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Sample records for complete complement c4

  1. Juvenile elastic arteries after 28 years of renal replacement therapy in a patient with complete complement C4 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Complement activation products are present in atherosclerotic plaques. Recently, binding of complement to elastin and collagen in the aortic wall has been demonstrated, suggesting a role of complement in the development aortic stiffness and atherosclerosis. The definitive role of complement in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis, however, remains unclear. Case presentation We here describe a patient with hereditary complete deficiency of complement C4 suffering from Henoch-Schoenlein purpura and on renal replacement therapy for twenty-eight years. The patient had the full range of risk factors for vascular damage such as hypertension, volume overload, hyperphosphatemia and hyperparathyroidism. Despite that, his carotid artery intima media thickness was below the normal range and his pulse wave velocity was normal. In contrast, the patient’s coronary and peripheral muscular arteries were heavily calcified. Conclusion This case supports the hypothesis that complement plays an important role in the development of stiffness of elastic arteries. We speculate that inability to activate complement by the classical or lectin pathways protected the patient from atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, stiffening and calcification of the aorta and carotid arteries. Inhibition of complement activation may be a potential target for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. PMID:23199021

  2. Juvenile elastic arteries after 28 years of renal replacement therapy in a patient with complete complement C4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Florian; Zitt, Emanuel; Intemann, Denis; Lhotta, Karl

    2012-12-02

    Complement activation products are present in atherosclerotic plaques. Recently, binding of complement to elastin and collagen in the aortic wall has been demonstrated, suggesting a role of complement in the development aortic stiffness and atherosclerosis. The definitive role of complement in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis, however, remains unclear. We here describe a patient with hereditary complete deficiency of complement C4 suffering from Henoch-Schoenlein purpura and on renal replacement therapy for twenty-eight years. The patient had the full range of risk factors for vascular damage such as hypertension, volume overload, hyperphosphatemia and hyperparathyroidism. Despite that, his carotid artery intima media thickness was below the normal range and his pulse wave velocity was normal. In contrast, the patient's coronary and peripheral muscular arteries were heavily calcified. This case supports the hypothesis that complement plays an important role in the development of stiffness of elastic arteries. We speculate that inability to activate complement by the classical or lectin pathways protected the patient from atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, stiffening and calcification of the aorta and carotid arteries. Inhibition of complement activation may be a potential target for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions.

  3. Molecular analysis of complement component C4 gene copy number.

    PubMed

    Castley, Alison S L; Martinez, O Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Classical, alternative, or lectin pathways may activate the complement system cascade. The classical pathway includes the C4 protein and functions in the prevention of immune complex precipitation and in clearance of immune complexes.Two isotypes of C4-C4A and C4B-are coded by genes located at two loci within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6. While these isotypes share over 99% amino acid sequence homology, five nucleotide differences located in exon 26 are responsible for major structural and functional differences between the C4 isotypes.C4A and C4B are highly polymorphic with over 40 alleles, gene duplications, and "null alleles". C4 genes may be short (14.6 kb) or long (21 kb), due to the absence or presence of an endogenous retroviral sequence-HERV-K(C4)-in intron 9, respectively. The C4 gene copy number (GCN) can vary from 1-3 per haplotype or 2-6 per diploid genome. The variation in GCN leads to a range of C4 plasma protein concentrations among healthy subjects. In subjects with equal numbers of C4 genes, subjects with short genes have C4 plasma levels relatively higher than subjects with long genes.Variation of the C4 GCN, the gene size (long or short) and the C4 isotypes (C4A and C4B) may also lead to susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Therefore, in subjects with autoimmune disease, a low serum C4 level may be due to ongoing disease activity associated with complement activation and consumption or it may be due to genetic factors. Distinguishing between these will have clinical implications.Exact determination of GCN can be difficult, at least in part due to the high degree of homology between C4A and C4B and a variety of techniques has been described. This chapter describes a quantitative TaqMan real-time PCR (qPCR) copy number assay, based on our laboratory experience using this assay.

  4. Genetically Determined Partial Complement C4 Deficiency States Are Not Independent Risk Factors for SLE in UK and Spanish Populations

    PubMed Central

    Boteva, Lora; Morris, David L.; Cortés-Hernández, Josefina; Martin, Javier; Vyse, Timothy J.; Fernando, Michelle M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease. Complete deficiency of complement component C4 confers strong genetic risk for SLE. Partial C4 deficiency states have also shown association with SLE, but despite much effort over the last 30 years, it has not been established whether this association is primarily causal or secondary to long-range linkage disequilibrium. The complement C4 locus, located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region, exhibits copy-number variation (CNV) and C4 itself exists as two paralogs, C4A and C4B. In order to determine whether partial C4 deficiency is an independent genetic risk factor for SLE, we investigated C4 CNV in the context of HLA-DRB1 and MHC region SNP polymorphism in the largest and most comprehensive complement C4 study to date. Specifically, we genotyped 2,207 subjects of northern and southern European ancestry (1,028 SLE cases and 1,179 controls) for total C4, C4A, and C4B gene copy numbers, and the loss-of-function C4 exon 29 CT indel. We used multiple logistic regression to determine the independence of C4 CNV from known SNP and HLA-DRB1 associations. We clearly demonstrate that genetically determined partial C4 deficiency states are not independent risk factors for SLE in UK and Spanish populations. These results are further corroborated by the lack of association shown by the C4A exon 29 CT insertion in either cohort. Thus, although complete homozygous deficiency of complement C4 is one of the strongest genetic risk factors for SLE, partial C4 deficiency states do not independently predispose to the disease. PMID:22387014

  5. Complement components C2, C3, and C4 (C4A and C4B) and BF polymorphisms in populations of the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Ad'hiah, A H; Papiha, S S

    1996-10-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of the complement components (five loci: C2, C3, C4A, C4B, and BF) have been investigated in the Telugu-speaking Hindu population of Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India, and the Bangali-speaking Muslim population of Dacca, Bangladesh. The available data are compared to understand the genetic variation of complement components in populations of the Indian subcontinent. The C3*F and BF*F alleles show wide frequency variations in different ethnic groups of India. The range of variation in the C3*F allele is intermediate between European whites and southeast Asian populations, whereas the BF*F allele places the Indian frequencies between European whites and African blacks. This is the first population study to investigate the C2 and C4 (C4A and C4B) polymorphisms in two distinct groups of the Indian subcontinent. For the C2 polymorphism only the C2*B variant allele was observed, and its frequency was slightly higher than in European populations. In both populations the C4A and C4B loci were highly polymorphic, with a high frequency of the null alleles C4A*QO and C4B*QO, which may account for the greater susceptibility to certain autoimmune diseases in populations of South Asia.

  6. Structural Basis for the Function of Complement Component C4 within the Classical and Lectin Pathways of Complement.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Sofia; Kidmose, Rune T; Petersen, Steen V; Szilágyi, Ágnes; Prohászka, Zoltan; Andersen, Gregers R

    2015-06-01

    Complement component C4 is a central protein in the classical and lectin pathways within the complement system. During activation of complement, its major fragment C4b becomes covalently attached to the surface of pathogens and altered self-tissue, where it acts as an opsonin marking the surface for removal. Moreover, C4b provides a platform for assembly of the proteolytically active convertases that mediate downstream complement activation by cleavage of C3 and C5. In this article, we present the crystal and solution structures of the 195-kDa C4b. Our results provide the molecular details of the rearrangement accompanying C4 cleavage and suggest intramolecular flexibility of C4b. The conformations of C4b and its paralogue C3b are shown to be remarkably conserved, suggesting that the convertases from the classical and alternative pathways are likely to share their overall architecture and mode of substrate recognition. We propose an overall molecular model for the classical pathway C5 convertase in complex with C5, suggesting that C3b increases the affinity for the substrate by inducing conformational changes in C4b rather than a direct interaction with C5. C4b-specific features revealed by our structural studies are probably involved in the assembly of the classical pathway C3/C5 convertases and C4b binding to regulators. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Antagonism of the complement component C4 by flavivirus nonstructural protein NS1

    PubMed Central

    Avirutnan, Panisadee; Fuchs, Anja; Hauhart, Richard E.; Somnuke, Pawit; Youn, Soonjeon

    2010-01-01

    The complement system plays an essential protective role in the initial defense against many microorganisms. Flavivirus NS1 is a secreted nonstructural glycoprotein that accumulates in blood, is displayed on the surface of infected cells, and has been hypothesized to have immune evasion functions. Herein, we demonstrate that dengue virus (DENV), West Nile virus (WNV), and yellow fever virus (YFV) NS1 attenuate classical and lectin pathway activation by directly interacting with C4. Binding of NS1 to C4 reduced C4b deposition and C3 convertase (C4b2a) activity. Although NS1 bound C4b, it lacked intrinsic cofactor activity to degrade C4b, and did not block C3 convertase formation or accelerate decay of the C3 and C5 convertases. Instead, NS1 enhanced C4 cleavage by recruiting and activating the complement-specific protease C1s. By binding C1s and C4 in a complex, NS1 promotes efficient degradation of C4 to C4b. Through this mechanism, NS1 protects DENV from complement-dependent neutralization in solution. These studies define a novel immune evasion mechanism for restricting complement control of microbial infection. PMID:20308361

  8. Assessment of Complement C4 Gene Copy Number Using the Paralog Ratio Test

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Michelle M.A.; Boteva, Lora; Morris, David L.; Zhou, Bi; Wu, Yee Ling; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Yu, Chack Yung; Rioux, John D.; Hollox, Edward J.; Vyse, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The complement C4 locus is in the class III region of the MHC, and exhibits copy number variation. Complement C4 null alleles have shown association with a number of diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, most studies to date have used protein immunophenotyping and not direct interrogation of the genome to determine C4 null allele status. Moreover, a lack of accurate C4 gene copy number (GCN) estimation and tight linkage disequilibrium across the disease-associated MHC haplotypes has confounded attempts to establish whether or not these associations are causal. We have therefore developed a high through-put paralog ratio test (PRT) in association with two restriction enzyme digest variant ratio tests (REDVRs) to determine total C4 GCN, C4A GCN, and C4B GCN. In the densely genotyped CEU cohort we show that this method is accurate and reproducible when compared to gold standard Southern blot copy number estimation with a discrepancy rate of 9%. We find a broad range of C4 GCNs in the CEU and the 1958 British Birth Cohort populations under study. In addition, SNP-C4 CNV analyses show only moderate levels of correlation and therefore do not support the use of SNP genotypes as proxies for complement C4 GCN. PMID:20506482

  9. Complement Factor C4d Is a Common Denominator in Thrombotic Microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Baelde, Hans J.; Zandbergen, Malu; Wilhelmus, Suzanne; van Es, Leendert A.; de Fijter, Johan W.; Bruijn, Jan A.; Bajema, Ingeborg M.; Cohen, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has a major role in thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), a disorder that can occur in a variety of clinical conditions. Promising results of recent trials with terminal complement-inhibiting drugs call for biomarkers identifying patients who might benefit from this treatment. The primary aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and localization of complement factor C4d in kidneys of patients with TMA. The secondary aims were to determine which complement pathways lead to C4d deposition and to determine whether complement activation results in deposition of the terminal complement complex. We examined 42 renal sections with histologically confirmed TMA obtained from a heterogeneous patient group. Deposits of C4d, mannose-binding lectin, C1q, IgM, and C5b-9 were scored in the glomeruli, peritubular capillaries, and arterioles. Notably, C4d deposits were present in 88.1% of TMA cases, and the various clinical conditions had distinct staining patterns within the various compartments of the renal vasculature. Classical pathway activation was observed in 90.5% of TMA cases. C5b-9 deposits were present in 78.6% of TMA cases and in 39.6% of controls (n=53), but the staining pattern differed between cases and controls. In conclusion, C4d is a common finding in TMA, regardless of the underlying clinical condition. Moreover, C5b-9 was present in >75% of the TMA samples, suggesting that terminal complement inhibitors may have a beneficial effect in these patients. C4d and C5b-9 should be investigated as possible diagnostic biomarkers in the clinical work-up of patients suspected of having complement-mediated TMA. PMID:25573909

  10. C4, BF, C3 allele distribution and complement activity in healthy aged people and centenarians.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, D; Fradà, G; Di Franco, P; Feo, S; Franceschi, C; Sansoni, P; Brai, M

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the complement system and the distribution of some human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class III alleles (C4, BF) in healthy aged people (77 centenarians and 89 elderly subjects). We have also studied the alleles of C3, a complement component genetically unrelated to HLA, the immunochemical levels of C4 and C3 and serum functional hemolytic activity for classical (CH50) and alternative (AP50) complement pathway. The levels of C3 and C4 and the CH50 and AP50 were found to be within the normal range. The frequencies of C3, BF, and C4A alleles were similar in the cohorts that have been studied. For C4B null allele (C4BQ0) a trend toward an increase in the older cohort was observed, although the differences were not significant after statistical correction. Our data suggest that the complement system is well preserved in centenarians and elderly subjects and class III HLA antigens are equally distributed in aged cohorts and in young healthy individuals.

  11. Structural basis for activation of the complement system by component C4 cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Kidmose, Rune T.; Laursen, Nick S.; Dobó, József; Kjaer, Troels R.; Sirotkina, Sofia; Yatime, Laure; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Thiel, Steffen; Gál, Péter; Andersen, Gregers R.

    2012-01-01

    An essential aspect of innate immunity is recognition of molecular patterns on the surface of pathogens or altered self through the lectin and classical pathways, two of the three well-established activation pathways of the complement system. This recognition causes activation of the MASP-2 or the C1s serine proteases followed by cleavage of the protein C4. Here we present the crystal structures of the 203-kDa human C4 and the 245-kDa C4⋅MASP-2 substrate⋅enzyme complex. When C4 binds to MASP-2, substantial conformational changes in C4 are induced, and its scissile bond region becomes ordered and inserted into the protease catalytic site in a manner canonical to serine proteases. In MASP-2, an exosite located within the CCP domains recognizes the C4 C345C domain 60 Å from the scissile bond. Mutations in C4 and MASP-2 residues at the C345C–CCP interface inhibit the intermolecular interaction and C4 cleavage. The possible assembly of the huge in vivo enzyme–substrate complex consisting of glycan-bound mannan-binding lectin, MASP-2, and C4 is discussed. Our own and prior functional data suggest that C1s in the classical pathway of complement activated by, e.g., antigen–antibody complexes, also recognizes the C4 C345C domain through a CCP exosite. Our results provide a unified structural framework for understanding the early and essential step of C4 cleavage in the elimination of pathogens and altered self through two major pathways of complement activation. PMID:22949645

  12. Structural basis for activation of the complement system by component C4 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Kidmose, Rune T; Laursen, Nick S; Dobó, József; Kjaer, Troels R; Sirotkina, Sofia; Yatime, Laure; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Thiel, Steffen; Gál, Péter; Andersen, Gregers R

    2012-09-18

    An essential aspect of innate immunity is recognition of molecular patterns on the surface of pathogens or altered self through the lectin and classical pathways, two of the three well-established activation pathways of the complement system. This recognition causes activation of the MASP-2 or the C1s serine proteases followed by cleavage of the protein C4. Here we present the crystal structures of the 203-kDa human C4 and the 245-kDa C4·MASP-2 substrate·enzyme complex. When C4 binds to MASP-2, substantial conformational changes in C4 are induced, and its scissile bond region becomes ordered and inserted into the protease catalytic site in a manner canonical to serine proteases. In MASP-2, an exosite located within the CCP domains recognizes the C4 C345C domain 60 Å from the scissile bond. Mutations in C4 and MASP-2 residues at the C345C-CCP interface inhibit the intermolecular interaction and C4 cleavage. The possible assembly of the huge in vivo enzyme-substrate complex consisting of glycan-bound mannan-binding lectin, MASP-2, and C4 is discussed. Our own and prior functional data suggest that C1s in the classical pathway of complement activated by, e.g., antigen-antibody complexes, also recognizes the C4 C345C domain through a CCP exosite. Our results provide a unified structural framework for understanding the early and essential step of C4 cleavage in the elimination of pathogens and altered self through two major pathways of complement activation.

  13. Comparison of a fluorometric method with radial immunodiffusion assays for determination of complement components C3 and C4.

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, M; Bartholomew, W R

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of patient serum complement components C3 and C4 are useful indicators of complement consumption in immune complex diseases. A fluorometric quantitative immunofluorescence system was evaluated in terms of measuring these complement components, and the results were compared with those of radial immunodiffusion assays. For comparison of the two systems, 232 patient sera were evaluated for C3, and 202 specimens were tested for C4. Analysis of the data by linear regression indicated a proportional difference between the methods. C3 and C4 concentrations measured by the fluorometric method were lower than those measured by radial immunodiffusion, especially concentrations exceeding the normal ranges. In detecting lower concentrations (less than 120 mg/dl for C3 and less than 25 mg/dl for C4), the two methods showed better agreement. Each assay system was reproducible and could be used to evaluate changes that occur in concentrations of complement components during therapeutic treatment. However, the ease in processing a large volume of specimens and the short time needed to complete the assay are advantages that make the fluorometric method more suitable than radial immunodiffusion for use in a large clinical laboratory. PMID:6811611

  14. Comparison of a fluorometric method with radial immunodiffusion assays for determination of complement components C3 and C4.

    PubMed

    Koelle, M; Bartholomew, W R

    1982-08-01

    Measurements of patient serum complement components C3 and C4 are useful indicators of complement consumption in immune complex diseases. A fluorometric quantitative immunofluorescence system was evaluated in terms of measuring these complement components, and the results were compared with those of radial immunodiffusion assays. For comparison of the two systems, 232 patient sera were evaluated for C3, and 202 specimens were tested for C4. Analysis of the data by linear regression indicated a proportional difference between the methods. C3 and C4 concentrations measured by the fluorometric method were lower than those measured by radial immunodiffusion, especially concentrations exceeding the normal ranges. In detecting lower concentrations (less than 120 mg/dl for C3 and less than 25 mg/dl for C4), the two methods showed better agreement. Each assay system was reproducible and could be used to evaluate changes that occur in concentrations of complement components during therapeutic treatment. However, the ease in processing a large volume of specimens and the short time needed to complete the assay are advantages that make the fluorometric method more suitable than radial immunodiffusion for use in a large clinical laboratory.

  15. Murine complement C4 is not required for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Boos, Laura A; Szalai, Alexander J; Barnum, Scott R

    2005-01-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that myelin and myelin-derived proteins activate both the classical and alternative complement pathways. More recently, studies have shown that mice deficient in factor B, a protein required for activation of the alternative pathway, have attenuated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. The relative contribution of the classical pathway to the pathogenesis of EAE has remained unexplored. To address this question, we performed EAE using mice deficient in C4 (C4-/-), a protein required for full activation of the classical pathway. We found that deletion of the C4 gene does not significantly change either the time of onset or the severity and tempo of myelin oligodendrocyte-induced EAE compared with controls with a fully intact complement system. We observed similar levels of cellular infiltration (CD11b+ macrophages and CD3+ T cells) and demyelination in the two kinds of mice. Despite this, ribonuclease protection assays demonstrated a two- to fourfold increase in several pro-inflammatory cytokines in C4-/- mice with EAE, including interleukin-beta (IL-1beta), IL-18, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IP-10, and RANTES. These results support the conclusion that the contribution of murine complement to the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease is realized via the alternative pathway. copyright (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. [Plasma concentrations of complement components C3, C4, and C3PA in juvenile nephropathies].

    PubMed

    Brai, M; Amato, G; Ziino, M; Tolone, G

    1975-01-01

    Complement profiles in children suffering for nephropathy have been investigated. The approach has proved useful in differentiating distinct nosologic entities. Plasma C3 and, to a lesser extent, C4 levels were found to be markedly reduced in glomerulonephritis and significantly increased in nephrotic syndrome. Although in both conditions plasma C3PA concentration ranges normally, additional data are request before assuming that alternate pathway is not involved. The extensive serial study of complement profiles should be widely adopted by clinicians managing nephropatic patients.

  17. Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP

    PubMed Central

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Granados Martinez, Adriana Patricia; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections. PMID:25347183

  18. Evolutionary analysis of two complement C4 genes: Ancient duplication and conservation during jawed vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Mayumi I; Terado, Tokio; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Masaru

    2017-03-01

    The complement C4 is a thioester-containing protein, and a histidine (H) residue catalyzes the cleavage of the thioester to allow covalent binding to carbohydrates on target cells. Some mammalian and teleost species possess an additional isotype where the catalytic H is replaced by an aspartic acid (D), which binds preferentially to proteins. We found the two C4 isotypes in many other jawed vertebrates, including sharks and birds/reptiles. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that C4 gene duplication occurred in the early days of the jawed vertebrate evolution. The D-type C4 of bony fish except for mammals formed a cluster, termed D-lineage. The D-lineage genes were located in a syntenic region outside MHC, and evolved conservatively. Mammals lost the D-lineage before speciation, but D-type C4 was regenerated by recent gene duplication in some mammalian species or groups. Dual C4 molecules with different substrate specificities would have contributed to development of the antibody-dependent classical pathway.

  19. Phenotyping of human complement component C4, a class-III HLA antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, E; Cross, S J

    1986-01-01

    The plasma complement protein C4 is encoded at two highly polymorphic loci, A and B, within the class-III region of the major histocompatibility complex. At least 34 different polymorphic variants of human C4 have been identified, including non-expressed or 'null' alleles. The main method of identification of C4 polymorphic allotypes is separation on the basis of charge by agarose-gel electrophoresis of plasma. On staining by immunofixation with anti-C4 antibodies, each C4 type gives three major bands, but, since individuals can have up to five allotypes, the overlapping banding pattern is difficult to interpret. We show that digestion of plasma samples with carboxypeptidase B, which removes C-terminal basic amino acids, before electrophoresis, produces a single, sharp, distinct band for each allotype and allows identification of the biochemical basis of the multiple banding pattern previously observed in C4 phenotype determination. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3103606

  20. Amino acid residues 1101-1105 of the isotypic region of human C4B is important to the covalent binding activity of complement component C4.

    PubMed

    Reilly, B D; Levine, R P; Skanes, V M

    1991-11-01

    The C4A and C4B isotypes of human C4 show certain functional differences that stem from their relative preference for transacylation to amino (-NH2) vs hydroxyl (-OH) nucleophiles, respectively, on complement-activating surfaces. Comparison of amino acid sequences of the alpha-chain fragment of C4, C4d, has shown C4A- and C4B-specific sequences at residues 1101-1106 are the only consistent structural difference between isotype, i.e., Pro, Cys, Pro, Val, Leu, Asp in C4A and Leu, Ser, Pro, Val Ile, His in C4B. These residues may be responsible either in part or entirely for properties associated with isotype. To examine the functional role of residues 1101-1106 in C4B-mediated hemolysis, whole serum or immunopurified human C4 with allotypes, A3B1, A3, B2B1, or B1 were preincubated in the presence or absence of an antipeptide mAb (BII-1) specific for amino acid residues 1101-1105 of C4B. Sensitized sheep E and C4-deficient guinea pig serum was then added and lysis measured by absorbance at 415 nm. Our results show lysis of antibody-sensitized sheep E is inhibited by antibody and C4B2B1, C4B1, or C4A3B1 but not antibody and C4A3. The interference of hemolysis by BII-1 could not be explained by inhibition of activation of C4B or inhibition of C3 or C5 convertase activity. Furthermore, results from uptake experiments show that BII-1 interferes with the covalent binding activity of C4B, indicating residues 1101-1105 play a role in the covalent binding reaction of C4B to the target E-antibody complex.

  1. Complement C4 maintains peripheral B-cell tolerance in a myeloid cell-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Alimzhanov, Marat B.; Degn, Soren; Tsiftsoglou, Stefanos A.; Alicot, Elisabeth; Jones, Sarah A.; Ma, Minghe; Carroll, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The factors that allow self-reactive B cells to escape negative selection and become activated remain poorly defined. Using a B-cell receptor-knock-in mouse strain, we identify a pathway by which B-cell selection to nucleolar self-antigens is complement-dependent. Deficiency in complement component C4 led to a breakdown in the elimination of autoreactive B-cell clones at the transitional stage, characterized by a relative increase in their response to a range of stimuli, entrance into follicles and a greater propensity to form self-reactive germinal centers. Using mixed bone marrow chimeras we found that the myeloid compartment was sufficient to restore negative selection in the auto-reactive mice. A model is proposed in which in the absence of complement C4, inappropriate clearance of apoptotic debris promotes chronic activation of myeloid cells, allowing the maturation and activation of self-reactive B-cell clones leading to increased spontaneous formation of germinal centers. PMID:23749435

  2. C4B gene influences intestinal microbiota through complement activation in patients with Pediatric-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Nissilä, Eija; Korpela, Katri; Lokki, A Inkeri; Paakkanen, Riitta; Jokiranta, Sakari; de Vos, Willem; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Meri, Seppo

    2017-08-23

    Complement C4 genes are linked to pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (PIBD), but the mechanisms have remained unclear. We examined the influence of C4B gene number on intestinal microbiota and in vitro serum complement activation by intestinal microbes in PIBD patients. Complement C4A and C4B gene numbers were determined by genomic RT-PCR from 64 patients with PIBD (Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis). The severity of the disease course was determined from fecal calprotectin levels. Intestinal microbiota was assessed using the HITChip microarray. Complement reactivity in patients was analyzed by incubating their sera with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Akkermansia muciniphila and determining the levels of C3a and SC5b-9 using enzyme immunoassays. The microbiota diversity was wider in patients with no C4B genes than in those with 1 or 2 C4B genes, irrespective of intestinal inflammation. C4B and total C4 gene numbers correlated positively with soluble terminal complement complex (TCC, SC5b-9) levels, when patient serum samples were stimulated with bacteria. Our results suggest that the C4B gene number associates positively to inflammation in patients with PIBD. Multiple copies of the C4B gene may thus aggravate the IBD-associated dysbiosis through escalated complement reactivity towards the microbiota. (Word count 191/250) This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  3. Substitution of a single amino acid (aspartic acid for histidine) converts the functional activity of human complement C4B to C4A.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, M C; Fathallah, D M; Bergamaschini, L; Alicot, E M; Isenman, D E

    1990-01-01

    The C4B isotype of the fourth component of human complement (C4) displays 3- to 4-fold greater hemolytic activity than does its other isotype C4A. This correlates with differences in their covalent binding efficiencies to erythrocytes coated with antibody and complement C1. C4A binds to a greater extent when C1 is on IgG immune aggregates. The differences in covalent binding properties correlate only with amino acid changes between residues 1101 and 1106 (pro-C4 numbering)--namely, Pro-1101, Cys-1102, Leu-1105, and Asp-1106 in C4A and Leu-1101, Ser-1102, Ile-1105, and His-1106 in C4B, which are located in the C4d region of the alpha chain. To more precisely identify the residues that are important for the functional differences, C4A-C4B hybrid proteins were constructed by using recombinant DNA techniques. Comparison of these by hemolytic assay and binding to IgG aggregates showed that the single substitution of aspartic acid for histidine at position 1106 largely accounted for the change in functional activity and nature of the chemical bond formed (ester vs. amide). Surprisingly, substitution of a neutral residue, alanine, for histidine at position 1106 resulted in an increase in binding to immune aggregates without subsequent reduction in the hemolytic activity. This result strongly suggests that position 1106 is not "catalytic" as previously proposed but interacts sterically/electrostatically with potential acceptor sites and serves to "select" binding sites on potential acceptor molecules. Images PMID:2395880

  4. Electrophoretic polymorphism of the fourth component of human complement (C4) in paired maternal and foetal plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Shirley; Ruddy, S.; MacLaren, J. A.; Austen, K. F.

    1971-01-01

    The polymorphism of the fourth component of complement (C4) as demonstrated by antigen—antibody crossed electrophoresis was used to study paired samples of maternal and cord plasma. Curve analysis was employed to analyse the qualitative and quantitative composition of the C4 patterns. Among the fifty-two paired samples studied, the findings in nine could not be explained by placental passage of C4 from mother to foetus, and evidence for foetal synthesis of C4 was found in five cases. Family studies supported the genetic basis for the electrophoretic polymorphism of C4. ImagesFIG.1FIG.2FIG.3 PMID:5115615

  5. Complement-activated oligodendroglia: a new pathogenic entity identified by immunostaining with antibodies to human complement proteins C3d and C4d.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Akiyama, H; McGeer, P L

    1990-05-04

    Clusters of oligodendroglial fibers were identified immunohistochemically in human brain tissue with antibodies to the complement proteins C3d and C4d in several neurological disorders. These included Pick's, Huntington's, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, progressive supranuclear palsy and Shy-Drager syndrome. These complement-activated oligodendroglia occurred in selected areas of gray and white matter. They were rarely observed in control tissue. Immunogold electron microscopy established that the C4d antibody was attached to degenerating myelin sheaths. These data indicate attachment of classical complement pathway proteins to selective oligodendroglia in several neurological disorders.

  6. The interaction of soluble human complement receptor type 1 (sCR1, BRL55730) with human complement component C4.

    PubMed

    Gibb, A L; Freeman, A M; Smith, R A; Edmonds, S; Sim, E

    1993-01-22

    Human CR1 is a membrane-bound protein which plays an important role in the control of the human complement system. In addition to its involvement in the processing and clearance of immune complexes with C3b or C4b on their surface, CR1 acts as a cofactor for the proteolysis of C3b and C4b by Factor I. sCR1 is a recombinant, soluble form of CR1 which retains the cofactor activities of CR1, and is of potential therapeutic value for the suppression of complement-mediated tissue damage in vivo. An assay has been established using microtitre plates to explore the binding of sCR1 to the two isotypes of C4, C4A and C4B, and to C4 fragments. Specific binding of 125I-sCR1 to C4b and ammonia-treated C4 has been demonstrated. The binding of 125I-sCR1 to ammonia-treated C4 is dependent on pH and ionic strength, decreasing with an increase in pH and with an increase in ionic strength. At physiological ionic strength, up to twice as much 125I-sCR1 bound to ammonia-treated C4A as bound to ammonia-treated C4B. This preference of sCR1 for binding to the C4A isotype has implications for the clinical association of immune complex disease with C4A null alleles.

  7. A Novel Interaction between Complement Inhibitor C4b-binding Protein and Plasminogen That Enhances Plasminogen Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Talens, Simone; Grandits, Alexander M.; Blom, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    The complement, coagulation, and fibrinolytic systems are crucial for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. To date numerous interactions and cross-talks have been identified between these cascades. In line with this, here we propose a novel, hitherto unknown interaction between the complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and plasminogen of the fibrinolytic pathway. Binding of C4BP to Streptococcus pneumoniae is a known virulence mechanism of this pathogen and it was increased in the presence of plasminogen. Interestingly, the acute phase variant of C4BP lacking the β-chain and protein S binds plasminogen much stronger than the main isoform containing the β-chain and protein S. Indeed, the complement control protein (CCP) 8 domain of C4BP, which would otherwise be sterically hindered by the β-chain, primarily mediates this interaction. Moreover, the lysine-binding sites in plasminogen kringle domains facilitate the C4BP-plasminogen interaction. Furthermore, C4BP readily forms complexes with plasminogen in fluid phase and such complexes are present in human serum and plasma. Importantly, whereas the presence of plasminogen did not affect the factor I cofactor activity of C4BP, the activation of plasminogen by urokinase-type plasminogen activator to active plasmin was significantly augmented in the presence of C4BP. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel interaction between two proteins of the complement and fibrinolytic system. Most complexes might be formed during the acute phase of inflammation and have an effect on the homeostasis at the site of injury or acute inflammation. PMID:26067271

  8. Complement haemolytic activity (classical and alternative pathways), C3, C4 and factor B titres in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Ferriani, V P; Barbosa, J E; de Carvalho, I F

    1999-10-01

    Values of complement lytic activity of classical and alternative pathways, assessed by measuring the time required to lyse 50% of target red blood cells, and the concentration of complement components C3, C4 and factor B were estimated in the sera of 103 healthy children aged 3 to 14 y. Age-dependent variations were seen in the C3 and factor B concentrations, but not in C4, with the highest values found among 5-6-y-old children. Variations in classical and alternative lytic activity were not detected in this group of children, although the values are significantly different from our previously published data on adults, using the same kinetic assay (1). We also evaluated the relationship between the lytic activity of the classical (CPT) and alternative pathways (APT) and the levels of complement components. There were significant correlations between: APT and factor B, APT and C3, C3 and C4, C3 and factor B, and C4 and factor B concentrations. The normal ranges measured here can be used in the initial screening of Brazilian children presenting diseases involving the complement system. This study also contributes to a better understanding of the complement system ontogeny.

  9. Complement Component C4 Regulates the Development of Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis through a T Cell-Intrinsic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingjun; Bell, Brent A.; Li, Yan; Caspi, Rachel R.; Lin, Feng

    2017-01-01

    In addition to its conventional roles in the innate immune system, complement has been found to directly regulate T cells in the adaptive immune system. Complement components, including C3, C5, and factor D, are important in regulating T cell responses. However, whether complement component C4 is involved in regulating T cell responses remains unclear. In this study, we used a T cell-dependent model of autoimmunity, experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) to address this issue. We compared disease severity in wild-type (WT) and C4 knockout (KO) mice using indirect ophthalmoscopy, scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and histopathological analysis. We also explored the underlying mechanism by examining T cell responses in ex vivo antigen-specific recall assays and in in vitro T cell priming assays using bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, splenic dendritic cells, and T cells from WT or C4 KO mice. We found that C4 KO mice develop less severe retinal inflammation than WT mice in EAU and show reduced autoreactive T cell responses and decreased retinal T cell infiltration. We also found that T cells, but not dendritic cells, from C4 KO mice have impaired function. These results demonstrate a previously unknown role of C4 in regulating T cell responses, which affects the development of T cell-mediated autoimmunity, as exemplified by EAU. Our data could shed light on the pathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis in humans. PMID:28955337

  10. Multiple domains of MASP-2, an initiating complement protease, are required for interaction with its substrate C4.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Renee C; Bergström, Frida; Coetzer, Theresa H; Blom, Anna M; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C; Pike, Robert N

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is fundamental to both innate and adaptive immunity and can be initiated via the classical, lectin or alternative pathways. Cleavage of C4 by MASP-2, the initiating protease of the lectin pathway, is a crucial event in the activation of this pathway, preceding the eventual formation of the C3 convertase (C4bC2a) complex on the pathogen surface. Interactions required for the cleavage of C4 by MASP-2 are likely to be facilitated by the initial binding of C4 to an exosite on the protease. We have shown that both proteolytically active and catalytically inactive CCP1-CCP2-serine protease (CCP1-CCP2-SP) forms bind C4 with similar affinity. Interestingly, proteins containing the CCP1-CCP2 domains or the SP domain alone bound C4 with much lower affinity than the CCP1-CCP2-SP protein, suggesting that the CCP domains cooperate positively with the active site to mediate efficient binding and cleavage of C4. In addition, mutation of residue K342 to alanine in the CCP1 domain abolished binding to both C4 and C4b in its CCP1-CCP2 form, suggesting a key electrostatic role for this amino acid. The presented data indicates that all of the domains are required in order to mediate high affinity interaction with C4. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Secreted Aspergillus fumigatus Protease Alp1 Degrades Human Complement Proteins C3, C4, and C5▿

    PubMed Central

    Behnsen, Judith; Lessing, Franziska; Schindler, Susann; Wartenberg, Dirk; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Thoen, Marcel; Zipfel, Peter F.; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2010-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is a major cause of fungal infections in immunocompromised patients. Innate immunity plays an important role in the defense against infections. The complement system represents an essential part of the innate immune system. This cascade system is activated on the surface of A. fumigatus conidia and hyphae and enhances phagocytosis of conidia. A. fumigatus conidia but not hyphae bind to their surface host complement regulators factor H, FHL-1, and CFHR1, which control complement activation. Here, we show that A. fumigatus hyphae possess an additional endogenous activity to control complement activation. A. fumigatus culture supernatant efficiently cleaved complement components C3, C4, C5, and C1q as well as immunoglobulin G. Secretome analysis and protease inhibitor studies identified the secreted alkaline protease Alp1, which is present in large amounts in the culture supernatant, as the central molecule responsible for this cleavage. An alp1 deletion strain was generated, and the culture supernatant possessed minimal complement-degrading activity. Moreover, protein extract derived from an Escherichia coli strain overproducing Alp1 cleaved C3b, C4b, and C5. Thus, the protease Alp1 is responsible for the observed cleavage and degrades a broad range of different substrates. In summary, we identified a novel mechanism in A. fumigatus that contributes to evasion from the host complement attack. PMID:20498262

  12. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and complement C4 alleles in systemic lupus erythematosus. Results of a multicenter study.

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, K; Baur, M P; Coldewey, R; Fricke, M; Kalden, J R; Lakomek, H J; Peter, H H; Schendel, D; Schneider, P M; Seuchter, S A

    1992-01-01

    In a multicenter study more than 300 central European systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients were examined for HLA-B, HLA-DR, and complement C4 phenotypes. For 174 SLE patients MHC haplotypes were determined by family segregation analysis, and for 155 patients C4 gene deletions were determined by TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism. Two haplotypes, B8-C4AQ0-C4B1-DR3 and B7-C4A3-C4B1-DR2, were identified as risk factors for SLE. These findings were confirmed by applying the haplotype frequency difference (HFD) method, which uses nontransmitted haplotypes from the family study as internal controls. Furthermore, only HLA-DR2, but not DR3, B7, or B8, was significantly increased in SLE patients independently of the two risk haplotypes. C4A gene deletions, but not silent C4AQ0 alleles, were increased in SLE patients and neither C4BQ0 alleles nor C4B gene deletions were increased. The observed frequencies of homozygosity and heterozygosity for the two haplotypes and the frequencies of homozygotes for C4AQ0 and C4A deletions did not differ from the expected values, indicating that the risk for SLE is conveyed by single allele effects. In conclusion, there are two MHC-linked susceptibility factors for Caucasian SLE patients carried by the haplotypes B7-DR2 and B8-DR3. The results argue against C4Q0 alleles being the decisive factors increasing susceptibility to SLE. PMID:1401069

  13. Solution Structures of Complement C2 and Its C4 Complexes Propose Pathway-specific Mechanisms for Control and Activation of the Complement Proconvertases*

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    The lectin (LP) and classical (CP) pathways are two of the three main activation cascades of the complement system. These pathways start with recognition of different pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and include identical steps of proteolytic activation of complement component C4, formation of the C3 proconvertase C4b2, followed by cleavage of complement component C2 within C4b2 resulting in the C3 convertase C4b2a. Here, we describe the solution structures of the two central complexes of the pathways, C3 proconvertase and C3 convertase, as well as the unbound zymogen C2 obtained by small angle x-ray scattering analysis. We analyzed both native and enzymatically deglycosylated C4b2 and C2 and showed that the resulting structural models were independent of the glycans. The small angle x-ray scattering-derived models suggest a different activation mode for the CP/LP C3 proconvertase as compared with that established for the alternative pathway proconvertase C3bB. This is likely due to the rather different structural and functional properties of the proteases activating the proconvertases. The solution structure of a stabilized form of the active CP/LP C3 convertase C4b2a is strikingly similar to the crystal structure of the alternative pathway C3 convertase C3bBb, which is in accordance with their identical functions in cleaving the complement proteins C3 and C5. PMID:27252379

  14. Solution Structures of Complement C2 and Its C4 Complexes Propose Pathway-specific Mechanisms for Control and Activation of the Complement Proconvertases.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Sofia; Jensen, Jan K; Andersen, Gregers R

    2016-08-05

    The lectin (LP) and classical (CP) pathways are two of the three main activation cascades of the complement system. These pathways start with recognition of different pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and include identical steps of proteolytic activation of complement component C4, formation of the C3 proconvertase C4b2, followed by cleavage of complement component C2 within C4b2 resulting in the C3 convertase C4b2a. Here, we describe the solution structures of the two central complexes of the pathways, C3 proconvertase and C3 convertase, as well as the unbound zymogen C2 obtained by small angle x-ray scattering analysis. We analyzed both native and enzymatically deglycosylated C4b2 and C2 and showed that the resulting structural models were independent of the glycans. The small angle x-ray scattering-derived models suggest a different activation mode for the CP/LP C3 proconvertase as compared with that established for the alternative pathway proconvertase C3bB. This is likely due to the rather different structural and functional properties of the proteases activating the proconvertases. The solution structure of a stabilized form of the active CP/LP C3 convertase C4b2a is strikingly similar to the crystal structure of the alternative pathway C3 convertase C3bBb, which is in accordance with their identical functions in cleaving the complement proteins C3 and C5. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Plasma kinetics of complement component C4: comparison of three models

    SciTech Connect

    Wisnieski, J.J.; Nathanson, M.H.

    1989-02-01

    Plasma C4 kinetics were studied in members of a kindred with hereditary incomplete C4 deficiency and in control subjects. Test subjects received iodine /sup 125/-labeled C4 intravenously, and plasma disappearance curves for 125I-C4 were plotted. By nonlinear least-squares analysis, we fit two-, three-, and four-exponential models of plasma disappearance to the plasma curves of each subject. Goodness of fit was significantly better for all subjects with the three-exponential versus the two-exponential model (p less than 0.0005). No further improvement in curve fit was accomplished by using a four-exponential model (p greater than 0.5). Metabolic rates and extravascular/plasma ratios calculated from the two- and three-exponential models were significantly different. As judged by extravascular/plasma ratio, the two-exponential model underestimated the amount of extravascular C4. Furthermore, the two-exponential model significantly over-estimated catabolic and synthetic rates. Hence, our results show that C4 kinetics are not optimally described by a conventional, two-exponential model. A possible explanation for our findings is that in previous studies of C4 metabolism, the analysis of plasma radioactivity disappearance curves was done by inspection, whereas we used least-squares analysis, a method that determines the number of exponentials with greater reliability.

  16. Significance of complement components C1q and C4 bound to circulating immune complexes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: support for classical complement pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Brooke E; Reed, Melinda R; Chauhan, Anil K; Dehlendorf, Amanda B; Moore, Terry L

    2011-01-01

    Immune complexes (ICs) from sera of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients show increased complement opsonisation; however, a definitive role for involvement of the classical or alternative pathway is not entirely clear. To delineate the role of these pathways, we measured activated complement products bound to circulating IC (CICs) in the sera of JIA patients. Sera from 100 JIA patients and 22 healthy children were collected. C1q, C4, C3, C3d, and membrane attack complex (MAC) bound to CICs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data was compared to IgM rheumatoid factor (RF), IgG anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, C-reactive protein (CRP), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) levels. Mean levels of C1q, C4, and MAC bound to CICs were significantly elevated in JIA patients compared to healthy children. C1q correlated significantly with C4 and MAC bound to CICs and C4 and MAC also demonstrated significant correlation. No significant differences were noted in complement components bound to CICs when evaluating IgM RF, anti-CCP antibody, and CRP positivity. A significant correlation was noted between MAC bound to CICs and ESR. C1q and MAC bound to CICs mean levels were significantly higher in patients with an elevated ESR compared to those with a normal ESR level. JIA patients have elevated levels of complement components bound to CICs, particularly from the classical pathway. Moreover, classical pathway components were associated with ESR, a marker of disease activity. MAC bound to CICs also correlated significantly with ESR, further supporting the notion of complement-mediated tissue injury that is triggered by IC-mediated classical pathway activation.

  17. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like proteins interact with human complement regulators factor H, FHL-1, FHR-1, and C4BP.

    PubMed

    Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Silva, Ludmila Bezerra da; Monaris, Denize; Abreu, Patrícia Antônia Estima; Strobel, Stefanie; Józsi, Mihály; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2012-03-15

    Leptospira, the causative agent of leptospirosis, interacts with several host molecules, including extracellular matrix components, coagulation cascade proteins, and human complement regulators. Here we demonstrate that acquisition of factor H (FH) on the Leptospira surface is crucial for bacterial survival in the serum and that these spirochetes, besides interacting with FH, FH related-1, and C4b binding protein (C4BP), also acquire FH like-1 from human serum. We also demonstrate that binding to these complement regulators is mediated by leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins, previously shown to interact with fibronectin, laminin, collagen, elastin, tropoelastin, and fibrinogen. Factor H binds to Lig proteins via short consensus repeat domains 5 and 20. Competition assays suggest that FH and C4BP have distinct binding sites on Lig proteins. Moreover, FH and C4BP bound to immobilized Ligs display cofactor activity, mediating C3b and C4b degradation by factor I. In conclusion, Lig proteins are multifunctional molecules, contributing to leptospiral adhesion and immune evasion.

  18. Complement split product C4d deposition in placenta in systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Mikami, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Naoki; Salah, Adeeb; Kondoh, Eiji; Tatsumi, Keiji; Konishi, Ikuo; Haga, Hironori

    2013-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) are related to premature delivery and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and share histological findings of the placenta. Association with complement dysregulation has been reported in pregnancy for both disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of C4d immunohistochemistry for placentas with SLE- and PIH-associated pregnancy. C4d staining was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue of placentas from 26 patients with SLE, 26 with PIH, and 25 control cases. We used the H-score with a range of 0-300 for the evaluation of C4d immunoreactivity. Placentas of SLE and PIH cases showed a higher H-score than control cases (average, SLE, 38.3 (P < 0.05); PIH, 17.8; control, 1.68), with linear staining on the membrane of syncytiotrophoblast. C4d-high groups comprised 50% (12/26) of SLE and 35% (9/26) of PIH cases, with H-scores ranging 14-270 and 15-170. C4d-high groups were significantly associated with low-placental weights and low birth weight in both SLE and PIH (P < 0.05), and lower gestational age (P < 0.05) in PIH cases. These results suggest that C4d might be utilized as a biomarker evaluating the subsequent risk for IUGR and disease control during the gestation period in these patients.

  19. [Levels of total hemolytic complement, C3, C4 and antibodies against the myocardium in rheumatic fever].

    PubMed

    Martinez, R D

    1978-01-01

    The levels of the hemolytic complement (UH 50%), C3, C4 and the antibodies against myocardium and against the antigenic fractions of myocardium precipitated with ammonium sulphate were studied in 8 patients with active rehumatic fever (ARF), 28 with inactive rheumatic fever (IRF) and 26 people without cardiopaties (NI). The UH 50% was low in 2 out of 36 patients with rheumatic fever (RF). C3 was normal and C4 low in 12.5% of the ARF patients. C3 had subnormal values in 25% and C4 in 33% of IRF patients, this last value had a stadistic significant decrease with respect to the values of C4 in normal people. The 36 patients with RF had antibodies against the myocardium and also against the heart antigenic fractions precipitated with 10% ammonium sulphate. 11.5% of the normal group had anti-myocardial antibodies and none had antibodies against the fractions. The levels of anti-streptolysin-O and C-reactive protein were higher in the ARF group than in the patients with IRF or the normal people. The participation of the hemolytic complement, the anti-myocardium antibodies, the anti-streptococcus antibodies and the cytophilic activity in the etiopathogeny of rheumatic fever is discussed.

  20. [A case of traumatic anterior dislocation of C4 recovered from complete tetraplegia].

    PubMed

    Okada, K; Tasaki, T; Komatsu, S; Asakura, K

    1985-07-01

    A case of traumatic anterior dislocation of C4 is presented. A 65-year-old man who was beastly drunken fell down backward and severely struck occipital region against the door and immediately developed tetraplegia. Neurological examination 12 hours after the trauma revealed complete flaccid tetraplegia, abdominal respiration, bladder-bowel disturbance, anesthesia below C5 and hyperpathia in C3 and C4 dermatomes. Plain films of the cervical spine disclosed anterior dislocation of C4 upon C5 approximately 6 mm and possible disc herniation of C4/5. On Amipaque cervical myelography via C1C2 lateral puncture, there was almost complete block of the dye at C4/5 level. With diagnosis of acute cervical spinal cord injury on C4/5 caused by pincer mechanism and herniated disc material, the patient was operated on 19 hours after the trauma by anterior discectomy of C4/5 and fusion under Crutchfield skull traction. Neurological recovery began with the right leg from the day after the operation and it's recovery pattern showed the syndrome of acute central cervical spinal cord injury reported by Schneider. The patient discharged on March '84 four months after the trauma walking by himself with tetraparesis especially weakness of the hands and hypesthesia of glove and stocking type. We emphasized importance of Amipaque cervical myelography via C1C2 lateral puncture and anterior approach on the treatment of acute cervical spinal cord injury to be done as soon as possible.

  1. Complete Genome Analysis of the C4 Subgenotype Strains of Enterovirus 71: Predominant Recombination C4 Viruses Persistently Circulating in China for 14 Years

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Aili; Mao, Naiying; Xu, Songtao; Zhu, Zhen; Zhou, Jianhui; Shi, Jing; Zhao, Yueping; Wang, Xianjun; Huang, Xueyong; Zhu, Shuangli; Zhang, Yong; Tang, Wei; Ling, Hua; Xu, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    Genetic recombination is a well-known phenomenon for enteroviruses. To investigate the genetic characterization and the potential recombination of enterovirus 71 (EV71) circulating in China, we determined the 16 complete genome sequences of EV71 isolated from Hand Foot Mouth Disease (HFMD) patients during the large scale outbreak and non-outbreak years since 1998 in China. The full length genome sequences of 16 Chinese EV71 in present study were aligned with 186 genome sequences of EV71 available from GenBank, including 104 China mainland and 82 international sequences, covering the time period of 1970–2011. The oldest strains of each subgenotype of EV71 and prototype strains of HEV-A were included to do the phylogenetic and Simplot analysis. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that all Chinese strains were clustered into C4 subgenotype of EV71, except for HuB/CHN/2009 clustered into A and Xiamen/CHN/2009 clustered into B5 subgenotype. Most of C4 EV71 were clustered into 2 predominant evolutionary branches: C4b and C4a evolutionary brunches. Our comprehensive recombination analysis showed the evidence of genome recombination of subgenotype C4 (including C4a and C4b) sequences between structural genes from genotype C EV71 and non-structural genes from the prototype strains of CAV16, 14 and 4, but the evidence of intratypic recombination between C4 strains and B subgenotype was not enough strong. This intertypic recombination C4 viruses were first seen in 1998 and became the predominant endemic viruses circulating in China mainland for at least 14 years. A shift between C4a and C4b evolutionary brunches of C4 recombination viruses were observed, and C4a viruses have been associated with large scale nationwide HFMD outbreak with higher morbidity and mortality since 2007. PMID:23441179

  2. A soluble deletion mutant of the human complement receptor type 1, which lacks the C4b binding site, is a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway.

    PubMed

    Scesney, S M; Makrides, S C; Gosselin, M L; Ford, P J; Andrews, B M; Hayman, E G; Marsh, H C

    1996-08-01

    The human complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35), is a single-chain glycoprotein consisting of 30 repeating homologous protein domains known as short consensus repeats (SCR) followed by transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The SCR themselves, considered in groups of seven, form long homologous repeats (LHR) which have been designated LHR-A, -B, -C, and -D for the most common human allotype of CR1. A soluble deletion mutant of CR1 which lacks the first seven N-terminal SCR (LHR-A) as well as the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains was produced and characterized. The resulting protein, designated sCR1[desLHR-A], lacks the C4b binding site found in LHR-A, but retains the two C3b binding sites found in LHR-B and -C, respectively. The functional activities of sCR1[desLHR-A] were quantitatively compared in vitro to those of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) which has been shown to retain all known functions of the native cell surface receptor. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 competed equally for the binding of dimeric C3b to erythrocyte CR1. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 were similar in their capacity to serve as a cofactor in the factor I-mediated degradation of the C3b and C4b alpha chains. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 were comparable in their capacity to inhibit erythrocyte lysis and anaphylatoxin production mediated by the alternative complement pathway. sCR1[desLHR-A], however, was significantly less effective an inhibitor of erythrocyte lysis and anaphylatoxin production than sCR1 under conditions which allow classical pathway activation. These results demonstrate sCR1[desLHR-A] to be a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway in vitro.

  3. Molecular interactions between MASP-2, C4, and C2 and their activation fragments leading to complement activation via the lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Russell; Dodds, Alister W; Mitchell, Daniel A; Sim, Robert B; Reid, Kenneth B M; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J

    2007-03-16

    Activation of component C3 is central to the pathways of complement and leads directly to neutralization of pathogens and stimulation of adaptive immune responses. The convertases that catalyze this reaction assemble from fragments of complement components via multistep reactions. In the lectin pathway, mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins bind to pathogens and activate MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2). MASP-2 cleaves C4 releasing C4a and generating C4b, which attaches covalently to the pathogen surface upon exposure of its reactive thioester. C2 binds to C4b and is also cleaved by MASP-2 to form the C3 convertase (C4b2a). To understand how this complex process is coordinated, we have analyzed the interactions between MASP-2, C4, C2, and their activation fragments and have compared MASP-2-catalyzed cleavage of C4b2 and C2. The data show that C2 binds tightly to C4b but not to C4, implying that C4 and C2 do not circulate as preformed complexes but that C2 is recruited only after prior activation of C4. Following cleavage of C4, C4b still binds to MASP-2 (KD approximately 0.6 microM) and dissociates relatively slowly (koff approximately 0.06 s-1) compared with the half-life of the thioester (C4b.MASP-2 interaction favors attachment of C4b near to the activating MBL.MASP complex on the bacterial surface so that, following recruitment of C2, the proximity of enzyme and substrate (C4b2) combined with more favorable reaction kinetics drive the formation of the C3 convertase, promoting complement activation.

  4. Functional Characterization of LcpA, a Surface-Exposed Protein of Leptospira spp. That Binds the Human Complement Regulator C4BP▿

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Angela S.; Monaris, Denize; Silva, Ludmila B.; Morais, Zenaide M.; Vasconcellos, Sílvio A.; Cianciarullo, Aurora M.; Isaac, Lourdes; Abreu, Patricia A. E.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that pathogenic leptospiral strains are able to bind C4b binding protein (C4BP). Surface-bound C4BP retains its cofactor activity, indicating that acquisition of this complement regulator may contribute to leptospiral serum resistance. In the present study, the abilities of seven recombinant putative leptospiral outer membrane proteins to interact with C4BP were evaluated. The protein encoded by LIC11947 interacted with this human complement regulator in a dose-dependent manner. The cofactor activity of C4BP bound to immobilized recombinant LIC11947 (rLIC11947) was confirmed by detecting factor I-mediated cleavage of C4b. rLIC11947 was therefore named LcpA (for leptospiral complement regulator-acquiring protein A). LcpA was shown to be an outer membrane protein by using immunoelectron microscopy, cell surface proteolysis, and Triton X-114 fractionation. The gene coding for LcpA is conserved among pathogenic leptospiral strains. This is the first characterization of a Leptospira surface protein that binds to the human complement regulator C4BP in a manner that allows this important regulator to control complement system activation mediated either by the classical pathway or by the lectin pathway. This newly identified protein may play a role in immune evasion by Leptospira spp. and may therefore represent a target for the development of a human vaccine against leptospirosis. PMID:20404075

  5. Sites within the complement C3b/C4b receptor important for the specificity of ligand binding.

    PubMed Central

    Krych, M; Hourcade, D; Atkinson, J P

    1991-01-01

    Cysteine-rich repeated units of 40-70 amino acids are building blocks of many mammalian proteins, including 12 proteins of the complement system. Human complement arranged motifs, designated short consensus repeats (SCRs), which constitute the entire extracellular portion of this protein. Klickstein et al. [Klickstein, L. B., Bartow, T. J., Miletic, V., Rabson, L. D., Smith, J. A. & Fearon, D. T. (1988) J. Exp. Med. 168, 1699-1717 (abstr.)] localized a C4b binding domain to SCR-1 and/or SCR-2 and a C3b binding domain to SCR-8 and/or SCR-9. These SCRs bind different ligands, although SCR-1 and SCR-8 are 55% homologous and SCR-2 and SCR-9 are 70% homologous. To examine if one or two SCRs are required for ligand binding and to define sites within the SCRs that determine specificity of binding, mutagenesis analysis of a truncated, secreted form of CR1, called CR1-4 by Hourcade et al. [Hourcade, D., Meisner, D. R., Atkinson, J. P. & Holers, V. M. (1988) J. Exp. Med. 168, 1255-1270], was undertaken. The latter, composed of the first eight and one-half amino-terminal SCRs of CR1, efficiently bound C4b but not iC3. SCR-1 and SCR-2 were necessary for this interaction. Analysis of the mutant CR1-4 proteins, in which amino acids in SCR-1 and SCR-2 were substituted a few at a time with the homologous amino acids of SCR-8 and SCR-9, led to the identification of one amino acid in SCR-1 and three amino acids in SCR-2 important for C4b binding. Furthermore, five amino acids at the end of SCR-9, if placed in the homologous positions of SCR-2, conferred iC3 binding and are likely essential for ligand binding activity of SCR-8 and SCR-9. This iC3 binding occurred only if SCR-1 was present, indicating that two contiguous SCRs are necessary for this interaction. These results provide identification of amino acids within SCRs that are important for ligand binding. Images PMID:1827918

  6. Gene Copy-Number Variations (CNVs) and Protein Levels of Complement C4A and C4B as Novel Biomarkers for Partial Disease Remissions in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kingery, Suzanne E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Zhou, Bi; Hoffman, Robert P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the roles of complement C4A and C4B gene CNVs and their plasma protein concentrations in residual insulin secretion and loss of pancreatic beta-cell function in new-onset type 1 diabetes patients. Methods We studied 34 patients of European ancestry with new-onset type 1 diabetes, aged between 3 and 17 years (10.7±3.45), at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Gene copy-number and size variations of complement C4A and C4B were determined by genomic Southern blot analyses. C4A and C4B protein phenotypes were elucidated by immunofixation and radial immunodiffusion. Two-digit HLA-DRB1 genotypes were determined by sequence-specific PCR. At 1 month and 9-month post diagnosis, stimulated C-peptide levels were measured after a standardized mixed-meal tolerance test. Results The diploid gene copy-numbers of C4A varied from 0 to 4, and those of C4B from 0 to 3. Patients with higher copy-number of C4A or higher C4A plasma protein concentrations at diagnosis had higher C-peptide levels at 1 month post diagnosis (p=0.008; p=0.008). When controlled by the Z-score of body-mass index, C4A copy-numbers, C4A protein concentrations, the age of disease-onset, the number of HLA-DR3 but not DR4 alleles were significant parameters in determining C-peptide levels. At 9-month post diagnosis, 42.3% of patients remained in partial remission, and these patients were characterized by lower total C4B copy-numbers or lower C4B protein concentrations (p=0.02, p=0.0004). Conclusions C4A appears to associate with the protection of residual beta-cell function in new-onset type 1 diabetes; C4B is correlated with the end of disease remission at 9-month post diagnosis. PMID:22151770

  7. Reduced tissue damage and improved recovery of motor function after traumatic brain injury in mice deficient in complement component C4.

