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Sample records for complement lectin pathway

  1. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  2. Complementary Roles of the Classical and Lectin Complement Pathways in the Defense against Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Rosbjerg, Anne; Genster, Ninette; Pilely, Katrine; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Stahl, Gregory L.; Garred, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus infections are associated with a high mortality rate for immunocompromised patients. The complement system is considered to be important in protection against this fungus, yet the course of activation is unclear. The aim of this study was to unravel the role of the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways under both immunocompetent and immunocompromised conditions to provide a relevant dual-perspective on the response against A. fumigatus. Conidia (spores) from a clinical isolate of A. fumigatus were combined with various human serum types (including serum deficient of various complement components and serum from umbilical cord blood). We also combined this with inhibitors against C1q, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), and ficolin-2 before complement activation products and phagocytosis were detected by flow cytometry. Our results showed that alternative pathway amplified complement on A. fumigatus, but required classical and/or lectin pathway for initiation. In normal human serum, this initiation came primarily from the classical pathway. However, with a dysfunctional classical pathway (C1q-deficient serum), lectin pathway activated complement and mediated opsonophagocytosis through MBL. To model the antibody-decline in a compromised immune system, we used serum from normal umbilical cords and found MBL to be the key complement initiator. In another set of experiments, serum from patients with different kinds of immunoglobulin insufficiencies showed that the MBL lectin pathway contribution was highest in the samples with the lowest IgG/IgM binding. In conclusion, lectin pathway appears to be the primary route of complement activation in the absence of anti-A. fumigatus antibodies, whereas in a balanced immune state classical pathway is the main activator. This suggests a crucial role for the lectin pathway in innate immune protection against A. fumigatus in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27857715

  3. Near-planar Solution Structures of Mannose-binding Lectin Oligomers Provide Insight on Activation of Lectin Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ami; Phillips, Anna; Gor, Jayesh; Wallis, Russell; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is a fundamental component of innate immunity that orchestrates complex immunological and inflammatory processes. Complement comprises over 30 proteins that eliminate invading microorganisms while maintaining host cell integrity. Protein-carbohydrate interactions play critical roles in both the activation and regulation of complement. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) activates the lectin pathway of complement via the recognition of sugar arrays on pathogenic surfaces. To determine the solution structure of MBL, synchrotron x-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the carbohydrate-recognition domains in the MBL dimer, trimer, and tetramer are positioned close to each other in near-planar fan-like structures. These data were subjected to constrained modeling fits. A bent structure for the MBL monomer was identified starting from two crystal structures for its carbohydrate-recognition domain and its triple helical region. The MBL monomer structure was used to identify 10–12 near-planar solution structures for each of the MBL dimers, trimers, and tetramers starting from 900 to 6,859 randomized structures for each. These near-planar fan-like solution structures joined at an N-terminal hub clarified how the carbohydrate-recognition domain of MBL binds to pathogenic surfaces. They also provided insight on how MBL presents a structural template for the binding and auto-activation of the MBL-associated serine proteases to initiate the lectin pathway of complement activation. PMID:22167201

  4. The bacteria binding glycoprotein salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp340) activates complement via the lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Leito, Jelani T D; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; van Houdt, Michel; van den Berg, Timo K; Wouters, Diana

    2011-10-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG), also known as gp-340 and Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1, is a glycoprotein that is present in tears, lung fluid and mucosal surfaces along the gastrointestinal tract. It is encoded by the Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 gene, a member of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich group B protein superfamily. SAG aggregates bacteria thus promoting their clearance from the oral cavity and activates the complement system. Complement proteins may enter the oral cavity in case of serum leakage, which occurs after mucosal damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mode of complement activation. We showed a dose-dependent C4 deposition on SAG-coated microplates showing that either the classical or lectin pathway of complement was activated. Antibodies against mannose binding lectin inhibited C4 deposition and SAG induced no C4 deposition in MBL deficient sera showing SAG activated complement through the MBL pathway. Periodate treatment of SAG abolished MBL pathway activation consistent with an involvement of SAG glycans in complement activation. This provides the first evidence for a role of SAG in complement activation through the MBL pathway and suggests a potential role of SAG as a complement activating factor at the mucosal epithelia.

  5. A journey through the lectin pathway of complement-MBL and beyond.

    PubMed

    Garred, Peter; Genster, Ninette; Pilely, Katrine; Bayarri-Olmos, Rafael; Rosbjerg, Anne; Ma, Ying Jie; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2016-11-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin-10, collectin-11, and the ficolins (ficolin-1, ficolin-2, and ficolin-3) are soluble pattern recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. These proteins act as mediators of host defense and participate in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. They bind to conserved pathogen-specific structures and altered self-antigens and form complexes with the pentraxins to modulate innate immune functions. All molecules exhibit distinct expression in different tissue compartments, but all are found to a varying degree in the circulation. A common feature of these molecules is their ability to interact with a set of serine proteases named MASPs (MASP-1, MASP-2, and MASP-3). MASP-1 and -2 trigger the activation of the lectin pathway and MASP-3 may be involved in the activation of the alternative pathway of complement. Furthermore, MASPs mediate processes related to coagulation, bradykinin release, and endothelial and platelet activation. Variant alleles affecting expression and structure of the proteins have been associated with a variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases, most commonly as disease modifiers. Notably, the severe 3MC (Malpuech, Michels, Mingarelli, and Carnevale) embryonic development syndrome originates from rare mutations affecting either collectin-11 or MASP-3, indicating a broader functionality of the complement system than previously anticipated. This review summarizes the characteristics of the molecules in the lectin pathway.

  6. Classical and lectin complement pathway activity in polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Stork, Abraham C J; Cats, Elisabeth A; Vlam, Lotte; Heezius, Erik; Rooijakkers, Suzan; Herpers, Bjorn; de Jong, Ben A W; Rijkers, Ger; van Strijp, Jos; Notermans, Nicolette C; van den Berg, Leonard H; van der Pol, W-Ludo

    2016-01-15

    Polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy (IgM-PNP) is a slowly progressive, sensorimotor neuropathy. It is assumed that complement activation contributes to IgM-PNP pathogenesis. We investigated whether innate differences in complement activity of the classical and mannose binding lectin (MBL) pathways are associated with IgM-PNP or its severity. We measured complement activity using ELISA and determined MBL serumc oncentrations and MBL gene polymorphisms in 83 patients and 83 healthy controls. We did not observe differences between IgM-PNP patients and healthy controls nor associations with different disease severities. Differences in innate complement activity are not likely to explain susceptibility to or severity of IgM-PNP.

  7. Mutations in lectin complement pathway genes COLEC11 and MASP1 cause 3MC syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rooryck, Caroline; Diaz-Font, Anna; Osborn, Daniel P S; Chabchoub, Elyes; Hernandez-Hernandez, Victor; Shamseldin, Hanan; Kenny, Joanna; Waters, Aoife; Jenkins, Dagan; Kaissi, Ali Al; Leal, Gabriela F; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Carnevale, Franco; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Lees, Melissa; Hennekam, Raoul; Stanier, Philip; Burns, Alan J; Peeters, Hilde; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Beales, Philip L

    2011-03-01

    3MC syndrome has been proposed as a unifying term encompassing the overlapping Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech and Michels syndromes. These rare autosomal recessive disorders exhibit a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism, cleft lip and/or palate, craniosynostosis, learning disability and genital, limb and vesicorenal anomalies. Here we studied 11 families with 3MC syndrome and identified two mutated genes, COLEC11 and MASP1, both of which encode proteins in the lectin complement pathway (collectin kidney 1 (CL-K1) and MASP-1 and MASP-3, respectively). CL-K1 is highly expressed in embryonic murine craniofacial cartilage, heart, bronchi, kidney and vertebral bodies. Zebrafish morphants for either gene develop pigmentary defects and severe craniofacial abnormalities. Finally, we show that CL-K1 serves as a guidance cue for neural crest cell migration. Together, these findings demonstrate a role for complement pathway factors in fundamental developmental processes and in the etiology of 3MC syndrome.

  8. Mutations in the lectin complement pathway genes COLEC11 and MASP1 cause 3MC syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rooryck, Caroline; Diaz-Font, Anna; Osborn, Daniel P.S.; Chabchoub, Elyes; Hernandez-Hernandez, Victor; Shamseldin, Hanan; Kenny, Joanna; Waters, Aoife; Jenkins, Dagan; Kaissi, Ali Al; Leal, Gabriela F.; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Carnevale, Franco; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Lees, Melissa; Hennekam, Raoul; Stanier, Philip; Burns, Alan J.; Peeters, Hilde; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Beales, Philip L.

    2011-01-01

    3MC syndrome has been proposed as a unifying term to integrate the overlapping Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech and Michels syndromes. These rare autosomal recessive disorders of unknown cause comprise a spectrum of developmental features including characteristic facial dysmorphism, cleft lip and/or palate, craniosynostosis, learning disability, and genital, limb and vesicorenal anomalies. In a cohort of eleven 3MC families, we identified two mutated genes COLEC11 and MASP1 both of which encode proteins within the lectin complement pathway (CL-K1 and MASP-1 & −3 respectively). CL-K1 is highly expressed in embryonic murine craniofacial cartilage, heart, bronchi, kidney, and vertebral bodies. Zebrafish morphants develop pigment defects and severe craniofacial abnormalities. Here, we show that CL-K1 serves as a key guidance cue for neural crest cell migration thus demonstrating for the first time, a role for complement pathway factors in fundamental developmental processes and the origin of 3MC syndrome. PMID:21258343

  9. Activation of the lectin complement pathway in post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Satoshi; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita, Teizo; Takeshita, Morishige; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the correlation between complement pathways and clinicopathological findings in post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (PSAGN). Immunohistological staining was performed on renal specimens obtained from 18 patients with PSAGN and 20 controls, using antibodies against IgG, IgA, IgM, C1q, C3c, C4, fibrinogen, factor B, C4-binding protein (C4-bp), C5b-9, CD59, mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1). Controls showed no deposition of any antibody. In seven patients, glomerular deposits of C3c, C4, factor B, C4-bp, C5b-9, CD59, MBL and MASP-1 were found. In the remaining 11 patients, glomerular deposits of neither C4 nor MBL/MASP-1 were found, and glomerular deposits of C3c, factor B, C5b-9 and CD59 were evident. C4-bp was detected in seven of these 11 patients. Glomerular deposits of fibrinogen were detected in five of seven patients with MBL/MASP-1 deposits and in only two of 11 patients without MBL/MASP-1 deposits. Hematuria was prolonged in three of seven patients with MBL/MASP-1 deposits through follow up, whereas urinalysis was normal in all patients without MBL/MASP-1 deposits. However, the histological indicators were not different between the two groups. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report to show that complement activation through both the alternative and lectin pathways is evident in some patients with PSAGN. Complement activation is promoted in situ in the glomerulus.

  10. Lectin Pathway of Complement Activation Is Associated with Vulnerability of Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Perego, Carlo; Zangari, Rosalia; De Blasio, Daiana; Oggioni, Marco; De Nigris, Francesca; Snider, Francesco; Garred, Peter; Ferrante, Angela M. R.; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory mechanisms may be involved in atherosclerotic plaque rupture. By using a novel histology-based method to quantify plaque instability here, we assess whether lectin pathway (LP) of complement activation, a major inflammation arm, could represent an index of plaque instability. Plaques from 42 consecutive patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the lipid core, cholesterol clefts, hemorrhagic content, thickness of tunica media, and intima, including or not infiltration of cellular debris and cholesterol, were determined. The presence of ficolin-1, -2, and -3 and mannose-binding lectin (MBL), LP initiators, was assessed in the plaques by immunofluorescence and in plasma by ELISA. LP activation was assessed in plasma by functional in vitro assays. Patients presenting low stenosis (≤75%) had higher hemorrhagic content than those with high stenosis (>75%), indicating increased erosion. Increased hemorrhagic content and tunica media thickness, as well as decreased lipid core and infiltrated content were associated with vulnerable plaques and therefore used to establish a plaque vulnerability score that allowed to classify patients according to plaque vulnerability. Ficolins and MBL were found both in plaques’ necrotic core and tunica media. Patients with vulnerable plaques showed decreased plasma levels and intraplaque deposition of ficolin-2. Symptomatic patients experiencing a transient ischemic attack had lower plasma levels of ficolin-1. We show that the LP initiators are present within the plaques and their circulating levels change in atherosclerotic patients. In particular, we show that decreased ficolin-2 levels are associated with rupture-prone vulnerable plaques, indicating its potential use as marker for cardiovascular risk assessment in atherosclerotic patients. PMID:28360913

  11. MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-factor D activator in resting blood: the lectin and the alternative complement pathways are fundamentally linked

    PubMed Central

    Dobó, József; Szakács, Dávid; Oroszlán, Gábor; Kortvely, Elod; Kiss, Bence; Boros, Eszter; Szász, Róbert; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Pál, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    MASP-3 was discovered 15 years ago as the third mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease of the complement lectin pathway. Lacking any verified substrate its role remained ambiguous. MASP-3 was shown to compete with a key lectin pathway enzyme MASP-2 for MBL binding, and was therefore considered to be a negative complement regulator. Later, knock-out mice experiments suggested that MASP-1 and/or MASP-3 play important roles in complement pro-factor D (pro-FD) maturation. However, studies on a MASP-1/MASP-3-deficient human patient produced contradicting results. In normal resting blood unperturbed by ongoing coagulation or complement activation, factor D is present predominantly in its active form, suggesting that resting blood contains at least one pro-FD activating proteinase that is not a direct initiator of coagulation or complement activation. We have recently showed that all three MASPs can activate pro-FD in vitro. In resting blood, however, using our previously evolved MASP-1 and MASP-2 inhibitors we proved that neither MASP-1 nor MASP-2 activates pro-FD. Other plasma proteinases, particularly MASP-3, remained candidates for that function. For this study we evolved a specific MASP-3 inhibitor and unambiguously proved that activated MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-FD activator in resting blood, which demonstrates a fundamental link between the lectin and alternative pathways. PMID:27535802

  12. Deletion of wboA Enhances Activation of the Lectin Pathway of Complement in Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Prada, Carmen M.; Nikolich, Mikeljon; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M.; Schurig, Gerhardt G.; Hadfield, Ted L.; Hoover, David L.

    2001-01-01

    Brucella spp. are gram-negative intracellular pathogens that survive and multiply within phagocytic cells of their hosts. Smooth organisms present O polysaccharides (OPS) on their surface. These OPS help the bacteria avoid the bactericidal action of serum. The wboA gene, coding for the enzyme glycosyltransferase, is essential for the synthesis of O chain in Brucella. In this study, the sensitivity to serum of smooth, virulent Brucella melitensis 16M and B. abortus 2308, rough wboA mutants VTRM1, RA1, and WRR51 derived from these two Brucella species, and the B. abortus vaccine strain RB51 was assayed using normal nonimmune human serum (NHS). The deposition of complement components and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) on the bacterial surface was detected by flow cytometry. Rough B. abortus mutants were more sensitive to the bactericidal action of NHS than were rough B. melitensis mutants. Complement components were deposited on smooth strains at a slower rate compared to rough strains. Deposition of iC3b and C5b-9 and bacterial killing occurred when bacteria were treated with C1q-depleted, but not with C2-depleted serum or NHS in the presence of Mg-EGTA. These results indicate that (i) OPS-deficient strains derived from B. melitensis 16M are more resistant to the bactericidal action of NHS than OPS-deficient strains derived from B. abortus 2308, (ii) both the classical and the MBL-mediated pathways are involved in complement deposition and complement-mediated killing of Brucella, and (iii) the alternative pathway is not activated by smooth or rough brucellae. PMID:11401980

  13. Simultaneous Complement Response via Lectin Pathway in Retina and Optic Nerve in an Experimental Autoimmune Glaucoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Reinehr, Sabrina; Reinhard, Jacqueline; Gandej, Marcel; Kuehn, Sandra; Noristani, Rozina; Faissner, Andreas; Burkhard Dick, H.; Joachim, Stephanie C.

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial disease and especially mechanisms occurring independently from an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are still unknown. Likely, the immune system contributes to the glaucoma pathogenesis. Previously, IgG antibody depositions and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss were found in an IOP-independent autoimmune glaucoma model. Therefore, we investigated the possible participation of the complement system in this model. Here, rats were immunized with bovine optic nerve homogenate antigen (ONA), while controls (Co) received sodium chloride (n = 5–6/group). After 14 days, RGC density was quantified on flatmounts. No changes in the number of RGCs could be observed at this point in time. Longitudinal optic nerve sections were stained against the myelin basic protein (MBP). We could note few signs of degeneration processes. In order to detect distinct complement components, retinas and optic nerves were labeled with complement markers at 3, 7, 14, and 28 days and analyzed. Significantly more C3 and MAC depositions were found in retinas and optic nerves of the ONA group. These were already present at day 7, before RGC loss and demyelination occurred. Additionally, an upregulation of C3 protein was noted via Western Blot at this time. After 14 days, quantitative real-time PCR revealed significantly more C3 mRNA in the ONA retinas. An upregulation of the lectin pathway-associated mannose-serine-protease-2 (MASP2) was observed in the retinas as well as in the optic nerves of the ONA group after 7 days. Significantly more MASP2 in retinas could also be observed via Western Blot analyses at this point in time. No effect was noted in regard to C1q. Therefore, we assume that the immunization led to an activation of the complement system via the lectin pathway in retinas and optic nerves at an early stage in this glaucoma model. This activation seems to be an early response, which then triggers degeneration. These findings can help to develop novel

  14. Complement Activation by Giardia duodenalis Parasites through the Lectin Pathway Contributes to Mast Cell Responses and Parasite Control

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erqiu; Tako, Ernest A.

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Giardia duodenalis is one of the most common causes of diarrheal disease in the world. While numerous studies have identified important contributions of adaptive immune responses to parasite control, much less work has examined innate immunity and its connections to the adaptive response during this infection. We explored the role of complement in immunity to Giardia using mice deficient in mannose-binding lectin (Mbl2) or complement factor 3a receptor (C3aR). Both strains exhibited delayed clearance of parasites and a reduced ability to recruit mast cells in the intestinal submucosa. C3aR-deficient mice had normal production of antiparasite IgA, but ex vivo T cell recall responses were impaired. These data suggest that complement is a key factor in the innate recognition of Giardia and that recruitment of mast cells and activation of T cell immunity through C3a are important for parasite control. PMID:26831470

  15. Heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits selectively deplete the pattern recognition molecule ficolin-2 of the lectin complement pathway in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hein, E; Munthe-Fog, L; Thiara, A S; Fiane, A E; Mollnes, T E; Garred, P

    2015-02-01

    The complement system can be activated via the lectin pathway by the recognition molecules mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and the ficolins. Ficolin-2 exhibits binding against a broad range of ligands, including biomaterials in vitro, and low ficolin-2 levels are associated with increased risk of infections. Thus, we investigated the biocompatibility of the recognition molecules of the lectin pathway in two different types of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. Bloods were drawn at five time-points before, during and postoperatively from 30 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Patients were randomized into two groups using different coatings of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits, Phisio® (phosphorylcholine polymer coating) and Bioline® (albumin-heparin coating). Concentrations of MBL, ficolin-1, -2 and -3 and soluble C3a and terminal complement complex (TCC) in plasma samples were measured. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was evaluated with C4, C3 and TCC as output. There was no significant difference between the two circuit materials regarding MBL, ficolin-1 and -3. In the Bioline® group the ficolin-2 levels decreased significantly after initiation of surgery (P < 0.0001) and remained reduced throughout the sampling period. This was not seen for Phisio®-coated circuits. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was reduced significantly in both groups after start of operation (P < 0.0001), whereas soluble C3a and TCC in the samples were increased (P < 0.0001). Ficolin-2 was depleted from plasma during cardiac surgery when using heparin-coated bypass circuits and did not reach baseline level 24 h postoperation. These findings may have implications for the postoperative susceptibility to infections in patients undergoing extracorporeal circulation procedures.

  16. Polymorphisms in the lectin pathway of complement activation influence the incidence of acute rejection and graft outcome after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Golshayan, Déla; Wójtowicz, Agnieszka; Bibert, Stéphanie; Pyndiah, Nitisha; Manuel, Oriol; Binet, Isabelle; Buhler, Leo H; Huynh-Do, Uyen; Mueller, Thomas; Steiger, Jürg; Pascual, Manuel; Meylan, Pascal; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2016-04-01

    There are conflicting data on the role of the lectin pathway of complement activation and its recognition molecules in acute rejection and outcome after transplantation. To help resolve this we analyzed polymorphisms and serum levels of lectin pathway components in 710 consecutive kidney transplant recipients enrolled in the nationwide Swiss Transplant Cohort Study, together with all biopsy-proven rejection episodes and 1-year graft and patient survival. Functional mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels were determined in serum samples, and previously described MBL2, ficolin 2, and MBL-associated serine protease 2 polymorphisms were genotyped. Low MBL serum levels and deficient MBL2 diplotypes were associated with a higher incidence of acute cellular rejection during the first year, in particular in recipients of deceased-donor kidneys. This association remained significant (hazard ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.18-2.60) in a Cox regression model after adjustment for relevant covariates. In contrast, there was no significant association with rates of antibody-mediated rejection, patient death, early graft dysfunction or loss. Thus, results in a prospective multicenter contemporary cohort suggest that MBL2 polymorphisms result in low MBL serum levels and are associated with acute cellular rejection after kidney transplantation. Since MBL deficiency is a relatively frequent trait in the normal population, our findings may lead to individual risk stratification and customized immunosuppression.

  17. The extracellular adherence protein from Staphylococcus aureus inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement by blocking formation of the C3 proconvertase.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Jordan L; Stapels, Daphne A C; Garcia, Brandon L; Ramyar, Kasra X; Keightley, Andrew; Ruyken, Maartje; Syriga, Maria; Sfyroera, Georgia; Weber, Alexander B; Zolkiewski, Michal; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2014-12-15

    The pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus actively evades many aspects of human innate immunity by expressing a series of small inhibitory proteins. A number of these proteins inhibit the complement system, which labels bacteria for phagocytosis and generates inflammatory chemoattractants. Although the majority of staphylococcal complement inhibitors act on the alternative pathway to block the amplification loop, only a few proteins act on the initial recognition cascades that constitute the classical pathway (CP) and lectin pathway (LP). We screened a collection of recombinant, secreted staphylococcal proteins to determine whether S. aureus produces other molecules that inhibit the CP and/or LP. Using this approach, we identified the extracellular adherence protein (Eap) as a potent, specific inhibitor of both the CP and LP. We found that Eap blocked CP/LP-dependent activation of C3, but not C4, and that Eap likewise inhibited deposition of C3b on the surface of S. aureus cells. In turn, this significantly diminished the extent of S. aureus opsonophagocytosis and killing by neutrophils. This combination of functional properties suggested that Eap acts specifically at the level of the CP/LP C3 convertase (C4b2a). Indeed, we demonstrated a direct, nanomolar-affinity interaction of Eap with C4b. Eap binding to C4b inhibited binding of both full-length C2 and its C2b fragment, which indicated that Eap disrupts formation of the CP/LP C3 proconvertase (C4b2). As a whole, our results demonstrate that S. aureus inhibits two initiation routes of complement by expression of the Eap protein, and thereby define a novel mechanism of immune evasion.

  18. Essential Role for the Lectin Pathway in Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis Revealed Through Use of Adenovirus Programming Complement Inhibitor MAp44 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Nirmal K.; Mehta, Gaurav; Kjaer, Troels R.; Takahashi, Minoru; Schaack, Jerome; Morrison, Thomas E.; Thiel, Steffen; Arend, William P.; Holers, V. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies using mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and complement C4 deficient mice have suggested that the lectin pathway (LP) is not required for the development of inflammatory arthritis in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. MBL, ficolins and collectin-11 are key LP pattern recognition molecules that associate with three serine proteases, MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3, and also with two MBL-associated proteins designated sMAP and MAp44. Recent studies have shown that MAp44, an alternatively spliced product of the MASP-1/3 gene, is a competitive inhibitor of the binding of the recognition molecules to all three MASPs. In these studies we examined the effect of treatment of mice with adenovirus (Ad) programmed to express human MAp44 (AdhMAp44) on the development of CAIA. AdhMAp44 and Ad programming Green fluorescent protein (AdGFP) expression were injected intraperitoneally in C57BL/6 wild-type mice prior to the induction of CAIA. AdhMAp44 significantly reduced the clinical disease activity score (CDA) by 81% compared to mice injected with AdGFP. Similarly, histopathologic injury scores for inflammation, pannus, cartilage and bone damage, as well as C3 deposition in the cartilage and synovium, were significantly reduced by AdhMAp44 pretreatment. Mice treated with AdmMAp44, programming expression of mouse MAp44, also showed significantly decreased CDA and histopathologic injury scores. Additionally, administration of AdhMAp44 significantly diminished the severity of Ross River Virus-induced arthritis, a LP-dependent model. Our study provides conclusive evidence that an intact complement LP is essential to initiate CAIA, and that MAp44 may be an appropriate treatment for inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25070856

  19. Quantitative Characterization of the Activation Steps of Mannan-binding Lectin (MBL)-associated Serine Proteases (MASPs) Points to the Central Role of MASP-1 in the Initiation of the Complement Lectin Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Megyeri, Márton; Harmat, Veronika; Major, Balázs; Végh, Ádám; Balczer, Júlia; Héja, Dávid; Szilágyi, Katalin; Datz, Dániel; Pál, Gábor; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Dobó, József

    2013-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine proteases, MASP-1 and MASP-2, have been thought to autoactivate when MBL/ficolin·MASP complexes bind to pathogens triggering the complement lectin pathway. Autoactivation of MASPs occurs in two steps: 1) zymogen autoactivation, when one proenzyme cleaves another proenzyme molecule of the same protease, and 2) autocatalytic activation, when the activated protease cleaves its own zymogen. Using recombinant catalytic fragments, we demonstrated that a stable proenzyme MASP-1 variant (R448Q) cleaved the inactive, catalytic site Ser-to-Ala variant (S646A). The autoactivation steps of MASP-1 were separately quantified using these mutants and the wild type enzyme. Analogous mutants were made for MASP-2, and rate constants of the autoactivation steps as well as the possible cross-activation steps between MASP-1 and MASP-2 were determined. Based on the rate constants, a kinetic model of lectin pathway activation was outlined. The zymogen autoactivation rate of MASP-1 is ∼3000-fold higher, and the autocatalytic activation of MASP-1 is about 140-fold faster than those of MASP-2. Moreover, both activated and proenzyme MASP-1 can effectively cleave proenzyme MASP-2. MASP-3, which does not autoactivate, is also cleaved by MASP-1 quite efficiently. The structure of the catalytic region of proenzyme MASP-1 R448Q was solved at 2.5 Å. Proenzyme MASP-1 R448Q readily cleaves synthetic substrates, and it is inhibited by a specific canonical inhibitor developed against active MASP-1, indicating that zymogen MASP-1 fluctuates between an inactive and an active-like conformation. The determined structure provides a feasible explanation for this phenomenon. In summary, autoactivation of MASP-1 is crucial for the activation of MBL/ficolin·MASP complexes, and in the proenzymic phase zymogen MASP-1 controls the process. PMID:23386610

  20. Secondary Cell Wall Polymers of Enterococcus faecalis Are Critical for Resistance to Complement Activation via Mannose-binding Lectin*

    PubMed Central

    Geiss-Liebisch, Stefan; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.; Beczala, Agnieszka; Sanchez-Carballo, Patricia; Kruszynska, Karolina; Repp, Christian; Sakinc, Tuerkan; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Holst, Otto; Huebner, Johannes; Theilacker, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is part of our first line of defense against invading pathogens. The strategies used by Enterococcus faecalis to evade recognition by human complement are incompletely understood. In this study, we identified an insertional mutant of the wall teichoic acid (WTA) synthesis gene tagB in E. faecalis V583 that exhibited an increased susceptibility to complement-mediated killing by neutrophils. Further analysis revealed that increased killing of the mutant was due to a higher rate of phagocytosis by neutrophils, which correlated with higher C3b deposition on the bacterial surface. Our studies indicated that complement activation via the lectin pathway was much stronger on the tagB mutant compared with wild type. In concordance, we found an increased binding of the key lectin pathway components mannose-binding lectin and mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) on the mutant. To understand the mechanism of lectin pathway inhibition by E. faecalis, we purified and characterized cell wall carbohydrates of E. faecalis wild type and V583ΔtagB. NMR analysis revealed that the mutant strain lacked two WTAs with a repeating unit of →6)[α-l-Rhap-(1→3)]β-d-GalpNAc-(1→5)-Rbo-1-P and →6) β-d-Glcp-(1→3) [α-d-Glcp-(1→4)]-β-d-GalpNAc-(1→5)-Rbo-1-P→, respectively (Rbo, ribitol). In addition, compositional changes in the enterococcal rhamnopolysaccharide were noticed. Our study indicates that in E. faecalis, modification of peptidoglycan by secondary cell wall polymers is critical to evade recognition by the complement system. PMID:22908219

  1. Direct Complement Restriction of Flavivirus Infection Requires Glycan Recognition by Mannose Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Anja; Lin, Tsai-Yu; Beasley, David W.; Stover, Cordula M.; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Pierson, Theodore C.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY An intact complement system is crucial for limiting West Nile virus (WNV) dissemination. Herein, we define how complement directly restricts flavivirus infection in an antibody-independent fashion. Mannose binding lectin (MBL) recognized N-linked glycans on the structural proteins of WNV and Dengue virus (DENV), resulting in neutralization through a C3 and C4-dependent mechanism that utilized both the canonical and bypass lectin activation pathways. For WNV, neutralization occurred with virus produced in insect cells, whereas for DENV, neutralization of insect and mammalian cell-derived virus was observed. Mechanism of action studies suggested that the MBL-dependent neutralization occurred in part, by blocking viral fusion. Experiments in mice showed an MBL-dependent accelerated intravascular clearance of DENV or a WNV mutant with two N-linked glycans on its E protein, but not with wild type WNV. Our studies show that MBL recognizes terminal mannose containing carbohydrates on flaviviruses, resulting in neutralization and efficient clearance in vivo. PMID:20709295

  2. Lectin Complement Protein Collectin 11 (CL-K1) and Susceptibility to Urinary Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Justin S.; Ojurongbe, Olusola; Kremsner, Peter G.; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Urinary Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease endemic in many sub Saharan -African countries. Collectin Kidney 1 (CL-K1, encoded by COLEC11 on chromosome 2p25.3), a member of the vertebrate C-type lectin super family, has recently been identified as pattern-recognition molecule (PRR) of the lectin complement pathway. CL-K1 is preferentially expressed in the kidneys, but also in other organs and it is considered to play a role in host defense to some infectious agents. Schistosome teguments are fucosylated and CL-K1 has, through its collagen-like domain, a high binding affinity to fucose. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized a Nigerian study group consisting of 167 Schistosoma haematobium infected individuals and 186 matched healthy subjects, and investigated the contribution of CL-K1 deficiency and of COLEC11 polymorphisms to infection phenotype. Higher CL-K1 serum levels were associated with decreased risk of schistosome infection (Pcorr = 0.0004). CL-K1 serum levels were differentially distributed between the COLEC11 genotypes and haplotypes observed. The non-synonymous variant p.R216H was associated with the occurrence of schistosomiasis (OR = 0.44, 95%CI = 0.22–0.72, Pcorr = 0.0004). The reconstructed COLEC11*TCCA haplotypes were associated with higher CL-K1 serum levels (P = 0.002) and with decreased schistosomiasis (OR = 0.38, 95%CI = 0.23–0.63, Pcorr = 0.0001). Conclusions In agreement with findings from our earlier published study, our findings support the observation that CL-K1 and their functional variants may be host factors associated with protection in schistosomiasis and may be a useful marker for further investigations. PMID:25807310

  3. Alternative complement pathway of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus: molecular characterization and expression analysis of factors Bf/C2 and Df

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complement system important in both innate and adaptive host defense against microbial infection in vertebrates. It contains three pathways: the classical, alternative, and lectin pathways. Complement component factors B and D are two crucial proteases in the alternative pathway. In this study,...

  4. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Viviana P; Fazito Vale, Vladimir; Pangburn, Michael K; Abdeladhim, Maha; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio Ferreira; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Brandt, Elizabeth A; Meneses, Claudio; Lima, Kolyvan Ferreira; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Gontijo, Nelder F; Collin, Nicolas; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2016-01-13

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host's skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the same chromatographic properties as the Lu. longipalpis salivary gland homogenate (SGH)counterparts and anti-rSALO antibodies blocked the classical pathway complement activity of rSALO and SGH. Both rSALO and SGH inhibited C4b deposition and cleavage of C4. rSALO, however, did not inhibit the protease activity of C1s nor the enzymatic activity of factor Xa, uPA, thrombin, kallikrein, trypsin and plasmin. Importantly, rSALO did not inhibit the alternative or the lectin pathway of complement. In conclusion our data shows that SALO is a specific classical pathway complement inhibitor present in the saliva of Lu. longipalpis. Importantly, due to its small size and specificity, SALO may offer a therapeutic alternative for complement classical pathway-mediated pathogenic effects in human diseases.

  5. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Viviana P.; Fazito Vale, Vladimir; Pangburn, Michael K.; Abdeladhim, Maha; Ferreira Mendes-Sousa, Antonio; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V.; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Brandt, Elizabeth A.; Meneses, Claudio; Lima, Kolyvan Ferreira; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Horácio Pereira, Marcos; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Gontijo, Nelder F.; Collin, Nicolas; Valenzuela, Jesus G.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host’s skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the same chromatographic properties as the Lu. longipalpis salivary gland homogenate (SGH)counterparts and anti-rSALO antibodies blocked the classical pathway complement activity of rSALO and SGH. Both rSALO and SGH inhibited C4b deposition and cleavage of C4. rSALO, however, did not inhibit the protease activity of C1s nor the enzymatic activity of factor Xa, uPA, thrombin, kallikrein, trypsin and plasmin. Importantly, rSALO did not inhibit the alternative or the lectin pathway of complement. In conclusion our data shows that SALO is a specific classical pathway complement inhibitor present in the saliva of Lu. longipalpis. Importantly, due to its small size and specificity, SALO may offer a therapeutic alternative for complement classical pathway-mediated pathogenic effects in human diseases. PMID:26758086

  6. A Metalloproteinase Mirolysin of Tannerella forsythia Inhibits All Pathways of the Complement System.

    PubMed

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Mizgalska, Danuta; Bielecka, Ewa; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Riesbeck, Kristian; Garred, Peter; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M

    2015-09-01

    Recent reports focusing on virulence factors of periodontal pathogens implicated proteinases as major determinants of remarkable pathogenicity of these species, with special emphasis on their capacity to modulate complement activity. In particular, bacteria-mediated cleavage of C5 and subsequent release of C5a seems to be an important phenomenon in the manipulation of the local inflammatory response in periodontitis. In this study, we present mirolysin, a novel metalloproteinase secreted by Tannerella forsythia, a well-recognized pathogen strongly associated with periodontitis. Mirolysin exhibited a strong effect on all complement pathways. It inhibited the classical and lectin complement pathways due to efficient degradation of mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-2, ficolin-3, and C4, whereas inhibition of the alternative pathway was caused by degradation of C5. This specificity toward complement largely resembled the activity of a previously characterized metalloproteinase of T. forsythia, karilysin. Interestingly, mirolysin released the biologically active C5a peptide in human plasma and induced migration of neutrophils. Importantly, we demonstrated that combination of mirolysin with karilysin, as well as a cysteine proteinase of another periodontal pathogen, Prevotella intermedia, resulted in a strong synergistic effect on complement. Furthermore, mutant strains of T. forsythia, devoid of either mirolysin or karilysin, showed diminished survival in human serum, providing further evidence for the synergistic inactivation of complement by these metalloproteinases. Taken together, our findings on interactions of mirolysin with complement significantly add to the understanding of immune evasion strategies of T. forsythia and expand the knowledge on molecular mechanisms driving pathogenic events in the infected periodontium.

  7. Comprehensive and comparative transcription analyses of the complement pathway in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Köbis, Judith M; Rebl, Alexander; Kühn, Carsten; Korytář, Tomáš; Köllner, Bernd; Goldammer, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is one of the most ancient and most essential innate immune cascades throughout the animal kingdom. Survival of aquatic animals, such as rainbow trout, depends on this early inducible, efficient immune cascade. Despite increasing research on genes coding for complement components in bony fish, some complement-related genes are still unknown in salmonid fish. In the present study, we characterize the genes encoding complement factor D (CFD), CD93 molecule (CD93), and C-type lectin domain family 4, member M (CLEC4M) from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Subsequently, we performed comprehensive and comparative expression analyses of 36 complement genes including CFD, CD93, and CLEC4M and further putative complement-associated genes to obtain general information about the functional gene interaction within the complement pathway in fish. These quantification analyses were conducted in liver, spleen and gills of healthy fish of two rainbow trout strains, selected for survival (strain BORN) and growth (Import strain), respectively. The present expression study clearly confirms for rainbow trout that liver represents the primary site of complement expression. Spleen and gills also express most complement genes, although the mean transcript levels were generally lower than in liver. The transcription data suggest a contribution of spleen and gills to complement activity. The comparison of the two rainbow trout strains revealed a generally similar complement gene expression. However, a significantly lower expression of numerous genes especially in spleen seems characteristic for the BORN strain. This suggests a strain-specific complement pathway regulation under the selected rearing conditions.

  8. Association of Low Ficolin-Lectin Pathway Parameters with Cardiac Syndrome X.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Z; Csuka, D; Vargova, K; Leé, S; Varga, L; Garred, P; Préda, I; Zsámboki, E T; Prohászka, Z; Kiss, R G

    2016-09-01

    In patients with typical angina pectoris, inducible myocardial ischaemia and macroscopically normal coronaries (cardiac syndrome X (CSX)), a significantly elevated plasma level of terminal complement complex (TCC), the common end product of complement activation, has been observed without accompanying activation of the classical or the alternative pathways. Therefore, our aim was to clarify the role of the ficolin-lectin pathway in CSX. Eighteen patients with CSX, 37 stable angina patients with significant coronary stenosis (CHD) and 54 healthy volunteers (HC) were enrolled. Serum levels of ficolin-2 and ficolin-3, ficolin-3/MASP-2 complex and ficolin-3-mediated TCC deposition (FCN3-TCC) were determined. Plasma level of TCC was significantly higher in the CSX than in the HC or CHD group (5.45 versus 1.30 versus 2.04 AU/ml, P < 0.001). Serum levels of ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 were significantly lower in the CSX compared to the HC or CHD group (3.60 versus 5.80 or 5.20 μg/ml, P < 0.05; 17.80 versus 24.10 or 26.80 μg/ml, P < 0.05). The ficolin-3/MASP-2 complex was significantly lower in the CSX group compared to the HC group (92.90 versus 144.90 AU/ml, P = 0.006). FCN3-TCC deposition was significantly lower in the CSX group compared to the HC and CHD groups (67.8% versus 143.3% or 159.7%, P < 0.05). In the CSX group, a significant correlation was found between TCC and FCN3-TCC level (r = 0.507, P = 0.032) and between ficolin-3/MASP-2 complex level and FCN3-TCC deposition (r = 0.651, P = 0.003). In conclusion, in patients with typical angina and myocardial ischaemia despite macroscopically normal coronary arteries, low levels of several lectin pathway parameters were observed, indicating complement activation and consumption. Complement activation through the ficolin-lectin pathway might play a role in the complex pathomechanism of CSX.

  9. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Deficiencies of Early Components of the Complement Classical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Ana Catarina Lunz; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in the innate and acquired immune response against pathogens. It consists of more than 30 proteins found in soluble form or attached to cell membranes. Most complement proteins circulate in inactive forms and can be sequentially activated by the classical, alternative, or lectin pathways. Biological functions, such as opsonization, removal of apoptotic cells, adjuvant function, activation of B lymphocytes, degranulation of mast cells and basophils, and solubilization and clearance of immune complex and cell lysis, are dependent on complement activation. Although the activation of the complement system is important to avoid infections, it also can contribute to the inflammatory response triggered by immune complex deposition in tissues in autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, the deficiency of early complement proteins from the classical pathway (CP) is strongly associated with development of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) – mainly C1q deficiency (93%) and C4 deficiency (75%). The aim of this review is to focus on the deficiencies of early components of the CP (C1q, C1r, C1s, C4, and C2) proteins in SLE patients. PMID:26941740

  10. Classical Complement Pathway Activation in the Kidneys of Women With Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Penning, Marlies; Chua, Jamie S; van Kooten, Cees; Zandbergen, Malu; Buurma, Aletta; Schutte, Joke; Bruijn, Jan Anthonie; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Bloemenkamp, Kitty; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Baelde, Hans

    2015-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that complement dysregulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. The kidney is one of the major organs affected in preeclampsia. Because the kidney is highly susceptible to complement activation, we hypothesized that preeclampsia is associated with renal complement activation. We performed a nationwide search for renal autopsy material in the Netherlands using a computerized database (PALGA). Renal tissue was obtained from 11 women with preeclampsia, 25 pregnant controls, and 14 nonpregnant controls with hypertension. The samples were immunostained for C4d, C1q, mannose-binding lectin, properdin, C3d, C5b-9, IgA, IgG, and IgM. Preeclampsia was significantly associated with renal C4d-a stable marker of complement activation-and the classical pathway marker C1q. In addition, the prevalence of IgM was significantly higher in the kidneys of the preeclamptic women. No other complement markers studied differed between the groups. Our findings in human samples were validated using a soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 mouse model of preeclampsia. The kidneys in the soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1-injected mice had significantly more C4 deposits than the control mice. The association between preeclampsia and renal C4d, C1q, and IgM levels suggests that the classical complement pathway is involved in the renal injury in preeclampsia. Moreover, our finding that soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1-injected mice develop excess C4 deposits indicates that angiogenic dysregulation may play a role in complement activation within the kidney. We suggest that inhibiting complement activation may be beneficial for preventing the renal manifestations of preeclampsia.

  11. Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide activates the classical complement pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, C S; Schultz, D R; Arnold, P I; Johnson, W

    1992-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterium capable of entering and growing in alveolar macrophages and monocytes. Complement and complement receptors are important in the uptake of L. pneumophila by human mononuclear phagocytes. The surface molecules of L. pneumophila that activate the complement system are unknown. To identify these factors, we investigated the effects of L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the classical and alternative complement pathways of normal human serum by functional hemolytic assays. Although incubation of LPS in normal human serum at 37 degrees C resulted in the activation of both pathways, complement activation proceeded primarily through the classical pathway. Activation of the classical pathway by LPS was dependent on natural antibodies of the immunoglobulin M class that were present in various quantities in sera from different normal individuals but were absent in an immunoglobulin-deficient serum obtained from an agammaglobulinemic patient. Additional studies using sheep erythrocytes coated with LPS suggested that the antibodies recognized antigenic sites in the carbohydrate portion of LPS. The ability of LPS to interact with the complement system suggests a role for LPS in the uptake of L. pneumophila by mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:1612744

  12. Quantitative Modeling of the Alternative Pathway of the Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Dorado, Angel; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an integral part of innate immunity that detects and eliminates invading pathogens through a cascade of reactions. The destructive effects of the complement activation on host cells are inhibited through versatile regulators that are present in plasma and bound to membranes. Impairment in the capacity of these regulators to function in the proper manner results in autoimmune diseases. To better understand the delicate balance between complement activation and regulation, we have developed a comprehensive quantitative model of the alternative pathway. Our model incorporates a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the dynamics of the four steps of the alternative pathway under physiological conditions: (i) initiation (fluid phase), (ii) amplification (surfaces), (iii) termination (pathogen), and (iv) regulation (host cell and fluid phase). We have examined complement activation and regulation on different surfaces, using the cellular dimensions of a characteristic bacterium (E. coli) and host cell (human erythrocyte). In addition, we have incorporated neutrophil-secreted properdin into the model highlighting the cross talk of neutrophils with the alternative pathway in coordinating innate immunity. Our study yields a series of time-dependent response data for all alternative pathway proteins, fragments, and complexes. We demonstrate the robustness of alternative pathway on the surface of pathogens in which complement components were able to saturate the entire region in about 54 minutes, while occupying less than one percent on host cells at the same time period. Our model reveals that tight regulation of complement starts in fluid phase in which propagation of the alternative pathway was inhibited through the dismantlement of fluid phase convertases. Our model also depicts the intricate role that properdin released from neutrophils plays in initiating and propagating the alternative pathway during bacterial infection. PMID

  13. A metalloproteinase karilysin present in the majority of Tannerella forsythia isolates inhibits all pathways of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Karim, Abdulkarim Y; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Riesbeck, Kristian; Garred, Peter; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M

    2012-03-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a poorly studied pathogen despite being one of the main causes of periodontitis, which is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth. We found that despite being recognized by all complement pathways, T. forsythia is resistant to killing by human complement, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with karilysin, a metalloproteinase of T. forsythia, resulted in a decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. T. forsythia strains expressing karilysin at higher levels were more resistant than low-expressing strains. Furthermore, the low-expressing strain was significantly more opsonized with activated complement factor 3 and membrane attack complex from serum compared with the other strains. The high-expressing strain was more resistant to killing in human blood. The protective effect of karilysin against serum bactericidal activity was attributable to its ability to inhibit complement at several stages. The classical and lectin complement pathways were inhibited because of the efficient degradation of mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-2, ficolin-3, and C4 by karilysin, whereas inhibition of the terminal pathway was caused by degradation of C5. Interestingly, karilysin was able to release biologically active C5a peptide in human plasma and induce migration of neutrophils. Importantly, we detected the karilysin gene in >90% of gingival crevicular fluid samples containing T. forsythia obtained from patients with periodontitis. Taken together, the newly characterized karilysin appears to be an important virulence factor of T. forsythia and might have several important implications for immune evasion.

  14. Eosinophil granule cationic proteins regulate the classical pathway of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, J M; Edens, R E; Bell, C S; Gleich, G J

    1995-01-01

    Major basic protein, the primary constituent of eosinophil granules, regulates the alternative and classical pathways of complement. Major basic protein and other eosinophil granule cationic proteins, which are important in mediating tissue damage in allergic disease, regulate the alternative pathway by interfering with C3b interaction with factor B to assemble an alternative pathway C3 convertase. In the present study, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, as well as major basic protein, were examined for capacity to regulate the classical pathway. Eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and major basic protein inhibited formation of cell-bound classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a), causing 50% inhibition of complement-mediated lysis at about 0.19, 0.75 and 0.5 micrograms/10(7) cellular intermediates, respectively. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin had no activity on this pathway of complement. The eosinophil granule proteins were examined for activity on the formation of the membrane attack complex. Major basic protein and eosinophil cationic protein had no activity on terminal lysis. In contrast, eosinophil peroxidase inhibited lysis of EAC1,4b,2a,3b,5b, but had only minimal activity on later events in complement lysis. These polycations were then examined to determine the site(s) at which they regulated the early classical pathway. Eosinophil granule polycationic proteins: (1) reduced the Zmax at all time points but had only minimal effect on the Tmax during the formation of the classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a); (2) inhibited formation of EAC1,4b,2a proportional to C4 but independent of C2 concentration; (3) inhibited fluid phase formation of C1,4b,2a, as reflected by a decrease in C1-induced consumption of C2 over time; and (4) inhibited C1 activity over time without a direct effect on either C4 or C2. These observations suggest that polycations regulate the early classical pathway by

  15. Therapeutic inhibition of the alternative complement pathway attenuates chronic EAE.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Holers, V Michael; Thurman, Joshua M; Schoeb, Trent R; Ramos, Theresa N; Barnum, Scott R

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory using complement-mutant mice demonstrated that the alternative pathway is the dominant activation pathway responsible for complement-mediated pathology in demyelinating disease. Using a well-characterized inhibitory monoclonal antibody (mAb 1379) directed against mouse factor B, we assessed the therapeutic value of inhibiting the alternative complement pathway in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. Administration of anti-factor B antibody to mice prior to the onset of clinical signs of active EAE had no affect on the onset or acute phase of disease, but significantly attenuated the chronic phase of disease resulting in reduced cellular infiltration, inflammation and demyelination in antibody-treated mice. Attenuation of the chronic phase of disease was long lasting even though antibody administration was terminated shortly after disease onset. Chronic disease was also attenuated in transferred EAE when anti-factor B antibody was administered before or after disease onset. Similar levels of disease attenuation were observed in transferred EAE using MOG-specific encephalitogenic T cells. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential for inhibition of factor B in the chronic phase of demyelinating disease, where treatment options are limited.

  16. Therapeutic Inhibition of the Alternative Complement Pathway Attenuates Chronic EAE

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xianzhen; Holers, V. Michael; Thurman, Joshua M.; Schoeb, Trent R.; Ramos, Theresa N; Barnum, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory using complement-mutant mice demonstrated that the alternative pathway is the dominant activation pathway responsible for complement-mediated pathology in demyelinating disease. Using a well-characterized inhibitory monoclonal antibody (mAb 1379) directed against mouse factor B, we assessed the therapeutic value of inhibiting the alternative complement pathway in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. Administration of anti-factor B antibody to mice prior to the onset of clinical signs of active EAE had no affect on the onset or acute phase of disease, but significantly attenuated the chronic phase of disease resulting in reduced cellular infiltration, inflammation and demyelination in antibody-treated mice. Attenuation of the chronic phase of disease was long lasting even though antibody administration was terminated shortly after disease onset. Chronic disease was also attenuated in transferred EAE when anti-factor B antibody was administered before or after disease onset. Similar levels of disease attenuation were observed in transferred EAE using MOG-specific encephalitogenic T cells. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential for inhibition of factor B in the chronic phase of demyelinating disease, where treatment options are limited. PMID:23337717

  17. Alternative Pathway Dysregulation and the Conundrum of Complement Activation by IgG4 Immune Complexes in Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN), a major cause of nephrotic syndrome, is a non-inflammatory immune kidney disease mediated by IgG antibodies that form glomerular subepithelial immune complexes. In primary MN, autoantibodies target proteins expressed on the podocyte surface, often phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1). Pathology is driven by complement activation, leading to podocyte injury and proteinuria. This article overviews the mechanisms of complement activation and regulation in MN, addressing the paradox that anti-PLA2R1 and other antibodies causing primary MN are predominantly (but not exclusively) IgG4, an IgG subclass that does not fix complement. Besides immune complexes, alterations of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) in MN may lead to impaired regulation of the alternative pathway (AP). The AP amplifies complement activation on surfaces insufficiently protected by complement regulatory proteins. Whereas podocytes are protected by cell-bound regulators, the GBM must recruit plasma factor H, which inhibits the AP on host surfaces carrying certain polyanions, such as heparan sulfate (HS) chains. Because HS chains present in the normal GBM are lost in MN, we posit that the local complement regulation by factor H may be impaired as a result. Thus, the loss of GBM HS in MN creates a micro-environment that promotes local amplification of complement activation, which in turn may be initiated via the classical or lectin pathways by subsets of IgG in immune complexes. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of complement activation and dysregulation in MN is important for designing more effective therapies. PMID:27199983

  18. Pathogenesis and significance of glomerular C4d deposition in lupus nephritis: activation of classical and lectin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Kyung; Maeng, Young-In; Lee, Sun-Jae; Lee, In Hee; Bae, Jisuk; Kang, Yu-Na; Park, Byung-Tae; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Immune complex-mediated complement activation through the classic pathway plays a key role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). C4d deposition in renal tissue reflects the prognosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the current study is to investigate the pathogenesis and clinicopathologic significance of glomerular C4d deposition in LN. We retrospectively analyzed clinical and histopathological data of 20 SLE patients with renal biopsy-proven LN and 10 non-SLE renal biopsy samples as control. LN biopsies showed varying degrees of glomerular C4d staining associated with immune complex deposits, IgG (p = 0.015), C1q (p = 0.032) and C3 (p = 0.049). 7 LN biopsies had all of C4d, C1q and C3 deposits in their glomeruli, indicative of the activation of the classical pathway, whereas 2 LN biopsies had C4d and C3 deposits without accompanying C1q deposits, indicating the activation of the lectin pathway. Glomerular C4d deposition was correlated with the LN subtype (p < 0.001). In particular, a diffusely intense and coarsely granular pattern of C4d deposition in all glomeruli was detected in class V membranous LN. However, glomerular C4d deposition was correlated with neither disease activity of SLE nor histological activity and chronicity of LN. In conclusion, the activation of the lectin pathway as well as the classical pathway seems to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of LN. Glomerular C4d staining could be helpful for diagnosing class V membranous LN, although glomerular C4d deposition does not reflect SLE disease activity and histological activity and chronicity. PMID:24133594

  19. An amphioxus gC1q protein binds human IgG and initiates the classical pathway: Implications for a C1q-mediated complement system in the basal chordate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Li, Mengyang; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-12-01

    The origin of the classical complement pathway remains open during chordate evolution. A C1q-like member, BjC1q, was identified in the basal chordate amphioxus. It is predominantly expressed in the hepatic caecum, hindgut, and notochord, and is significantly upregulated following challenge with bacteria or lipoteichoic acid and LPS. Recombinant BjC1q and its globular head domain specifically interact with lipoteichoic acid and LPS, but BjC1q displays little lectin activity. Moreover, rBjC1q can assemble to form the high molecular weight oligomers necessary for binding to proteases C1r/C1s and for complement activation, and binds human C1r/C1s/mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 as well as amphioxus serine proteases involved in the cleavage of C4/C2, and C3 activation. Importantly, rBjC1q binds with human IgG as well as an amphioxus Ig domain containing protein, resulting in the activation of the classical complement pathway. This is the first report showing that a C1q-like protein in invertebrates is able to initiate classical pathway, raising the possibility that amphioxus possesses a C1q-mediated complement system. It also suggests a new scenario for the emergence of the classical complement pathway, in contrast to the proposal that the lectin pathway evolved into the classical pathway.

  20. Characterization of mannose binding lectin from channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity capable of activating the lectin pathway of the complement system. A MBL gene was isolated from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). The deduced protein contains a canonical collagen-like domain, a carbohydrate recognition d...

  1. Complement-triggered pathways orchestrate regenerative responses throughout phylogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; DeAngelis, Robert A.; Lambris, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Adult tissue plasticity, cell reprogramming, and organ regeneration are major challenges in the field of modern regenerative medicine. Devising strategies to increase the regenerative capacity of tissues holds great promise for dealing with donor organ shortages and low transplantation outcomes and also provides essential impetus to tissue bioengineering approaches for organ repair and replacement. The inherent ability of cells to reprogram their fate by switching into an embryonic-like, pluripotent progenitor state is an evolutionary vestige that in mammals has been retained mostly in fetal tissues and persists only in a few organs of the adult body. Tissue regeneration reflects the capacity of terminally differentiated cells to re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate in response to acute injury or environmental stress signals. In lower vertebrates, this regenerative capacity extends to several organs and remarkably culminates in precise tissue patterning, through cellular transdifferentiation and complex morphogenetic processes that can faithfully reconstruct entire body parts. Many lessons have been learned from robust regeneration models in amphibians such as the newt and axolotl. However, the dynamic interactions between the regenerating tissue, the surrounding stroma, and the host immune response, as it adapts to the actively proliferating tissue, remain ill-defined. The regenerating zone, through a sequence of distinct molecular events, adopts phenotypic plasticity and undergoes rigorous tissue remodeling that, in turn, evokes a significant inflammatory response. Complement is a primordial sentinel of the innate immune response that engages in multiple inflammatory cascades as it becomes activated during tissue injury and remodeling. In this respect, complement proteins have been implicated in tissue and organ regeneration in both urodeles and mammals. Distinct complement-triggered pathways have been shown to modulate critical responses that promote tissue

  2. Identification of Novel Pathways in Plant Lectin-Induced Cancer Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zheng; Sun, Rong; Yu, Tian; Liu, Rong; Cheng, Li-Jia; Bao, Jin-Ku; Zou, Liang; Tang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Plant lectins have been investigated to elucidate their complicated mechanisms due to their remarkable anticancer activities. Although plant lectins seems promising as a potential anticancer agent for further preclinical and clinical uses, further research is still urgently needed and should include more focus on molecular mechanisms. Herein, a Naïve Bayesian model was developed to predict the protein-protein interaction (PPI), and thus construct the global human PPI network. Moreover, multiple sources of biological data, such as smallest shared biological process (SSBP), domain-domain interaction (DDI), gene co-expression profiles and cross-species interolog mapping were integrated to build the core apoptotic PPI network. In addition, we further modified it into a plant lectin-induced apoptotic cell death context. Then, we identified 22 apoptotic hub proteins in mesothelioma cells according to their different microarray expressions. Subsequently, we used combinational methods to predict microRNAs (miRNAs) which could negatively regulate the abovementioned hub proteins. Together, we demonstrated the ability of our Naïve Bayesian model-based network for identifying novel plant lectin-treated cancer cell apoptotic pathways. These findings may provide new clues concerning plant lectins as potential apoptotic inducers for cancer drug discovery. PMID:26867193

  3. Identification of Novel Pathways in Plant Lectin-Induced Cancer Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zheng; Sun, Rong; Yu, Tian; Liu, Rong; Cheng, Li-Jia; Bao, Jin-Ku; Zou, Liang; Tang, Yong

    2016-02-08

    Plant lectins have been investigated to elucidate their complicated mechanisms due to their remarkable anticancer activities. Although plant lectins seems promising as a potential anticancer agent for further preclinical and clinical uses, further research is still urgently needed and should include more focus on molecular mechanisms. Herein, a Naïve Bayesian model was developed to predict the protein-protein interaction (PPI), and thus construct the global human PPI network. Moreover, multiple sources of biological data, such as smallest shared biological process (SSBP), domain-domain interaction (DDI), gene co-expression profiles and cross-species interolog mapping were integrated to build the core apoptotic PPI network. In addition, we further modified it into a plant lectin-induced apoptotic cell death context. Then, we identified 22 apoptotic hub proteins in mesothelioma cells according to their different microarray expressions. Subsequently, we used combinational methods to predict microRNAs (miRNAs) which could negatively regulate the abovementioned hub proteins. Together, we demonstrated the ability of our Naïve Bayesian model-based network for identifying novel plant lectin-treated cancer cell apoptotic pathways. These findings may provide new clues concerning plant lectins as potential apoptotic inducers for cancer drug discovery.

  4. AMD and the alternative complement pathway: genetics and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Tan, Perciliz L; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2016-06-21

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an ocular neurodegenerative disorder and is the leading cause of legal blindness in Western societies, with a prevalence of up to 8 % over the age of 60, which continues to increase with age. AMD is characterized by the progressive breakdown of the macula (the central region of the retina), resulting in the loss of central vision including visual acuity. While its molecular etiology remains unclear, advances in genetics and genomics have illuminated the genetic architecture of the disease and have generated attractive pathomechanistic hypotheses. Here, we review the genetic architecture of AMD, considering the contribution of both common and rare alleles to susceptibility, and we explore the possible mechanistic links between photoreceptor degeneration and the alternative complement pathway, a cascade that has emerged as the most potent genetic driver of this disorder.

  5. Complement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fungal infections and some parasitic infections such as malaria . Normal Results Total blood complement level: 41 to ... Glomerulonephritis Hepatitis Hereditary angioedema Kidney transplant Lupus nephritis Malaria Protein in diet Rheumatoid arthritis Septicemia Shock Systemic ...

  6. Genetic control of the alternative pathway of complement in humans and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Laura A; Edwards, Albert O; Ryu, Euijung; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Baratz, Keith H; Brown, William L; Charbel Issa, Peter; Scholl, Hendrik P; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Schmid-Kubista, Katharina E; Bailey, Kent R; Oppermann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the alternative pathway of complement is implicated in common neurodegenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We explored the impact of common variation in genes encoding proteins of the alternative pathway on complement activation in human blood and in AMD. Genetic variation across the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB) and component 3 (C3) was determined. The influence of common haplotypes defining transcriptional and translational units on complement activation in blood was determined in a quantitative genomic association study. Individual haplotypes in CFH and CFB were associated with distinct and novel effects on plasma levels of precursors, regulators and activation products of the alternative pathway of complement in human blood. Further, genetic variation in CFH thought to influence cell surface regulation of complement did not alter plasma complement levels in human blood. Plasma markers of chronic activation (split-products Ba and C3d) and an activating enzyme (factor D) were elevated in AMD subjects. Most of the elevation in AMD was accounted for by the genetic variation controlling complement activation in human blood. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement in blood is under genetic control and increases with age. The genetic variation associated with increased activation of complement in human blood also increased the risk of AMD. Our data are consistent with a disease model in which genetic variation in the complement system increases the risk of AMD by a combination of systemic complement activation and abnormal regulation of complement activation in local tissues.

  7. Complement in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Rawat, Amit; Sharma, Madhubala; Singh, Surjit

    2017-02-01

    The complement system is an ancient and evolutionary conserved element of the innate immune mechanism. It comprises of more than 20 serum proteins most of which are synthesized in the liver. These proteins are synthesized as inactive precursor proteins which are activated by appropriate stimuli. The activated forms of these proteins act as proteases and cleave other components successively in amplification pathways leading to exponential generation of final effectors. Three major pathways of complement pathways have been described, namely the classical, alternative and lectin pathways which are activated by different stimuli. However, all the 3 pathways converge on Complement C3. Cleavage of C3 and C5 successively leads to the production of the membrane attack complex which is final common effector. Excessive and uncontrolled activation of the complement has been implicated in the host of autoimmune diseases. But the complement has also been bemusedly described as the proverbial "double edged sword". On one hand, complement is the final effector of tissue injury in autoimmune diseases and on the other, deficiencies of some components of the complement can result in autoimmune diseases. Currently available tools such as enzyme based immunoassays for functional assessment of complement pathways, flow cytometry, next generation sequencing and proteomics-based approaches provide an exciting opportunity to study this ancient yet mysterious element of innate immunity.

