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Sample records for complete complement c4

  1. Real-time PCR quantification of human complement C4A and C4B genes

    PubMed Central

    Szilagyi, Agnes; Blasko, Bernadett; Szilassy, Denes; Fust, George; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Ronai, Zsolt

    2006-01-01

    Background The fourth component of human complement (C4), an essential factor of the innate immunity, is represented as two isoforms (C4A and C4B) in the genome. Although these genes differ only in 5 nucleotides, the encoded C4A and C4B proteins are functionally different. Based on phenotypic determination, unbalanced production of C4A and C4B is associated with several diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes, several autoimmune diseases, moreover with higher morbidity and mortality of myocardial infarction and increased susceptibility for bacterial infections. Despite of this major clinical relevance, only low throughput, time and labor intensive methods have been used so far for the quantification of C4A and C4B genes. Results A novel quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technique was developed for rapid and accurate quantification of the C4A and C4B genes applying a duplex, TaqMan based methodology. The reliable, single-step analysis provides the determination of the copy number of the C4A and C4B genes applying a wide range of DNA template concentration (0.3–300 ng genomic DNA). The developed qPCR was applied to determine C4A and C4B gene dosages in a healthy Hungarian population (N = 118). The obtained data were compared to the results of an earlier study of the same population. Moreover a set of 33 samples were analyzed by two independent methods. No significant difference was observed between the gene dosages determined by the employed techniques demonstrating the reliability of the novel qPCR methodology. A Microsoft Excel worksheet and a DOS executable are also provided for simple and automated evaluation of the measured data. Conclusion This report describes a novel real-time PCR method for single-step quantification of C4A and C4B genes. The developed technique could facilitate studies investigating disease association of different C4 isotypes. PMID:16403222

  2. Genotypic diversity of complement component C4 does not predict kidney transplant outcome.

    PubMed

    Wahrmann, Markus; Döhler, Bernd; Ruhenstroth, Andrea; Haslacher, Helmuth; Perkmann, Thomas; Exner, Markus; Rees, Andrew J; Böhmig, Georg A

    2011-02-01

    Gene copy number of complement component C4, which varies among individuals, may determine the intrinsic strength of the classical complement pathway. Presuming a major role of complement as an effector in transplant rejection, we hypothesized that C4 genetic diversity may partially explain the variation in allograft outcomes. This retrospective study included 1969 deceased-donor kidney transplants randomly selected from the Collaborative Transplant Study DNA bank. We determined recipient and donor gene copy number of total C4, C4 isotypes (C4A and C4B), and C4 gene length variants (C4L and C4S) by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Groups defined according to recipient C4 gene copy number (low, intermediate, and high) had similar 10-year allograft survival. Genotypic groups showed comparable rates of graft dysfunction, treatment for rejection, immunological graft loss, hospitalization for infection, malignant disease, and death. Similarly, separate analyses of C4A, C4B, C4L, and C4S; combined evaluation of donor and recipient C4 genotype; or analysis of recipients with higher risk for rejection did not reveal considerable outcome effects. In conclusion, we did not demonstrate that C4 gene copy number associates with transplant outcome, and we found no evidence that the resulting variation in the strength of classical complement activation influences susceptibility to rejection.

  3. Genotypic Diversity of Complement Component C4 Does Not Predict Kidney Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Wahrmann, Markus; Döhler, Bernd; Ruhenstroth, Andrea; Haslacher, Helmuth; Perkmann, Thomas; Exner, Markus; Rees, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Gene copy number of complement component C4, which varies among individuals, may determine the intrinsic strength of the classical complement pathway. Presuming a major role of complement as an effector in transplant rejection, we hypothesized that C4 genetic diversity may partially explain the variation in allograft outcomes. This retrospective study included 1969 deceased-donor kidney transplants randomly selected from the Collaborative Transplant Study DNA bank. We determined recipient and donor gene copy number of total C4, C4 isotypes (C4A and C4B), and C4 gene length variants (C4L and C4S) by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Groups defined according to recipient C4 gene copy number (low, intermediate, and high) had similar 10-year allograft survival. Genotypic groups showed comparable rates of graft dysfunction, treatment for rejection, immunological graft loss, hospitalization for infection, malignant disease, and death. Similarly, separate analyses of C4A, C4B, C4L, and C4S; combined evaluation of donor and recipient C4 genotype; or analysis of recipients with higher risk for rejection did not reveal considerable outcome effects. In conclusion, we did not demonstrate that C4 gene copy number associates with transplant outcome, and we found no evidence that the resulting variation in the strength of classical complement activation influences susceptibility to rejection. PMID:21164027

  4. Structural Basis for the Function of Complement Component C4 within the Classical and Lectin Pathways of Complement.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Sofia; Kidmose, Rune T; Petersen, Steen V; Szilágyi, Ágnes; Prohászka, Zoltan; Andersen, Gregers R

    2015-06-01

    Complement component C4 is a central protein in the classical and lectin pathways within the complement system. During activation of complement, its major fragment C4b becomes covalently attached to the surface of pathogens and altered self-tissue, where it acts as an opsonin marking the surface for removal. Moreover, C4b provides a platform for assembly of the proteolytically active convertases that mediate downstream complement activation by cleavage of C3 and C5. In this article, we present the crystal and solution structures of the 195-kDa C4b. Our results provide the molecular details of the rearrangement accompanying C4 cleavage and suggest intramolecular flexibility of C4b. The conformations of C4b and its paralogue C3b are shown to be remarkably conserved, suggesting that the convertases from the classical and alternative pathways are likely to share their overall architecture and mode of substrate recognition. We propose an overall molecular model for the classical pathway C5 convertase in complex with C5, suggesting that C3b increases the affinity for the substrate by inducing conformational changes in C4b rather than a direct interaction with C5. C4b-specific features revealed by our structural studies are probably involved in the assembly of the classical pathway C3/C5 convertases and C4b binding to regulators.

  5. Ig-like transcript 4 as a cellular receptor for soluble complement fragment C4d.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Johannes; Forster, Florian; Isenman, David E; Wahrmann, Markus; Leitner, Judith; Hölzl, Markus A; Kovarik, Johannes J; Stockinger, Hannes; Böhmig, Georg A; Steinberger, Peter; Zlabinger, Gerhard J

    2016-04-01

    Complement regulation leads to the generation of complement split products (CSPs) such as complement component (C)4d, a marker for disease activity in autoimmune syndromes or antibody-mediated allograft rejection. However, the physiologic role of C4d has been unknown. By screening murine thymoma BW5147 cells expressing a cDNA library generated from human monocyte-derived dendritic cells with recombinant human C4d, we identified Ig-like transcript (ILT)4 and ILT5v2 as cellular receptors for C4d. Both receptors, expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, also interacted with the CSPs C3d, C4b, C3b, and iC3b. However, C4d did not bind to classic complement receptors (CRs). Interaction between cell surface-resident ILT4 and soluble monomeric C4d resulted in endocytosis of C4d. Surprisingly, binding of soluble ILT4 to C4d covalently immobilized to a cellular surface following classic complement activation could not be detected. Remarkably, C4d immobilized to a solid phaseviaits intrinsic thioester conferred a dose-dependent inhibition of TNF-α and IL-6 secretion in monocytes activatedviaFc-cross-linking of up to 50% as compared to baseline. Similarly, C4d conferred an attenuation of intracellular Ca(2+)flux in monocytes activatedviaFc-cross-linking. In conclusion, ILT4 represents a scavenger-type endocytotic CR for soluble monomeric C4d, whereas attenuation of monocyte activation by physiologically oriented C4d on a surface appears to be dependent on a yet to be identified C4d receptor.-Hofer, J., Forster, F., Isenman, D. E., Wahrmann, M., Leitner, J., Hölzl, M. A., Kovarik, J. K., Stockinger, H., Böhmig, G. A., Steinberger, P., Zlabinger, G. J. Ig-like transcript 4 as a cellular receptor for soluble complement fragment C4d.

  6. Antagonism of the complement component C4 by flavivirus nonstructural protein NS1

    PubMed Central

    Avirutnan, Panisadee; Fuchs, Anja; Hauhart, Richard E.; Somnuke, Pawit; Youn, Soonjeon

    2010-01-01

    The complement system plays an essential protective role in the initial defense against many microorganisms. Flavivirus NS1 is a secreted nonstructural glycoprotein that accumulates in blood, is displayed on the surface of infected cells, and has been hypothesized to have immune evasion functions. Herein, we demonstrate that dengue virus (DENV), West Nile virus (WNV), and yellow fever virus (YFV) NS1 attenuate classical and lectin pathway activation by directly interacting with C4. Binding of NS1 to C4 reduced C4b deposition and C3 convertase (C4b2a) activity. Although NS1 bound C4b, it lacked intrinsic cofactor activity to degrade C4b, and did not block C3 convertase formation or accelerate decay of the C3 and C5 convertases. Instead, NS1 enhanced C4 cleavage by recruiting and activating the complement-specific protease C1s. By binding C1s and C4 in a complex, NS1 promotes efficient degradation of C4 to C4b. Through this mechanism, NS1 protects DENV from complement-dependent neutralization in solution. These studies define a novel immune evasion mechanism for restricting complement control of microbial infection. PMID:20308361

  7. Comparison of a fluorometric method with radial immunodiffusion assays for determination of complement components C3 and C4.

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, M; Bartholomew, W R

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of patient serum complement components C3 and C4 are useful indicators of complement consumption in immune complex diseases. A fluorometric quantitative immunofluorescence system was evaluated in terms of measuring these complement components, and the results were compared with those of radial immunodiffusion assays. For comparison of the two systems, 232 patient sera were evaluated for C3, and 202 specimens were tested for C4. Analysis of the data by linear regression indicated a proportional difference between the methods. C3 and C4 concentrations measured by the fluorometric method were lower than those measured by radial immunodiffusion, especially concentrations exceeding the normal ranges. In detecting lower concentrations (less than 120 mg/dl for C3 and less than 25 mg/dl for C4), the two methods showed better agreement. Each assay system was reproducible and could be used to evaluate changes that occur in concentrations of complement components during therapeutic treatment. However, the ease in processing a large volume of specimens and the short time needed to complete the assay are advantages that make the fluorometric method more suitable than radial immunodiffusion for use in a large clinical laboratory. PMID:6811611

  8. The purification and characterization of bovine C4, the fourth component of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, N A; Campbell, R D; Fothergill, J E

    1979-01-01

    The fourth component of complement, C4, was isolated from bovine plasma in high yield, by using simple purification techniques. The protein, like human component C4, is a beta-globulin with a mol.wt. of about 200 000 and consists of three polypeptide chains, alpha, beta and gamma, with apparent mol. wts. of 98 000, 82 000 and 32 000 respectively. The chains of C4 have been separated by methods previously used for human C4. Their amino acid compositions are very similar to those of the human component, but differences in carbohydrate distribution have been observed. The haemolytic activity of bovine C4 is totally destroyed by incubation with bovine C1s, the activated subcomponent of the first component of complement. Component C4, treated in this way, was shown to be cleaved in the alpha chain, which was decreased in mol.wt. by about 9000, corresponding to the removal of subcomponent C4a. Images Fig. 3. PMID:312644

  9. Complement split products c3a and c4a in chronic lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Stricker, R B; Savely, V R; Motanya, N C; Giclas, P C

    2009-01-01

    Complement split products C3a and C4a are reportedly elevated in patients with acute Lyme disease. We have now examined these immunologic markers in patients with chronic Lyme disease compared to appropriate disease controls. The study population consisted of 29 healthy controls, 445 patients with chronic Lyme disease, 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and six patients with AIDS. The Lyme disease patients were divided according to predominant musculoskeletal symptoms (324 patients) or predominant neurologic symptoms (121 patients). C3a and C4a levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. All patients with chronic Lyme disease and AIDS had normal C3a levels compared to controls, whereas patients with SLE had significantly increased levels of this marker. Patients with predominant musculoskeletal symptoms of Lyme disease and AIDS patients had significantly increased levels of C4a compared to either controls, patients with predominant neurologic symptoms of Lyme disease or SLE patients. Response to antibiotic therapy in chronic Lyme disease was associated with a significant decrease in the C4a level, whereas lack of response was associated with a significant increase in this marker. In contrast, AIDS patients had persistently increased C4a levels despite antiretroviral therapy. Lyme patients with positive single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scans had significantly lower C4a levels compared to Lyme patients with normal SPECT scan results. Patients with predominant musculoskeletal symptoms of Lyme disease have normal C3a and increased C4a levels. This pattern differs from the increase in both markers seen in acute Lyme disease, and C4a changes correlate with the response to therapy in chronic Lyme disease. C4a appears to be a valuable immunologic marker in patients with persistent symptoms of Lyme disease.

  10. Phenotyping of human complement component C4, a class-III HLA antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, E; Cross, S J

    1986-01-01

    The plasma complement protein C4 is encoded at two highly polymorphic loci, A and B, within the class-III region of the major histocompatibility complex. At least 34 different polymorphic variants of human C4 have been identified, including non-expressed or 'null' alleles. The main method of identification of C4 polymorphic allotypes is separation on the basis of charge by agarose-gel electrophoresis of plasma. On staining by immunofixation with anti-C4 antibodies, each C4 type gives three major bands, but, since individuals can have up to five allotypes, the overlapping banding pattern is difficult to interpret. We show that digestion of plasma samples with carboxypeptidase B, which removes C-terminal basic amino acids, before electrophoresis, produces a single, sharp, distinct band for each allotype and allows identification of the biochemical basis of the multiple banding pattern previously observed in C4 phenotype determination. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3103606

  11. Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP

    PubMed Central

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Granados Martinez, Adriana Patricia; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections. PMID:25347183

  12. Capillary Deposition of Complement C4d and C3d in Chinese Renal Allograft Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Rong; Zhang, Wei; Han, Fei; Liu, Guangjun; Xie, Wenqing

    2015-01-01

    Background. C3d is a product of both the classic and the alternative complement cascades; however, few studies have addressed the role of C3d in renal biopsies and its relationship with long-term graft survival rate is not very clear. Methods. 94 patients with biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes were included in the study. We investigated the associations between histological findings, clinical examinations, and outcome. Results. The overall prevalence for C4dPTC and C3dPTC was 42.6% and 29.8%. There was a significant association between C3dPTC and C4dPTC (P < 0.001). C3dPTC and C4dPTC were related with histological types (P = 0.024 and P < 0.001, resp.). The long-term survival rate for C4dPTC positive transplants was lower than that of C4dPTC negative transplants, but it was not statistic significant in our study (P = 0.150). The survival rate of C3dPTC positive group was much lower than the negative group (P = 0.014). Patients with double positives for C4dPTC and C3dPTC exhibited the lowest survival rate significantly different from those of the C3dPTC only and C4dPTC only groups (P = 0.01 and P = 0.0037). Conclusions. This longitudinal cohort study has demonstrated that C3d deposition in the PTC was closely related to renal dysfunction and pathological changes. PMID:25821339

  13. The isolation and structure of C4, the fourth component of human complement.

    PubMed Central

    Gigli, I; von Zabern, I; Porter, R R

    1977-01-01

    The fourth component of complement, C4, was isolated from human serum in good yield, and in confirmation of previous reports was shown to be formed from three peptide chains, alpha, beta and gamma, with apparent mol.wts. 90 000, 80 000 and 30 000 respectively. Preparative methods are described for the isolation of the three peptide chains and their amino acid analyses reported. Component C4 contains 7.0% carbohydrate, alpha-chain 8.6% and the beta-chain 5.6%. The N-terminal amino acid sequences are given for 12 residues of the alpha-chain, eight of the beta-chain and 19 of the gamma-chain. Images PLATE 1 PMID:921758

  14. Increased expression of a novel splice variant of the complement component 4 (C4A) gene in mastitis-infected dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Huang, J M; Ju, Z H; Li, Q L; Zhou, L; Li, R L; Li, J B; Shi, F X; Zhong, J F; Wang, C F

    2012-08-29

    The complement system helps in the direct lysis of invading pathogens and modulates phagocytic, humoral and cellular immune responses. Complement 4 is a critical component in complement activity and protection against many bacterial pathogens because it is essential to classical and lectin activation pathways. We used reverse transcription and PCR to investigate alternative splicing and expression of the complement component 4 (C4A) gene in Chinese Holstein cattle. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced. A novel splice variant involving intron 10 was identified, which we named C4A-AS. To examine how C4A gene activity is affected by bovine mastitis, six Chinese Holstein cattle were divided into healthy (non-mastitic) and Staphylococcus aureus-induced mastitic groups. Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that the C4A-complete and C4A-AS transcripts are expressed at significantly different levels in healthy cows, while there were no significant differences in the mastitic group (P = 0.257). Expression of C4A-AS increased significantly when mastitis developed. We also examined the expression of C4A-complete and C4A-AS in several tissues (liver, heart, spleen, lung, kidney, tongue, and muscle). The two transcripts were expressed in all of these tissues but there were no significant differences in expression between healthy and mastitic cows. We therefore conclude that the C4A-complete transcript is the main transcript under normal physiological conditions, while C4A-AS is augmented when mastitis develops.

  15. Stringent Regulation of Complement Lectin Pathway C3/C5 Convertase By C4b-Binding Protein (C4bp)

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Nenoo; Rajagopalan, Rema; Salvi, Veena P.

    2009-01-01

    The complement lectin pathway, an essential component of the innate immune system, is geared for rapid recognition of infections as each C4b deposited via this pathway is capable of forming a C3/C5 convertase. In the present study, role of C4b-binding protein (C4BP) in regulating the lectin pathway C3/C5 convertase assembled on zymosan and sheep erythrocytes coated with mannan (EMan) was examined. While the C4BP concentration for inhibiting 50% (IC50) formation of surface-bound C3 convertase on the two surfaces was similar to that obtained for the soluble C3 convertase (1.05 nM), ∼3- and 41-fold more was required to inhibit assembly of the C5 convertase on zymosan (2.81 nM) and EMan (42.66 nM). No difference in binding interactions between C4BP and surface-bound C4b alone or in complex with C3b was observed. Increasing the C4b density on zymosan (14,000-431,000 C4b/Zym) increased the number of C4b bound per C4BP from 2.87 to 8.23 indicating that at high C4b density all seven α-chains of C4BP are engaged in C4b-binding. In contrast, the number of C4b bound per C4BP remained constant (3.79 ± 0.60) when the C4b density on EMan was increased. The data also show that C4BP regulates assembly and decay of the lectin pathway C3/C5 convertase more stringently than the classical pathway C3/C5 convertase because of a ∼7 to 13-fold greater affinity for C4b deposited via the lectin pathway than the classical pathway. C4BP thus regulates efficiently the four times greater potential of the lectin pathway than the classical pathway in generating the C3/C5 convertase and hence production of pro-inflammatory products, which are required to fight infections but occasionally cause pathological inflammatory reactions. PMID:19660812

  16. Substitution of a single amino acid (aspartic acid for histidine) converts the functional activity of human complement C4B to C4A

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.C.; Fathallah, D.M.; Bergamaschini, L.; Alicot, E.M. ); Isenman, D.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The C4B isotype of the fourth component of human complement (C4) displays 3- to 4-fold greater hemolytic activity than does its other isotype C4A. This correlates with differences in their covalent binding efficiencies to erythrocytes coated with antibody and complement C1. C4A binds to a greater extent when C1 is on IgG immune aggregates. The differences in covalent binding properties correlate only with amino acid changes between residues 1101 and 1106 (pro-C4 numbering)-namely, Pro-1101, Cys-1102, Leu-1105, and Asp-1106 in C4A and Leu-1101, Ser-1102, Ile-1105, and His-1106 in C4B, which are located in the C4d region of the {alpha} chain. To more precisely identify the residues that are important for the functional differences, C4A-C4B hybrid proteins were constructed by using recombinant DNA techniques. Comparison of these by hemolytic assay and binding to IgG aggregates showed that the single substitution of aspartic acid for histidine at position 1106 largely accounted for the change in functional activity and nature of the chemical bond formed. Surprisingly, substitution of a neutral residue, alanine, for histidine at position 1106 resulted in an increase in binding to immune aggregates without subsequent reduction in the hemolytic activity. This result strongly suggests that position 1106 is not catalytic as previously proposed but interacts sterically/electrostatically with potential acceptor sites and serves to select binding sites on potential acceptor molecules.

  17. Complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein-friend or foe in the innate immune system?

    PubMed

    Blom, Anna M; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2004-04-01

    The complement system constitutes an important component of the defence against foreign organisms, functioning both in innate and adaptive immune systems. It is potentially harmful also to the own organism and is therefore tightly regulated by a number of membrane-bound and soluble factors. C4b-binding protein (C4BP) is a potent circulating soluble inhibitor of the classical and lectin pathways of complement. In recent years, the relationships between the structure of C4BP and its functions have been elucidated using a combination of computer-based molecular analysis and recombinant DNA technologies. Moreover, two novel functions have recently been ascribed to C4BP. One is the ability of C4BP to localize complement regulatory activity to the surface of apoptotic cells via its interaction with the membrane-binding vitamin K-dependent protein S. The other is the ability of C4BP to act as a survival factor for B cells due to an interaction with CD40. The complement regulatory activity of C4BP is not only beneficial because it is also explored by pathogens such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Bordetella pertussis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli K1, and Candida albicans, that bind C4BP to their surfaces. This contributes to the serum resistance and the pathogenicity of these bacteria. In this review, the structural requirements and functional importance of the interactions between C4BP and its various ligands are discussed.

  18. Genetic basis of human complement C4A deficiency. Detection of a point mutation leading to nonexpression.

    PubMed Central

    Barba, G; Rittner, C; Schneider, P M

    1993-01-01

    The fourth component of the human complement system (C4) is coded for by two genes, C4A and C4B, located within the MHC. Null alleles of C4 (C4Q0) are defined by the absence of C4 protein in plasma. These null alleles are due either to large gene deletions or to nonexpression of the respective genes. In a previous study, evidence was obtained for nonexpressed defective genes at the C4A locus, and for gene conversion at the C4B locus. To further characterize the molecular basis of these non-expressed C4A genes, we selected nine pairs of PCR primers from flanking genomic intron sequences to amplify all 41 exons from individuals with a defective C4A gene. The amplified products were subjected to single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis to detect possible mutations. PCR products exhibiting a variation in the SSCP pattern were sequenced directly. In 10 of 12 individuals studied, we detected a 2-bp insertion in exon 29 leading to nonexpression due to the creation of a termination codon, which was observed in linkage to the haplotype HLA-B60-DR6 in seven cases. In one of the other two individuals without this mutation, evidence was obtained for gene conversion to the C4B isotype. The genetic basis of C4A nonexpression in the second individual is not yet known and will be subject to further analysis. Images PMID:8473511

  19. Elevated levels of the complement activation product C4d in bronchial fluids for the diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ajona, Daniel; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Maria Dolores; Pajares, Maria Jose; Garcia, Javier; Cardenal, Felipe; Fleischhacker, Michael; Lozano, Maria Dolores; Zulueta, Javier J; Schmidt, Bernd; Nadal, Ernest; Paz-Ares, Luis; Montuenga, Luis M; Pio, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Molecular markers in bronchial fluids may contribute to the diagnosis of lung cancer. We previously observed a significant increase of C4d-containing complement degradation fragments in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) supernatants from lung cancer patients in a cohort of 50 cases and 22 controls (CUN cohort). The present study was designed to determine the diagnostic performance of these complement fragments (hereinafter jointly referred as C4d) in bronchial fluids. C4d levels were determined in BAL supernatants from two independent cohorts: the CU cohort (25 cases and 26 controls) and the HUVR cohort (60 cases and 98 controls). A series of spontaneous sputum samples from 68 patients with lung cancer and 10 controls was also used (LCCCIO cohort). Total protein content, complement C4, complement C5a, and CYFRA 21-1 were also measured in all cohorts. C4d levels were significantly increased in BAL samples from lung cancer patients. The area under the ROC curve was 0.82 (95%CI = 0.71-0.94) and 0.67 (95%CI = 0.58-0.76) for the CU and HUVR cohorts, respectively. In addition, unlike the other markers, C4d levels in BAL samples were highly consistent across the CUN, CU and HUVR cohorts. Interestingly, C4d test markedly increased the sensitivity of bronchoscopy in the two cohorts in which cytological data were available (CUN and HUVR cohorts). Finally, in the LCCCIO cohort, C4d levels were higher in sputum supernatants from patients with lung cancer (area under the ROC curve: 0.7; 95%CI = 0.56-0.83). In conclusion, C4d is consistently elevated in bronchial fluids from lung cancer patients and may be used to improve the diagnosis of the disease. PMID:25799154

  20. Complement C4 Deficiency – A Plausible Risk Factor for Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) Infection in Apparently Immunocompetent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kotilainen, Hannele; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Paakkanen, Riitta; Seppänen, Mikko; Tukiainen, Pentti; Meri, Seppo; Poussa, Tuija; Eskola, Jussi; Valtonen, Ville; Järvinen, Asko

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous in the environment and they infect mainly persons with underlying pulmonary diseases but also previously healthy elderly women. Defects in host resistance that lead to pulmonary infections by NTM are relatively unknown. A few genetic defects have been associated with both pulmonary and disseminated mycobacterial infections. Rare disseminated NTM infections have been associated with genetic defects in T-cell mediated immunity and in cytokine signaling in families. We investigated whether there was an association between NTM infections and deficiencies of complement components C4A or C4B that are encoded by major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Methods 50 adult patients with a positive NTM culture with symptoms and findings of a NTM disease were recruited. Patients' clinical history was collected and symptoms and clinical findings were categorized according to 2007 diagnostic criteria of The American Thoracic Society (ATS). To investigate the deficiencies of complement, C4A and C4B gene copy numbers and phenotype frequencies of the C4 allotypes were analyzed. Unselected, healthy, 149 Finnish adults were used as controls. Results NTM patients had more often C4 deficiencies (C4A or C4B) than controls (36/50 [72%] vs 83/149 [56%], OR = 2.05, 95%CI = 1.019–4.105, p = 0.042). C4 deficiencies for female NTM patients were more common than for controls (29/36 [81%] vs 55/100 [55%], OR = 3.39, 95% CI = 1.358–8.460, p = 0.007). C4 deficiences seemed not to be related to any specific underlying disease or C4 phenotype. Conclusions C4 deficiency may be a risk factor for NTM infection in especially elderly female patients. PMID:24638111

  1. The complement regulator C4b-binding protein analyzed by molecular modeling, bioinformatics and computer-aided experimental design.

    PubMed

    Villoutreix, B O; Blom, A M; Webb, J; Dahlbäck, B

    1999-05-01

    Molecular modeling and bioinformatics have gained recognition as scientific disciplines of importance in the field of biomedical research. Molecular modeling not only allows to predict the three-dimensional structure of a protein but also helps to define its function. Careful incorporation of the experimental findings in the structural/theoretical data provides means to understand molecular mechanisms for highly complex biological systems. C4b-binding protein (C4BP) is composed of one beta-chain and seven alpha-chains essentially built from three- and eight-complement control protein (CCP) modules, respectively, followed by a non-repeat carboxy-terminal region involved in polymerization of the chains. C4BP is involved in the regulation of the complement system and interacts with many molecules such as C4b, Arp, protein S and heparin. Here, we report experimental and computer data obtained for C4BP. Protein modeling together with site directed mutagenesis indicate that R39, R64 and R66 from the C4BP alpha-chain form a key binding site for heparin, suggesting that this region could be of major importance for interaction with C4b. We also propose that the first CCP of the C4BP beta-chain displays a key hydrophobic surface of major importance for the interaction with the coagulation cofactor protein S. PMID:10408373

  2. Complexes between C1q and C3 or C4: novel and specific markers for classical complement pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Diana; Wiessenberg, Hans D; Hart, Margreet; Bruins, Peter; Voskuyl, Alexandre; Daha, Mohamed R; Hack, C Erik

    2005-03-01

    Classical pathway activation is often assessed by measuring circulating levels of activated C4. However, this parameter does not discriminate between activation through the classical or the lectin pathway. We hypothesized that during classical pathway activation, complexes are formed between C1q and activated C4 or C3. Using ELISA, we investigated whether such complexes constitute specific markers for classical pathway activation. In vitro, C1q-C3d/C4d complexes were generated upon incubation of normal recalcified plasma with aggregated IgG or an anti-C1q mAb that activates C1 (mAb anti-C1q-130). In contrast, during incubation with C1s or trypsin, C1q-C3d/C4d complexes were not generated, which excludes an innocent bystander effect. Additionally, C1q-C3d/C4d complexes were not generated during activation of the alternative or the lectin pathway. Repeated freezing and thawing did not influence levels of C1q-C3d/C4d complexes in recalcified plasma. To measure C1q-complement complexes in plasma samples, we separated unbound complement proteins from C1q-C3d/C4d complexes in the samples prior to testing with ELISA. In samples from patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery or suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, we found higher levels of C1q-C4 complexes than in samples from healthy individuals. We conclude that complexes between C1q and C4 or C3 are specific markers of classical complement pathway activation.

  3. Complete complement deficiency in a large cohort of familial systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rachna; Sestak, Andrea L; Souza, Anil D’; Dillon, Skyler P.; Namjou, Bahram; Scofield, R Hal

    2010-01-01

    Genetic complete deficiency of the early complement components such as C1, C2 and C4 commonly results in a monogenetic form of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, previous studies have examined groups of complete complement deficient subjects for SLE, while a familial SLE cohort has not been studied for deficiencies of complement. Thus, we undertook the present study to determine the frequency of hereditary complete complement deficiencies among families with two or more SLE patients. All SLE patients from 544 such families had CH50 determined. Medical records were examined for past CH50 values. There were 66 individuals in whom all available CH50 values were zero. All but four of these had an SLE-affected relative with a non-zero CH50; thus, these families did not have monogenic complement deficient related SLE. The four remaining SLE-affected subjects were in fact two sets of siblings in which 3 of the 4 SLE patients had onset of disease at <18 years of age. Both patients in one of these families had been determined to have C4 deficiency, while the other family had no clinical diagnosis of complement deficiency. In this second family, one of the SLE patients had had normal C4 and C3 values, indicating that either C1q or C2 deficiency was possible. Thus, only 2 of 544 SLE families had definite or possible complement deficiency; however, 1 of 7 families in which all SLE patients had pediatric onset and 2 of 85 families with at least 1 pediatric-onset SLE patent had complete complement deficiency. SLE is found commonly among families with hereditary complement deficiency but the reverse is not true. Complete complement deficiency is rare among families with two or more SLE patients, but is concentrated among families with onset of SLE prior to age 18. PMID:19910391

  4. The internal thioester and the covalent binding properties of the complement proteins C3 and C4.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S. K.; Dodds, A. W.