    PubMed

    You, Zerong; Yang, Jinsheng; Takahashi, Kazue; Yager, Phoebe H; Kim, Hyung-Hwan; Qin, Tao; Stahl, Gregory L; Ezekowitz, R Alan B; Carroll, Michael C; Whalen, Michael J

    2007-12-01

    Complement component C4 mediates C3-dependent tissue damage after systemic ischemia-reperfusion injury. Activation of C3 also contributes to the pathogenesis of experimental and human traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, few data exist regarding the specific pathways (classic, alternative, and lectin) involved. Using complement knockout mice and a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model, we tested the hypothesis that the classic pathway mediates secondary damage after TBI. After CCI, C4c and C3d immunostaining were detected in cortical vascular endothelial cells in wild-type (WT) mice; however, C4c and C3d immunostaining were also detected in C1q(-/-) mice, and C3d immunostaining was detected in C4(-/-) mice. After CCI, WT and C1q(-/-) mice had similar motor deficits, Morris water maze performance, and brain lesion size. Naive C4(-/-) and WT mice did not differ in baseline motor performance, but C4(-/-) mice had reduced postinjury motor deficits (days 1 to 7, P<0.05) and decreased brain tissue damage (days 14 and 35, P<0.05) versus WT. Reconstitution of C4(-/-) mice with human C4 (hC4) reversed their protection against postinjury motor deficits (P<0.05 versus vehicle), but administration of hC4 did not impair postinjury motor performance (versus vehicle) in WT mice. The protective effects of C4(-/-) were functionally distinct from the classic pathway and terminal complement, as C1q(-/-) and C3(-/-) mice had postinjury tissue damage and motor dysfunction similar to WT. Thus, C4 contributes to motor deficits and brain tissue damage after CCI by mechanism(s) fundamentally different from those involved in experimental systemic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  8. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Malm, Sven; Jusko, Monika; Eick, Sigrun; Potempa, Jan; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI) is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and Factor H (FH). Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125)I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  9. Complement-coated antibody-transfer (CCAT); serum IgA1 antibodies intercept and transport C4 and C3 fragments and preserve IgG1 deployment (PGD)†

    PubMed Central

    Boackle, Robert J.; Nguyen, Quang L.; Leite, Renata S.; Yang, Xiaofeng; Vesely, Jana

    2005-01-01

    in which complement-coated IgA1 antibodies transferred to non-complement-coated antigens is termed complement-coated antibody-transfer/transport (CCAT). In this way, IgA1 antibodies extended the efficiency of the complement system by insuring the specific IgA1 antibody-mediated transport of the captured biologically active complement fragments to those antigens stimulating the IgA1 antibody response but not yet neutralized (completely coated) with complement. Simultaneously by impeding the rate of C1 consumption and by intercepting C4b and C3b, IgA1 antibodies slowed C4b and C3b deposition on the antigenic surface and on the co-deposited IgG1 antibodies. Thus, in the presence of ongoing complement activation, the deposition of serum IgA1 antibodies enabled the co-deposited IgG1 antibodies to better maintain their ability to interact with antigens. We termed this latter phenomenon, preservation of IgG antibody deployment (PGD). In summary, co-deposited IgA1 antibodies maximized the efficiency of the complement system, transported their covalently bound complement fragments to specific antigens and sustained the effective deployment of IgG1 antibodies directed to those same antigens. PMID:16199260

  10. Polymorphism of the human complement C4 and steroid 21-hydroxylase genes. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms revealing structural deletions, homoduplications, and size variants.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, P M; Carroll, M C; Alper, C A; Rittner, C; Whitehead, A S; Yunis, E J; Colten, H R

    1986-01-01

    Several autoimmune disorders as well as congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) are either associated or closely linked with genetic variants of the fourth component of complement (C4A and C4B) and the enzyme steroid 21-hydroxylase (21-OH). These proteins are encoded by genes that are located downstream from the genes for complement proteins, C2 and factor B (BF) between HLA-B and -DR in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Previous studies of variants and null alleles were based on electrophoretic mobility of C4 protein and linkage with disease phenotypes. These data did not permit analysis of the basis for the observed null alleles and duplicated variants. We studied this region of the MHC in 126 haplotypes for a structural analysis of the four adjacent loci, C4A, 21-OHA, C4B, and 21-OHB. About half of the C4 genes typed as C4 null are deleted and several unrecognized homoduplicated C4 alleles were detected. Hence the frequencies of different C4 structural variants must be recalculated based on a direct analysis of the genes. Analysis of the C4/21-OH genes of patients with the classical (salt-wasting) form of CAH showed that some involve a deletion of the C4B and 21-OHB genes; whereas for two only the 21-OHB gene is deleted, i.e., the C4B gene is present. Together, these data provide a better understanding of the mechanisms generating and importance of deleted C4 and 21-OH null alleles in human disease. Images PMID:3018042

  11. Great Genotypic and Phenotypic Diversities Associated with Copy-Number Variations of Complement C4 and RP-C4-CYP21-TNX (RCCX) Modules: a Comparison of Asian Indian and European American Populations

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Kapil; Kitzmiller, Kathryn J.; Wu, Yee Ling; Zhou, Bi; Esack, Nazreen; Hiremath, Leena; Chung, Erwin K.; Yang, Yan; Yu, C. Yung

    2009-01-01

    Inter-individual gene copy-number variations (CNVs) probably afford human populations the flexibility to respond to a variety of environmental challenges, but also lead to differential disease predispositions. We investigated gene CNVs for complement component C4 and steroid 21-hydroxylase from the RP-C4-CYP21-TNX (RCCX) modules located in the major histocompatibility complex among healthy Asian-Indian Americans (AIA) and compared them to European Americans. A combination of definitive techniques that yielded cross-confirmatory results was used. The medium gene copy-numbers for C4 and its isotypes, acidic C4A and basic C4B, were 4, 2 and 2, respectively, but their frequencies were only 53–56%. The distribution patterns for total C4 and C4A are skewed towards the high copy-number side. For example, the frequency of AIA-subjects with three copies of C4A (30.7%) was 3.92-fold of those with a single copy (7.83%). The monomodular-short haplotype with a single C4B gene and the absence of C4A, which is in linkage- disequilibrium with HLA DRB1*0301 in Europeans and a strong risk factor for autoimmune diseases, has a frequency of 0.012 in AIA but 0.106 among healthy European Americans (p=6.6×10−8). The copy-number and the size of C4 genes strongly determine the plasma C4 protein concentrations. Parallel variations in copy-numbers of CYP21A (CYP21A1P) and TNXA with total C4 were also observed. Notably, 13.1% of AIA-subjects had three copies of the functional CYP21B, which were likely generated by recombinations between monomodular and bimodular RCCX haplotypes. The high copy-numbers of C4 and the high frequency of RCCX recombinants offer important insights to the prevalence of autoimmune and genetic diseases. PMID:19135723

  12. Structural and functional characterization of complement C4 and C1s-like molecules in teleost fish: insights into the evolution of classical and alternative pathways.

    PubMed

    Boshra, Hani; Gelman, Andrew E; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2004-07-01

    There is growing evidence that certain components of complement systems in lower vertebrates are promiscuous in their modes of activation through the classical or alternative pathways. To better understand the evolution of the classical pathway, we have evaluated the degree of functional diversification of key components of the classical and alternative pathways in rainbow trout, an evolutionarily relevant teleost species. Trout C4 was purified in two distinct forms (C4-1 and C4-2), both exhibiting the presence of a thioester bond at the cDNA and protein levels. C4-1 and C4-2 bound in a similar manner to trout IgM-sensitized sheep erythrocytes in the presence of Ca(2+)/Mg(2+), and both C4 molecules equally restored the classical pathway-mediated hemolytic activity of serum depleted of C3 and C4. Reconstitution of activity was dependent on the presence of both C3-1 and C4-1/C4-2 and on the presence of IgM bound to the sheep erythrocytes. A C1s-like molecule was shown to cleave specifically purified C4-1 and C4-2 into C4b, while failing to cleave trout C3 molecules. The C1s preparation was unable to cleave trout factor B/C2 when added in the presence of C3b or C4b molecules. Our results show a striking conservation of the mode of activation of the classical pathway. We also show that functional interchange between components of the classical and alternative pathway in teleosts is more restricted than was anticipated. These data suggest that functional diversification between the two pathways must have occurred shortly after the gene duplication that gave rise to the earliest classical pathway molecules.

  13. Determination of the Loss of Function Complement C4 Exon 29 CT Insertion Using a Novel Paralog-Specific Assay in Healthy UK and Spanish Populations

    PubMed Central

    Boteva, Lora; Wu, Yee Ling; Cortes-Hernández, Josefina; Martin, Javier; Vyse, Timothy J.; Fernando, Michelle M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variants resulting in non-expression of complement C4A and C4B genes are common in healthy European populations and have shown association with a number of diseases, most notably the autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus. The most frequent cause of a C4 “null” allele, following that of C4 gene copy number variation (CNV), is a non-sense mutation arising from a 2 bp CT insertion into codon 1232 of exon 29. Previous attempts to accurately genotype this polymorphism have not been amenable to high-throughput typing, and have been confounded by failure to account for CNV at this locus, as well as by inability to distinguish between paralogs. We have developed a novel, high-throughput, paralog-specific assay to detect the presence and copy number of this polymorphism. We have genotyped healthy cohorts from the United Kingdom (UK) and Spain. Overall, 30/719 (4.17%) individuals from the UK cohort and 8/449 (1.78%) individuals from the Spanish cohort harboured the CT insertion in a C4A gene. A single Spanish individual possessed a C4B CT insertion. There is weak correlation between the C4 CT insertion and flanking MHC polymorphism. Therefore it is important to note that, as with C4 gene CNV, disease-association due to this variant will be missed by current SNP-based genome-wide association strategies. PMID:21857912

  14. Determination of the loss of function complement C4 exon 29 CT insertion using a novel paralog-specific assay in healthy UK and Spanish populations.

    PubMed

    Boteva, Lora; Wu, Yee Ling; Cortes-Hernández, Josefina; Martin, Javier; Vyse, Timothy J; Fernando, Michelle M A

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variants resulting in non-expression of complement C4A and C4B genes are common in healthy European populations and have shown association with a number of diseases, most notably the autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus. The most frequent cause of a C4 "null" allele, following that of C4 gene copy number variation (CNV), is a non-sense mutation arising from a 2 bp CT insertion into codon 1232 of exon 29. Previous attempts to accurately genotype this polymorphism have not been amenable to high-throughput typing, and have been confounded by failure to account for CNV at this locus, as well as by inability to distinguish between paralogs. We have developed a novel, high-throughput, paralog-specific assay to detect the presence and copy number of this polymorphism. We have genotyped healthy cohorts from the United Kingdom (UK) and Spain. Overall, 30/719 (4.17%) individuals from the UK cohort and 8/449 (1.78%) individuals from the Spanish cohort harboured the CT insertion in a C4A gene. A single Spanish individual possessed a C4B CT insertion. There is weak correlation between the C4 CT insertion and flanking MHC polymorphism. Therefore it is important to note that, as with C4 gene CNV, disease-association due to this variant will be missed by current SNP-based genome-wide association strategies.

  15. Complement split products C3a and C4a are early markers of acute lyme disease in tick bite patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Ritchie C; Giclas, Patricia C; Crowder, Chris; House, Dennis; Glovsky, M Michael

    2008-01-01

    Current laboratory markers do not readily detect acute Lyme disease. We assessed the utility of complement and its split products as markers of Lyme disease in patients shortly after a tick bite. Thirty-one consecutive acute Lyme disease patients, 14 with and 17 without erythema migrans (EM) skin rash, seen by a physician within 96 h of a tick bite were matched with 24 consecutive tick bite patients without Lyme disease symptoms and 46 healthy control subjects. Complement and split products measured included factor B, Bb, C4, C3c, C3a(des Arg), C4a(des Arg), C1q- and C3d-containing immune complexes, and C2. C2, C4, C3 and factor B levels were within normal ranges in all groups. C3a and C4a levels were significantly higher in acute Lyme disease patients than in tick bite and healthy control groups (both p < 0.001). All acute Lyme disease patients, regardless of EM, had elevated levels of C3a or C4a. Few tick bite controls had elevated levels of C3a (2/20) or C4a (5/24) and only 1 of the healthy control subjects had elevated C3a (0/46) or C4a (1/32). These findings suggest that C3a and C4a may be useful markers of Lyme disease in patients seen shortly after tick bite, even in those without EM. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. The Group B Streptococcus-Secreted Protein CIP Interacts with C4, Preventing C3b Deposition via the Lectin and Classical Complement Pathways.

    PubMed

    Pietrocola, Giampiero; Rindi, Simonetta; Rosini, Roberto; Buccato, Scilla; Speziale, Pietro; Margarit, Immaculada

    2016-01-01

    The group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal invasive disease. GBS bacteria are surrounded by a thick capsular polysaccharide that is a potent inhibitor of complement deposition via the alternative pathway. Several of its surface molecules can however activate the classical and lectin complement pathways, rendering this species still vulnerable to phagocytic killing. In this study we have identified a novel secreted protein named complement interfering protein (CIP) that downregulates complement activation via the classical and lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway. The CIP protein showed high affinity toward C4b and inhibited its interaction with C2, presumably preventing the formation of the C4bC2a convertase. Addition of recombinant CIP to GBS cip-negative bacteria resulted in decreased deposition of C3b on their surface and in diminished phagocytic killing in a whole-blood assay. Our data reveal a novel strategy exploited by GBS to counteract innate immunity and could be valuable for the development of anti-infective agents against this important pathogen. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Characterization of the interaction between human complement protein C4 and a single-chain variable fragment antibody by capillary electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Seifar, Reza M; Cool, Robbert H; Quax, Wim J; Bischoff, Rainer

    2004-06-01

    Immunoaffinity capillary electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance have been used for the characterization of the interaction between two large-sized proteins, the human complement protein C4 and the single-chain variable fragment C43. The rather high kinetic rate constants as determined by surface plasmon resonance pointed out that a capillary electrophoresis method had to be applied, in which the labeled C4 is preincubated with C43 before injection and the same concentration of C43 is included in the running buffer. Analysis of the concentration dependence of the small mobility shift of the fluorescent C4 signal upon binding of C43 resulted in a dissociation constant that was comparable to the one obtained with surface plasmon resonance. This study is one of the few examples where capillary electrophoresis is successfully used to characterize the interaction between large proteins.

  18. The Anticomplementary Activity of ’Fusobacterium polymorphum’ in Normal and C-4 Deficient Sources of Guinea Pig Complement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-12

    aide Il neceeea~~ end Identity by block number) F sobacterium polymorphum has been isolated from the gingival crevice in man , and~~~s been impl...icated in theimmunopathology of periodontal diseases . The presence\\of alternate complement pathway factors in gingival crev i ce material suggests t’het...Abstract Fusobacteriwn po l~p ivrphwn has been isolated from the gingival crevice in man, and has been implicated in the imnunopathology of

  19. Complement C4-derived monocyte-directed chemotaxis-inhibitory factor. A molecular mechanism to cause polymorphonuclear leukocyte-predominant infiltration in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cavities.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Tsuruta, T.; Takagi, K.; Kambara, T.

    1991-01-01

    To reveal the mechanism of the lesser infiltration of monocytes in synovial cavities with rheumatoid arthritis despite the presence of chronic inflammation, the synovial fluid from 15 rheumatoid arthritis patients was analyzed with respect to leukocyte chemotaxis. The synovial fluid possessed strong chemotactic activity to polymorphonuclear leukocytes but rather suppressed one to monocytes. The synovial fluid contained two different inhibitory activities in monocyte chemotaxis. One, which also suppressed polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis, was identified as alpha 1 protease inhibitor. The other, with molecular weight of 8 kd, possessed the specificity to monocytes and shared the antigenicity with complement C4 but not with C3 or C5. A similar inhibitor was generated in normal human plasma when the classical pathway of the complement system was initiated with aggregated human IgG, while it was not when alternative pathway was initiated with zymosan. The small size factor in the synovial fluid, apparently derived from C4, seemed to be a cyto-directed factor that might block an early part of signal transduction system of monocytes in the chemotaxis. After removal of the small-size inhibitor, the synovial fluid exhibited chemotactic ability to monocytes. Therefore the apparent C4-derived factor might play a key role in the polymorphonuclear leukocyte-predominant infiltration in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:2024711

  20. Difference in serum complement component C4a levels between hepatitis C virus carriers with persistently normal alanine aminotransferase levels or chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Imakiire, Kazuyuki; Uto, Hirofumi; Sato, Yuko; Sasaki, Fumisato; Mawatari, Seiichi; Ido, Akio; Shimoda, Kazuya; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Stuver, Sherri O; Ito, Yoshito; Okanoue, Takeshi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2012-08-01

    Certain hepatitis C virus (HCV) carriers exhibit persistently normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (PNALT) (≤ 30 IU/l) accompanied by normal platelet counts (≥ 15 x 10(4)/µl); these individuals show milder disease activity and slower progression to cirrhosis. This study aimed to elucidate the characteristics of HCV carriers with PNALT using serum proteomics. The first group of subjects, who underwent clinical evaluation in the hospital, consisted of 19 HCV carriers with PNALT (PNALT-1) and 20 chronic hepatitis C (CHC-1) patients. The second group of subjects was part of a cohort study on the natural history of liver disease, and included 37 PNALT (PNALT-2) and 30 CHC (CHC-2) patients. Affinity bead-purified serum protein was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Serum proteomics showed that 6 protein peaks with mass-to-charge ratios ranging from 1,000 to 3,000 differed significantly between the PNALT-1 and CHC-1 groups. Among these peaks, a 1738-m/z peak protein was identified as a fragment of complement component 4 (C4) and correlated significantly with serum C4a concentrations as determined by enzyme immunoassay. Serum C4a levels were also significantly higher in the PNALT-2 group compared to the CHC-2 group and healthy volunteers. Furthermore, in the PNALT-2 group, serum C4a levels negatively correlated with transaminase levels, but not with other biochemical tests, HCV core antigen levels, peripheral blood cell counts or serum hepatic fibrosis markers. This study indicates that host factors such as C4a not only differ between HCV carriers with PNALT and CHC, but that proteomic approaches could also contribute to the elucidation of factors in PNALT as more differences are discovered.

  1. Complement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fungal infections and some parasitic infections such as malaria . Normal Results Total blood complement level: 41 to ... Glomerulonephritis Hepatitis Hereditary angioedema Kidney transplant Lupus nephritis Malaria Protein in diet Rheumatoid arthritis Septicemia Shock Systemic ...

  2. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of green foxtail (Setaria viridis), a promising model system for C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of green foxtail (Setaria viridis), a promising model system for C4 photosynthesis, is first reported in this study. The genome harbors a large single copy (LSC) region of 81 016 bp and a small single copy (SSC) region of 12 456  bp separated by a pair of inverted repeat (IRa and IRb) regions of 22 315 bp. GC content is 38.92%. The proportion of coding sequence is 57.97%, comprising of 111 (19 duplicated in IR regions) unique genes, 71 of which are protein-coding genes, four are rRNA genes, and 36 are tRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that S. viridis was clustered with its cultivated species S. italica in the tribe Paniceae of the family Poaceae. This newly determined chloroplast genome will provide valuable genetic resources to assist future studies on C4 photosynthesis in grasses.

  3. Re-evaluation of low-resolution crystal structures via interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF): a case study in complement C4.

    PubMed

    Croll, Tristan Ian; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-09-01

    While the rapid proliferation of high-resolution structures in the Protein Data Bank provides a rich set of templates for starting models, it remains the case that a great many structures both past and present are built at least in part by hand-threading through low-resolution and/or weak electron density. With current model-building tools this task can be challenging, and the de facto standard for acceptable error rates (in the form of atomic clashes and unfavourable backbone and side-chain conformations) in structures based on data with dmax not exceeding 3.5 Å reflects this. When combined with other factors such as model bias, these residual errors can conspire to make more serious errors in the protein fold difficult or impossible to detect. The three recently published 3.6-4.2 Å resolution structures of complement C4 (PDB entries 4fxg, 4fxk and 4xam) rank in the top quartile of structures of comparable resolution both in terms of Rfree and MolProbity score, yet, as shown here, contain register errors in six β-strands. By applying a molecular-dynamics force field that explicitly models interatomic forces and hence excludes most physically impossible conformations, the recently developed interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF) approach significantly reduces the complexity of the conformational space to be searched during manual rebuilding. This substantially improves the rate of detection and correction of register errors, and allows user-guided model building in maps with a resolution lower than 3.5 Å to converge to solutions with a stereochemical quality comparable to atomic resolution structures. Here, iMDFF has been used to individually correct and re-refine these three structures to MolProbity scores of <1.7, and strategies for working with such challenging data sets are suggested. Notably, the improved model allowed the resolution for complement C4b to be extended from 4.2 to 3.5 Å as demonstrated by paired refinement.

  4. Human complement C3b/C4b receptor (CR1) mRNA polymorphism that correlates with the CR1 allelic molecular weight polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Chaplin, D.D.; Leykam, J.F.; Gruner, B.A.; Kumar, V.; Atkinson, J.P.

    1987-04-01

    The human C3b/C4b receptor (CR1) is a M/sub r/ approx. = 200,000 single-chain integral membrane glycoprotein of human erythrocytes and leukocytes. It functions both as a receptor for C3b- and C4b-coated ligands and as a regulator of complement activation. Prior structural studies have defined an unusual molecular weight allelic polymorphism in which the allelic products differ in molecular weight by as much as 90,000. On peripheral blood cells there is codominant expression of CR1 gene products of M/sub r/ 190,000 (A), 220,000 (B), 160,000 (C), and 250,000 (D). Results of prior biosynthetic and tryptic peptide mapping experiments have suggested that the most likely basis for the allelic molecular weight differences if at the polypeptide level. In order to define further the molecular basis for these molecular weight differences, human CR1 was purified to homogeneity, tryptic peptide fragments were isolated by HPLC and sequenced, oligonucleotide probes were prepared, and a CR1 cDNA was identified. A subclone of this CR1 cDNA was used as a probe of RNA blots of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cell lines expressing the allelic variants. Each allelic variant encodes two distinct transcripts. A mRNA size polymorphism was identified that correlated with the gene product molecular weight polymorphism. This finding, in addition to a prior report of several homologous repeats in CR1, is consistent with the hypothesis that the molecular weight polymorphism is determined at the genomic level and may have been generated by unequal crossing-over.

  5. Lectin pathway effector enzyme mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 can activate native complement C3 in absence of C4 and/or C2.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Sadam; Demopulos, Gregory; Dudler, Thomas; Yabuki, Munehisa; Wood, Christi L; Cummings, W Jason; Tjoelker, Larry W; Fujita, Teizo; Sacks, Steven; Garred, Peter; Andrew, Peter; Sim, Robert B; Lachmann, Peter J; Wallis, Russell; Lynch, Nicholas; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J

    2017-05-01

    All 3 activation pathways of complement-the classic pathway (CP), the alternative pathway, and the lectin pathway (LP)- converge into a common central event: the cleavage and activation of the abundant third complement component, C3, via formation of C3-activating enzymes (C3 convertases). The fourth complement component, C4, and the second component, C2, are indispensable constituents of the C3 convertase complex, C4bC2a, which is formed by both the CP and the LP. Whereas in the absence of C4, CP can no longer activate C3, LP retains a residual but physiologically critical capacity to convert native C3 into its activation fragments, C3a and C3b. This residual C4 and/or C2 bypass route is dependent on LP-specific mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2. By using various serum sources with defined complement deficiencies, we demonstrate that, under physiologic conditions LP-specific C4 and/or C2 bypass activation of C3 is mediated by direct cleavage of native C3 by mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 bound to LP-activation complexes captured on ligand-coated surfaces.-Yaseen, S., Demopulos, G., Dudler, T., Yabuki, M., Wood, C. L., Cummings, W. J., Tjoelker, L. W., Fujita, T., Sacks, S., Garred, P., Andrew, P., Sim, R. B., Lachmann, P. J., Wallis, R., Lynch, N., Schwaeble, W. J. Lectin pathway effector enzyme mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 can activate native complement C3 in absence of C4 and/or C2. © FASEB.

  6. Interaction between complement regulators and Streptococcus pyogenes: binding of C4b-binding protein and factor H/factor H-like protein 1 to M18 strains involves two different cell surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Caballero, David; García-Laorden, Isabel; Cortés, Guadalupe; Wessels, Michael R; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez; Albertí, Sebastián

    2004-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus, is one of the most frequent causes of pharyngitis and skin infections in humans. Many virulence mechanisms have been suggested to be involved in the infectious process. Among them is the binding to the bacterial cell surface of the complement regulatory proteins factor H, factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), and C4b-binding protein. Previous studies indicate that binding of these three regulators to the streptococcal cell involves the M protein encoded by the emm gene. M-type 18 strains are prevalent among clinical isolates and have been shown to interact with all three complement regulators simultaneously. Using isogenic strains lacking expression of the Emm18 or the Enn18 proteins, we demonstrate in this study that, in contradistinction to previously described S. pyogenes strains, M18 strains bind the complement regulators factor H, FHL-1, and C4b-binding protein through two distinct cell surface proteins. Factor H and FHL-1 bind to the Emm18 protein, while C4BP binds to the Enn18 protein. We propose that expression of two distinct surface structures that bind complement regulatory proteins represents a unique adaptation of M18 strains that enhances their resistance to opsonization by human plasma and increases survival of this particular S. pyogenes strain in the human host. These new findings illustrate that S. pyogenes has evolved diverse mechanisms for recruitment of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface to evade immune clearance in the human host.

  7. Sodium butyrate blocks interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-induced biosynthesis of MHC class III gene products (complement C4 and factor B) in human fetal intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, K; Andoh, A; Inoue, T; Amakata, Y; Hodohara, K; Fujiyama, Y; Bamba, T

    1999-01-01

    Human intestinal epithelial cells have been established as local sites for complement biosynthesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of IFN-γ and sodium butyrate on biosynthesis of MHC class III gene products (complement C4 and factor B) in the human fetal intestinal epithelial cell line INT-407. IFN-γ induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in C4 and factor B secretion. However, sodium butyrate dose-dependently inhibited IFN-γ-induced C4 and factor B secretion. These effects were also observed at the mRNA level. Immunoblotting indicated that IFN-γ induced a rapid activation of Stat1α, and fluorescence immunohistochemistry detected a translocation of Stat1α into the nucleus within 1 h. However, the translocation of Stat1α was not affected by the addition of sodium butyrate. Nuclear run-on assay indicated that IFN-γ induced a weak increase in the transcription rate of factor B gene, and sodium butyrate did not affect this response. IFN-γ and sodium butyrate induced a counter-regulatory effect on C4 and factor B secretion: IFN-γ acted as a potent inducer, but sodium butyrate potently abrogated these responses. These are mainly regulated through the post-transcriptional mechanism. PMID:10540154

  8. Molecular characterization of the complement C1q, C2 and C4 genes in Brazilian patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Liphaus, Bernadete L; Umetsu, Natalia; Jesus, Adriana A; Bando, Silvia Y; Silva, Clovis A; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda

    2015-03-01

    To perform a molecular characterization of the C1q, C2 and C4 genes in patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. Patient 1 (P1) had undetectable C1q, patient 2 (P2) and patient 3 (P3) had decreased C2 and patient 4 (P4) had decreased C4 levels. All exons and non-coding regions of the C1q and C2 genes were sequenced. Mononuclear cells were cultured and stimulated with interferon gamma to evaluate C1q, C2 and C4 mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. C1q sequencing revealed heterozygous silent mutations in the A (c.276 A>G Gly) and C (c.126 C>T Pro) chains, as well as a homozygous single-base change in the 3' non-coding region of the B chain (c*78 A>G). C1qA mRNA expression without interferon was decreased compared with that of healthy controls (p<0.05) and was decreased after stimulation compared with that of non-treated cells. C1qB mRNA expression was decreased compared with that of controls and did not change with stimulation. C1qC mRNA expression was increased compared with that of controls and was even higher after stimulation. P2 and P3 had Type I C2 deficiency (heterozygous 28 bp deletion at exon 6). The C2 mRNA expression in P3 was 23 times lower compared with that of controls and did not change after stimulation. The C4B mRNA expression of P4 was decreased compared with that of controls and increased after stimulation. Silent mutations and single-base changes in the 3' non-coding regions may modify mRNA transcription and C1q production. Type I C2 deficiency should be evaluated in JSLE patients with decreased C2 serum levels. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of decreased C4B mRNA expression in JSLE pathogenesis.

  9. Molecular characterization of the complement C1q, C2 and C4 genes in Brazilian patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Liphaus, Bernadete L; Umetsu, Natalia; Jesus, Adriana A; Bando, Silvia Y; Silva, Clovis A; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a molecular characterization of the C1q, C2 and C4 genes in patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. METHODS: Patient 1 (P1) had undetectable C1q, patient 2 (P2) and patient 3 (P3) had decreased C2 and patient 4 (P4) had decreased C4 levels. All exons and non-coding regions of the C1q and C2 genes were sequenced. Mononuclear cells were cultured and stimulated with interferon gamma to evaluate C1q, C2 and C4 mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: C1q sequencing revealed heterozygous silent mutations in the A (c.276 A>G Gly) and C (c.126 C>T Pro) chains, as well as a homozygous single-base change in the 3′ non-coding region of the B chain (c*78 A>G). C1qA mRNA expression without interferon was decreased compared with that of healthy controls (p<0.05) and was decreased after stimulation compared with that of non-treated cells. C1qB mRNA expression was decreased compared with that of controls and did not change with stimulation. C1qC mRNA expression was increased compared with that of controls and was even higher after stimulation. P2 and P3 had Type I C2 deficiency (heterozygous 28 bp deletion at exon 6). The C2 mRNA expression in P3 was 23 times lower compared with that of controls and did not change after stimulation. The C4B mRNA expression of P4 was decreased compared with that of controls and increased after stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Silent mutations and single-base changes in the 3′ non-coding regions may modify mRNA transcription and C1q production. Type I C2 deficiency should be evaluated in JSLE patients with decreased C2 serum levels. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of decreased C4B mRNA expression in JSLE pathogenesis. PMID:26017655

  10. Major-histocompatibility-complex gene markers and restriction-fragment analysis of steroid 21-hydroxylase (CYP21) and complement C4 genes in classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients in a single population.

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, J; Koskimies, S; Sipilä, I; Lipsanen, V

    1989-01-01

    The gene CYP21B, encoding the steroid 21-hydroxylase enzyme of adrenal steroid biosynthesis, has been mapped to the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Deficiency of this enzyme leads to congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). We report the phenotypes of the HLA and complement C4 and Bf genes, which are closely linked to the CYP21B gene, together with a detailed analysis of the CYP21 and C4 RFLP, in 17 Finnish families with CAH. The RFLP analysis with six restriction enzymes suggested that, altogether, 35% of the affected chromosomes had a CYP21B + C4B gene deletion, 9% an obvious gene conversion of the CYP21B gene to a CYP21A-like gene, and 3% a CYP21A + C4B duplication. The remaining 53% gave the RFLP patterns also found in nonaffected chromosomes. We also found that a 14.0-kb EcoRI RFLP marker of the CYP21 genes was strongly associated with the presence of a short C4B gene, suggesting that some of the RFLP markers found with the CYP21 probe may actually derive from C4B gene polymorphism. Three particular MHC haplotypes, each with a characteristic RFLP pattern, were found in many unrelated families. These three haplotypes accounted for 59% of the affected chromosomes in our study group, the rest (41%) of the affected chromosomes being distributed among various subtypes. The results suggest that, within a single, well-defined population such as in Finland, only a few CYP21B gene defects may constitute a substantial part of the affected chromosomes. This finding will help in genetic studies of CAH in such populations. Images Figure 2 PMID:2565078

  11. Familial C4B Deficiency and Immune Complex Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Soto, K; Wu, YL; Ortiz, A; Aparício, SR; Yu, CY

    2010-01-01

    Homozygous complement C4B deficiency is described in a Southern European young female patient with Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type III characterized by renal biopsies with strong complement C4 and IgG deposits. Low C4 levels were independent of clinical evolution or type of immunosuppression and were found in three other family members without renal disease or infections. HLA typing revealed that the patient has homozygous A*02, Cw*06, B*50 at the class I region, and DRB1*08 and DQB1*03 at the class II region. Genotypic and phenotypic studies demonstrated that the patient has homozygous monomodular RCCX in the HLA class III region, with single long C4A genes coding for C4A3 and complete C4B deficiency. Her father, mother, son and niece have heterozygous C4B deficiency. The patient’s deceased brother had a history of Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (HSP), an immune complex-mediated proliferative glomerulonephritis. These findings challenge the putative pathophysiological roles of C4A and C4B and underscore the need to perform functional assays, C4 allotyping and genotyping on patients with persistently low serum levels of a classical pathway complement component and glomerulopathy associated with immune deposits. PMID:20580617

  12. Familial C4B deficiency and immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Soto, K; Wu, Y L; Ortiz, A; Aparício, S R; Yu, C Y

    2010-10-01

    Homozygous complement C4B deficiency is described in a Southern European young female patient with Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type III characterized by renal biopsies with strong complement C4 and IgG deposits. Low C4 levels were independent of clinical evolution or type of immunosuppression and were found in three other family members without renal disease or infections. HLA typing revealed that the patient has homozygous A*02, Cw*06, B*50 at the class I region, and DRB1*08 and DQB1*03 at the class II region. Genotypic and phenotypic studies demonstrated that the patient has homozygous monomodular RCCX in the HLA class III region, with single long C4A genes coding for C4A3 and complete C4B deficiency. Her father, mother, son and niece have heterozygous C4B deficiency. The patient's deceased brother had a history of Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (HSP), an immune complex-mediated proliferative glomerulonephritis. These findings challenge the putative pathophysiological roles of C4A and C4B and underscore the need to perform functional assays, C4 allotyping and genotyping on patients with persistently low serum levels of a classical pathway complement component and glomerulopathy associated with immune deposits. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The partly folded back solution structure arrangement of the 30 SCR domains in human complement receptor type 1 (CR1) permits access to its C3b and C4b ligands.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Patricia B; Huang, Chen Y; Ihyembe, Demvihin; Hammond, Russell A; Marsh, Henry C; Perkins, Stephen J

    2008-01-04

    differ from those in CR2, and the SCR arrangement in CR1 will permit C3b or C4b to access all three ligand sites.

  14. Completely ES cell-derived mice produced by tetraploid complementation using inner cell mass (ICM) deficient blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Wen, Duancheng; Saiz, Nestor; Rosenwaks, Zev; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Rafii, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Tetraploid complementation is often used to produce mice from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by injection of diploid (2n) ESCs into tetraploid (4n) blastocysts (ESC-derived mice). This method has also been adapted to mouse cloning and the derivation of mice from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of the tetraploid complementation remains largely unclear. Whether this approach can give rise to completely ES cell-derived mice is an open question, and has not yet been unambiguously proven. Here, we show that mouse tetraploid blastocysts can be classified into two groups, according to the presence or absence of an inner cell mass (ICM). We designate these as type a (presence of ICM at blastocyst stage) or type b (absence of ICM). ESC lines were readily derived from type a blastocysts, suggesting that these embryos retain a pluripotent epiblast compartment; whereas the type b blastocysts possessed very low potential to give rise to ESC lines, suggesting that they had lost the pluripotent epiblast. When the type a blastocysts were used for tetraploid complementation, some of the resulting mice were found to be 2n/4n chimeric; whereas when type b blastocysts were used as hosts, the resulting mice are all completely ES cell-derived, with the newborn pups displaying a high frequency of abdominal hernias. Our results demonstrate that completely ES cell-derived mice can be produced using ICM-deficient 4n blastocysts, and provide evidence that the exclusion of tetraploid cells from the fetus in 2n/4n chimeras can largely be attributed to the formation of ICM-deficient blastocysts.

  15. Gene Copy-Number Variation and Associated Polymorphisms of Complement Component C4 in Human Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): Low Copy Number Is a Risk Factor for and High Copy Number Is a Protective Factor against SLE Susceptibility in European Americans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan ; Chung, Erwin K. ; Wu, Yee Ling ; Savelli, Stephanie L. ; Nagaraja, Haikady N. ; Zhou, Bi ; Hebert, Maddie ; Jones, Karla N. ; Shu, Yaoling ; Kitzmiller, Kathryn ; Blanchong, Carol A. ; McBride, Kim L. ; Higgins, Gloria C. ; Rennebohm, Robert M. ; Rice, Robert R. ; Hackshaw, Kevin V. ; Roubey, Robert A. S. ; Grossman, Jennifer M. ; Tsao, Betty P. ; Birmingham, Daniel J. ; Rovin, Brad H. ; Hebert, Lee A. ; Yu, C. Yung 

    2007-01-01

    Interindividual gene copy-number variation (CNV) of complement component C4 and its associated polymorphisms in gene size (long and short) and protein isotypes (C4A and C4B) probably lead to different susceptibilities to autoimmune disease. We investigated the C4 gene CNV in 1,241 European Americans, including patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), their first-degree relatives, and unrelated healthy subjects, by definitive genotyping and phenotyping techniques. The gene copy number (GCN) varied from 2 to 6 for total C4, from 0 to 5 for C4A, and from 0 to 4 for C4B. Four copies of total C4, two copies of C4A, and two copies of C4B were the most common GCN counts, but each constituted only between one-half and three-quarters of the study populations. Long C4 genes were strongly correlated with C4A (R=0.695; P<.0001). Short C4 genes were correlated with C4B (R=0.437; P<.0001). In comparison with healthy subjects, patients with SLE clearly had the GCN of total C4 and C4A shifting to the lower side. The risk of SLE disease susceptibility significantly increased among subjects with only two copies of total C4 (patients 9.3%; unrelated controls 1.5%; odds ratio [OR] = 6.514; P=.00002) but decreased in those with ⩾5 copies of C4 (patients 5.79%; controls 12%; OR=0.466; P=.016). Both zero copies (OR=5.267; P=.001) and one copy (OR=1.613; P=.022) of C4A were risk factors for SLE, whereas ⩾3 copies of C4A appeared to be protective (OR=0.574; P=.012). Family-based association tests suggested that a specific haplotype with a single short C4B in tight linkage disequilibrium with the −308A allele of TNFA was more likely to be transmitted to patients with SLE. This work demonstrates how gene CNV and its related polymorphisms are associated with the susceptibility to a human complex disease. PMID:17503323

  16. Complement component 3 (C3)

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003539.htm Complement component 3 (C3) To use the sharing features on ... and C4 are the most commonly measured complement components. A complement test may be used to monitor ...

  17. Autoimmune-associated HLA-B8-DR3 haplotypes in Asian Indians are unique in C4 complement gene copy numbers and HSP-2 1267A/G.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurvinder; Kumar, Neeraj; Szilagyi, Agnes; Blasko, Bernadett; Fust, George; Rajczy, Katalin; Pozsonyi, Eva; Hosso, Adrienn; Petranyi, Gyozo; Tandon, Nikhil; Mehra, Narinder

    2008-09-01

    The classical AH8.1 (HLA-A1-B8-DR3-DQ2) is the most common Caucasian haplotype, associated with several autoimmune diseases, immunologic hyperreactivity and rapid progression to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. However, in Asian Indians, there are multiple unique B8-DR3 haplotypes that are associated with autoimmunity and differ significantly from the common Caucasian AH8.1. The Indian HLA-A1-B8-DR3 is therefore referred to as an AH8.1 variant. The aims of this study were to compare C4A and C4B copy numbers and to identify alleles in HSP70-2 and LTA in these haplotypes. The Indian B8-DR3 haplotypes differ from the Caucasian AH8.1 at C4A and HSP70-2 loci. The Indian B8-DR3 haplotypes have 1 copy each at C4A and C4B, while the Caucasian AH8.1 has 1 copy at C4B but no C4A gene. Moreover, the Indian and Caucasian B8-DR3 haplotypes had HSP70-2 1267 *A, and *G alleles, respectively. By contrast, the LTA 252 *G allele occurred both in the Indian and Caucasian haplotypes. The Indian haplotypes also contained Bf*F and TNF-308*G that were different from the Caucasian equivalents Bf*S and TNF-308*A. These differences and previous studies support the hypothesis that B8-DR3-DQ2 haplotypes in Asian Indian population might have originated independently of Caucasian AH8.1 selectively through recombination and mutations. Because autoimmune disease associations are shared among these otherwise diverse haplotypes, these data strongly suggest that some shared component(s) of all these associated haplotypes may be playing a key role in such associations.

  18. [C4 type photosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Drozak, Anna; Wasilewska, Wioleta; Buczyńska, Alicja; Romanowska, Elzbieta

    2012-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis includes several anatomical and biochemical modifications that allow plants to concentrate CO2 at the site of Rubisco. The photorespiratory pathway is repressed in C4 plants, since the rates of photosynthesis and biomass production are increased. This is an adaptation to high light intensities, high temperatures and dryness. C4 plants contain two distinct types of photosynthetic cells, mesophyll and bundle sheath. The processes of assimilation and reduction of CO2 are separated spatiality and catayzed by two different enzymes. Only the bundle sheath chloroplasts perform the reactions of the Calvin-Benson cycle with the help of the Rubisco enzyme present exclusively in this cell type. The primary CO2 fixation occurs in mesophyll cells through the action of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The light-dependent reactions of the photosynthesis occur exclusively in the latter cell type. These differences in photochemistry lead to distinct redox profiles in both types of cells. C4 plants are divided into three biochemical subtypes on the basis of differences in the mechanisms of decarboxylation of the C4 acids. C4 plants will provide the main source of food for humans and animals in the nearest decade.

  19. Low C4, C4A and C4B gene copy numbers are stronger risk factors for juvenile-onset than for adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Kaline M C; Faria, Atila G A; Liphaus, Bernadete L; Jesus, Adriana A; Silva, Clovis A; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda; Andrade, Luis E C

    2016-05-01

    Complete deficiency of Complement C4 component is a strong genetic risk factor for SLE. C4 is encoded by two different genes, C4A and C4B, which show considerable gene copy number (GCN) variation. This study investigates the association of total C4, C4A and C4B GCN with JSLE. Ninety JSLE patients, 170 adult-onset SLE (aSLE) patients and 200 healthy individuals were evaluated for C4A and C4B GCN by quantitative real-time PCR. JSLE patients had lower GCN for C4A (mean = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.5, 1.9) and C4B (mean = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.3, 1.6) compared with healthy individuals (mean C4A = 2.3; 95% CI: 2.2, 2.5, P < 0.001; C4B = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.8, 2.1; P < 0.001) or with aSLE patients (mean C4A = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.8, 2.1, P = 0.006; mean C4B = 1.8; 95% CI: 1.7, 1.9, P < 0.001). Low total C4 GCN (<4 copies) was more frequent in JSLE than in healthy individuals (59% vs 28%; P < 0.001). The same was observed for low C4A (⩽1 copy) (52% vs 18%; P < 0.001) and for low C4B (60% vs 31%; P < 0.001). JSLE had a stronger association with low total C4 (OR = 3.68, 95% CI: 2.19, 6.20), C4A (OR = 4.98, 95% CI: 2.88, 8.62) and C4B (OR = 3.26; 95% CI: 1.95, 5.47) than aSLE (C4 OR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.32, 3.13; C4A OR = 2.36; 95% CI: 1.46, 3.81; C4B OR = 1.13; 95% CI: 0.73, 1.74). In addition, pericarditis in JSLE patients was associated with low C4 (OR = 4.13; 95% CI: 1.02, 16.68; P = 0.047) and low C4A (OR = 5.54; 95% CI: 1.37, 22.32; P = 0.016). Low total C4, C4A and C4B GCN were associated with a stronger risk for developing JSLE than aSLE. Additionally, low total C4 and C4A GCN are risk factors for pericarditis in JSLE. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Toward a definition of the complete proteome of plant peroxisomes: Where experimental proteomics must be complemented by bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Reumann, Sigrun

    2011-05-01

    In the past few years, proteome analysis of Arabidopsis peroxisomes has been established by the complementary efforts of four research groups and has emerged as the major unbiased approach to identify new peroxisomal proteins on a large scale. Collectively, more than 100 new candidate proteins from plant peroxisomes have been identified, including long-awaited low-abundance proteins. More than 50 proteins have been validated as peroxisome targeted, nearly doubling the number of established plant peroxisomal proteins. Sequence homologies of the new proteins predict unexpected enzyme activities, novel metabolic pathways and unknown non-metabolic peroxisome functions. Despite this remarkable success, proteome analyses of plant peroxisomes remain highly material intensive and require major preparative efforts. Characterization of the membrane proteome or post-translational protein modifications poses major technical challenges. New strategies, including quantitative mass spectrometry methods, need to be applied to allow further identifications of plant peroxisomal proteins, such as of stress-inducible proteins. In the long process of defining the complete proteome of plant peroxisomes, the prediction of peroxisome-targeted proteins from plant genome sequences emerges as an essential complementary approach to identify additional peroxisomal proteins that are, for instance, specific to peroxisome variants from minor tissues and organs or to abiotically stressed model and crop plants.

  1. Complete amino acid sequence of the A chain of human complement-classical-pathway enzyme C1r.

    PubMed Central

    Arlaud, G J; Willis, A C; Gagnon, J

    1987-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of human C1r A chain was determined, from sequence analysis performed on fragments obtained from C1r autolytic cleavage, cleavage of methionyl bonds, tryptic cleavages at arginine and lysine residues, and cleavages by staphylococcal proteinase. The polypeptide chain has an N-terminal serine residue and contains 446 amino acid residues (Mr 51,200). The sequence data allow chemical characterization of fragments alpha (positions 1-211), beta (positions 212-279) and gamma (positions 280-446) yielded from C1r autolytic cleavage, and identification of the two major cleavage sites generating these fragments. Position 150 of C1r A chain is occupied by a modified amino acid residue that, upon acid hydrolysis, yields erythro-beta-hydroxyaspartic acid, and that is located in a sequence homologous to the beta-hydroxyaspartic acid-containing regions of Factor IX, Factor X, protein C and protein Z. Sequence comparison reveals internal homology between two segments (positions 10-78 and 186-257). Two carbohydrate moieties are attached to the polypeptide chain, both via asparagine residues at positions 108 and 204. Combined with the previously determined sequence of C1r B chain [Arlaud & Gagnon (1983) Biochemistry 22, 1758-1764], these data give the complete sequence of human C1r. PMID:3036070

  2. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  3. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  4. C4a: An Anaphylatoxin in Name Only.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    Activation of complement leads to generation of the 3 anaphylatoxins C3a, C4a, and C5a. Although all 3 peptides are structurally similar, only C3a and C5a share a similar functional profile that includes the classic inflammatory activities and, more recently, developmental homing and regenerative properties among others. In contrast, the functional profile of C4a is questionable in most cases owing to contamination of C4a preparations with physiologically relevant levels of C3a and/or C5a. Combined with the absence of an identified C4a receptor and the inability of C4a to signal through the C3a and C5a receptors, it is clear that C4a should not be included in the family of complement anaphylatoxins.

  5. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host. PMID:28066433

  6. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host.

  7. Pros and cons for C4d as a biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Danielle; Colvin, Robert B.; Daha, Mohamed R.; Drachenberg, Cinthia B.; Haas, Mark; Nickeleit, Volker; Salmon, Jane E.; Sis, Banu; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Bruijn, Jan A.; Bajema, Ingeborg M.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of C4d in daily clinical practice in the late nineties aroused an ever-increasing interest in the role of antibody-mediated mechanisms in allograft rejection. As a marker of classical complement activation, C4d made it possible to visualize the direct link between anti-donor antibodies and tissue injury at sites of antibody binding in a graft. With the expanding use of C4d worldwide several limitations of C4d were identified. For instance, in ABO-incompatible transplantations C4d is present in the majority of grafts but this seems to point at ‘graft accommodation’ rather than antibody-mediated rejection. C4d is now increasingly recognized as a potential biomarker in other fields where antibodies can cause tissue damage, such as systemic autoimmune diseases and pregnancy. In all these fields, C4d holds promise to detect patients at risk for the consequences of antibody-mediated disease. Moreover, the emergence of new therapeutics that block complement activation makes C4d a marker with potential to identify patients who may possibly benefit from these drugs. This review provides an overview of the past, present, and future perspectives of C4d as a biomarker, focusing on its use in solid organ transplantation and discussing its possible new roles in autoimmunity and pregnancy. PMID:22297669

  8. Encapsidation of poliovirus replicons encoding the complete human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene by using a complementation system which provides the P1 capsid protein in trans.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, D C; Ansardi, D C; Morrow, C D

    1995-01-01

    Poliovirus genomes which contain small regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gag, pol, and env genes substituted in frame for the P1 capsid region replicate and express HIV-1 proteins as fusion proteins with the P1 capsid precursor protein upon transfection into cells (W. S. Choi, R. Pal-Ghosh, and C. D. Morrow, J. Virol. 65:2875-2883, 1991). Since these genomes, referred to as replicons, do not express capsid proteins, a complementation system was developed to encapsidate the genomes by providing P1 capsid proteins in trans from a recombinant vaccinia virus, VV-P1. Virus stocks of encapsidated replicons were generated after serial passage of the replicon genomes into cells previously infected with VV-P1 (D. C. Porter, D. C. Ansardi, W. S. Choi, and C. D. Morrow, J. Virol. 67:3712-3719, 1993). Using this system, we have further defined the role of the P1 region in viral protein expression and RNA encapsidation. In the present study, we constructed poliovirus replicons which contain the complete 1,492-bp gag gene of HIV-1 substituted for the entire P1 region of poliovirus. To investigate whether the VP4 coding region was required for the replication and encapsidation of poliovirus RNA, a second replicon in which the complete gag gene was substituted for the VP2, VP3, and VP1 capsid sequences was constructed. Transfection of replicon RNA with and without the VP4 coding region into cells resulted in similar levels of expression of the HIV-1 Gag protein and poliovirus 3CD protein, as indicated by immunoprecipitation using specific antibodies. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of RNA from transfected cells demonstrated comparable levels of RNA replication for each replicon. Transfection of the replicon genomes into cells infected with VV-P1 resulted in the encapsidation of the genomes; serial passage in the presence of VV-P1 resulted in the generation of virus stocks of encapsidated replicons. Analysis of the levels of protein expression and encapsidated

  9. An evaluation of association between common variants in C4BPB/C4BPA genes and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuihong; Lu, Houquan; Ni, Jianliang; Zhang, Jiangtao; Tang, Wenxin; Lu, Weihong; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Chen

    2015-03-17

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that both maternal bacterial and viral infections during pregnancy increase the risk of schizophrenia among offspring, but to date there is not clear explanation for this increased risk. Previously, the decreased C4b-binding protein (C4BP), a potent circulating soluble inhibitor of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, was reported to be associated with risk of schizophrenia. Here, we analyzed 4 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of C4BPB and 5 SNPs of C4BPA in a group of 556 schizophrenia patients and a matched group of 610 healthy controls to see if the genes C4BPB and C4BPA, which encode C4BP, may confer a susceptibility to schizophrenia. Comparing the genotype and allele frequencies of those SNPs between cases and controls, we found no association between the C4BPB/C4BPA variants and schizophrenia. Our results provided preliminary evidence that C4BPB/C4BPA may not confer susceptibility to schizophrenia among Han Chinese. Further genetic studies from large-scale population are required to obtain more conclusive results.

  10. Association of C4B deficiency (C4B*Q0) with erythema nodosum in leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    de Messias, I J; Santamaria, J; Brenden, M; Reis, A; Mauff, G

    1993-01-01

    A considerable number of studies have postulated significant associations between susceptibility to the different clinical manifestations of leprosy and the MHC. In this investigation, the association between the MHC class III complement proteins C2, BF, C4A and C4B and leprosy in a patient population of Southern Brazil was studied. A total of 109 non-related leprosy patients was investigated; 73 presented with lepromatous leprosy (LL), 46 of them had the immunopathological reaction of erythema nodosum (ENL), the remaining 36 were tuberculoid, borderline and indeterminate leprosy (TIBL) patients. The control group included 172 healthy individuals matched with the patients according to their ethnic and geographical origin. C2, BF, C4A and C4B allotypes were determined by standard technologies including Western blots for C2 and C4 variant alleles with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Non-expressed ('silent') C4 alleles in hemizygously deficient individuals were estimated semiquantitatively on the basis of the C4A and C4B isotype ratio and by the MASC ('minimal chi-square') method. The results showed a significantly elevated presence of the non-expressed C4B allele (C4B*Q0) in the LL and ENL patient groups in comparison with the controls. The most significant difference was observed in the ENL group when compared with the controls. In addition, all patients who were homozygously C4B-deficient had ENL, and most of them had the BF*F1 allele. The comparison between LL patients with and without ENL also showed a statistically significant difference in the presence of C4B*Q0, indicating that C4B deficiency itself is associated with ENL. The relative risk of LL patients with the C4B*Q0 allele suffering from ENL was 5.3 compared with LL patients without C4B*Q0. Since immune complexes (IC) are considered to be the pathogenic cause of ENL, our findings indicate that C4B deficiency may play an important role in the abnormal immune response against Mycobacterium leprae and

  11. Association of C4B deficiency (C4B*Q0) with erythema nodosum in leprosy.

    PubMed

    de Messias, I J; Santamaria, J; Brenden, M; Reis, A; Mauff, G

    1993-05-01

    A considerable number of studies have postulated significant associations between susceptibility to the different clinical manifestations of leprosy and the MHC. In this investigation, the association between the MHC class III complement proteins C2, BF, C4A and C4B and leprosy in a patient population of Southern Brazil was studied. A total of 109 non-related leprosy patients was investigated; 73 presented with lepromatous leprosy (LL), 46 of them had the immunopathological reaction of erythema nodosum (ENL), the remaining 36 were tuberculoid, borderline and indeterminate leprosy (TIBL) patients. The control group included 172 healthy individuals matched with the patients according to their ethnic and geographical origin. C2, BF, C4A and C4B allotypes were determined by standard technologies including Western blots for C2 and C4 variant alleles with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Non-expressed ('silent') C4 alleles in hemizygously deficient individuals were estimated semiquantitatively on the basis of the C4A and C4B isotype ratio and by the MASC ('minimal chi-square') method. The results showed a significantly elevated presence of the non-expressed C4B allele (C4B*Q0) in the LL and ENL patient groups in comparison with the controls. The most significant difference was observed in the ENL group when compared with the controls. In addition, all patients who were homozygously C4B-deficient had ENL, and most of them had the BF*F1 allele. The comparison between LL patients with and without ENL also showed a statistically significant difference in the presence of C4B*Q0, indicating that C4B deficiency itself is associated with ENL. The relative risk of LL patients with the C4B*Q0 allele suffering from ENL was 5.3 compared with LL patients without C4B*Q0. Since immune complexes (IC) are considered to be the pathogenic cause of ENL, our findings indicate that C4B deficiency may play an important role in the abnormal immune response against Mycobacterium leprae and

  12. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis of a 6- to 11-cM subregion of the Fah-Hbb interval of mouse chromosome 7: Completed testing of 4557 gametes and deletion mapping and complementation analysis of 31 mutations.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Carpenter, D A

    1999-05-01

    An interval of mouse chromosome (Chr) 7 surrounding the albino (Tyr; c) locus, and corresponding to a long 6- to 11-cM Tyr deletion, has been the target of a large-scale mutagenesis screen with the chemical supermutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). A segment of Chr 7, from a mutagenized genome bred from ENU-treated males, was made hemizygous opposite the long deletion for recognition and recovery of new recessive mutations that map within the albino deletion complex. Over 6000 pedigrees were analyzed, and 4557 of these were completely tested for mutations specifying both lethal and gross visible phenotypes. Thirty-one nonclustered mutations were identified and assigned to 10 complementation groups by pairwise trans-complementation crosses. Deletion-mapping analyses, using the extensive series of radiation-induced Tyr deletions, placed the loci defined by each of these complementation groups into defined intervals of the Tyr-region deletion map, which facilitates the identification of each locus on physical and transcription maps of the region. These mutations identified seven new loci and provided new ENU-induced alleles at three previously defined loci. Interestingly, no mutations were recovered that recapitulated three phenotypes defined by analysis of homozygous or partially complementing albino deletions. On the basis of our experience with this screen, we discuss a number of issues (e.g., locus mutability, failure to saturate, number of gametes to screen, allelic series) of concern when application of chemical mutagenesis screens to megabase regions of the mouse genome is considered.

  13. Deficiency of C4 from donor or recipient mouse fails to prevent renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Zhou, Wuding; Farrar, Conrad A; Hargreaves, Roseanna E G; Sheerin, Neil S; Sacks, Steven H

    2006-04-01

    Complement effector products generated in the transplanted kidney are known to mediate transplant rejection, but which of the three main activation pathways of complement trigger this response is unclear. Here we assessed the role of the classical and lectin pathways by studying the common component C4 in mouse kidney transplant rejection. We transplanted wild-type or C4-null H-2(b) donor kidneys into H-2(k) or H-2(d) recipients, or vice-versa, to assess the roles of donor kidney and recipient expression of complement. Intragraft C4 gene expression rose substantially during rejection. However, we found no significant association between graft acceptance and the presence of C4 in either the donor kidney or recipient mouse. At the time of rejection, we found no significant differences in alloantibody response in the different groups. Tubular deposition of C3 to C9 occurred regardless of the absence or presence of C4 in either the donor or recipient mouse, indicating that C4 was dispensable for complement activation at this site. These data suggest that complement activation and renal allograft rejection are independent of the classical and lectin pathways in these models, implying that in the absence of these pathways the alternative pathway is the main trigger for complement-mediated rejection.

  14. Multiple C4/Slp genes distinguished by expression after transfection.

    PubMed Central

    Robins, D M; Malissen, M; Hood, L; Ferreira, A; Walthall, D; Mitchell, M

    1986-01-01

    The S region of the murine major histocompatibility complex contains two closely related genes: C4, encoding the fourth component of complement, and Slp, encoding sex-limited protein. We cloned these genes from a cosmid library of the B10.W7R strain that does not show androgen regulation of the Slp protein. Restriction site polymorphisms revealed at least four C4-like genes within the Sw7 locus, indicating evolutionary amplification of this region. Transfection of these genes into L cells resulted in expression, processing, and secretion of immunologically correct C4 and Slp proteins. At least two different Slp genes and one C4 gene were capable, after transfection, of expressing C4 and Slp indistinguishable from macrophage-derived protein. A third Slp gene exists within this locus whose recombinant cognate did not express in L cells. Thus, the B10.W7R S region includes one C4 gene and at least three Slp-like genes. Images PMID:3023818

  15. Widely distributed C 4ISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goughnour, David A.; Allen, Swati D.; Salonish, Michael J.

    2007-04-01

    Advances in networking and communications make the dream of a highly connected mobile war fighter, persistent networked sensors, and distributed command and control a reality. However, being able to communicate is only the first part of the problem. The ability to easily communicate with a wide variety of highly distributed sensors and systems presents significant new problems that need to be addressed. First, an application must discover what services are available and establish communications with the desired services. Secondly, time synchronization across all of the networked systems is critical to correctly correlating the information into a coherent picture. In addition, maintaining data consistency in a highly distributed environment is an extremely challenging problem. Given the amount of data available clients must be able to subscribe to specific data in order to avoid information/system overload. Finally the information must be presented to the user in a form and on a platform well suited to the task at hand. All of these problems, and many more, must be solved in order to deliver a truly effective net-centric C4ISR system. A software architecture will be presented that attempts to solve the issues described above. The architecture inherently includes many features designed to address these issues. In addition, the user can select data from a wide variety of services, both local and remote and control how it is accessed, processed, and displayed. A detailed analysis of each of these techniques and how it impacts the effectiveness of the system will be discussed.

  16. Degree of C4 Photosynthesis in C4 and C3-C4Flaveria Species and Their Hybrids 1

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, George T.; Brown, R. Harold; Bouton, Joseph H.; Bassett, Carole L.; Black, Clanton C.

    1992-01-01

    The degree of C4 photosynthesis was assessed in four hybrids among C4, C4-like, and C3-C4 species in the genus Flaveria using 14C labeling, CO2 exchange, 13C discrimination, and C4 enzyme activities. The hybrids incorporated from 57 to 88% of the 14C assimilated in a 10-s exposure into C4 acids compared with 26% for the C3-C4 species Flaveria linearis, 91% for the C4 species Flaveria trinervia, and 87% for the C4-like Flaveria brownii. Those plants with high percentages of 14C initially fixed into C4 acids also metabolized the C4 acids quickly, and the percentage of 14C in 3-phosphoglyceric acid plus sugar phosphates increased for at least a 30-s exposure to 12CO2. This indicated a high degree of coordination between the carbon accumulation and reduction phases of the C4 and C3 cycles. Synthesis and metabolism of C4 acids by the species and their hybrids were highly and linearly correlated with discrimination against 13C. The relationship of 13C discrimination or 14C metabolism to O2 inhibition of photosynthesis was curvilinear, changing more rapidly at C4-like values of 14C metabolism and 13C discrimination. Incorporation of initial 14C into C4 acids showed a biphasic increase with increased activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and NADP-malic enzyme (steep at low activities), but turnover of C4 acids was linearly related to NADP-malic enzyme activity. Several other traits were closely related to the in vitro activity of NADP-malic enzyme but not phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The data indicate that the hybrids have variable degrees of C4 photosynthesis but that the carbon accumulation and reduction portions of the C4 and C3 cycles are well coordinated. PMID:16653079

  17. Reibergram of Intrathecal Synthesis of C4 in Patients with Eosinophilic Meningitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Docal, Bárbara; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto Juan; Bu-Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa; Rodríguez-Rey, Alexis; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Juan Carlos; de Paula-Almeida, Susana Olga

    2010-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis produces eosinophilic meningitis in humans and is endemic in Thailand, Taiwan, China, and the Caribbean region. During infection with this parasite, it is important to know if the complement system may be activated by the classical or lectin pathway. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples from 20 patients with meningitic angiostrongyliasis were used to quantify C4 levels and albumin. Results were plotted on a C4 CSF/serum quotient diagram or Reibergram. Twelve patients showed intrathecal synthesis of C4. Antibody-dependent complement cytotoxicity should be considered as a possible mechanism that destroys third-stage larvae of this helminth in cerebrospinal fluid of affected patients. PMID:20519605

  18. Complements do not lie.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-12-13

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy.