  8. C-type lectin-like receptors of the dectin-1 cluster: ligands and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Plato, Anthony; Willment, Janet A; Brown, Gordon D

    2013-04-01

    Innate immunity is constructed around genetically encoded receptors that survey the intracellular and extracellular environments for signs of invading microorganisms. These receptors recognise the invader and through complex intracellular networks of molecular signaling, they destroy the threat whilst instructing effective adaptive immune responses. Many of these receptors, like the Toll-like receptors in particular, are well-known for their ability to mediate downstream responses upon recognition of exogenous or endogenous ligands; however, the emerging family known as the C-type lectin-like receptors contains many members that have a huge impact on immune and homeostatic regulation. Of particular interest here are the C-type lectin-like receptors that make up the Dectin-1 cluster and their intracellular signaling motifs that mediate their functions. In this review, we aim to draw together current knowledge of ligands, motifs and signaling pathways, present downstream of Dectin-1 cluster receptors, and discuss how these dictate their role within biological systems.

  9. Cigarette smoke can activate the alternative pathway of complement in vitro by modifying the third component of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Kew, R R; Ghebrehiwet, B; Janoff, A

    1985-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with significant increases in the number of pulmonary mononuclear phagocytes and neutrophils. A potent chemoattractant for these cells is C5a, a peptide generated during complement (C) activation. We, therefore, investigated the possibility that cigarette smoke could activate the complement system in vitro. Our results show that factor(s) (mol wt less than 1,000) present in an aqueous solution of whole, unfiltered cigarette smoke can deplete the hemolytic capacity of whole human serum in a dose-dependent manner. The particle-free, filtered gas phase of cigarette smoke is inactive. The smoke factor(s) do not activate serum C1, but do deplete serum C4 activity. Treatment of purified human C3 with whole smoke solution modifies the molecule such that its subsequent addition to serum (containing Mg/EGTA to block the classical pathway) results in consumption of hemolytic complement by activation of the alternative pathway. Smoke-modified C3 shows increased anodal migration in agarose electrophoresis, but this is not due to proteolytic cleavage of the molecule as evidenced by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In contrast to methylamine-treated C3, C3 treated with smoke is only partially susceptible to the action of the complement regulatory proteins Factors H and I. In addition, smoke-modified C3 has diminished binding to Factor H as compared with methylamine-treated C3. Finally, smoke-modified C3 incorporates [14C]methylamine which suggests that the thiolester bond may be intact. These data indicate that aqueous whole cigarette smoke solution can modify C3 and activate the alternative pathway of complement, perhaps by a previously unrecognized mechanism. Should this occur in vivo, complement activation might partly account for the extensive pulmonary leukocyte recruitment observed in smokers. Images PMID:3156879

  10. Review on complement analysis method and the roles of glycosaminoglycans in the complement system.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Li, Yan; Ijaz, Muhammad; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Lian, Qianqian; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-12-10

    Complement system is composed of over 30 proteins and it plays important roles in self-defence and inflammation. There are three activation pathways, including classical pathway, alternative pathway and lectin pathway, in complement system, and they are associated with many diseases such as osteoarthritis and age-related macular degeneration. Modulation of the complement system may be a promising strategy in the treatment of related diseases. Glycosaminoglycans are anionic linear polysaccharides without branches. They are one kind of multi-functional macromolecules which have great potential in regulating complement system. This review is organized around two aspects between the introduction of complement system and the interaction of glycosaminoglycans with complement system. Three complement activation pathways and the biological significance were introduced first. Then functional analysis methods were compared to provide a strategy for potential glycosaminoglycans screen. Finally, the roles of glycosaminoglycans played in the complement system were summed up.

  11. Target pattern recognition by complement proteins of the classical and alternative pathways.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu-Hoi; Tan, Lee Aun; Carroll, Maria V; Gentle, Madeleine E; Sim, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    The complement system is a major component of the innate defence of animals against invading microorganisms, and is also essential for the recognition and clearance of damaged or structurally-altered host cells or macromolecules. The system is activated by three different pathways, each of which responds, using different recognition molecules, to a very wide range of activators. The recognition protein of the complement classical pathway, C1q is described in detail here, with comparisons to the alternative pathway.

  12. Pentraxin 3, ficolin-2 and lectin pathway associated serine protease MASP-3 as early predictors of myocardial infarction - the HUNT2 study

    PubMed Central

    Vengen, Inga Thorsen; Enger, Tone Bull; Videm, Vibeke; Garred, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The lectin complement pathway is suggested to play a role in atherogenesis. Pentraxin-3 (PTX3), ficolin-1, ficolin-2, ficolin-3, MBL/ficolin/collectin-associated serine protease-3 (MASP-3) and MBL/ficolin/collectin-associated protein-1 (MAP-1) are molecules related to activation of the lectin complement pathway. We hypothesized that serum levels of these molecules may be associated with the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). In a Norwegian population-based cohort (HUNT2) where young to middle-aged relatively healthy Caucasians were followed up for a first-time MI from 1995–1997 through 2008, the 370 youngest MI patients were matched by age (range 29–62 years) and gender to 370 controls. After adjustments for traditional risk factors, the two highest tertiles of PTX3 and the highest tertiles of ficolin-2 and MASP-3 were associated with MI, with odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of 1.65 (1.10–2.47) and 2.79 (1.83–4.24) for PTX3, 1.55 (1.04–2.30) for ficolin-2, and 0.63 (0.043–0.94) for MASP-3. Ficolin-1, ficolin-3 and MAP-1 were not associated with MI. In a multimarker analysis of all associated biomarkers, only PTX3 and MASP-3 remained significant. PTX-3 and MASP-3 enhanced prediction of MI compared to the traditional Framingham risk score alone (AUC increased from 0.64 to 0.68, p = 0.006). These results support the role of complement-dependent inflammation in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. PMID:28216633

  13. Complement pathway biomarkers and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2016-01-01

    In the age-related macular degeneration (AMD) ‘inflammation model', local inflammation plus complement activation contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of the disease. Multiple genetic associations have now been established correlating the risk of development or progression of AMD. Stratifying patients by their AMD genetic profile may facilitate future AMD therapeutic trials resulting in meaningful clinical trial end points with smaller sample sizes and study duration. PMID:26493033

  14. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host.

  15. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host. PMID:28066433

  16. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway preserves photoreceptors after retinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Sweigard, J. Harry; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Smith, Kaylee E.; Kim, Leo A.; Paschalis, Eleftherios I.; Okonuki, Yoko; Castillejos, Alexandra; Kataoka, Keiko; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Yanai, Ryoji; Husain, Deeba; Lambris, John D.; Vavvas, Demetrios; Miller, Joan W.; Connor, Kip M.

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of photoreceptors is a primary cause of vision loss worldwide, making the underlying mechanisms surrounding photoreceptor cell death critical to developing new treatment strategies. Retinal detachment, characterized by the separation of photoreceptors from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium, is a sight-threatening event that can happen in a number of retinal diseases. The detached photoreceptors undergo apoptosis and programmed necrosis. Given that photoreceptors are nondividing cells, their loss leads to irreversible visual impairment even after successful retinal reattachment surgery. To better understand the underlying disease mechanisms, we analyzed innate immune system regulators in the vitreous of human patients with retinal detachment and correlated the results with findings in a mouse model of retinal detachment. We identified the alternative complement pathway as promoting early photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment. Photoreceptors down-regulate membrane-bound inhibitors of complement, allowing for selective targeting by the alternative complement pathway. When photoreceptors in the detached retina were removed from the primary source of oxygen and nutrients (choroidal vascular bed), the retina became hypoxic, leading to an up-regulation of complement factor B, a key mediator of the alternative pathway. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway in knockout mice or through pharmacological means ameliorated photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment. Our current study begins to outline the mechanism by which the alternative complement pathway facilitates photoreceptor cell death in the damaged retina. PMID:26203084

  17. Activation of complement pathways after contusion-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Aileen J; Robert, Stephanie; Huang, Wencheng; Young, Wise; Cotman, Carl W

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that a cellular inflammatory response is initiated, and inflammatory cytokines are synthesized, following experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the complement cascade, a major component of both the innate and adaptive immune response, is also activated following experimental SCI. We investigated the pathways, cellular localization, timecourse, and degree of complement activation in rat spinal cord following acute contusion-induced SCI using the New York University (NYU) weight drop impactor. Mild and severe injuries (12.5 and 50 mm drop heights) at 1, 7, and 42 days post injury time points were evaluated. Classical (C1q and C4), alternative (Factor B) and terminal (C5b-9) complement pathways were strongly activated within 1 day of SCI. Complement protein immunoreactivity was predominantly found in cell types vulnerable to degeneration, neurons and oligodendrocytes, and was not generally observed in inflammatory or astroglial cells. Surprisingly, immunoreactivity for complement proteins was also evident 6 weeks after injury, and complement activation was observed as far as 20 mm rostral to the site of injury. Axonal staining by C1q and Factor B was also observed, suggesting a potential role for the complement cascade in demyelination or axonal degeneration. These data support the hypothesis that complement activation plays a role in SCI.

  18. Alternative complement pathway activation increases mortality in a model of burn injury in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, J A; Donelan, M; Hawiger, A; Burke, J F

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the role of the complement system in burn injury in an experimental model in mice. A 25% body surface area, full-thickness scald wound was produced in anesthetized animals. Massive activation of the alternative complement pathway, but not the classical pathway, was seen. This activation was associated with the generation of neutrophil aggregating activity in the plasma, neutrophil aggregates in the lungs, increased pulmonary vascular permeability, and increased lung edema formation. Decomplementation with cobra venom factor (CVF) or genetic C5 deficiency diminished these pathologic changes, and CVF pretreatment substantially reduced burn mortality in the first 24 h. Preliminary data show that human burn patients have a similar pattern of complement activation involving predominantly the alternative pathway, indicating the possible relevance of the murine model to human disease. Images PMID:7174787

  19. Alternative Complement Pathway Deficiency Ameliorates Chronic Smoke-Induced Functional and Morphological Ocular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodell, Alex; Coughlin, Beth; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Casey, Sarah; Williamson, Tucker; Ferrell, W. Drew; Atkinson, Carl; Jones, Bryan W.; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2013-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a complex disease involving genetic variants and environmental insults, is among the leading causes of blindness in Western populations. Genetic and histologic evidence implicate the complement system in AMD pathogenesis; and smoking is the major environmental risk factor associated with increased disease risk. Although previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke exposure (CE) causes retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) defects in mice, and smoking leads to complement activation in patients, it is unknown whether complement activation is causative in the development of CE pathology; and if so, which complement pathway is required. Methods Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or clean, filtered air for 6 months. The effects of CE were analyzed in wildtype (WT) mice or mice without a functional complement alternative pathway (AP; CFB−/−) using molecular, histological, electrophysiological, and behavioral outcomes. Results CE in WT mice exhibited a significant reduction in function of both rods and cones as determined by electroretinography and contrast sensitivity measurements, concomitant with a thinning of the nuclear layers as measured by SD-OCT imaging and histology. Gene expression analyses suggested that alterations in both photoreceptors and RPE/choroid might contribute to the observed loss of function, and visualization of complement C3d deposition implies the RPE/Bruch's membrane (BrM) complex as the target of AP activity. RPE/BrM alterations include an increase in mitochondrial size concomitant with an apical shift in mitochondrial distribution within the RPE and a thickening of BrM. CFB−/− mice were protected from developing these CE-mediated alterations. Conclusions Taken together, these findings provide clear evidence that ocular pathology generated in CE mice is dependent on complement activation and requires the AP. Identifying animal models with RPE/BrM damage and verifying which

  20. Evidence for intrathecal synthesis of alternative pathway complement activation proteins in experimental meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Stahel, P. F.; Frei, K.; Fontana, A.; Eugster, H. P.; Ault, B. H.; Barnum, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    Complement has been shown to contribute to intrathecal inflammation in bacterial meningitis. However, the cellular source of complement in the infected central nervous system has not been determined. In this study, we analyzed protein and mRNA expression of two alternative pathway complement activation proteins, C3 and factor B, in the brains of mice with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis. Complement protein levels were found elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of infected mice, compared with mock-infected animals. In the course of the disease, enhanced C3 and factor B mRNA expression was detected on pyramidal neurons and Purkinje cells within 6 hours, peaking at 12 hours and then gradually decreasing by 72 hours after infection. In addition, leukocytes infiltrating the subarachnoid space, within 12 to 24 hours, expressed mRNA for C3 and factor B. The cellular infiltration increased dramatically up to 72 hours. Intraperitoneal injection of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha up-regulated C3 and factor B mRNA expression on neurons in normal mice, suggesting that TNF-alpha may represent one cytokine regulating complement expression in this model of bacterial meningitis. However, additional mediators may be involved in regulation of intrathecal complement expression, as infected mice deficient of TNF/lymphotoxin-alpha genes did not demonstrate attenuated complement expression in the brain. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9327721

  1. Disease-causing mutations in genes of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Degn, Søren E; Jensenius, Jens C; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-06-10

    Recent studies have revealed profound developmental consequences of mutations in genes encoding proteins of the lectin pathway of complement activation, a central component of the innate immune system. Apart from impairment of immunity against microorganisms, it is known that hereditary deficiencies of this system predispose one to autoimmune conditions. Polymorphisms in complement genes are linked to, for example, atypical hemolytic uremia and age-dependent macular degeneration. The complement system comprises three convergent pathways of activation: the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathway. The recently discovered lectin pathway is less studied, but polymorphisms in the plasma pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are known to impact its level, and polymorphisms in the MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) result in defects of complement activation. Recent studies have described roles outside complement and immunity of another MBL-associated serine protease, MASP-3, in the etiology of 3MC syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder involving a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism. Syndrome-causing mutations were identified in MASP1, encoding MASP-3 and two additional proteins, MASP-1 and MAp44. Furthermore, an association was discovered between 3MC syndrome and mutations in COLEC11, encoding CL-K1, another molecule of the lectin pathway. The findings were confirmed in zebrafish, indicating that MASP-3 and CL-K1 underlie an evolutionarily conserved pathway of embryonic development. Along with the discovery of a role of C1q in pruning synapses in mice, these recent advances point toward a broader role of complement in development. Here, we compare the functional immunologic consequences of "conventional" complement deficiencies with these newly described developmental roles.

  2. Disease-Causing Mutations in Genes of the Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Degn, Søren E.; Jensenius, Jens C.; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed profound developmental consequences of mutations in genes encoding proteins of the lectin pathway of complement activation, a central component of the innate immune system. Apart from impairment of immunity against microorganisms, it is known that hereditary deficiencies of this system predispose one to autoimmune conditions. Polymorphisms in complement genes are linked to, for example, atypical hemolytic uremia and age-dependent macular degeneration. The complement system comprises three convergent pathways of activation: the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathway. The recently discovered lectin pathway is less studied, but polymorphisms in the plasma pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are known to impact its level, and polymorphisms in the MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) result in defects of complement activation. Recent studies have described roles outside complement and immunity of another MBL-associated serine protease, MASP-3, in the etiology of 3MC syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder involving a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism. Syndrome-causing mutations were identified in MASP1, encoding MASP-3 and two additional proteins, MASP-1 and MAp44. Furthermore, an association was discovered between 3MC syndrome and mutations in COLEC11, encoding CL-K1, another molecule of the lectin pathway. The findings were confirmed in zebrafish, indicating that MASP-3 and CL-K1 underlie an evolutionarily conserved pathway of embryonic development. Along with the discovery of a role of C1q in pruning synapses in mice, these recent advances point toward a broader role of complement in development. Here, we compare the functional immunologic consequences of “conventional” complement deficiencies with these newly described developmental roles. PMID:21664996

  3. Complement activation pathways in murine immune complex-induced arthritis and in C3a and C5a generation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Banda, N K; Levitt, B; Wood, A K; Takahashi, K; Stahl, G L; Holers, V M; Arend, W P

    2010-01-01

    The alternative pathway (AP) of complement alone is capable of mediating immune complex-induced arthritis in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model in mice. Whether the classical pathway (CP) or lectin pathway (LP) alone can mediate CAIA is not known. Using mice genetically deficient in different complement components, our results reported herein establish that the CP and LP alone are each incapable of mediating CAIA. A lower level or absence of C3 and/or C5 activation by the CP may be possible explanations for the importance of the AP in CAIA and in many murine models of disease. In addition, other investigators have reported that CP C5 convertase activity is absent in mouse sera. To address these questions, we employed an in vitro system of adherent immunoglobulin (Ig)G-induced complement activation using plates coated with murine anti-collagen monoclonal antibody (mAb). These experiments used complement-deficient mouse sera and wild-type mouse or normal human sera under conditions inactivating either the CP (Ca++ deficiency) or the AP (mAb inhibitory to factor B). Robust generation of both C3a and C5a by either the AP or CP alone were observed with both mouse and human sera, although there were some small differences between the species of sera. We conclude that neither the CP nor LP alone is capable of mediating CAIA in vivo and that mouse sera exhibits a high level of IgG-induced C5a generation in vitro through either the CP or AP. PMID:19843088

  4. Glomeruli of Dense Deposit Disease contain components of the alternative and terminal complement pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Gamez, Jeffrey D.; Vrana, Julie A.; Theis, Jason D.; Bergen, H. Robert; Zipfel, Peter F.; Dogan, Ahmet; Smith, Richard J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Dense Deposit Disease (DDD), or membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II, is a rare renal disease characterized by dense deposits in the mesangium and along the glomerular basement membranes that can be seen by electron microscopy. Although these deposits contain complement factor C3, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy, their precise composition remains unknown. To address this question, we used mass spectrometry to identify the proteins in laser microdissected glomeruli isolated from paraffin-embedded tissue of eight confirmed cases of DDD. Compared to glomeruli from five control patients, we found that all of the glomeruli from patients with DDD contain components of the alternative pathway and terminal complement complex. Factor C9 was uniformly present as well as the two fluid-phase regulators of terminal complement complex clusterin and vitronectin. In contrast, in nine patients with immune complex–mediated membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, glomerular samples contained mainly immunoglobulins and complement factors C3 and C4. Our study shows that in addition to fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative pathway, soluble components of the terminal complement complex contribute to glomerular lesions found in DDD. PMID:19177158

  5. Activation of the alternative complement pathway in canine normal serum by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Bianchini, A.A.C.; Petroni, T.F.; Fedatto, P.F.; Bianchini, R.R.; Venancio, E.J.; Itano, E.N.; Ono, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a human granulomatous disease. Recently the first case of natural disease in dogs was reported. The complement system is an important effector component of humoral immunity against infectious agents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the activation of the dog alternative complement pathway by P. brasiliensis. Initially, the ability of erythrocytes of guinea pig, rabbit, sheep, chicken and swine to activate the dog alternative pathway was evaluated. The guinea pig erythrocytes showed the greatest capacity to activate dog alternative pathway. The alternative (AH50) hemolytic activity was evaluated in 27 serum samples from healthy dogs and the mean values were 87.2 AH50/ml. No significant differences were observed in relation to sex and age. The alternative pathway activation by P. brasiliensis was higher in serum samples from adult dogs when compared to puppies and aged dogs (p ≤ 0.05). This is the first report of dog alternative complement pathway activation by P. brasiliensis and suggests that it may play a protective role in canine paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:24031350

  6. Synergy between the classical and alternative pathways of complement is essential for conferring effective protection against the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, Ajitanuj; Pawar, Shailesh D.; Nawadkar, Renuka; Kulkarni, Neeraja

    2017-01-01

    The pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus caused significant morbidity and mortality worldwide thus necessitating the need to understand the host factors that influence its control. Previously, the complement system has been shown to provide protection during the seasonal influenza virus infection, however, the role of individual complement pathways is not yet clear. Here, we have dissected the role of intact complement as well as of its individual activation pathways during the pandemic influenza virus infection using mouse strains deficient in various complement components. We show that the virus infection in C3-/- mice results in increased viral load and 100% mortality, which can be reversed by adoptive transfer of naïve wild-type (WT) splenocytes, purified splenic B cells, or passive transfer of immune sera from WT, but not C3-/- mice. Blocking of C3a and/or C5a receptor signaling in WT mice using receptor antagonists and use of C3aR-/- and C5aR-/- mice showed significant mortality after blocking/ablation of C3aR, with little or no effect after blocking/ablation of C5aR. Intriguingly, deficiency of C4 and FB in mice resulted in only partial mortality (24%-32%) suggesting a necessary cross-talk between the classical/lectin and alternative pathways for providing effective protection. In vitro virus neutralization experiments performed to probe the cross-talk between the various pathways indicated that activation of the classical and alternative pathways in concert, owing to coating of viral surface by antibodies, is needed for its efficient neutralization. Examination of the virus-specific complement-binding antibodies in virus positive subjects showed that their levels vary among individuals. Together these results indicate that cooperation between the classical and alternative pathways not only result in efficient direct neutralization of the pandemic influenza virus, but also lead to the optimum generation of C3a, which when sensed by the immune cells along

  7. Differential ability to resist to complement lysis and invade host cells mediated by MBL in R4 and 860 strains of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Evans-Osses, Ingrid; Mojoli, Andres; Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; da Costa, Denise Endo; DaRocha, Wanderson Duarte; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; de Messias-Reason, Iara; Ramirez, Marcel Ivan

    2014-03-18

    To produce an infection Trypanosoma cruzi must evade lysis by the complement system. During early stages of infection, the lectin pathway plays an important role in host defense and can be activated by binding of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) to carbohydrates on the surface of pathogens. We hypothesized that MBL has a dual role during parasite-host cell interaction as lectin complement pathway activator and as binding molecule to invade the host cell. We used two polarized strains of T. cruzi, R4 (susceptible) and 860 (resistant) strains, to investigate the role of MBL in complement-mediated lysis. Interestingly R4, but not 860 metacyclic strain, markedly increases the invasion of host cells, suggesting that MBL drives the invasion process while the parasite deactivates the Lectin complement pathway.

  8. Alternative Pathway of Complement in Children with Diarrhea-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Marians, Russell; Emlen, Woodruff; Wood, Susan; Smith, Christopher; Akana, Hillary; Holers, V. Michael; Lesser, Martin; Kline, Myriam; Hoffman, Cathy; Christen, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) is a common cause of acute kidney injury in children. Mutations in alternative pathway (AP) complement regulatory proteins have been identified in severe cases of thrombotic microangiopathy, but the role of the AP in D+HUS has not been studied. Therefore, we determined whether plasma levels of markers of activation of the AP are increased in D+HUS and are biomarkers of the severity of renal injury that predict the need for dialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Patients were randomly selected from among participants in the HUS-SYNSORB Pk trial. Plasma samples were collected on days 1, 4, 7, and 10 after enrollment and day 28 after discharge from the hospital. Levels of two complement pathway products, Bb and SC5b-9, were determined by ELISA. Results: Seventeen children (6 boys and 11 girls; age, 5.4 ± 3.5 yr) were studied. Eight (47%) required dialysis support, and two had serious extrarenal events. On the day of enrollment, plasma levels of Bb and SC5b-9 were significantly increased in all patients compared with healthy controls (P < 0.01). The elevated concentrations normalized by day 28 after discharge. Circulating levels of complement pathway fragments did not correlate with severity of renal injury or occurrence of complications. Conclusions: Patients with acute-onset D+HUS manifest activation of the AP of complement that is temporally related to the onset of disease and that resolves within 1 mo. Therapies to inhibit the AP of complement may be useful in attenuating the severity of renal injury and extrarenal complications. PMID:19820137

  9. Demonstration of alternative and classical complement pathway activity in colostrum from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Matheswaran, K; Dhinakar Raj, G; Nachimuthu, K

    2003-09-01

    Buffalo colostrum caused lysis of unsensitized red blood cells (RBC) from sheep, goats, rabbits and chickens. RBC from cattle and buffalo were resistant to lysis. That lysis was due to the presence of natural antibodies to these RBC was ruled out since there was no reduction in haemolytic titres even after adsorption with the respective RBC. The addition of EGTA to the diluent had no effect on the haemolytic activity. These findings indicate the presence of alternative complement pathway (ACP) activity in buffalo colostrum. The haemolytic activity of buffalo complement for unsensitized rabbit RBC was reduced to very low levels by heating at 50 degrees C for 45 min. Treatment with zymosan also inhibited the haemolytic activity, while inulin had no effect. The maximum activity of ACP occurred in the presence of 4 mmol/L Mg(2+) in the diluent. The range of ACP activities in colostrum from buffaloes varied from 4.06 to 8.48 CH50 units/ml. Using a standard system for titrating the classical complement pathway and rabbit red blood cells sensitized with goat haemolysin, the range of complement activity in buffalo colostrum was 4.81-6.77 CH50/ml.

  10. The alternative complement pathway is dysregulated in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Shahini, Negar; Michelsen, Annika E.; Nilsson, Per H.; Ekholt, Karin; Gullestad, Lars; Broch, Kaspar; Dahl, Christen P.; Aukrust, Pål; Ueland, Thor; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Yndestad, Arne; Louwe, Mieke C.

    2017-01-01

    The complement system, an important arm of the innate immune system, is activated in heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that HF patients are characterized by an imbalance of alternative amplification loop components; including properdin and complement factor D and the alternative pathway inhibitor factor H. These components and the activation product, terminal complement complex (TCC), were measured in plasma from 188 HF patients and 67 age- and sex- matched healthy controls by enzyme immunoassay. Our main findings were: (i) Compared to controls, patients with HF had significantly increased levels of factor D and TCC, and decreased levels of properdin, particularly patients with advanced clinical disorder (i.e., NYHA functional class IV), (ii) Levels of factor D and properdin in HF patients were correlated with measures of systemic inflammation (i.e., C-reactive protein), neurohormonal deterioration (i.e., Nt-proBNP), cardiac function, and deteriorated diastolic function, (iii) Low levels of factor H and properdin were associated with adverse outcome in univariate analysis and for factor H, this was also seen in an adjusted model. Our results indicate that dysregulation of circulating components of the alternative pathway explain the increased degree of complement activation and is related to disease severity in HF patients. PMID:28195242

  11. The alternative complement pathway is dysregulated in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Shahini, Negar; Michelsen, Annika E; Nilsson, Per H; Ekholt, Karin; Gullestad, Lars; Broch, Kaspar; Dahl, Christen P; Aukrust, Pål; Ueland, Thor; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Yndestad, Arne; Louwe, Mieke C

    2017-02-14

    The complement system, an important arm of the innate immune system, is activated in heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that HF patients are characterized by an imbalance of alternative amplification loop components; including properdin and complement factor D and the alternative pathway inhibitor factor H. These components and the activation product, terminal complement complex (TCC), were measured in plasma from 188 HF patients and 67 age- and sex- matched healthy controls by enzyme immunoassay. Our main findings were: (i) Compared to controls, patients with HF had significantly increased levels of factor D and TCC, and decreased levels of properdin, particularly patients with advanced clinical disorder (i.e., NYHA functional class IV), (ii) Levels of factor D and properdin in HF patients were correlated with measures of systemic inflammation (i.e., C-reactive protein), neurohormonal deterioration (i.e., Nt-proBNP), cardiac function, and deteriorated diastolic function, (iii) Low levels of factor H and properdin were associated with adverse outcome in univariate analysis and for factor H, this was also seen in an adjusted model. Our results indicate that dysregulation of circulating components of the alternative pathway explain the increased degree of complement activation and is related to disease severity in HF patients.

  12. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J.; Julian, Bruce A.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan–binding lectin–associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome–wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H–related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1–containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease. PMID:25694468

  13. Selective inhibition of the alternative complement pathway by sCR1[desLHR-A] protects the rabbit isolated heart from human complement-mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Gralinski, M R; Wiater, B C; Assenmacher, A N; Lucchesi, B R

    1996-09-01

    Evidence is presented that treatment with a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, sCR1[desLHR-A], protects the ex vivo perfused rabbit heart from human complement-mediated injury. Hearts from male New Zealand white rabbits were perfused in the Langendorff mode. After equilibration, normal human plasma was added to the perfusate as a source of complement. Concomitant with the addition of human plasma, vehicle (n = 13), soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) (n = 10), or sCR1[desLHR-A], a truncated version of sCR1 that lacks the C4b binding region (n = 10) was included in the perfusate. Hemodynamic variables were obtained for all groups before (baseline) and after the addition of human plasma. Compared to vehicle-treated hearts, variables recorded during perfusion with human plasma including coronary perfusion pressure, left ventricular developed pressure, and left ventricular end diastolic pressure, along with a reduction of creatine kinase efflux, were improved in hearts perfused with either complement inhibitor. In addition, in vitro hemolysis assays were utilized to discriminate between the classical and alternative pathways. The addition of sCR1 to human serum prevented both the classical and alternative pathway-mediated hemolysis while sCR1[desLHR-A] prevented only the alternative pathway-mediated lysis. This study indicates that deletion of the C4b-binding site from sCR1 results in a new pharmacological moiety, sCR1[desLHR-A], that primarily inhibits the alternative pathway of human complement.

  14. Alternative complement pathway activation during invasive coronary procedures in acute myocardial infarction and stable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Zsófia; Csuka, Dorottya; Vargova, Katarina; Kovács, Andrea; Leé, Sarolta; Varga, Lilian; Préda, István; Tóth Zsámboki, Emese; Prohászka, Zoltán; Kiss, Róbert Gábor

    2016-12-01

    The effect of invasive percutaneous coronary procedures on complement activation has not been elucidated. We enrolled stable angina patients with elective percutaneous coronary intervention (SA-PCI, n=24), diagnostic coronary angiography (CA, n=52) and 23 patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction and primary PCI (STEMI-PCI). Complement activation products (C1rC1sC1inh, C3bBbP and SC5b-9) were measured on admission, 6 and 24h after coronary procedures. The alternative pathway product, C3bBbP significantly and reversibly increased 6h after elective PCI (baseline: 7.81AU/ml, 6h: 16.09AU/ml, 24h: 4.27AU/ml, p<0.01, n=23) and diagnostic angiography (baseline: 6.13AU/ml, 6h: 12.08AU/ml, 24h: 5.4AU/ml, p<0.01, n=52). Six hour C3bBbP values correlated with post-procedural CK, creatinine level and the applied contrast material volume (r=0.41, r=0.4, r=0.3, p<0.05, respectively). In STEMI-PCI, baseline C3bBbP level was higher, compared to SA-PCI or CA patients (11.33AU/ml vs. 7.81AU/ml or 6.13AU/ml, p<0.001). Similarly, the terminal complex (SC5b-9) level was already elevated at baseline compared to SA-PCI group (3.49AU/ml vs. 1.87AU/ml, p=0.011). Complement pathway products did not increase further after primary PCI. Elective coronary procedures induced transient alternative complement pathway activation, influenced by the applied contrast volume. In STEMI, the alternative complement pathway is promptly activated during the atherothrombotic event and PCI itself had no further detectable effect.

  15. Complement activity is associated with disease severity in multifocal motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vlam, Lotte; Cats, Elisabeth A.; Harschnitz, Oliver; Jansen, Marc D.; Piepers, Sanne; Veldink, Jan Herman; Franssen, Hessel; Stork, Abraham C.J.; Heezius, Erik; Rooijakkers, Suzan H.M.; Herpers, Bjorn L.; van Strijp, Jos A.; van den Berg, Leonard H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether high innate activity of the classical and lectin pathways of complement is associated with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and whether levels of innate complement activity or the potential of anti-GM1 antibodies to activate the complement system correlate with disease severity. Methods: We performed a case-control study including 79 patients with MMN and 79 matched healthy controls. Muscle weakness was documented with Medical Research Council scale sum score and axonal loss with nerve conduction studies. Activity of the classical and lectin pathways of complement was assessed by ELISA. We also determined serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) concentrations and polymorphisms in the MBL gene (MBL2) and quantified complement-activating properties of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies by ELISA. Results: Activity of the classical and lectin pathways, MBL2 genotypes, and serum MBL concentrations did not differ between patients and controls. Complement activation by anti-GM1 IgM antibodies was exclusively mediated through the classical pathway and correlated with antibody titers (p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that both high innate activity of the classical pathway of complement and high complement-activating capacity of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies were significantly associated with more severe muscle weakness and axonal loss. Conclusion: High innate activity of the classical pathway of complement and efficient complement-activating properties of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies are determinants of disease severity in patients with MMN. These findings underline the importance of anti-GM1 antibody–mediated complement activation in the pathogenesis and clinical course of MMN. PMID:26161430

  16. A Zebrafish Model for Uremic Toxicity: Role of the Complement Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Josh; Reinecke, James; Raff, Amanda C.; Melamed, Michal L.; Reinecke, James; Quan, Zhe; Evans, Todd; Meyer, Timothy W.; Hostetter, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    Many organic solutes accumulate in ESRD and some are poorly removed removed with urea based prescriptions for hemodialysis. However, their toxicities have been difficult to assess. We have employed an animal model, the zebrafish embryo, to test the toxicity of uremic serum compared to control. Serum was obtained from stable ESRD patients pre-dialysis or from normal subjects. Zebrafish embryos 24 hours post fertilization were exposed to experimental media at a ratio of 3:1 water:human serum. Those exposed to serum from uremic subjects had significantly reduced survival at 8 hours (19% +/− 18% vs. 94% +/− 6%; p < 0.05, uremic serum vs control, respectively). Embryos exposed to serum from ESRD subjects fractionated at 50kD showed significantly greater toxicity with the larger molecular weight fraction (83% +/− 11% vs 7% +/−17% survival, p < 0.05, <50kD vs >50 kD, respectively). Heating serum abrogated its toxicity. EDTA, a potent inhibitor of complement by virtue of calcium chelation, reduced the toxicity of uremic serum compared to untreated uremic serum (96%+/− 5% vs 28%+/− 20% survival, p < 0.016, chelated vs non chelated serum respectively). Anti- factor B, a specific inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, reduced the toxicity of uremic serum, compared to untreated uremic serum (98% +/− 6% vs. 3% +/− 9% survival, p < 0.016, anti- factor B treated vs non treated, respectively).Uremic serum is thus more toxic to zebrafish embryos than normal serum. Furthermore, this toxicity is associated with a fraction of large size, is inactivated by heat, and is reduced by both specific and non-specific inhibitors of complement activation. Together these data lend support to the hypothesis that at least some uremic toxicities may be mediated by complement. PMID:23689420

  17. A zebrafish model for uremic toxicity: role of the complement pathway.

    PubMed

    Berman, Nathaniel; Lectura, Melisa; Thurman, Joshua M; Reinecke, James; Raff, Amanda C; Melamed, Michal L; Quan, Zhe; Evans, Todd; Meyer, Timothy W; Hostetter, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    Many organic solutes accumulate in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and some are poorly removed with urea-based prescriptions for hemodialysis. However, their toxicities have been difficult to assess. We have employed an animal model, the zebrafish embryo, to test the toxicity of uremic serum compared to control. Serum was obtained from stable ESRD patients predialysis or from normal subjects. Zebrafish embryos 24 h postfertilization were exposed to experimental media at a water:human serum ratio of 3:1. Those exposed to serum from uremic subjects had significantly reduced survival at 8 h (19 ± 18 vs. 94 ± 6%, p < 0.05, uremic serum vs. control, respectively). Embryos exposed to serum from ESRD subjects fractionated at 50 kDa showed significantly greater toxicity with the larger molecular weight fraction (83 ± 11 vs. 7 ± 17% survival, p < 0.05, <50 vs. >50 kDa, respectively). Heating serum abrogated its toxicity. EDTA, a potent inhibitor of complement by virtue of calcium chelation, reduced the toxicity of uremic serum compared to untreated uremic serum (96 ± 5 vs. 28 ± 20% survival, p < 0.016, chelated vs. nonchelated serum, respectively). Anti-factor B, a specific inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, reduced the toxicity of uremic serum, compared to untreated uremic serum (98 ± 6 vs. 3 ± 9% survival, p < 0.016, anti-factor B treated vs. nontreated, respectively). Uremic serum is thus more toxic to zebrafish embryos than normal serum. Furthermore, this toxicity is associated with a fraction of large size, is inactivated by heat, and is reduced by both specific and nonspecific inhibitors of complement activation. Together these data lend support to the hypothesis that at least some uremic toxicities may be mediated by complement.

  18. Molluskan Hemocyanins Activate the Classical Pathway of the Human Complement System through Natural Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro-Bauerle, Javier; Maldonado, Ismael; Sosoniuk-Roche, Eduardo; Vallejos, Gerardo; López, Mercedes N.; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; Aguilar-Guzmán, Lorena; Valck, Carolina; Ferreira, Arturo; Becker, María Inés

    2017-01-01

    Molluskan hemocyanins are enormous oxygen-carrier glycoproteins that show remarkable immunostimulatory properties when inoculated in mammals, such as the generation of high levels of antibodies, a strong cellular reaction, and generation of non-specific antitumor immune responses in some types of cancer, particularly for superficial bladder cancer. These proteins have the ability to bias the immune response toward a Th1 phenotype. However, despite all their current uses with beneficial clinical outcomes, a clear mechanism explaining these properties is not available. Taking into account reports of natural antibodies against the hemocyanin of the gastropod Megathura crenulata [keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)] in humans as well as other vertebrate species, we report here for the first time, the presence, in sera from unimmunized healthy donors, of antibodies recognizing, in addition to KLH, two other hemocyanins from gastropods with documented immunomodulatory capacities: Fisurella latimarginata hemocyanin (FLH) and Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). Through an ELISA screening, we found IgM and IgG antibodies reactive with these hemocyanins. When the capacity of these antibodies to bind deglycosylated hemocyanins was studied, no decreased interaction was detected. Moreover, in the case of FLH, deglycosylation increased antibody binding. We evaluated through an in vitro complement deposition assay whether these antibodies activated the classical pathway of the human complement system. The results showed that all three hemocyanins and their deglycosylated counterparts elicited this activation, mediated by C1 binding to immunoglobulins. Thus, this work contributes to the understanding on how the complement system could participate in the immunostimulatory properties of hemocyanins, through natural, complement-activating antibodies reacting with these proteins. Although a role for carbohydrates cannot be completely ruled out, in our experimental setting

  19. Bioactive Lysophospholipids Generated by Hepatic Lipase Degradation of Lipoproteins Lead to Complement Activation via the Classical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wanchao; Paik, David C.; Barile, Gaetano R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We determined bioactivity of lysophospholipids generated by degradation of the low-density (LDL), very low-density (VLDL), and high-density (HDL) lipoproteins with hepatic lipase (HL), cholesterol esterase (CE), and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2). Methods. The LDL, VLDL, and HDL were treated with HL, CE, and Lp-PLA2 after immobilization on plates, and complement activation studies were performed with diluted human serum. Complement component 3 (C3) fixation, a marker for complement activation, was determined with a monoclonal anti-human C3d antibody. Enzymatic properties of HL and CE were assayed with triglyceride and phosphatidylcholine substrates for triglyceride hydrolase and phospholipase A activities. The ARPE-19 cells were used for viability studies. Results. The HL degradation of human lipoproteins LDL, VLDL, or HDL results in the formation of modified lipoproteins that can activate the complement pathway. Complement activation is dose- and time-dependent upon HL and occurs via the classical pathway. Enzymatic studies suggest that the phospholipase A1 activity of HL generates complement-activating lysophospholipids. C-reactive protein (CRP), known to simultaneously interact with complement C1 and complement factor H (CFH), further enhances HL-induced complement activation. The lysophospholipids, 1-Palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-Oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, can be directly cytotoxic to ARPE-19 cells. Conclusions. The HL degradation of lipoproteins, known to accumulate in the outer retina and in drusen, can lead to the formation of bioactive lysophospholipids that can trigger complement activation and induce RPE cellular dysfunction. Given the known risk associations for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with HL, CRP, and CFH, this study elucidates a possible damage pathway for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in genetically predisposed individuals, that HL activity may lead to accumulation of

  20. Interspecies Complementation of the LuxR Family Pathway-Specific Regulator Involved in Macrolide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mo, SangJoon; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2016-01-01

    PikD is a widely known pathway-specific regulator for controlling pikromycin production in Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, which is a representative of the large ATP-binding regulator of the LuxR family (LAL) in Streptomyces sp. RapH and FkbN also belong to the LAL family of transcriptional regulators, which show greatest homology with the ATP-binding motif and helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif of PikD. Overexpression of pikD and heterologous expression of rapH and fkbN led to enhanced production of pikromycin by approximately 1.8-, 1.6-, and 1.6-fold in S. venezuelae, respectively. Cross-complementation of rapH and fkbN in the pikD deletion mutant (ΔpikD) restored pikromycin and derived macrolactone production. Overall, these results show that heterologous expression of rapH and fkbN leads to the overproduction of pikromycin and its congeners from the pikromycin biosynthetic pathway in S. venezuelae, and they have the same functionality as the pathwayspecific transcriptional activator for the pikromycin biosynthetic pathway in the ΔpikD strain. These results also show extensive "cross-communication" between pathway-specific regulators of streptomycetes and suggest revision of the current paradigm for pathwayspecific versus global regulation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces species.

  1. NETosing Neutrophils Activate Complement Both on Their Own NETs and Bacteria via Alternative and Non-alternative Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Joshua; Pluthero, Fred G.; Douda, David N.; Riedl, Magdalena; Cherry, Ahmed; Ulanova, Marina; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils deposit antimicrobial proteins, such as myeloperoxidase and proteases on chromatin, which they release as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Neutrophils also carry key components of the complement alternative pathway (AP) such as properdin or complement factor P (CFP), complement factor B (CFB), and C3. However, the contribution of these complement components and complement activation during NET formation in the presence and absence of bacteria is poorly understood. We studied complement activation on NETs and a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01, PAKwt, and PAKgfp). Here, we show that anaphylatoxin C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which activates NADPH oxidase, induce the release of CFP, CFB, and C3 from neutrophils. In response to PMA or P. aeruginosa, neutrophils secrete CFP, deposit it on NETs and bacteria, and induce the formation of terminal complement complexes (C5b–9). A blocking anti-CFP antibody inhibited AP-mediated but not non-AP-mediated complement activation on NETs and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, NET-mediated complement activation occurs via both AP- and non AP-based mechanisms, and AP-mediated complement activation during NETosis is dependent on CFP. These findings suggest that neutrophils could use their “AP tool kit” to readily activate complement on NETs and Gram-negative bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa, whereas additional components present in the serum help to fix non-AP-mediated complement both on NETs and bacteria. This unique mechanism may play important roles in host defense and help to explain specific roles of complement activation in NET-related diseases. PMID:27148258

  2. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Julia A.; Hair, Pamela S.; Pallera, Haree K.; Kumar, Parvathi S.; Mauriello, Clifford T.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Phelps, Cody A.; Park, Dalnam; Thielens, Nicole M.; Pascal, Stephen M.; Chen, Waldon; Duffy, Diane M.; Lattanzio, Frank A.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26196285

  3. Early Components of the Complement Classical Activation Pathway in Human Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Katherine E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Yang, Yan; Spencer, Charles H.; Hauptmann, Georges; Hebert, Lee A.; Atkinson, John P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2016-01-01

    The complement system consists of effector proteins, regulators, and receptors that participate in host defense against pathogens. Activation of the complement system, via the classical pathway (CP), has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated tissue injury, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Paradoxically, a complete deficiency of an early component of the CP, as evidenced by homozygous genetic deficiencies reported in human, are strongly associated with the risk of developing SLE or a lupus-like disease. Similarly, isotype deficiency attributable to a gene copy-number (GCN) variation and/or the presence of autoantibodies directed against a CP component or a regulatory protein that result in an acquired deficiency are relatively common in SLE patients. Applying accurate assay methodologies with rigorous data validations, low GCNs of total C4, and heterozygous and homozygous deficiencies of C4A have been shown as medium to large effect size risk factors, while high copy numbers of total C4 or C4A as prevalent protective factors, of European and East-Asian SLE. Here, we summarize the current knowledge related to genetic deficiency and insufficiency, and acquired protein deficiencies for C1q, C1r, C1s, C4A/C4B, and C2 in disease pathogenesis and prognosis of SLE, and, briefly, for other systemic autoimmune diseases. As the complement system is increasingly found to be associated with autoimmune diseases and immune-mediated diseases, it has become an attractive therapeutic target. We highlight the recent developments and offer a balanced perspective concerning future investigations and therapeutic applications with a focus on early components of the CP in human systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26913032

  4. Functional and structural insight into properdin control of complement alternative pathway amplification.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Dennis V; Roumenina, Lubka; Jensen, Rasmus K; Gadeberg, Trine Af; Marinozzi, Chiara; Picard, Capucine; Rybkine, Tania; Thiel, Steffen; Sørensen, Uffe Bs; Stover, Cordula; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Andersen, Gregers R

    2017-03-06

    Properdin (FP) is an essential positive regulator of the complement alternative pathway (AP) providing stabilization of the C3 and C5 convertases, but its oligomeric nature challenges structural analysis. We describe here a novel FP deficiency (E244K) caused by a single point mutation which results in a very low level of AP activity. Recombinant FP E244K is monomeric, fails to support bacteriolysis, and binds weakly to C3 products. We compare this to a monomeric unit excised from oligomeric FP, which is also dysfunctional in bacteriolysis but binds the AP proconvertase, C3 convertase, C3 products and partially stabilizes the convertase. The crystal structure of such a FP-convertase complex suggests that the major contact between FP and the AP convertase is mediated by a single FP thrombospondin repeat and a small region in C3b. Small angle X-ray scattering indicates that FP E244K is trapped in a compact conformation preventing its oligomerization. Our studies demonstrate an essential role of FP oligomerization in vivo while our monomers enable detailed structural insight paving the way for novel modulators of complement.

  5. Inhibition effects of the classical pathway complement of isolated compounds from Quercus glauca.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Jong-Jin; Moon, Hyung-In

    2011-09-01

    Species of the Quercus species is an evergreen broadleaf tree found not only in Korea but also in China, Taiwan, and Japan. Quercus species is the most commonly occurring plant among the 50 native species of the family Fagaceae in Korea, China, and Taiwan. Quercus species have been used for diarrhea, dysentery, dermatitis, and hemorrhagia in Korean folk medicine. The present study evaluated the anticomplement effect of constituents from Quercus species (Fagaceae) in classical pathway complement system. We have evaluated leaves of five species of the Quercus genus with regard to its anticomplement activity and have identified its active principles following activity-guided isolation. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the 80% methanol extracts of the stem barks of Quercus glauca Thunberg has led to the isolation of galloyl derivatives, displaying high anticomplement activity. Four galloyl derivatives isolated from the leaves of Q. glauca, namely 6'-O-galloyl salidroside (1), methyl gallate (2), 1,2,3,6-tetragalloylglucose (3), and 1,2,6-trigalloylglucose (4). 1, 2, 3 and 4 showed inhibitory activity against complement system with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) values of 224 μM, 362.4 μM, 32.3 μM, and 138.3 μM. Among the compounds tested, 3 showed the most potent anticomplement activity (IC(50), 32.3 μM). This is the first report of the isolation and anticomplement activity from Q. glauca.

  6. Mechanisms involved in antibody- and complement-mediated allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has become critical clinically because this form of rejection is usually unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, and therefore, it has been recognized as a major cause of allograft loss. Our group developed experimental animal models of vascularized organ transplantation to study pathogenesis of antibody- and complement-mediated endothelial cell injury leading to graft rejection. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft rejection resulting from activation of complement by C1q- and MBL (mannose-binding lectin)-dependent pathways and interactions with a variety of effector cells, including macrophages and monocytes through Fcγ receptors and complement receptors. PMID:20135240

  7. Deficiency in Mannose-Binding Lectin-Associated Serine Protease-2 Does Not Increase Susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Carolina H.; Lynch, Nicholas J.; Stover, Cordula M.; Ali, Youssif M.; Valck, Carolina; Noya-Leal, Francisca; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, a chronic illness affecting 10 million people around the world. The complement system plays an important role in fighting microbial infections. The recognition molecules of the lectin pathway of complement activation, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins, and CL-11, bind to specific carbohydrates on pathogens, triggering complement activation through MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2). Previous in vitro work showed that human MBL and ficolins contribute to T. cruzi lysis. However, MBL-deficient mice are only moderately compromised in their defense against the parasite, as they may still activate the lectin pathway through ficolins and CL-11. Here, we assessed MASP-2-deficient mice, the only presently available mouse line with total lectin pathway deficiency, for a phenotype in T. cruzi infection. Total absence of lectin pathway functional activity did not confer higher susceptibility to T. cruzi infection, suggesting that it plays a minor role in the immune response against this parasite. PMID:25548381

  8. A soluble deletion mutant of the human complement receptor type 1, which lacks the C4b binding site, is a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway.

    PubMed

    Scesney, S M; Makrides, S C; Gosselin, M L; Ford, P J; Andrews, B M; Hayman, E G; Marsh, H C

    1996-08-01

    The human complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35), is a single-chain glycoprotein consisting of 30 repeating homologous protein domains known as short consensus repeats (SCR) followed by transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The SCR themselves, considered in groups of seven, form long homologous repeats (LHR) which have been designated LHR-A, -B, -C, and -D for the most common human allotype of CR1. A soluble deletion mutant of CR1 which lacks the first seven N-terminal SCR (LHR-A) as well as the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains was produced and characterized. The resulting protein, designated sCR1[desLHR-A], lacks the C4b binding site found in LHR-A, but retains the two C3b binding sites found in LHR-B and -C, respectively. The functional activities of sCR1[desLHR-A] were quantitatively compared in vitro to those of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) which has been shown to retain all known functions of the native cell surface receptor. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 competed equally for the binding of dimeric C3b to erythrocyte CR1. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 were similar in their capacity to serve as a cofactor in the factor I-mediated degradation of the C3b and C4b alpha chains. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 were comparable in their capacity to inhibit erythrocyte lysis and anaphylatoxin production mediated by the alternative complement pathway. sCR1[desLHR-A], however, was significantly less effective an inhibitor of erythrocyte lysis and anaphylatoxin production than sCR1 under conditions which allow classical pathway activation. These results demonstrate sCR1[desLHR-A] to be a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway in vitro.

  9. The role of specific antibody in alternative complement pathway- mediated opsonophagocytosis of type III, group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The native capsular polysaccharide antigen of type III, group B Streptococcus contains a terminal sialic acid residue on each repeating unit that masks all end-group galactopyranose residues and prevents alternative pathway complement activation by adult human sera in the absence of type-specific antibody. The critical role of the sialic acid residues in allowing the organism to evade activating the alternative complement pathway was shown when neuraminidase treatment of the organism converted the bacteria to activators of the alternative pathway as assessed in agammaglobulinemic serum. The requirement for specific antibody in permitting alternative pathway activation by the fully sialated bacteria was shown when sera that contained low levels of specific antibody failed to activate this pathway, and when prior absorption of serum that contained higher type-specific antibody levels with the capsular antigen failed to activate this pathway. The use of C2-deficient sera showed that the calssical pathway was not required for antibody-dependent alternative pathway activation. The use of isotonic, pH 7.5, veronal-NaCl buffer that contained 1% gelatin and that was supplemented to 4 mM Mg++ and 16 mM EGTA and adjusted to pH 7.5 (MgEGTA) ruled out the participation of the C1-bypass pathway. The presence of sialic acid on the bacterial surface is one means of evading an important mechanism of natural immunity, namely activation of complement by the alternative pathway. Only specific antibody, i.e., acquired immunity, can overcome this virulence factor. PMID:6989947

  10. Serum amyloid P component bound to gram-negative bacteria prevents lipopolysaccharide-mediated classical pathway complement activation.

    PubMed

    de Haas, C J; van Leeuwen, E M; van Bommel, T; Verhoef, J; van Kessel, K P; van Strijp, J A

    2000-04-01

    Although serum amyloid P component (SAP) is known to bind many ligands, its biological function is not yet clear. Recently, it was demonstrated that SAP binds to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the present study, SAP was shown to bind to gram-negative bacteria expressing short types of LPS or lipo-oligosaccharide (LOS), such as Salmonella enterica serovar Copenhagen Re and Escherichia coli J5, and also to clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae. It was hypothesized that SAP binds to the bacteria via the lipid A part of LPS or LOS, since the htrB mutant of the nontypeable H. influenzae strain NTHi 2019-B29-3, which expresses a nonacetylated lipid A, did not bind SAP. This was in contrast to the parental strain NTHi 2019. The binding of SAP resulted in a clear inhibition of the deposition of complement component C3 on the bacteria. SAP inhibited only the activation of the classical complement pathway; the alternative route remained unaffected. In the classical route, SAP prevented the deposition of the first complement component, Clq, probably by interfering with the binding of Clq to LPS. Since antibody-mediated Clq activation was not inhibited by SAP, SAP seems to inhibit only the LPS-induced classical complement pathway activation. The SAP-induced inhibition of C3 deposition strongly diminished the complement-mediated lysis as well as the phagocytosis of the bacteria. The binding of SAP to gram-negative bacteria, therefore, might influence the pathophysiology of an infection with such bacteria.

  11. Characterization of a Factor H Mutation That Perturbs the Alternative Pathway of Complement in a Family with Membranoproliferative GN

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Edwin K.S.; Anderson, Holly E.; Herbert, Andrew P.; Challis, Rachel C.; Brown, Paul; Reis, Geisilaine S.; Tellez, James O.; Strain, Lisa; Fluck, Nicholas; Humphrey, Ann; Macleod, Alison; Richards, Anna; Ahlert, Daniel; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Barlow, Paul N.; Marchbank, Kevin J.; Harris, Claire L.; Goodship, Timothy H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Complement C3 activation is a characteristic finding in membranoproliferative GN (MPGN). This activation can be caused by immune complex deposition or an acquired or inherited defect in complement regulation. Deficiency of complement factor H has long been associated with MPGN. More recently, heterozygous genetic variants have been reported in sporadic cases of MPGN, although their functional significance has not been assessed. We describe a family with MPGN and acquired partial lipodystrophy. Although C3 nephritic factor was shown in family members with acquired partial lipodystrophy, it did not segregate with the renal phenotype. Genetic analysis revealed a novel heterozygous mutation in complement factor H (R83S) in addition to known risk polymorphisms carried by individuals with MPGN. Patients with MPGN had normal levels of factor H, and structural analysis of the mutant revealed only subtle alterations. However, functional analysis revealed profoundly reduced C3b binding, cofactor activity, and decay accelerating activity leading to loss of regulation of the alternative pathway. In summary, this family showed a confluence of common and rare functionally significant genetic risk factors causing disease. Data from our analysis of these factors highlight the role of the alternative pathway of complement in MPGN. PMID:24722444

  12. The terminal pathway of the complement system is activated in focal penetrating but not in mild diffuse traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Elham; Davidsson, Johan; Gyorgy, Andrea; Agoston, Denes V; Risling, Mårten; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2013-12-01

    The complement system plays an important role in the inflammatory response activated by many central nervous system disorders. However, its significance in traumatic diffuse traumatic axonal injury (TAI) is not fully known. Here we analyze the complement activity in two rat models of traumatic brain injury (TBI); a focal penetration injury (pen-TBI) and a rotational acceleration injury (rot-TBI) that leads to a mild TAI. We used in situ hybridization to examine the distribution of mRNA for C1q and C3 and immunohistochemistry to examine the presence of the C3 protein and C5b-9 complex at 1-5 days after injury. We found a time-dependent complement activity in both models. However, the responses caused by the two models were different. We detected C5b-9 surrounding the cavity in pen-TBI, but C5b-9 was not found in the rot-TBI. Our findings suggest that the terminal complement pathway is progressed to the formation of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex only in the penetrating TBI but not in isolated TAI model. This indicates that the complement activation does not lead to membrane-damaging effects and a subsequent secondary axotomy in TAI by the terminal complex C5b-9. The role of complement activation in TAI is unclear, but might indicate an alternative function following rot-TBI, such as opsonizing the synapses for elimination.

  13. The alternative complement pathway control protein H binds to immune complexes and serves their detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nydegger, U.E.; Corvetta, A.; Spaeth, P.J.; Spycher, M.

    1983-01-01

    During solubilization of immune complexes C3b becomes fixed to the immunoglobulin part and serves as a receptor for the alternative complement pathway control protein H. The H-C3b immune complex interaction can be made detectable using 4% polyethyleneglycol to separate free from bound /sup 125/I-H. Tetanus toxoid (Te)/anti-Te complexes kept soluble with fresh serum and containing 125 IU of specific antibody bound 18% of /sup 125/I-H; when fresh serum was chelated with 10 mM EDTA, /sup 125/I-H binding was only 5%. On sucrose density gradients, the H-binding material sedimented in the range of 12 to 30 S. In 36 serum samples from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and in 12 serum samples from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), /sup 125/I-H binding was significantly elevated to 9.5 +/- 4.7% (mean +/- 1 SD) and 13.3 +/- 5.6%, respectively, while /sup 125/I-H binding by 36 normal human sera was 4 +/- 2%. RA samples (17/36, 47%) and SLE samples (9/12, 75%) had H-binding values increased by more than 2 SD above the normal mean. The serum samples were also assessed for conglutinin- and C1q-binding activities; a significant correlation between H and C1q binding was observed (P less than 0.001); there was no correlation between H and conglutinin binding. Although binding to immune complexes through its interaction with C3b, H clearly detects a population of complexes other than conglutinin, thus expanding the possibilities of further characterizing pathological complexes.

  14. Complement-Mediated Death of Ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis Caused by Human Blood Serum.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P A; Faktor, M I; Karpova, N S; Cheremnykh, E G; Brusov, O S

    2016-04-01

    Toxicity of human blood serum for ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis is determined by the complement system. When ciliate are dying after being exposed to blood serum, cell membrane permeability for low-molecular-weight compounds significantly increases, probably due to pore formation. Serine protease inhibitors or exposure to physical factors inducing complement inactivation (e.g., heating up to 56°C) completely prevented ciliate death under the effect of human serum. Activation of serum complement upon interaction with Tetrahymena cells occurred by the classical or lectin pathway, while the contribution of the alternative activation pathway was negligible.

  15. Molecular mechanism of anticancer effect of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin in HT29 cells involves differential expression of genes associated with multiple signaling pathways: A microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Barkeer, Srikanth; Guha, Nilanjan; Hothpet, Vishwanathreddy; Saligrama Adavigowda, Deepak; Hegde, Prajna; Padmanaban, Arunkumar; Yu, Lu-Gang; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2015-12-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) is a lectin isolated from fungus S. rolfsii and has high binding specificity toward the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich carbohydrate antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAc-α-O-Ser/Thr, T or TF), which is expressed in more than 90% of human cancers. Our previous studies have shown that binding of SRL to human colon, breast and ovarian cancer cells induces cell apoptosis in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo. This study investigated the SRL-mediated cell signaling in human colon cancer HT29 cells by mRNA and miRNA microarrays. It was found that SRL treatment results in altered expression of several hundred molecules including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-JUN-associated, apoptosis-associated and cell cycle and DNA replication-associated signaling molecules. Pathway analysis using GeneSpring 12.6.1 revealed that SRL treatment induces changes of MAPK and c-JUN-associated signaling pathways as early as 2 h while changes of cell cycle, DNA replication and apoptosis pathways were significantly affected only after 24 h. A significant change of cell miRNA expression was also observed after 12 h treatment of the cells with SRL. These changes were further validated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. This study thus suggests that the presence of SRL affects multiple signaling pathways in cancer cells with early effects on cell proliferation pathways associated with MAPK and c-JUN, followed by miRNA-associated cell activity and apoptosis. This provides insight information into the molecular mechanism of the anticancer activity of this fungal lectin.

  16. Multiple activities of LigB potentiate virulence of Leptospira interrogans: inhibition of alternative and classical pathways of complement.