    1997-01-01

    The covalent binding of complement components C3 and C4 is critical for their activities. This reaction is made possible by the presence of an internal thioester in the native protein. Upon activation, which involves a conformational change initiated by the cleavage of a single peptide bond, the thioester becomes available to react with molecules with nucleophilic groups. This description is probably sufficient to account for the binding of the C4A isotype of human C4 to amino nucleophiles. The binding of the C4B isotype, and most likely C3, to hydroxyl nucleophiles, however, involves a histidine residue, which attacks the thioester to form an intramolecular acyl-imidazole bond. The released thiolate anion then acts as a base to catalyze the binding of hydroxyl nucleophiles, including water, to the acyl function. This mechanism allows the complement proteins to bind to the hydroxyl groups of carbohydrates found on all biological surfaces, including the components of bacterial cell walls. In addition, the fast hydrolysis of the thioester provides a means to contain this very damaging reaction to the immediate proximity of the site of activation. PMID:9041627

  5. Serum complement C4b, fibronectin, and prolidase are associated with the pathological changes of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection can activate the immune system, leading to characteristic pathological changes such as inflammatory granuloma, caseous necrosis, and cavity formation. Methods Clinical data of 187 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) were analyzed using statistical methods, while serum levels of complement C4b (C4b), fibronectin (FN), and prolidase (PEPD) were detected using the ELISA method among the control, minimal PTB, moderate PTB, and advanced PTB groups. Results We found significantly higher levels of serum C4b and PEPD (P = 0.018, P = 0.003), and significantly lower levels of serum FN (P < 0.001) in PTB patients. Furthermore, the serum levels of 3 proteins were significantly different among 3 PTB groups. FN level was significantly higher in the moderate PTB group, compared with patients in the minimal and advanced PTB groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). PEPD level was significantly higher in the moderate PTB group, compared with the minimal PTB group (P < 0.05). Analysis of clinical data showed that serum albumin, C-reactive protein (CRP), prealbumin, and C4 were significantly higher (P < 0.05), while serum globulin was significantly lower in patients with PTB (P < 0.001). A significant negative correlation was found between C4b and albumin, prealbumin. On the other hand, a significant positive correlation was found between C4b and globulin, CRP, PEPD, as well as between PEPD and CRP (P < 0.05). Conclusions Our study showed that C4b, FN, and PEPD are associated with tissue damage, granuloma formation, and cavity formation, respectively, in patients with PTB. The present study provides a new experimental basis to understand the pathogenesis and pathological changes of PTB. PMID:24484408

  6. Complete genome analysis of the C4 subgenotype strains of enterovirus 71: predominant recombination C4 viruses persistently circulating in China for 14 years.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Tan, Xiaojuan; Cui, Aili; Mao, Naiying; Xu, Songtao; Zhu, Zhen; Zhou, Jianhui; Shi, Jing; Zhao, Yueping; Wang, Xianjun; Huang, Xueyong; Zhu, Shuangli; Zhang, Yong; Tang, Wei; Ling, Hua; Xu, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    Genetic recombination is a well-known phenomenon for enteroviruses. To investigate the genetic characterization and the potential recombination of enterovirus 71 (EV71) circulating in China, we determined the 16 complete genome sequences of EV71 isolated from Hand Foot Mouth Disease (HFMD) patients during the large scale outbreak and non-outbreak years since 1998 in China. The full length genome sequences of 16 Chinese EV71 in present study were aligned with 186 genome sequences of EV71 available from GenBank, including 104 China mainland and 82 international sequences, covering the time period of 1970-2011. The oldest strains of each subgenotype of EV71 and prototype strains of HEV-A were included to do the phylogenetic and Simplot analysis. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that all Chinese strains were clustered into C4 subgenotype of EV71, except for HuB/CHN/2009 clustered into A and Xiamen/CHN/2009 clustered into B5 subgenotype. Most of C4 EV71 were clustered into 2 predominant evolutionary branches: C4b and C4a evolutionary brunches. Our comprehensive recombination analysis showed the evidence of genome recombination of subgenotype C4 (including C4a and C4b) sequences between structural genes from genotype C EV71 and non-structural genes from the prototype strains of CAV16, 14 and 4, but the evidence of intratypic recombination between C4 strains and B subgenotype was not enough strong. This intertypic recombination C4 viruses were first seen in 1998 and became the predominant endemic viruses circulating in China mainland for at least 14 years. A shift between C4a and C4b evolutionary brunches of C4 recombination viruses were observed, and C4a viruses have been associated with large scale nationwide HFMD outbreak with higher morbidity and mortality since 2007.

  7. Transcript encoded on the opposite strand of the human steroid 21-hydroxylase/complement component C4 gene locus.

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Y; Bristow, J; Gitelman, S E; Miller, W L

    1989-01-01

    The gene encoding human adrenal steroid 21-hydroxylase (P450c21) and its highly similar pseudogene are duplicated in tandem with the two genes encoding the fourth component of human serum hemolytic complement (C4). This 60-kilobase gene complex, which lies within the major histocompatibility complex on the short arm of human chromosome 6, has been studied in considerable detail because genetic disorders in steroid 21-hydroxylation and in C4 are common. We have cloned a cDNA encoded by a previously unidentified gene in this region. This gene lies on the strand of DNA opposite from the strand containing the P450c21 and C4 genes, and it overlaps the last exon of P450c21. The newly identified gene encodes mRNAs of 3.5 and 1.8 kilobases that are expressed in the adrenal and in a Leydig cell tumor but are not expressed in nonsteroidogenic tissues. The sequence of the longest cDNA (2.7 kilobases) shows no similarity to known sequences available in two computerized data bases. The 5' end of this sequence is characterized by three repeats, each encoding about 100 amino acids flanked by potential sites for proteolytic cleavage. Although numerous studies have shown that gene deletions causing congenital adrenal hyperplasia occur in this region, none of these gene deletions extends into this newly identified gene, suggesting that it encodes an essential function. Images PMID:2475872

  8. Regulation of complement activation by C-reactive protein: targeting of the inhibitory activity of C4b-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Andreas P; Trouw, Leendert A; McGrath, Fabian D G; Hack, C Erik; Blom, Anna M

    2006-06-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is the major acute phase protein in humans. It has been shown that CRP interacts with factor H, an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement, and now we demonstrate binding of CRP to the fluid-phase inhibitor of the classical pathway, C4b-binding protein (C4BP). C4BP bound to directly immobilized recombinant CRP as well as CRP attached to phosphorylcholine. The binding was sensitive to ionic strength and was enhanced in the presence of calcium. C4BP lacking beta-chain and protein S, which is a form of C4BP increasing upon inflammation, bound CRP with higher affinity than the C4BP-protein S complex. The binding could not be blocked with mAbs directed against peripheral parts of the alpha-chains of C4BP while the isolated central core of C4BP obtained by partial proteolytic digestion bound CRP, indicating that the binding site for CRP is localized in the central core of the C4BP molecule. Furthermore, we found complexes in serum from a patient with an elevated CRP level and trace amounts of CRP were also identified in a plasma-derived C4BP preparation. We were also able to detect C4BP-CRP complexes in solution and established that C4BP retains full complement regulatory activity in the presence of CRP. In addition, we found that C4BP can compete with C1q for binding to immobilized CRP and that it inhibits complement activation locally. We hypothesize that CRP limits excessive complement activation on targets via its interactions with both factor H and C4BP.

  9. Application of a monoclonal antibody against a neoepitope on activated C4 in an ELISA for the quantification of complement activation via the classical pathway.

    PubMed

    Wolbink, G J; Bollen, J; Baars, J W; ten Berge, R J; Swaak, A J; Paardekooper, J; Hack, C E

    1993-07-01

    In order to study the activation of the complement system via the classical pathway we have attempted to raise antibodies specific for C4 activation products. Of 20 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) obtained, one appeared to react with an activation dependent epitope exposed on the activation products C4b, C4bi, C4c (C4b/c) as well as on iC4, but not on native C4. Using this antibody as a capture antibody and polyclonal biotinylated antibodies against C4 as detecting antibodies we developed an ELISA for the quantification of C4b/c in biological fluids. The lower limit of detection was approximately 0.025 nmol C4b/c per litre. Mean C4b/c levels in plasma samples collected from healthy volunteers in tubes containing 10 mM EDTA and 0.05% (w/v) polybrene, final concentrations, appeared to be 30 nmol/l. The potential of the ELISA procedure for evaluating complement activation in clinical samples was demonstrated.

  10. Complement-coated antibody-transfer (CCAT); serum IgA1 antibodies intercept and transport C4 and C3 fragments and preserve IgG1 deployment (PGD).

    PubMed

    Boackle, Robert J; Nguyen, Quang L; Leite, Renata S; Yang, Xiaofeng; Vesely, Jana

    2006-02-01

    in which complement-coated IgA1 antibodies transferred to non-complement-coated antigens is termed complement-coated antibody-transfer/transport (CCAT). In this way, IgA1 antibodies extended the efficiency of the complement system by insuring the specific IgA1 antibody-mediated transport of the captured biologically active complement fragments to those antigens stimulating the IgA1 antibody response but not yet neutralized (completely coated) with complement. Simultaneously by impeding the rate of C1 consumption and by intercepting C4b and C3b, IgA1 antibodies slowed C4b and C3b deposition on the antigenic surface and on the co-deposited IgG1 antibodies. Thus, in the presence of ongoing complement activation, the deposition of serum IgA1 antibodies enabled the co-deposited IgG1 antibodies to better maintain their ability to interact with antigens. We termed this latter phenomenon, preservation of IgG antibody deployment (PGD). In summary, co-deposited IgA1 antibodies maximized the efficiency of the complement system, transported their covalently bound complement fragments to specific antigens and sustained the effective deployment of IgG1 antibodies directed to those same antigens.

  11. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Malm, Sven; Jusko, Monika; Eick, Sigrun; Potempa, Jan; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI) is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and Factor H (FH). Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125)I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  12. Polymorphism of the human complement C4 and steroid 21-hydroxylase genes. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms revealing structural deletions, homoduplications, and size variants.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, P M; Carroll, M C; Alper, C A; Rittner, C; Whitehead, A S; Yunis, E J; Colten, H R

    1986-01-01

    Several autoimmune disorders as well as congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) are either associated or closely linked with genetic variants of the fourth component of complement (C4A and C4B) and the enzyme steroid 21-hydroxylase (21-OH). These proteins are encoded by genes that are located downstream from the genes for complement proteins, C2 and factor B (BF) between HLA-B and -DR in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Previous studies of variants and null alleles were based on electrophoretic mobility of C4 protein and linkage with disease phenotypes. These data did not permit analysis of the basis for the observed null alleles and duplicated variants. We studied this region of the MHC in 126 haplotypes for a structural analysis of the four adjacent loci, C4A, 21-OHA, C4B, and 21-OHB. About half of the C4 genes typed as C4 null are deleted and several unrecognized homoduplicated C4 alleles were detected. Hence the frequencies of different C4 structural variants must be recalculated based on a direct analysis of the genes. Analysis of the C4/21-OH genes of patients with the classical (salt-wasting) form of CAH showed that some involve a deletion of the C4B and 21-OHB genes; whereas for two only the 21-OHB gene is deleted, i.e., the C4B gene is present. Together, these data provide a better understanding of the mechanisms generating and importance of deleted C4 and 21-OH null alleles in human disease. Images PMID:3018042

  13. Complement regulator C4BP binds to Staphylococcus aureus surface proteins SdrE and Bbp inhibiting bacterial opsonization and killing☆

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Pamela S.; Foley, Caitlin K.; Krishna, Neel K.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Foster, Timothy J.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a premier human pathogen and the most common cause of osteoarticular, wound, and implanted device infections. We recently demonstrated S. aureus efficiently binds the classical complement regulator C4b-binding protein (C4BP) inhibiting antibody-initiated complement-mediated opsonization. Here we identify S. aureus surface protein SdrE as a C4BP-binding protein. Recombinant SdrE and recombinant bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp), an allelic variant of SdrE, both efficiently bound to C4BP in heat-inactivated human serum. We previously described SdrE as binding alternative pathway regulator factor H. Recombinant SdrE and Bbp efficiently bound C4BP and factor H in serum without apparent interference. Gain of function studies utilizing Lactococcus lactis clones expressing SdrE or Bbp increased serum C4BP and factor H binding, compared with empty-vector control (WT) approximately 2-fold. Correspondingly, classical pathway-mediated C3-fragment opsonization and bacterial killing by human neutrophils decreased by half for L. lactis clones expressing SdrE or Bbp compared with WT. In summary, we identify SdrE and allelic variant Bbp as S. aureus surface proteins that bind the complement regulator C4BP inhibiting classical pathway-mediated bacterial opsonization and killing. PMID:24600566

  14. The Group B Streptococcus–Secreted Protein CIP Interacts with C4, Preventing C3b Deposition via the Lectin and Classical Complement Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Giampiero; Rindi, Simonetta; Rosini, Roberto; Buccato, Scilla

    2016-01-01

    The group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal invasive disease. GBS bacteria are surrounded by a thick capsular polysaccharide that is a potent inhibitor of complement deposition via the alternative pathway. Several of its surface molecules can however activate the classical and lectin complement pathways, rendering this species still vulnerable to phagocytic killing. In this study we have identified a novel secreted protein named complement interfering protein (CIP) that downregulates complement activation via the classical and lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway. The CIP protein showed high affinity toward C4b and inhibited its interaction with C2, presumably preventing the formation of the C4bC2a convertase. Addition of recombinant CIP to GBS cip-negative bacteria resulted in decreased deposition of C3b on their surface and in diminished phagocytic killing in a whole-blood assay. Our data reveal a novel strategy exploited by GBS to counteract innate immunity and could be valuable for the development of anti-infective agents against this important pathogen. PMID:26608922

  15. Complement metabolism in man: hypercatabolism of the fourth (C4) and third (C3) components in patients with renal allograft rejection and hereditary angioedema (HAE)

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Charles B.; Ruddy, Shaun; Shehadeh, Isam H.; Müller-Eberhard, Hans J.; Merrill, John P.; Austen, K. Frank

    1969-01-01

    Highly purified and radioiodinated human C4 and (or) C3 were administered to patients with renal allografts in rejection, with hereditary angioedema (HAE), with chronic glomerulonephritis, and to control subjects. The latter group included normal individuals, anephric patients before transplantation, and stable renal allograft recipients. The catabolic rates of these complement proteins were determined by analysis of the disappearance of plasma protein-bound radioactivity (km), and by direct measurement of urinary excretion of radioactivity (ku). The correlation coefficient between these two methods was 0.96. The mean ±2 SD for catabolic rates in the control subjects was 0.9-2.7% plasma pool/hr for C4 and 0.9-2.0% plasma pool/hr for C3. Patients experiencing renal allograft rejection had unstable levels of C4 and C3, and exhibited moderate hypercatabolism of both proteins. One patient with chronic glomerulonephritis had hypercatabolism of C4 and C3 in the presence of stable normal serum levels. In patients with HAE who had extremely low levels of C4, catabolic rates for C4 were markedly elevated (3.7, 5.8, 7.0 and 8.8%/hr). Analysis of plasma curves in HAE revealed a three component disappearance curve instead of the two component curve in control subjects receiving the same preparation. Even though C3 levels were normal, moderate hypercatabolism of C3 was also present in HAE (2.6, 2.8, 2.8, and 3.2% of pool/hr). The marked hypercatabolism of C4 in HAE constitutes the first direct evidence for the in vivo destruction by uninhibited C1 esterase of its natural substrate C4. The moderate hypercatabolism of C3 is consistent with the in vivo formation of C3-convertase. Images PMID:4894302

  16. Hepatitis B virus X protein up-regulates C4b-binding protein α through activating transcription factor Sp1 in protection of hepatoma cells from complement attack

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guoxing; Li, Jiong; Zheng, Minying; Yang, Zhe; Liu, Yunxia; Zhang, Shuqin; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Weiying; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays crucial roles in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We previously showed that HBx protected hepatoma cells from complement attack by activation of CD59. Moreover, in this study we found that HBx protected hepatoma cells from complement attack by activation of C4b-binding protein α (C4BPα), a potent inhibitor of complement system. We observed that HBx were positively correlated with those of C4BPα in clinical HCC tissues. Mechanistically, HBx activated the promoter core region of C4BPα, located at −1199/−803nt, through binding to transcription factor Sp1. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that HBx was able to bind to the promoter of C4BPα, which could be blocked by Sp1 silencing. Functionally, knockdown of C4BPα obviously increased the deposition of C5b-9, a complex of complement membrane attack, and remarkably abolished the HBx-induced resistance of hepatoma cells from complement attack in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we conclude that HBx up-regulates C4BPα through activating transcription factor Sp1 in protection of liver cancer cells from complement attack. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which HBx enhances protection of hepatoma cells from complement attack. PMID:27050367

  17. Complement

    MedlinePlus

    ... in: Cancer Certain infections Ulcerative colitis Decreased complement activity may be seen in: Cirrhosis Glomerulonephritis Hereditary angioedema Hepatitis Kidney transplant rejection Lupus nephritis Malnutrition Systemic lupus erythematosis

  18. Re-evaluation of low-resolution crystal structures via interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF): a case study in complement C4.

    PubMed

    Croll, Tristan Ian; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-09-01

    While the rapid proliferation of high-resolution structures in the Protein Data Bank provides a rich set of templates for starting models, it remains the case that a great many structures both past and present are built at least in part by hand-threading through low-resolution and/or weak electron density. With current model-building tools this task can be challenging, and the de facto standard for acceptable error rates (in the form of atomic clashes and unfavourable backbone and side-chain conformations) in structures based on data with dmax not exceeding 3.5 Å reflects this. When combined with other factors such as model bias, these residual errors can conspire to make more serious errors in the protein fold difficult or impossible to detect. The three recently published 3.6-4.2 Å resolution structures of complement C4 (PDB entries 4fxg, 4fxk and 4xam) rank in the top quartile of structures of comparable resolution both in terms of Rfree and MolProbity score, yet, as shown here, contain register errors in six β-strands. By applying a molecular-dynamics force field that explicitly models interatomic forces and hence excludes most physically impossible conformations, the recently developed interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF) approach significantly reduces the complexity of the conformational space to be searched during manual rebuilding. This substantially improves the rate of detection and correction of register errors, and allows user-guided model building in maps with a resolution lower than 3.5 Å to converge to solutions with a stereochemical quality comparable to atomic resolution structures. Here, iMDFF has been used to individually correct and re-refine these three structures to MolProbity scores of <1.7, and strategies for working with such challenging data sets are suggested. Notably, the improved model allowed the resolution for complement C4b to be extended from 4.2 to 3.5 Å as demonstrated by paired refinement.

  19. Re-evaluation of low-resolution crystal structures via interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF): a case study in complement C4.

    PubMed

    Croll, Tristan Ian; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-09-01

    While the rapid proliferation of high-resolution structures in the Protein Data Bank provides a rich set of templates for starting models, it remains the case that a great many structures both past and present are built at least in part by hand-threading through low-resolution and/or weak electron density. With current model-building tools this task can be challenging, and the de facto standard for acceptable error rates (in the form of atomic clashes and unfavourable backbone and side-chain conformations) in structures based on data with dmax not exceeding 3.5 Å reflects this. When combined with other factors such as model bias, these residual errors can conspire to make more serious errors in the protein fold difficult or impossible to detect. The three recently published 3.6-4.2 Å resolution structures of complement C4 (PDB entries 4fxg, 4fxk and 4xam) rank in the top quartile of structures of comparable resolution both in terms of Rfree and MolProbity score, yet, as shown here, contain register errors in six β-strands. By applying a molecular-dynamics force field that explicitly models interatomic forces and hence excludes most physically impossible conformations, the recently developed interactive molecular-dynamics flexible fitting (iMDFF) approach significantly reduces the complexity of the conformational space to be searched during manual rebuilding. This substantially improves the rate of detection and correction of register errors, and allows user-guided model building in maps with a resolution lower than 3.5 Å to converge to solutions with a stereochemical quality comparable to atomic resolution structures. Here, iMDFF has been used to individually correct and re-refine these three structures to MolProbity scores of <1.7, and strategies for working with such challenging data sets are suggested. Notably, the improved model allowed the resolution for complement C4b to be extended from 4.2 to 3.5 Å as demonstrated by paired refinement. PMID

  20. Binding of complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein to a highly virulent Streptococcus pyogenes M1 strain is mediated by protein H and enhances adhesion to and invasion of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ermert, David; Weckel, Antonin; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Blom, Anna M

    2013-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes AP1, a strain of the highly virulent M1 serotype, uses exclusively protein H to bind the complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein (C4BP). We found a strong correlation between the ability of AP1 and its isogenic mutants lacking protein H to inhibit opsonization with complement C3b and binding of C4BP. C4BP bound to immobilized protein H or AP1 bacteria retained its cofactor activity for degradation of (125)I-C4b. Furthermore, C4b deposited from serum onto AP1 bacterial surfaces was processed into C4c/C4d fragments, which did not occur on strains unable to bind C4BP. Recombinant C4BP mutants, which (i) lack certain CCP domains or (ii) have mutations in single aa as well as (iii) mutants with additional aa between different CCP domains were used to determine that the binding is mainly mediated by a patch of positively charged amino acid residues at the interface of domains CCP1 and CCP2. Using recombinant protein H fragments, we narrowed down the binding site to the N-terminal domain A. With a peptide microarray, we identified one single 18-amino acid-long peptide comprising residues 92-109, which specifically bound C4BP. Biacore was used to determine KD = 6 × 10(-7) M between protein H and a single subunit of C4BP. C4BP binding also correlated with elevated levels of adhesion and invasion to endothelial cells. Taken together, we identified the molecular basis of C4BP-protein H interaction and found that it is not only important for decreased opsonization but also for invasion of endothelial cells by S. pyogenes.

  1. Mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 is critical for the development of renal ischemia reperfusion injury and mediates tissue injury in the absence of complement C4.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Elham; Farrar, Conrad A; Lynch, Nicholas; Ali, Youssif M; Roscher, Silke; Stover, Cordula; Zhou, Wuding; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Sacks, Steven H

    2014-09-01

    Mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) has been described as the essential enzyme for the lectin pathway (LP) of complement activation. Since there is strong published evidence indicating that complement activation via the LP critically contributes to ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury, we assessed the effect of MASP-2 deficiency in an isogenic mouse model of renal transplantation. The experimental transplantation model used included nephrectomy of the remaining native kidney at d 5 post-transplantation. While wild-type (WT) kidneys grafted into WT recipients (n=7) developed acute renal failure (control group), WT grafts transplanted into MASP-2-deficient recipients (n=7) showed significantly better kidney function, less C3 deposition, and less IR injury. In the absence of donor or recipient complement C4 (n=7), the WT to WT phenotype was preserved, indicating that the MASP-2-mediated damage was independent of C4 activation. This C4-bypass MASP-2 activity was confirmed in mice deficient for both MASP-2 and C4 (n=7), where the protection from postoperative acute renal failure was no greater than in mice with MASP-2 deficiency alone. Our study highlights the role of LP activation in renal IR injury and indicates that injury occurs through MASP-2-dependent activation events independent of C4.

  2. Analysis of active and inactive complement C4 complotypes associated with subtypes of HLA-B17 in different racial groups.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, G J; Nerl, C; Pollack, M S

    1983-03-01

    HLA-A, B, and C antigens and the HLA-linked markers BF, C2, and C4 were determined in 1,799 unrelated Caucasians, 140 North American blacks, 140 Chinese, and 66 Japanese. One allele of the C4A locus (Rodgers), C4A*6, was found to code for a functionally inactive product in HLA-B17 (Bw57)-positive individuals, but for a functionally active product in HLA-B37- or HLA-B27-positive individuals. Further studies revealed that the functionally inactive C4A*6 gene product was found only in one subtype of HLA-B17, namely, 17.1 (Bw57, long). In addition, it was found that the frequency of the other subtype of HLA-B17, namely, 17.2(Bw58, short) varies greatly in different populations and that HLA-Bw58 is associated with either C4A*3,B*1 or C4A*3,B*Q0.

  3. The novel complement inhibitor human CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) protein promotes factor I-mediated degradation of C4b and C3b and inhibits the membrane attack complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Esparza, Astrid; Kalchishkova, Nikolina; Kurbasic, Emila; Jiang, Wen G; Blom, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) is a transmembrane protein containing 15 consecutive complement control protein (CCP) domains, which are characteristic for complement inhibitors. We expressed a membrane-bound fragment of human CSMD1 composed of the 15 C-terminal CCP domains and demonstrated that it inhibits deposition of C3b by the classical pathway on the surface of Chinese hamster ovary cells by 70% at 6% serum and of C9 (component of membrane attack complex) by 90% at 1.25% serum. Furthermore, this fragment of CSMD1 served as a cofactor to factor I-mediated degradation of C3b. In all functional assays performed, well-characterized complement inhibitors were used as positive controls, whereas Coxsackie adenovirus receptor, a protein with no effect on complement, was a negative control. Moreover, attenuation of expression in human T47 breast cancer cells that express endogenous CSMD1 significantly increased C3b deposition on these cells by 45% at 8% serum compared with that for the controls. Furthermore, by expressing a soluble 17-21 CCP fragment of CSMD1, we found that CSMD1 inhibits complement by promoting factor I-mediated C4b/C3b degradation and inhibition of MAC assembly at the level of C7. Our results revealed a novel complement inhibitor for the classical and lectin pathways.

  4. The novel complement inhibitor human CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) protein promotes factor I-mediated degradation of C4b and C3b and inhibits the membrane attack complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Esparza, Astrid; Kalchishkova, Nikolina; Kurbasic, Emila; Jiang, Wen G; Blom, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) is a transmembrane protein containing 15 consecutive complement control protein (CCP) domains, which are characteristic for complement inhibitors. We expressed a membrane-bound fragment of human CSMD1 composed of the 15 C-terminal CCP domains and demonstrated that it inhibits deposition of C3b by the classical pathway on the surface of Chinese hamster ovary cells by 70% at 6% serum and of C9 (component of membrane attack complex) by 90% at 1.25% serum. Furthermore, this fragment of CSMD1 served as a cofactor to factor I-mediated degradation of C3b. In all functional assays performed, well-characterized complement inhibitors were used as positive controls, whereas Coxsackie adenovirus receptor, a protein with no effect on complement, was a negative control. Moreover, attenuation of expression in human T47 breast cancer cells that express endogenous CSMD1 significantly increased C3b deposition on these cells by 45% at 8% serum compared with that for the controls. Furthermore, by expressing a soluble 17-21 CCP fragment of CSMD1, we found that CSMD1 inhibits complement by promoting factor I-mediated C4b/C3b degradation and inhibition of MAC assembly at the level of C7. Our results revealed a novel complement inhibitor for the classical and lectin pathways. PMID:23964079

  5. Complement Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... helpful? Also known as: C1; C1q; C2; C3; C4; CH50; CH100 (among others) Formal name: Complement Activity; ... whether the system is functioning normally. C3 and C4 are the most frequently measured complement proteins. Total ...

  6. Amniotic fluid embolism pathophysiology suggests the new diagnostic armamentarium: β-tryptase and complement fractions C3-C4 are the indispensable working tools.

    PubMed

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Frati, Paola; Zaami, Simona; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is an uncommon obstetric condition involving pregnant women during labor or in the initial stages after delivery. Its incidence is estimated to be around 5.5 cases per 100,000 deliveries. Therefore, this paper investigated the pathophysiological mechanism, which underlies AFE, in order to evaluate the role of immune response in the development of this still enigmatic clinical entity. The following databases (from 1956 to September 2014) Medline, Cochrane Central, Scopus, Web of Science and Science Direct were used, searching the following key words: AFE, pathophysiology, immune/inflammatory response, complement and anaphylaxis. The main key word "AFE" was searched singularly and associated individually to each of the other keywords. Of the 146 sources found, only 19 were considered appropriate for the purpose of this paper. The clinical course is characterized by a rapid onset of symptoms, which include: acute hypotension and/or cardiac arrest, acute hypoxia (with dyspnoea, cyanosis and/or respiratory arrest), coagulopathies (disseminated intravascular coagulation and/or severe hemorrhage), coma and seizures. The pathology still determines a significant morbidity and mortality and potential permanent neurological sequelae for surviving patients. At this moment, numerous aspects involving the pathophysiology and clinical development are still not understood and several hypotheses have been formulated, in particular the possible role of anaphylaxis and complement. Moreover, the detection of serum tryptase and complement components and the evaluation of fetal antigens can explain several aspects of immune response. PMID:25807263

  7. Molecular characterization of the complement C1q, C2 and C4 genes in Brazilian patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Liphaus, Bernadete L; Umetsu, Natalia; Jesus, Adriana A; Bando, Silvia Y; Silva, Clovis A; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a molecular characterization of the C1q, C2 and C4 genes in patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. METHODS: Patient 1 (P1) had undetectable C1q, patient 2 (P2) and patient 3 (P3) had decreased C2 and patient 4 (P4) had decreased C4 levels. All exons and non-coding regions of the C1q and C2 genes were sequenced. Mononuclear cells were cultured and stimulated with interferon gamma to evaluate C1q, C2 and C4 mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: C1q sequencing revealed heterozygous silent mutations in the A (c.276 A>G Gly) and C (c.126 C>T Pro) chains, as well as a homozygous single-base change in the 3′ non-coding region of the B chain (c*78 A>G). C1qA mRNA expression without interferon was decreased compared with that of healthy controls (p<0.05) and was decreased after stimulation compared with that of non-treated cells. C1qB mRNA expression was decreased compared with that of controls and did not change with stimulation. C1qC mRNA expression was increased compared with that of controls and was even higher after stimulation. P2 and P3 had Type I C2 deficiency (heterozygous 28 bp deletion at exon 6). The C2 mRNA expression in P3 was 23 times lower compared with that of controls and did not change after stimulation. The C4B mRNA expression of P4 was decreased compared with that of controls and increased after stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Silent mutations and single-base changes in the 3′ non-coding regions may modify mRNA transcription and C1q production. Type I C2 deficiency should be evaluated in JSLE patients with decreased C2 serum levels. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of decreased C4B mRNA expression in JSLE pathogenesis. PMID:26017655

  8. The partly folded back solution structure arrangement of the 30 SCR domains in human complement receptor type 1 (CR1) permits access to its C3b and C4b ligands.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Patricia B; Huang, Chen Y; Ihyembe, Demvihin; Hammond, Russell A; Marsh, Henry C; Perkins, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    differ from those in CR2, and the SCR arrangement in CR1 will permit C3b or C4b to access all three ligand sites.