  19. Complements do not lie

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy. PMID:22674942

  20. Complements do not lie.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-12-01

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy.

  1. Small passenger car transmission test; Ford C4 transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bujold, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    A 1979 Ford C4 automatic transmission was tested per a passenger car automatic transmission test code (SAE J651b) which required drive performance, coast performance, and no load test conditions. Under these test conditions, the transmission attained maximum efficiencies in the mid-eighty percent range for both drive performance tests and coast performance tests. The major results of this test (torque, speed, and efficiency curves) are presented. Graphs map the complete performance characteristics for the Ford C4 transmission.

  2. 42 CFR 52c.4 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application. 52c.4 Section 52c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.4 Application. An institution interested in applying for a grant under this...

  3. 42 CFR 52c.4 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application. 52c.4 Section 52c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.4 Application. An institution interested in applying for a grant under this...

  4. 42 CFR 52c.4 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application. 52c.4 Section 52c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.4 Application. An institution interested in applying for a grant under this...

  5. 42 CFR 52c.4 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application. 52c.4 Section 52c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.4 Application. An institution interested in applying for a grant under this...

  6. 42 CFR 52c.4 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application. 52c.4 Section 52c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.4 Application. An institution interested in applying for a grant under this...

  7. Amino acid sequence of the Bb fragment from complement Factor B. Sequence of the major cyanogen bromide-cleavage peptide (CB-II) and completion of the sequence of the Bb fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Christie, D L; Gagnon, J

    1983-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of peptide CB-II, the major product (mol.wt. 30 000) of CNBr cleavage of fragment Bb from human complement Factor B, is given. The sequence was obtained from peptides derived by trypsin cleavage of peptide CB-II and clostripain digestion of fragment Bb. Cleavage of two Asn-Gly bonds in peptide CB-II was also found useful. These results, along with those presented in the preceding paper [Gagnon & Christie (1983) Biochem. J. 209, 51-60], yield the complete sequence of the 505 amino acid residues of fragment Bb. The C-terminal half of the molecule shows strong homology of sequence with serine proteinases. Factor B has a catalytic chain (fragment Bb) with a molecular weight twice that of proteinases previously described, suggesting that it is a novel type of serine proteinase, probably with a different activation mechanism. PMID:6342610

  8. Low C4 gene copy numbers are associated with superior graft survival in patients transplanted with a deceased donor kidney.

    PubMed

    Bay, Jakob T; Schejbel, Lone; Madsen, Hans O; Sørensen, Søren S; Hansen, Jesper M; Garred, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Complement C4 is a central component of the classical and the lectin pathways of the complement system. The C4 protein exists as two isotypes C4A and C4B encoded by the C4A and C4B genes, both of which are found with varying copy numbers. Deposition of C4 has been implicated in kidney graft rejection, but a relationship between graft survival and serum C4 concentration as well as C4 genetic variation has not been established. We evaluated this using a prospective study design of 676 kidney transplant patients and 211 healthy individuals as controls. Increasing C4 gene copy numbers significantly correlated with the C4 serum concentration in both patients and controls. Patients with less than four total copies of C4 genes transplanted with a deceased donor kidney experienced a superior 5-year graft survival (hazard ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval: 0.25-0.84). No significant association was observed in patients transplanted with a living donor. Thus, low C4 copy numbers are associated with increased kidney graft survival in patients receiving a kidney from a deceased donor. Hence, the degree of ischemia may influence the clinical impact of complement.

  9. DNase I hypersensitivity mapping and promoter polymorphism analysis of human C4

    SciTech Connect

    Vaishnaw, A.K.; Hargreaves, R.; Morley, B.J.

    1995-04-01

    Human complement component C4 is encoded by two structurally distinct loci in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region. The two isotypes, C4A and C4B, differ at only four residues in the C4d fragment, but C4 constitutes the most polymorphic of the complement components. It is not known, however, whether the regions involved in the regulation of C4 expression also display polymorphic variation. By using the technique of DNase I hypersensitivity mapping, we established that the only area of transcriptional activity for C4 in the hepatocyte cell line, HepG2, occurs approximately 500 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site. This region was found to be remarkably constant in sequence when analyzed in the context of differing MHC haplotypes including HLA B57, C4A6, C4B1, DR7, which has been correlated with reduced expression of the C4A isotype. Similarly, polymerase chain reaction followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis failed to demonstrate any promoter polymorphisms in 103 individuals comprising 52 systemic lupus erythermatosus patients and 51 healthy controls. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. C4 photosynthesis evolution: the conditional Mt. Fuji.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, David

    2016-06-01

    C4 photosynthesis implements a biochemical carbon pump to suppress photorespiration. While this mechanism allows for increased photosynthetic efficiency, it requires the ancestral C3 state to be modified in terms of leaf anatomy, expression of metabolic genes, and enzyme kinetics. Despite the complexity of the C4 syndrome, it evolved in more than 60 independent lineages. Because the phylogenetic distribution of these origins appears to be non-random, enabling factors that are initially unrelated to C4 photosynthesis are assumed to be acting in certain C3 lineages. In recent years, substantial progress has been made on firstly, the nature of enabling events and finally, quantitative models of C4 evolution that are based on C3-C4 intermediate species. I discuss the synthesis of these approaches as a consensus trajectory towards C4 photosynthesis and hypothesize on the effect of enabling factors on the fitness landscape of C4 evolution. A complete understanding of these mechanisms will require both further experimental studies and improved quantitative models of leaf physiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Exploiting the engine of C(4) photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2011-05-01

    Ever since the discovery of C(4) photosynthesis in the mid-1960s, plant biologists have envisaged the introduction of the C(4) photosynthetic pathway into C(3) crops such as rice and soybeans. Recent advances in genomics capabilities, and new evolutionary and developmental studies indicate that C(4) engineering will be feasible in the next few decades. Furthermore, better understanding of the function of C(4) photosynthesis provides new ways to improve existing C(4) crops and bioenergy species, for example by creating varieties with ultra-high water and nitrogen use efficiencies. In the case of C(4) engineering, the main enzymes of the C(4) metabolic cycle have already been engineered into various C(3) plants. In contrast, knowledge of the genes controlling Kranz anatomy lags far behind. Combining traditional genetics, high-throughput sequencing technologies, systems biology, bioinformatics, and the use of the new C(4) model species Setaria viridis, the discovery of the key genes controlling the expression of C(4) photosynthesis can be dramatically accelerated. Sustained investment in the research areas directly related to C(4) engineering has the potential for substantial return in the decades to come, primarily by increasing crop production at a time when global food supplies are predicted to fall below world demand.

  12. The evolutionary ecology of C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Osborne, Colin P

    2014-12-01

    C4 photosynthesis is a physiological syndrome resulting from multiple anatomical and biochemical components, which function together to increase the CO2 concentration around Rubisco and reduce photorespiration. It evolved independently multiple times and C4 plants now dominate many biomes, especially in the tropics and subtropics. The C4 syndrome comes in many flavours, with numerous phenotypic realizations of C4 physiology and diverse ecological strategies. In this work, we analyse the events that happened in a C3 context and enabled C4 physiology in the descendants, those that generated the C4 physiology, and those that happened in a C4 background and opened novel ecological niches. Throughout the manuscript, we evaluate the biochemical and physiological evidence in a phylogenetic context, which demonstrates the importance of contingency in evolutionary trajectories and shows how these constrained the realized phenotype. We then discuss the physiological innovations that allowed C4 plants to escape these constraints for two important dimensions of the ecological niche--growth rates and distribution along climatic gradients. This review shows that a comprehensive understanding of C4 plant ecology can be achieved by accounting for evolutionary processes spread over millions of years, including the ancestral condition, functional convergence via independent evolutionary trajectories, and physiological diversification.

  13. Complement activation in pemphigus vulgaris blister fluid*

    PubMed Central

    Jordon, R. E.; Day, N. K.; Luckasen, J. R.; Good, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Total haemolytic complement was reduced in blister fluids of four pemphigus vulgaris patients when compared to serum complement levels and other serum and blister fluid proteins. Complement levels in most control blister fluids, on the other hand, more closely approached their corresponding serum levels. Haemolytic C1, C4, C2, C3 and C5, measured in two pemphigus sera and blister fluids, were not measurable in one blister fluid and were extremely low in the second patient. C3 proactivator (C3PA) was absent from both of these blister fluids. Three of the blister fluids exhibited anti-complementary activity when tested with normal human serum. By adding one blister fluid to normal human serum, inhibition of haemolytic C1, C2, C3 and C5 with conversion of C3 and C3PA occurred. Activation of complement locally in pemphigus blister fluids would suggest a pathogenetic role for complement in this disease. PMID:4765721

  14. Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R; de Rivera, Heather; Davis, Avery; Hammond, Timothy R; Kamitaki, Nolan; Tooley, Katherine; Presumey, Jessy; Baum, Matthew; Van Doren, Vanessa; Genovese, Giulio; Rose, Samuel A; Handsaker, Robert E; Daly, Mark J; Carroll, Michael C; Stevens, Beth; McCarroll, Steven A

    2016-02-11

    Schizophrenia is a heritable brain illness with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Schizophrenia's strongest genetic association at a population level involves variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, but the genes and molecular mechanisms accounting for this have been challenging to identify. Here we show that this association arises in part from many structurally diverse alleles of the complement component 4 (C4) genes. We found that these alleles generated widely varying levels of C4A and C4B expression in the brain, with each common C4 allele associating with schizophrenia in proportion to its tendency to generate greater expression of C4A. Human C4 protein localized to neuronal synapses, dendrites, axons, and cell bodies. In mice, C4 mediated synapse elimination during postnatal development. These results implicate excessive complement activity in the development of schizophrenia and may help explain the reduced numbers of synapses in the brains of individuals with schizophrenia.

  15. Despite phylogenetic effects, C3-C4 lineages bridge the ecological gap to C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Marjorie R; Christin, Pascal-Antoine

    2017-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis is a physiological innovation involving several anatomical and biochemical components that emerged recurrently in flowering plants. This complex trait evolved via a series of physiological intermediates, broadly termed 'C3-C4', which have been widely studied to understand C4 origins. While this research program has focused on biochemistry, physiology, and anatomy, the ecology of these intermediates remains largely unexplored. Here, we use global occurrence data and local habitat descriptions to characterize the niches of multiple C3-C4 lineages, as well as their close C3 and C4 relatives. While C3-C4 taxa tend to occur in warm climates, their abiotic niches are spread along other dimensions, making it impossible to define a universal C3-C4 niche. Phylogeny-based comparisons suggest that, despite shifts associated with photosynthetic types, the precipitation component of the C3-C4 niche is particularly lineage specific, being highly correlated with that of closely related C3 and C4 taxa. Our large-scale analyses suggest that C3-C4 lineages converged toward warm habitats, which may have facilitated the transition to C4 photosynthesis, effectively bridging the ecological gap between C3 and C4 plants. The intermediates retained some precipitation aspects of their C3 ancestors' habitat, and likely transmitted them to their C4 descendants, contributing to the diversity among C4 lineages seen today.

  16. Early Components of the Complement Classical Activation Pathway in Human Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Katherine E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Yang, Yan; Spencer, Charles H.; Hauptmann, Georges; Hebert, Lee A.; Atkinson, John P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2016-01-01

    The complement system consists of effector proteins, regulators, and receptors that participate in host defense against pathogens. Activation of the complement system, via the classical pathway (CP), has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated tissue injury, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Paradoxically, a complete deficiency of an early component of the CP, as evidenced by homozygous genetic deficiencies reported in human, are strongly associated with the risk of developing SLE or a lupus-like disease. Similarly, isotype deficiency attributable to a gene copy-number (GCN) variation and/or the presence of autoantibodies directed against a CP component or a regulatory protein that result in an acquired deficiency are relatively common in SLE patients. Applying accurate assay methodologies with rigorous data validations, low GCNs of total C4, and heterozygous and homozygous deficiencies of C4A have been shown as medium to large effect size risk factors, while high copy numbers of total C4 or C4A as prevalent protective factors, of European and East-Asian SLE. Here, we summarize the current knowledge related to genetic deficiency and insufficiency, and acquired protein deficiencies for C1q, C1r, C1s, C4A/C4B, and C2 in disease pathogenesis and prognosis of SLE, and, briefly, for other systemic autoimmune diseases. As the complement system is increasingly found to be associated with autoimmune diseases and immune-mediated diseases, it has become an attractive therapeutic target. We highlight the recent developments and offer a balanced perspective concerning future investigations and therapeutic applications with a focus on early components of the CP in human systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26913032

  17. Geminivirus C4 protein alters Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Mills-Lujan, Katherine; Deom, Carl Michael

    2010-03-01

    The C4 protein of beet curly top virus [BCTV-B (US:Log:76)] induces hyperplasia in infected phloem tissue and tumorigenic growths in transgenic plants. The protein offers an excellent model for studying cell cycle control, cell differentiation, and plant development. To investigate the role of the C4 protein in plant development, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants were generated in which the C4 transgene was expressed under the control of an inducible promoter. A detailed analysis of the developmental changes that occur in cotyledons and hypocotyls of seedlings expressing the C4 transgene showed extensive cell division in all tissues types examined, radically altered tissue layer organization, and the absence of a clearly defined vascular system. Induced seedlings failed to develop true leaves, lateral roots, and shoot and root apical meristems, as well as vascular tissue. Specialized epidermis structures, such as stomata and root hairs, were either absent or developmentally impaired in seedlings that expressed C4 protein. Exogenous application of brassinosteroid and abscisic acid weakly rescued the C4-induced phenotype, while induced seedlings were hypersensitive to gibberellic acid and kinetin. These results indicate that ectopic expression of the BCTV C4 protein in A. thaliana drastically alters plant development, possibly through the disruption of multiple hormonal pathways.

  18. Can Cell Bound Complement Activation Products Predict Inherited Complement Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus?

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the classical pathway complement system has long been implicated in stimulating immune complex mediated tissue destruction in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). C3 and C4 complement levels are utilized as part of SLE diagnosis and monitoring criteria. Recently, cell bound complement activation products (CBCAPs) have shown increased sensitivity in diagnosing and monitoring lupus activity, compared to traditional markers. CBCAPs are increasingly utilized in rheumatology practice as additional serological markers in evaluating SLE patients. We report a case of a patient diagnosed with SLE that had chronically low C3 and C4, along with negative CBCAPs. We surmise that the patient has an inherited complement deficiency as the etiology of her SLE and that CBCAPs could be used to predict such deficiency. PMID:28074166

  19. C(4) photosynthesis: convergence upon convergence upon...

    PubMed

    Roalson, Eric H

    2007-09-04

    C(4) photosynthesis has evolved independently numerous times in plants. New work suggests that these multiple origins are the result of recurring selection on a few amino acid positions in the key enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase.

  20. Complement associated pathogenic mechanisms in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Erdem; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody (Ab) related myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). The most characteristic finding of muscle pathology in both MG and EAMG is the abundance of IgG and complement deposits at the nerve-muscle junction (NMJ), suggesting that AChR-Ab induces muscle weakness by complement pathway activation and consequent membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. This assumption has been supported with EAMG resistance of complement factor C3 knockout (KO), C4 KO and C5 deficient mice and amelioration of EAMG symptoms following treatment with complement inhibitors such as cobra venom factor, soluble complement receptor 1, anti-C1q, anti-C5 and anti-C6 Abs. Moreover, the complement inhibitor decay accelerating factor (DAF) KO mice exhibit increased susceptibility to EAMG. These findings have brought forward improvisation of novel therapy methods based on inhibition of classical and common complement pathways in MG treatment.

  1. Strategies for improving C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    von Caemmerer, Susanne; Furbank, Robert T

    2016-06-01

    Recent activities to improve photosynthetic performance in crop plants has focused mainly on C3 photosynthesis where there are clear identified targets such as improving Rubisco kinetics, installation of a CO2 concentrating mechanism and alleviating limitations in chloroplast electron transport. Here we address strategies to improve photosynthetic performance in C4 plants, which utilize a CO2 concentrating mechanism, having evolved a complex blend of anatomy and biochemistry to achieve this. While the limitations to photosynthetic flux are not as well studied in C4 plants, work in transgenic Flaveria bidentis, a transformable model C4 dicot, and recent transcriptional analysis of leaves from diverse C4 plants, provides several gene candidates for improvement of carbon metabolism (such as pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and Rubisco) and for access of CO2 to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the mesophyll cells (such as carbonic anhydrase and CO2 porins). Chloroplast electron transport in C4 plants is shared between the two cell types, providing opportunities not only to alleviate limitations to flux through intersystem electron transport by targeting nuclear encoded proteins in the cytochrome (Cyt) b6/f complex, but in better sharing the harvesting of light energy between mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts. Gene candidates for improvement of C4 photosynthesis could be utilized either through transgenic approaches or via mining natural allelic variation in sequenced populations of crop species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulatory mechanisms underlying C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Peterson, Richard B; Brutnell, Thomas P

    2011-04-01

    C4 photosynthesis is an adaptation that evolved to alleviate the detrimental effects of photorespiration as a result of the gradual decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. In most C4 plants, two cell types, bundle sheath and mesophyll, cooperate in carbon fixation, and, in so doing, are able to alleviate photorespiratory losses. Although much of the biochemistry is well characterized, little is known about the genetic mechanisms underlying the cell-type specificity driving C4 . However, several studies have shown that regulation acts at multiple levels, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, post-translational and epigenetic. One example of such a regulatory mechanism is the cell-specific accumulation of major photorespiratory transcripts/proteins in bundle sheath cells, where ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase is localized. Although many of the genes are expressed in the bundle sheath, some are expressed in both cell types, implicating post-transcriptional control mechanisms. Recently, ultra-high-throughput sequencing techniques and sophisticated mass spectrometry instrumentation have provided new opportunities to further our understanding of C4 regulation. Computational pipelines are being developed to accommodate the mass of data associated with these techniques. Finally, we discuss a readily transformable C4 grass--Setaria viridis--that has great potential to serve as a model for the genetic dissection of C4 photosynthesis in the grasses. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Complement activation by antibodies to Sm in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, U K; Fong, S; Hoch, S; Cook, R D; Vaughan, J H; Curd, J G

    1983-02-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was developed to quantitate antibodies to Sm (anti-Sm) and to measure complement activation by anti-Sm in vitro. Anti-Sm in plasma of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were bound to purified Sm bound to polyvinyl chloride microtitre plates and assayed for bound IgG or IgM using enzyme linked anti-gamma or anti-mu. The activation of C4 by anti-Sm was measured by adding diluted normal human serum (complement) to the wells and quantitating the amount of C4 bound to the well surface using (Fab')2 goat anti-C4 followed by enzyme linked rabbit anti-goat IgG. The plasmas of 12 of 36 patients with SLE contained anti-Sm and all 12 activated complement (complement activating anti-Sm). Twenty-eight plasmas containing anti-Sm from 12 patients with SLE were studied. Ten of the 12 patients had anti-Sm of the IgG class whereas two had anti-Sm of both IgG and IgM classes. The amount of C4 activating anti-Sm correlated significantly with the in vivo activation of C4 measured by rocket immunoelectrophoresis for C4d and C4, suggesting that complement activation by anti-Sm is important in vivo.

  4. Complement component 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003354.htm Complement component 4 To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Complement component 4 is a blood test that measures the ...

  5. CSF/serum quotient graphs for the evaluation of intrathecal C4 synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Docal, Barbara; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto J; Bu-Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa; Rey, Alexis Rodriguez

    2009-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/serum quotient graphs have been used previously to determine local synthesis in brain of immunoglobulins and C3 complement component. The aim of this study was to use the same technique to construct quotient graphs, or Reibergrams, for the beta globulin C4 and to evaluate the method for assessing intrathecal synthesis in neurological disease. Methods The constants in the previously-defined Reibergram for immunoglobulin IgA were used to calculate the CSF/serum quotient for C4. CSF and serum were analyzed for C4, IgA and albumin from a total of 12 patients with meningoencephalitis caused by encapsulated microorganisms and 10 subjects without infections or inflammatory neurological disease, some of which had dysfunction of the blood-CSF barrier, Results The formula and C4 Reibergram with the constants previously found for IgA, determined the intrathecal C4 synthesis in CSF. The intrathecal C4 fraction in CSF (C4 loc in mg/l) was compared to the C4-Index (fraction of CSF: serum for C 4/fraction of CSF: serum for albumin). There was a significant correlation between the two formulae. The CSF/Serum quotient graph was superior for detecting intrathecal synthesis of C4 under variable conditions of blood-CSF barrier permeability. Conclusion The C4 Reibergram can be used to quantify the intrathecal synthesis of this component of the complement system in different infectious diseases of the central nervous system and is especially useful for patients with blood-brain barrier dysfunction. PMID:19573230

  6. C4 photosynthesis and water stress.

    PubMed

    Ghannoum, Oula

    2009-02-01

    In contrast to C(3) photosynthesis, the response of C(4) photosynthesis to water stress has been less-well studied in spite of the significant contribution of C(4) plants to the global carbon budget and food security. The key feature of C(4) photosynthesis is the operation of a CO(2)-concentrating mechanism in the leaves, which serves to saturate photosynthesis and suppress photorespiration in normal air. This article reviews the current state of understanding about the response of C(4) photosynthesis to water stress, including the interaction with elevated CO(2) concentration. Major gaps in our knowledge in this area are identified and further required research is suggested. Evidence indicates that C(4) photosynthesis is highly sensitive to water stress. With declining leaf water status, CO(2) assimilation rate and stomatal conductance decrease rapidly and photosynthesis goes through three successive phases. The initial, mainly stomatal phase, may or may not be detected as a decline in assimilation rates depending on environmental conditions. This is because the CO(2)-concentrating mechanism is capable of saturating C(4) photosynthesis under relatively low intercellular CO(2) concentrations. In addition, photorespired CO(2) is likely to be refixed before escaping the bundle sheath. This is followed by a mixed stomatal and non-stomatal phase and, finally, a mainly non-stomatal phase. The main non-stomatal factors include reduced activity of photosynthetic enzymes; inhibition of nitrate assimilation, induction of early senescence, and changes to the leaf anatomy and ultrastructure. Results from the literature about CO(2) enrichment indicate that when C(4) plants experience drought in their natural environment, elevated CO(2) concentration alleviates the effect of water stress on plant productivity indirectly via improved soil moisture and plant water status as a result of decreased stomatal conductance and reduced leaf transpiration. It is suggested that there is a

  7. C4 photosynthesis and water stress

    PubMed Central

    Ghannoum, Oula

    2009-01-01

    Background In contrast to C3 photosynthesis, the response of C4 photosynthesis to water stress has been less-well studied in spite of the significant contribution of C4 plants to the global carbon budget and food security. The key feature of C4 photosynthesis is the operation of a CO2-concentrating mechanism in the leaves, which serves to saturate photosynthesis and suppress photorespiration in normal air. This article reviews the current state of understanding about the response of C4 photosynthesis to water stress, including the interaction with elevated CO2 concentration. Major gaps in our knowledge in this area are identified and further required research is suggested. Scope Evidence indicates that C4 photosynthesis is highly sensitive to water stress. With declining leaf water status, CO2 assimilation rate and stomatal conductance decrease rapidly and photosynthesis goes through three successive phases. The initial, mainly stomatal phase, may or may not be detected as a decline in assimilation rates depending on environmental conditions. This is because the CO2-concentrating mechanism is capable of saturating C4 photosynthesis under relatively low intercellular CO2 concentrations. In addition, photorespired CO2 is likely to be refixed before escaping the bundle sheath. This is followed by a mixed stomatal and non-stomatal phase and, finally, a mainly non-stomatal phase. The main non-stomatal factors include reduced activity of photosynthetic enzymes; inhibition of nitrate assimilation, induction of early senescence, and changes to the leaf anatomy and ultrastructure. Results from the literature about CO2 enrichment indicate that when C4 plants experience drought in their natural environment, elevated CO2 concentration alleviates the effect of water stress on plant productivity indirectly via improved soil moisture and plant water status as a result of decreased stomatal conductance and reduced leaf transpiration. Conclusions It is suggested that there is a

  8. Parallel recruitment of multiple genes into c4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Boxall, Susanna F; Gregory, Richard; Edwards, Erika J; Hartwell, James; Osborne, Colin P

    2013-01-01

    During the diversification of living organisms, novel adaptive traits usually evolve through the co-option of preexisting genes. However, most enzymes are encoded by gene families, whose members vary in their expression and catalytic properties. Each may therefore differ in its suitability for recruitment into a novel function. In this work, we test for the presence of such a gene recruitment bias using the example of C4 photosynthesis, a complex trait that evolved recurrently in flowering plants as a response to atmospheric CO2 depletion. We combined the analysis of complete nuclear genomes and high-throughput transcriptome data for three grass species that evolved the C4 trait independently. For five of the seven enzymes analyzed, the same gene lineage was recruited across the independent C4 origins, despite the existence of multiple copies. The analysis of a closely related C3 grass confirmed that C4 expression patterns were not present in the C3 ancestors but were acquired during the evolutionary transition to C4 photosynthesis. The significant bias in gene recruitment indicates that some genes are more suitable for a novel function, probably because the mutations they accumulated brought them closer to the characteristics required for the new function.

  9. Parallel Recruitment of Multiple Genes into C4 Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Boxall, Susanna F.; Gregory, Richard; Edwards, Erika J.; Hartwell, James; Osborne, Colin P.

    2013-01-01

    During the diversification of living organisms, novel adaptive traits usually evolve through the co-option of preexisting genes. However, most enzymes are encoded by gene families, whose members vary in their expression and catalytic properties. Each may therefore differ in its suitability for recruitment into a novel function. In this work, we test for the presence of such a gene recruitment bias using the example of C4 photosynthesis, a complex trait that evolved recurrently in flowering plants as a response to atmospheric CO2 depletion. We combined the analysis of complete nuclear genomes and high-throughput transcriptome data for three grass species that evolved the C4 trait independently. For five of the seven enzymes analyzed, the same gene lineage was recruited across the independent C4 origins, despite the existence of multiple copies. The analysis of a closely related C3 grass confirmed that C4 expression patterns were not present in the C3 ancestors but were acquired during the evolutionary transition to C4 photosynthesis. The significant bias in gene recruitment indicates that some genes are more suitable for a novel function, probably because the mutations they accumulated brought them closer to the characteristics required for the new function. PMID:24179135

  10. Strategies for engineering C(4) photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Leegood, Richard C

    2013-03-01

    C(3) photosynthesis is an inefficient process, because the enzyme that lies at the heart of the Benson-Calvin cycle, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) is itself a very inefficient enzyme. The oxygenase activity of Rubisco is an unavoidable side reaction that is a consequence of its reaction mechanism. The product of oxygenation, glycollate 2-P, has to be retrieved by photorespiration, a process which results in the loss of a quarter of the carbon that was originally present in glycollate 2-P. Photorespiration therefore reduces carbon gain. Purely in terms of carbon economy, there is, therefore, a strong selection pressure on plants to reduce the rate of photorespiration so as to increase carbon gain, but it also improves water- and nitrogen-use efficiency. Possibilities for the manipulation of plants to decrease the amount of photorespiration include the introduction of improved Rubisco from other species, reconfiguring photorespiration, or introducing carbon-concentrating mechanisms, such as inorganic carbon transporters, carboxysomes or pyrenoids, or engineering a full C(4) Kranz pathway using the existing evolutionary progression in C(3)-C(4) intermediates as a blueprint. Possible routes and progress to suppressing photorespiration by introducing C(4) photosynthesis in C(3) crop plants will be discussed, including whether single cell C(4) photosynthesis is feasible, how the evolution of C(3)-C(4) intermediates can be used as a blueprint for engineering C(4) photosynthesis, which pathway for the C(4) cycle might be introduced and the extent to which processes and structures in C(3) plant might require optimisation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R.; de Rivera, Heather; Davis, Avery; Hammond, Timothy R.; Kamitaki, Nolan; Tooley, Katherine; Presumey, Jessy; Baum, Matthew; Van Doren, Vanessa; Genovese, Giulio; Rose, Samuel A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Daly, Mark J.; Carroll, Michael C.; Stevens, Beth; McCarroll, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a heritable brain illness with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Schizophrenia’s strongest genetic association at a population level involves variation in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus, but the genes and molecular mechanisms accounting for this have been challenging to recognize. We show here that schizophrenia’s association with the MHC locus arises in substantial part from many structurally diverse alleles of the complement component 4 (C4) genes. We found that these alleles promoted widely varying levels of C4A and C4B expression and associated with schizophrenia in proportion to their tendency to promote greater expression of C4A in the brain. Human C4 protein localized at neuronal synapses, dendrites, axons, and cell bodies. In mice, C4 mediated synapse elimination during postnatal development. These results implicate excessive complement activity in the development of schizophrenia and may help explain the reduced numbers of synapses in the brains of individuals affected with schizophrenia. PMID:26814963

  12. Do "savanna" chimpanzees consume C4 resources?

    PubMed

    Sponheimer, M; Loudon, J E; Codron, D; Howells, M E; Pruetz, J D; Codron, J; de Ruiter, D J; Lee-Thorp, J A

    2006-08-01

    Several stable carbon isotopic studies have shown that South African australopiths consumed significant quantities of C(4) resources (tropical grasses, sedges, or animals that eat those foods), but relatively little is known about the consumption of such resources by chimpanzees. Here, we present stable carbon isotopic data for 36 chimpanzee hair samples from Fongoli, one of the driest and most open areas inhabited by chimpanzees. These data suggest that the Fongoli chimpanzees consume little in the way of C(4) vegetation or animals that eat such vegetation, even though these resources are locally abundant and preferred fruits are more widely scattered than at most chimpanzee study sites. The homogeneity of the Fongoli results is especially striking and recalls the narrow isotopic distribution of stenotopic savanna mammals. This is in stark contrast to what has been observed for australopiths, which had highly variable diets and consumed about 35% C(4) vegetation on average. Carbon isotope data for modern and fossil Papio depict a dietarily variable genus with a tendency to consume C(4) vegetation. This trophic flexibility, or willingness to consume C(4) savanna resources, may make Papio a more profitable ecological analog for australopiths than chimpanzees.

  13. Cold urticaria associated with C4 deficiency and elevated IgM.

    PubMed

    Stafford, C T; Jamieson, D M

    1986-04-01

    Various immunologic abnormalities have been implicated in cold urticaria. This is the first report of cold urticaria associated with C4 deficiency and elevated IgM. A 12-year-old male developed urticaria upon exposure to cold. He denied fever, purpura, hemoglobinuria, Raynaud's disease, or arthralgias. Family history was negative for cold urticaria. Immunologic studies revealed elevated IgM (186 mg/dL) as well as decreased CH100 and C4 (8.0 mg/dL). C1, C2, and C3 were normal. Ice cube skin test was positive, but passive transfer tests were negative. Biopsy was not diagnostic for vasculitis, although it revealed a few immunofluorescent deposits of IgM and C4. Complement genetic studies revealed deficiency of two half-null C4 haplotypes expressed as C4A*3QO and B*2QO.

  14. Characterization of the complement inhibitory function of rhesus rhadinovirus complement control protein (RCP).

    PubMed

    Okroj, Marcin; Mark, Linda; Stokowska, Anna; Wong, Scott W; Rose, Nicola; Blackbourn, David J; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Spiller, O Brad; Blom, Anna M

    2009-01-02

    Rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV) is currently the closest known, fully sequenced homolog of human Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Both these viruses encode complement inhibitors as follows: Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-complement control protein (KCP) and RRV-complement control protein (RCP). Previously we characterized in detail the functional properties of KCP as a complement inhibitor. Here, we performed comparative analyses for two variants of RCP protein, encoded by RRV strains H26-95 and 17577. Both RCP variants and KCP inhibited human and rhesus complement when tested in hemolytic assays measuring all steps of activation via the classical and the alternative pathway. RCP variants from both RRV strains supported C3b and C4b degradation by factor I and decay acceleration of the classical C3 convertase, similar to KCP. Additionally, the 17577 RCP variant accelerated decay of the alternative C3 convertase, which was not seen for KCP. In contrast to KCP, RCP showed no affinity to heparin and is the first described complement inhibitor in which the binding site for C3b/C4b does not interact with heparin. Molecular modeling shows a structural disruption in the region of RCP that corresponds to the KCP-heparin-binding site. This makes RRV a superior model for future in vivo investigations of complement evasion, as RCP does not play a supportive role in viral attachment as KCP does.

  15. Arterial Blood Pressure Induces Transient C4b-Binding Protein in Human Saphenous Vein Grafts.

    PubMed

    Kupreishvili, Koba; Meischl, Christof; Vonk, Alexander B A; Stooker, Wim; Eijsman, Leon; Blom, Anna M; Quax, Paul H A; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Niessen, Hans W M; Krijnen, Paul A J

    2017-05-01

    Complement is an important mediator in arterial blood pressure-induced vein graft failure. Previously, we noted activation of cell protective mechanisms in human saphenous veins too. Here we have analyzed whether C4b-binding protein (C4bp), an endogenous complement inhibitor, is present in the vein wall. Human saphenous vein segments obtained from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (n = 55) were perfused in vitro at arterial blood pressure with either autologous blood for 1, 2, 4, or 6 hr or with autologous blood supplemented with reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine. The segments were subsequently analyzed quantitatively for presence of C4bp and complement activation product C3d using immunohistochemistry. Perfusion induced deposition of C3d and C4bp within the media of the vessel wall, which increased reproducibly and significantly over a period of 4 hr up to 3.8% for C3d and 81% for C4bp of the total vessel area. Remarkably after 6 hr of perfusion, the C3d-positive area decreased significantly to 1.3% and the C4bp-positive area to 19% of the total area of the vein. The areas positive for both C4bp and C3d were increased in the presence of N-acetylcysteine. Exposure to arterial blood pressure leads to a transient presence of C4bp in the vein wall. This may be part of a cell-protective mechanism to counteract arterial blood pressure-induced cellular stress and inflammation in grafted veins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancing drought tolerance in C(4) crops.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marta S; Araus, Jose Luis; van Heerden, Philippus D R; Foyer, Christine H

    2011-05-01

    Adaptation to abiotic stresses is a quantitative trait controlled by many different genes. Enhancing the tolerance of crop plants to abiotic stresses such as drought has therefore proved to be somewhat elusive in terms of plant breeding. While many C(4) species have significant agronomic importance, most of the research effort on improving drought tolerance has focused on maize. Ideally, drought tolerance has to be achieved without penalties in yield potential. Possibilities for success in this regard are highlighted by studies on maize hybrids performed over the last 70 years that have demonstrated that yield potential and enhanced stress tolerance are associated traits. However, while our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that enable plants to tolerate drought has increased considerably in recent years, there have been relatively few applications of DNA marker technologies in practical C(4) breeding programmes for improved stress tolerance. Moreover, until recently, targeted approaches to drought tolerance have concentrated largely on shoot parameters, particularly those associated with photosynthesis and stay green phenotypes, rather than on root traits such as soil moisture capture for transpiration, root architecture, and improvement of effective use of water. These root traits are now increasingly considered as important targets for yield improvement in C(4) plants under drought stress. Similarly, the molecular mechanisms underpinning heterosis have considerable potential for exploitation in enhancing drought stress tolerance. While current evidence points to the crucial importance of root traits in drought tolerance in C(4) plants, shoot traits may also be important in maintaining high yields during drought.

  17. On the smell of Composition C-4.

    PubMed

    Kranz, William; Kitts, Kelley; Strange, Nicholas; Cummins, Joshua; Lotspeich, Erica; Goodpaster, John

    2014-03-01

    In efforts to locate hidden explosives, humans have had few allies as valuable as the explosives-detecting canine. The unrivaled sensitivity and selectivity of the canine nose have combined to make these animals an attractive choice for law enforcement, military, and private security applications. Although the efficacy of trained detector dogs is well-established, the question of which chemical compounds are responsible for causing a dog to recognize a particular odor and alert to it remains a subject of debate for several explosive formulations--including, perhaps most notably, Composition C-4. Previous studies have indicated that cyclohexanone, 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol are the chemicals that may cause canines to alert to C-4. This has led to the suggestion that these substances could be used as a substitute for genuine C-4 in the training, testing, and maintenance of explosives-detecting canines. In this paper, we present an alternative view. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with solid phase microextraction as a pre-concentration technique, we have discovered that 2-ethyl-1-hexanol off-gasses not only from C-4, but also from benign sources, such as the common plasticizers bis(2-ethylhexyl)adipate, bis(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate, and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate; as well as several plasticized items common to our everyday world, including PVC tile, PVC pipe, electrical tape, and credit cards. This observation may potentially discourage the use of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol for training purposes. We also present the results of our own canine field trials focused on the detection of C-4. Through the use of contingency tables and statistical testing, we demonstrate the failure of trained law enforcement dogs in our study to respond in any significant way to these potential odor compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Complement-targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2010-01-01

    The complement system is a central component of innate immunity and bridges the innate to the adaptive immune response. However, it can also turn its destructive capabilities against host cells and is involved in numerous diseases and pathological conditions. Modulation of the complement system has been recognized as a promising strategy in drug discovery, and a large number of therapeutic modalities have been developed. However, successful marketing of complement-targeted drugs has proved to be more difficult than initially expected, and many strategies have been discontinued. The US Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the first complement-specific drug, an antibody against complement component C5 (eculizumab; Soliris), in March 2007, was a long-awaited breakthrough in the field. Approval of eculizumab validates the complement system as therapeutic target and might facilitate clinical development of other promising drug candidates. PMID:17989689

  19. Photosynthesis of C3, C3-C4, and C4 grasses at glacial CO2.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Harshini; Sharwood, Robert E; Tissue, David T; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-07-01

    Most physiology comparisons of C3 and C4 plants are made under current or elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 which do not reflect the low CO2 environment under which C4 photosynthesis has evolved. Accordingly, photosynthetic nitrogen (PNUE) and water (PWUE) use efficiency, and the activity of the photosynthetic carboxylases [Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] were compared in eight C4 grasses with NAD-ME, PCK, and NADP-ME subtypes, one C3 grass, and one C3-C4 grass grown under ambient (400 μl l(-1)) and glacial (180 μl l(-1)) CO2. Glacial CO2 caused a smaller reduction of photosynthesis and a greater increase of stomatal conductance in C4 relative to C3 and C3-C4 species. Panicum bisulcatum (C3) acclimated to glacial [CO2] by doubling Rubisco activity, while Rubisco was unchanged in Panicum milioides (C3-C4), possibly due to its high leaf N and Rubisco contents. Glacial CO2 up-regulated Rubisco and PEPC activities in concert for several C4 grasses, while NADP-ME and PEP-CK activities were unchanged, reflecting the high control exerted by the carboxylases relative to the decarboxylases on the efficiency of C4 metabolism. Despite having larger stomatal conductance at glacial CO2, C4 species maintained greater PWUE and PNUE relative to C3-C4 and C3 species due to higher photosynthetic rates. Relative to other C4 subtypes, NAD-ME and PEP-CK grasses had the highest PWUE and PNUE, respectively; relative to C3, the C3-C4 grass had higher PWUE and similar PNUE at glacial CO2. Biomass accumulation was reduced by glacial CO2 in the C3 grass relative to the C3-C4 grass, while biomass was less reduced in NAD-ME grasses compared with NADP-ME and PCK grasses. Under glacial CO2, high resource use efficiency offers a key evolutionary advantage for the transition from C3 to C4 photosynthesis in water- and nutrient-limited environments. © The Author 2014

  20. Histologic evaluation of post-implantation immediate C4d deposition in 13 intestinal grafts: correlation with cell-based crossmatching, cold ischemia time, and preservation injury.

    PubMed

    López-García, P; Calvo Pulido, J; Colina, F; Ballestin Carcavilla, C; Jiménez-Romero, C; Martinez González, M A; Ibarrola de Andrés, C; López-Alonso, G; Cambra Molero, F; Justo Alonso, I; Moreno-González, E

    2014-01-01

    C4d deposits are predictive of humoral rejection in kidney and heart transplantation. The aim of this study was to identify C4d deposit patterns in intestinal mucosa of the grafts on biopsy specimens obtained immediately after implantation and to detect if it could be a valuable tool to predict humoral or acute rejection. A second objective was to search for a statistically significant relationship between positive C4d deposition and other collected variables. Thirteen immediately post-transplantation mucosal graft biopsy specimens, formalin fixed, underwent immunohistochemical stain for C4d deposits. Diffuse intense staining of capillary endothelium was considered positive and absent, focal or weak stains as negative. Preservation injury grade and cold ischemia times were registered for each case. Donor-specific preformed antibodies were detected by complement dependent cytotoxicity serologic technique (crossmatching). Another 19 endoscopic follow-up biopsy specimens from days 2 to 6 were also evaluated. Statistical studies were made using the index of correlation ρ (Spearman's test). Diffuse intense C4d deposits were observed in 2 grafts, focal and weak in 5, and completely negative in 6. The mean cold ischemia time was 327 ± 101 minutes. Two cases showed diffuse positive deposits, 1 had a positive crossmatch and the cold ischemia time was 360 minutes whereas the other had not preformed antibodies and its cold ischemia time was 475 minutes. Humoral or acute rejection was not observed in follow-up mucosal biopsy specimens. There was no statistically significant relationship between the C4d deposition, cold ischemia time, crossmatching results, and preservation injury degree. In conclusion, C4d deposition was not a helpful tool for diagnosis of humoral rejection and prediction of acute rejection during the early post-transplantation period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Epididymal C4b-binding protein is processed and degraded during transit through the duct and is not essential for fertility.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Mayumi I; Zsigmond, Eva; Kudo, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hayato; Yoshida, Kaoru; Yoshida, Manabu; Kawano, Natsuko; Miyado, Kenji; Nonaka, Masaru; Wetsel, Rick A

    2015-04-01

    C4b-binding protein (C4BP) is known as one of the circulating complement regulators that prevents excessive activation of the host-defense complement system. We have reported previously that C4BP is expressed abundantly in the rodent epididymis, one of the male reproductive organs connecting the testis and vas deferens, where immature spermatozoa acquire their motility and fertilizing ability during their transit through the duct. Epididymal C4BP (EpC4BP) is synthesized androgen-dependently by the epithelial cells, secreted into the lumen, and bound to the outer membrane of the passing spermatozoa. In this study, we found that EpC4BP is secreted as a large oligomer, similar to the serum C4BP, but is digested during the epididymal transit and is almost lost from both the luminal fluid and the sperm surface in the vas deferens. Such a processing pattern is not known in serum C4BP, suggesting that EpC4BP and serum C4BP might have different functional mechanisms, and that there is a novel function of EpC4BP in reproduction. In addition, the disappearance of EpC4BP from the sperm surface prior to ejaculation suggests that EpC4BP works only in the epididymis and would not work in the female reproductive tract to protect spermatozoa from complement attack. Next, we generated C4BP-deficient (C4BP-/-) mice to examine the possible role of EpC4BP in reproduction. However, the C4BP-/- mice were fertile and no significant differences were observed between the C4BP-/- and wild-type mouse spermatozoa in terms of morphology, motility, and rate of the spontaneous acrosome reaction. These results suggest that EpC4BP is involved in male reproduction, but not essential for sperm maturation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Epididymal C4b-binding protein is processed and degraded during transit through the duct and is not essential for fertility

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Mayumi I.; Zsigmond, Eva; Kudo, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hayato; Yoshida, Kaoru; Yoshida, Manabu; Kawano, Natsuko; Miyado, Kenji; Nonaka, Masaru; Wetsel, Rick A.

    2014-01-01

    C4b-binding protein (C4BP) is known as one of the circulating complement regulators that prevents excessive activation of the host-defense complement system. We have reported previously that C4BP is expressed abundantly in the rodent epididymis, one of the male reproductive organs connecting the testis and vas deferens, where immature spermatozoa acquire their motility and fertilizing ability during their transit through the duct. Epididymal C4BP (EpC4BP) is synthesized androgen-dependently by the epithelial cells, secreted into the lumen, and bound to the outer membrane of the passing spermatozoa. In this study, we found that EpC4BP is secreted as a large oligomer, similar to the serum C4BP, but is digested during the epididymal transit and is almost lost from both the luminal fluid and the sperm surface in the vas deferens. Such a processing pattern is not known in serum C4BP, suggesting that EpC4BP and serum C4BP might have different functional mechanisms, and that there is a novel function of EpC4BP in reproduction. In addition, the disappearance of EpC4BP from the sperm surface prior to ejaculation suggests that EpC4BP works only in the epididymis and would not work in the female reproductive tract to protect spermatozoa from complement attack. Next, we generated C4BP-deficient (C4BP−/−) mice to examine the possible role of EpC4BP in reproduction. However, the C4BP−/− mice were fertile and no significant differences were observed between the C4BP−/− and wild-type mouse spermatozoa in terms of morphology, motility, and rate of the spontaneous acrosome reaction. These results suggest that EpC4BP is involved in male reproduction, but not essential for sperm maturation. PMID:25468721

  3. Climate-driven C4 plant distributions in China: divergence in C4 taxa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renzhong; Ma, Linna

    2016-01-01

    There have been debates on the driving factors of C4 plant expansion, such as PCO2 decline in the late Micocene and warmer climate and precipitation at large-scale modern ecosystems. These disputes are mainly due to the lack of direct evidence and extensive data analysis. Here we use mass flora data to explore the driving factors of C4 distribution and divergent patterns for different C4 taxa at continental scale in China. The results display that it is mean annual climate variables driving C4 distribution at present-day vegetation. Mean annual temperature is the critical restriction of total C4 plants and the precipitation gradients seem to have much less impact. Grass and sedge C4 plants are largely restricted to mean annual temperature and precipitation respectively, while Chenopod C4 plants are strongly restricted by aridity in China. Separate regression analysis can succeed to detect divergences of climate distribution patterns of C4 taxa at global scale. PMID:27302686

  4. Climate-driven C4 plant distributions in China: divergence in C4 taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renzhong; Ma, Linna

    2016-06-01

    There have been debates on the driving factors of C4 plant expansion, such as PCO2 decline in the late Micocene and warmer climate and precipitation at large-scale modern ecosystems. These disputes are mainly due to the lack of direct evidence and extensive data analysis. Here we use mass flora data to explore the driving factors of C4 distribution and divergent patterns for different C4 taxa at continental scale in China. The results display that it is mean annual climate variables driving C4 distribution at present-day vegetation. Mean annual temperature is the critical restriction of total C4 plants and the precipitation gradients seem to have much less impact. Grass and sedge C4 plants are largely restricted to mean annual temperature and precipitation respectively, while Chenopod C4 plants are strongly restricted by aridity in China. Separate regression analysis can succeed to detect divergences of climate distribution patterns of C4 taxa at global scale.

  5. Role of Antibody and Complement in the Immune Clearance and Destruction of Erythrocytes I. IN VIVO EFFECTS OF IgG AND IgM COMPLEMENT-FIXING SITES

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Aland D.; Frank, Michael M.

    1972-01-01

    A model which permits evaluation in molecular terms of the role of antibody and of complement in the immune destruction of erythrocytes was established in the guinea pig. IgM and IgG immunoglobulins were isolated from rabbit anti-guinea pig erythrocyte antisera and were used to sensitize 51Cr-labeled guinea pig erythrocytes. The average number of complement-fixing sites per erythrocyte formed by antibody was determined for each of the various preparations by the Cla fixation and transfer test. The rate of clearance and of organ localization was determined for cells sensitized with either IgM or IgG antibodies, and dose-response curves were established in normal guinea pigs and guinea pigs with a genetically controlled, complete absence of the fourth component of complement (C4). At least 60 complement-fixing sites per cell were required for accelerated clearance of IgM-sensitized erythrocytes. The bulk of cells with IgM sites were cleared by the liver within 5 min after injection and were then slowly returned to the circulation where they survived normally. There was no accelerated clearance whatsoever of IgM-sensitized erythrocytes in C4-deficient guinea pigs. As few as 1.4 IgG complement-fixing sites per cell resulted in decreased erythrocyte survival. There was no evidence of immediate tissue sequestration and release. Progressive trapping and destruction of erythrocytes by the spleen was responsible for most of the clearance of IgG-sensitized cells. Clearance of IgG-sensitized cells was markedly impaired in guinea pigs with C4 deficiency; however, there was some decrease over normal survival. The data indicate that IgG and IgM antibodies interact with complement in vivo by mechanisms which are qualitatively or quantitatively different and produce different biologic effects. Images PMID:4536807

  6. Ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes protects intracellular mature virus and infected cells from mouse complement.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Elizabeth A; Bertram, Paula; Chen, Nanhai; Buller, R Mark L; Atkinson, John P

    2010-09-01

    Poxviruses produce complement regulatory proteins to subvert the host's immune response. Similar to the human pathogen variola virus, ectromelia virus has a limited host range and provides a mouse model where the virus and the host's immune response have coevolved. We previously demonstrated that multiple components (C3, C4, and factor B) of the classical and alternative pathways are required to survive ectromelia virus infection. Complement's role in the innate and adaptive immune responses likely drove the evolution of a virus-encoded virulence factor that regulates complement activation. In this study, we characterized the ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes (EMICE). Recombinant EMICE regulated complement activation on the surface of CHO cells, and it protected complement-sensitive intracellular mature virions (IMV) from neutralization in vitro. It accomplished this by serving as a cofactor for the inactivation of C3b and C4b and by dissociating the catalytic domain of the classical pathway C3 convertase. Infected murine cells initiated synthesis of EMICE within 4 to 6 h postinoculation. The levels were sufficient in the supernatant to protect the IMV, upon release, from complement-mediated neutralization. EMICE on the surface of infected murine cells also reduced complement activation by the alternative pathway. In contrast, classical pathway activation by high-titer antibody overwhelmed EMICE's regulatory capacity. These results suggest that EMICE's role is early during infection when it counteracts the innate immune response. In summary, ectromelia virus produced EMICE within a few hours of an infection, and EMICE in turn decreased complement activation on IMV and infected cells.

  7. Operational Protection of C4I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-05

    The American way of war has been dependent upon information dominance in the battlefield for a long time. But the old ways of waging wars where the overwhelming force of the US provided a clear advantage may not be successful in fighting the wars of the future. This paper explores some of the problems associated with the protection of operational C4I assets in the current era and how CINCs can approach this planning issue.

  8. Targeting complement in therapy.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M

    2001-04-01

    With increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases, strategies that interfere with its deleterious action have become a major focus in pharmacological research. Endogenous soluble complement inhibitors (C1 inhibitor, recombinant soluble complement receptor 1, antibodies) blocking key proteins of the cascade reaction, neutralizing the action of the complement-derived anaphylatoxin C5a, or interfering with complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD18/11b)-mediated adhesion of inflammatory cells to the vascular endothelium have successfully been tested in various animal models over the past years. Promising results consequently led to clinical trials. Furthermore, incorporation of membrane-bound complement regulators (decay-accelerating factor (CD55), membrane co-factor protein (CD46), CD59) in transgenic animals has provided a major step forward in protecting xenografts from hyperacute rejection. At the same time, the poor contribution of complement to the antitumor response, which is caused by multiple resistance mechanisms that hamper the efficacy of antibody-based tumor therapy, is increasingly recognized and requires pharmacologic intervention. First attempts have now been made to interfere with the resistance mechanisms, thereby improving complement-mediated tumor cell destruction.

  9. Complement in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Rawat, Amit; Sharma, Madhubala; Singh, Surjit

    2017-02-01

    The complement system is an ancient and evolutionary conserved element of the innate immune mechanism. It comprises of more than 20 serum proteins most of which are synthesized in the liver. These proteins are synthesized as inactive precursor proteins which are activated by appropriate stimuli. The activated forms of these proteins act as proteases and cleave other components successively in amplification pathways leading to exponential generation of final effectors. Three major pathways of complement pathways have been described, namely the classical, alternative and lectin pathways which are activated by different stimuli. However, all the 3 pathways converge on Complement C3. Cleavage of C3 and C5 successively leads to the production of the membrane attack complex which is final common effector. Excessive and uncontrolled activation of the complement has been implicated in the host of autoimmune diseases. But the complement has also been bemusedly described as the proverbial "double edged sword". On one hand, complement is the final effector of tissue injury in autoimmune diseases and on the other, deficiencies of some components of the complement can result in autoimmune diseases. Currently available tools such as enzyme based immunoassays for functional assessment of complement pathways, flow cytometry, next generation sequencing and proteomics-based approaches provide an exciting opportunity to study this ancient yet mysterious element of innate immunity.

  10. Erythrocyte C3d and C4d for Monitoring Disease Activity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Amy H.; Navratil, Jeannine S.; Ruffing, Margie J.; Liu, Chau-Ching; Hawkins, Douglas; McKinnon, Kathleen M.; Danchenko, Natalya; Ahearn, Joseph M.; Manzi, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Objective Disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is typically monitored by measuring serum C3 and C4. However, these proteins have limited utility as lupus biomarkers, because they are substrates rather than products of complement activation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of measuring the erythrocyte-bound complement activation products, erythrocyte-bound C3d (E-C3d) and E-C4d, compared with that of serum C3 and C4 for monitoring disease activity in patients with SLE. Methods The levels of E-C3d and E-C4d were measured by flow cytometry in 157 patients with SLE, 290 patients with other diseases, and 256 healthy individuals. The patients with SLE were followed up longitudinally. Disease activity was measured at each visit, using the validated Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) and the Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus: National Assessment (SELENA) version of the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Results At baseline, patients with SLE had higher median levels of E-C3d and E-C4d (P < 0.0001) in addition to higher within-patient and between-patient variability in both E-C3d and E-C4d when compared with the 2 non-SLE groups. In a longitudinal analysis of patients with SLE, E-C3d, E-C4d, serum C3, and anti–double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies were each significantly associated with the SLAM and SELENA–SLEDAI. In a multivariable analysis, E-C4d remained significantly associated with these SLE activity measures after adjusting for serum C3, C4, and anti-dsDNA antibodies; however, E-C3d was associated with the SLAM but not with the SELENA–SLEDAI. Conclusion Determining the levels of the erythrocyte-bound complement activation products, especially E-C4d, is an informative measure of SLE disease activity as compared with assessing serum C4 levels and should be considered for monitoring disease activity in patients with SLE. PMID:20187154

  11. Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Glenn C.; Clark, Benton C.; Knocke, Philip C.; OHara, Bonnie J.; Adams, Larry; Niemann, Hasso B.; Alexander, Merle; Veverka, Joseph; Goldstein, Raymond; Huebner, Walter; hide

    1994-01-01

    Cometary exploration remains of great importance to virtually all of space science. Because comets are presumed to be remnants of the early solar nebula, they are expected to provide fundamental knowledge as to the origin and development of the solar system as well as to be key to understanding of the source of volatiles and even life itself in the inner solar system. Clearly the time for a detailed study of the composition of these apparent messages from the past has come. A comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, is now being studied as a candidate for the new Discovery program. This mission is a highly-focussed and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission. The C4 mission will concentrate on measurements that will produce an understanding of the composition and physical makeup of a cometary nucleus. The core science goals of the C4 mission are 1) to determine the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of a cometary nucleus and 2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. A related goal is to obtain temporal information about the development of the cometary coma as a function of time and orbital position. The four short-period comets -- Tempel 1, Tempel 2, Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and Wirtanen -which all appear to have acceptable dust production rates, were identified as candidate targets. Mission opportunities have been identified beginning as early as 1998. Tempel I with a launch in 1999, however, remains the baseline comet for studies of and planning the C4 mission. The C4 mission incorporates two science instruments and two engineering instruments in the payload to obtain the desired measurements. The science instruments include an advanced version of the Cometary Ice and Dust Experiment (CIDEX), a mini-CIDEX with a sample collection system, an X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer and a Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatograph, and a simplified version of the Neutral

  12. Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Glenn C.; Clark, Benton C.; Knocke, Philip C.; OHara, Bonnie J.; Adams, Larry; Niemann, Hasso B.; Alexander, Merle; Veverka, Joseph; Goldstein, Raymond; Huebner, Walter; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Cometary exploration remains of great importance to virtually all of space science. Because comets are presumed to be remnants of the early solar nebula, they are expected to provide fundamental knowledge as to the origin and development of the solar system as well as to be key to understanding of the source of volatiles and even life itself in the inner solar system. Clearly the time for a detailed study of the composition of these apparent messages from the past has come. A comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, is now being studied as a candidate for the new Discovery program. This mission is a highly-focussed and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission. The C4 mission will concentrate on measurements that will produce an understanding of the composition and physical makeup of a cometary nucleus. The core science goals of the C4 mission are 1) to determine the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of a cometary nucleus and 2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. A related goal is to obtain temporal information about the development of the cometary coma as a function of time and orbital position. The four short-period comets -- Tempel 1, Tempel 2, Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and Wirtanen -which all appear to have acceptable dust production rates, were identified as candidate targets. Mission opportunities have been identified beginning as early as 1998. Tempel I with a launch in 1999, however, remains the baseline comet for studies of and planning the C4 mission. The C4 mission incorporates two science instruments and two engineering instruments in the payload to obtain the desired measurements. The science instruments include an advanced version of the Cometary Ice and Dust Experiment (CIDEX), a mini-CIDEX with a sample collection system, an X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer and a Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatograph, and a simplified version of the Neutral

  13. Complement activation in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, L E; De Villiers, D; Markham, D; Whaley, K; Thomas, H C

    1982-01-01

    Patients with HBsAg positive chronic active liver disease (CALD) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) exhibit increased C3d concentrations and changes in the serum concentrations of the complement components consistent with activation of the classical and alternative pathways. In these patients the concentrations of the regulatory proteins, C3b inactivator (C3bINA) and beta IH globulin, are normal. Patients with HBsAg negative CALD and alcohol induced liver disease (ALD) exhibit no evidence of an increased level of complement system activation. In these patients diminished serum concentrations of complement components appear to be related to diminished hepatic synthetic function. C4 synthesis may be specifically reduced in autoimmune chronic active liver disease. PMID:7083631

  14. C4 Cycles: Past, Present, and Future Research on C4 Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Langdale, Jane A.

    2011-01-01

    In the late 1960s, a vibrant new research field was ignited by the discovery that instead of fixing CO2 into a C3 compound, some plants initially fix CO2 into a four-carbon (C4) compound. The term C4 photosynthesis was born. In the 20 years that followed, physiologists, biochemists, and molecular and developmental biologists grappled to understand how the C4 photosynthetic pathway was partitioned between two morphologically distinct cell types in the leaf. By the early 1990s, much was known about C4 biochemistry, the types of leaf anatomy that facilitated the pathway, and the patterns of gene expression that underpinned the biochemistry. However, virtually nothing was known about how the pathway was regulated. It should have been an exciting time, but many of the original researchers were approaching retirement, C4 plants were proving recalcitrant to genetic manipulation, and whole-genome sequences were not even a dream. In combination, these factors led to reduced funding and the failure to attract young people into the field; the endgame seemed to be underway. But over the last 5 years, there has been a resurgence of interest and funding, not least because of ambitious multinational projects that aim to increase crop yields by introducing C4 traits into C3 plants. Combined with new technologies, this renewed interest has resulted in the development of more sophisticated approaches toward understanding how the C4 pathway evolved, how it is regulated, and how it might be manipulated. The extent of this resurgence is manifest by the publication in 2011 of more than 650 pages of reviews on different aspects of C4. Here, I provide an overview of our current understanding, the questions that are being addressed, and the issues that lie ahead. PMID:22128120

  15. An experimental and theoretical study of the thermal decomposition of C4H6 isomers

    DOE PAGES

    Lockhart, James P. A.; Goldsmith, C. Franklin; Randazzo, John B.; ...

