacial species. Further support is provided by critical experiments that produce the same moisture effect, but by isolating hydrogen from other potential causative factors. These experiments include tests in H2-containing atmospheres or cathodic hydrogen charging.

  20. Musashi mediates translational repression of the Drosophila hypoxia inducible factor.

    PubMed

    Bertolin, Agustina P; Katz, Maximiliano J; Yano, Masato; Pozzi, Berta; Acevedo, Julieta M; Blanco-Obregón, Dalmiro; Gándara, Lautaro; Sorianello, Eleonora; Kanda, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Srebrow, Anabella; Wappner, Pablo

    2016-09-19

    Adaptation to hypoxia depends on a conserved α/β heterodimeric transcription factor called Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), whose α-subunit is regulated by oxygen through different concurrent mechanisms. In this study, we have identified the RNA binding protein dMusashi, as a negative regulator of the fly HIF homologue Sima. Genetic interaction assays suggested that dMusashi participates of the HIF pathway, and molecular studies carried out in Drosophila cell cultures showed that dMusashi recognizes a Musashi Binding Element in the 3' UTR of the HIFα transcript, thereby mediating its translational repression in normoxia. In hypoxic conditions dMusashi is downregulated, lifting HIFα repression and contributing to trigger HIF-dependent gene expression. Analysis performed in mouse brains revealed that murine Msi1 protein physically interacts with HIF-1α transcript, suggesting that the regulation of HIF by Msi might be conserved in mammalian systems. Thus, Musashi is a novel regulator of HIF that inhibits responses to hypoxia specifically when oxygen is available.

  1. Endocannabinoids participate in placental apoptosis induced by hypoxia inducible factor-1.

    PubMed

    Abán, C; Martinez, N; Carou, C; Albamonte, I; Toro, A; Seyahian, A; Franchi, A; Leguizamón, G; Trigubo, D; Damiano, A; Farina, M

    2016-10-01

    During pregnancy, apoptosis is a physiological event critical in the remodeling and aging of the placenta. Increasing evidence has pointed towards the relevance of endocannabinoids (ECs) and hypoxia as modulators of trophoblast cell death. However, the relation between these factors is still unknown. In this report, we evaluated the participation of ECs in placental apoptosis induced by cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a hypoxia mimicking agent that stabilizes the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). We found that HIF-1α stabilization decreased FAAH mRNA and protein levels, suggesting an increase in ECs tone. Additionally, CoCl2 incubation and Met-AEA treatment reduced cell viability and increased TUNEL-positive staining in syncytiotrophoblast layer. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated Bax and Bcl-2 protein expression in the cytoplasm of syncytiotrophoblast. Finally, HIF-1α stabilization produced an increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, activation of caspase 3 and PARP cleavage. All these changes in apoptotic parameters were reversed with AM251, a CB1 antagonist. These results demonstrate that HIF-1α may induce apoptosis in human placenta via intrinsic pathway by a mechanism that involves activation of CB1 receptor suggesting a role of the ECs in this process.

  2. Factors affecting cold-induced hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, O; Fregly, M J; Papanek, P E

    1990-12-01

    A 3- to 4-week exposure of rats to a cold environment (5 +/- 2 degrees C) induces hypertension, including elevation of systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressures and cardiac (left ventricular) hypertrophy. The studies described here were designed to investigate some factors affecting both the magnitude and the time course for development of cold-induced hypertension. The objective of the first study was to determine whether there was an ambient temperature at which the cold-induced elevation of blood pressure did not occur. The objective of the second experiment was to determine whether body weight at the time of exposure to cold affected the magnitude and time course for development of hypertension. To assess the first objective, male rats were housed in a chamber whose temperature was maintained at 5 +/- 2 degrees C while others were housed in an identical chamber at 9 +/- 2 degrees C. After 7 days of exposure to cold, the rats exposed to the colder temperature had a significant elevation of blood pressure (140 +/- 2 mm Hg) compared with the group maintained at 9 degrees C (122 +/- 3 mm Hg). The rats exposed to 9 degrees C had no significant elevation of systolic blood pressure at either 27 or 40 days after initiation of exposure to cold. At the latter time, the temperature in the second chamber was reduced to 5 +/- 2 degrees C. By the 25th day of exposure to this ambient temperature, the rats had a significant increase in systolic blood pressure above their levels at 9 degrees C. Thus, there appears to be a threshold ambient temperature for elevation of blood pressure during exposure to cold. That temperature appears to lie somewhere between 5 and 9 degrees C. The second objective was assessed by placing rats varying in weight from approximately 250 to 430 g in air at 5 degrees C. There was a highly significant direct relationship (r = 0.96) between body weight at the time of introduction to cold and the number of days required to increase systolic blood

  3. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  4. CD11b is protective in complement-mediated immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jessy J; Chaves, Lee D; Chang, Anthony; Jacob, Alexander; Ritchie, Maria; Quigg, Richard J

    2015-05-01

    In chronic serum sickness, glomerular immune complexes form, yet C57BL/6 mice do not develop glomerulonephritis unless complement factor H (CfH) is absent, indicating the relevance of complement regulation. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b) and Fcγ receptors on leukocytes, and CfH on platelets, can bind immune complexes. Here we induced immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in CfH(-/-) mice chimeric for wild-type, CfH(-/-), CD11b(-/-), or FcRγ(-/-) bone marrow stem cells. Glomerulonephritis was worse in CD11b(-/-) chimeras compared with all others, whereas disease in FcRγ(-/-) and wild-type chimeras was comparable. Disease tracked strongly with humoral immune responses, but not glomerular immune complex deposits. Interstitial inflammation with M1 macrophages strongly correlated with glomerulonephritis scores. CD11b(-/-) chimeras had significantly more M1 macrophages and CD4(+) T cells. The renal dendritic cell populations originating from bone marrow-derived CD11c(+) cells were similar in all experimental groups. CD11b(+) cells bearing colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor were present in kidneys, including CD11b(-/-) chimeras; these cells correlated negatively with glomerulonephritis scores. Thus, experimental immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis is associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages and CD4(+) T cells in kidneys and functional renal insufficiency. Hence, CD11b on mononuclear cells is instrumental in generating an anti-inflammatory response in the inflamed kidney.

  5. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced angiogenesis depends on in situ platelet-activating factor biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell growth in vitro, is angiogenic in vivo. Therefore, it was suggested that the angiogenic properties of this agent might be consequent to the production of secondary mediators. Since TNF-alpha stimulates the synthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF) by monocytes and endothelial cells, we investigated the possible involvement of PAF in the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha. Angiogenesis was studied in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model the angiogenesis induced by TNF-alpha was shown to be inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. Moreover, in mice injected with TNF-alpha, PAF was detected within the Matrigel, 6 and 24 h after TNF-alpha injection. The synthesis of PAF within the Matrigel was concomitant with the early migration of endothelial cells and infiltration of monocytes. No infiltration of lymphocytes or polymorphonuclear leukocytes was observed. Synthetic PAF as well as PAF extracted and purified from mice challenged with TNF-alpha induced a rapid angiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170. These results suggest that the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha is, at least in part, mediated by PAF synthesized from monocytes and/or endothelial cells infiltrating the Matrigel plug. PMID:7516414

  6. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Activates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor in a p53-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Seiko; Oda, Tomoyuki; Nishi, Kenichiro; Takabuchi, Satoshi; Wakamatsu, Takuhiko; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Adachi, Takehiko; Fukuda, Kazuhiko; Semenza, Gregg L.; Hirota, Kiichi

    2008-01-01

    Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is not only a cytokine which has a critical role in several inflammatory conditions but also has endocrine and enzymatic functions. MIF is identified as an intracellular signaling molecule and is implicated in the process of tumor progression, and also strongly enhances neovascularization. Overexpression of MIF has been observed in tumors from various organs. MIF is one of the genes induced by hypoxia in an hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)-dependent manner. Methods/Principal Findings The effect of MIF on HIF-1 activity was investigated in human breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, and osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells. We demonstrate that intracellular overexpression or extracellular administration of MIF enhances activation of HIF-1 under hypoxic conditions in MCF-7 cells. Mutagenesis analysis of MIF and knockdown of 53 demonstrates that the activation is not dependent on redox activity of MIF but on wild-type p53. We also indicate that the MIF receptor CD74 is involved in HIF-1 activation by MIF at least when MIF is administrated extracellularly. Conclusion/Significance MIF regulates HIF-1 activity in a p53-dependent manner. In addition to MIF's potent effects on the immune system, MIF is linked to fundamental processes conferring cell proliferation, cell survival, angiogenesis, and tumor invasiveness. This functional interdependence between MIF and HIF-1α protein stabilization and transactivation activity provide a molecular mechanism for promotion of tumorigenesis by MIF. PMID:18493321

  7. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 8 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord (meningitis). Although meningitis can be life-threatening, individuals with complement component ... leaves affected individuals prone to recurrent episodes of meningitis. Learn more about the genes associated with complement ...

  8. Complement fixation test to C. burnetii

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003520.htm Complement fixation test to C burnetii To use the sharing features on this ... JavaScript. The complement fixation test to Coxiella burnetii ( C burnetti ) is a blood test that checks for ...

  9. Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide activates the classical complement pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, C S; Schultz, D R; Arnold, P I; Johnson, W

    1992-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterium capable of entering and growing in alveolar macrophages and monocytes. Complement and complement receptors are important in the uptake of L. pneumophila by human mononuclear phagocytes. The surface molecules of L. pneumophila that activate the complement system are unknown. To identify these factors, we investigated the effects of L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the classical and alternative complement pathways of normal human serum by functional hemolytic assays. Although incubation of LPS in normal human serum at 37 degrees C resulted in the activation of both pathways, complement activation proceeded primarily through the classical pathway. Activation of the classical pathway by LPS was dependent on natural antibodies of the immunoglobulin M class that were present in various quantities in sera from different normal individuals but were absent in an immunoglobulin-deficient serum obtained from an agammaglobulinemic patient. Additional studies using sheep erythrocytes coated with LPS suggested that the antibodies recognized antigenic sites in the carbohydrate portion of LPS. The ability of LPS to interact with the complement system suggests a role for LPS in the uptake of L. pneumophila by mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:1612744

  10. Particulate matter phagocytosis induces tissue factor in differentiating macrophages.

    PubMed

    Milano, M; Dongiovanni, P; Artoni, A; Gatti, S; Rosso, L; Colombo, F; Bollati, V; Maggioni, M; Mannucci, P M; Bertazzi, P A; Fargion, S; Valenti, L

    2016-01-01

    Airborne exposure to particulate matter with diameter < 10 mcM (PM10) has been linked to an increased risk of thromboembolic events, but the mechanisms are not completely understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of PM10 phagocytosis on the release of procoagulant molecules in human differentiating macrophages, and that of PM10 inhalation in an experimental model in rats. Human monocytes were separated from the peripheral blood by the lymphoprep method, differentiated in vitro and treated with standard PM10 or vehicle. Sprague-Dawley rats were instilled intratracheally with PM10 or vehicle alone. The outcome was expression of proinflammatory genes and of tissue factor (TF). In human differentiating macrophages, PM10 exposure upregulated inflammatory genes, but most consistently induced TF mRNA and protein levels, but not TF protein inhibitor, resulting in increased TF membrane expression and a procoagulant phenotype. Differentiation towards the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype inhibited PM10 -mediated TF expression. TF induction required phagocytosis of PM10 , whereas phagocytosis of inert particles was less effective. PM10 phagocytosis was associated with a gene expression profile consistent with intracellular retention of iron, inducing oxidative stress. Both PM10 and iron activated the stress kinases ERK1/2 pathway, involved in the induction of TF expression. In rats, alveolar exposure to PM10 was associated with pulmonary recruitment of inflammatory cells and resulted in local, but not systemic, induction of TF expression, which was sufficient to increase circulating TF levels. In conclusion, TF induction by differentiating lung macrophages, activated following phagocytosis, contributes to the increased risk of thromboembolic complications associated with PM10 exposure.

  11. Endometrial factors similarly induced by IFNT2 and IFNTc1 through transcription factor FOXS1.

    PubMed

    Kusama, Kazuya; Bai, Rulan; Nakamura, Keigo; Okada, Sayaka; Yasuda, Jiro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    In ruminants, Interferon tau (IFNT) is the pregnancy recognition protein produced by the mononuclear trophectoderm of the conceptus, and is secreted into the uterine lumen during the peri-attachment period. In our previous study, the high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data obtained from bovine conceptuses during the peri-attachment period identified two IFNT mRNAs, IFNT2 and IFNTc1. However, how each of these IFNT variants regulates endometrial gene expression has not been characterized. Using RNA-seq analysis, we evaluated how IFNT2 and IFNTc1 affected transcript expression in primary bovine endometrial epithelial cells (EECs). IFNT treatment induced 348 differentially expressed genes (DEGs); however, there are few DEGs in IFNT2 or IFNTc1 treated EECs, indicating that IFNT2-induced DEGs were similar to those induced by IFNTc1 treatment. In in silico analysis, we identified four IFNT2- and IFNTc1-induced pathways: 1) type II interferon signaling, 2) proteasome degradation, 3) type III interferon signaling, and 4) DNA damage response. We further demonstrated that IFNT2 and IFNTc1 up-regulated several transcription factors, among which forkhead box S1 (FOXS1) was identified as the most highly expressed gene. Furthermore, the knockdown of FOXS1 in IFNT2- or IFNTc1-treated EECs similarly down-regulated 9 genes including IRF3 and IRF9, and up-regulated 9 genes including STAT1, STAT2, and IRF8. These represent the first demonstration that effects of each IFNT on EECs were studied, and suggest that endometrial response as well as signaling mechanisms were similar between two IFNT variants existed in utero.