    PubMed

    Choy, Henry A

    2012-01-01

    Microbial pathogens acquire the immediate imperative to avoid or counteract the formidable defense of innate immunity as soon as they overcome the initial physical barriers of the host. Many have adopted the strategy of directly disrupting the complement system through the capture of its components, using proteins on the pathogen's surface. In leptospirosis, pathogenic Leptospira spp. are resistant to complement-mediated killing, in contrast to the highly vulnerable non-pathogenic strains. Pathogenic L. interrogans uses LenA/LfhA and LcpA to respectively sequester and commandeer the function of two regulators, factor H and C4BP, which in turn bind C3b or C4b to interrupt the alternative or classical pathways of complement activation. LigB, another surface-proximal protein originally characterized as an adhesin binding multiple host proteins, has other activities suggesting its importance early in infection, including binding extracellular matrix, plasma, and cutaneous repair proteins and inhibiting hemostasis. In this study, we used a recent model of ectopic expression of LigB in the saprophyte, L. biflexa, to test the hypothesis that LigB also interacts with complement proteins C3b and C4b to promote the virulence of L. interrogans. The surface expression of LigB partially rescued the non-pathogen from killing by 5% normal human serum, showing 1.3- to 48-fold greater survival 4 to 6 d following exposure to complement than cultures of the non-expressing parental strain. Recombinant LigB7'-12 comprising the LigB-specific immunoglobulin repeats binds directly to human complement proteins, C3b and C4b, with respective K(d)s of 43±26 nM and 69±18 nM. Repeats 9 to 11, previously shown to contain the binding domain for fibronectin and fibrinogen, are also important in LigB-complement interactions, which interfere with the alternative and classical pathways measured by complement-mediated hemolysis of erythrocytes. Thus, LigB is an adaptable interface for L. interrogans

  17. Activation of the Complement Classical Pathway (C1q Binding) by Mesophilic Aeromonas hydrophila Outer Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Nogueras, Maria Mercedes; Aguilar, Alicia; Rubires, Xavier; Albertí, Sebastian; Benedí, Vicente Javier; Tomás, Juan M.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of killing of Aeromonas hydrophila serum-sensitive strains in nonimmune serum by the complement classical pathway has been studied. The bacterial cell surface component that binds C1q more efficiently was identified as a major outer membrane protein of 39 kDa, presumably the porin II described by D. Jeanteur, N. Gletsu, F. Pattus, and J. T. Buckley (Mol. Microbiol. 6:3355–3363, 1992), of these microorganisms. We have demonstrated that the purified form of porin II binds C1q and activates the classical pathway in an antibody-independent manner, with the subsequent consumption of C4 and reduction of the serum total hemolytic activity. Activation of the classical pathway has been observed in human nonimmune serum and agammaglobulinemic serum (both depleted of factor D). Binding of C1q to other components of the bacterial outer membrane, in particular to rough lipopolysaccharide, could not be demonstrated. Activation of the classical pathway by this lipopolysaccharide was also much less efficient than activation by the outer membrane protein. The strains possessing O-antigen lipopolysaccharide bind less C1q than the serum-sensitive strains, because the outer membrane protein is less accessible, and are resistant to complement-mediated killing. Finally, a similar or identical outer membrane protein (presumably porin II) that binds C1q was shown to be present in strains from the most common mesophilic Aeromonas O serogroups. PMID:9673268

  18. In vitro inhibition of the classical pathway of human complement by a natural microbial product, colistin sulphate.

    PubMed

    Asghar, S S; de Koster, A; van der Helm, H J

    1986-09-01

    Colistin sulphate was found to be an inhibitor of the classical pathway of the complement system. The main sites of inhibition were the interaction of EAC14 with C2 and EAC142 with C3. It also inhibited EAC14 formation from EA and C2-deficient serum, EAC1-7 formation from EAC1-3, C5, C6 and C7 and the interaction of EAC1-7 with C8 and C9, though less efficiently. It did not inhibit formation of C3/C5 convertase of the alternative pathway. The inhibition of the classical pathway was reversible since hemolytic activity was completely restored after dialysis.

  19. Complement and the Alternative Pathway Play an Important Role in LPS/D-GalN-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangyu; Zhou, Xiaojun; Li, Junfeng; Hu, Jingya; Yu, Hong; Chen, Yu; Song, Hongbin; Qiao, Fei; Xu, Guilian; Yang, Fei; Wu, Yuzhang; Tomlinson, Stephen; Duan, Zhongping; Zhou, Yusen

    2011-01-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is a clinically severe type of liver injury with an extremely high mortality rate. Although the pathological mechanisms of FHF are not well understood, evidence suggests that the complement system is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders. In the present study, to investigate the role of complement in FHF, we examined groups of mice following intraperitoneal injection of LPS/D-GalN: wild-type C57BL/6 mice, wild-type mice treated with a C3aR antagonist, C5aR monoclonal antibody (C5aRmAb) or CR2-Factor H (CR2-fH, an inhibitor of the alternative pathway), and C3 deficient mice (C3−/− mice). The animals were euthanized and samples analyzed at specific times after LPS/D-GalN injection. The results show that intraperitoneal administration of LPS/D-GalN activated the complement pathway, as evidenced by the hepatic deposition of C3 and C5b-9 and elevated serum levels of the complement activation product C3a, the level of which was associated with the severity of the liver damage. C3a receptor (C3aR) and C5a receptor (C5aR) expression was also upregulated. Compared with wild-type mice, C3−/− mice survived significantly longer and displayed reduced liver inflammation and attenuated pathological damage following LPS/D-GalN injection. Similar levels of protection were seen in mice treated with C3aR antagonist,C5aRmAb or CR2-fH. These data indicate an important role for the C3a and C5a generated by the alternative pathway in LPS/D-GalN-induced FHF. The data further suggest that complement inhibition may be an effective strategy for the adjunctive treatment of fulminant hepatic failure. PMID:22069473

  20. PpsA-mediated alternative pathway to complement RNase E essentiality in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masaru; Honda, Naoko; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Cohen, Stanley N; Kato, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli cells require RNase E, encoded by the essential gene rne, to propagate. The growth properties on different carbon sources of E. coli cells undergoing suppression of RNase E production suggested that reduction in RNase E is associated with decreased expression of phosphoenolpyruvate synthetase (PpsA), which converts pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate during gluconeogenesis. Western blotting and genetic complementation confirmed the role of RNase E in PpsA expression. Adventitious ppsA overexpression from a multicopy plasmid was sufficient to restore colony formation of ∆rne E. coli on minimal media containing glycerol or succinate as the sole carbon source. Complementation of ∆rne by ppsA overproduction was observed during growth on solid media but was only partial, and bacteria showed slowed cell division and grew as filamentous chains. We found that restoration of colony-forming ability by ppsA complementation occurred independent of the presence of endogenous RNase G or second-site suppressors of RNase E essentiality. Our investigations demonstrate the role of phosphoryl transfer catalyzable by PpsA as a determinant of RNase E essentiality in E. coli.

  1. Inherited mitochondrial DNA variants can affect complement, inflammation and apoptosis pathways: insights into mitochondrial–nuclear interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cristina Kenney, M.; Chwa, Marilyn; Atilano, Shari R.; Falatoonzadeh, Payam; Ramirez, Claudio; Malik, Deepika; Tarek, Mohamed; Cáceres-del-Carpio, Javier; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Boyer, David S.; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Vawter, Marquis; Michal Jazwinski, S.; Miceli, Michael; Wallace, Douglas C.; Udar, Nitin

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in developed countries. While linked to genetic polymorphisms in the complement pathway, there are many individuals with high risk alleles that do not develop AMD, suggesting that other ‘modifiers’ may be involved. Mitochondrial (mt) haplogroups, defined by accumulations of specific mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which represent population origins, may be one such modifier. J haplogroup has been associated with high risk for AMD while the H haplogroup is protective. It has been difficult to assign biological consequences for haplogroups so we created human ARPE-19 cybrids (cytoplasmic hybrids), which have identical nuclei but mitochondria of either J or H haplogroups, to investigate their effects upon bioenergetics and molecular pathways. J cybrids have altered bioenergetic profiles compared with H cybrids. Q-PCR analyses show significantly lower expression levels for seven respiratory complex genes encoded by mtDNA. J and H cybrids have significantly altered expression of eight nuclear genes of the alternative complement, inflammation and apoptosis pathways. Sequencing of the entire mtDNA was carried out for all the cybrids to identify haplogroup and non-haplogroup defining SNPs. mtDNA can mediate cellular bioenergetics and expression levels of nuclear genes related to complement, inflammation and apoptosis. Sequencing data suggest that observed effects are not due to rare mtDNA variants but rather the combination of SNPs representing the J versus H haplogroups. These findings represent a paradigm shift in our concepts of mt–nuclear interactions. PMID:24584571

  2. Local release of properdin in the cellular microenvironment: role in pattern recognition and amplification of the alternative pathway of complement

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Claudio; Ohtola, Jennifer A.; Saggu, Gurpanna; Ferreira, Viviana P.

    2013-01-01

    Properdin, the only positive regulatory protein of the complement system, acts as both a stabilizer of the alternative pathway (AP) convertases and as a selective pattern recognition molecule of certain microorganisms and host cells (i.e., apoptotic/necrotic cells) by serving as a platform for de novo C3b,Bb assembly. Properdin, a highly positively charged protein, normally exists as cyclic dimers (P2), trimers (P3), and tetramers (P4) of head-to-tail associations of monomeric 53 kDa subunits. While most complement proteins are produced mainly in the liver, properdin is synthesized primarily by various cell types, including neutrophils, monocytes, primary T cells, and shear-stressed endothelial cells resulting in properdin serum levels of 4–25 μg/ml. Multiple inflammatory agonists stimulate the release of properdin from stimulated leukocytes into the cellular microenvironment. Concentrated, focused increases in properdin levels may lead to stabilization and initiation of AP convertases, thus greatly amplifying the complement response to a local stimulus. This review highlights current knowledge related to these properties and discusses the implications of properdin production in a pro-inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:23335922

  3. Complement System Part I – Molecular Mechanisms of Activation and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Church, Sarah Elizabeth; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in defense against pathogens and in host homeostasis. The complement system is initiated by conformational changes in recognition molecular complexes upon sensing danger signals. The subsequent cascade of enzymatic reactions is tightly regulated to assure that complement is activated only at specific locations requiring defense against pathogens, thus avoiding host tissue damage. Here, we discuss the recent advances describing the molecular and structural basis of activation and regulation of the complement pathways and their implication on physiology and pathology. This article will review the mechanisms of activation of alternative, classical, and lectin pathways, the formation of C3 and C5 convertases, the action of anaphylatoxins, and the membrane-attack-complex. We will also discuss the importance of structure–function relationships using the example of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Lastly, we will discuss the development and benefits of therapies using complement inhibitors. PMID:26082779

  4. Complement activity and pharmacological inhibition in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Théroux, Pierre; Martel, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    While complement is the most important component of humoral autoimmunity, and inflammation plays a key role in atherosclerosis, relatively few studies have looked at complement implications in atherosclerosis and its complications. C-reactive protein is a marker of inflammation and is also involved in atherosclerosis; it activates complement and colocalizes with activated complement proteins within the infarcting myocardium and the active atherosclerotic plaques. As new agents capable of modulating complement activity are being developed, new targets for the management of atherosclerosis are emerging that are related to autoimmunity and inflammation. The present paper reviews the putative roles of the various complement activation pathways in the development of atherosclerosis, in ST segment elevation and non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes, and in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. It also provides a perspective on new therapeutic interventions being developed to modulate complement activity. These interventions include the C1 esterase inhibitor, which may be consumed in some inflammatory states resulting in the loss of one of the mechanisms inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways; TP10, a recombinant protein of the soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) which inhibits the C3 and C5 convertases of the common pathway by binding C3b and C4b; a truncated version of the soluble complement receptor type 1 CRI lacking the C4b binding site which selectively inhibits the alternative pathway; and pexelizumab, a monoclonal antibody selectively blocking C5 to prevent the activation of the terminal pathway that is involved in excessive inflammation and autoimmune responses. PMID:16498508

  5. Response gene to complement 32 protein promotes macrophage phagocytosis via activation of protein kinase C pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Zhang, Gui; Chen, Shi-You

    2014-08-15

    Macrophage phagocytosis plays an important role in host defense. The molecular mechanism, especially factors regulating the phagocytosis, however, is not completely understood. In the present study, we found that response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) is an important regulator of phagocytosis. Although RGC-32 is induced and abundantly expressed in macrophage during monocyte-macrophage differentiation, RGC-32 appears not to be important for this process because RGC-32-deficient bone marrow progenitor can normally differentiate to macrophage. However, both peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages with RGC-32 deficiency exhibit significant defects in phagocytosis, whereas RGC-32-overexpressed macrophages show increased phagocytosis. Mechanistically, RGC-32 is recruited to macrophage membrane where it promotes F-actin assembly and the formation of phagocytic cups. RGC-32 knock-out impairs F-actin assembly. RGC-32 appears to interact with PKC to regulate PKC-induced phosphorylation of F-actin cross-linking protein myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that RGC-32 is a novel membrane regulator for macrophage phagocytosis.

  6. Influence of surface modulations by enzymes and monoclonal antibodies on alternative complement pathway activation by Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, E; Brade, V

    1989-01-01

    Effector mechanisms resulting from alternative complement pathway (ACP) activation cannot act efficiently against Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O3, as indicated by poor C3 to C9 consumption and by survival in EGTA (ethyleneglycoldiaminetetraacetic acid) Mg-serum. These results were not influenced by the lack or presence of plasmid-encoded outer membrane proteins or lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with different amounts of side chains or by treatment of the bacteria with pronase or neuraminidase. Surface modulation of Y. enterocolitica with polyclonal immunoglobulin G or the immunoglobulin G fragments F(ab')2 and Fab always converted Y. enterocolitica to a high ACP activator, with strong C3 to C9 consumption and surface deposition of activated C3. Killing of Y. enterocolitica as a result of antibody-mediated ACP activation was observed only with bacteria grown at 22 degrees C but not with bacteria from 37 degrees C cultures. The expression of complement resistance in Y. enterocolitica grown at 37 degrees C was not influenced by the presence or absence of plasmids. Using different monoclonal antibodies (MAb), we found that MAb with LPS specificity mediated ACP activation, whereas MAb specific for different plasmid-encoded outer membrane proteins were ineffective, despite surface binding. These results suggest a major inhibitory role of LPS on ACP activation which was neutralized by LPS-specific antibodies. PMID:2731980

  7. Shiga Toxin Promotes Podocyte Injury in Experimental Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome via Activation of the Alternative Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Monica; Buelli, Simona; Pezzotta, Anna; Corna, Daniela; Perico, Luca; Tomasoni, Susanna; Rottoli, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Conti, Debora; Thurman, Joshua M.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Zoja, Carlamaria

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)–producing Escherichia coli is the offending agent of postdiarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a disorder of glomerular ischemic damage and widespread microvascular thrombosis. We previously documented that Stx induces glomerular complement activation, generating C3a responsible for microvascular thrombosis in experimental HUS. Here, we show that the presence of C3 deposits on podocytes is associated with podocyte damage and loss in HUS mice generated by the coinjection of Stx2 and LPS. Because podocyte adhesion to the glomerular basement membrane is mediated by integrins, the relevance of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signals in podocyte dysfunction was evaluated. Podocyte expression of ILK increased after the injection of Stx2/LPS and preceded the upregulation of Snail and downregulation of nephrin and α-actinin-4. Factor B deficiency or pretreatment with an inhibitory antibody to factor B protected mice against Stx2/LPS-induced podocyte dysregulation. Similarly, pretreatment with a C3a receptor antagonist limited podocyte loss and changes in ILK, Snail, and α-actinin-4 expression. In cultured podocytes, treatment with C3a reduced α-actinin-4 expression and promoted ILK-dependent nuclear expression of Snail and cell motility. These results suggest that Stx-induced activation of the alternative pathway of complement and generation of C3a promotes ILK signaling, leading to podocyte dysfunction and loss in Stx-HUS. PMID:24578132

  8. Anti-Mouse Properdin TSR 5/6 Monoclonal Antibodies Block Complement Alternative Pathway-dependent Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Paula; Akk, Antonina M.; Zhou, Hui-fang; Mitchell, Lynne M.; Pham, Christine T.N.

    2015-01-01

    The complement alternative pathway (AP) is a major contributor to a broad and growing spectrum of diseases that includes age-related macular degeneration, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and preeclampsia. As a result, there is much interest in the therapeutic disruption of AP activity. Properdin, the only positive regulator of the AP, is a particularly promising AP target. Several issues need to be clarified before the potential for properdin-directed therapy can be realized. In this report we use a portion of the mouse properdin protein, expressed in a bacterial system, to raise rabbit polyclonal and hamster monoclonal antibodies that block properdin-dependent pathogenesis. These antibodies, when employed with AP-dependent mouse disease models, can help evaluate the feasibility of properdin-directed therapy. PMID:25723276

  9. Ureaplasma urealyticum binds mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Benstein, Barbara D; Ourth, Donald D; Crouse, Dennis T; Shanklin, D Radford

    2004-10-01

    Mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity in mammals. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), an acute phase protein, acts as an opsonin for phagocytosis and also activates the mannan-binding lectin complement pathway. It may play a particularly significant role during infancy before adequate specific protection can be provided by the adaptive immune system. Ureaplasma urealyticum has been linked to several diseases including pneumonia and chronic lung disease (CLD) in premature infants. We therefore investigated the ability of U. urealyticum to bind MBL. A guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit-MBL antiserum was produced. An immunoblot (dot-blot) assay done on nitrocellulose membrane determined that the anti-MBL antibody had specificity against both rabbit and human MBL. Pure cultures of U. urealyticum, serotype 3, were used to make slide preparations. The slides containing the organisms were then incubated with nonimmune rabbit serum containing MBL. Ureaplasma was shown to bind rabbit MBL with an immunocytochemical assay using the guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit MBL antiserum. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled anti-guinea pig IgG was used to localize the reaction. The anti-MBL antiserum was also used in an immunocytochemical assay to localize U. urealyticum in histological sections of lungs from mice specifically infected with this organism. The same method also indicated binding of MBL by ureaplasma in human lung tissue obtained at autopsy from culture positive infants. Our results demonstrate that ureaplasma has the capacity to bind MBL. The absence of MBL may play a role in the predisposition of diseases related to this organism.

  10. Inhibitor(s) of the classical complement pathway in mouse serum limit the utility of mice as experimental models of neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Ratelade, Julien; Verkman, A S

    2014-11-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system in which anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) autoantibodies (AQP4-IgG) cause damage to astrocytes by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). Various approaches have been attempted to produce NMO lesions in rodents, some involving genetically modified mice with altered immune cell function. Here, we found that mouse serum strongly inhibits complement from multiple species, preventing AQP4-IgG-dependent CDC. Effects of mouse serum on complement activation were tested in CDC assays in which AQP4-expressing cells were incubated with AQP4-IgG and complement from different species. Biochemical assays and mass spectrometry were used to characterize complement inhibitor(s) in mouse serum. Sera from different strains of mice produced almost no AQP4-IgG-dependent CDC compared with human, rat and guinea pig sera. Remarkably, addition of mouse serum prevented AQP4-IgG-dependent CDC caused by human, rat or guinea pig serum, with 50% inhibition at <5% mouse serum. Hemolysis assays indicated that the inhibitor(s) in mouse serum target the classical and not the alternative complement pathway. We found that the complement inhibitor(s) in mouse serum were contained in a serum fraction purified with protein-A resin; however, the inhibitor was not IgG as determined using serum from IgG-deficient mice. Mass spectrometry on the protein A-purified fraction produced several inhibitor candidates. The low intrinsic complement activity of mouse serum and the presence of complement inhibitor(s) limit the utility of mouse models to study disorders, such as NMO, involving the classical complement pathway.

  11. Rapid assays for lectin toxicity and binding changes that reflect altered glycosylation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Pamela; Sundaram, Subha

    2014-06-03

    Glycosylation engineering is used to generate glycoproteins, glycolipids, or proteoglycans with a more defined complement of glycans on their glycoconjugates. For example, a mammalian cell glycosylation mutant lacking a specific glycosyltransferase generates glycoproteins, and/or glycolipids, and/or proteoglycans with truncated glycans missing the sugar transferred by that glycosyltransferase, as well as those sugars that would be added subsequently. In some cases, an alternative glycosyltransferase may then use the truncated glycans as acceptors, thereby generating a new or different glycan subset in the mutant cell. Another type of glycosylation mutant arises from gain-of-function mutations that, for example, activate a silent glycosyltransferase gene. In this case, glycoconjugates will have glycans with additional sugar(s) that are more elaborate than the glycans of wild type cells. Mutations in other genes that affect glycosylation, such as nucleotide sugar synthases or transporters, will alter the glycan complement in more general ways that usually affect several types of glycoconjugates. There are now many strategies for generating a precise mutation in a glycosylation gene in a mammalian cell. Large-volume cultures of mammalian cells may also generate spontaneous mutants in glycosylation pathways. This article will focus on how to rapidly characterize mammalian cells with an altered glycosylation activity. The key reagents for the protocols described are plant lectins that bind mammalian glycans with varying avidities, depending on the specific structure of those glycans. Cells with altered glycosylation generally become resistant or hypersensitive to lectin toxicity, and have reduced or increased lectin or antibody binding. Here we describe rapid assays to compare the cytotoxicity of lectins in a lectin resistance test, and the binding of lectins or antibodies by flow cytometry in a glycan-binding assay. Based on these tests, glycosylation changes expressed

  12. Functional Complementation Analysis (FCA): A Laboratory Exercise Designed and Implemented to Supplement the Teaching of Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hudson, André O; Harkness, Taylor C M; Savka, Michael A

    2016-06-24

    Functional complementation assay (FCA) is an in vivo assay that is widely used to elucidate the function/role of genes/enzymes. This technique is very common in biochemistry, genetics and many other disciplines. A comprehensive overview of the technique to supplement the teaching of biochemical pathways pertaining to amino acids, peptidoglycan and the bacterial stringent response is reported in this manuscript. Two cDNAs from the model plant organism Arabidopsis thaliana that are involved in the metabolism of lysine (L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (dapL) and tyrosine aminotransferase (tyrB) involved in the metabolism of tyrosine and phenylalanine are highlighted. In addition, the bacterial peptidoglycan anabolic pathway is highlighted through the analysis of the UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-D-glutamate-meso-2,6-diaminopimelate ligase (murE) gene from the bacterium Verrucomicrobium spinosum involved in the cross-linking of peptidoglycan. The bacterial stringent response is also reported through the analysis of the rsh (relA/spoT homolog) bifunctional gene responsible for a hyper-mucoid phenotype in the bacterium Novosphingobium sp. Four examples of FCA are presented. The video will focus on three of them, namely lysine, peptidoglycan and the stringent response.

  13. Mycobacterial antigen 85 complex (Ag85) as a target for ficolins and mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Świerzko, Anna S; Bartłomiejczyk, Marcin A; Brzostek, Anna; Łukasiewicz, Jolanta; Michalski, Mateusz; Dziadek, Jarosław; Cedzyński, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    The pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) able to activate complement via the lectin pathway are suspected to be involved in the interaction between pathogenic Mycobacteria and the host immune response. Recently, we have found strong interactions between 25 and 35kDa mycobacterial cell fractions and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. Here we demonstrate that two biologically important mycobacterial structures, mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and the antigen 85 (Ag85) complex, induce activation of the lectin pathway of complement. The strong interaction of recombinant MBL with purified ManLAM was confirmed, but no binding of recombinant ficolins (ficolin-1, -2, -3) with this structure was observed. Interestingly, all PRMs tested reacted with the mycobacterial antigen 85 (Ag85) complex. Based on the use of specific inhibitors (mannan for MBL, acetylated bovine serum albumin for ficolin-1 and -2, Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 lipopolysaccharide for ficolin-3), we concluded that carbohydrate-recognition (MBL) and fibrinogen-like domains (ficolins) were involved in these interactions. Our results indicate that the mycobacterial antigen 85 complex is a target for ficolins and MBL. Furthermore, those PRMs also bound to fibronectin and therefore might influence the Ag85 complex-dependent interaction of Mycobacterium with the extracellular matrix.

  14. SALSA: A Regulator of the Early Steps of Complement Activation on Mucosal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, Martin Parnov; Meri, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Complement is present mainly in blood. However, following mechanical damage or inflammation, serous exudates enter the mucosal surfaces. Here, the complement proteins interact with other endogenous molecules to keep microbes from entering the parenteral tissues. One of the mucosal proteins known to interact with the early complement components of both the classical and the lectin pathway is the salivary scavenger and agglutinin (SALSA). SALSA is also known as deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 and gp340. It is found both attached to the epithelium and secreted into the surrounding fluids of most mucosal surfaces. SALSA has been shown to bind directly to C1q, mannose-binding lectin, and the ficolins. Through these interactions SALSA regulates activation of the complement system. In addition, SALSA interacts with surfactant proteins A and D, secretory IgA, and lactoferrin. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are examples of diseases, where complement activation in mucosal tissues may occur. This review describes the latest advances in our understanding of how the early complement components interact with the SALSA molecule. Furthermore, we discuss how these interactions may affect disease propagation on mucosal surfaces in immunological and inflammatory diseases.

  15. COMPLEMENT REGULATION IN RENAL DISEASE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Abhijit; Sharma, Shweta; Quigg, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the complement system is tightly regulated by plasma and cell-associated complement regulatory proteins (CRPs), such as factor H (fH), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and membrane cofactor protein (MCP). Animal models of disease have provided considerable insights into the important roles for CRPs in the kidney. Mice deficient in fH have excessive fluid phase C3 activation and inactivation leading to deposition of iC3b in glomerular capillary walls (GCW), comparable to dense deposit disease. In contrast, when fH lacks C-terminal surface targeting regions, local activation on the GCW leads to a disease reminiscent of thrombotic microangiopathy. The uniquely rodent protein, CR1-related y (Crry), has features analogous to human MCP. Defective Crry leads to unrestricted alternative pathway activation in the tubulointerstitium (TI) resulting in pathological features ranging from TMA, acute kidney injury and TI nephritis. In the presence of initiators of the classical or lectin pathways, commonly in the form of immune complexes in human glomerular diseases, complement regulation on self is stressed, with the potential for recruitment of the spontaneously active alternative pathway. The threshold for this activation is set by CRPs; pathology is more likely when complement regulation is defective. Within the endocapillary region of the GCW, fH is key, while DAF and Crry are protective on mesangial cells and podocytes. Arguably, acquired alterations in these CRPs is a more common event, extending from pathological states of cellular injury or production of inhibitory antibodies, to physiological fine tuning of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24161042

  16. Immunologic injury of cultured cells infected with measles virus. I. role of IfG antibody and the alternative complement pathway

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    In these studies, a number of human cell lines including epithelial, neural, glial, and lymphoid cells infected with several strains of measles virus were found to be lysed upon incubation with fresh sera from humans containing antibody measles virus. In all instances, the cytolytic event was mediated by alternative complement (C) pathway without a significant contribution from classical pathway. In contrast, isolated measles virus in conjunction with antibody was found to selectively activate the classical C pathway. Measles antibodies of the IgG class, but not the IgA class, possessed cytolytic potential against cells infected with measles virus. Human IgG antibodies could directly activate the alternative C pathway. No defect was found in cytolytic measles antibody in sera or cerebrospinal fluid from patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, nor was the alternative C pathway impaired in sera from these patients. Sera from newborn humans exhibited a functional alternative C pathway. PMID:1092789

  17. Mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms and rheumatoid arthritis: A short review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Epp Boschmann, Stefanie; Goeldner, Isabela; Tuon, Felipe Francisco; Schiel, Wagner; Aoyama, Fernanda; de Messias-Reason, Iara J

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a pattern recognition receptor of the lectin pathway of complement system. MBL binds to carbohydrates on microorganism's surfaces leading to complement activation, opsonization and phagocytosis. Polymorphisms in the MBL gene (MBL2) are associated with variations on MBL serum levels and with the susceptibility to various infectious and autoimmune diseases. The involvement of the lectin pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been demonstrated by several studies and although MBL has been considered to have a dual role in the pathogenesis of the disease, the association between MBL and RA remains inconclusive. In an attempt to clarify this relationship, we developed this short review summarizing accumulated evidences in regard to MBL and RA and a meta-analysis to evaluate the influence of MBL2 polymorphisms on the susceptibility to RA. Among a total of 217 articles that were identified following a predefined search strategy on PubMed, Scopus, Scielo, EMBASE and Cochrane databases, only 13 met all inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Data assessment was conducted by three independent investigators and presented in odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using forest plot charts. Both heterogeneity and publication bias were analyzed. The results of the meta-analysis evidenced that MBL2 low producing OO and XX genotypes do not confer higher risk to RA, even when data were analyzed according to cohort's ethnicity. Further studies are needed in order to clarify the importance of other genes of the lectin pathway in the pathogenesis of RA.

  18. MASP-1 Induces a Unique Cytokine Pattern in Endothelial Cells: A Novel Link between Complement System and Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Péter K.; Kajdácsi, Erika; Megyeri, Márton; Dobó, József; Doleschall, Zoltán; Futosi, Krisztina; Tímár, Csaba I.; Mócsai, Attila; Makó, Veronika; Gál, Péter; Cervenak, László

    2014-01-01

    Microbial infection urges prompt intervention by the immune system. The complement cascade and neutrophil granulocytes are the predominant contributors to this immediate anti-microbial action. We have previously shown that mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1), the most abundant enzyme of the complement lectin pathway, can induce p38-MAPK activation, NFkappaB signaling, and Ca2+-mobilization in endothelial cells. Since neutrophil chemotaxis and transmigration depends on endothelial cell activation, we aimed to explore whether recombinant MASP-1 (rMASP-1) is able to induce cytokine production and subsequent neutrophil chemotaxis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). We found that HUVECs activated by rMASP-1 secreted IL-6 and IL-8, but not IL-1alpha, IL-1ra, TNFalpha and MCP-1. rMASP-1 induced dose-dependent IL-6 and IL-8 production with different kinetics. rMASP-1 triggered IL-6 and IL-8 production was regulated predominantly by the p38-MAPK pathway. Moreover, the supernatant of rMASP-1-stimulated HUVECs activated the chemotaxis of neutrophil granulocytes as an integrated effect of cytokine production. Our results implicate that besides initializing the complement lectin pathway, MASP-1 may activate neutrophils indirectly, via the endothelial cells, which link these effective antimicrobial host defense mechanisms. PMID:24489848

  19. Human mannose-binding lectin inhibitor prevents myocardial injury and arterial thrombogenesis in a novel animal model.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Vasile I; Tan, Ying S; McClure, Erin E; La Bonte, Laura R; Zou, Chenhui; Gorsuch, William B; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-02-01

    Myocardial infarction and coagulation disorders are leading causes of disability and death in the world. An important role of the lectin complement pathway in myocardial infarction and coagulation has been demonstrated in mice genetically deficient in lectin complement pathway proteins. However, these studies are limited to comparisons between wild-type and deficient mice and lack the ability to examine reversal/inhibition of injury after disease establishment. We developed a novel mouse that expresses functional human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) 2 under the control of Mbl1 promoter. Serum MBL2 concentrations averaged approximately 3 μg/mL in MBL2(+/+)Mbl1(-/-)Mbl2(-/-) [MBL2 knock in (KI)] mice. Serum MBL2 level in MBL2 KI mice significantly increased after 7 (8 μg/mL) or 14 (9 μg/mL) days of hyperglycemia compared to normoglycemic mice (P < 0.001). Monoclonal antibody 3F8 inhibited C3 deposition on mannan-coated plates in MBL2 KI, but not wild-type, mice. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in MBL2 KI mice revealed that 3F8 preserved cardiac function and decreased infarct size and fibrin deposition in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, 3F8 prevented ferric chloride-induced occlusive arterial thrombogenesis in vivo. MBL2 KI mice represent a novel animal model that can be used to study the lectin complement pathway in acute and chronic models of human disease. Furthermore, these novel mice demonstrate the therapeutic window for MBL2 inhibition for effective treatment of disease and its complications.

  20. Human Mannose-Binding Lectin Inhibitor Prevents Myocardial Injury and Arterial Thrombogenesis in a Novel Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Vasile I.; Tan, Ying S.; McClure, Erin E.; La Bonte, Laura R.; Zou, Chenhui; Gorsuch, William B.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction and coagulation disorders are leading causes of disability and death in the world. An important role of the lectin complement pathway in myocardial infarction and coagulation has been demonstrated in mice genetically deficient in lectin complement pathway proteins. However, these studies are limited to comparisons between wild-type and deficient mice and lack the ability to examine reversal/inhibition of injury after disease establishment. We developed a novel mouse that expresses functional human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) 2 under the control of Mbl1 promoter. Serum MBL2 concentrations averaged approximately 3 μg/mL in MBL2+/+Mbl1−/−Mbl2−/− [MBL2 knock in (KI)] mice. Serum MBL2 level in MBL2 KI mice significantly increased after 7 (8 μg/mL) or 14 (9 μg/mL) days of hyperglycemia compared to normoglycemic mice (P < 0.001). Monoclonal antibody 3F8 inhibited C3 deposition on mannan-coated plates in MBL2 KI, but not wild-type, mice. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in MBL2 KI mice revealed that 3F8 preserved cardiac function and decreased infarct size and fibrin deposition in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, 3F8 prevented ferric chloride–induced occlusive arterial thrombogenesis in vivo. MBL2 KI mice represent a novel animal model that can be used to study the lectin complement pathway in acute and chronic models of human disease. Furthermore, these novel mice demonstrate the therapeutic window for MBL2 inhibition for effective treatment of disease and its complications. PMID:25482922

  1. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  2. Infections of People with Complement Deficiencies and Patients Who Have Undergone Splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Sanjay; Lewis, Lisa A.; Rice, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The complement system comprises several fluid-phase and membrane-associated proteins. Under physiological conditions, activation of the fluid-phase components of complement is maintained under tight control and complement activation occurs primarily on surfaces recognized as “nonself” in an attempt to minimize damage to bystander host cells. Membrane complement components act to limit complement activation on host cells or to facilitate uptake of antigens or microbes “tagged” with complement fragments. While this review focuses on the role of complement in infectious diseases, work over the past couple of decades has defined several important functions of complement distinct from that of combating infections. Activation of complement in the fluid phase can occur through the classical, lectin, or alternative pathway. Deficiencies of components of the classical pathway lead to the development of autoimmune disorders and predispose individuals to recurrent respiratory infections and infections caused by encapsulated organisms, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. While no individual with complete mannan-binding lectin (MBL) deficiency has been identified, low MBL levels have been linked to predisposition to, or severity of, several diseases. It appears that MBL may play an important role in children, who have a relatively immature adaptive immune response. C3 is the point at which all complement pathways converge, and complete deficiency of C3 invariably leads to severe infections, including those caused by meningococci and pneumococci. Deficiencies of the alternative and terminal complement pathways result in an almost exclusive predisposition to invasive meningococcal disease. The spleen plays an important role in antigen processing and the production of antibodies. Splenic macrophages are critical in clearing opsonized encapsulated bacteria (such as pneumococci, meningococci, and Escherichia coli

  3. The CD94/NKG2C killer lectin-like receptor constitutes an alternative activation pathway for a subset of CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Gumá, Mónica; Busch, Lisa K; Salazar-Fontana, Laura I; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Morte, Carles; García, Pilar; López-Botet, Miguel

    2005-07-01

    The CD94/NKG2C killer lectin-like receptor (KLR) specific for HLA-E is coupled to the KARAP/DAP12 adapter in a subset of NK cells, triggering their effector functions. We have studied the distribution and function of this KLR in T lymphocytes. Like other NK cell receptors (NKR), CD94/NKG2C was predominantly expressed by a CD8(+) T cell subset, though TCRgammadelta(+) NKG2C(+) and rare CD4(+) NKG2C(+) cells were also detected in some individuals. Coculture with the 721.221 HLA class I-deficient lymphoma cell line transfected with HLA-E (.221-AEH) induced IL-2Ralpha expression in CD94/NKG2C+ NK cells and a minor subset of CD94/NKG2C(+) T cells, promoting their proliferation; moreover, a similar response was triggered upon selective engagement of CD94/NKG2C with a specific mAb. CD8(+) TCRalphabeta CD94/NKG2C(+) T cell clones, that displayed different combinations of KIR and CD85j receptors, expressed KARAP/DAP12 which was co-precipitated by an anti-CD94 mAb. Specific engagement of the KLR triggered cytotoxicity and cytokine production in CD94/NKG2C(+) T cell clones, inducing as well IL-2Ralpha expression and a proliferative response. Altogether these results support that CD94/NKG2C may constitute an alternative T cell activation pathway capable of driving the expansion and triggering the effector functions of a CTL subset.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... MBL2 gene. Mannose-binding lectin plays an important role in the body's immune response by attaching to foreign invaders such as bacteria, viruses, or yeast and turning on (activating) the complement system . The complement system is a group of immune system proteins that work together to ...

  5. The Passover Locus in Drosophila Melanogaster: Complex Complementation and Different Effects on the Giant Fiber Neural Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Baird, D. H.; Schalet, A. P.; Wyman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster bearing the Passover mutation fail to jump in response to a light-off stimulus. Pas also disrupts some of the synapses between the neurons of the giant fiber system which mediate this escape behavior. We have mapped Pas to the 19E subdivision of the polytene X chromosome. Our genetic analyses reveal that deletions of either of two nonoverlapping regions fail to fully complement Pas. Heterozygotes of Pas with chromosomal deletions in the vicinity of polytene band 19E3 exhibit the full set of neuronal defects shown by Pas homozygotes. Alleles of the R-9-29 complementation group, which maps to band 19E3, exhibit a complex pattern of complementation with Pas. Heterozygotes combining the lethal R-9-29 alleles with Pas are all viable, some complement the neuronal defects of Pas, but most exhibit these defects. The viable shaking-B(2) mutation also fails to complement Pas, the R-9-29 alleles or the 19E3 deficiencies. The R-9-29 locus may contain two functional domains, one required for viability the other for normal neuronal phenotype. trans-Heterozygotes bearing mutant alleles or a deficiency of the first region (19E3) together with deficiencies of the second region (19E5-6) also exhibit some of the neuronal defects shown by the Passover mutant. Deficiencies which delete the entire 19E3 to 19E6 interval do not produce this phenotype when heterozygous with a normal X chromosome. Thus normal function requires a cis-interaction between the two regions. These findings raise the possibility that the gene mutated by Pas is split or separated from a cis-activator by at least one other gene. PMID:2127576

  6. The Passover locus in Drosophila melanogaster: complex complementation and different effects on the giant fiber neural pathway.

    PubMed

    Baird, D H; Schalet, A P; Wyman, R J

    1990-12-01

    Drosophila melanogaster bearing the Passover mutation fail to jump in response to a light-off stimulus. Pas also disrupts some of the synapses between the neurons of the giant fiber system which mediate this escape behavior. We have mapped Pas to the 19E subdivision of the polytene X chromosome. Our genetic analyses reveal that deletions of either of two nonoverlapping regions fail to fully complement Pas. Heterozygotes of Pas with chromosomal deletions in the vicinity of polytene band 19E3 exhibit the full set of neuronal defects shown by Pas homozygotes. Alleles of the R-9-29 complementation group, which maps to band 19E3, exhibit a complex pattern of complementation with Pas. Heterozygotes combining the lethal R-9-29 alleles with Pas are all viable, some complement the neuronal defects of Pas, but most exhibit these defects. The viable shaking-B2 mutation also fails to complement Pas, the R-9-29 alleles or the 19E3 deficiencies. The R-9-29 locus may contain two functional domains, one required for viability the other for normal neuronal phenotype, trans-Heterozygotes bearing mutant alleles or a deficiency of the first region (19E3) together with deficiencies of the second region (19E5-6) also exhibit some of the neuronal defects shown by the Passover mutant. Deficiencies which delete the entire 19E3 to 19E6 interval do not produce this phenotype when heterozygous with a normal X chromosome. Thus normal function requires a cis-interaction between the two regions. These findings raise the possibility that the gene mutated by Pas is split or separated from a cis-activator by at least one other gene.

  7. Commercially Available Complement Component-Depleted Sera Are Unexpectedly Codepleted of Ficolin-2

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Allison M.; Geno, K. Aaron; Dalecki, Alex G.; Cheng, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    The ficolins are a family of innate pattern recognition molecules that are known to bind acetylated compounds and activate complement through the association of mannose binding lectin (MBL)/ficolin-associated serine proteases (MASPs). Their importance has more recently become appreciated, as they have been shown to play a role in a variety of disease processes from infection to autoimmunity. While studying ficolin-2-mediated complement deposition on Streptococcus pneumoniae, we found that sera depleted of C1q or other complement components were also codepleted of ficolin-2 but not ficolin-1, ficolin-3, or MBL. MBL present in C1q-depleted sera was able to mediate complement deposition on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting the presence of MASPs. We found that complement was activated on pneumococci in C1q-depleted serum only after opsonization with exogenous recombinant ficolin-2 (rFicolin-2). Also, no complement deposition was observed in C1q-depleted serum when pneumococci were opsonized with rFicolin-2 mutated at its lysine-57 residue, where MASPs are known to associate. Thus, these depleted sera are a unique tool to study ficolin-2-mediated complement pathways; however, one should be aware that ficolin-2 is absent from complement component-depleted sera. PMID:25030054

  8. Aptamer–biotin–streptavidin–C1q complexes can trigger the classical complement pathway to kill cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John Gordon

    2010-02-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers are regarded as rivals for antibodies and as such are being investigated for their therapeutic potential. In the present work, it is shown that two different high-affinity DNA aptamers developed previously by Ferreira et al. against MUC1 antigen (designated MUC1-5TR-1 and MUC1-S1.3/S2.2) on MCF7 breast cancer cells can be linked to the first component of complement (C1q) via a biotin–streptavidin system and induce significant killing of MCF7 cells in vitro. Cell viability was assessed by Trypan blue uptake and absorbance at 590 nm of stained cells following buffer washes and lysis in 1% SDS. While the killing effect is demonstrable versus various controls, dependent on aptamer dose, and reproducible, it appears to kill maximally about half of treated MCF7 cells. Possible reasons for the marginal killing effect include antigenic shedding in vitro and membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins (mCRPs) on the cell surface such as CD46, CD55, and CD59 which act to inhibit complement-mediated lysis of cells. Future in vitro research could benefit from application of mCRP-specific aptamers in combination with anti-MUC1 aptamers to overcome surface protective mechanisms while attacking the plasma membrane of MCF7 cells or other MUC1-expressing cancer cells. However, in vivo such a combination could have deleterious effects on normal MUC1-expressing cells as well.

  9. Mannose-binding lectin may affect pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Çalkavur, Şebnem; Erdemir, Gülin; Onay, Hüseyin; Altun Köroğlu, Özge; Yalaz, Mehmet; Zekioğlu, Osman; Aksu, Güzide; Özkınay, Ferda; Akercan, Fuat; Kültürsay, Nilgün

    2015-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a component of the innate immune system and acts as a complement activator through the lectin pathway. Genetic variations of MBL and low MBL levels cause several infection problems, which may also be related to pregnancy problems. We aimed to investigate the role of MBL gene codon 54 polymorphism and serum MBL levels in pregnancy problems and premature delivery. In this prospective study, MBL gene codon 54 polymorphism and serum MBL levels were studied in 45 mothers who delivered earlier than 35 gestational weeks. The frequency of MBL gene codon 54 variant allele B was much higher (homozygous 4.4% and heterozygous 33.3%) in the study group mothers than the previously reported frequency in the healthy Turkish population (homozygous 2-6%, heterozygous 12-20%). MBL variant allele B frequency was closely related to low MBL levels (<0.1 μg/ml), vaginitis and increased IL-6 levels. The median MBL levels were lower than the critical level of 0.1 μg/ ml in study mothers who had recurrent miscarriage, infertility, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm premature rupture of membranes with duration of longer than 72 hours, tocolysis, histological chorioamnionitis, urinary tract infection and vaginitis. MBL gene codon 54 variant allele B is related to low serum MBL levels, increased IL-6 levels, genitourinary infections and may cause pregnancy-related problems such as infertility, recurrent miscarriage and preterm delivery.

  10. Regulatory components of the alternative complement pathway in endothelial cell cytoplasm, factor H and factor I, are not packaged in Weibel-Palade bodies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy A; Sartain, Sarah E; Hui, Shiu-Ki; Moake, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that factor H, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway, is stored with von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. If this were to be the case, it would have therapeutic importance for patients with the atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome that can be caused either by a heterozygous defect in the factor H gene or by the presence of an autoantibody against factor H. The in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP), would be expected to increase transiently the circulating factor H levels, in addition to increasing the circulating levels of VWF. We describe experiments demonstrating that factor H is released from endothelial cell cytoplasm without a secondary storage site. These experiments showed that factor H is not stored with VWF in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies, and is not secreted in response in vitro in response to the Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, histamine. Furthermore, the in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, DDAVP does not increase the circulating factor H levels concomitantly with DDAVP-induced increased VWF. Factor I, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway that is functionally related to factor H, is also located in endothelial cell cytoplasm, and is also not present in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies. Our data demonstrate that the factor H and factor I regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway are not stored in Weibel-Palade bodies. DDAVP induces the secretion into human plasma of VWF--but not factor H.

  11. Diabetes Is Associated with Increased Autoreactivity of Mannan-Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) has been reported to be involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. MBL is a pattern-recognition molecule of the innate immune system that initiates the lectin pathway of the complement system upon recognition of evolutionary conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns or to altered self-tissue. Our group have previously shown direct effects of MBL on diabetes-induced kidney damage, and we hypothesized that MBL may cause autoactivation of the complement system via binding to neoepitopes induced by hyperglycemia. In the present study, we induced diabetes in MBL knockout mice and in wild type C57BL/6J mice by low-dose streptozotocin injection and measured blood glucose and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio to monitor development of diabetes. After 24 weeks, fluorescently labelled recombinant MBL was injected intravenously in diabetic MBL knockout mice after which the distribution was investigated using in vivo fluorescence imaging. Mice were subjected to in vivo and ex vivo imaging 24 hours after injection. MBL was found to accumulate in the kidneys of diabetic mice as compared to healthy control mice (p < 0.0001). These findings support the hypothesis of a significant role of MBL and the complement system in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:28349070

  12. Pinellia ternata lectin exerts a pro-inflammatory effect on macrophages by inducing the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the activation of the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway and the overproduction of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong-Li; Zhao, Teng-Fei; Wu, Hao; Pan, Yao-Zong; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Kui-Long; Zhang, Chen-Chao; Jin, Yang-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Pinellia ternata (PT) is a widely used traditional Chinese medicine. The raw material has a throat-irritating toxicity that is associated with the PT lectin (PTL). PTL is a monocot lectin isolated from the tubers of PT, which exhibits mouse peritoneal acute inflammatory effects in vivo. The present study aimed to investigate the pro-inflammatory effect of PTL on macrophages. PTL (50 µg/ml)‑stimulated macrophages enhanced the chemotactic activity of neutrophils. PTL (50, 100, 200 and 400 µg/ml) significantly elevated the production of cytokines [tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF-α) , interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL‑6]. PTL (25, 50 and 100 µg/ml) induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. PTL also caused transfer of p65 from the macrophage cytoplasm to the nucleus and activated the nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) signaling pathway. Scanning electron microscope images revealed severe cell swelling and membrane integrity defection of macrophages following PTL (100 µg/ml) stimulation, which was also associated with inflammation. PTL had pro‑inflammatory activity, involving induced neutrophil migration, cytokine release, ROS overproduction and the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, which was associated with the activation of macrophages.

  13. Fanconi anemia complementation group FANCD2 protein serine 331 phosphorylation is important for fanconi anemia pathway function and BRCA2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Gang; Wilson, James B; Chen, Xiaoyong; Krause, Diane S; Xiao, Yuxuan; Jones, Nigel J; Kupfer, Gary M

    2009-11-15

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer-prone inherited bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility syndrome with at least 13 complementation groups (FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCD1, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, FANCI, FANCJ, FANCL, FANCM, and FANCN). Our laboratory has previously described several regulatory phosphorylation events for core complex member proteins FANCG and FANCA by phosphorylation. In this study, we report a novel phosphorylation site serine 331 (S331) of FANCD2, the pivotal downstream player of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Phosphorylation of S331 is important for its DNA damage-inducible monoubiquitylation, resistance to DNA cross-linkers, and in vivo interaction with FANCD1/BRCA2. A phosphomimetic mutation at S331 restores all of these phenotypes to wild-type. In vitro and in vivo experiments show that phosphorylation of S331 is mediated by CHK1, the S-phase checkpoint kinase implicated in the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway.

  14. Meningococcal surface fibril (Msf) binds to activated vitronectin and inhibits the terminal complement pathway to increase serum resistance.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Natalie J; Hill, Darryl J; Borodina, Elena; Sessions, Richard B; Devos, Nathalie I; Feron, Christiane M; Poolman, Jan T; Virji, Mumtaz

    2011-12-01

    Complement evasion is an important survival strategy of Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) during colonization and infection. Previously, we have shown that Nm Opc binds to serum vitronectin to inhibit complement-mediated killing. In this study, we demonstrate meningococcal interactions with vitronectin via a novel adhesin, Msf (meningococcal surface fibril, previously NhhA or Hsf). As with Opc, Msf binds preferentially to activated vitronectin (aVn), engaging at its N-terminal region but the C-terminal heparin binding domain may also participate. However, unlike Opc, the latter binding is not heparin-mediated. By binding to aVn, Msf or Opc can impart serum resistance, which is further increased in coexpressers, a phenomenon dependent on serum aVn concentrations. The survival fitness of aVn-binding derivatives was evident from mixed population studies, in which msf/opc mutants were preferentially depleted. In addition, using vitronectin peptides to block Msf-aVn interactions, aVn-induced inhibition of lytic C5b-9 formation and of serum killing could be reversed. As Msf-encoding gene is ubiquitous in the meningococcal strains examined and is expressed in vivo, serum resistance via Msf may be of significance to meningococcal pathogenesis. The data imply that vitronectin binding may be an important strategy for the in vivo survival of Nm for which the bacterium has evolved redundant mechanisms.

  15. Early graft failure of GalTKO pig organs in baboons is reduced by expression of a human complement pathway-regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Kelishadi, Sean S; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B; Singh, Avneesh K; Stoddard, Tiffany; Iwase, Hayato; Zhang, Tianshu; Burdorf, Lars; Sievert, Evelyn; Avon, Chris; Cheng, Xiangfei; Ayares, David; Horvath, Keith A; Corcoran, Philip C; Mohiuddin, Muhammad M; Barth, Rolf N; Cooper, David K C; Pierson, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    We describe the incidence of early graft failure (EGF, defined as loss of function from any cause within 3 days after transplant) in a large cohort of GalTKO pig organs transplanted into baboons in three centers, and the effect of additional expression of a human complement pathway-regulatory protein, CD46 or CD55 (GalTKO.hCPRP). Baboon recipients of life-supporting GalTKO kidney (n = 7) or heterotopic heart (n = 14) grafts received either no immunosuppression (n = 4), or one of several partial or full immunosuppressive regimens (n = 17). Fourteen additional baboons received a GalTKO.hCPRP kidney (n = 5) or heart (n = 9) and similar treatment regimens. Immunologic, pathologic, and coagulation parameters were measured at frequent intervals. EGF of GalTKO organs occurred in 9/21 baboons (43%). hCPRP expression reduced the GalTKO EGF incidence to 7% (1/14; P < 0.01 vs. GalTKO alone). At 30 mins, complement deposits were more intense in organs in which EGF developed (P < 0.005). The intensity of peri-transplant platelet activation (as β-thromboglobulin release) correlated with EGF, as did the cumulative coagulation score (P < 0.01). We conclude that (i) the transgenic expression of a hCPRP on the vascular endothelium of a GalTKO pig reduces the incidence of EGF and reduces complement deposition, (ii) complement deposition and platelet activation correlate with early GalTKO organ failure, and (iii) the expression of a hCPRP reduces EGF but does not prevent systemic coagulation activation. Additional strategies will be required to control coagulation activation.

  16. A novel lectin from Artocarpus lingnanensis induces proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion through CD45 signaling pathway in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bo; Li, Lu; Zeng, Qiyan; Lin, Faquan; Yin, Lijun; Liao, Liejun; Huang, Min; Wang, Jingping

    2017-04-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins and have been used for purification and characterization of glycoproteins. In this study, a novel 58.9-kDa tetrameric lectin from Artocarpus lingnanensis seeds was purified, characterized, and its mitogenic potential was evaluated. The hemagglutination inhibition assay indicated that Artocarpus lingnanensis lectin (ALL) showed specificity toward galactose. ALL was effectively purified in a single-step using affinity chromatography on a galactose-Sepharose column. ALL showed pH optima between 5.0 and 9.0, and optimal temperature between 20 and 40 °C. ALL triggered proliferation and activation of human T lymphocytes (e.g., CD4(+) T lymphocytes). Flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed binding of ALL to T cells and colocalized with CD45. Affinity chromatography and Western blot suggested that CD45 isolated from human T cell membrane fraction may be the major receptor of ALL. CD45 blocking antibody attenuated the binding and proliferation of T cells induced by ALL. CD45-PTPase inhibitor dephostatin reduced ALL-induced T cells proliferation and expression of CD25 and pZAP-70. Furthermore, secretion of ALL-induced Th1/Th2 cytokines was blocked with dephostatin. Also, dephostatin inhibited phosphorylation of ALL-mediated activation of ERK and p38MAPK. This study demonstrates the involvement of CD45-mediated signaling in ALL-induced T lymphocyte proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion through activation of p38 and ERK.

  17. Specifically binding of L-ficolin to N-glycans of HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 leads to complement activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Ali, Mohammed A M; Shi, Yinghua; Zhao, Yinglan; Luo, Fenglin; Yu, Jin; Xiang, Tian; Tang, Jie; Li, Dongqing; Hu, Quan; Ho, Wenzhe; Zhang, Xiaolian

    2009-08-01

    L-ficolin, one of lectin families, is a recently identified complement factor that initiates lectin pathway of complement. Little is known about its role in viral hepatitis. In the present study, we found that L-ficolin in serum from 103 patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV), were significantly higher than that in 150 healthy controls. We further found that L-ficolin expressions were significantly increased in vitro study by HCV JFH-1 infected human hepatocyte cell line Huh7.5.1. Investigation of the mechanisms of the L-ficolin action on HCV demonstrated that L-ficolin protein could recognize and bind to envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 of HCV, activating the lectin complement pathway-mediated cytolytic activity in HCV-infected hepatocyte. This interaction between L-ficolin and HCV E1 and E2 glycoproteins was attributed to the N-glycans of E1 and E2. These findings provide new insights into the biological functions of L-ficolin in clinically important hepatic viral diseases.

  18. Cyborg lectins: novel leguminous lectins with unique specificities.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Maruyama, I N; Osawa, T

    2000-01-01

    Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPA) is one of the beta-galactose-binding leguminous lectins. Leguminous lectins contain a long metal-binding loop, part of which determines their carbohydrate-binding specificities. Random mutations were introduced into a portion of the cDNA coding BPA that corresponds to the carbohydrate-binding loop of the lectin. An library of the mutant lectin expressed on the surface of lambda foo phages was screened by the panning method. Several phage clones with an affinity for mannose or N-acetylglucosamine were isolated. These results indicate the possibility of making artificial lectins (so-called "cyborg lectins") with distinct and desired carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  19. The C5 convertase is not required for activation of the terminal complement pathway in murine experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Theresa N; Darley, Meghan M; Weckbach, Sebastian; Stahel, Philip F; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R

    2012-07-13

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe manifestation of clinical malaria syndromes and has a high fatality rate especially in the developing world. Recent studies demonstrated that C5(-/-) mice are resistant to experimental CM (ECM) and that protection was due to the inability to form the membrane attack complex. Unexpectedly, we observed that C4(-/-) and factor B(-/-) mice were fully susceptible to disease, indicating that activation of the classical or alternative pathways is not required for ECM. C3(-/-) mice were also susceptible to ECM, indicating that the canonical C5 convertases are not required for ECM development and progression. Abrogation of ECM by treatment with anti-C9 antibody and detection of C5a in serum of C3(-/-) mice confirmed that C5 activation occurs in ECM independent of C5 convertases. Our data indicate that activation of C5 in ECM likely occurs via coagulation enzymes of the extrinsic protease pathway.

  20. Collectin liver 1 and collectin kidney 1 and other complement-associated pattern recognition molecules in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Troldborg, A; Thiel, S; Jensen, L; Hansen, S; Laska, M J; Deleuran, B; Jensenius, J C; Stengaard-Pedersen, K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the involvement of collectin liver 1 (CL-L1) and collectin kidney 1 (CL-K1) and other pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) of the lectin pathway of the complement system in a cross-sectional cohort of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Concentrations in plasma of CL-L1, CL-K1, mannan-binding lectin (MBL), M-ficolin, H-ficolin and L-ficolin were determined in 58 patients with SLE and 65 healthy controls using time-resolved immunoflourometric assays. The SLE patients' demographic, diagnostic, clinical and biochemical data and collection of plasma samples were performed prospectively during 4 months. CL-L1, CL-K1 and M-ficolin plasma concentrations were lower in SLE patients than healthy controls (P-values < 0·001, 0·033 and < 0·001, respectively). H-ficolin concentration was higher in SLE patients (P < 0·0001). CL-L1 and CL-K1 plasma concentrations in the individuals correlated in both patients and controls. Patients with low complement component 3 (C3) demonstrated a negative correlation between C3 and CL-L1 and CL-K1 (P = 0·022 and 0.031, respectively). Patients positive for anti-dsDNA antibodies had lower levels of MBL in plasma than patients negative for anti-dsDNA antibodies (P = 0·02). In a cross-sectional cohort of SLE patients, we found differences in the plasma concentrations of CL-L1, CL-K1, M-ficolin and H-ficolin compared to a group of healthy controls. Alterations in plasma concentrations of the PRMs of the lectin pathway in SLE patients and associations to key elements of the disease support the hypothesis that the lectin pathway plays a role in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:26154564

  1. Juvenile elastic arteries after 28 years of renal replacement therapy in a patient with complete complement C4 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Complement activation products are present in atherosclerotic plaques. Recently, binding of complement to elastin and collagen in the aortic wall has been demonstrated, suggesting a role of complement in the development aortic stiffness and atherosclerosis. The definitive role of complement in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis, however, remains unclear. Case presentation We here describe a patient with hereditary complete deficiency of complement C4 suffering from Henoch-Schoenlein purpura and on renal replacement therapy for twenty-eight years. The patient had the full range of risk factors for vascular damage such as hypertension, volume overload, hyperphosphatemia and hyperparathyroidism. Despite that, his carotid artery intima media thickness was below the normal range and his pulse wave velocity was normal. In contrast, the patient’s coronary and peripheral muscular arteries were heavily calcified. Conclusion This case supports the hypothesis that complement plays an important role in the development of stiffness of elastic arteries. We speculate that inability to activate complement by the classical or lectin pathways protected the patient from atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, stiffening and calcification of the aorta and carotid arteries. Inhibition of complement activation may be a potential target for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. PMID:23199021

  2. Collagen-binding Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecule (MSCRAMM) of Gram-positive Bacteria Inhibit Complement Activation via the Classical Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mingsong; Ko, Ya-Ping; Liang, Xiaowen; Ross, Caná L.; Liu, Qing; Murray, Barbara E.; Höök, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Members of a family of collagen-binding microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) from Gram-positive bacteria are established virulence factors in several infectious diseases models. Here, we report that these adhesins also can bind C1q and act as inhibitors of the classical complement pathway. Molecular analyses of Cna from Staphylococcus aureus suggested that this prototype MSCRAMM bound to the collagenous domain of C1q and interfered with the interactions of C1r with C1q. As a result, C1r2C1s2 was displaced from C1q, and the C1 complex was deactivated. This novel function of the Cna-like MSCRAMMs represents a potential immune evasion strategy that could be used by numerous Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:23720782

  3. CD45-mediated signaling pathway is involved in Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL)-induced proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion in human PBMC

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, Radha; Eligar, Sachin M.; Kumar, Natesh; Nagre, Nagaraja N.; Inamdar, Shashikala R.; Swamy, Bale M.; Shastry, Padma

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL, a potent mitogenic and complex N-glycan specific lectin binds to CD45 on PBMC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL triggers CD45-mediated signaling involved in activation of p38MAPK and STAT-5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of CD45 PTPase signaling blocks RBL-induced ZAP70 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL-CD45 mediated signaling is crucial for RBL-induced immunodulatory activities. -- Abstract: We earlier reported the mitogenic and immunostimulatory activities of Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), purified from phytopathogenic fungus R. bataticola in human PBMC. The lectin demonstrates specificity towards glycoproteins containing complex N-glycans. Since CD45-protein tyrosine phosphatase that abundantly expresses N-glycans is important in T-cell signaling, the study aimed to investigate the involvement of CD45 in the immunomodulatory activities of RBL. Flowcytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that RBL exhibited binding to PBMC and colocalized with CD45. The binding was comparable in cells expressing different CD45 isoforms-RA, -RB and -RO. CD45 blocking antibody reduced the binding and proliferation of PBMC induced by RBL. CD45-PTPase inhibitor dephostatin inhibited RBL-induced proliferation, expression of CD25 and pZAP-70. RBL-induced secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines were significantly inhibited in presence of dephostatin. Also, dephostatin blocked phosphorylation of p38MAPK and STAT-5 that was crucial for the biological functions of RBL. The study demonstrates the involvement of CD45-mediated signaling in RBL-induced PBMC proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion through activation of p38MAPK and STAT-5.

  4. The C5 Convertase Is Not Required for Activation of the Terminal Complement Pathway in Murine Experimental Cerebral Malaria*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Theresa N.; Darley, Meghan M.; Weckbach, Sebastian; Stahel, Philip F.; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe manifestation of clinical malaria syndromes and has a high fatality rate especially in the developing world. Recent studies demonstrated that C5−/− mice are resistant to experimental CM (ECM) and that protection was due to the inability to form the membrane attack complex. Unexpectedly, we observed that C4−/− and factor B−/− mice were fully susceptible to disease, indicating that activation of the classical or alternative pathways is not required for ECM. C3−/− mice were also susceptible to ECM, indicating that the canonical C5 convertases are not required for ECM development and progression. Abrogation of ECM by treatment with anti-C9 antibody and detection of C5a in serum of C3−/− mice confirmed that C5 activation occurs in ECM independent of C5 convertases. Our data indicate that activation of C5 in ECM likely occurs via coagulation enzymes of the extrinsic protease pathway. PMID:22689574

  5. Unfolding energetics and stability of banana lectin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Sinha, Sharmistha; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-08-01

    The unfolding pathway of banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca was determined by isothermal denaturation induced by the chaotrope GdnCl. The unfolding was found to be a reversible process. The data obtained by isothermal denaturation provided information on conformational stability of banana lectin. The high values of DeltaG of unfolding at various temperatures indicated the strength of intersubunit interactions. It was found that banana lectin is a very stable and denatures at high chaotrope concentrations only. The basis of the stability may be attributed to strong hydrogen bonds of the order 2.5-3.1 A at the dimeric interface along with the presence of water bridges. This is perhaps very unique example in proteins where subunit association is not a consequence of the predominance of hydrophobic interactions.