  9. Completely ES cell-derived mice produced by tetraploid complementation using inner cell mass (ICM) deficient blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Wen, Duancheng; Saiz, Nestor; Rosenwaks, Zev; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Rafii, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Tetraploid complementation is often used to produce mice from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by injection of diploid (2n) ESCs into tetraploid (4n) blastocysts (ESC-derived mice). This method has also been adapted to mouse cloning and the derivation of mice from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of the tetraploid complementation remains largely unclear. Whether this approach can give rise to completely ES cell-derived mice is an open question, and has not yet been unambiguously proven. Here, we show that mouse tetraploid blastocysts can be classified into two groups, according to the presence or absence of an inner cell mass (ICM). We designate these as type a (presence of ICM at blastocyst stage) or type b (absence of ICM). ESC lines were readily derived from type a blastocysts, suggesting that these embryos retain a pluripotent epiblast compartment; whereas the type b blastocysts possessed very low potential to give rise to ESC lines, suggesting that they had lost the pluripotent epiblast. When the type a blastocysts were used for tetraploid complementation, some of the resulting mice were found to be 2n/4n chimeric; whereas when type b blastocysts were used as hosts, the resulting mice are all completely ES cell-derived, with the newborn pups displaying a high frequency of abdominal hernias. Our results demonstrate that completely ES cell-derived mice can be produced using ICM-deficient 4n blastocysts, and provide evidence that the exclusion of tetraploid cells from the fetus in 2n/4n chimeras can largely be attributed to the formation of ICM-deficient blastocysts.

  10. Complement component 3 (C3)

    MedlinePlus

    C3 and C4 are the most commonly measured complement components. A complement test may be used to monitor people with an ... normal levels of the complement proteins C3 and C4 . Complement activity varies throughout the body. For example, ...

  11. Structure-activity relationships within the N-terminal short consensus repeats (SCR) of human CR1 (C3b/C4b receptor, CD35): SCR 3 plays a critical role in inhibition of the classical and alternative pathways of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Mossakowska, D; Dodd, I; Pindar, W; Smith, R A

    1999-06-01

    Genes coding for between one and four short consensus repeats (SCR) of the N-terminal region of human complement receptor 1 (CR1) were synthesized from oligonucleotides and those encoding SCR(1-2), SCR(1-3), SCR(1-4), SCR3 and SCR(3-4) were expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. Following solubilization in urea, the proteins were partially purified and refolded and the activity of each protein was assessed in both classical and alternative pathway complement assays. All fragments showed a varying degree of activity with the general order being SCR(1-3) = SCR(1-4) > SCR(1-2). Addition of SCR3 to SCR(1-2) significantly improved potency, whereas the addition of SCR4 conferred no additional benefit. This observation, coupled with the ability of the single-domain SCR3 to inhibit classical pathway mediated lysis with an IH50% (inhibition of hemolysis by 50%) of 4.8 microM, demonstrates that SCR3 provides key binding interactions with activated complement components. SCR(1-3) was able to inhibit both classical and alternative pathways of complement activation, showing that the N-terminal SCR of CR1 retain the ability to interact with C3b. Assays for CR1-like cofactor activity for factor I using C4b-like C4 or C3b-like C3 as substrates showed that SCR(1-3) possessed such cofactor activity and that C4b-like C4 was a better substrate. When compared to full-length (30 SCR) soluble CR1 (sCR1), SCR(1-3) was significantly less potent in accord with a model involving multi-valent binding of C3b/C4b to CR1.

  12. Quantitative analysis of C4Ab and C4Bb binding to the C3b/C4b receptor (CR1, CD35)

    PubMed Central

    REILLY, B D; MOLD, C

    1997-01-01

    Complement-dependent clearance of immune complexes in humans is dependent on the activation and binding of the early components of the classical complement cascade. This prevents immune complex precipitation and promotes binding of the complexes by the C4b/C3b complement receptor CR1 (CD35) found on erythrocytes. The fourth component of human complement is encoded by two closely linked genes within the MHC. These genes give rise to the isotypic forms C4A and C4B, and recent studies suggest that CR1 binds activated C4A (C4Ab) to a greater extent than activated C4B (C4Bb). To study this difference in a more quantitative way the binding reactions between CR1 and C4Ab- and C4Bb-coated immune complexes and between CR1 and soluble dimers of C4Ab (C4Ab2) and C4Bb (C4Bb2) were analysed using the native receptor on human erythrocytes. The binding reaction between immune complexes with equivalent amounts of covalently bound C4Ab or C4Bb and erythrocyte CR1 showed a two-fold higher binding of complexes coated with C4A. Furthermore, erythrocyte CR1 bound C4Ab2 with an apparent four-fold higher affinity (Kd ≍ 1.4 10−7M) than C4Bb2 (Kd ≍ 4–8 10−7M), indicating a preferential binding of CR1 for C4A. PMID:9367418

  13. [C4 type photosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Drozak, Anna; Wasilewska, Wioleta; Buczyńska, Alicja; Romanowska, Elzbieta

    2012-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis includes several anatomical and biochemical modifications that allow plants to concentrate CO2 at the site of Rubisco. The photorespiratory pathway is repressed in C4 plants, since the rates of photosynthesis and biomass production are increased. This is an adaptation to high light intensities, high temperatures and dryness. C4 plants contain two distinct types of photosynthetic cells, mesophyll and bundle sheath. The processes of assimilation and reduction of CO2 are separated spatiality and catayzed by two different enzymes. Only the bundle sheath chloroplasts perform the reactions of the Calvin-Benson cycle with the help of the Rubisco enzyme present exclusively in this cell type. The primary CO2 fixation occurs in mesophyll cells through the action of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The light-dependent reactions of the photosynthesis occur exclusively in the latter cell type. These differences in photochemistry lead to distinct redox profiles in both types of cells. C4 plants are divided into three biochemical subtypes on the basis of differences in the mechanisms of decarboxylation of the C4 acids. C4 plants will provide the main source of food for humans and animals in the nearest decade.

  14. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  15. Pros and cons for C4d as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Danielle; Colvin, Robert B; Daha, Mohamed R; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Haas, Mark; Nickeleit, Volker; Salmon, Jane E; Sis, Banu; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Bruijn, Jan A; Bajema, Ingeborg M

    2012-04-01

    The introduction of C4d in daily clinical practice in the late nineties aroused an ever-increasing interest in the role of antibody-mediated mechanisms in allograft rejection. As a marker of classical complement activation, C4d made it possible to visualize the direct link between anti-donor antibodies and tissue injury at sites of antibody binding in a graft. With the expanding use of C4d worldwide several limitations of C4d were identified. For instance, in ABO-incompatible transplantations C4d is present in the majority of grafts but this seems to point at 'graft accommodation' rather than antibody-mediated rejection. C4d is now increasingly recognized as a potential biomarker in other fields where antibodies can cause tissue damage, such as systemic autoimmune diseases and pregnancy. In all these fields, C4d holds promise to detect patients at risk for the consequences of antibody-mediated disease. Moreover, the emergence of new therapeutics that block complement activation makes C4d a marker with potential to identify patients who may possibly benefit from these drugs. This review provides an overview of the past, present, and future perspectives of C4d as a biomarker, focusing on its use in solid organ transplantation and discussing its possible new roles in autoimmunity and pregnancy. PMID:22297669

  16. Polysomnographic correlates of inflammatory complement components in young healthy males.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Ejaz; Golam Sarwar, Abu Hasnath M; Alam, Mohd Shoeb; Noohu, Majumi M; Zannat, Wassilatul; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Bahammam, Ahmed S; Manzar, Md Dilshad

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has delineated the predominant role of humoral mediators of inflammation in linking sleep with immunity. Nonetheless, characterization of the relationship between complement components with inflammatory functions and objective sleep measures has not been performed. In this study we investigated the relationships between objective measures of sleep and complement components with inflammatory functions. Thirty-six healthy male university students (age, 23.94±4.23 years; BMI, 23.44±2.67 kg/m(2)) completed the study. An RMS Quest 32 polysomnograph (PSG) was used for sleep recording. Non-fasting blood was collected before subjects went to bed on the second night in the sleep laboratory to estimate complement component 3 (C-3), complement component 4 (C-4), complement factor-H (Factor-H), C1-inhibitor (C1INH), complement factor I (CFI) and other inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6 and sICAM-1. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between PSG sleep measures and inflammatory mediators. Higher values of C-3 and lower values of sICAM-1, C1INH, and CFI (adjusted model, R2=0.211, p<0.041) predicted longer sleep duration. Lower C-3 (adjusted model, R2=0.078, p<0.055) predicted higher N1 (%). Higher levels of C1INH and CFI and lower values of C-4 (model adjusted R2=0.269, p<0.008) predicted higher N3 (%). Higher C-3, higher C-4, lower IL-6, lower C1INH and lower CFI (model adjusted R2=0.296, p<0.007) predicted higher REM (%). Poor sleep measures were associated with increased levels of pro-inflammatory complement components and decreased anti-inflammatory complement components. PMID:27656278

  17. An evaluation of association between common variants in C4BPB/C4BPA genes and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuihong; Lu, Houquan; Ni, Jianliang; Zhang, Jiangtao; Tang, Wenxin; Lu, Weihong; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Chen

    2015-03-17

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that both maternal bacterial and viral infections during pregnancy increase the risk of schizophrenia among offspring, but to date there is not clear explanation for this increased risk. Previously, the decreased C4b-binding protein (C4BP), a potent circulating soluble inhibitor of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, was reported to be associated with risk of schizophrenia. Here, we analyzed 4 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of C4BPB and 5 SNPs of C4BPA in a group of 556 schizophrenia patients and a matched group of 610 healthy controls to see if the genes C4BPB and C4BPA, which encode C4BP, may confer a susceptibility to schizophrenia. Comparing the genotype and allele frequencies of those SNPs between cases and controls, we found no association between the C4BPB/C4BPA variants and schizophrenia. Our results provided preliminary evidence that C4BPB/C4BPA may not confer susceptibility to schizophrenia among Han Chinese. Further genetic studies from large-scale population are required to obtain more conclusive results.

  18. Encapsidation of poliovirus replicons encoding the complete human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene by using a complementation system which provides the P1 capsid protein in trans.

    PubMed

    Porter, D C; Ansardi, D C; Morrow, C D

    1995-03-01

    Poliovirus genomes which contain small regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gag, pol, and env genes substituted in frame for the P1 capsid region replicate and express HIV-1 proteins as fusion proteins with the P1 capsid precursor protein upon transfection into cells (W. S. Choi, R. Pal-Ghosh, and C. D. Morrow, J. Virol. 65:2875-2883, 1991). Since these genomes, referred to as replicons, do not express capsid proteins, a complementation system was developed to encapsidate the genomes by providing P1 capsid proteins in trans from a recombinant vaccinia virus, VV-P1. Virus stocks of encapsidated replicons were generated after serial passage of the replicon genomes into cells previously infected with VV-P1 (D. C. Porter, D. C. Ansardi, W. S. Choi, and C. D. Morrow, J. Virol. 67:3712-3719, 1993). Using this system, we have further defined the role of the P1 region in viral protein expression and RNA encapsidation. In the present study, we constructed poliovirus replicons which contain the complete 1,492-bp gag gene of HIV-1 substituted for the entire P1 region of poliovirus. To investigate whether the VP4 coding region was required for the replication and encapsidation of poliovirus RNA, a second replicon in which the complete gag gene was substituted for the VP2, VP3, and VP1 capsid sequences was constructed. Transfection of replicon RNA with and without the VP4 coding region into cells resulted in similar levels of expression of the HIV-1 Gag protein and poliovirus 3CD protein, as indicated by immunoprecipitation using specific antibodies. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of RNA from transfected cells demonstrated comparable levels of RNA replication for each replicon. Transfection of the replicon genomes into cells infected with VV-P1 resulted in the encapsidation of the genomes; serial passage in the presence of VV-P1 resulted in the generation of virus stocks of encapsidated replicons. Analysis of the levels of protein expression and encapsidated

  19. Thermochemistry of disputed soot formation intermediates C4H3 and C4H5.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Steven E; Allen, Wesley D; Schaefer, Henry F

    2004-11-01

    Accurate isomeric energy differences and standard enthalpies of formation for disputed intermediates in soot formation, C(4)H(3) and C(4)H(5), have been determined through systematic extrapolations of ab initio energies. Electron correlation has been included through second-order Z-averaged perturbation theory (ZAPT2), and spin-restricted, open-shell coupled-cluster methods through triple excitations [ROCCSD, ROCCSD(T), and ROCCSDT] utilizing the correlation-consistent hierarchy of basis sets, cc-pVXZ (X = D, T, Q, 5, and 6), followed by extrapolations to the complete basis set limit via the focal point method of Allen and co-workers. Reference geometries were fully optimized at the ROCCSD(T) level with a TZ(2d1f,2p1d) basis set. Our analysis finds that the resonance-stabilized i-C(4)H(3) and i-C(4)H(5) isomers lie 11.8 and 10.7 kcal mol(-1) below E-n-C(4)H(3) and E-n-C(4)H(5), respectively, several kcal mol(-1) (more, less) than reported in recent (diffusion Monte Carlo, B3LYP density-functional) studies. Moreover, in these systems Gaussian-3 (G3) theory suffers from large spin contamination in electronic wave functions, poor reference geometries, and anomalous vibrational frequencies, but fortuitous cancellation of these sizable errors leads to isomerization energies apparently accurate to 1 kcal mol(-1). Using focal-point extrapolations for isodesmic reactions, we determine the enthalpies of formation (delta(f)H(0) (composite function)) for i-C(4)H(3), Z-n-C(4)H(3), E-n-C(4)H(3), i-C(4)H(5), Z-n-C(4)H(5), and E-n-C(4)H(5) to be 119.0, 130.8, 130.8, 78.4, 89.7, and 89.1 kcal mol(-1), respectively. These definitive values remove any remaining uncertainty surrounding the thermochemistry of these isomers in combustion models, allowing for better assessment of whether even-carbon pathways contribute to soot formation. PMID:15527344

  20. Thermochemistry of disputed soot formation intermediates C4H3 and C4H5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Steven E.; Allen, Wesley D.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    2004-11-01

    Accurate isomeric energy differences and standard enthalpies of formation for disputed intermediates in soot formation, C4H3 and C4H5, have been determined through systematic extrapolations of ab initio energies. Electron correlation has been included through second-order Z-averaged perturbation theory (ZAPT2), and spin-restricted, open-shell coupled-cluster methods through triple excitations [ROCCSD, ROCCSD(T), and ROCCSDT] utilizing the correlation-consistent hierarchy of basis sets, cc-pVXZ (X=D, T, Q, 5, and 6), followed by extrapolations to the complete basis set limit via the focal point method of Allen and co-workers. Reference geometries were fully optimized at the ROCCSD(T) level with a TZ(2d1f,2p1d) basis set. Our analysis finds that the resonance-stabilized i-C4H3 and i-C4H5 isomers lie 11.8 and 10.7 kcal mol-1 below E-n-C4H3 and E-n-C4H5, respectively, several kcal mol-1 (more, less) than reported in recent (diffusion Monte Carlo, B3LYP density-functional) studies. Moreover, in these systems Gaussian-3 (G3) theory suffers from large spin contamination in electronic wave functions, poor reference geometries, and anomalous vibrational frequencies, but fortuitous cancellation of these sizable errors leads to isomerization energies apparently accurate to 1 kcal mol-1. Using focal-point extrapolations for isodesmic reactions, we determine the enthalpies of formation (ΔfH0∘) for i-C4H3, Z-n-C4H3, E-n-C4H3, i-C4H5, Z-n-C4H5, and E-n-C4H5 to be 119.0, 130.8, 130.8, 78.4, 89.7, and 89.1 kcal mol-1, respectively. These definitive values remove any remaining uncertainty surrounding the thermochemistry of these isomers in combustion models, allowing for better assessment of whether even-carbon pathways contribute to soot formation.

  1. Complement deposition in glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    di Belgiojoso, G B; Tarantino, A; Durante, A; Guerra, L

    1975-01-01

    Biopsies from 400 patients affected by glomerular diseases, both "primary" and secondary to systemic diseases, have been studied by immunofluorescence. Staining was performed for immunoglobulins fibrogen and C1q, C4, C3 and C3A. C1q, C4 and C3 were positive in a high percentage of cases in focal glomerulosclerosis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, lupus nephritis and essential cryoglobulinaemia glomerulonephritis. C1q and C4 were very rarely present in focal proliferative glomerulonephritis and rheumatoid purpura glomerulonephritis. C3A was found frequently only in acute glomerulonephritis. Results are discussed with reference to their diagnostic value and to information about mechanisms of complement activation.

  2. Inherited polymorphism of guinea pig factor B and C4: evidence for genetic linkage between the C4 and Bf loci.

    PubMed

    Bitter-Suermann, D; Krönke, M; Brade, V; Hadding, U

    1977-05-01

    An inherited structural polymorphism of the guinea pig complement protein C4 and of factor B of the alternative pathway was demonstrated by use of high voltage agarose electrophoresis combined with a subsequent immunofixation technique. No polymorphism of guinea pig C3 could be shown. Three common allelic genes were proven to code for C4-S, C4-S1, and C4-F, respectively. Two common allelic genes are responsible for the Bf-F and Bf-S phenotype expression. A strong linkage disequilibrium between both C4 and Bf was demonstrated.

  3. Evolution of carbonic anhydrase in C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Martha

    2016-06-01

    During the evolution of C4 photosynthesis, the intracellular location with most carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity has changed. In Flaveria, the loss of the sequence encoding a chloroplast transit peptide from an ancestral C3 CA ortholog confined the C4 isoform to the mesophyll cell cytosol. Recent studies indicate that sequence elements and histone modifications controlling the expression of C4-associated CAs were likely present in the C3 ancestral chromatin, enabling the evolution of the C4 pathway. Almost complete abolishment of maize CA activity yields no obvious phenotype at ambient CO2 levels. This contrasts with results for Flaveria CA mutants, and has opened discussion on the role of CA in the C4 carbon concentrating mechanism.

  4. Complement fixation by rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, K; Cooper, N R; Johnson, J S; Vaughan, J H

    1975-01-01

    The capacity for fixation and activation of hemolytic complement by polyclonal IgM rheumatoid factors (RF) isolated from sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and monoclonal IgM-RF isolated from the cryoprecipitates of patients with IgM-IgG mixed cryoglobulinemia was examined. RF mixed with aggregated, reduced, and alkylated human IgG (Agg-R/A-IgG) in the fluid phase failed to significantly reduce the level of total hemolytic complement, CH50, or of individual complement components, C1, C2, C3, and C5. However, sheep erythrocytes (SRC) coated with Agg-R/A-IgG or with reduced and alkylated rabbit IgG anti-SRC antibody were hemolyzed by complement in the presence of polyclonal IgM-RF. Human and guinea pig complement worked equally well. The degree of hemolysis was in direct proportion to the hemagglutination titer of the RF against the same coated cells. Monoclonal IgM-RF, normal human IgM, and purified Waldenström macroglobulins without antiglobulin activity were all inert. Hemolysis of coated SRC by RF and complement was inhibited by prior treatment of the complement source with chelating agents, hydrazine, cobra venom factor, specific antisera to C1q, CR, C5, C6, or C8, or by heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min. Purified radiolabeled C4, C3, and C8 included in the complement source were bound to hemolysed SRC in direct proportion to the degree of hemolysis. These data indicate that polyclonal IgM-RF fix and activate complement via the classic pathway. The system described for assessing complement fixation by isolated RF is readily adaptable to use with whole human serum. PMID:1078825

  5. Reibergram of Intrathecal Synthesis of C4 in Patients with Eosinophilic Meningitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Docal, Bárbara; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto Juan; Bu-Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa; Rodríguez-Rey, Alexis; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Juan Carlos; de Paula-Almeida, Susana Olga

    2010-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis produces eosinophilic meningitis in humans and is endemic in Thailand, Taiwan, China, and the Caribbean region. During infection with this parasite, it is important to know if the complement system may be activated by the classical or lectin pathway. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples from 20 patients with meningitic angiostrongyliasis were used to quantify C4 levels and albumin. Results were plotted on a C4 CSF/serum quotient diagram or Reibergram. Twelve patients showed intrathecal synthesis of C4. Antibody-dependent complement cytotoxicity should be considered as a possible mechanism that destroys third-stage larvae of this helminth in cerebrospinal fluid of affected patients. PMID:20519605

  6. Small passenger car transmission test; Ford C4 transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bujold, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    A 1979 Ford C4 automatic transmission was tested per a passenger car automatic transmission test code (SAE J651b) which required drive performance, coast performance, and no load test conditions. Under these test conditions, the transmission attained maximum efficiencies in the mid-eighty percent range for both drive performance tests and coast performance tests. The major results of this test (torque, speed, and efficiency curves) are presented. Graphs map the complete performance characteristics for the Ford C4 transmission.

  7. Electronic spectra of C4H3Cl+ isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, S.; Rudnev, V.; Fulara, J.; Dietsche, R.; Nagy, A.; Garkusha, I.; Mazzotti, F. J.; Rice, C. A.; Maier, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Two experimental methods were applied to identify the structure and electronic transitions of C4H3Cl+ isomers. The first is a direct absorption technique where mass-selected ions are embedded in 6 K neon matrices using a mass-selected ion beam and absorption spectra of different C4H3Cl+ isomers were thus observed. The second is a gas phase method on ions which have been collisional cooled with cryogenic helium inside of a 22-pole ion trap. The c-type (1)2 A‧ ← X 2 A″ electronic transition of a C4H3Cl+ isomer could then be measured by a one-colour, two-photon technique at 20 and 50 K in the gas phase. The two sets of data, complemented by calculated excitation energies, allowed the assignment of particular isomers. Rotational structure in the gas phase spectra was resolved for C4H3 35Cl+ and C4H3 37Cl+ isomers of cis-1-chlorobutenynylium. The analysis leads to the spectroscopic constants: T 00 = 19 184.680(5), ? , ? , ? , ? , ? and ? (all in cm-1).

  8. 42 CFR 52c.4 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application. 52c.4 Section 52c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.4 Application. An institution interested in applying for a grant under this...

  9. 42 CFR 52c.4 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application. 52c.4 Section 52c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.4 Application. An institution interested in applying for a grant under this...

  10. 42 CFR 52c.4 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application. 52c.4 Section 52c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.4 Application. An institution interested in applying for a grant under this...

  11. 42 CFR 52c.4 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application. 52c.4 Section 52c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.4 Application. An institution interested in applying for a grant under this...

  12. 42 CFR 52c.4 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application. 52c.4 Section 52c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.4 Application. An institution interested in applying for a grant under this...

  13. Activation of the complement, coagulation, fibrinolytic and kallikrein-kinin systems during attacks of hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, E W; Johansen, H T; Høgåsen, K; Wuillemin, W; Hack, C E; Mollnes, T E

    1996-08-01

    Five patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE) were studied during attacks and remission as were healthy controls. The high levels of C1/C1-INH complexes, low C4 and high ratio C4 activation products (C4bc)/C4 also differed significantly during remission compared to controls. During attacks C4bc/C4 increased (922-2007; P = 0.022, remission versus attacks, median values throughout), C2 and CH50 dropped (111-31%; P = 0.043 and 110-36%; P = 0.016, respectively), TCC (C5b-9) increased (0.88-1.23 AU/ml; P = 0.028). Cleavage of HK increased to be almost complete during attacks (20-90%; P = 0.009). While factor XIa/serpin-complexes did not increase, a more than twofold rise in thrombin/antithrombin-complexes (0.20-0.50 microgram/l; P = 0.009) and in plasmin/alpha-2-antiplasmin-complexes (7.3-17 nmol/l; P = 0.028) was observed. For the first time cascade activation in HAE was studied simultaneously, and corroborates that attacks lead to activation of the kallikrein-kinin system, fibrinolysis and early part of the classical complement pathway. In addition, the authors present novel data of terminal complement and coagulation activation, the latter apparently not via FXIa.

  14. DNase I hypersensitivity mapping and promoter polymorphism analysis of human C4

    SciTech Connect

    Vaishnaw, A.K.; Hargreaves, R.; Morley, B.J.

    1995-04-01

    Human complement component C4 is encoded by two structurally distinct loci in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region. The two isotypes, C4A and C4B, differ at only four residues in the C4d fragment, but C4 constitutes the most polymorphic of the complement components. It is not known, however, whether the regions involved in the regulation of C4 expression also display polymorphic variation. By using the technique of DNase I hypersensitivity mapping, we established that the only area of transcriptional activity for C4 in the hepatocyte cell line, HepG2, occurs approximately 500 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site. This region was found to be remarkably constant in sequence when analyzed in the context of differing MHC haplotypes including HLA B57, C4A6, C4B1, DR7, which has been correlated with reduced expression of the C4A isotype. Similarly, polymerase chain reaction followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis failed to demonstrate any promoter polymorphisms in 103 individuals comprising 52 systemic lupus erythermatosus patients and 51 healthy controls. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Complete hamster CAD protein and the carbamylphosphate synthetase domain of CAD complement mammalian cell mutants defective in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Musmanno, L A; Jamison, R S; Barnett, R S; Buford, E; Davidson, J N

    1992-07-01

    The mammalian CAD gene codes for a 240-kDa multifunctional protein that catalyzes the first three steps of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Previously, the longest cDNA construct available was missing approximately 500 bp of coding sequence at the 5' end, thereby lacking the sequence to encode the entire carbamylphosphate synthetase (CPSase) domain. Here, a complete CAD hamster cDNA is constructed, placed into a mammalian expression vector, and transfected into hamster cells deficient in CAD. Transfectants show coordinately restored levels of all three enzyme activities and the presence of full-length CAD protein. A derivative construct of the CAD cDNA was generated that should encode only the CPSase domain. When transfected into mammalian cells, a protein was synthesized that had significant CPSase activity both in vivo and in vitro. The two constructs generated in this study will facilitate the study of CAD structure, function, and allosteric regulation. PMID:1359654

  16. Evolution of C4 Photosynthesis in Flaveria Species1

    PubMed Central

    Drincovich, Maria F.; Casati, Paula; Andreo, Carlos S.; Chessin, Saul J.; Franceschi, Vincent R.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Ku, Maurice S.B.

    1998-01-01

    NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME, EC 1.1.1.40), a key enzyme in C4 photosynthesis, provides CO2 to the bundle-sheath chloroplasts, where it is fixed by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. We characterized the isoform pattern of NADP-ME in different photosynthetic species of Flaveria (C3, C3-C4 intermediate, C4-like, C4) based on sucrose density gradient centrifugation and isoelectric focusing of the native protein, western-blot analysis of the denatured protein, and in situ immunolocalization with antibody against the 62-kD C4 isoform of maize. A 72-kD isoform, present to varying degrees in all species examined, is predominant in leaves of C3 Flaveria spp. and is also present in stem and root tissue. By immunolabeling, NADP-ME was found to be mostly localized in the upper palisade mesophyll chloroplasts of C3 photosynthetic tissue. Two other isoforms of the enzyme, with molecular masses of 62 and 64 kD, occur in leaves of certain intermediates having C4 cycle activity. The 62-kD isoform, which is the predominant highly active form in the C4 species, is localized in bundle-sheath chloroplasts. Among Flaveria spp. there is a 72-kD constitutive form, a 64-kD form that may have appeared during evolution of C4 metabolism, and a 62-kD form that is necessary for the complete functioning of C4 photosynthesis. PMID:9662516

  17. Complement in Lupus Nephritis: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lihua; Cunningham, Patrick N.; Quigg, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder caused by loss of tolerance to self-antigens, the production of autoantibodies and deposition of complement-fixing immune complexes (ICs) in injured tissues. SLE is characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and targeted organs, with lupus nephritis being one of the most serious complications. The complement system consists of three pathways and is tightly controlled by a set of regulatory proteins to prevent injudicious complement activation on host tissue. The involvement of the complement system in the pathogenesis of SLE is well accepted; yet, its exact role is still not clear. Summary Complement plays dual roles in the pathogenesis of SLE. On the one hand, the complement system appears to have protective features in that hereditary homozygous deficiencies of classical pathway components, such as C1q and C4, are associated with an increased risk for SLE. On the other hand, IC-mediated activation of complement in affected tissues is clearly evident in both experimental and human SLE along with pathological features that are logical consequences of complement activation. Studies in genetically altered mice have shown that lack of complement inhibitors, such as complement factor H (CFH) or decay-accelerating factor (DAF) accelerates the development of experimental lupus nephritis, while treatment with recombinant protein inhibitors, such as Crry-Ig, CR2-Crry, CR2-DAF and CR2-CFH, ameliorates the disease development. Complement-targeted drugs, including soluble complement receptor 1 (TP10), C1 esterase inhibitor and a monoclonal anti-C5 antibody (eculizumab), have been shown to inhibit complement safely, and are now being investigated in a variety of clinical conditions. Key Messages SLE is an autoimmune disorder which targets multiple systems. Complement is centrally involved and plays dual roles in the pathogenesis of SLE. Studies from experimental lupus models and clinical

  18. The evolutionary ecology of C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Osborne, Colin P

    2014-12-01

    C4 photosynthesis is a physiological syndrome resulting from multiple anatomical and biochemical components, which function together to increase the CO2 concentration around Rubisco and reduce photorespiration. It evolved independently multiple times and C4 plants now dominate many biomes, especially in the tropics and subtropics. The C4 syndrome comes in many flavours, with numerous phenotypic realizations of C4 physiology and diverse ecological strategies. In this work, we analyse the events that happened in a C3 context and enabled C4 physiology in the descendants, those that generated the C4 physiology, and those that happened in a C4 background and opened novel ecological niches. Throughout the manuscript, we evaluate the biochemical and physiological evidence in a phylogenetic context, which demonstrates the importance of contingency in evolutionary trajectories and shows how these constrained the realized phenotype. We then discuss the physiological innovations that allowed C4 plants to escape these constraints for two important dimensions of the ecological niche--growth rates and distribution along climatic gradients. This review shows that a comprehensive understanding of C4 plant ecology can be achieved by accounting for evolutionary processes spread over millions of years, including the ancestral condition, functional convergence via independent evolutionary trajectories, and physiological diversification.