    2017-04-25

    The chemistry of small unsaturated hydrocarbons, such as 1,3–butadiene (1,3–C4H6), 1,2–butadiene (1,2–C4H6), 2–butyne (2–C4H6) and 1–butyne (1–C4H6), is of central importance to the modeling of combustion systems. These species are important intermediates in combustion processes, and yet their high-temperature chemistry remains poorly understood, with various dissociation and isomerization pathways proposed in the literature. Here we investigate the thermal decompositions of 1,3–C4H6, 1,2–C4H6, 2–C4H6 and 1–C4H6 inside a diaphragmless shock tube, at post shock total pressures of 26–261 Torr and temperatures ranging from 1428–2354 K, using laser schlieren densitometry. The experimental work has been complemented by high-level ab initio calculations, whichmore » collectively provide strong evidence that formally direct dissociation is the major channel for pyrolysis of 1,3–C4H6 and 2–C4H6; these paths have not been previously reported but are critical to reconciling the current work and disparate literature reports. The reaction mechanism presented here simulates the current experiments and experimental data from the literature very well. As a result, pressure and temperature dependent rate coefficients are given for the isomerization, formally direct and direct dissociation paths.« less

  16. TMA: beware of complements.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel; Cines, Douglas B

    2013-09-19

    In this issue of Blood, Jodele and colleagues report that defective complement regulation contributes to the development of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with important implications for diagnosis and management of this severe clinical complication.

  17. Complement in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Veerhuis, Robert; Nielsen, Henrietta M.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is considered to be an immune privileged site, because the blood-brain barrier limits entry of blood borne cells and proteins into the central nervous system (CNS). As a result, the detection and clearance of invading microorganisms and senescent cells as well as surplus neurotransmitters, aged and glycated proteins, in order to maintain a healthy environment for neuronal and glial cells, is largely confined to the innate immune system. In recent years it has become clear that many factors of innate immunity are expressed throughout the brain. Neuronal and glial cells express Toll like receptors as well as complement receptors, and virtually all complement components can be locally produced in the brain, often in response to injury or developmental cues. However, as inflammatory reactions could interfere with proper functioning of the brain, tight and fine tuned regulatory mechanisms are warranted. In age related diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), accumulating amyloid proteins elicit complement activation and a local, chronic inflammatory response that leads to attraction and activation of glial cells that, under such activation conditions, can produce neurotoxic substances, including pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxygen radicals. This process may be exacerbated by a disturbed balance between complement activators and complement regulatory proteins such as occurs in AD, as the local synthesis of these proteins is differentially regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Much knowledge about the role of complement in neurodegenerative diseases has been derived from animal studies with transgenic overexpressing or knockout mice for specific complement factors or receptors. These studies have provided insight into the potential therapeutic use of complement regulators and complement receptor antagonists in chronic neurodegenerative diseases as well as in acute conditions, such as stroke. Interestingly, recent animal studies have also indicated that

  18. Antibody and complement mediated injury in transplants following sensitization by allogeneic blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhiping; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Murata, Kazunori; Liu, Jinhuan; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Wasowska, Barbara A; Baldwin, William M

    2006-10-15

    Many patients on the waiting list for transplants are sensitized from previous blood transfusions, pregnancy, or transplants. We investigated the role of complement in acute and chronic pathology in hearts transplanted to sensitized rats. Blood was transfused from allogeneic PVG.R8 rats or control isogeneic PVG.1U rats to C6-sufficient and -deficient PVG.1U rats. Three weeks later hearts were transplanted from PVG.R8 donors and low-dose cyclosporin A was initiated. Allogeneic but not isogeneic blood transfusion elicited strong immunoglobulin (Ig) M, IgG1 and IgG2b alloantibody responses. Sensitization caused accelerated acute rejection of cardiac allografts by C6-sufficient recipients (4 days). In contrast, allografts functioned over 40 days in all C6-deficient recipients, but sensitization caused increased interstitial fibrosis and chronic vasculopathy. Circulating alloantibodies were associated with deposits of C4d on the vascular endothelium together with pericapillary accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages in the grafts. In contrast, T cells accumulated in periarterial lymphatics that did not have C4d deposits. Presensitization by allogeneic blood transfusion causes accelerated acute graft rejection in the presence of the complete complement cascade. In the absence of C6, macrophages colocalized with deposits of C4d and T cells accumulated in the periarterial lymphatics.

  19. Phylogeny of C4-photosynthesis enzymes based on algal transcriptomic and genomic data supports an archaeal/proteobacterial origin and multiple duplication for most C4-related genes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Shan; Wu, Shuangxiu; Yu, Jun; Wang, Xumin; Tang, Xuexi; Liu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Both Calvin-Benson-Bassham (C3) and Hatch-Slack (C4) cycles are most important autotrophic CO2 fixation pathways on today's Earth. C3 cycle is believed to be originated from cyanobacterial endosymbiosis. However, studies on evolution of different biochemical variants of C4 photosynthesis are limited to tracheophytes and origins of C4-cycle genes are not clear till now. Our comprehensive analyses on bioinformatics and phylogenetics of novel transcriptomic sequencing data of 21 rhodophytes and 19 Phaeophyceae marine species and public genomic data of more algae, tracheophytes, cyanobacteria, proteobacteria and archaea revealed the origin and evolution of C4 cycle-related genes. Almost all of C4-related genes were annotated in extensive algal lineages with proteobacterial or archaeal origins, except for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) with both cyanobacterial and archaeal/proteobacterial origin. Notably, cyanobacteria may not possess complete C4 pathway because of the flawed annotation of pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) genes in public data. Most C4 cycle-related genes endured duplication and gave rise to functional differentiation and adaptation in different algal lineages. C4-related genes of NAD-ME (NAD-malic enzyme) and PCK subtypes exist in most algae and may be primitive ones, while NADP-ME (NADP-malic enzyme) subtype genes might evolve from NAD-ME subtype by gene duplication in chlorophytes and tracheophytes.

  20. Monoclonal antipeptide antibodies against amino acid residues 1101-1106 of human C4 distinguish C4A from C4B.

    PubMed

    Reilly, B D; Levine, P; Rothbard, J; Skanes, V M

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of amino acid sequences of the alpha-chain fragment of human C4, C4d, has shown C4A- and C4B-specific sequences at residues 1101-1106 in which the aspartic acid-histidine substitution at position 1106 may be related to the amide and ester bond forming properties of these molecules. Peptides containing twelve amino acid residues of the C4A- or C4B-specific sequences were synthesized and injected into female Balb/c mice. Serum from 2 mice, one immunized with the C4A-specific peptide and the other with the C4B-specific peptide, gave strong isotype-specific responses in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against affinity-purified C4A3 and C4B2B1. Spleen cells from these mice were fused with the mouse myeloma SP2/0-Ag 14, and two cloned cell lines, AII-1 and BII-1, were established from hybrids. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting of monoclonal antibodies AII-1 and BII-1 show that the former reacts with the C4A but not with the C4B alpha-chain and the latter with C4B but not with the C4A alpha-chain. Furthermore, immunoblotting of C4 allelic variants showed that AII-1 reacted with all C4A allotypes tested, including A6, A4, A3 and A2, whereas BII-1 reacted with all C4B allotypes tested, including B5, B3, B2, and B1.

  1. Association of C4d deposition with clinical outcomes in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Mario; Ortega, Rosa; Sánchez, Marina; Segarra, Alfons; Salcedo, Maria Teresa; González, Fayna; Camacho, Rafael; Valdivia, Miguel Angel; Cabrera, Rocio; López, Katia; Pinedo, Fernando; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Valera, Alfonso; Leon, Miryam; Cobo, Maria Angeles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Ballarín, Jose; Arce, Yolanda; García, Beatriz; Muñoz, María Dolores; Praga, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have suggested that activation of the complement system is a contributing pathogenic mechanism in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). C4d staining is an inexpensive and easy-to-perform method for the analysis of renal biopsies. This study aimed to assess the clinical and prognostic implications of C4d staining in IgAN. This retrospective cohort study included 283 patients with IgAN in 11 hospitals in Spain who underwent a renal biopsy between 1979 and 2010. The primary predictor was mesangial C4d staining. Secondary predictors included demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics, and Oxford pathologic classification criteria. The primary end point was the cumulative percentage of patients who developed ESRD, defined as onset of chronic dialysis or renal transplantation. C4d was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining using a polyclonal antibody. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to evaluate the effect of C4d staining on renal survival. There were 109 patients (38.5%) and 174 patients (61.5%) who were classified as C4d positive and C4d negative, respectively. Renal survival at 20 years was 28% in C4d-positive patients versus 85% in C4d-negative patients (P<0.001). Independent risk factors associated with ESRD were as follows: proteinuria (hazard ratio [HR] per every 1 g/d increase. 1.16; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.03 to 1.31; P=0.01), eGFR (HR per every 1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) increase, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94 to 0.97; P<0.001), T2 Oxford classification (tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis, >50%; HR, 4.42; 95% CI, 1.40 to 13.88; P=0.01), and C4d-positive staining (HR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.30 to 4.64; P=0.01). C4d-positive staining is an independent risk factor for the development of ESRD in IgAN. This finding is consistent with the possibility that complement activation is involved in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  2. Complement activation by Coccidioides immitis: in vitro and clinical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Galgiani, J N; Yam, P; Petz, L D; Williams, P L; Stevens, D A

    1980-01-01

    Mycelial- or spherule-phase derivatives of Coccidioides immitis caused a decrease in vitro of total hemolytic complement in serum from a nonsensitized person. Activation involved both classic and alternative pathways as shown by deprssion of hemolytic C4 and by generation of products of activation of components C3, C4, and factor B. In addition, functional complement activity or immunoreactive levels of complement components or both were measured in 23 patients with self-limited or disseminated coccidioidomycosis. Low total hemolytic complement was found in nine, usually during the early phase of primary illness, and was transient. Hemolytic C4 was low, and the effect of inulin to decrease complement levels was blunted, suggested both classic and alternative pathways may be deficient. However, associated depression of immunoreactive levels of components assayed (C3, C4, C5, factor B, and properdin) was not consistently found. This disparity raises the possibility of enhanced in vitro inactivation analogous to activation by immune complexes. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6901703

  3. Complement genetics, deficiencies, and disease associations.

    PubMed

    Mayilyan, Karine R

    2012-07-01

    The complement system is a key component of innate immunity. More than 45 genes encoding the proteins of complement components or their isotypes and subunits, receptors, and regulators have been discovered. These genes are distributed throughout different chromosomes, with 19 genes comprising three significant complement gene clusters in the human genome. Genetic deficiency of any early component of the classical pathway (C1q, C1r/s, C2, C4, and C3) is associated with autoimmune diseases due to the failure of clearance of immune complexes (IC) and apoptotic materials, and the impairment of normal humoral response. Deficiencies of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and the early components of the alternative (factor D, properdin) and terminal pathways (from C3 onward components: C5, C6, C7, C8, C9) increase susceptibility to infections and their recurrence. While the association of MBL deficiency with a number of autoimmune and infectious disorders has been well established, the effects of the deficiency of other lectin pathway components (ficolins, MASPs) have been less extensively investigated due to our incomplete knowledge of the genetic background of such deficiencies and the functional activity of those components. For complement regulators and receptors, the consequences of their genetic deficiency vary depending on their specific involvement in the regulatory or signalling steps within the complement cascade and beyond. This article reviews current knowledge and concepts about the genetic load of complement component deficiencies and their association with diseases. An integrative presentation of genetic data with the latest updates provides a background to further investigations of the disease association investigations of the complement system from the perspective of systems biology and systems genetics.

  4. Polymorphism of the complement components in human pathology.

    PubMed

    Brai, M; Accardo, P; Bellavia, D

    1994-01-01

    The complement system is an important part of non clonal or innate immunity that collaborates with acquired immunity to kill pathogens and to facilitate the clearance of immune complexes. The complement is made up of 20 distinct plasma proteins and 9 different membrane proteins. Three components, factor B, C2 and C4 (with 2 isotypes), are coded by polymorphic HLA-linked genes and are sometimes referred to as class III antigens, inherited as compact units called complotypes. The C4 genes are the most polymorphic, including a common null allele (Q0) at both the C4A and C4B loci. Other polymorphic complement factors (not linked to HLA) are C3 (2 common alleles), C6 and C7 (closely linked, with 3 and 2 alleles, respectively). A certain degree of polymorphism has also been described for complement receptors and membrane control proteins. No differences in functional activity are usually detected among different alleles. Immune-mediated diseases are associated with C4Q0, in particular: systemic lupus erythematosus and discoid-systemic lupus erythematosus, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, liver cirrhosis, celiac disease and IgA/IgG4 deficiency. Even if optimal HLA markers do become available, genetic counselling is usually not the ultimate goal for dealing with most of the HLA-associated common diseases, although their study could help to better delineate disease pathogenesis.

  5. Glomerular and tubular C4d depositions in IgA nephropathy: relations with histopathology and with albuminuria.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Young-In; Kim, Min-Kyung; Park, Jae-Bok; Cho, Chang-Ho; Oh, Hoon-Kyu; Sung, Woo Jung; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    C4d has been used as an evaluation marker for antibody-mediated rejection for solid organ transplantation. Although some studies have proposed that complement activation is involved in renal diseases, very little information is available on pathogenesis. This study was conducted to investigate C4d deposition in IgA nephropathy and to find its relations with histopathology and albuminuria. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent renal biopsy at our medical center. The WHO grade of IgA nephropathy, interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, C4d staining and medical records including sex, age, and urine albumin were reviewed. Thirteen patients (56.5%) were positive for C4d staining in the glomerulus and eleven patients (47.8%) were positive in the tubular epithelium. Glomerular C4d deposition was associated with albuminuria (p=0.044), and tubular C4d deposition was associated with a higher grade of IgA nephropathy (p=0.014). Activation of the complement system was involved in renal damage and was identified through deposition of C4d in the glomerulus and tubules. Positive C4d staining in the glomerulus and the tubules may be associated with functional damage related to glomerular filtration and poor renal outcome.

  6. From proto-Kranz to C4 Kranz: building the bridge to C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Khoshravesh, Roxana; Sage, Tammy L

    2014-07-01

    In this review, we examine how the specialized "Kranz" anatomy of C4 photosynthesis evolved from C3 ancestors. Kranz anatomy refers to the wreath-like structural traits that compartmentalize the biochemistry of C4 photosynthesis and enables the concentration of CO2 around Rubisco. A simplified version of Kranz anatomy is also present in the species that utilize C2 photosynthesis, where a photorespiratory glycine shuttle concentrates CO2 into an inner bundle-sheath-like compartment surrounding the vascular tissue. C2 Kranz is considered to be an intermediate stage in the evolutionary development of C4 Kranz, based on the intermediate branching position of C2 species in 14 evolutionary lineages of C4 photosynthesis. In the best-supported model of C4 evolution, Kranz anatomy in C2 species evolved from C3 ancestors with enlarged bundle sheath cells and high vein density. Four independent lineages have been identified where C3 sister species of C2 plants exhibit an increase in organelle numbers in the bundle sheath and enlarged bundle sheath cells. Notably, in all of these species, there is a pronounced shift of mitochondria to the inner bundle sheath wall, forming an incipient version of the C2 type of Kranz anatomy. This incipient version of C2 Kranz anatomy is termed proto-Kranz, and is proposed to scavenge photorespiratory CO2. By doing so, it may provide fitness benefits in hot environments, and thus represent a critical first stage of the evolution of both the C2 and C4 forms of Kranz anatomy.

  7. Copper Causes Regiospecific Formation of C4F8-Containing Six-Membered Rings and their Defluorination/Aromatization to C4F4-Containing Rings in Triphenylene/1,4-C4F8I2 Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rippy, Kerry C.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Popov, Alexey; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.

    2016-01-18

    The presence of Cu in reactions of triphenylene (TRPH) and 1,4-C4F8I2 at 360 °C led to regiospecific substitution of TRPH ortho C(β) atoms to form C4F8-containing rings, completely suppressing substitution on C(α) atoms. In addition, Cu caused selective reductive-defluorination/aromatization (RD/A) to form C4F4- containing aromatic rings. Without Cu, the reactions of TRPH and 1,4- C4F8I2 were not regiospecific and no RD/A was observed. These results, supported by DFT calculations, are the first examples of Cupromoted (i) regiospecific perfluoroannulation, (ii) preparative C–F activation, and (iii) RD/A. HPLC-purified products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, low-temperature PES, and 1H/19F NMR.

  8. The effects of soluble recombinant complement receptor 1 on complement-mediated experimental glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Couser, W G; Johnson, R J; Young, B A; Yeh, C G; Toth, C A; Rudolph, A R

    1995-05-01

    Complement is a major mediator of tissue injury in several types of glomerulonephritis. However, no therapeutic agents that inhibit complement activation are available for human use. sCR1 (TP10, BRL 55736) is a recombinant, soluble human complement receptor 1 (CR1) molecule lacking transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that inhibits C3 and C5 convertase activity by preferentially binding C4b and C3b. To test the efficacy of sCR1 on complement-mediated glomerulonephritis, rats were pretreated with sCR1 (60 mg/kg per day) before and during the induction of three models of complement-dependent glomerulonephritis (concanavalin A and antithymocyte serum models of proliferative glomerulonephritis, passive Heyman nephritis). Daily sCR1 and complement hemolytic activity levels were measured, and renal histology and urine protein excretion were examined. Mean serum sCR1 levels of 100 to 200 micrograms/mL were maintained with a reduction in complement hemolytic activity to less than 15% in most animals. In the antithymocyte serum model, sCR1-treated animals had significant reductions in mesangiolysis, glomerular platelet and macrophage infiltrates, and proteinuria at 48 h. In the concanavalin A model, sCR1 significantly reduced glomerular C3 and fibrin deposits, platelet infiltrates, and proteinuria at 48 h. In passive Heymann nephritis, proteinuria was also significantly reduced (199 +/- 8.5 versus 125 +/- 16 mg/day, P < 0.002) at 5 days. It was concluded that sCR1 significantly reduces both morphologic and functional consequences of several different types of complement-mediated glomerulonephritis and deserves evaluation as a potential therapeutic agent in complement-mediated immune glomerular disease in humans.

  9. Association between C4, C4A, and C4B copy number variations and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Zhang, Jun; Liao, Dan; Yang, Lu; Wang, Yingxiong; Hou, Shengping

    2017-01-01

    Although several studies have investigated the association between C4, C4A, and C4B gene copy number variations (CNVs) and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, the results remain inconsistency for those diseases. Thus, in this study, a comprehensive meta-analysis was conducted to assess the role of C4, C4A, and C4B CNVs in autoimmune diseases in different ethnic groups. A total of 16 case-control studies described in 12 articles (8663 cases and 11099 controls) were included in this study. The pooled analyses showed that a low C4 gene copy number (GCN) (<4) was treated as a significant risk factor (odds ratio [OR] = 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.19–1.78) for autoimmune diseases compared with a higher GCN (>4). The pooled statistical results revealed that low C4 (<4) and low C4A (<2) GCNs could be risk factors for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Caucasian populations. Additionally, the correlation between C4B CNVs and all type of autoimmune diseases could not be confirmed by the current meta-analysis (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 0.93–1.24). These data suggest that deficiency or absence of C4 and C4A CNVs may cause susceptibility to SLE. PMID:28205620

  10. 29 CFR 2560.502c-4 - Civil penalties under section 502(c)(4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... determined by the Department of Labor, taking into consideration the degree or willfulness of the failure or... for each violation under section 502(c)(4) of the Act shall not exceed $1,000 a day (or such other... applicable, or on a showing by such person of mitigating circumstances regarding the degree or willfulness...

  11. 29 CFR 2560.502c-4 - Civil penalties under section 502(c)(4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... determined by the Department of Labor, taking into consideration the degree or willfulness of the failure or... for each violation under section 502(c)(4) of the Act shall not exceed $1,000 a day (or such other... applicable, or on a showing by such person of mitigating circumstances regarding the degree or willfulness...

  12. Tracking the evolutionary rise of C4 metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F

    2016-05-01

    Upregulation of the C4 metabolic cycle is a major step in the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. Why this happened remains unclear, in part because of difficulties measuring the C4 cycle in situ in C3-C4 intermediate species. Now, Alonso-Cantabrana and von Caemmerer (2016) have described a new approach for quantifying C4 cycle activity, thereby providing the means to analyze its upregulation in an evolutionary context.

  13. Tracking the evolutionary rise of C4 metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of the C4 metabolic cycle is a major step in the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. Why this happened remains unclear, in part because of difficulties measuring the C4 cycle in situ in C3-C4 intermediate species. Now, Alonso-Cantabrana and von Caemmerer (2016) have described a new approach for quantifying C4 cycle activity, thereby providing the means to analyze its upregulation in an evolutionary context. PMID:27085185

  14. Outline of Hungarian Complementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szamosi, Michael

    This study presents a preliminary analysis of Hungarian complement constructions and the syntactic operations needed to account for them. The expository framework (and the implicit framework of the research itself) is based upon that of Rosenbaum (1967). The aim of the paper is to arrive at a rough picture of the kinds of structures and syntactic…

  15. Verbal Complementizers in Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Hossam Eldin Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    A class of Modern Standard Arabic complementizers known as "'?inna' and its sisters" demonstrate unique case and word order restrictions. While CPs in Arabic allow both Subject-Verb (SV) and Verb-Subject (VS) word order and their subjects show nominative morphology, CPs introduced by "?inna" ban a verb from directly following…

  16. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  17. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  18. Polymerase chain reaction based C4AQ0 and C4BQ0 genotyping: association with systemic lupus erythematosus in southwest Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Man, X; Luo, H; Li, X; Yao, Y; Mao, C; Zhang, Y

    2003-01-01

    Methods: C4 null genes were determined by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP). The 2 bp insertion in exon 29, which was previously identified in non-Chinese populations and caused defective C4A genes, was directly typed by sequencing the whole exon 29 using exon specific primers. The exon 6 of complement C2 was also sequenced in both the patients and controls. Results: The frequency of homozygous C4AQ0 allele was 12.5% (17/136) in patients with SLE compared with 1.1% (2/174) in controls (p<0.001, odds ratio (OR)=12.286, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.786 to 54.170). There was no significant difference for homozygous C4BQ0 allele between patients with SLE and controls (p=0.699). Patients with the C4AQ0 gene had an increased risk of acquiring renal disorder, serositis, and anti-dsDNA antibodies compared with those without C4AQ0 (for renal disorder, p=0.018, OR=8.951, 95% CI 1.132 to 70.804; for serositis, p=0.011, OR 4.891, 95% CI 1.574 to 15.198; for anti-dsDNA, p=0.004, OR 7.630, 95%CI 1.636 to 35.584). None of the patients or controls had the 2 bp insertion in exon 29 of the C4 gene. The type I C2 deficiency was not detected in the 310 samples. Conclusion: It is suggested that deficiency of C4A (not due to a 2 bp insertion in exon 29), but not C4B or C2, may be a risk factor for acquiring SLE in south west Han Chinese; this results in increased risk of renal disorder, serositis, and anti-dsDNA antibodies in patients with SLE. Racial differences seem to be relevant in susceptibility to SLE PMID:12480675

  19. Specific Inactivation of the Fourth Complement Component I. In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Joerg A.; Garces, Mary C.; Iglesias, Elena

    1971-01-01

    Intravascular injection of guinea pigs with the fourth complement component (C4) inactivator from shark serum resulted in severe serum C4 depletion that lasted for several hours. Active and direct passive Arthus reactions did not develop or were extremely mild in such C4 inactivator-treated animals as judged by gross and histological observation. In consideration of the specificity of the C4 inactivator, its independence of cofactors, and its failure to generate biologically active materials in the process of C4 inactivation, it is concluded that complement-dependent immune injury can be suppressed or avoided by interruption of the complement cascade at a single early step. The depression of the Arthus reaction beyond the time of C4 recovery prompted quantitative speculations concerning (i) the in vivo rate of C5a generation under conditions of limited C4 supply and (ii) the “saturation” of immune complexes. This view is supported by in vitro demonstration of functional inactivation or “saturation” of immune precipitates by repeated incubation with fresh guinea pig complement. It seems therefore conceivable that even temporary complement inactivation may have a profound beneficial effect on complement-dependent immune injuries. Images PMID:4263696

  20. Use of C4d as a diagnostic tool to classify membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nirupama; Wakefield, Dara N; Clapp, William L; Garin, Eduardo H

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN type I, II and III) was reclassified in 2013 as MPGN and C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) based on the complement system activation mechanism. To evaluate whether C4d, a component of the classical pathway, could be a diagnostic tool in differentiating between MPGN and C3G. We conducted a retrospective study of 15 MPGN type I, II and III and 13 minimal change disease (MCD) patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2012. C4d staining using the peroxidase method was employed. Using the 2013 C3G consensus classification, the 15 MPGN types I, II and III biopsies were re-classified as MPGN (8) and C3G (7). Following C4d staining, of the 8 biopsies diagnosed as MPGN, 4 had classical pathway involvement [C1q (+), C3 (+), C4d (+)]; two had lectin pathway involvement [C1q (-), C3 (+), C4d (+)]; and, two were reclassified as C3G because the absence of C4d and C1q suggested the presence of the alternative pathway [C1q (-), C3 (+), C4d (-)]. Three of the seven C3G biopsies presented classical pathway involvement and were reclassified as MPGN. The alternative pathway was present in one of the other 4 biopsies considered to be C3G. Two C3G biopsies involved the lectin pathway and the one case of dense deposit disease had lectin pathway involvement. C4d staining may help to differentiate between MPGN and C3G. In addition, the lectin pathway could play a role in the pathogenesis of these glomerulopathies. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Phylogenetic aspects of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Zarkadis, I K; Mastellos, D; Lambris, J D

    2001-01-01

    During evolution two general systems of immunity have emerged: innate or, natural immunity and adaptive (acquired), or specific immunity. The innate system is phylogenetically older and is found in some form in all multicellular organisms, whereas the adaptive system appeared about 450 million years ago and is found in all vertebrates except jawless fish. The complement system in higher vertebrates plays an important role as an effector of both the innate and the acquired immune response, and also participates in various immunoregulatory processes. In lower vertebrates complement is activated by the alternative and lectin pathways and is primarily involved in the opsonization of foreign material. The Agnatha (the most primitive vertebrate species) possess the alternative and lectin pathways while cartilaginous fish are the first species in which the classical pathway appears following the emergence of immunoglobulins. The rest of the poikilothermic species, ranging from teleosts to reptilians, appear to contain a well-developed complement system resembling that of the homeothermic vertebrates. It seems that most of the complement components have appeared after the duplication of primordial genes encoding C3/C4/C5, fB/C2, C1s/C1r/MASP-1/MASP-2, and C6/C7/C8/C9 molecules, in a process that led to the formation of distinct activation pathways. However, unlike homeotherms, several species of poikilotherms (e.g. trout) have recently been shown to possess multiple forms of complement components (C3, factor B) that are structurally and functionally more diverse than those of higher vertebrates. We hypothesize that this remarkable diversity has allowed these animals to expand their innate capacity for immune recognition and response. Recent studies have also indicated the possible presence of complement receptors in protochordates and lower vertebrates. In conclusion, there is considerable evidence suggesting that the complement system is present in the entire lineage of

  2. Major alterations in transcript profiles between C3-C4 and C4 photosynthesis of an amphibious species Eleocharis baldwinii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Taiyu; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Lin, Yongjun

    2014-09-01

    Engineering C4 photosynthetic metabolism into C3 crops is regarded as a major strategy to increase crop productivity, and clarification of the evolutionary processes of C4 photosynthesis can help the better use of this strategy. Here, Eleocharis baldwinii, a species in which C4 photosynthesis can be induced from a C3-C4 state under either environmental or ABA treatments, was used to identify the major transcriptional modifications during the process from C3-C4 to C4. The transcriptomic comparison suggested that in addition to the major differences in C4 core pathway, the pathways of glycolysis, citrate acid metabolism and protein synthesis were dramatically modified during the inducement of C4 photosynthetic states. Transcripts of many transporters, including not only metabolite transporters but also ion transporters, were dramatically increased in C4 photosynthetic state. Many candidate regulatory genes with unidentified functions were differentially expressed in C3-C4 and C4 photosynthetic states. Finally, it was indicated that ABA, auxin signaling and DNA methylation play critical roles in the regulation of C4 photosynthesis. In summary, by studying the different photosynthetic states of the same species, this work provides the major transcriptional differences between C3-C4 and C4 photosynthesis, and many of the transcriptional differences are potentially related to C4 development and therefore are the potential targets for reverse genetics studies.

  3. Complement components in Nigerians with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Onyemelukwe, G C

    1989-10-01

    Serum complement components C1q, C3, C4, factor B, and C3d breakdown products were measured in asthmatic Nigerians and in age-matched and sex-matched controls. C3 mean level was higher than in controls while C1q and C4 mean levels were lower than in controls. High levels of C3d in asthmatic patients suggest the possible role of C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins in the etiopathogenesis of perennial asthma in Nigerian patients in a tropical environment with ubiquitous airborne allergens and infective agents. The significantly elevated levels of IgM and IgG may suggest recurrent respiratory challenge of perennial antigens in our environment.

  4. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Hendrik P N; Charbel Issa, Peter; Walier, Maja; Janzer, Stefanie; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Börncke, Florian; Fritsche, Lars G; Chong, Ngaihang V; Fimmers, Rolf; Wienker, Thomas; Holz, Frank G; Weber, Bernhard H F; Oppermann, Martin

    2008-07-02

    Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112) and controls (n = 67). Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH), factor B-C2 (BF-C2) and complement C3 (C3) genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (p<0.001), were significantly elevated in AMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  5. Report Out of the C4I Study Group

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    1 of the DoD M &S Master Plan states, “Provide a common technical framework for M &S.” Sub-objective 1 - 1 includes the establishment of a common, high...authenticated observers, etc. 4.3 LISI Model While not explicitly developed to codify cross- domain links to M &S, the LISI model (Figure 1 ) provides a...757-726-6896 brandtk@mitre.org Keywords: C4I, C4ISR, HLA, JTA, M &S, C4ISR-to-Simulation FOM, M &S-to-C4I Interoperability, C4I/ M &S TRM, SISO M &S-to-C4I

  6. Triatoma infestans Calreticulin: Gene Cloning and Expression of a Main Domain That Interacts with the Host Complement System.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Katherine; Collazo, Norberto; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Molina, María Carmen; Rosas, Carlos; Peña, Jaime; Pizarro, Javier; Maldonado, Ismael; Cattan, Pedro E; Apt, Werner; Ferreira, Arturo

    2017-02-08

    Triatoma infestans is an important hematophagous vector of Chagas disease, a neglected chronic illness affecting approximately 6 million people in Latin America. Hematophagous insects possess several molecules in their saliva that counteract host defensive responses. Calreticulin (CRT), a multifunctional protein secreted in saliva, contributes to the feeding process in some insects. Human CRT (HuCRT) and Trypanosoma cruzi CRT (TcCRT) inhibit the classical pathway of complement activation, mainly by interacting through their central S domain with complement component C1. In previous studies, we have detected CRT in salivary gland extracts from T. infestans We have called this molecule TiCRT. Given that the S domain is responsible for C1 binding, we have tested its role in the classical pathway of complement activation in vertebrate blood. We have cloned and characterized the complete nucleotide sequence of CRT from T. infestans, and expressed its S domain. As expected, this S domain binds to human C1 and, as a consequence, it inhibits the classical pathway of complement, at its earliest stage of activation, namely the generation of C4b. Possibly, the presence of TiCRT in the salivary gland represents an evolutionary adaptation in hematophagous insects to control a potential activation of complement proteins, present in the massive blood meal that they ingest, with deleterious consequences at least on the anterior digestive tract of these insects.

  7. Anti-glycoprotein g antibodies of herpes simplex virus 2 contribute to complete protection after vaccination in mice and induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Görander, Staffan; Ekblad, Maria; Bergström, Tomas; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-11-12

    We investigated the role of antibodies against the mature portion of glycoprotein G (mgG-2) of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) in protective immunity after vaccination. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with mgG-2 and oligodeoxynucleotides containing two CpG motifs plus alum as adjuvant. All C57BL/6 mice survived and presented no genital or systemic disease. High levels of immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) and IgG2 antibodies were detected and re-stimulated splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced IFN-γ. None of the sera from immunized mice exhibited neutralization, while all sera exerted antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytolysis (ACMC) activity. Passive transfer of anti-mgG-2 monoclonal antibodies, or immune serum, to naive C57BL/6 mice did not limit disease progression. Immunized B‑cell KO mice presented lower survival rate and higher vaginal viral titers, as compared with vaccinated B-cell KO mice after passive transfer of immune serum and vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Sera from mice that were vaccinated subcutaneously and intranasally with mgG-2 presented significantly lower titers of IgG antibodies and lower ADCC and ACMC activity. We conclude that anti-mgG-2 antibodies were of importance to limit genital HSV‑2 infection. ADCC and ACMC activity are potentially important mechanisms in protective immunity, and could tentatively be evaluated in future animal vaccine studies and in clinical trials.

  8. IXO: The Instrument Complement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.; IWG, IXO

    2009-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory (IXO) has recently been created as a mission concept by a joint team of NASA, ESA and JAXA scientists, based on the previous Constellation-X and XEUS concepts. Definition of the IXO instruments is still under evolution, but the core instrument complement will include a Wide Field X-ray Imager, an X-ray Calorimeter / Narrow Field X-ray Imager, and an X-ray Grating Spectrometer. Other, modest additional instruments (such as a hard X-ray capability, a polarimeter, and a high time resolution detector) will also be considered. We present the current status of the IXO instrument complement and offer the opportunity for discussion of ideas relevant to the IXO mission concept process.

  9. Modulation of C4b-binding protein isoforms during the acute phase response caused by orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Criado-García, O; González-Rubio, C; López-Trascasa, M; Pascual-Salcedo, D; Munuera, L; Rodríguez de Córdoba, S

    1997-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery is described as an event with a high risk of thromboembolic diseases. This is probably a consequence of a synergistic combination of different risk factors in the patients subjected to this type of surgery, including age, immobilization, anesthesia and different hypercoagulable states. After surgery patients develop an acute-phase response that leads to changes in several plasma proteins. One of these proteins is the complement regulator C4b-binding protein (C4BP). We have recently shown that in some acute-phase patients C4BP is incorrectly controlled (with elevation of the C4BP beta-containing isoforms), leading to a potential hypercoagulable state by decreasing the plasma levels of free (active) protein S. Here we have studied whether patients subjected to orthopedic surgery have an appropriate modulation of the C4BP isoforms during their postoperative acute-phase responses. We have analyzed the evolution of the C4BP isoforms in serial samples from 11 patients who have undergone knee (or hip) prosthesis surgery (mean age 70 years), or scoliosis surgery (mean age 18 years). Our data suggest a similar evolution of C4BP isoforms in all these patients, with an almost exclusive increase of C4BP isoforms lacking C4BP beta polypeptides and steady levels of free protein S.

  10. When do different C4 leaf anatomies indicate independent C4 origins? Parallel evolution of C4 leaf types in Camphorosmeae (Chenopodiaceae).

    PubMed

    Kadereit, Gudrun; Lauterbach, Maximilian; Pirie, Michael D; Arafeh, Rami; Freitag, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    Broad-scale phylogenetic studies give first insights in numbers, relationships, and ages of C4 lineages. They are, however, generally limited to a model that treats the evolution of the complex C4 syndrome in different lineages as a directly comparable process. Here, we use a resolved and well-sampled phylogenetic tree of Camphorosmeae, based on three chloroplast and one nuclear marker and on leaf anatomical traits to infer a more detailed picture of C4 leaf-type evolution in this lineage. Our ancestral character state reconstructions allowed two scenarios: (i) Sedobassia is a derived C3/C4 intermediate, implying two independent gains of C4 in Bassia and Camphorosma; or (ii) Sedobassia is a plesiomorphic C3/C4 intermediate, representing a syndrome ancestral to the Bassia/Camphorosma/Sedobassia lineage. In Bassia, a kochioid leaf type (Bassia muricata and/or Bassia prostrata type) is ancestral. At least three independent losses of water-storage tissue occurred, resulting in parallel shifts towards an atriplicoid leaf type. These changes in leaf anatomy are adaptations to different survival strategies in steppic or semi-desert habitats with seasonal rainfall. In contrast, Camphorosma shows a fixed C4 anatomy differing from Bassia types in its continuous Kranz layer, which indeed points to an independent origin of the full C4 syndrome in Camphorosma, either from an independent C3 or from a common C3/C4 intermediate ancestor, perhaps similar to its C3/C4 intermediate sister genus Sedobassia. The enlarged bundle sheath cells of Sedobassia might represent an important early step in C4 evolution in Camphorosmeae. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. C4d Deposition Reveals Myocardial Infarction After Cardiac Arrest--Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Vuohelainen, Vilma; Paavonen, Timo; Hamalainen, Mari; Moilanen, Eeva; Mennander, Ari A

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of regional myocardial infarction (MI) after cardiac arrest and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major clinical challenge. We evaluated in a rat cardiac transplantation model whether IRI alone or with MI would induce complement C4d deposition. Isogenic heterotopic cardiac transplantation was performed in 16 Fischer 344 rats to induce IRI, of which 9 rats also underwent ligation of the left anterior coronary artery (LAD) of the heart to yield MI. Histology and qRT-PCR for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) were performed after cessation of heart beat. C4d was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Myocardial inflammation and C4d deposition was increased in grafts with IRI+MI as compared with IRI (0.71 vs. 0.14, PSU, respectively, p<0.04 and 80.13 vs. 20.29, PSU, respectively, p<0.02). The expression of eNOS decreased in grafts with IRI+MI as compared with IRI (p<0.05). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that IRI+MI was associated with C4d deposition (AUC 0.837; S.E. 0.116; p=0.035; 95% C.I. 0.610-1.000). Increased C4d deposition may be amenable to identify early MI after cardiac arrest. Early treatment aimed towards complement activation may provide a novel means for induced MI after cardiac arrest.

  12. 19 CFR 142.49 - Deletion of C-4 Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Deletion of C-4 Code. 142.49 Section 142.49... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.49 Deletion of C-4 Code. (a) By Customs. A port director may temporarily or permanently delete an entry filer's C-4 Code without providing the participant...

  13. 19 CFR 142.49 - Deletion of C-4 Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... director may temporarily or permanently delete an entry filer's C-4 Code without providing the participant.... Entry filers may delete C-4 Codes from Line Release by notifying the port director in writing on a Deletion Data Loading Sheet. Such notification shall state the C-4 Code which is to be deleted, the port...

  14. 19 CFR 142.49 - Deletion of C-4 Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... director may temporarily or permanently delete an entry filer's C-4 Code without providing the participant.... Entry filers may delete C-4 Codes from Line Release by notifying the port director in writing on a Deletion Data Loading Sheet. Such notification shall state the C-4 Code which is to be deleted, the port...

  15. Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy and C4d deposition; correlation and its implication.

    PubMed

    Rath, Ashutosh; Tewari, Rohit; Mendonca, Satish; Badwal, Sonia; Nijhawan, Vijay Shrawan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is well known to be the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis throughout the world. The histopathological changes are wide and varied as brought out by the various classification systems like the Haas and Oxford systems. C4d is a well-known biomarker of the complement cascade and has recently been implicated in certain native renal diseases. We attempted to characterize C4d deposition in IgAN and correlate this with histopathology by the Oxford classification system. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study included renal biopsies of 15 cases of IgAN diagnosed on histopathology and immunofluorescence over a period of 2 years. Demographic parameters of age and sex were reviewed. The Oxford classification system was applied to score the cases and immunohistochemistry for C4d was done on all cases to characterize staining pattern and intensity and was correlated with Oxford classification. Results: On histological examination, the cases showed various combinations of lesions ranging from M0E0S0T0 to M1E1S1T1. C4d deposition was found to be occurring mainly in mesangial location (12/15 cases, 80%). Forty percent cases showed C4d deposition in the glomerular capillary walls in a segmental fashion and 26.67% showed global pattern. Other patterns of deposition were arteriolar (53.33%), in peritubular capillaries (26.67%) and in tubular epithelium (20%). Conclusion: On comparing the various patterns of deposition of C4d with the four variables of the Oxford classification system, we found that segmental and global deposition of C4d correlated best with endocapillary proliferation.

  16. In vitro C3 deposition on Cryptococcus capsule occurs via multiple complement activation pathways.

    PubMed

    Mershon-Shier, Kileen L; Vasuthasawat, Alex; Takahashi, Kazue; Morrison, Sherie L; Beenhouwer, David O

    2011-09-01

    Complement can be activated via three pathways: classical, alternative, and lectin. Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans are closely related fungal pathogens possessing a polysaccharide capsule composed mainly of glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), which serves as a site for complement activation and deposition of complement components. We determined C3 deposition on Cryptococcus spp. by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy after incubation with serum from C57BL/6J mice as well as mice deficient in complement components C4, C3, factor B, and mannose binding lectin (MBL). C. gattii and C. neoformans activate complement in EGTA-treated serum indicating that they can activate the alternative pathway. However, complement activation was seen with factor B(-/-) serum suggesting activation could also take place in the absence of a functional alternative pathway. Furthermore, we uncovered a role for C4 in the alternative pathway activation by Cryptococcus spp. We also identified an unexpected and complex role for MBL in complement activation by Cryptococcus spp. No complement activation occurred in the absence of MBL-A and -C proteins although activation took place when the lectin binding activity of MBL was disrupted by calcium chelation. In addition, alternative pathway activation by C. neoformans required both MBL-A and -C, while either MBL-A or -C was sufficient for alternative pathway activation by C. gattii. Thus, complement activation by Cryptococcus spp. can take place through multiple pathways and complement activation via the alternative pathway requires the presence of C4 and MBL proteins. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Complement activity and pharmacological inhibition in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Théroux, Pierre; Martel, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    While complement is the most important component of humoral autoimmunity, and inflammation plays a key role in atherosclerosis, relatively few studies have looked at complement implications in atherosclerosis and its complications. C-reactive protein is a marker of inflammation and is also involved in atherosclerosis; it activates complement and colocalizes with activated complement proteins within the infarcting myocardium and the active atherosclerotic plaques. As new agents capable of modulating complement activity are being developed, new targets for the management of atherosclerosis are emerging that are related to autoimmunity and inflammation. The present paper reviews the putative roles of the various complement activation pathways in the development of atherosclerosis, in ST segment elevation and non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes, and in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. It also provides a perspective on new therapeutic interventions being developed to modulate complement activity. These interventions include the C1 esterase inhibitor, which may be consumed in some inflammatory states resulting in the loss of one of the mechanisms inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways; TP10, a recombinant protein of the soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) which inhibits the C3 and C5 convertases of the common pathway by binding C3b and C4b; a truncated version of the soluble complement receptor type 1 CRI lacking the C4b binding site which selectively inhibits the alternative pathway; and pexelizumab, a monoclonal antibody selectively blocking C5 to prevent the activation of the terminal pathway that is involved in excessive inflammation and autoimmune responses. PMID:16498508

  18. Inactivation of complement by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom.

    PubMed

    Gebel, H M; Finke, J H; Elgert, K D; Cambell, B J; Barrett, J T

    1979-07-01

    Zymosan depletion of serum complement in guinea pigs rendered them highly resistant to lesion by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom. Guinea pigs deficient in C4 of the complement system are as sensitive to the venom as normal guinea pigs. The injection of 35 micrograms of whole recluse venom intradermally into guinea pigs lowered their complement level by 35.7%. Brown recluse spider venom in concentrations as slight as 0.02 micrograms protein/ml can totally inactivate one CH50 of guinea pig complement in vitro. Bee, scorpion, and other spider venoms had no influence on the hemolytic titer of complement. Fractionation of recluse spider venom by Sephadex G-200 filtration separated the complement-inactivating property of the venom into three major regions which could be distinguished on the basis of heat stability as well as size. None was neutralized by antivenom. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of venom resolved the complement inactivators into five fractions. Complement inactivated by whole venom or the Sephadex fractions could be restored to hemolytic activity by supplements of fresh serum but not by heat-inactivated serum, pure C3, pure C5, or C3 and C5 in combination.

  19. Quo vadis C(4)? An ecophysiological perspective on global change and the future of C(4) plants.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Kubien, David S

    2003-01-01

    C(4) plants are directly affected by all major global change parameters, often in a manner that is distinct from that of C(3) plants. Rising CO(2) generally stimulates C(3) photosynthesis more than C(4), but C(4) species still exhibit positive responses, particularly at elevated temperature and arid conditions where they are currently common. Acclimation of photosynthesis to high CO(2) occurs in both C(3) and C(4) plants, most notably in nutrient-limited situations. High CO(2) aggravates nitrogen limitations and in doing so may favor C(4) species, which have greater photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency. C(4) photosynthesis is favored by high temperature, but global warming will not necessarily favor C(4) over C(3) plants because the timing of warming could be more critical than the warming itself. C(3) species will likely be favored where harsh winter climates are moderated, particularly where hot summers also become drier and less favorable to C(4) plant growth. Eutrophication of soils by nitrogen deposition generally favors C(3) species by offsetting the superior nitrogen use efficiency of C(4) species; this should allow C(3) species to expand at the expense of C(4) plants. Land-use change and biotic invasions are also important global change factors that affect the future of C(4) plants. Human exploitation of forested landscapes favors C(4) species at low latitude by removing woody competitors and opening gaps in which C(4) grasses can establish. Invasive C(4) grasses are causing widespread forest loss in Asia, the Americas and Oceania by accelerating fire cycles and reducing soil nutrient status. Once established, weedy C(4) grasses can prevent woodland establishment, and thus arrest ecological succession. In sum, in the future, certain C(4) plants will prosper at the expense of C(3) species, and should be able to adjust to the changes the future brings.

  20. Complement receptor 1 inhibitors for prevention of immune-mediated red cell destruction: potential use in transfusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina; Kang, Stanley; Tamasauskas, Daniel; Sung, Dorothy; Scaradavou, Andromachi

    2003-06-15

    Activation of complement cascade via the antibody-mediated classical pathway can initiate red blood cell (RBC) destruction, causing transfusion reactions and hemolytic anemia. In the present study, we have assessed the ability of a human recombinant soluble form of complement receptor 1 (sCR1) to inhibit complement-mediated RBC destruction in vitro and in vivo. Using an in vitro alloimmune incompatibility model, sCR1 inhibited complement activation and prevented hemolysis. Following transfusion of human group O RBCs into mice lacking detectable pre-existing antibodies against the transfused RBCs, systemic coadministration of 10 mg/kg sCR1, a dose well tolerated in human subjects for prevention of tissue injury, completely inhibited the in vivo clearance of the transfused RBCs and surface C3 deposition in the first hour after transfusion, correlating with the half-life of sCR1 in the circulation. Treatment with sCR1 increased the survival of transfused human group A RBCs in the circulation of mice with pre-existing anti-A for 2 hours after transfusion by 50%, reduced intravascular hemolysis, and lowered the levels of complement deposition (C3 and C4), but not immunoglobulin G (IgG) or IgM, on the transfused cells by 100-fold. We further identified potential functional domains in CR1 that can act to limit complement-mediated RBC destruction in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our data highlight a potential use of CR1-based inhibitors for prevention of complement-dependent immune hemolysis.

  1. Carbonic anhydrase and the molecular evolution of C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Martha

    2012-01-01

    C(4) photosynthesis, a biochemical CO(2)-concentrating mechanism (CCM), evolved more than 60 times within the angiosperms from C(3) ancestors. The genus Flaveria, which contains species demonstrating C(3), C(3)-C(4), C(4)-like or C(4) photosynthesis, is a model for examining the molecular evolution of the C(4) pathway. Work with carbonic anhydrase (CA), and C(3) and C(4) Flaveria congeners has added significantly to the understanding of this process. The C(4) form of CA3, a β-CA, which catalyses the first reaction in the C(4) pathway by hydrating atmospheric CO(2) to bicarbonate in the cytosol of mesophyll cells (mcs), evolved from a chloroplastic C(3) ancestor. The molecular modifications to the ancestral CA3 gene included the loss of the sequence encoding the chloroplast transit peptide, and mutations in regulatory regions that resulted in high levels of expression in the C(4) mesophyll. Analyses of the CA3 proteins and regulatory elements from Flaveria photosynthetic intermediates indicated C(4) biochemistry very likely evolved in a specific, stepwise manner in this genus. The details of the mechanisms involved in the molecular evolution of other C(4) plant β-CAs are unknown; however, comparative genetics indicate gene duplication and neofunctionalization played significant roles as they did in Flaveria. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Electronic structure calculations on the C4 cluster.

    PubMed

    Massó, H; Senent, M L; Rosmus, P; Hochlaf, M

    2006-06-21

    The ground and the electronically excited states of the C4 radical are studied using interaction configuration methods and large basis sets. Apart from the known isomers [l-C4(X(3)Sigmag (-)) and r-C4(X(1)Ag)], it is found that the ground singlet surface has two other stationary points: s-C4(X(1)Ag) and d-C4(X(1)A1). The d-C4 form is the third isomer of this cluster. The isomerization pathways from one form to the other show that deep potential wells are separating each minimum. Multireference configuration interaction studies of the electronic excited states reveal a high density of electronic states of these species in the 0-2 eV energy ranges. The high rovibrational levels of l-C4((3)Sigmau (-)) undergo predissociation processes via spin-orbit interactions with the neighboring (5)Sigmag + state.

  3. Shared characteristics underpinning C4 leaf maturation derived from analysis of multiple C3 and C4 species of Flaveria.

    PubMed

    Kümpers, Britta M C; Burgess, Steven J; Reyna-Llorens, Ivan; Smith-Unna, Richard; Boursnell, Chris; Hibberd, Julian M

    2017-01-01

    Most terrestrial plants use C3 photosynthesis to fix carbon. In multiple plant lineages a modified system known as C4 photosynthesis has evolved. To better understand the molecular patterns associated with induction of C4 photosynthesis, the genus Flaveria that contains C3 and C4 species was used. A base to tip maturation gradient of leaf anatomy was defined, and RNA sequencing was undertaken along this gradient for two C3 and two C4 Flaveria species. Key C4 traits including vein density, mesophyll and bundle sheath cross-sectional area, chloroplast ultrastructure, and abundance of transcripts encoding proteins of C4 photosynthesis were quantified. Candidate genes underlying each of these C4 characteristics were identified. Principal components analysis indicated that leaf maturation and the photosynthetic pathway were responsible for the greatest amount of variation in transcript abundance. Photosynthesis genes were over-represented for a prolonged period in the C4 species. Through comparison with publicly available data sets, we identify a small number of transcriptional regulators that have been up-regulated in diverse C4 species. The analysis identifies similar patterns of expression in independent C4 lineages and so indicates that the complex C4 pathway is associated with parallel as well as convergent evolution. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. The Paleo-ecology of C4 Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, R. F.; Khoshravesh, R.

    2014-12-01

    Molecular clock analysis of extant plant lineages consistently place the earliest appearance of the C4 photosynthetic pathway in the mid-to-late Oligocene, coincident with a decline in atmospheric CO2 and a spread of dry environments. Most of the approximately 70 known lineages of C4 photosynthesis, however, evolved over the subsequent 23 million years since the Oligocene. Examination of living C3-C4 intermediate species, and close C3 relatives of modern C4 lineages, indicate that the C4 pathway evolved in regions of high heat and episodic drought and/or salinity, usually in the drier ends of the monsoon belts of the subtropics. Soils associated with transitional species are typically sandy, rocky, or salinized, and have low vegetation density, which in combination with high air temperature allows for high surface heat loads that warm leaves to near 45°C. Under such conditions in low CO2 atmospheres, the rate of photorespiration is very high and would greatly impair C3 photosynthesis and establish conditions favoring C4 evolution. However, studies with modern taxa do not address whether the extreme habitats proposed to facilitate C4 evolution were actually present at the time when the C4 pathway evolved in any given lineage. Here, we examine the paleo-record to evaluate the environmental conditions present in the C4 centres of origin when the respective transitions from C3 to C4 photosynthesis are estimated to have occurred.

  5. C4 rice - an ideal arena for systems biology research.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin-Guang; Shan, Lanlan; Wang, Yu; Quick, William Paul

    2010-08-01

    Engineering the C4 photosynthetic pathway into C3 crops has the potential to dramatically increase the yields of major C3 crops. The genetic control of features involved in C4 photosynthesis are still far from being understood; which partially explains why we have gained little success in C4 engineering thus far. Next generation sequencing techniques and other high throughput technologies are offering an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate the developmental and evolutionary processes of C4 photosynthesis. Two contrasting hypotheses about the evolution of C4 photosynthesis exist, i.e. the master switch hypothesis and the incremental gain hypothesis. These two hypotheses demand two different research strategies to proceed in parallel to maximize the success of C4 engineering. In either case, systems biology research will play pivotal roles in identifying key regulatory elements controlling development of C4 features, identifying essential biochemical and anatomical features required to achieve high photosynthetic efficiency, elucidating genetic mechanisms underlining C4 differentiation and ultimately identifying viable routes to engineer C4 rice. As a highly interdisciplinary project, the C4 rice project will have far-reaching impacts on both basic and applied research related to agriculture in the 21st century.

  6. CitA (citrate) and DcuS (C4-dicarboxylate) sensor kinases in thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus and Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Graf, Sabrina; Broll, Constanze; Wissig, Juliane; Strecker, Alexander; Parowatkin, Maria; Unden, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    The thermophilic Geobacillus thermodenitrificans and Geobacillus kaustophilus are able to use citrate or C4-dicarboxylates like fumarate or succinate as the substrates for growth. The genomes of the sequenced Geobacillus strains (nine strains) each encoded a two-component system of the CitA family. The sensor kinase of G. thermodenitrificans (termed CitAGt) was able to replace CitA of Escherichia coli (CitAEc) in a heterologous complementation assay restoring expression of the CitAEc-dependent citC-lacZ reporter gene and anaerobic growth on citrate. Complementation was specific for citrate. The sensor kinase of G. kaustophilus (termed DcuSGk) was able to replace DcuSEc of E. coli. It responded in the heterologous expression system to C4-dicarboxylates and to citrate, suggesting that DcuSGk is, like DcuSEc, a C4-dicarboxylate sensor with a side-activity for citrate. DcuSGk, unlike the homologous DctS from Bacillus subtilis, required no binding protein for function in the complementation assay. Thus, the thermophilic G. thermodenitrificans and G. kaustophilus contain citrate and C4-dicarboxylate sensor kinases of the CitA and DcuS type, respectively, and retain function and substrate specificity under mesophilic growth conditions in E. coli.

  7. Why Are C3-C4 Intermediate Species Rare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Field, C. B.; Berry, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    While C3-C4 intermediate photosynthesis is thought to represent the evolutionary bridge between C3 and C4 photosynthesis, C3-C4 intermediate species are ecologically rare in comparison to both C3 and C4 species. Here, we report results from a laboratory experiment, field observations, and model simulations that suggest a new explanation for the ecological rarity of C3-C4 intermediate species. In the laboratory experiment, we combined gas exchange and fluorescence to characterize the temperature response of photosynthesis in three closely-related species in the genus Flaveria that are representatives of the C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 photosynthetic pathways. The leaf temperature that maximized the quantum yield for CO2 assimilation (Topt(ΦCO2)) was 24.9 ± 0.7°C in Flaveria robusta (C3), 29.8 ± 1.0°C in F. chloraefolia (C3-C4), and 35.7 ± 0.8°C in F. bidentis (C4), and was linearly related to the temperature sensitivity of the coupling between CO2 assimilation and electron transport (d(ΦCO2/ ΦPSII)/dT)). While F. chloraefolia does not simultaneously occur with F. robusta and F. bidentis in naturally-assembled communities, this C3-C4 intermediate species does occur with other C3 and C4 species. During the growing season in two of these mixed-photosynthetic-type communities, leaf temperatures for F. chloraefolia were similar to the Topt(ΦCO2) determined in the laboratory. A model of maximum potential carbon gain suggests that competitive coexistence of C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species could be dependent on a temperature regime that highlights the distinct relative advantages of the C3-C4 intermediate pathway. In combination, these results suggest that the relative temperature sensitivity of the C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 photosynthetic pathways combined with environmental variation in temperature may help to explain why C3-C4 intermediate species are generally rare.

  8. Photorespiration and the evolution of C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Sage, Tammy L; Kocacinar, Ferit

    2012-01-01

    C(4) photosynthesis is one of the most convergent evolutionary phenomena in the biological world, with at least 66 independent origins. Evidence from these lineages consistently indicates that the C(4) pathway is the end result of a series of evolutionary modifications to recover photorespired CO(2) in environments where RuBisCO oxygenation is high. Phylogenetically informed research indicates that the repositioning of mitochondria in the bundle sheath is one of the earliest steps in C(4) evolution, as it may establish a single-celled mechanism to scavenge photorespired CO(2) produced in the bundle sheath cells. Elaboration of this mechanism leads to the two-celled photorespiratory concentration mechanism known as C(2) photosynthesis (commonly observed in C(3)-C(4) intermediate species) and then to C(4) photosynthesis following the upregulation of a C(4) metabolic cycle.

  9. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital.

  10. Identification of the size and antigenic determinants of the human C4 gene by a polymerase chain-reaction-based amplification method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsien-Hsiung; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Tseng, Yung-Te; Lee, Yann-Jinn

    2006-10-01

    The human C4 complement components of the C4 locus are encoded by two genes, C4A and C4B, located on chromosome 6p21.3 of the major histocompatibility complex of the human leukocyte antigen class III region. The size difference between the two genes is due to the presence of HERV-K (C4), an endogenous retroviral sequence (6.7 kb long), in intron 9 of the long C4 gene. Whether the C4 is the long (L) or short (S) gene was determined by the Southern blot method, and the antigenic determinants in residues 1,054-1,106 of Rodgers and Chido were generally identified by immunoblot analysis. Herein, we explore a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification method for directly determining the size of C4 loci adjacent to the respective RP1 and RP2 genes and antigenic determinants by DNA sequencing. From the results of this study, we concluded that all of the C4 genes adjacent to the RP1 gene presented the long gene. In addition, 47% of the C4 genes adjacent to the RP2 gene were the short gene and 53% were the long gene. This result was consistent with that of the Southern blot analysis. The PCR method is practical for identifying the C4 genotype and can be used to detect other polymorphisms among variants of C4 genes.

  11. C4-Dicarboxylate Utilization in Aerobic and Anaerobic Growth.

    PubMed

    Unden, Gottfried; Strecker, Alexander; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Kim, Ok Bin

    2016-06-01

    C4-dicarboxylates and the C4-dicarboxylic amino acid l-aspartate support aerobic and anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli and related bacteria. In aerobic growth, succinate, fumarate, D- and L-malate, L-aspartate, and L-tartrate are metabolized by the citric acid cycle and associated reactions. Because of the interruption of the citric acid cycle under anaerobic conditions, anaerobic metabolism of C4-dicarboxylates depends on fumarate reduction to succinate (fumarate respiration). In some related bacteria (e.g., Klebsiella), utilization of C4-dicarboxylates, such as tartrate, is independent of fumarate respiration and uses a Na+-dependent membrane-bound oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Uptake of the C4-dicarboxylates into the bacteria (and anaerobic export of succinate) is achieved under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by different sets of secondary transporters. Expression of the genes for C4-dicarboxylate metabolism is induced in the presence of external C4-dicarboxylates by the membrane-bound DcuS-DcuR two-component system. Noncommon C4-dicarboxylates like l-tartrate or D-malate are perceived by cytoplasmic one-component sensors/transcriptional regulators. This article describes the pathways of aerobic and anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate metabolism and their regulation. The citric acid cycle, fumarate respiration, and fumarate reductase are covered in other articles and discussed here only in the context of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism. Recent aspects of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism like transport, sensing, and regulation will be treated in more detail. This article is an updated version of an article published in 2004 in EcoSal Plus. The update includes new literature, but, in particular, the sections on the metabolism of noncommon C4-dicarboxylates and their regulation, on the DcuS-DcuR regulatory system, and on succinate production by engineered E. coli are largely revised or new.