  6. Lectin purified from Musca domestica pupa up-regulates NO and iNOS production via TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaohong; Zhou, Minghui; Wang, Chunling; Hou, Lihua; Zeng, Bin

    2011-04-01

    The present study reported that nitric oxide (NO) was up-regulated by the induction of lectin purified from Musca domestica pupa (MPL) in macrophages without cytotoxicity. The mRNA expression and protein secretion of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were strongly induced by MPL treatments. Subsequent investigation revealed that the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitory κB (IκB) in endochylema was inhibited and NF-κB translocated into the nucleus after MPL treatment. Meanwhile, the IKKβ was strongly induced and the production of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was significantly up-regulated. Moreover, MPL increased NO production via inducing the expression of iNOS through the activation of NF-κB, which suggested that MPL probably acted as an activating agent of the NF-κB activation.

  7. Thrombotic Microangiopathy Care Pathway: A Consensus Statement for the Mayo Clinic Complement Alternative Pathway-Thrombotic Microangiopathy (CAP-TMA) Disease-Oriented Group.

    PubMed

    Go, Ronald S; Winters, Jeffrey L; Leung, Nelson; Murray, David L; Willrich, Maria A; Abraham, Roshini S; Amer, Hatem; Hogan, William J; Marshall, Ariela L; Sethi, Sanjeev; Tran, Cheryl L; Chen, Dong; Pruthi, Rajiv K; Ashrani, Aneel A; Fervenza, Fernando C; Cramer, Carl H; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Wolanskyj, Alexandra P; Thomé, Stephan D; Hook, C Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) comprise a heterogeneous set of conditions linked by a common histopathologic finding of endothelial damage resulting in microvascular thromboses and potentially serious complications. The typical clinical presentation is microangiopathic hemolytic anemia accompanied by thrombocytopenia with varying degrees of organ ischemia. The differential diagnoses are generally broad, while the workup is frequently complex and can be confusing. This statement represents the joint recommendations from a multidisciplinary team of Mayo Clinic physicians specializing in the management of TMA. It comprises a series of evidence- and consensus-based clinical pathways developed to allow a uniform approach to the spectrum of care including when to suspect TMA, what differential diagnoses to consider, which diagnostic tests to order, and how to provide initial empiric therapy, as well as some guidance on subsequent management.

  8. Complement research in the 18th-21st centuries: Progress comes with new technology.

    PubMed

    Sim, R B; Schwaeble, W; Fujita, T

    2016-10-01

    The complement system has been studied for about 120 years. Progress in defining this large and complex system has been dependent on the research technologies available, but since the introduction of protein chromatography, electrophoresis, and antibody-based assay methods in the 1950s and 60s, and sequencing of proteins and DNA in the 70s and 80s, there has been very rapid accumulation of data. With more recent improvements in 3D structure determination (nmr and X-ray crystallography), the structures of most of the complement proteins have now been solved. Complement research since 1990 has been greatly stimulated by the discoveries of the multiple proteins in the lectin pathway, the strong association of Factor H, C3, Factor B allelic variants with adult macular degeneration and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, and the introduction of the anti-C5 monoclonal antibody as a therapy for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. Potential new roles for complement in tissue development and the search for novel therapeutics suggest a very active future for complement research.

  9. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-06

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  10. Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar Calreticulin: inhibition of classical complement pathway and differences in the level of expression in amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Ximénez, Cecilia; González, Enrique; Nieves, Miriam E; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Shibayama, Mineko; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; García de León, Ma Del Carmen; Morán, Patricia; Valadez, Alicia; Rojas, Liliana; Hernández, Eric G; Partida, Oswaldo; Cerritos, René

    2014-01-01

    The role of calreticulin (CRT) in host-parasite interactions has recently become an important area of research. Information about the functions of calreticulin and its relevance to the physiology of Entamoeba parasites is limited. The present work demonstrates that CRT of both pathogenic E. histolytica and nonpathogenic E. dispar species specifically interacted with human C1q inhibiting the activation of the classical complement pathway. Using recombinant EhCRT protein, we demonstrate that CRT interaction site and human C1q is located at the N-terminal region of EhCRT. The immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy experiments show that CRT and human C1q colocalize in the cytoplasmic vesicles and near to the surface membrane of previously permeabilized trophozoites or are incubated with normal human serum which is known to destroy trophozoites. In the presence of peripheral mononuclear blood cells, the distribution of EhCRT and C1q is clearly over the surface membrane of trophozoites. Nevertheless, the level of expression of CRT in situ in lesions of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in the hamster model is different in both Entamoeba species; this molecule is expressed in higher levels in E. histolytica than in E. dispar. This result suggests that EhCRT may modulate some functions during the early moments of the host-parasite relationship.

  11. The Role of Complement in Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate Symbiosis and Immune Challenge in the Sea Anemone Aiptasia pallida

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Angela Z.; Kitchen, Sheila A.; Weis, Virginia M.

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an innate immune pathway that in vertebrates, is responsible for initial recognition and ultimately phagocytosis and destruction of microbes. Several complement molecules including C3, Factor B, and mannose binding lectin associated serine proteases (MASP) have been characterized in invertebrates and while most studies have focused on their conserved role in defense against pathogens, little is known about their role in managing beneficial microbes. The purpose of this study was to (1) characterize complement pathway genes in the symbiotic sea anemone Aiptasia pallida, (2) investigate the evolution of complement genes in invertebrates, and (3) examine the potential dual role of complement genes Factor B and MASP in the onset and maintenance of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and immune challenge using qPCR based studies. The results demonstrate that A. pallida has multiple Factor B genes (Ap_Bf-1, Ap_Bf-2a, and Ap_Bf-2b) and one MASP gene (Ap_MASP). Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the evolutionary history of complement genes is complex, and there have been many gene duplications or gene loss events, even within members of the same phylum. Gene expression analyses revealed a potential role for complement in both onset and maintenance of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and immune challenge. Specifically, Ap_Bf-1 and Ap_MASP are significantly upregulated in the light at the onset of symbiosis and in response to challenge with the pathogen Serratia marcescens suggesting that they play a role in the initial recognition of both beneficial and harmful microbes. Ap_Bf-2b in contrast, was generally downregulated during the onset and maintenance of symbiosis and in response to challenge with S. marcescens. Therefore, the exact role of Ap_Bf-2b in response to microbes remains unclear, but the results suggest that the presence of microbes leads to repressed expression. Together, these results indicate functional divergence between Ap_Bf-1

  12. A profile of protein-protein interaction: Crystal structure of a lectin-lectin complex.

    PubMed

    Surya, Sukumaran; Abhilash, Joseph; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkottu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakathu

    2016-06-01

    Proteins may utilize complex networks of interactions to create/proceed signaling pathways of highly adaptive responses such as programmed cell death. Direct binary interactions study of proteins may help propose models for protein-protein interaction. Towards this goal we applied a combination of thermodynamic kinetics and crystal structure analyses to elucidate the complexity and diversity in such interactions. By determining the heat change on the association of two galactose-specific legume lectins from Butea monosperma (BML) and Spatholobus parviflorus (SPL) belonging to Fabaceae family helped to compute the binding equilibrium. It was extended further by X-ray structural analysis of BML-SPL binary complex. In order to chart the proteins interacting mainly through their interfaces, identification of the nature of forces which stabilized the association of the lectin-lectin complex was examined. Comprehensive analysis of the BMLSPL complex by isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystal structure threw new light on the lectin-lectin interactions suggesting of their use in diverse areas of glycobiology.

  13. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  14. Complement inhibition in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pio, Ruben; Ajona, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2013-02-01

    For decades, complement has been recognized as an effector arm of the immune system that contributes to the destruction of tumor cells. In fact, many therapeutic strategies have been proposed that are based on the intensification of complement-mediated responses against tumors. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm by demonstrating a tumor-promoting role for complement. Cancer cells seem to be able to establish a convenient balance between complement activation and inhibition, taking advantage of complement initiation without suffering its deleterious effects. Complement activation may support chronic inflammation, promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment, induce angiogenesis, and activate cancer-related signaling pathways. In this context, inhibition of complement activation would be a therapeutic option for treating cancer. This concept is relatively new and deserves closer attention. In this article, we summarize the mechanisms of complement activation on cancer cells, the cancer-promoting effect of complement initiation, and the rationale behind the use of complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against cancer.

  15. A Serine Protease Isolated from the Bristles of the Amazonic Caterpillar, Premolis semirufa, Is a Potent Complement System Activator

    PubMed Central

    Villas Boas, Isadora Maria; Pidde-Queiroz, Giselle; Magnoli, Fabio Carlos; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M.; van den Berg, Carmen W.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The caterpillar of the moth Premolis semirufa, commonly named pararama, is found in the Brazilian Amazon region. Accidental contact with the caterpillar bristles causes an intense itching sensation, followed by symptoms of an acute inflammation, which last for three to seven days after the first incident. After multiple accidents a chronic inflammatory reaction, called “Pararamose”, characterized by articular synovial membrane thickening with joint deformities common to chronic synovitis, frequently occurs. Although complement mediated inflammation may aid the host defense, inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system and generation of anaphylatoxins can lead to inflammatory disorder and pathologies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in vitro, whether the Premolis semirufa’s bristles extract could interfere with the human complement system. Results The bristles extract was able to inhibit the haemolytic activity of the alternative pathway, as well as the activation of the lectin pathway, but had no effect on the classical pathway, and this inhibition seemed to be caused by activation and consumption of complement components. The extract induced the production of significant amounts of all three anaphylatoxins, C3a, C4a and C5a, promoted direct cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and induced a significant generation of terminal complement complexes in normal human serum. By using molecular exclusion chromatography, a serine protease of 82 kDa, which activates complement, was isolated from P. semirufa bristles extract. The protease, named here as Ps82, reduced the haemolytic activity of the alternative and classical pathways and inhibited the lectin pathway. In addition, Ps82 induced the cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and the generation of C3a and C4a in normal human serum and it was capable to cleave human purified C5 and generate C5a. The use of Phenanthroline, metalloprotease inhibitor, in the reactions did not significantly

  16. Lectin-Dependent Enhancement of Ebola Virus Infection via Soluble and Transmembrane C-type Lectin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lear, Calli; Chen, Li; Yantosca, L. Michael; Scully, Corinne; Sarraju, Ashish; Sokolovska, Anna; Zariffard, M. Reza; Eisen, Damon P.; Mungall, Bruce A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Omari, Amel; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael; Takahashi, Kazue; Stuart, Lynda; Stahl, Gregory L.; Ezekowitz, Alan B.; Spear, Gregory T.; Olinger, Gene G.; Schmidt, Emmett V.; Michelow, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble effector of the innate immune system that recognizes pathogen-specific surface glycans. Surprisingly, low-producing MBL genetic variants that may predispose children and immunocompromised individuals to infectious diseases are more common than would be expected in human populations. Since certain immune defense molecules, such as immunoglobulins, can be exploited by invasive pathogens, we hypothesized that MBL might also enhance infections in some circumstances. Consequently, the low and intermediate MBL levels commonly found in human populations might be the result of balancing selection. Using model infection systems with pseudotyped and authentic glycosylated viruses, we demonstrated that MBL indeed enhances infection of Ebola, Hendra, Nipah and West Nile viruses in low complement conditions. Mechanistic studies with Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviruses confirmed that MBL binds to N-linked glycan epitopes on viral surfaces in a specific manner via the MBL carbohydrate recognition domain, which is necessary for enhanced infection. MBL mediates lipid-raft-dependent macropinocytosis of EBOV via a pathway that appears to require less actin or early endosomal processing compared with the filovirus canonical endocytic pathway. Using a validated RNA interference screen, we identified C1QBP (gC1qR) as a candidate surface receptor that mediates MBL-dependent enhancement of EBOV infection. We also identified dectin-2 (CLEC6A) as a potentially novel candidate attachment factor for EBOV. Our findings support the concept of an innate immune haplotype that represents critical interactions between MBL and complement component C4 genes and that may modify susceptibility or resistance to certain glycosylated pathogens. Therefore, higher levels of native or exogenous MBL could be deleterious in the setting of relative hypocomplementemia which can occur genetically or because of immunodepletion during active

  17. Microencapsulation of lectin anti-cancer agent and controlled release by alginate beads, biosafety approach.

    PubMed

    El-Aassar, M R; Hafez, Elsayed E; El-Deeb, Nehal M; Fouda, Moustafa M G

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered as one of the most aggressive cancer worldwide. In Egypt, the prevalence of HCC is increasing during last years. Recently, drug-loaded microparticles were used to improve the efficiency of various medical treatments. This study is designed to evaluate the anticancer potentialities of lectins against HCC while hinting to its safety usage. The aim is also extended to encapsulate lectins in alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery purposes. The extracted lectins showed anti-proliferative effect against HCC with a percentage of 60.76% by using its nontoxic dose with an up-regulation of P53 gene expression. Concerning the handling of lectin alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery, the prepared lectin alginate beads were ∼100μm in diameter. The efficiency of the microcapsules was checked by scanning electron microscopy, the SEM showed the change on the alginate beads surface revealing the successful lectin encapsulation. The release of lectins from the microbeads depended on a variety of factors as the microbeads forming carriers and the amount-encapsulated lectins. The Pisum sativum extracted lectins may be considered as a promising agent in controlling HCC and this solid dosage form could be suitable for oral administration complemented with/or without the standard HCC drugs.

  18. The collectins CL-L1, CL-K1 and CL-P1, and their roles in complement and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Soren W K; Ohtani, Katsuki; Roy, Nitai; Wakamiya, Nobutaka

    2016-10-01

    Both the complement system and collectins play important roles in our innate immune system. The collectins, which are characterized by their inclusion of a collagen-like region and a calcium-dependent carbohydrate recognition domain, are pattern recognition molecules and include the well characterized proteins mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and the surfactant proteins SP-A/-D. Collectin liver 1 (CL-L1), collectin kidney 1 (CL-K1) and collectin placenta 1 (CL-P1) are the most recently discovered collectins. Although their function is still under investigation, accumulating information suggests that CL-L1, CL-K1 and CL-P1 play important roles in host defense by recognizing a variety of microorganisms and interacting with effector proteins, including complement components. The recent establishment of the existence of CL-K1 in the circulation in form of heteromeric complexes with CL-L1 (known as CL-LK) and its activation of the lectin pathway via MASPs, drew new attention in the complement biology, which was further strengthened by the observed interactions between CL-P1 and CRP-C1q-factor H or properdin. Deficiency of either CL-K1 or MASP-3 has been demonstrated in 3MC syndrome patients with developmental abnormalities, showing that lectin pathway components, regulation and/or activation are essential during the embryonic development; another feature that they most likely share CL-P1. Herein, we discuss the recent characteristics and roles of the collectins CL-L1, CL-K1 and CL-P1 in the complement system, in innate immunity and their possible association with disease development and pathogenesis.

  19. Lectin typing of Campylobacter isolates.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, N; Benjamin, J; Skirrow, M B

    1990-01-01

    Isolates of Campylobacter jejuni, C coli, C fetus and C laridis were tested for agglutination reactions with a panel of five lectins: Arachis hypogaea, Bauhinia purpurea, Solanum tuberosum, Triticum vulgaris and Wisteria floribunda. Twenty three patterns of agglutination (lectin types) were recorded among 376 isolates. Patterns were consistent and reproducible. Only 4.5% of isolates were untypable because of autoagglutination. Some lectin types were found exclusively or predominantly in a species, but others were shared between species. Forty two per cent of C jejuni and 35% of C coli isolates belonged to lectin type 4. There was no apparent correlation between lectin type and serotype; different lectin types were found among strains of single Penner and Lior serotypes. Lectin typing is a simple and economical procedure suitable for use in non-specialist laboratories, either as an adjunct to serogrouping or, after further development, as a sole typing scheme. PMID:2262570

  20. C3 dysregulation due to factor H deficiency is mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases (MASP)-1 and MASP-3 independent in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ruseva, M M; Takahashi, M; Fujita, T; Pickering, M C

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled activation of the complement alternative pathway is associated with complement-mediated renal disease. Factor B and factor D are essential components of this pathway, while factor H (FH) is its major regulator. In complete FH deficiency, uncontrolled C3 activation through the alternative pathway results in plasma C3 depletion and complement-mediated renal disease. These are dependent on factor B. Mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases 1 and 3 (MASP-1, MASP-3) have been shown recently to contribute to alternative pathway activation by cleaving pro-factor D to its active form, factor D. We studied the contribution of MASP-1 and MASP-3 to uncontrolled alternative pathway activation in experimental complete FH deficiency. Co-deficiency of FH and MASP-1/MASP-3 did not ameliorate either the plasma C3 activation or glomerular C3 accumulation in FH-deficient mice. Our data indicate that MASP-1 and MASP-3 are not essential for alternative pathway activation in complete FH deficiency. PMID:24279761

  1. Model-Driven Redox Pathway Manipulation for Improved Isobutanol Production in Bacillus subtilis Complemented with Experimental Validation and Metabolic Profiling Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Haishan; Li, Shanshan; Zhao, Sumin; Huang, Di; Xia, Menglei; Wen, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    To rationally guide the improvement of isobutanol production, metabolic network and metabolic profiling analysis were performed to provide global and profound insights into cell metabolism of isobutanol-producing Bacillus subtilis. The metabolic flux distribution of strains with different isobutanol production capacity (BSUL03, BSUL04 and BSUL05) drops a hint of the importance of NADPH on isobutanol biosynthesis. Therefore, the redox pathways were redesigned in this study. To increase NADPH concentration, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase was inactivated (BSUL06) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was overexpressed (BSUL07) successively. As expected, NADPH pool size in BSUL07 was 4.4-fold higher than that in parental strain BSUL05. However, cell growth, isobutanol yield and production were decreased by 46%, 22%, and 80%, respectively. Metabolic profiling analysis suggested that the severely imbalanced redox status might be the primary reason. To solve this problem, gene udhA of Escherichia coli encoding transhydrogenase was further overexpressed (BSUL08), which not only well balanced the cellular ratio of NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+, but also increased NADH and ATP concentration. In addition, a straightforward engineering approach for improving NADPH concentrations was employed in BSUL05 by overexpressing exogenous gene pntAB and obtained BSUL09. The performance for isobutanol production by BSUL09 was poorer than BSUL08 but better than other engineered strains. Furthermore, in fed-batch fermentation the isobutanol production and yield of BSUL08 increased by 11% and 19%, up to the value of 6.12 g/L and 0.37 C-mol isobutanol/C-mol glucose (63% of the theoretical value), respectively, compared with parental strain BSUL05. These results demonstrated that model-driven complemented with metabolic profiling analysis could serve as a useful approach in the strain improvement for higher bio-productivity in further application. PMID:24705866

  2. CsMAP34, a teleost MAP with dual role: A promoter of MASP-assisted complement activation and a regulator of immune cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo-fei; Li, Jun; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    In teleost fish, the immune functions of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) associated protein (MAP) and MBL associated serine protease (MASP) are scarcely investigated. In the present study, we examined the biological properties both MAP (CsMAP34) and MASP (CsMASP1) molecules from tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). We found that CsMAP34 and CsMASP1 expressions occurred in nine different tissues and were upregulated by bacterial challenge. CsMAP34 protein was detected in blood, especially during bacterial infection. Recombinant CsMAP34 (rCsMAP34) bound C. semilaevis MBL (rCsBML) when the latter was activated by bacteria, while recombinant CsMASP1 (rCsMASP1) bound activated rCsBML only in the presence of rCsMAP34. rCsMAP34 stimulated the hemolytic and bactericidal activities of serum complement, whereas anti-CsMAP34 antibody blocked complement activities. Knockdown of CsMASP1 in C. semilaevis resulted in significant inhibition of complement activities. Furthermore, rCsMAP34 interacted directly with peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and enhanced the respiratory burst, acid phosphatase activity, chemotactic activity, and gene expression of PBL. These results indicate for the first time that a teleost MAP acts one hand as a regulator that promotes the lectin pathway of complement activation via its ability to recruit MBL to MASP, and other hand as a modulator of immune cell activity. PMID:28008939

  3. Could plant lectins become promising anti-tumour drugs for causing autophagic cell death?

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Luo, Y; Zhou, T-T; Zhang, W-Z

    2013-10-01

    Plant lectins, a group of highly diverse carbohydrate-binding proteins of non-immune origin, are ubiquitously distributed through a variety of plant species, and have recently drawn rising attention due to their remarkable ability to kill tumour cells using mechanisms implicated in autophagy. In this review, we provide a brief outline of structures of some representative plant lectins such as concanavalin A, Polygonatum cyrtonema lectin and mistletoe lectins. These can target autophagy by modulating BNIP-3, ROS-p38-p53, Ras-Raf and PI3KCI-Akt pathways, as well as Beclin-1, in many types of cancer cells. In addition, we further discuss how plant lectins are able to kill cancer cells by modulating autophagic death, for therapeutic purposes. Together, these findings provide a comprehensive perspective concerning plant lectins as promising new anti-tumour drugs, with respect to autophagic cell death in future cancer therapeutics.

  4. IgG and complement-mediated tissue damage in the absence of C2: evidence of a functionally active C2-bypass pathway in a guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Wagner, E; Platt, J L; Howell, D N; Marsh, H C; Frank, M M

    1999-09-15

    In vitro complement-mediated lysis of heavily sensitized sheep erythrocytes by C4-deficient (C4D) guinea pig and C2-deficient (C2D) human sera was demonstrated some years ago. It was postulated that these "complement-bypass" pathways resulted from activation of C1 and components of the alternative pathway. We used normal, C2D, and C4D guinea pigs in a Forssman shock model to test the in vivo relevance of the C2- and C4-bypass pathways of complement activation. High concentrations of both anti-Forssman Ab and C2D or C4D guinea pig serum induced efficient lysis of sheep erythrocytes in vitro. The most efficient lysis was observed when IgG Ab and C2D guinea pig serum were used. Blocking either the classical pathway (treatments with EGTA-Mg2+ or soluble recombinant complement receptor type 1 (sCR1)) or the alternative pathway (treatment with heating at 50 degrees C, sCR1, or soluble recombinant CR1 lacking the first of the four long homologous repeat sequences (sCR1[desLHR-A])) inhibited lysis; both pathways were required for lysis of sheep erythrocytes by C2D and C4D guinea pig sera. i.v. injection of anti-Forssman Ab in normal guinea pigs resulted in rapid death from pulmonary shock, whereas C4D guinea pigs had no adverse effect. Surprisingly, C2D guinea pigs either died in a delayed fashion or had a sublethal reaction. sCR1 treatment prevented Forssman shock in both normal and C2D guinea pigs, whereas sCR1[desLHR-A] prevented Forssman shock only in C2D animals. Our results suggest that the C2-bypass pathway occurs in vivo to produce tissue damage. Activation of complement in the absence of C2 appears to be far more efficient than in the absence of C4.

  5. Low pH impairs complement-dependent cytotoxicity against IgG-coated target cells

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Ezequiel; Díaz, Fernando Erra; Gerber, Pehuén Pereyra; Merlotti, Antonela; Varese, Augusto; Ostrowski, Matías; Sabatté, Juan; Geffner, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Local acidosis is a common feature of allergic, vascular, autoimmune, and cancer diseases. However, few studies have addressed the effect of extracellular pH on the immune response. Here, we analyzed whether low pH could modulate complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against IgG-coated cells. Using human serum as a complement source, we found that extracellular pH values of 5.5 and 6.0 strongly inhibit CDC against either B lymphoblast cell lines coated with the chimeric anti-CD20 mAb rituximab or PBMCs coated with the humanized anti-CD52 mAb alemtuzumab. Suppression of CDC by low pH was observed either in cells suspended in culture medium or in whole blood assays. Interestingly, not only CDC against IgG-coated cells, but also the activation of the complement system induced by the alternative and lectin pathways was prevented by low pH. Tumor-targeting mAbs represent one of the most successful tools for cancer therapy, however, the use of mAb monotherapy has only modest effects on solid tumors. Our present results suggest that severe acidosis, a hallmark of solid tumors, might impair complement-mediated tumor destruction directed by mAb. PMID:27716623

  6. Lectin from Abelmoschus esculentus reduces zymosan-induced temporomandibular joint inflammatory hypernociception in rats via heme oxygenase-1 pathway integrity and tnf-α and il-1β suppression.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Raul Sousa; do Val, Danielle Rocha; Fernandes, Maria Ester Frota; Gomes, Francisco Isaac Fernandes; de Lacerda, José Thalles Jocelino Gomes; SantiGadelha, Tatiane; de Almeida Gadelha, Carlos Alberto; de Paulo Teixeira Pinto, Vicente; Cristino-Filho, Gerardo; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders show inflammatory components, heavily impacting on quality of life. Abelmoschus esculentus is largely cultivated in Northeastern Brazil for medicinal purposes, having it shown anti-inflammatory activity. We evaluated A. esculentus lectin (AEL) efficacy in reducing zymosan-induced temporomandibular joint inflammatory hypernociception in rats along with the mechanism of action through which it exerts anti-inflammatory activity. Animals were pre-treated with AEL (0.01, 0.1 or 1mg/kg) before zymosan (Zy) injection in the TMJ to determine anti-inflammatory activity. To analyse the possible effect of the hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and the nitric oxide (NO) pathways on AEL efficacy, animals were pre-treated with ZnPP-IX (3mg/kg), a specific HO-1 inhibitor, or aminoguanidine (30mg/kg), a selective iNOS inhibitor, before AEL administration. Von Frey test evaluated inflammatory hypernociception, synovial fluid collection was performed to determine leukocyte counting and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity 6h after Zy injection, and Evans Blue extravasation determined vascular permeability. TMJ tissue was collected for histopathological analysis (H&E) and immunohistochemistry (TNF-α, IL-1β, HO-1). In addition, TMJ tissue and trigeminal ganglion collection was performed for TNF-α and IL-1β dosage (ELISA). AEL increased inflammatory nociceptive threshold, reduced leukocyte influx along with MPO activity, leukocyte influx into the synovial membrane, and Evans Blue extravasation. It promoted HO-1 overexpression whilst decreased TNF-α and IL-1β expression in the TMJ tissue. AEL reduced TNF-α and IL-1β levels in TMJ tissue and trigeminal ganglion. AEL effects, however, were not observed in the presence of ZnPP-IX. These findings suggest that AEL efficacy depends on TNF-α/IL-1β inhibition and HO-1 pathway integrity.

  7. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  8. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  9. Improvements on the purification of mannan-binding lectin and demonstration of its Ca(2+)-independent association with a C1s-like serine protease.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, S M; Chung, M C; Kon, O L; Thiel, S; Lee, S H; Lu, J

    1996-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), previously called 'mannan-binding protein' or MBP, is a plasma C-type lectin which, upon binding to carbohydrate structures on micro-organisms, activates the classical pathway of complement. Purification of MBL relies on its Ca(2+)-dependent affinity for carbohydrate, but existing methods are susceptible to contamination by anti-carbohydrate antibodies. In the present study a sequential-sugar-elution method has been developed which can achieve a preparation of virtually pure MBL and its associated serine protease (MBL-associated serine protease, MASP) by two steps of affinity chromatography. In further separation of MASP from MBL, it was found that activated MASP was associated with MBL independent of Ca2+. Since MBL was found to bind to underivatized Sepharose 4B, the MBL-MASP complex was purified using Sepharose 4B and protease inhibitors were included to purify the complex with MASP in its proenzyme form. Analysis of thus-purified MBL-MASP complex by gel filtration on a Sephacryl S-300 column at pH 7.8 showed that the proenzyme MASP was also associated with MBL independently of Ca2+, but that the complex could be disrupted at a low pH (5.0). Therefore the mechanism of MBL-MASP-mediated complement activation appears to be significantly different from the C1-mediated classical pathway. PMID:8912663

  10. The Serine Protease Pic From Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Mediates Immune Evasion by the Direct Cleavage of Complement Proteins.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Afonso G; Fraga, Tatiana R; Granados Martínez, Adriana P; Kondo, Marcia Y; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela S; Elias, Waldir P

    2015-07-01

    Enteroaggregative and uropathogenic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri 2a, and the hybrid enteroaggregative/Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strain (O104:H4) are important pathogens responsible for intestinal and urinary tract infections, as well as sepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. They have in common the production of a serine protease called Pic. Several biological roles for Pic have been described, including protection of E. coli DH5α from complement-mediated killing. Hereby we showed that Pic significantly reduces complement activation by all 3 pathways. Pic cleaves purified C3/C3b and other proteins from the classic and lectin pathways, such as C4 and C2. Cleavage fragments of C3, C4, and C2 were also observed with HB101(pPic1) culture supernatants, and C3 cleavage sites were mapped by fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptides. Experiments using human serum as a source of complement proteins confirmed Pic proteolytic activity on these proteins. Furthermore, Pic works synergistically with the human complement regulators factor I and factor H, promoting inactivation of C3b. In the presence of both regulators, further degradation of C3 α' chain was observed. Therefore, Pic may contribute to immune evasion of E. coli and S. flexneri, favoring invasiveness and increasing the severity of the disorders caused by these pathogens.

  11. Characterization of the human submandibular/sublingual saliva glycoproteome using lectin affinity chromatography coupled to multidimensional protein identification technology.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Lu, Bingwen; Liao, Lujian; Xu, Tao; Bedi, Gurrinder; Melvin, James E; Yates, John R

    2011-11-04

    In-depth analysis of the salivary proteome is fundamental to understanding the functions of salivary proteins in the oral cavity and to reveal disease biomarkers involved in different pathophysiological conditions, with the ultimate goal of improving patient diagnosis and prognosis. Submandibular and sublingual glands contribute saliva rich in glycoproteins to the total saliva output, making them valuable sources for glycoproteomic analysis. Lectin-affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics was used to explore the submandibular/sublingual (SM/SL) saliva glycoproteome. A total of 262 N- and O-linked glycoproteins were identified by multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Only 38 were previously described in SM and SL salivas from the human salivary N-linked glycoproteome, while 224 were unique. Further comparison analysis with SM/SL saliva of the human saliva proteome, revealed 125 glycoproteins not formerly reported in this secretion. KEGG pathway analyses demonstrated that many of these glycoproteins are involved in processes such as complement and coagulation cascades, cell communication, glycosphingolipid biosynthesis neo-lactoseries, O-glycan biosynthesis, glycan structures-biosynthesis 2, starch and sucrose metabolism, peptidoglycan biosynthesis or others pathways. In summary, lectin-affinity chromatography coupled to MudPIT mass spectrometry identified many novel glycoproteins in SM/SL saliva. These new additions to the salivary proteome may prove to be a critical step for providing reliable biomarkers in the diagnosis of a myriad of oral and systemic diseases.

  12. Effect of functionalization of carbon nanotubes with psychosine on complement activation and protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Rybak-Smith, Malgorzata J; Tripisciano, Carla; Borowiak-Palen, Ewa; Lamprecht, Constanze; Sim, Robert B

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes possess interesting physicochemical properties which make them potentially usable in medicine. Single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, for example, may carry and deliver anticancer drugs, such as cisplatin. Magnetic nanoparticles, like iron filled MWCNT, can be used in hyperthermia therapy. However, their hydrophobic character is a major difficulty, as preparation of stable dispersions of carbon nanotubes in biological buffers is an essential step towards biomedical applications. Recently, a novel treatment using the glycolipid, Galactosyl-beta1-sphingosine (psychosine), was employed to make stable suspensions of psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes in biological buffers. In this paper, the interactions of psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes with a part of the human immune system, complement, is presented. To investigate if human serum complement proteins can interact with psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes, complement consumption (depletion) assays were conducted. Moreover, direct protein binding studies, to analyze the interaction of plasma proteins with the psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes, using affinity chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis techniques, were applied. The psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes activate human complement via the classical pathway. Interestingly, as the hydrophilic part of the glycolipid may bind to ficolins, the lectin pathway could also be involved. Binding of human plasma proteins is very selective as only very few proteins adsorb to the psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotube surface, when placed in contact with human plasma. Bovine serum albumin-coated carbon nanotubes were used as a standard to find the differences in complement activation and protein adsorption patterns, caused by various non-covalent coatings of carbon nanotubes.

  13. RNase activity of sialic acid-binding lectin from bullfrog eggs drives antitumor effect via the activation of p38 MAPK to caspase-3/7 signaling pathway in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kariya, Yukiko; Tatsuta, Takeo; Sugawara, Shigeki; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Nitta, Kazuo; Hosono, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acid-binding lectin obtained from bullfrog eggs (SBL) induces cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells. This antitumor effect is mediated through its ribo-nuclease (RNase) activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We found that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated when SBL induced cell death in three human breast cancer cell lines: SK-BR-3, MCF-7, and MDA-MB231. The suppression of p38 MAPK phosphorylation by a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as short interference RNA knockdown of p38 MAPK expression significantly decreased cell death and increased the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA-MB231 cells. H103A, an SBL mutant lacking in RNase activity, showed decreased SBL-induced cell death compared with native SBL. However, the loss of RNase activity of SBL had no effect on its internalization into cells. The H103A mutant also displayed decreased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Moreover, SBL promoted caspase-3/7 activation followed by a cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase, whereas the SBL mutant, H103A, lost this ability. The SBL-induced caspase-3/7 activation was suppressed by the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, as well as pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk. In the presence of zVAD-fmk, the SBL-induced cell death was decreased. In addition, the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA-MB231 cells recovered by zVAD-fmk treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that the RNase activity of SBL leads to breast cancer cell death through the activation of p38 MAPK followed by the activation of caspase-3/7. PMID:27513956

  14. RNase activity of sialic acid-binding lectin from bullfrog eggs drives antitumor effect via the activation of p38 MAPK to caspase-3/7 signaling pathway in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kariya, Yukiko; Tatsuta, Takeo; Sugawara, Shigeki; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Nitta, Kazuo; Hosono, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Sialic acid-binding lectin obtained from bullfrog eggs (SBL) induces cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells. This antitumor effect is mediated through its ribonuclease (RNase) activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We found that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated when SBL induced cell death in three human breast cancer cell lines: SK-BR-3, MCF-7, and MDA‑MB231. The suppression of p38 MAPK phosphorylation by a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as short interference RNA knockdown of p38 MAPK expression significantly decreased cell death and increased the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA‑MB231 cells. H103A, an SBL mutant lacking in RNase activity, showed decreased SBL-induced cell death compared with native SBL. However, the loss of RNase activity of SBL had no effect on its internalization into cells. The H103A mutant also displayed decreased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Moreover, SBL promoted caspase‑3/7 activation followed by a cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase, whereas the SBL mutant, H103A, lost this ability. The SBL-induced caspase‑3/7 activation was suppressed by the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, as well as pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk. In the presence of zVAD-fmk, the SBL-induced cell death was decreased. In addition, the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA‑MB231 cells recovered by zVAD-fmk treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that the RNase activity of SBL leads to breast cancer cell death through the activation of p38 MAPK followed by the activation of caspase‑3/7.

  15. Characterization and expression analysis of a complement component gene in sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Zhou, Zunchun; Yang, Aifu; Dong, Ying; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-12-01

    The complement system plays a crucial role in the innate immune system of animals. It can be activated by distinct yet overlapping classical, alternative and lectin pathways. In the alternative pathway, complement factor B (Bf) serves as the catalytic subunit of complement component 3 (C3) convertase, which plays the central role among three activation pathways. In this study, the Bf gene in sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus), termed AjBf, was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of AjBf was 3231 bp in length barring the poly (A) tail. It contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 2742 bp encoding 913 amino acids, a 105 bp 5'-UTR (5'-terminal untranslated region) and a 384 bp 3'-UTR. AjBf was a mosaic protein with six CCP (complement control protein) domains, a VWA (von Willebrand factor A) domain, and a serine protease domain. The deduced molecular weight of AjBf protein was 101 kDa. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the expression level of AjBf in A. japonicus was obviously higher at larval stage than that at embryonic stage. Expression detection in different tissues showed that AjBf expressed higher in coelomocytes than in other four tissues. In addation, AjBf expression in different tissues was induced significantly after LPS or PolyI:C challenge. These results indicated that AjBf plays an important role in immune responses to pathogen infection.

  16. Human monocyte spreading induced by factor Bb of the alternative pathway of complement activation. A possible role for C5 in monocyte spreading

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The central serine esterase of the alternative pathway of complement (APC) activation, activated factor B (Bb), has been shown recently to induce murine macrophages and human monocytes to become spread on a glass substrata. It has also been established that to induce the spreading reaction, the catalytic site of the Bb enzyme must be structurally intact since treatment of Bb with heat (56 degrees C for 30 min) or diisopropylfluorophosphate (10(-3) M) destroyed both enzymatic and spreading activities. In the C3b,Bb complex, Bb exhibits restricted substrate specificity for C3 and C5. With this in mind, the role of C3 and C5 in the monocyte spreading reaction was explored in the present study. Expression of C3 and C5 on the surface of human peripheral blood monocytes was investigated by the direct fluorescent antibody technique employing fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated anti- C3 or C5 F(ab')2 antibody fragments. It was found that C3 and C5 were present on 6 +/- 7% of freshly prepared monocytes and that expression of C5, but not C3, increased to 70 +/- 6% when monocytes were incubated for 3 d in serum-free medium. Biosynthesis of C5 was indicated when it was found that under serum-free conditions, monocytes incorporated [3H]leucine into immunoprecipitable C5 with an apparent mol wt of 180,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The role of C3 and C5 in the monocyte spreading reaction induced by factor Bb was explored by testing for the ability of anti-C3 and anti- C5 Fab' antibody fragments to block monocyte spreading. It was found that anti-C5 Fab' inhibited by up to 100% the 3-h human monocyte spreading reaction induced by Bb; in contrast, anti-C3 Fab' or anti-C4 Fab' inhibited by less than 10%. That the inhibitory effect of anti-C5 Fab' was exerted directly on the monocyte was established when it was found that the 3-h monocyte spreading reaction was significantly inhibited by pretreating monocytes with anti-C5 Fab' for 20 min and then

  17. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  18. The mechanisms of complement activation in normal bovine serum and normal horse serum against Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 strains with different outer membrane proteins content.

    PubMed

    Miętka, K; Brzostek, K; Guz-Regner, K; Bugla-Płoskońska, G

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a common zoonotic pathogen and facultative intracellular bacterium which can survive within blood cells. Cattle and horses are considered a reservoir of Y. enterocolitica which often causes several serious syndromes associated with yersiniosis such as abortions, premature births or infertility. The aim of our investigation was to determine the vitality of Y. enterocolitica O:9 strains (Ye9) in bovine and horse sera (NBS and NHrS) and explain the role of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in serum resistance of these bacteria. Our previous studies demonstrated moderate human serum (NHS) resistance of the wild type Ye9 strain, whereas mutants lacking YadA, Ail or OmpC remained sensitive to the bactericidal activity of NHS. The present study showed that the wild type of Ye9 strain was resistant to the bactericidal activity of both NHrS and NBS, while Ye9 mutants lacking the YadA, Ail and OmpC proteins were sensitive to NHrS and NBS as well as to NHS. The mechanisms of complement activation against Ye9 strains lacking Ail and YadA were distinguished, i.e. activation of the classical/lectin pathways decisive in the bactericidal mechanism of complement activation of NBS, parallel activation of the classical/lectin and alternative pathways of NHrS. In this research the mechanism of independent activation of the classical/lectin or the alternative pathway of NBS and NHrS against Ye9 lacking OmpC porin was also established. The results indicate that serum resistance of Ye9 is multifactorial, in which extracellular structures, i.e. outer membrane proteins (OMPs) such as Ail, OmpC or YadA, play the main role.

  19. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Turner, M W

    1998-08-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is the most intensively studied human collectin. It is recognized to be a versatile macro-molecule with many of the functional characteristics of IgM, IgG and Clq. In the presence of calcium the protein can bind to a wide spectrum of oligosaccharides through multiple lectin domains. Such binding to the repeating sugar arrays on microbial surfaces may result in direct uptake by one or more collectin receptors on phagocyte surface or may trigger the activation of a pro-serine protease complex (MASP 1 and MASP 2) leading to cleavage of C4 and C2 of the classical complement pathway. Although serum levels of MBL are normally rather low (1500 micrograms/litre) there is increasing evidence that the protein plays an important role in immune defence, particularly during the phase of primary contact with a microorganism. This is suggested by the observed association of an increased incidence of infections in individuals with structural mutations in exon 1 of the MBL gene. A cluster of such mutations in codons 52, 54 and 57 lead to secondary structural abnormalities of the collagenous triple helix and a failure to form biologically functional higher order oligomers. The codon 54 mutation has been identified in several Eurasian populations whereas the codon 57 mutation is characteristic of sub-Saharan populations. One intriguing paradox arising from the MBL genotyping studies is the observation that in many populations there are surprisingly high frequencies of either the codon 54 or codon 57 mutation, suggesting that there may be some biological advantage associated with absence of the protein. Nevertheless, various groups have reported either low serum levels of MBL or an increased frequency of the structural gene mutations in patients with suspected immunodeficiencies, those with frequent unexplained infections and those with systemic lupus erythematosus. There is also evidence that the rate of progression of AIDS in HIV positive men is faster

  20. Lectins and Tetrahymena - A review.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2016-09-01

    The unicellular ciliate Tetrahymena is a complete organism, one of the most highly developed protozoans, which has specialized organelles performing each of the functions characteristic to the cells of higher ranked animals. It is also able to produce, store, and secrete hormones of higher ranked animals and also react to them. It produces lectins that can bind them and has functions, which are influenced by exogenous lectins. The review lists the observations on the relationship between lectins and Tetrahymena and try to construe them on the basis of the data, which are at our disposal. Considering the data, lectins can be used by Tetrahymena as materials for influencing conjugation, for stimulating hormone receptors, and by this, mimic the hormonal functions. Lectins can influence phagocytosis and movement of the cells as well as the cell division. As Tetrahymena can recognize both related and hostile cells by the help of lectins and surface sugars, it could be surmised a complex predator-prey system. This could determine the survival of the population as well as the nourishment conditions. When Tetrahymena is pathogenic, it can use lectins as virulence factors.

  1. Meningococcal disease and the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lisa A; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of meningococcal disease, this infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. The role of the complement system in innate immune defenses against invasive meningococcal disease is well established. Individuals deficient in components of the alternative and terminal complement pathways are highly predisposed to invasive, often recurrent meningococcal infections. Genome-wide analysis studies also point to a central role for complement in disease pathogenesis. Here we review the pathophysiologic events pertinent to the complement system that accompany meningococcal sepsis in humans. Meningococci use several often redundant mechanisms to evade killing by human complement. Capsular polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide glycan composition play critical roles in complement evasion. Some of the newly described protein vaccine antigens interact with complement components and have sparked considerable research interest. PMID:24104403

  2. A novel L-type lectin was required for the multiplication of WSSV in red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clakii).

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunjia; Wang, Yuqing; Zhao, Lingling; Qin, Zhendong; Yuan, Junfa; Qin, Qiwei; Lin, Li; Lan, Jiangfeng

    2016-08-01

    L-type lectins are involved in glycoproteins secretory pathways and are associated with many immune responses. There is growing evidence that L-type lectins are also involved in viral replication. In this study, a novel L-type lectin (named as PcL-lectin) was identified from red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clakii). Gene sequencing and phylogenetic tree analysis results showed that the PcL-lectin was a kind of endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment-53 (ERGIC-53). The expression level of PcL-lectin was significantly down regulated in crayfish after challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Recombinant PcL-lectin protein facilitated the replication of WSSV in crayfish. In addition, WSSV replication was decreased when endogenous PcL-lectin was knocked down by RNA interference in crayfish. Furthermore, PcL-lectin may interact with VP24, an envelope protein of WSSV. Our results suggest that PcL-lectin may be required for the multiplication of WSSV, and will pave a new way for the developing of strategies against WSSV infection.

  3. Use of lectins in immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review. PMID:27011665

  4. Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides can activate the early components of complement classical pathway in a C1q-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschini, L; Canziani, S; Bottasso, B; Cugno, M; Braidotti, P; Agostoni, A

    1999-01-01

    β-Amyloid (β-A) accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is presumably involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, on account of its neurotoxicity and complement-activating ability. Although assembly of β-A in particular aggregates seems to be crucial, soluble non-fibrillar β-A may also be involved. Non-fibrillar β-A does not bind C1q, so we investigated alternative mechanisms of β-A-dependent complement activation in vitro. On incubation with normal human plasma, non-fibrillar β-A 1-42, and truncated peptide 1–28, induced dose-dependent activation of C1s and C4, sparing C3, as assessed by densitometric analysis of immunostained membrane after SDS–PAGE and Western blotting. The mechanism of C4 activation was not dependent on C1q, because non-fibrillar β-A can still activate C1s and C4 in plasma genetically deficient in C1q (C1qd). In Factor XII-deficient plasma (F.XIId) the amount of cleaved C4 was about 5–10% less that in C1qd and in normal EDTA plasma; the reconstitution of F.XIId plasma with physiologic concentrations of F.XII resulted in an increased (8–15%) β-A-dependent cleavage of C4. Thus our results indicate that the C1q-independent activation of C1 and C4 can be partially mediated by the activation products of contact system. Since the activation of contact system and of C4 leads to generation of several humoral inflammatory peptides, non-fibrillar β-A might play a role in initiating the early inflammatory reactions leading to a multistep cascade contributing to neuronal and clinical dysfunction of AD brain. PMID:10193429

  5. Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptides can activate the early components of complement classical pathway in a C1q-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschini, L; Canziani, S; Bottasso, B; Cugno, M; Braidotti, P; Agostoni, A

    1999-03-01

    beta-Amyloid (beta-A) accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is presumably involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, on account of its neurotoxicity and complement-activating ability. Although assembly of beta-A in particular aggregates seems to be crucial, soluble non-fibrillar beta-A may also be involved. Non-fibrillar beta-A does not bind C1q, so we investigated alternative mechanisms of beta-A-dependent complement activation in vitro. On incubation with normal human plasma, non-fibrillar beta-A 1-42, and truncated peptide 1-28, induced dose-dependent activation of C1s and C4, sparing C3, as assessed by densitometric analysis of immunostained membrane after SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The mechanism of C4 activation was not dependent on C1q, because non-fibrillar beta-A can still activate C1s and C4 in plasma genetically deficient in C1q (C1qd). In Factor XII-deficient plasma (F.XIId) the amount of cleaved C4 was about 5-10% less that in C1qd and in normal EDTA plasma; the reconstitution of F.XIId plasma with physiologic concentrations of F.XII resulted in an increased (8-15%) beta-A-dependent cleavage of C4. Thus our results indicate that the C1q-independent activation of C1 and C4 can be partially mediated by the activation products of contact system. Since the activation of contact system and of C4 leads to generation of several humoral inflammatory peptides, non-fibrillar beta-A might play a role in initiating the early inflammatory reactions leading to a multistep cascade contributing to neuronal and clinical dysfunction of AD brain.

  6. Exercise reverses age-related vulnerability of the retina to injury by preventing complement-mediated synapse elimination via a BDNF-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Chrysostomou, Vicki; Galic, Sandra; van Wijngaarden, Peter; Trounce, Ian A; Steinberg, Gregory R; Crowston, Jonathan G

    2016-09-09

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) become increasingly vulnerable to injury with advancing age. We recently showed that this vulnerability can be strongly modified in mice by exercise. However, the characteristics and underlying mechanisms of retinal protection with exercise remain unknown. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate cellular changes associated with exercise-induced protection of aging retinal cells and the role of local and peripheral trophic signalling in mediating these effects. We focussed on two molecules that are thought to play key roles in mediating beneficial effects of exercise: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In middle-aged (12 months old) C57BL/6J mice, we found that exercise protected RGCs against dysfunction and cell loss after an acute injury induced by elevation of intra-ocular pressure. This was associated with preservation of inner retinal synapses and reduced synaptic complement deposition. Retinal expression of BDNF was not upregulated in response to exercise alone. Rather, exercise maintained BDNF levels in the retina, which were decreased postinjury in nonexercised animals. Confirming a critical role for BDNF, we found that blocking BDNF signalling during exercise by pharmacological means or genetic knock-down suppressed the functional protection of RGCs afforded by exercise. Protection of RGCs with exercise was independent of activation of AMPK in either retina or skeletal muscle. Our data support a previously unidentified mechanism in which exercise prevents loss of BDNF in the retina after injury and preserves neuronal function and survival by preventing complement-mediated elimination of synapses.

  7. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-01-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies. PMID

  8. Complement C5a-C5aR interaction enhances MAPK signaling pathway activities to mediate renal injury in trichloroethylene sensitized BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-xiang; Zha, Wan-sheng; Ye, Liang-ping; Wang, Feng; Wang, Hui; Shen, Tong; Wu, Chang-hao; Zhu, Qi-xing

    2016-02-01

    We have previously shown complement activation as a possible mechanism for trichloroethylene (TCE) sensitization, leading to multi-organ damage including the kidneys. In particular, excessive deposition of C5 and C5b-9-the membrane attack complex, which can generate significant tissue damage, was observed in the kidney tissue after TCE sensitization. The present study tested the hypothesis that anaphylatoxin C5a binding to its receptor C5aR mediates renal injury in TCE-sensitized BALB/c mice. BALB/c mice were sensitized through skin challenge with TCE, with or without pretreatment by the C5aR antagonist W54011. Kidney histopathology and the renal functional test were performed to assess renal injury, and immunohistochemistry and fluorescent labeling were carried out to assess C5a and C5aR expressions. TCE sensitization up-regulated C5a and C5aR expressions in kidney tissue, generated inflammatory infiltration, renal tubule damage, glomerular hypercellularity and impaired renal function. Antagonist pretreatment blocked C5a binding to C5aR and attenuated TCE-induced tissue damage and renal dysfunction. TCE sensitization also caused the deposition of major pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ in the kidney tissue (P < 0.05); this was accompanied by increased expression of P-p38, P-ERK and P-JNK proteins (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with the C5aR antagonist attenuated the increase of expression of P-p38, P-ERK and P-JNK proteins (P < 0.05) and also consistently reduced the TCE sensitization-induced increase of IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ (P < 0.05). These data identify C5a binding to C5aR, MAP kinase activation, and inflammatory cytokine release as a novel mechanism for complement-mediated renal injury by sensitization with TCE or other environmental chemicals.

  9. Protein regulation and Apoptotic induction in human breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7) through lectin from G. beauts.

    PubMed

    Ponraj, Thondhi; Paulpandi, Manickam; Vivek, Raju; Vimala, Karuppaiya; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2017-02-01

    Lectins are proteins that show a variety of biological activities. Nevertheless, information on lectin from Gluttonous beauts and their anticancer activities are very limited. In this study, we purified a lectin from hemolymph of G. beauts and identified its molecular weight to be 66kDa. The effect of lectin at different concentrations (μg/mL) on the cell growth and apoptosis were evaluated against MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells, whereas cytotoxicity to the MCF-7 cells mediated by lectin was observed and the mechanism of action of the lectin in including apoptosis in cancer cells via the intrinsic pathway was also proposed. The MCF-7 cells were employed for in vitro studies on cytotoxicity, induction of apoptosis and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. In MCF-10A cells lectin did not show any adverse effect even at higher concentration. Cell cycle analysis also showed a significant cell cycle arrest on selected cells after lectin treatment. Western blotting suggested that lectin up regulates the apoptotic protein expression in MCF-7 cells while it down regulates the level of Bcl-2 expression.

  10. AglH, a thermophilic UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate:dolichyl phosphate GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase initiating protein N-glycosylation pathway in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, is capable of complementing the eukaryal Alg7.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Benjamin H; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2017-01-01

    AglH, a predicted UDP-GlcNAc-1-phosphate:dolichyl phosphate GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase, is initiating the protein N-glycosylation pathway in the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. AglH successfully replaced the endogenous GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase activity of Alg7 in a conditional lethal Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, in which the first step of the eukaryal protein N-glycosylation process was repressed. This study is one of the few examples of cross-domain complementation demonstrating a conserved polyprenyl phosphate transferase reaction within the eukaryal and archaeal domain like it was demonstrated for Methanococcus voltae (Shams-Eldin et al. 2008). The topology prediction and the alignment of the AglH membrane protein with GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferases from the three domains of life show significant conservation of amino acids within the different proposed cytoplasmic loops. Alanine mutations of selected conserved amino acids in the putative cytoplasmic loops II (D100), IV (F220) and V (F264) demonstrated the importance of these amino acids for cross-domain AlgH activity in in vitro complementation assays in S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment interfering directly with the activity of dolichyl phosphate GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferases confirmed the essentiality of N-glycosylation for cell survival.

  11. Complement associated pathogenic mechanisms in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Erdem; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody (Ab) related myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). The most characteristic finding of muscle pathology in both MG and EAMG is the abundance of IgG and complement deposits at the nerve-muscle junction (NMJ), suggesting that AChR-Ab induces muscle weakness by complement pathway activation and consequent membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. This assumption has been supported with EAMG resistance of complement factor C3 knockout (KO), C4 KO and C5 deficient mice and amelioration of EAMG symptoms following treatment with complement inhibitors such as cobra venom factor, soluble complement receptor 1, anti-C1q, anti-C5 and anti-C6 Abs. Moreover, the complement inhibitor decay accelerating factor (DAF) KO mice exhibit increased susceptibility to EAMG. These findings have brought forward improvisation of novel therapy methods based on inhibition of classical and common complement pathways in MG treatment.

  12. The role of complement in AMD.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Peter F; Lauer, Nadine; Skerka, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common form of blindness in the western world and genetic variations of several complement genes, including the complement regulator Factor H, the central complement component C3, Factor B, C2, and also Factor I confer a risk for the disease. However deletion of a chromosomal segment in the Factor H gene cluster on human chromosome 1, which results in the deficiency of the terminal pathway regulator CFHR1, and of the putative complement regulator CFHR3 has a protective effect for development of AMD. The Factor H gene encodes two proteins Factor H and FHL1 which are derived from alternatively processed transcripts. In particular a sequence variation at position 402 of both Factor H and FHL1 is associated with a risk for AMD. A tyrosine residue at position 402 represents the protective and a histidine residue the risk variant. AMD is considered a chronic inflammatory disease, which can be caused by defective and inappropriate regulation of the continuously activated alternative complement pathway. This activation generates complement effector products and inflammatory mediators that stimulate further inflammatory reactions. Defective regulation can lead to formation of immune deposits, drusen and ultimately translate into damage of retinal pigment epithelial cells, rupture of the interface between these epithelial cells and the Bruch's membrane and vision loss. Here we describe the role of complement in the retina and summarize the current concept how defective or inappropriate local complement control contributes to inflammation and the pathophysiology of AMD.

  13. In Vitro and In Vivo Differences in Murine Third Complement Component (C3) Opsonization and Macrophage/Leukocyte Responses to Antibody-Functionalized Iron Oxide Nanoworms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guankui; Griffin, James I.; Inturi, Swetha; Brenneman, Barbara; Banda, Nirmal K.; Holers, V. Michael; Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Simberg, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    Balancing surface functionalization and low immune recognition of nanomedicines is a major challenge. Opsonization with the third component of the complement protein (C3) plays a major role in immune cell recognition of nanomedicines. We used dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoworms (SPIO NWs) to study the effect of surface functionalization on C3 opsonization in mouse serum and subsequent macrophage/leukocyte recognition in vitro as well as on intravenous injection into mice. Previously, we found that in mouse serum, SPIO NWs became opsonized with C3 via complement lectin pathway. Crosslinking the dextran shell with epichlorohydrin significantly decreased C3 opsonization and uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages. Crosslinked nanoworms (NWs) further functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) or with PEG-antibody (Ab) (~160 IgG molecules/particle) did not show an increase in C3 opsonization and peritoneal macrophage uptake in vitro. Following tail vein injection into mice, plain crosslinked NWs and PEGylated crosslinked NWs showed very low C3 opsonization and mouse leukocyte uptake. However, Ab-decorated crosslinked NWs showed significant C3 opsonization and high level of complement-dependent uptake by leukocytes in mice. Decreasing the number of conjugated Abs to 46 IgG molecules/particle significantly reduced C3 opsonization and leukocyte uptake. Using fresh mouse lepirudin plasma rather than serum showed better correlation with C3 opsonization in vivo. The reason for this difference could be related to the known instability of complement classical pathway in mouse sera. Our data illustrate that fine-tuning in nanoparticle surface functionalization with Abs is required to avoid excessive complement activation and complement-mediated immune uptake in mice, and raise issues with in vitro immunological assays of nanomedicines intended to mimic in vivo conditions. PMID:28239384

  14. Age-related macular degeneration: Complement in action.

    PubMed

    van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Strauss, Erich C; Yaspan, Brian L

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in host-defense against common pathogens but must be tightly controlled to avoid inflammation and tissue damage. Polymorphisms in genes encoding two important negative regulators of the alternative complement pathway, complement factor H (CFH) and complement factor I (CFI), are associated with the risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population. In this review, we will discuss the genetic basis of AMD and the potential impact of complement de-regulation on disease pathogenesis. Finally, we will highlight recent therapeutic approaches aimed at controlling complement activation in patients with AMD.

  15. Structural insights on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Alcorlo, Martín; López-Perrote, Andrés; Delgado, Sandra; Yébenes, Hugo; Subías, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, César; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Llorca, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    The proteolytic cleavage of C3 to generate C3b is the central and most important step in the activation of complement, a major component of innate immunity. The comparison of the crystal structures of C3 and C3b illustrates large conformational changes during the transition from C3 to C3b. Exposure of a reactive thio-ester group allows C3b to bind covalently to surfaces such as pathogens or apoptotic cellular debris. The displacement of the thio-ester-containing domain (TED) exposes hidden surfaces that mediate the interaction with complement factor B to assemble the C3-convertase of the alternative pathway (AP). In addition, the displacement of the TED and its interaction with the macroglobulin 1 (MG1) domain generates an extended surface in C3b where the complement regulators factor H (FH), decay accelerating factor (DAF), membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and complement receptor 1 (CR1) can bind, mediating accelerated decay of the AP C3-convertase and proteolytic inactivation of C3b. In the last few years, evidence has accumulated revealing that the structure of C3b in solution is significantly more flexible than anticipated. We review our current knowledge on C3b structural flexibility to propose a general model where the TED can display a collection of conformations around the MG ring, as well as a few specialized positions where the TED is held in one of several fixed locations. Importantly, this conformational heterogeneity in C3b impacts complement regulation by affecting the interaction with regulators.

  16. Properdin in Complement Activation and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lesher, AM; B, Nilsson; Song, W-C

    2013-01-01

    The plasma protein properdin is the only known positive regulator of complement activation. Although regarded as an initiator of the alternative pathway of complement activation at the time of its discovery more than a half century ago, the role and mechanism of action of properdin in the complement cascade has undergone significant conceptual evolution since then. Despite the long history of research on properdin, however, new insight and unexpected findings on the role of properdin in complement activation, pathogen infection and host tissue injury are still being revealed by ongoing investigations. In this article, we provide a brief review on recent studies that shed new light on properdin biology, focusing on the following three topics: 1) its role as a pattern recognition molecule to direct and trigger complement activation, 2) its context-dependent requirement in complement activation on foreign and host cell surfaces, and 3) its involvement in alternative pathway complement-mediated immune disorders and considerations of properdin as a potential therapeutic target in human diseases. PMID:23816404

  17. Targeted Inhibition of Complement Using Complement Receptor 2-Conjugated Inhibitors Attenuates EAE

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xianzhen; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. In the last two decades, many therapeutic options for the treatment of MS have become available, however they are limited in terms of effectiveness and some remain plagued by safety issues. The currently available treatment options target relapsing remitting forms of MS and are not effective against the more progressive forms of the disease. These limitations highlight a significant unmet treatment need for MS. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) studies from our laboratory, we have previously shown, using a number of complement mutant and transgenic mice, that inhibition of the alternative complement pathway and the C3 convertase confers significant protection from disease. We report here that targeted inhibition of complement activation using complement receptor 2 (CR2)-conjugated inhibitors significantly attenuates EAE. Administration of CR2-Crry (blocks all complement pathways at C3 activation) and CR2-fH (specifically blocks the alternative pathway) just prior to and during the onset of EAE blocks progression of both acute and chronic disease. These data indicate that inhibition of complement may offer an effective therapeutic approach to treating both acute and chronic forms of demyelinating disease through blocking the alternative pathway or complement convertases. PMID:23079547

  18. Targeted inhibition of complement using complement receptor 2-conjugated inhibitors attenuates EAE.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R

    2012-11-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. In the last two decades, many therapeutic options for the treatment of MS have become available, however they are limited in terms of effectiveness and some remain plagued by safety issues. The currently available treatment options target relapsing remitting forms of MS and are not effective against the more progressive forms of the disease. These limitations highlight a significant unmet treatment need for MS. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) studies from our laboratory, we have previously shown, using a number of complement mutant and transgenic mice, that inhibition of the alternative complement pathway and the C3 convertase confers significant protection from disease. We report here that targeted inhibition of complement activation using complement receptor 2 (CR2)-conjugated inhibitors significantly attenuates EAE. Administration of CR2-Crry (blocks all complement pathways at C3 activation) and CR2-fH (specifically blocks the alternative pathway) just prior to and during the onset of EAE blocks progression of both acute and chronic disease. These data indicate that inhibition of complement may offer an effective therapeutic approach to treating both acute and chronic forms of demyelinating disease through blocking the alternative pathway or complement convertases.