  19. Studies on the haemolytic activity of circulating C1q-C3/C4 complexes.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Diana; Brouwer, Mieke C; Daha, Mohamed R; Hack, C Erik

    2008-04-01

    During classical complement pathway activation, the internal thio-ester of both C3 and C4 becomes exposed which enables C3 and C4 to bind covalently to nearby molecules. Recently, we described that C3 and C4 bind to C1q, the recognition molecule of the classical pathway, upon activation of this pathway. Covalently linked complexes between C1q and activated C4 (C1q-C4 complexes) are specific markers for classical complement pathway activation. In the present study we further investigated the molecular characteristics of complexes between C1q and activated C3 or C4 that occur in vivo. In human serum only complexes of C1q with C3d or C4d fragments were detected but not those with the larger C3b/bi or C4b/bi fragments. We identified that C1q-C4 complexes circulate as part of the intact C1 complex instead of as free C1q. Finally, we investigated whether deposited C3d or C4d affect C1 haemolytic activity. We observed that both C1q-C3 and C1q-C4 complexes are significantly (P<0.05) less active in a C1q-haemolytic assay than non-complexed C1q. Thus, the dominant types of C1q complexes that circulate in vivo are C1q-C3d and C1q-C4d complexes. These complexes are still able to interact with C1r and C1s to form a C1 complex, but seem to have a reduced activity as compared to C1q not carrying C3- or C4-fragments.

  20. Complement activation in amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's dementia.

    PubMed

    Eikelenboom, P; Hack, C E; Rozemuller, J M; Stam, F C

    1989-01-01

    Amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's dementia contain complement factors C1q, C4 and C3. In the present study we demonstrate complement activation in amyloid plaques using immunoenzymatical techniques and specific antibodies against subunits of individual complement components and activated complement products. Amyloid plaques contain C1q and activated C3 fragments (C3c and C3d, g) but no C1s and C3a. These findings demonstrate that the complement components are not passively bound to the amyloid plaque structures but are the result of an activation process. The role of complement activation in the genesis of senile plaques is discussed.

  1. Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R; de Rivera, Heather; Davis, Avery; Hammond, Timothy R; Kamitaki, Nolan; Tooley, Katherine; Presumey, Jessy; Baum, Matthew; Van Doren, Vanessa; Genovese, Giulio; Rose, Samuel A; Handsaker, Robert E; Daly, Mark J; Carroll, Michael C; Stevens, Beth; McCarroll, Steven A

    2016-02-11

    Schizophrenia is a heritable brain illness with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Schizophrenia's strongest genetic association at a population level involves variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, but the genes and molecular mechanisms accounting for this have been challenging to identify. Here we show that this association arises in part from many structurally diverse alleles of the complement component 4 (C4) genes. We found that these alleles generated widely varying levels of C4A and C4B expression in the brain, with each common C4 allele associating with schizophrenia in proportion to its tendency to generate greater expression of C4A. Human C4 protein localized to neuronal synapses, dendrites, axons, and cell bodies. In mice, C4 mediated synapse elimination during postnatal development. These results implicate excessive complement activity in the development of schizophrenia and may help explain the reduced numbers of synapses in the brains of individuals with schizophrenia.

  2. Early Components of the Complement Classical Activation Pathway in Human Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Katherine E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Yang, Yan; Spencer, Charles H.; Hauptmann, Georges; Hebert, Lee A.; Atkinson, John P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2016-01-01

    The complement system consists of effector proteins, regulators, and receptors that participate in host defense against pathogens. Activation of the complement system, via the classical pathway (CP), has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated tissue injury, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Paradoxically, a complete deficiency of an early component of the CP, as evidenced by homozygous genetic deficiencies reported in human, are strongly associated with the risk of developing SLE or a lupus-like disease. Similarly, isotype deficiency attributable to a gene copy-number (GCN) variation and/or the presence of autoantibodies directed against a CP component or a regulatory protein that result in an acquired deficiency are relatively common in SLE patients. Applying accurate assay methodologies with rigorous data validations, low GCNs of total C4, and heterozygous and homozygous deficiencies of C4A have been shown as medium to large effect size risk factors, while high copy numbers of total C4 or C4A as prevalent protective factors, of European and East-Asian SLE. Here, we summarize the current knowledge related to genetic deficiency and insufficiency, and acquired protein deficiencies for C1q, C1r, C1s, C4A/C4B, and C2 in disease pathogenesis and prognosis of SLE, and, briefly, for other systemic autoimmune diseases. As the complement system is increasingly found to be associated with autoimmune diseases and immune-mediated diseases, it has become an attractive therapeutic target. We highlight the recent developments and offer a balanced perspective concerning future investigations and therapeutic applications with a focus on early components of the CP in human systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26913032

  3. Human C4b-binding protein selectively interacts with Neisseria gonorrhoeae and results in species-specific infection.

    PubMed

    Ngampasutadol, Jutamas; Ram, Sanjay; Blom, Anna M; Jarva, Hanna; Jerse, Ann E; Lien, Egil; Goguen, Jon; Gulati, Sunita; Rice, Peter A

    2005-11-22

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of gonorrhea, a disease that is restricted to humans. Complement forms a key arm of the innate immune system that combats gonococcal infections. N. gonorrhoeae uses its outer membrane porin (Por) molecules to bind the classical pathway of complement down-regulatory protein C4b-binding protein (C4bp) to evade killing by human complement. Strains of N. gonorrhoeae that resisted killing by human serum complement were killed by serum from rodent, lagomorph, and primate species, which cannot be readily infected experimentally with this organism and whose C4bp molecules did not bind to N. gonorrhoeae. In contrast, we found that Yersinia pestis, an organism that can infect virtually all mammals, bound species-specific C4bp and uniformly resisted serum complement-mediated killing by these species. Serum resistance of gonococci was restored in these sera by human C4bp. An exception was serotype Por1B-bearing gonococcal strains that previously had been used successfully in a chimpanzee model of gonorrhea that simulates human disease. Por1B gonococci bound chimpanzee C4bp and resisted killing by chimpanzee serum, providing insight into the host restriction of gonorrhea and addressing why Por1B strains, but not Por1A strains, have been successful in experimental chimpanzee infection. Our findings may lead to the development of better animal models for gonorrhea and may also have implications in the choice of complement sources to evaluate neisserial vaccine candidates.

  4. CSF/serum quotient graphs for the evaluation of intrathecal C4 synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Docal, Barbara; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto J; Bu-Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa; Rey, Alexis Rodriguez

    2009-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/serum quotient graphs have been used previously to determine local synthesis in brain of immunoglobulins and C3 complement component. The aim of this study was to use the same technique to construct quotient graphs, or Reibergrams, for the beta globulin C4 and to evaluate the method for assessing intrathecal synthesis in neurological disease. Methods The constants in the previously-defined Reibergram for immunoglobulin IgA were used to calculate the CSF/serum quotient for C4. CSF and serum were analyzed for C4, IgA and albumin from a total of 12 patients with meningoencephalitis caused by encapsulated microorganisms and 10 subjects without infections or inflammatory neurological disease, some of which had dysfunction of the blood-CSF barrier, Results The formula and C4 Reibergram with the constants previously found for IgA, determined the intrathecal C4 synthesis in CSF. The intrathecal C4 fraction in CSF (C4 loc in mg/l) was compared to the C4-Index (fraction of CSF: serum for C 4/fraction of CSF: serum for albumin). There was a significant correlation between the two formulae. The CSF/Serum quotient graph was superior for detecting intrathecal synthesis of C4 under variable conditions of blood-CSF barrier permeability. Conclusion The C4 Reibergram can be used to quantify the intrathecal synthesis of this component of the complement system in different infectious diseases of the central nervous system and is especially useful for patients with blood-brain barrier dysfunction. PMID:19573230

  5. Parallel Recruitment of Multiple Genes into C4 Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Boxall, Susanna F.; Gregory, Richard; Edwards, Erika J.; Hartwell, James; Osborne, Colin P.

    2013-01-01

    During the diversification of living organisms, novel adaptive traits usually evolve through the co-option of preexisting genes. However, most enzymes are encoded by gene families, whose members vary in their expression and catalytic properties. Each may therefore differ in its suitability for recruitment into a novel function. In this work, we test for the presence of such a gene recruitment bias using the example of C4 photosynthesis, a complex trait that evolved recurrently in flowering plants as a response to atmospheric CO2 depletion. We combined the analysis of complete nuclear genomes and high-throughput transcriptome data for three grass species that evolved the C4 trait independently. For five of the seven enzymes analyzed, the same gene lineage was recruited across the independent C4 origins, despite the existence of multiple copies. The analysis of a closely related C3 grass confirmed that C4 expression patterns were not present in the C3 ancestors but were acquired during the evolutionary transition to C4 photosynthesis. The significant bias in gene recruitment indicates that some genes are more suitable for a novel function, probably because the mutations they accumulated brought them closer to the characteristics required for the new function. PMID:24179135

  6. Phylogenetic niche conservatism in C4 grasses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Edwards, Erika J; Freckleton, Robert P; Osborne, Colin P

    2012-11-01

    Photosynthetic pathway is used widely to discriminate plant functional types in studies of global change. However, independent evolutionary lineages of C(4) grasses with different variants of C(4) photosynthesis show different biogeographical relationships with mean annual precipitation, suggesting phylogenetic niche conservatism (PNC). To investigate how phylogeny and photosynthetic type differentiate C(4) grasses, we compiled a dataset of morphological and habitat information of 185 genera belonging to two monophyletic subfamilies, Chloridoideae and Panicoideae, which together account for 90 % of the world's C(4) grass species. We evaluated evolutionary variance and covariance of morphological and habitat traits. Strong phylogenetic signals were found in both morphological and habitat traits, arising mainly from the divergence of the two subfamilies. Genera in Chloridoideae had significantly smaller culm heights, leaf widths, 1,000-seed weights and stomata; they also appeared more in dry, open or saline habitats than those of Panicoideae. Controlling for phylogenetic structure showed significant covariation among morphological traits, supporting the hypothesis of phylogenetically independent scaling effects. However, associations between morphological and habitat traits showed limited phylogenetic covariance. Subfamily was a better explanation than photosynthetic type for the variance in most morphological traits. Morphology, habitat water availability, shading, and productivity are therefore all involved in the PNC of C(4) grass lineages. This study emphasized the importance of phylogenetic history in the ecology and biogeography of C(4) grasses, suggesting that divergent lineages need to be considered to fully understand the impacts of global change on plant distributions. PMID:22569558

  7. Strategies for engineering C(4) photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Leegood, Richard C

    2013-03-01

    C(3) photosynthesis is an inefficient process, because the enzyme that lies at the heart of the Benson-Calvin cycle, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) is itself a very inefficient enzyme. The oxygenase activity of Rubisco is an unavoidable side reaction that is a consequence of its reaction mechanism. The product of oxygenation, glycollate 2-P, has to be retrieved by photorespiration, a process which results in the loss of a quarter of the carbon that was originally present in glycollate 2-P. Photorespiration therefore reduces carbon gain. Purely in terms of carbon economy, there is, therefore, a strong selection pressure on plants to reduce the rate of photorespiration so as to increase carbon gain, but it also improves water- and nitrogen-use efficiency. Possibilities for the manipulation of plants to decrease the amount of photorespiration include the introduction of improved Rubisco from other species, reconfiguring photorespiration, or introducing carbon-concentrating mechanisms, such as inorganic carbon transporters, carboxysomes or pyrenoids, or engineering a full C(4) Kranz pathway using the existing evolutionary progression in C(3)-C(4) intermediates as a blueprint. Possible routes and progress to suppressing photorespiration by introducing C(4) photosynthesis in C(3) crop plants will be discussed, including whether single cell C(4) photosynthesis is feasible, how the evolution of C(3)-C(4) intermediates can be used as a blueprint for engineering C(4) photosynthesis, which pathway for the C(4) cycle might be introduced and the extent to which processes and structures in C(3) plant might require optimisation.

  8. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    PubMed

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, complement analysis of body fluids and biopsies, going far beyond C3 and C4, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease process. Such expanded complement analysis allows for a more precise differential diagnosis and for critical monitoring of complement-targeted therapy. These changes are a result of the growing understanding of the involvement of complement in a diverse set of disorders. To appreciate the importance of proper complement analysis, it is important to understand the role it plays in disease. Historically, it was the absence of complement as manifested in severe infection that was noted. Since then complement has been connected to a variety of inflammatory disorders, such as autoimmune diseases and hereditary angioedema. While the role of complement in the rejection of renal grafts has been known longer, the significant impact of complement. In certain nephropathies has now led to the reclassification of some rare kidney diseases and an increased role for complement analysis in diagnosis. Even more unexpected is that complement has also been implicated in neural, ophtalmological and dermatological disorders. With this level of involvement in some varied and impactful health issues proper complement testing is clearly important; however, analysis of the complement system varies widely among laboratories. Except for a few proteins, such as C3 and C4, there are neither well-characterized standard preparations nor calibrated assays available. This is especially true for the inter-laboratory variation of tests which assess classical, alternative, or lectin pathway function. In addition, there is a need for the standardization of the measurement of complement activation products that are so critical in determining whether clinically relevant complement activation has occurred in vivo. Finally, autoantibodies to complement proteins (e.g. anti-C1q), C3 and C4 convertases (C3 and C4 nephritic factor) or to regulatory proteins

  9. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    PubMed

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, complement analysis of body fluids and biopsies, going far beyond C3 and C4, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease process. Such expanded complement analysis allows for a more precise differential diagnosis and for critical monitoring of complement-targeted therapy. These changes are a result of the growing understanding of the involvement of complement in a diverse set of disorders. To appreciate the importance of proper complement analysis, it is important to understand the role it plays in disease. Historically, it was the absence of complement as manifested in severe infection that was noted. Since then complement has been connected to a variety of inflammatory disorders, such as autoimmune diseases and hereditary angioedema. While the role of complement in the rejection of renal grafts has been known longer, the significant impact of complement. In certain nephropathies has now led to the reclassification of some rare kidney diseases and an increased role for complement analysis in diagnosis. Even more unexpected is that complement has also been implicated in neural, ophtalmological and dermatological disorders. With this level of involvement in some varied and impactful health issues proper complement testing is clearly important; however, analysis of the complement system varies widely among laboratories. Except for a few proteins, such as C3 and C4, there are neither well-characterized standard preparations nor calibrated assays available. This is especially true for the inter-laboratory variation of tests which assess classical, alternative, or lectin pathway function. In addition, there is a need for the standardization of the measurement of complement activation products that are so critical in determining whether clinically relevant complement activation has occurred in vivo. Finally, autoantibodies to complement proteins (e.g. anti-C1q), C3 and C4 convertases (C3 and C4 nephritic factor) or to regulatory proteins

  10. Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R.; de Rivera, Heather; Davis, Avery; Hammond, Timothy R.; Kamitaki, Nolan; Tooley, Katherine; Presumey, Jessy; Baum, Matthew; Van Doren, Vanessa; Genovese, Giulio; Rose, Samuel A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Daly, Mark J.; Carroll, Michael C.; Stevens, Beth; McCarroll, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a heritable brain illness with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Schizophrenia’s strongest genetic association at a population level involves variation in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus, but the genes and molecular mechanisms accounting for this have been challenging to recognize. We show here that schizophrenia’s association with the MHC locus arises in substantial part from many structurally diverse alleles of the complement component 4 (C4) genes. We found that these alleles promoted widely varying levels of C4A and C4B expression and associated with schizophrenia in proportion to their tendency to promote greater expression of C4A in the brain. Human C4 protein localized at neuronal synapses, dendrites, axons, and cell bodies. In mice, C4 mediated synapse elimination during postnatal development. These results implicate excessive complement activity in the development of schizophrenia and may help explain the reduced numbers of synapses in the brains of individuals affected with schizophrenia. PMID:26814963

  11. Complement associated pathogenic mechanisms in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Erdem; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody (Ab) related myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). The most characteristic finding of muscle pathology in both MG and EAMG is the abundance of IgG and complement deposits at the nerve-muscle junction (NMJ), suggesting that AChR-Ab induces muscle weakness by complement pathway activation and consequent membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. This assumption has been supported with EAMG resistance of complement factor C3 knockout (KO), C4 KO and C5 deficient mice and amelioration of EAMG symptoms following treatment with complement inhibitors such as cobra venom factor, soluble complement receptor 1, anti-C1q, anti-C5 and anti-C6 Abs. Moreover, the complement inhibitor decay accelerating factor (DAF) KO mice exhibit increased susceptibility to EAMG. These findings have brought forward improvisation of novel therapy methods based on inhibition of classical and common complement pathways in MG treatment.

  12. Viral complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosengard, A M; Ahearn, J M

    1999-05-01

    The inactivation of complement provides cells and tissues critical protection from complement-mediated attack and decreases the associated recruitment of other inflammatory mediators. In an attempt to evade the host immune response, viruses have evolved two mechanisms to acquire complement regulatory proteins. They can directly seize the host cell complement regulators onto their outer envelope and/or they can produce their own proteins which are either secreted into the neighboring intercellular space or expressed as membrane-bound proteins on the infected host cell. The following review will concentrate on the viral homologues of the mammalian complement regulatory proteins, specifically those containing complement control protein (CCP) repeats. PMID:10408371

  13. Complement system in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shicui; Cui, Pengfei

    2014-09-01

    Zebrafish is recently emerging as a model species for the study of immunology and human diseases. Complement system is the humoral backbone of the innate immune defense, and our knowledge as such in zebrafish has dramatically increased in the recent years. This review summarizes the current research progress of zebrafish complement system. The global searching for complement components in genome database, together with published data, has unveiled the existence of all the orthologues of mammalian complement components identified thus far, including the complement regulatory proteins and complement receptors, in zebrafish. Interestingly, zebrafish complement components also display some distinctive features, such as prominent levels of extrahepatic expression and isotypic diversity of the complement components. Future studies should focus on the following issues that would be of special importance for understanding the physiological role of complement components in zebrafish: conclusive identification of complement genes, especially those with isotypic diversity; analysis and elucidation of function and mechanism of complement components; modulation of innate and adaptive immune response by complement system; and unconventional roles of complement-triggered pathways.

  14. Complement activation by necrotic cells in normal plasma environment compares to that by late apoptotic cells and involves predominantly IgM.

    PubMed

    Ciurana, Caroline L F; Zwart, Bas; van Mierlo, Gerard; Hack, C Erik

    2004-09-01

    Necrotic cells are generally considered to stimulate inflammation, whereas apoptotic cells should not. However, apoptotic cells have pro-inflammatory properties since they can activate complement. To what extent this activation compares to that by necrotic cells is not known. We compared complement activation by necrotic cells and apoptotic cells in plasma. Jurkat cells were made apoptotic or necrotic by incubation with etoposide or by heat shock, respectively. Cells incubated in recalcified plasma were tested for C3 and C4 fixation and fluid phase generation of complement activation products. Fixation of C3 and C4 to necrotic cells occurred mainly via the classical pathway, independent from the method of necrosis induction and the cell type. Depletion of IgM from plasma almost completely abrogated complement fixation by necrotic cells, which was restored by supplementation with purified IgM. Complement activation by late apoptotic cells was comparable to that by necrotic cells regarding the extent and dependence on IgM. Moreover, incubation of plasma with necrotic or late apoptotic cells led to the generation of comparable amounts of complement activation products. These results indicate that late apoptotic and necrotic cells employ similar complement activation mechanisms in the plasma environment.

  15. On the smell of Composition C-4.

    PubMed

    Kranz, William; Kitts, Kelley; Strange, Nicholas; Cummins, Joshua; Lotspeich, Erica; Goodpaster, John

    2014-03-01

    In efforts to locate hidden explosives, humans have had few allies as valuable as the explosives-detecting canine. The unrivaled sensitivity and selectivity of the canine nose have combined to make these animals an attractive choice for law enforcement, military, and private security applications. Although the efficacy of trained detector dogs is well-established, the question of which chemical compounds are responsible for causing a dog to recognize a particular odor and alert to it remains a subject of debate for several explosive formulations--including, perhaps most notably, Composition C-4. Previous studies have indicated that cyclohexanone, 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol are the chemicals that may cause canines to alert to C-4. This has led to the suggestion that these substances could be used as a substitute for genuine C-4 in the training, testing, and maintenance of explosives-detecting canines. In this paper, we present an alternative view. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with solid phase microextraction as a pre-concentration technique, we have discovered that 2-ethyl-1-hexanol off-gasses not only from C-4, but also from benign sources, such as the common plasticizers bis(2-ethylhexyl)adipate, bis(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate, and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate; as well as several plasticized items common to our everyday world, including PVC tile, PVC pipe, electrical tape, and credit cards. This observation may potentially discourage the use of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol for training purposes. We also present the results of our own canine field trials focused on the detection of C-4. Through the use of contingency tables and statistical testing, we demonstrate the failure of trained law enforcement dogs in our study to respond in any significant way to these potential odor compounds. PMID:24529788

  16. On the smell of Composition C-4.

    PubMed

    Kranz, William; Kitts, Kelley; Strange, Nicholas; Cummins, Joshua; Lotspeich, Erica; Goodpaster, John

    2014-03-01

    In efforts to locate hidden explosives, humans have had few allies as valuable as the explosives-detecting canine. The unrivaled sensitivity and selectivity of the canine nose have combined to make these animals an attractive choice for law enforcement, military, and private security applications. Although the efficacy of trained detector dogs is well-established, the question of which chemical compounds are responsible for causing a dog to recognize a particular odor and alert to it remains a subject of debate for several explosive formulations--including, perhaps most notably, Composition C-4. Previous studies have indicated that cyclohexanone, 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol are the chemicals that may cause canines to alert to C-4. This has led to the suggestion that these substances could be used as a substitute for genuine C-4 in the training, testing, and maintenance of explosives-detecting canines. In this paper, we present an alternative view. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with solid phase microextraction as a pre-concentration technique, we have discovered that 2-ethyl-1-hexanol off-gasses not only from C-4, but also from benign sources, such as the common plasticizers bis(2-ethylhexyl)adipate, bis(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate, and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate; as well as several plasticized items common to our everyday world, including PVC tile, PVC pipe, electrical tape, and credit cards. This observation may potentially discourage the use of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol for training purposes. We also present the results of our own canine field trials focused on the detection of C-4. Through the use of contingency tables and statistical testing, we demonstrate the failure of trained law enforcement dogs in our study to respond in any significant way to these potential odor compounds.

  17. Polymorphism of the fourth component of complement in Turks.

    PubMed

    Metin, A; Sanal, O; Ersoy, F; Tezcan, I; Berkel, A I; Irkeç, C

    2000-06-01

    An analysis of polymorphism in the fourth component of human complement (C4) was performed on EDTA-plasma from 142 unrelated, randomly selected Turks without collagen-vascular disease or recurrent infections. Plasma samples treated with neuraminidase and carboxypeptidase-B were subjected to high-voltage agarose gel electrophoresis followed by immunofixation. C4B allotypes were further detected in some samples by Western blots with monoclonal antibody 1228 (anti-C4B/Ch1 reactivity). The frequencies of C4A and C4B alleles were determined. Allele C4B*5, which has been found to be relatively common in Asian (Oriental) populations, was not detected in this study. No specific predilection could be noted among the rare variants. C4A*3-C4B*1 was the most common haplotype (n = 40/142, or 28%) but was found less frequently than in Caucasian populations. This finding may be the result of the limited number of samples examined. C4A and/or C4B null allotypes were seen in 49 of 142 (34.6%) subjects. The most frequent C4 null allotype seen was C4B null (37/142, or 26%): 28 subjects had one C4B null allele; 1 had a homozygous deficiency of C4B (C4B*QO, *QO) and 7 had C4A*QO C4B*QO, a double heterozygous haplotype. Frequencies of homozygous haplotype C4A*Q0-C4B*Q0 in the population studied were found to be 0.007. The results of this study demonstrate that the genetic composition of the Turkish population exhibits both similarities and differences with the European population, and ranges between Caucasian and Mongoloid (Asian) populations.

  18. Photosynthesis of C3, C3-C4, and C4 grasses at glacial CO2.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Harshini; Sharwood, Robert E; Tissue, David T; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-07-01

    Most physiology comparisons of C3 and C4 plants are made under current or elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 which do not reflect the low CO2 environment under which C4 photosynthesis has evolved. Accordingly, photosynthetic nitrogen (PNUE) and water (PWUE) use efficiency, and the activity of the photosynthetic carboxylases [Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] were compared in eight C4 grasses with NAD-ME, PCK, and NADP-ME subtypes, one C3 grass, and one C3-C4 grass grown under ambient (400 μl l(-1)) and glacial (180 μl l(-1)) CO2. Glacial CO2 caused a smaller reduction of photosynthesis and a greater increase of stomatal conductance in C4 relative to C3 and C3-C4 species. Panicum bisulcatum (C3) acclimated to glacial [CO2] by doubling Rubisco activity, while Rubisco was unchanged in Panicum milioides (C3-C4), possibly due to its high leaf N and Rubisco contents. Glacial CO2 up-regulated Rubisco and PEPC activities in concert for several C4 grasses, while NADP-ME and PEP-CK activities were unchanged, reflecting the high control exerted by the carboxylases relative to the decarboxylases on the efficiency of C4 metabolism. Despite having larger stomatal conductance at glacial CO2, C4 species maintained greater PWUE and PNUE relative to C3-C4 and C3 species due to higher photosynthetic rates. Relative to other C4 subtypes, NAD-ME and PEP-CK grasses had the highest PWUE and PNUE, respectively; relative to C3, the C3-C4 grass had higher PWUE and similar PNUE at glacial CO2. Biomass accumulation was reduced by glacial CO2 in the C3 grass relative to the C3-C4 grass, while biomass was less reduced in NAD-ME grasses compared with NADP-ME and PCK grasses. Under glacial CO2, high resource use efficiency offers a key evolutionary advantage for the transition from C3 to C4 photosynthesis in water- and nutrient-limited environments.

  19. Climate-driven C4 plant distributions in China: divergence in C4 taxa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renzhong; Ma, Linna

    2016-01-01

    There have been debates on the driving factors of C4 plant expansion, such as PCO2 decline in the late Micocene and warmer climate and precipitation at large-scale modern ecosystems. These disputes are mainly due to the lack of direct evidence and extensive data analysis. Here we use mass flora data to explore the driving factors of C4 distribution and divergent patterns for different C4 taxa at continental scale in China. The results display that it is mean annual climate variables driving C4 distribution at present-day vegetation. Mean annual temperature is the critical restriction of total C4 plants and the precipitation gradients seem to have much less impact. Grass and sedge C4 plants are largely restricted to mean annual temperature and precipitation respectively, while Chenopod C4 plants are strongly restricted by aridity in China. Separate regression analysis can succeed to detect divergences of climate distribution patterns of C4 taxa at global scale. PMID:27302686

  20. Complement and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ballanti, Eleonora; Perricone, Carlo; Greco, Elisabetta; Ballanti, Marta; Di Muzio, Gioia; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Perricone, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is a component of the innate immune system. Its main function was initially believed to be limited to the recognition and elimination of pathogens through direct killing or stimulation of phagocytosis. However, in recent years, the immunoregulatory functions of the complement system were demonstrated and it was determined that the complement proteins play an important role in modulating adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. When the delicate mechanisms that regulate this sophisticated enzymatic system are unbalanced, the complement system may cause damage, mediating tissue inflammation. Dysregulation of the complement system has been involved in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, Sjögren's syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Complement deficiencies have been associated with an increased risk to develop autoimmune disorders. Because of its functions, the complement system is an attractive therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. Up to date, several compounds interfering with the complement cascade have been studied in experimental models for autoimmune diseases. The main therapeutic strategies are inhibition of complement activation components, inhibition of complement receptors, and inhibition of membrane attack complex. At present, none of the available agents was proven to be both safe and effective for treatment of autoimmune diseases in humans. Nonetheless, data from preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the modulation of the complement system could constitute a viable strategy for the treatment of autoimmune conditions in the decades to come.