  12. Monomeric C-reactive protein modulates classic complement activation on necrotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mihlan, Michael; Blom, Anna M; Kupreishvili, Koba; Lauer, Nadine; Stelzner, Kristin; Bergström, Frida; Niessen, Hans W M; Zipfel, Peter F

    2011-12-01

    The acute-phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) recruits C1q to the surface of damaged cells and thereby initiates complement activation. However, CRP also recruits complement inhibitors, such as C4b-binding protein (C4bp) and factor H, which both block complement progression at the level of C3 and inhibits inflammation. To define how CRP modulates the classic complement pathway, we studied the interaction of CRP with the classic pathway inhibitor C4bp. Monomeric CRP (mCRP), but not pentameric CRP (pCRP), binds C4bp and enhances degradation of C4b and C3b. Both C1q, the initiator, and C4bp, the inhibitor of the classic pathway, compete for mCRP binding, and this competition adjusts the local balance of activation and inhibition. After attachment of pCRP to the surface of necrotic rat myocytes, generation of mCRP was demonstrated over a period of 18 h. Similarly, a biological role for mCRP, C1q, and C4bp in the disease setting of acute myocardial infarction was revealed. In this inflamed tissue, mCRP, pCRP, C4bp, C1q, and C4d were detected in acetone-fixed and in unfixed tissue. Protein levels were enhanced 6 h to 5 d after infarction. Thus, mCRP bound to damaged cardiomyocytes recruits C1q to activate and also C4bp to control the classic complement pathway.

  13. Ecological selection pressures for C4 photosynthesis in the grasses

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Colin P.; Freckleton, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Grasses using the C4 photosynthetic pathway dominate grasslands and savannahs of warm regions, and account for half of the species in this ecologically and economically important plant family. The C4 pathway increases the potential for high rates of photosynthesis, particularly at high irradiance, and raises water-use efficiency compared with the C3 type. It is therefore classically viewed as an adaptation to open, arid conditions. Here, we test this adaptive hypothesis using the comparative method, analysing habitat data for 117 genera of grasses, representing 15 C4 lineages. The evidence from our three complementary analyses is consistent with the hypothesis that evolutionary selection for C4 photosynthesis requires open environments, but we find an equal likelihood of C4 evolutionary origins in mesic, arid and saline habitats. However, once the pathway has arisen, evolutionary transitions into arid habitats occur at higher rates in C4 than C3 clades. Extant C4 genera therefore occupy a wider range of drier habitats than their C3 counterparts because the C4 pathway represents a pre-adaptation to arid conditions. Our analyses warn against evolutionary inferences based solely upon the high occurrence of extant C4 species in dry habitats, and provide a novel interpretation of this classic ecological association. PMID:19324795

  14. Photosynthesis in C3-C4 intermediate Moricandia species.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, Urte; Bräutigam, Andrea; Gowik, Udo; Melzer, Michael; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Kurz, Samantha; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Weber, Andreas Pm

    2017-01-01

    Evolution of C4 photosynthesis is not distributed evenly in the plant kingdom. Particularly interesting is the situation in the Brassicaceae, because the family contains no C4 species, but several C3-C4 intermediates, mainly in the genus Moricandia Investigation of leaf anatomy, gas exchange parameters, the metabolome, and the transcriptome of two C3-C4 intermediate Moricandia species, M. arvensis and M. suffruticosa, and their close C3 relative M. moricandioides enabled us to unravel the specific C3-C4 characteristics in these Moricandia lines. Reduced CO2 compensation points in these lines were accompanied by anatomical adjustments, such as centripetal concentration of organelles in the bundle sheath, and metabolic adjustments, such as the balancing of C and N metabolism between mesophyll and bundle sheath cells by multiple pathways. Evolution from C3 to C3-C4 intermediacy was probably facilitated first by loss of one copy of the glycine decarboxylase P-protein, followed by dominant activity of a bundle sheath-specific element in its promoter. In contrast to recent models, installation of the C3-C4 pathway was not accompanied by enhanced activity of the C4 cycle. Our results indicate that metabolic limitations connected to N metabolism or anatomical limitations connected to vein density could have constrained evolution of C4 in Moricandia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. C4-Dicarboxylate Degradation in Aerobic and Anaerobic Growth.

    PubMed

    Unden, Gottfried; Kleefeld, Alexandra

    2004-12-01

    C4-dicarboxylates, like succinate, fumarate, L- and D-malate, tartrate, and the C4-dicarboxylic amino acid aspartate, support aerobic and anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli and related bacteria and can serve as carbon and energy sources. In aerobic growth, the C4-dicarboxylates are oxidized in the citric acid cycle. Due to the interruption of the citric acid cycle under anaerobic conditions, anaerobic metabolism of the C4-dicarboxylates depends on fumarate reduction to succinate. In some related bacteria (e.g., Klebsiella), degradation of C4-dicarboxylates, like tartrate, uses a different mechanism and pathway. It requires the functioning of an Na+-dependent and membrane-associated oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Due to the incomplete function of the citric acid cycle in anaerobic growth, succinate supports only aerobic growth of E. coli. This chapter describes the pathways of and differences in aerobic and anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate metabolism and the physiological consequences. The citric acid cycle, fumarate respiration, and fumarate reductase are discussed here only in the context of aerobic and anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate metabolism. Some recent aspects of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism, such as transport and sensing of C4-dicarboxylates, and their relationships are treated in more detail.

  16. Identification of hot spots in the variola virus complement inhibitor (SPICE) for human complement regulation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Viveka Nand; Pyaram, Kalyani; Mullick, Jayati; Sahu, Arvind

    2008-04-01

    Variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, encodes a soluble complement regulator named SPICE. Previously, SPICE has been shown to be much more potent in inactivating human complement than the vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP), although they differ only in 11 amino acid residues. In the present study, we have expressed SPICE, VCP, and mutants of VCP by substituting each or more of the 11 non-variant VCP residues with the corresponding residue of SPICE to identify hot spots that impart functional advantage to SPICE over VCP. Our data indicate that (i) SPICE is approximately 90-fold more potent than VCP in inactivating human C3b, and the residues Y98, Y103, K108 and K120 are predominantly responsible for its enhanced activity; (ii) SPICE is 5.4-fold more potent in inactivating human C4b, and residues Y98, Y103, K108, K120 and L193 mainly dictate this increase; (iii) the classical pathway decay-accelerating activity of activity is only twofold higher than that of VCP, and the 11 mutations in SPICE do not significantly affect this activity; (iv) SPICE possesses significantly greater binding ability to human C3b compared to VCP, although its binding to human C4b is lower than that of VCP; (v) residue N144 is largely responsible for the increased binding of SPICE to human C3b; and (vi) the human specificity of SPICE is dictated primarily by residues Y98, Y103, K108, and K120 since these are enough to formulate VCP as potent as SPICE. Together, these results suggest that principally 4 of the 11 residues that differ between SPICE and VCP partake in its enhanced function against human complement.

  17. Hide and Seek: How Lyme Disease Spirochetes Overcome Complement Attack

    PubMed Central

    Kraiczy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Overcoming the first line of the innate immune system is a general hallmark of pathogenic microbes to avoid recognition and to enter the human host. In particular, spirochetes belonging to the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex have developed various means to counter the immune response and to successfully survive in diverse host environments for a prolonged period of time. In regard to complement resistance, Borrelia utilize a plethora of immune evasion strategies involves capturing of host-derived complement regulators, terminating complement activation as well as shedding of cell-destroying complement complexes to manipulate and to expeditiously inhibit human complement. Owing to their mode of action, the interacting surface-exposed proteins identified among B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia spielmanii, and Borrelia bavariensis can be classified into at least two major categories, namely, molecules that directly interfere with distinct complement components including BBK32, CspA, BGA66, BGA71, and a CD59-like protein or molecules, which indirectly counteract complement activation by binding various complement regulators such as Factor H, Factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), Factor H-related proteins FHR-1, FHR-2, or C4Bp. The latter group of genetically and structurally unrelated proteins has been collectively referred to as “complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins” and consists of CspA, CspZ, ErpA, ErpC, ErpP, and the as yet unidentified protein p43. This review focuses on the current knowledge of immune evasion mechanisms exhibited by Lyme disease spirochetes and highlights the role of complement-interfering, infection-associated molecules playing an important part in these processes. Deciphering the immune evasion strategies may provide novel avenues for improved diagnostic approaches and therapeutic interventions. PMID:27725820

  18. Micrurus snake venoms activate human complement system and generate anaphylatoxins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Micrurus, coral snakes (Serpentes, Elapidae), comprises more than 120 species and subspecies distributed from the south United States to the south of South America. Micrurus snake bites can cause death by muscle paralysis and further respiratory arrest within a few hours after envenomation. Clinical observations show mainly neurotoxic symptoms, although other biological activities have also been experimentally observed, including cardiotoxicity, hemolysis, edema and myotoxicity. Results In the present study we have investigated the action of venoms from seven species of snakes from the genus Micrurus on the complement system in in vitro studies. Several of the Micrurus species could consume the classical and/or the lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway, and C3a, C4a and C5a were generated in sera treated with the venoms as result of this complement activation. Micrurus venoms were also able to directly cleave the α chain of the component C3, but not of the C4, which was inhibited by 1,10 Phenanthroline, suggesting the presence of a C3α chain specific metalloprotease in Micrurus spp venoms. Furthermore, complement activation was in part associated with the cleavage of C1-Inhibitor by protease(s) present in the venoms, which disrupts complement activation control. Conclusion Micrurus venoms can activate the complement system, generating a significant amount of anaphylatoxins, which may assist due to their vasodilatory effects, to enhance the spreading of other venom components during the envenomation process. PMID:22248157

  19. Function of Serum Complement in Drinking Water Arsenic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Laila N.; Zahid, M. Shamim Hasan; Nabi, A. H. M. Nurun; Hossain, Mahmud

    2012-01-01

    Serum complement function was evaluated in 125 affected subjects suffering from drinking water arsenic toxicity. Their mean duration of exposure was 7.4 ± 5.3 yrs, and the levels of arsenic in drinking water and urine samples were 216 ± 211 and 223 ± 302 μg/L, respectively. The mean bactericidal activity of complement from the arsenic patients was 92% and that in the unexposed controls was 99% (P < 0.01), but heat-inactivated serum showed slightly elevated activity than in controls. In patients, the mean complement C3 was 1.56 g/L, and C4 was 0.29 g/L compared to 1.68 g/L and 0.25 g/L, respectively, in the controls. The mean IgG in the arsenic patients was 24.3 g/L that was highly significantly elevated (P < 0.001). Arsenic patients showed a significant direct correlation between C3 and bactericidal activity (P = 0.014). Elevated levels of C4 indicated underutilization and possibly impaired activity of the classical complement pathway. We conclude reduced function of serum complement in drinking water arsenic toxicity. PMID:22545044

  20. Complement inhibition in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pio, Ruben; Ajona, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2013-02-01

    For decades, complement has been recognized as an effector arm of the immune system that contributes to the destruction of tumor cells. In fact, many therapeutic strategies have been proposed that are based on the intensification of complement-mediated responses against tumors. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm by demonstrating a tumor-promoting role for complement. Cancer cells seem to be able to establish a convenient balance between complement activation and inhibition, taking advantage of complement initiation without suffering its deleterious effects. Complement activation may support chronic inflammation, promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment, induce angiogenesis, and activate cancer-related signaling pathways. In this context, inhibition of complement activation would be a therapeutic option for treating cancer. This concept is relatively new and deserves closer attention. In this article, we summarize the mechanisms of complement activation on cancer cells, the cancer-promoting effect of complement initiation, and the rationale behind the use of complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against cancer.

  1. C4GEM, a Genome-Scale Metabolic Model to Study C4 Plant Metabolism1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Dal’Molin, Cristiana Gomes; Quek, Lake-Ee; Palfreyman, Robin William; Brumbley, Stevens Michael; Nielsen, Lars Keld

    2010-01-01

    Leaves of C4 grasses (such as maize [Zea mays], sugarcane [Saccharum officinarum], and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor]) form a classical Kranz leaf anatomy. Unlike C3 plants, where photosynthetic CO2 fixation proceeds in the mesophyll (M), the fixation process in C4 plants is distributed between two cell types, the M cell and the bundle sheath (BS) cell. Here, we develop a C4 genome-scale model (C4GEM) for the investigation of flux distribution in M and BS cells during C4 photosynthesis. C4GEM, to our knowledge, is the first large-scale metabolic model that encapsulates metabolic interactions between two different cell types. C4GEM is based on the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) model (AraGEM) but has been extended by adding reactions and transporters responsible to represent three different C4 subtypes (NADP-ME [for malic enzyme], NAD-ME, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase). C4GEM has been validated for its ability to synthesize 47 biomass components and consists of 1,588 unique reactions, 1,755 metabolites, 83 interorganelle transporters, and 29 external transporters (including transport through plasmodesmata). Reactions in the common C4 model have been associated with well-annotated C4 species (NADP-ME subtypes): 3,557 genes in sorghum, 11,623 genes in maize, and 3,881 genes in sugarcane. The number of essential reactions not assigned to genes is 131, 135, and 156 in sorghum, maize, and sugarcane, respectively. Flux balance analysis was used to assess the metabolic activity in M and BS cells during C4 photosynthesis. Our simulations were consistent with chloroplast proteomic studies, and C4GEM predicted the classical C4 photosynthesis pathway and its major effect in organelle function in M and BS. The model also highlights differences in metabolic activities around photosystem I and photosystem II for three different C4 subtypes. Effects of CO2 leakage were also explored. C4GEM is a viable framework for in silico analysis of cell cooperation between M and BS

  2. Relation of platelet C4d with all-cause mortality and ischemic stroke in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kao, Amy H; McBurney, Christine A; Sattar, Abdus; Lertratanakul, Apinya; Wilson, Nicole L; Rutman, Sarah; Paul, Barbara; Navratil, Jeannine S; Scioscia, Andrea; Ahearn, Joseph M; Manzi, Susan

    2014-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease associated with significant morbidity, including premature cardiovascular disease, and mortality. Platelets bearing complement protein C4d (P-C4d) were initially determined to be specific for diagnosis of SLE and were later found to be associated with acute ischemic stroke in non-SLE patients. P-C4d may identify a subset of SLE patients with a worse clinical prognosis. This study investigated the associations of P-C4d with all-cause mortality and vascular events in a lupus cohort. A cohort of 356 consecutive patients with SLE was followed from 2001 to 2009. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were vascular events (myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft, percutaneous coronary transluminal angioplasty, ischemic stroke, venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, or other thrombosis). P-C4d was measured at study baseline. Seventy SLE patients (19.7%) had P-C4d. Mean follow-up was 4.7 years. All-cause mortality was 4%. P-C4d was associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 7.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.14-26.45, p = 0.002) after adjusting for age, ethnicity, sex, cancer, and anticoagulant use. Vascular event rate was 21.6%. Patients with positive P-C4d were more likely to have had vascular events compared to those with negative P-C4d (35.7 vs. 18.2%, p = 0.001). Specifically, P-C4d was associated with ischemic stroke (odds ratio 4.54, 95% CI 1.63-12.69, p = 0.004) after adjusting for age, ethnicity, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Platelet-C4d is associated with all-cause mortality and stroke in SLE patients. P-C4d may be a prognostic biomarker as well as a pathogenic clue that links platelets, complement activation, and thrombosis.

  3. Analysis of genes coding for CD46, CD55 and C4b-binding protein in patients with idiopathic, recurrent, spontaneous pregnancy loss

    PubMed Central

    Mohlin, Frida C.; Mercier, Eric; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Atkinson, John P.; Gris, Jean-Christophe; Blom, Anna M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Since a tightly regulated complement system is needed for a successful pregnancy, we hypothesized that alterations in complement inhibitors may be associated with idiopathic, recurrent miscarriage. We sequenced all exons coding for three complement inhibitors: C4b-binding protein (C4BP), CD46 and CD55 in 384 childless women with at least two miscarriages that could not be explained by known risk factors. Several alterations were found in C4BPA, of which the R120H, I126T, and the G423T mutations affected the expression level and/or the ability of recombinant C4BP to serve as cofactor for factor I. The only variant in C4BPB was located in the C-terminal part, and did not impair the polymerization of the molecule. Our results identify for the first time alterations in C4BP in women experiencing recurrent miscarriages. We also found four CD46 alterations in individual patients that were not found in healthy controls. One of the rare variants, P324L, showed decreased expression, whereas N213I resulted in deficient protein processing as well as an impaired cofactor activity in the degradation of both C4b and C3b. The identified alterations may result in in vivo consequences and contribute to the disorder but the degree of association must be evaluated in larger cohorts. PMID:23508668

  4. Comparative cell-specific transcriptomics reveals differentiation of C4 photosynthesis pathways in switchgrass and other C4 lineages.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiaolan; Lu, Nan; Li, Guifen; Nakashima, Jin; Tang, Yuhong; Dixon, Richard A

    2016-03-01

    Almost all C4 plants require the co-ordination of the adjacent and fully differentiated cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS). The C4 photosynthetic pathway operates through two distinct subtypes based on how malate is decarboxylated in BS cells; through NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) or NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME). The diverse or unique cell-specific molecular features of M and BS cells from separate C4 subtypes of independent lineages remain to be determined. We here provide an M/BS cell type-specific transcriptome data set from the monocot NAD-ME subtype switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). A comparative transcriptomics approach was then applied to compare the M/BS mRNA profiles of switchgrass, monocot NADP-ME subtype C4 plants maize and Setaria viridis, and dicot NAD-ME subtype Cleome gynandra. We evaluated the convergence in the transcript abundance of core components in C4 photosynthesis and transcription factors to establish Kranz anatomy, as well as gene distribution of biological functions, in these four independent C4 lineages. We also estimated the divergence between NAD-ME and NADP-ME subtypes of C4 photosynthesis in the two cell types within C4 species, including differences in genes encoding decarboxylating enzymes, aminotransferases, and metabolite transporters, and differences in the cell-specific functional enrichment of RNA regulation and protein biogenesis/homeostasis. We suggest that C4 plants of independent lineages in both monocots and dicots underwent convergent evolution to establish C4 photosynthesis, while distinct C4 subtypes also underwent divergent processes for the optimization of M and BS cell co-ordination. The comprehensive data sets in our study provide a basis for further research on evolution of C4 species.

  5. Comparative cell-specific transcriptomics reveals differentiation of C4 photosynthesis pathways in switchgrass and other C4 lineages

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiaolan; Lu, Nan; Li, Guifen; Nakashima, Jin; Tang, Yuhong; Dixon, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Almost all C4 plants require the co-ordination of the adjacent and fully differentiated cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS). The C4 photosynthetic pathway operates through two distinct subtypes based on how malate is decarboxylated in BS cells; through NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) or NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME). The diverse or unique cell-specific molecular features of M and BS cells from separate C4 subtypes of independent lineages remain to be determined. We here provide an M/BS cell type-specific transcriptome data set from the monocot NAD-ME subtype switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). A comparative transcriptomics approach was then applied to compare the M/BS mRNA profiles of switchgrass, monocot NADP-ME subtype C4 plants maize and Setaria viridis, and dicot NAD-ME subtype Cleome gynandra. We evaluated the convergence in the transcript abundance of core components in C4 photosynthesis and transcription factors to establish Kranz anatomy, as well as gene distribution of biological functions, in these four independent C4 lineages. We also estimated the divergence between NAD-ME and NADP-ME subtypes of C4 photosynthesis in the two cell types within C4 species, including differences in genes encoding decarboxylating enzymes, aminotransferases, and metabolite transporters, and differences in the cell-specific functional enrichment of RNA regulation and protein biogenesis/homeostasis. We suggest that C4 plants of independent lineages in both monocots and dicots underwent convergent evolution to establish C4 photosynthesis, while distinct C4 subtypes also underwent divergent processes for the optimization of M and BS cell co-ordination. The comprehensive data sets in our study provide a basis for further research on evolution of C4 species. PMID:26896851

  6. Pathogenesis and significance of glomerular C4d deposition in lupus nephritis: activation of classical and lectin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Kyung; Maeng, Young-In; Lee, Sun-Jae; Lee, In Hee; Bae, Jisuk; Kang, Yu-Na; Park, Byung-Tae; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Immune complex-mediated complement activation through the classic pathway plays a key role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). C4d deposition in renal tissue reflects the prognosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the current study is to investigate the pathogenesis and clinicopathologic significance of glomerular C4d deposition in LN. We retrospectively analyzed clinical and histopathological data of 20 SLE patients with renal biopsy-proven LN and 10 non-SLE renal biopsy samples as control. LN biopsies showed varying degrees of glomerular C4d staining associated with immune complex deposits, IgG (p = 0.015), C1q (p = 0.032) and C3 (p = 0.049). 7 LN biopsies had all of C4d, C1q and C3 deposits in their glomeruli, indicative of the activation of the classical pathway, whereas 2 LN biopsies had C4d and C3 deposits without accompanying C1q deposits, indicating the activation of the lectin pathway. Glomerular C4d deposition was correlated with the LN subtype (p < 0.001). In particular, a diffusely intense and coarsely granular pattern of C4d deposition in all glomeruli was detected in class V membranous LN. However, glomerular C4d deposition was correlated with neither disease activity of SLE nor histological activity and chronicity of LN. In conclusion, the activation of the lectin pathway as well as the classical pathway seems to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of LN. Glomerular C4d staining could be helpful for diagnosing class V membranous LN, although glomerular C4d deposition does not reflect SLE disease activity and histological activity and chronicity. PMID:24133594

  7. Drivers of inter-annual variability in C4 abundance in mixed C3-C4 grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, D.; Ratajczak, Z.; Anderson, M.; Lind, E. M.; Still, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Grassland communities tend to be dominated by either C3 or C4 grass species, as opposed to being evenly mixed. Globally, this pattern is a consequence of the crossover temperature threshold above which C4 grasses are climatically favored. However, C3-C4 distributions can also be distinctly bimodal at the landscape scale, reflecting variation in fire regime, herbivory, soils, and other factors that favor either C3 or C4 vegetation. As such, our aims were to first investigate the global controls on C3 and C4 species pools, and second to determine the magnitude of inter-annual variation in C4 grass relative abundance in mixed C3-C4 grasslands with different fire regimes, soil nitrogen, and grazing pressures. Our analyses used data from 74 globally distributed Nutrient Network sites, 30 of which are mixed C3-C4 grasslands. Each site has factorial fertilizer (NPK) and herbivore exclosure treatments in replicated blocks. To address our first goal we conducted a random forest analysis of site-level C4 relative abundances in relation to mean annual temperature and rainfall, growing season temperature (GST) and rainfall, rainfall seasonality, aridity, fire frequency and management, frost, soil fertility, and grass lineage. In order to address our second goal, we narrowed our focus to sites having mixed C3-C4 grass composition and at least five years of species composition data (16 sites). A GST of 15 °C was a good descriptor of C4 versus C3 grass dominance, although there were marked differences among specific C4 grass lineages in their distributions. For example, whether or not a site has an actively managed burn regime was a greater predictor of Andropogoneae (C4) than GST. Furthermore, in mixed C3-C4 grasslands fertilization favored C3 grasses. Our research delineates the climatic limits of mixed C3-C4 grasslands and highlights the influence of disturbance, soil, and phylogeny on C4 and C3 grass dominance.

  8. C4I Community of Interest C2 Roadmap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-24

    public release; distribution is unlimited C4I COI Overview • Purpose: The C4I CoI provides the DoD S&T EXCOM recommendations on matters related to...info guard functions • Partners left in dark • Dependence on Field Support Reps. • Communicate but can’t share ideas • Unintuitive interface

  9. 42 CFR 68c.4 - Who is eligible to participate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who is eligible to participate? 68c.4 Section 68c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY...

  10. 42 CFR 68c.4 - Who is eligible to participate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who is eligible to participate? 68c.4 Section 68c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY...

  11. 42 CFR 68c.4 - Who is eligible to participate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who is eligible to participate? 68c.4 Section 68c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY...

  12. 12 CFR 563c.4 - Condensed financial information [Parent only].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Condensed financial information . 563c.4... REQUIREMENTS Form and Content of Financial Statements § 563c.4 Condensed financial information . (a) The... a note to the financial statements when the restricted net assets (17 CFR 210.4-08(e)(3)) of...

  13. 19 CFR 142.49 - Deletion of C-4 Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with any justification and without prior notification in cases of willfulness or when public health... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Deletion of C-4 Code. 142.49 Section 142.49... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.49 Deletion of C-4 Code. (a) By Customs. A...

  14. 19 CFR 142.49 - Deletion of C-4 Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... with any justification and without prior notification in cases of willfulness or when public health... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Deletion of C-4 Code. 142.49 Section 142.49... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.49 Deletion of C-4 Code. (a) By Customs. A...

  15. Diversity and plasticity of C4 photosynthesis in Eleocharis (Cyperaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eleocharis contains many amphibious species, and displays diversity of photosynthetic mechanism (C3, C4 or C3-C4 intermediates). A unique feature of Eleocharis is the plasticity in the photosynthetic mechanism of some species in response to the environment. In this study, we have examined the culm a...

  16. Setaria viridis: a model for C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Brutnell, Thomas P; Wang, Lin; Swartwood, Kerry; Goldschmidt, Alexander; Jackson, David; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Kellogg, Elizabeth; Van Eck, Joyce

    2010-08-01

    C(4) photosynthesis drives productivity in several major food crops and bioenergy grasses, including maize (Zea mays), sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), Miscanthus x giganteus, and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Gains in productivity associated with C(4) photosynthesis include improved water and nitrogen use efficiencies. Thus, engineering C(4) traits into C(3) crops is an attractive target for crop improvement. However, the lack of a small, rapid cycling genetic model system to study C(4) photosynthesis has limited progress in dissecting the regulatory networks underlying the C(4) syndrome. Setaria viridis is a member of the Panicoideae clade and is a close relative of several major feed, fuel, and bioenergy grasses. It is a true diploid with a relatively small genome of ~510 Mb. Its short stature, simple growth requirements, and rapid life cycle will greatly facilitate genetic studies of the C(4) grasses. Importantly, S. viridis uses an NADP-malic enzyme subtype C(4) photosynthetic system to fix carbon and therefore is a potentially powerful model system for dissecting C(4) photosynthesis. Here, we summarize some of the recent advances that promise greatly to accelerate the use of S. viridis as a genetic system. These include our recent successful efforts at regenerating plants from seed callus, establishing a transient transformation system, and developing stable transformation.

  17. 17 CFR 240.16c-4 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16c-4 Section 240.16c-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  18. 17 CFR 240.16c-4 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16c-4 Section 240.16c-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  19. 17 CFR 240.16c-4 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16c-4 Section 240.16c-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  20. 17 CFR 240.16c-4 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16c-4 Section 240.16c-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  1. The regulation of gene expression required for C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Julian M; Covshoff, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    C(4) photosynthesis is normally associated with the compartmentation of photosynthesis between mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS) cells. The mechanisms regulating the differential accumulation of photosynthesis proteins in these specialized cells are fundamental to our understanding of how C(4) photosynthesis operates. Cell-specific accumulation of proteins in M or BS can be mediated by posttranscriptional processes and translational efficiency as well as by differences in transcription. Individual genes are likely regulated at multiple levels. Although cis-elements have been associated with cell-specific expression in C(4) leaves, there has been little progress in identifying trans-factors. When C(4) photosynthesis genes from C(4) species are placed in closely related C(3) species, they are often expressed in a manner faithful to the C(4) cycle. Next-generation sequencing and comprehensive analysis of the extent to which genes from C(4) species are expressed in M or BS cells of C(3) plants should provide insight into how the C(4) pathway is regulated and evolved.

  2. Insect herbivory on C3 and C4 grasses.

    PubMed

    Boutton, Thomas W; Cameron, Guy N; Smith, Bruce N

    1978-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that grasses with the C4 photosynthetic pathway are avoided as a food source by insect herbivores in natural communities. Insects were sampled from ten pairs of C3-C4 grasses and their distributions analyzed by paired comparisons tests. Results showed no statistically significant differences in herbivore utilization of C3-C4 species. However, there was a trend towards heavier utilization of C3 species when means for both plant groups were compared. In particular, Homoptera and Diptera showed heavier usage of C3 plants. Significant correlations between insect abundances and plant protein levels suggest that herbivores respond to the higher protein content of C3 grasses. δ(13)C values for six of the most common grasshopper species in the study area indicated that three species fed on C3 plants, two species fed on C4 plants, and one species consumed a mixture of C3 and C4 tissue.

  3. Nanomedicine and the complement paradigm.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, S Moein; Farhangrazi, Z Shadi

    2013-05-01

    The role of complement in idiosyncratic reactions to nanopharmaceutical infusion is receiving increasing attention. We discuss this in relation to nanopharmaceutical development and the possible use of complement inhibitors to prevent related adverse reactions. We further call on initiation of genetic association studies to unravel the genetic basis of nanomedicine infusion-related adverse responses, since most of the polymorphic genes in the genome belong to the immune system. In this paper, idiosyncratic reactions based on complement activation are discussed in the context of newly available complement inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Complement System in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Pankita H.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to its established contribution to innate immunity, recent studies have suggested novel roles for the complement system in the development of various lung diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that complement may serve as a key link between innate and adaptive immunity in a variety of pulmonary conditions. However, the specific contributions of complement to lung diseases based on innate and adaptive immunity are just beginning to emerge. Elucidating the role of complement-mediated immune regulation in these diseases will help to identify new targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24901241

  5. Photosynthesis of C3, C3–C4, and C4 grasses at glacial CO2

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Harshini; Sharwood, Robert E.; Tissue, David T.; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-01-01

    Most physiology comparisons of C3 and C4 plants are made under current or elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 which do not reflect the low CO2 environment under which C4 photosynthesis has evolved. Accordingly, photosynthetic nitrogen (PNUE) and water (PWUE) use efficiency, and the activity of the photosynthetic carboxylases [Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] were compared in eight C4 grasses with NAD-ME, PCK, and NADP-ME subtypes, one C3 grass, and one C3–C4 grass grown under ambient (400 μl l–1) and glacial (180 μl l–1) CO2. Glacial CO2 caused a smaller reduction of photosynthesis and a greater increase of stomatal conductance in C4 relative to C3 and C3–C4 species. Panicum bisulcatum (C3) acclimated to glacial [CO2] by doubling Rubisco activity, while Rubisco was unchanged in Panicum milioides (C3–C4), possibly due to its high leaf N and Rubisco contents. Glacial CO2 up-regulated Rubisco and PEPC activities in concert for several C4 grasses, while NADP-ME and PEP-CK activities were unchanged, reflecting the high control exerted by the carboxylases relative to the decarboxylases on the efficiency of C4 metabolism. Despite having larger stomatal conductance at glacial CO2, C4 species maintained greater PWUE and PNUE relative to C3–C4 and C3 species due to higher photosynthetic rates. Relative to other C4 subtypes, NAD-ME and PEP-CK grasses had the highest PWUE and PNUE, respectively; relative to C3, the C3–C4 grass had higher PWUE and similar PNUE at glacial CO2. Biomass accumulation was reduced by glacial CO2 in the C3 grass relative to the C3–C4 grass, while biomass was less reduced in NAD-ME grasses compared with NADP-ME and PCK grasses. Under glacial CO2, high resource use efficiency offers a key evolutionary advantage for the transition from C3 to C4 photosynthesis in water- and nutrient-limited environments. PMID:24723409

  6. A theoretical study on the reaction mechanism of O2 with C4H9• radical.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong-chen; Gong, Xue-dong

    2012-05-01

    Ab initio calculations have been performed using the complete basis set model (CBS-QB3) to study the reaction mechanism of butane radical (C(4)H(9)•) with oxygen (O(2)). On the calculated potential energy surface, the addition of O(2) to C(4)H(9)• forms three intermediates barrierlessly, which can undergo subsequent isomerization or decomposition reaction leading to various products: HOO• + C(4)H(8), C(2)H(5)• + CH(2)CHOOH, OH• + C(3)H(7)CHO, OH• + cycle-C(4)H(8)O, CH(3)• + CH(3)CHCHOOH, CH(2)OOH• + C(3)H(6). Five pathways are supposed in this study. After taking into account the reaction barrier and enthalpy, the most possible reaction pathway is C(4)H(9)• + O(2) → IM1 → TS5 → IM3 → TS6 → IM4 → TS7 → OH• + cycle-C(4)H(8)O.

  7. The bacteria binding glycoprotein salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp340) activates complement via the lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Leito, Jelani T D; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; van Houdt, Michel; van den Berg, Timo K; Wouters, Diana

    2011-10-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG), also known as gp-340 and Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1, is a glycoprotein that is present in tears, lung fluid and mucosal surfaces along the gastrointestinal tract. It is encoded by the Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 gene, a member of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich group B protein superfamily. SAG aggregates bacteria thus promoting their clearance from the oral cavity and activates the complement system. Complement proteins may enter the oral cavity in case of serum leakage, which occurs after mucosal damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mode of complement activation. We showed a dose-dependent C4 deposition on SAG-coated microplates showing that either the classical or lectin pathway of complement was activated. Antibodies against mannose binding lectin inhibited C4 deposition and SAG induced no C4 deposition in MBL deficient sera showing SAG activated complement through the MBL pathway. Periodate treatment of SAG abolished MBL pathway activation consistent with an involvement of SAG glycans in complement activation. This provides the first evidence for a role of SAG in complement activation through the MBL pathway and suggests a potential role of SAG as a complement activating factor at the mucosal epithelia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Roles of Organic Acids in C4 Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are involved in numerous metabolic pathways in all plants. The finding that some plants, known as C4 plants, have four-carbon dicarboxylic acids as the first product of carbon fixation showed these organic acids play essential roles as photosynthetic intermediates. Oxaloacetate (OAA), malate, and aspartate (Asp) are substrates for the C4 acid cycle that underpins the CO2 concentrating mechanism of C4 photosynthesis. In this cycle, OAA is the immediate, short-lived, product of the initial CO2 fixation step in C4 leaf mesophyll cells. The malate and Asp, resulting from the rapid conversion of OAA, are the organic acids delivered to the sites of carbon reduction in the bundle-sheath cells of the leaf, where they are decarboxylated, with the released CO2 used to make carbohydrates. The three-carbon organic acids resulting from the decarboxylation reactions are returned to the mesophyll cells where they are used to regenerate the CO2 acceptor pool. NADP-malic enzyme-type, NAD-malic enzyme-type, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-type C4 plants were identified, based on the most abundant decarboxylating enzyme in the leaf tissue. The genes encoding these C4 pathway-associated decarboxylases were co-opted from ancestral C3 plant genes during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. Malate was recognized as the major organic acid transferred in NADP-malic enzyme-type C4 species, while Asp fills this role in NAD-malic enzyme-type and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-type plants. However, accumulating evidence indicates that many C4 plants use a combination of organic acids and decarboxylases during CO2 fixation, and the C4-type categories are not rigid. The ability to transfer multiple organic acid species and utilize different decarboxylases has been suggested to give C4 plants advantages in changing and stressful environments, as well as during development, by facilitating the balance of energy between the two cell types involved in the C4 pathway of CO2

  9. The Roles of Organic Acids in C4 Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are involved in numerous metabolic pathways in all plants. The finding that some plants, known as C4 plants, have four-carbon dicarboxylic acids as the first product of carbon fixation showed these organic acids play essential roles as photosynthetic intermediates. Oxaloacetate (OAA), malate, and aspartate (Asp) are substrates for the C4 acid cycle that underpins the CO2 concentrating mechanism of C4 photosynthesis. In this cycle, OAA is the immediate, short-lived, product of the initial CO2 fixation step in C4 leaf mesophyll cells. The malate and Asp, resulting from the rapid conversion of OAA, are the organic acids delivered to the sites of carbon reduction in the bundle-sheath cells of the leaf, where they are decarboxylated, with the released CO2 used to make carbohydrates. The three-carbon organic acids resulting from the decarboxylation reactions are returned to the mesophyll cells where they are used to regenerate the CO2 acceptor pool. NADP-malic enzyme-type, NAD-malic enzyme-type, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-type C4 plants were identified, based on the most abundant decarboxylating enzyme in the leaf tissue. The genes encoding these C4 pathway-associated decarboxylases were co-opted from ancestral C3 plant genes during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. Malate was recognized as the major organic acid transferred in NADP-malic enzyme-type C4 species, while Asp fills this role in NAD-malic enzyme-type and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-type plants. However, accumulating evidence indicates that many C4 plants use a combination of organic acids and decarboxylases during CO2 fixation, and the C4-type categories are not rigid. The ability to transfer multiple organic acid species and utilize different decarboxylases has been suggested to give C4 plants advantages in changing and stressful environments, as well as during development, by facilitating the balance of energy between the two cell types involved in the C4 pathway of CO2

  10. Genomic characterization and expression pattern of Bf/C2 and C4 in miiuy croaker and molecular evolution analysis on mammals and fishes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanchen; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2014-08-01

    The complement system plays an important role in both innate and adaptive host defense against the invading microorganisms in vertebrates. It can be activated by three pathways: the classical, alternative and lectin pathways. Bf/C2 and C4, as members of complement, play a pivotal role in the activation of the complement system. In our study, we identified Bf/C2 and C4 genes and genomic structure in miiuy croaker, and expression patterns of Bf/C2 and C4 genes was analyzed. In healthy miiuy croaker tissues, Bf/C2 and C4 genes were found to be ubiquitously expressed in all ten tested tissues. Analysis of expression of Bf/C2 and C4 genes after bacterial infection showed a significant up-regulated in liver. The evolutionary analysis showed that the ancestral lineages of Bf/C2 and C4 genes in mammals and fishes experienced positive selection indicated that the ancestors of mammals and fishes had further evolved to adapt to their environment, respectively. A series of maximum likelihood (ML) methods were used to study the evolution on vertebrates' Bf/C2 and C4 genes. One and five positive selection sites were found in mammals of Bf/C2 and C4 genes, but no positive selection site was found in fishes of Bf/C2 and C4 genes, indicating that Bf/C2 and C4 genes in mammals and fishes underwent different evolutionary patterns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Carbon isotope discrimination as a diagnostic tool for C4 photosynthesis in C3-C4 intermediate species

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The presence and activity of the C4 cycle in C3-C4 intermediate species have proven difficult to analyze, especially when such activity is low. This study proposes a strategy to detect C4 activity and estimate its contribution to overall photosynthesis in intermediate plants, by using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) coupled to gas exchange systems to simultaneously measure the CO2 responses of CO2 assimilation (A) and carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) under low O2 partial pressure. Mathematical models of C3-C4 photosynthesis and Δ are then fitted concurrently to both responses using the same set of constants. This strategy was applied to the intermediate species Flaveria floridana and F. brownii, and to F. pringlei and F. bidentis as C3 and C4 controls, respectively. Our results support the presence of a functional C4 cycle in F. floridana, that can fix 12–21% of carbon. In F. brownii, 75–100% of carbon is fixed via the C4 cycle, and the contribution of mesophyll Rubisco to overall carbon assimilation increases with CO2 partial pressure in both intermediate plants. Combined gas exchange and Δ measurement and modeling is a powerful diagnostic tool for C4 photosynthesis. PMID:26862154

  12. Carbon isotope discrimination as a diagnostic tool for C4 photosynthesis in C3-C4 intermediate species.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    The presence and activity of the C4 cycle in C3-C4 intermediate species have proven difficult to analyze, especially when such activity is low. This study proposes a strategy to detect C4 activity and estimate its contribution to overall photosynthesis in intermediate plants, by using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) coupled to gas exchange systems to simultaneously measure the CO2 responses of CO2 assimilation (A) and carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) under low O2 partial pressure. Mathematical models of C3-C4 photosynthesis and Δ are then fitted concurrently to both responses using the same set of constants. This strategy was applied to the intermediate species Flaveria floridana and F. brownii, and to F. pringlei and F. bidentis as C3 and C4 controls, respectively. Our results support the presence of a functional C4 cycle in F. floridana, that can fix 12-21% of carbon. In F. brownii, 75-100% of carbon is fixed via the C4 cycle, and the contribution of mesophyll Rubisco to overall carbon assimilation increases with CO2 partial pressure in both intermediate plants. Combined gas exchange and Δ measurement and modeling is a powerful diagnostic tool for C4 photosynthesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  13. The C(4) plant lineages of planet Earth.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Edwards, Erika J

    2011-05-01

    Using isotopic screens, phylogenetic assessments, and 45 years of physiological data, it is now possible to identify most of the evolutionary lineages expressing the C(4) photosynthetic pathway. Here, 62 recognizable lineages of C(4) photosynthesis are listed. Thirty-six lineages (60%) occur in the eudicots. Monocots account for 26 lineages, with a minimum of 18 lineages being present in the grass family and six in the sedge family. Species exhibiting the C(3)-C(4) intermediate type of photosynthesis correspond to 21 lineages. Of these, 9 are not immediately associated with any C(4) lineage, indicating that they did not share common C(3)-C(4) ancestors with C(4) species and are instead an independent line. The geographic centre of origin for 47 of the lineages could be estimated. These centres tend to cluster in areas corresponding to what are now arid to semi-arid regions of southwestern North America, south-central South America, central Asia, northeastern and southern Africa, and inland Australia. With 62 independent lineages, C(4) photosynthesis has to be considered one of the most convergent of the complex evolutionary phenomena on planet Earth, and is thus an outstanding system to study the mechanisms of evolutionary adaptation.

  14. Photosynthetic diversity meets biodiversity: the C4 plant example.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Stata, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Physiological diversification reflects adaptation for specific environmental challenges. As the major physiological process that provides plants with carbon and energy, photosynthesis is under strong evolutionary selection that gives rise to variability in nearly all parts of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we discuss how plants, notably those using C4 photosynthesis, diversified in response to environmental challenges imposed by declining atmospheric CO2 content in recent geological time. This reduction in atmospheric CO2 increases the rate of photorespiration and reduces photosynthetic efficiency. While plants have evolved numerous mechanisms to compensate for low CO2, the most effective are the carbon concentration mechanisms of C4, C2, and CAM photosynthesis; and the pumping of dissolved inorganic carbon, mainly by algae. C4 photosynthesis enables plants to dominate warm, dry and often salinized habitats, and to colonize areas that are too stressful for most plant groups. Because C4 lineages generally lack arborescence, they cannot form forests. Hence, where they predominate, C4 plants create a different landscape than would occur if C3 plants were to predominate. These landscapes (mostly grasslands and savannahs) present unique selection environments that promoted the diversification of animal guilds able to graze upon the C4 vegetation. Thus, the rise of C4 photosynthesis has made a significant contribution to the origin of numerous biomes in the modern biosphere.

  15. New evidence for grain specific C4 photosynthesis in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, Parimalan; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The C4 photosynthetic pathway evolved to allow efficient CO2 capture by plants where effective carbon supply may be limiting as in hot or dry environments, explaining the high growth rates of C4 plants such as maize. Important crops such as wheat and rice are C3 plants resulting in efforts to engineer them to use the C4 pathway. Here we show the presence of a C4 photosynthetic pathway in the developing wheat grain that is absent in the leaves. Genes specific for C4 photosynthesis were identified in the wheat genome and found to be preferentially expressed in the photosynthetic pericarp tissue (cross- and tube-cell layers) of the wheat caryopsis. The chloroplasts exhibit dimorphism that corresponds to chloroplasts of mesophyll- and bundle sheath-cells in leaves of classical C4 plants. Breeding to optimize the relative contributions of C3 and C4 photosynthesis may adapt wheat to climate change, contributing to wheat food security. PMID:27530078

  16. Soluble complement receptor 1 inhibits both complement and granulocyte activation during ex vivo hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Himmelfarb, J; McMonagle, E; Holbrook, D; Toth, C

    1995-10-01

    Hemodialysis with cellulosic membranes results in both complement and granulocyte activation. We investigated the effects of soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1), a potent complement inhibitor, on both complement and granulocyte activation in an ex vivo model of dialysis. Measurements were made of complement activation (radioimmunoassay for C3a desArg) as well as granulocyte activation (flow cytometric measurements of reactive oxygen species production, granulocyte CD11b/CD18 (MAC-1) expression and CD62L (L-selectin) expression). sCR1 completely abolished the generation of plasma C3a desArg during ex vivo hemodialysis. Without sCR1, C3a desArg levels rose from 968 +/- 373 ng/ml to 4961 +/- 40 ng/ml by the end of the ex vivo procedure (p < 0.001). sCR1 also completely inhibited MAC-1 upregulation and L-selectin shedding from granulocytes during ex vivo hemodialysis. With sCR1 there was still a statistically significant increase in granulocyte reactive oxygen species production (from 2.42 +/- 0.1 fluorescence channels to 6.47 +/- 0.7 fluorescence channels, p < 0.01) but a 50% inhibition when compared with experiments without sCR1 (3.15 +/- 0.5 to 11.2 +/- 1.9, p < 0.01). We conclude that sCR1 completely abolishes complement activation and changes in granulocyte cell adhesion molecules during ex vivo hemodialysis with cellulosic membranes. sCR1 partially inhibits granulocyte reactive oxygen species formation.

  17. The rise of C4 grassland ecosystems, a climate puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, A.; Fox, D.; Freeman, K. H.

    2011-12-01

    The expansion of grasslands was one of the most profound ecological changes in the Cenozoic. Understanding the history of forest to grassland transitions, and the development of C4 grasslands in particular, is critical for understanding the relationship between land surface climate feedbacks, seasonality, and temperature. Modern distributions and ecological experiments demonstrate a strong correlation between C4 biogeography and high growing season temperatures and precipitation, as well as low pCO2 concentrations. The rise of C4 grasses in North America, as documented by carbonate nodule and mammal teeth δ13C values, began during a warm period with relatively stable pCO2 in the late Miocene. Surprisingly, C4 grasses continued to expand and then rose to dominance in the Great Plains as climates progressively cooled, moisture availability increased, and ice sheets formed further north on the continent. To understand this seemingly paradoxical scenario, we need constraints on the rate and character of increasing abundances of C4 vegetation. To this end, we use molecular and isotopic tools from terrestrial plant leaf wax n-alkanes extracted from carbonate nodules in the Meade Basin, Kansas and sites in Texas for the past 12 Ma. These records offer site-specific reconstructions tied directly to vegetation source. We compare our results to published continental-scale reconstructions of n-alkanes from the Mississippi River drainage basin and to climate records. From the distribution of C27 to C33 n-alkane abundances and patterns in δ13C values, we infer that C4 grasses coexisted with patches of C3 vegetation, including both grasses and trees. C4 grasses increasingly dominated the landscape, reaching modern abundances as ice sheets were reaching their southern limit in North America. Our results confirm that C4 grasslands emerged under cool and wet conditions, something we would not predict based on modern analogues, raising questions about our understanding of the

  18. Nouns, Verbs and NP Complements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, J. T.

    This paper investigates restrictions on three types of noun-phrase complements (gerundive, infinitive, clause) in English and seeks to point out some parallels between the occurrence of these three types in object positions. The author first presents a list of verbs which may be followed by noun-phrase complements; he then considers the occurrence…

  19. Activation of complement during apheresis.

    PubMed Central

    Hetland, G; Mollnes, T E; Garred, P

    1991-01-01

    C3 activation products and the terminal complement complex (TCC) were examined in plasma during plasmapheresis of patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), Waldenström's syndrome (n = 4), and hypercholesterolaemia (n = 1), or during cytapheresis of platelet (n = 10) and granulocyte (n = 2) donors. Blood specimens were taken before, during and after the procedures. There was a significant activation of complement after apheresis in the GBS patients and one of the patients with Waldenström's syndrome, but not in the other patients. There were no significant differences in complement activation products before compared with after cytapheresis in the healthy donors. This demonstrates the biocompatibility with respect to complement activation of the materials used. The observed complement activation in some of the patients during plasma exchange is probably caused by activation products in the replacement plasma. PMID:1904328

  20. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    PubMed

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  1. Differential ability of carotenoid C4-oxygenation in yellow and red bishop species (Euplectes spp.).

    PubMed

    Prager, Maria; Johansson, E I Anette; Andersson, Staffan

    2009-12-01

    Male breeding plumages of African widowbirds and bishops (Euplectes spp.) show striking variation in carotenoid-based plumage coloration, with saturated yellow or orange-red patches of different size. Yet, from observations and experiments, agonistic signaling appears to have been a generalized sexual selection pressure for redness in the genus. Recent results show that yellow and red widowbird colors derive from distinctly different pigment profiles, and suggest that species vary in their ability to metabolize ingested carotenoids. We used reflectance spectrometry and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to describe the species-specific colors and plumage carotenoids of the congeneric yellow-crowned bishop (E. afer) and southern red bishop (E. orix). Results show that the yellow rump color of E. afer primarily derives from direct-deposited, dietary yellow pigments, i.e. lutein and zeaxanthin. In the red breast of E. orix, these are complemented by smaller amounts of derived red C4-keto-carotenoids: mainly alpha-doradexanthin, but also beta-doradexanthin, canthaxanthin, astaxanthin and adonirubin. We also performed a diet supplementation experiment to investigate the relative importance of nutritional and metabolic constraints in determining the differential occurrence of C4-keto-carotenoids, and thus red plumage color, in the two species. Our results indicate that E. orix, but not E. afer, can manufacture red C4-keto-carotenoids (alpha-doradexanthin and canthaxanthin) from yellow dietary precursors (lutein and beta-carotene).

  2. Does Bienertia cycloptera with the single-cell system of C(4) photosynthesis exhibit a seasonal pattern of delta (13)C values in nature similar to co-existing C (4) Chenopodiaceae having the dual-cell (Kranz) system?

    PubMed

    Akhani, Hossein; Lara, María Valeria; Ghasemkhani, Maryam; Ziegler, Hubert; Edwards, Gerald E

    2009-01-01

    Family Chenopodiaceae is an intriguing lineage, having the largest number of C(4) species among dicots, including a number of anatomical variants of Kranz anatomy and three single-cell C(4) functioning species. In some previous studies, during the culture of Bienertia cycloptera Bunge ex Boiss., carbon isotope values (delta(13)C values) of leaves deviated from C(4) to C(3)-C(4) intermediate type, raising questions as to its mode of photosynthesis during growth in natural environments. This species usually co-occurs with several Kranz type C(4) annuals. The development of B. cycloptera morphologically and delta(13)C values derived from plant samples (cotyledons, leaves, bracts, shoots) were analyzed over a complete growing season in a salt flat in north central Iran, along with eight Kranz type C(4) species and one C(3) species. For a number of species, plants were greenhouse-grown from seeds collected from the site, in order to examine leaf anatomy and C(4) biochemical subtype. Among the nine C(4) species, the cotyledons of B. cycloptera, and of the Suaeda spp. have the same respective forms of C(4) anatomy occurring in leaves, while cotyledons of members of tribe Caroxyloneae lack Kranz anatomy, which is reflected in the delta(13)C values found in plants grown in the natural habitat. The nine C(4) species had average seasonal delta(13)C values of -13.9 per thousand (with a range between species from -11.3 to -15.9 per thousand). The measurements of delta(13)C values over a complete growing season show that B. cycloptera performs C(4) photosynthesis during its life cycle in nature, similar to Kranz type species, with a seasonal average delta(13)C value of -15.2 per thousand.

  3. Phosphoethanolamine Residues on the Lipid A Moiety of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipooligosaccharide Modulate Binding of Complement Inhibitors and Resistance to Complement Killing

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, William M.; Dutta Ray, Tathagat; Ram, Sanjay; Rice, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of phosphoethanolamine (PEA) from the lipid A of gonococcal strain FA19 results in increased sensitivity to killing by the classical pathway of complement. Here we demonstrate that loss of PEA from lipid A diminishes binding of the complement regulatory protein C4b binding protein (C4BP) to the FA19 porin B (PorB), providing a molecular basis to explain the susceptibility of an lptA null strain of FA19 to killing by normal human serum (NHS). Loss of PEA from lipid A in three additional gonococcal strains that expressed diverse PorB molecules also resulted in decreased C4BP binding, increased deposition of C4b, and increased susceptibility to killing by NHS. Complementation of lptA null strains with lptA restored C4BP binding, decreased C4b deposition, and increased resistance to killing by NHS. These effects of lipid A PEA on C4BP binding to gonococcal PorB and serum resistance were simulated when gonococcal PorB was expressed in a meningococcal background. Loss of PEA from lipid A also affected binding of the alternative pathway regulator factor H (fH) to PorB of some strains. For instance, PorB molecules of lptA null mutants of strains 252 and 1291 bound less fH than those of their parent strains when lipooligosaccharide (LOS) was sialylated, whereas PorB molecules of lptA null mutants of strains FA1090 and 273 retained the ability to bind fH when LOS was sialylated. These data indicate that replacement of lipid A with PEA alters binding of C4BP and fH to PorB and contributes to the ability of gonococci to resist complement-mediated killing. PMID:23071134

  4. Phosphoethanolamine residues on the lipid A moiety of Neisseria gonorrhoeae lipooligosaccharide modulate binding of complement inhibitors and resistance to complement killing.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lisa A; Shafer, William M; Dutta Ray, Tathagat; Ram, Sanjay; Rice, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Loss of phosphoethanolamine (PEA) from the lipid A of gonococcal strain FA19 results in increased sensitivity to killing by the classical pathway of complement. Here we demonstrate that loss of PEA from lipid A diminishes binding of the complement regulatory protein C4b binding protein (C4BP) to the FA19 porin B (PorB), providing a molecular basis to explain the susceptibility of an lptA null strain of FA19 to killing by normal human serum (NHS). Loss of PEA from lipid A in three additional gonococcal strains that expressed diverse PorB molecules also resulted in decreased C4BP binding, increased deposition of C4b, and increased susceptibility to killing by NHS. Complementation of lptA null strains with lptA restored C4BP binding, decreased C4b deposition, and increased resistance to killing by NHS. These effects of lipid A PEA on C4BP binding to gonococcal PorB and serum resistance were simulated when gonococcal PorB was expressed in a meningococcal background. Loss of PEA from lipid A also affected binding of the alternative pathway regulator factor H (fH) to PorB of some strains. For instance, PorB molecules of lptA null mutants of strains 252 and 1291 bound less fH than those of their parent strains when lipooligosaccharide (LOS) was sialylated, whereas PorB molecules of lptA null mutants of strains FA1090 and 273 retained the ability to bind fH when LOS was sialylated. These data indicate that replacement of lipid A with PEA alters binding of C4BP and fH to PorB and contributes to the ability of gonococci to resist complement-mediated killing.

  5. Complement activation in very early Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Zanjani, H; Finch, C E; Kemper, C; Atkinson, J; McKeel, D; Morris, J C; Price, J L

    2005-01-01

    The activation of the classical complement (C)-system in early-stage Alzheimer disease (AD) and nondemented aging was examined with immunohistochemistry in subjects assessed by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR). Activation (staining for C3 and C4 fragments) was found in all brains with amyloid deposits, including all nondemented (CDR 0) cases, with either small numbers of diffuse plaques or with sufficient plaques and tangles to indicate preclinical AD. Staining for C3 and C4 increased in parallel with plaque density in very mild to severe clinical AD. A subset of very mild AD (CDR 0.5) cases also showed C1q (on plaques) and C5b-9 (on neuritic plaques and tangles), whereas these C-fragments were consistently found in severe AD (CDR 3). Mirror section (split-face) analysis showed that C1q, C3, and apoJ (clusterin) occurred on the same plaques. However, C-system regulators CD59, CR1, DAF, and MCP were not detected on plaques or tangles at any stage, indicating that C-activation related to AD is incompletely controlled.

  6. Insights into C4 metabolism from comparative deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Hibberd, Julian M

    2015-06-01

    C4 photosynthesis suppresses the oxygenation activity of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase Oxygenase and so limits photorespiration. Although highly complex, it is estimated to have evolved in 66 plant lineages, with the vast majority lacking sequenced genomes. Transcriptomics has recently initiated assessments of the degree to which transcript abundance differs between C3 and C4 leaves, identified novel components of C4 metabolism, and also led to mathematical models explaining the repeated evolution of this complex phenotype. Evidence is accumulating that this complex and convergent phenotype is partly underpinned by parallel evolution of structural genes, but also regulatory elements in both cis and trans. Furthermore, it appears that initial events associated with acquisition of C4 traits likely represent evolutionary exaptations related to non-photosynthetic processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Homologous genes for the C4 isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in a C3 and a C4 Flaveria species.

    PubMed

    Hermans, J; Westhoff, P

    1992-08-01

    The C4 isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) in Flaveria trinervia is encoded by the ppcA subgroup of the PEPCase gene family and is abundantly expressed in the mesophyll cells of leaves. The homologous ppcA genes in the C3 plant F pringlei are only weakly expressed and their transcripts do not show the strictly leaf-specific accumulation pattern observed for the F. trinervia genes. Two representative members of the ppcA subfamilies of F. trinervia (C4) and F. pringeli (C3)-named ppcA1-were characterized by Southern blotting, nucleotide sequencing and primer extension analysis. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences reveals a close similarity between C4 and C3 isoforms. Only few C4-specific positions can be detected when all known plant PEPCases are included in the comparison. A regulatory domain involved in light-dependent phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of the C4 and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) isoforms is present in the ppcA1 gene products of both the C3 and C4 Flaveria. The 5' flanking regions are essentially homologous. The putative promoter regions share several identical sequence motifs (CCAAT, AT-1 and GT-1 box III/III* elements). Additionally, alterations in elements that could contribute to differences in expression rates and light regulation are found. The significance of these findings is discussed with respect to the molecular evolution of C4 photosynthesis in Flaveria.

  8. Molecular genetics of the fourth component of human complement

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.C.

    1987-05-15

    The fourth component of complement in humans is coded for by two closely linked loci, i.e., C4A and C4B, that have been positioned within the class III region of the human major histocompatibility complex along with the genes for C2, Bf, and steroid 21-OH. Both C4 loci are highly polymorphic and certain alleles, particularly the nulls, are associated with susceptibility to autoimmune disease. About one-half of the null alleles are due to a large deletion that includes both a C4 and flanking 21-OH gene. Despite the near identity of the products of the two loci, the proteins differ dramatically in their efficiency of covalent binding to antigen. The amino acid substitutions responsible for the functional differences have been identified and they are clustered relatively near the covalent binding site within the C4d region of the ..cap alpha.. chain. These observations support the hypothesis that the susceptibility to autoimmune disease is related to the structural variation of the C4 protein.

  9. Classical Complement Pathway Activation in the Kidneys of Women With Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Penning, Marlies; Chua, Jamie S; van Kooten, Cees; Zandbergen, Malu; Buurma, Aletta; Schutte, Joke; Bruijn, Jan Anthonie; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Bloemenkamp, Kitty; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Baelde, Hans

    2015-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that complement dysregulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. The kidney is one of the major organs affected in preeclampsia. Because the kidney is highly susceptible to complement activation, we hypothesized that preeclampsia is associated with renal complement activation. We performed a nationwide search for renal autopsy material in the Netherlands using a computerized database (PALGA). Renal tissue was obtained from 11 women with preeclampsia, 25 pregnant controls, and 14 nonpregnant controls with hypertension. The samples were immunostained for C4d, C1q, mannose-binding lectin, properdin, C3d, C5b-9, IgA, IgG, and IgM. Preeclampsia was significantly associated with renal C4d-a stable marker of complement activation-and the classical pathway marker C1q. In addition, the prevalence of IgM was significantly higher in the kidneys of the preeclamptic women. No other complement markers studied differed between the groups. Our findings in human samples were validated using a soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 mouse model of preeclampsia. The kidneys in the soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1-injected mice had significantly more C4 deposits than the control mice. The association between preeclampsia and renal C4d, C1q, and IgM levels suggests that the classical complement pathway is involved in the renal injury in preeclampsia. Moreover, our finding that soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1-injected mice develop excess C4 deposits indicates that angiogenic dysregulation may play a role in complement activation within the kidney. We suggest that inhibiting complement activation may be beneficial for preventing the renal manifestations of preeclampsia.