  19. Targeting complement in therapy.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M

    2001-04-01

    With increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases, strategies that interfere with its deleterious action have become a major focus in pharmacological research. Endogenous soluble complement inhibitors (C1 inhibitor, recombinant soluble complement receptor 1, antibodies) blocking key proteins of the cascade reaction, neutralizing the action of the complement-derived anaphylatoxin C5a, or interfering with complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD18/11b)-mediated adhesion of inflammatory cells to the vascular endothelium have successfully been tested in various animal models over the past years. Promising results consequently led to clinical trials. Furthermore, incorporation of membrane-bound complement regulators (decay-accelerating factor (CD55), membrane co-factor protein (CD46), CD59) in transgenic animals has provided a major step forward in protecting xenografts from hyperacute rejection. At the same time, the poor contribution of complement to the antitumor response, which is caused by multiple resistance mechanisms that hamper the efficacy of antibody-based tumor therapy, is increasingly recognized and requires pharmacologic intervention. First attempts have now been made to interfere with the resistance mechanisms, thereby improving complement-mediated tumor cell destruction.

  20. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  1. Plant as a plenteous reserve of lectin

    PubMed Central

    Hivrale, AU; Ingale, AG

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are clusters of glycoproteins of nonimmune foundation that combine specifically and reversibly to carbohydrates, mainly the sugar moiety of glycoconjugates, resulting in cell agglutination and precipitation of glycoconjugates. They are universally distributed in nature, being established in plants, fungi, viruses, bacteria, crustacea, insects, and animals, but leguminacae plants are rich source of lectins. The present review reveals the structure, biological properties, and application of plant lectins. PMID:24084524

  2. Influence of Lectins on Constricting Ring Formation by Arthrobotrys dactyloides.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Davis, E L; Walter, D E

    1991-04-01

    Incubation of Arthrobotrys dactyloides conidia in the presence of Radopholus citrophilus in lectin solutions with their corresponding sugars did not alter the stimulation of trap formation in solutions containing lectins alone. The lack of inhibition of lectin-stimulated trap formation by sugars or by lectin denaturation and the lack of lectin specificity indicate that the carbohydrate-binding regions of the particular lectins studied are not the stimulatory moieties of these macromolecules.

  3. Therapeutic complement inhibition in complement-mediated hemolytic anemias: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Risitano, Antonio M; Marotta, Serena

    2016-06-01

    The introduction in the clinic of anti-complement agents represented a major achievement which gave to physicians a novel etiologic treatment for different human diseases. Indeed, the first anti-complement agent eculizumab has changed the treatment paradigm of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), dramatically impacting its severe clinical course. In addition, eculizumab is the first agent approved for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), a life-threatening inherited thrombotic microangiopathy. Nevertheless, such remarkable milestone in medicine has brought to the fore additional challenges for the scientific community. Indeed, the list of complement-mediated anemias is not limited to PNH and aHUS, and other human diseases can be considered for anti-complement treatment. They include other thrombotic microangiopathies, as well as some antibody-mediated hemolytic anemias. Furthermore, more than ten years of experience with eculizumab led to a better understanding of the individual steps of the complement cascade involved in the pathophysiology of different human diseases. Based on this, new unmet clinical needs are emerging; a number of different strategies are currently under development to improve current anti-complement treatment, trying to address these specific clinical needs. They include: (i) alternative anti-C5 agents, which may improve the heaviness of eculizumab treatment; (ii) broad-spectrum anti-C3 agents, which may improve the efficacy of anti-C5 treatment by intercepting the complement cascade upstream (i.e., preventing C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis in PNH); (iii) targeted inhibitors of selective complement activating pathways, which may prevent early pathogenic events of specific human diseases (e.g., anti-classical pathway for antibody-mediated anemias, or anti-alternative pathway for PNH and aHUS). Here we briefly summarize the status of art of current and future complement inhibition for different complement-mediated anemias

  4. Ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes protects intracellular mature virus and infected cells from mouse complement.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Elizabeth A; Bertram, Paula; Chen, Nanhai; Buller, R Mark L; Atkinson, John P

    2010-09-01

    Poxviruses produce complement regulatory proteins to subvert the host's immune response. Similar to the human pathogen variola virus, ectromelia virus has a limited host range and provides a mouse model where the virus and the host's immune response have coevolved. We previously demonstrated that multiple components (C3, C4, and factor B) of the classical and alternative pathways are required to survive ectromelia virus infection. Complement's role in the innate and adaptive immune responses likely drove the evolution of a virus-encoded virulence factor that regulates complement activation. In this study, we characterized the ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes (EMICE). Recombinant EMICE regulated complement activation on the surface of CHO cells, and it protected complement-sensitive intracellular mature virions (IMV) from neutralization in vitro. It accomplished this by serving as a cofactor for the inactivation of C3b and C4b and by dissociating the catalytic domain of the classical pathway C3 convertase. Infected murine cells initiated synthesis of EMICE within 4 to 6 h postinoculation. The levels were sufficient in the supernatant to protect the IMV, upon release, from complement-mediated neutralization. EMICE on the surface of infected murine cells also reduced complement activation by the alternative pathway. In contrast, classical pathway activation by high-titer antibody overwhelmed EMICE's regulatory capacity. These results suggest that EMICE's role is early during infection when it counteracts the innate immune response. In summary, ectromelia virus produced EMICE within a few hours of an infection, and EMICE in turn decreased complement activation on IMV and infected cells.

  5. Lectins and their application to clinical microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Doyle, R J

    1990-01-01

    Lectins are generally associated with plant or animal components, selectively bind carbohydrates, and interact with procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. Lectins have various specificities that are associated with their ability to interact with acetylaminocarbohydrates, aminocarbohydrates, sialic acids, hexoses, pentoses, and as other carbohydrates. Microbial surfaces generally contain many of the sugar residues that react with lectins. Lectins are presently used in the clinical laboratory to type blood cells and are used in a wide spectrum of applications, including, in part, as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents, as mitogens, for fractionation of animal cells, and for investigations of cellular surfaces. Numerous studies have shown that lectins can be used to identify rapidly certain microorganisms isolated from a clinical specimen or directly in a clinical specimen. Lectins have been demonstrated to be important diagnostic reagents in the major realms of clinical microbiology. Thus, they have been applied in bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and virology for the identification and/or differentiation of various microorganisms. Lectins have been used successfully as epidemiologic as well as taxonomic markers of specific microorganisms. Lectins provide the clinical microbiologist with cost-effective and potential diagnostic reagents. This review describes the applications of lectins in clinical microbiology. Images PMID:2200603

  6. Classical complement pathway component C1q: purification of human C1q, isolation of C1q collagen-like and globular head fragments and production of recombinant C1q-derivatives. Functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Kojouharova, Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    The classical complement pathway (CCP) activation is a multimolecular complex, composed of three subcomponents namely C1q, C1r, and C1s. C1q is the recognition subunit of this complex and its binding to the specific targets leads to the formation of active C1, which in turn activates the CCP in an immunoglobulin-dependent or -independent manner. C1q is a hexameric glycoprotein composed of 18 polypeptide chains of three different types (A, B, and C), organized in two fragments-collagen-like (CLR) and globular head (gC1q) possessing different functional activity. The contemporary knowledge of the C1q structure allows the isolation and purification of a C1q molecule from serum by combination of different chromatography procedures including ion-exchange, size-exclusion, and affinity chromatography, as well as the isolation of CLR and gC1q by limited enzymatic hydrolysis of the native C1q molecule. In this chapter, we described methods for purification of human C1q and its CLR and gC1q fragments, as well as methods for their biochemical and functional characterization. The production and purification of recombinant C1q derivatives ghA, ghB, and ghC (globular fragments of the individual C1q chains) are also presented.

  7. Autocrine Effects of Tumor-Derived Complement

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min Soon; Vasquez, Hernan G.; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Pradeep, Sunila; Wu, Sherry; Zand, Behrouz; Han, Hee-Dong; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Huang, Jie; Miyake, Takahito; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Dalton, Heather J.; Ivan, Cristina; Baggerly, Keith; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We describe a role for the complement system in enhancing cancer growth. Cancer cells secrete complement proteins that stimulate tumor growth upon activation. Complement promotes tumor growth via a direct autocrine effect that is partially independent of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T cells. Activated C5aR and C3aR signal through the PI3K/AKT pathway in cancer cells, and silencing the PI3K or AKT gene in cancer cells eliminates the progrowth effects of C5aR and C3aR stimulation. In patients with ovarian or lung cancer, higher tumoral C3 or C5aR mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival. These data identify a role for tumor-derived complement proteins in promoting tumor growth, and they therefore have substantial clinical and therapeutic implications. PMID:24613353

  8. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  9. Extreme high prevalence of a defective mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotype in native South American West Andean populations.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Descailleaux-Dulanto, Jaime; Velazquez-Reinoso, Margarita; Ñique, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2) influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown that MBL2 variant alleles are associated with susceptibility to and the course of different types of infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, it has been suggested that these alleles are maintained in different populations due to selected advantages for carriers. We investigated the MBL2 allelic variation in indigenous individuals from 12 different West Central South America localities spanning from the desert coast, high altitude Andean plates and the Amazon tropical forest within the territories of Peru (n = 249) (Departments of Loreto, Ucayali, Lambayeque, Junin, Ayacucho, Huancayo and Puno), and Ecuador (n = 182) (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados). The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80), Amantani (0.80) and Anapia (0.58) islander communities of the Lake Titicaca), but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland) and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest), as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations.

  10. Extreme High Prevalence of a Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin (MBL2) Genotype in Native South American West Andean Populations

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O.; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Descailleaux-Dulanto, Jaime; Velazquez-Reinoso, Margarita; Ñique, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2) influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown that MBL2 variant alleles are associated with susceptibility to and the course of different types of infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, it has been suggested that these alleles are maintained in different populations due to selected advantages for carriers. We investigated the MBL2 allelic variation in indigenous individuals from 12 different West Central South America localities spanning from the desert coast, high altitude Andean plates and the Amazon tropical forest within the territories of Peru (n = 249) (Departments of Loreto, Ucayali, Lambayeque, Junin, Ayacucho, Huancayo and Puno), and Ecuador (n = 182) (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados). The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80), Amantani (0.80) and Anapia (0.58) islander communities of the Lake Titicaca), but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland) and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest), as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations. PMID:25313559

  11. Complement activation by a B cell superantigen.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, L M; Soulika, A M; Silverman, G J; Lambris, J D; Levinson, A I

    1996-08-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA), acting as a B cell superantigen, binds to the Fab region of human VH3+ Igs. Using SpA abrogated of its IgG Fc binding activity (Mod SpA) as a model B cell superantigen, we determined whether such an interaction causes complement activation. Addition of Mod SpA to human serum led to complement consumption and the generation of C3a. To determine whether this complement activation 1) was due to an interaction between VH3+ Igs and the Fab binding site of SpA and 2) proceeded via the classical complement pathway, we tested a panel of monoclonal IgM proteins for the ability to hind C1q following interaction with SpA. C1q binding was restricted to SpA-reactive, VH3+ IgM proteins. To formally determine whether the binding of SpA to the reactive VH3+ IgM proteins led to complement activation, we reconstituted the serum from a hypogammaglobulinemic patient with monoclonal IgM proteins and measured complement consumption and C3a generation following the addition of Mod SpA. We observed complement consumption and C3a production only in Mod SpA-treated serum reconstituted with a VH3+, SpA-binding, IgM protein. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the interaction of the Fab binding site of SpA and VH3+ Igs can lead to complement activation via the classical pathway. This novel interaction may have significant implications for the in vivo properties of a B cell superantigen.

  12. The structure of C2b, a fragment of complement component C2 produced during C3 convertase formation

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Vengadesan; Xu, Yuanyuan; Macon, Kevin; Volanakis, John E.; Narayana, Sthanam V. L.

    2009-03-01

    The crystal structure of C2b has been determined at 1.8 Å resolution, which reveals the arrangement of its three complement control protein (CCP) modules. A model for complement component C2 is presented and its conformational changes during the C3-convertase formation are also discussed. The second component of complement (C2) is a multi-domain serine protease that provides catalytic activity for the C3 and C5 convertases of the classical and lectin pathways of human complement. The formation of these convertases requires the Mg{sup 2+}-dependent binding of C2 to C4b and the subsequent cleavage of C2 by C1s or MASP2, respectively. The crystal structure of full-length C2 is not yet available, although the structure of its C-terminal catalytic segment C2a has been determined. The crystal structure of the N-terminal segment C2b of C2 determined to 1.8 Å resolution presented here reveals the arrangement of its three CCP domains. The domains are arranged differently compared with most other CCP-domain assemblies, but their arrangement is similar to that found in the Ba part of the full-length factor B structure. The crystal structures of C2a, C2b and full-length factor B are used to generate a model for C2 and a discussion of the domain association and possible interactions with C4b during formation of the C4b–C2 complex is presented. The results of this study also suggest that upon cleavage by C1s, C2a domains undergo conformational rotation while bound to C4b and the released C2b domains may remain folded together similar to as observed in the intact protein.

  13. Lectin engineering, a molecular evolutionary approach to expanding the lectin utilities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2015-04-27

    In the post genomic era, glycomics--the systematic study of all glycan structures of a given cell or organism--has emerged as an indispensable technology in various fields of biology and medicine. Lectins are regarded as "decipherers of glycans", being useful reagents for their structural analysis, and have been widely used in glycomic studies. However, the inconsistent activity and availability associated with the plant-derived lectins that comprise most of the commercially available lectins, and the limit in the range of glycan structures covered, have necessitated the development of innovative tools via engineering of lectins on existing scaffolds. This review will summarize the current state of the art of lectin engineering and highlight recent technological advances in this field. The key issues associated with the strategy of lectin engineering including selection of template lectin, construction of a mutagenesis library, and high-throughput screening methods are discussed.

  14. Primary structure of the A chain of human complement-classical-pathway enzyme C1r. N-terminal sequences and alignment of autolytic fragments and CNBr-cleavage peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, J; Arlaud, G J

    1985-01-01

    Activated human complement-classical-pathway enzyme C1r has previously been shown to undergo autolytic cleavages occurring in the A chain [Arlaud, Villiers, Chesne & Colomb (1980) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 616, 116-129]. Chemical analysis of the autolytic products confirms that the A chain undergoes two major cleavages, generating three fragments, which have now been isolated and characterized. The N-terminal alpha fragment (approx. 210 residues long) has a blocked N-terminus, as does the whole A chain, whereas N-terminal sequences of fragments beta and gamma (approx. 66 and 176 residues long respectively) do not, and their N-terminal sequences were determined. Fragments alpha, beta and gamma, which are not interconnected by disulphide bridges, are located in this order within C1r A chain. Fragment gamma is disulphide-linked to the B chain of C1r, which is C-terminal in the single polypeptide chain of precursor C1r. CNBr cleavage of C1r A chain yields seven major peptides, CN1b, CN4a, CN2a, CN1a, CN3, CN4b and CN2b, which were positioned in that order, on the basis of N-terminal sequences of the methionine-containing peptides generated from tryptic cleavage of the succinylated (3-carboxypropionylated) C1r A chain. About 60% of the sequence of C1r A chain (440-460 residues long) was determined, including the complete sequence of the C-terminal 95 residues. This region shows homology with the corresponding parts of plasminogen and chymotrypsinogen and, more surprisingly, with the alpha 1 chain of human haptoglobin 1-1, a serine proteinase homologue. PMID:2983658

  15. Outline of Hungarian Complementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szamosi, Michael

    This study presents a preliminary analysis of Hungarian complement constructions and the syntactic operations needed to account for them. The expository framework (and the implicit framework of the research itself) is based upon that of Rosenbaum (1967). The aim of the paper is to arrive at a rough picture of the kinds of structures and syntactic…

  16. Verbal Complementizers in Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Hossam Eldin Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    A class of Modern Standard Arabic complementizers known as "'?inna' and its sisters" demonstrate unique case and word order restrictions. While CPs in Arabic allow both Subject-Verb (SV) and Verb-Subject (VS) word order and their subjects show nominative morphology, CPs introduced by "?inna" ban a verb from directly following…

  17. Complement: A primer for the coming therapeutic revolution.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Scott R

    2017-04-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Originally characterized as a single serum component contributing to the killing of bacteria, we now know that there are close to sixty complement proteins, multiple activation pathways and a wide range of effector functions mediated by complement. The system plays a critical role in host defense against bacteria, viruses, fungi and other pathogens. However, inappropriate complement activation contributes to the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases and many inflammatory syndromes. Over the last several decades, therapeutic approaches to inhibit complement activation at various steps in the pathways have met with initial success, particularly at the level of the terminal pathway. This success, combined with insight from animal model studies, has lead to an unprecedented effort by biotech and pharmaceutical companies to begin developing complement inhibitors. As a result, complement has been brought for the first time to the attention of pharmacologists, toxicologists, project managers and others in the drug development industry, as well as those in the investment world. The purpose of this primer is to provide a broad overview of complement immunobiology to help those new to complement understand the rationale behind the current therapeutic directions and the investment potential of these new therapeutics.

  18. C-type lectins facilitate tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dongbing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Songbai; Su, Chunjie; Zhang, Yonglian

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis, a life-threatening complication of cancer, leads to the majority of cases of cancer-associated mortality. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. C-type lectins are a large group of proteins, which share structurally homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and possess diverse physiological functions, including inflammation and antimicrobial immunity. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated the contribution of C-type lectins in different steps of the metastatic spread of cancer. Notably, a substantial proportion of C-type lectins, including selectins, mannose receptor (MR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin, are important molecular targets for the formation of metastases in vitro and in vivo. The present review summarizes what has been found regarding C-type lectins in the lymphatic and hematogenous metastasis of cancer. An improved understanding the role of C-type lectins in cancer metastasis provides a comprehensive perspective for further clarifying the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis and supports the development of novel C-type lectins-based therapies the for prevention of metastasis in certain types of cancer. PMID:28123516

  19. C-type lectins facilitate tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dongbing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Songbai; Su, Chunjie; Zhang, Yonglian

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis, a life-threatening complication of cancer, leads to the majority of cases of cancer-associated mortality. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. C-type lectins are a large group of proteins, which share structurally homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and possess diverse physiological functions, including inflammation and antimicrobial immunity. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated the contribution of C-type lectins in different steps of the metastatic spread of cancer. Notably, a substantial proportion of C-type lectins, including selectins, mannose receptor (MR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin, are important molecular targets for the formation of metastases in vitro and in vivo. The present review summarizes what has been found regarding C-type lectins in the lymphatic and hematogenous metastasis of cancer. An improved understanding the role of C-type lectins in cancer metastasis provides a comprehensive perspective for further clarifying the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis and supports the development of novel C-type lectins-based therapies the for prevention of metastasis in certain types of cancer.

  20. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    PubMed Central

    Khin, Mar Mar; Hua, Jie Song; Ng, Han Cong; Wadström, Torkel; Ho, Bow

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms. METHODS: Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS: Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A), fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas (Lotus A) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori lectin agglutination. Interes tingly, heating of H. pylori cells at 60 °C for 1 h was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION: The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during the events of morphological transformation, resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection. This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease. PMID:11819557

  1. ERGIC-53 is a functional mannose-selective and calcium-dependent human homologue of leguminous lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Itin, C; Roche, A C; Monsigny, M; Hauri, H P

    1996-01-01

    Based on sequence homologies with leguminous lectins, the intermediate compartment marker ERGIC-53 was proposed to be a member of a putative new class of animal lectins associated with the secretory pathway. Independent, a promyelocytic protein, MR60, was purified by mannose-column chromatography, and a cDNA was isolated that matched MR60 peptide sequences. This cDNA was identical to that of ERGIC-53 and homologies with the animal lectin family of the galectins were noticed. Not all peptide sequences of MR60, however, were found in ERGIC-53, raising the possibility that another protein associated with ERGIC-53 may possess the lectin activity. Here, we provide the first direct evidence for a lectin function of ERGIC-53. Overexpressed ERGIC-53 binds to a mannose column in a calcium-dependent manner and also co-stains with mannosylated neoglycoprotein in a morphological binding assay. By using a sequential elution protocol we show that ERGIC-53 has selectivity for mannose and low affinity for glucose and GlcNAc, but no affinity for galactose. To experimentally address the putative homology of ERGIC-53 to leguminous lectins, a highly conserved protein family with an invariant asparagine essential for carbohydrate binding, we substituted the corresponding asparagine in ERGIC-53. This mutation, as well as a mutation affecting a second site in the putative carbohydrate recognition domain, abolished mannose-column binding and co-staining with mannosylated neoglycoprotein. These findings establish ERGIC-53 as a lectin and provide functional evidence for its relationship to leguminous lectins. Based on its monosaccharide specificity, domain organization, and recycling properties, we propose ERGIC-53 to function as a sorting receptor for glyco-proteins in the early secretory pathway. Images PMID:8868475

  2. Effect of chum salmon egg lectin on tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Ryo; Yamamoto, Shintaro; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-05-05

    The effect of a chum salmon egg lectin (CSL3) on tight junction (TJ) of Caco-2 cell monolayers was investigated. The lectin opened TJ as indicated by the decrease of the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) value and the increase of the permeation of lucifer yellow, which is transported via the TJ-mediated paracellular pathway. The effects of CSL3 were inhibited by the addition of 10 mM L-rhamnose or D-galactose which were specific sugars for CSL3. The lectin increased the intracellular Ca2+ of Caco-2 cell monolayers, that could be inhibited by the addition of L-rhamnose. The fluorescence immunostaining of β-actin in Caco-2 cell monolayers revealed that the cytoskeleton was changed by the CSL3 treatment, suggesting that CSL3 depolymerized β-actin to cause reversible TJ structural and functional disruption. Although Japanese jack bean lectin and wheat germ lectin showed similar effects in the decrease of the TER values and the increase of the intracellular Ca2+, they could not be inhibited by the same concentrations of simple sugars, such as D-glucose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine.

  3. Spectral characters of lectin saccharide interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deyu; Jiang, Duxiao; Yuan, Chunwei

    1999-09-01

    In this paper we report attempts to directly detect the interaction behavior between erythrocyte and lectin concanavalin a (Con A) as well as phaseolus vulgaris (PHA) on the polystyrene film surface. In the procedure, an optical transducer based reflectance interferometry was set up and used to detect the film thickness change during the lectin adsorption and lectin- erythrocyte interaction. The specific interactions among Con A, PHA and erythrocyte were obtained. The solubility monosaccharide inhibition test confirmed that there is affinity between (alpha) - D-mannose and Con A.

  4. Complements do not lie.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-12-13

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy.

  5. Complements do not lie

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy. PMID:22674942

  6. Complements do not lie.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-12-01

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy.

  7. IXO: The Instrument Complement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.; IWG, IXO

    2009-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory (IXO) has recently been created as a mission concept by a joint team of NASA, ESA and JAXA scientists, based on the previous Constellation-X and XEUS concepts. Definition of the IXO instruments is still under evolution, but the core instrument complement will include a Wide Field X-ray Imager, an X-ray Calorimeter / Narrow Field X-ray Imager, and an X-ray Grating Spectrometer. Other, modest additional instruments (such as a hard X-ray capability, a polarimeter, and a high time resolution detector) will also be considered. We present the current status of the IXO instrument complement and offer the opportunity for discussion of ideas relevant to the IXO mission concept process.

  8. Complement activation in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, L E; De Villiers, D; Markham, D; Whaley, K; Thomas, H C

    1982-01-01

    Patients with HBsAg positive chronic active liver disease (CALD) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) exhibit increased C3d concentrations and changes in the serum concentrations of the complement components consistent with activation of the classical and alternative pathways. In these patients the concentrations of the regulatory proteins, C3b inactivator (C3bINA) and beta IH globulin, are normal. Patients with HBsAg negative CALD and alcohol induced liver disease (ALD) exhibit no evidence of an increased level of complement system activation. In these patients diminished serum concentrations of complement components appear to be related to diminished hepatic synthetic function. C4 synthesis may be specifically reduced in autoimmune chronic active liver disease. PMID:7083631

  9. Characterization of the complement inhibitory function of rhesus rhadinovirus complement control protein (RCP).

    PubMed

    Okroj, Marcin; Mark, Linda; Stokowska, Anna; Wong, Scott W; Rose, Nicola; Blackbourn, David J; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Spiller, O Brad; Blom, Anna M

    2009-01-02

    Rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV) is currently the closest known, fully sequenced homolog of human Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Both these viruses encode complement inhibitors as follows: Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-complement control protein (KCP) and RRV-complement control protein (RCP). Previously we characterized in detail the functional properties of KCP as a complement inhibitor. Here, we performed comparative analyses for two variants of RCP protein, encoded by RRV strains H26-95 and 17577. Both RCP variants and KCP inhibited human and rhesus complement when tested in hemolytic assays measuring all steps of activation via the classical and the alternative pathway. RCP variants from both RRV strains supported C3b and C4b degradation by factor I and decay acceleration of the classical C3 convertase, similar to KCP. Additionally, the 17577 RCP variant accelerated decay of the alternative C3 convertase, which was not seen for KCP. In contrast to KCP, RCP showed no affinity to heparin and is the first described complement inhibitor in which the binding site for C3b/C4b does not interact with heparin. Molecular modeling shows a structural disruption in the region of RCP that corresponds to the KCP-heparin-binding site. This makes RRV a superior model for future in vivo investigations of complement evasion, as RCP does not play a supportive role in viral attachment as KCP does.

  10. Can Cell Bound Complement Activation Products Predict Inherited Complement Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus?

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the classical pathway complement system has long been implicated in stimulating immune complex mediated tissue destruction in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). C3 and C4 complement levels are utilized as part of SLE diagnosis and monitoring criteria. Recently, cell bound complement activation products (CBCAPs) have shown increased sensitivity in diagnosing and monitoring lupus activity, compared to traditional markers. CBCAPs are increasingly utilized in rheumatology practice as additional serological markers in evaluating SLE patients. We report a case of a patient diagnosed with SLE that had chronically low C3 and C4, along with negative CBCAPs. We surmise that the patient has an inherited complement deficiency as the etiology of her SLE and that CBCAPs could be used to predict such deficiency. PMID:28074166

  11. Complement--tapping into new sites and effector systems.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Kemper, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Complement is traditionally known to be a system of serum proteins that provide protection against pathogens through direct cell lysis and the mobilization of innate and adaptive immunity. However, recent work indicates that the complement system has additional physiological roles beyond those in host defence. In this Opinion article, we describe the new modes and locations of complement activation that enable it to interact with other cell effector systems, such as growth factor receptors, inflammasomes and metabolic pathways. We propose that the location of complement activation dictates its function.

  12. The x-ray crystal structure of mannose-binding lectin-associated serine proteinase-3 reveals the structural basis for enzyme inactivity associated with the Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yongqing, Tang; Wilmann, Pascal G; Reeve, Shane B; Coetzer, Theresa H; Smith, A Ian; Whisstock, James C; Pike, Robert N; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C

    2013-08-02

    The mannose-binding lectin associated-protease-3 (MASP-3) is a member of the lectin pathway of the complement system, a key component of human innate and active immunity. Mutations in MASP-3 have recently been found to be associated with Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) syndrome, a severe developmental disorder manifested by cleft palate, intellectual disability, and skeletal abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for MASP-3 function remains to be understood. Here we characterize the substrate specificity of MASP-3 by screening against a combinatorial peptide substrate library. Through this approach, we successfully identified a peptide substrate that was 20-fold more efficiently cleaved than any other identified to date. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutant forms of the enzyme associated with 3MC syndrome were completely inactive against this substrate. To address the structural basis for this defect, we determined the 2.6-Å structure of the zymogen form of the G666E mutant of MASP-3. These data reveal that the mutation disrupts the active site and perturbs the position of the catalytic serine residue. Together, these insights into the function of MASP-3 reveal how a mutation in this enzyme causes it to be inactive and thus contribute to the 3MC syndrome.

  13. The X-ray Crystal Structure of Mannose-binding Lectin-associated Serine Proteinase-3 Reveals the Structural Basis for Enzyme Inactivity Associated with the Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Yongqing, Tang; Wilmann, Pascal G.; Reeve, Shane B.; Coetzer, Theresa H.; Smith, A. Ian; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.

    2013-01-01

    The mannose-binding lectin associated-protease-3 (MASP-3) is a member of the lectin pathway of the complement system, a key component of human innate and active immunity. Mutations in MASP-3 have recently been found to be associated with Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) syndrome, a severe developmental disorder manifested by cleft palate, intellectual disability, and skeletal abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for MASP-3 function remains to be understood. Here we characterize the substrate specificity of MASP-3 by screening against a combinatorial peptide substrate library. Through this approach, we successfully identified a peptide substrate that was 20-fold more efficiently cleaved than any other identified to date. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutant forms of the enzyme associated with 3MC syndrome were completely inactive against this substrate. To address the structural basis for this defect, we determined the 2.6-Å structure of the zymogen form of the G666E mutant of MASP-3. These data reveal that the mutation disrupts the active site and perturbs the position of the catalytic serine residue. Together, these insights into the function of MASP-3 reveal how a mutation in this enzyme causes it to be inactive and thus contribute to the 3MC syndrome. PMID:23792966

  14. Galactose-specific seed lectins from Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Musti J; Marapakala, Kavitha; Sultan, Nabil Ali M; Kenoth, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    Lectins, the carbohydrate binding proteins have been studied extensively in view of their ubiquitous nature and wide-ranging applications. As they were originally found in plant seed extracts, much of the work on them was focused on plant seed lectins, especially those from legume seeds whereas much less attention was paid to the lectins from other plant families. During the last two decades many studies have been reported on lectins from the seeds of Cucurbitaceae species. The main focus of the present review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on these proteins, especially with regard to their physico-chemical characterization, interaction with carbohydrates and hydrophobic ligands, 3-dimensional structure and similarity to type-II ribosome inactivating proteins. The future outlook of research on these galactose-specific proteins is also briefly considered.

  15. Identification of mycobacterial lectins from genomic data.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, M

    2013-04-01

    Sixty-four sequences containing lectin domains with homologs of known three-dimensional structure were identified through a search of mycobacterial genomes. They appear to belong to the β-prism II, the C-type, the Microcystis virdis (MV), and the β-trefoil lectin folds. The first three always occur in conjunction with the LysM, the PI-PLC, and the β-grasp domains, respectively while mycobacterial β-trefoil lectins are unaccompanied by any other domain. Thirty heparin binding hemagglutinins (HBHA), already annotated, have also been included in the study although they have no homologs of known three-dimensional structure. The biological role of HBHA has been well characterized. A comparison between the sequences of the lectin from pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria provides insights into the carbohydrate binding region of the molecule, but the structure of the molecule is yet to be determined. A reasonable picture of the structural features of other mycobacterial proteins containing one or the other of the four lectin domains can be gleaned through the examination of homologs proteins, although the structure of none of them is available. Their biological role is also yet to be elucidated. The work presented here is among the first steps towards exploring the almost unexplored area of the structural biology of mycobacterial lectins.

  16. Mannose-binding dietary lectins induce adipogenic differentiation of the marrow-derived mesenchymal cells via an active insulin-like signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Manmohan; Hinge, Ashwini; Limaye, Lalita S; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Surolia, Avadhesha; Kale, Vaijayanti P

    2011-04-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the mannose-binding lectins, namely banana lectin (BL) and garlic lectin (GL), interacted with the insulin receptors on M210B4 cells--an established mesenchymal cell line of murine marrow origin--and initiate mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in them. In this study, we show that this lectin-mediated active ERK signaling culminates into an adipogenic differentiation of these cells. Gene expression studies indicate that the effect takes place at the transcriptional level. Experiments carried out with pharmacological inhibitors show that MEK-dependent ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent AKT pathways are positive regulators of the lectin- and insulin-mediated adipogenic differentiation, while stress-activated kinase/c-jun N-terminal kinase pathway acts as a negative one. Since both lectins could efficiently substitute for insulin in the standard adipogenic induction medium, they may perhaps serve as molecular tools to study the mechanistic aspects of the adipogenic process that are independent of cell proliferation. Our study clearly demonstrates the ability of BL and GL to activate insulin-like signaling in the mesenchymal cells in vitro leading to their adipocytic differentiation. The dietary origin of these lectins underscores an urgent need to examine their in vivo effects on tissue homeostasis.

  17. Complement-mediated regulation of metabolism and basic cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Christoph; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Complement is well appreciated as critical arm of innate immunity. It is required for the removal of invading pathogens and functions by direct pathogen destruction and through the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. However, complement activation and function is not confined to the extracellular space but also occurs within cells. Recent work indicates that complement activation regulates key metabolic pathways and thus can impact fundamental processes of the cell, such as survival, proliferation, and autophagy. Novel identified functions of complement include a key role in shaping metabolic reprogramming, which underlies T cell effector differentiation, and a role as a nexus for interactions with other effector systems, in particular the inflammasome and Notch transcription factor networks. This review focuses on the contributions of complement to basic processes of the cell, in particular the integration of complement with cellular metabolism, and the potential implications in infection and other disease settings. PMID:27533012

  18. Complement-Mediated Regulation of Metabolism and Basic Cellular Processes.

    PubMed

    Hess, Christoph; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-08-16

    Complement is well appreciated as a critical arm of innate immunity. It is required for the removal of invading pathogens and works by directly destroying them through the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. However, complement activation and function is not confined to the extracellular space but also occurs within cells. Recent work indicates that complement activation regulates key metabolic pathways and thus can impact fundamental cellular processes, such as survival, proliferation, and autophagy. Newly identified functions of complement include a key role in shaping metabolic reprogramming, which underlies T cell effector differentiation, and a role as a nexus for interactions with other effector systems, in particular the inflammasome and Notch transcription-factor networks. This review focuses on the contributions of complement to basic processes of the cell, in particular the integration of complement with cellular metabolism and the potential implications in infection and other disease settings.

  19. Activated Complement Factors as Disease Markers for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflieh, Jean; Rushbrook, Julie; Worah, Samrat; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Early recognition and effective management are essential for improved outcome. However, early recognition is impeded by lack of clinically utilized biomarkers. Complement factors play important roles in the mechanisms leading to sepsis and can potentially serve as early markers of sepsis and of sepsis severity and outcome. This review provides a synopsis of recent animal and clinical studies of the role of complement factors in sepsis development, together with their potential as disease markers. In addition, new results from our laboratory are presented regarding the involvement of the complement factor, mannose-binding lectin, in septic shock patients. Future clinical studies are needed to obtain the complete profiles of complement factors/their activated products during the course of sepsis development. We anticipate that the results of these studies will lead to a multipanel set of sepsis biomarkers which, along with currently used laboratory tests, will facilitate earlier diagnosis, timely treatment, and improved outcome. PMID:26420913

  20. Complement inhibition: a promising concept for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pio, Ruben; Ajona, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2013-01-01

    For decades, complement has been recognized as an effector arm of the immune system that contributes to the destruction of tumor cells. In fact, many therapeutic strategies have been proposed that are based on the intensification of complement-mediated responses against tumors. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm by demonstrating a tumor-promoting role for complement. Cancer cells seem to be able to establish a convenient balance between complement activation and inhibition, taking advantage of complement initiation without suffering its deleterious effects. Complement activation may support chronic inflammation, promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment, induce angiogenesis, and activate cancer-related signaling pathways. In this context, inhibition of complement activation would be a therapeutic option for treating cancer. This concept is relatively novel and deserves closer attention. In this paper, we will summarize the mechanisms of complement activation on cancer cells, the cancer-promoting effect of complement initiation, and the rationale behind the use of complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against cancer. PMID:23706991

  1. Incorporation of Host Complement Regulatory Proteins into Newcastle Disease Virus Enhances Complement Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Moanaro; Johnson, John B.; Kumar, Sandeep R. P.; Parks, Griffith D.

    2012-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus, is inherently tumor selective and is currently being considered as a clinical oncolytic virus and vaccine vector. In this study, we analyzed the effect of complement on the neutralization of NDV purified from embryonated chicken eggs, a common source for virus production. Fresh normal human serum (NHS) neutralized NDV by multiple pathways of complement activation, independent of neutralizing antibodies. Neutralization was associated with C3 deposition and the activation of C2, C3, C4, and C5 components. Interestingly, NDV grown in mammalian cell lines was resistant to complement neutralization by NHS. To confirm whether the incorporation of regulators of complement activity (RCA) into the viral envelope afforded complement resistance, we grew NDV in CHO cells stably transfected with CD46 or HeLa cells, which strongly express CD46 and CD55. NDV grown in RCA-expressing cells was resistant to complement by incorporating CD46 and CD55 on virions. Mammalian CD46 and CD55 molecules on virions exhibited homologous restriction, since chicken sera devoid of neutralizing antibodies to NDV were able to effectively neutralize these virions. The incorporation of chicken RCA into NDV produced in embryonated eggs similarly provided species specificity toward chicken sera. PMID:22973037

  2. Epidemiological characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Whittington, W L; Rice, R J; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 101 isolates of penicillinase-producing and non-penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae with known nutritional requirements, plasmid content, and serovars, were examined for lectin agglutination patterns. These isolates were from outbreaks in Georgia, California, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania. Cell suspensions made from 16- to 18-h cultures were mixed with 14 different lectins, and the resultant agglutination patterns were classified as agglutination groups. Among the 101 isolates tested, 24 different agglutination groups were demonstrated. Of the organisms tested, 55% were located in 3 of the 24 groups, and 86% of the isolates reacted with the lectins Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, peanut agglutinin, soybean agglutinin, potato agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin. One isolate did not react with peanut or potato agglutinin, five isolates lacked reactivity with potato agglutinin, and six isolates did not react with wheat germ agglutinin. Of the wheat germ-negative isolates, four were from Pennsylvania and were identical with regard to auxotype, plasmid content, serovar, and lectin group. The other two wheat germ-negative isolates were from California and were unrelated by the same criteria to the four Pennsylvania isolates and to each other. Among the isolates tested, there were no differences in lectin groups with regard to the sex of the patient. In the Georgia collection, agglutination with one lectin group was confined to isolates of serogroup IA. This association was not observed for the other geographic areas. Some isolates showing identical auxotype, plasmid content, and serovars could be differentiated based on lectin agglutination patterns, whereas other isolates were identical by all testing criteria. PMID:3930560

  3. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-07

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest.

  4. A two-nucleotide deletion renders the mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene nonfunctional in Danish Landrace and Duroc pigs.

    PubMed

    Bergman, I M; Edman, K; van As, P; Huisman, A; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2014-03-01

    The mannose-binding lectins (MBLs) are central components of innate immunity, facilitating phagocytosis and inducing the lectin activation pathway of the complement system. Previously, it has been found that certain single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in porcine MBL1 and MBL2 (pMBL1, pMBL2) affect mRNA expression, serum concentration, and susceptibility to disease, but the combinatory effect of pMBL1 and pMBL2 genotypes needs further elucidation. In the present study, pMBL1 and pMBL2 alleles, combined pMBL haplotypes, and MBL-A concentration in serum were analyzed in purebred Landrace (N = 30) and Duroc (N = 10) pigs. Furthermore, the combined pMBL haplotypes of 89 Piètrain × (Large White × Landrace) crossbred pigs were studied, and the genotypes of 67 crossbreds challenged with Escherichia coli were compared to their individual disease records. In the purebred animals, three non-synonymous SNPs and a two-nucleotide deletion were detected in the coding sequence of pMBL2. The two-nucleotide deletion was present at a frequency of 0.88 in the Landrace pigs and 0.90 in the Duroc pigs, respectively. In the crossbreds, the T allele of the SNP G949T in pMBL1-previously shown to have profound effect on MBL-A concentration even in the heterozygote condition-was detected in 47 % of the animals. Finally, an association was found between low-producing MBL genotypes and low body weight on the day of weaning in the same animals.

  5. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) codon 54 (rs1800450) polymorphism predisposes towards medium vessel vasculitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Negi, Vir Singh; Devaraju, Panneer; Misra, Durga Prasanna; Jain, Vikramraj K; Usdadiya, Jignesh Babulal; Antony, Paul T; Gulati, Reena

    2017-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease with multiple etiological factors. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays a key role in innate immunity by activating antibody-independent lectin complement pathway, opsonisation, phagocytosis, and immune complex (IC) clearance. Genetic polymorphisms in the promoter and coding regions of MBL gene affect the circulatory levels and biological activity of MBL. Defects in MBL can lead to defective opsonisation and, hence, hamper clearance of apoptotic debris, the persistence of which can drive autoantibody formation in lupus. The exon1 variants at codon 52, 54, and 57 have been reported to augment the risk of SLE in different ethnic populations. Three hundred South Indian Tamil patients with SLE and 460 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched controls were genotyped for three polymorphisms at codon 52, 54, and 57 in exon1 of MBL gene by Taqman real-time PCR. The three polymorphisms in exon1 of MBL were observed not to confer risk of developing SLE. However, MBL codon 54 rs1800450 polymorphism was associated with the development of medium vessel vasculitis and gangrene (OR-2.29, CI 95% 1.08-4.83, p = 0.02), whereas, the ancestral allele G conferred protection (OR-0.44, CI 95% 0.21-0.93, p = 0.02). Genetic variants in the exon1 of MBL gene per se are not risk factors for SLE in South Indian Tamils. However, the association of codon 54 (rs1800450) with medium vessel vasculitis suggests that it may be a genetic modifier of clinical phenotype in SLE.

  6. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital.

  7. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  8. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed.

  9. A rainbow trout lectin with multimeric structure.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L E; Thiel, S; Petersen, T E; Jensenius, J C

    1997-04-01

    A novel lectin has been identified in rainbow trout serum and plasma. The lectin binds to Sepharose (an agarose polymer) in a calcium-dependent manner. Glucose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, mannose, N-acetyl-mannosamine, L-fucose, maltose and alpha-methyl-mannoside are good inhibitors of this binding, whereas glucosamine and D-fucose inhibits to a lesser degree and mannosamine and galactose do not inhibit the binding to Sepharose. When analysed by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions, the lectin appears as a characteristic ladder of bands with approximately 16 kDa between consecutive bands. Upon reduction, the lectin appears as a 16-kDa band. On size-exclusion chromatography of trout serum and plasma, the protein emerges over a broad range corresponding to sizes from about 2000 kDa to less than 200 kDa. The NH2-terminal sequence (AAENRNQXPPG) shows no significant homology with known proteins. Because of the characteristic appearance in non-reducing SDS-PAGE and the lectin activity, we propose to name the protein "ladderlectin."

  10. Isolation, characterization and molecular cloning of a leaf-specific lectin from ramsons (Allium ursinum L.).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1997-11-01

    Lectins were isolated from roots and leaves of ramsons and compared to the previously described bulb lectins. Biochemical analyses indicated that the root lectins AUAIr and AUAIIr are identical to the bulb lectins AUAI and AUAII, whereas the leaf lectin AUAL has no counterpart in the bulbs. cDNA cloning confirmed that the leaf lectin differs from the bulb lectins. Northern blot analysis further indicated that the leaf lectin is tissue-specifically expressed. Sequence comparisons revealed that the ramsons leaf lectin differs considerably from the leaf lectins of garlic, leek, onion and shallot.

  11. The complement system: an evolution in progress

    PubMed Central

    Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2016-01-01

    The complement system, which consists of three independent but interacting pathways, constitutes a powerful arm of innate immunity. Its major function is to recognize and destroy pathogenic microorganisms as well as eliminate modified self-antigens. Although it is a fine-tuned system with innate capacity to discriminate self from non-self as well as danger from non-danger signals, an unwarranted activation can nonetheless occur and cause tissue destruction. To prevent such activation, specific regulators present both in plasma and on the cell surface tightly control it. Data accumulated over the past four decades have also shown that the complement system is capable of not only cross-talk with the activation cascades of plasma––i.e. blood coagulation, contact activation, and the kinin/kallikrein system––but also serving as a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. It is for these reasons that the various activation steps of the complement system have been recently targeted for therapy to treat diseases in which the role of complement is beyond doubt. This trend will certainly continue for years to come, especially as novel concepts guiding the field into areas never contemplated before are continuing to be discovered. PMID:27990282

  12. Complement and HIV-I infection/ HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengming; Dai, Shen; Gordon, Jennifer; Qin, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    The various neurological complications associated with HIV-1 infection, specifically HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist as a major public health burden worldwide. Despite the widespread use of anti-retroviral therapy, the prevalence of HAND is significantly high. HAND results from the direct effects of an HIV-1 infection as well as secondary effects of HIV-1-induced immune reaction and inflammatory response. Complement, a critical mediator of innate and acquired immunity, plays important roles in defeating many viral infections by the formation of a lytic pore or indirectly by opsonization and recruitment of phagocytes. While the role of complement in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and HAND has been previously recognized for over fifteen years, it has been largely underestimated thus far. Complement can be activated through HIV-1 envelope proteins, mannose binding lectins (MBL) and anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Complement not only fights against HIV-1 infection but also enhances HIV-1 infection. Also, HIV-1 can hijack complement regulators such as CD59 and CD55 and can utilize these regulators and factor H to escape from complement attack. Normally, complement levels in brain are much lower than plasma levels and there is no or little complement deposition in brain cells. Interestingly, local production and deposition of complement are dramatically increased in HIV-1-infected brain, indicating that complement may contribute to the pathogenesis of HAND. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of complement in HIV-1 infection and HAND as well as potential therapeutic approaches targeting to the complement system for the treatment and eradications of HIV-1 infection. PMID:24639397

  13. Complement System in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Pankita H.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to its established contribution to innate immunity, recent studies have suggested novel roles for the complement system in the development of various lung diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that complement may serve as a key link between innate and adaptive immunity in a variety of pulmonary conditions. However, the specific contributions of complement to lung diseases based on innate and adaptive immunity are just beginning to emerge. Elucidating the role of complement-mediated immune regulation in these diseases will help to identify new targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24901241

  14. Keeping It All Going-Complement Meets Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Martin; Kemper, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The complement system is an evolutionary old and crucial component of innate immunity, which is key to the detection and removal of invading pathogens. It was initially discovered as a liver-derived sentinel system circulating in serum, the lymph, and interstitial fluids that mediate the opsonization and lytic killing of bacteria, fungi, and viruses and the initiation of the general inflammatory responses. Although work performed specifically in the last five decades identified complement also as a critical instructor of adaptive immunity-indicating that complement's function is likely broader than initially anticipated-the dominant opinion among researchers and clinicians was that the key complement functions were in principle defined. However, there is now a growing realization that complement activity goes well beyond "classic" immune functions and that this system is also required for normal (neuronal) development and activity and general cell and tissue integrity and homeostasis. Furthermore, the recent discovery that complement activation is not confined to the extracellular space but occurs within cells led to the surprising understanding that complement is involved in the regulation of basic processes of the cell, particularly those of metabolic nature-mostly via novel crosstalks between complement and intracellular sensor, and effector, pathways that had been overlooked because of their spatial separation. These paradigm shifts in the field led to a renaissance in complement research and provide new platforms to now better understand the molecular pathways underlying the wide-reaching effects of complement functions in immunity and beyond. In this review, we will cover the current knowledge about complement's emerging relationship with the cellular metabolism machinery with a focus on the functional differences between serum-circulating versus intracellularly active complement during normal cell survival and induction of effector functions. We will also

  15. The complement system in ischemia-reperfusion injuries.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, William B; Chrysanthou, Elvina; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Stahl, Gregory L

    2012-11-01

    Tissue injury and inflammation following ischemia and reperfusion of various organs have been recognized for many years. Many reviews have been written over the last several decades outlining the role of complement in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This short review provides a current state of the art knowledge on the complement pathways activated, complement components involved and a review of the clinical biologics/inhibitors used in the clinical setting of ischemia/reperfusion. This is not a complete review of the complement system in ischemia and reperfusion injury but will give the reader an updated view point of the field, potential clinical use of complement inhibitors, and the future studies needed to advance the field.

  16. The Complement System in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Gorsuch, William B.; Chrysanthou, Elvina; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue injury and inflammation following ischemia and reperfusion of various organs has been recognized for many years. Many reviews have been written over the last several decades outlining the role of complement in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This short review provides a current state of the art knowledge on the complement pathways activated, complement components involved and a review of the clinical biologics/inhibitors used in the clinical setting of ischemia/reperfusion. This is not a complete review of the complement system in ischemia and reperfusion injury but will give the reader an updated view point of the field, potential clinical use of complement inhibitors, and the future studies needed to advance the field. PMID:22964228

  17. Complement inhibition by Sarcoptes scabiei protects Streptococcus pyogenes - An in vitro study to unravel the molecular mechanisms behind the poorly understood predilection of S. pyogenes to infect mite-induced skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Swe, Pearl M.; Christian, Lindsay D.; Lu, Hieng C.; Sriprakash, Kadaba S.

    2017-01-01

    Background On a global scale scabies is one of the most common dermatological conditions, imposing a considerable economic burden on individuals, communities and health systems. There is substantial epidemiological evidence that in tropical regions scabies is often causing pyoderma and subsequently serious illness due to invasion by opportunistic bacteria. The health burden due to complicated scabies causing cellulitis, bacteraemia and sepsis, heart and kidney diseases in resource-poor communities is extreme. Co-infections of group A streptococcus (GAS) and scabies mites is a common phenomenon in the tropics. Both pathogens produce multiple complement inhibitors to overcome the host innate defence. We investigated the relative role of classical (CP), lectin (LP) and alternative pathways (AP) towards a pyodermic GAS isolate 88/30 in the presence of a scabies mite complement inhibitor, SMSB4. Methodology/Principal findings Opsonophagocytosis assays in fresh blood showed baseline immunity towards GAS. The role of innate immunity was investigated by deposition of the first complement components of each pathway, specifically C1q, FB and MBL from normal human serum on GAS. C1q deposition was the highest followed by FB deposition while MBL deposition was undetectable, suggesting that CP and AP may be mainly activated by GAS. We confirmed this result using sera depleted of either C1q or FB, and serum deficient in MBL. Recombinant SMSB4 was produced and purified from Pichia pastoris. SMSB4 reduced the baseline immunity against GAS by decreasing the formation of CP- and AP-C3 convertases, subsequently affecting opsonisation and the release of anaphylatoxin. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the complement-inhibitory function of SMSB4 promotes the survival of GAS in vitro and inferably in the microenvironment of the mite-infested skin. Understanding the tripartite interactions between host, parasite and microbial pathogens at a molecular level may serve as a

  18. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pueppke, Steven G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Keegstra, Kenneth; Ferguson, Ardene L.

    1978-01-01

    Three different assay procedures have been used to quantitate the levels of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) lectin in various tissues of soybean plants. The assays used were a standard hemagglutination assay, a radioimmunoassay, and an isotope dilution assay. Most of the lectin in seeds was found in the cotyledons, but lectin was also detected in the embryo axis and the seed coat. Soybean lectin was present in all of the tissues of young seedlings, but decreased as the plants matured and was not detectable in plants older than 2 to 3 weeks. Soybean lectin isolated from seeds of several soybean varieties were identical when compared by several methods. PMID:16660384

  19. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Hendrik P N; Charbel Issa, Peter; Walier, Maja; Janzer, Stefanie; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Börncke, Florian; Fritsche, Lars G; Chong, Ngaihang V; Fimmers, Rolf; Wienker, Thomas; Holz, Frank G; Weber, Bernhard H F; Oppermann, Martin

    2008-07-02

    Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112) and controls (n = 67). Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH), factor B-C2 (BF-C2) and complement C3 (C3) genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (p<0.001), were significantly elevated in AMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  20. Electrochemical lectin based biosensors as a label-free tool in glycomics

    PubMed Central

    Bertók, Tomáš; Katrlík, Jaroslav; Gemeiner, Peter; Tkac, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Glycans and other saccharide moieties attached to proteins and lipids, or present on the surface of a cell, are actively involved in numerous physiological or pathological processes. Their structural flexibility (that is based on the formation of various kinds of linkages between saccharides) is making glycans superb “identity cards”. In fact, glycans can form more “words” or “codes” (i.e., unique sequences) from the same number of “letters” (building blocks) than DNA or proteins. Glycans are physicochemically similar and it is not a trivial task to identify their sequence, or - even more challenging - to link a given glycan to a particular physiological or pathological process. Lectins can recognise differences in glycan compositions even in their bound state and therefore are most useful tools in the task to decipher the “glycocode”. Thus, lectin-based biosensors working in a label-free mode can effectively complement the current weaponry of analytical tools in glycomics. This review gives an introduction into the area of glycomics and then focuses on the design, analytical performance, and practical utility of lectin-based electrochemical label-free biosensors for the detection of isolated glycoproteins or intact cells. PMID:27239071

  1. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system.

  2. Fruit-specific lectins from banana and plantain.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Zhang, W; Barre, A; Houlès Astoul, C; Balint-Kurti, P J; Rovira, P; Rougé, P; May, G D; Van Leuven, F; Truffa-Bachi, P; Van Damme, E J

    2000-09-01

    One of the predominant proteins in the pulp of ripe bananas (Musa acuminata L.) and plantains (Musa spp.) has been identified as a lectin. The banana and plantain agglutinins (called BanLec and PlanLec, respectively) were purified in reasonable quantities using a novel isolation procedure, which prevented adsorption of the lectins onto insoluble endogenous polysaccharides. Both BanLec and PlanLec are dimeric proteins composed of two identical subunits of 15 kDa. They readily agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes and exhibit specificity towards mannose. Molecular cloning revealed that BanLec has sequence similarity to previously described lectins of the family of jacalin-related lectins, and according to molecular modelling studies has the same overall fold and three-dimensional structure. The identification of BanLec and PlanLec demonstrates the occurrence of jacalin-related lectins in monocot species, suggesting that these lectins are more widespread among higher plants than is actually believed. The banana and plantain lectins are also the first documented examples of jacalin-related lectins, which are abundantly present in the pulp of mature fruits but are apparently absent from other tissues. However, after treatment of intact plants with methyl jasmonate, BanLec is also clearly induced in leaves. The banana lectin is a powerful murine T-cell mitogen. The relevance of the mitogenicity of the banana lectin is discussed in terms of both the physiological role of the lectin and the impact on food safety.

  3. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W.; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  4. Mushroom lectins: specificity, structure and bioactivity relevant to human disease.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-04-08

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell-cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity.

  5. Detection of complement activation by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE).

    PubMed

    Arroyave, C M; Tan, E M

    1976-01-01

    Counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) was used as a method of detecting activation of the third component of the complement system (C3). Highly purified C3, normal human serum (NHS), EDTA-treated plasma and serum activated with aggregated human immunoglobulin (agg-IgG) or inulin were used as sources of C3 and/or C3 split products. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement was assayed in the presence of EGTA (10 mM) and MgCl2 (0.3 mM), conditions which block activation of the classical pathway. When purified native C3, fresh NHS and fresh EDTA-plasma were tested in CIE against either antisera to whole C3 or to C3 split products, only one precipitin line was found, which was identified as native C3. However, when serum activated with agg-IgG or inulin were tested against the same reagents, two precipitin lines were seen. The first, with more cathodal mobility was identical to that of native C3. The second line had a more anodal mobility, was distinctly separated from the first and contained C3c and C3d as shown immunochemically with specific antisera. Native C3 and split products of C3 were identified by this CIE method in patients showing evidence of activated complement by having subnormal total complement (CH50) levels. When C3 split products were identified, the C3c-C3d precipitin line could always be distinguished from native C3 by its different electrophoretic mobility, even when C3 concentrations in serum varied from 0.25 mg/ml to 1.5 mg/ml. The sensitivity of CIE was compared to that of CH50 by asssaying at different time intervals after agg-IgG was added to fresh NHS. C3c-C3d split products were detected by CIE before any fall in CH50 and at all times when a significant decrease in CH50 was present. This study shows that the CIE technique is a highly sensitive, specific and rapid method for detecting activation of the complement system via classical or alternative pathways in human disease.

  6. Nouns, Verbs and NP Complements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, J. T.

    This paper investigates restrictions on three types of noun-phrase complements (gerundive, infinitive, clause) in English and seeks to point out some parallels between the occurrence of these three types in object positions. The author first presents a list of verbs which may be followed by noun-phrase complements; he then considers the occurrence…

  7. BAD-lectins: boronic acid-decorated lectins with enhanced binding affinity for the selective enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Lin, Po-Chiao; Huang, Li-De; Chen, Chang-Yang; Wu, Sz-Wei; Han, Chia-Li; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-09-03

    The weak and variable binding affinities exhibited by lectin-carbohydrate interactions have often compromised the practical utility of lectin in capturing glycoproteins for glycoproteomic applications. We report here the development and applications of a new type of hybrid biomaterial, namely a boronic acid-decorated lectin (BAD-lectin), for efficient bifunctional glycoprotein labeling and enrichment. Our binding studies showed an enhanced affinity by BAD-lectin, likely to be mediated via the formation of boronate ester linkages between the lectin and glycan subsequent to the initial recognition process and thus preserving its glycan-specificity. Moreover, when attached to magnetic nanoparticles (BAD-lectin@MNPs), 2 to 60-fold improvement on detection sensitivity and enrichment efficiency for specific glycoproteins was observed over the independent use of either lectin or BA. Tested at the level of whole cell lysates for glycoproteomic applications, three different types of BAD-lectin@MNPs exhibited excellent specificities with only 6% overlapping among the 295 N-linked glycopeptides identified. As many as 236 N-linked glycopeptides (80%) were uniquely identified by one of the BAD-lectin@MNPs. These results indicated that the enhanced glycan-selective recognition and binding affinity of BAD-lectin@MNPs will facilitate a complementary identification of the under-explored glycoproteome.

  8. Complement in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Maria V; Sim, Robert B

    2011-09-16

    The complement system consists of about 35-40 proteins and glycoproteins present in blood plasma or on cell surfaces. Its main biological function is to recognise "foreign" particles and macromolecules, and to promote their elimination either by opsonisation or lysis. Although historically complement has been studied as a system for immune defence against bacteria, it has an important homeostatic role in which it recognises damaged or altered "self" components. Thus complement has major roles in both immune defence against microorganisms, and in clearance of damaged or "used" host components. Since complement proteins opsonise or lyse cells, complement can damage healthy host cells and tissues. The system is regulated by many endogenous regulatory proteins. Regulation is sometimes imperfect and both too much and too little complement activation is associated with many diseases. Excessive or inappropriate activation can cause tissue damage in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), multiple sclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury (e.g. ischemic stroke). Insufficient complement activity is associated with susceptibility to infection (mainly bacterial) and development of autoimmune disease, like SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus).

  9. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Michal; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Manandhar, Surya P; Popadiak, Katarzyna; Riesbeck, Kristian; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M

    2009-02-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A) resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  10. Lectin-binding by sporozoites of Elmeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fuller, A L; McDougald, L R

    2002-02-01

    Sporozoites of Eimeria tenella were reacted in vitro with 19 different lectins characterized with a variety of carbohydrate-binding properties. Nine lectins caused sporozoite agglutination, which was inhibited by the specific carbohydrates mannose, sialic acid, melibiose, D-galactose, or D-galNAc. When intact live or fixed whole sporozoites were reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectins, another nine lectins bound to sporozoites, giving weak to strong fluorescence but not agglutination. Of these, all nine lectins bound to surface sites, but four also bound to the refractile body. Two of the agglutinating lectins also bound to intracellular organelles of air-dried sporozoites. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that biotinylated lectins bound a wide variety of parasite proteins. Lectins with similar carbohydrate specificities had some similarity in binding patterns of parasite proteins, as well as marked differences. In a few cases lectins with different carbohydrate specificities bound common protein bands. Only one lectin (Dolichos biflorus) showed no evidence of binding to whole sporozoites, organelles, or proteins.