  1. CRP-mediated activation of complement in vivo: assessment by measuring circulating complement-C-reactive protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Wolbink, G J; Brouwer, M C; Buysmann, S; ten Berge, I J; Hack, C E

    1996-07-01

    The in vivo function of C-reactive protein (CRP) is unknown. Among the in vitro functions assigned to CRP is the ability to activate complement via the classical pathway. To date, there is no evidence supporting that CRP exerts this function in vivo. We here show a novel approach to assess CRP-mediated complement activation in vivo, which is based on the property that activated complement factors C3 and C4 fix to CRP during complement activation induced by this acute phase protein. We developed specific ELISAs for complexes between CRP and C4b, C4d, C3b, or C3d. We established that in vitro complement-CRP complexes were formed only during CRP-dependent activation, and not during activation by other activators, even in the presence of high CRP levels. Circulating levels of complement-CRP complexes were undetectable in normal donors, but significantly increased in nine patients following implantation of a renal allograft. Importantly, levels of complement-CRP complexes did not change in these patients upon a bolus infusion of mAb OKT3, which induces activation of the classical complement pathway, demonstrating in vivo that complement-CRP complexes are not formed during CRP-independent activation of complement, even when CRP is elevated. We conclude that measurement of complement-CRP complexes provides a suitable tool to study CRP-mediated activation of complement in vivo. Furthermore, increased levels of these complexes occur in clinical samples, indicating that CRP may induce activation of complement in vivo.

  2. The C-4 Dark Matter Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bonicalzi, Ricco M.; Collar, J. I.; Colaresi, J.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Fuller, Erin S.; Hai, M.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Cory T.; Reid, Douglas J.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wiseman, Clinton G.; Yocum, K. M.

    2013-02-18

    Abstract We describe the experimental design of C-4, an expansion of the CoGeNT dark matter search to four identical detectors each approximately three times the mass of the p-type point contact (PPC) germanium diode presently taking data at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Expected reductions of radioactive backgrounds and energy threshold are discussed, including an estimate of the additional sensitivity to low-mass dark matter candidates to be obtained with this search.

  3. The Expression Profile of Complement Components in Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejuan; Ding, Fangrui; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Baihong; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Podocytes are critical for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and are injured in many renal diseases, especially proteinuric kidney diseases. Recently, reports suggested that podocytes are among the renal cells that synthesize complement components that mediate glomerular diseases. Nevertheless, the profile and extent of complement component expression in podocytes remain unclear. This study examined the expression profile of complement in podocytes under physiological conditions and in abnormal podocytes induced by multiple stimuli. In total, 23/32 complement component components were detected in podocyte by conventional RT-PCR. Both primary cultured podocytes and immortalized podocytes expressed the complement factors C1q, C1r, C2, C3, C7, MASP, CFI, DAF, CD59, C4bp, CD46, Protein S, CR2, C1qR, C3aR, C5aR, and Crry (17/32), whereas C4, CFB, CFD, C5, C6, C8, C9, MBL1, and MBL2 (9/32) complement factors were not expressed. C3, Crry, and C1q-binding protein were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Podocyte complement gene expression was affected by several factors (puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN), angiotensin II (Ang II), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)). Representative complement components were detected using fluorescence confocal microscopy. In conclusion, primary podocytes express various complement components at the mRNA and protein levels. The complement gene expressions were affected by several podocyte injury factors. PMID:27043537

  4. The Expression Profile of Complement Components in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejuan; Ding, Fangrui; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Baihong; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Podocytes are critical for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and are injured in many renal diseases, especially proteinuric kidney diseases. Recently, reports suggested that podocytes are among the renal cells that synthesize complement components that mediate glomerular diseases. Nevertheless, the profile and extent of complement component expression in podocytes remain unclear. This study examined the expression profile of complement in podocytes under physiological conditions and in abnormal podocytes induced by multiple stimuli. In total, 23/32 complement component components were detected in podocyte by conventional RT-PCR. Both primary cultured podocytes and immortalized podocytes expressed the complement factors C1q, C1r, C2, C3, C7, MASP, CFI, DAF, CD59, C4bp, CD46, Protein S, CR2, C1qR, C3aR, C5aR, and Crry (17/32), whereas C4, CFB, CFD, C5, C6, C8, C9, MBL1, and MBL2 (9/32) complement factors were not expressed. C3, Crry, and C1q-binding protein were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Podocyte complement gene expression was affected by several factors (puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN), angiotensin II (Ang II), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)). Representative complement components were detected using fluorescence confocal microscopy. In conclusion, primary podocytes express various complement components at the mRNA and protein levels. The complement gene expressions were affected by several podocyte injury factors. PMID:27043537

  5. Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Glenn C.; Clark, Benton C.; Knocke, Philip C.; OHara, Bonnie J.; Adams, Larry; Niemann, Hasso B.; Alexander, Merle; Veverka, Joseph; Goldstein, Raymond; Huebner, Walter; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Cometary exploration remains of great importance to virtually all of space science. Because comets are presumed to be remnants of the early solar nebula, they are expected to provide fundamental knowledge as to the origin and development of the solar system as well as to be key to understanding of the source of volatiles and even life itself in the inner solar system. Clearly the time for a detailed study of the composition of these apparent messages from the past has come. A comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, is now being studied as a candidate for the new Discovery program. This mission is a highly-focussed and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission. The C4 mission will concentrate on measurements that will produce an understanding of the composition and physical makeup of a cometary nucleus. The core science goals of the C4 mission are 1) to determine the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of a cometary nucleus and 2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. A related goal is to obtain temporal information about the development of the cometary coma as a function of time and orbital position. The four short-period comets -- Tempel 1, Tempel 2, Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and Wirtanen -which all appear to have acceptable dust production rates, were identified as candidate targets. Mission opportunities have been identified beginning as early as 1998. Tempel I with a launch in 1999, however, remains the baseline comet for studies of and planning the C4 mission. The C4 mission incorporates two science instruments and two engineering instruments in the payload to obtain the desired measurements. The science instruments include an advanced version of the Cometary Ice and Dust Experiment (CIDEX), a mini-CIDEX with a sample collection system, an X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer and a Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatograph, and a simplified version of the Neutral

  6. Human seminal plasma inhibition of complement.

    PubMed

    Petersen, B H; Lammel, C J; Stites, D P; Brooks, G F

    1980-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that human seminal plasma contains chemically and biologically distinct factors which inhibit lymphocyte functions and the serum bactericidal and opsonic activities associated with the killing of gram-negative organisms. Because of the direct association between complement action and serum bactericidal and opsonic activities, inhibition of complement may be one of the possible mechanisms of action of seminal plasma immunoinhibitory factors. Complement hemolytic activity was measured for C3 and C4 in serum Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Escherichia coli bactericidal reaction mixtures with and without addition of seminal plasma. In the presence of seminal plasma, where there was no bactericidal action, C3 and titers were reduced to approximately 50% of the titers in the reactions with complement donor serum. The C3 titers were lower than in the reaction mixtures with immune serum and complement donor serum, where N. gonorrhoeae bactericidal activity occurred. Individual human seminal plasma specimens depressed CH50 activity of pooled normal human sera up to 50% of normal levels. There were no differences in inhibition by seminal plasma specimens from normal or vasectomized men. Treatment with seminal plasma depressed the functional activity of complement components C1 and C3 by more than 50%. Seminal plasma also inhibited alternate pathway activity. Cleavage of factor B was demonstrated. The seminal plasma factor which inhibited complement was of low molecular weight. DPF blocked the seminal plasma complement-inhibitory factor. However, amidolytic activity for serine protease substrates could not be demonstrated. It is likely that the seminal plasma complement inhibitor is a protease inhibitor acting singly or in combination.

  7. C4 cycles: past, present, and future research on C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Langdale, Jane A

    2011-11-01

    In the late 1960s, a vibrant new research field was ignited by the discovery that instead of fixing CO(2) into a C(3) compound, some plants initially fix CO(2) into a four-carbon (C(4)) compound. The term C(4) photosynthesis was born. In the 20 years that followed, physiologists, biochemists, and molecular and developmental biologists grappled to understand how the C(4) photosynthetic pathway was partitioned between two morphologically distinct cell types in the leaf. By the early 1990s, much was known about C(4) biochemistry, the types of leaf anatomy that facilitated the pathway, and the patterns of gene expression that underpinned the biochemistry. However, virtually nothing was known about how the pathway was regulated. It should have been an exciting time, but many of the original researchers were approaching retirement, C(4) plants were proving recalcitrant to genetic manipulation, and whole-genome sequences were not even a dream. In combination, these factors led to reduced funding and the failure to attract young people into the field; the endgame seemed to be underway. But over the last 5 years, there has been a resurgence of interest and funding, not least because of ambitious multinational projects that aim to increase crop yields by introducing C(4) traits into C(3) plants. Combined with new technologies, this renewed interest has resulted in the development of more sophisticated approaches toward understanding how the C(4) pathway evolved, how it is regulated, and how it might be manipulated. The extent of this resurgence is manifest by the publication in 2011 of more than 650 pages of reviews on different aspects of C(4). Here, I provide an overview of our current understanding, the questions that are being addressed, and the issues that lie ahead.

  8. C4 Cycles: Past, Present, and Future Research on C4 Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Langdale, Jane A.

    2011-01-01

    In the late 1960s, a vibrant new research field was ignited by the discovery that instead of fixing CO2 into a C3 compound, some plants initially fix CO2 into a four-carbon (C4) compound. The term C4 photosynthesis was born. In the 20 years that followed, physiologists, biochemists, and molecular and developmental biologists grappled to understand how the C4 photosynthetic pathway was partitioned between two morphologically distinct cell types in the leaf. By the early 1990s, much was known about C4 biochemistry, the types of leaf anatomy that facilitated the pathway, and the patterns of gene expression that underpinned the biochemistry. However, virtually nothing was known about how the pathway was regulated. It should have been an exciting time, but many of the original researchers were approaching retirement, C4 plants were proving recalcitrant to genetic manipulation, and whole-genome sequences were not even a dream. In combination, these factors led to reduced funding and the failure to attract young people into the field; the endgame seemed to be underway. But over the last 5 years, there has been a resurgence of interest and funding, not least because of ambitious multinational projects that aim to increase crop yields by introducing C4 traits into C3 plants. Combined with new technologies, this renewed interest has resulted in the development of more sophisticated approaches toward understanding how the C4 pathway evolved, how it is regulated, and how it might be manipulated. The extent of this resurgence is manifest by the publication in 2011 of more than 650 pages of reviews on different aspects of C4. Here, I provide an overview of our current understanding, the questions that are being addressed, and the issues that lie ahead. PMID:22128120

  9. Phylogeny of C4-photosynthesis enzymes based on algal transcriptomic and genomic data supports an archaeal/proteobacterial origin and multiple duplication for most C4-related genes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Shan; Wu, Shuangxiu; Yu, Jun; Wang, Xumin; Tang, Xuexi; Liu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Both Calvin-Benson-Bassham (C3) and Hatch-Slack (C4) cycles are most important autotrophic CO2 fixation pathways on today's Earth. C3 cycle is believed to be originated from cyanobacterial endosymbiosis. However, studies on evolution of different biochemical variants of C4 photosynthesis are limited to tracheophytes and origins of C4-cycle genes are not clear till now. Our comprehensive analyses on bioinformatics and phylogenetics of novel transcriptomic sequencing data of 21 rhodophytes and 19 Phaeophyceae marine species and public genomic data of more algae, tracheophytes, cyanobacteria, proteobacteria and archaea revealed the origin and evolution of C4 cycle-related genes. Almost all of C4-related genes were annotated in extensive algal lineages with proteobacterial or archaeal origins, except for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) with both cyanobacterial and archaeal/proteobacterial origin. Notably, cyanobacteria may not possess complete C4 pathway because of the flawed annotation of pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) genes in public data. Most C4 cycle-related genes endured duplication and gave rise to functional differentiation and adaptation in different algal lineages. C4-related genes of NAD-ME (NAD-malic enzyme) and PCK subtypes exist in most algae and may be primitive ones, while NADP-ME (NADP-malic enzyme) subtype genes might evolve from NAD-ME subtype by gene duplication in chlorophytes and tracheophytes. PMID:25313828

  10. Phylogeny of C4-Photosynthesis Enzymes Based on Algal Transcriptomic and Genomic Data Supports an Archaeal/Proteobacterial Origin and Multiple Duplication for Most C4-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Wang, Xumin; Tang, Xuexi; Liu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Both Calvin-Benson-Bassham (C3) and Hatch-Slack (C4) cycles are most important autotrophic CO2 fixation pathways on today’s Earth. C3 cycle is believed to be originated from cyanobacterial endosymbiosis. However, studies on evolution of different biochemical variants of C4 photosynthesis are limited to tracheophytes and origins of C4-cycle genes are not clear till now. Our comprehensive analyses on bioinformatics and phylogenetics of novel transcriptomic sequencing data of 21 rhodophytes and 19 Phaeophyceae marine species and public genomic data of more algae, tracheophytes, cyanobacteria, proteobacteria and archaea revealed the origin and evolution of C4 cycle-related genes. Almost all of C4-related genes were annotated in extensive algal lineages with proteobacterial or archaeal origins, except for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) with both cyanobacterial and archaeal/proteobacterial origin. Notably, cyanobacteria may not possess complete C4 pathway because of the flawed annotation of pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) genes in public data. Most C4 cycle-related genes endured duplication and gave rise to functional differentiation and adaptation in different algal lineages. C4-related genes of NAD-ME (NAD-malic enzyme) and PCK subtypes exist in most algae and may be primitive ones, while NADP-ME (NADP-malic enzyme) subtype genes might evolve from NAD-ME subtype by gene duplication in chlorophytes and tracheophytes. PMID:25313828

  11. Phylogeny of C4-photosynthesis enzymes based on algal transcriptomic and genomic data supports an archaeal/proteobacterial origin and multiple duplication for most C4-related genes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Shan; Wu, Shuangxiu; Yu, Jun; Wang, Xumin; Tang, Xuexi; Liu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Both Calvin-Benson-Bassham (C3) and Hatch-Slack (C4) cycles are most important autotrophic CO2 fixation pathways on today's Earth. C3 cycle is believed to be originated from cyanobacterial endosymbiosis. However, studies on evolution of different biochemical variants of C4 photosynthesis are limited to tracheophytes and origins of C4-cycle genes are not clear till now. Our comprehensive analyses on bioinformatics and phylogenetics of novel transcriptomic sequencing data of 21 rhodophytes and 19 Phaeophyceae marine species and public genomic data of more algae, tracheophytes, cyanobacteria, proteobacteria and archaea revealed the origin and evolution of C4 cycle-related genes. Almost all of C4-related genes were annotated in extensive algal lineages with proteobacterial or archaeal origins, except for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) with both cyanobacterial and archaeal/proteobacterial origin. Notably, cyanobacteria may not possess complete C4 pathway because of the flawed annotation of pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) genes in public data. Most C4 cycle-related genes endured duplication and gave rise to functional differentiation and adaptation in different algal lineages. C4-related genes of NAD-ME (NAD-malic enzyme) and PCK subtypes exist in most algae and may be primitive ones, while NADP-ME (NADP-malic enzyme) subtype genes might evolve from NAD-ME subtype by gene duplication in chlorophytes and tracheophytes.

  12. Complement system in dermatological diseases - fire under the skin.

    PubMed

    Panelius, Jaana; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The complement system plays a key role in several dermatological diseases. Overactivation, deficiency, or abnormality of the control proteins are often related to a skin disease. Autoimmune mechanisms with autoantibodies and a cytotoxic effect of the complement membrane attack complex on epidermal or vascular cells can cause direct tissue damage and inflammation, e.g., in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), phospholipid antibody syndrome, and bullous skin diseases like pemphigoid. By evading complement attack, some microbes like Borrelia spirochetes and staphylococci can persist in the skin and cause prolonged symptoms. In this review, we present the most important skin diseases connected to abnormalities in the function of the complement system. Drugs having an effect on the complement system are also briefly described. On one hand, drugs with free hydroxyl on amino groups (e.g., hydralazine, procainamide) could interact with C4A, C4B, or C3 and cause an SLE-like disease. On the other hand, progress in studies on complement has led to novel anti-complement drugs (recombinant C1-inhibitor and anti-C5 antibody, eculizumab) that could alleviate symptoms in diseases associated with excessive complement activation. The main theme of the manuscript is to show how relevant the complement system is as an immune effector system in contributing to tissue injury and inflammation in a broad range of skin disorders.

  13. Complement System in Dermatological Diseases – Fire Under the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Panelius, Jaana; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The complement system plays a key role in several dermatological diseases. Overactivation, deficiency, or abnormality of the control proteins are often related to a skin disease. Autoimmune mechanisms with autoantibodies and a cytotoxic effect of the complement membrane attack complex on epidermal or vascular cells can cause direct tissue damage and inflammation, e.g., in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), phospholipid antibody syndrome, and bullous skin diseases like pemphigoid. By evading complement attack, some microbes like Borrelia spirochetes and staphylococci can persist in the skin and cause prolonged symptoms. In this review, we present the most important skin diseases connected to abnormalities in the function of the complement system. Drugs having an effect on the complement system are also briefly described. On one hand, drugs with free hydroxyl on amino groups (e.g., hydralazine, procainamide) could interact with C4A, C4B, or C3 and cause an SLE-like disease. On the other hand, progress in studies on complement has led to novel anti-complement drugs (recombinant C1-inhibitor and anti-C5 antibody, eculizumab) that could alleviate symptoms in diseases associated with excessive complement activation. The main theme of the manuscript is to show how relevant the complement system is as an immune effector system in contributing to tissue injury and inflammation in a broad range of skin disorders. PMID:25688346

  14. Complement activation in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, L E; De Villiers, D; Markham, D; Whaley, K; Thomas, H C

    1982-01-01

    Patients with HBsAg positive chronic active liver disease (CALD) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) exhibit increased C3d concentrations and changes in the serum concentrations of the complement components consistent with activation of the classical and alternative pathways. In these patients the concentrations of the regulatory proteins, C3b inactivator (C3bINA) and beta IH globulin, are normal. Patients with HBsAg negative CALD and alcohol induced liver disease (ALD) exhibit no evidence of an increased level of complement system activation. In these patients diminished serum concentrations of complement components appear to be related to diminished hepatic synthetic function. C4 synthesis may be specifically reduced in autoimmune chronic active liver disease. PMID:7083631

  15. C4 bioenergy crops for cool climates, with special emphasis on perennial C4 grasses.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; de Melo Peixoto, Murilo; Friesen, Patrick; Deen, Bill

    2015-07-01

    There is much interest in cultivating C4 perennial plants in northern climates where there is an abundance of land and a potential large market for biofuels. C4 feedstocks can exhibit superior yields to C3 alternatives during the long warm days of summer at high latitude, but their summer success depends on an ability to tolerate deep winter cold, spring frosts, and early growth-season chill. Here, we review cold tolerance limits in C4 perennial grasses. Dozens of C4 species are known from high latitudes to 63 °N and elevations up to 5200 m, demonstrating that C4 plants can adapt to cold climates. Of the three leading C4 grasses being considered for bioenergy production in cold climates--Miscanthus spp., switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), and prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata)--all are tolerant of cool temperatures (10-15 °C), but only cordgrass tolerates hard spring frosts. All three species overwinter as dormant rhizomes. In the productive Miscanthus×giganteus hybrids, exposure to temperatures below -3 °C to -7 °C will kill overwintering rhizomes, while for upland switchgrass and cordgrass, rhizomes survive exposure to temperatures above -20 °C to -24 °C. Cordgrass emerges earlier than switchgrass and M. giganteus genotypes, but lacks the Miscanthus growth potential once warmer days of late spring arrive. To enable C4-based bioenergy production in colder climates, breeding priorities should emphasize improved cold tolerance of M.×giganteus, and enhanced productivity of switchgrass and cordgrass. This should be feasible in the near future, because wild populations of each species exhibit a diverse range of cold tolerance and growth capabilities.

  16. Activation of Complement Following Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Thordardottir, S; Vikingsdottir, T; Bjarnadottir, H; Jonsson, H; Gudbjornsson, B

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether complement activation, via the classical and alternative pathways, occurs following a cemented total hip replacement (THR) surgery due to osteoarthritis. Blood samples were collected systematically from 12 patients - six male and six women, with a median age of 75 (range: 59-90 years) - preoperatively, 6 h post-operatively and on the first, second and third post-operative day. Total function of classical (CH50) and alternative pathways (AH50) was evaluated, along with the determination of serum concentrations of the complement proteins C3, C4, C3d, the soluble terminal complement complex (sTCC) sC5b-9, as well as C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin. Measurements of CRP and albumin levels elucidated a marked inflammatory response following the operation. The CH50, AH50 and C3 and C4 levels were significantly lower 6 h after the surgery compared with the preoperative levels, but elevated above the preoperative levels during the following 3 days. The complement activation product C3d levels increased continually during the whole observation period, from 13.5 AU/ml (range: 8-19 AU/ml) preoperative to 20 AU/ml (range: 12-34 AU/ml) on the third post-operative day. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the sC5b-9 levels between the preoperative and the third post-operative day. These results demonstrate a significant activation of the complement system following cemented THR. Further studies are needed to elucidate the time frame and the pathogenic role of this observed complement activation.

  17. Copper Causes Regiospecific Formation of C4 F8 -Containing Six-Membered Rings and their Defluorination/Aromatization to C4 F4 -Containing Rings in Triphenylene/1,4-C4 F8 I2 Reactions.

    PubMed

    Rippy, Kerry C; Bukovsky, Eric V; Clikeman, Tyler T; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Popov, Alexey A; Boltalina, Olga V; Strauss, Steven H

    2016-01-18

    The presence of Cu in reactions of triphenylene (TRPH) and 1,4-C4 F8 I2 at 360 °C led to regiospecific substitution of TRPH ortho C(β) atoms to form C4 F8 -containing rings, completely suppressing substitution on C(α) atoms. In addition, Cu caused selective reductive-defluorination/aromatization (RD/A) to form C4 F4 -containing aromatic rings. Without Cu, the reactions of TRPH and 1,4-C4 F8 I2 were not regiospecific and no RD/A was observed. These results, supported by DFT calculations, are the first examples of Cu-promoted 1) regiospecific perfluoroannulation, 2) preparative C-F activation, and 3) RD/A. HPLC-purified products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, low-temperature PES, and (1) H/(19) F NMR. PMID:26581454

  18. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-11-26

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD.

  19. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD.

  20. Evolution of the C(4) photosynthetic mechanism: are there really three C(4) acid decarboxylation types?

    PubMed

    Furbank, Robert T

    2011-05-01

    Some of the most productive plants on the planet use a variant of photosynthesis known as the C(4) pathway. This photosynthetic mechanism uses a biochemical pump to concentrate CO(2) to levels up to 10-fold atmospheric in specialized cells of the leaf where Rubisco, the primary enzyme of C(3) photosynthesis, is located. The basic biochemical pathways underlying this process, discovered more than 40 years ago, have been extensively studied and, based on these pathways, C(4) plants have been subdivided into two broad groups according to the species of C(4) acid produced in the mesophyll cells and into three groups according to the enzyme used to decarboxylate C(4) acids in the bundle sheath to release CO(2). Recent molecular, biochemical, and physiological data indicate that these three decarboxylation types may not be rigidly genetically determined, that the possibility of flexibility between the pathways exists and that this may potentially be both developmentally and environmentally controlled. This evidence is synthesized here and the implications for C(4) engineering discussed.

  1. From proto-Kranz to C4 Kranz: building the bridge to C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Khoshravesh, Roxana; Sage, Tammy L

    2014-07-01

    In this review, we examine how the specialized "Kranz" anatomy of C4 photosynthesis evolved from C3 ancestors. Kranz anatomy refers to the wreath-like structural traits that compartmentalize the biochemistry of C4 photosynthesis and enables the concentration of CO2 around Rubisco. A simplified version of Kranz anatomy is also present in the species that utilize C2 photosynthesis, where a photorespiratory glycine shuttle concentrates CO2 into an inner bundle-sheath-like compartment surrounding the vascular tissue. C2 Kranz is considered to be an intermediate stage in the evolutionary development of C4 Kranz, based on the intermediate branching position of C2 species in 14 evolutionary lineages of C4 photosynthesis. In the best-supported model of C4 evolution, Kranz anatomy in C2 species evolved from C3 ancestors with enlarged bundle sheath cells and high vein density. Four independent lineages have been identified where C3 sister species of C2 plants exhibit an increase in organelle numbers in the bundle sheath and enlarged bundle sheath cells. Notably, in all of these species, there is a pronounced shift of mitochondria to the inner bundle sheath wall, forming an incipient version of the C2 type of Kranz anatomy. This incipient version of C2 Kranz anatomy is termed proto-Kranz, and is proposed to scavenge photorespiratory CO2. By doing so, it may provide fitness benefits in hot environments, and thus represent a critical first stage of the evolution of both the C2 and C4 forms of Kranz anatomy.

  2. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of C4 genes in mice with t chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Golubić, M; Figueroa, F; Tosi, M; Klein, J

    1985-01-01

    Genomic DNA was isolated from 29 t strains and 4 congenic lines of mice, digested with restriction endonucleases, and hybridized with a probe representing the complement component 4 (C4) gene. All but one of the enzymes revealed restriction fragment length polymorphism in this sample of C4-related genes. Double digestion analysis suggested the presence of three C4 gene copies in some of the t chromosomes and two copies in others. The enzymes distinguished 16 different haplotypes among the 33 strains tested. Based on their restriction fragment length patterns, the t strains could be divided into four groups with strains in each group more closely related to each other with respect to their C4-region genes than strains belonging to different groups. At least three of these four groups represent different branches of the evolutionary tree constructed for the t chromosomes. The C4-related genes of the chromosomes are in strong linkage disequilibrium with the class II genes of the H-2 complex. Typing for the Ss and Slp allotypes of C4 has revealed the presence of the Ss1 phenotype in two t strains and of the Slpa phenotype in one strain.

  3. Functional characterization of the lectin pathway of complement in human serum.

    PubMed

    Roos, Anja; Bouwman, Lee H; Munoz, Jeric; Zuiverloon, Tahlita; Faber-Krol, Maria C; Fallaux-van den Houten, Francien C; Klar-Mohamad, Ngaisah; Hack, C Erik; Tilanus, Marcel G; Daha, Mohamed R

    2003-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a major initiator of the lectin pathway (LP) of complement. Polymorphisms in exon 1 of the MBL gene are associated with impaired MBL function and infections. Functional assays to assess the activity of the classical pathway (CP) and the alternative pathway (AP) of complement in serum are broadly used in patient diagnostics. We have now developed a functional LP assay that enables the specific quantification of autologous MBL-dependent complement activation in human serum. Complement activation was assessed by ELISA using coated mannan to assess the LP and coated IgM to assess the CP. Normal human serum (NHS) contains IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against mannan, as shown by ELISA. These antibodies are likely to induce CP activation. Using C1q-blocking and MBL-blocking mAb, it was confirmed that both the LP and the CP contribute to complement activation by mannan. In order to quantify LP activity without interference of the CP, LP activity was measured in serum in the presence of C1q-blocking Ab. Activation of serum on coated IgM via the CP resulted in a dose-dependent deposition of C1q, C4, C3, and C5b-9. This activation and subsequent complement deposition was completely inhibited by the C1q-blocking mAb 2204 and by polyclonal Fab anti-C1q Ab. Evaluation of the LP in the presence of mAb 2204 showed a strong dose-dependent deposition of C4, C3, and C5b-9 using serum from MBL-wildtype (AA) but not MBL-mutant donors (AB or BB genotype), indicating that complement activation under these conditions is MBL-dependent and C1q-independent. Donors with different MBL genotypes were identified using a newly developed oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) for detection of MBL exon 1 polymorphisms. We describe a novel functional assay that enables quantification of autologous complement activation via the LP in full human serum up to the formation of the membrane attack complex. This assay offers novel possibilities for patient diagnostics as well as

  4. Tracking the evolutionary rise of C4 metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F

    2016-05-01

    Upregulation of the C4 metabolic cycle is a major step in the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. Why this happened remains unclear, in part because of difficulties measuring the C4 cycle in situ in C3-C4 intermediate species. Now, Alonso-Cantabrana and von Caemmerer (2016) have described a new approach for quantifying C4 cycle activity, thereby providing the means to analyze its upregulation in an evolutionary context.

  5. Tracking the evolutionary rise of C4 metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of the C4 metabolic cycle is a major step in the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. Why this happened remains unclear, in part because of difficulties measuring the C4 cycle in situ in C3-C4 intermediate species. Now, Alonso-Cantabrana and von Caemmerer (2016) have described a new approach for quantifying C4 cycle activity, thereby providing the means to analyze its upregulation in an evolutionary context. PMID:27085185

  6. Rat C-reactive protein activates the autologous complement system.

    PubMed

    Diaz Padilla, Niubel; Bleeker, Wim K; Lubbers, Yvonne; Rigter, Gemma M M; Van Mierlo, Gerard J; Daha, Mohamed R; Hack, C Erik

    2003-08-01

    Activation of complement is a biological function of human C-reactive protein (hCRP), whereas rat CRP (rCRP) has been claimed to be unable to activate complement. As important biological functions of proteins are probably conserved among species, we re-evaluated, using various ligands, the capability of rCRP to activate complement. The activation of complement by hCRP and rCRP was investigated in solid- and fluid-phase systems. In the solid-phase system, purified CRP was fixed to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plates and incubated with human or rat recalcified plasma. Dose-dependent binding of human and rat C3 and C4 was observed to human and rat CRP, respectively. In the fluid-phase system, recalcified rat plasma, which contains about 500 mg/l of CRP, or human plasma supplemented with hCRP, were incubated with lyso-phosphatidylcholine. A dose-dependent activation of complement was observed upon incubation with this ligand, as reflected by the generation of activated C4 as well as of CRP-complement complexes. This activation was, in both cases, inhibited by preincubation of plasma with p-aminophosphorylcholine, a specific inhibitor of the interaction of CRP with its ligands, or by chelation of calcium ions. We conclude that rat CRP, similarly to human CRP, can activate autologous complement. These results support the notion that opsonization of ligands with complement is an important biological function of CRP.