  12. Endometrial factors similarly induced by IFNT2 and IFNTc1 through transcription factor FOXS1

    PubMed Central

    Kusama, Kazuya; Bai, Rulan; Nakamura, Keigo; Okada, Sayaka; Yasuda, Jiro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    In ruminants, Interferon tau (IFNT) is the pregnancy recognition protein produced by the mononuclear trophectoderm of the conceptus, and is secreted into the uterine lumen during the peri-attachment period. In our previous study, the high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data obtained from bovine conceptuses during the peri-attachment period identified two IFNT mRNAs, IFNT2 and IFNTc1. However, how each of these IFNT variants regulates endometrial gene expression has not been characterized. Using RNA-seq analysis, we evaluated how IFNT2 and IFNTc1 affected transcript expression in primary bovine endometrial epithelial cells (EECs). IFNT treatment induced 348 differentially expressed genes (DEGs); however, there are few DEGs in IFNT2 or IFNTc1 treated EECs, indicating that IFNT2-induced DEGs were similar to those induced by IFNTc1 treatment. In in silico analysis, we identified four IFNT2- and IFNTc1-induced pathways: 1) type II interferon signaling, 2) proteasome degradation, 3) type III interferon signaling, and 4) DNA damage response. We further demonstrated that IFNT2 and IFNTc1 up-regulated several transcription factors, among which forkhead box S1 (FOXS1) was identified as the most highly expressed gene. Furthermore, the knockdown of FOXS1 in IFNT2- or IFNTc1-treated EECs similarly down-regulated 9 genes including IRF3 and IRF9, and up-regulated 9 genes including STAT1, STAT2, and IRF8. These represent the first demonstration that effects of each IFNT on EECs were studied, and suggest that endometrial response as well as signaling mechanisms were similar between two IFNT variants existed in utero. PMID:28199372

  13. Cigarette smoke can activate the alternative pathway of complement in vitro by modifying the third component of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Kew, R R; Ghebrehiwet, B; Janoff, A

    1985-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with significant increases in the number of pulmonary mononuclear phagocytes and neutrophils. A potent chemoattractant for these cells is C5a, a peptide generated during complement (C) activation. We, therefore, investigated the possibility that cigarette smoke could activate the complement system in vitro. Our results show that factor(s) (mol wt less than 1,000) present in an aqueous solution of whole, unfiltered cigarette smoke can deplete the hemolytic capacity of whole human serum in a dose-dependent manner. The particle-free, filtered gas phase of cigarette smoke is inactive. The smoke factor(s) do not activate serum C1, but do deplete serum C4 activity. Treatment of purified human C3 with whole smoke solution modifies the molecule such that its subsequent addition to serum (containing Mg/EGTA to block the classical pathway) results in consumption of hemolytic complement by activation of the alternative pathway. Smoke-modified C3 shows increased anodal migration in agarose electrophoresis, but this is not due to proteolytic cleavage of the molecule as evidenced by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In contrast to methylamine-treated C3, C3 treated with smoke is only partially susceptible to the action of the complement regulatory proteins Factors H and I. In addition, smoke-modified C3 has diminished binding to Factor H as compared with methylamine-treated C3. Finally, smoke-modified C3 incorporates [14C]methylamine which suggests that the thiolester bond may be intact. These data indicate that aqueous whole cigarette smoke solution can modify C3 and activate the alternative pathway of complement, perhaps by a previously unrecognized mechanism. Should this occur in vivo, complement activation might partly account for the extensive pulmonary leukocyte recruitment observed in smokers. Images PMID:3156879

  14. An Integrated Theory of Complement Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sag, Ivan A.; Pollard, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Presents an integrated theory of the syntactic and semantic representation of complements where the unexpressed subjects of the embedded verb-phrase complement are subject to certain interpretation restrictions. It is argued that the grammar of English controlled complements can be derived from the interaction of semantically based principles of…

  15. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  16. Adenosine (AD) decreases cobra venom factor (CVF)-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Bruner, L.H.; Till, G.O.; Ward, P.A.

    1986-03-01

    Systemic activation of complement following intravenous injection of CVF causes acute pulmonary microvascular injury. This injury is caused by release of neutrophil-derived oxygen radicals in the pulmonary microvasculature after complement activation. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophils exposed to AD in vitro produce less O/sub 2/- than do neutrophils exposed to PMA alone. Thus, it was of interest to determine whether AD co-treatment would protect rats from injury due to CVF in vivo. Four groups of rats were treated with either CVF/AD, CVF/Saline (S), S/AD or S/S. AD or S vehicle was given 5 min prior to CVF or S vehicle. The rats were killed 30 min after CVF when pulmonary injury was assessed by measuring sequestration of /sup 125/I-labeled bovine serum albumin in the lungs. The lung injury in rats co-treated with CVF/AD was approximately 50% less than in rats receiving CVF/S. AD alone had no effects. These results indicate that AD decreases pulmonary damage due to CVF-induced systemic complement activation in vivo.

  17. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus viral IFN regulatory factor 3 stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha to induce vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young C; Joo, Chul-Hyun; Gack, Michaela U; Lee, Hye-Ra; Jung, Jae U

    2008-03-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is the master regulator of both developmental and pathologic angiogenesis, composed of an oxygen-sensitive alpha-subunit and a constitutively expressed beta-subunit. HIF-1 activity in tumors depends on the availability of the HIF-1 alpha subunit, the levels of which are increased under hypoxic conditions. Recent studies have shown that HIF-1 plays an important role in KSHV reactivation from latency and pathogenesis. Here, we report a novel mechanism by which KSHV activates HIF-1 activity. Specific interaction between KSHV viral IFN regulatory factor 3 (vIRF3) and the HIF-1 alpha subunit led to the HIF-1 alpha stabilization and transcriptional activation, which induced vascular endothelial growth factor expression and ultimately facilitated endothelial tube formation. Remarkably, the central domain of vIRF3, containing double alpha-helix motifs, was sufficient not only for binding to HIF-1 alpha but also for blocking its degradation in normoxic conditions. This indicates that KSHV has developed a unique mechanism to enhance HIF-1 alpha protein stability and transcriptional activity by incorporating a viral homologue of cellular IRF gene into its genome, which may contribute to viral pathogenesis.

  18. Effect of the Anti-C1s Humanized Antibody TNT009 and its Parental Mouse Variant TNT003 on HLA Antibody-induced Complement Activation - A Preclinical in Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Wahrmann, M; Mühlbacher, J; Marinova, L; Regele, H; Huttary, N; Eskandary, F; Cohen, G; Fischer, G F; Parry, Graham C; Gilbert, J C; Panicker, S; Böhmig, G A

    2017-03-01

    The classical pathway (CP) of complement is believed to significantly contribute to alloantibody-mediated transplant injury, and targeted complement inhibition is currently considered to be a promising approach for preventing rejection. Here, we investigated the mode of action and efficacy of the humanized anti-C1s monoclonal antibody TNT009 and its parental mouse variant, TNT003, in preclinical in vitro models of HLA antibody-triggered CP activation. In flow cytometric assays, we measured the attachment of C1 subcomponents and C4/C3 split products (C4b/d, C3b/d) to HLA antigen-coated flow beads or HLA-mismatched aortic endothelial cells and splenic lymphocytes. Anti-C1s antibodies profoundly inhibited C3 activation at concentrations >20 μg/ml, both in solid phase and cellular assays. While C4 activation was also prevented, this was not the case for C1 subcomponent attachment. Analysis of serum samples obtained from 68 sensitized transplant candidates revealed that the potency of inhibition was related to the extent of baseline CP activation. This study demonstrates that anti-C1s antibodies TNT009 and TNT003 are highly effective in blocking HLA antibody-triggered complement activation downstream of C1. Our results provide the foundation for clinical studies designed to investigate the potential of TNT009 in the treatment or prevention of complement-mediated tissue injury in sensitized transplant recipients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Drug-induced proarrhythmia: risk factors and electrophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Frommeyer, Gerrit; Eckardt, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmias can be caused by cardiovascular drugs, noncardiovascular drugs, and even nonprescription agents. They can result in arrhythmic emergencies and sudden cardiac death. If a new arrhythmia or aggravation of an existing arrhythmia develops during therapy with a drug at a concentration usually considered not to be toxic, the situation can be defined as proarrhythmia. Various cardiovascular and noncardiovascular drugs can increase the occurrence of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia of the 'torsade de pointes' type. Antiarrhythmic drugs, antimicrobial agents, and antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs are the most important groups. Age, female sex, and structural heart disease are important risk factors for the occurrence of torsade de pointes. Genetic predisposition and individual pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic sensitivity also have important roles in the generation of arrhythmias. An increase in spatial or temporal dispersion of repolarization and a triangular action-potential configuration have been identified as crucial predictors of proarrhythmia in experimental models. These studies emphasized that sole consideration of the QT interval is not sufficient to assess the proarrhythmic risk. In this Review, we focus on important triggers of proarrhythmia and the underlying electrophysiological mechanisms that can enhance or prevent the development of torsade de pointes.

  20. Mechanics of Coriolis stimulus and inducing factors of motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Isu, N; Shimizu, T; Sugata, K

    2001-12-01

    To specify inducing factors of motion sickness comprised in Coriolis stimulus, or cross-coupled rotation, the sensation of rotation derived from the semicircular canal system during and after Coriolis stimulus under a variety of stimulus conditions, was estimated by an approach from mechanics with giving minimal hypotheses and simplifications on the semicircular canal system and the sensory nervous system. By solving an equation of motion of the endolymph during Coriolis stimulus, rotating angle of the endolymph was obtained, and the sensation of rotation derived from each semicircular canal was estimated. Then the sensation derived from the whole semicircular canal system was particularly considered in two cases of a single Coriolis stimulus and cyclic Coriolis stimuli. The magnitude and the direction of sensation of rotation were shown to depend on an angular velocity of body rotation and a rotating angle of head movement (amplitude of head oscillation when cyclic Coriolis stimuli) irrespective of initial angle (center angle) of the head relative to the vertical axis. The present mechanical analysis of Coriolis stimulus led a suggestion that the severity of nausea evoked by Coriolis stimulus is proportional to the effective value of the sensation of rotation caused by the Coriolis stimulus.

  1. Apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) mediates lethal redox stress induced by menadione

    PubMed Central

    Wiraswati, Hesti Lina; Hangen, Emilie; Sanz, Ana Belén; Lam, Ngoc-Vy; Reinhardt, Camille; Sauvat, Allan; Mogha, Ariane; Ortiz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is a redox-active enzyme that participates to the biogenesis/maintenance of complex I of the respiratory chain, yet also contributes to catabolic reactions in the context of regulated cell death when AIF translocates to the cytosol and to the nucleus. Here we explore the contribution of AIF to cell death induced by menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphtoquinone; also called vitamin K3) in conditions in which this pro-oxidant does not cause the mitochondrial release of AIF, yet causes caspase-independent cell killing. Depletion of AIF from human cancer cells reduced the cytotoxicity of menadione. This cytoprotective effect was accompanied by the maintenance of high levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), which are normally depleted by menadione. In addition, AIF depletion reduced the arylation of cellular proteins induced by menadione. This menadione-triggered arylation, which can be measured by a fluorescence assay, is completely suppressed by addition of exogenous glutathione or N-acetyl cysteine. Complex I inhibition by Rotenone did not mimic the cytoprotective action of AIF depletion. Altogether, these results are compatible with the hypothesis that mitochondrion-sessile AIF facilitates lethal redox cycling of menadione, thereby precipitating protein arylation and glutathione depletion. PMID:27738311

  2. Copper is required for cobalt-induced transcriptional activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Liying; Ding, Xueqin; Zhang, Zhen; Kang, Y James

    2012-08-01

    Cobalt inhibits prolyl hydroxylases, leading to the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and a concomitant increase in the transcriptional activity of HIF-1. Therefore, cobalt has been under development as a drug for activating HIF-1 under some disease conditions. However, it has been shown that ischemic conditions resulted in the loss of copper, and the activation of HIF-1 would not occur unless copper was supplemented. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that copper is also required for the cobalt activation of HIF-1 transcriptional activity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to treatment with cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) at concentrations above 25 μM for 2 h resulted in an accumulation of HIF-1α, which was determined by Western blot analysis, and an increase in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which was determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis for mRNA levels and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis for protein levels. The copper chelator tetraethylenepentamine at 25 μM did not significantly affect the accumulation of HIF-1α but blocked increases in VEGF mRNA and protein levels, an effect that could be reversed by the addition of 25 μM copper sulfate (CuSO(4)). In addition, gene silencing of the copper chaperone for Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase blocked VEGF expression with little effect on cobalt-induced HIF-1α accumulation. The present study thus demonstrates that copper was required for cobalt-activated transcriptional activity of HIF-1, although copper did not affect cobalt-induced accumulation of HIF-1α in the cells.

  3. Characterization and expression analysis of a complement component gene in sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Zhou, Zunchun; Yang, Aifu; Dong, Ying; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-12-01

    The complement system plays a crucial role in the innate immune system of animals. It can be activated by distinct yet overlapping classical, alternative and lectin pathways. In the alternative pathway, complement factor B (Bf) serves as the catalytic subunit of complement component 3 (C3) convertase, which plays the central role among three activation pathways. In this study, the Bf gene in sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus), termed AjBf, was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of AjBf was 3231 bp in length barring the poly (A) tail. It contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 2742 bp encoding 913 amino acids, a 105 bp 5'-UTR (5'-terminal untranslated region) and a 384 bp 3'-UTR. AjBf was a mosaic protein with six CCP (complement control protein) domains, a VWA (von Willebrand factor A) domain, and a serine protease domain. The deduced molecular weight of AjBf protein was 101 kDa. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the expression level of AjBf in A. japonicus was obviously higher at larval stage than that at embryonic stage. Expression detection in different tissues showed that AjBf expressed higher in coelomocytes than in other four tissues. In addation, AjBf expression in different tissues was induced significantly after LPS or PolyI:C challenge. These results indicated that AjBf plays an important role in immune responses to pathogen infection.

  4. Complement activation by Coccidioides immitis: in vitro and clinical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Galgiani, J N; Yam, P; Petz, L D; Williams, P L; Stevens, D A

    1980-01-01

    Mycelial- or spherule-phase derivatives of Coccidioides immitis caused a decrease in vitro of total hemolytic complement in serum from a nonsensitized person. Activation involved both classic and alternative pathways as shown by deprssion of hemolytic C4 and by generation of products of activation of components C3, C4, and factor B. In addition, functional complement activity or immunoreactive levels of complement components or both were measured in 23 patients with self-limited or disseminated coccidioidomycosis. Low total hemolytic complement was found in nine, usually during the early phase of primary illness, and was transient. Hemolytic C4 was low, and the effect of inulin to decrease complement levels was blunted, suggested both classic and alternative pathways may be deficient. However, associated depression of immunoreactive levels of components assayed (C3, C4, C5, factor B, and properdin) was not consistently found. This disparity raises the possibility of enhanced in vitro inactivation analogous to activation by immune complexes. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6901703

  5. Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor (PEDF) Blocks Wnt3a Protein-induced Autophagy in Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jingjing; Belinsky, Glenn; Sagheer, Usman; Zhang, Xuchen; Grippo, Paul J; Chung, Chuhan

    2016-10-14

    An increase in autophagy characterizes pancreatic carcinogenesis, but the signals that regulate this process are incompletely understood. Because canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for the transition from early to advanced pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions, we assessed whether Wnt ligands and endogenous inhibitors of Wnt signaling modulate autophagy. In this study, canonical Wnt3a ligand induced autophagy markers and vacuoles in murine PanIN cells. Furthermore, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a secreted glycoprotein known for its anti-tumor properties, blocked Wnt3a-directed induction of autophagy proteins. Autophagy inhibition was complemented by reciprocal regulation of the oxidative stress enzymes, superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and catalase. Transcriptional control of Sod2 expression was mediated by PEDF-induced NFκB nuclear translocation. PEDF-dependent SOD2 expression in PanIN lesions was recapitulated in a murine model of PanIN formation where PEDF was deleted. In human PanIN lesions, co-expression of PEDF and SOD2 was observed in the majority of early PanIN lesions (47/50, 94%), whereas PEDF and SOD2 immunolocalization in high-grade human PanIN-2/3 was uncommon (7/50, 14%). These results indicate that PEDF regulates autophagy through coordinate Wnt signaling blockade and NFκB activation.