  11. Lectins, Interconnecting Proteins with Biotechnological/Pharmacological and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Priscila Marcelino dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are proteins extensively used in biomedical applications with property to recognize carbohydrates through carbohydrate-binding sites, which identify glycans attached to cell surfaces, glycoconjugates, or free sugars, detecting abnormal cells and biomarkers related to diseases. These lectin abilities promoted interesting results in experimental treatments of immunological diseases, wounds, and cancer. Lectins obtained from virus, microorganisms, algae, animals, and plants were reported as modulators and tool markers in vivo and in vitro; these molecules also play a role in the induction of mitosis and immune responses, contributing for resolution of infections and inflammations. Lectins revealed healing effect through induction of reepithelialization and cicatrization of wounds. Some lectins have been efficient agents against virus, fungi, bacteria, and helminths at low concentrations. Lectin-mediated bioadhesion has been an interesting characteristic for development of drug delivery systems. Lectin histochemistry and lectin-based biosensors are useful to detect transformed tissues and biomarkers related to disease occurrence; antitumor lectins reported are promising for cancer therapy. Here, we address lectins from distinct sources with some biological effect and biotechnological potential in the diagnosis and therapeutic of diseases, highlighting many advances in this growing field. PMID:28367220

  12. Keeping It All Going—Complement Meets Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kolev, Martin; Kemper, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The complement system is an evolutionary old and crucial component of innate immunity, which is key to the detection and removal of invading pathogens. It was initially discovered as a liver-derived sentinel system circulating in serum, the lymph, and interstitial fluids that mediate the opsonization and lytic killing of bacteria, fungi, and viruses and the initiation of the general inflammatory responses. Although work performed specifically in the last five decades identified complement also as a critical instructor of adaptive immunity—indicating that complement’s function is likely broader than initially anticipated—the dominant opinion among researchers and clinicians was that the key complement functions were in principle defined. However, there is now a growing realization that complement activity goes well beyond “classic” immune functions and that this system is also required for normal (neuronal) development and activity and general cell and tissue integrity and homeostasis. Furthermore, the recent discovery that complement activation is not confined to the extracellular space but occurs within cells led to the surprising understanding that complement is involved in the regulation of basic processes of the cell, particularly those of metabolic nature—mostly via novel crosstalks between complement and intracellular sensor, and effector, pathways that had been overlooked because of their spatial separation. These paradigm shifts in the field led to a renaissance in complement research and provide new platforms to now better understand the molecular pathways underlying the wide-reaching effects of complement functions in immunity and beyond. In this review, we will cover the current knowledge about complement’s emerging relationship with the cellular metabolism machinery with a focus on the functional differences between serum-circulating versus intracellularly active complement during normal cell survival and induction of effector functions

  13. Genetics of the complement system.

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, P

    1975-01-01

    The complement system, unlike the coagulation system, was largely characterized by in-vitro techniques which did not make use of genetically deficient plasmas. The existence of the genetically deficient plasmas. The existence of the genetically deficient subjects therefore has served largely to increase our knowledge of the in-vivo role of complement. At the present time its clearest role is in the resistance to infection; obviously in the case of C3 deficiency and bacterial infection and possibly more subtly in the case of deficiency of the early active complement components and low virulence organisms. There is so far no evidence that genetic complement deficiency interferes with antibody formation or with the generation of tolerance as has been suggested in the pas (Azar et al, 1968; Dukor and Hartmann, 1973). PMID:768477

  14. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mice and mice transfused with Syk inhibitor-treated platelets . Platelet lodging was remarkably decreased in lungs of mice transfused with Syk...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet ...30September2012–29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  15. Using Single Lectins to Enrich Glycoproteins in Conditioned Media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that can recognize and bind to carbohydrates conjugated to proteins and lipids. Coupled with mass spectrometry technologies, lectin affinity chromatography is becoming a popular approach for identification and quantification of glycoproteins in complex samples such as blood, tumor tissues, and cell lines. Given the commercial availability of a large number of lectins that recognize diverse sugar structures, it is now possible to isolate and study glycoproteins for biological and medical research. This unit provides a general guide to single-lectin-based enrichment of glycoproteins from serum-free conditioned media. Due to the unique carbohydrate specificity of most lectins and the complexity of the samples, optimization steps may be required to evaluate different elution buffers and methods as well as binding conditions, for each lectin, for optimal recovery of bound glycoproteins.

  16. Complement factor B expression profile in a spontaneous uveitis model.

    PubMed

    Zipplies, Johanna K; Kirschfink, Michael; Amann, Barbara; Hauck, Stefanie M; Stangassinger, Manfred; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2010-12-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis serves as a spontaneous model for human autoimmune uveitis. Unpredictable relapses and ongoing inflammation in the eyes of diseased horses as well as in humans lead to destruction of the retina and finally result in blindness. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to inflammation and retinal degeneration are not well understood. An initial screening for differentially regulated proteins in sera of uveitic cases compared to healthy controls revealed an increase of the alternative pathway complement component factor B in ERU cases. To determine the activation status of the complement system, sera were subsequently examined for complement split products. We could demonstrate a significant higher concentration of the activation products B/Ba, B/Bb, Bb neoantigen, iC3b and C3d in uveitic condition compared to healthy controls, whereas for C5b-9 no differences were detected. Additionally, we investigated complement activation directly in the retina by immunohistochemistry, since it is the main target organ of this autoimmune disease. Interestingly, infiltrating cells co-expressed activated factor Bb neoantigen, complement split product C3d as well as CD68, a macrophage marker. In this study, we could demonstrate activation of the complement system both systemically as well as in the eye, the target organ of spontaneous recurrent uveitis. Based on these novel findings, we postulate a novel role for macrophages in connection with complement synthesis at the site of inflammation.

  17. Complement: a key system for immune surveillance and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel; Hajishengallis, George; Yang, Kun; Lambris, John D

    2010-09-01

    Nearly a century after the significance of the human complement system was recognized, we have come to realize that its functions extend far beyond the elimination of microbes. Complement acts as a rapid and efficient immune surveillance system that has distinct effects on healthy and altered host cells and foreign intruders. By eliminating cellular debris and infectious microbes, orchestrating immune responses and sending 'danger' signals, complement contributes substantially to homeostasis, but it can also take action against healthy cells if not properly controlled. This review describes our updated view of the function, structure and dynamics of the complement network, highlights its interconnection with immunity at large and with other endogenous pathways, and illustrates its multiple roles in homeostasis and disease.

  18. Luciferase fragment complementation imaging in preclinical cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Madryn C.; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    The luciferase fragment complementation assay (LFCA) enables molecular events to be non-invasively imaged in live cells in vitro and in vivo in a comparatively cheap and safe manner. It is a development of previous enzyme complementation assays in which reporter genes are split into two, individually enzymatically inactive, fragments that are able to complement one another upon interaction. This complementation can be used to externally visualize cellular activities. In recent years, the number of studies which have used LFCAs to probe questions relevant to cancer have increased, and this review summarizes the most significant and interesting of these. In particular, it focuses on work conducted on the epidermal growth factor, nuclear and chemokine receptor families, and intracellular signaling pathways, including IP3, cAMP, Akt, cMyc, NRF2 and Rho GTPases. LFCAs which have been developed to image DNA methylation and detect RNA transcripts are also discussed. PMID:25594026

  19. Deficiencies and excessive human complement system activation in disorders of multifarious etiology.

    PubMed

    Tichaczek-Goska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Complement is an integral part of the immune system protecting the host organism against invasion and proliferation of various microorganisms. It is also involved in the removal of the body's own damaged and altered cells. Activation of the complement system is a very precise process and it is strictly controlled by regulatory proteins present in both plasma and at host cells' surfaces. C3 protein plays a major role in the complement activation and generation of immune responses. Deficiencies of the C3 and other complement components, so-called early and late complement proteins, contribute to the emergence of recurrent bacterial, viral and fungal infections. The low level of mannose-binding lectin is also important. This protein plays a protective role in the early stages of infection and in the control of inflammation. Its deficit is one of the most common reasons for human immunodeficiency, observed in microbial infections as well as in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. On the other hand, the excessive activation of complement proteins is often discovered to be the reason for many diseases. These include e.g. autoimmune diseases, Alzheimer's syndrome, schizophrenia, atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome, angioedema, macular degeneration, and Crohn's disease.

  20. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  1. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  2. Two Chitotriose-Specific Lectins Show Anti-Angiogenesis, Induces Caspase-9-Mediated Apoptosis and Early Arrest of Pancreatic Tumor Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Dhiman; Suresh, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    The antiproliferative activity of two chito- specific agglutinins purified from Benincasa hispida (BhL) and Datura innoxia (DiL9) of different plant family origin was investigated on various cancer cell lines. Both lectins showed chitotriose specificity, by inhibiting lectin hemagglutinating activity. On further studies, it was revealed that these agglutinins caused remarkable concentration-dependent antiproliferative effect on human pancreatic cancerous cells but not on the normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells even at higher doses determined using MTT assay. The GI50 values were approximately 8.4 μg ml-1 (0.247 μM) and 142 μg ml-1(14.8 μM) for BhL and DiL9, respectively, against PANC-1 cells. The growth inhibitory effect of these lectins on pancreatic cancer cells were shown to be a consequence of lectin cell surface binding and triggering G0/G1 arrest, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, sustained increase of the intracellular calcium release and the apoptotic signal is amplified by activation of caspases executing cell death. Interestingly, these lectins also showed anti-angiogenic activity by disrupting the endothelial tubulogenesis. Therefore, we report for the first time two chito-specific lectins specifically binding to tumor glycans; they can be considered to be a class of molecules with antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer cells mediated through caspase dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:26795117

  3. Specific Endocytosis Blockade of Trypanosoma cruzi Exposed to a Poly-LAcNAc Binding Lectin Suggests that Lectin-Sugar Interactions Participate to Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Brosson, Sébastien; Fontaine, Frédéric; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Perez-Morga, David; Pays, Etienne; Bousbata, Sabrina; Salmon, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite transmitted by a triatomine insect, and causing human Chagas disease in South America. This parasite undergoes a complex life cycle alternating between non-proliferative and dividing forms. Owing to their high energy requirement, replicative epimastigotes of the insect midgut display high endocytic activity. This activity is mainly restricted to the cytostome, by which the cargo is taken up and sorted through the endosomal vesicular network to be delivered to reservosomes, the final lysosomal-like compartments. In African trypanosomes tomato lectin (TL) and ricin, respectively specific to poly-N-acetyllactosamine (poly-LacNAc) and β-D-galactose, allowed the identification of giant chains of poly-LacNAc in N-glycoproteins of the endocytic pathway. We show that in T. cruzi epimastigote forms also, glycoproteins of the endocytic pathway are characterized by the presence of N-linked glycans binding to both ricin and TL. Affinity chromatography using both TL and Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSLII), specific to non-reducing terminal residue of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), led to an enrichment of glycoproteins of the trypanosomal endocytic pathway. Incubation of live parasites with TL, which selectively bound to the cytostome/cytopharynx, specifically inhibited endocytosis of transferrin (Tf) but not dextran, a marker of fluid endocytosis. Taken together, our data suggest that N-glycan modification of endocytic components plays a crucial role in receptor-mediated endocytosis of T. cruzi. PMID:27685262

  4. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda Santos, I.K.; Pereira, M.E.

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various /sup 125/I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  5. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    de Miranda Santos, I K; Pereira, M E

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various 125I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  6. A comparison of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin with its deglycosylated derivative.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, D C; Graham, C; Urbaniak, S J; Jeffree, C E; Allen, A K

    1984-06-15

    A deglycosylated derivative of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin was prepared with the use of trifluoromethanesulphonic acid. Its properties were generally similar to those of the native lectin, but differences were evident in terms of relative agglutinating activity towards sheep, (untreated) human and trypsin-treated human erythrocytes. The two forms of tomato lectin were used in conjunction with a battery of specific antisera to investigate structural relatedness among solanaceous lectins. Immunological cross-reactivity between tomato, potato and Datura lectins depends on the integrity of the glycosylated region of those lectins; that between Datura lectin and other seed lectins, however, has a separate structural basis.

  7. Mycoplasma polysaccharide protects against complement

    PubMed Central

    Bolland, Jeffrey R.; Simmons, Warren L.; Daubenspeck, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Although they lack a cell wall, mycoplasmas do possess a glycocalyx. The interactions between the glycocalyx, mycoplasmal surface proteins and host complement were explored using the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis as a model. It was previously shown that the length of the tandem repeat region of the surface lipoprotein Vsa is associated with susceptibility to complement-mediated killing. Cells producing a long Vsa containing about 40 repeats are resistant to complement, whereas strains that produce a short Vsa of five or fewer repeats are susceptible. We show here that the length of the Vsa protein modulates the affinity of the M. pulmonis EPS-I polysaccharide for the mycoplasma cell surface, with more EPS-I being associated with mycoplasmas producing a short Vsa protein. An examination of mutants that lack EPS-I revealed that planktonic mycoplasmas were highly susceptible to complement killing even when the Vsa protein was long, demonstrating that both EPS-I and Vsa length contribute to resistance. In contrast, the mycoplasmas were resistant to complement even in the absence of EPS-I when the cells were encased in a biofilm. PMID:22504437

  8. Mannose-binding lectin gene polymorphic variants predispose to the development of bronchopulmonary complications but have no influence on other clinical and laboratory symptoms or signs of common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Litzman, J; Freiberger, T; Grimbacher, B; Gathmann, B; Salzer, U; Pavlík, T; Vlček, J; Postránecká, V; Trávníčková, Z; Thon, V

    2008-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), activating protein of the lectin pathway of the complement system, is an important component of the non-specific immune response. MBL2 gene polymorphisms, both in the coding and promoter regions, lead to low or deficient serum MBL levels. Low serum MBL levels were shown to be associated with serious infectious complications, mainly in patients in whom other non-specific immune system barriers were disturbed (granulocytopenia, cystic fibrosis). We have analysed two promoter (−550 and −221) and three exon (codons 52, 54 and 57) MBL2 polymorphisms in a total of 94 patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) from two immunodeficiency centres. Low-producing genotypes were associated with the presence of bronchiectasis (P = 0·009), lung fibrosis (P = 0·037) and also with respiratory insufficiency (P = 0·029). We could not demonstrate any association of MBL deficiency with age at onset of clinical symptoms, age at diagnosis, the number of pneumonias before diagnosis or serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA and IgM levels before initiation of Ig treatment. No association with emphysema development was observed, such as with lung function test abnormalities. No effect of MBL2 genotypes on the presence of diarrhoea, granuloma formation, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, frequency of respiratory tract infection or the number of antibiotic courses of the patients was observed. Our study suggests that low MBL-producing genotypes predispose to bronchiectasis formation, and also fibrosis and respiratory insufficiency development, but have no effect on other complications in CVID patients. PMID:18637104

  9. Long Circulating Lectin Conjugated Paclitaxel Loaded Magnetic Nanoparticles: A New Theranostic Avenue for Leukemia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhalaxmi; Dilnawaz, Fahima; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Amongst all leukemias, Bcr-Abl positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) confers resistance to native drug due to multi drug resistance and also resistance to p53 and fas ligand pathways. In the present study, we have investigated the efficacy of microtubule stabilizing paclitaxel loaded magnetic nanoparticles (pac-MNPs) to ascertain its cytotoxic effect on Bcr-Abl positive K562 cells. For active targeted therapy, pac-MNPs were functionalized with lectin glycoprotein which resulted in higher cellular uptake and lower IC50 value suggesting the efficacy of targeted delivery of paclitaxel. Both pac-MNPs and lectin conjugated pac-MNPs have a prolonged circulation time in serum suggesting increased bioavailability and therapeutics index of paclitaxel in vivo. Further, the molecular mechanism pertaining to pac-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed by studying the involvement of different apoptotic pathway proteins by immunoblotting and quantitative PCR. Our study revealed simultaneous activation of JNK pathway leading to Bcr-Abl instability and the extrinsic apoptotic pathway after pac-MNPs treatment in two Bcr-Abl positive cell lines. In addition, the MRI data suggested the potential application of MNPs as imaging agent. Thus our in vitro and in vivo results strongly suggested the pac-MNPs as a future prospective theranostic tool for leukemia therapy. PMID:22110595

  10. Complement activation by Coccidioides immitis: in vitro and clinical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Galgiani, J N; Yam, P; Petz, L D; Williams, P L; Stevens, D A

    1980-01-01

    Mycelial- or spherule-phase derivatives of Coccidioides immitis caused a decrease in vitro of total hemolytic complement in serum from a nonsensitized person. Activation involved both classic and alternative pathways as shown by deprssion of hemolytic C4 and by generation of products of activation of components C3, C4, and factor B. In addition, functional complement activity or immunoreactive levels of complement components or both were measured in 23 patients with self-limited or disseminated coccidioidomycosis. Low total hemolytic complement was found in nine, usually during the early phase of primary illness, and was transient. Hemolytic C4 was low, and the effect of inulin to decrease complement levels was blunted, suggested both classic and alternative pathways may be deficient. However, associated depression of immunoreactive levels of components assayed (C3, C4, C5, factor B, and properdin) was not consistently found. This disparity raises the possibility of enhanced in vitro inactivation analogous to activation by immune complexes. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6901703

  11. Isothermal calorimetric analysis of lectin-sugar interaction.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yoichi; Matsuo, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful tool for analyzing lectin-glycan interactions because it can measure the binding affinity and thermodynamic properties such as ∆H and ΔS in a single experiment without any chemical modification or immobilization. Here we describe a method for preparing glycan and lectin solution to minimize the buffer mismatch, setting parameters, and performing experiments.

  12. Glycan profiling of endometrial cancers using lectin microarray.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Sugiyama, Taro; Miyazawa, Masaki; Muramatsu, Toshinari; Nakamura, Kyoko; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Mikami, Mikio

    2012-10-01

    Cell surface glycans change during the process of malignant transformation. To characterize and distinguish endometrial cancer and endometrium, we performed glycan profiling using an emerging modern technology, lectin microarray analysis. The three cell lines, two from endometrial cancers [well-differentiated type (G1) and poorly differentiated type (G3)] and one from normal endometrium, were successfully categorized into three independent groups by 45 lectins. Furthermore, in cancer cells, a clear difference between G1 and G3 type was observed for the glycans recognized with six lectins, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), Sambucus sieboldiana agglutinin (SSA), Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), Trichosanthes japonica agglutinin I (TJA-I), Amaranthus caudatus agglutinin (ACA), and Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPL). The lectin microarray analysis using G3 type tissues demonstrated that stage I and stage III or IV were distinguished depending on signal pattern of three lectins, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), BPL, and ACA. In addition, the analysis of the glycans on the ovarian cancer cells showed that only anticancer drug-sensitive cell lines had almost no activities to specific three lectins. Glycan profiling by the lectin microarray may be used to assess the characteristics of tumors and potentially to predict the success of chemotherapy treatment.

  13. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C.; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2015-01-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  14. Lectin-binding properties of Aeromonas caviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-de-Souza, Cláudio M.; Hirata-Jr, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Freitas-Almeida, Angela C.; Andrade, Arnaldo F. B.

    2008-01-01

    The cell surface carbohydrates of four strains of Aeromonas caviae were analyzed by agglutination and lectin-binding assays employing twenty highly purified lectins encompassing all sugar specificities. With the exception of L-fucose and sialic acid, the sugar residues were detected in A. caviae strains. A marked difference, however, in the pattern of cell surface carbohydrates in different A. caviae isolates was observed. Specific receptors for Tritricum vulgaris (WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEL) and Solanum tuberosum (STA) (D-GlcNAc-binding lectins) were found only in ATCC 15468 strain, whereas Euonymus europaeus (EEL, D-Gal-binding lectin) sites were present exclusively in AeQ32 strain, those for Helix pomatia (HPA, D-GalNAc-binding lectin) in AeC398 and AeV11 strains, and for Canavalia ensiformes (Con A, D-Man-binding lectin) in ATCC 15468, AeC398, AeQ32 and AeV11 strains, after bacterial growing at 37°C. On the other hand, specific receptors for WGA and EEL were completely abrogated growing the bacteria at 22°C. Binding studies with 125I- labeled lectins from WGA, EEL and Con A were performed. These assays essentially confirmed the selectivity, demonstrated in the agglutination assays of these lectins for the A. caviae strains. PMID:24031204

  15. Metabolic Complementation in Bacterial Communities: Necessary Conditions and Optimality

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Matteo; Ponce-de-León, Miguel; Peretó, Juli; Montero, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial communities may display metabolic complementation, in which different members of the association partially contribute to the same biosynthetic pathway. In this way, the end product of the pathway is synthesized by the community as a whole. However, the emergence and the benefits of such complementation are poorly understood. Herein, we present a simple model to analyze the metabolic interactions among bacteria, including the host in the case of endosymbiotic bacteria. The model considers two cell populations, with both cell types encoding for the same linear biosynthetic pathway. We have found that, for metabolic complementation to emerge as an optimal strategy, both product inhibition and large permeabilities are needed. In the light of these results, we then consider the patterns found in the case of tryptophan biosynthesis in the endosymbiont consortium hosted by the aphid Cinara cedri. Using in-silico computed physicochemical properties of metabolites of this and other biosynthetic pathways, we verified that the splitting point of the pathway corresponds to the most permeable intermediate. PMID:27774085

  16. Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Green A.

    2006-01-01

    With the growth of standardized assessment benchmarks in both the public and private paradigms, testing performance matters to institutions more than ever. In an attempt to take as many hindering variables out of this process, such as test anxiety, socioeconomic influences, and latency in cognition, Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum seeks…

  17. Role of complement in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Fiane, A E

    2002-01-01

    The xenotransplantation research is driven by the increasing gap between the number of patients with end-stage organ failure on waiting lists for transplantation and the supply of allografts. The lack of success in developing suitable artificial organs for permanent treatment of organ failure has further strengthened the need for xenotransplantation research. Pigs are now generally accepted to be the source animal of choice. Transplantation of pig organs to humans faces several barriers which have to be overcome before it comes to clinical application: (1) anatomical and physiological conditions; (2) immunological rejection mechanisms; (3) molecular compatibility between signal molecules of the two species; (4) risk of transmission of microorganisms, particularly pig endogenous retroviruses; and (5) legal and ethical aspects both with respect to the animal and the recipient. Here we will focus on the role of the complement system in the rejection of immediately vascularized pig-to-primate xenografts. The hyperacute rejection occurring within minutes after transplantation is mediated by binding of natural antibodies to the Galalpha(l-3)Gal epitope on the endothelial cells with subsequent complement activation. Whereas inhibition of complement activation protects against hyperacute rejection, the role of complement in the later rejection phases is less clarified.

  18. Sentential Complementation--An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuessel, Frank H., Jr.

    A review of traditional and transformational studies on the phenomenon of sentential complementation (noun clauses) reveals many areas of agreement. Although some adherents of generative grammar may have occasionally obscured this aspect because of the offensive nature of their criticism of other modes of analysis, it is seen that, in several…

  19. Isolation, characterization, and extra-embryonic secretion of the Xenopus laevis embryonic epidermal lectin, XEEL.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Saburo

    2005-03-01

    The Xenopus laevis embryonic epidermal lectin (XEEL) is a novel member of a group of lectins including mammalian intelectins, frog oocyte cortical granule lectins, and plasma lectins in lower vertebrates and ascidians. We isolated the XEEL protein from the extract of tailbud embryos by affinity chromatography on a galactose-Sepharose column. The XEEL protein is a homohexamer of 43-kDa N-glycosylated peptide subunits linked by disulfide bonds. It requires Ca(2+) for saccharide binding and shows a higher affinity to pentoses than hexoses and disaccharides. HEK-293T cells transfected with an expression vector containing the XEEL cDNA secrete into the culture medium the recombinant XEEL (rXEEL) that is similar to the purified XEEL in its molecular nature and saccharide-binding properties. Substitution of Asn-192 to Gln removed the N-linked carbohydrate and inhibited secretion of rXEEL but did not abolish the activity to bind to galactose-Sepharose. The embryo's XEEL content, as estimated by western blot analyses, increases during neurula/tailbud stages and declines after 1 week postfertilization. Immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopic analyses showed localization of the XEEL protein in a typical secretory granule pathway of nonciliated epidermal cells. When tailbud embryos were cultured in the standard medium, XEEL was accumulated in the medium, indicating secretion of XEEL into the environmental water. The rate of XEEL secretion greatly increased at around the hatching stage and stayed at a high level during the first week after hatching. XEEL may have a role in innate immunity to protect embryos and larvae against pathogenic microorganisms in the environmental water.

  20. Complement related kidney diseases: Recurrence after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2016-12-24

    The recurrence of renal disease after renal transplantation is becoming one of the main causes of graft loss after kidney transplantation. This principally concerns some of the original diseases as the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), in particular the MPGN now called C3 glomerulopathy. Both this groups of renal diseases are characterized by congenital (genetic) or acquired (auto-antibodies) modifications of the alternative pathway of complement. These abnormalities often remain after transplantation because they are constitutional and poorly influenced by the immunosuppression. This fact justifies the high recurrence rate of these diseases. Early diagnosis of recurrence is essential for an optimal therapeutically approach, whenever possible. Patients affected by end stage renal disease due to C3 glomerulopathies or to atypical HUS, may be transplanted with extreme caution. Living donor donation from relatives is not recommended because members of the same family may be affected by the same gene mutation. Different therapeutically approaches have been attempted either for recurrence prevention and treatment. The most promising approach is represented by complement inhibitors. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5 convertase is the most promising drug, even if to date is not known how long the therapy should be continued and which are the best dosing. These facts face the high costs of the treatment. Eculizumab resistant patients have been described. They could benefit by a C3 convertase inhibitor, but this class of drugs is by now the object of randomized controlled trials.

  1. Complement related kidney diseases: Recurrence after transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    The recurrence of renal disease after renal transplantation is becoming one of the main causes of graft loss after kidney transplantation. This principally concerns some of the original diseases as the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), in particular the MPGN now called C3 glomerulopathy. Both this groups of renal diseases are characterized by congenital (genetic) or acquired (auto-antibodies) modifications of the alternative pathway of complement. These abnormalities often remain after transplantation because they are constitutional and poorly influenced by the immunosuppression. This fact justifies the high recurrence rate of these diseases. Early diagnosis of recurrence is essential for an optimal therapeutically approach, whenever possible. Patients affected by end stage renal disease due to C3 glomerulopathies or to atypical HUS, may be transplanted with extreme caution. Living donor donation from relatives is not recommended because members of the same family may be affected by the same gene mutation. Different therapeutically approaches have been attempted either for recurrence prevention and treatment. The most promising approach is represented by complement inhibitors. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5 convertase is the most promising drug, even if to date is not known how long the therapy should be continued and which are the best dosing. These facts face the high costs of the treatment. Eculizumab resistant patients have been described. They could benefit by a C3 convertase inhibitor, but this class of drugs is by now the object of randomized controlled trials. PMID:28058212

  2. A developmentally regulated lectin in Bufo arenarum embryos.

    PubMed

    Elola, M T; Fink-de-Cabutti, N E; Herkovits, H

    1987-01-01

    We report the levels of an endogenous beta-galactoside lectin activity from Bufo arenarum whole embryos extracts and specific inhibition by saccharides at different developmental stages. Specific activity measured against trypsinized rabbit red blood cells showed relatively high and fluctuating levels during early stages (up to about 76 h post-fertilization) which fell to significantly lower and more constant values at late stages (77-264 h post-fertilization). Lactose is the most potent inhibitor of this lectin activity, and saccharides having alpha-galactoside configurations are weaker inhibitors. At the last embryonic stage, the agglutinating activity showed a different sugar specificity which suggests either the modification of the preexistent lectin or the synthesis of another type of lectin. The possible physiological roles of these lectins in the blockage of polyspermy or in embryonic cell-cell interactions are discussed.

  3. Diversified Carbohydrate-Binding Lectins from Marine Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Mizuki; Naganuma, Takako; Muramoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Marine bioresources produce a great variety of specific and potent bioactive molecules including natural organic compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, polyether, peptides, proteins, and enzymes. Lectins are also one of the promising candidates for useful therapeutic agents because they can recognize the specific carbohydrate structures such as proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, resulting in the regulation of various cells via glycoconjugates and their physiological and pathological phenomenon through the host-pathogen interactions and cell-cell communications. Here, we review the multiple lectins from marine resources including fishes and sea invertebrate in terms of their structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution. Especially, we focus on the unique structural properties and molecular evolution of C-type lectins, galectin, F-type lectin, and rhamnose-binding lectin families. PMID:22312473

  4. Structure-function relationship of monocot mannose-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1996-01-01

    The monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins, which until now have been isolated from species of the Amaryllidaceae, Alliaceae, Araceae, Orchidaceae, and Liliaceae. To explain the obvious differences in biological activities, the structure-function relationships of the monocot mannose-binding lectins were studied by a combination of glycan-binding studies and molecular modeling using the deduced amino acid sequences of the currently known lectins. Molecular modeling indicated that the number of active mannose-binding sites per monomer varies between three and zero. Since the number of binding sites is fairly well correlated with the binding activity measured by surface plasmon resonance, and is also in good agreement with the results of previous studies of the biological activities of the mannose-binding lectins, molecular modeling is of great value for predicting which lectins are best suited for a particular application. PMID:8972598

  5. Reincarnation of ancient links between coagulation and complement.

    PubMed

    Conway, E M

    2015-06-01

    Throughout evolution, organisms have developed means to contain wounds by simultaneously limiting bleeding and eliminating pathogens and damaged host cells via the recruitment of innate defense mechanisms. Disease emerges when there is unchecked activation of innate immune and/or coagulation responses. A key component of innate immunity is the complement system. Concurrent excess activation of coagulation and complement - two major blood-borne proteolytic pathways - is evident in numerous diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, venous thromboembolic disease, thrombotic microangiopathies, arthritis, cancer, and infectious diseases. Delineating the cross-talk between these two cascades will uncover novel therapeutic insights.

  6. MMBL proteins: from lectin to bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-12-01

    Arguably, bacteriocins deployed in warfare among related bacteria are among the most diverse proteinacous compounds with respect to structure and mode of action. Identification of the first prokaryotic member of the so-called MMBLs (monocot mannose-binding lectins) or GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) lectin family and discovery of its genus-specific killer activity in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas has added yet another kind of toxin to this group of allelopathic molecules. This novel feature is reminiscent of the protective function, on the basis of antifungal, insecticidal, nematicidal or antiviral activity, assigned to or proposed for several of the eukaryotic MMBL proteins that are ubiquitously distributed among monocot plants, but also occur in some other plants, fish, sponges, amoebae and fungi. Direct bactericidal activity can also be effected by a C-type lectin, but this is a mammalian protein that limits mucosal colonization by Gram-positive bacteria. The presence of two divergent MMBL domains in the novel bacteriocins raises questions about task distribution between modules and the possible role of carbohydrate binding in the specificity of target strain recognition and killing. Notably, bacteriocin activity was also demonstrated for a hybrid MMBL protein with an accessory protease-like domain. This association with one or more additional modules, often with predicted peptide-hydrolysing or -binding activity, suggests that additional bacteriotoxic proteins may be found among the diverse chimaeric MMBL proteins encoded in prokaryotic genomes. A phylogenetic survey of the bacterial MMBL modules reveals a mosaic pattern of strongly diverged sequences, mainly occurring in soil-dwelling and rhizosphere bacteria, which may reflect a trans-kingdom acquisition of the ancestral genes.

  7. Exploring the Innate Immune System: Using Complement-Medicated Cell Lysis in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Kevin G.

    2008-01-01

    The protein complement pathway comprises an important part of the innate immunity. The use of serum to demonstrate complement-mediated destruction across a series of bacterial dilutions allows an instructor to introduce a number of important biological concepts such as bacterial growth, activation cascades, and adaptive versus innate immunity.

  8. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age.

  9. Lectin binding to cystic stages of Taenia taeniaeformis.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, R M; Williams, J F

    1984-10-01

    Studies of membrane glycoconjugates of Taenia taeniaeformis were initiated by assays of the lectin binding characteristics of 35-day-old cysticerci. Parasites fixed in glutaraldehyde were incubated with one of the following FITC-labelled lectins: Concanavalin A (Con A), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), fucose binding protein (FBP) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and either their specific or a nonspecific sugar. Ultraviolet microscopy revealed that only Con A and LCA bound in large amounts to the surface of cysticerci. This binding was partly inhibited by the specific sugar, but the nonspecific sugar had little effect. The lectin not removed by either of the sugars may have been bound nonspecifically to the charged glycocalyx. Lectins were primarily bound on the anterior third of the parasite around the scolex invagination. Kinetic studies of lectin interactions were carried out with LCA and RCA by spectrophotofluorometric analysis of the amount bound specifically or nonspecifically over a range of lectin concentrations. Lens culinaris lectin binding was found to be specific and involve 2 receptors which showed large differences in their affinity for lectin and prevalence on the surface. Ricinus communis lectin did not bind specifically but nonspecific interactions were observed. Adherence of small numbers of host cells was shown to have no measurable effect on the lectin binding characteristics. The results suggest that the major surface carbohydrates exposed are D-mannose and/or D-glucose residues with the other sugar groups poorly represented. This relatively homogeneous surface may have implications for the antigenicity of the parasite in its host.

  10. Isolation and characterization of lectins and lectin-alliinase complexes from bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) and ramsons (Allium ursinum).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1997-04-01

    A procedure developed to separate the homodimeric and heterodimeric mannose-binding lectins from bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum L.) and ramsons (Allium ursinum L.) also enabled the isolation of stable lectin-alliinase complexes. Characterization of the individual lectins indicated that, in spite of their different molecular structure, the homomeric and heteromeric lectins resemble each other reasonably well with respect to their agglutination properties and carbohydrate-binding specificity. However, a detailed analysis of the lectin-alliinase complexes from garlic and ramsons bulbs demonstrated that only the heterodimeric lectins are capable of binding to the glycan chains of the alliinase molecules (EC 4.4.1.4). Moreover, it appears that only a subpopulation of the alliinase molecules is involved in the formation of lectin-alliinase complexes and that the complexed alliinase contains more glycan chains than the free enzyme. Finally, some arguments are given that the lectin-alliinase complexes do not occur in vivo but are formed in vitro after homogenization of the tissue.

  11. The Liverwort Contains a Lectin That Is Structurally and Evolutionary Related to the Monocot Mannose-Binding Lectins1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Barre, Annick; Bras, Julien; Rougé, Pierre; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A mannose (Man)-binding lectin has been isolated and characterized from the thallus of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. N-terminal sequencing indicated that the M. polymorpha agglutinin (Marpola) shares sequence similarity with the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Searches in the databases yielded expressed sequence tags encoding Marpola. Sequence analysis, molecular modeling, and docking experiments revealed striking structural similarities between Marpola and the monocot Man-binding lectins. Activity and specificity studies further indicated that Marpola is a much stronger agglutinin than the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and exhibits a preference for methylated Man and glucose, which is unprecedented within the family of monocot Man-binding lectins. The discovery of Marpola allows us, for the first time, to corroborate the evolutionary relationship between a lectin from a lower plant and a well-established lectin family from flowering plants. In addition, the identification of Marpola sheds a new light on the molecular evolution of the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Beside evolutionary considerations, the occurrence of a G. nivalis agglutinin homolog in a lower plant necessitates the rethinking of the physiological role of the whole family of monocot Man-binding lectins. PMID:12114560

  12. cDNA cloning, characterization, and pharmacologic evaluation of anticancer activity of a lectin gene in Pinellia integrifolia.

    PubMed

    Liu, L L; Yang, Z J; Peng, Z S

    2016-08-12

    Plant lectins are proteins that possess at least one non-catalytic domain, which could reversibly bind to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. The important roles played by plant lectins in immune regulation, signaling pathways, and plant defense could be attributed to their specific binding activities with carbohydrates. In this study, a Pinellia integrifolia lectin gene, designated pia, was cloned using rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The open reading frame (ORF) of pia was constructed into the pET-28a vector, and a 33-kDa recombinant protein was induced in Escherichia coli BL21. The hemagglutination and anticancer properties of the purified recombinant protein were assayed in vitro. The results indicated that the full-length cDNA of pia was 1210 bp long, containing an 807-bp ORF encoding a 268-amino acid peptide. The putative P. integrifolia lectin protein (PIA) contained three mannose-binding sites. The agglutinating activity exhibited by PIA was inhibited by D-mannose. PIA was also shown to exert an anti-proliferative activity against nasopharyngeal carcinoma, human cervical carcinoma, and human breast cancer cell lines in vitro. These results could be applied to determine the function of PIA in the future.

  13. Identification of hot spots in the variola virus complement inhibitor (SPICE) for human complement regulation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Viveka Nand; Pyaram, Kalyani; Mullick, Jayati; Sahu, Arvind

    2008-04-01

    Variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, encodes a soluble complement regulator named SPICE. Previously, SPICE has been shown to be much more potent in inactivating human complement than the vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP), although they differ only in 11 amino acid residues. In the present study, we have expressed SPICE, VCP, and mutants of VCP by substituting each or more of the 11 non-variant VCP residues with the corresponding residue of SPICE to identify hot spots that impart functional advantage to SPICE over VCP. Our data indicate that (i) SPICE is approximately 90-fold more potent than VCP in inactivating human C3b, and the residues Y98, Y103, K108 and K120 are predominantly responsible for its enhanced activity; (ii) SPICE is 5.4-fold more potent in inactivating human C4b, and residues Y98, Y103, K108, K120 and L193 mainly dictate this increase; (iii) the classical pathway decay-accelerating activity of activity is only twofold higher than that of VCP, and the 11 mutations in SPICE do not significantly affect this activity; (iv) SPICE possesses significantly greater binding ability to human C3b compared to VCP, although its binding to human C4b is lower than that of VCP; (v) residue N144 is largely responsible for the increased binding of SPICE to human C3b; and (vi) the human specificity of SPICE is dictated primarily by residues Y98, Y103, K108, and K120 since these are enough to formulate VCP as potent as SPICE. Together, these results suggest that principally 4 of the 11 residues that differ between SPICE and VCP partake in its enhanced function against human complement.

  14. The Complement Anaphylatoxins C5a and C3a Suppress IFN-β Production in Response to Listeria monocytogenes by Inhibition of the Cyclic Dinucleotide-Activated Cytosolic Surveillance Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey L; Calame, Daniel G; Shenoi, Nancy; Li, Yi-Dong; Wetsel, Rick A

    2017-03-08

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular Gram-positive bacterium that induces expression of type I IFNs (IFN-α/IFN-β) during infection. These cytokines are detrimental to the host during infection by priming leukocytes to undergo L. monocytogenes-mediated apoptosis. Our previous studies showed that C5aR1(-/-) and C3aR(-/-) mice are highly susceptible to L. monocytogenes infection as a result of increased IFN-β-mediated apoptosis of major leukocyte cell populations, including CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. However, the mechanisms by which C3a and C5a modulate IFN-β expression during L. monocytogenes infection were not examined in these initial investigations. Accordingly, we report in this article that C5a and C3a suppress IFN-β production in response to L. monocytogenes via cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP), a secondary messenger molecule of L. monocytogenes, in J774A.1 macrophage-like cells and in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Moreover, C5a and C3a suppress IFN-β production by acting through their respective receptors, because no inhibition was seen in C5aR1(-/-) or C3aR(-/-) BMDCs, respectively. C5a and C3a suppress IFN-β production in a manner that is dependent on Bruton's tyrosine kinase, p38 MAPK, and TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), as demonstrated by the individual use of Bruton's tyrosine kinase, p38 MAPK, and TBK1 inhibitors. Pretreatment of cells with C5a and C3a reduced the expression of the IFN-β signaling molecules DDX41, STING, phosphorylated TBK1, and phosphorylated p38 MAPK in wild-type BMDCs following treatment with c-di-AMP. Collectively, these data demonstrate that C3a and C5a, via direct signaling through their specific receptors, suppress IFN-β expression by modulation of a distinct innate cytosolic surveillance pathway involving DDX41, STING, and other downstream molecular targets of L. monocytogenes-generated c-di-AMP.

  15. Interaction of human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) with Yersinia enterocolitica lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kasperkiewicz, Katarzyna; Swierzko, Anna S; Bartlomiejczyk, Marcin A; Cedzynski, Maciej; Noszczynska, Magdalena; Duda, Katarzyna A; Michalski, Mateusz; Skurnik, Mikael

    2015-09-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is involved in the interaction between Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria and host. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), complement-activating soluble pattern-recognition receptor targets microbial glycoconjugates, including LPS. We studied its interactions with a set of Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 LPS mutants. The wild-type strain LPS consists of lipid A (LA) substituted with an inner core oligosaccharide (IC) which in turn is substituted either with the O-specific polysaccharide (OPS) or the outer core hexasaccharide (OC), and sometimes also with the enterobacterial common antigen (ECA). The LPS mutants produced truncated LPS, missing OPS, OC or both, or, in addition, different IC constituents or ECA. MBL bound to LA-IC, LA-IC-OPS and LA-IC-ECA but not LA-IC-OC structures. Moreover, LA-IC substitution with both OPS and ECA prevented the lectin binding. Sequential truncation of the IC heptoses demonstrated that the MBL targets the IC heptose region. Furthermore, microbial growth temperature influenced MBL binding; binding was stronger to bacteria grown at room temperature (22°C) than to bacteria grown at 37°C. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that MBL can interact with Y. enterocolitica LPS, however, the in vivo significance of that interaction remains to be elucidated.

  16. Complement in lupus nephritis: the good, the bad, and the unknown.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lihua; Quigg, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    The complement system consists of 3 pathways and more than 30 proteins, including those with biological activity that directly or indirectly mediate the effects of this system, plus a set of regulatory proteins necessary to prevent injudicious complement activation on host tissue. The role for complement in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is paradoxic. On one hand, the complement system appears to have protective features in that hereditary homozygous deficiencies of classic pathway components are associated with an increased risk for SLE. On the other hand, immune complex-mediated activation of complement in affected tissues is clearly evident in both experimental and human SLE along with pathologic features that are logical consequences of complement activation. By using accurate mouse models of SLE, we have gained remarkable insights into pathogenic features likely relevant to the human disease, and the ability to test potential therapies, some of which have made it to standard clinical use. Studies in genetically altered mice and using recombinant protein inhibitors of complement have confirmed what was believed but unproven-early complement proteins C1q and C4 are protective whereas complement activation later in the pathways is proinflammatory and deleterious. Two complement inhibitors, soluble complement receptor 1 (TP10, Avant Immunotherapeutics, Needham, MA) and a monoclonal anti-C5 antibody (Eculizumab, Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cheshire, CT) have been shown to inhibit complement safely and now are being investigated in a variety of clinical conditions. Although these and others earlier in their clinical development hold promise to be used therapeutically in lupus nephritis, this optimism must be tempered by the fact that the clinical trials to prove this remain fraught with obstacles.

  17. [Separation of osteoclasts by lectin affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Itokazu, M; Tan, A; Tanaka, S

    1991-09-01

    Newborn rat calvaria bone cells obtained by digestion were fractionated on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) sepharose 6MB for osteoclast isolation. The initial nonspecific binding cells which were passed through the WGA sepharose column by a buffer acquired a high enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, but not that of acid phosphatase. However, elution of cells using a buffer with the addition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in a high acid phosphatase activity but no alkaline phosphatase activity. The former WGA binding negative fraction enriched osteoblasts averaging 30 microns in size. The latter WGA binding positive fraction enriched osteoclasts ranging from 20 microns to 60 microns in size. The electron-microscope clearly demonstrated the cellular details of osteoclasts. Isolated cell counts showed a ratio of six to four. These results indicate that our method of osteoclast isolation is simple and useful in lectin affinity chromatography because all cells have sugar moieties on their surface and the binding of osteoclasts can be reversed by the addition of specific lectin-binding sugars to the eluting buffer.

  18. Bridging lectin binding sites by multivalent carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Valentin; Pieters, Roland J

    2013-05-21

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions are involved in a multitude of biological recognition processes. Since individual protein-carbohydrate interactions are usually weak, multivalency is often required to achieve biologically relevant binding affinities and selectivities. Among the possible mechanisms responsible for binding enhancement by multivalency, the simultaneous attachment of a multivalent ligand to several binding sites of a multivalent receptor (i.e. chelation) has been proven to have a strong impact. This article summarizes recent examples of chelating lectin ligands of different size. Covered lectins include the Shiga-like toxin, where the shortest distance between binding sites is ca. 9 Å, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (shortest distance between binding sites 13-14 Å), LecA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (shortest distance 26 Å), cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin (shortest distance 31 Å), anti-HIV antibody 2G12 (shortest distance 31 Å), concanavalin A (ConA) (shortest distance 72 Å), RCA120 (shortest distance 100 Å), and Erythrina cristagalli (ECL) (shortest distance 100 Å). While chelating binding of the discussed ligands is likely, experimental proof, for example by X-ray crystallography, is limited to only a few cases.

  19. CD44 Antibody Inhibition of Macrophage Phagocytosis Targets Fcγ Receptor- and Complement Receptor 3-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Amash, Alaa; Wang, Lin; Wang, Yawen; Bhakta, Varsha; Fairn, Gregory D; Hou, Ming; Peng, Jun; Sheffield, William P; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-04-15

    Targeting CD44, a major leukocyte adhesion molecule, using specific Abs has been shown beneficial in several models of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The mechanisms contributing to the anti-inflammatory effects of CD44 Abs, however, remain poorly understood. Phagocytosis is a key component of immune system function and can play a pivotal role in autoimmune states where CD44 Abs have shown to be effective. In this study, we show that the well-known anti-inflammatory CD44 Ab IM7 can inhibit murine macrophage phagocytosis of RBCs. We assessed three selected macrophage phagocytic receptor systems: Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), complement receptor 3 (CR3), and dectin-1. Treatment of macrophages with IM7 resulted in significant inhibition of FcγR-mediated phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized RBCs. The inhibition of FcγR-mediated phagocytosis was at an early stage in the phagocytic process involving both inhibition of the binding of the target RBC to the macrophages and postbinding events. This CD44 Ab also inhibited CR3-mediated phagocytosis of C3bi-opsonized RBCs, but it did not affect the phagocytosis of zymosan particles, known to be mediated by the C-type lectin dectin-1. Other CD44 Abs known to have less broad anti-inflammatory activity, including KM114, KM81, and KM201, did not inhibit FcγR-mediated phagocytosis of RBCs. Taken together, these findings demonstrate selective inhibition of FcγR and CR3-mediated phagocytosis by IM7 and suggest that this broadly anti-inflammatory CD44 Ab inhibits these selected macrophage phagocytic pathways. The understanding of the immune-regulatory effects of CD44 Abs is important in the development and optimization of therapeutic strategies for the potential treatment of autoimmune conditions.

  20. Multivalent 3D Display of Glycopolymer Chains for Enhanced Lectin Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kenneth; Kasko, Andrea M

    2015-08-19

    Synthetic glycoprotein conjugates were synthesized through the polymerization of glycomonomers (mannose and/or galactose acrylate) directly from a protein macroinitiator. This design combines the multivalency of polymer structures with 3D display of saccharides randomly arranged around a central protein structure. The conjugates were tested for their interaction with mannose binding lectin (MBL), a key protein of immune complement. Increasing mannose number (controlled through polymer chain length) and density (controlled through comonomer feed ratio of mannose versus galactose) result in greater interaction with MBL. Most significantly, mannose glycopolymers displayed in a multivalent and 3D configuration from the protein exhibit dramatically enhanced interaction with MBL compared to linear glycopolymer chains with similar total valency but lacking 3D display. These findings demonstrate the importance of the 3D presentation of ligand structures for designing biomimetic materials.

  1. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses. PMID:25165467

  2. Extensive amino acid sequence homologies between animal lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Paroutaud, P.; Levi, G.; Teichberg, V.I.; Strosberg, A.D.

    1987-09-01

    The authors have established the amino acid sequence of the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectin from the electric eel and the sequences of several peptides from a similar lectin isolated from human placenta. These sequences were compared with the published sequences of peptides derived from the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectin from human lung and with sequences deduced from cDNAs assigned to the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectins from chicken embryo skin and human hepatomas. Significant homologies were observed. One of the highly conserved regions that contains a tryptophan residue and two glutamic acid resides is probably part of the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding site, which, on the basis of spectroscopic studies of the electric eel lectin, is expected to contain such residues. The similarity of the hydropathy profiles and the predicted secondary structure of the lectins from chicken skin and electric eel, in spite of differences in their amino acid sequences, strongly suggests that these proteins have maintained structural homologies during evolution and together with the other ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectins were derived form a common ancestor gene.

  3. Cloning and characterization of root-specific barley lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, D.R.; Raikhel, N.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Cereal lectins are a class of biochemically and antigenically related proteins localized in a tissue-specific manner in embryos and adult plants. To study the specificity of lectin expression, a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) embryo cDNa library was constructed and a clone (BLc3) for barley lectin was isolated. BLc3 is 972 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 212 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acid residues followed by a 186 amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide has 95% sequence identity to the antigenically indistinguishable wheat germ agglutinin isolectin-B (WGA-B) suggesting that BLc3 encodes barley lectin. Further evidence that BLc3 encodes barley lectin was obtained by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of BLc3 RNA transcripts and barley embryo poly(A{sup +}) RNA. In situ hybridizations with BLc3 showed that barley lectin gene expression is confined to the outermost cell layers of both embryonic and adult root tips. On Northern blots, BLc3 hybridizes to a 1.0 kilobyte mRNA in poly(A{sup +}) RNA from both embryos and root tips. We suggest, on the basis of immunoblot experiments, that barley lectin is synthesized as a glycosylated precursor and processed by removal of a portion of the carboxyl terminus including the single N-linked glycosylation site.

  4. Use of labeled tomato lectin for imaging vasculature structures.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Levine, Samantha T; Haynes, Sherry M; Gutierrez, Paula; Baratta, Janie L; Tan, Zhiqun; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2015-02-01

    Intravascular injections of fluorescent or biotinylated tomato lectin were tested to study labeling of vascular elements in laboratory mice. Injections of Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (tomato lectin) (50-100 µg/100 µl) were made intravascularly, through the tail vein, through a cannula implanted in the jugular vein, or directly into the left ventricle of the heart. Tissues cut for thin 10- to 12-µm cryostat sections, or thick 50- to 100-µm vibratome sections, were examined using fluorescence microscopy. Tissue labeled by biotinylated lectin was examined by bright field microscopy or electron microscopy after tissue processing for biotin. Intravascular injections of tomato lectin led to labeling of vascular structures in a variety of tissues, including brain, kidney, liver, intestine, spleen, skin, skeletal and cardiac muscle, and experimental tumors. Analyses of fluorescence in serum indicated the lectin was cleared from circulating blood within 2 min. Capillary labeling was apparent in tissues collected from animals within 1 min of intravascular injections, remained robust for about 1 h, and then declined markedly until difficult to detect 12 h after injection. Light microscopic images suggest the lectin bound to the endothelial cells that form capillaries and endothelial cells that line some larger vessels. Electron microscopic studies confirmed the labeling of luminal surfaces of endothelial cells. Vascular labeling by tomato lectin is compatible with a variety of other morphological labeling techniques, including histochemistry and immunocytochemistry, and thus appears to be a sensitive and useful method to reveal vascular patterns in relationship to other aspects of parenchymal development, structure, and function.

  5. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense.

    PubMed

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J M

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses.

  6. Cloning and Characterization of Root-Specific Barley Lectin 1

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, David R.; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1989-01-01

    Cereal lectins are a class of biochemically and antigenically related proteins localized in a tissue-specific manner in embryos and adult plants. To study the specificity of lectin expression, a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) embryo cDNA library was constructed and a clone (BLc3) for barley lectin was isolated. BLc3 is 972 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 212 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acid residues followed by a 186 amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide has 95% sequence identity to the antigenically indistinguishable wheat germ agglutinin isolectin-B (WGA-B) suggesting that BLc3 encodes barley lectin. Further evidence that BLc3 encodes barley lectin was obtained by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of BLc3 RNA transcripts and barley embryo poly(A+) RNA. In situ hybridizations with BLc3 showed that barley lectin gene expression is confined to the outermost cell layers of both embryonic and adult root tips. On Northern blots, BLc3 hybridizes to a 1.0 kilobyte mRNA in poly(A+) RNA from both embryos and root tips. We suggest, on the basis of immunoblot experiments, that barley lectin is synthesized as a glycosylated precursor and processed by removal of a portion of the carboxyl terminus including the single N-linked glycosylation site. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16666982

  7. Purification, some properties of a D-galactose-binding leaf lectin from Erythrina indica and further characterization of seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Konozy, Emadeldin H E; Mulay, Ranjana; Faca, Vitor; Ward, Richard John; Greene, Lewis Joel; Roque-Barriera, Maria Cristina; Sabharwal, Sushma; Bhide, Shobhana V

    2002-10-01

    Lectin from a leaf of Erythrina indica was isolated by affinity chromatography on Lactamyl-Seralose 4B. Lectin gave a single band in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). In SDS-gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions Erythrina indica leaf lectin (EiLL) split into two bands with subunit molecular weights of 30 and 33 kDa, whereas 58 kDa was obtained for the intact lectin by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. EiLL agglutinated all human RBC types, with a slight preference for the O blood group. Lectin was found to be a glycoprotein with a neutral sugar content of 9.5%. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin was directed towards D-galactose and its derivatives with pronounced preference for lactose. EiLL had pH optima at pH 7.0; above and below this pH lectin lost sugar-binding capability rapidly. Lectin showed broad temperature optima from 25 to 50 degrees C; however, at 55 degrees C EiLL lost more than 90% of its activity and at 60 degrees C it was totally inactivated. The pI of EiLL was found to be 7.6. The amino acid analysis of EiLL indicated that the lectin was rich in acidic as well as hydrophobic amino acids and totally lacked cysteine and methionine. The N-terminal amino acids were Val-Glu-Thr-IIe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Glu-Phe-Glu-Ala-Gly-Asn-Asp-X-Leu-Thr-Gln-Glu-Gly-Ala-Ala-Leu-. Chemical modification studies of both EiLL and Erythrina indica seed lectin (EiSL) with phenylglyoxal, DEP and DTNB revealed an absence of arginine, histidine and cysteine, respectively, in or near the ligand-binding site of both lectins. Modification of tyrosine with NAI led to partial inactivation of EiLL and EiSL; however, total inactivation was observed upon NBS-modification of two tryptophan residues in EiSL. Despite the apparent importance of these tryptophan residues for lectin activity they did not seem to have a direct role in binding haptenic sugar as D-galactose did not protect lectin from inactivation by NBS.

  8. Self-assembled carbohydrate-based vesicles for lectin targeting.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Marinalva Cardoso; Micheletto, Yasmine Miguel Serafini; da Silveira, Nadya Pesce; da Silva Pinto, Luciano; Giacomelli, Fernando Carlos; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues; Frizon, Tiago Elias Allievi; Dal-Bó, Alexandre Gonçalves

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the physicochemical interactions between vesicles formed by phosphatidylcholine (PC) and glycosylated polymeric amphiphile N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminyl-PEG900-docosanate (C22PEG900GlcNAc) conjugated with Bauhinia variegata lectin (BVL). Lectins are proteins or glycoproteins capable of binding glycosylated membrane components. Accordingly, the surface functionalization by such entities is considered a potential strategy for targeted drug delivery. We observed increased hydrodynamic radii (RH) of PC+C22PEG900GlcNAc vesicles in the presence of lectins, suggesting that this aggregation was due to the interaction between lectins and the vesicular glycosylated surfaces. Furthermore, changes in the zeta potential of the vesicles with increasing lectin concentrations implied that the vesicular glycosylated surfaces were recognized by the investigated lectin. The presence of carbohydrate residues on vesicle surfaces and the ability of the vesicles to establish specific interactions with BVL were further explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. The results indicated that the thickness of the hydrophilic layer was to some extent influenced by the presence of lectins. The presence of lectins required a higher degree of polydispersity as indicated by the width parameter of the log-normal distribution of size, which also suggested more irregular structures. Reflectance Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis.) analyses revealed that the studied lectin preferentially interacted with the choline and carbonyl groups of the lipid, thereby changing the choline orientation and intermolecular interactions. The protein also discretely reduced the intermolecular communication of the hydrophobic acyl chains, resulting in a disordered state.

  9. Plasma mannose-binding lectin is stimulated by PPARα in humans.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Stienstra, Rinke; de Wit, Nicole J; Bragt, Marjolijn C E; Haluzik, Martin; Mensink, Ronald P; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2012-03-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα) is a major transcriptional regulator of lipid metabolism in liver and represents the molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrate drugs. Effects of PPARα on lipid metabolism are partially mediated by circulating proteins such as FGF21 and ANGPTL4. The present study was undertaken to screen for and identify circulating proteins produced by human liver that are under the control of PPARα. Toward that aim, primary human hepatocytes were treated with the synthetic PPARα agonist Wy-14643 and whole genome expression data selected for secreted proteins. Expression of FGF21, ANGPTL4, and mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a soluble mediator of innate immunity and primary component of the lectin branch of the complement system, was markedly upregulated by Wy-14643 in primary human hepatocytes. Mice express two MBL isomers, Mbl1 and Mbl2. Mbl1 mRNA was weakly induced by Wy-14643 in primary mouse hepatocytes and remained unaltered by Wy-14643 in mouse liver. Mbl2 mRNA was unchanged by Wy-14643 in primary mouse hepatocytes and was strongly reduced by Wy-14643 in mouse liver. Remarkably, plasma Mbl1 levels were increased by chronic PPARα activation in lean and obese mice. Importantly, in two independent clinical trials, treatment with the PPARα agonist fenofibrate at 200 mg/day for 6 wk and 3 mo increased plasma MBL levels by 73 (P = 0.0016) and 86% (P = 0.017), respectively. It is concluded that hepatocyte gene expression and plasma levels of MBL are stimulated by PPARα and fenofibrate in humans, linking PPARα to regulation of innate immunity and complement activation in humans and suggesting a possible role of MBL in lipid metabolism.

  10. Molecular modeling of lectin-like protein from Acacia farnesiana reveals a possible anti-inflammatory mechanism in Carrageenan-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Vanessa Erika Ferreira; Matias da Rocha, Bruno Anderson; Batista da Nóbrega, Raphael; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; Ferreira, Sergio Henrique; Figueiredo, Jozi Godoy; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Delatorre, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    Acacia farnesiana lectin-like protein (AFAL) is a chitin-binding protein and has been classified as phytohaemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA). Legume lectins are examples for structural studies, and this family of proteins shows a remarkable conservation in primary, secondary, and tertiary structures. Lectins have ability to reduce the effects of inflammation caused by phlogistic agents, such as carrageenan (CGN). This paper explains the anti-inflammatory activity of AFAL through structural comparison with anti-inflammatory legume lectins. The AFAL model was obtained by molecular modeling and molecular docking with glycan and carrageenan were performed to explain the AFAL structural behavior and biological activity. Pisum sativum lectin was the best template for molecular modeling. The AFAL structure model is folded as a β sandwich. The model differs from template in loop regions, number of β strands and carbohydrate-binding site. Carrageenan and glycan bind to different sites on AFAL. The ability of AFAL binding to carrageenan can be explained by absence of the sixth β -strand (posterior β sheets) and two β strands in frontal region. AFAL can inhibit pathway inflammatory process by carrageenan injection by connecting to it and preventing its entry into the cell and triggers the reaction.

  11. Molecular Modeling of Lectin-Like Protein from Acacia farnesiana Reveals a Possible Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism in Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Abrantes, Vanessa Erika Ferreira; Matias da Rocha, Bruno Anderson; Batista da Nóbrega, Raphael; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; Ferreira, Sergio Henrique; Figueiredo, Jozi Godoy; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Delatorre, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    Acacia farnesiana lectin-like protein (AFAL) is a chitin-binding protein and has been classified as phytohaemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA). Legume lectins are examples for structural studies, and this family of proteins shows a remarkable conservation in primary, secondary, and tertiary structures. Lectins have ability to reduce the effects of inflammation caused by phlogistic agents, such as carrageenan (CGN). This paper explains the anti-inflammatory activity of AFAL through structural comparison with anti-inflammatory legume lectins. The AFAL model was obtained by molecular modeling and molecular docking with glycan and carrageenan were performed to explain the AFAL structural behavior and biological activity. Pisum sativum lectin was the best template for molecular modeling. The AFAL structure model is folded as a β sandwich. The model differs from template in loop regions, number of β strands and carbohydrate-binding site. Carrageenan and glycan bind to different sites on AFAL. The ability of AFAL binding to carrageenan can be explained by absence of the sixth β-strand (posterior β sheets) and two β strands in frontal region. AFAL can inhibit pathway inflammatory process by carrageenan injection by connecting to it and preventing its entry into the cell and triggers the reaction. PMID:24490151

  12. Upregulation of glycans containing 3' fucose in a subset of pancreatic cancers uncovered using fusion-tagged lectins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhir; Pal, Kuntal; Yadav, Jessica; Tang, Huiyuan; Partyka, Katie; Kletter, Doron; Hsueh, Peter; Ensink, Elliot; Kc, Birendra; Hostetter, Galen; Xu, H Eric; Bern, Marshall; Smith, David F; Mehta, Anand S; Brand, Randall; Melcher, Karsten; Haab, Brian B

    2015-06-05

    The fucose post-translational modification is frequently increased in pancreatic cancer, thus forming the basis for promising biomarkers, but a subset of pancreatic cancer patients does not elevate the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We hypothesized that such patients elevate glycan motifs with fucose in linkages and contexts different from the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We used a database of glycan array data to identify the lectins CCL2 to detect glycan motifs with fucose in a 3' linkage; CGL2 for motifs with fucose in a 2' linkage; and RSL for fucose in all linkages. We used several practical methods to test the lectins and determine the optimal mode of detection, and we then tested whether the lectins detected glycans in pancreatic cancer patients who did not elevate the sialyl-Lewis A glycan, which is upregulated in ∼75% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Patients who did not upregulate sialyl-Lewis A, which contains fucose in a 4' linkage, tended to upregulate fucose in a 3' linkage, as detected by CCL2, but they did not upregulate total fucose or fucose in a 2' linkage. CCL2 binding was high in cancerous epithelia from pancreatic tumors, including areas negative for sialyl-Lewis A and a related motif containing 3' fucose, sialyl-Lewis X. Thus, glycans containing 3' fucose may complement sialyl-Lewis A to contribute to improved detection of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the use of panels of recombinant lectins may uncover details about glycosylation that could be important for characterizing and detecting cancer.