  7. 29 CFR 2560.502c-4 - Civil penalties under section 502(c)(4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to the administrator of the plan a written notice indicating the Department's intent to assess a... administrator (within the meaning of section 3(16)(A) of the Act) shall be liable for civil penalties assessed... assessed. (1) The amount assessed under section 502(c)(4) of the Act for each separate violation shall...

  8. Maggot excretions affect the human complement system.

    PubMed

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Schreurs, Marco W J; Renwarin, Lennaert; Dorresteijn, Corry; Hamann, Dörte; Jukema, Gerrolt N

    2012-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in the activation of the inflammatory response to injury, although inappropriate complement activation (CA) can lead to severe tissue damage. Maggot therapy is successfully used to treat infected wounds. In this study, we hypothesized that maggot excretions/secretions influence CA in order to modulate the host's inflammatory response. Therefore, the effect of maggot excretions on CA was investigated in preoperatively and postoperatively obtained sera from patients. Our results show that maggot excretions reduce CA in healthy and postoperatively immune-activated human sera up to 99.9%, via all pathways. Maggot excretions do not specifically initiate or inhibit CA, but break down complement proteins C3 and C4 in a cation-independent manner and this effect proves to be temperature tolerant. This study indicates a CA-reducing substrate that is already successfully used in clinical practice and may explain part of the improved wound healing caused by maggot therapy. Furthermore, the complement activation-reducing substance present in maggot excretions could provide a novel treatment modality for several diseases, resulting from an (over)active complement system.

  9. CSF coccidioides complement fixation

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 61. Read More Complement Update Date 5/1/2015 Updated by: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, ...

  10. Glycine decarboxylase in C3, C4 and C3-C4 intermediate species.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Stefanie; Westhoff, Peter; Gowik, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) plays a central role in photorespiration. GDC is localized in the mitochondria and together with serine hydroxymethyltransferase it converts two molecules of glycine to one molecule of serine, CO2 and NH3. Overexpression of GDC subunits in the C3 species Arabidopsis thaliana can increase the metabolic flux through the photorespiratory pathway leading to enhanced photosynthetic efficiency and consequently to an enhanced biomass production of the transgenic plants. Changing the spatial expression patterns of GDC subunits was an important step during the evolution of C3-C4 intermediate and likely also C4 plants. Restriction of the GDC activity to the bundle sheath cells led to the establishment of a photorespiratory CO2 pump. PMID:27038285

  11. Fine Mapping of the Interaction between C4b-Binding Protein and Outer Membrane Proteins LigA and LigB of Pathogenic Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Breda, Leandro C D; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica M; da Silva, Ludmila B; Barbosa, Angela S; Blom, Anna M; Chang, Yung-Fu; Yung-Fu, Chang; Isaac, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The complement system consists of more than 40 proteins that participate in the inflammatory response and in pathogen killing. Complement inhibitors are necessary to avoid the excessive consumption and activation of this system on host cells. Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic leptospires are able to escape from complement activation by binding to host complement inhibitors Factor H [FH] and C4b-binding protein (C4BP) while non-pathogenic leptospires are rapidly killed in the presence of fresh serum. In this study, we demonstrate that complement control protein domains (CCP) 7 and 8 of C4BP α-chain interact with the outer membrane proteins LcpA, LigA and LigB from the pathogenic leptospire L. interrogans. The interaction between C4BP and LcpA, LigA and LigB is sensitive to ionic strength and inhibited by heparin. We fine mapped the LigA and LigB domains involved in its binding to C4BP and heparin and found that both interactions are mediated through the bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains 7 and 8 (LigA7-8 and LigB7-8) of both LigA and LigB and also through LigB9-10. Therefore, C4BP and heparin may share the same binding sites on Lig proteins.

  12. A novel recombinant fibrinogenase of Agkistrodon acutus venom protects against hyperacute rejection via degradation of complements.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xi; Qi, Jie-Zhen; Chen, Ming-Hui; Qiu, Bi-Tao; Huang, Zhen-Hua; Qiu, Peng-Xin; Chen, Jia-Shu; Yan, Guang-Mei

    2013-03-15

    Hyperacute rejection (HAR) is a main barrier in xenotransplantation, which is mediated by the combination of natural antibody to the xenograft and complement activation. Current therapies have focus on the inhibition of complement by development of complement inhibitor and transgenic animal organ. Here, we investigated the effects of rFII, a recombinant fibrinogenase from Agkistrodon acutus venom, on complement and HAR. The degradation effect of rFII on complement was tested by SDS-PAGE, CH50 examination, ELISA Kit and cofocal immunofluorescence microscopy in vitro and in vivo. An ex-vivo rat-to-human perfusion model and a vivo guinea-pig-to-rat heat HAR model were used to determine the protection of rFII against HAR. Our investigation indicated that rFII could significantly degrade human C5, C6, and C9, decrease the activity of complement, and inhibit the MAC deposition on HUVECs membrane in vitro. In addition, serum levels of C1q, C3 and C4 in rat were gradually reduced after infusion of rFII. Importantly, in an ex vivo rat-to-human perfusion model, the survival of rat hearts perfused with human serum treated with rFII (83.36 ± 16.63 min) were significantly longer than that of hearts perfused with fresh human serum(15.94 ± 4.75 min). At the time of 15 minutes after perfusion, functions of hearts added with 50 ug/ml rFII sustained well with heart rates at 283 ± 65.32 beats/minute and LVDP at 13.70 ± 5.45 Kpa, while that of hearts perfused with fresh human serum were severely damaged by HAR with heart rates at 107.77 ± 40.31 beats/minute and LVDP at 1.01 ± 0.83 Kpa. We also found that rFII significantly decreased the levels of C1q, C3 and C4 in human fresh serum perfusate. In a vivo guinea-pig-to-rat heat HAR model, the survival of rat hearts treated with rFII were significantly longer than that of hearts perfused with normal saline; and relieved heart damage by complete activation. Our finding demonstrates the anti-complement property of rFII and its

  13. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  14. Laboratory tests for disorders of complement and complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Shih, Angela R; Murali, Mandakolathur R

    2015-12-01

    The complement pathway is a cascade of proteases that is involved in immune surveillance and innate immunity, as well as adaptive immunity. Dysfunction of the complement cascade may be mediated by aberrations in the pathways of activation, complement regulatory proteins, or complement deficiencies, and has been linked to a number of hematologic disorders, including paroxysmal noctural hemoglobinuria (PNH), hereditary angioedema (HAE), and atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS). Here, current laboratory tests for disorders of the complement pathway are reviewed, and their utility and limitations in hematologic disorders and systemic diseases are discussed. Current therapeutic advances targeting the complement pathway in treatment of complement-mediated hematologic disorders are also reviewed.

  15. When do different C4 leaf anatomies indicate independent C4 origins? Parallel evolution of C4 leaf types in Camphorosmeae (Chenopodiaceae).

    PubMed

    Kadereit, Gudrun; Lauterbach, Maximilian; Pirie, Michael D; Arafeh, Rami; Freitag, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    Broad-scale phylogenetic studies give first insights in numbers, relationships, and ages of C4 lineages. They are, however, generally limited to a model that treats the evolution of the complex C4 syndrome in different lineages as a directly comparable process. Here, we use a resolved and well-sampled phylogenetic tree of Camphorosmeae, based on three chloroplast and one nuclear marker and on leaf anatomical traits to infer a more detailed picture of C4 leaf-type evolution in this lineage. Our ancestral character state reconstructions allowed two scenarios: (i) Sedobassia is a derived C3/C4 intermediate, implying two independent gains of C4 in Bassia and Camphorosma; or (ii) Sedobassia is a plesiomorphic C3/C4 intermediate, representing a syndrome ancestral to the Bassia/Camphorosma/Sedobassia lineage. In Bassia, a kochioid leaf type (Bassia muricata and/or Bassia prostrata type) is ancestral. At least three independent losses of water-storage tissue occurred, resulting in parallel shifts towards an atriplicoid leaf type. These changes in leaf anatomy are adaptations to different survival strategies in steppic or semi-desert habitats with seasonal rainfall. In contrast, Camphorosma shows a fixed C4 anatomy differing from Bassia types in its continuous Kranz layer, which indeed points to an independent origin of the full C4 syndrome in Camphorosma, either from an independent C3 or from a common C3/C4 intermediate ancestor, perhaps similar to its C3/C4 intermediate sister genus Sedobassia. The enlarged bundle sheath cells of Sedobassia might represent an important early step in C4 evolution in Camphorosmeae.

  16. Verbal Complementizers in Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Hossam Eldin Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    A class of Modern Standard Arabic complementizers known as "'?inna' and its sisters" demonstrate unique case and word order restrictions. While CPs in Arabic allow both Subject-Verb (SV) and Verb-Subject (VS) word order and their subjects show nominative morphology, CPs introduced by "?inna" ban a verb from directly following…

  17. Quo vadis C(4)? An ecophysiological perspective on global change and the future of C(4) plants.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Kubien, David S

    2003-01-01

    C(4) plants are directly affected by all major global change parameters, often in a manner that is distinct from that of C(3) plants. Rising CO(2) generally stimulates C(3) photosynthesis more than C(4), but C(4) species still exhibit positive responses, particularly at elevated temperature and arid conditions where they are currently common. Acclimation of photosynthesis to high CO(2) occurs in both C(3) and C(4) plants, most notably in nutrient-limited situations. High CO(2) aggravates nitrogen limitations and in doing so may favor C(4) species, which have greater photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency. C(4) photosynthesis is favored by high temperature, but global warming will not necessarily favor C(4) over C(3) plants because the timing of warming could be more critical than the warming itself. C(3) species will likely be favored where harsh winter climates are moderated, particularly where hot summers also become drier and less favorable to C(4) plant growth. Eutrophication of soils by nitrogen deposition generally favors C(3) species by offsetting the superior nitrogen use efficiency of C(4) species; this should allow C(3) species to expand at the expense of C(4) plants. Land-use change and biotic invasions are also important global change factors that affect the future of C(4) plants. Human exploitation of forested landscapes favors C(4) species at low latitude by removing woody competitors and opening gaps in which C(4) grasses can establish. Invasive C(4) grasses are causing widespread forest loss in Asia, the Americas and Oceania by accelerating fire cycles and reducing soil nutrient status. Once established, weedy C(4) grasses can prevent woodland establishment, and thus arrest ecological succession. In sum, in the future, certain C(4) plants will prosper at the expense of C(3) species, and should be able to adjust to the changes the future brings. PMID:16228377

  18. Carbonic anhydrase and the molecular evolution of C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Martha

    2012-01-01

    C(4) photosynthesis, a biochemical CO(2)-concentrating mechanism (CCM), evolved more than 60 times within the angiosperms from C(3) ancestors. The genus Flaveria, which contains species demonstrating C(3), C(3)-C(4), C(4)-like or C(4) photosynthesis, is a model for examining the molecular evolution of the C(4) pathway. Work with carbonic anhydrase (CA), and C(3) and C(4) Flaveria congeners has added significantly to the understanding of this process. The C(4) form of CA3, a β-CA, which catalyses the first reaction in the C(4) pathway by hydrating atmospheric CO(2) to bicarbonate in the cytosol of mesophyll cells (mcs), evolved from a chloroplastic C(3) ancestor. The molecular modifications to the ancestral CA3 gene included the loss of the sequence encoding the chloroplast transit peptide, and mutations in regulatory regions that resulted in high levels of expression in the C(4) mesophyll. Analyses of the CA3 proteins and regulatory elements from Flaveria photosynthetic intermediates indicated C(4) biochemistry very likely evolved in a specific, stepwise manner in this genus. The details of the mechanisms involved in the molecular evolution of other C(4) plant β-CAs are unknown; however, comparative genetics indicate gene duplication and neofunctionalization played significant roles as they did in Flaveria.

  19. Capillary C4d and Kidney Allograft Outcome in Relation to Morphologic Lesions Suggestive of Antibody-Mediated Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Kikić, Željko; Kainz, Alexander; Kozakowski, Nicolas; Oberbauer, Rainer; Regele, Heinz; Bond, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Recent studies highlighting a role of C4d− antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) have debated whether C4d staining has independent value as a rejection marker. Considering the presumed role of complement as an important effector of graft injury, this study hypothesized that capillary C4d, a footprint of antibody-triggered complement activation, indicates a particularly severe manifestation of ABMR. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This large retrospective clinicopathologic study sought to assess the clinical predictive value of C4d staining in relation to ABMR morphology. Overall, 885 renal allograft recipients who underwent transplantation between 1999 and 2006 (median duration of follow-up, 63.3 [interquartile range, 40.6–93.5] months; 206 graft losses) were included if they had had one or more indication biopsies. A total of 1976 biopsy specimens were reevaluated for capillary C4d staining (C4d data were available for 825 patients) and distinct morphologic lesions suggestive of ABMR, including glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, capillary microthrombi, transplant glomerulopathy, and severe intimal arteritis. Results C4d+ patients, with or without ABMR features, had worse death-censored 8-year graft survival (53% or 67%) than C4d− patients (66% or 81%; P<0.001). In Cox regression analysis, C4d was associated with a risk of graft loss independently of baseline confounders and ABMR morphology (hazard ratio, 1.85 [95% confidence interval, 1.34 to 2.57]; P<0.001). The risk was higher than that observed for C4d− patients, a finding that reached statistical significance in patients showing fewer than two different ABMR lesions. Moreover, in a mixed model, C4d was independently associated with a steeper decline of eGFR (slope per year, −8.23±3.97 ml/min per 1.73 m2; P<0.001). Conclusions These results suggest that detection of intragraft complement activation has strong independent value as an additional indicator of

  20. Anti-Glycoprotein G Antibodies of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Contribute to Complete Protection after Vaccination in Mice and Induce Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Mediated Cytolysis

    PubMed Central

    Görander, Staffan; Ekblad, Maria; Bergström, Tomas; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of antibodies against the mature portion of glycoprotein G (mgG-2) of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) in protective immunity after vaccination. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with mgG-2 and oligodeoxynucleotides containing two CpG motifs plus alum as adjuvant. All C57BL/6 mice survived and presented no genital or systemic disease. High levels of immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) and IgG2 antibodies were detected and re-stimulated splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced IFN-γ. None of the sera from immunized mice exhibited neutralization, while all sera exerted antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytolysis (ACMC) activity. Passive transfer of anti-mgG-2 monoclonal antibodies, or immune serum, to naive C57BL/6 mice did not limit disease progression. Immunized B‑cell KO mice presented lower survival rate and higher vaginal viral titers, as compared with vaccinated B-cell KO mice after passive transfer of immune serum and vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Sera from mice that were vaccinated subcutaneously and intranasally with mgG-2 presented significantly lower titers of IgG antibodies and lower ADCC and ACMC activity. We conclude that anti-mgG-2 antibodies were of importance to limit genital HSV‑2 infection. ADCC and ACMC activity are potentially important mechanisms in protective immunity, and could tentatively be evaluated in future animal vaccine studies and in clinical trials. PMID:25398047

  1. Assimilatory Sulfate Reduction in C3, C3-C4, and C4 Species of Flaveria1

    PubMed Central

    Koprivova, Anna; Melzer, Michael; von Ballmoos, Peter; Mandel, Therese; Brunold, Christian; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    The activity of the enzymes catalyzing the first two steps of sulfate assimilation, ATP sulfurylase and adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR), are confined to bundle sheath cells in several C4 monocot species. With the aim to analyze the molecular basis of this distribution and to determine whether it was a prerequisite or a consequence of the C4 photosynthetic mechanism, we compared the intercellular distribution of the activity and the mRNA of APR in C3, C3-C4, C4-like, and C4 species of the dicot genus Flaveria. Measurements of APR activity, mRNA level, and protein accumulation in six Flaveria species revealed that APR activity, cysteine, and glutathione levels were significantly higher in C4-like and C4 species than in C3 and C3-C4 species. ATP sulfurylase and APR mRNA were present at comparable levels in both mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of C4 species Flaveria trinervia. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of APR protein in chloroplasts of both cell types. These findings, taken together with results from the literature, show that the localization of assimilatory sulfate reduction in the bundle sheath cells is not ubiquitous among C4 plants and therefore is neither a prerequisite nor a consequence of C4 photosynthesis. PMID:11598228

  2. Why Are C3-C4 Intermediate Species Rare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Field, C. B.; Berry, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    While C3-C4 intermediate photosynthesis is thought to represent the evolutionary bridge between C3 and C4 photosynthesis, C3-C4 intermediate species are ecologically rare in comparison to both C3 and C4 species. Here, we report results from a laboratory experiment, field observations, and model simulations that suggest a new explanation for the ecological rarity of C3-C4 intermediate species. In the laboratory experiment, we combined gas exchange and fluorescence to characterize the temperature response of photosynthesis in three closely-related species in the genus Flaveria that are representatives of the C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 photosynthetic pathways. The leaf temperature that maximized the quantum yield for CO2 assimilation (Topt(ΦCO2)) was 24.9 ± 0.7°C in Flaveria robusta (C3), 29.8 ± 1.0°C in F. chloraefolia (C3-C4), and 35.7 ± 0.8°C in F. bidentis (C4), and was linearly related to the temperature sensitivity of the coupling between CO2 assimilation and electron transport (d(ΦCO2/ ΦPSII)/dT)). While F. chloraefolia does not simultaneously occur with F. robusta and F. bidentis in naturally-assembled communities, this C3-C4 intermediate species does occur with other C3 and C4 species. During the growing season in two of these mixed-photosynthetic-type communities, leaf temperatures for F. chloraefolia were similar to the Topt(ΦCO2) determined in the laboratory. A model of maximum potential carbon gain suggests that competitive coexistence of C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species could be dependent on a temperature regime that highlights the distinct relative advantages of the C3-C4 intermediate pathway. In combination, these results suggest that the relative temperature sensitivity of the C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 photosynthetic pathways combined with environmental variation in temperature may help to explain why C3-C4 intermediate species are generally rare.

  3. Photorespiration connects C3 and C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bräutigam, Andrea; Gowik, Udo

    2016-05-01

    C4 plants evolved independently more than 60 times from C3 ancestors. C4 photosynthesis is a complex trait and its evolution from the ancestral C3 photosynthetic pathway involved the modification of the leaf anatomy and the leaf physiology accompanied by changes in the expression of thousands of genes. Under high temperature, high light, and the current CO2 concentration in the atmosphere, the C4 pathway is more efficient than C3 photosynthesis because it increases the CO2 concentration around the major CO2 fixating enzyme Rubisco. The oxygenase reaction and, accordingly, photorespiration are largely suppressed. In the present review we describe a scenario for C4 evolution that not only includes the avoidance of photorespiration as the major driving force for C4 evolution but also highlights the relevance of changes in the expression of photorespiratory genes in inducing and establishing important phases on the path from C3 to C4.

  4. C4-Dicarboxylate Utilization in Aerobic and Anaerobic Growth.

    PubMed

    Unden, Gottfried; Strecker, Alexander; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Kim, Ok Bin

    2016-06-01

    C4-dicarboxylates and the C4-dicarboxylic amino acid l-aspartate support aerobic and anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli and related bacteria. In aerobic growth, succinate, fumarate, D- and L-malate, L-aspartate, and L-tartrate are metabolized by the citric acid cycle and associated reactions. Because of the interruption of the citric acid cycle under anaerobic conditions, anaerobic metabolism of C4-dicarboxylates depends on fumarate reduction to succinate (fumarate respiration). In some related bacteria (e.g., Klebsiella), utilization of C4-dicarboxylates, such as tartrate, is independent of fumarate respiration and uses a Na+-dependent membrane-bound oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Uptake of the C4-dicarboxylates into the bacteria (and anaerobic export of succinate) is achieved under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by different sets of secondary transporters. Expression of the genes for C4-dicarboxylate metabolism is induced in the presence of external C4-dicarboxylates by the membrane-bound DcuS-DcuR two-component system. Noncommon C4-dicarboxylates like l-tartrate or D-malate are perceived by cytoplasmic one-component sensors/transcriptional regulators. This article describes the pathways of aerobic and anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate metabolism and their regulation. The citric acid cycle, fumarate respiration, and fumarate reductase are covered in other articles and discussed here only in the context of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism. Recent aspects of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism like transport, sensing, and regulation will be treated in more detail. This article is an updated version of an article published in 2004 in EcoSal Plus. The update includes new literature, but, in particular, the sections on the metabolism of noncommon C4-dicarboxylates and their regulation, on the DcuS-DcuR regulatory system, and on succinate production by engineered E. coli are largely revised or new.

  5. C4-Dicarboxylate Utilization in Aerobic and Anaerobic Growth.

    PubMed

    Unden, Gottfried; Strecker, Alexander; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Kim, Ok Bin

    2016-06-01

    C4-dicarboxylates and the C4-dicarboxylic amino acid l-aspartate support aerobic and anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli and related bacteria. In aerobic growth, succinate, fumarate, D- and L-malate, L-aspartate, and L-tartrate are metabolized by the citric acid cycle and associated reactions. Because of the interruption of the citric acid cycle under anaerobic conditions, anaerobic metabolism of C4-dicarboxylates depends on fumarate reduction to succinate (fumarate respiration). In some related bacteria (e.g., Klebsiella), utilization of C4-dicarboxylates, such as tartrate, is independent of fumarate respiration and uses a Na+-dependent membrane-bound oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Uptake of the C4-dicarboxylates into the bacteria (and anaerobic export of succinate) is achieved under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by different sets of secondary transporters. Expression of the genes for C4-dicarboxylate metabolism is induced in the presence of external C4-dicarboxylates by the membrane-bound DcuS-DcuR two-component system. Noncommon C4-dicarboxylates like l-tartrate or D-malate are perceived by cytoplasmic one-component sensors/transcriptional regulators. This article describes the pathways of aerobic and anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate metabolism and their regulation. The citric acid cycle, fumarate respiration, and fumarate reductase are covered in other articles and discussed here only in the context of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism. Recent aspects of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism like transport, sensing, and regulation will be treated in more detail. This article is an updated version of an article published in 2004 in EcoSal Plus. The update includes new literature, but, in particular, the sections on the metabolism of noncommon C4-dicarboxylates and their regulation, on the DcuS-DcuR regulatory system, and on succinate production by engineered E. coli are largely revised or new. PMID:27415771

  6. A systematic review of the role of C4d in the diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Sapir-Pichhadze, Ruth; Curran, Simon P; John, Rohan; Tricco, Andrea C; Uleryk, Elizabeth; Laupacis, Andreas; Tinckam, Kathryn; Sis, Banu; Beyene, Joseph; Logan, Alexander G; Kim, S Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we conducted a systematic review of the literature to re-evaluate the role of C4d in the diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection of kidney allografts. Electronic databases were searched until September 2013. Eligible studies allowed derivation of diagnostic tables for the performance of C4d by immunofluorescence or immunohistochemistry with comparison to histopathological features of acute antibody-mediated rejection and/or donor-specific antibody (DSA) assays. Of 3492 unique abstracts, 29 studies encompassing 3485 indication and 868 surveillance biopsies were identified. Assessment of C4d by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry exhibited slight to moderate agreement with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, solid-phase DSA assays, DSA with glomerulitis, and DSA with peritubular capillaritis. The sensitivity and specificity of C4d varied as a function of C4d and comparator test thresholds. Prognostically, the presence of C4d was associated with inferior allograft survival compared with DSA or histopathology alone. Thus, our findings support the presence of complement-dependent and -independent phenotypes of acute antibody-mediated rejection. Whether the presence of C4d in combination with histopathology or DSA should be considered for the diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection warrants further study. PMID:24827778

  7. Therapeutic inhibition of the early phase of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Roos, Anja; Ramwadhdoebé, Tamara H; Nauta, Alma J; Hack, C Erik; Daha, Mohamed R

    2002-09-01

    The complement system is a key component of innate immunity against invading pathogens. However, undesired activation of complement is involved in inflammation and associated tissue damage in a number of pathological conditions, such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, autoimmune diseases, and rejection of allo- and xenografts. During recent years, various therapeutically active complement inhibitors have been developed. In vivo studies using these inhibitors underscored the value of complement inhibition in the prevention of tissue damage. The currently available complement inhibitors mainly target the effector phase of the complement system that is common to all three activation pathways. Such a complete block of complement activation breaks the innate anti-microbial barrier, thereby increasing the risk for infection. Therefore, the development of potent complement inhibitors that interfere in the recognition phase of a specific complement activation pathway will generate important novel possibilities for treatment. The present review is focused on molecules that are able to inhibit the function of C1q and MBL, the recognition units of the classical pathway and the lectin pathway of complement, respectively. The potential value of these molecules for the development of therapeutically active complement inhibitors is discussed.

  8. Comparative cell-specific transcriptomics reveals differentiation of C4 photosynthesis pathways in switchgrass and other C4 lineages

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiaolan; Lu, Nan; Li, Guifen; Nakashima, Jin; Tang, Yuhong; Dixon, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Almost all C4 plants require the co-ordination of the adjacent and fully differentiated cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS). The C4 photosynthetic pathway operates through two distinct subtypes based on how malate is decarboxylated in BS cells; through NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) or NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME). The diverse or unique cell-specific molecular features of M and BS cells from separate C4 subtypes of independent lineages remain to be determined. We here provide an M/BS cell type-specific transcriptome data set from the monocot NAD-ME subtype switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). A comparative transcriptomics approach was then applied to compare the M/BS mRNA profiles of switchgrass, monocot NADP-ME subtype C4 plants maize and Setaria viridis, and dicot NAD-ME subtype Cleome gynandra. We evaluated the convergence in the transcript abundance of core components in C4 photosynthesis and transcription factors to establish Kranz anatomy, as well as gene distribution of biological functions, in these four independent C4 lineages. We also estimated the divergence between NAD-ME and NADP-ME subtypes of C4 photosynthesis in the two cell types within C4 species, including differences in genes encoding decarboxylating enzymes, aminotransferases, and metabolite transporters, and differences in the cell-specific functional enrichment of RNA regulation and protein biogenesis/homeostasis. We suggest that C4 plants of independent lineages in both monocots and dicots underwent convergent evolution to establish C4 photosynthesis, while distinct C4 subtypes also underwent divergent processes for the optimization of M and BS cell co-ordination. The comprehensive data sets in our study provide a basis for further research on evolution of C4 species. PMID:26896851

  9. 12 CFR 563c.4 - Condensed financial information [Parent only].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Condensed financial information . 563c.4... REQUIREMENTS Form and Content of Financial Statements § 563c.4 Condensed financial information . (a) The... a note to the financial statements when the restricted net assets (17 CFR 210.4-08(e)(3))...

  10. 42 CFR 68c.4 - Who is eligible to participate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who is eligible to participate? 68c.4 Section 68c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY...

  11. 42 CFR 68c.4 - Who is eligible to participate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who is eligible to participate? 68c.4 Section 68c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY...

  12. 42 CFR 68c.4 - Who is eligible to participate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who is eligible to participate? 68c.4 Section 68c.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY...

  13. 17 CFR 240.16c-4 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16c-4 Section 240.16c-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  14. 17 CFR 240.16c-4 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16c-4 Section 240.16c-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  15. 17 CFR 240.16c-4 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16c-4 Section 240.16c-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  16. 17 CFR 240.16c-4 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16c-4 Section 240.16c-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  17. 17 CFR 240.16c-4 - Derivative securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Derivative securities. 240.16c-4 Section 240.16c-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the...