  6. The Semantics of Complementation in English: A Cognitive Semantic Account of Two English Complement Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Studies on complementation in English and other languages have traditionally focused on syntactic issues, most notably on the constituent structures of different complement types. As a result, they have neglected the role of meaning in the choice of different complements. This paper investigates the semantics of complementation within the…

  7. Meningococcal disease and the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lisa A; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of meningococcal disease, this infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. The role of the complement system in innate immune defenses against invasive meningococcal disease is well established. Individuals deficient in components of the alternative and terminal complement pathways are highly predisposed to invasive, often recurrent meningococcal infections. Genome-wide analysis studies also point to a central role for complement in disease pathogenesis. Here we review the pathophysiologic events pertinent to the complement system that accompany meningococcal sepsis in humans. Meningococci use several often redundant mechanisms to evade killing by human complement. Capsular polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide glycan composition play critical roles in complement evasion. Some of the newly described protein vaccine antigens interact with complement components and have sparked considerable research interest. PMID:24104403

  8. Complement components in Nigerians with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Onyemelukwe, G C

    1989-10-01

    Serum complement components C1q, C3, C4, factor B, and C3d breakdown products were measured in asthmatic Nigerians and in age-matched and sex-matched controls. C3 mean level was higher than in controls while C1q and C4 mean levels were lower than in controls. High levels of C3d in asthmatic patients suggest the possible role of C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins in the etiopathogenesis of perennial asthma in Nigerian patients in a tropical environment with ubiquitous airborne allergens and infective agents. The significantly elevated levels of IgM and IgG may suggest recurrent respiratory challenge of perennial antigens in our environment.

  9. Prevalence and risk factors of sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ryota; Kuriyama, Akira; Takada, Tadaaki; Nasu, Michitaka; Luthe, Sarah Kyuragi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to evaluate the epidemiology and clinical features of sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy (SICM). A retrospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 210 adult patients with sepsis or septic shock admitted to a Japanese tertiary care hospital from January 1, 2013, to December 31, 2015, who underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) on admission. The definition of SICM was ejection fraction (EF) < 50% and a ≥10% decrease compared to the baseline EF which recovered within 2 weeks, in sepsis or septic shock patients. Our primary outcome was the incidence rate of SICM. Our secondary outcomes were the in-hospital mortality rate and length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay according to the presence or absence of SICM. In total, 29 patients (13.8%) were diagnosed with SICM. The prevalence rate of SICM was significantly higher in male than in female (P = 0.02). Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that the incidence of SICM was associated with younger age (odds ratio [OR], 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.95–0.99), higher lactate level on admission (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.05–1.32) and history of heart failure (HF) (OR, 3.77; 95% CI, 1.37–10.40). There were no significant differences in the in-hospital and 30-day mortality between patients with and without SICM (24.1% vs 12.7%, P = 0.15; 20.7% vs 12.1%, P = 0.23). Lengths of hospital and ICU stay were significantly longer in patients with SICM than in those without SICM (median, 43 vs 26 days, P = 0.04; 9 vs 5 days, P < 0.01). SICM developed in 13.8% of patients with sepsis and septic shock. A younger age, higher lactate levels on admission and history of HF were risk factors. PMID:27684877

  10. Evidence of human induce factors in automotive crashes in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abidemi, Awopeju K

    2013-01-01

    Nigeria is one of the countries in Africa highly affected by automotive crashes which led to establishment of Federal Road Safety Corps (FRSC). The organization fought and is fighting against reckless driving in the country to prevent loss of life through automotive crashes. The record of the organization and the Statistical investigation of the researcher reveal that most of the crashes were due to human error such as alcoholism, inexperience and peer influence on the high-way. The data for the research was collected from published report of FRSC 2012 and analyzed using chi-square dependency test and charts due to the nature of the presentation. Ratios were used to determine Number of people killed per Road Total Crashes (RTC), Casualty per RTC and RTC severity Index from 2007 to 2010 in the country. Among the human induced factors, it was discovered that most of the drivers involved in road crashes were drunk during the period and the years of experience play major role in the automotive crashes as drivers with less than 2years of experience were more involved than the other groups. In the consideration of life style of drivers involve in road crashes, it was discovered that drivers with less than 30years of age are vulnerable to road crashes than drivers with ages higher than 30years. Among the findings, the most common automobile in Nigeria road crashes is commercial buses in the years considered. It was recommended that proper and adequate training should be given to drivers on the high-way to prevent injuries and loss of life. Alcoholism should be discouraged in totality and age of obtaining drivers license could be increased in developing countries such as Nigeria.

  11. Complement and contact activation in term neonates after fetal acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, J.; Wagner, M.; Strauss, E.; Obladen, M.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate complement and contact activation after fetal acidosis.
METHODS—Fifteen term neonates with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy after umbilical arterial pH < 7.10 were compared with 15 healthy neonates with umbilical arterial pH > 7.20. Determinations of the complement function and C1-inhibitor activity were performed as kinetic tests 22-28 hours after birth. C1q, C1-inhibitor, and factor B concentrations were determined by radial immunodiffusion and those of C3a, C5a, and factor XIIa by enzyme immunoabsorbent assay.
RESULTS—Median complement function (46 vs 73 %), C1q (4.3 vs 9.1 mg/dl), and factor B (5.2 vs 7.7 mg/dl) decreased after fetal acidosis. The activated split products C3a (260 vs 185 µg/l), C5a (5.0 vs 0.6 µg/l), and factor XIIa (3.2 vs 1.3 µg/l) increased in the neonates after fetal acidosis. No differences were found in the concentration and activity of C1-inhibitor.
CONCLUSIONS—Complement and contact activation occurred in the newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Activation of these systems generates mediators which can trigger inflammation and tissue injury.

 PMID:9577283

  12. PASylated Coversin, a C5-Specific Complement Inhibitor with Extended Pharmacokinetics, Shows Enhanced Anti-Hemolytic Activity in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Nadine; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Schlapschy, Martin; Skerra, Arne

    2016-10-19

    The Ornithodoros moubata Complement Inhibitor (OmCI) binds complement component 5 (C5) with high affinity and, thus, selectively prevents proteolytic activation of the terminal lytic complement pathway. A recombinant version of OmCI (also known as Coversin and rEV576) has proven efficacious in several animal models of complement-mediated diseases and successfully completed a phase Ia clinical trial. Coversin is a small 17 kDa lipocalin protein which has a very short plasma half-life if not bound to C5; therefore, the drug requires frequent dosing. We have improved the pharmacokinetics of Coversin by N-terminal translational conjugation with a 600 residue polypeptide composed of Pro, Ala, and Ser (PAS) residues. To this end, PAS-Coversin as well as the unmodified Coversin were functionally expressed in the cytoplasm of E. coli and purified to homogeneity. Both versions showed identical affinity to human C5, as determined by surface plasmon resonance measurements, and revealed similar complement inhibitory activity, as measured in ELISAs with human serum. In line with the PEG-like biophysical properties, PASylation dramatically prolonged the plasma half-life of uncomplexed Coversin by a factor ≥50 in mice. In a clinically relevant in vitro model of the complement-mediated disease paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) both versions of Coversin effectively reduced erythrocyte lysis. Unexpectedly, while the IC50 values were comparable, PAS-Coversin reached a substantially lower plateau of residual lysis at saturating inhibitor concentrations. Taken together, our data demonstrate two clinically relevant improvements of PASylated Coversin: markedly increased plasma half-life and considerably reduced background hemolysis of erythrocytes with PNH-induced phenotype.

  13. The complement system contributes to the pathology of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by triggering demyelination and modifying the antigen-specific T and B cell response.

    PubMed

    Hundgeburth, Lorenz C; Wunsch, Marie; Rovituso, Damiano; Recks, Mascha S; Addicks, Klaus; Lehmann, Paul V; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2013-03-01

    So far, studies of the human autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis (MS) have largely been hampered by the absence of a pathogenic B cell component in its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). To overcome this shortcoming, we have previously introduced the myelin basic protein (MBP)-proteolipid protein (PLP) MP4-induced EAE, which is B cell and autoantibody-dependent. Here we show that MP4-immunized wild-type C57BL/6 mice displayed a significantly lower disease incidence when their complement system was transiently depleted by a single injection of cobra venom factor (CVF) prior to immunization. Considering the underlying pathomechanism, our data suggest that the complement system is crucial for MP4-specific antibodies to trigger CNS pathology. Demyelinated lesions in the CNS were colocalized with complement depositions. In addition, B cell deficient JHT mice reconstituted with MP4-reactive serum showed significantly attenuated clinical and histological EAE after depletion of complement by CVF. The complement system was also critically involved in the generation of the MP4-specific T and B cell response: in MP4-immunized wild-type mice treated with CVF the MP4-specific cytokine and antibody response was significantly attenuated compared to untreated wild-type mice. Taken together, we propose two independent mechanisms by which the complement system can contribute to the pathology of autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Our data corroborate the role of complement in triggering antibody-dependent demyelination and antigen-specific T cell immunity and also provide first evidence that the complement system can modify the antigen-specific B cell response in EAE and possibly MS.

  14. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  15. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Wen-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Rui-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, no grade 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P = 0.0001<0.01). CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. PMID:15849822

  16. Complement inhibition by Sarcoptes scabiei protects Streptococcus pyogenes - An in vitro study to unravel the molecular mechanisms behind the poorly understood predilection of S. pyogenes to infect mite-induced skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Swe, Pearl M.; Christian, Lindsay D.; Lu, Hieng C.; Sriprakash, Kadaba S.

    2017-01-01

    Background On a global scale scabies is one of the most common dermatological conditions, imposing a considerable economic burden on individuals, communities and health systems. There is substantial epidemiological evidence that in tropical regions scabies is often causing pyoderma and subsequently serious illness due to invasion by opportunistic bacteria. The health burden due to complicated scabies causing cellulitis, bacteraemia and sepsis, heart and kidney diseases in resource-poor communities is extreme. Co-infections of group A streptococcus (GAS) and scabies mites is a common phenomenon in the tropics. Both pathogens produce multiple complement inhibitors to overcome the host innate defence. We investigated the relative role of classical (CP), lectin (LP) and alternative pathways (AP) towards a pyodermic GAS isolate 88/30 in the presence of a scabies mite complement inhibitor, SMSB4. Methodology/Principal findings Opsonophagocytosis assays in fresh blood showed baseline immunity towards GAS. The role of innate immunity was investigated by deposition of the first complement components of each pathway, specifically C1q, FB and MBL from normal human serum on GAS. C1q deposition was the highest followed by FB deposition while MBL deposition was undetectable, suggesting that CP and AP may be mainly activated by GAS. We confirmed this result using sera depleted of either C1q or FB, and serum deficient in MBL. Recombinant SMSB4 was produced and purified from Pichia pastoris. SMSB4 reduced the baseline immunity against GAS by decreasing the formation of CP- and AP-C3 convertases, subsequently affecting opsonisation and the release of anaphylatoxin. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the complement-inhibitory function of SMSB4 promotes the survival of GAS in vitro and inferably in the microenvironment of the mite-infested skin. Understanding the tripartite interactions between host, parasite and microbial pathogens at a molecular level may serve as a

  17. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} in modulating cobalt-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saini, Yogesh; Kim, Kyung Y; Lewandowski, Ryan; Bramble, Lori A; Harkema, Jack R; Lapres, John J

    2010-02-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in development, cellular homeostasis, and pathological conditions, such as cancer and stroke. There is also growing evidence that hypoxia is an important modulator of the inflammatory process. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are a family of proteins that regulate the cellular response to oxygen deficit, and loss of HIFs impairs inflammatory cell function. There is little known, however, about the role of epithelial-derived HIF signaling in modulating inflammation. Cobalt is capable of eliciting an allergic response and promoting HIF signaling. To characterize the inflammatory function of epithelial-derived HIF in response to inhaled cobalt, a conditional lung-specific HIF1alpha, the most ubiquitously expressed HIF, deletion mouse, was created. Control mice showed classic signs of metal-induced injury following cobalt exposure, including fibrosis and neutrophil infiltration. In contrast, HIF1alpha-deficient mice displayed a Th2 response that resembled asthma, including increased eosinophilic infiltration, mucus cell metaplasia, and chitinase-like protein expression. The results suggest that epithelial-derived HIF signaling has a critical role in establishing a tissue's inflammatory response, and compromised HIF1alpha signaling biases the tissue towards a Th2-mediated reaction.