  13. Upregulation of Glycans Containing 3’ Fucose in a Subset of Pancreatic Cancers Uncovered Using Fusion-Tagged Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhir; Pal, Kuntal; Yadav, Jessica; Tang, Huiyuan; Partyka, Katie; Kletter, Doron; Hsueh, Peter; Ensink, Elliot; Birendra, KC; Hostetter, Galen; Xu, H. Eric; Bern, Marshall; Smith, David F.; Mehta, Anand S.; Brand, Randall; Melcher, Karsten; Haab, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    The fucose post-translational modification is frequently increased in pancreatic cancer, thus forming the basis for promising biomarkers, but a subset of pancreatic cancer patients does not elevate the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We hypothesized that such patients elevate glycan motifs with fucose in linkages and contexts different from the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We used a database of glycan array data to identify the lectins CCL2 to detect glycan motifs with fucose in a 3’ linkage; CGL2 for motifs with fucose in a 2’ linkage; and RSL for fucose in all linkages. We used several practical methods to test the lectins and determine the optimal mode of detection, and we then tested whether the lectins detected glycans in pancreatic cancer patients who did not elevate the sialyl-Lewis A glycan, which is upregulated in ~75% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Patients who did not upregulate sialyl-Lewis A, which contains fucose in a 4’ linkage, tended to upregulate fucose in a 3’ linkage, as detected by CCL2, but they did not upregulate total fucose or fucose in a 2’ linkage. CCL2 binding was high in cancerous epithelia from pancreatic tumors, including areas negative for sialyl-Lewis A and a related motif containing 3’ fucose, sialyl-Lewis X. Thus glycans containing 3’ fucose may complement sialyl-Lewis A to contribute to improved detection of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the use of panels of recombinant lectins may uncover details about glycosylation that could be important for characterizing and detecting cancer. PMID:25938165

  14. In vivo biosynthetic studies of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J.M.; Etzler, M.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The in vivo biosynthesis of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin was studied by pulse-chase labeling experiments using ({sup 35}S)methionine and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine. These studies demonstrate that each of the two mature lectin subunit types are derived by the processing of separate glycosylated precursors. The appearance of the precursor to subunit I before the precursor to subunit II supports the possibility raised by previous studies that both subunit types of this lectin may originate from a single gene product.

  15. Gain-of-function mutations in complement factor B are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Jorge, Elena Goicoechea; Harris, Claire L.; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Carreras, Luis; Arranz, Elena Aller; Garrido, Cynthia Abarrategui; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B. Paul; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an important cause of acute renal failure in children. Mutations in one or more genes encoding complement-regulatory proteins have been reported in approximately one-third of nondiarrheal, atypical HUS (aHUS) patients, suggesting a defect in the protection of cell surfaces against complement activation in susceptible individuals. Here, we identified a subgroup of aHUS patients showing persistent activation of the complement alternative pathway and found within this subgroup two families with mutations in the gene encoding factor B (BF), a zymogen that carries the catalytic site of the complement alternative pathway convertase (C3bBb). Functional analyses demonstrated that F286L and K323E aHUS-associated BF mutations are gain-of-function mutations that result in enhanced formation of the C3bBb convertase or increased resistance to inactivation by complement regulators. These data expand our understanding of the genetic factors conferring predisposition to aHUS, demonstrate the critical role of the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of aHUS, and provide support for the use of complement-inhibition therapies to prevent or reduce tissue damage caused by dysregulated complement activation. PMID:17182750

  16. A Lactose-Binding Lectin from the Marine Sponge Cinachyrella Apion (Cal) Induces Cell Death in Human Cervical Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Luciana; Monteiro, Norberto; Serquiz, Raphael; Santos, Paula; Oliveira, Ruth; Oliveira, Adeliana; Rocha, Hugo; Morais, Ana Heloneida; Uchoa, Adriana; Santos, Elizeu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer represents a set of more than 100 diseases, including malignant tumors from different locations. Strategies inducing differentiation have had limited success in the treatment of established cancers. Marine sponges are a biological reservoir of bioactive molecules, especially lectins. Several animal and plant lectins were purified with antitumor activity, mitogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral, but there are few reports in the literature describing the mechanism of action of lectins purified from marine sponges to induce apoptosis in human tumor cells. In this work, a lectin purified from the marine sponge Cinachyrella apion (CaL) was evaluated with respect to its hemolytic, cytotoxic and antiproliferative properties, besides the ability to induce cell death in tumor cells. The antiproliferative activity of CaL was tested against HeLa, PC3 and 3T3 cell lines, with highest growth inhibition for HeLa, reducing cell growth at a dose dependent manner (0.5–10 µg/mL). Hemolytic activity and toxicity against peripheral blood cells were tested using the concentration of IC50 (10 µg/mL) for both trials and twice the IC50 for analysis in flow cytometry, indicating that CaL is not toxic to these cells. To assess the mechanism of cell death caused by CaL in HeLa cells, we performed flow cytometry and western blotting. Results showed that lectin probably induces cell death by apoptosis activation by pro-apoptotic protein Bax, promoting mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, cell cycle arrest in S phase and acting as both dependent and/or independent of caspases pathway. These results indicate the potential of CaL in studies of medicine for treating cancer. PMID:22690140

  17. Complement activation and effect of eculizumab in scleroderma renal crisis

    PubMed Central

    Devresse, Arnaud; Aydin, Selda; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Demoulin, Nathalie; Stordeur, Patrick; Lambert, Catherine; Gastoldi, Sara; Pirson, Yves; Jadoul, Michel; Morelle, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a life-threatening complication of systemic sclerosis characterized by abrupt onset of hypertension, thrombotic microangiopathy, and kidney injury. The mechanisms of the disease remain ill-defined, but a growing body of evidence suggests that activation of the complement system may be involved. Methods: Here, we report the case of a patient presenting with severe SRC and strong evidence of complement activation, both in serum and in the kidney, in the absence of genetic defect of the complement system. Results: Immunofluorescence studies on kidney biopsy showed significant deposits of C1q and C4d in the endothelium of renal arterioles, pointing toward activation of the classical pathway. Because of the dramatic clinical and histological severity, and the lack of response to early treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers and plasma exchange, the patient was treated with the specific C5 blocker eculizumab. Contrarily to conventional treatment, eculizumab efficiently blocked C5b-9 deposition ex vivo and maintained hematological remission. Unfortunately, the patient died from heart failure a few weeks later. Postmortem examination of the heart showed diffuse patchy interstitial fibrosis, the typical lesion of systemic sclerosis-related cardiomyopathy, but normal coronary arteries and myocardial microvasculature. Conclusion: SRC may lead to complement system activation through the classical pathway. Early administration of C5 inhibitor eculizumab may have therapeutic potential in patients with life-threatening SRC refractory to conventional treatment using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. PMID:27472742

  18. Hydroxyl radical scavengers inhibit human lectin-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Melinn, M; McLaughlin, H

    1986-06-01

    The role of oxygen-derived free radicals (ODFR) in lectin-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (LDCC) in humans was investigated. The hydroxyl radical traps thiourea, methanol, ethanol and phenol were effective in inhibiting LDCC, as was DABCO, a singlet oxygen quencher. The proposed pathway of hydroxyl radical production in living cells is either an iron catalysed Haber-Weiss reaction or a Fenton reaction. The effect of inhibitors of these pathways was investigated. The superoxide anion scavengers superoxide dismutase, ferricytochrome c and Tiron were without effect. It was shown that Tiron inhibits the lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence produced by the action of xanthine oxidase, and also the lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence produced by activated PMN, suggesting that this agent (Tiron) scavenges intracellular superoxide anion. Catalase gave slight inhibition of LDCC only. The ferric iron chelator desferrioxamine gave no protection of the target cells, while the ferrous chelator, 1,10-phenanthroline, inhibited LDCC and partially prevented the detection of hydroxyl radicals generated by the Fe2+-H2O2 system. Cibacron blue, an agent that inhibits NAD(P)H linked enzymes, also inhibited LDCC. The cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors indomethacin and salicylate were without effect, while the lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibited cytolysis. None of the LDCC inhibitors was cytotoxic to the effector cells or to the target cells, neither did they inhibit lymphocyte-target binding. The findings would suggest that hydroxyl radicals have a role to play in human T-cell mediated cytolysis, either as the active lytic agent or as an epiphenomenon.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 8 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord (meningitis). Although meningitis can be life-threatening, individuals with complement component ... leaves affected individuals prone to recurrent episodes of meningitis. Learn more about the genes associated with complement ...

  20. Complement fixation test to C. burnetii

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003520.htm Complement fixation test to C burnetii To use the sharing features on this ... JavaScript. The complement fixation test to Coxiella burnetii ( C burnetti ) is a blood test that checks for ...

  1. An Integrated Theory of Complement Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sag, Ivan A.; Pollard, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Presents an integrated theory of the syntactic and semantic representation of complements where the unexpressed subjects of the embedded verb-phrase complement are subject to certain interpretation restrictions. It is argued that the grammar of English controlled complements can be derived from the interaction of semantically based principles of…

  2. Specific interaction of lectins with liposomes and monolayers bearing neoglycolipids.

    PubMed

    Faivre, Vincent; Costa, Maria de Lourdes; Boullanger, Paul; Baszkin, Adam; Rosilio, Véronique

    2003-10-01

    The interaction of three lectins (wheat germ, Ulex europaeus I, and Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinins: WGA, UEA-I and LTA) with either N-acetyl-D-glucosamine or L-fucose neoglycolipids incorporated into phospholipid monolayers and liposome bilayers was studied at the air/water interface and in bulk solution. The results show that for both systems studied, synthesized neoglycolipids were capable of binding their specific lectin and that, in general, the binding of lectins increased with the increase in the molar fraction of the saccharide derivative incorporated in either the monolayers or bilayers. However, whereas for UEA-I, molecular recognition was enhanced by a strong hydrophobic interaction, for WGA and LTA successful recognition was predominantly related to the distance between neighboring sugar groups. The observed lengthy adsorption times of these lectins onto their specific ligands were attributed to interfacial conformational changes occurring in the proteins upon their adsorption at the interfaces.

  3. Molecular cloning of mannose-binding lectins from Clivia miniata.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-03-01

    Screening of a cDNA library constructed from total RNA isolated from young developing ovaries of Clivia miniata Regel with the amaryllis lectin cDNA clone resulted in the isolation of four different isolectin clones which clearly differ from each other in their nucleotide sequences and hence also in their deduced amino acid sequences. Apparently the lectin is translated from an mRNA of ca. 800 nucleotides encoding a precursor polypeptide of 163 amino acids. Northern blot analysis of total RNA isolated from different tissues of Clivia miniata has shown that the lectin is expressed in most plant tissues with very high lectin mRNA concentrations in the ovary and the seed endosperm.

  4. Effect of plant lectins on Ustilago maydis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Santiago, A P; Saavedra, E; Pérez Campos, E; Córdoba, F

    2000-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is an edible parasitic basidiomycete, which specifically infects corn (Zea mays) and teocintle (Z. diploperennis). To characterise the interaction between the basidiomycete and its host organism, we tested the effect of plant lectins with well-known sugar specificity on the growth and germination of U. maydis spores. Lectins specific for N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, such as those from Dolichos biflorus and Phaseolus lunatus, and the wheatgerm agglutinin specific for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine inhibited spore germination, but were ineffective in modifying U. maydis cell growth. The galactose-specific lectin from the corn coleoptyle inhibited both germination and cell growth, while the lectin concanavalin A (mannose/glucose specific) activated spore germination and growth. Our results suggest that specific saccharide-containing receptors participate in regulating the growth and maturation of U. maydis spores.

  5. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  6. An alternate high yielding purification method for Clitoria ternatea lectin.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Ahmad, Ejaz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-10-01

    In our previous publication we had reported the purification and characterization of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin from its seeds on fetuin CL agarose affinity column, designated CTA [A. Naeem, S. Haque, R.H. Khan. Protein J., 2007]. Since CTA binds beta-d-galactosides, this lectin can be used as valuable tool for glycobiology studies in biomedical and cancer research. So an attempt was made for a high yielding alternative purification method employing the use of asialofetuin CL agarose column for the above-mentioned lectin, designated CTL. The fetuin affinity purified agglutinin was found similar to asialofetuin affinity purified lectin in SDS pattern, HPLC and N-terminal sequence. The content of lectin was found to be 30mg/30g dry weight of pulse. The yield was 2.8% as compared to 0.3% obtained on fetuin column. The number of tryptophan and tyrosine estimated was four and six per subunit.

  7. On the Functional Overlap between Complement and Anti-Microbial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jana; Hobkirk, James; Mohamed, Fatima; Browning, Michael J.; Stover, Cordula M.

    2015-01-01

    Intriguingly, activated complement and anti-microbial peptides share certain functionalities; lytic, phagocytic, and chemo-attractant activities and each may, in addition, exert cell instructive roles. Each has been shown to have distinct LPS detoxifying activity and may play a role in the development of endotoxin tolerance. In search of the origin of complement, a functional homolog of complement C3 involved in opsonization has been identified in horseshoe crabs. Horseshoe crabs possess anti-microbial peptides able to bind to acyl chains or phosphate groups/saccharides of endotoxin, LPS. Complement activity as a whole is detectable in marine invertebrates. These are also a source of anti-microbial peptides with potential pharmaceutical applicability. Investigating the locality for the production of complement pathway proteins and their role in modulating cellular immune responses are emerging fields. The significance of local synthesis of complement components is becoming clearer from in vivo studies of parenchymatous disease involving specifically generated, complement-deficient mouse lines. Complement C3 is a central component of complement activation. Its provision by cells of the myeloid lineage varies. Their effector functions in turn are increased in the presence of anti-microbial peptides. This may point to a potentiating range of activities, which should serve the maintenance of health but may also cause disease. Because of the therapeutic implications, this review will consider closely studies dealing with complement activation and anti-microbial peptide activity in acute inflammation (e.g., dialysis-related peritonitis, appendicitis, and ischemia). PMID:25646095

  8. A pathogenic role of complement in arterial hypertension and hypertensive end organ damage.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Ulrich O; Bode, Marlies; Köhl, Jörg; Ehmke, Heimo

    2017-03-01

    The self-amplifying cascade of messenger and effector molecules of the complement system serves as a powerful danger-sensing system that protects the host from a hostile microbial environment, while maintaining proper tissue and organ function through effective clearance of altered or dying cells. As an important effector arm of innate immunity, it also plays important roles in the regulation of adaptive immunity. Innate and adaptive immune responses have been identified as crucial players in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension and hypertensive end organ damage. In line with this view, complement activation may drive the pathology of hypertension and hypertensive injury through its impact on innate and adaptive immune responses. It is well known that complement activation can cause tissue inflammation and injury and complement-inhibitory drugs are effective treatments for several inflammatory diseases. In addition to these proinflammatory properties, complement cleavage fragments of C3 and C5 can exert anti-inflammatory effects that dampen the inflammatory response to injury. Recent experimental data strongly support a role for complement in arterial hypertension. The remarkably similar clinical and histopathological features of malignant nephrosclerosis and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is driven by complement activation, suggest a role for complement also in the development of malignant nephrosclerosis. Herein, we will review canonical and noncanonical pathways of complement activation as the framework to understand the multiple roles of complement in arterial hypertension and hypertensive end organ damage.

  9. Development and Distribution of Dolichos biflorus Lectin as Measured by Radioimmunoassay 1

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Craig F.; Etzler, Marilynn E.

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay, capable of detecting the Dolichos biflorus lectin at concentrations as low as 400 ng/ml, was developed and used to follow the distribution of this lectin in the plant during its life cycle. The lectin was first detected in the seeds of the plant 27 days after flowering and rapidly attained the high level of lectin present in the mature seed. The lectin content of the plant is highest in the seeds and cotyledons and decreases as the storage materials of the cotyledons decrease. A low but measurable amount of material that reacts with antibodies to the seed lectin was detected in the leaves, stems, and pods of the plant. This material gives a precipitin band of only partial identity to the seed lectin when tested in immunodiffusion against antiserum to the seed lectin. No lectin was detected by the radioimmunoassay in the roots of the plant at any stage of development. ImagesFIG. 4 PMID:16660399

  10. A Lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with Midgut Surface of Lutzomyia migonei, Unlike Its Homologues, Cratylia floribunda Lectin and Canavalia gladiata Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania. PMID:25431778

  11. Interactions between Rhizobia and Lectins of Lentil, Pea, Broad Bean, and Jackbean 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peter P.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative method was developed to measure the binding of fluorescent-labeled lentil (Lens esculenta Moench), pea (Pisum sativum L.), broad bean (Vicia faba L.), and jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis L., DC.) lectins to various Rhizobium strains. Lentil lectin bound to three of the five Rhizobium leguminosarum strains tested. The number of lentil lectin molecules bound per R. leguminosarum 128C53 cell was 2.1 × 104. Lentil lectin also bound to R. japonicum 61A133. Pea and broad bean lectins bound to only two of the five strains of R. leguminosarum, whereas concanavalin A (jackbean lectin) bound to all strains of R. leguminosarum, R. phaseoli, R. japonicum, and R. sp. tested. Since these four lectins have similar sugarbinding properties but different physical properties, the variation in bindings of these lectins to various Rhizobium strains indicates that binding of lectin to Rhizobium is determined not only by the sugar specificity of the lectin but also by its physical characteristics. The binding of lentil lectin and concanavalin A to R. leguminosarum 128C53 could be inhibited by glucose, fructose, and mannose. However, even at 150 millimolar glucose, about 15% of the binding remained. The binding of lentil lectin to R. japonicum 61A133 could be inhibited by glucose but not by galactose. It is concluded that the binding site of lentil lectin to R. japonicum is different from the binding site of soybean lectin to R. japonicum. PMID:16661328

  12. Complement-activated oligodendroglia: a new pathogenic entity identified by immunostaining with antibodies to human complement proteins C3d and C4d.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Akiyama, H; McGeer, P L

    1990-05-04

    Clusters of oligodendroglial fibers were identified immunohistochemically in human brain tissue with antibodies to the complement proteins C3d and C4d in several neurological disorders. These included Pick's, Huntington's, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, progressive supranuclear palsy and Shy-Drager syndrome. These complement-activated oligodendroglia occurred in selected areas of gray and white matter. They were rarely observed in control tissue. Immunogold electron microscopy established that the C4d antibody was attached to degenerating myelin sheaths. These data indicate attachment of classical complement pathway proteins to selective oligodendroglia in several neurological disorders.

  13. A lectin with some unique characteristics from the samta tomato.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Ng, T B

    2006-04-01

    A lectin, with a molecular mass of 79 kDa, and with specificity toward rhamnose and O-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, was isolated from samta tomato fruits. The procedure entailed ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The lectin was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose but adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and CM-cellulose. The lectin was stable up to 70 degrees C. The lectin activity was potentiated by NaOH solutions (25-100 mM), but was reduced by 50 and 100 mM HCl solutions. The activity of the lectin was reduced in the presence of CaCl(2), MgCl(2) and ZnCl(2), but was potentiated by 5 and 10 mM AlCl(3) solutions. The lectin stimulated the mitogenic response in mouse splenocytes and inhibited human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 6.2 microM.

  14. The Semantics of Complementation in English: A Cognitive Semantic Account of Two English Complement Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Studies on complementation in English and other languages have traditionally focused on syntactic issues, most notably on the constituent structures of different complement types. As a result, they have neglected the role of meaning in the choice of different complements. This paper investigates the semantics of complementation within the…

  15. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  16. The role of complement in CD4⁺ T cell homeostasis and effector functions.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaëlle; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-02-01

    The complement system is among the evolutionary oldest 'players' of the immune system. It was discovered in 1896 by Jules Bordet as a heat-labile fraction of the serum responsible for the opsonisation and subsequent killing of bacteria. The decades between the 1920s and 1990s then marked the discovery and biochemical characterization of the proteins comprising the complement system. Today, complement is defined as a complex system consisting of more than 30 membrane-bound and soluble plasma proteins, which are activated in a cascade-like manner, very similarly to the caspase proteases and blood coagulation systems. Complement is engrained in the immunologist's mind as a serum-effective, quintessential part of innate immunity, vitally required for the detection and removal of pathogens or other dangerous entities. Three decades ago, this rather confined definition was challenged and then refined when it was shown that complement participates vitally in the induction and regulation of B cell responses, thus adaptive immunity. Similarly, research work published in more recent years supports an equally important role for the complement system in shaping T cell responses. Today, we are again facing paradigm shifts in the field: complement is actively involved in the negative control of T cell effector immune responses, and thus, by definition in immune homeostasis. Further, while serum complement activity is without doubt fundamental in the defence against invading pathogens, local immune cell-derived production of complement emerges as key mediator of complement's impact on adaptive immune responses. And finally, the impact of complement on metabolic pathways and the crosstalk between complement and other immune effector systems is likely more extensive than previously anticipated and is fertile ground for future discoveries. In this review, we will discuss these emerging new roles of complement, with a focus on Th1 cell biology.

  17. Utilization of lectin-histochemistry in forensic neuropathology: lectin staining provides useful information for postmortem diagnosis in forensic neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Katsuji; Tanegashima, Akio; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Ushiyama, Ikuko; Ikemoto, Keiko; Yamasaki, Shigeru; Nishimura, Akiyoshi; Rand, Steven; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2003-09-01

    We have investigated the deposition of glycoconjugates in human brain tissue with or without brain disorders. In this review we describe the application of lectin-histochemistry techniques to forensic neuropathology. Lectin staining is able to reveal several kinds of carbohydrate-related depositions in addition to the conventional degenerative changes including senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and corpora amylacea. The senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles were clearly stained by Con A, PSA and GSI lectins, the corpora amylacea which is relevant to repeated brain hypoxia and mitochondrial damage was also easily detected by these and many other kinds of lectins. Amorphous spaces were detected around blood vessels and independently from blood vessels by lectin staining in the white matter from patients with brain disorders or severe edema. The white matter lesions were not considered relevant for forensic pathology, until a large group of cerebral white matter lesions were detected in the elderly with increasing frequency by modern neuro-imaging methods. The spherical deposits were newly detected by lectin staining in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation chiefly from patients with schizophrenia or cognitive dysfunctions.

  18. Heterologous carotenoid-biosynthetic enzymes: functional complementation and effects on carotenoid profiles in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Song, Gyu Hyeon; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Choi, Bo Hyun; Han, Se Jong; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2013-01-01

    A limited number of carotenoid pathway genes from microbial sources have been studied for analyzing the pathway complementation in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. In order to systematically investigate the functionality of carotenoid pathway enzymes in E. coli, the pathway genes of carotenogenic microorganisms (Brevibacterium linens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, Rhodopirellula baltica, and Pantoea ananatis) were modified to form synthetic expression modules and then were complemented with Pantoea agglomerans pathway enzymes (CrtE, CrtB, CrtI, CrtY, and CrtZ). The carotenogenic pathway enzymes in the synthetic modules showed unusual activities when complemented with E. coli. For example, the expression of heterologous CrtEs of B. linens, C. glutamicum, and R. baltica influenced P. agglomerans CrtI to convert its substrate phytoene into a rare product-3,4,3',4'-tetradehydrolycopene-along with lycopene, which was an expected product, indicating that CrtE, the first enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, can influence carotenoid profiles. In addition, CrtIs of R. sphaeroides and R. capsulatus converted phytoene into an unusual lycopene as well as into neurosporene. Thus, this study shows that the functional complementation of pathway enzymes from different sources is a useful methodology for diversifying biosynthesis as nature does.

  19. Heterologous Carotenoid-Biosynthetic Enzymes: Functional Complementation and Effects on Carotenoid Profiles in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyu Hyeon; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Choi, Bo Hyun; Han, Se Jong

    2013-01-01

    A limited number of carotenoid pathway genes from microbial sources have been studied for analyzing the pathway complementation in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. In order to systematically investigate the functionality of carotenoid pathway enzymes in E. coli, the pathway genes of carotenogenic microorganisms (Brevibacterium linens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, Rhodopirellula baltica, and Pantoea ananatis) were modified to form synthetic expression modules and then were complemented with Pantoea agglomerans pathway enzymes (CrtE, CrtB, CrtI, CrtY, and CrtZ). The carotenogenic pathway enzymes in the synthetic modules showed unusual activities when complemented with E. coli. For example, the expression of heterologous CrtEs of B. linens, C. glutamicum, and R. baltica influenced P. agglomerans CrtI to convert its substrate phytoene into a rare product—3,4,3′,4′-tetradehydrolycopene—along with lycopene, which was an expected product, indicating that CrtE, the first enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, can influence carotenoid profiles. In addition, CrtIs of R. sphaeroides and R. capsulatus converted phytoene into an unusual lycopene as well as into neurosporene. Thus, this study shows that the functional complementation of pathway enzymes from different sources is a useful methodology for diversifying biosynthesis as nature does. PMID:23144136

  20. Complement Factor H Binds to Human Serum Apolipoprotein E and Mediates Complement Regulation on High Density Lipoprotein Particles.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Karita; van Kessel, Kok; Nissilä, Eija; Metso, Jari; Johansson, Tiira; Miettinen, Sini; Varjosalo, Markku; Kirveskari, Juha; Kuusela, Pentti; Chroni, Angelika; Jauhiainen, Matti; van Strijp, Jos; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2015-11-27

    The alternative pathway of complement is an important part of the innate immunity response against foreign particles invading the human body. To avoid damage to host cells, it needs to be efficiently down-regulated by plasma factor H (FH) as exemplified by various diseases caused by mutations in its domains 19-20 (FH19-20) and 5-7 (FH5-7). These regions are also the main interaction sites for microbial pathogens that bind host FH to evade complement attack. We previously showed that inhibition of FH binding by a recombinant FH5-7 construct impairs survival of FH binding pathogens in human blood. In this study we found that upon exposure to full blood, the addition of FH5-7 reduces survival of, surprisingly, also those microbes that are not able to bind FH. This effect was mediated by inhibition of complement regulation and subsequently enhanced neutrophil phagocytosis by FH5-7. We found that although FH5-7 does not reduce complement regulation in the actual fluid phase of plasma, it reduces regulation on HDL particles in plasma. Using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry we revealed that FH interacts with serum apolipoprotein E (apoE) via FH5-7 domains. Furthermore, binding of FH5-7 to HDL was dependent on the concentration of apoE on the HDL particles. These findings explain why the addition of FH5-7 to plasma leads to excessive complement activation and phagocytosis of microbes in full anticoagulated blood. In conclusion, our data show how FH interacts with apoE molecules via domains 5-7 and regulates alternative pathway activation on plasma HDL particles.

  1. Differential Expression of Complement Markers in Normal and AMD Transmitochondrial Cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Nashine, Sonali; Chwa, Marilyn; Kazemian, Mina; Thaker, Kunal; Lu, Stephanie; Nesburn, Anthony; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Kenney, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Variations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and abnormalities in the complement pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study was designed to determine the effects of mtDNA from AMD subjects on the complement pathway. Methods Transmitochondrial cybrids were prepared by fusing platelets from AMD and age-matched Normal subjects with Rho0 (lacking mtDNA) human ARPE-19 cells. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting were performed to examine gene and protein expression profiles, respectively, of complement markers in these cybrids. Bioenergetic profiles of Normal and AMD cybrids were examined using the Seahorse XF24 flux analyzer. Results Significant decreases in the gene and protein expression of complement inhibitors, along with significantly higher levels of complement activators, were found in AMD cybrids compared to Older-Normal cybrids. Seahorse flux data demonstrated that the bioenergetic profiles for Older-Normal and Older-AMD cybrid samples were similar to each other but were lower compared to Young-Normal cybrid samples. Conclusion In summary, since all cybrids had identical nuclei and differed only in mtDNA content, the observed changes in components of complement pathways can be attributed to mtDNA variations in the AMD subjects, suggesting that mitochondrial genome and retrograde signaling play critical roles in this disease. Furthermore, the similar bioenergetic profiles of AMD and Older-Normal cybrids indicate that the signaling between mitochondria and nuclei are probably not via a respiratory pathway. PMID:27486856

  2. Microbe-specific C3b deposition in the horseshoe crab complement system in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Toyoki; Shibata, Toshio; Kitazaki, Kazuki; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens in the mammalian complement system, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. To understand the molecular mechanism of C3b deposition on microbes, we characterized two types of C2/factor B homologs (designated TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2) identified from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Although the domain architectures of TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were identical to those of mammalian homologs, they contained five-repeated and seven-repeated complement control protein domains at their N-terminal regions, respectively. TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were synthesized and glycosylated in hemocytes and secreted to hemolymph plasma, which existed in a complex with C3 (TtC3), and their activation by microbes was absolutely Mg(2+)-dependent. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TtC3b deposition was Mg(2+)-dependent on Gram-positive bacteria or fungi, but not on Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this analysis demonstrated that Ca(2+)-dependent lectins (C-reactive protein-1 and tachylectin-5A) were required for TtC3b deposition on Gram-positive bacteria, and that a Ca(2+)-independent lectin (Tachypleus plasma lectin-1) was definitely indispensable for TtC3b deposition on fungi. In contrast, a horseshoe crab lipopolysaccharide-sensitive protease factor C was necessary and sufficient to deposit TtC3b on Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that plasma lectins and factor C play key roles in microbe-specific TtC3b deposition in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

  3. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  4. Cercarial glycocalyx of Schistosoma mansoni activates human complement.

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, J C; Caulfield, J P

    1986-01-01

    Human complement activation by cercariae and schistosomula of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni was studied in vitro. Cercariae are composed of tails which are shed after infection of the host and bodies which transform into the larvae or schistosomula after infection. After incubation in fresh normal human serum (NHS), cercarial tails bound more anti-C3 antibodies than did cercarial bodies (CB), and the tails were rapidly lysed, while the attached CB remained intact. Complement activation by cercariae was dependent on the alternative pathway but was independent of antibody, as shown by C3 deposition by hypogammaglobulinemic human sera. By transmission microscopy, the fibrillar glycocalyx on both CB and tails was stained by NHS but not by heat-inactivated serum (HI-NHS). The glycocalyx was labeled with periodate and tritiated borohydride, and parasites were incubated in NHS and HI-NHS. After solubilization, the labeled glycocalyx on organisms incubated in NHS but not HI-NHS bound anti-C3 antibodies. Of the CB incubated with eserine sulfate to prevent transformation, 78% +/- 10% were dead after culture for 24 h in NHS. In contrast, 21% +/- 12% of the CB were dead after culture in HI-NHS. Schistosomula incubated in NHS bound 37% of the amount of anti-C3 antibodies bound by cercariae but were not killed by NHS. In conclusion, the cercarial glycocalyx activated human complement, and schistosomula were less susceptible to killing than cercariae because they had less glycocalyx and activated less complement. Images PMID:3940995

  5. Detection of surface bound complement at increasing serum anticoagulant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, S; Askendal, A; Lindahl, T L; Tengvall, P

    2008-04-01

    Surface mediated immune complement activation can be detected by a variety of antibody utilizing methods such as ELISA, fluorescence- or radiolabelling techniques, QCM, and ellipsometry. In the present work we investigated how the common anticoagulants heparin, dalteparin, fondaparinux and sodium citrate affected the binding of anti-complement factor 3c (anti-C3c) on a model complement activator surface, immobilised IgG, after incubation in human blood serum. The results show, as expected, that different anticoagulants affect the antibody binding differently. Increasing amounts of heparin, dalteparin and sodium citrate in normal serum resulted in a decreasing anti-C3c binding. The antibody deposition was not sensitive for the fondaparinux concentration. Surprisingly high concentrations of anti-coagulantia were needed to completely eradicate the antibody binding. Experiments in EGTA-serum showed that anticoagulants interfered directly with both the classical and alternative pathways. Control C3a-des arg ELISA measurements show that the lowered antibody surface binding was not a result of complement depletion in serum. Kallikrein generation by hydrophilic glass surfaces was not affected by high anticoagulant concentrations.

  6. Lectin-like molecules in transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Gorbushin, Alexander M; Borisova, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    The common periwinkle Littorina littorea was introduced in the list of models for comparative immunobiology as a representative of phylogenetically important taxon Caenogastropoda. Using Illumina sequencing technology, we de novo assembled the transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes from 182 million mRNA-Seq pair-end 100 bp reads into a total of 15,526 contigs clustered in 4472 unigenes. The transcriptome profile was analyzed for presence of carbohydrate-binding molecules in a variety of architectural contexts. Hemocytes' repertoire of lectin-like proteins bearing conserved carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) is highly diversified, including 11 of 15 lectin families earlier described in animals, as well as the novel members of lectin family found for the first time in mollusc species. The new molluscan lineage-specific domain combinations were confirmed by cloning and sequencing, including the fuco-lectin related molecules (FLReMs) composed of N-terminal region with no sequence homology to any known protein, a middle Fucolectin Tachylectin-4 Pentaxrin (FTP) domain, and a C-terminal epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat region. The repertoire of lectin-like molecules is discussed in terms of their potential participation in the receptor phase of immune response. In total, immune-associated functions may be attributed to 70 transcripts belonging to 6 lectin families. These lectin-like genes show low overlap between species of invertebrates, suggesting relatively rapid evolution of immune-associated genes in the group. The repertoire provides valuable candidates for further characterization of the gene functions in mollusc immunity.

  7. Interaction of lectins with membrane receptors on erythrocyte surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sung, L A; Kabat, E A; Chien, S

    1985-08-01

    The interactions of human genotype AO erythrocytes (red blood cells) (RBCs) with N-acetylgalactosamine-reactive lectins isolated from Helix pomatia (HPA) and from Dolichos biflorus (DBA) were studied. Binding curves obtained with the use of tritium-labeled lectins showed that the maximal numbers of lectin molecules capable of binding to human genotype AO RBCs were 3.8 X 10(5) and 2.7 X 10(5) molecules/RBC for HPA and DBA, respectively. The binding of one type of lectin may influence the binding of another type. HPA was found to inhibit the binding of DBA, but not vice versa. The binding of HPA was weakly inhibited by a beta-D-galactose-reactive lectin isolated from Ricinus communis (designated RCA1). Limulus polyphemus lectin (LPA), with specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, did not influence the binding of HPA but enhanced the binding of DBA. About 80% of LPA receptors (N-acetylneuraminic acid) were removed from RBC surfaces by neuraminidase treatment. Neuraminidase treatment of RBCs resulted in increases of binding of both HPA and DBA, but through different mechanisms. An equal number (7.6 X 10(5) of new HPA sites were generated on genotypes AO and OO RBCs by neuraminidase treatment, and these new sites accounted for the enhancement (AO cells) and appearance (OO cells) of hemagglutinability by HPA. Neuraminidase treatment did not generate new DBA sites, but increased the DBA affinity for the existing receptors; as a result, genotype AO cells increased their hemagglutinability by DBA, while OO cells remained unagglutinable. The use of RBCs of different genotypes in binding assays with 3H-labeled lectins of known specificities provides an experimental system for studying cell-cell recognition and association.

  8. Complement Interaction with Trypanosomatid Promastigotes in Normal Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Mercedes; Moreno, Inmaculada; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Toraño, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    In normal human serum (NHS), axenic promastigotes of Crithidia, Phytomonas, and Leishmania trigger complement activation, and from 1.2 to 1.8 × 105 C3 molecules are deposited per promastigote within 2.5 min. In Leishmania, promastigote C3 binding capacity remains constant during in vitro metacyclogenesis. C3 deposition on promastigotes activated through the classical complement pathway reaches a 50% maximum after ∼50 s, and represents >85% of total C3 bound. In C1q- and C2-deficient human sera, promastigotes cannot activate the classical pathway (CP) unless purified C1q or C2 factors, respectively, are supplemented, demonstrating a requirement for CP factor in promastigote C3 opsonization. NHS depleted of natural anti-Leishmania antibodies cannot trigger promastigote CP activation, but IgM addition restores C3 binding. Furthermore, Leishmania binds natural antibodies in ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA)-treated NHS; after EDTA removal, promastigote-bound IgM triggers C3 deposition in natural antibody-depleted NHS. Serum collectins and pentraxins thus do not participate significantly in NHS promastigote C3 opsonization. Real-time kinetic analysis of promastigote CP-mediated lysis indicates that between 85–95% of parasites are killed within 2.5 min of serum contact. These data indicate that successful Leishmania infection in man must immediately follow promastigote transmission, and that Leishmania evasion strategies are shaped by the selective pressure exerted by complement. PMID:11854358

  9. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  10. Subversion of complement by hematophagous parasites

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Hélène; Skelly, Patrick; Zipfel, Peter F.; Losson, Bertrand; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2008-01-01

    The complement system is a crucial part of innate and adaptive immunity which exerts a significant evolutionary pressure on pathogens. It has selected for those pathogens, mainly micro-organisms but also parasites, that have evolved countermeasures. The characterization of how pathogens evade complement attack is a rapidly developing field of current research. In recent years, multiple complement evasion strategies have been characterized. In this review, we focus on complement escape mechanisms expressed by hematophagous parasites, a heterogeneous group of metazoan parasites that share the property of ingesting the whole blood of their host. Complement inhibition is crucial for parasite survival within the host tissue or to facilitate blood feeding. Finally, complement inhibition by hematophagous parasites may also contribute to their success as pathogen vectors. PMID:18762211

  11. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  12. Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP

    PubMed Central

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Granados Martinez, Adriana Patricia; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections. PMID:25347183

  13. Structure predictions of two Bauhinia variegata lectins reveal patterns of C-terminal properties in single chain legume lectins.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Gustavo M S G; Conceição, Fabricio R; McBride, Alan J A; Pinto, Luciano da S

    2013-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata lectins (BVL-I and BVL-II) are single chain lectins isolated from the plant Bauhinia variegata. Single chain lectins undergo post-translational processing on its N-terminal and C-terminal regions, which determines their physiological targeting, carbohydrate binding activity and pattern of quaternary association. These two lectins are isoforms, BVL-I being highly glycosylated, and thus far, it has not been possible to determine their structures. The present study used prediction and validation algorithms to elucidate the likely structures of BVL-I and -II. The program Bhageerath-H was chosen from among three different structure prediction programs due to its better overall reliability. In order to predict the C-terminal region cleavage sites, other lectins known to have this modification were analysed and three rules were created: (1) the first amino acid of the excised peptide is small or hydrophobic; (2) the cleavage occurs after an acid, polar, or hydrophobic residue, but not after a basic one; and (3) the cleavage spot is located 5-8 residues after a conserved Leu amino acid. These rules predicted that BVL-I and -II would have fifteen C-terminal residues cleaved, and this was confirmed experimentally by Edman degradation sequencing of BVL-I. Furthermore, the C-terminal analyses predicted that only BVL-II underwent α-helical folding in this region, similar to that seen in SBA and DBL. Conversely, BVL-I and -II contained four conserved regions of a GS-I association, providing evidence of a previously undescribed X4+unusual oligomerisation between the truncated BVL-I and the intact BVL-II. This is the first report on the structural analysis of lectins from Bauhinia spp. and therefore is important for the characterisation C-terminal cleavage and patterns of quaternary association of single chain lectins.

  14. Structure Predictions of Two Bauhinia variegata Lectins Reveal Patterns of C-Terminal Properties in Single Chain Legume Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Gustavo M. S. G.; Conceição, Fabricio R.; McBride, Alan J. A.; Pinto, Luciano da S.

    2013-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata lectins (BVL-I and BVL-II) are single chain lectins isolated from the plant Bauhinia variegata. Single chain lectins undergo post-translational processing on its N-terminal and C-terminal regions, which determines their physiological targeting, carbohydrate binding activity and pattern of quaternary association. These two lectins are isoforms, BVL-I being highly glycosylated, and thus far, it has not been possible to determine their structures. The present study used prediction and validation algorithms to elucidate the likely structures of BVL-I and -II. The program Bhageerath-H was chosen from among three different structure prediction programs due to its better overall reliability. In order to predict the C-terminal region cleavage sites, other lectins known to have this modification were analysed and three rules were created: (1) the first amino acid of the excised peptide is small or hydrophobic; (2) the cleavage occurs after an acid, polar, or hydrophobic residue, but not after a basic one; and (3) the cleavage spot is located 5-8 residues after a conserved Leu amino acid. These rules predicted that BVL-I and –II would have fifteen C-terminal residues cleaved, and this was confirmed experimentally by Edman degradation sequencing of BVL-I. Furthermore, the C-terminal analyses predicted that only BVL-II underwent α-helical folding in this region, similar to that seen in SBA and DBL. Conversely, BVL-I and -II contained four conserved regions of a GS-I association, providing evidence of a previously undescribed X4+unusual oligomerisation between the truncated BVL-I and the intact BVL-II. This is the first report on the structural analysis of lectins from Bauhinia spp. and therefore is important for the characterisation C-terminal cleavage and patterns of quaternary association of single chain lectins. PMID:24260572

  15. Probing the cons and pros of lectin-induced immunomodulation: case studies for the mistletoe lectin and galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H J

    2001-07-01

    When imagining to monitor animal cells through a microscope with resolution at the molecular level, a salient attribute of their surfaces will be the abundance of glycan chains. They present galactosides at their termini widely extending like tentacles into the extracellular space. Their spatial accessibility and their potential for structural variability endow especially these glycan parts with capacity to act as docking points for molecular sensors (sugar receptors such as lectins). Binding and ligand clustering account for transmission of post-binding signals into the cell interior. The range of triggered activities has turned plant lectins into popular tools in cell biology and immunology. Potential for clinical application has been investigated rigorously only in recent years. As documented in vitro and in vivo for the galactoside-specific mistletoe lectin, its apparent immunomodulatory capacity reflected in upregulation of production of proinflammatory cytokines will not necessarily be clinically favorable but a double-edged sword. In fact, lectin application has been shown to stimulate tumor growth in cell lines, histocultures of human tumors and in two animal models using chemical carcinogenesis or tumor transplantation. When testing immunological effects of the endogenous lectin galectin-1, protection against disorders mediated by activated T cells came up for consideration. Elimination of these cells via CD7-dependent induction of apoptosis, and a shift to the Th2 response by the galectin, are factors to ameliorate disease states. This result encourages further efforts with other galectins. Functional redundancy, synergism, diversity or antagonism among galectins are being explored to understand the actual role of this class of endogenous lectins in inflammation. Regardless of the results of further preclinical testing for galectin-1, these two case studies break new ground in our understanding how glycans as ligands for lectins convey reactivity to

  16. Serum complement and immunoconglutinin in malnutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, R K

    1975-01-01

    Serum haemolytic complement activity and C3 were significantly decreased in 35 malnourished children. The changes were more pronounced in those with infection. Electrophoretically altered forms of complement C were detected in 14. There was an inverse correlation between C3 levels and immunoconglutinin titres. Nutritional rehabilitation and eradication of infection reversed the abnormalities. It is suggested that reduced complement function in malnutrition is the combined result of impaired synthesis, complement activation in vivo, and changes in plasma volume, and that it may contribute to an increased susceptibility to infection in undernourished individuals. PMID:807166

  17. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches.

  18. Lectin histochemistry of palatine glands in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Zaki; Kitaura, Hideki; Honma, Shiho; Wakisaka, Satoshi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the binding pattern of lectins, soybean agglutinin (SBA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), peanut agglutinin (PNA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and succinylated WGA (sucWGA) in the developing rat palatine glands. In adult rats, heterogeneous lectin binding patterns were revealed between the anterior and posterior portions of palatine glands, as DBA, VVA, and WGA were bound more intensely and broadly in the posterior portion. SBA, PNA, and sucWGA showed far less reactivity in the anterior than in the posterior portion. At embryonic day 18 (E18), weak labeling was observed with UEA-I and WGA at the basal membrane of terminal buds, UEA-I and PNA labeled the epithelial cord, and there was no apparent binding for SBA, DBA, VVA, and sucWGA. At E20, after acinar lumenization, all lectins were detected at the acinar cell basal membranes. After birth, all lectins detectably labeled at the mucous cell apical membranes and progressively, with maturation, extended from the apical to basal portions of the cytoplasm. Apparent serous cells were observed around postnatal day 10 (PN10) and bound UEA-I. Lectins reached peak reactivity at PN21 and the binding patterns became identical to those of adults around PN28.

  19. Bauhinia variegata var. variegata lectin: isolation, characterization, and comparison.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata var. variegata seeds are rich in proteins. Previously, one of the major storage proteins of the seeds was found to be a trypsin inhibitor that possessed various biological activities. By using another purification protocol, a glucoside- and galactoside-binding lectin that demonstrated some differences from the previously reported B. variegata lectin could be isolated from the seeds. It involved affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and Mono Q, and also size exclusion chromatography on Superdex 75. The lectin was not retained on Affi-gel blue gel but interacted with Q-Sepharose. The lectin was a 64-kDa protein with two 32-kDa subunits. It had low thermostability (stable up to 50 °C) and moderate pH stability (stable in pH 3-10). It exhibited anti-proliferative activity on nasopharyngeal carcinoma HONE1 cells with an IC50 of 12.8 μM after treatment for 48 h. It also slightly inhibited the growth of hepatoma HepG2 cells. The lectin may have potential in aiding cancer treatments.

  20. Lectin Activity in Gut Extract of Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Koosha, Mona; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Abolhasani, Mandan; Charedar, Soroor; Basseri, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: The role of lectins is important in interaction between pathogens and mosquito vectors. This study was performed to identify agglutinin activities of protein molecules on the midgut of Culex pipiens. Methods: Culex pipiens was reared in insectray condition and the midguts of males and females (blood fed and unfed) were dissected separately in Tris-HCl buffer. The extracts of midguts were applied for hemagglutinin assay against red blood cells of rabbit, mouse, rat, dog, horse, sheep, guinea pig, cow, human (A, B, AB, O groups). Then, the RBCs with relatively high agglutinin activity were chosen for carbohydrate inhibition assay. D (+) glucose, D (+) galactose, D (+) mannose, D (−) fructose, D (−) arabinose, L (−) fucose, lactose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, sialic acid were used to specify carbohydrate binding lectin. Results: The highest agglutinin activities were found against sheep and rabbits RBCs. Sexual diversity of agglutinin activities was observed among midgut extraction of males and females. In addition, variation in agglutinin activity of blood fed and unfed female mosquitoes were detected. The lectin activity was inhibited highly with glucose, galactose, fucose and fructose but less inhibitor activities was observed by arabinose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, n-acetyl-d-glucosamine, lactose and mannose. Conclusion: The secretion of hemagglutinins (lectins or lectin-like molecules) in the digestive system depends on the type of food in the gut. This suggests that emptying of the gut in preparation for protein rich food probably starts the secretion of hemagglutinins. PMID:23785692

  1. Differential activity of candidate microbicides against early steps of HIV-1 infection upon complement virus opsonization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV-1 in genital secretions may be opsonized by several molecules including complement components. Opsonized HIV-1 by complement enhances the infection of various mucosal target cells, such as dendritic cells (DC) and epithelial cells. Results We herein evaluated the effect of HIV-1 complement opsonization on microbicide candidates' activity, by using three in vitro mucosal models: CCR5-tropic HIV-1JR-CSF transcytosis through epithelial cells, HIV-1JR-CSF attachment on immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (iMDDC), and infectivity of iMDDC by CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1NDK. A panel of 10 microbicide candidates [T20, CADA, lectines HHA & GNA, PVAS, human lactoferrin, and monoclonal antibodies IgG1B12, 12G5, 2G12 and 2F5], were investigated using cell-free unopsonized or opsonized HIV-1 by complements. Only HHA and PVAS were able to inhibit HIV trancytosis. Upon opsonization, transcytosis was affected only by HHA, HIV-1 adsorption on iMDDC by four molecules (lactoferrin, IgG1B12, IgG2G5, IgG2G12), and replication in iMDDC of HIV-1BaL by five molecules (lactoferrin, CADA, T20, IgG1B12, IgG2F5) and of HIV-1NDK by two molecules (lactoferrin, IgG12G5). Conclusion These observations demonstrate that HIV-1 opsonization by complements may modulate in vitro the efficiency of candidate microbicides to inhibit HIV-1 infection of mucosal target cells, as well as its crossing through mucosa. PMID:20546571

  2. The pivotal role of the complement system in aging and age-related macular degeneration: hypothesis re-visited.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Don H; Radeke, Monte J; Gallo, Natasha B; Chapin, Ethan A; Johnson, Patrick T; Curletti, Christy R; Hancox, Lisa S; Hu, Jane; Ebright, Jessica N; Malek, Goldis; Hauser, Michael A; Rickman, Catherine Bowes; Bok, Dean; Hageman, Gregory S; Johnson, Lincoln V

    2010-03-01

    During the past ten years, dramatic advances have been made in unraveling the biological bases of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of irreversible blindness in western populations. In that timeframe, two distinct lines of evidence emerged which implicated chronic local inflammation and activation of the complement cascade in AMD pathogenesis. First, a number of complement system proteins, complement activators, and complement regulatory proteins were identified as molecular constituents of drusen, the hallmark extracellular deposits associated with early AMD. Subsequently, genetic studies revealed highly significant statistical associations between AMD and variants of several complement pathway-associated genes including: Complement factor H (CFH), complement factor H-related 1 and 3 (CFHR1 and CFHR3), complement factor B (CFB), complement component 2 (C2), and complement component 3 (C3). In this article, we revisit our original hypothesis that chronic local inflammatory and immune-mediated events at the level of Bruch's membrane play critical roles in drusen biogenesis and, by extension, in the pathobiology of AMD. Secondly, we report the results of a new screening for additional AMD-associated polymorphisms in a battery of 63 complement-related genes. Third, we identify and characterize the local complement system in the RPE-choroid complex - thus adding a new dimension of biological complexity to the role of the complement system in ocular aging and AMD. Finally, we evaluate the most salient, recent evidence that bears directly on the role of complement in AMD pathogenesis and progression. Collectively, these recent findings strongly re-affirm the importance of the complement system in AMD. They lay the groundwork for further studies that may lead to the identification of a transcriptional disease signature of AMD, and hasten the development of new therapeutic approaches that will restore the complement-modulating activity that

  3. Complements Spurned: Our Experience with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nagar, Vidya S.; Chaterjee, Rudrarpan; Sood, Ankita; Sajjan, Basavaraj; Kaushik, Aniruddha; Vyahalkar, Sameer V.

    2017-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disorder resulting from a dysregulated activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system. It results in significant morbidity and mortality if not diagnosed and treated promptly. It lends itself to myriad renal and extrarenal manifestations, all potentially disabling. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody to complement C5 is now the widely accepted norm for treatment. However, in resource-limited settings, plasma exchange if instituted early may be as beneficial. We report a case of aHUS treated with extended plasma exchange with excellent results. Critical care monitoring is essential for the management of the disease in view of a tendency to develop multiple complications. Long-term immunosuppression may be successful in maintaining remission. PMID:28250608

  4. White kidney bean lectin exerts anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Xia, Lixin; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-04-01

    A 60-kDa glucosamine binding lectin, white kidney bean lectin (WKBL), was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. white kidney beans, by application of anion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, and FPLC-size exclusion on Superdex 75. The anti-proliferative activity of WKBL on HONE1 cells and HepG2 cells was stronger than the activity on MCF7 cells and WRL68 cells (IC50 values for a 48-h treatment with WKBL on HONE1 cells: 18.8 μM; HepG2 cells: 19.7 μM; MCF7 cells: 26.9 μM; and WRL68 cells: >80 μM). The activity could be reduced by addition of glucosamine, which occupies the binding sites of WKBL, indicating that carbohydrate binding is crucial for the activity. Annexin V-FITC and PI staining, JC-1 staining and Hoechst 33342 staining revealed that apoptosis was induced on WKBL-treated HONE1 cells and HepG2 cells, but not as obviously on MCF7 cells. Cell cycle analysis also showed a slight cell cycle arrest on HONE1 cells after WKBL treatment. Western blotting suggested that WKBL induced apoptosis of HONE1 cells occurred through the extrinsic apoptosis pathway, with detection of increased level of active caspase 3, 8 and 9.

  5. Histological and lectin histochemical studies on the olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-01

    The olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the Corriedale sheep were examined using lectin histochemistry in order to clarify the histochemical and glycohistochemical differences between these two tissues. The olfactory epithelium was stained with 13 lectins out of 21 lectins examined, while the respiratory epithelium was positive to 16 lectins. The free border of both of the olfactory and respiratory epithelia was stained with 12 lectins: Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL), Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Soybean agglutinin (SBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120), Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). The associated glands of the olfactory mucosa, Bowman's glands, were stained with 13 lectins. While both the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands were stained with 8 lectins; five of them (WGA, s-WGA, STL, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) and ECL) were mutually positive among the Bowman's glands, mucous nasal glands and the goblet cells. These findings indicate that the glycohistochemical characteristics of the free borders of both olfactory and respiratory epithelia are similar to each other, suggesting that secretions from the Bowman's glands and those of the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands are partially exchanged between the surface of two epithelia to contribute the functions of the respiratory epithelium and the olfactory receptor cells, respectively.

  6. Recombinant lectins: an array of tailor-made glycan-interaction biosynthetic tools.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2013-03-01

    Lectins are a heterogeneous group of proteins found in plants, animals and microorganisms, which possess at least one non-catalytic domain that binds reversibly to specific mono- or oligosaccharides. The range of lectins and respective biological activities is unsurprising given the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and the multiple modes of interaction with proteins. Recombinant DNA technology has been traditionally used for cloning and characterizing newly discovered lectins. It has also been employed as a means of producing pure and sequence-defined lectins for different biotechnological applications. This review focuses on the production of recombinant lectins in heterologous organisms, and highlighting the Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris expression systems, which are the most employed. The choice of expression host depends on the lectin. Non-glycosylated recombinant lectins are produced in E. coli and post-translational modified recombinant lectins are produced in eukaryotic organisms, namely P. pastoris and non-microbial hosts such as mammalian cells. Emphasis is given to the applications of the recombinant lectins especially (a) in cancer diagnosis and/or therapeutics, (b) as anti-microbial, anti-viral, and anti-insect molecules or (c) in microarrays for glycome profiling. Most reported applications are from recombinant plant lectins. These applications benefit from the tailor-made design associated with recombinant production and will aid in unraveling the complex biological mechanisms of glycan-interactions, bringing recombinant lectins to the forefront of glycobiology. In conclusion, recombinant lectins are developing into valuable biosynthetic tools for biomedical research.

  7. Quantitation of Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes Using Agarose Containing Wheat Germ Lectin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    SIl Quantitation of Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes Using Agarose Containing Wheat Germ Lectin A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the...16 Wheat Germ Lectin Electrophoresis to Quantitate Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes ................ 16 Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzyme...vs Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis ......................... 40 Clinical Correlation Using Wheat Germ Lectin 45 Placental Alkaline Phosphatase

  8. Complement-dependent control of teratoma formation by embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koch, Cody A; Jordan, Corinne E; Platt, Jeffrey L

    2006-10-01

    The fetus has pluripotent stem cells that when transferred to mature individuals can generate tumors. However, for reasons yet unknown, tumors form rarely in the fetus and/or the mother during normal gestation. We questioned whether the complement system might protect against tumor formation by pluripotent stem cells. Murine embryonic stem cells were notably more susceptible than cardiomyocytes differentiated from those cells to lysis by complement in heterologous and homologous sera. Treatment of embryonic stem cells with heterologous serum averted tumor formation after residual cells were transplanted into mice. Confirming the importance of homologous complement in preventing formation of tumors, untreated embryonic stem cells formed tumors more quickly in C3-deficient than in wild-type mice. Susceptibility of embryonic stem cells to complement required an intact alternative pathway and was owed at least in part to a relative deficiency of sialic acid on cell surfaces compared with differentiated cells. Susceptibility to complement and resistance to tumors was inversely related to the number of cells transferred. These findings show that formation of tumors from embryonic stem cells is controlled in part by the alternative pathway of complement and suggest that susceptibility to complement might represent a general property of pluripotent stem cells that can be exploited to prevent tumor formation.

  9. [The role of complement factor H in the pathogenesis of Borrelia infection].

    PubMed

    Gęca, Aleksandra; Mazurek, Urszula; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Niedworok, Elżbieta; Ziółko, Ewa; Kokot, Teresa

    2012-07-20

    Complement factor H (CFH) is one of the most important negative regulators of the alternative pathway of the complement system. It is a glycoprotein belonging to the protein H family, which is synthesized mainly in the liver and is composed into a globular protein consisting of 60 amino acid domains in the serum. It shows specificity for C3b molecule of the complement system present in the serum or bound to the cell surface. It inhibits the steady formation of C3 convertase enzymes and the binding of C2 to C4b and factor B to C3b. It accelerates the decomposition of C2a into C4b and the displacement of Bb from C3b. The present paper discusses the composition, properties and functions of the complement factor and the family it belongs to. The paper focuses in particular on its role in the pathogenesis of an infection caused by the spirochetes of the Borrelia genus. Through binding CFH and other related proteins, bacteria of the Borrelia species inhibit the key effect of the alternative pathway of the complement system - the lysis of spirochete cells dependent on the complement's activation. The mechanism enables pathogens to spread in the host organism and facilitates the evolution of the disease. Discovering the immune mechanisms of the infection caused by the spirochetes of the Borrelia genus may allow for implementing a therapy blocking the binding of complement factor H early enough, apart from the standard treatment of the disease.

  10. Therapeutic targeting of the complement system in age-related macular degeneration: a review.

    PubMed

    Troutbeck, Robyn; Al-Qureshi, Salmaan; Guymer, Robyn H

    2012-01-01

    The last decade has produced pivotal change in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of global blindness. In this time, the complement system has featured as a unifying theme for several elements of new evidence: initially, the discovery of complement proteins within drusen and subsequently, the association between AMD and mutations in various complement pathway genes, most notably complement factor H. Increasingly, a wealth of data are pointing towards a role for chronic local inflammation and complement activation in the patho-aetiology of AMD. These findings have paved the way for the exploration of a new paradigm of therapy in AMD management; targeting of specific molecular constituents in the complement pathway thus producing dampening or inhibition of the inflammatory response. Such an approach has the potential to intervene earlier in the disease process and ideally before vision is compromised. In this review we discuss the role of the complement system in AMD, novel therapies in preclinical evaluation and clinical trial, and whether these have a part to play in reducing the burden of disease.

  11. Studies on lectins. XLIX. The use of glycosyl derivatives of Dextran T-500 for affinity electrophoresis of lectins.

    PubMed

    Cerovský, V; Tichá, M; Horejsi, V; Kocourek, J

    1980-09-01

    p-Aminophenyl glycosides and glycosylamines were coupled to periodate oxidized Dextran T-500 either directly or through an epsilon-aminocaproic acid spacer. The new glycosylated derivatives of dextran specifically precipitate lectins having the appropriate carbohydrate specificity, and thus were used in the preparation of affinity gels for affinity electrophoresis of lectins. The apparent strength of interaction of several lectins with carbohydrate residues immobilized in this way was less than with carbohydrates immobilized in O-glycosyl polyacrylamide copolymers. The presence of epsilon-aminocaproic spacer had no effect on the strength of interaction. The advantages of this type of macromolecular derivative of the ligand for affinity electrophoresis and some differences between the glycosylated dextrans and O-glycosyl polyacrylamide copolymers are discussed. Dextrans containing bound p-aminophenyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside and p-aminophenyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside were used to study the binding properties of concanavalin A and the lectin from Lathyrus sativus seeds. For the investigation of interaction of lectins from Ricinus communis and Glycine soja seeds, dextran derivatives containing bound p-aminophenyl alpha- and beta-D-galactopyranosides and alpha- and beta-D-galactopyranosylamines were used.

  12. Soluble complement receptor 1 protects the peripheral nerve from early axon loss after injury.

    PubMed

    Ramaglia, Valeria; Wolterman, Ruud; de Kok, Maryla; Vigar, Miriam Ann; Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke; King, Rosalind Helen Mary; Morgan, Brian Paul; Baas, Frank

    2008-04-01

    Complement activation is a crucial early event in Wallerian degeneration. In this study we show that treatment of rats with soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1), an inhibitor of all complement pathways, blocked both systemic and local complement activation after crush injury of the sciatic nerve. Deposition of membrane attack complex (MAC) in the nerve was inhibited, the nerve was protected from axonal and myelin breakdown at 3 days after injury, and macrophage infiltration and activation was strongly reduced. We show that both classical and alternative complement pathways are activated after acute nerve trauma. Inhibition of the classical pathway by C1 inhibitor (Cetor) diminished, but did not completely block, MAC deposition in the injured nerve, blocked myelin breakdown, inhibited macrophage infiltration, and prevented macrophage activation at 3 days after injury. However, in contrast to sCR1 treatment, early signs of axonal degradation were visible in the nerve, linking MAC deposition to axonal damage. We conclude that sCR1 protects the nerve from early axon loss after injury and propose complement inhibition as a potential therapy for the treatment of diseases in which axon loss is the main cause of disabilities.

  13. Anti-complement activity of the Ixodes scapularis salivary protein Salp20

    PubMed Central

    Hourcade, Dennis E.; Akk, Antonina M.; Mitchell, Lynne M.; Zhou, Hui-fang; Hauhart, Richard; Pham, Christine T.N.