  10. Activation of the complement system and accumulation of hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes in plasma during an adverse reaction to penicillin treatment.

    PubMed

    Brandslund, I; Svehag, S E; Teisner, B; Hyltoft Petersen, P

    1983-01-01

    A patient treated with penicillin intravenously developed a serum sickness-like reaction. Classical pathway complement (C) activation was indicated by quantitation of the split products C3c and C3d as well as demonstration of C4 conversion. Circulating immune complexes could, however, not be detected by the solid-phase Clq and PEG-precipitation methods. A concomitant accumulation of circulating hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes and a marked fall in serum-fibronectin concentrations suggested saturation of the reticuloendothelial system. The plasma became a deep-red color, and a diffuse intravascular coagulation followed. The patient recovered completely upon discontinuation of penicillin administration.

  11. Photorespiration connects C3 and C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bräutigam, Andrea; Gowik, Udo

    2016-05-01

    C4 plants evolved independently more than 60 times from C3 ancestors. C4 photosynthesis is a complex trait and its evolution from the ancestral C3 photosynthetic pathway involved the modification of the leaf anatomy and the leaf physiology accompanied by changes in the expression of thousands of genes. Under high temperature, high light, and the current CO2 concentration in the atmosphere, the C4 pathway is more efficient than C3 photosynthesis because it increases the CO2 concentration around the major CO2 fixating enzyme Rubisco. The oxygenase reaction and, accordingly, photorespiration are largely suppressed. In the present review we describe a scenario for C4 evolution that not only includes the avoidance of photorespiration as the major driving force for C4 evolution but also highlights the relevance of changes in the expression of photorespiratory genes in inducing and establishing important phases on the path from C3 to C4. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Salt tolerance evolves more frequently in C4 grass lineages.

    PubMed

    Bromham, L; Bennett, T H

    2014-03-01

    Salt tolerance has evolved many times in the grass family, and yet few cereal crops are salt tolerant. Why has it been so difficult to develop crops tolerant of saline soils when salt tolerance has evolved so frequently in nature? One possible explanation is that some grass lineages have traits that predispose them to developing salt tolerance and that without these background traits, salt tolerance is harder to achieve. One candidate background trait is photosynthetic pathway, which has also been remarkably labile in grasses. At least 22 independent origins of the C4 photosynthetic pathway have been suggested to occur within the grass family. It is possible that the evolution of C4 photosynthesis aids exploitation of saline environments, because it reduces transpiration, increases water-use efficiency and limits the uptake of toxic ions. But the observed link between the evolution of C4 photosynthesis and salt tolerance could simply be due to biases in phylogenetic distribution of halophytes or C4 species. Here, we use a phylogenetic analysis to investigate the association between photosynthetic pathway and salt tolerance in the grass family Poaceae. We find that salt tolerance is significantly more likely to occur in lineages with C4 photosynthesis than in C3 lineages. We discuss the possible links between C4 photosynthesis and salt tolerance and consider the limitations of inferring the direction of causality of this relationship. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. Complement in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Maria V; Sim, Robert B

    2011-09-16

    The complement system consists of about 35-40 proteins and glycoproteins present in blood plasma or on cell surfaces. Its main biological function is to recognise "foreign" particles and macromolecules, and to promote their elimination either by opsonisation or lysis. Although historically complement has been studied as a system for immune defence against bacteria, it has an important homeostatic role in which it recognises damaged or altered "self" components. Thus complement has major roles in both immune defence against microorganisms, and in clearance of damaged or "used" host components. Since complement proteins opsonise or lyse cells, complement can damage healthy host cells and tissues. The system is regulated by many endogenous regulatory proteins. Regulation is sometimes imperfect and both too much and too little complement activation is associated with many diseases. Excessive or inappropriate activation can cause tissue damage in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), multiple sclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury (e.g. ischemic stroke). Insufficient complement activity is associated with susceptibility to infection (mainly bacterial) and development of autoimmune disease, like SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus).

  14. The complement system in ischemia-reperfusion injuries.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, William B; Chrysanthou, Elvina; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Stahl, Gregory L

    2012-11-01

    Tissue injury and inflammation following ischemia and reperfusion of various organs have been recognized for many years. Many reviews have been written over the last several decades outlining the role of complement in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This short review provides a current state of the art knowledge on the complement pathways activated, complement components involved and a review of the clinical biologics/inhibitors used in the clinical setting of ischemia/reperfusion. This is not a complete review of the complement system in ischemia and reperfusion injury but will give the reader an updated view point of the field, potential clinical use of complement inhibitors, and the future studies needed to advance the field.

  15. The Complement System in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Gorsuch, William B.; Chrysanthou, Elvina; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue injury and inflammation following ischemia and reperfusion of various organs has been recognized for many years. Many reviews have been written over the last several decades outlining the role of complement in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This short review provides a current state of the art knowledge on the complement pathways activated, complement components involved and a review of the clinical biologics/inhibitors used in the clinical setting of ischemia/reperfusion. This is not a complete review of the complement system in ischemia and reperfusion injury but will give the reader an updated view point of the field, potential clinical use of complement inhibitors, and the future studies needed to advance the field. PMID:22964228

  16. Aeromonas salmonicida resistance to complement-mediated killing.

    PubMed Central

    Merino, S; Albertí, S; Tomás, J M

    1994-01-01

    The resistance of Aeromonas salmonicida to complement-mediated killing was investigated by using different strains and their isogenic mutants that had been previously characterized for their surface components. We found that the classical complement pathway is involved in serum killing of susceptible A. salmonicida strains, while the alternative complement pathway seems not to be involved. All of the A. salmonicida strains are able to activate complement, but the smooth strains (with or without the A-layer) are resistant to complement-mediated killing. The reasons for this resistance are that C3b may be bound far from the cell membrane and that it is rapidly degraded; therefore, the lytic final complex C5b-9 (membrane attack complex) is not formed. Isogenic rough mutants are serum sensitive because they bind more C3b than the smooth strains, and if C3b is not completely degraded, then the lytic complex (C5b-9) is formed. Images PMID:7525485

  17. Mitochondrial haplogroup C4c: a rare lineage entering America through the ice-free corridor?

    PubMed

    Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Perego, Ugo A; Olivieri, Anna; Angerhofer, Norman; Gandini, Francesca; Carossa, Valeria; Lancioni, Hovirag; Semino, Ornella; Woodward, Scott R; Achilli, Alessandro; Torroni, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Recent analyses of mitochondrial genomes from Native Americans have brought the overall number of recognized maternal founding lineages from just four to a current count of 15. However, because of their relative low frequency, almost nothing is known for some of these lineages. This leaves a considerable void in understanding the events that led to the colonization of the Americas following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In this study, we identified and completely sequenced 14 mitochondrial DNAs belonging to one extremely rare Native American lineage known as haplogroup C4c. Its age and geographical distribution raise the possibility that C4c marked the Paleo-Indian group(s) that entered North America from Beringia through the ice-free corridor between the Laurentide and Cordilleran ice sheets. The similarities in ages andgeographical distributions for C4c and the previously analyzed X2a lineage provide support to the scenario of a dual origin for Paleo-Indians. Taking into account that C4c is deeply rooted in the Asian portion of the mtDNA phylogeny and is indubitably of Asian origin, the finding that C4c and X2a are characterized by parallel genetic histories definitively dismisses the controversial hypothesis of an Atlantic glacial entry route into North America.

  18. Phylogenetic analyses reveal the shady history of C4 grasses

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Erika J.; Smith, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Grasslands cover more than 20% of the Earth's terrestrial surface, and their rise to dominance is one of the most dramatic events of biome evolution in Earth history. Grasses possess two main photosynthetic pathways: the C3 pathway that is typical of most plants and a specialized C4 pathway that minimizes photorespiration and thus increases photosynthetic performance in high-temperature and/or low-CO2 environments. C4 grasses dominate tropical and subtropical grasslands and savannas, and C3 grasses dominate the world's cooler temperate grassland regions. This striking pattern has been attributed to C4 physiology, with the implication that the evolution of the pathway enabled C4 grasses to persist in warmer climates than their C3 relatives. We combined geospatial and molecular sequence data from two public archives to produce a 1,230-taxon phylogeny of the grasses with accompanying climate data for all species, extracted from more than 1.1 million herbarium specimens. Here we show that grasses are ancestrally a warm-adapted clade and that C4 evolution was not correlated with shifts between temperate and tropical biomes. Instead, 18 of 20 inferred C4 origins were correlated with marked reductions in mean annual precipitation. These changes are consistent with a shift out of tropical forest environments and into tropical woodland/savanna systems. We conclude that C4 evolution in grasses coincided largely with migration out of the understory and into open-canopy environments. Furthermore, we argue that the evolution of cold tolerance in certain C3 lineages is an overlooked innovation that has profoundly influenced the patterning of grassland communities across the globe. PMID:20142480

  19. Phylogenetic analyses reveal the shady history of C4 grasses.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Erika J; Smith, Stephen A

    2010-02-09

    Grasslands cover more than 20% of the Earth's terrestrial surface, and their rise to dominance is one of the most dramatic events of biome evolution in Earth history. Grasses possess two main photosynthetic pathways: the C(3) pathway that is typical of most plants and a specialized C(4) pathway that minimizes photorespiration and thus increases photosynthetic performance in high-temperature and/or low-CO(2) environments. C(4) grasses dominate tropical and subtropical grasslands and savannas, and C(3) grasses dominate the world's cooler temperate grassland regions. This striking pattern has been attributed to C(4) physiology, with the implication that the evolution of the pathway enabled C(4) grasses to persist in warmer climates than their C(3) relatives. We combined geospatial and molecular sequence data from two public archives to produce a 1,230-taxon phylogeny of the grasses with accompanying climate data for all species, extracted from more than 1.1 million herbarium specimens. Here we show that grasses are ancestrally a warm-adapted clade and that C(4) evolution was not correlated with shifts between temperate and tropical biomes. Instead, 18 of 20 inferred C(4) origins were correlated with marked reductions in mean annual precipitation. These changes are consistent with a shift out of tropical forest environments and into tropical woodland/savanna systems. We conclude that C(4) evolution in grasses coincided largely with migration out of the understory and into open-canopy environments. Furthermore, we argue that the evolution of cold tolerance in certain C(3) lineages is an overlooked innovation that has profoundly influenced the patterning of grassland communities across the globe.

  20. Walking the C4 pathway: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Furbank, Robert T

    2016-07-01

    The year 2016 marks 50 years since the publication of the seminal paper by Hatch and Slack describing the biochemical pathway we now know as C4 photosynthesis. This review provides insight into the initial discovery of this pathway, the clues which led Hatch and Slack and others to these definitive experiments, some of the intrigue which surrounds the international activities which led up to the discovery, and personal insights into the future of this research field. While the biochemical understanding of the basic pathways came quickly, the role of the bundle sheath intermediate CO2 pool was not understood for a number of years, and the nature of C4 as a biochemical CO2 pump then linked the unique Kranz anatomy of C4 plants to their biochemical specialization. Decades of "grind and find biochemistry" and leaf physiology fleshed out the regulation of the pathway and the differences in physiological response to the environment between C3 and C4 plants. The more recent advent of plant transformation then high-throughput RNA and DNA sequencing and synthetic biology has allowed us both to carry out biochemical experiments and test hypotheses in planta and to better understand the evolution-driven molecular and genetic changes which occurred in the genomes of plants in the transition from C3 to C4 Now we are using this knowledge in attempts to engineer C4 rice and improve the C4 engine itself for enhanced food security and to provide novel biofuel feedstocks. The next 50 years of photosynthesis will no doubt be challenging, stimulating, and a drawcard for the best young minds in plant biology. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Walking the C4 pathway: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Furbank, Robert T

    2017-01-01

    The year 2016 marks 50 years since the publication of the seminal paper by Hatch and Slack describing the biochemical pathway we now know as C4 photosynthesis. This review provides insight into the initial discovery of this pathway, the clues which led Hatch and Slack and others to these definitive experiments, some of the intrigue which surrounds the international activities which led up to the discovery, and personal insights into the future of this research field. While the biochemical understanding of the basic pathways came quickly, the role of the bundle sheath intermediate CO2 pool was not understood for a number of years, and the nature of C4 as a biochemical CO2 pump then linked the unique Kranz anatomy of C4 plants to their biochemical specialization. Decades of "grind and find biochemistry" and leaf physiology fleshed out the regulation of the pathway and the differences in physiological response to the environment between C3 and C4 plants. The more recent advent of plant transformation then high-throughput RNA and DNA sequencing and synthetic biology has allowed us both to carry out biochemical experiments and test hypotheses in planta and to better understand the evolution-driven molecular and genetic changes which occurred in the genomes of plants in the transition from C3 to C4 Now we are using this knowledge in attempts to engineer C4 rice and improve the C4 engine itself for enhanced food security and to provide novel biofuel feedstocks. The next 50 years of photosynthesis will no doubt be challenging, stimulating, and a drawcard for the best young minds in plant biology. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Inefficient Complement System Clearance of Trypanosoma cruzi Metacyclic Trypomastigotes Enables Resistant Strains to Invade Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Igor; Ramirez, Marcel I.

    2010-01-01

    The complement system is the main arm of the vertebrate innate immune system against pathogen infection. For the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, subverting the complement system and invading the host cells is crucial to succeed in infection. However, little attention has focused on whether the complement system can effectively control T. cruzi infection. To address this question, we decided to analyse: 1) which complement pathways are activated by T. cruzi using strains isolated from different hosts, 2) the capacity of these strains to resist the complement-mediated killing at nearly physiological conditions, and 3) whether the complement system could limit or control T. cruzi invasion of eukaryotic cells. The complement activating molecules C1q, C3, mannan-binding lectin and ficolins bound to all strains analysed; however, C3b and C4b deposition assays revealed that T. cruzi activates mainly the lectin and alternative complement pathways in non-immune human serum. Strikingly, we detected that metacyclic trypomastigotes of some T. cruzi strains were highly susceptible to complement-mediated killing in non-immune serum, while other strains were resistant. Furthermore, the rate of parasite invasion in eukaryotic cells was decreased by non-immune serum. Altogether, these results establish that the complement system recognizes T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes, resulting in killing of susceptible strains. The complement system, therefore, acts as a physiological barrier which resistant strains have to evade for successful host infection. PMID:20300530

  3. Genetics of the complement system.

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, P

    1975-01-01

    The complement system, unlike the coagulation system, was largely characterized by in-vitro techniques which did not make use of genetically deficient plasmas. The existence of the genetically deficient plasmas. The existence of the genetically deficient subjects therefore has served largely to increase our knowledge of the in-vivo role of complement. At the present time its clearest role is in the resistance to infection; obviously in the case of C3 deficiency and bacterial infection and possibly more subtly in the case of deficiency of the early active complement components and low virulence organisms. There is so far no evidence that genetic complement deficiency interferes with antibody formation or with the generation of tolerance as has been suggested in the pas (Azar et al, 1968; Dukor and Hartmann, 1973). PMID:768477

  4. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mice and mice transfused with Syk inhibitor-treated platelets . Platelet lodging was remarkably decreased in lungs of mice transfused with Syk...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet ...30September2012–29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  5. Plasminogen Is a Complement Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Diana; Schindler, Susann; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Plasminogen is a 92-kDa single chain glycoprotein that circulates in plasma as a zymogen and when converted to proteolytically active plasmin dissolves preformed fibrin clots and extracellular matrix components. Here, we characterize the role of plasmin(ogen) in the complement cascade. Plasminogen binds the central complement protein C3, the C3 cleavage products C3b and C3d, and C5. Plasminogen binds to C3, C3b, C3d, and C5 via lysine residues, and the interaction is ionic strength-dependent. Plasminogen and Factor H bind C3b; however, the two proteins bind to different sites and do not compete for binding. Plasminogen affects complement action in multiple ways. Plasminogen enhanced Factor I-mediated C3b degradation in the presence of the cofactor Factor H. Plasminogen when activated to plasmin inhibited complement as demonstrated by hemolytic assays using either rabbit or sheep erythrocytes. Similarly, plasmin either in the fluid phase or attached to surfaces inhibited complement that was activated via the alternative and classical pathways and cleaved C3b to fragments of 68, 40, 30, and 17 kDa. The C3b fragments generated by plasmin differ in size from those generated by the complement protease Factor I, suggesting that plasmin-mediated C3b cleavage fragments lack effector function. Plasmin also cleaved C5 to products of 65, 50, 30, and 25 kDa. Thus, plasmin(ogen) regulates both complement and coagulation, the two central cascade systems of a vertebrate organism. This complement-inhibitory activity of plasmin provides a new explanation why pathogenic microbes utilize plasmin(ogen) for immune evasion and tissue penetration. PMID:22451663

  6. Sustainable Separations of C4 -Hydrocarbons by Using Microporous Materials.

    PubMed

    Gehre, Mascha; Guo, Zhiyong; Rothenberg, Gadi; Tanase, Stefania

    2017-06-15

    Petrochemical refineries must separate hydrocarbon mixtures on a large scale for the production of fuels and chemicals. Typically, these hydrocarbons are separated by distillation, which is extremely energy intensive. This high energy cost can be mitigated by developing materials that can enable efficient adsorptive separation. In this critical review, the principles of adsorptive separation are outlined, and then the case for C4 separations by using zeolites and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is examined. By analyzing both experimental and theoretical studies, the challenges and opportunities in C4 separation are outlined, with a focus on the separation mechanisms and structure-selectivity correlations. Zeolites are commonly used as adsorbents and, in some cases, can separate C4 mixtures well. The pore sizes of eight-membered-ring zeolites, for example, are in the order of the kinetic diameters of C4 isomers. Although zeolites have the advantage of a rigid and highly stable structure, this is often difficult to functionalize. MOFs are attractive candidates for hydrocarbon separation because their pores can be tailored to optimize the adsorbate-adsorbent interactions. MOF-5 and ZIF-7 show promising results in separating all C4 isomers, but breakthrough experiments under industrial conditions are needed to confirm these results. Moreover, the flexibility of the MOF structures could hamper their application under industrial conditions. Adsorptive separation is a promising viable alternative and it is likely to play an increasingly important role in tomorrow's refineries. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed.

  8. Renal Transplant Patients Biopsied for Cause and Tested for C4d, DSA, and IgG Subclasses and C1q: Which Humoral Markers Improve Diagnosis and Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Cicciarelli, James C.; Chang, Youngil; Koss, Michael; Hacke, Katrin; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Burns, Kevin M.; Min, David I.; Naraghi, Robert; Shah, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    The association between donor specific antibodies (DSA) and renal transplant rejection has been generally established, but there are cases when a DSA is present without rejection. We examined 73 renal transplant recipients biopsied for transplant dysfunction with DSA test results available: 23 patients diffusely positive for C4d (C4d+), 25 patients focally positive for C4d, and 25 patients negative for C4d (C4d−). We performed C1q and IgG subclass testing in our DSA+ and C4d+ patient group. Graft outcomes were determined for the C4d+ group. All 23 C4d+ patients had IgG DSA with an average of 12,500 MFI (cumulative DSA MFI). The C4d− patients had average DSA less than 500 MFI. Among the patients with C4d+ biopsies, 100% had IgG DSA, 70% had C1q+ DSA, and 83% had complement fixing IgG subclass antibodies. Interestingly, IgG4 was seen in 10 of the 23 recipients' sera, but always along with complement fixing IgG1, and we have previously seen excellent function in patients when IgG4 DSA exists alone. Cumulative DSA above 10,000 MFI were associated with C4d deposition and complement fixation. There was no significant correlation between graft loss and C1q positivity, and IgG subclass analysis seemed to be a better correlate for complement fixing antibodies in the C4d+ patient group. PMID:28182088

  9. The C4 clustering algorithm: Clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert; Reichart, Dan; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Annis, James; McKay, Timothy; Bahcall, Neta; Bernardi, Mariangela; Boehringer, Hans; Connolly, Andrew; Goto, Tomo; Kniazev, Alexie; Lamb, Donald; Postman, Marc; Schneider, Donald; Sheth, Ravi; Voges, Wolfgang; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Portsmouth U., ICG /North Carolina U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Chicago U., EFI /Michigan U. /Fermilab /Princeton U. Observ. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Pittsburgh U. /Tokyo U., ICRR /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Penn State U. /Chicago U. /Stavropol, Astrophys. Observ. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron. /INI, SAO

    2005-03-01

    We present the ''C4 Cluster Catalog'', a new sample of 748 clusters of galaxies identified in the spectroscopic sample of the Second Data Release (DR2) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The C4 cluster-finding algorithm identifies clusters as overdensities in a seven-dimensional position and color space, thus minimizing projection effects that have plagued previous optical cluster selection. The present C4 catalog covers {approx}2600 square degrees of sky and ranges in redshift from z = 0.02 to z = 0.17. The mean cluster membership is 36 galaxies (with redshifts) brighter than r = 17.7, but the catalog includes a range of systems, from groups containing 10 members to massive clusters with over 200 cluster members with redshifts. The catalog provides a large number of measured cluster properties including sky location, mean redshift, galaxy membership, summed r-band optical luminosity (L{sub r}), velocity dispersion, as well as quantitative measures of substructure and the surrounding large-scale environment. We use new, multi-color mock SDSS galaxy catalogs, empirically constructed from the {Lambda}CDM Hubble Volume (HV) Sky Survey output, to investigate the sensitivity of the C4 catalog to the various algorithm parameters (detection threshold, choice of passbands and search aperture), as well as to quantify the purity and completeness of the C4 cluster catalog. These mock catalogs indicate that the C4 catalog is {approx_equal}90% complete and 95% pure above M{sub 200} = 1 x 10{sup 14} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} and within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the SDSS DR2 data, we show that the C4 algorithm finds 98% of X-ray identified clusters and 90% of Abell clusters within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the mock galaxy catalogs and the full HV dark matter simulations, we show that the L{sub r} of a cluster is a more robust estimator of the halo mass (M{sub 200}) than the galaxy line-of-sight velocity dispersion or the richness of the cluster. However, if we

  10. Convertase Inhibitory Properties of Staphylococcal Extracellular Complement-binding Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Jongerius, Ilse; Garcia, Brandon L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.

    2010-01-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus secretes several complement evasion molecules to combat the human immune response. Extracellular complement-binding protein (Ecb) binds to the C3d domain of C3 and thereby blocks C3 convertases of the alternative pathway and C5 convertases via all complement pathways. Inhibition of C5 convertases results in complete inhibition of C5a generation and subsequent neutrophil migration. Here, we show that binding of Ecb to the C3d domain of C3b is crucial for inhibition of C5 convertases. Ecb does not interfere with substrate binding to convertases but prevents formation of an active convertase enzyme. PMID:20304920

  11. Change of immunoglobulins and complement factors in patients with self-injurious behaviour.

    PubMed

    Moe, T J; Mykletun, A; Matre, R; Skovlund, E; Bassøe, C-F; Dahl, A A

    2003-02-01

    As stress activates the inflammatory response system, and attempted suicide is connected with severe stress, we hypothesized that patients hospitalized for self-injurious behaviour have changed immunocompetence. The concentration of immunoglobulins IgG, IgA, IgM, and the complement components C3 and C4 in 73 patients hospitalized for self-injurious behaviour was compared with those of 122 healthy controls. The immunoglobulins and complement were quantified by nephelometric technique. The levels of IgG and IgM were significantly lower, and the complement C3 and C4 were significantly higher in self-injurious patients compared with controls. This was valid in both genders and the effects did not interact with gender. This controlled study showed that the concentrations of immunoglobulins were reduced and complement components were increased in patients who are admitted to hospital for self-injurious behaviour.

  12. Wild Manihot Species Do Not Possess C4 Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    CALATAYUD, P.‐A.; BARÓN, C. H.; VELÁSQUEZ, H.; ARROYAVE, J. A.; LAMAZE, T.

    2002-01-01

    Cultivated cassava (Manihot esculenta) has a higher rate of photosynthesis than is usual for C3 plants and photosynthesis is not light saturated. For these reasons it has been suggested that cultivated cassava could be derived from wild species possessing C4 photosynthesis. The natural abundance of 13C and activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoglycolate phosphatase were measured in leaves of 20 wild cassava species to test this hypothesis. All the species studied, including M. flabellifolia the potential wild progenitor of cultivated cassava, clearly exhibited C3 not C4 characteristics. PMID:12096814

  13. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Viviana P.; Fazito Vale, Vladimir; Pangburn, Michael K.; Abdeladhim, Maha; Ferreira Mendes-Sousa, Antonio; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V.; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Brandt, Elizabeth A.; Meneses, Claudio; Lima, Kolyvan Ferreira; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Horácio Pereira, Marcos; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Gontijo, Nelder F.; Collin, Nicolas; Valenzuela, Jesus G.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host’s skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the same chromatographic properties as the Lu. longipalpis salivary gland homogenate (SGH)counterparts and anti-rSALO antibodies blocked the classical pathway complement activity of rSALO and SGH. Both rSALO and SGH inhibited C4b deposition and cleavage of C4. rSALO, however, did not inhibit the protease activity of C1s nor the enzymatic activity of factor Xa, uPA, thrombin, kallikrein, trypsin and plasmin. Importantly, rSALO did not inhibit the alternative or the lectin pathway of complement. In conclusion our data shows that SALO is a specific classical pathway complement inhibitor present in the saliva of Lu. longipalpis. Importantly, due to its small size and specificity, SALO may offer a therapeutic alternative for complement classical pathway-mediated pathogenic effects in human diseases. PMID:26758086

  14. Methods for Quantitative Detection of Antibody-induced Complement Activation on Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M.; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies against red blood cells (RBCs) can lead to complement activation resulting in an accelerated clearance via complement receptors in the liver (extravascular hemolysis) or leading to intravascular lysis of RBCs. Alloantibodies (e.g. ABO) or autoantibodies to RBC antigens (as seen in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, AIHA) leading to complement activation are potentially harmful and can be - especially when leading to intravascular lysis - fatal1. Currently, complement activation due to (auto)-antibodies on RBCs is assessed in vitro by using the Coombs test reflecting complement deposition on RBC or by a nonquantitative hemolytic assay reflecting RBC lysis1-4. However, to assess the efficacy of complement inhibitors, it is mandatory to have quantitative techniques. Here we describe two such techniques. First, an assay to detect C3 and C4 deposition on red blood cells that is induced by antibodies in patient serum is presented. For this, FACS analysis is used with fluorescently labeled anti-C3 or anti-C4 antibodies. Next, a quantitative hemolytic assay is described. In this assay, complement-mediated hemolysis induced by patient serum is measured making use of spectrophotometric detection of the released hemoglobin. Both of these assays are very reproducible and quantitative, facilitating studies of antibody-induced complement activation. PMID:24514151

  15. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Viviana P; Fazito Vale, Vladimir; Pangburn, Michael K; Abdeladhim, Maha; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio Ferreira; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Brandt, Elizabeth A; Meneses, Claudio; Lima, Kolyvan Ferreira; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Gontijo, Nelder F; Collin, Nicolas; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2016-01-13

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host's skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the same chromatographic properties as the Lu. longipalpis salivary gland homogenate (SGH)counterparts and anti-rSALO antibodies blocked the classical pathway complement activity of rSALO and SGH. Both rSALO and SGH inhibited C4b deposition and cleavage of C4. rSALO, however, did not inhibit the protease activity of C1s nor the enzymatic activity of factor Xa, uPA, thrombin, kallikrein, trypsin and plasmin. Importantly, rSALO did not inhibit the alternative or the lectin pathway of complement. In conclusion our data shows that SALO is a specific classical pathway complement inhibitor present in the saliva of Lu. longipalpis. Importantly, due to its small size and specificity, SALO may offer a therapeutic alternative for complement classical pathway-mediated pathogenic effects in human diseases.

  16. A generalized stoichiometric model of C3, C2, C2+C4, and C4 photosynthetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bellasio, Chandra

    2017-01-01

    The goal of suppressing photorespiration in crops to maximize assimilation and yield is stimulating considerable interest among researchers looking to bioengineer carbon-concentrating mechanisms into C3 plants. However, detailed quantification of the biochemical activities in the bundle sheath is lacking. This work presents a general stoichiometric model for C3, C2, C2+C4, and C4 assimilation (SMA) in which energetics, metabolite traffic, and the different decarboxylating enzymes (NAD-dependent malic enzyme, NADP-dependent malic enzyme, or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) are explicitly included. The SMA can be used to refine experimental data analysis or formulate hypothetical scenarios, and is coded in a freely available Microsoft Excel workbook. The theoretical underpinnings and general model behaviour are analysed with a range of simulations, including (i) an analysis of C3, C2, C2+C4, and C4 in operational conditions; (ii) manipulating photorespiration in a C3 plant; (iii) progressively upregulating a C2 shuttle in C3 photosynthesis; (iv) progressively upregulating a C4 cycle in C2 photosynthesis; and (v) manipulating processes that are hypothesized to respond to transient environmental inputs. Results quantify the functional trade-offs, such as the electron transport needed to meet ATP/NADPH demand, as well as metabolite traffic, inherent to different subtypes. The SMA refines our understanding of the stoichiometry of photosynthesis, which is of paramount importance for basic and applied research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. Evolution of CAM and C4 carbon-concentrating mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2003-01-01

    Mechanisms for concentrating carbon around the Rubisco enzyme, which drives the carbon-reducing steps in photosynthesis, are widespread in plants; in vascular plants they are known as crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) and C4 photosynthesis. CAM is common in desert succulents, tropical epiphytes, and aquatic plants and is characterized by nighttime fixation of CO2. The proximal selective factor driving the evolution of this CO2-concentrating pathway is low daytime CO2, which results from the unusual reverse stomatal behavior of terrestrial CAM species or from patterns of ambient CO2 availability for aquatic CAM species. In terrestrials the ultimate selective factor is water stress that has selected for increased water use efficiency. In aquatics the ultimate selective factor is diel fluctuations in CO2 availability for palustrine species and extreme oligotrophic conditions for lacustrine species. C4 photosynthesis is based on similar biochemistry but carboxylation steps are spatially separated in the leaf rather than temporally as in CAM. This biochemical pathway is most commonly associated with a specialized leaf anatomy known as Kranz anatomy; however, there are exceptions. The ultimate selective factor driving the evolution of this pathway is excessively high photorespiration that inhibits normal C3 photosynthesis under high light and high temperature in both terrestrial and aquatic habitats. CAM is an ancient pathway that likely has been present since the Paleozoic era in aquatic species from shallow-water palustrine habitats. While atmospheric CO2 levels have undoubtedly affected the evolution of terrestrial plant carbon-concentrating mechanisms, there is reason to believe that past atmospheric changes have not played as important a selective role in the aquatic milieu since palustrine habitats today are not generally carbon sinks, and the selective factors driving aquatic CAM are autogenic. Terrestrial CAM, in contrast, is of increasing selective value under

  18. Snake venoms. The amino-acid sequence of protein S5C4 from Dendroaspis jamesoni kaimosae (Jameson's mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J; Strydom, A J; Taljaard, N

    1978-06-01

    A major component (S5C4) was purified from Jameson's mamba by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 and by ion-exchange chromotography on CM-cellulose. Protein S5C4 contains 60 amino acid residues and is cross-linked by four intrachain disulphide bridges. The complete primary structure of the protein has been elucidated. The toxicities, the immunochemical properties, the sequence and the invariant amino acid residues of protein S5C4 resemble subgroup II of the angusticeps-type proteins.

  19. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  20. Microvascular alterations and the role of complement in dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Lahoria, Rajat; Selcen, Duygu; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the pathological basis of perifascicular muscle fibre atrophy in dermatomyositis. These include ischaemia due to immune-mediated microvascular injury, enhanced expression of type 1 interferon-induced gene transcripts in perifascicular capillaries and muscle fibres, and occlusion of larger perimysial blood vessels. Microvascular complement deposition is a feature of dermatomyositis pathology but the trigger for complement activation, the predominant complement pathway involved, or its role in the pathogenesis of the disease, has not been clearly defined. In the first step of this study we examined the density of capillaries and transverse vessels and searched for occlusion or depletion of larger perimysial blood vessels in 10 patients with dermatomyositis. This revealed an invariable association of perifascicular atrophy with capillary and transverse vessel depletion. The capillary and transverse vessel densities in non-atrophic fibre regions were not significantly different from those in muscle specimens of 10 age-matched controls. Next, in the same 10, as well as in 40 additional dermatomyositis patients, we searched for vascular deposits of IgG, IgM, and the C5b-9 complement membrane attack complex. Thirty-one of 50 dermatomyositis specimens contained C5b-9 reactive endomysial microvessels but none of these or other vessels reacted for IgG. Ten of 50 specimens harboured IgM-positive capillaries but only a few of these reacted for C5b-9. Finally, we analysed and compared different pathways of complement activation in dermatomyositis, lupus nephritis, and necrotic muscle fibres in Duchenne dystrophy. In lupus nephritis, C5-b9 deposits co-localized with IgG, IgM, C1q, and C4d, consistent with immune complex dependent activation of the classical complement pathway. In both dermatomyositis and Duchenne dystrophy, C5-b9 deposits co-localized with C1q and C4d and rarely with IgM indicating activation of the classical

  1. Applicability of Virtual Environments as C4ISR Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    simulator sickness questionnaire (ssq): A method for quantifying simulator sickness. International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 3(3):203ff. Ergonomie ...Displays Thomas Alexander FGAN - Research Institute for Communication, Information Processing, and Ergonomics Wachtberg, Germany Ergonomie und...Führungssysteme FORSCHUNGSINSTITUT FÜR KOMMUNIKATION, INFORMATIONSVERARBEITUNG UND ERGONOMIE 1 FGAN Applicability of Virtual Environments as C4ISR Displays

  2. Senescence, dormancy and tillering in perennial C4 grasses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Perennial, temperate, C4 warm-season grasses, such as switchgrass and miscanthus have been tabbed as sources of herbaceous biomass for the production of green fuels and chemicals based on a number of positive agronomic traits. Although there is important literature on the management of these specie...

  3. Mycoplasma polysaccharide protects against complement

    PubMed Central

    Bolland, Jeffrey R.; Simmons, Warren L.; Daubenspeck, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Although they lack a cell wall, mycoplasmas do possess a glycocalyx. The interactions between the glycocalyx, mycoplasmal surface proteins and host complement were explored using the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis as a model. It was previously shown that the length of the tandem repeat region of the surface lipoprotein Vsa is associated with susceptibility to complement-mediated killing. Cells producing a long Vsa containing about 40 repeats are resistant to complement, whereas strains that produce a short Vsa of five or fewer repeats are susceptible. We show here that the length of the Vsa protein modulates the affinity of the M. pulmonis EPS-I polysaccharide for the mycoplasma cell surface, with more EPS-I being associated with mycoplasmas producing a short Vsa protein. An examination of mutants that lack EPS-I revealed that planktonic mycoplasmas were highly susceptible to complement killing even when the Vsa protein was long, demonstrating that both EPS-I and Vsa length contribute to resistance. In contrast, the mycoplasmas were resistant to complement even in the absence of EPS-I when the cells were encased in a biofilm. PMID:22504437

  4. Complement-Mediated Enhancement of Monocyte Adhesion to Endothelial Cells by HLA Antibodies, and Blockade by a Specific Inhibitor of the Classical Complement Cascade, TNT003

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Thomas, Kimberly A.; Mulder, Arend; Parry, Graham C.; Panicker, Sandip; Reed, Elaine F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of most solid organs is characterized by evidence of complement activation and/or intragraft macrophages (C4d + and CD68+ biopsies). We previously demonstrated that crosslinking of HLA I by antibodies triggered endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion. We hypothesized that activation of the classical complement pathway at the endothelial cell surface by HLA antibodies would enhance monocyte adhesion through soluble split product generation, in parallel with direct endothelial activation downstream of HLA signaling. Methods Primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were stimulated with HLA class I antibodies in the presence of intact human serum complement. C3a and C5a generation, endothelial P-selectin expression, and adhesion of human primary and immortalized monocytes (Mono Mac 6) were measured. Alternatively, HAEC or monocytes were directly stimulated with purified C3a or C5a. Classical complement activation was inhibited by pretreatment of complement with an anti-C1s antibody (TNT003). Results Treatment of HAEC with HLA antibody and human complement increased the formation of C3a and C5a. Monocyte recruitment by human HLA antibodies was enhanced in the presence of intact human serum complement or purified C3a or C5a. Specific inhibition of the classical complement pathway using TNT003 or C1q-depleted serum significantly reduced adhesion of monocytes in the presence of human complement. Conclusions Despite persistent endothelial viability in the presence of HLA antibodies and complement, upstream complement anaphylatoxin production exacerbates endothelial exocytosis and leukocyte recruitment. Upstream inhibition of classical complement may be therapeutic to dampen mononuclear cell recruitment and endothelial activation characteristic of microvascular inflammation during AMR. PMID:28640789

  5. Transition from half metal to semiconductor in Li doped g-C4N3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, Arqum; Hu, Tao; Hong, Jisang

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the structural and magnetic properties of Li doped graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3) using the van der Waals density functional theory. A free standing g-C4N3 was known to show a half metallic state with buckling geometry, but this feature completely disappears in the presence of Li doping. Besides this structural modification, very interestingly, we have obtained that the Li doped g-C4N3 shows dramatic change in its electronic structure. Both ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic states are almost degenerated in one Li atom doped system. However, the transition from half metallic state to semiconductor is observed with further increase of Li concentration and the calculated energy gap is 1.97 eV. We found that Li impurity plays as a donor element and charge transfer from the Li atom to neighboring N atoms induces a band gap. Overall, we have observed that the electronic and magnetic properties of g-C4N3 are substantially modified by Li doping.

  6. DNA-Mediated Prophage Induction in Bacillus subtilis Lysogenic for φ105c4

    PubMed Central

    Garro, Anthony J.

    1973-01-01

    Prophage was induced when strains of Bacillus subtilis 168 lysogenic for φ105c4 were grown to competence and exposed to specific bacterial DNAs. The time course of phage production was similar to that observed for mitomycin C induction of wild-type prophage. Induction was directly dependent upon DNA concentration up to levels which were saturating for the transformation of bacterial auxotrophic markers. The extent of induction varied with the source of DNA. The burst of phage induced by DNA isolated from a W23 strain of B. subtilis was fivefold less than that induced by DNA from B. subtilis 168 strains, while B. licheniformis DNA was completely inactive. This order of inducing activity was correlated with the ability of the respective DNAs to transform auxotrophic markers carried by one of the φ105c4 lysogens. Differences in inducing activity also were observed for different forms of φ105 DNA. The DNAs isolated from φ105 phage particles and φ105c4 lysogens were inactive, whereas DNA from cells lysogenized by wild-type φ105 induced a burst of phage. When tested for transforming activity, however, both φ105c4 and φ105 lysogen DNAs were equally effective. An induction mechanism which involves recombination at the prophage insertion site is proposed to explain these differences. PMID:4199106

  7. Clinical presentations and molecular basis of complement C1r deficiency in a male African-American patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y L; Brookshire, B P; Verani, R R; Arnett, F C; Yu, C Y

    2011-10-01

    Homozygous deficiencies of early components for complement activation are among the strongest genetic risk factors for human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Eleven cases of C1r deficiency are documented but this is the first report on the molecular basis of C1r deficiency. The proband is an African-American male who developed SLE at 3 months of age. He had a discoid lupus rash and diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis. Serum complement analysis of the patient showed zero CH50 activity, undetectable C1r, and reduced levels of C1s, but highly elevated levels of complement C4, C2, and C1-inhibitor. The coding regions of the mutant C1R gene with 11 exons located at chromosome 12p13 were polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified and sequenced to completion. DNA sequencing revealed a homozygous C→T mutation at nucleotide-6392 in exon 10 of the C1R gene, resulting in a nonsense mutation from Arg-380 (R380X). The patient's clinically normal mother was heterozygous for this mutation. A sequence-specific primer (SSP) PCR coupled with StuI-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was developed to detect the novel mutation. Screening of 209 African-American SLE patients suggested that the R380X mutation is a rare causal variant. Mutations leading to early complement component deficiencies in SLE are mostly private variants with large effects.

  8. Saliva of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) inhibits classical and alternative complement pathways.

    PubMed

    Silva, Naylene C S; Vale, Vladimir F; Franco, Paula F; Gontijo, Nelder F; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Pereira, Marcos H; Sant'Anna, Mauricio R V; Rodrigues, Daniel S; Lima, Walter S; Fux, Blima; Araujo, Ricardo N

    2016-08-11

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is the main ectoparasite affecting livestock worldwide. For a successful parasitism, ticks need to evade several immune responses of their hosts, including the activation of the complement system. In spite of the importance of R. microplus, previous work only identified one salivary molecule that blocks the complement system. The current study describes complement inhibitory activities induced by R. microplus salivary components and mechanisms elicited by putative salivary proteins on both classical and alternative complement pathways. We found that R. microplus saliva from fully- and partially engorged females was able to inhibit both pathways. Saliva acts strongly at the initial steps of both complement activation pathways. In the classical pathway, the saliva blocked C4 cleavage, and hence, deposition of C4b on the activation surface, suggesting that the inhibition occurs at some point between C1q and C4. In the alternative pathway, saliva acts by binding to initial components of the cascade (C3b and properdin) thereby preventing the C3 convertase formation and reducing C3b production and deposition as well as cleavage of factor B. Saliva has no effect on formation or decay of the C6 to C8 components of the membrane attack complex. The saliva of R. microplus is able to inhibit the early steps of classical and alternative pathways of the complement system. Saliva acts by blocking C4 cleavage and deposition of C4b on the classical pathway activation surface and, in the alternative pathway, saliva bind to initial components of the cascade (C3b and properdin) thereby preventing the C3 convertase formation and the production and deposition of additional C3b.

  9. Complement activation in leprosy: a retrospective study shows elevated circulating terminal complement complex in reactional leprosy.

    PubMed

    Bahia El Idrissi, N; Hakobyan, S; Ramaglia, V; Geluk, A; Morgan, B Paul; Das, P Kumar; Baas, F

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium leprae infection gives rise to the immunologically and histopathologically classified spectrum of leprosy. At present, several tools for the stratification of patients are based on acquired immunity markers. However, the role of innate immunity, particularly the complement system, is largely unexplored. The present retrospective study was undertaken to explore whether the systemic levels of complement activation components and regulators can stratify leprosy patients, particularly in reference to the reactional state of the disease. Serum samples from two cohorts were analysed. The cohort from Bangladesh included multi-bacillary (MB) patients with (n = 12) or without (n = 46) reaction (R) at intake and endemic controls (n = 20). The cohort from Ethiopia included pauci-bacillary (PB) (n = 7) and MB (n = 23) patients without reaction and MB (n = 15) patients with reaction. The results showed that the activation products terminal complement complex (TCC) (P ≤ 0·01), C4d (P ≤ 0·05) and iC3b (P ≤ 0·05) were specifically elevated in Bangladeshi patients with reaction at intake compared to endemic controls. In addition, levels of the regulator clusterin (P ≤ 0·001 without R; P < 0·05 with R) were also elevated in MB patients, irrespective of a reaction. Similar analysis of the Ethiopian cohort confirmed that, irrespective of a reaction, serum TCC levels were increased significantly in patients with reactions compared to patients without reactions (P ≤ 0·05). Our findings suggests that serum TCC levels may prove to be a valuable tool in diagnosing patients at risk of developing reactions. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  10. Milk immunoglobulins and complement factors.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, H; Marnila, P; Gill, H S

    2000-11-01

    The importance of colostrum for the growth and health of newborn offspring is well known. In bovine colostrum, the antibody (immunoglobulin) complement system provides a major antimicrobial effect against a wide range of microbes and confers passive immunity until the calf's own immune system has matured. Bovine serum and lacteal secretions contain three major classes of immunoglobulins: IgG, IgM and IgA. The immunoglobulins are selectively transported from the serum into the mammary gland, as a result of which the first colostrum contains very high concentrations of immunoglobulins (40-200 mg/ml). IgG1 accounts for over 75 % of the immunoglobulins in colostral whey, followed by IgM, IgA and IgG2. All these immunoglobulins decrease within a few days to a total immunoglobulin concentration of 0.7-1.0 mg/ml, with IgG1 representing the major Ig class in milk throughout the lactation period. Together with the antibodies absorbed from colostrum after birth, the complement system plays a crucial role in the passive immunisation of the newborn calf. The occurrence of haemolytic or bactericidal complement activity in bovine colostrum and milk has been demonstrated in several studies. This review deals with the characteristics of bovine Igs and the complement system to be exploited as potential ingredients for health-promoting functional foods.

  11. Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Green A.

    2006-01-01

    With the growth of standardized assessment benchmarks in both the public and private paradigms, testing performance matters to institutions more than ever. In an attempt to take as many hindering variables out of this process, such as test anxiety, socioeconomic influences, and latency in cognition, Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum seeks…

  12. Role of complement in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Fiane, A E

    2002-01-01

    The xenotransplantation research is driven by the increasing gap between the number of patients with end-stage organ failure on waiting lists for transplantation and the supply of allografts. The lack of success in developing suitable artificial organs for permanent treatment of organ failure has further strengthened the need for xenotransplantation research. Pigs are now generally accepted to be the source animal of choice. Transplantation of pig organs to humans faces several barriers which have to be overcome before it comes to clinical application: (1) anatomical and physiological conditions; (2) immunological rejection mechanisms; (3) molecular compatibility between signal molecules of the two species; (4) risk of transmission of microorganisms, particularly pig endogenous retroviruses; and (5) legal and ethical aspects both with respect to the animal and the recipient. Here we will focus on the role of the complement system in the rejection of immediately vascularized pig-to-primate xenografts. The hyperacute rejection occurring within minutes after transplantation is mediated by binding of natural antibodies to the Galalpha(l-3)Gal epitope on the endothelial cells with subsequent complement activation. Whereas inhibition of complement activation protects against hyperacute rejection, the role of complement in the later rejection phases is less clarified.

  13. Sentential Complementation--An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuessel, Frank H., Jr.

    A review of traditional and transformational studies on the phenomenon of sentential complementation (noun clauses) reveals many areas of agreement. Although some adherents of generative grammar may have occasionally obscured this aspect because of the offensive nature of their criticism of other modes of analysis, it is seen that, in several…

  14. Access control within military C4ISR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschino, Mike

    2003-07-01

    Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) tactical battlefield systems must provide the right information and resources to the right individuals at the right time. At the same time, the C4ISR system must enforce access controls to prevent the wrong individuals from obtaining sensitive information, or consuming scarce resources. Because lives, missions and property depend upon them, these access control mechanisms must be effective, reliable, efficient and flexible. The mechanisms employed must suit the nature of the items that are to be protected, as well as the varieties of access policies that must be enforced, and the types of access that will be made to these items. Some access control technologies are inherently centralized, while others are suitable for distributed implementation. The C4ISR architect must select from among the available technologies a combination of mechanisms that eases the burden of policy administration, but is inherently survivable, accurate, resource efficient, and which provides low latency. This paper explores various alternative access enforcement mechanisms, and assesses their effectiveness in managing policy-driven access control within the battlespace.

  15. Cometary coma chemical composition (C4) mission. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Clark, B. C.; Niemann, H. B.; Alexander, M.; Knocke, P. C.; O'Hara, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cometary missions are of enormous fundamental importance for many different space science disciplines, including exobiology. Comets are presumed relics of the earliest, most primitive material in the solar nebula and are related to the planetesimals. They undoubtedly provided a general enrichment of volatiles to the inner solar system (contributing to atmospheres and oceans) and may have been key to the origin of life. A Discovery class, comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, was selected for further study by NASA earlier this year. The C4 Mission is a highly focused and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission, concentrating exclusively on measurements which will lead to an understanding of the chemical composition and make-up of the cometary nucleus. The scientific goals of the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission are to rendezvous with a short-period comet and (1) to determine the elemental, chemical, and isotopic composition of the nucleus and (2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. Further, it is a goal to obtain preliminary data on the development of the coma (dust and gas composition) as a function of time and orbital position.

  16. Photorespiration in C4 grasses remains slow under drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Carmo-Silva, Ana E; Powers, Stephen J; Keys, Alfred J; Arrabaça, Maria Celeste; Parry, Martin A J

    2008-07-01

    The CO(2)-concentrating mechanism present in C(4) plants decreases the oxygenase activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and, consequently, photorespiratory rates in air. Under drought conditions, the intercellular CO(2) concentration may decrease and cause photorespiration to increase. The C(4) grasses Paspalum dilatatum Poiret, Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. and Zoysia japonica Steudel were grown in soil and drought was imposed by ceasing to provide water. Net CO(2) assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance to water vapour decreased with leaf dehydration. Decreased carbon and increased oxygen isotope composition were also observed under drought. The response of A to CO(2) suggested that the compensation point was zero in all species irrespective of the extent of drought stress. A slight decrease of A as O(2) concentration increased above 10% provided evidence for slow photorespiratory gas exchanges. Analysis of amino acids contained in the leaves, particularly the decrease of glycine after 30 s in darkness, supported the presence of slow photorespiration rates, but these were slightly faster in Cynodon dactylon than in Paspalum dilatatum and Zoysia japonica. Although the contents of glycine and serine increased with dehydration and mechanistic modelling of C(4) photosynthesis suggested slightly increased photorespiration rates in proportion to photosynthesis, the results provide evidence that photorespiration remained slow under drought conditions.

  17. Cometary coma chemical composition (C4) mission. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Clark, B. C.; Niemann, H. B.; Alexander, M.; Knocke, P. C.; O'Hara, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cometary missions are of enormous fundamental importance for many different space science disciplines, including exobiology. Comets are presumed relics of the earliest, most primitive material in the solar nebula and are related to the planetesimals. They undoubtedly provided a general enrichment of volatiles to the inner solar system (contributing to atmospheres and oceans) and may have been key to the origin of life. A Discovery class, comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, was selected for further study by NASA earlier this year. The C4 Mission is a highly focused and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission, concentrating exclusively on measurements which will lead to an understanding of the chemical composition and make-up of the cometary nucleus. The scientific goals of the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission are to rendezvous with a short-period comet and (1) to determine the elemental, chemical, and isotopic composition of the nucleus and (2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. Further, it is a goal to obtain preliminary data on the development of the coma (dust and gas composition) as a function of time and orbital position.

  18. C4: a real-time object detection framework.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianxin; Liu, Nini; Geyer, Christopher; Rehg, James M

    2013-10-01

    A real-time and accurate object detection framework, C(4), is proposed in this paper. C(4) achieves 20 fps speed and the state-of-the-art detection accuracy, using only one processing thread without resorting to special hardware such as GPU. The real-time accurate object detection is made possible by two contributions. First, we conjecture (with supporting experiments) that contour is what we should capture and signs of comparisons among neighboring pixels are the key information to capture contour cues. Second, we show that the CENTRIST visual descriptor is suitable for contour based object detection, because it encodes the sign information and can implicitly represent the global contour. When CENTRIST and linear classifier are used, we propose a computational method that does not need to explicitly generate feature vectors. It involves no image preprocessing or feature vector normalization, and only requires O(1) steps to test an image patch. C(4) is also friendly to further hardware acceleration. It has been applied to detect objects such as pedestrians, faces, and cars on benchmark data sets. It has comparable detection accuracy with state-of-the-art methods, and has a clear advantage in detection speed.

  19. Virulence of Group A Streptococci Is Enhanced by Human Complement Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ermert, David; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Joeris, Thorsten; Kaplan, Jakub; Pang, Catherine J.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Rice, Peter A.; Ram, Sanjay; Blom, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an important human bacterial pathogen that can cause invasive infections. Once it colonizes its exclusively human host, GAS needs to surmount numerous innate immune defense mechanisms, including opsonization by complement and consequent phagocytosis. Several strains of GAS bind to human-specific complement inhibitors, C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and/or Factor H (FH), to curtail complement C3 (a critical opsonin) deposition. This results in diminished activation of phagocytes and clearance of GAS that may lead to the host being unable to limit the infection. Herein we describe the course of GAS infection in three human complement inhibitor transgenic (tg) mouse models that examined each inhibitor (human C4BP or FH) alone, or the two inhibitors together (C4BPxFH or ‘double’ tg). GAS infection with strains that bound C4BP and FH resulted in enhanced mortality in each of the three transgenic mouse models compared to infection in wild type mice. In addition, GAS manifested increased virulence in C4BPxFH mice: higher organism burdens and greater elevations of pro-inflammatory cytokines and they died earlier than single transgenic or wt controls. The effects of hu-C4BP and hu-FH were specific for GAS strains that bound these inhibitors because strains that did not bind the inhibitors showed reduced virulence in the ‘double’ tg mice compared to strains that did bind; mortality was also similar in wild-type and C4BPxFH mice infected by non-binding GAS. Our findings emphasize the importance of binding of complement inhibitors to GAS that results in impaired opsonization and phagocytic killing, which translates to enhanced virulence in a humanized whole animal model. This novel hu-C4BPxFH tg model may prove invaluable in studies of GAS pathogenesis and for developing vaccines and therapeutics that rely on human complement activation for efficacy. PMID:26200783

  20. [The role of complement factor H in the pathogenesis of Borrelia infection].

    PubMed

    Gęca, Aleksandra; Mazurek, Urszula; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Niedworok, Elżbieta; Ziółko, Ewa; Kokot, Teresa

    2012-07-20

    Complement factor H (CFH) is one of the most important negative regulators of the alternative pathway of the complement system. It is a glycoprotein belonging to the protein H family, which is synthesized mainly in the liver and is composed into a globular protein consisting of 60 amino acid domains in the serum. It shows specificity for C3b molecule of the complement system present in the serum or bound to the cell surface. It inhibits the steady formation of C3 convertase enzymes and the binding of C2 to C4b and factor B to C3b. It accelerates the decomposition of C2a into C4b and the displacement of Bb from C3b. The present paper discusses the composition, properties and functions of the complement factor and the family it belongs to. The paper focuses in particular on its role in the pathogenesis of an infection caused by the spirochetes of the Borrelia genus. Through binding CFH and other related proteins, bacteria of the Borrelia species inhibit the key effect of the alternative pathway of the complement system - the lysis of spirochete cells dependent on the complement's activation. The mechanism enables pathogens to spread in the host organism and facilitates the evolution of the disease. Discovering the immune mechanisms of the infection caused by the spirochetes of the Borrelia genus may allow for implementing a therapy blocking the binding of complement factor H early enough, apart from the standard treatment of the disease.

  1. Structural insights on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Alcorlo, Martín; López-Perrote, Andrés; Delgado, Sandra; Yébenes, Hugo; Subías, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, César; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Llorca, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    The proteolytic cleavage of C3 to generate C3b is the central and most important step in the activation of complement, a major component of innate immunity. The comparison of the crystal structures of C3 and C3b illustrates large conformational changes during the transition from C3 to C3b. Exposure of a reactive thio-ester group allows C3b to bind covalently to surfaces such as pathogens or apoptotic cellular debris. The displacement of the thio-ester-containing domain (TED) exposes hidden surfaces that mediate the interaction with complement factor B to assemble the C3-convertase of the alternative pathway (AP). In addition, the displacement of the TED and its interaction with the macroglobulin 1 (MG1) domain generates an extended surface in C3b where the complement regulators factor H (FH), decay accelerating factor (DAF), membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and complement receptor 1 (CR1) can bind, mediating accelerated decay of the AP C3-convertase and proteolytic inactivation of C3b. In the last few years, evidence has accumulated revealing that the structure of C3b in solution is significantly more flexible than anticipated. We review our current knowledge on C3b structural flexibility to propose a general model where the TED can display a collection of conformations around the MG ring, as well as a few specialized positions where the TED is held in one of several fixed locations. Importantly, this conformational heterogeneity in C3b impacts complement regulation by affecting the interaction with regulators.

  2. Dissecting the sterol C-4 demethylation process in higher plants. From structures and genes to catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rahier, Alain

    2011-03-01

    Sterols become functional only after removal of the two methyl groups at C-4. This review focuses on the sterol C-4 demethylation process in higher plants. An intriguing aspect in the removal of the two C-4 methyl groups of sterol precursors in plants is that it does not occur consecutively as it does in yeast and animals, but is interrupted by several enzymatic steps. Each C-4 demethylation step involves the sequential participation of three individual enzymatic reactions including a sterol methyl oxidase (SMO), a 3β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase/C4-decarboxylase (3βHSD/D) and a 3-ketosteroid reductase (SR). The distant location of the two C-4 demethylations in the sterol pathway requires distinct SMOs with respective substrate specificity. Combination of genetic and molecular enzymological approaches allowed a thorough identification and functional characterization of two distinct families of SMOs genes and two 3βHSD/D genes. For the latter, these studies provided the first molecularly and functionally characterized HSDs from a short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family in plants, and the first data on 3-D molecular interactions of an enzyme of the postoxidosqualene cyclase sterol biosynthetic pathway with its substrate in animals, yeast and higher plants. Characterization of these three new components involved in C-4 demethylation participates to the completion of the molecular inventory of sterol synthesis in higher plants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Deriving C4 photosynthetic parameters from combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence using an Excel tool: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Bellasio, Chandra; Beerling, David J; Griffiths, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The higher photosynthetic potential of C4 plants has led to extensive research over the past 50 years, including C4 -dominated natural biomes, crops such as maize, or for evaluating the transfer of C4 traits into C3 lineages. Photosynthetic gas exchange can be measured in air or in a 2% Oxygen mixture using readily available commercial gas exchange and modulated PSII fluorescence systems. Interpretation of these data, however, requires an understanding (or the development) of various modelling approaches, which limit the use by non-specialists. In this paper we present an accessible summary of the theory behind the analysis and derivation of C4 photosynthetic parameters, and provide a freely available Excel Fitting Tool (EFT), making rigorous C4 data analysis accessible to a broader audience. Outputs include those defining C4 photochemical and biochemical efficiency, the rate of photorespiration, bundle sheath conductance to CO2 diffusion and the in vivo biochemical constants for PEP carboxylase. The EFT compares several methodological variants proposed by different investigators, allowing users to choose the level of complexity required to interpret data. We provide a complete analysis of gas exchange data on maize (as a model C4 organism and key global crop) to illustrate the approaches, their analysis and interpretation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. 670-nm light treatment reduces complement propagation following retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim Complement activation is associated with the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We aimed to investigate whether 670-nm light treatment reduces the propagation of complement in a light-induced model of atrophic AMD. Methods Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were pretreated with 9 J/cm2 670-nm light for 3 minutes daily over 5 days; other animals were sham treated. Animals were exposed to white light (1,000 lux) for 24 h, after which animals were kept in dim light (5 lux) for 7 days. Expression of complement genes was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and immunohistochemistry. Counts were made of C3-expressing monocytes/microglia using in situ hybridization. Photoreceptor death was also assessed using outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness measurements, and oxidative stress using immunohistochemistry for 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Results Following light damage, retinas pretreated with 670-nm light had reduced immunoreactivity for the oxidative damage maker 4-HNE in the ONL and outer segments, compared to controls. In conjunction, there was significant reduction in retinal expression of complement genes C1s, C2, C3, C4b, C3aR1, and C5r1 following 670 nm treatment. In situ hybridization, coupled with immunoreactivity for the marker ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (IBA1), revealed that C3 is expressed by infiltrating microglia/monocytes in subretinal space following light damage, which were significantly reduced in number after 670 nm treatment. Additionally, immunohistochemistry for C3 revealed a decrease in C3 deposition in the ONL following 670 nm treatment. Conclusions Our data indicate that 670-nm light pretreatment reduces lipid peroxidation and complement propagation in the degenerating retina. These findings have relevance to the cellular events of complement activation underling the pathogenesis of AMD, and highlight the potential of 670-nm light as a non-invasive anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:23181358

  5. Inactivation of C4orf26 in toothless placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Springer, Mark S; Starrett, James; Morin, Phillip A; Lanzetti, Agnese; Hayashi, Cheryl; Gatesy, John

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have reported inactivated copies of six enamel-related genes (AMBN, AMEL, AMTN, ENAM, KLK4, MMP20) and one dentin-related gene (DSPP) in one or more toothless vertebrates and/or vertebrates with enamelless teeth, thereby providing evidence that these genes are enamel or tooth-specific with respect to their critical functions that are maintained by natural selection. Here, we employ available genome sequences for edentulous and enamelless mammals to evaluate the enamel specificity of four genes (WDR72, SLC24A4, FAM83H, C4orf26) that have been implicated in amelogenesis imperfecta, a condition in which proper enamel formation is abrogated during tooth development. Coding sequences for WDR72, SCL24A4, and FAM83H are intact in four edentulous taxa (Chinese pangolin, three baleen whales) and three taxa (aardvark, nine-banded armadillo, Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) with enamelless teeth, suggesting that these genes have critical functions beyond their involvement in tooth development. By contrast, genomic data for C4orf26 reveal inactivating mutations in pangolin and bowhead whale as well as evidence for deletion of this gene in two minke whale species. Hybridization capture of exonic regions and PCR screens provide evidence for inactivation of C4orf26 in eight additional baleen whale species. However, C4orf26 is intact in all three species with enamelless teeth that were surveyed, as well as in 95 additional mammalian species with enamel-capped teeth. Estimates of selection intensity suggest that dN/dS ratios on branches leading to taxa with enamelless teeth are similar to the dN/dS ratio on branches leading to taxa with enamel-capped teeth. Based on these results, we conclude that C4orf26 is tooth-specific, but not enamel-specific, with respect to its essential functions that are maintained by natural selection. A caveat is that an alternative splice site variant, which translates exon 3 in a different reading frame, is putatively functional in

  6. Interaction of toxic venoms with the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Birdsey, Vanessa; Lindorfer, Jean; Gewurz, H.