  18. Fine-structure mapping and complementation analysis of nif (nitrogen fixation) genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, T; MacNeil, D; Roberts, G P; Supiano, M A; Brill, W J

    1978-01-01

    Four hundred and eighty-nine independent Nif- strains containing 260 point, 130 millimicron-induced, and 99 deletion mutations in nif in the Klebsiella pneumoniae chromosome were isolated. Three hundred and ninety insertion and point mutations were mapped with millimicron-induced deletions carried on 44 plasmids derived from pTM4010, a recombinant R factor containing the his-nif region of K. pneumoniae. The 99 chromosomal deletions in the nif region were mapped with 69 derivatives of pTM4010 carrying insertion and point mutations in nif. Complementation analysis between 84 derivatives of pTM4010 carrying nif mutations and Rec- derivatives of the 390 Nif- mutants identified 14 genes. The nif mutations were ordered into 49 deletion groups with a gene order of his...nifQBALFMVSNEKDHJ. Complementation analysis of millimicron-induced, amber, frameshift, and deletion mutations indicates there are five polycistronic and two monocistronic operons: nifQ nifB, nifA nifL, nifF, nifM nifV nifS, nifN nifE, nifK nifD nifH, and nifJ. Transcription is from right to left in all polycistronic operons. PMID:361693

  19. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  20. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  1. Subversion of complement by hematophagous parasites

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Hélène; Skelly, Patrick; Zipfel, Peter F.; Losson, Bertrand; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2008-01-01

    The complement system is a crucial part of innate and adaptive immunity which exerts a significant evolutionary pressure on pathogens. It has selected for those pathogens, mainly micro-organisms but also parasites, that have evolved countermeasures. The characterization of how pathogens evade complement attack is a rapidly developing field of current research. In recent years, multiple complement evasion strategies have been characterized. In this review, we focus on complement escape mechanisms expressed by hematophagous parasites, a heterogeneous group of metazoan parasites that share the property of ingesting the whole blood of their host. Complement inhibition is crucial for parasite survival within the host tissue or to facilitate blood feeding. Finally, complement inhibition by hematophagous parasites may also contribute to their success as pathogen vectors. PMID:18762211

  2. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  3. The complement system and its role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, C; Holmstrup, P; Van Dyke, T E; Nielsen, C H

    2015-06-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent inflammatory disease in tooth supporting tissues, induced by bacteria growing in a biofilm on tooth surfaces. Components of the complement system are present in the periodontal tissue and the system is activated in periodontitis. Continuous complement activation and modulation by bacteria within the biofilm in periodontal pockets, however, may enhance local tissue destruction, providing the biofilm with both essential nutrients and space to grow. A more profound understanding of the mechanisms involved in complement-derived tissue degradation may facilitate the development of new treatment concepts for periodontitis. Further studies on the role of complement in periodontitis pathogenesis may also contribute to the understanding of why some individuals fail to resolve periodontitis. Here, we review evidence that links complement to the pathogenesis of periodontitis with an emphasis on interaction of complement with bacteria from periodontitis-associated biofilm.

  4. A Dialogue between the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Frédéric; Mazure, Nathalie M.; Brahimi-Horn, M. Christiane

    2008-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor is the key protein responsible for the cellular adaptation to low oxygen tension. This transcription factor becomes activated as a result of a drop in the partial pressure of oxygen, to hypoxic levels below 5% oxygen, and targets a panel of genes involved in maintenance of oxygen homeostasis. Hypoxia is a common characteristic of the microenvironment of solid tumors and, through activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor, is at the center of the growth dynamics of tumor cells. Not only does the microenvironment impact on the hypoxia-inducible factor but this factor impacts on microenvironmental features, such as pH, nutrient availability, metabolism and the extracellular matrix. In this review we discuss the influence the tumor environment has on the hypoxia-inducible factor and outline the role of this factor as a modulator of the microenvironment and as a powerful actor in tumor remodeling. From a fundamental research point of view the hypoxia-inducible factor is at the center of a signaling pathway that must be deciphered to fully understand the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. From a translational and pharmacological research point of view the hypoxia-inducible factor and its induced downstream gene products may provide information on patient prognosis and offer promising targets that open perspectives for novel “anti-microenvironment” directed therapies. PMID:19308685

  5. Featured Article: Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α dependent nuclear entry of factor inhibiting HIF-1

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ke; Ding, Xue-qin; Lin, Chen

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcriptional activity in the nucleus is related to factor inhibiting HIF-1 (FIH-1). FIH-1 hydrolyzes asparagine at the C-terminal of HIF-1α, preventing the interaction between HIF-1α and its associated cofactors, and leading to suppressed activation of HIF-1. FIH-1 is a cytosolic protein and its entry to the nucleus has to be coordinated with HIF-1α. The present study was undertaken to examine the correlation between HIF-1α and FIH-1 in their nuclear entry. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were treated with dimethyloxalylglycine at a final concentration of 100 µM for 4 h, resulting in an accumulation of HIF-1α and an increase of FIH-1 in the nucleus as determined by Western blot analysis. Pretreatment of the cells with copper (Cu) chelator tetraethylenepentamine at 50 µM in cultures for 24 h reduced both HIF-1α protein levels and the HIF-1α entry to the nucleus, along with decreased FIH-1 protein levels in the nucleus but no changes in the total FIH-1 protein levels in the cells. These effects were prevented by simultaneous addition of 50 µM CuSO4 with tetraethylenepentamine. Gene-silencing of HIF-1α significantly inhibited FIH-1 entry to the nucleus, but did not affect the total protein levels of FIH-1 in the cells. This work demonstrates that the nuclear entry of FIH-1 depends on HIF-1α. Cu deficiency caused a decrease of HIF-1α, leading to suppression of FIH-1 entry to the nucleus. PMID:25687434

  6. Featured Article: Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α dependent nuclear entry of factor inhibiting HIF-1.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ke; Ding, Xue-Qin; Lin, Chen; Kang, Y James

    2015-11-01

    The regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcriptional activity in the nucleus is related to factor inhibiting HIF-1 (FIH-1). FIH-1 hydrolyzes asparagine at the C-terminal of HIF-1α, preventing the interaction between HIF-1α and its associated cofactors, and leading to suppressed activation of HIF-1. FIH-1 is a cytosolic protein and its entry to the nucleus has to be coordinated with HIF-1α. The present study was undertaken to examine the correlation between HIF-1α and FIH-1 in their nuclear entry. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were treated with dimethyloxalylglycine at a final concentration of 100 µM for 4 h, resulting in an accumulation of HIF-1α and an increase of FIH-1 in the nucleus as determined by Western blot analysis. Pretreatment of the cells with copper (Cu) chelator tetraethylenepentamine at 50 µM in cultures for 24 h reduced both HIF-1α protein levels and the HIF-1α entry to the nucleus, along with decreased FIH-1 protein levels in the nucleus but no changes in the total FIH-1 protein levels in the cells. These effects were prevented by simultaneous addition of 50 µM CuSO4 with tetraethylenepentamine. Gene-silencing of HIF-1α significantly inhibited FIH-1 entry to the nucleus, but did not affect the total protein levels of FIH-1 in the cells. This work demonstrates that the nuclear entry of FIH-1 depends on HIF-1α. Cu deficiency caused a decrease of HIF-1α, leading to suppression of FIH-1 entry to the nucleus.

  7. Serum complement and immunoconglutinin in malnutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, R K

    1975-01-01

    Serum haemolytic complement activity and C3 were significantly decreased in 35 malnourished children. The changes were more pronounced in those with infection. Electrophoretically altered forms of complement C were detected in 14. There was an inverse correlation between C3 levels and immunoconglutinin titres. Nutritional rehabilitation and eradication of infection reversed the abnormalities. It is suggested that reduced complement function in malnutrition is the combined result of impaired synthesis, complement activation in vivo, and changes in plasma volume, and that it may contribute to an increased susceptibility to infection in undernourished individuals. PMID:807166

  8. Mutations in complement C3 predispose to development of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth C.; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Strain, Lisa; Blouin, Jacques; Brown, Alison L.; Moghal, Nadeem; Kaplan, Bernard S.; Weiss, Robert A.; Lhotta, Karl; Kapur, Gaurav; Mattoo, Tej; Nivet, Hubert; Wong, William; Gie, Sophie; de Ligny, Bruno Hurault; Fischbach, Michel; Gupta, Ritu; Hauhart, Richard; Meunier, Vincent; Loirat, Chantal; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnès; Fridman, Wolf H.; Janssen, Bert J. C.

    2008-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a disease of complement dysregulation. In approximately 50% of patients, mutations have been described in the genes encoding the complement regulators factor H, MCP, and factor I or the activator factor B. We report here mutations in the central component of the complement cascade, C3, in association with aHUS. We describe 9 novel C3 mutations in 14 aHUS patients with a persistently low serum C3 level. We have demonstrated that 5 of these mutations are gain-of-function and 2 are inactivating. This establishes C3 as a susceptibility factor for aHUS. PMID:18796626

  9. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J.; Julian, Bruce A.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan–binding lectin–associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome–wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H–related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1–containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease. PMID:25694468

  10. Nitric oxide mediates angiogenesis induced in vivo by platelet-activating factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Lupia, E.; de Martino, A.; Battaglia, E.; Arese, M.; Tizzani, A.; Bussolino, F.; Camussi, G.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the role of an endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO) in the in vitro migration of endothelial cells and in the in vivo angiogenic response elicited by platelet-activating factor (PAF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The NO synthase inhibitor, N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), but not its enantiomer D-NAME, prevented chemotaxis of endothelial cells induced in vitro by PAF and by TNF. The motogenic activity of TNF was also inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF-receptor antagonist. In contrast, chemotaxis induced by bFGF was not prevented by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. Angiogenesis was studied in vivo in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model, the angiogenesis induced by PAF and TNF was inhibited by WEB 2170 and L-NAME but not by D-NAME. In contrast, angiogenesis induced by bFGF was not affected by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. TNF, but not bFGF, induced PAF synthesis within Matrigel. These results suggest that NO mediates the angiogenesis induced by PAF as well as that induced by TNF, which is dependent on the production of PAF. In contrast, the angiogenic effect of bFGF appears to be both PAF and NO independent. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9250168

  11. Cannabinoids act as necrosis-inducing factors in Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Shoyama, Yoshinari; Sugawa, Chitomi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-12-01

    Cannabis sativa is well known to produce unique secondary metabolites called cannabinoids. We recently discovered that Cannabis leaves induce cell death by secreting tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) into leaf tissues. Examinations using isolated Cannabis mitochondria demonstrated that THCA causes mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) though opening of MPT pores, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction (the important feature of necrosis). Although Ca(2+) is known to cause opening of animal MPT pores, THCA directly opened Cannabis MPT pores in the absence of Ca(2+). Based on these results, we conclude that THCA has the ability to induce necrosis though MPT in Cannabis leaves, independently of Ca(2+). We confirmed that other cannabinoids (cannabidiolic acid and cannabigerolic acid) also have MPT-inducing activity similar to that of THCA. Moreover, mitochondria of plants which do not produce cannabinoids were shown to induce MPT by THCA treatment, thus suggesting that many higher plants may have systems to cause THCA-dependent necrosis.

  12. A metalloproteinase karilysin present in the majority of Tannerella forsythia isolates inhibits all pathways of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Karim, Abdulkarim Y; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Riesbeck, Kristian; Garred, Peter; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M

    2012-03-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a poorly studied pathogen despite being one of the main causes of periodontitis, which is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth. We found that despite being recognized by all complement pathways, T. forsythia is resistant to killing by human complement, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with karilysin, a metalloproteinase of T. forsythia, resulted in a decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. T. forsythia strains expressing karilysin at higher levels were more resistant than low-expressing strains. Furthermore, the low-expressing strain was significantly more opsonized with activated complement factor 3 and membrane attack complex from serum compared with the other strains. The high-expressing strain was more resistant to killing in human blood. The protective effect of karilysin against serum bactericidal activity was attributable to its ability to inhibit complement at several stages. The classical and lectin complement pathways were inhibited because of the efficient degradation of mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-2, ficolin-3, and C4 by karilysin, whereas inhibition of the terminal pathway was caused by degradation of C5. Interestingly, karilysin was able to release biologically active C5a peptide in human plasma and induce migration of neutrophils. Importantly, we detected the karilysin gene in >90% of gingival crevicular fluid samples containing T. forsythia obtained from patients with periodontitis. Taken together, the newly characterized karilysin appears to be an important virulence factor of T. forsythia and might have several important implications for immune evasion.

  13. 670-nm light treatment reduces complement propagation following retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim Complement activation is associated with the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We aimed to investigate whether 670-nm light treatment reduces the propagation of complement in a light-induced model of atrophic AMD. Methods Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were pretreated with 9 J/cm2 670-nm light for 3 minutes daily over 5 days; other animals were sham treated. Animals were exposed to white light (1,000 lux) for 24 h, after which animals were kept in dim light (5 lux) for 7 days. Expression of complement genes was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and immunohistochemistry. Counts were made of C3-expressing monocytes/microglia using in situ hybridization. Photoreceptor death was also assessed using outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness measurements, and oxidative stress using immunohistochemistry for 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Results Following light damage, retinas pretreated with 670-nm light had reduced immunoreactivity for the oxidative damage maker 4-HNE in the ONL and outer segments, compared to controls. In conjunction, there was significant reduction in retinal expression of complement genes C1s, C2, C3, C4b, C3aR1, and C5r1 following 670 nm treatment. In situ hybridization, coupled with immunoreactivity for the marker ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (IBA1), revealed that C3 is expressed by infiltrating microglia/monocytes in subretinal space following light damage, which were significantly reduced in number after 670 nm treatment. Additionally, immunohistochemistry for C3 revealed a decrease in C3 deposition in the ONL following 670 nm treatment. Conclusions Our data indicate that 670-nm light pretreatment reduces lipid peroxidation and complement propagation in the degenerating retina. These findings have relevance to the cellular events of complement activation underling the pathogenesis of AMD, and highlight the potential of 670-nm light as a non-invasive anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:23181358

  14. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-01-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies. PMID

  15. The pivotal role of the complement system in aging and age-related macular degeneration: hypothesis re-visited.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Don H; Radeke, Monte J; Gallo, Natasha B; Chapin, Ethan A; Johnson, Patrick T; Curletti, Christy R; Hancox, Lisa S; Hu, Jane; Ebright, Jessica N; Malek, Goldis; Hauser, Michael A; Rickman, Catherine Bowes; Bok, Dean; Hageman, Gregory S; Johnson, Lincoln V

    2010-03-01

    During the past ten years, dramatic advances have been made in unraveling the biological bases of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of irreversible blindness in western populations. In that timeframe, two distinct lines of evidence emerged which implicated chronic local inflammation and activation of the complement cascade in AMD pathogenesis. First, a number of complement system proteins, complement activators, and complement regulatory proteins were identified as molecular constituents of drusen, the hallmark extracellular deposits associated with early AMD. Subsequently, genetic studies revealed highly significant statistical associations between AMD and variants of several complement pathway-associated genes including: Complement factor H (CFH), complement factor H-related 1 and 3 (CFHR1 and CFHR3), complement factor B (CFB), complement component 2 (C2), and complement component 3 (C3). In this article, we revisit our original hypothesis that chronic local inflammatory and immune-mediated events at the level of Bruch's membrane play critical roles in drusen biogenesis and, by extension, in the pathobiology of AMD. Secondly, we report the results of a new screening for additional AMD-associated polymorphisms in a battery of 63 complement-related genes. Third, we identify and characterize the local complement system in the RPE-choroid complex - thus adding a new dimension of biological complexity to the role of the complement system in ocular aging and AMD. Finally, we evaluate the most salient, recent evidence that bears directly on the role of complement in AMD pathogenesis and progression. Collectively, these recent findings strongly re-affirm the importance of the complement system in AMD. They lay the groundwork for further studies that may lead to the identification of a transcriptional disease signature of AMD, and hasten the development of new therapeutic approaches that will restore the complement-modulating activity that

  16. Transforming growth factor-beta induces endothelin-1 expression through activation of the Smad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando; Reimunde, Francisco Manuel; Redondo-Horcajo, Mariano; Lamas, Santiago

    2004-11-01

    Expression of the endothelin-1 gene is subject to complex regulation by different factors, among which transforming growth factor-beta is one of the most important. We have analyzed the mechanism by which transforming growth factor-beta increases endothelin-1 expression in vascular endothelial cells. Transcriptional activation of the endothelin-1 promoter accounted for the transforming growth factor-beta-induced increase in endothelin-1 mRNA levels. Two DNA elements within the promoter are responsible for this effect: a Smad binding element and a proximal activator protein-1 site. Mutation of both elements abolished transforming growth factor-beta responsiveness. Overexpression of the Smad3 isoform strongly potentiates transforming growth factor-beta- induced endothelin-1 promoter activity in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that transforming growth factor-beta induces endothelin-1 expression by a functional cooperation between Smads and activator protein-1 through activation of the Smad signaling pathway.