  18. Function of Serum Complement in Drinking Water Arsenic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Laila N.; Zahid, M. Shamim Hasan; Nabi, A. H. M. Nurun; Hossain, Mahmud

    2012-01-01

    Serum complement function was evaluated in 125 affected subjects suffering from drinking water arsenic toxicity. Their mean duration of exposure was 7.4 ± 5.3 yrs, and the levels of arsenic in drinking water and urine samples were 216 ± 211 and 223 ± 302 μg/L, respectively. The mean bactericidal activity of complement from the arsenic patients was 92% and that in the unexposed controls was 99% (P < 0.01), but heat-inactivated serum showed slightly elevated activity than in controls. In patients, the mean complement C3 was 1.56 g/L, and C4 was 0.29 g/L compared to 1.68 g/L and 0.25 g/L, respectively, in the controls. The mean IgG in the arsenic patients was 24.3 g/L that was highly significantly elevated (P < 0.001). Arsenic patients showed a significant direct correlation between C3 and bactericidal activity (P = 0.014). Elevated levels of C4 indicated underutilization and possibly impaired activity of the classical complement pathway. We conclude reduced function of serum complement in drinking water arsenic toxicity. PMID:22545044

  19. The Roles of Organic Acids in C4 Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are involved in numerous metabolic pathways in all plants. The finding that some plants, known as C4 plants, have four-carbon dicarboxylic acids as the first product of carbon fixation showed these organic acids play essential roles as photosynthetic intermediates. Oxaloacetate (OAA), malate, and aspartate (Asp) are substrates for the C4 acid cycle that underpins the CO2 concentrating mechanism of C4 photosynthesis. In this cycle, OAA is the immediate, short-lived, product of the initial CO2 fixation step in C4 leaf mesophyll cells. The malate and Asp, resulting from the rapid conversion of OAA, are the organic acids delivered to the sites of carbon reduction in the bundle-sheath cells of the leaf, where they are decarboxylated, with the released CO2 used to make carbohydrates. The three-carbon organic acids resulting from the decarboxylation reactions are returned to the mesophyll cells where they are used to regenerate the CO2 acceptor pool. NADP-malic enzyme-type, NAD-malic enzyme-type, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-type C4 plants were identified, based on the most abundant decarboxylating enzyme in the leaf tissue. The genes encoding these C4 pathway-associated decarboxylases were co-opted from ancestral C3 plant genes during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. Malate was recognized as the major organic acid transferred in NADP-malic enzyme-type C4 species, while Asp fills this role in NAD-malic enzyme-type and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-type plants. However, accumulating evidence indicates that many C4 plants use a combination of organic acids and decarboxylases during CO2 fixation, and the C4-type categories are not rigid. The ability to transfer multiple organic acid species and utilize different decarboxylases has been suggested to give C4 plants advantages in changing and stressful environments, as well as during development, by facilitating the balance of energy between the two cell types involved in the C4 pathway of CO2

  20. The Roles of Organic Acids in C4 Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are involved in numerous metabolic pathways in all plants. The finding that some plants, known as C4 plants, have four-carbon dicarboxylic acids as the first product of carbon fixation showed these organic acids play essential roles as photosynthetic intermediates. Oxaloacetate (OAA), malate, and aspartate (Asp) are substrates for the C4 acid cycle that underpins the CO2 concentrating mechanism of C4 photosynthesis. In this cycle, OAA is the immediate, short-lived, product of the initial CO2 fixation step in C4 leaf mesophyll cells. The malate and Asp, resulting from the rapid conversion of OAA, are the organic acids delivered to the sites of carbon reduction in the bundle-sheath cells of the leaf, where they are decarboxylated, with the released CO2 used to make carbohydrates. The three-carbon organic acids resulting from the decarboxylation reactions are returned to the mesophyll cells where they are used to regenerate the CO2 acceptor pool. NADP-malic enzyme-type, NAD-malic enzyme-type, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-type C4 plants were identified, based on the most abundant decarboxylating enzyme in the leaf tissue. The genes encoding these C4 pathway-associated decarboxylases were co-opted from ancestral C3 plant genes during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. Malate was recognized as the major organic acid transferred in NADP-malic enzyme-type C4 species, while Asp fills this role in NAD-malic enzyme-type and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-type plants. However, accumulating evidence indicates that many C4 plants use a combination of organic acids and decarboxylases during CO2 fixation, and the C4-type categories are not rigid. The ability to transfer multiple organic acid species and utilize different decarboxylases has been suggested to give C4 plants advantages in changing and stressful environments, as well as during development, by facilitating the balance of energy between the two cell types involved in the C4 pathway of CO2

  1. Hide and Seek: How Lyme Disease Spirochetes Overcome Complement Attack

    PubMed Central

    Kraiczy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Overcoming the first line of the innate immune system is a general hallmark of pathogenic microbes to avoid recognition and to enter the human host. In particular, spirochetes belonging to the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex have developed various means to counter the immune response and to successfully survive in diverse host environments for a prolonged period of time. In regard to complement resistance, Borrelia utilize a plethora of immune evasion strategies involves capturing of host-derived complement regulators, terminating complement activation as well as shedding of cell-destroying complement complexes to manipulate and to expeditiously inhibit human complement. Owing to their mode of action, the interacting surface-exposed proteins identified among B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia spielmanii, and Borrelia bavariensis can be classified into at least two major categories, namely, molecules that directly interfere with distinct complement components including BBK32, CspA, BGA66, BGA71, and a CD59-like protein or molecules, which indirectly counteract complement activation by binding various complement regulators such as Factor H, Factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), Factor H-related proteins FHR-1, FHR-2, or C4Bp. The latter group of genetically and structurally unrelated proteins has been collectively referred to as “complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins” and consists of CspA, CspZ, ErpA, ErpC, ErpP, and the as yet unidentified protein p43. This review focuses on the current knowledge of immune evasion mechanisms exhibited by Lyme disease spirochetes and highlights the role of complement-interfering, infection-associated molecules playing an important part in these processes. Deciphering the immune evasion strategies may provide novel avenues for improved diagnostic approaches and therapeutic interventions. PMID:27725820

  2. Identification of hot spots in the variola virus complement inhibitor (SPICE) for human complement regulation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Viveka Nand; Pyaram, Kalyani; Mullick, Jayati; Sahu, Arvind

    2008-04-01

    Variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, encodes a soluble complement regulator named SPICE. Previously, SPICE has been shown to be much more potent in inactivating human complement than the vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP), although they differ only in 11 amino acid residues. In the present study, we have expressed SPICE, VCP, and mutants of VCP by substituting each or more of the 11 non-variant VCP residues with the corresponding residue of SPICE to identify hot spots that impart functional advantage to SPICE over VCP. Our data indicate that (i) SPICE is approximately 90-fold more potent than VCP in inactivating human C3b, and the residues Y98, Y103, K108 and K120 are predominantly responsible for its enhanced activity; (ii) SPICE is 5.4-fold more potent in inactivating human C4b, and residues Y98, Y103, K108, K120 and L193 mainly dictate this increase; (iii) the classical pathway decay-accelerating activity of activity is only twofold higher than that of VCP, and the 11 mutations in SPICE do not significantly affect this activity; (iv) SPICE possesses significantly greater binding ability to human C3b compared to VCP, although its binding to human C4b is lower than that of VCP; (v) residue N144 is largely responsible for the increased binding of SPICE to human C3b; and (vi) the human specificity of SPICE is dictated primarily by residues Y98, Y103, K108, and K120 since these are enough to formulate VCP as potent as SPICE. Together, these results suggest that principally 4 of the 11 residues that differ between SPICE and VCP partake in its enhanced function against human complement.

  3. Carbon isotope discrimination as a diagnostic tool for C4 photosynthesis in C3-C4 intermediate species

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The presence and activity of the C4 cycle in C3-C4 intermediate species have proven difficult to analyze, especially when such activity is low. This study proposes a strategy to detect C4 activity and estimate its contribution to overall photosynthesis in intermediate plants, by using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) coupled to gas exchange systems to simultaneously measure the CO2 responses of CO2 assimilation (A) and carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) under low O2 partial pressure. Mathematical models of C3-C4 photosynthesis and Δ are then fitted concurrently to both responses using the same set of constants. This strategy was applied to the intermediate species Flaveria floridana and F. brownii, and to F. pringlei and F. bidentis as C3 and C4 controls, respectively. Our results support the presence of a functional C4 cycle in F. floridana, that can fix 12–21% of carbon. In F. brownii, 75–100% of carbon is fixed via the C4 cycle, and the contribution of mesophyll Rubisco to overall carbon assimilation increases with CO2 partial pressure in both intermediate plants. Combined gas exchange and Δ measurement and modeling is a powerful diagnostic tool for C4 photosynthesis. PMID:26862154

  4. Brief communication: mitochondrial haplotype C4c confirmed as a founding genome in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Ripan S; Cybulski, Jerome S; Tito, Raul Y; Johnson, Jesse; Harry, Harold; Dan, Carrie

    2010-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA analysis of 31 unrelated Shuswap speakers from a previously poorly sampled region of North America revealed two individuals with haplogroups rarely found in the Americas, C4c and C1d. Comparison of the complete genomes of the two individuals with others found in the literature confirms that C4c is a founding haplotype and gives insight into the evolution of the C1d haplotype. This study demonstrates the importance of collecting and analyzing data from Native North Americans when addressing hypotheses about the peopling of the Americas.

  5. The recurrent assembly of C4 photosynthesis, an evolutionary tale.

    PubMed

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Osborne, Colin P

    2013-11-01

    Today, plants using C4 photosynthesis are widespread and important components of major tropical and subtropical biomes, but the events that led to their evolution and success started billions of years ago (bya). A CO2-fixing enzyme evolved in the early Earth atmosphere with a tendency to confuse CO2 and O2 molecules. The descendants of early photosynthetic organisms coped with this property in the geological eras that followed through successive fixes, the latest of which is the addition of complex CO2-concentrating mechanisms such as C4 photosynthesis. This trait was assembled from bricks available in C3 ancestors, which were altered to fulfill their new role in C4 photosynthesis. The existence of C4-suitable bricks probably determined the lineages of plants that could make the transition to C4 photosynthesis, highlighting the power of contingency in evolution. Based on the latest findings in C4 research, we present the evolutionary tale of C4 photosynthesis, with a focus on the general evolutionary phenomena that it so wonderfully exemplifies.

  6. The C(4) plant lineages of planet Earth.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Edwards, Erika J

    2011-05-01

    Using isotopic screens, phylogenetic assessments, and 45 years of physiological data, it is now possible to identify most of the evolutionary lineages expressing the C(4) photosynthetic pathway. Here, 62 recognizable lineages of C(4) photosynthesis are listed. Thirty-six lineages (60%) occur in the eudicots. Monocots account for 26 lineages, with a minimum of 18 lineages being present in the grass family and six in the sedge family. Species exhibiting the C(3)-C(4) intermediate type of photosynthesis correspond to 21 lineages. Of these, 9 are not immediately associated with any C(4) lineage, indicating that they did not share common C(3)-C(4) ancestors with C(4) species and are instead an independent line. The geographic centre of origin for 47 of the lineages could be estimated. These centres tend to cluster in areas corresponding to what are now arid to semi-arid regions of southwestern North America, south-central South America, central Asia, northeastern and southern Africa, and inland Australia. With 62 independent lineages, C(4) photosynthesis has to be considered one of the most convergent of the complex evolutionary phenomena on planet Earth, and is thus an outstanding system to study the mechanisms of evolutionary adaptation.

  7. New evidence for grain specific C4 photosynthesis in wheat.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Parimalan; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The C4 photosynthetic pathway evolved to allow efficient CO2 capture by plants where effective carbon supply may be limiting as in hot or dry environments, explaining the high growth rates of C4 plants such as maize. Important crops such as wheat and rice are C3 plants resulting in efforts to engineer them to use the C4 pathway. Here we show the presence of a C4 photosynthetic pathway in the developing wheat grain that is absent in the leaves. Genes specific for C4 photosynthesis were identified in the wheat genome and found to be preferentially expressed in the photosynthetic pericarp tissue (cross- and tube-cell layers) of the wheat caryopsis. The chloroplasts exhibit dimorphism that corresponds to chloroplasts of mesophyll- and bundle sheath-cells in leaves of classical C4 plants. Breeding to optimize the relative contributions of C3 and C4 photosynthesis may adapt wheat to climate change, contributing to wheat food security. PMID:27530078

  8. New evidence for grain specific C4 photosynthesis in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, Parimalan; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The C4 photosynthetic pathway evolved to allow efficient CO2 capture by plants where effective carbon supply may be limiting as in hot or dry environments, explaining the high growth rates of C4 plants such as maize. Important crops such as wheat and rice are C3 plants resulting in efforts to engineer them to use the C4 pathway. Here we show the presence of a C4 photosynthetic pathway in the developing wheat grain that is absent in the leaves. Genes specific for C4 photosynthesis were identified in the wheat genome and found to be preferentially expressed in the photosynthetic pericarp tissue (cross- and tube-cell layers) of the wheat caryopsis. The chloroplasts exhibit dimorphism that corresponds to chloroplasts of mesophyll- and bundle sheath-cells in leaves of classical C4 plants. Breeding to optimize the relative contributions of C3 and C4 photosynthesis may adapt wheat to climate change, contributing to wheat food security. PMID:27530078

  9. Photosynthetic diversity meets biodiversity: the C4 plant example.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Stata, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Physiological diversification reflects adaptation for specific environmental challenges. As the major physiological process that provides plants with carbon and energy, photosynthesis is under strong evolutionary selection that gives rise to variability in nearly all parts of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we discuss how plants, notably those using C4 photosynthesis, diversified in response to environmental challenges imposed by declining atmospheric CO2 content in recent geological time. This reduction in atmospheric CO2 increases the rate of photorespiration and reduces photosynthetic efficiency. While plants have evolved numerous mechanisms to compensate for low CO2, the most effective are the carbon concentration mechanisms of C4, C2, and CAM photosynthesis; and the pumping of dissolved inorganic carbon, mainly by algae. C4 photosynthesis enables plants to dominate warm, dry and often salinized habitats, and to colonize areas that are too stressful for most plant groups. Because C4 lineages generally lack arborescence, they cannot form forests. Hence, where they predominate, C4 plants create a different landscape than would occur if C3 plants were to predominate. These landscapes (mostly grasslands and savannahs) present unique selection environments that promoted the diversification of animal guilds able to graze upon the C4 vegetation. Thus, the rise of C4 photosynthesis has made a significant contribution to the origin of numerous biomes in the modern biosphere.

  10. Complement Component C3 Binds to Activated Normal Platelets without Preceding Proteolytic Activation and Promotes Binding to Complement Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Osama A.; Nilsson, Per H.; Wouters, Diana; Lambris, John D.; Ekdahl, Kristina N.; Nilsson, Bo

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that complement is activated on the surface of activated platelets, despite the presence of multiple regulators of complement activation. To reinvestigate the mechanisms by which activated platelets bind to complement components, the presence of complement proteins on the surfaces of nonactivated and thrombin receptor-activating peptide-activated platelets was analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot analyses. C1q, C4, C3, and C9 were found to bind to thrombin receptor-activating peptide-activated platelets in lepirudin-anticoagulated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood. However, inhibiting complement activation at the C1q or C3 level did not block the binding of C3 to activated platelets. Diluting PRP and chelating divalent cations also had no effect, further indicating that the deposition of complement components was independent of complement activation. Furthermore, washed, activated platelets bound added C1q and C3 to the same extent as platelets in PRP. The use of mAbs against different forms of C3 demonstrated that the bound C3 consisted of C3(H2O). Furthermore, exogenously added soluble complement receptor 1 was shown to bind to this form of platelet-bound C3. These observations indicate that there is no complement activation on the surface of platelets under physiological conditions. This situation is in direct contrast to a number of pathological conditions in which regulators of complement activation are lacking and thrombocytopenia and thrombotic disease are the ultimate result. However, the generation of C3(H2O) represents nonproteolytic activation of C3 and after factor I cleavage may act as a ligand for receptor binding. PMID:20139276

  11. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital. PMID:25941756

  12. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital.

  13. Early complement components in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    PubMed

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1996-01-01

    Activation products of the early complement components C1, C4 and C3 can be found colocalized with diffuse and fibrillar beta-amyloid (beta/A4) deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Immunohistochemically, C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh) and the C1 subcomponents C1s and C1r can not, or only occasionally, be detected in plaques or in astrocytes. The present finding that C1q, C1s and C1-Inh mRNA are present in both AD and control brains suggests that the variable immunohistochemical staining results for C1r, C1s and C1-Inh are due to a rapid consumption, and that the inability to detect C1s, C1r or C1-Inh is probably due to the dissociation of C1s-C1-Inh and C1r-C1-Inh complexes from the activator-bound C1q into the fluid phase. Employing monoclonal antibodies specific for different forms of C1-Inh, no complexed C1-Inh could be found, whereas inactivated C1-Inh seems to be present in astrocytes surrounding beta/A4 plaques in AD brains. These findings, together with our finding (using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) that C1-Inh is locally produced in the brain, suggest that in the brain complement activation at the C1 level is regulated by C1-Inh. Immunohistochemically, no evidence for the presence of the late complement components C5, C7 and C9, or of the membrane attack complex (MAC), was found in beta/A4 plaques. In contrast to the mRNA encoding the early components, that of the late complement components appears to be hardly detectable (C7) or absent (C9). Thus, without blood-brain-barrier impairment, the late complement components are probably present at too low a concentration to allow the formation of the MAC, which is generally believed to be responsible for at least some of the neurodegenerative effects observed in AD. Therefore, the present findings support the idea that in AD, complement does not function as an inflammatory mediator through MAC formation, but through the action of early component activation products.

  14. Binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae endopeptidase O (PepO) to complement component C1q modulates the complement attack and promotes host cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Sroka, Magdalena; Fulde, Marcus; Bergmann, Simone; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2014-05-30

    The Gram-positive species Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing severe local and life-threatening invasive diseases associated with high mortality rates and death. We demonstrated recently that pneumococcal endopeptidase O (PepO) is a ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional plasminogen and fibronectin-binding protein facilitating host cell invasion and evasion of innate immunity. In this study, we found that PepO interacts directly with the complement C1q protein, thereby attenuating the classical complement pathway and facilitating pneumococcal complement escape. PepO binds both free C1q and C1 complex in a dose-dependent manner based on ionic interactions. Our results indicate that recombinant PepO specifically inhibits the classical pathway of complement activation in both hemolytic and complement deposition assays. This inhibition is due to direct interaction of PepO with C1q, leading to a strong activation of the classical complement pathway, and results in consumption of complement components. In addition, PepO binds the classical complement pathway inhibitor C4BP, thereby regulating downstream complement activation. Importantly, pneumococcal surface-exposed PepO-C1q interaction mediates bacterial adherence to host epithelial cells. Taken together, PepO facilitates C1q-mediated bacterial adherence, whereas its localized release consumes complement as a result of its activation following binding of C1q, thus representing an additional mechanism of human complement escape by this versatile pathogen.

  15. C4 photosynthetic machinery: insights from maize chloroplast proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Chen, Sixue; Dai, Shaojun

    2013-01-01

    C4 plants exhibit much higher CO2 assimilation rates than C{}3 plants under certain conditions. The specialized differentiation of mesophyll cell and bundle sheath cell type chloroplasts is unique to C4 plants and improves photosynthetic efficiency. Maize (Zea mays) is an important crop and model with C4 photosynthetic machinery. 2DE and high-throughput quantitative proteomics approaches (e.g., isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation and shotgun proteomics) have been employed to investigate maize chloroplast structure and function. These proteomics studies have provided valuable information on C4 chloroplast protein components, photosynthesis, and other metabolic mechanisms underlying chloroplast biogenesis, stromal, and membrane differentiation, as well as response to salinity, high/low temperature, and light stress. This review presents an overview of proteomics advances in maize chloroplast biology. PMID:23596450

  16. C4d staining as immunohistochemical marker in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis of an inflammatory myopathy is often established based on basic histologic studies. Additional immunohistochemical studies are sometimes required to support the diagnosis and the classification of inflammatory myopathies. Staining for major histocompatibility complex 1 (MHC1) often shows increased sarcolemmal labeling in inflammatory myopathies. Endomysial capillary staining C5b-9 (membrane attack complex) is a feature that is reported as frequently associated with dermatomyositis. Immunohistochemical staining for C4d is widely used for various applications including the assessment of antibody-mediated rejection after solid organ transplantation. In the context of dermatomyositis, C4d staining has been described in skin biopsies but not in muscle biopsies. A total of 32 muscle biopsy specimens were examined. The hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were reviewed, and immunohistochemical studies for MHC1, C5b-9, and C4d were conducted. The staining observed for C5b-9 and C4d was compared. Overall, the staining pattern for C4d mirrored the one observed for C5b-9 in the examined muscle biopsy specimens. There was high and statistically significant (P<0.0001) correlation between the staining seen with these 2 antibodies. Both antibodies labeled the cytoplasm of degenerating necrotic myofibers. In addition, both antibodies showed distinct endomysial capillary labeling in a subset of dermatomyositis. Areas with perifascicular atrophy often exhibited the most prominent vascular labeling for C4d and C5b-9. In conclusion, C4d and C5b-9 show similar expression patterns in muscle biopsies of patients with inflammatory myopathies and both highlight the presence of vascular labeling associated with dermatomyositis. C4d antibodies are widely used and may offer an alternative for C5b-9 staining.

  17. Mitochondrial haplogroup C4c: a rare lineage entering America through the ice-free corridor?

    PubMed

    Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Perego, Ugo A; Olivieri, Anna; Angerhofer, Norman; Gandini, Francesca; Carossa, Valeria; Lancioni, Hovirag; Semino, Ornella; Woodward, Scott R; Achilli, Alessandro; Torroni, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Recent analyses of mitochondrial genomes from Native Americans have brought the overall number of recognized maternal founding lineages from just four to a current count of 15. However, because of their relative low frequency, almost nothing is known for some of these lineages. This leaves a considerable void in understanding the events that led to the colonization of the Americas following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In this study, we identified and completely sequenced 14 mitochondrial DNAs belonging to one extremely rare Native American lineage known as haplogroup C4c. Its age and geographical distribution raise the possibility that C4c marked the Paleo-Indian group(s) that entered North America from Beringia through the ice-free corridor between the Laurentide and Cordilleran ice sheets. The similarities in ages andgeographical distributions for C4c and the previously analyzed X2a lineage provide support to the scenario of a dual origin for Paleo-Indians. Taking into account that C4c is deeply rooted in the Asian portion of the mtDNA phylogeny and is indubitably of Asian origin, the finding that C4c and X2a are characterized by parallel genetic histories definitively dismisses the controversial hypothesis of an Atlantic glacial entry route into North America.

  18. Salt tolerance evolves more frequently in C4 grass lineages.

    PubMed

    Bromham, L; Bennett, T H

    2014-03-01

    Salt tolerance has evolved many times in the grass family, and yet few cereal crops are salt tolerant. Why has it been so difficult to develop crops tolerant of saline soils when salt tolerance has evolved so frequently in nature? One possible explanation is that some grass lineages have traits that predispose them to developing salt tolerance and that without these background traits, salt tolerance is harder to achieve. One candidate background trait is photosynthetic pathway, which has also been remarkably labile in grasses. At least 22 independent origins of the C4 photosynthetic pathway have been suggested to occur within the grass family. It is possible that the evolution of C4 photosynthesis aids exploitation of saline environments, because it reduces transpiration, increases water-use efficiency and limits the uptake of toxic ions. But the observed link between the evolution of C4 photosynthesis and salt tolerance could simply be due to biases in phylogenetic distribution of halophytes or C4 species. Here, we use a phylogenetic analysis to investigate the association between photosynthetic pathway and salt tolerance in the grass family Poaceae. We find that salt tolerance is significantly more likely to occur in lineages with C4 photosynthesis than in C3 lineages. We discuss the possible links between C4 photosynthesis and salt tolerance and consider the limitations of inferring the direction of causality of this relationship.

  19. Finding the genes to build C4 rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Vlad, Daniela; Langdale, Jane A

    2016-06-01

    Rice, a C3 crop, is a staple food for more than half of the world's population, with most consumers living in developing countries. Engineering C4 photosynthetic traits into rice is increasingly suggested as a way to meet the 50% yield increase that is predicted to be needed by 2050. Advances in genome-wide deep-sequencing, gene discovery and genome editing platforms have brought the possibility of engineering a C3 to C4 conversion closer than ever before. Because C4 plants have evolved independently multiple times from C3 origins, it is probably that key genes and gene regulatory networks that regulate C4 were recruited from C3 ancestors. In the past five years there have been over 20 comparative transcriptomic studies published that aimed to identify these recruited C4 genes and regulatory mechanisms. Here we present an overview of what we have learned so far and preview the efforts still needed to provide a practical blueprint for building C4 rice. PMID:27055266

  20. Complement and immunoglobulin levels in athletes and sedentary controls.

    PubMed

    Nieman, D C; Tan, S A; Lee, J W; Berk, L S

    1989-04-01

    Eleven marathon runners (42.7 +/- 2.1 yrs, 54.2 +/- 1.8 ml.kg-1.min-1) and nine sedentary controls (44.2 +/- 1.2 yrs, 33.3 +/- 1.1 ml.kg-1.min-1) were studied during 30 min of rest, a graded maximal treadmill test using the Balke protocol, and 45 min of recovery to determine the effects of training and acute exercise on complement and immunoglobulin levels. Three baseline and five recovery blood samples were obtained in addition to repeated 5-min samples during exercise. Data for the exercise period were analyzed using a multiple regression approach to repeated measures ANOVA to allow comparison between groups on a percent VO2max basis. Groups did not differ during any of the three phases for IgG, IgA, or IgM. Resting levels of complement C3 (0.89 +/- 0.05 vs 1.27 +/- 0.10 g/L, P less than 0.001) and C4 (0.19 +/- 0.02 vs 0.29 +/- 0.03 g/L, P less than 0.001) were significantly lower in athletes than in controls. Exercise complement C3 [F(1,18) = 14.1, P = 0.001] and C4 [F(1,18) = 7.6, P = 0.013], and recovery complement [F(1,18) = 19.4, P less than 0.001] and C4 [F(1,18) = 13.5, P = 0.002] were also lower in the athletes than in sedentary controls. Acute increases during exercise were not associated with changes in catecholamines or cortisol. These data suggest that blood concentrations of C3 and C4, but not IgG, IgA, or IgM, are decreased during rest, graded maximal exercise, and recovery in marathon runners in comparison with sedentary controls.

  1. Species-specificity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection: do human complement regulators contribute?

    PubMed

    Ngampasutadol, Jutamas; Tran, Connie; Gulati, Sunita; Blom, Anna M; Jerse, E Ann; Ram, Sanjay; Rice, Peter A

    2008-12-30

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of gonorrhea, a disease restricted to humans. Complement forms a key arm of the innate immune system that combats gonococcal infections. N. gonorrhoeae uses its outer membrane porin (Por) molecules to bind complement down-regulatory proteins, C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and factor H (fH), to evade killing by human complement. In addition, sialylation of gonococcal lipooligosaccharide (LOS) also enables N. gonorrhoeae to bind fH. Strains of N. gonorrhoeae that resist killing by human serum complement are killed by serum from rodent, lagomorph and primate species, which cannot be readily infected experimentally with this organism and whose C4BP and/or fH molecules do not bind toN. gonorrhoeae. Serum resistance of gonococci is restored in these sera by human C4BP and/or fH. Direct binding specificity of human and chimpanzee C4BP and human fH to gonococci may explain, in part, species-specific restriction of natural gonococcal infection and address why Por1B, but not Por1A containing gonococcal strains, have been successful in experimental chimpanzee infection. Our findings may help to improve animal models for gonorrhea while also having implications in the choice of complement sources to evaluate neisserial vaccine candidates.

  2. Complement: the Iceman of immunology?

    PubMed

    Würzner, R

    1997-12-01

    Complement provides an important host defence system involved in a multitude of immune reactions, including opsonisation of micro-organisms, enhancement of inflammatory response, immunomodulation, clearance of immune complexes and cell lysis. The 6th European Meeting on Complement in Human Disease, 12-15 March 1997 in Innsbruck, Austria, the preservation site of the neolithic Iceman, addressed the functional role of complement and its regulators in human disease. The scientific presentations clearly demonstrated that complement is not a redundant fossil, evolving since the dawn of vertebrate existence on the earth, but remains continuously important for mankind.

  3. Complement system in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Pankita H; Wilkes, David S

    2014-10-01

    In addition to its established contribution to innate immunity, recent studies have suggested novel roles for the complement system in the development of various lung diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that complement may serve as a key link between innate and adaptive immunity in a variety of pulmonary conditions. However, the specific contributions of complement to lung diseases based on innate and adaptive immunity are just beginning to emerge. Elucidating the role of complement-mediated immune regulation in these diseases will help to identify new targets for therapeutic interventions.

  4. Photosynthetic Characteristics of Segregates from Hybrids between Flaveria brownii (C4 Like) and Flaveria linearis (C3-C4).

    PubMed

    Brown, R. H.; Byrd, G. T.; Bouton, J. H.; Bassett, C. L.

    1993-03-01

    Characteristics related to C4 photosynthesis were studied in reciprocal F1 hybrids and F2 plants from Flaveria brownii (C4 like) and Flaveria linearis (C3-C4). The reciprocal F1 plants differed in 13C/12C ratios of leaves and the percentage of 14C initially incorporated into C4 acids, being more like the pollen parents in these traits. They did not differ in apparent photosynthesis or in O2 inhibition of apparent photosynthesis and differed only slightly in CO2 compensation concentration at 175 [mu]mol quanta m-2 s-1 and 400 mL L-1 O2. The 13C/12C ratios of 78 F2 progeny from the two F1 plants exhibited a normal distribution centered between those of the parents, with a few values slightly higher and lower than the parents. Apparent photosynthesis at 130 [mu]L L-1 CO2 and inhibition of photosynthesis by O2 was nearly normally distributed in the F2 population, but no values for F2 plants approached those for F. brownii (15.4 [mu]mol m-2 s-1 and 7.8%, respectively). Distribution of the CO2 compensation concentration measured at 1000 [mu]mol quanta m-2 s-1 and 400 mL L-1 of O2 in the F2 population was skewed toward F. brownii with 72% of the progeny having values <9 [mu]L of CO2 L-1 compared to 1.5 and 27.2 [mu]L L-1 for F. brownii and F. linearis, respectively. Correlations among traits of F2 plants were low (coefficients of 0.30 to -0.49), indicating that the C4- related traits are not closely linked in segregating populations. Plants in the F2 population selected for high or low apparent photosynthesis at 130 [mu]L of CO2 L-1 (six each) did not rank consistently high or low for 13C/12C ratios, O2 inhibition of apparent photosynthesis, CO2 compensation concentration, or activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase or NADP-malic enzyme. This study confirms results of earlier work that indicates independent segregation of C4 traits and also shows that the C4-like parental type can be recovered, at least for some characteristics (13C/12C ratio), in segregating

  5. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    PubMed

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  6. Classical Complement Pathway Activation in the Kidneys of Women With Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Penning, Marlies; Chua, Jamie S; van Kooten, Cees; Zandbergen, Malu; Buurma, Aletta; Schutte, Joke; Bruijn, Jan Anthonie; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Bloemenkamp, Kitty; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Baelde, Hans

    2015-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that complement dysregulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. The kidney is one of the major organs affected in preeclampsia. Because the kidney is highly susceptible to complement activation, we hypothesized that preeclampsia is associated with renal complement activation. We performed a nationwide search for renal autopsy material in the Netherlands using a computerized database (PALGA). Renal tissue was obtained from 11 women with preeclampsia, 25 pregnant controls, and 14 nonpregnant controls with hypertension. The samples were immunostained for C4d, C1q, mannose-binding lectin, properdin, C3d, C5b-9, IgA, IgG, and IgM. Preeclampsia was significantly associated with renal C4d-a stable marker of complement activation-and the classical pathway marker C1q. In addition, the prevalence of IgM was significantly higher in the kidneys of the preeclamptic women. No other complement markers studied differed between the groups. Our findings in human samples were validated using a soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 mouse model of preeclampsia. The kidneys in the soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1-injected mice had significantly more C4 deposits than the control mice. The association between preeclampsia and renal C4d, C1q, and IgM levels suggests that the classical complement pathway is involved in the renal injury in preeclampsia. Moreover, our finding that soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1-injected mice develop excess C4 deposits indicates that angiogenic dysregulation may play a role in complement activation within the kidney. We suggest that inhibiting complement activation may be beneficial for preventing the renal manifestations of preeclampsia.