    2015-01-01

    Complement, a major component of innate immunity, presents a rapid and robust defense of the intravascular space. While regulatory proteins protect host cells from complement attack, when these measures fail, unrestrained complement activation may trigger self-tissue injury, leading to pathologic conditions. Of the three complement activation pathways, the alternative pathway (AP) in particular has been implicated in numerous disease and injury states. Consequently, the AP components represent attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. The common hard-bodied ticks from the family Ixodidae derive nourishment from the blood of their mammalian hosts. During its blood meal the tick is exposed to host immune effectors, including the complement system. In defense, the tick produces salivary proteins that can inhibit host immune functions. The Salp20 salivary protein of Ixodes scapularis inhibits the host AP pathway by binding properdin and dissociating C3bBbP, the active C3 convertase. In these studies we examined Salp20 activity in various complement-mediated pathologies. Our results indicate that Salp20 can inhibit AP-dependent pathogenesis in the mouse. Its efficacy may be part in due to synergic effects it provides with the endogenous AP regulator, factor H. While Salp20 itself would be expected to be highly immunogenic and therefore inappropriate for therapeutic use, its emergence speaks for the potential development of a non-immunogenic Salp20 mimic that replicates its anti-properdin activity. PMID:26675068

  14. Isolation and biochemical characterization of Apios tuber lectin.

    PubMed

    Kenmochi, Eri; Kabir, Syed Rashel; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-01-09

    Apios tuber lectin, named ATL, was isolated from Apios americana Medikus by two chromatography steps, hydrophobic chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography. The minimum concentration required for the hemagglutination activity toward rabbit erythrocytes of ATL was 4 μg/mL. ATL was composed of a homodimer of 28.4 kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of ATL was similar to those of other legume lectins. The lectin showed moderate stability toward heating and acidic pH, and the binding affinity against several monosaccharides, such as D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine. ATL also bound to desialylated or agalactosylated glycoproteins such as asialo and agalacto transferrin. ATL decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting the effect on the tight junction-mediated paracellular transport.

  15. Parkia pendula lectin as histochemistry marker for meningothelial tumour.

    PubMed

    Beltrão, E I C; Medeiros, P L; Rodrigues, O G; Figueredo-Silva, J; Valença, M M; Coelho, L C B B; Carvalho, L B

    2003-01-01

    Lectins have been intensively used in histochemical techniques for cell surface characterization. These proteins are involved in several biological processes and their use as histochemical markers have been evaluated since they can indicate differences in cell surfaces. Parkia pendula lectin (PpeL) was evaluated as histochemical marker for meningothelial meningioma biopsies. Tissue slices were incubated with PpeL conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (PpeL-HRP) and Concanavalin A-HRP (ConA-HPR) and the binding visualized with diaminobenzidine and hydrogen peroxide. The lectin-tissue binding was inhibited with D-glucose. PpeL showed to be a useful tool for the characterization of meningothelial tumour and clinico-pathological diagnosis.

  16. Progress and Trends in Complement Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The past few years have proven to be a highly successful and exciting period for the field of complement-directed drug discovery and development. Driven by promising experiences with the first marketed complement drugs, increased knowledge about the involvement of complement in health and disease, and improvements in structural and analytical techniques as well as animal models of disease, the field has seen a surge in creative approaches to therapeutically intervene at various stages of the cascade. An impressive panel of compounds that show promise in clinical trials is meanwhile being lined up in the pipelines of both small biotechnology and big pharmaceutical companies. Yet with this new focus on complement-targeted therapeutics, important questions concerning target selection, point and length of intervention, safety, and drug delivery emerge. In view of the diversity of the clinical disorders involving abnormal complement activity or regulation, which include both acute and chronic diseases and affect a wide range of organs, diverse yet specifically tailored therapeutic approaches may be needed to shift complement back into balance. This chapter highlights the key changes in the field that shape our current perception of complement-targeted drugs and provides a brief overview of recent strategies and emerging trends. Selected examples of complement-related diseases and inhibitor classes are highlighted to illustrate the diversity and creativity in field. PMID:22990692

  17. Lectin histochemical studies on the vomeronasal organ of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ of sheep was examined using lectin histochemistry in order to compare the types and amounts of the glycoconjugates among various components of the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. In the vomeronasal sensory epithelium, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) stained particular cells, located at the same level as the vomeronasal receptor cells, while the distribution, shape and number of the stained cells did not correspond to those of the vomeronasal receptor cells. Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L) labeled the basal cells of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. While, Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL) and Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120) labeled the basal cells of the sensory epithelium, and Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I) stained the basal cells of the non-sensory epithelium, respectively. Seventeen lectins labeled the free border of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, while Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), Jacalin and Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) labeled neither free border of the sensory nor that of non-sensory epithelia. The expression pattern of glycoconjugate was similar, but not identical, in the free border between the sensory and non-sensory epithelia. These results indicate that there are dissimilar features in the type and amount of glycoconjugates between the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, and at the same time, among the various cell types either in the vomeronasal sensory or non-sensory epithelium.

  18. Purification of a thermostable antinociceptive lectin isolated from Andira anthelmia.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Nascimento, Francisco Lucas Faustino do; Silva, Mayara Torquato Lima; Nobre, Camila Bezerra; Moreira, Cleane Gomes; Brizeno, Luiz André Cavalcante; da Ponte, Edson Lopes; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Andira anthelmia (tribe Dalbergieae), a plant from Brazilian Amazon, possesses a seed lectin that was purified by affinity chromatography in sepharose-mannose. This novel Dalbergieae lectin, named AAL, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes treated with trypsin. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was maintained after incubation at a wide range of temperature (40 to 70 °C) and pH, was shown to be dependent on divalent cations, and was inhibited by d-mannose and d-sucrose. AAL showed an electrophoretic profile in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis similar to other lectins of the tribe Dalbergieae, presenting a double band of molecular weight with approximately 20 kDa and other minor bands of 17, 15, and 13 kDa, being the smaller fragment glycosylated. AAL injected by intravenous route in mice showed antinociceptive activity in two behavioral tests (writhing and formalin). In the writhing test induced by acetic acid, AAL showed inhibitory effect at 0.01 mg/kg (68%), 0.1 mg/kg (46%) and 1 mg/kg (74%). In the formalin test, AAL (0.1 mg/kg) inhibited by 48% the licking time in the inflammatory phase, an effect that was recovered by the lectin association with mannose. In conclusion, AAL presents analgesic effect involving the lectin domain via peripheral mechanisms of inflammatory nociception. This activity highlights the importance of lectins as tools to be used for understanding the interaction of protein-carbohydrate in processes associated to inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Lectin binding to olfactory system in a shark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, V; Ciani, F

    1993-01-01

    Lectin histochemical studies were performed on the olfactory system of Scyliorhinus canicula to identify specific glycoconjugates on the cell surface of primary olfactory neurons. The olfactory receptor cells, the olfactory nerve fibers and their terminals in the bulbs were labelled with SBA, BSA-I and BSA-I-B4. The lectin staining patterns indicate that the membranes of small-spotted catshark olfactory neurons had glycoproteins with alpha-galactose residues. This carbohydrate moiety could be related to modulation of the cell-cell interactions in the olfactory system.

  20. Ribosome-inactivating lectins with polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Barbieri, L; Bolognesi, A; Buonamici, L; Valbonesi, P; Polito, L; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Stirpe, F

    1997-05-26

    Lectins from Aegopodium podagraria (APA), Bryonia dioica (BDA), Galanthus nivalis (GNA), Iris hybrid (IRA) and Sambucus nigra (SNAI), and a new lectin-related protein from Sambucus nigra (SNLRP) were studied to ascertain whether they had the properties of ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP). IRA and SNLRP inhibited protein synthesis by a cell-free system and, at much higher concentrations, by cells and had polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase activity, thus behaving like non-toxic type 2 (two chain) RIP. APA and SNAI had much less activity, and BDA and GNA did not inhibit protein synthesis.

  1. Complement modulation of T cell immune responses during homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Elizabeth V; Tenner, Andrea J

    2014-11-01

    The complement system is an ancient and critical effector mechanism of the innate immune system as it senses, kills, and clears infectious and/or dangerous particles and alerts the immune system to the presence of the infection and/or danger. Interestingly, an increasing number of reports have demonstrated a clear role for complement in the adaptive immune system as well. Of note, a number of recent studies have identified previously unknown roles for complement proteins, receptors, and regulators in T cell function. Here, we will review recent data demonstrating the influence of complement proteins C1q, C3b/iC3b, C3a (and C3aR), and C5a (and C5aR) and complement regulators DAF (CD55) and CD46 (MCP) on T cell function during homeostasis and disease. Although new concepts are beginning to emerge in the field of complement regulation of T cell function, future experiments should focus on whether complement is interacting directly with the T cell or is having an indirect effect on T cell function via APCs, the cytokine milieu, or downstream complement activation products. Importantly, the identification of the pivotal molecular pathways in the human systems will be beneficial in the translation of concepts derived from model systems to therapeutic targeting for treatment of human disorders.

  2. Interactions of the complement system with molecules of extracellular matrix: relevance for joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Happonen, Kaisa E; Heinegård, Dick; Saxne, Tore; Blom, Anna M

    2012-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a highly disabling disease affecting all structures of the joint. Understanding the pathology behind the development of RA is essential for developing targeted therapeutic strategies as well as for developing novel markers to predict disease onset. Several molecules normally hidden within the cartilage tissue are exposed to complement components in the synovial fluid upon cartilage breakdown. Some of these have been shown to activate complement and toll-like receptors, which may enhance an already existing inflammatory response, thereby worsening the course of disease. Other cartilage-resident molecules have in contrast shown to possess complement-inhibitory properties. Knowledge about mechanisms behind pathological complement activation in the joints will hopefully lead to methods which allow us to distinguish patients with pathological complement activation from those where other inflammatory pathways are predominant. This will help to elucidate which patients will benefit from complement inhibitory therapies, which are thought to aid a specific subset of patients or patients at a certain stage of disease. Future challenges are to target the complement inhibition specifically to the joints to minimize systemic complement blockade.

  3. VEGF regulates local inhibitory complement proteins in the eye and kidney

    PubMed Central

    Keir, Lindsay S.; Firth, Rachel; Aponik, Lyndsey; Sakimoto, Susumu; Aguilar, Edith; Welsh, Gavin I.; Richards, Anna; Usui, Yoshihiko; Satchell, Simon C.; Kuzmuk, Valeryia; Coward, Richard J.; Goult, Jonathan; Bull, Katherine R.; Bharti, Kapil; Westenskow, Peter D.; Michael, Iacovos P.; Saleem, Moin A.

    2016-01-01

    Outer retinal and renal glomerular functions rely on specialized vasculature maintained by VEGF that is produced by neighboring epithelial cells, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and podocytes, respectively. Dysregulation of RPE- and podocyte-derived VEGF is associated with neovascularization in wet age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), choriocapillaris degeneration, and glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Since complement activation and genetic variants in inhibitory complement factor H (CFH) are also features of both ARMD and TMA, we hypothesized that VEGF and CFH interact. Here, we demonstrated that VEGF inhibition decreases local CFH and other complement regulators in the eye and kidney through reduced VEGFR2/PKC-α/CREB signaling. Patient podocytes and RPE cells carrying disease-associated CFH genetic variants had more alternative complement pathway deposits than controls. These deposits were increased by VEGF antagonism, a common wet ARMD treatment, suggesting that VEGF inhibition could reduce cellular complement regulatory capacity. VEGF antagonism also increased markers of endothelial cell activation, which was partially reduced by genetic complement inhibition. Together, these results suggest that VEGF protects the retinal and glomerular microvasculature, not only through VEGFR2-mediated vasculotrophism, but also through modulation of local complement proteins that could protect against complement-mediated damage. Though further study is warranted, these findings could be relevant for patients receiving VEGF antagonists. PMID:27918307

  4. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  5. The use of lectin microarray for assessing glycosylation of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycans or carbohydrates attached to therapeutic glycoproteins can directly affect product quality, safety and efficacy, and therefore must be adequately analyzed and controlled throughout product life cycles. However, the complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a lectin microarray for assessing protein glycans. Using commercial lectin chips, which contain 45 lectins toward distinct glycan structures, we were able to determine the lectin binding patterns of a panel of 15 therapeutic proteins, including 8 monoclonal antibodies. Lectin binding signals were analyzed to generate glycan profiles that were generally consistent with the known glycan patterns for these glycoproteins. In particular, the lectin-based microarray was found to be highly sensitive to variations in the terminal carbohydrate structures such as galactose versus sialic acid epitopes. These data suggest that lectin microarray could be used for screening glycan patterns of therapeutic glycoproteins. PMID:26918373

  6. Purification and characterization of a new type lactose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T

    1991-02-01

    A new type lactose-binding lectin was purified from extracts of Ulex europaeus seeds by affinity chromatography on a column of galactose-Sepharose 4B, followed by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. This lectin, designated as Ulex europaeus lectin III (UEA-III), was found to be inhibited by lactose. The dimeric lectin is a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 70,000 Da; it consists of two apparently identical subunits of a molecular mass of 34,000 Da. Compositional analysis showed that this lectin contains 30% carbohydrate and a large amount of aspartic acid, serine and valine, but no sulfur-containing amino acids. The N-terminal amino-acid sequences of L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin I (UEA-I) and di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin II (UEA-II), both of which we have already purified and characterized, and that of UEA-III were determined and compared.

  7. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  8. Finding off-targets, biological pathways, and target diseases for chymase inhibitors via structure-based systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Arooj, Mahreen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Cao, Guang Ping; Kim, Songmi; Arulalapperumal, Venkatesh; Lee, Keun Woo

    2015-07-01

    Off-target binding connotes the binding of a small molecule of therapeutic significance to a protein target in addition to the primary target for which it was proposed. Progressively such off-targeting is emerging to be regular practice to reveal side effects. Chymase is an enzyme of hydrolase class that catalyzes hydrolysis of peptide bonds. A link between heart failure and chymase is ascribed, and a chymase inhibitor is in clinical phase II for treatment of heart failure. However, the underlying mechanisms of the off-target effects of human chymase inhibitors are still unclear. Here, we develop a robust computational strategy that is applicable to any enzyme system and that allows the prediction of drug effects on biological processes. Putative off-targets for chymase inhibitors were identified through various structural and functional similarity analyses along with molecular docking studies. Finally, literature survey was performed to incorporate these off-targets into biological pathways and to establish links between pathways and particular adverse effects. Off-targets of chymase inhibitors are linked to various biological pathways such as classical and lectin pathways of complement system, intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation cascade, and fibrinolytic system. Tissue kallikreins, granzyme M, neutrophil elastase, and mesotrypsin are also identified as off-targets. These off-targets and their associated pathways are elucidated for the effects of inflammation, cancer, hemorrhage, thrombosis, and central nervous system diseases (Alzheimer's disease). Prospectively, our approach is helpful not only to better understand the mechanisms of chymase inhibitors but also for drug repurposing exercises to find novel uses for these inhibitors.

  9. Defensins, lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A: microbe-binding biomolecules that contribute to mucosal immunity in the human gut.

    PubMed

    Chairatana, Phoom; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2017-02-01

    In the intestine, the mucosal immune system plays essential roles in maintaining homeostasis between the host and microorganisms, and protecting the host from pathogenic invaders. Epithelial cells produce and release a variety of biomolecules into the mucosa and lumen that contribute to immunity. In this review, we focus on a subset of these remarkable host-defense factors - enteric α-defensins, select lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A - that have the capacity to bind microbes and thereby contribute to barrier function in the human gut. We provide an overview of the intestinal epithelium, describe specialized secretory cells named Paneth cells, and summarize our current understanding of the biophysical and functional properties of these select microbe-binding biomolecules. We intend for this compilation to complement prior reviews on intestinal host-defense factors, highlight recent advances in the field, and motivate investigations that further illuminate molecular mechanisms as well as the interplay between these molecules and microbes.

  10. Lectin staining and Western blot data showing differential sialylation of nutrient-deprived cancer cells to sialic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Badr, Haitham A; AlSadek, Dina M M; Mathew, Mohit P; Li, Chen-Zhong; Djansugurova, Leyla B; Yarema, Kevin J; Ahmed, Hafiz

    2015-12-01

    This report provides data that are specifically related to the differential sialylation of nutrient deprived breast cancer cells to sialic acid supplementation in support of the research article entitled, "Nutrient-deprived cancer cells preferentially use sialic acid to maintain cell surface glycosylation" [1]. Particularly, breast cancer cells, when supplemented with sialic acid under nutrient deprivation, display sialylated glycans at the cell surface, but non-malignant mammary cells show sialylated glycans intracellularly. The impact of sialic acid supplementation under nutrient deprivation was demonstrated by measuring levels of expression and sialylation of two markers, EGFR1 and MUC1. This Data in Brief article complements the main manuscript by providing detailed instructions and representative results for cell-level imaging and Western blot analyses of changes in sialylation during nutrient deprivation and sialic acid supplementation. These methods can be readily generalized for the study of many types of glycosylation and various glycoprotein markers through the appropriate selection of fluorescently-labeled lectins.

  11. Defensins, Lectins, Mucins and Secretory Immunoglobulin A: Microbe-Binding Biomolecules that Contribute to Mucosal Immunity in the Human Gut

    PubMed Central

    Chairatana, Phoom; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    In the intestine, the mucosal immune system plays essential roles in maintaining homeostasis between the host and microorganisms, and protecting the host from pathogenic invaders. Epithelial cells produce and release a variety of biomolecules into the mucosa and lumen that contribute to immunity. In this review, we focus on a subset of these remarkable host-defense factors – enteric α-defensins, select lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A – that have the capacity to bind microbes and thereby contribute to barrier function in the human gut. We provide an overview of the intestinal epithelium, describe specialized secretory cells named Paneth cells, and summarize our current understanding of the biophysical and functional properties of these select microbe-binding biomolecules. We intend for this compilation to complement prior reviews on intestinal host-defense factors, highlight recent advances in the field, and motivate investigations that further illuminate molecular mechanisms as well as the interplay between these molecules and microbes. PMID:27841019

  12. Killing of Gyrodactylus salaris (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) mediated by host complement.

    PubMed

    Harris, P D; Soleng, A; Bakke, T A

    1998-08-01

    Gyrodactylus salaris, an important pathogen of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, has been shown to be highly sensitive to factors in host serum and mucus, being killed rapidly (50% within 1 h) by serum at a dilution of 1:200. The time needed for killing was inversely proportional to serum concentration. Similar effects were noted using host mucus, which contained approximately 1/20th of the anti-Gyrodactylus activity of serum. Serum activity was abolished completely by heating at 45 degrees C for 30 min, and by addition of EDTA, but not by EGTA + 1 mM magnesium ions. Activity was not dependent on whether the serum was from infected or naive fishes, nor was it species specific. Attempts to pre-coat parasites in salmon anti-Gyrodactylus antibodies also failed to enhance the activity of fresh serum. These observations suggest that killing is due to the complement system of the host, acting via the alternate pathway. G. salaris appears to be exceptionally sensitive to complement, being killed at concentrations which could be experienced in vivo. The role of complement in the protection of fishes against gyrodactylid infection therefore deserves further investigation.

  13. Lamprey variable lymphocyte receptors mediate complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfang; Chen, Liyong; Liu, Xin; Wang, Huaying; Su, Peng; Han, Yinglun; Feng, Bo; Qiao, Xu; Zhao, Jing; Ma, Ning; Liu, Huijie; Zheng, Zhen; Li, Qingwei

    2013-02-01

    An alternative adaptive-immune system is present in the most basal vertebrates--lampreys and hagfish--the only surviving jawless vertebrates. These eel-like fish use leucine-rich repeat-based receptors for Ag recognition instead of the Ig-based receptors used in jawed vertebrates. We report that in Japanese lamprey (Lampetra japonica), variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR)B interacts with C1q and C3 proteins to mediate complement-dependent cytotoxicity for bacteria and tumor cells. The immune-based lysis involves deposition of VLRB and C1q-like protein complex on the surface of target cells, activation of C3, and ultimate disruption of cell wall integrity. The demonstration of functional interaction between VLRB and complement components in lamprey provides evidence for the emergence of cooperative innate and adaptive-immune responses at a pivotal point in vertebrate evolution, before or in parallel with the evolution of Ig-based Abs and the classical complement-activation pathway.

  14. CD46: the 'multitasker' of complement proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Fara, Antonella Francesca; Dasgupta, Prokar; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-12-01

    Complement is undeniably quintessential for innate immunity by detecting and eliminating infectious microorganisms. Recent work, however, highlights an equally profound impact of complement on the induction and regulation of a wide range of immune cells. In particular, the complement regulator CD46 emerges as a key sensor of immune activation and a vital modulator of adaptive immunity. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of CD46-mediated signalling events and their functional consequences on immune-competent cells with a specific focus on those in CD4(+) T cells. We will also discuss the promises and challenges that potential therapeutic modulation of CD46 may hold and pose.

  15. Use of lectin microarray to differentiate gastric cancer from gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Li; Li, Yang-Guang; Lv, Yong-Chen; Guan, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Hui-Fan; Chi, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of lectin microarray for differentiating gastric cancer from gastric ulcer. METHODS: Twenty cases of human gastric cancer tissue and 20 cases of human gastric ulcer tissue were collected and processed. Protein was extracted from the frozen tissues and stored. The lectins were dissolved in buffer, and the sugar-binding specificities of lectins and the layout of the lectin microarray were summarized. The median of the effective data points for each lectin was globally normalized to the sum of medians of all effective data points for each lectin in one block. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues and their corresponding gastric ulcer tissues were subjected to Ag retrieval. Biotinylated lectin was used as the primary antibody and HRP-streptavidin as the secondary antibody. The glycopatterns of glycoprotein in gastric cancer and gastric ulcer specimens were determined by lectin microarray, and then validated by lectin histochemistry. Data are presented as mean ± SD for the indicated number of independent experiments. RESULTS: The glycosylation level of gastric cancer was significantly higher than that in ulcer. In gastric cancer, most of the lectin binders showed positive signals and the intensity of the signals was stronger, whereas the opposite was the case for ulcers. Significant differences in the pathological score of the two lectins were apparent between ulcer and gastric cancer tissues using the same lectin. For MPL and VVA, all types of gastric cancer detected showed stronger staining and a higher positive rate in comparison with ulcer, especially in the case of signet ring cell carcinoma and intra-mucosal carcinoma. GalNAc bound to MPL showed a significant increase. A statistically significant association between MPL and gastric cancer was observed. As with MPL, there were significant differences in VVA staining between gastric cancer and ulcer. CONCLUSION: Lectin microarray can differentiate the different

  16. Momordica charantia seed lectin: toxicity, bacterial agglutination and antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed Rashel; Nabi, Md Mahamodun; Nurujjaman, Md; Abu Reza, Md; Alam, A H M Khurshid; Uz Zaman, Rokon; Khalid-Bin-Ferdaus, Khandaker Md; Amin, Ruhul; Khan, Md Masudul Hasan; Hossain, Md Anowar; Uddin, Md Salim; Mahmud, Zahid Hayat

    2015-03-01

    In last three decades, several studies were carried out on the D-galactose-specific lectin of Momordica charantia seeds (MCL). In the present study, in vitro growth inhibition (8-23 %) at different concentrations (6-24 μg/ml) of MCL was observed against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. MCL also showed 28, 45, and 75 % growth inhibitions against EAC cells when administered 1.2, 2.0, and 2.8 mg/kg/day (i.p.), respectively for five consequent days in vivo in mice. After lectin treatment, the level of red blood cell and hemoglobin was increased significantly with the decrease of white blood cell and maintained the normal level when compared with EAC-bearing control and normal mice without EAC cells. Although MCL caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase of EAC cells, any irregular shape or apoptotic morphological alterations in the lectin-treated EAC cells was not observed by an optical and fluorescence microscope. Lectin showed toxicity against brine shrimp nauplii with an LC50 value of 49.7 μg/ml. Four out of seven pathogenic bacteria were agglutinated by MCL in the absence of inhibitory sugar D-lactose/D-galactose. In conclusion, MCL showed strong cytotoxic effect and therefore can be used as a potent anticancer chemotherapeutic agent.

  17. Lectin Binding to Radopholus citrophilus and R. similis Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Gottwald, T R

    1992-06-01

    Lectin-binding glycoproteins in seven populations of two burrowing nematode sibling species were probed with five different biotinylated lectins on Western blots, and differences were correlated with nematode ability to parasitize citrus and to overcome citrus rootstock resistance. Banding patterns of molecular weight standards were fit best by an exponential decay function, and a predictive equation was used to estimate molecular weights (r(2) = 0.999). A band (131 kDa) that labeled with the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A) occurred in extracts from cuticles and egg shells of populations of Radopholus citrophilus that parasitize citrus. Wheat germ agglutin labeled a band (58 kDa) in aqueous homogenates of populations that reproduce in roots of citrus rootstock normally resistant to burrowing nematodes. The two sibling species R. citrophilus and R. similis were distinguished by a high molecular weight Con A-labeled band (608 kDa) from cuticle and egg shells. Probing blots with the lectin Limulus polyphemus agglutinin indicated that each population contained a band (12-16 kDa) specifically inhibited by the addition of 25 mM neuraminic acid, suggesting that glycoproteins with sialic acid moieties are present in burrowing nematodes.

  18. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Lectins As Targets for Novel Antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Grishin, A. V.; Krivozubov, M. S.; Karyagina, A. S.; Gintsburg, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most widespread and troublesome opportunistic pathogens that is capable of colonizing various human tissues and organs and is often resistant to many currently used antibiotics. This resistance is caused by different factors, including the acquisition of specific resistance genes, intrinsic capability to diminish antibiotic penetration into the bacterial cell, and the ability to form biofilms. This situation has prompted the development of novel compounds differing in their mechanism of action from traditional antibiotics that suppress the growth of microorganisms or directly kill bacteria. Instead, these new compounds should decrease the pathogens’ ability to colonize and damage human tissues by inhibiting the virulence factors and biofilm formation. The lectins LecA and LecB that bind galactose and fucose, as well as oligo- and polysaccharides containing these sugars, are among the most thoroughly-studied targets for such novel antibacterials. In this review, we summarize the results of experiments highlighting the importance of these proteins for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity and provide information on existing lectins inhibitors and their effectiveness in various experimental models. Particular attention is paid to the effects of lectins inhibition in animal models of infection and in clinical practice. We argue that lectins inhibition is a perspective approach to combating P. aeruginosa. However, despite the existence of highly effective in vitro inhibitors, further experiments are required in order to advance these inhibitors into pre-clinical studies. PMID:26085942

  19. Peanut lectin-binding sites in large bowel carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H S

    1982-10-01

    Peanut lectin is known to bind to B-D-Gal-(1 leads to 3)-D-GalNac which provides antigenic determination for the T (TAg) blood group antigen. We examined 33 rectosigmoid carcinomas and 15 corresponding controls for their ability to express peanut lectin-binding sites. In controls one could localize TAg to the supranuclear portion of the cell, however, in cancers one noticed a cytostructural relocalization of TAg with the following two major patterns: localization to the region of the glycocalyx and localization intracytoplasmically in the apical portion of the cell. These two patterns were associated with glandular differentiation. Less frequently noted or in association with the above was a mucin glob-like pattern and/or a fine diffuse intracytoplasmic pattern associated with solid, nonglandular areas. The more poorly differentiated cancers less frequently expressed peanut lectin-binding sites. Benign (nontransitional zone) epithelium in those patients whose tumor expressed TAg was negative for peanut lectin-binding sites in 66 per cent of the cases. Reduced tumoral glycosyltransferases may explain this increased synthesis of TAg in cancers as compared with controls, if one considers TAg to be an incomplete glycoprotein of the MN blood group system.

  20. Evolution of the complement system in protostomes revealed by de novo transcriptome analysis of six species of Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Reo; Nonaka, Masaru

    2015-05-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary history of the complement system in Arthropoda, de novo transcriptome analysis was performed with six species among the Chelicerata, Myriapoda, and Crustacea, and complement genes were identified based on their characteristic domain structures. Complement C3 and factor B (FB) were identified from a sea spider, a jumping spider, and a centipede, but not from a sea firefly or two millipede species. No additional complement components identifiable by their characteristic domain structures were found from any of these six species. These results together with genome sequence information for several species of the Hexapoda suggest that the common ancestor of the Arthropoda possessed a simple complement system comprising C3 and FB, and thus resembled the alternative pathway of the mammalian complement system. It was lost at least twice independently during the evolution of Arthropoda in the millipede lineage and in the common ancestor of Crustacea and Hexapoda.

  1. The role of complement in C3 glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Chen, Qian; Wiech, Thorsten; Goodship, Tim; Johnson, Sally; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Nester, Clara; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez; Noris, Marina; Pickering, Matthew; Smith, Richard

    2015-09-01

    C3 glomerulopathy describes a spectrum of disorders with glomerular pathology associated with C3 cleavage product deposition and with defective complement action and regulation (Fakhouri et al., 2010; Sethi et al., 2012b). Kidney biopsies from these patients show glomerular accumulation or deposition of C3 cleavage fragments, but no or minor deposition of immunoglobulins (Appel et al., 2005; D'Agati and Bomback, 2012; Servais et al., 2007; Sethi and Fervenza, 2011). At present the current situation asks for a better definition of the underlining disease mechanisms, for precise biomarkers, and for a treatment for this disease. The complement system is a self activating and propelling enzymatic cascade type system in which inactive, soluble plasma components are activated spontaneously and lead into an amplification loop (Zipfel and Skerka, 2009). Activation of the alternative pathway is spontaneous, occurs by default, and cascade progression leads to amplification by complement activators. The system however is self-controlled by multiple regulators and inhibitors, like Factor H that control cascade progression in fluid phase and on surfaces. The activated complement system generates a series of potent effector components and activation products, which damage foreign-, as well as modified self cells, recruit innate immune cells to the site of action, coordinate inflammation and the response of the adaptive immune system in form of B cells and T lymphocytes (Kohl, 2006; Medzhitov and Janeway, 2002; Ogden and Elkon, 2006; Carroll, 2004; Kemper and Atkinson, 2007; Morgan, 1999; Muller-Eberhard, 1986; Ricklin et al., 2010). Complement controls homeostasis and multiple reactions in the vertebrate organism including defense against microbial infections (Diaz-Guillen et al., 1999; Mastellos and Lambris, 2002; Nordahl et al., 2004; Ricklin et al., 2010). In consequence defective control of the spontaneous self amplifying cascade or regulation is associated with numerous

  2. Differential mechanisms of complement-mediated neutralization of the closely related paramyxoviruses simian virus 5 and mumps virus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, John B.; Capraro, Gerald A.; Parks, Griffith D.

    2008-06-20

    The complement system is an important component of the innate immune response to virus infection. The role of human complement pathways in the in vitro neutralization of three closely related paramyxoviruses, Simian Virus 5 (SV5), Mumps virus (MuV) and Human Parainfluenza virus type 2 (HPIV2) was investigated. Sera from ten donors showed high levels of neutralization against HPIV2 that was largely complement-independent, whereas nine of ten donor sera were found to neutralize SV5 and MuV only in the presence of active complement pathways. SV5 and MuV neutralization proceeded through the alternative pathway of the complement cascade. Electron microscopy studies and biochemical analyses showed that treatment of purified SV5 with human serum resulted in C3 deposition on virions and the formation of massive aggregates, but there was relatively little evidence of virion lysis. Treatment of MuV with human serum also resulted in C3 deposition on virions, however in contrast to SV5, MuV particles were lysed by serum complement and there was relatively little aggregation. Assays using serum depleted of complement factors showed that SV5 and MuV neutralization in vitro was absolutely dependent on complement factor C3, but was not dependent on downstream complement factors C5 or C8. Our results indicate that even though antibodies exist that recognize both SV5 and MuV, they are mostly non-neutralizing and viral inactivation in vitro occurs through the alternative pathway of complement. The implications of our work for development of paramyxovirus vectors and vaccines are discussed.

  3. Regulation of humoral immunity by complement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael C; Isenman, David E

    2012-08-24

    The complement system of innate immunity is important in regulating humoral immunity largely through the complement receptor CR2, which forms a coreceptor on B cells during antigen-induced activation. However, CR2 also retains antigens on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs). Display of antigen on FDCs is critical for clonal selection and affinity maturation of activated B cells. This review will discuss the role of complement in adaptive immunity in general with a focus on the interplay between CR2-associated antigen on B cells with CR2 expressed on FDCs. This latter interaction provides an opportunity for memory B cells to sample antigen over prolonged periods. The cocrystal structure of CR2 with its ligand C3d provides insight into how the complement system regulates access of antigen by B cells with implications for therapeutic manipulations to modulate aberrant B cell responses in the case of autoimmunity.

  4. On complements of coradicals of finite groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, V. A.; Sorokina, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Let F be an ω-local Fitting formation, and G a finite group that can be represented in the form of a product of n subnormal subgroups whose F-coradicals are ω-soluble, and whose Sylow p-subgroups are abelian for any p\\inω. It is established that there exist ω-complements of the F-coradical of G. New theorems on the existence of complements of coradicals of a group are obtained as corollaries. For an ω-local formation F, conditions are established for the existence of complements and ω-complements of the F-coradical of a group in any of its extensions. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  5. Complement and thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oku, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kono, Michihiro; Ohmura, Kazumasa; Kato, Masaru; Bohgaki, Toshiyuki; Horita, Tetsuya; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Amengual, Olga; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of complement activation in the pathophysiology of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was first reported in murine models of antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-related pregnancy morbidities. We previously reported that complement activation is prevalent and may function as a source of procoagulant cell activation in the sera of APS patients. Recently, autoantibodies against C1q, a component of complement 1, were reported to be correlated with complement activation in systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies target neoepitopes of deformed C1q bound to various molecules (i.e., anionic phospholipids) and induce accelerated complement activation. We found that anti-C1q antibodies are more frequently detected in primary APS patients than in control patients and in refractory APS patients with repeated thrombotic events. The titer of anti-C1q antibodies was significantly higher in refractory APS patients than in APS patients without flare. The binding of C1q to anionic phospholipids may be associated with the surge in complement activation in patients with anti-C1q antibodies when triggered by 'second-hit' biological stressors such as infection. Such stressors will induce overexpression of anionic phospholipids, with subsequent increases in deformed C1q that is targeted by anti-C1q antibodies.

  6. Direct evidence of complement activation in HELLP syndrome: A link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaught, Arthur J; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Hueppchen, Nancy; Blakemore, Karin; Yuan, Xuan; Seifert, Sara M; York, Sarah; Brodsky, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) is a severe variant of pre-eclampsia whose pathogenesis remains unclear. Recent evidence and clinical similarities suggest a link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease of excessive activation of the alternative complement pathway effectively treated with a complement inhibitor, eculizumab. Therefore, we used a functional complement assay, the modified Ham test, to analyze sera of women with classic or atypical HELLP syndrome, pre-eclampsia with severe features, normal pregnancies, and healthy nonpregnant women. Sera were also evaluated using levels of the terminal product of complement activation (C5b-9). We tested the in vitro ability of eculizumab to inhibit complement activation in HELLP serum. Increased complement activation was observed in participants with classic or atypical HELLP compared with those with normal pregnancies and nonpregnant controls. Mixing HELLP serum with eculizumab-containing serum resulted in a significant decrease in cell killing compared with HELLP serum alone. We found that HELLP syndrome is associated with increased complement activation as assessed with the modified Ham test. This assay may aid in the diagnosis of HELLP syndrome and could confirm that its pathophysiology is related to that of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

  7. Flavonoids from the leaves of Litsea japonica and their anti-complement activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Joongku; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Chan-Soo; Kim, Young-Ho; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu

    2005-04-01

    Four flavonoids, epicatechin (1), afzelin (2), quercitrin (3), and tiliroside (4), were isolated from the leaves of Litsea japonica (Thunb.) Jussieu (Lauraceae). The structures of compounds were identified by comparing their chemical and spectral data with those previously reported. The flavonoids (1-4) were tested for their anti-complement activity against classical pathway of complement system. Compounds 2-4 showed inhibitory activity against complement system with IC50 values of 258, 440, and 101 microm, respectively, whereas 1 was inactive. For the evaluation of the structure-activity relationship of 5,7-dihydroxyflavones, myricitrin (5) from Juglans mandshurica also tested for it's anti-complement activity and is inactive in this assay system. Furthermore, compounds 2, 3, and 5 were hydrolyzed with naringinase to give kaempferol (2a), quercetin (3a), and myricetin (5a), and these were also tested for their activity. Of the three aglycones, 2a exhibited anti-complement activity with an IC50 value of 730 microM, while 3a and 5a were inactive. The inhibitory potencies of 2, 2a, 3, 3a, 5, and 5a against complement activity increased in inverse proportion to number of free hydroxyls on B-ring of 5,7-dihydroxyflavone. Of the compounds tested, 4 showed the most potent inhibitory activity against the complement system.

  8. Factor H in Porcine Seminal Plasma Protects Sperm against Complement Attack in Genital Tracts*

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Tomohisa; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Maeda, Toshinaga; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Nishi, Katsuji; Ohkubo, Iwao

    2010-01-01

    We found that factor H (FH) exists in porcine seminal plasma. Purified FH strongly inhibited serum alternative pathway complement activation against lipopolysaccharide. The molecular weight, pI, and heparin-binding activity of the purified protein were different from those of purified FH from porcine serum. The complement regulatory activity of seminal plasma FH was ∼2-fold stronger than that of serum FH. Treatment of purified serum FH with sialidase and N-glycosidase F gave almost the same results as those of seminal plasma FH. The deletion of sialic acid from the carbohydrate chains of both FHs contributed to heparin-binding and complement regulatory activities. Results of reverse transcriptase-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry showed that seminal plasma FH is mainly secreted from epithelial cells of the seminal vesicle in male genital tracts. FH was also detected in the outer acrosomal region of ejaculated sperm by immunofluorescence staining, and found that the purified FH from the sperm membrane has the same complement regulatory activity as that of seminal plasma FH. The ejaculated sperm possessing FH in the outer acrosomal region considerably evaded complement attack. We also found that there is strong complement activity in fluids from female genital tract ducts. These findings indicate that FH bound to the outer acrosomal region and soluble FH play important roles in protecting sperm against complement attack in male and female genital tracts. PMID:19920146

  9. Development of a large scale human complement source for use in bacterial immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Charlotte; Kuisma, Eeva; Alexander, Frances; Allen, Lauren; Tipton, Thomas; Ram, Sanjay; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2013-05-31

    The serum bactericidal assay is the correlate of protection for meningococcal disease but the use and comparison of functional immunological assays for the assessment of meningococcal vaccines is complicated by the sourcing of human complement. This is due to high levels of immunity in the population acquired through natural meningococcal carriage and means that many individuals must be screened to find donors with suitably low bactericidal titres against the target strain. The use of different donors for each meningococcal strain means that comparisons of assay responses between strains and between laboratories is difficult. We have developed a method for IgG-depletion of 300 ml batches of pooled human lepirudin-derived plasma using Protein G sepharose affinity chromatography that retains complement activity. However, IgG-depletion also removed C1q. This was also eluted from the affinity matrix, concentrated and added to the complement source. The final complement source retained mean alternative pathway activity of 96.8% and total haemolytic activity of 84.2% in four batches. Complement components C3, C5, properdin and factor H were retained following the process and the IgG-depleted complement was shown to be suitable for use in antibody-mediated complement deposition and serum bactericidal activity assays against serogroup B meningococci. The generation of large IgG-depleted batches of pooled human plasma allows for the comparison of immunological responses to diverse meningococcal strain panels in large clinical trials.

  10. The role of complement in antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stegall, Mark D; Chedid, Marcio F; Cornell, Lynn D

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, several studies have suggested that the complement system has an active role in both acute and chronic allograft rejection. These studies have been facilitated by improved techniques to detect antibody-mediated organ rejection, including immunohistological staining for C4d deposition in the allograft and solid-phase assays that identify donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) in the serum of transplant recipients. Studies with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against complement component C5, have shown that activation of the terminal complement pathway is necessary for the development of acute antibody-mediated rejection in recipients of living-donor kidney allografts who have high levels of DSAs. The extent to which complement activation drives chronic antibody-mediated injury leading to organ rejection is less clear. In chronic antibody-mediated injury, early complement activation might facilitate chemotaxis of inflammatory cells into the allograft in a process that later becomes somewhat independent of DSA levels and complement factors. In this Review, we discuss the different roles that the complement system might have in antibody-mediated allograft rejection, with specific emphasis on renal transplantation.

  11. Interactions of lectins with plasma membrane glycoproteins of the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cell.

    PubMed

    Nachbar, M S; Oppenheim, J D; Aull, F

    1976-02-06

    Several aspects of the interaction of various lectins with the surface of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells are described. The order of agglutinating activity for various lectins is Ricinus communis greater than wheat germ greater than or equal to concanavalin A greater than or equal to soybean greater than Limulus polyphemus. No agglutination was noted for Ulex europaeus. Using 125I-labeled lectins it was determined that there are 1.6 and 7 times as many Ricinus communis lectin binding sites for concanavalin A and soybean lectins. Sodium deoxycholate-solubilized plasma membrane material was subjected to lectin affinity chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The lectin receptors of the plasma membrane appeared to be heterogeneous and some qualitative differences could be discerned among the electrophoretically analyzed material, which bound to and was specifically eluted from the various lectin affinity columns. The characteristics of elution of bound material from individual lectin columns indicated secondary hydrophobic interactions between concanavalin A or wheat germ agglutinin and their respective lectin receptor molecules.

  12. Properties of Lectins in the Root and Seed of Lotononis bainesii1

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ian J.; Strijdom, Barend W.

    1984-01-01

    A lectin was purified from the root of Lotononis bainesii Baker by affinity chromatography on Sepharose-blood group substance A + H. The molecular weight of the lectin was estimated by gel filtration to be 118,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the lectin was a tetramer composed of two slightly different subunits with respective molecular weights of 32,000 and 35,000. The lectin had a hexose content of 12% (w/w) and contained the sugars fucose, glucosamine, mannose, and xylose. Root lectin hemagglutination was preferentially inhibited by disaccharides with terminal nonreducing galactose residues. Antigens capable of cross-reaction with root lectin antibody were not detected in the seed of L. bainesii. A lectin from the seed of L. bainesii was partially purified by adsorption to pronase-treated rabbit erythrocytes. The lectin preparation had a molecular weight of approximately 200,000. Galactose and galactono-1,4-lactone inhibited seed lectin hemagglutination but lactose was ineffective. There was no evidence that the root of L. bainesii contained material antigenically related to the seed lectin. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16663508

  13. Isolation and partial characterization of a lectin from ground elder (Aegopodium podagraria) rhizomes.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Nsimba-Lubaki, M; Peeters, B; Broekaert, W F

    1985-05-01

    A lectin has been isolated from rhizomes of ground elder (Aegopodium podagraria) using a combination of affinity chromatography on erythrocyte membrane proteins immobilized on cross-linked agarose and hydroxyapatite, and ion-exchange chromatography. The molecular structure of the lectin was determined by gelfiltration, sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. It has an unusually high Mr (about 480000) and is most probably an octamer composed of two distinct types of subunits with slightly different Mr (about 60000). Hapten inhibition assays indicated that the Aegopodium lectin is preferentially inhibited by N-acetylgalactosamine. Nevertheless, it does not agglutinate preferentially blood-group-A erythrocytes. The ground-elder lectin is a typical non-seed lectin, which occurs virtually exclusively in the underground rhizomes. In this organ it is an abundant protein as it represents up to 5% of the total protein content. The lectin content of the rhizome tissue varies strongly according to its particular location along the organ. In addition, the lectin content changes dramatically as a function of the seasons. The ground-elder lectin differs from all other plant lectins by its unusually high molecular weight. In addition, it is the first lectin to be isolated from a species of the family Apiaceae.

  14. Anopheles Midgut Epithelium Evades Human Complement Activity by Capturing Factor H from the Blood Meal

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ayman; Barroso, Marta; Miettinen, Tiera; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Hematophagous vectors strictly require ingesting blood from their hosts to complete their life cycles. Exposure of the alimentary canal of these vectors to the host immune effectors necessitates efficient counteractive measures by hematophagous vectors. The Anopheles mosquito transmitting the malaria parasite is an example of hematophagous vectors that within seconds can ingest human blood double its weight. The innate immune defense mechanisms, like the complement system, in the human blood should thereby immediately react against foreign cells in the mosquito midgut. A prerequisite for complement activation is that the target cells lack complement regulators on their surfaces. In this work, we analyzed whether human complement is active in the mosquito midgut, and how the mosquito midgut cells protect themselves against complement attack. We found that complement remained active for a considerable time and was able to kill microbes within the mosquito midgut. However, the Anopheles mosquito midgut cells were not injured. These cells were found to protect themselves by capturing factor H, the main soluble inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway. Factor H inhibited complement on the midgut cells by promoting inactivation of C3b to iC3b and preventing the activity of the alternative pathway amplification C3 convertase enzyme. An interference of the FH regulatory activity by monoclonal antibodies, carried to the midgut via blood, resulted in increased mosquito mortality and reduced fecundity. By using a ligand blotting assay, a putative mosquito midgut FH receptor could be detected. Thereby, we have identified a novel mechanism whereby mosquitoes can tolerate human blood. PMID:25679788

  15. Immune evasion by pathogenic Leptospira strains: the secretion of proteases that directly cleave complement proteins.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Courrol, Daniella Dos Santos; Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Hirata, Izaura Yoshico; Vasconcellos, Sílvio Arruda; Juliano, Luiz; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-03-01

    Leptospirosis is an infectious disease of public health importance. To successfully colonize the host, pathogens have evolved multiple strategies to escape the complement system. Here we demonstrate that the culture supernatant of pathogenic but not saprophytic Leptospira inhibit the three complement pathways. We showed that the proteolytic activity in the supernatants of pathogenic strains targets the central complement molecule C3 and specific proteins from each pathway, such as factor B, C2, and C4b. The proteases cleaved α and β chains of C3 and work in synergy with host regulators to inactivate C3b. Proteolytic activity was inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, suggesting the participation of metalloproteases. A recombinant leptospiral metalloprotease from the thermolysin family cleaved C3 in serum and could be one of the proteases responsible for the supernatant activity. We conclude that pathogenic leptospiral proteases can deactivate immune effector molecules and represent potential targets to the development of new therapies in leptospirosis.

  16. Complement in therapy and disease: Regulating the complement system with antibody-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Melis, Joost P M; Strumane, Kristin; Ruuls, Sigrid R; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I

    2015-10-01

    Complement is recognized as a key player in a wide range of normal as well as disease-related immune, developmental and homeostatic processes. Knowledge of complement components, structures, interactions, and cross-talk with other biological systems continues to grow and this leads to novel treatments for cancer, infectious, autoimmune- or age-related diseases as well as for preventing transplantation rejection. Antibodies are superbly suited to be developed into therapeutics with appropriate complement stimulatory or inhibitory activity. Here we review the design, development and future of antibody-based drugs that enhance or dampen the complement system.

  17. Blocking of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum lectins by diverse mammalian milks.

    PubMed

    Zinger-Yosovich, K D; Iluz, D; Sudakevitz, D; Gilboa-Garber, N

    2010-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum morbid and mortal infections are initiated by bacterial adherence to host-cell receptors via their adhesins, including lectins (which also contribute to bacterial biofilm formation). Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a galactophilic lectin, PA-IL (LecA), and a fucophilic (Lewis-specific) lectin, PA-IIL (LecB), and C. violaceum produces a fucophilic (H-specific) lectin, CV-IIL. The antibiotic resistance of these bacteria prompted the search for glycosylated receptor-mimicking compounds that would function as glycodecoys for blocking lectin attachment to human cell receptors. Lectins PA-IL and PA-IIL have been shown to be useful for such glycodecoy probing, clearly differentiating between human and cow milks. This article describes their usage, together with CV-IIL and the plant lectin concanavalin A, for comparing the anti-lectin-dependent adhesion potential of diverse mammalian milks. The results show that the diverse milks differ in blocking (hemagglutination inhibition) and differential binding (Western blots) of these lectins. Human milk most strongly inhibited the 3 bacterial lectins (with PA-IIL superiority), followed by alpaca, giraffe, and monkey milks, whereas cow milk was a weak inhibitor. Lectin PA-IL was inhibited strongly by human, followed by alpaca, mare, giraffe, buffalo, and monkey milks, weakly by camel milk, and not at all by rabbit milk. Lectins PA-IIL and CV-IIL were also most sensitive to human milk, followed by alpaca, monkey, giraffe, rabbit, and camel milks but negligibly sensitive to buffalo and mare milks. Plant lectin concanavalinA, which was used as the reference, differed from them in that it was much less sensitive to human milk and was equally as sensitive to cow milk. These results have provided important information on the anti-lectin-dependent adhesion potential of the diverse milks examined. They showed that human followed by alpaca, giraffe, and Rhesus monkey milks efficiently

  18. Effects of complement depletion in experimental chagas disease: immune lysis of virulent blood forms of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Budzko, D B; Pizzimenti, M C; Kierszenbaum, F

    1975-01-01

    In mice infected with virulent blood (trypomastigote) forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, complement depletion with cobra venom factor caused a marked exacerbation of the disease evidenced by significantly increased parasitemia levels and early mortality as compared with those of untreated infected animals. The effect was greater in mice receiving cobra venom factor on day 7 postinfection, i.e., at the time when the parasites had had time to localize and multiply in the tissues and appeared in the circulation in appreciable numbers. The possibility that complement participates in host defense against T. cruzi infection through a mechanism involving immune lysis was explored in vitro. T. cruzi trypomastigotes were found to undergo immune lysis in sera of patients with chronic Chagas' disease, in sera of immunized mice, and in solutions containing both immune mouse gamma globulin and a source of active complement. This phenomenon failed to take place either in the absence of complement or after complement inactivation by heat or utilizing complement inactivators. The lytic capacity of heated sera was restored by the addition of active complement to the system. During the immune lysis of T. cruzi blood forms, complement was activated in human sera via both the classical and the alternate pathways. In mouse sera, activation followed at least the alternate pathway. PMID:46840

  19. Inhibition of Complement Retards Ankylosing Spondylitis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chaoqun; Ding, Peipei; Wang, Qingkai; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Jianquan; Xu, Enjie; Wang, Na; Chen, Jianfeng; Yang, Guang; Hu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) resulting in back pain and progressive spinal ankyloses. Currently, there are no effective therapeutics targeting AS largely due to elusive pathogenesis mechanisms, even as potential candidates such as HLA-B27 autoantigen have been identified. Herein, we employed a proteoglycan (PG)-induced AS mouse model together with clinical specimens, and found that the complement system was substantially activated in the spinal bone marrow, accompanied by a remarkable proportion alteration of neutrophils and macrophage in bone marrow and spleen, and by the significant increase of TGF-β1 in serum. The combined treatment with a bacteria-derived complement inhibitor Efb-C (C-terminal of extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus) remarkably retarded the progression of mouse AS by reducing osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that two important modulators involved in AS disease, TGF-β1 and RANKL, were elevated upon in vitro complement attack in osteoblast and/or osteoclast cells. These findings further unravel that complement activation is closely related with the pathogenesis of AS, and suggest that complement inhibition may hold great potential for AS therapy. PMID:27698377

  20. Histochemical characterization of the lectin-binding sites in the equine vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee-young; Kang, Tae-young; Lee, Yong-duk; Shin, Tae-kyun

    2003-04-01

    The binding specificities of various lectins, such as the Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), soybean agglutinin (SBA), and the Bandeiraea simplicifolia BS-1 (Isolectin B4), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), and Ulex europaeus (UEA-I) lectins, were studied in the vomeronasal organ of the horse. The microvilli of the vomeronasal sensory epithelium were positive for DBA, SBA, Isolectin B4, WGA, PNA, and UEA-I. The receptor cells showed intense reactivity for DBA and WGA. Lectins were not detected in the supporting cells or basal cells. The Jacobson's glands were positive for WGA and UEA-I, but lectins were absent from the nerve bundles. From these results, we postulate that several lectin-binding carbohydrates on the microvilli and neurosensory cells are associated with chemoreception in the horse. In addition, the differential lectin-binding patterns in the horse suggest that the carbohydrates present in this particular sense organ are species-specific.

  1. Isolation of the galactose-binding lectin that mediates the in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Smith, R D; Schlesinger, P H; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucus, colonic epithelial cells, and other target cells via a galactose (Gal) or N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) inhibitable surface lectin. Blockade of this adherence lectin with Gal or GalNAc in vitro prevents amebic killing of target cells. We have identified and purified the adherence lectin by two methods: affinity columns derivatized with galactose monomers or galactose terminal glycoproteins, and affinity columns and immunoblots prepared with monoclonal antibodies that inhibit amebic adherence. By both methods the adherence lectin was identified as a 170-kD secreted and membrane-bound amebic protein. The surface location of the lectin was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Purified lectin competitively inhibited amebic adherence to target cells by binding to receptors on the target Chinese hamster ovary cells in a Gal-inhibitable manner. Images PMID:2890654

  2. Leguminous lectins as tools for studying the role of sugar residues in leukocyte recruitment.

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, N M; Teixeira, E H; Assreuy, A M; Cavada, B S; Flores, C A; Ribeiro, R A

    1999-01-01

    The natural physiological ligands for selectins are oligosaccharides found in glycoprotein or glycolipid molecules in cell membranes. In order to study the role of sugar residues in the in vivo lectin anti-inflammatory effect, we tested three leguminous lectins with different carbohydrate binding affinities in the peritonitis and paw oedema models induced by carrageenin in rats. L. sericeus lectin was more anti-inflammatory than D. virgata lectin, the effects being reversed by their specific binding sugars (N-acetylglucosamine and alpha-methylmannoside, respectively). However, V. macrocarpa, a galactose-specific lectin, was not anti-inflammatory. The proposed anti-inflammatory activity of lectins could be due to a blockage of neutrophil-selectin carbohydrate ligands. Thus, according to the present data, we suggest an important role for N-acetylglucosamine residue as the major ligand for selectins on rat neutrophil membranes. PMID:10704148

  3. A galactose-specific lectin from the hemolymph of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata martensii.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Mori, K

    1989-01-01

    1. A lectin in the serum of Pinctada fucata martensii was purified by a combination of affinity chromatography on Sepharose 4B coupled with bovine submaxillary gland mucine, anion exchange chromatography on Mono Q and gel filtration on Superose 6. 2. The purified lectin was indicated to be homogeneous by polyacrylamide electrophoresis and rechromatography on Mono Q. 3. The purified lectin was approximately 440,000 in molecular weight and was composed of identical subunits with a molecular weight of approximately 20,000. 4. D-galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine gave a 50% inhibition of agglutination of horse erythrocytes by the lectin at 0.3 and 1.2 mM, respectively. 5. The antibody obtained from rabbit immunized with the purified lectin was monospecific to the lectin judged from the hemagglutination blocking test, immunoelectrophoresis and immunoblotting.

  4. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  5. Prostaglandin synthesis in human T cells: its partial inhibition by lectins and anti-CD3 antibodies as a possible step in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Aussel, C; Mary, D; Fehlmann, M

    1987-05-15

    The human leukemic T cell line Jurkat was used to study arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism. We demonstrated that Jurkat cells are able to convert AA into prostaglandins (PG) and thromboxanes. The presence of tritiated 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGE2, PGA2 (B2), and thromboxane B2 in the culture medium was shown either by thin-layer chromatography after a 4-hr incubation period of [3H]AA-prelabeled Jurkat cells or by using specific radioimmuno assays. PG synthesis was inhibited by both indomethacin and niflumic acid, two cyclooxygenase inhibitors. AA metabolism through the cyclooxygenase pathway was followed during T cell activation. T cells were activated by lectins or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to trigger the T3-Ti complex and by 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) to mimic IL 1-dependent pathways. Our results show that lectins and anti-CD3 mAb both reduce the amount of PG released by the cells, whereas TPA did not. We confirmed that a combination of TPA and lectins or TPA and anti-CD3 mAb is necessary to obtain full activation of Jurkat cells if this event is monitored by using measurement of IL 2 synthesis. In addition, lectins and anti-CD3 mAb can be replaced by the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin or niflumic acid. Indeed, a combination of TPA and one of these two drugs induced maximal IL 2 synthesis. These results thus suggest that a reduction in PG synthesis might be a prerequisite to allow the cascade of events involved in T cell activation.

  6. State of Büchi Complementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Fogarty, Seth; Vardi, Moshe Y.; Tsay, Yih-Kuen

    Büchi complementation has been studied for five decades since the formalism was introduced in 1960. Known complementation constructions can be classified into Ramsey-based, determinization-based, rank-based, and slice-based approaches. For the performance of these approaches, there have been several complexity analyses but very few experimental results. What especially lacks is a comparative experiment on all the four approaches to see how they perform in practice. In this paper, we review the state of Büchi complementation, propose several optimization heuristics, and perform comparative experimentation on the four approaches. The experimental results show that the determinization-based Safra-Piterman construction outperforms the other three and our heuristics substantially improve the Safra-Piterman construction and the slice-based construction.

  7. Applying Complement Therapeutics to Rare Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Edimara S.; Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Yancopoulou, Despina; Risitano, Antonio M.; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Around 350 million people worldwide suffer from rare diseases. These may have a genetic, infectious, or autoimmune basis, and several include an inflammatory component. Launching of effective treatments can be very challenging when there is a low disease prevalence and limited scientific insights into the disease mechanisms. As a key trigger of inflammatory processes, complement has been associated with a variety of diseases and has become an attractive therapeutic target for conditions involving inflammation. In view of the clinical experience acquired with drugs licensed for the treatment of rare diseases such as hereditary angioedema and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, growing evidence supports the safety and efficacy of complement therapeutics in restoring immune balance and preventing aggravation of clinical outcomes. This review provides an overview of the candidates currently in the pharmaceutical pipeline with potential to treat orphan diseases and discusses the molecular mechanisms triggered by complement involved with the disease pathogenesis. PMID:26341313

  8. Applying complement therapeutics to rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Reis, Edimara S; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Yancopoulou, Despina; Risitano, Antonio M; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2015-12-01

    Around 350 million people worldwide suffer from rare diseases. These may have a genetic, infectious, or autoimmune basis, and several include an inflammatory component. Launching of effective treatments can be very challenging when there is a low disease prevalence and limited scientific insights into the disease mechanisms. As a key trigger of inflammatory processes, complement has been associated with a variety of diseases and has become an attractive therapeutic target for conditions involving inflammation. In view of the clinical experience acquired with drugs licensed for the treatment of rare diseases such as hereditary angioedema and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, growing evidence supports the safety and efficacy of complement therapeutics in restoring immune balance and preventing aggravation of clinical outcomes. This review provides an overview of the candidates currently in the pharmaceutical pipeline with potential to treat orphan diseases and discusses the molecular mechanisms triggered by complement involved with the disease pathogenesis.

  9. Large Scale Magnetic Separation of Solanum tuberosum Tuber Lectin from Potato Starch Waste Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarik, Ivo; Horska, Katerina; Martinez, Lluis M.; Safarikova, Mirka

    2010-12-01

    A simple procedure for large scale isolation of Solanum tuberosum tuber lectin from potato starch industry waste water has been developed. The procedure employed magnetic chitosan microparticles as an affinity adsorbent. Magnetic separation was performed in a flow-through magnetic separation system. The adsorbed lectin was eluted with glycine/HCl buffer, pH 2.2. The specific activity of separated lectin increased approximately 27 times during the isolation process.

  10. Isolation and partial characterization of a lectin from a false brome grass (Brachypodium sylvaticum).

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, W J; Spaepen, C; Stinissen, H M; Carlier, A R

    1982-01-01

    A lectin has been isolated from embryos of a false brome grass species (Brachypodium sylvaticum) by affinity chromatography on immobilized N-acetylglucosamine. It is a dimeric protein of two identical subunits of mol.wt. 18 000. Although it resembles cereal lectins with respect to its biochemical and physicochemical properties, it differs structurally in several aspects from wheat-germ-agglutinin-like lectins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6816219

  11. Pharmacological inhibition of mannose-binding lectin ameliorates neurobehavioral dysfunction following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Daiana; Fumagalli, Stefano; Longhi, Luca; Orsini, Franca; Palmioli, Alessandro; Stravalaci, Matteo; Vegliante, Gloria; Zanier, Elisa R; Bernardi, Anna; Gobbi, Marco; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2017-03-01

    Mannose-binding lectin is present in the contusion area of traumatic brain-injured patients and in that of traumatic brain-injured mice, where mannose-binding lectin-C exceeds mannose-binding lectin-A. The reduced susceptibility to traumatic brain injury of mannose-binding lectin double knock-out mice (mannose-binding lectin(-/-)) when compared to wild type mice suggests that mannose-binding lectin may be a therapeutic target following traumatic brain injury. Here, we evaluated the effects of a multivalent glycomimetic mannose-binding lectin ligand, Polyman9, following traumatic brain injury in mice. In vitro surface plasmon resonance assay indicated that Polyman9 dose-dependently inhibits the binding to immobilized mannose residues of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C selectively over that of mannose-binding lectin-A. Male C57Bl/6 mice underwent sham/controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury and intravenous treatment with Polyman9/saline. Ex-vivo surface plasmon resonance studies confirmed that Polyman9 effectively reduces the binding of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C to immobilized mannose residues. In vivo studies up to four weeks post injury, showed that Polyman9 induces significant improvement in sensorimotor deficits (by neuroscore and beam walk), promotes neurogenesis (73% increase in doublecortin immunoreactivity), and astrogliosis (28% increase in glial fibrillary acid protein). Polyman9 administration in brain-injured mannose-binding lectin(-/-) mice had no effect on post-traumatic brain-injured functional deficits, suggestive of the specificity of its neuroprotective effects. The neurobehavioral efficacy of Polyman9 implicates mannose-binding lectin-C as a novel therapeutic target for traumatic brain injury.

  12. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT), an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this