  17. Review on complement analysis method and the roles of glycosaminoglycans in the complement system.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Li, Yan; Ijaz, Muhammad; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Lian, Qianqian; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-12-10

    Complement system is composed of over 30 proteins and it plays important roles in self-defence and inflammation. There are three activation pathways, including classical pathway, alternative pathway and lectin pathway, in complement system, and they are associated with many diseases such as osteoarthritis and age-related macular degeneration. Modulation of the complement system may be a promising strategy in the treatment of related diseases. Glycosaminoglycans are anionic linear polysaccharides without branches. They are one kind of multi-functional macromolecules which have great potential in regulating complement system. This review is organized around two aspects between the introduction of complement system and the interaction of glycosaminoglycans with complement system. Three complement activation pathways and the biological significance were introduced first. Then functional analysis methods were compared to provide a strategy for potential glycosaminoglycans screen. Finally, the roles of glycosaminoglycans played in the complement system were summed up.

  18. Progress and Trends in Complement Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The past few years have proven to be a highly successful and exciting period for the field of complement-directed drug discovery and development. Driven by promising experiences with the first marketed complement drugs, increased knowledge about the involvement of complement in health and disease, and improvements in structural and analytical techniques as well as animal models of disease, the field has seen a surge in creative approaches to therapeutically intervene at various stages of the cascade. An impressive panel of compounds that show promise in clinical trials is meanwhile being lined up in the pipelines of both small biotechnology and big pharmaceutical companies. Yet with this new focus on complement-targeted therapeutics, important questions concerning target selection, point and length of intervention, safety, and drug delivery emerge. In view of the diversity of the clinical disorders involving abnormal complement activity or regulation, which include both acute and chronic diseases and affect a wide range of organs, diverse yet specifically tailored therapeutic approaches may be needed to shift complement back into balance. This chapter highlights the key changes in the field that shape our current perception of complement-targeted drugs and provides a brief overview of recent strategies and emerging trends. Selected examples of complement-related diseases and inhibitor classes are highlighted to illustrate the diversity and creativity in field. PMID:22990692

  19. Early nodulin gene expression during Nod factor-induced processes in Vicia sativa.

    PubMed

    Vijn, I; Martinez-Abarca, F; Yang, W C; das Neves, L; van Brussel, A; van Kammen, A; Bisseling, T

    1995-07-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae-secreted Nod factors are able to induce root hair deformation, the formation of nodule primordia and the expression of early nodulin genes in Vicia sativa (vetch). To obtain more insight into the mode of action of Nod factors the expression of early nodulin genes was followed during Nod factor-induced root hair deformation and nodule primordium formation. The results of these studies suggested that the expression of VsENOD5 and VsENOD12 is not required for root hair deformation. In the Nod factor-induced primordia both VsENOD12 and VsENOD40 are expressed in a spatially controlled manner similar to that found in Rhizobium-induced nodule primordia. In contrast, VsENOD5 expression has never been observed in Nod factor-induced primordia, showing that the induction of VsENOD5 and VsENOD12 expression are not coupled. VsENOD5 expression is induced in the root epidermis by Nod factors and in Rhizobium-induced nodule primordia only in cells infected by the bacteria, suggesting that the Nod factor does not reach the inner cortical cells.

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor regulates hepcidin via erythropoietin-induced erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingdu; Davidoff, Olena; Niss, Knut; Haase, Volker H

    2012-12-01

    Iron demand in bone marrow increases when erythropoiesis is stimulated by hypoxia via increased erythropoietin (EPO) synthesis in kidney and liver. Hepcidin, a small polypeptide produced by hepatocytes, plays a central role in regulating iron uptake by promoting internalization and degradation of ferroportin, the only known cellular iron exporter. Hypoxia suppresses hepcidin, thereby enhancing intestinal iron uptake and release from internal stores. While HIF, a central mediator of cellular adaptation to hypoxia, directly regulates renal and hepatic EPO synthesis under hypoxia, the molecular basis of hypoxia/HIF-mediated hepcidin suppression in the liver remains unclear. Here, we used a genetic approach to disengage HIF activation from EPO synthesis and found that HIF-mediated suppression of the hepcidin gene (Hamp1) required EPO induction. EPO induction was associated with increased erythropoietic activity and elevated serum levels of growth differentiation factor 15. When erythropoiesis was inhibited pharmacologically, Hamp1 was no longer suppressed despite profound elevations in serum EPO, indicating that EPO by itself is not directly involved in Hamp1 regulation. Taken together, we provide in vivo evidence that Hamp1 suppression by the HIF pathway occurs indirectly through stimulation of EPO-induced erythropoiesis.

  1. Down-regulation of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 protein (XRCC1) expression by Hsp90 inhibition enhances the gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Syu, Jhan-Jhang; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chang, Po-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Yu; Jian, Yun-Ting; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2015-05-15

    Gefitinib (Iressa{sup R}, ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) that blocks growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and AKT signaling activation. It has been shown that inhibition of Hsp90 function can enhance antitumor activity of EGFR-TKI. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein in base excision repair, which could be regulated by ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. However, the role of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated XRCC1 expression in gefitinib alone or combination with an Hsp90 inhibitor-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. In this study, gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through ERK1/2 and AKT inactivation in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1975. Knocking down XRCC1 expression by transfection with small interfering RNA of XRCC1 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of gefitinib. Combining treatment of gefitinib with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in enhancing the reduction of XRCC1 protein and mRNA levels in gefitinib-exposed A549 and H1975 cells. Compared to a single agent alone, gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition synergistically in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK1 or AKT vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level as well as the cell survival suppressed by an Hsp90 inhibitor and gefitinib. These findings suggested that down-regulation of XRCC1 can enhance the sensitivity of gefitinib for NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • Gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression in NSCLC cells. • Knocking down XRCC1 expression enhanced the cytotoxic effect of gefitinib. • Gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in synergistically cytotoxicity.

  2. Differential effects of complement activation products c3a and c5a on cardiovascular function in hypertensive pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Lillegard, Kathryn E; Loeks-Johnson, Alex C; Opacich, Jonathan W; Peterson, Jenna M; Bauer, Ashley J; Elmquist, Barbara J; Regal, Ronald R; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Regal, Jean F

    2014-11-01

    Early-onset pre-eclampsia is characterized by decreased placental perfusion, new-onset hypertension, angiogenic imbalance, and endothelial dysfunction associated with excessive activation of the innate immune complement system. Although our previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of complement activation attenuates placental ischemia-induced hypertension using the rat reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model, the important product(s) of complement activation has yet to be identified. We hypothesized that antagonism of receptors for complement activation products C3a and C5a would improve vascular function and attenuate RUPP hypertension. On gestational day (GD) 14, rats underwent sham surgery or vascular clip placement on ovarian arteries and abdominal aorta (RUPP). Rats were treated once daily with the C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRA), PMX51 (acetyl-F-[Orn-P-(D-Cha)-WR]), the C3a receptor antagonist (C3aRA), SB290157 (N(2)-[(2,2-diphenylethoxy)acetyl]-l-arginine), or vehicle from GD 14-18. Both the C3aRA and C5aRA attenuated placental ischemia-induced hypertension without affecting the decreased fetal weight or decreased concentration of free circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also present in this model. The C5aRA, but not the C3aRA, attenuated placental ischemia-induced increase in heart rate and impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. The C3aRA abrogated the acute pressor response to C3a peptide injection, but it also unexpectedly attenuated the placental ischemia-induced increase in C3a, suggesting nonreceptor-mediated effects. Overall, these results indicate that both C3a and C5a are important products of complement activation that mediate the hypertension regardless of the reduction in free plasma VEGF. The mechanism by which C3a contributes to placental ischemia-induced hypertension appears to be distinct from that of C5a, and management of pregnancy-induced hypertension is likely to require a broad anti

  3. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman W.

    1987-01-01

    New muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow embryonic skeletal myofibers which are able to differentiate into more adultlike myofibers. Studies on mechanical simulation of cultured muscle cell growth will now be more directly applicable to mechanically-induced growth in adult muscle, and lead to better models for understanding muscle tissue atrophy caused by disuse in the microgravity of space.

  4. Heterogeneity of Lethals in a "Simple" Lethal Complementation Group

    PubMed Central

    Janca, Frank C.; Woloshyn, Effie P.; Nash, David

    1986-01-01

    Of 24 ethyl methanesulphonate-induced, recessive-lethal mutations in the region 9E1-9F13 of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster , eight fall into a typically homogeneous lethal complementation group associated with the raspberry (ras) locus. Mutations in this group have previously been shown to be pleiotropic, affecting not only ras but also two other genetic entities, gua1 and pur1, which yield auxotrophic mutations.—The eight new mutations have been characterized phenotypically in double heterozygotes with gua1, pur1 and ras mutations. Despite their homogeneity in lethal complementation tests, the mutations prove quite diverse. For example, two mutations have little or no effect on eye color in double heterozygotes with ras2 . The differences between the lethals are allele-specific and cannot be explained as a trivial outcome of a hypomorphic series.—Taken alone, the lethal complementation studies mask the complexity of the locus and the diversity of its recessive lethal alleles. By extension, we argue that the general use of lethal saturation studies provides an unduly simplified image of genetic organization. We suggest that the reason why recessive lethal mutations rarely present complex complementation patterns is that complex loci tend to produce mutations that affect several subfunctions. PMID:3080355

  5. TCDD Induces the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF)-1α Regulatory Pathway in Human Trophoblastic JAR Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Tien-Ling; Chen, Su-Chee; Tzeng, Chii-Reuy; Kao, Shu-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The exposure to dioxin can compromise pregnancy outcomes and increase the risk of preterm births. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been demonstrated to induce placental hypoxia at the end of pregnancy in a rat model, and hypoxia has been suggested to be the cause of abnormal trophoblast differentiation and placental insufficiency syndromes. In this study, we demonstrate that the non-hypoxic stimulation of human trophoblastic cells by TCDD strongly increased hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) stabilization. TCDD exposure induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide. TCDD-induced HIF-1α stabilization and Akt phosphorylation was inhibited by pretreatment with wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor) or N-acetylcysteine (a ROS scavenger). The augmented HIF-1α stabilization by TCDD occurred via the ROS-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Additionally, a significant increase in invasion and metallomatrix protease-9 activity was found in TCDD-treated cells. The gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor was induced upon TCDD stimulation, whereas the protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), PPARγ coactivator-1α, mitochondrial transcription factor, and uncoupling protein 2 were decreased. Our results indicate that an activated HIF-1α pathway, elicited oxidative stress, and induced metabolic stress contribute to TCDD-induced trophoblastic toxicity. These findings may provide molecular insight into the TCDD-induced impairment of trophoblast function and placental development. PMID:25272228

  6. Biological effects of short-term, high-concentration exposure to methyl isocyanate. VI. In vitro and in vivo complement activation studies.

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, W P; Savary, J R; Troup, C M; Dodd, D E; Tamerius, J D

    1987-01-01

    The ability of MIC to induce complement activation in vitro and in vivo was investigated. For the in vitro studies, both human and guinea pig serum or EDTA-plasma samples were exposed to 1167 to 1260 ppm MIC vapor for 15 min at room temperature. The human serum samples exposed to MIC showed significant reductions in Factor B, C2, C4, C3, C5, and total hemolytic complement CH50 activity levels. C6 functional activity was unaffected. The C3, C5, and CH50 functional activities in guinea pig serum (the only functional tests conducted on these samples) were more sensitive to MIC-mediated reduction than the corresponding activity reductions observed in the human serum samples. The human and single guinea pig EDTA-plasma samples exposed to MIC vapor showed no evidence of C3 consumption but did show significant reductions in CH50 levels. Thus, MIC vapor was able to activate, and thereby reduce serum complement C3 activity in vitro by a complement-dependent process. However, the data suggest at least one complement component other than C3 was inactivated in EDTA-plasma by a complement-independent mechanism. For the in vivo studies, five pairs of guinea pigs were exposed to 644 to 702 ppm MIC vapor until one of the pair died (11-15 min). MIC exposure was then discontinued, the surviving guinea pig was sacrificed, and EDTA-plasma was obtained from both animals and analyzed for complement consumption.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3622434

  7. Opsonization of HIV with complement enhances infection of dendritic cells and viral transfer to CD4 T cells in a CR3 and DC-SIGN-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Bouhlal, Hicham; Chomont, Nicolas; Réquena, Mary; Nasreddine, Nadine; Saidi, Héla; Legoff, Jérôme; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Bélec, Laurent; Hocini, Hakim

    2007-01-15

    In the present study, we demonstrated that opsonization of primary HIV-1 with human complement enhances infection of immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (iDC) and transmission in trans of HIV to autologous CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Infection of iDC by opsonized primary R5- and X4-tropic HIV was increased 3- to 5-fold as compared with infection by the corresponding unopsonized HIV. Enhancement of infection was dependent on CR3 as demonstrated by inhibition induced by blocking Abs. The interaction of HIV with CCR5 and CXCR4 on iDC was affected by opsonization. Indeed, stromal-derived factor-1 was more efficient in inhibiting infection of iDC with opsonized R5-tropic HIV-1(BaL) (45%) than with heat-inactivated complement opsonized virus and similarly RANTES inhibited more efficiently infection of iDC with opsonized X4-tropic HIV-1(NDK) (42%) than with heat-inactivated complement opsonized virus. We also showed that attachment of complement-opsonized virus to DC-specific ICAM-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) molecule on iDC and HeLa DC-SIGN(+) CR3(-) cells was 46% and 50% higher compared with heat-inactivated complement opsonized virus, respectively. Hence, Abs to DC-SIGN suppressed up to 80% and 60% the binding of opsonized virus to HeLa cells and iDC, respectively. Furthermore, Abs to DC-SIGN inhibited up to 70% of the infection of iDC and up to 65% of infection in trans of autologous lymphocytes with opsonized virus. These results further demonstrated the role of DC-SIGN in complement opsonized virus uptake and infection. Thus, the virus uses complement to its advantage to facilitate early steps leading to infection following mucosal transmission of HIV.