    1971-01-01

    Thirty-nine venoms from various vertebrate and invertebrate species were tested for their ability to consume haemolytic complement (C) activity upon incubation in fresh guinea-pig serum. Nineteen had `anti-complementary' activity, and these were provisionally sorted into the following groups: Pattern I—exemplified by the Naja haje (Egyptian cobra) and six other Elapidae species (all cobras), which induced selective consumption of C3—C9, and led to formation of a stable C3—C9-consuming intermediate; Pattern II—exemplified by the Agkistrodon rhodostoma (Malayan pit viper), Bitis arietans (puff adder), Bothrops jararaca (South American pit viper), Bothrops atrox (Fer de Lance) and three other species, which induced marked consumption of C4 and C2, as well as C3—C9, but did not form a stable C3—C9-consuming intermediate; and individual animals, e.g. the Lachesis muta (bushmaster), which induced other patterns (III—VI) of complement component consumption. Active fractions of representative venoms were partially purified by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography and their interactions with the complement system characterized further. It is anticipated that these enzymes, with a capacity to activate the complement system in unique ways, will prove to be of further experimental usefulness. PMID:4398349

  7. Complement activation and effect of eculizumab in scleroderma renal crisis

    PubMed Central

    Devresse, Arnaud; Aydin, Selda; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Demoulin, Nathalie; Stordeur, Patrick; Lambert, Catherine; Gastoldi, Sara; Pirson, Yves; Jadoul, Michel; Morelle, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a life-threatening complication of systemic sclerosis characterized by abrupt onset of hypertension, thrombotic microangiopathy, and kidney injury. The mechanisms of the disease remain ill-defined, but a growing body of evidence suggests that activation of the complement system may be involved. Methods: Here, we report the case of a patient presenting with severe SRC and strong evidence of complement activation, both in serum and in the kidney, in the absence of genetic defect of the complement system. Results: Immunofluorescence studies on kidney biopsy showed significant deposits of C1q and C4d in the endothelium of renal arterioles, pointing toward activation of the classical pathway. Because of the dramatic clinical and histological severity, and the lack of response to early treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers and plasma exchange, the patient was treated with the specific C5 blocker eculizumab. Contrarily to conventional treatment, eculizumab efficiently blocked C5b-9 deposition ex vivo and maintained hematological remission. Unfortunately, the patient died from heart failure a few weeks later. Postmortem examination of the heart showed diffuse patchy interstitial fibrosis, the typical lesion of systemic sclerosis-related cardiomyopathy, but normal coronary arteries and myocardial microvasculature. Conclusion: SRC may lead to complement system activation through the classical pathway. Early administration of C5 inhibitor eculizumab may have therapeutic potential in patients with life-threatening SRC refractory to conventional treatment using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. PMID:27472742

  8. Mechanism and consequences of the duplication of the human C4/P450c21/gene X locus

    SciTech Connect

    Gitelman, S.E.; Bristow, J.; Miller, W.L. )

    1992-05-01

    The adjacent C4 and P450c21 genes encode the fourth component of serum complement and steroid 21-hydroxylase respectively, and are tandemly duplicated in the human, murine, and bovine genomes. We recently cloned a cDNA for another duplicated gene, operationally termed X, which overlaps the 3' end of human P450c21 and has the opposite transcriptional orientation. Thus, the organization of the locus is 5'-C4A-21A-XA-C4B-21B-XB-3'. To determine how this locus was duplicated, we sequenced the DNA at the duplication boundaries and the 7 kb between P450c21A and C4B comprising the XA locus. The sequences located the duplication boundaries precisely and indicate that the duplication occurred by nonhomologous recombination. The boundaries are substantially different from those of the corresponding duplication in the mouse genome, suggesting that similar gene duplications may have occurred independently in ancestors of rodents and primates after mammalian speciation. Compared with XB, the XA gene is truncated at its 5' end and bears a 121-bp intragenic deletion causing a frameshift and premature translational stop signal. Nevertheless, XA is transcribed into a stable 2.6-kb polyadenylated RNA that is expressed uniquely in the adrenal gland. 61 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Cigarette smoke can activate the alternative pathway of complement in vitro by modifying the third component of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Kew, R R; Ghebrehiwet, B; Janoff, A

    1985-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with significant increases in the number of pulmonary mononuclear phagocytes and neutrophils. A potent chemoattractant for these cells is C5a, a peptide generated during complement (C) activation. We, therefore, investigated the possibility that cigarette smoke could activate the complement system in vitro. Our results show that factor(s) (mol wt less than 1,000) present in an aqueous solution of whole, unfiltered cigarette smoke can deplete the hemolytic capacity of whole human serum in a dose-dependent manner. The particle-free, filtered gas phase of cigarette smoke is inactive. The smoke factor(s) do not activate serum C1, but do deplete serum C4 activity. Treatment of purified human C3 with whole smoke solution modifies the molecule such that its subsequent addition to serum (containing Mg/EGTA to block the classical pathway) results in consumption of hemolytic complement by activation of the alternative pathway. Smoke-modified C3 shows increased anodal migration in agarose electrophoresis, but this is not due to proteolytic cleavage of the molecule as evidenced by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In contrast to methylamine-treated C3, C3 treated with smoke is only partially susceptible to the action of the complement regulatory proteins Factors H and I. In addition, smoke-modified C3 has diminished binding to Factor H as compared with methylamine-treated C3. Finally, smoke-modified C3 incorporates [14C]methylamine which suggests that the thiolester bond may be intact. These data indicate that aqueous whole cigarette smoke solution can modify C3 and activate the alternative pathway of complement, perhaps by a previously unrecognized mechanism. Should this occur in vivo, complement activation might partly account for the extensive pulmonary leukocyte recruitment observed in smokers. Images PMID:3156879

  10. Critical Role and Therapeutic Control of the Lectin Pathway of Complement Activation in an Abortion-Prone Mouse Mating.

    PubMed

    Petitbarat, Marie; Durigutto, Paolo; Macor, Paolo; Bulla, Roberta; Palmioli, Alessandro; Bernardi, Anna; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Ledee, Nathalie; Chaouat, Gerard; Tedesco, Francesco

    2015-12-15

    The abortion-prone mating combination CBA/J × DBA/2 has been recognized as a model of preeclampsia, and complement activation has been implicated in the high rate of pregnancy loss observed in CBA/J mice. We have analyzed the implantation sites collected from DBA/2-mated CBA/J mice for the deposition of the complement recognition molecules using CBA/J mated with BALB/c mice as a control group. MBL-A was observed in the implantation sites of CBA/J × DBA/2 combination in the absence of MBL-C and was undetectable in BALB/c-mated CBA/J mice. Conversely, C1q was present in both mating combinations. Searching for other complement components localized at the implantation sites of CBA/J × DBA/2, we found C4 and C3, but we failed to reveal C1r. These data suggest that complement is activated through the lectin pathway and proceeds to completion of the activation sequence as revealed by C9 deposition. MBL-A was detected as early as 3.5 d of pregnancy, and MBL-A deficiency prevented pregnancy loss in the abortion-prone mating combination. The contribution of the terminal complex to miscarriage was supported by the finding that pregnancy failure was largely inhibited by the administration of neutralizing Ab to C5. Treatment of DBA/2-mated CBA/J mice with Polyman2 that binds to MBL-A with high affinity proved to be highly effective in controlling the activation of the lectin pathway and in preventing fetal loss. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. [Study of functional activity of components and factors of the human complement system].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, L V

    2002-01-01

    Development suitable for clinical researches of hemolytic methods of determination of functional activity of the first components of a complement has allowed to show diagnostic value of testing activity of complement components in comparison with their contents as antigens. It has predetermined necessity for building modern ELISA tests-systems for quantitative determination of functional activity of complement components. Such methods built for the first time allow to determine activity of components C1q, C2, C3, C4 (and a ratio of isotypes C4A and C4B), C1-inhibitor, factors B and D. Addition of these tests-systems ELISA systems for quantitative determination of components, and in case of C1-inhibitor of presence IgG, IgA and IgM autoantibodies against C1-inhibitor frames opportunities of an evaluation complement status of the patient, hereditary predisposition to such diseases as a stomach ulcer, the glaucoma, a clamidiosis, bacteroidosis, allows to carry out differential diagnostics of angioedema. Inhibition of covalent linkage C4b or C3b various endogenic and exogenous effectors during formation C3- and C5-convertases allows to understand processes of a regulation of a homeostasis, and also the mechanism of action of drugs.

  12. Properdin is critical for antibody-dependent bactericidal activity against Neisseria gonorrhoeae that recruit C4b-binding protein1

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sunita; Agarwal, Sarika; Vasudhev, Shreekant; Rice, Peter A.; Ram, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted disease caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, is an important cause of morbidity worldwide. A safe and effective vaccine against gonorrhea is needed because of emerging resistance of gonococci to almost every class of antibiotic. A gonococcal lipooligosaccharide (LOS) epitope defined by the monoclonal antibody (mAb), 2C7, is being evaluated as a candidate for development of an antibody-based vaccine. Immune antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae need to overcome several subversive mechanisms whereby gonococcus evades complement, including binding to C4b-binding protein (C4BP; classical pathway inhibitor) and factor H (alternative pathway [AP] inhibitor). The role of AP recruitment and in particular properdin in assisting killing of gonococci by specific antibodies is the subject of this study. We show that only those gonococcal strains that bind C4BP require properdin for killing by 2C7, whereas strains that do not bind C4BP are efficiently killed by 2C7 even when AP function is blocked. C3 deposition on bacteria mirrored killing. Recruitment of the AP by mAb 2C7, as measured by factor B binding, occurred in a properdin-dependent manner. These findings were confirmed using isogenic mutant strains that differed in their ability to bind to C4BP. Immune human serum that contained bactericidal antibodies directed against the 2C7 LOS epitope as well as murine anti-gonococcal antiserum, required functional properdin to kill C4BP binding strains, but not C4BP non-binding strains. Collectively, these data point to an important role for properdin in facilitating immune antibody-mediated complement-dependent killing of gonococcal strains that inhibit the classical pathway by recruiting C4BP. PMID:22368277

  13. The potential of C4 grasses for cellulosic biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    van der Weijde, Tim; Alvim Kamei, Claire L.; Torres, Andres F.; Vermerris, Wilfred; Dolstra, Oene; Visser, Richard G. F.; Trindade, Luisa M.

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of biorefinery technologies enabling plant biomass to be processed into biofuel, many researchers set out to study and improve candidate biomass crops. Many of these candidates are C4 grasses, characterized by a high productivity and resource use efficiency. In this review the potential of five C4 grasses as lignocellulosic feedstock for biofuel production is discussed. These include three important field crops—maize, sugarcane and sorghum—and two undomesticated perennial energy grasses—miscanthus and switchgrass. Although all these grasses are high yielding, they produce different products. While miscanthus and switchgrass are exploited exclusively for lignocellulosic biomass, maize, sorghum, and sugarcane are dual-purpose crops. It is unlikely that all the prerequisites for the sustainable and economic production of biomass for a global cellulosic biofuel industry will be fulfilled by a single crop. High and stable yields of lignocellulose are required in diverse environments worldwide, to sustain a year-round production of biofuel. A high resource use efficiency is indispensable to allow cultivation with minimal inputs of nutrients and water and the exploitation of marginal soils for biomass production. Finally, the lignocellulose composition of the feedstock should be optimized to allow its efficient conversion into biofuel and other by-products. Breeding for these objectives should encompass diverse crops, to meet the demands of local biorefineries and provide adaptability to different environments. Collectively, these C4 grasses are likely to play a central role in the supply of lignocellulose for the cellulosic ethanol industry. Moreover, as these species are evolutionary closely related, advances in each of these crops will expedite improvements in the other crops. This review aims to provide an overview of their potential, prospects and research needs as lignocellulose feedstocks for the commercial production of biofuel. PMID:23653628

  14. Adaptation responses in C4 photosynthesis of maize under salinity.

    PubMed

    Omoto, Eiji; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2012-03-15

    The effect of salinity on C(4) photosynthesis was examined in leaves of maize, a NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) type C(4) species. Potted plants with the fourth leaf blade fully developed were treated with 3% NaCl solution for 5d. Under salt treatment, the activities of pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase), NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) and NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH), which are derived mainly from mesophyll cells, increased, whereas those of NADP-ME and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, which are derived mainly from bundle sheath cells (BSCs), decreased. Immunocytochemical studies by electron microscopy revealed that PPDK protein increased, while the content of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase protein decreased under salinity. In salt-treated plants, the photosynthetic metabolites malate, pyruvate and starch decreased by 40, 89 and 81%, respectively. Gas-exchange analysis revealed that the net photosynthetic rate, the transpiration rate, stomatal conductance (g(s)) and the intercellular CO(2) concentration decreased strongly in salt-treated plants. The carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C) in these plants was significantly lower than that in control. These findings suggest that the decrease in photosynthetic metabolites under salinity was induced by a reduction in gas-exchange. Moreover, in addition to the decrease in g(s), the decrease in enzyme activities in BSCs was responsible for the decline of C(4) photosynthesis. The increase of PPDK, PEPCase, NADP-MDH, and NAD-MDH activities and the decrease of NADP-ME activity are interpreted as adaptation responses to salinity.

  15. Bayesian truthing as experimental verification of C4ISR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Forrester, Thomas; Romanov, Volodymyr; Wang, Wenjian; Nielsen, Thomas; Kostrzewski, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the general methodology for experimental verification/validation of C4ISR and other sensors' performance, is presented, based on Bayesian inference, in general, and binary sensors, in particular. This methodology, called Bayesian Truthing, defines Performance Metrics for binary sensors in: physics, optics, electronics, medicine, law enforcement, C3ISR, QC, ATR (Automatic Target Recognition), terrorism related events, and many others. For Bayesian Truthing, the sensing medium itself is not what is truly important; it is how the decision process is affected.

  16. Transport of C4-Dicarboxylates in Wolinella succinogenes

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, Roland; Gross, Roland; Simon, Jörg; Unden, Gottfried; Kröger, Achim

    2000-01-01

    C4-dicarboxylate transport is a prerequisite for anaerobic respiration with fumarate in Wolinella succinogenes, since the substrate site of fumarate reductase is oriented towards the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. W. succinogenes was found to transport C4-dicarboxylates (fumarate, succinate, malate, and aspartate) across the cytoplasmic membrane by antiport and uniport mechanisms. The electrogenic uniport resulted in dicarboxylate accumulation driven by anaerobic respiration. The molar ratio of internal to external dicarboxylate concentration was up to 103. The dicarboxylate antiport was either electrogenic or electroneutral. The electroneutral antiport required the presence of internal Na+, whereas the electrogenic antiport also operated in the absence of Na+. In the absence of Na+, no electrochemical proton potential (Δp) was measured across the membrane of cells catalyzing fumarate respiration. This suggests that the proton potential generated by fumarate respiration is dissipated by the concomitant electrogenic dicarboxylate antiport. Three gene loci (dcuA, dcuB, and dctPQM) encoding putative C4-dicarboxylate transporters were identified on the genome of W. succinogenes. The predicted gene products of dcuA and dcuB are similar to the Dcu transporters that are involved in the fumarate respiration of Escherichia coli with external C4-dicarboxylates. The genes dctP, -Q, and -M probably encode a binding-protein-dependent secondary uptake transporter for dicarboxylates. A mutant (DcuA− DcuB−) of W. succinogenes lacking the intact dcuA and dcuB genes grew by nitrate respiration with succinate as the carbon source but did not grow by fumarate respiration with fumarate, malate, or aspartate as substrates. The DcuA−, DcuB−, and DctQM− mutants grew by fumarate respiration as well as by nitrate respiration with succinate as the carbon source. Cells of the DcuA− DcuB− mutant performed fumarate respiration without generating a proton potential even in the

  17. Volatile/mobile trace elements in Karoonda /C4/ chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matza, S. D.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    Concentrations of ten volatile/mobile trace elements and of nonvolatile Co in the Karoonda (C4) meteorite were determined, and the atomic abundances relative to C1 are compared with values for the Murchison (C2) and Allende (C3) meteorites. Empirical Bi, In, and Tl data for Karoonda and heated Allende and Murchison are compared with theoretical curves for condensation from a gas of cosmic composition at low pressures. It is suggested that Karoonda might derive from low-temperature open-system metamorphism of pristine C3-like material.

  18. Complement in lupus nephritis: the good, the bad, and the unknown.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lihua; Quigg, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    The complement system consists of 3 pathways and more than 30 proteins, including those with biological activity that directly or indirectly mediate the effects of this system, plus a set of regulatory proteins necessary to prevent injudicious complement activation on host tissue. The role for complement in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is paradoxic. On one hand, the complement system appears to have protective features in that hereditary homozygous deficiencies of classic pathway components are associated with an increased risk for SLE. On the other hand, immune complex-mediated activation of complement in affected tissues is clearly evident in both experimental and human SLE along with pathologic features that are logical consequences of complement activation. By using accurate mouse models of SLE, we have gained remarkable insights into pathogenic features likely relevant to the human disease, and the ability to test potential therapies, some of which have made it to standard clinical use. Studies in genetically altered mice and using recombinant protein inhibitors of complement have confirmed what was believed but unproven-early complement proteins C1q and C4 are protective whereas complement activation later in the pathways is proinflammatory and deleterious. Two complement inhibitors, soluble complement receptor 1 (TP10, Avant Immunotherapeutics, Needham, MA) and a monoclonal anti-C5 antibody (Eculizumab, Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cheshire, CT) have been shown to inhibit complement safely and now are being investigated in a variety of clinical conditions. Although these and others earlier in their clinical development hold promise to be used therapeutically in lupus nephritis, this optimism must be tempered by the fact that the clinical trials to prove this remain fraught with obstacles.

  19. Carbon isotopes and water use efficiency in C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Patrick Z; Cousins, Asaph B

    2016-06-01

    Drought is a major agricultural problem worldwide. Therefore, selection for increased water use efficiency (WUE) in food and biofuel crop species will be an important trait in plant breeding programs. The leaf carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)Cleaf) has been suggested to serve as a rapid and effective high throughput phenotyping method for WUE in both C3 and C4 species. This is because WUE, leaf carbon discrimination (Δ(13)Cleaf), and δ(13)Cleaf are correlated through their relationships with intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures (Ci/Ca). However, in C4 plants, changing environmental conditions may influence photosynthetic efficiency (bundle-sheath leakiness) and post-photosynthetic fractionation that will potentially alter the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and Ci/Ca. Here we discuss how these factors influence the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and WUE, and the potential of using δ(13)Cleaf as a meaningful proxy for WUE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Complement System: A Prey of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Lidani, Kárita C. F.; Bavia, Lorena; Ambrosio, Altair R.; de Messias-Reason, Iara J.

    2017-01-01

    membrane-derived vesicles from host cells, which prevent the activity of C3 convertase C4b2a and thereby may hinder complement. In this review, we aim to present an overview on the strategies used by T. cruzi in order to circumvent the activation of complement and, consequently, its biological effects. PMID:28473804

  1. Serological and Genetic Evidence for Altered Complement System Functionality in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Findings of the GAPAID Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Prechl, József; Papp, Krisztián; Hérincs, Zoltán; Péterfy, Hajna; Lóránd, Veronika; Szittner, Zoltán; Estonba, Andone; Rovero, Paolo; Paolini, Ilaria; del Amo, Jokin; Uribarri, Maria; Alcaro, Maria Claudia; Ruiz-Larrañaga, Otsanda; Migliorini, Paola; Czirják, László

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with multifactorial ethiopathogenesis. The complement system is involved in both the early and late stages of disease development and organ damage. To better understand autoantibody mediated complement consumption we examined ex vivo immune complex formation on autoantigen arrays. We recruited patients with SLE (n = 211), with other systemic autoimmune diseases (n = 65) and non-autoimmune control subjects (n = 149). Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected and serum complement levels were determined. The genotype of SNP rs1143679 in the ITGAM gene was also determined. Ex vivo formation of immune complexes, with respect to IgM, IgG, complement C4 and C3 binding, was examined using a functional immunoassay on autoantigen microarray comprising nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Complement consumption of nucleic acids increased upon binding of IgM and IgG even when serum complement levels were decreased due to consumption in SLE patients. A negative correlation between serum complement levels and ex vivo complement deposition on nucleic acid autoantigens is demonstrated. On the contrary, complement deposition on tested protein and lipid autoantigens showed positive correlation with C4 levels. Genetic analysis revealed that the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 in complement receptor type 3 is associated with an increased production of anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies. Notwithstanding, homozygous carriers of the previously reported susceptible allele (AA) had lower levels of dsDNA specific IgM among SLE patients. Both the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 and the high ratio of nucleic acid specific IgG/IgM were associated with multiple organ involvement. In summary, secondary complement deficiency in SLE does not impair opsonization of nucleic-acid-containing autoantigens but does affect other antigens and potentially other complement dependent processes. Dysfunction of the receptor recognizing complement

  2. Serological and Genetic Evidence for Altered Complement System Functionality in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Findings of the GAPAID Consortium.

    PubMed

    Prechl, József; Papp, Krisztián; Hérincs, Zoltán; Péterfy, Hajna; Lóránd, Veronika; Szittner, Zoltán; Estonba, Andone; Rovero, Paolo; Paolini, Ilaria; Del Amo, Jokin; Uribarri, Maria; Alcaro, Maria Claudia; Ruiz-Larrañaga, Otsanda; Migliorini, Paola; Czirják, László

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with multifactorial ethiopathogenesis. The complement system is involved in both the early and late stages of disease development and organ damage. To better understand autoantibody mediated complement consumption we examined ex vivo immune complex formation on autoantigen arrays. We recruited patients with SLE (n = 211), with other systemic autoimmune diseases (n = 65) and non-autoimmune control subjects (n = 149). Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected and serum complement levels were determined. The genotype of SNP rs1143679 in the ITGAM gene was also determined. Ex vivo formation of immune complexes, with respect to IgM, IgG, complement C4 and C3 binding, was examined using a functional immunoassay on autoantigen microarray comprising nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Complement consumption of nucleic acids increased upon binding of IgM and IgG even when serum complement levels were decreased due to consumption in SLE patients. A negative correlation between serum complement levels and ex vivo complement deposition on nucleic acid autoantigens is demonstrated. On the contrary, complement deposition on tested protein and lipid autoantigens showed positive correlation with C4 levels. Genetic analysis revealed that the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 in complement receptor type 3 is associated with an increased production of anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies. Notwithstanding, homozygous carriers of the previously reported susceptible allele (AA) had lower levels of dsDNA specific IgM among SLE patients. Both the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 and the high ratio of nucleic acid specific IgG/IgM were associated with multiple organ involvement. In summary, secondary complement deficiency in SLE does not impair opsonization of nucleic-acid-containing autoantigens but does affect other antigens and potentially other complement dependent processes. Dysfunction of the receptor recognizing complement

  3. C4 grasses prosper as carbon dioxide eliminates desiccation in warmed semi-arid grassland.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jack A; LeCain, Daniel R; Pendall, Elise; Blumenthal, Dana M; Kimball, Bruce A; Carrillo, Yolima; Williams, David G; Heisler-White, Jana; Dijkstra, Feike A; West, Mark

    2011-08-03

    Global warming is predicted to induce desiccation in many world regions through increases in evaporative demand. Rising CO(2) may counter that trend by improving plant water-use efficiency. However, it is not clear how important this CO(2)-enhanced water use efficiency might be in offsetting warming-induced desiccation because higher CO(2) also leads to higher plant biomass, and therefore greater transpirational surface. Furthermore, although warming is predicted to favour warm-season, C(4) grasses, rising CO(2) should favour C(3), or cool-season plants. Here we show in a semi-arid grassland that elevated CO(2) can completely reverse the desiccating effects of moderate warming. Although enrichment of air to 600 p.p.m.v. CO(2) increased soil water content (SWC), 1.5/3.0 °C day/night warming resulted in desiccation, such that combined CO(2) enrichment and warming had no effect on SWC relative to control plots. As predicted, elevated CO(2) favoured C(3) grasses and enhanced stand productivity, whereas warming favoured C(4) grasses. Combined warming and CO(2) enrichment stimulated above-ground growth of C(4) grasses in 2 of 3 years when soil moisture most limited plant productivity. The results indicate that in a warmer, CO(2)-enriched world, both SWC and productivity in semi-arid grasslands may be higher than previously expected.

  4. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  5. Systemic complement profiling in multiple sclerosis as a biomarker of disease state

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, G; Hakobyan, S; Hirst, CL; Harris, CL; Loveless, S; Mitchell, JP; Pickersgill, TP; Robertson, NP

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence of significant and dynamic systemic activation and upregulation of complement in multiple sclerosis (MS), which may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Objective: We aimed to investigate the pathological role of complement in MS and the potential role for complement profiling as a biomarker of MS disease state. Methods: Key components of the classical, alternative and terminal pathways of complement were measured in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with MS in different clinical phases of disease and in matched controls. Results: Increased plasma levels of C3 (p<0.003), C4 (p<0.001), C4a (p<0.001), C1 inhibitor (p<0.001), and factor H (p<0.001), and reduced levels of C9 (p<0.001) were observed in MS patients compared with controls. Combined profiling of these analytes produced a statistical model with a predictive value of 97% for MS and 73% for clinical relapse when combined with selected demographic data. CSF-plasma correlations suggested that source of synthesis of these components was both systemic and central. Conclusion: These data provide further evidence of alterations in both local and systemic expression and activation of complement in MS and suggest that complement profiling may be informative as a biomarker of MS disease, although further work is needed to determine its use in distinguishing MS from its differential. PMID:22354735

  6. A Unique Model Platform for C4 Plant Systems and Synthetic Biology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-10

    ABSTRACT We are developing Setaria viridis as a C4 model to accelerate metabolic engineering of key C4 crop species. A genome scale metabolic...14. ABSTRACT We are developing Setaria viridis as a C4 model to accelerate metabolic engineering of key C4 crop species. A genome scale metabolic...Performance: 3 June 2014 – 2 June 2015 Abstract: We are developing Setaria viridis as a C4 model to accelerate metabolic engineering of key C4 crop

  7. Persistent complement activation on tumor cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, F.; Rus, H. G.; Retegan, M.; Vlaicu, R.

    1992-01-01

    The neoantigens of the C5b-9 complement complex, IgG, C3, C4, S-protein/vitronectin, fibronectin, and macrophages were localized on 17 samples of breast cancer and on 6 samples of benign breast tumors using polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies and the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase technique. All the tissue samples with carcinoma in each the TNM stages presented C5b-9 deposits on the membranes of tumor cells, thin granules on cell remnants, and diffuse deposits in the necrotic areas. When chemotherapy and radiation therapy preceded surgery, C5b-9 deposits were more intense and extended. The C5b-9 deposits were absent in all the samples with benign lesions. S-protein/vitronectin was present as fibrillar deposits in the connective tissue matrix and as diffuse deposits around the tumor cells, less intense and extended than fibronectin. IgG, C3, and C4 deposits were present only in carcinoma samples. The presence of C5b-9 deposits is indicative of complement activation and its subsequent pathogenetic effects in breast cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:1374587

  8. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J.; Julian, Bruce A.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan–binding lectin–associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome–wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H–related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1–containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease. PMID:25694468

  9. Activation of complement pathways after contusion-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Aileen J; Robert, Stephanie; Huang, Wencheng; Young, Wise; Cotman, Carl W

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that a cellular inflammatory response is initiated, and inflammatory cytokines are synthesized, following experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the complement cascade, a major component of both the innate and adaptive immune response, is also activated following experimental SCI. We investigated the pathways, cellular localization, timecourse, and degree of complement activation in rat spinal cord following acute contusion-induced SCI using the New York University (NYU) weight drop impactor. Mild and severe injuries (12.5 and 50 mm drop heights) at 1, 7, and 42 days post injury time points were evaluated. Classical (C1q and C4), alternative (Factor B) and terminal (C5b-9) complement pathways were strongly activated within 1 day of SCI. Complement protein immunoreactivity was predominantly found in cell types vulnerable to degeneration, neurons and oligodendrocytes, and was not generally observed in inflammatory or astroglial cells. Surprisingly, immunoreactivity for complement proteins was also evident 6 weeks after injury, and complement activation was observed as far as 20 mm rostral to the site of injury. Axonal staining by C1q and Factor B was also observed, suggesting a potential role for the complement cascade in demyelination or axonal degeneration. These data support the hypothesis that complement activation plays a role in SCI.

  10. Complement fixation test to C. burnetii

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003520.htm Complement fixation test to C burnetii To use the sharing features on this ... JavaScript. The complement fixation test to Coxiella burnetii ( C burnetti ) is a blood test that checks for ...

  11. Electron-impact detachment and dissociation of C4- ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Padellec, A.; Rabilloud, F.; Pegg, D.; Neau, A.; Hellberg, F.; Thomas, R.; Schmidt, H. T.; Larsson, M.; Danared, H.; Källberg, A.; Andersson, K.; Hanstorp, D.

    2001-12-01

    CRYRING was used to study collision processes between an electron and a negative ion cluster C4-. The total detachment cross sections for the production of the neutral 4C, 3C, 2C, and C fragments were measured. The cross sections for pure detachment, and for detachment plus dissociation leading to the production of C3+C, 2C2, and C2+2C were extracted using a grid. It was found that the pure detachment process overwhelmingly dominates all other fragmentation processes. The threshold location for the detachment channel is found to be around 6.0 eV. Although the doubly charged negative ion C42- has received little previous attention, a defined near-threshold resonance observed in the detachment cross section curve, has been associated with the short-lived state C42- (0.7 fs lifetime).

  12. Leukotriene C4 elimination and metabolism in man

    SciTech Connect

    Maltby, N.H.; Taylor, G.W.; Ritter, J.M.; Moore, K.; Fuller, R.W.; Dollery, C.T. )

    1990-01-01

    Three doses of radiolabeled leukotriene C4 (0.2 to 15 muCi) were infused into three subjects to investigate its metabolism and routes of elimination during 4 days. Between 12% and 20% of the infused dose was recovered in the urine within 24 hours, of which a substantial and relatively constant proportion (4.1% to 6.3% total dose) appeared as leukotriene E4 (LTE4), mainly in the first 4 hours. Polar omega-oxidation products, N-acetyl LTE4, and tritiated water were also present. Fecal elimination accounted for a further 30% to 40% of the infused dose. In the absence of altered metabolism or biliary excretion, urinary LTE4 may be a useful measure of whole body production of the cysteinyl leukotrienes.

  13. Simulation of the Reflected Blast Wave froma C-4 Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Kuhl, A L; Tringe, J W

    2011-08-01

    The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 {micro}m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 8 ranges (GR = 0, 2, 4, 8, 10, and 12 inches) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 2 inches), which were dominated by jetting effects.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide regulated photosynthesis in C4-pepc transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Ren, C G; Li, X; Liu, X L; Wei, X D; Dai, C C

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the photosynthetic physiological basis in 'PC' transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.), showing high-level expression of the gene encoding C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (pepc), by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The C4-PEPC gene (pepc) from maize in the transgenic rice plants was checked by PCR. Comparison of yield components and photosynthetic indices between PC and untransformed wild-type (WT) plants indicated that increased yield in PC was associated with higher net photosynthetic rate and higher activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Both PC and WT plants were treated with 1 mmol L(-1) abscisic acid (ABA), 0.04% 1-butanol (BA), 2 mmol L(-1) neomycin (NS), or 2 mmol L(-1) diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) to investigate the relationship between photosynthesis and levels of H2O2 and phosphatidic acid. In both PC and WT, ABA induced H2O2 generation and simultaneous decrease in stomatal conductance (g(s)). PC plants treated with BA showed decreased H2O2 content and strongly increased g(s) within 2 h of treatment. Similar results were observed in response to DPI treatment in PC. However, WT did not observe the decrease of H2O2 during the treatments of BA and DPI. The reduced H2O2 content in PC caused by BA treatment differed to that induced by DPI because BA did not inhibit NADPH oxidase activities. While BA induced a larger PEPC activity in PC, and higher catalase activity as well. These results indicated that the regulation of endogenous H2O2 metabolism of PC could be helpful for enhancing photosynthetic capability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Senescence, dormancy and tillering in perennial C4 grasses.

    PubMed

    Sarath, Gautam; Baird, Lisa M; Mitchell, Robert B

    2014-03-01

    Perennial, temperate, C4 grasses, such as switchgrass and miscanthus have been tabbed as sources of herbaceous biomass for the production of green fuels and chemicals based on a number of positive agronomic traits. Although there is important literature on the management of these species for biomass production on marginal lands, numerous aspects of their biology are as yet unexplored at the molecular level. Perenniality, a key agronomic trait, is a function of plant dormancy and winter survival of the below-ground parts of the plants. These include the crowns, rhizomes and meristems that will produce tillers. Maintaining meristem viability is critical for the continued survival of the plants. Plant tillers emerge from the dormant crown and rhizome meristems at the start of the growing period in the spring, progress through a phase of vegetative growth, followed by flowering and eventually undergo senescence. There is nutrient mobilization from the aerial portions of the plant to the crowns and rhizomes during tiller senescence. Signals arising from the shoots and from the environment can be expected to be integrated as the plants enter into dormancy. Plant senescence and dormancy have been well studied in several dicot species and offer a potential framework to understand these processes in temperate C4 perennial grasses. The availability of latitudinally adapted populations for switchgrass presents an opportunity to dissect molecular mechanisms that can impact senescence, dormancy and winter survival. Given the large increase in genomic and other resources for switchgrass, it is anticipated that projected molecular studies with switchgrass will have a broader impact on related species.

  16. Pharmacological modulation of human platelet leukotriene C4-synthase.

    PubMed

    Sala, A; Folco, G; Henson, P M; Murphy, R C

    1997-03-21

    The aim of this study was to test if human platelet leukotriene C4-synthase (LTC4-S) is pharmacologically different from cloned and expressed LTC4-S and, in light of the significant homologies between 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) and LTC4-S, if different potencies of leukotriene synthesis inhibitors acting through binding with FLAP (FLAP inhibitors) reflect in different potencies as LTC4-S inhibitors. Leukotriene C4 (LTC4) synthesis by washed human platelets supplemented with synthetic leukotriene A4 (LTA4) was studied in the absence and presence of two different, structurally unrelated FLAP inhibitors (MK-886 and BAY-X1005) as well as a direct 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor (zileuton). LTC4 production was analyzed by RP-HPLC coupled to diode array detection. We report that human platelet LTC4-S was inhibited by MK-886 and BAY-X1005 (IC50 of 4.7 microM and 91.2 microM, respectively), but not by zileuton (inactive up to 300 microM); all 3 compounds were able to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase metabolite biosynthesis in intact human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (IC50 of 0.044 microM, 0.85 microM, and 1.5 microM, respectively). Platelet LTC4-S does not appear pharmacologically different from expression cloned LTC4-S. LTC4-S inhibition by FLAP inhibitors is in agreement with the significant homology reported for expression-cloned LTC4-S with FLAP, Furthermore, functional homology of the binding sites for inhibitors on LTC4-S and FLAP is suggested by the conservation of the relative potencies of MK-886 and BAY-X1005 vs FLAP-dependent 5-lipoxygenase activity and LTC4-S inhibition: MK-886 was 19.3-fold more potent than BAY-X1005 as FLAP inhibitor and 19.6-fold more potent than BAY-X1005 as LTC4-S inhibitor.

  17. Solid phase detection of C4d-fixing HLA antibodies to predict rejection in high immunological risk kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Gregor; Wahrmann, Markus; Schwaiger, Elisabeth; Kikić, Željko; Winzer, Christine; Hörl, Walter H; Mühlbacher, Ferdinand; Hoke, Matthias; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Regele, Heinz; Böhmig, Georg A

    2013-02-01

    Protocols for recipient desensitization may allow for successful kidney transplantation across major immunological barriers. Desensitized recipients, however, still face a considerable risk of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), which underscores the need for risk stratification tools to individually tailor treatment. Here, we investigated whether solid phase detection of complement-fixing donor-specific antibodies (DSA) has the potential to improve AMR prediction in high-risk transplants. The study included 68 sensitized recipients of deceased donor kidney allografts who underwent peritransplant immunoadsorption for alloantibody depletion (median cytotoxic panel reactivity: 73%; crossmatch conversion: n = 21). Pre and post-transplant sera were subjected to detection of DSA-triggered C4d deposition ([C4d]DSA) applying single-antigen bead (SAB) technology. While standard crossmatch and [IgG]SAB testing failed to predict outcomes in our desensitized patients, detection of preformed [C4d]DSA (n = 44) was tightly associated with C4d-positive AMR [36% vs. 8%, P = 0.01; binary logistic regression: odds ratio: 10.1 (95% confidence interval: 1.6-64.2), P = 0.01]. Moreover, long-term death-censored graft survival tended to be worse among [C4d]DSA-positive recipients (P = 0.07). There were no associations with C4d-negative AMR or cellular rejection. [C4d]DSA detected 6 months post-transplantation were not related to clinical outcomes. Our data suggest that pretransplant SAB-based detection of complement-fixing DSA may be a valuable tool for risk stratification. © 2012 The Authors Transplant International © 2012 European Society for Organ Transplantation. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Complement and Immunoregulation in Tissue Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    19), T cells (20, 21), neutrophils (22), endothelial cells and platelets (23). Deposition of natural antibodies, subsequent complement activation ...of the ischemic cells to which natural IgM bind and subsequently activate complement (27, 28). Deficiency of complement factors has been shown to be...expression by damaged cells of antigens that are recognized by circulating natural antibodies, which fix and activate complement. This is supported by

  19. Activation of the lectin complement pathway in post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Satoshi; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita, Teizo; Takeshita, Morishige; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the correlation between complement pathways and clinicopathological findings in post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (PSAGN). Immunohistological staining was performed on renal specimens obtained from 18 patients with PSAGN and 20 controls, using antibodies against IgG, IgA, IgM, C1q, C3c, C4, fibrinogen, factor B, C4-binding protein (C4-bp), C5b-9, CD59, mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1). Controls showed no deposition of any antibody. In seven patients, glomerular deposits of C3c, C4, factor B, C4-bp, C5b-9, CD59, MBL and MASP-1 were found. In the remaining 11 patients, glomerular deposits of neither C4 nor MBL/MASP-1 were found, and glomerular deposits of C3c, factor B, C5b-9 and CD59 were evident. C4-bp was detected in seven of these 11 patients. Glomerular deposits of fibrinogen were detected in five of seven patients with MBL/MASP-1 deposits and in only two of 11 patients without MBL/MASP-1 deposits. Hematuria was prolonged in three of seven patients with MBL/MASP-1 deposits through follow up, whereas urinalysis was normal in all patients without MBL/MASP-1 deposits. However, the histological indicators were not different between the two groups. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report to show that complement activation through both the alternative and lectin pathways is evident in some patients with PSAGN. Complement activation is promoted in situ in the glomerulus.

  20. An Integrated Theory of Complement Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sag, Ivan A.; Pollard, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Presents an integrated theory of the syntactic and semantic representation of complements where the unexpressed subjects of the embedded verb-phrase complement are subject to certain interpretation restrictions. It is argued that the grammar of English controlled complements can be derived from the interaction of semantically based principles of…

  1. An Integrated Theory of Complement Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sag, Ivan A.; Pollard, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Presents an integrated theory of the syntactic and semantic representation of complements where the unexpressed subjects of the embedded verb-phrase complement are subject to certain interpretation restrictions. It is argued that the grammar of English controlled complements can be derived from the interaction of semantically based principles of…

  2. Complement in the Homeostatic and Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Alawieh, Ali; Elvington, Andrew; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a component of the immune system involved in both recognition and response to pathogens, and it is implicated in an increasing number of homeostatic and disease processes. It is well documented that reperfusion of ischemic tissue results in complement activation and an inflammatory response that causes post-reperfusion injury. This occurs following cerebral ischemia and reperfusion and triggers secondary damage that extends beyond the initial infarcted area, an outcome that has rationalized the use of complement inhibitors as candidate therapeutics after stroke. In the central nervous system, however, recent studies have revealed that complement also has essential roles in synaptic pruning, neurogenesis, and neuronal migration. In the context of recovery after stroke, these apparent divergent functions of complement may account for findings that the protective effect of complement inhibition in the acute phase after stroke is not always maintained in the subacute and chronic phases. The development of effective stroke therapies based on modulation of the complement system will require a detailed understanding of complement-dependent processes in both early neurodegenerative events and delayed neuro-reparatory processes. Here, we review the role of complement in normal brain physiology, the events initiating complement activation after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, and the contribution of complement to both injury and recovery. We also discuss how the design of future experiments may better characterize the dual role of complement in recovery after ischemic stroke. PMID:26322048

  3. Invasive C4 Perennial Grass Alters Net Ecosystem Exchange in Mixed C3/C4 Savanna Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basham, T. S.; Litvak, M.

    2006-12-01

    The invasion of ecosystems by non-native plants that differ from native plants in physiological characteristics and phenology has the potential to alter ecosystem function. In Texas and other regions of the southern central plains of the United States, the introduced C4 perennial grass, Bothriochloa ischaemum, invades C3/C4 mixed grasslands and savannas, resulting in decreased plant community diversity (Gabbard 2003; Harmoney et al 2004). The objective of this study was to quantify how the conversion of these mixed grass communities to C4 dominated, B. ischaemum monocultures impacts carbon cycling and sequestration. Seasonal measurements of Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of CO2, leaf level gas exchange and soil respiration were compared between savanna grassland plots composed of either naturally occurring B. ischaemum monocultures or native mixed grasses (n=16). NEE was measured using a closed system chamber that attached to permanently installed stainless steel bases. Temperature, soil moisture, aerial percent species cover and leaf area index were also monitored in plots to explain variability in measured responses. Results showed that NEE differed seasonally between invaded and native plots due to 1) greater leaf surface area per unit ground area in invaded plots, 2) differences in phenological patterns of plant activity and 3) differences in responses to water limitation between invaded and native plots. Cold season and summer drought NEE were driven primarily by belowground respiration in both plot types, however spring uptake activity commenced two months later in invaded plots. This later start in invaded plots was compensated for by greater uptake throughout the growing season and in particular during the drier summer months. Differences in NEE between plot types were not due to differences in soil respiration nor were they due to greater leaf level photosynthetic capabilities of B. ischaemum relative to the dominant native grasses. NEE, soil respiration and

  4. Complement activation associated with polysorbate 80 in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shidong; Liu, Zhaohua; Hou, Li; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jiao; Wang, Hong; Du, Wu; Wang, Wenfang; Qin, Yizhuo; Liu, Zhaoping

    2013-01-01

    Polysorbate 80 (Tween® 80) is the most extensively used surfactant in parenteral drug formulation. Its application as an adjunct for intravenous drug administration is approved by the Food and Drug Administration. However, severe hypersensitive reactions, which are typical non-immune anaphylactic reactions (pseudoallergy) characterized by the release of histamine and unvaried IgE antibodies, have been associated with Tween® 80. In order to explore the non-immune anaphylactic mechanisms of Tween® 80, we performed in vivo experiments to assess the changes in physiological and hematologic indicators after intravenous injection of Tween® 80 into dogs. Tween® 80 induced the release of histamine, and a 2-fold increase in SC5b-9, 2.5-fold increase in C4d, 1.3-fold increase in Bb, while IgE remained unchanged. It also produced changes in pulmonary pressure, systemic pressure and ECG. In in vitro experiments, Tween® 80 was incubated with dog serum in the presence of an inhibitor of complement activation (EGTA/Mg(2+)). Under these conditions, Tween® 80 increased the contents of C4d and Bb. The results of this study reveal that Tween® 80 can cause cardiopulmonary distress in dogs and activate the complement system through classical and alternative pathways as indicated in both in vivo and in vitro preparations. Moreover, they demonstrate the utility of the beagle dog as an animal model for the study of complement activation-related pseudoallergy. These findings raise concerns with regard to the indiscriminate use of Tween® 80 in clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [The practical assessment of complement involvement in anaphylactoid reactions].

    PubMed

    Watkins, J

    1982-01-01

    While no single test is entirely satisfactory for the investigation of anaphylactoid response to intravenous anaesthetic drugs, changes in plasma chemistry are particularly easy to measure and may be carried out at centres remote from the clinical incident. Analysis should be carried out on a sequence of blood samples taken into EDTA over the 24 hours following such reaction. Few reactions are classical Type I, IgE antibody mediated, reactions and most involved the complement proteins in some specific manner. By measuring changes in the levels and activity of the complement proteins, particularly C3, C4 and C5, between samples, it is possible to deduce the likely mechanism of a reaction and thus to advise more wisely on future treatment of the patient. Although levels of any plasma protein may be readily measured by single radial immunodiffusion (Mancini technique) using appropriate specific antisera, one assessment of complement activity (degree of conversion) has until now largely been restricted to technically exacting Laurell immunoelectrophoresis. Two simple immunoelectrophoretic techniques are described here which do not require such expertise.

  6. Complement activation in chromosome 13 dementias. Similarities with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, Agueda; Revesz, Tamas; Lashley, Tammaryn; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Magnotti, Laura; Braendgaard, Hans; Plant, Gordon; Bojsen-Møller, Marie; Holton, Janice; Frangione, Blas; Ghiso, Jorge

    2002-12-20

    Chromosome 13 dementias, familial British dementia (FBD) and familial Danish dementia (FDD), are associated with neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular amyloidosis, with striking neuropathological similarities to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite the structural differences among the amyloid subunits (ABri in FBD, ADan in FDD, and Abeta in AD), these disorders are all characterized by the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and parenchymal and vascular amyloid deposits co-localizing with markers of glial activation, suggestive of local inflammation. Proteins of the complement system and their pro-inflammatory activation products are among the inflammation markers associated with AD lesions. Immunohistochemistry of FBD and FDD brain sections demonstrated the presence of complement activation components of the classical and alternative pathways as well as the neo-epitope of the membrane attack complex. Hemolytic experiments and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for the activation products iC3b, C4d, Bb, and C5b-9 indicated that ABri and ADan are able to fully activate the complement cascade at levels comparable to those generated by Abeta1-42. ABri and ADan specifically bound C1q with high affinity and formed stable complexes in physiological conditions. Activation proceeds approximately 70-75% through the classical pathway while only approximately 25-30% seems to occur through the alternative pathway. The data suggest that the chronic inflammatory response generated by the amyloid peptides in vivo might be a contributing factor for the pathogenesis of FBD and FDD and, in more general terms, to other neurodegenerative conditions.

  7. Evolution of C4 Photosynthesis in the Genus Flaveria: How Many and Which Genes Does It Take to Make C4?[W

    PubMed Central

    Gowik, Udo; Bräutigam, Andrea; Weber, Katrin L.; Weber, Andreas P.M.; Westhoff, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Selective pressure exerted by a massive decline in atmospheric CO2 levels 55 to 40 million years ago promoted the evolution of a novel, highly efficient mode of photosynthetic carbon assimilation known as C4 photosynthesis. C4 species have concurrently evolved multiple times in a broad range of plant families, and this multiple and parallel evolution of the complex C4 trait indicates a common underlying evolutionary mechanism that might be elucidated by comparative analyses of related C3 and C4 species. Here, we use mRNA-Seq analysis of five species within the genus Flaveria, ranging from C3 to C3-C4 intermediate to C4 species, to quantify the differences in the transcriptomes of closely related plant species with varying degrees of C4-associated characteristics. Single gene analysis defines the C4 cycle enzymes and transporters more precisely and provides new candidates for yet unknown functions as well as identifies C4 associated pathways. Molecular evidence for a photorespiratory CO2 pump prior to the establishment of the C4 cycle-based CO2 pump is provided. Cluster analysis defines the upper limit of C4-related gene expression changes in mature leaves of Flaveria as 3582 alterations. PMID:21705644

  8. Evolution of C4 photosynthesis in the genus Flaveria: how many and which genes does it take to make C4?

    PubMed

    Gowik, Udo; Bräutigam, Andrea; Weber, Katrin L; Weber, Andreas P M; Westhoff, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Selective pressure exerted by a massive decline in atmospheric CO(2) levels 55 to 40 million years ago promoted the evolution of a novel, highly efficient mode of photosynthetic carbon assimilation known as C(4) photosynthesis. C(4) species have concurrently evolved multiple times in a broad range of plant families, and this multiple and parallel evolution of the complex C(4) trait indicates a common underlying evolutionary mechanism that might be elucidated by comparative analyses of related C(3) and C(4) species. Here, we use mRNA-Seq analysis of five species within the genus Flaveria, ranging from C(3) to C(3)-C(4) intermediate to C(4) species, to quantify the differences in the transcriptomes of closely related plant species with varying degrees of C(4)-associated characteristics. Single gene analysis defines the C(4) cycle enzymes and transporters more precisely and provides new candidates for yet unknown functions as well as identifies C(4) associated pathways. Molecular evidence for a photorespiratory CO(2) pump prior to the establishment of the C(4) cycle-based CO(2) pump is provided. Cluster analysis defines the upper limit of C(4)-related gene expression changes in mature leaves of Flaveria as 3582 alterations.

  9. Study of the variables associated with local complement activation in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Segarra-Medrano, Alfons; Carnicer-Caceres, Clara; Valtierra-Carmeno, Naiara; Agraz-Pamplona, Irene; Ramos-Terrades, Natalia; Jatem Escalante, Elías; Ostos-Roldan, Elena

    1. To identify the variables that are associated with urinary levels of properdin, MBL, C4d, and C5b-9 in patients with idiopathic IgA nephropathy. 2. To analyse whether urinary levels of MBL and/or C4d are useful for identifying the presence of mesangial deposits of C4d/MBL. A total of 96 patients with IgA nephropathy were studied. Demographic, clinical and biochemical variables were recorded at the time of diagnosis. Renal lesions were quantified using the Oxford classification. Immunohistochemical staining for MBL, MASP-2, properdin, C4d, and C5b-9 was performed in kidney biopsies, and in urine, the levels of properdin, MBL, C4d and C5b-9 were determined. In multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of C4d and MBL levels in urine were the mesangial deposits of each protein and, to a lesser extent, the urinary protein excretion. The independent predictors of urinary levels of C5b-9 were MBL properdin and proteinuria. Urinary excretion of C4d had a sensitivity of 90% (95% CI: 58,7 to 99) and a specificity of 73% (95% CI: 54-87) for detecting mesangial C4d deposits, and the level of MBL had a sensitivity of 83.9% (95% CI: 62-95) and a specificity of 81.6% (95% CI: 65-92) for identifying mesangial deposits of MBL. The main predictor of urinary concentration of C4d and MBL was the presence of their respective mesangial deposits. Urine MBL may contribute to complement activation in the tubular luz through the lectin pathway. Urinary levels of MBL and C4d could be sensitive and specific biomarkers for the identification of patients with mesangial deposits of MBL and C4d. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  10. Mechanisms of rejection: role of complement.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Conrad A; Sacks, Steven H

    2014-02-01

    To provide the reader with an up-to-date comprehensive review of recent findings that highlight advances describing how proteins of the complement cascades contribute to the pathogenesis of solid organ rejection. The review is focussed mainly on renal transplantation. Of note are recent advances in elucidating the interactions between anaphylatoxins and their receptors in organ transplantation; there is evidence of direct engagement of C5aR on donor tubules and in addition, mechanisms by which the allostimulatory capacity of dendritic cells is modulated by complement are more fully understood. Activation of the lectin pathway is increasingly implicated in allograft rejection and the role of complement in modulating regulatory T cells is being vigorously investigated. As an alternative to systemic complement inhibition, there is continued focus on the design of targeted anti-complement therapies, directed to the donor organ. Complement has evolved as the first line of defence against pathogens, employing well defined effector mechanisms to rapidly remove infectious material. However, complement effector mechanisms are also triggered during inflammation associated with solid organ transplantation. Hence, complement has a significant role in mediating donor organ injury during both the initial ischaemia/reperfusion phase and the subsequent adaptive immune responses. Research on mechanisms of complement-mediated injury in transplantation provide a basis for the development of therapies that are aimed at transiently blocking complement activation at the site of injury, whereas leaving systemic anti-bacterial complement effector mechanisms intact.

  11. Species having C4 single-cell-type photosynthesis in the Chenopodiaceae family evolved a photosynthetic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase like that of Kranz-type C4 species.

    PubMed

    Lara, María Valeria; Chuong, Simon D X; Akhani, Hossein; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Edwards, Gerald E

    2006-10-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is critical to the function of C(4) photosynthesis. The photosynthetic isoform of PEPC in the cytosol of mesophyll cells in Kranz-type C(4) photosynthesis has distinctive kinetic and regulatory properties. Some species in the Chenopodiaceae family perform C(4) photosynthesis without Kranz anatomy by spatial separation of initial fixation of atmospheric CO(2) via PEPC from C(4) acid decarboxylation and CO(2) donation to Rubisco within individual chlorenchyma cells. We studied molecular and functional features of PEPC in two single-cell functioning C(4) species (Bienertia sinuspersici, Suaeda aralocaspica) as compared to Kranz type (Haloxylon persicum, Salsola richteri, Suaeda eltonica) and C(3) (Suaeda linifolia) chenopods. It was found that PEPC from both types of C(4) chenopods displays higher specific activity than that of the C(3) species and shows kinetic and regulatory characteristics similar to those of C(4) species in other families in that they are subject to light/dark regulation by phosphorylation and display differential malate sensitivity. Also, the deduced amino acid sequence from leaf cDNA indicates that the single-cell functioning C(4) species possesses a Kranz-type C(4) isoform with a Ser in the amino terminal. A phylogeny of PEPC shows that isoforms in the two single-cell functioning C(4) species are in a clade with the C(3) and Kranz C(4) Suaeda spp. with high sequence homology. Overall, this study indicates that B. sinuspersici and S. aralocaspica have a C(4)-type PEPC similar to that in Kranz C(4) plants, which likely is required for effective function of C(4) photosynthesis.

  12. Role of complement in experiment silicosis

    SciTech Connect

    Callis, A.H.; Sohnle, P.G.; Mandel, G.S.; Mandel, N.S.

    1986-08-01

    The role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of crystal-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis was evaluated using a mouse model of silicosis and congenitally complement-deficient mice. Mice lacking the fifth component of complement (B10.D2/o) were compared to C5-sufficient animals (B10.D2/n) for pulmonary changes following intratracheal instillation of silica crystals. Complement-deficient mice demonstrated a significant reduction compared to complement-sufficient mice in both cell number and protein content of lung lavage fluid throughout the 12 weeks following silica exposure. Lung hydroxyproline content (indicative of collagen deposition) was equivalent for both strains and significantly higher than controls at all times points following silica instillation. Moreover, studies in vitro have shown that silica crystals are capable of activating complement via the alternative pathway. These studies indicate that the complement system may be responsible for some of the pulmonary inflammation, but not fibrosis elicited by silica exposure.

  13. Meningococcal disease and the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lisa A; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of meningococcal disease, this infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. The role of the complement system in innate immune defenses against invasive meningococcal disease is well established. Individuals deficient in components of the alternative and terminal complement pathways are highly predisposed to invasive, often recurrent meningococcal infections. Genome-wide analysis studies also point to a central role for complement in disease pathogenesis. Here we review the pathophysiologic events pertinent to the complement system that accompany meningococcal sepsis in humans. Meningococci use several often redundant mechanisms to evade killing by human complement. Capsular polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide glycan composition play critical roles in complement evasion. Some of the newly described protein vaccine antigens interact with complement components and have sparked considerable research interest. PMID:24104403

  14. The Semantics of Complementation in English: A Cognitive Semantic Account of Two English Complement Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Studies on complementation in English and other languages have traditionally focused on syntactic issues, most notably on the constituent structures of different complement types. As a result, they have neglected the role of meaning in the choice of different complements. This paper investigates the semantics of complementation within the…

  15. Metabolite Diffusion into Bundle Sheath Cells from C4 Plants

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Hendrik; Burnell, James N.; Woodrow, Ian E.; Heldt, Hans W.; Hatch, Marshall D.

    1988-01-01

    The present studies provide the first measurements of the resistance to diffusive flux of metabolites between mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of C4 plants. Species examined were Panicum miliaceum, Urochloa panicoides, Atriplex spongiosa, and Zea mays. Diffusive flux of metabolites into isolated bundle sheath cells was monitored by following their metabolic transformation. Evidence was obtained that the observed rapid fluxes occurred via functional plasmodesmata. Diffusion constants were determined from the rate of transformation of limiting concentrations of metabolites via cytosolic enzymes with high potential velocities and favorable equilibrium constants. Values on a leaf chlorophyll basis ranged between 1 and 5 micromoles per minute per milligram of chlorophyll per millimolar gradient depending on the molecular weight of the metabolite and the source of bundle sheath cells. Diffusion of metabolites into these cells was unaffected by a wide variety of compounds including respiratory inhibitors, monovalent and divalent cations, and plant hormones, but it was interrupted by treatments inducing cell plasmolysis. The molecular weight exclusion limit for permeation of compounds into bundle sheath cells was in the range of 850 to 900. These cells provide an ideal system for the quantitative study of plasmodesmatal function. PMID:16666390

  16. Active C4 Electrodes for Local Field Potential Recording Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Freedman, David; Sahin, Mesut; Ünlü, M. Selim; Knepper, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular neural recording, with multi-electrode arrays (MEAs), is a powerful method used to study neural function at the network level. However, in a high density array, it can be costly and time consuming to integrate the active circuit with the expensive electrodes. In this paper, we present a 4 mm × 4 mm neural recording integrated circuit (IC) chip, utilizing IBM C4 bumps as recording electrodes, which enable a seamless active chip and electrode integration. The IC chip was designed and fabricated in a 0.13 μm BiCMOS process for both in vitro and in vivo applications. It has an input-referred noise of 4.6 μVrms for the bandwidth of 10 Hz to 10 kHz and a power dissipation of 11.25 mW at 2.5 V, or 43.9 μW per input channel. This prototype is scalable for implementing larger number and higher density electrode arrays. To validate the functionality of the chip, electrical testing results and acute in vivo recordings from a rat barrel cortex are presented. PMID:26861324

  17. Degradation pathways of phenanthrene by Sinorhizobium sp. C4.

    PubMed

    Keum, Young-Soo; Seo, Jong-Su; Hu, Yuting; Li, Qing X

    2006-08-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. C4 was isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated site in Hilo, HI, USA. This isolate can utilize phenanthrene as a sole carbon source. Sixteen metabolites of phenanthrene were isolated and identified, and the metabolic map was proposed. Degradation of phenanthrene was initiated by dioxygenation on 1,2- and 3,4-C, where the 3,4-dioxygenation was dominant. Subsequent accumulation of 5,6- and 7,8-benzocoumarins confirmed dioxygenation on multiple positions and extradiol cleavage of corresponding diols. The products were further transformed to 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid then to naphthalene-1,2-diol. In addition to the typical degradation pathways, intradiol cleavage of phenanthrene-3,4-diol was proposed based on the observation of naphthalene-1,2-dicarboxylic acid. Degradation of naphthalene-1,2-diol proceeded through intradiol cleavage to produce trans-2-carboxycinnamic acid. Phthalic acid, 4,5-dihydroxyphthalic acid, and protocatechuic acid were identified as probable metabolites of trans-2-carboxycinnamic acid, but no trace salicylic acid or its metabolites were found. This is the first detailed study of PAH metabolism by a Sinorhizobium species. The results give a new insight into microbial degradation of PAHs.