  8. A novel protocol allowing oral delivery of a protein complement inhibitor that subsequently targets to inflamed colon mucosa and ameliorates murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Elvington, M; Blichmann, P; Qiao, F; Scheiber, M; Wadsworth, C; Luzinov, I; Lucero, J; Vertegel, A; Tomlinson, S

    2014-01-01

    While there is evidence of a pathogenic role for complement in inflammatory bowel disease, there is also evidence for a protective role that relates to host defence and protection from endotoxaemia. There is thus concern regarding the use of systemic complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. Local delivery of a complement inhibitor to the colon by oral administration would ameliorate such concerns, but while formulations exist for oral delivery of low molecular weight drugs to the colon, they have not been used successfully for oral delivery of proteins. We describe a novel pellet formulation consisting of cross-linked dextran coated with an acrylic co-polymer that protects the complement inhibitor CR2-Crry from destruction in the gastrointestinal tract. CR2-Crry containing pellets administered by gavage, were characterized using a therapeutic protocol in a mouse model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Oral treatment of established colitis over a 5-day period significantly reduced mucosal inflammation and injury, with similar therapeutic benefit whether or not the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, was co-administered. Reduction in injury was associated with the targeting of CR2-Crry to the mucosal surface and reduced local complement activation. Treatment had no effect on systemic complement activity. This novel method for oral delivery of a targeted protein complement inhibitor will reduce systemic effects, thereby decreasing the risk of opportunistic infection, as well as lowering the required dose and treatment cost and improving patient compliance. Furthermore, the novel delivery system described here may provide similar benefits for administration of other protein-based drugs, such as anti-tumour necrosis factor-α antibodies. PMID:24730624

  9. Circulating factors are involved in hypoxia-induced hepcidin suppression.

    PubMed

    Ravasi, Giulia; Pelucchi, Sara; Greni, Federico; Mariani, Raffaella; Giuliano, Andrea; Parati, Gianfranco; Silvestri, Laura; Piperno, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    Hepcidin transcription is strongly down-regulated under hypoxic conditions, however whether hypoxia inhibits hepcidin directly or indirectly is still unknown. We investigated the time course of hypoxia-mediated hepcidin down-regulation in vivo in healthy volunteers exposed to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude and, based on the hypothesis that circulating factors are implicated in hepcidin inhibition, we analyzed the effect of sera of these volunteers exposed to normoxia and hypoxia on hepcidin expression in Huh-7 cell lines. Hypoxia led to a significant hepcidin down-regulation in vivo that was almost complete within 72h of exposure and followed erythropoietin induction. This delay in hepcidin down-regulation suggests the existence of soluble factor/s regulating hepcidin production. We then stimulated HuH-7 cells with normoxic and hypoxic sera to analyze the effects of sera on hepcidin regulation. Hypoxic sera had a significant inhibitory effect on hepcidin promoter activity assessed by a luciferase assay, although the amount of such decrease was not as relevant as that observed in vivo. Cellular mRNA analysis showed that a number of volunteers' sera inhibited hepcidin expression, concurrently with ID1 inhibition, suggesting that inhibitory factor(s) may act through the SMAD-pathway.

  10. Protective Effects of Decay-Accelerating Factor on Blast-Induced Neurotrauma in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-16

    neuronal apoptosis [12]. Genetic and pharmacological manipulation of both complement levels and complement activation in mouse models of TBI are reported...characterized by neurofibrillary tangles and neuropil threads composed of hyperphosphorylated tau [41]. Recent studies in mice with genetic deficiency of...complement. Int J Alzheimers Dis 2012, 2012:983640. doi:10.1155/2012/983640. 47. Shen Y, Lue L, Yang L, et al: Complement activation by neurofibrillary

  11. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    2004; Danese et al., 2003). Recent studies have demonstrated a role for platelets in the development of both innate and adaptive immune responses...mediated modulation of adaptive immunity. A communication link between innate and adaptive immune compartments. Immunity 19:9-19. 4. Fleming, S.D., M...Monestier, and G.C. Tsokos. 2004. Accelerated ischemia/reperfusion- induced injury in autoimmunity-prone mice. Journal of immunology 173:4230-4235

  12. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces indirect angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Phillips, G D; Aukerman, S L; Whitehead, R A; Knighton, D R

    1993-01-01

    The cytokine macrophage colony-stimulating factor was implanted in the rabbit cornea over a wide dose range (1 ng to 100 microg) to assay its angiogenic activity in vivo. Neovascularization occurred in a dose-dependent manner, and maximum angiogenesis occurred only with 100 microg. Histologic analysis revealed that the corneas were free of inflammation at the lower doses, but had slight inflammation at 50 and 100 microg. Nonspecific esterase staining of frozen sections and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the inflammatory cells were predominantly macrophages, with very few neutrophils present. This association of capillary formation with inflammation suggests an indirect mechanism of angiogenesis. The lack of neutrophils within the inflammatory cell infiltrate demonstrates that indirect angiogenesis can proceed without the local presence of neutrophils. This distinguishes macrophage colony-stimulating factor from other indirect-acting angiogenesis factors that have been identified to date.

  13. Therapeutic inhibition of the alternative complement pathway attenuates chronic EAE.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Holers, V Michael; Thurman, Joshua M; Schoeb, Trent R; Ramos, Theresa N; Barnum, Scott R

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory using complement-mutant mice demonstrated that the alternative pathway is the dominant activation pathway responsible for complement-mediated pathology in demyelinating disease. Using a well-characterized inhibitory monoclonal antibody (mAb 1379) directed against mouse factor B, we assessed the therapeutic value of inhibiting the alternative complement pathway in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. Administration of anti-factor B antibody to mice prior to the onset of clinical signs of active EAE had no affect on the onset or acute phase of disease, but significantly attenuated the chronic phase of disease resulting in reduced cellular infiltration, inflammation and demyelination in antibody-treated mice. Attenuation of the chronic phase of disease was long lasting even though antibody administration was terminated shortly after disease onset. Chronic disease was also attenuated in transferred EAE when anti-factor B antibody was administered before or after disease onset. Similar levels of disease attenuation were observed in transferred EAE using MOG-specific encephalitogenic T cells. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential for inhibition of factor B in the chronic phase of demyelinating disease, where treatment options are limited.

  14. Therapeutic Inhibition of the Alternative Complement Pathway Attenuates Chronic EAE

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xianzhen; Holers, V. Michael; Thurman, Joshua M.; Schoeb, Trent R.; Ramos, Theresa N; Barnum, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory using complement-mutant mice demonstrated that the alternative pathway is the dominant activation pathway responsible for complement-mediated pathology in demyelinating disease. Using a well-characterized inhibitory monoclonal antibody (mAb 1379) directed against mouse factor B, we assessed the therapeutic value of inhibiting the alternative complement pathway in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. Administration of anti-factor B antibody to mice prior to the onset of clinical signs of active EAE had no affect on the onset or acute phase of disease, but significantly attenuated the chronic phase of disease resulting in reduced cellular infiltration, inflammation and demyelination in antibody-treated mice. Attenuation of the chronic phase of disease was long lasting even though antibody administration was terminated shortly after disease onset. Chronic disease was also attenuated in transferred EAE when anti-factor B antibody was administered before or after disease onset. Similar levels of disease attenuation were observed in transferred EAE using MOG-specific encephalitogenic T cells. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential for inhibition of factor B in the chronic phase of demyelinating disease, where treatment options are limited. PMID:23337717

  15. Hyperin inhibits nuclear factor kappa B and activates nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 signaling pathways in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Sheng; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Chang, Yee-Phoung; Chen, Jian-Ming; Chin, Hsien-Kuo; Yang, Shyh-Chyun

    2016-11-01

    Hyperin, a flavonoid compound found in Ericaceae, Guttiferae, and Celastraceae, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hyperin on cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) in mice. The renal tissue damage induced by cisplatin was detected by H&E staining. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were also detected. Further, the effects of hyperin on cisplatin-induced TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were detected by ELISA. In addition, the phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and the expression of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and HO-1 were detected by western blot analysis. The results showed that hyperin attenuated histological changes of kidney induced by cisplatin. The levels of BUN, creatinine, ROS, MDA, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 induced by cisplatin were also inhibited by hyperin. Cisplatin-induced NF-κB activation was inhibited by hyperin. Additionally, hyperin was found to up regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. In conclusion, the results suggest that hyperin protects against cisplatin-induced AKI by inhibiting inflammatory and oxidant response.

  16. CD11b is protective in complement-mediated immune complex glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jessy J; Chaves, Lee D; Chang, Anthony; Jacob, Alexander; Ritchie, Maria; Quigg, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    In chronic serum sickness, glomerular immune complexes form, yet C57BL/6 mice do not develop glomerulonephritis unless complement factor H (CfH) is absent, indicating the relevance of complement regulation. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b) and Fcγ receptors on leukocytes, and CfH on platelets, can bind immune complexes. Here we induced immune complex–mediated glomerulonephritis in CfH−/− mice chimeric for wild-type, CfH−/−, CD11b−/−, or FcRγ−/− bone marrow stem cells. Glomerulonephritis was worse in CD11b−/− chimeras compared with all others, whereas disease in FcRγ−/− and wild-type chimeras was comparable. Disease tracked strongly with humoral immune responses, but not glomerular immune complex deposits. Interstitial inflammation with M1 macrophages strongly correlated with glomerulonephritis scores. CD11b−/− chimeras had significantly more M1 macrophages and CD4+ T cells. The renal dendritic cell populations originating from bone marrow–derived CD11c+ cells were similar in all experimental groups. CD11b+ cells bearing colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor were present in kidneys, including CD11b−/− chimeras; these cells correlated negatively with glomerulonephritis scores. Thus, experimental immune complex–mediated glomerulonephritis is associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages and CD4+ T cells in kidneys and functional renal insufficiency. Hence, CD11b on mononuclear cells is instrumental in generating an anti-inflammatory response in the inflamed kidney. PMID:25565310

  17. Properdin in Complement Activation and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lesher, AM; B, Nilsson; Song, W-C

    2013-01-01

    The plasma protein properdin is the only known positive regulator of complement activation. Although regarded as an initiator of the alternative pathway of complement activation at the time of its discovery more than a half century ago, the role and mechanism of action of properdin in the complement cascade has undergone significant conceptual evolution since then. Despite the long history of research on properdin, however, new insight and unexpected findings on the role of properdin in complement activation, pathogen infection and host tissue injury are still being revealed by ongoing investigations. In this article, we provide a brief review on recent studies that shed new light on properdin biology, focusing on the following three topics: 1) its role as a pattern recognition molecule to direct and trigger complement activation, 2) its context-dependent requirement in complement activation on foreign and host cell surfaces, and 3) its involvement in alternative pathway complement-mediated immune disorders and considerations of properdin as a potential therapeutic target in human diseases. PMID:23816404

  18. Identification of jasmonic acid and its methyl ester as gum-inducing factors in tulips.

    PubMed

    Skrzypek, Edyta; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Saniewski, Marian; Ueda, Junichi

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify endogenous factors that induce gummosis and to show their role in gummosis in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L. cv. Apeldoorn) stems. Using procedures to detect endogenous factors that induce gum in the stem of tulips, jasmonic acid (JA) and methyl jasmonate (JA-Me) were successfully identified using gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total amounts of JA and JA-Me designated as jasmonates in tulip stems were also estimated at about 70-80 ng/g fresh weight, using deuterium-labeled jasmonates as internal standards. The application of JA and JA-Me as lanolin pastes substantially induced gums in tulip stems with ethylene production. The application of ethephon, an ethylene-generating compound, however, induced no gummosis although it slightly affected jasmonate content in tulip stems. These results strongly suggest that JA and JA-Me are endogenous factors that induce gummosis in tulip stems.

  19. Zebrafish scube1 (Signal Peptide-CUB (Complement Protein C1r/C1s, Uegf, and Bmp1)-EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor) Domain-containing Protein 1) Is Involved in Primitive Hematopoiesis*

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Ku-Chi; Tu, Cheng-Fen; Lee, Shyh-Jye; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2013-01-01

    scube1 (signal peptide-CUB (complement protein C1r/C1s, Uegf, and Bmp1)-EGF domain-containing protein 1), the founding member of a novel secreted and cell surface SCUBE protein family, is expressed predominantly in various developing tissues in mice. However, its function in primitive hematopoiesis remains unknown. In this study, we identified and characterized zebrafish scube1 and analyzed its function by injecting antisense morpholino-oligonucleotide into embryos. Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that zebrafish scube1 mRNA is maternally expressed and widely distributed during early embryonic development. Knockdown of scube1 by morpholino-oligonucleotide down-regulated the expression of marker genes associated with early primitive hematopoietic precursors (scl) and erythroid (gata1 and hbbe1), as well as early (pu.1) and late (mpo and l-plastin) myelomonocytic lineages. However, the expression of an early endothelial marker fli1a and vascular morphogenesis appeared normal in scube1 morphants. Overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein (bmp) rescued the expression of scl in the posterior lateral mesoderm during early primitive hematopoiesis in scube1 morphants. Biochemical and molecular analysis revealed that Scube1 could be a BMP co-receptor to augment BMP signaling. Our results suggest that scube1 is critical for and functions at the top of the regulatory hierarchy of primitive hematopoiesis by modulating BMP activity during zebrafish embryogenesis. PMID:23271740

  20. Immune Response to Snake Envenoming and Treatment with Antivenom; Complement Activation, Cytokine Production and Mast Cell Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Shelley F.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.; Shahmy, Seyed; Mohamed, Fahim; Abeysinghe, Chandana; Karunathilake, Harendra; Ariaratnam, Ariaranee; Jacoby-Alner, Tamara E.; Cotterell, Claire L.; Brown, Simon G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Snake bite is one of the most neglected public health issues in poor rural communities worldwide. In addition to the clinical effects of envenoming, treatment with antivenom frequently causes serious adverse reactions, including hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis) and pyrogenic reactions. We aimed to investigate the immune responses to Sri Lankan snake envenoming (predominantly by Russell's viper) and antivenom treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Plasma concentrations of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), soluble TNF receptor I (sTNFRI), anaphylatoxins (C3a, C4a, C5a; markers of complement activation), mast cell tryptase (MCT), and histamine were measured in 120 Sri Lankan snakebite victims, both before and after treatment with antivenom. Immune mediator concentrations were correlated with envenoming features and the severity of antivenom-induced reactions including anaphylaxis. Envenoming was associated with complement activation and increased cytokine concentrations prior to antivenom administration, which correlated with non-specific systemic symptoms of envenoming but not with coagulopathy or neurotoxicity. Typical hypersensitivity reactions to antivenom occurred in 77/120 patients (64%), satisfying criteria for a diagnosis of anaphylaxis in 57/120 (48%). Pyrogenic reactions were observed in 32/120 patients (27%). All patients had further elevations in cytokine concentrations, but not complement activation, after the administration of antivenom, whether a reaction was noted to occur or not. Patients with anaphylaxis had significantly elevated concentrations of MCT and histamine. Conclusions/Significance We have demonstrated that Sri Lankan snake envenoming is characterized by significant complement activation and release of inflammatory mediators. Antivenom treatment further enhances the release of inflammatory mediators in all patients, with anaphylactic reactions characterised by high levels of mast

  1. Evidence for intrathecal synthesis of alternative pathway complement activation proteins in experimental meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Stahel, P. F.; Frei, K.; Fontana, A.; Eugster, H. P.; Ault, B. H.; Barnum, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    Complement has been shown to contribute to intrathecal inflammation in bacterial meningitis. However, the cellular source of complement in the infected central nervous system has not been determined. In this study, we analyzed protein and mRNA expression of two alternative pathway complement activation proteins, C3 and factor B, in the brains of mice with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis. Complement protein levels were found elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of infected mice, compared with mock-infected animals. In the course of the disease, enhanced C3 and factor B mRNA expression was detected on pyramidal neurons and Purkinje cells within 6 hours, peaking at 12 hours and then gradually decreasing by 72 hours after infection. In addition, leukocytes infiltrating the subarachnoid space, within 12 to 24 hours, expressed mRNA for C3 and factor B. The cellular infiltration increased dramatically up to 72 hours. Intraperitoneal injection of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha up-regulated C3 and factor B mRNA expression on neurons in normal mice, suggesting that TNF-alpha may represent one cytokine regulating complement expression in this model of bacterial meningitis. However, additional mediators may be involved in regulation of intrathecal complement expression, as infected mice deficient of TNF/lymphotoxin-alpha genes did not demonstrate attenuated complement expression in the brain. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9327721

  2. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha blocks differentiation of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huimin; Li, Yan; Shu, Minfeng; Tang, Jianjun; Huang, Yijun; Zhou, Yuxi; Liang, Yingjie; Yan, Guangmei

    2009-12-01

    Aberrant differentiation is a characteristic feature of neoplastic transformation, while hypoxia in solid tumors is believed to be linked to aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. However, the possible relationship between hypoxia and differentiation in malignancies remains poorly defined. Here we show that rat C6 and primary human malignant glioma cells can be induced to differentiate into astrocytes by the well-known adenylate cyclase activator forskolin. However, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha expression stimulated by the hypoxia mimetics cobalt chloride or deferoxamine blocks this differentiation and this effectiveness is reversible upon withdrawal of the hypoxia mimetics. Importantly, knockdown of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha by RNA interference restores the differentiation capabilities of the cells, even in the presence of cobalt chloride, whereas stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha through retarded ubiquitination by von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene silence abrogates the induced differentiation. Moreover, targeting of HIF-1 using chetomin, a disrupter of HIF-1 binding to its transcriptional co-activator CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300, abolishes the differentiation-inhibitory effect of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha. Administration of chetomin in combination with forskolin significantly suppresses malignant glioma growth in an in vivo xenograft model. Analysis of 95 human glioma tissues revealed an increase of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha protein expression with progressing tumor grade. Taken together, these findings suggest a key signal transduction pathway involving hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha that contributes to a differentiation defect in malignant gliomas and sheds new light on the differentiation therapy of solid tumors by targeting hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

  3. The processing of inter-item relations as a moderating factor of retrieval-induced forgetting

    PubMed Central

    Tempel, Tobias; Wippich, Werner

    2012-01-01

    We investigated influences of item generation and emotional valence on retrieval-induced forgetting. Drawing on postulates of the three-factor theory of generation effects, generation tasks differentially affecting the processing of inter-item relations were applied. Whereas retrieval-induced forgetting of freely generated items was moderated by the emotional valence as well as retrieval-induced forgetting of read items, even though in the reverse direction (Experiment 1), fragment completion eliminated the moderation of retrieval-induced forgetting by emotional valence (Experiment 2). The results corroborate the assumption that the processing of inter-item relations is crucial for the immunization against retrieval-induced forgetting. Moreover, differential processing of inter-item relations may clarify the mixed results on moderating factors of retrieval-induced forgetting that have been reported. PMID:22956987

  4. The processing of inter-item relations as a moderating factor of retrieval-induced forgetting.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Tobias; Wippich, Werner

    2012-01-01

    We investigated influences of item generation and emotional valence on retrieval-induced forgetting. Drawing on postulates of the three-factor theory of generation effects, generation tasks differentially affecting the processing of inter-item relations were applied. Whereas retrieval-induced forgetting of freely generated items was moderated by the emotional valence as well as retrieval-induced forgetting of read items, even though in the reverse direction (Experiment 1), fragment completion eliminated the moderation of retrieval-induced forgetting by emotional valence (Experiment 2). The results corroborate the assumption that the processing of inter-item relations is crucial for the immunization against retrieval-induced forgetting. Moreover, differential processing of inter-item relations may clarify the mixed results on moderating factors of retrieval-induced forgetting that have been reported.

  5. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  6. CD46: the 'multitasker' of complement proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Fara, Antonella Francesca; Dasgupta, Prokar; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-12-01

    Complement is undeniably quintessential for innate immunity by detecting and eliminating infectious microorganisms. Recent work, however, highlights an equally profound impact of complement on the induction and regulation of a wide range of immune cells. In particular, the complement regulator CD46 emerges as a key sensor of immune activation and a vital modulator of adaptive immunity. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of CD46-mediated signalling events and their functional consequences on immune-competent cells with a specific focus on those in CD4(+) T cells. We will also discuss the promises and challenges that potential therapeutic modulation of CD46 may hold and pose.

  7. Detection of surface bound complement at increasing serum anticoagulant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, S; Askendal, A; Lindahl, T L; Tengvall, P

    2008-04-01

    Surface mediated immune complement activation can be detected by a variety of antibody utilizing methods such as ELISA, fluorescence- or radiolabelling techniques, QCM, and ellipsometry. In the present work we investigated how the common anticoagulants heparin, dalteparin, fondaparinux and sodium citrate affected the binding of anti-complement factor 3c (anti-C3c) on a model complement activator surface, immobilised IgG, after incubation in human blood serum. The results show, as expected, that different anticoagulants affect the antibody binding differently. Increasing amounts of heparin, dalteparin and sodium citrate in normal serum resulted in a decreasing anti-C3c binding. The antibody deposition was not sensitive for the fondaparinux concentration. Surprisingly high concentrations of anti-coagulantia were needed to completely eradicate the antibody binding. Experiments in EGTA-serum showed that anticoagulants interfered directly with both the classical and alternative pathways. Control C3a-des arg ELISA measurements show that the lowered antibody surface binding was not a result of complement depletion in serum. Kallikrein generation by hydrophilic glass surfaces was not affected by high anticoagulant concentrations.

  8. Nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase is required for graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Valdepeñas, Carmen; Casanova, Lucía; Colmenero, Isabel; Arriero, Mar; González, África; Lozano, Nieves; González-Vicent, Marta; Díaz, Miguel A.; Madero, Luís; Fresno, Manuel; Ramírez, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Background Donor T lymphocytes are directly responsible for graft-versus-host disease. Molecules important in T-cell function may, therefore, be appropriate targets for graft-versus-host disease therapy and/or prophylaxis. Here we analyzed whether nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase might have a role in graft-versus-host disease. Design and Methods We studied the expression of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase in human samples from patients with graft-versus-host disease. We also explored the effect of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase in a murine model of graft-versus-host disease using donor cells from aly/aly mice (deficient in nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase) and C57BL/6 mice (control). Results We detected expression of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase in T-lymphocytes in the pathological lesions of patients with acute graft-versus-host disease. Mice transplanted with aly/aly T lymphocytes did not develop graft-versus-host disease at all, while mice receiving C57BL/6 cells died of a lethal form of the disease. Deficiency of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase did not affect the engrafting ability of donor T cells, but severely impaired their expansion capacity early after transplantation, and aly/aly T cells showed a higher proportion of apoptosis than did C57BL/6 T cells. Effector T lymphocytes were the T-cell subset most affected by nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase deficiency. We also detected lower amounts of inflammatory cytokines in the serum of mice receiving aly/aly T cells than in the serum of mice receiving C57BL/6 T cells. Conclusions Our results show that nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase has a role in graft-versus-host disease by maintaining the viability of activated alloreactive T lymphocytes. PMID:20823135

  9. Roles of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor in lipopolysaccharide-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, S N; Henricson, B E; Neta, R

    1991-01-01

    In this study, hypoglycemia induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the recombinant cytokine interleukin-1 alpha or tumor necrosis factor alpha (administered alone or in combination) was compared. LPS-induced hypoglycemia was reversed significantly by recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. PMID:1828792

  10. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  11. AMKL chimeric transcription factors are potent inducers of leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dang, J; Nance, S; Ma, J; Cheng, J; Walsh, M P; Vogel, P; Easton, J; Song, G; Rusch, M; Gedman, A L; Koss, C; Downing, J R; Gruber, T A

    2017-03-10

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia in patients without Down syndrome is a rare malignancy with a poor prognosis. RNA sequencing of fourteen pediatric cases previously identified novel fusion transcripts that are predicted to be pathological including CBFA2T3-GLIS2, GATA2-HOXA9, MN1-FLI and NIPBL-HOXB9. In contrast to CBFA2T3-GLIS2, which is insufficient to induce leukemia, we demonstrate that the introduction of GATA2-HOXA9, MN1-FLI1 or NIPBL-HOXB9 into murine bone marrow induces overt disease in syngeneic transplant models. With the exception of MN1, full penetrance was not achieved through the introduction of fusion partner genes alone, suggesting that the chimeric transcripts possess a unique gain-of-function phenotype. Leukemias were found to exhibit elements of the megakaryocyte erythroid progenitor gene expression program, as well as unique leukemia-specific signatures that contribute to transformation. Comprehensive genomic analyses of resultant murine tumors revealed few cooperating mutations confirming the strength of the fusion genes and their role as pathological drivers. These models are critical for both the understanding of the biology of disease as well as providing a tool for the identification of effective therapeutic agents in preclinical studies.Leukemia advance online publication, 10 March 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.51.

  12. v-rasH induces non-small cell phenotype, with associated growth factors and receptors, in a small cell lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Falco, J P; Baylin, S B; Lupu, R; Borges, M; Nelkin, B D; Jasti, R K; Davidson, N E; Mabry, M

    1990-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumor progression can involve partial or complete conversion to a more treatment-resistant non-small cell (NSCLC) phenotype. In a cell culture model of this phenomenon, we have previously demonstrated that insertion of the viral Harvey ras gene (v-Ha-ras) into SCLC cell lines with amplification and overexpression of the c-myc gene induced many NSCLC phenotypic features. We now report that the v-Ha-ras gene can also induce morphologic, biochemical, and growth characteristics consistent with the NSCLC phenotype in an N-myc amplified SCLC cell line, NCI-H249. We show that v-Ha-ras has novel effects on these cells, abrogating an SCLC-specific growth requirement for gastrin-releasing peptide, and inducing mRNA expression of three NSCLC-associated growth factors and receptors, platelet-derived growth factor B chain, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R). TGF-alpha secretion and EGF-R also appear, consistent with the induction of an autocrine loop previously shown to be growth stimulatory for NSCLC in culture. These data suggest that N-myc and v-Ha-ras represent functional classes of genes that may complement each other in bringing about the phenotypic alterations seen during SCLC tumor progression, and suggest that such alterations might include the appearance of growth factors and receptors of potential importance for the growth of the tumor and its surrounding stroma. Images PMID:2161428

  13. Autocrine Effects of Tumor-Derived Complement

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min Soon; Vasquez, Hernan G.; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Pradeep, Sunila; Wu, Sherry; Zand, Behrouz; Han, Hee-Dong; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Huang, Jie; Miyake, Takahito; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Dalton, Heather J.; Ivan, Cristina; Baggerly, Keith; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We describe a role for the complement system in enhancing cancer growth. Cancer cells secrete complement proteins that stimulate tumor growth upon activation. Complement promotes tumor growth via a direct autocrine effect that is partially independent of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T cells. Activated C5aR and C3aR signal through the PI3K/AKT pathway in cancer cells, and silencing the PI3K or AKT gene in cancer cells eliminates the progrowth effects of C5aR and C3aR stimulation. In patients with ovarian or lung cancer, higher tumoral C3 or C5aR mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival. These data identify a role for tumor-derived complement proteins in promoting tumor growth, and they therefore have substantial clinical and therapeutic implications. PMID:24613353

  14. On complements of coradicals of finite groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, V. A.; Sorokina, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Let F be an ω-local Fitting formation, and G a finite group that can be represented in the form of a product of n subnormal subgroups whose F-coradicals are ω-soluble, and whose Sylow p-subgroups are abelian for any p\\inω. It is established that there exist ω-complements of the F-coradical of G. New theorems on the existence of complements of coradicals of a group are obtained as corollaries. For an ω-local formation F, conditions are established for the existence of complements and ω-complements of the F-coradical of a group in any of its extensions. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  15. Shiga Toxin Promotes Podocyte Injury in Experimental Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome via Activation of the Alternative Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Monica; Buelli, Simona; Pezzotta, Anna; Corna, Daniela; Perico, Luca; Tomasoni, Susanna; Rottoli, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Conti, Debora; Thurman, Joshua M.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Zoja, Carlamaria

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)–producing Escherichia coli is the offending agent of postdiarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a disorder of glomerular ischemic damage and widespread microvascular thrombosis. We previously documented that Stx induces glomerular complement activation, generating C3a responsible for microvascular thrombosis in experimental HUS. Here, we show that the presence of C3 deposits on podocytes is associated with podocyte damage and loss in HUS mice generated by the coinjection of Stx2 and LPS. Because podocyte adhesion to the glomerular basement membrane is mediated by integrins, the relevance of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signals in podocyte dysfunction was evaluated. Podocyte expression of ILK increased after the injection of Stx2/LPS and preceded the upregulation of Snail and downregulation of nephrin and α-actinin-4. Factor B deficiency or pretreatment with an inhibitory antibody to factor B protected mice against Stx2/LPS-induced podocyte dysregulation. Similarly, pretreatment with a C3a receptor antagonist limited podocyte loss and changes in ILK, Snail, and α-actinin-4 expression. In cultured podocytes, treatment with C3a reduced α-actinin-4 expression and promoted ILK-dependent nuclear expression of Snail and cell motility. These results suggest that Stx-induced activation of the alternative pathway of complement and generation of C3a promotes ILK signaling, leading to podocyte dysfunction and loss in Stx-HUS. PMID:24578132

  16. Complement activation by a B cell superantigen.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, L M; Soulika, A M; Silverman, G J; Lambris, J D; Levinson, A I

    1996-08-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA), acting as a B cell superantigen, binds to the Fab region of human VH3+ Igs. Using SpA abrogated of its IgG Fc binding activity (Mod SpA) as a model B cell superantigen, we determined whether such an interaction causes complement activation. Addition of Mod SpA to human serum led to complement consumption and the generation of C3a. To determine whether this complement activation 1) was due to an interaction between VH3+ Igs and the Fab binding site of SpA and 2) proceeded via the classical complement pathway, we tested a panel of monoclonal IgM proteins for the ability to hind C1q following interaction with SpA. C1q binding was restricted to SpA-reactive, VH3+ IgM proteins. To formally determine whether the binding of SpA to the reactive VH3+ IgM proteins led to complement activation, we reconstituted the serum from a hypogammaglobulinemic patient with monoclonal IgM proteins and measured complement consumption and C3a generation following the addition of Mod SpA. We observed complement consumption and C3a production only in Mod SpA-treated serum reconstituted with a VH3+, SpA-binding, IgM protein. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the interaction of the Fab binding site of SpA and VH3+ Igs can lead to complement activation via the classical pathway. This novel interaction may have significant implications for the in vivo properties of a B cell superantigen.