  18. Complement Activation in Relation to Capillary Leakage in Children with Septic Shock and Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Hazelzet, Jan A.; de Groot, Ronald; van Mierlo, Gerard; Joosten, Koen F. M.; van der Voort, Edwin; Eerenberg, Anke; Suur, Marja H.; Hop, Wim C. J.; Hack, C. Erik

    1998-01-01

    To assess the relationship between capillary leakage and inflammatory mediators during sepsis, blood samples were taken on hospital admission, as well as 24 and 72 h later, from 52 children (median age, 3.3 years) with severe meningococcal sepsis, of whom 38 survived and 14 died. Parameters related to cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6] IL-8, plasma phospholipase A2, and C-reactive protein [CRP]), to neutrophil degranulation (elastase and lactoferrin), to complement activation (C3a, C3b/c, C4b/c, and C3- and C4-CRP complexes), and to complement regulation (functional and inactivated C1 inhibitor and C4BP) were determined. The degree of capillary leakage was derived from the amount of plasma infused and the severity of disease by assessing the pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) score. Levels of IL-6, IL-8, C3b/c, C3-CRP complexes, and C4BP on admission, adjusted for the duration of skin lesions, were significantly different in survivors and nonsurvivors (C3b/c levels were on average 2.2 times higher in nonsurvivors, and C3-CRP levels were 1.9 times higher in survivors). Mortality was independently related to the levels of C3b/c and C3-CRP complexes. In agreement with this, levels of complement activation products correlated well with the PRISM score or capillary leakage. Thus, these data show that complement activation in patients with severe meningococcal sepsis is associated with a poor outcome and a more severe disease course. Further studies should reveal whether complement activation may be a target for therapeutical intervention in this disease. PMID:9784543

  19. Relationships between the haemolytic activities of the human complement system and complement components.

    PubMed Central

    Takada, A; Imamura, Y; Takada, Y

    1979-01-01

    The relationships between the haemolytic activities of complement and its components were studied. The activities studied included CH50 (classical pathway), AP50 (alternative pathway), CV50 (early part of alternative pathway) and C(3--9)H50 ((the late part of both pathways). The components included C3, C4, C5, C9, B and D. There was a good correlation between CH50 and AP50. AP50 had a good correlation with B and CV50. There was no correlation between AP50 and C(3--9)H50, and none between C(3--9)H50 and C5 or C9. AP50 may primarily represent changes in the early part of the alternative pathway. C(3--9)H50 is not influenced by respective changes in the amounts of C5 or C9. Since cell lesion is now considered to be caused by a unit of C5b to C9, a change in each component of C5 to C9 may not influence haemolytic activity. PMID:436337

  20. The FAK scaffold inhibitor C4 disrupts FAK-VEGFR-3 signaling and inhibits pancreatic cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Kurenova, Elena; Liao, Jianqun; He, Di-Hua; Hunt, Darrell; Yemma, Michael; Bshara, Wiam; Seshadri, Mukund; Cance, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Even with successful surgical resection and perioperative chemotherapy and radiation, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has a high incidence of recurrence. Tumor cell survival depends on activation of signaling pathways that suppress the apoptotic stimuli of invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a critical signaling molecule that has been implicated in tumor cell survival, invasion and metastasis. We have previously shown that FAK and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR-3) are overexpressed in cancer cells and physically interact to confer a significant survival advantage. We subsequently identified a novel small molecule inhibitor C4 that targeted the VEGFR-3-FAK site of interaction. In this study, we have shown that C4 disrupted the FAK-VEGFR-3 complexes in PDA cells. C4 treatment caused dose-dependent dephosphorylation and inactivation of the VEGFR-3 and FAK, reduction in cell viability and proliferation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in PDA cells. C4 increased the sensitivity of tumor cells to gemcitabine chemotherapy in vitro that lead to apoptosis at nanomolar concentrations of both drugs. C4 reduced tumor growth in vivoin subcutaneous and orthotopic murine models of PDA. The drug alone at low dose, decreased tumor growth; however, concomitant administration with low dose of gemcitabine had significant synergistic effect and led to 70% tumor reduction. Combination of C4 with gemcitabine had a prolonged cytostatic effect on tumor growth after treatment withdrawal. Finally, we report an anecdotal case of stage IV pancreatic cancer treated with gemcitabine in combination with C4 that showed a significant clinical response in primary tumor and complete clinical response in liver metastasis over an eight month period. Taken together, these results demonstrate that targeting the scaffolding function of FAK with a small-molecule FAK-VEGFR-3 inhibitor can be an effective therapeutic strategy against PDA. PMID:24142503

  1. The FAK scaffold inhibitor C4 disrupts FAK-VEGFR-3 signaling and inhibits pancreatic cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Kurenova, Elena; Liao, Jianqun; He, Di-Hua; Hunt, Darrell; Yemma, Michael; Bshara, Wiam; Seshadri, Mukund; Cance, William G

    2013-10-01

    Even with successful surgical resection and perioperative chemotherapy and radiation, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has a high incidence of recurrence. Tumor cell survival depends on activation of signaling pathways that suppress the apoptotic stimuli of invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a critical signaling molecule that has been implicated in tumor cell survival, invasion and metastasis. We have previously shown that FAK and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR-3) are overexpressed in cancer cells and physically interact to confer a significant survival advantage. We subsequently identified a novel small molecule inhibitor C4 that targeted the VEGFR-3-FAK site of interaction. In this study, we have shown that C4 disrupted the FAK-VEGFR-3 complexes in PDA cells. C4 treatment caused dose-dependent dephosphorylation and inactivation of the VEGFR-3 and FAK, reduction in cell viability and proliferation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in PDA cells. C4 increased the sensitivity of tumor cells to gemcitabine chemotherapy in vitro that lead to apoptosis at nanomolar concentrations of both drugs. C4 reduced tumor growth in vivo in subcutaneous and orthotopic murine models of PDA. The drug alone at low dose, decreased tumor growth; however, concomitant administration with low dose of gemcitabine had significant synergistic effect and led to 70% tumor reduction. Combination of C4 with gemcitabine had a prolonged cytostatic effect on tumor growth after treatment withdrawal. Finally, we report an anecdotal case of stage IV pancreatic cancer treated with gemcitabine in combination with C4 that showed a significant clinical response in primary tumor and complete clinical response in liver metastasis over an eight month period. Taken together, these results demonstrate that targeting the scaffolding function of FAK with a small-molecule FAK-VEGFR-3 inhibitor can be an effective therapeutic strategy against PDA.

  2. Activated complement components and complement activator molecules on the surface of cell‐derived microparticles in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Biró, Éva; Nieuwland, Rienk; Tak, Paul P; Pronk, Loes M; Schaap, Marianne C L; Sturk, Augueste; Hack, C Erik

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In vitro, microparticles can activate complement via the classical pathway. If demonstrable ex vivo, this mechanism may contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We therefore investigated the presence of activated complement components and complement activator molecules on the surface of cell‐derived microparticles of RA patients and healthy individuals. Methods Microparticles from synovial fluid (n = 8) and plasma (n = 9) of 10 RA patients and plasma of sex‐ and age‐matched healthy individuals (n = 10) were analysed by flow cytometry for bound complement components (C1q, C4, C3) and complement activator molecules (C‐reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid P component (SAP), immunoglobulin (Ig) M, IgG). Results Microparticles with bound C1q, C4, and/or C3 were abundant in RA synovial fluid, while in RA and control plasma much lower levels were present. Microparticles with bound C1q correlated with those with bound C3 in synovial fluid (r = 0.961, p = 0.0001), and with those with bound C4 in plasma (RA: r = 0.908, p = 0.0007; control: r = 0.632, p = 0.0498), indicating classical pathway activation. In synovial fluid, microparticles with IgM and IgG correlated with those with C1q (r = 0.728, p = 0.0408; r = 0.952, p = 0.0003, respectively), and in plasma, microparticles with CRP correlated with those with C1q (RA: r = 0.903, p = 0.0021; control: r = 0.683, p = 0.0296), implicating IgG and IgM in the classical pathway activation in RA synovial fluid, and CRP in the low level classical pathway activation in plasma. Conclusions This study demonstrates the presence of bound complement components and activator molecules on microparticles ex vivo, and supports their role in low grade complement activation in plasma and increased complement activation in RA synovial fluid. PMID:17261534

  3. Identification of Photosynthesis-Associated C4 Candidate Genes through Comparative Leaf Gradient Transcriptome in Multiple Lineages of C3 and C4 Species.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zehong; Weissmann, Sarit; Wang, Minghui; Du, Baijuan; Huang, Lei; Wang, Lin; Tu, Xiaoyu; Zhong, Silin; Myers, Christopher; Brutnell, Thomas P; Sun, Qi; Li, Pinghua

    2015-01-01

    Leaves of C4 crops usually have higher radiation, water and nitrogen use efficiencies compared to the C3 species. Engineering C4 traits into C3 crops has been proposed as one of the most promising ways to repeal the biomass yield ceiling. To better understand the function of C4 photosynthesis, and to identify candidate genes that are associated with the C4 pathways, a comparative transcription network analysis was conducted on leaf developmental gradients of three C4 species including maize, green foxtail and sorghum and one C3 species, rice. By combining the methods of gene co-expression and differentially co-expression networks, we identified a total of 128 C4 specific genes. Besides the classic C4 shuttle genes, a new set of genes associated with light reaction, starch and sucrose metabolism, metabolites transportation, as well as transcription regulation, were identified as involved in C4 photosynthesis. These findings will provide important insights into the differential gene regulation between C3 and C4 species, and a good genetic resource for establishing C4 pathways in C3 crops.

  4. Identification of Photosynthesis-Associated C4 Candidate Genes through Comparative Leaf Gradient Transcriptome in Multiple Lineages of C3 and C4 Species

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zehong; Weissmann, Sarit; Wang, Minghui; Du, Baijuan; Huang, Lei; Wang, Lin; Tu, Xiaoyu; Zhong, Silin; Myers, Christopher; Brutnell, Thomas P.; Sun, Qi; Li, Pinghua

    2015-01-01

    Leaves of C4 crops usually have higher radiation, water and nitrogen use efficiencies compared to the C3 species. Engineering C4 traits into C3 crops has been proposed as one of the most promising ways to repeal the biomass yield ceiling. To better understand the function of C4 photosynthesis, and to identify candidate genes that are associated with the C4 pathways, a comparative transcription network analysis was conducted on leaf developmental gradients of three C4 species including maize, green foxtail and sorghum and one C3 species, rice. By combining the methods of gene co-expression and differentially co-expression networks, we identified a total of 128 C4 specific genes. Besides the classic C4 shuttle genes, a new set of genes associated with light reaction, starch and sucrose metabolism, metabolites transportation, as well as transcription regulation, were identified as involved in C4 photosynthesis. These findings will provide important insights into the differential gene regulation between C3 and C4 species, and a good genetic resource for establishing C4 pathways in C3 crops. PMID:26465154

  5. Inhibitory effect of FUT-175 on complement activation and its application for glomerulonephritis with hypocomplementemia.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Inoue, I; Inagi, R; Miyata, T; Shinzato, T; Sugiyama, S; Miyama, A; Maeda, K

    1993-04-01

    FUT-175 (6-amidino-2-naphthyl p-guanidinobenzoate dimethane-sulphonate), a potent serine protease inhibitor, has been reported to inhibit complement activity in vitro, and especially the classical complement pathway effectively. In the present study, we examined the inhibitory effect of FUT-175 on the classical complement pathway components by hemolytic assay using purified human complement components. As a result, 50% inhibition of the C1 protease activity for classical C3 convertase formation and for C2 was obtained with 3.0 x 10(-8) M and 7.0 x 10(-8) M of FUT-175, respectively. FUT-175 did not inhibit the C2 protease activity at all. We then administered FUT-175 to 5 glomerulonephritic patients with hypocomplementemia and proteinuria in order to assess the clinical effectiveness of this drug. When FUT-175 was administered intravenously and continuously at a rate of 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg/hr for 2 weeks, the urinary protein excretion decreased significantly from 2.9 +/- 0.8 to 1.4 +/- 0.5 g/day (P < 0.025). In these patients, some of the serum complement markers (serum C3, C4 level and the hemolytic activity via the classical complement pathway (CH50)) were increased after FUT-175 administration. The above findings suggests that FUT-175 can exert beneficial effects on glomerulonephritis with hypocomplementemia by inhibiting complement activation.

  6. The role of complement in antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stegall, Mark D; Chedid, Marcio F; Cornell, Lynn D

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, several studies have suggested that the complement system has an active role in both acute and chronic allograft rejection. These studies have been facilitated by improved techniques to detect antibody-mediated organ rejection, including immunohistological staining for C4d deposition in the allograft and solid-phase assays that identify donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) in the serum of transplant recipients. Studies with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against complement component C5, have shown that activation of the terminal complement pathway is necessary for the development of acute antibody-mediated rejection in recipients of living-donor kidney allografts who have high levels of DSAs. The extent to which complement activation drives chronic antibody-mediated injury leading to organ rejection is less clear. In chronic antibody-mediated injury, early complement activation might facilitate chemotaxis of inflammatory cells into the allograft in a process that later becomes somewhat independent of DSA levels and complement factors. In this Review, we discuss the different roles that the complement system might have in antibody-mediated allograft rejection, with specific emphasis on renal transplantation.

  7. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Deficiencies of Early Components of the Complement Classical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Ana Catarina Lunz; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in the innate and acquired immune response against pathogens. It consists of more than 30 proteins found in soluble form or attached to cell membranes. Most complement proteins circulate in inactive forms and can be sequentially activated by the classical, alternative, or lectin pathways. Biological functions, such as opsonization, removal of apoptotic cells, adjuvant function, activation of B lymphocytes, degranulation of mast cells and basophils, and solubilization and clearance of immune complex and cell lysis, are dependent on complement activation. Although the activation of the complement system is important to avoid infections, it also can contribute to the inflammatory response triggered by immune complex deposition in tissues in autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, the deficiency of early complement proteins from the classical pathway (CP) is strongly associated with development of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) – mainly C1q deficiency (93%) and C4 deficiency (75%). The aim of this review is to focus on the deficiencies of early components of the CP (C1q, C1r, C1s, C4, and C2) proteins in SLE patients. PMID:26941740

  8. Complement Split Products in Amniotic Fluid in Pregnancies Subsequently Developing Early-Onset Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Banadakoppa, Manu; Vidaeff, Alex C.; Yallampalli, Uma; Ramin, Susan M.; Belfort, Michael A.; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the second-trimester amniotic fluid concentrations of complement split products in pregnancies subsequently affected by early-onset preeclampsia. Study Design. Cohort of 731 women with singleton pregnancies undergoing second-trimester genetic amniocentesis followed up to delivery and analyzed as a nested case-control study. Cases of preeclampsia developing before 34 weeks' gestation (n = 15) were compared with 47 uncomplicated term controls. Amniotic fluid collected at amniocentesis was tested for complement split products Bb, C4a, C3a, and C5a. Results. Women who developed early-onset preeclampsia as compared with the term pregnant controls had significantly higher (P = 0.04) median amniotic fluid C3a levels (318.7 ng/mL versus 254.5 ng/mL). Median amniotic fluid Bb levels were also significantly higher (P = 0.03) in preeclamptic women than in normal pregnant women (1127 ng/mL versus 749 ng/mL). Median levels of C4a and C5a were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusion. Our data suggest that complement activation in early pregnancy is associated with early-onset preeclampsia. We believe this to be the first prospective study to link complement activation in amniotic fluid in early pregnancy and later development of preeclampsia. Our findings provide evidence that immune dysregulation may precede the clinical manifestations of preeclampsia and that the alternative complement pathway is principally involved. PMID:26556948

  9. Observations of Titan 3C-4 Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan 3C-4 Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper will present a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots will also be shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) believed to be associated with the Titan break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9-m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN# 25001, 33509, 33510) and the parent rocket body. Color index data will be used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In 2012, the SSN added 16 additional fragments to the catalogue. MODEST acquired magnitude data on ten Titan fragments in late 2012 and early 2013. The magnitude distribution of all the observed fragments are analyzed as a function of time. In order to better characterize the breakup fragments spectral measurements were acquired on the original rocket body and five Titan fragments using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., Aluminum and various paints) and categorized based on known absorption features for spacecraft materials.

  10. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  11. Complement Evasion Strategies of Viruses: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Palak; Nawadkar, Renuka; Ojha, Hina; Kumar, Jitendra; Sahu, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    Being a major first line of immune defense, the complement system keeps a constant vigil against viruses. Its ability to recognize large panoply of viruses and virus-infected cells, and trigger the effector pathways, results in neutralization of viruses and killing of the infected cells. This selection pressure exerted by complement on viruses has made them evolve a multitude of countermeasures. These include targeting the recognition molecules for the avoidance of detection, targeting key enzymes and complexes of the complement pathways like C3 convertases and C5b-9 formation – either by encoding complement regulators or by recruiting membrane-bound and soluble host complement regulators, cleaving complement proteins by encoding protease, and inhibiting the synthesis of complement proteins. Additionally, viruses also exploit the complement system for their own benefit. For example, they use complement receptors as well as membrane regulators for cellular entry as well as their spread. Here, we provide an overview on the complement subversion mechanisms adopted by the members of various viral families including Poxviridae, Herpesviridae, Adenoviridae, Flaviviridae, Retroviridae, Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Togaviridae, Orthomyxoviridae and Paramyxoviridae. PMID:28670306

  12. Complement Depletion Deteriorates Clinical Outcomes of Severe Abdominal Sepsis: A Conspirator of Infection and Coagulopathy in Crime?

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunzhao; Han, Gang; Li, Weiqin; Huang, Qian; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Jieshou

    2012-01-01

    Background The complement depletion commonly occurred during sepsis, but it was often underestimated compared with severe infection or coagulation dysfunction. Objective This study was designed to investigate the alteration of complement system in patients with severe abdominal sepsis and evaluate the role of complement depletion in prognosis of such patients. The relationship between complement depletion and infection or coagulopathy was also explored. Methods Forty-five patients with severe abdominal sepsis were prospectively conducted among individuals referral to SICU. Currently recommended treatments, such as early goal-directed resuscitation, source control and antibiotics therapy, were performed. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) and sepsis related organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were employed to evaluate severity. Plasma levels of C3, C4, CRP, PCT, D-dimer and other parameters were detected within eight times of observation. The 28-day mortality, length of stay, and postoperative complications were compared between complement depletion and non-complement depletion groups. Results Within the study period, eight (17.8%) patients died, five of them suffering from complement depletion. The overall incidence of complement depletion was 64.4%. At admission, mean complement C3 and C4 levels were 0.70 and 0.13 mg/mL, respectively. Using ROC analysis for mortality prediction, the area under the curve of C3 was 0.926 (95% CI, 0.845–0.998, P<0.001), with optimal cutpoint value of 0.578 mg/mL. Complement C3 depletion was shown to be no correlation to severity scores, however, strongly correlated with elevated D-dimer, PCT concentrations and increased postoperative complications. Conclusions Complement C3 depletion was found to be connected to poor prognosis in severe abdominal sepsis. This depletion seems to be associated with coagulopathy and aggravated infection during sepsis, which should be paid close attention in critical care

  13. Selective inhibition of the alternative complement pathway by sCR1[desLHR-A] protects the rabbit isolated heart from human complement-mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Gralinski, M R; Wiater, B C; Assenmacher, A N; Lucchesi, B R

    1996-09-01

    Evidence is presented that treatment with a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, sCR1[desLHR-A], protects the ex vivo perfused rabbit heart from human complement-mediated injury. Hearts from male New Zealand white rabbits were perfused in the Langendorff mode. After equilibration, normal human plasma was added to the perfusate as a source of complement. Concomitant with the addition of human plasma, vehicle (n = 13), soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) (n = 10), or sCR1[desLHR-A], a truncated version of sCR1 that lacks the C4b binding region (n = 10) was included in the perfusate. Hemodynamic variables were obtained for all groups before (baseline) and after the addition of human plasma. Compared to vehicle-treated hearts, variables recorded during perfusion with human plasma including coronary perfusion pressure, left ventricular developed pressure, and left ventricular end diastolic pressure, along with a reduction of creatine kinase efflux, were improved in hearts perfused with either complement inhibitor. In addition, in vitro hemolysis assays were utilized to discriminate between the classical and alternative pathways. The addition of sCR1 to human serum prevented both the classical and alternative pathway-mediated hemolysis while sCR1[desLHR-A] prevented only the alternative pathway-mediated lysis. This study indicates that deletion of the C4b-binding site from sCR1 results in a new pharmacological moiety, sCR1[desLHR-A], that primarily inhibits the alternative pathway of human complement.

  14. Molecular and expression analysis of complement component C5 in the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) and its predicted functional role.

    PubMed

    Graham, Matthew; Shin, Dong-Ho; Smith, Sylvia L

    2009-07-01

    We present the complete cDNA sequence of shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) pro-C5 and its molecular characterization with a descriptive analysis of the structural elements necessary for its potential functional role as a potent mediator of inflammation (fragment C5a) and initiator molecule (fragment C5b) for the assembly of the membrane attack complex (MAC) upon activation by C5 convertase. In mammals the three complement activation cascades, the classical, alternative and lectin pathways, converge at the activation of C3, a pivotal complement protein. It is, however, the subsequent activation of the next complement component, C5, which is the focal point at which the initiation of the terminal lytic pathway takes place and involves the stepwise assembly of the MAC. The effector cytolytic function of complement occurs with the insertion of MAC into target membranes causing dough-nut like holes and cell leakage. The lytic activity of shark complement results in structurally similar holes in target membranes suggesting the assembly of a shark MAC that likely involves a functional analogue of C5. The composition of shark MAC remains unresolved and to date conclusive evidence has been lacking for shark C5. The gene has not been cloned nor has the serum protein been characterized for any elasmobranch species. This report is the first to confirm the presence of C5 homologue in the shark. GcC5 is remarkably similar to human C5 in overall structure and domain arrangement. The GcC5 cDNA measured 5160-bp with 5' and 3' UTRs of 35 bp and 79 bp, respectively. Structural analysis of the derived protein sequence predicts a molecule that is a two-chain structure which lacks a thiolester bond and contains a C5 convertase cleavage site indicating that activation will generate two peptides, akin to C5b and C5a. The putative GcC5 molecule also contains the C-terminal C345C/Netrin module that characterizes C3, C4 and C5. Multiple alignment of deduced amino acid sequences shows that GcC5

  15. Molecular and expression analysis of complement component C5 in the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) and its predicted functional role

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Matthew; Shin, Dong-Ho; Smith, Sylvia L.

    2009-01-01

    We present the complete cDNA sequence of shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) pro-C5 and its molecular characterization with a descriptive analysis of the structural elements necessary for its potential functional role as a potent mediator of inflammation (fragment C5a) and initiator molecule (fragment C5b) for the assembly of the membrane attack complex (MAC) upon activation by C5 convertase. In mammals the three complement activation cascades, the classical, alternative and lectin pathways, converge at the activation of C3, a pivotal complement protein. It is, however, the subsequent activation of the next complement component, C5, which is the focal point at which the initiation of the terminal lytic pathway takes place and involves the stepwise assembly of the MAC. The effector cytolytic function of complement occurs with the insertion of MAC into target membranes causing dough-nut like holes and cell leakage. The lytic activity of shark complement results in structurally similar holes in target membranes suggesting the assembly of a shark MAC that likely involves a functional analogue of C5. The composition of shark MAC remains unresolved and to date conclusive evidence has been lacking for shark C5. The gene has not been cloned nor has the serum protein been characterized for any elasmobranch species. This report is the first to confirm the presence of C5 homologue in the shark. GcC5 is remarkably similar to human C5 in overall structure and domain arrangement. The GcC5 cDNA measured 5160-bp with 5′ and 3′ UTRs of 35bp and 79bp, respectively. Structural analysis of the derived protein sequence predicts a molecule that is a two-chain structure which lacks a thiolester bond and contains a C5 convertase cleavage site indicating that activation will generate two peptides, akin to C5b and C5a. The putative GcC5 molecule also contains the C-terminal C345C/Netrin module that characterizes C3, C4 and C5. Multiple alignment of deduced amino acid sequences show that GcC5

  16. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  17. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  18. The eye as a complement dysregulation hotspot.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon J; Bishop, Paul N

    2017-09-25

    Complement turnover is tightly regulated throughout the human body in order to prevent over-activation and subsequent damage from inflammation. In the eye, low-level complement activation is maintained to provide immune tolerance in this immune privileged organ. Conversely, the complement system is suppressed in the cornea to protect it from continuous immunological insult. Over-activation of the complement cascade has been implicated in the disease progression of glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy and is now known to be a central driver in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Indeed, it is with AMD where the most recent and exciting work has been carried out with complement-based therapies entering into clinical trials. However, the success of these trials will depend upon delivering the therapeutics to the correct anatomical sites within the eye, so a full understanding of how complement regulation is compartmentalized in the eye is required, a topic that will be highlighted in this review.

  19. Interoperability Modeling of the C4ISR Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    interoperable action A fuzzy measure refers to a means of expressing uncertainty when, not disposing of complete information, it is impossible to use...for an increased efficiency by coordinating their military means and technical systems. In merging these systems, we have to cope with a major problem...conflicts. These coalitions are formed for the purpose of increasing efficiency, by the coordinated action of military means and the gathering of their

  20. Developmental genetic mechanisms of C4 syndrome based on transcriptome analysis of C3 cotyledons and C4 assimilating shoots in Haloxylon ammodendron.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Ma, Xiuling; Zhao, Jialei; Xu, Jiajia; Shi, Junfeng; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Zhao, Yanxiu; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that transferring the C4 engine into C3 crops will greatly increase the yields of major C3 crops. Many efforts have been made since the 1960s, but relatively little success has been achieved because C4plant traits, referred to collectively as C4 syndrome, are very complex, and little is known about the genetic mechanisms involved. Unfortunately, there exists no ideal genetic model system to study C4 syndrome. It was previously reported that the Haloxylon species have different photosynthetic pathways in different photosynthetic organs, cotyledons and assimilating shoots. Here, we took advantage of the developmental switch from the C3 to the C4 pathway to study the genetic mechanisms behind this natural transition. We compared the transcriptomes of cotyledons and assimilating shoots using mRNA-Seq to gain insight into the molecular and cellular events associated with C4 syndrome. A total of 2959 differentially expressed genes [FDR ≤ 0.001 and abs (|log2(Fold change)| ≥ 1)] were identified, revealing that the transcriptomes of cotyledons and assimilating shoots are considerably different. We further identified a set of putative regulators of C4 syndrome. This study expands our understanding of the development of C4 syndrome and provides a new model system for future studies on the C3-to- C4 switch mechanism.

  1. Eosinophil granule cationic proteins regulate the classical pathway of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, J M; Edens, R E; Bell, C S; Gleich, G J

    1995-01-01

    Major basic protein, the primary constituent of eosinophil granules, regulates the alternative and classical pathways of complement. Major basic protein and other eosinophil granule cationic proteins, which are important in mediating tissue damage in allergic disease, regulate the alternative pathway by interfering with C3b interaction with factor B to assemble an alternative pathway C3 convertase. In the present study, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, as well as major basic protein, were examined for capacity to regulate the classical pathway. Eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and major basic protein inhibited formation of cell-bound classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a), causing 50% inhibition of complement-mediated lysis at about 0.19, 0.75 and 0.5 micrograms/10(7) cellular intermediates, respectively. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin had no activity on this pathway of complement. The eosinophil granule proteins were examined for activity on the formation of the membrane attack complex. Major basic protein and eosinophil cationic protein had no activity on terminal lysis. In contrast, eosinophil peroxidase inhibited lysis of EAC1,4b,2a,3b,5b, but had only minimal activity on later events in complement lysis. These polycations were then examined to determine the site(s) at which they regulated the early classical pathway. Eosinophil granule polycationic proteins: (1) reduced the Zmax at all time points but had only minimal effect on the Tmax during the formation of the classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a); (2) inhibited formation of EAC1,4b,2a proportional to C4 but independent of C2 concentration; (3) inhibited fluid phase formation of C1,4b,2a, as reflected by a decrease in C1-induced consumption of C2 over time; and (4) inhibited C1 activity over time without a direct effect on either C4 or C2. These observations suggest that polycations regulate the early classical pathway by

  2. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING OF COMPOSITION B AND C-4

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Forbes, J W

    2006-06-13

    Shock initiation experiments on the explosives Composition B and C-4 were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data for the purpose of determining the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model with proper modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges containing manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages embedded in the explosive sample. Experimental data provided new information on the shock velocity versus particle velocity relationship for each of the investigated materials in their respective pressure range. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement with previously published data, and Ignition and Growth modeling calculations resulted in a good fit to the experimental data. These experimental data were used to determine Ignition and Growth reactive flow model parameters for these explosives. Identical ignition and growth reaction rate parameters were used for C-4 and Composition B, and the Composition B model also included a third reaction rate to simulate the completion of reaction by the TNT component. The Composition B model was then tested on existing short pulse duration, gap test, and projectile impact shock initiation with good results. This Composition B model can be applied to shock initiation scenarios that have not or cannot be tested experimentally with a high level of confidence in its predictions.

  3. SHOCK INITIATION OF COMPOSITION B AND C-4 EXPLOSIVES; EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Forbes, J W

    2006-08-18

    Shock initiation experiments on the explosives Composition B and C-4 were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data for the purpose of providing the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model with proper modeling parameters. A 100 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges containing manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages embedded in the explosive sample. Experimental data provided new information on the shock velocity--particle velocity relationship for each of the investigated material in their respective pressure range. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement with previously published data, and Ignition and Growth modeling calculations resulted in a good fit to the experimental data. Identical ignition and growth reaction rate parameters were used for C-4 and Composition B, and the Composition B model also included a third reaction rate to simulate the completion of reaction by the TNT component. This model can be applied to shock initiation scenarios that have not or cannot be tested experimentally with a high level of confidence in its predictions.

  4. Complement activation by PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes is independent of C1q and alternative pathway turnover

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Islam; Hunter, A. Christy; Rutt, Kenneth J.; Liu, Zhuang; Dai, Hongjie; Moghimi, S. Moein

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction between long circulating poly(ethylene glycol)-stabilized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the complement system. Aminopoly(ethylene glycol)5000–distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (aminoPEG5000–DSPE) and methoxyPEG5000–DSPE coated as-grown HIPco SWNTs activated complement in undiluted normal human serum as reflected in significant rises in C4d and SC5b-9 levels, but not the alternative pathway split-product Bb, thus indicating activation exclusively through C4 cleavage. Studies in C2-depleted serum confirmed that PEGylated nanotube-mediated elevation of SC5b-9 was C4b2a convertase-dependent. With the aid of monoclonal antibodies against C1s and human serum depleted from C1q, nanotube-mediated complement activation in C1q-depleted serum was also shown to be independent of classical pathway. Nanotube-mediated C4d elevation in C1q-depleted serum, however, was inhibited by N-acetylglucosamine, Futhan (a broad-spectrum serine protease inhibitor capable of preventing complement activation through all three pathways) and anti-MASP-2 antibodies; this strongly suggests a role for activation of MASP-2 in subsequent C4 cleavage and assembly of C4b2a covertases. Intravenous injection of PEGylated nanotubes in some rats was associated with a significant rise in plasma thromboxane B2 levels, indicative of in vivo nanotube-mediated complement activation. The clinical implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:18602161

  5. Identification and sequence analysis of the Rhizobium meliloti dctA gene encoding the C4-dicarboxylate carrier.

    PubMed

    Engelke, T; Jording, D; Kapp, D; Pühler, A

    1989-10-01

    Transposon Tn5-induced C4-dicarboxylate transport mutants of Rhizobium meliloti 2011 which could be complemented by cosmid pRmSC121 were subdivided into two classes. Class I mutants (RMS37 and RMS938) were defective in symbiotic C4-dicarboxylate transport and in nitrogen fixation. They were mutated in the structural gene dctA, which codes for the C4-dicarboxylate carrier. Class II mutants (RMS11, RMS16, RMS17, RMS24, and RMS31) expressed reduced activity in symbiotic C4-dicarboxylate transport and in nitrogen fixation. These mutants were mutated in regulatory dct genes which do not play an essential role in the symbiotic state. Thin sections of alfalfa nodules induced by the wild type and class I and class II mutants were analyzed by light microscopy. Class mutants induced typical Fix- nodules, showing a large senescent zone, whereas nodules induced by class II mutants only differed in an enhanced content of starch granules compared with wild-type nodules. Class I mutants could be complemented by a 2.1-kilobase SalI-HindIII subfragment of cosmid pRmSC121. DNA sequencing of this fragment resulted in the identification of an open reading frame, which was designated dctA because Tn5 insertion sites of the class I mutants mapped within this coding region. The dctA gene was preceded by a nif consensus promoter and an upstream NifA-binding element. Upstream of the dctA promoter, the 5' end of the R. meliloti dctB gene could be localized. The amino acid sequence of the N-terminal part of the R. meliloti DctB protein shared 49% homology with the corresponding part of the R. leguminosarum DctB protein. The DctA protein consisted of 441 or 453 amino acids due to two possible ATG start codons, with calculated molecular masses of 46.1 and 47.6 kilodaltons, respectively. The hydrophobicity plot suggests that DctA is a membrane protein with several membrane passages. The amino acid sequences of the R. meliloti and the R. leguminosarum DctA proteins were highly conserved (82%).

  6. Identification and sequence analysis of the Rhizobium meliloti dctA gene encoding the C4-dicarboxylate carrier.

    PubMed Central

    Engelke, T; Jording, D; Kapp, D; Pühler, A

    1989-01-01

    Transposon Tn5-induced C4-dicarboxylate transport mutants of Rhizobium meliloti 2011 which could be complemented by cosmid pRmSC121 were subdivided into two classes. Class I mutants (RMS37 and RMS938) were defective in symbiotic C4-dicarboxylate transport and in nitrogen fixation. They were mutated in the structural gene dctA, which codes for the C4-dicarboxylate carrier. Class II mutants (RMS11, RMS16, RMS17, RMS24, and RMS31) expressed reduced activity in symbiotic C4-dicarboxylate transport and in nitrogen fixation. These mutants were mutated in regulatory dct genes which do not play an essential role in the symbiotic state. Thin sections of alfalfa nodules induced by the wild type and class I and class II mutants were analyzed by light microscopy. Class mutants induced typical Fix- nodules, showing a large senescent zone, whereas nodules induced by class II mutants only differed in an enhanced content of starch granules compared with wild-type nodules. Class I mutants could be complemented by a 2.1-kilobase SalI-HindIII subfragment of cosmid pRmSC121. DNA sequencing of this fragment resulted in the identification of an open reading frame, which was designated dctA because Tn5 insertion sites of the class I mutants mapped within this coding region. The dctA gene was preceded by a nif consensus promoter and an upstream NifA-binding element. Upstream of the dctA promoter, the 5' end of the R. meliloti dctB gene could be localized. The amino acid sequence of the N-terminal part of the R. meliloti DctB protein shared 49% homology with the corresponding part of the R. leguminosarum DctB protein. The DctA protein consisted of 441 or 453 amino acids due to two possible ATG start codons, with calculated molecular masses of 46.1 and 47.6 kilodaltons, respectively. The hydrophobicity plot suggests that DctA is a membrane protein with several membrane passages. The amino acid sequences of the R. meliloti and the R. leguminosarum DctA proteins were highly conserved (82

  7. Serum complement and immunoconglutinin in malnutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, R K

    1975-01-01

    Serum haemolytic complement activity and C3 were significantly decreased in 35 malnourished children. The changes were more pronounced in those with infection. Electrophoretically altered forms of complement C were detected in 14. There was an inverse correlation between C3 levels and immunoconglutinin titres. Nutritional rehabilitation and eradication of infection reversed the abnormalities. It is suggested that reduced complement function in malnutrition is the combined result of impaired synthesis, complement activation in vivo, and changes in plasma volume, and that it may contribute to an increased susceptibility to infection in undernourished individuals. PMID:807166

  8. Kranz and single-cell forms of C4 plants in the subfamily Suaedoideae show kinetic C4 convergence for PEPC and Rubisco with divergent amino acid substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Rosnow, Josh J.; Evans, Marc A.; Kapralov, Maxim V.; Cousins, Asaph B.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Roalson, Eric H.

    2015-01-01

    The two carboxylation reactions performed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) are vital in the fixation of inorganic carbon for C4 plants. The abundance of PEPC is substantially elevated in C4 leaves, while the location of Rubisco is restricted to one of two chloroplast types. These differences compared with C3 leaves have been shown to result in convergent enzyme optimization in some C4 species. Investigation into the kinetic properties of PEPC and Rubisco from Kranz C4, single cell C4, and C3 species in Chenopodiaceae s. s. subfamily Suaedoideae showed that these major carboxylases in C4 Suaedoideae species lack the same mutations found in other C4 systems which have been examined; but still have similar convergent kinetic properties. Positive selection analysis on the N-terminus of PEPC identified residues 364 and 368 to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 using Bayes empirical Bayes. Compared with previous analyses on other C4 species, PEPC from C4 Suaedoideae species have different convergent amino acids that result in a higher K m for PEP and malate tolerance compared with C3 species. Kinetic analysis of Rubisco showed that C4 species have a higher catalytic efficiency of Rubisco (k catc in mol CO2 mol–1 Rubisco active sites s–1), despite lacking convergent substitutions in the rbcL gene. The importance of kinetic changes to the two-carboxylation reactions in C4 leaves related to amino acid selection is discussed. PMID:26417023

  9. Kranz and single-cell forms of C4 plants in the subfamily Suaedoideae show kinetic C4 convergence for PEPC and Rubisco with divergent amino acid substitutions.

    PubMed

    Rosnow, Josh J; Evans, Marc A; Kapralov, Maxim V; Cousins, Asaph B; Edwards, Gerald E; Roalson, Eric H

    2015-12-01

    The two carboxylation reactions performed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) are vital in the fixation of inorganic carbon for C4 plants. The abundance of PEPC is substantially elevated in C4 leaves, while the location of Rubisco is restricted to one of two chloroplast types. These differences compared with C3 leaves have been shown to result in convergent enzyme optimization in some C4 species. Investigation into the kinetic properties of PEPC and Rubisco from Kranz C4, single cell C4, and C3 species in Chenopodiaceae s. s. subfamily Suaedoideae showed that these major carboxylases in C4 Suaedoideae species lack the same mutations found in other C4 systems which have been examined; but still have similar convergent kinetic properties. Positive selection analysis on the N-terminus of PEPC identified residues 364 and 368 to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 using Bayes empirical Bayes. Compared with previous analyses on other C4 species, PEPC from C4 Suaedoideae species have different convergent amino acids that result in a higher K m for PEP and malate tolerance compared with C3 species. Kinetic analysis of Rubisco showed that C4 species have a higher catalytic efficiency of Rubisco (k catc in mol CO2 mol(-1) Rubisco active sites s(-1)), despite lacking convergent substitutions in the rbcL gene. The importance of kinetic changes to the two-carboxylation reactions in C4 leaves related to amino acid selection is discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. Human L-ficolin, a Recognition Molecule of the Lectin Activation Pathway of Complement, Activates Complement by Binding to Pneumolysin, the Major Toxin of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Youssif M.; Kenawy, Hany I.; Muhammad, Adnan; Sim, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is an essential component of the immune response, providing a critical line of defense against different pathogens including S. pneumoniae. Complement is activated via three distinct pathways: the classical (CP), the alternative (AP) and the lectin pathway (LP). The role of Pneumolysin (PLY), a bacterial toxin released by S. pneumoniae, in triggering complement activation has been studied in vitro. Our results demonstrate that in both human and mouse sera complement was activated via the CP, initiated by direct binding of even non-specific IgM and IgG3 to PLY. Absence of CP activity in C1q−/− mouse serum completely abolished any C3 deposition. However, C1q depleted human serum strongly opsonized PLY through abundant deposition of C3 activation products, indicating that the LP may have a vital role in activating the human complement system on PLY. We identified that human L-ficolin is the critical LP recognition molecule that drives LP activation on PLY, while all of the murine LP recognition components fail to bind and activate complement on PLY. This work elucidates the detailed interactions between PLY and complement and shows for the first time a specific role of the LP in PLY-mediated complement activation in human serum. PMID:24349316

  11. Effects of low atmospheric CO2 and elevated temperature during growth on the gas exchange responses of C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species from three evolutionary lineages of C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Vogan, Patrick J; Sage, Rowan F

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluates acclimation of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance in three evolutionary lineages of C(3), C(3)-C(4) intermediate, and C(4) species grown in the low CO(2) and hot conditions proposed to favo r the evolution of C(4) photosynthesis. Closely related C(3), C(3)-C(4), and C(4) species in the genera Flaveria, Heliotropium, and Alternanthera were grown near 380 and 180 μmol CO(2) mol(-1) air and day/night temperatures of 37/29°C. Growth CO(2) had no effect on photosynthetic capacity or nitrogen allocation to Rubisco and electron transport in any of the species. There was also no effect of growth CO(2) on photosynthetic and stomatal responses to intercellular CO(2) concentration. These results demonstrate little ability to acclimate to low CO(2) growth conditions in closely related C(3) and C(3)-C(4) species, indicating that, during past episodes of low CO(2), individual C(3) plants had little ability to adjust their photosynthetic physiology to compensate for carbon starvation. This deficiency could have favored selection for more efficient modes of carbon assimilation, such as C(3)-C(4) intermediacy. The C(3)-C(4) species had approximately 50% greater rates of net CO(2) assimilation than the C(3) species when measured at the growth conditions of 180 μmol mol(-1) and 37°C, demonstrating the superiority of the C(3)-C(4) pathway in low atmospheric CO(2) and hot climates of recent geological time.

  12. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-01-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies. PMID

  13. Complement-binding anti-HLA antibodies and kidney-allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Vernerey, Dewi; Prugger, Christof; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Mooney, Nuala; Suberbielle, Caroline; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Méjean, Arnaud; Desgrandchamps, François; Anglicheau, Dany; Nochy, Dominique; Charron, Dominique; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Delahousse, Michel; Legendre, Christophe; Glotz, Denis; Hill, Gary S; Zeevi, Adriana; Jouven, Xavier

    2013-09-26

    Anti-HLA antibodies hamper successful transplantation, and activation of the complement cascade is involved in antibody-mediated rejection. We investigated whether the complement-binding capacity of anti-HLA antibodies plays a role in kidney-allograft failure. We enrolled patients who received kidney allografts at two transplantation centers in Paris between January 1, 2005, and January 1, 2011, in a population-based study. Patients were screened for the presence of circulating donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies and their complement-binding capacity. Graft injury phenotype and the time to kidney-allograft loss were assessed. The primary analysis included 1016 patients. Patients with complement-binding donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies after transplantation had the lowest 5-year rate of graft survival (54%), as compared with patients with non-complement-binding donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (93%) and patients without donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (94%) (P<0.001 for both comparisons). The presence of complement-binding donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies after transplantation was associated with a risk of graft loss that was more than quadrupled (hazard ratio, 4.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.69 to 8.49) when adjusted for clinical, functional, histologic, and immunologic factors. These antibodies were also associated with an increased rate of antibody-mediated rejection, a more severe graft injury phenotype with more extensive microvascular inflammation, and increased deposition of complement fraction C4d within graft capillaries. Adding complement-binding donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies to a traditional risk model improved the stratification of patients at risk for graft failure (continuous net reclassification improvement, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.97). Assessment of the complement-binding capacity of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies appears to be useful in identifying patients at high risk for kidney-allograft loss.

  14. An Anti-C1s Monoclonal, TNT003, Inhibits Complement Activation Induced by Antibodies Against HLA

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, K A; Valenzuela, N M; Gjertson, D; Mulder, A; Fishbein, M C; Parry, G C; Panicker, S; Reed, E F

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants (SOT) is characterized by damage triggered by donor-specific antibodies (DSA) binding donor Class I and II HLA (HLA-I and HLA-II) expressed on endothelial cells. While F(ab′)2 portions of DSA cause cellular activation and proliferation, Fc regions activate the classical complement cascade, resulting in complement deposition and leukocyte recruitment, both hallmark features of AMR. We characterized the ability of an anti-C1s monoclonal antibody, TNT003, to inhibit HLA antibody (HLA-Ab)-induced complement activation. Complement deposition induced by HLA-Ab was evaluated using novel cell- and bead-based assays. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured with HLA-Ab and human complement; production of activated complement proteins was measured by flow cytometry. Additionally, C3d deposition was measured on single antigen beads (SAB) mixed with HLA-Ab and human complement. TNT003 inhibited HLA-Ab mediated complement deposition on HAEC in a concentration-dependent manner; C3a, C4a and C5a anaphylatoxin production was also diminished by TNT003. Finally, TNT003 blocked C3d deposition induced by Class I (HLAI-Ab)- and Class II (HLAII-Ab)-specific antibodies on SAB. These data suggest TNT003 may be useful for modulating the effects of DSA, as TNT003 inhibits complement deposition and split product formation generated by HLA-I/II-Ab in vitro. PMID:25904443

  15. The ultraviolet photochemistry of diacetylene - Direct detection of primary products of the metastable C4H2* + C4H2 reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandy, Ralph E.; Lakshminarayan, Chitra; Frost, Rex K.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    The products of diacetylene's ultraviolet photochemistry over the 245-220 nm region were directly determined in experiments where C4H2 was excited within a small reaction tube attached to a pulsed nozzle. The products formed in the collisions of C4H2* with C4H2 were subsequently ionized by vacuum UV radiation (at 118 nm) in the ion source of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It was found that the reaction of C4H2* with C4H2 produces C6H2 (+C2H2), C8H2 (+2H,H2), and C8H3 (+H), confirming the results of Glicker and Okabe (1987). Under certain conditions, secondary products were observed. Mechanisms for the observed reactions are proposed.

  16. Review on complement analysis method and the roles of glycosaminoglycans in the complement system.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Li, Yan; Ijaz, Muhammad; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Lian, Qianqian; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-12-10

    Complement system is composed of over 30 proteins and it plays important roles in self-defence and inflammation. There are three activation pathways, including classical pathway, alternative pathway and lectin pathway, in complement system, and they are associated with many diseases such as osteoarthritis and age-related macular degeneration. Modulation of the complement system may be a promising strategy in the treatment of related diseases. Glycosaminoglycans are anionic linear polysaccharides without branches. They are one kind of multi-functional macromolecules which have great potential in regulating complement system. This review is organized around two aspects between the introduction of complement system and the interaction of glycosaminoglycans with complement system. Three complement activation pathways and the biological significance were introduced first. Then functional analysis methods were compared to provide a strategy for potential glycosaminoglycans screen. Finally, the roles of glycosaminoglycans played in the complement system were summed up.

  17. The role of complement in AMD.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Peter F; Lauer, Nadine; Skerka, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common form of blindness in the western world and genetic variations of several complement genes, including the complement regulator Factor H, the central complement component C3, Factor B, C2, and also Factor I confer a risk for the disease. However deletion of a chromosomal segment in the Factor H gene cluster on human chromosome 1, which results in the deficiency of the terminal pathway regulator CFHR1, and of the putative complement regulator CFHR3 has a protective effect for development of AMD. The Factor H gene encodes two proteins Factor H and FHL1 which are derived from alternatively processed transcripts. In particular a sequence variation at position 402 of both Factor H and FHL1 is associated with a risk for AMD. A tyrosine residue at position 402 represents the protective and a histidine residue the risk variant. AMD is considered a chronic inflammatory disease, which can be caused by defective and inappropriate regulation of the continuously activated alternative complement pathway. This activation generates complement effector products and inflammatory mediators that stimulate further inflammatory reactions. Defective regulation can lead to formation of immune deposits, drusen and ultimately translate into damage of retinal pigment epithelial cells, rupture of the interface between these epithelial cells and the Bruch's membrane and vision loss. Here we describe the role of complement in the retina and summarize the current concept how defective or inappropriate local complement control contributes to inflammation and the pathophysiology of AMD.

  18. Progress and Trends in Complement Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The past few years have proven to be a highly successful and exciting period for the field of complement-directed drug discovery and development. Driven by promising experiences with the first marketed complement drugs, increased knowledge about the involvement of complement in health and disease, and improvements in structural and analytical techniques as well as animal models of disease, the field has seen a surge in creative approaches to therapeutically intervene at various stages of the cascade. An impressive panel of compounds that show promise in clinical trials is meanwhile being lined up in the pipelines of both small biotechnology and big pharmaceutical companies. Yet with this new focus on complement-targeted therapeutics, important questions concerning target selection, point and length of intervention, safety, and drug delivery emerge. In view of the diversity of the clinical disorders involving abnormal complement activity or regulation, which include both acute and chronic diseases and affect a wide range of organs, diverse yet specifically tailored therapeutic approaches may be needed to shift complement back into balance. This chapter highlights the key changes in the field that shape our current perception of complement-targeted drugs and provides a brief overview of recent strategies and emerging trends. Selected examples of complement-related diseases and inhibitor classes are highlighted to illustrate the diversity and creativity in field. PMID:22990692

  19. Traces of strong selective pressures in the genomes of C4 grasses.

    PubMed

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine

    2017-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis is nature's response to CO2 limitations, and evolved recurrently in several groups of plants. To identify genes related to C4 photosynthesis, Huang et al. looked for evidence of past episodes of adaptive evolution in the genomes of C4 grasses. They identified a large number of candidate genes that evolved under divergent selection, indicating that, besides alterations to expression patterns, the history of C4 involved strong selection on protein-coding sequences.

  20. Activated Complement Factors as Disease Markers for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflieh, Jean; Rushbrook, Julie; Worah, Samrat; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Early recognition and effective management are essential for improved outcome. However, early recognition is impeded by lack of clinically utilized biomarkers. Complement factors play important roles in the mechanisms leading to sepsis and can potentially serve as early markers of sepsis and of sepsis severity and outcome. This review provides a synopsis of recent animal and clinical studies of the role of complement factors in sepsis development, together with their potential as disease markers. In addition, new results from our laboratory are presented regarding the involvement of the complement factor, mannose-binding lectin, in septic shock patients. Future clinical studies are needed to obtain the complete profiles of complement factors/their activated products during the course of sepsis development. We anticipate that the results of these studies will lead to a multipanel set of sepsis biomarkers which, along with currently used laboratory tests, will facilitate earlier diagnosis, timely treatment, and improved outcome. PMID:26420913

  1. Detection of surface bound complement at increasing serum anticoagulant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, S; Askendal, A; Lindahl, T L; Tengvall, P

    2008-04-01

    Surface mediated immune complement activation can be detected by a variety of antibody utilizing methods such as ELISA, fluorescence- or radiolabelling techniques, QCM, and ellipsometry. In the present work we investigated how the common anticoagulants heparin, dalteparin, fondaparinux and sodium citrate affected the binding of anti-complement factor 3c (anti-C3c) on a model complement activator surface, immobilised IgG, after incubation in human blood serum. The results show, as expected, that different anticoagulants affect the antibody binding differently. Increasing amounts of heparin, dalteparin and sodium citrate in normal serum resulted in a decreasing anti-C3c binding. The antibody deposition was not sensitive for the fondaparinux concentration. Surprisingly high concentrations of anti-coagulantia were needed to completely eradicate the antibody binding. Experiments in EGTA-serum showed that anticoagulants interfered directly with both the classical and alternative pathways. Control C3a-des arg ELISA measurements show that the lowered antibody surface binding was not a result of complement depletion in serum. Kallikrein generation by hydrophilic glass surfaces was not affected by high anticoagulant concentrations.

  2. Revealing diversity in structural and biochemical forms of C4 photosynthesis and a C3–C4 intermediate in genus Portulaca L. (Portulacaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Voznesenskaya, Elena V.; Koteyeva, Nuria K.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Ocampo, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Portulacaceae is one of 19 families of terrestrial plants in which species having C4 photosynthesis have been found. Representative species from major clades of the genus Portulaca were studied to characterize the forms of photosynthesis structurally and biochemically. The species P. amilis, P. grandiflora, P. molokiniensis, P. oleracea, P. pilosa, and P. umbraticola belong to the subgenus Portulaca and are C4 plants based on leaf carbon isotope values, Kranz anatomy, and expression of key C4 enzymes. Portulaca umbraticola, clade Umbraticola, is NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME)-type C4 species, while P. oleracea and P. molokiniensis in clade Oleracea are NAD-ME-type C4 species, all having different forms of Atriplicoid-type leaf anatomy. In clade Pilosa, P. amilis, P. grandiflora, and P. pilosa are NADP-ME-type C4 species. They have Pilosoid-type anatomy in which Kranz tissues enclose peripheral vascular bundles with water storage in the centre of the leaf. Portulaca cf. bicolor, which belongs to subgenus Portulacella, is an NADP-ME C4 species with Portulacelloid-type anatomy; it has well-developed Kranz chlorenchyma surrounding lateral veins distributed in one plane under the adaxial epidermis with water storage cells underneath. Portulaca cryptopetala (clade Oleracea), an endemic species from central South America, was identified as a C3–C4 based on its intermediate CO2 compensation point and selective localization of glycine decarboxylase of the photorespiratory pathway in mitochondria of bundle sheath cells. The C4 Portulaca species which were examined also have cotyledons with Kranz-type anatomy, while the stems of all species have C3-type photosynthetic cells. The results indicate that multiple structural and biochemical forms of C4 photosynthesis evolved in genus Portulaca. PMID:20591900

  3. Flavonol glycosides and other phenolic compounds from Viola tianshanica and their anti-complement activities.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yan; Wen, Quan; Cao, Jie; Yin, Chengle; Chen, Daofeng; Cheng, Zhihong

    2016-07-01

    Viola tianshanica Maxim. (Violaceae) is a perennial herb distributed in Central Asia, especially in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (XUAR) of China. Preliminary study showed that the ethanol extract of the herb exhibited the anti-complement activity against the classical pathway, but the active components responsible for this capacity remain unknown and are yet to be studied. The objective of this study was the isolation and identification of the anti-complement constituents of V. tianshanica. The ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions from the ethanol extract of V. tianshanica were purified. The structures of the isolates were identified by spectroscopic methods, and comparing their spectral data with those reported in the literature. All the isolates (0.02-2.50 mg/mL) were evaluated for their anti-complement activity against the classical and alternative pathways. Twenty-one phenolic compounds including 15 flavonol O-glycosides (1-15), one flavone 6,8-di-C-glycoside (16), one flavone aglycone (17), and four phenolic acid derivatives (18-21) were isolated and identified. Bioassay showed that 11 compounds inhibited the classical pathway and the alternative pathway with CH50 and AP50 values of 0.113-1.210 mM and 0.120-1.579 mM, respectively. Preliminary mechanistic study using complement-depleted sera demonstrated that 1 acted on C1q, C2, C4, and C9 components, 16 on C1q, C4, and C5, and 21 on C1q, C3, C4, and C9. All isolated compounds except 1 and 10 were reported for the first time from V. tianshanica. Compound 16 is the first flavone C-glycoside isolated from the herb. Flavonol O-glycosides and phenolic acids contributed the anti-complement activity of the herb.

  4. 26 CFR 1.280C-4 - Credit for increasing research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit for increasing research activities. 1.280C-4 Section 1.280C-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.280C-4 Credit for increasing...

  5. Evolution of the C4 photosynthetic pathway: events at the cellular and molecular levels.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Martha

    2013-11-01

    The biochemistry and leaf anatomy of plants using C4 photosynthesis promote the concentration of atmospheric CO2 in leaf tissue that leads to improvements in growth and yield of C4 plants over C3 species in hot, dry, high light, and/or saline environments. C4 plants like maize and sugarcane are significant food, fodder, and bioenergy crops. The C4 photosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of convergent evolution, having evolved in multiple independent lineages of land plants from ancestors employing C3 photosynthesis. In addition to C3 and C4 species, some plant lineages contain closely related C3-C4 intermediate species that demonstrate leaf anatomical, biochemical, and physiological characteristics between those of C3 plants and species using C4 photosynthesis. These groups of plants have been extremely useful in dissecting the modifications to leaf anatomy and molecular biology, which led to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. It is now clear that great variation exists in C4 leaf anatomy, and diverse molecular mechanisms underlie C4 biochemistry and physiology. However, all these different paths have led to the same destination-the expression of a C4 CO2 concentrating mechanism. Further identification of C4 leaf anatomical traits and molecular biological components, and understanding how they are controlled and assembled will not only allow for additional insights into evolutionary convergence, but also contribute to sustainable food and bioenergy production strategies.

  6. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-4 - Illustration of the provisions of sections 651 and 652.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Illustration of the provisions of sections 651 and 652. 1.652(c)-4 Section 1.652(c)-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Only § 1.652(c)-4 Illustration of the provisions of sections 651 and 652. The rules applicable to...

  7. Expression analysis of kenaf cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) ortholog during developmental and stress responses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was conducted to clone and analyze the expression pattern of a C4H gene encoding cinnamate 4-hydroxylase from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.). A full-length C4H ortholog was cloned using degenerate primers and the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) method. The full-length C4H ortholog...

  8. Solvation Thermodynamic Properties of Hydrogen Sulfide in [C4mim][PF6], [C4mim][BF4], and [C4mim][Cl] Ionic Liquids, Determined by Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Badillo, Joel; Gallo, Marco; Alvarado, Sandra; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2015-08-20

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and acid gases from natural gas is accomplished by absorption processes using a solvent. The gas solubility in a liquid can be used to measure the degree of removal of the gas and is quantified by the Henry's constant, the free energy of solvation at infinite dilution, or the excess chemical potential. In this work, Henry's constants and thermodynamic properties of solvation of H2S were calculated in three ionic liquids: [C4mim][PF6], [C4mim][BF4], and [C4mim][Cl] ([C4mim], 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium). The first step in this work was the evaluation of the force fields for the gas and condensed phases in order to obtain accurate values for the excess chemical potential for H2S on each ionic liquid using free energy perturbation techniques. In the H2S-[C4mim][PF6] and H2S-[C4mim][BF4] systems, the results obtained by molecular simulation agree with the experimental values reported in the literature. However, the solvation free energy calculated for the H2S-[C4mim][Cl] system can be considered predictive because of the lack of experimental data at the simulated conditions. Based on these results, the best solvent for removing H2S is [C4mim][Cl] because it has the highest affinity for this species (lowest value of the Henry's constant). Also, solvation thermodynamic properties such as enthalpy and entropy were calculated in order to evaluate their contribution to the free energy of solvation.

  9. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that c