  17. Molecular Basis for Complement Recognition and Inhibition Determined by Crystallographic Studies of the Staphylococcal Complement Inhibitor (SCIN) Bound to C3c and C3b

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Brandon L.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Tzekou, Apostolia; Ricklin, Daniel; McWhorter, William J.; Lambris, John D.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2010-10-22

    The human complement system plays an essential role in innate and adaptive immunity by marking and eliminating microbial intruders. Activation of complement on foreign surfaces results in proteolytic cleavage of complement component 3 (C3) into the potent opsonin C3b, which triggers a variety of immune responses and participates in a self-amplification loop mediated by a multi-protein assembly known as the C3 convertase. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus has evolved a sophisticated and potent complement evasion strategy, which is predicated upon an arsenal of potent inhibitory proteins. One of these, the staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), acts at the level of the C3 convertase (C3bBb) and impairs downstream complement function by trapping the convertase in a stable but inactive state. Previously, we have shown that SCIN binds C3b directly and competitively inhibits binding of human factor H and, to a lesser degree, that of factor B to C3b. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of SCIN bound to C3b and C3c at 7.5 and 3.5 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively, and show that SCIN binds a critical functional area on C3b. Most significantly, the SCIN binding site sterically occludes the binding sites of both factor H and factor B. Our results give insight into SCIN binding to activated derivatives of C3, explain how SCIN can recognize C3b in the absence of other complement components, and provide a structural basis for the competitive C3b-binding properties of SCIN. In the future, this may suggest templates for the design of novel complement inhibitors based upon the SCIN structure.

  18. Interferon regulatory factor 3 is a key regulation factor for inducing the expression of SAMHD1 in antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shen; Zhan, Yuan; Zhou, Yanjun; Jiang, Yifeng; Zheng, Xuchen; Yu, Lingxue; Tong, Wu; Gao, Fei; Li, Liwei; Huang, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhiyong; Tong, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a type I interferon (IFN) inducible host innate immunity restriction factor that inhibits an early step of the viral life cycle. The underlying mechanisms of SAMHD1 transcriptional regulation remains elusive. Here, we report that inducing SAMHD1 upregulation is part of an early intrinsic immune response via TLR3 and RIG-I/MDA5 agonists that ultimately induce the nuclear translocation of the interferon regulation factor 3 (IRF3) protein. Further studies show that IRF3 plays a major role in upregulating endogenous SAMHD1 expression in a mechanism that is independent of the classical IFN-induced JAK-STAT pathway. Both overexpression and activation of IRF3 enhanced the SAMHD1 promoter luciferase activity, and activated IRF3 was necessary for upregulating SAMHD1 expression in a type I IFN cascade. We also show that the SAMHD1 promoter is a direct target of IRF3 and an IRF3 binding site is sufficient to render this promoter responsive to stimulation. Collectively, these findings indicate that upregulation of endogenous SAMHD1 expression is attributed to the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 and we suggest that type I IFN induction and induced SAMHD1 expression are coordinated. PMID:27411355

  19. Progesterone-induced neuroprotection: factors that may predict therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Meharvan; Su, Chang

    2013-06-13

    Both progesterone and estradiol have well-described neuroprotective effects against numerous insults in a variety of cell culture models, animal models and in humans. However, the efficacy of these hormones may depend on a variety of factors, including the type of hormone used (ex. progesterone versus medroxyprogesterone acetate), the duration of the postmenopausal period prior to initiating the hormone intervention, and potentially, the age of the subject. The latter two factors relate to the proposed existence of a "window of therapeutic opportunity" for steroid hormones in the brain. While such a window of opportunity has been described for estrogen, there is a paucity of information to address whether such a window of opportunity exists for progesterone and its related progestins. Here, we review known cellular mechanisms likely to underlie the protective effects of progesterone and furthermore, describe key differences in the neurobiology of progesterone and the synthetic progestin, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Based on the latter, we offer a model that defines some of the key cellular and molecular players that predict the neuroprotective efficacy of progesterone. Accordingly, we suggest how changes in the expression or function of these cellular and molecular targets of progesterone with age or prolonged duration of hormone withdrawal (such as following surgical or natural menopause) may impact the efficacy of progesterone. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Hormone Therapy.

  20. Interaction of complement and leukocytes in severe acute pancreatitis: potential for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Werner; Klafs, Martina; Kirschfink, Michael; Hackert, Thilo; Schneider, Lutz; Gebhard, Martha-Maria; Büchler, Markus W; Werner, Jens

    2006-11-01

    In acute pancreatitis, local as well as systemic organ complications are mediated by the activation of various inflammatory cascades. The role of complement in this setting is unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the level of complement activation in experimental pancreatitis, to evaluate the interaction of complement and leukocyte-endothelium activation, and to assess the effects of complement inhibition by soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) in this setting. Necrotizing pancreatitis was induced in Wistar rats by the combination of intravenous cerulein and retrograde infusion of glycodeoxycholic acid into the biliopancreatic duct; edematous pancreatitis was induced by intravenous cerulein only. In control animals, a sham operation (midline laparotomy) was performed. Complement activation, leukocyte sequestration, and pancreatic as well as pulmonary injury were assessed in the presence/absence of sCR1. Increased levels of C3a were found in necrotizing but not in edematous pancreatitis. When complement activation in necrotizing pancreatitis was blocked by sCR1, levels of C3a and total hemolytic activity (CH50) were decreased. Leukocyte-endothelial interaction, as assessed by intravital microscopy, and pancreatic as well as pulmonary organ injury (wet-to-dry weight ratio, MPO activity, and histology) were ameliorated by sCR1. As a result of the present study, necrotizing but not edematous pancreatitis is characterized by significant and early complement activation. Based on the interaction of complement and leukocytes, complement inhibition by sCR1 may be a valuable option in the treatment of leukocyte-associated organ injury in severe pancreatitis.

  1. Elevated Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Increases Tumor Necrosis FactorInduced Endothelial Cell Death in High Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Clyne, Alisa Morss; Zhu, Han; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2010-01-01

    Glucose and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) concentrations are elevated in diabetes. Both of these factors correlate with diabetic vasculopathy and endothelial cell apoptosis, yet their combined effects have not been measured. We have previously shown that the angiogenic growth factor fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), which is generally protective against endothelial cell death, is similarly elevated in high glucose conditions. We therefore investigated the effect of TNFα on endothelial cell death under normal and elevated glucose conditions, with a particular focus on FGF-2. Porcine aortic endothelial cells were cultured in 5 and 30 mM glucose and stimulated with TNFα, together with FGF-2 or a neutralizing FGF-2 antibody. Cell death was measured via cell counts or an annexin apoptotic assay, and cell cycle phase was determined by propidium iodide labeling. TNFα-induced endothelial cell death increased for cells in high glucose, and cell death was enhanced with increasing FGF-2 exposure and negated by a neutralizing FGF-2 antibody. Endothelial cells were most susceptible to TNFα-induced cell death when stimulated with FGF-2 18 h prior to TNFα, corresponding to cell entry into S phase of the proliferative cycle. The FGF-2 associated increase in TNFα-induced cell death was negated by blocking cell entry into S phase. Endothelial cell release of FGF-2 in high glucose leads to cell cycle progression, which makes cells more susceptible to TNFα-induced cell death. These data suggest that growth factor outcomes in high glucose depend on secondary mediators such as cytokines and stimulation cell cycle timing. PMID:18446810

  2. Factors that Impact Susceptibility to Fiber-Induced Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Below, Jennifer E.; Cox, Nancy J.; Fukagawa, Naomi K.; Hirvonen, Ari; Testa, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    Asbestos and related fibers are associated with a number of adverse health effects, including malignant mesothelioma (MM), an aggressive cancer that generally develops in the surface serosal cells of the pleural, pericardial, and peritoneal cavities. Although approximately 80% of individuals with MM are exposed to asbestos, fewer than 5% of asbestos workers develop MM. In addition to asbestos, other mineralogical, environmental, genetic, and possibly viral factors might contribute to MM susceptibility. Given this complex etiology of MM, understanding susceptibility to MM needs to be a priority for investigators in order to reduce exposure of those most at risk to known environmental carcinogens. In this review, the current body of literature related to fiber-associated disease susceptibility including age, sex, nutrition, genetics, asbestos, and other mineral exposure is addressed with a focus on MM, and critical areas for further study are recommended. PMID:21534090

  3. Enhanceosomes as integrators of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and other transcription factors in the hypoxic transcriptional response.

    PubMed

    Pawlus, Matthew R; Hu, Cheng-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Hypoxia is a prevalent attribute of the solid tumor microenvironment that promotes the expression of genes through posttranslational modifications and stabilization of alpha subunits (HIF1α and HIF2α) of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Despite significant similarities, HIF1 (HIF1α/ARNT) and HIF2 (HIF2α/ARNT) activate common as well as unique target genes and exhibit different functions in cancer biology. More surprisingly, accumulating data indicates that the HIF1- and/or HIF2-mediated hypoxia responses can be oncogenic as well as tumor suppressive. While the role of HIF in the hypoxia response is well established, recent data support the concept that HIF is necessary, but not sufficient for the hypoxic response. Other transcription factors that are activated by hypoxia are also required for the HIF-mediated hypoxia response. HIFs, other transcription factors, co-factors and RNA poll II recruited by HIF and other transcription factors form multifactorial enhanceosome complexes on the promoters of HIF target genes to activate hypoxia inducible genes. Importantly, HIF1 or HIF2 requires distinct partners in activating HIF1 or HIF2 target genes. Because HIF enhanceosome formation is required for the gene activation and distinct functions of HIF1 and HIF2 in tumor biology, disruption of the HIF1 or HIF2 specific enhanceosome complex may prove to be a beneficial strategy in tumor treatment in which tumor growth is specifically dependent upon HIF1 or HIF2 activity.

  4. Glial cell responses, complement, and clusterin in the central nervous system following dorsal root transection.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Persson, J K; Svensson, M; Aldskogius, H

    1998-07-01

    We have examined the glial cell response, the possible expression of compounds associated with the complement cascade, including the putative complement inhibitor clusterin, and their cellular association during Wallerian degeneration in the central nervous system. Examination of the proliferation pattern revealed an overall greater mitotic activity after rhizotomy, an exclusive involvement of microglia in this proliferation after peripheral nerve injury, but, in addition, a small fraction of proliferating astrocytes after rhizotomy. Immunostaining with the phagocytic cell marker ED1 gradually became very prominent after rhizotomy, possibly reflecting a response to the extensive nerve fiber disintegration. Lumbar dorsal rhizotomy did not induce endogenous immunoglobulin G (IgG) deposition or complement expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn, dorsal funiculus, or gracile nucleus. This is in marked contrast to the situation after peripheral nerve injury, which appears to activate the entire complement cascade in the vicinity of the central sensory processes. Clusterin, a multifunctional protein with complement inhibitory effects, was markedly upregulated in the dorsal funiculus in astrocytes. In addition, there was an intense induction of clusterin expression in the degenerating white matter in oligodendrocytes, possibly reflecting a degeneration process in these cells. The findings suggest that 1) complement expression by microglial cells is intimately associated with IgG deposition; 2) axotomized neuronal perikarya, but not degenerating central fibers, undergo changes which induce such deposition; and 3) clusterin is not related to complement expression following neuronal injury but participates in regulating the state of oligodendrocytes during Wallerian degeneration.

  5. A Histologically Distinctive Interstitial Pneumonia Induced by Overexpression of the Interleukin 6, Transforming Growth Factor β1, or Platelet-Derived Growth Factor B Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Sakuma, Junko; Hayashi, Seiji; Abe, Kin'ya; Saito, Izumu; Harada, Shizuko; Sakatani, Mitsunoir; Yamamoto, Satoru; Matsumoto, Norinao; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Kishmoto, Tadamitsu

    1995-10-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is characterized by alveolitis with resulting fibrosis of the interstitium. To determine the relevance of humoral factors in the pathogenesis of interstitial pneumonia, we introduced expression vectors into Wistar rats via the trachea to locally overexpress humoral factors in the lungs. Human interleukin (IL) 6 and IL-6 receptor genes induced lymphocytic alveolitis without marked fibroblast proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of human transforming growth factor β1 or human platelet-derived growth factor B gene induced only mild or apparent cellular infiltration in the alveoli, respectively. However, both factors induced significant proliferation of fibroblasts and deposition of collagen fibrils. These histopathologic changes induced by the transforming growth factor β1 and platelet-derived growth factor B gene are partly akin to those changes seen in lung tissues from patients with pulmonary fibrosis and markedly contrast with the changes induced by overexpression of the IL-6 and IL-6 receptor genes that mimics lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia.

  6. Polymethylmethacrylate-induced release of bone-resorbing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, J.H.; Sowder, W.G.; Anderson, D.; Appel, A.M.; Hopson, C.N. )

    1989-12-01

    A pseudomembranous structure that has the histological characteristics of a foreign-body-like reaction invariably develops at the bone-cement interface in the proximity o