  7. CLASSICAL COMPLEMENT PATHWAY ACTIVATION IN THE KIDNEYS OF WOMEN WITH PREECLAMPSIA

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Marlies; Chua, Jamie S.; van Kooten, Cees; Zandbergen, Malu; Buurma, Aletta; Schutte, Joke; Bruijn, Jan Anthonie; Khankin, Eliyahu. V.; Bloemenkamp, Kitty; Karumanchi, S. Ananth.; Baelde, Hans

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that complement dysregulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. The kidney is one of the major organs affected in preeclampsia. Because the kidney is highly susceptible to complement activation, we hypothesized that preeclampsia is associated with renal complement activation. We performed a nationwide search for renal autopsy material in the Netherlands using a computerized database (PALGA). Renal tissue was obtained from 11 women with preeclampsia, 25 pregnant controls, and 14 non-pregnant controls with hypertension. The samples were immunostained for C4d, C1q, MBL, properdin, C3d, C5b-9, IgA, IgG, and IgM. Preeclampsia was significantly associated with renal C4d—a stable marker of complement activation—and the classical pathway marker C1q. In addition, the prevalence of IgM was significantly higher in the kidneys of the preeclamptic women. No other complement markers studied differed between the groups. Our findings in human samples were validated using a soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) mouse model of preeclampsia. The kidneys in the sFlt-1–injected mice had significantly more C4 deposits than the control mice. The association between preeclampsia and renal C4d, C1q, and IgM levels suggests that the classical complement pathway is involved in the renal injury in preeclampsia. Moreover, our finding that sFlt-1–injected mice develop excess C4 deposits indicates that angiogenic dysregulation may play a role in complement activation within the kidney. We suggest that inhibiting complement activation may be beneficial for preventing the renal manifestations of preeclampsia. PMID:25941343

  8. Complement Activation in Patients with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Wong, Maria; Renner, Brandon; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Giclas, Patricia C.; Joy, Melanie S.; Jalal, Diana; Radeva, Milena K.; Gassman, Jennifer; Gipson, Debbie S.; Kaskel, Frederick; Friedman, Aaron; Trachtman, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent pre-clinical studies have shown that complement activation contributes to glomerular and tubular injury in experimental FSGS. Although complement proteins are detected in the glomeruli of some patients with FSGS, it is not known whether this is due to complement activation or whether the proteins are simply trapped in sclerotic glomeruli. We measured complement activation fragments in the plasma and urine of patients with primary FSGS to determine whether complement activation is part of the disease process. Study Design Plasma and urine samples from patients with biopsy-proven FSGS who participated in the FSGS Clinical Trial were analyzed. Setting and Participants We identified 19 patients for whom samples were available from weeks 0, 26, 52 and 78. The results for these FSGS patients were compared to results in samples from 10 healthy controls, 10 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), 20 patients with vasculitis, and 23 patients with lupus nephritis. Outcomes Longitudinal control of proteinuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Measurements Levels of the complement fragments Ba, Bb, C4a, and sC5b-9 in plasma and urine. Results Plasma and urine Ba, C4a, sC5b-9 were significantly higher in FSGS patients at the time of diagnosis than in the control groups. Plasma Ba levels inversely correlated with the eGFR at the time of diagnosis and at the end of the study. Plasma and urine Ba levels at the end of the study positively correlated with the level of proteinuria, the primary outcome of the study. Limitations Limited number of patients with samples from all time-points. Conclusions The complement system is activated in patients with primary FSGS, and elevated levels of plasma Ba correlate with more severe disease. Measurement of complement fragments may identify a subset of patients in whom the complement system is activated. Further investigations are needed to confirm our findings and to determine the prognostic significance of

  9. The C4 clustering algorithm: Clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert; Reichart, Dan; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Annis, James; McKay, Timothy; Bahcall, Neta; Bernardi, Mariangela; Boehringer, Hans; Connolly, Andrew; Goto, Tomo; Kniazev, Alexie; Lamb, Donald; Postman, Marc; Schneider, Donald; Sheth, Ravi; Voges, Wolfgang; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Portsmouth U., ICG /North Carolina U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Chicago U., EFI /Michigan U. /Fermilab /Princeton U. Observ. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Pittsburgh U. /Tokyo U., ICRR /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Penn State U. /Chicago U. /Stavropol, Astrophys. Observ. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron. /INI, SAO

    2005-03-01

    We present the ''C4 Cluster Catalog'', a new sample of 748 clusters of galaxies identified in the spectroscopic sample of the Second Data Release (DR2) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The C4 cluster-finding algorithm identifies clusters as overdensities in a seven-dimensional position and color space, thus minimizing projection effects that have plagued previous optical cluster selection. The present C4 catalog covers {approx}2600 square degrees of sky and ranges in redshift from z = 0.02 to z = 0.17. The mean cluster membership is 36 galaxies (with redshifts) brighter than r = 17.7, but the catalog includes a range of systems, from groups containing 10 members to massive clusters with over 200 cluster members with redshifts. The catalog provides a large number of measured cluster properties including sky location, mean redshift, galaxy membership, summed r-band optical luminosity (L{sub r}), velocity dispersion, as well as quantitative measures of substructure and the surrounding large-scale environment. We use new, multi-color mock SDSS galaxy catalogs, empirically constructed from the {Lambda}CDM Hubble Volume (HV) Sky Survey output, to investigate the sensitivity of the C4 catalog to the various algorithm parameters (detection threshold, choice of passbands and search aperture), as well as to quantify the purity and completeness of the C4 cluster catalog. These mock catalogs indicate that the C4 catalog is {approx_equal}90% complete and 95% pure above M{sub 200} = 1 x 10{sup 14} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} and within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the SDSS DR2 data, we show that the C4 algorithm finds 98% of X-ray identified clusters and 90% of Abell clusters within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the mock galaxy catalogs and the full HV dark matter simulations, we show that the L{sub r} of a cluster is a more robust estimator of the halo mass (M{sub 200}) than the galaxy line-of-sight velocity dispersion or the richness of the cluster. However, if we

  10. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition.

  11. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition. PMID:12813023

  12. New C4D Sensor with a Simulated Inductor

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Yingchao; Ji, Haifeng; Yang, Shijie; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing

    2016-01-01

    A new capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C4D) sensor with an improved simulated inductor is developed in this work. The improved simulated inductor is designed on the basis of the Riordan-type floating simulated inductor. With the improved simulated inductor, the negative influence of the coupling capacitances is overcome and the conductivity measurement is implemented by the series resonance principle. The conductivity measurement experiments are carried out in three pipes with different inner diameters of 3.0 mm, 4.6 mm and 6.4 mm, respectively. The experimental results show that the designs of the new C4D sensor and the improved simulated inductor are successful. The maximum relative error of the conductivity measurement is less than 5%. Compared with the C4D sensors using practical inductors, the measurement accuracy of the new C4D sensor is comparable. The research results also indicate that the adjustability of a simulated inductor can reduce the requirement for the AC source and guarantee the interchangeableness. Meanwhile, it is recommended that making the potential of one terminal of a simulated inductor stable is beneficial to the running stability. Furthermore, this work indirectly verifies the possibility and feasibility of the miniaturization of the C4D sensor by using the simulated inductor technique and lays a good foundation for future research work. PMID:26828493

  13. On the Ionization Energies of C4H3 Isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Mebel, Alexander; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-09-16

    We have conducted a combined experimental and theoretical study on the formation of distinct isomers of resonantly stabilized free radicals, C4H3, which are important intermediates in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in combustion flames and possibly in the interstellar medium. Our study utilized laser ablation of graphite in combination with seeding the ablated species in neat methylacetylene gas which also acted as a reagent. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves were recorded of the C4H3 isomers at the Advanced Light Source from 8.0 to 10.3 eV. The experimental PIE curve was compared with theoretical ones suggesting the formation of four C4H3 radicals: two acyclic structures i-C4H3 [1] and E/Z-n-C4H3 [2E/2Z]and two cyclic isomers 3 and 4. These molecules are likely formed via an initial addition of ground state carbon atoms to the carbon-carbon triple bond of the methylacetylene molecule followed by isomerization via hydrogen migrations and ring opening and emission of atomic hydrogen from these intermediates.

  14. Evolution of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian complement system constitutes a highly sophisticated body defense machinery comprising more than 30 components. Research into the evolutionary origin of the complement system has identified a primitive version composed of the central component C3 and two activation proteases Bf and MASP in cnidaria. This suggests that the complement system was established in the common ancestor of eumetazoa more than 500 million years ago. The original activation mechanism of the original complement system is believed to be close to the mammalian lectin and alternative activation pathways, and its main role seems to be opsonization and induction of inflammation. This primitive complement system has been retained by most deuterostomes without major change until the appearance of jawed vertebrates. At this stage, duplication of the C3, Bf and MASP genes as well as recruitment of membrane attack components added the classical and lytic pathways to the primitive complement system, converting it to the modern complement system. In contrast, the complement system was lost multiple times independently in the protostome lineage.

  15. Density Functional Exploration of C4H3N Isomers.

    PubMed

    Custer, Thomas; Szczepaniak, Urszula; Gronowski, Marcin; Fabisiewicz, Emilia; Couturier-Tamburelli, Isabelle; Kołos, Robert

    2016-07-28

    Molecules having C4H3N stoichiometry are of astrophysical interest. Two of these, methylcyanoacetylene (CH3C3N) and its structural isomer allenyl cyanide (H2CCCHN), have been observed in interstellar space, while several more have been examined in laboratories. Here we describe, for a broad range of C4H3N isomers, density functional calculations (B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ) of molecular parameters including the energetics, geometries, rotational constants, electric dipole moments, polarizabilities, vibrational IR frequencies, IR absorption intensities, and Raman activities. Singlet-triplet splittings as well as singlet vertical electronic excitation energies are given for selected species. The identification of less stable C4H3N molecules, generated in ongoing spectroscopic experiments, relies heavily on these quantum chemical predictions. PMID:27341606

  16. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity

    PubMed Central

    Khoa, D. V. A.; Wimmers, K.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative) leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS), Duroc (DU), Berlin miniature pig (BMP), German Landrace (LR), Pietrain (PIE), and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig). Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP) that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE) show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK). Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9) as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future. PMID:26194222

  17. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Katy A; O'Bryan, John P

    2011-01-01

    Defining the subcellular distribution of signaling complexes is imperative to understanding the output from that complex. Conventional methods such as immunoprecipitation do not provide information on the spatial localization of complexes. In contrast, BiFC monitors the interaction and subcellular compartmentalization of protein complexes. In this method, a fluororescent protein is split into amino- and carboxy-terminal non-fluorescent fragments which are then fused to two proteins of interest. Interaction of the proteins results in reconstitution of the fluorophore (Figure 1). A limitation of BiFC is that once the fragmented fluorophore is reconstituted the complex is irreversible. This limitation is advantageous in detecting transient or weak interactions, but precludes a kinetic analysis of complex dynamics. An additional caveat is that the reconstituted flourophore requires 30min to mature and fluoresce, again precluding the observation of real time interactions. BiFC is a specific example of the protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) which employs reporter proteins such as green fluorescent protein variants (BiFC), dihydrofolate reductase, b-lactamase, and luciferase to measure protein:protein interactions. Alternative methods to study protein:protein interactions in cells include fluorescence co-localization and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). For co-localization, two proteins are individually tagged either directly with a fluorophore or by indirect immunofluorescence. However, this approach leads to high background of non-interacting proteins making it difficult to interpret co-localization data. In addition, due to the limits of resolution of confocal microscopy, two proteins may appear co-localized without necessarily interacting. With BiFC, fluorescence is only observed when the two proteins of interest interact. FRET is another excellent method for studying protein:protein interactions, but can be technically challenging. FRET

  18. The complement system in ischemia-reperfusion injuries.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, William B; Chrysanthou, Elvina; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Stahl, Gregory L

    2012-11-01

    Tissue injury and inflammation following ischemia and reperfusion of various organs have been recognized for many years. Many reviews have been written over the last several decades outlining the role of complement in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This short review provides a current state of the art knowledge on the complement pathways activated, complement components involved and a review of the clinical biologics/inhibitors used in the clinical setting of ischemia/reperfusion. This is not a complete review of the complement system in ischemia and reperfusion injury but will give the reader an updated view point of the field, potential clinical use of complement inhibitors, and the future studies needed to advance the field.

  19. The mammalian complement system as an epitome of host-pathogen genetic conflicts.

    PubMed

    Cagliani, Rachele; Forni, Diego; Filippi, Giulia; Mozzi, Alessandra; De Gioia, Luca; Pontremoli, Chiara; Pozzoli, Uberto; Bresolin, Nereo; Clerici, Mario; Sironi, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    The complement system is an innate immunity effector mechanism; its action is antagonized by a wide array of pathogens and complement evasion determines the virulence of several infections. We investigated the evolutionary history of the complement system and of bacterial-encoded complement-interacting proteins. Complement components targeted by several pathogens evolved under strong selective pressure in primates, with selection acting on residues at the contact interface with microbial/viral proteins. Positively selected sites in CFH and C4BPA account for the human specificity of gonococcal infection. Bacterial interactors, evolved adaptively as well, with selected sites located at interaction surfaces with primate complement proteins. These results epitomize the expectation under a genetic conflict scenario whereby the host's and the pathogen's genes evolve within binding avoidance-binding seeking dynamics. In silico mutagenesis and protein-protein docking analyses supported this by showing that positively selected sites, both in the host's and in the pathogen's interacting partner, modulate binding.

  20. Evolution of CAM and C4 carbon-concentrating mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2003-01-01

    Mechanisms for concentrating carbon around the Rubisco enzyme, which drives the carbon-reducing steps in photosynthesis, are widespread in plants; in vascular plants they are known as crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) and C4 photosynthesis. CAM is common in desert succulents, tropical epiphytes, and aquatic plants and is characterized by nighttime fixation of CO2. The proximal selective factor driving the evolution of this CO2-concentrating pathway is low daytime CO2, which results from the unusual reverse stomatal behavior of terrestrial CAM species or from patterns of ambient CO2 availability for aquatic CAM species. In terrestrials the ultimate selective factor is water stress that has selected for increased water use efficiency. In aquatics the ultimate selective factor is diel fluctuations in CO2 availability for palustrine species and extreme oligotrophic conditions for lacustrine species. C4 photosynthesis is based on similar biochemistry but carboxylation steps are spatially separated in the leaf rather than temporally as in CAM. This biochemical pathway is most commonly associated with a specialized leaf anatomy known as Kranz anatomy; however, there are exceptions. The ultimate selective factor driving the evolution of this pathway is excessively high photorespiration that inhibits normal C3 photosynthesis under high light and high temperature in both terrestrial and aquatic habitats. CAM is an ancient pathway that likely has been present since the Paleozoic era in aquatic species from shallow-water palustrine habitats. While atmospheric CO2 levels have undoubtedly affected the evolution of terrestrial plant carbon-concentrating mechanisms, there is reason to believe that past atmospheric changes have not played as important a selective role in the aquatic milieu since palustrine habitats today are not generally carbon sinks, and the selective factors driving aquatic CAM are autogenic. Terrestrial CAM, in contrast, is of increasing selective value under

  1. 26 CFR 1.642(c)-4 - Nonexempt private foundations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonexempt private foundations. 1.642(c)-4... private foundations. In the case of a trust which is, or is treated under section 4947(a)(1) as though it were, a private foundation (as defined in section 509(a) and the regulations thereunder) that is...

  2. 26 CFR 1.642(c)-4 - Nonexempt private foundations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonexempt private foundations. 1.642(c)-4... private foundations. In the case of a trust which is, or is treated under section 4947(a)(1) as though it were, a private foundation (as defined in section 509(a) and the regulations thereunder) that is...

  3. 26 CFR 1.642(c)-4 - Nonexempt private foundations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonexempt private foundations. 1.642(c)-4... private foundations. In the case of a trust which is, or is treated under section 4947(a)(1) as though it were, a private foundation (as defined in section 509(a) and the regulations thereunder) that is...

  4. 26 CFR 1.642(c)-4 - Nonexempt private foundations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonexempt private foundations. 1.642(c)-4... foundations. In the case of a trust which is, or is treated under section 4947(a)(1) as though it were, a private foundation (as defined in section 509(a) and the regulations thereunder) that is not exempt...

  5. 26 CFR 1.642(c)-4 - Nonexempt private foundations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonexempt private foundations. 1.642(c)-4... private foundations. In the case of a trust which is, or is treated under section 4947(a)(1) as though it were, a private foundation (as defined in section 509(a) and the regulations thereunder) that is...

  6. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch.

    PubMed

    Peña, Jeremy Ryan; Fitzpatrick, Donna; Saidman, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    The complement-dependent cytotoxic crossmatch is an informative test that detects alloantibodies in pre- and post-transplant patients, which may dictate clinical management of transplant patients. While challenging to perform, the cytotoxic crossmatch represents the only assay that provides direct evidence for the presence of potentially pathologic (i.e., cytotoxic) alloantibodies. The cytotoxic crossmatch combines patient (recipient) serum and donor cells. If donor-reactive alloantibodies are present in patient serum, these antibodies can bind donor cells. Antibody-antigen complexes, in turn, can activate the complement cascade, leading to complement-mediated cytotoxicity. Two commonly performed cytotoxic crossmatches, using donor lymphocytes as target cells, are described.

  7. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed.

  8. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Viviana P; Fazito Vale, Vladimir; Pangburn, Michael K; Abdeladhim, Maha; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio Ferreira; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Brandt, Elizabeth A; Meneses, Claudio; Lima, Kolyvan Ferreira; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Gontijo, Nelder F; Collin, Nicolas; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2016-01-01

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host's skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the same chromatographic properties as the Lu. longipalpis salivary gland homogenate (SGH)counterparts and anti-rSALO antibodies blocked the classical pathway complement activity of rSALO and SGH. Both rSALO and SGH inhibited C4b deposition and cleavage of C4. rSALO, however, did not inhibit the protease activity of C1s nor the enzymatic activity of factor Xa, uPA, thrombin, kallikrein, trypsin and plasmin. Importantly, rSALO did not inhibit the alternative or the lectin pathway of complement. In conclusion our data shows that SALO is a specific classical pathway complement inhibitor present in the saliva of Lu. longipalpis. Importantly, due to its small size and specificity, SALO may offer a therapeutic alternative for complement classical pathway-mediated pathogenic effects in human diseases. PMID:26758086

  9. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Viviana P.; Fazito Vale, Vladimir; Pangburn, Michael K.; Abdeladhim, Maha; Ferreira Mendes-Sousa, Antonio; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V.; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Brandt, Elizabeth A.; Meneses, Claudio; Lima, Kolyvan Ferreira; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Horácio Pereira, Marcos; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Gontijo, Nelder F.; Collin, Nicolas; Valenzuela, Jesus G.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host’s skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the same chromatographic properties as the Lu. longipalpis salivary gland homogenate (SGH)counterparts and anti-rSALO antibodies blocked the classical pathway complement activity of rSALO and SGH. Both rSALO and SGH inhibited C4b deposition and cleavage of C4. rSALO, however, did not inhibit the protease activity of C1s nor the enzymatic activity of factor Xa, uPA, thrombin, kallikrein, trypsin and plasmin. Importantly, rSALO did not inhibit the alternative or the lectin pathway of complement. In conclusion our data shows that SALO is a specific classical pathway complement inhibitor present in the saliva of Lu. longipalpis. Importantly, due to its small size and specificity, SALO may offer a therapeutic alternative for complement classical pathway-mediated pathogenic effects in human diseases. PMID:26758086

  10. Carbon nanoscroll from C4H/C4F-type graphene superlattice: MD and MM simulation insights.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zilong; Xue, Qingzhong; Tao, Yehan; Li, Xiaofang; Wu, Tiantian; Jin, Yakang; Zhang, Zhongyang

    2015-02-01

    Morphology manipulation opens up a new avenue for controlling and tailoring the functional properties of graphene, enabling the exploration of graphene-based nanomaterials. Through mixing single-side-hydrogenated graphene (C4H) with fluorinated graphene (C4F) on one single sheet, the C4H/C4F-type graphene superlattices can self-scroll at room temperature. We demonstrate using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations that different proportions, sizes, directions of hydrogenation and fluorination, and geometry of graphene have a great influence on the self-scrolling of superlattices into a variety of well-defined carbon nanoscrolls (CNSs), thus providing a controllable approach to tune their structures. Based on molecular mechanics (MM) simulations, the CNSs bear more than eight times the radial pressure than that of their multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) counterparts, and an excellent radial elasticity of CNSs is also shown. Compared with conventional CNSs, these novel CNSs are endowed with more ample and flexible heterogeneous structures due to the on-demand hydrogenation and fluorination. Besides, this work provides a feasible route to achieve the necessary electronic and optical changes to be applied in graphene device applications. PMID:25531924

  11. Carbon nanoscroll from C4H/C4F-type graphene superlattice: MD and MM simulation insights.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zilong; Xue, Qingzhong; Tao, Yehan; Li, Xiaofang; Wu, Tiantian; Jin, Yakang; Zhang, Zhongyang

    2015-02-01

    Morphology manipulation opens up a new avenue for controlling and tailoring the functional properties of graphene, enabling the exploration of graphene-based nanomaterials. Through mixing single-side-hydrogenated graphene (C4H) with fluorinated graphene (C4F) on one single sheet, the C4H/C4F-type graphene superlattices can self-scroll at room temperature. We demonstrate using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations that different proportions, sizes, directions of hydrogenation and fluorination, and geometry of graphene have a great influence on the self-scrolling of superlattices into a variety of well-defined carbon nanoscrolls (CNSs), thus providing a controllable approach to tune their structures. Based on molecular mechanics (MM) simulations, the CNSs bear more than eight times the radial pressure than that of their multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) counterparts, and an excellent radial elasticity of CNSs is also shown. Compared with conventional CNSs, these novel CNSs are endowed with more ample and flexible heterogeneous structures due to the on-demand hydrogenation and fluorination. Besides, this work provides a feasible route to achieve the necessary electronic and optical changes to be applied in graphene device applications.

  12. Deriving C4 photosynthetic parameters from combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence using an Excel tool: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Bellasio, Chandra; Beerling, David J; Griffiths, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The higher photosynthetic potential of C4 plants has led to extensive research over the past 50 years, including C4 -dominated natural biomes, crops such as maize, or for evaluating the transfer of C4 traits into C3 lineages. Photosynthetic gas exchange can be measured in air or in a 2% Oxygen mixture using readily available commercial gas exchange and modulated PSII fluorescence systems. Interpretation of these data, however, requires an understanding (or the development) of various modelling approaches, which limit the use by non-specialists. In this paper we present an accessible summary of the theory behind the analysis and derivation of C4 photosynthetic parameters, and provide a freely available Excel Fitting Tool (EFT), making rigorous C4 data analysis accessible to a broader audience. Outputs include those defining C4 photochemical and biochemical efficiency, the rate of photorespiration, bundle sheath conductance to CO2 diffusion and the in vivo biochemical constants for PEP carboxylase. The EFT compares several methodological variants proposed by different investigators, allowing users to choose the level of complexity required to interpret data. We provide a complete analysis of gas exchange data on maize (as a model C4 organism and key global crop) to illustrate the approaches, their analysis and interpretation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26286697

  13. Deriving C4 photosynthetic parameters from combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence using an Excel tool: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Bellasio, Chandra; Beerling, David J; Griffiths, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The higher photosynthetic potential of C4 plants has led to extensive research over the past 50 years, including C4 -dominated natural biomes, crops such as maize, or for evaluating the transfer of C4 traits into C3 lineages. Photosynthetic gas exchange can be measured in air or in a 2% Oxygen mixture using readily available commercial gas exchange and modulated PSII fluorescence systems. Interpretation of these data, however, requires an understanding (or the development) of various modelling approaches, which limit the use by non-specialists. In this paper we present an accessible summary of the theory behind the analysis and derivation of C4 photosynthetic parameters, and provide a freely available Excel Fitting Tool (EFT), making rigorous C4 data analysis accessible to a broader audience. Outputs include those defining C4 photochemical and biochemical efficiency, the rate of photorespiration, bundle sheath conductance to CO2 diffusion and the in vivo biochemical constants for PEP carboxylase. The EFT compares several methodological variants proposed by different investigators, allowing users to choose the level of complexity required to interpret data. We provide a complete analysis of gas exchange data on maize (as a model C4 organism and key global crop) to illustrate the approaches, their analysis and interpretation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Heat differentiated complement factor profiling.

    PubMed

    Hamsten, Carl; Skattum, Lillemor; Truedsson, Lennart; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Uhlén, Mathias; Schwenk, Jochen M; Hammarström, Lennart; Nilsson, Peter; Neiman, Maja

    2015-08-01

    Complement components and their cascade of reactions are important defense mechanisms within both innate and adaptive immunity. Many complement deficient patients still remain undiagnosed because of a lack of high throughput screening tools. Aiming towards neonatal proteome screening for immunodeficiencies, we used a multiplex profiling approach with antibody bead arrays to measure 9 complement proteins in serum and dried blood spots. Several complement components have been described as heat sensitive, thus their heat-dependent detectability was investigated. Using sera from 16 patients with complement deficiencies and 23 controls, we confirmed that the proteins C1q, C2, C3, C6, C9 and factor H were positively affected by heating, thus the identification of deficient patients was improved when preheating samples. Measurements of C7, C8 and factor I were negatively affected by heating and non-heated samples should be used in analysis of these components. In addition, a proof of concept study demonstrated the feasibility of labeling eluates from dried blood spots to perform a subsequent correct classification of C2-deficiencies. Our study demonstrates the potential of using multiplexed single binder assays for screening of complement components that open possibilities to expand such analysis to other forms of deficiencies.

  15. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  16. Antigen-bound C3b and C4b enhance antigen-presenting cell function in activation of human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Arvieux, J; Yssel, H; Colomb, M G

    1988-10-01

    The effect of complement fragments C3b and C4b, on the triggering of antigen-specific human T-cell clones by Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid B cells (LCL) when these fragments are covalently coupled to the antigen tetanus toxin (TT) is described. TT was chemically cross-linked to purified C3b [(TT-C3b)n], C4b [(TT-C4b)n] or bovine serum albumin [(TT-BSA)n] as a control. T-cell activation was quantified by tritiated thymidine incorporation and 51Cr release. (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n induced proliferative responses comparable to (TT-BSA)n but at 18-25 and 4-6 lower concentrations, respectively. This enhancing effect required the covalent cross-linking of the complement fragments to the antigen and involved intracellular processing of the latter by LCL. Antigen presentation was similarly enhanced when measuring the cytotoxic activity of a helper T-cell clone against LCL previously pulsed with (TT-C3b)n or (TT-C4b)n compared with (TT-BSA)n. Binding studies, carried out on LCL using TT radiolabelled with 125I before cross-linking, indicated that (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n gave three- to four-fold more binding than (TT-BSA)n. Addition of antibodies against CR1 and CR2 or proteolytic removal of these complement receptors with trypsin inhibited by about 60% the enhancing effect of TT-bound C3b and C4b in both binding and functional assays. These results indicate that binding of C3b or C4b to antigen enhances antigen-specific proliferative and cytotoxic responses of T cells by targeting opsonized antigen onto complement receptors CR1 and CR2 of LCL. The putative significance of these findings in terms of regulation of immune responses by complement is discussed.

  17. Antigen-bound C3b and C4b enhance antigen-presenting cell function in activation of human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Arvieux, J; Yssel, H; Colomb, M G

    1988-10-01

    The effect of complement fragments C3b and C4b, on the triggering of antigen-specific human T-cell clones by Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid B cells (LCL) when these fragments are covalently coupled to the antigen tetanus toxin (TT) is described. TT was chemically cross-linked to purified C3b [(TT-C3b)n], C4b [(TT-C4b)n] or bovine serum albumin [(TT-BSA)n] as a control. T-cell activation was quantified by tritiated thymidine incorporation and 51Cr release. (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n induced proliferative responses comparable to (TT-BSA)n but at 18-25 and 4-6 lower concentrations, respectively. This enhancing effect required the covalent cross-linking of the complement fragments to the antigen and involved intracellular processing of the latter by LCL. Antigen presentation was similarly enhanced when measuring the cytotoxic activity of a helper T-cell clone against LCL previously pulsed with (TT-C3b)n or (TT-C4b)n compared with (TT-BSA)n. Binding studies, carried out on LCL using TT radiolabelled with 125I before cross-linking, indicated that (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n gave three- to four-fold more binding than (TT-BSA)n. Addition of antibodies against CR1 and CR2 or proteolytic removal of these complement receptors with trypsin inhibited by about 60% the enhancing effect of TT-bound C3b and C4b in both binding and functional assays. These results indicate that binding of C3b or C4b to antigen enhances antigen-specific proliferative and cytotoxic responses of T cells by targeting opsonized antigen onto complement receptors CR1 and CR2 of LCL. The putative significance of these findings in terms of regulation of immune responses by complement is discussed. PMID:2973431

  18. The relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate ('self'-directed) complement activation.

    PubMed

    Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Kyeremeh, Ransford; Adjei, Jonathan Kofi; Aryeh, Claudia; Kpentey, George

    2016-12-01

    The complement system is an enzyme cascade that helps defend against infection. Many complement proteins occur in serum as inactive enzyme precursors or reside on cell surfaces. Complement components have many biologic functions and their activation can eventually damage the plasma membranes of cells and some bacteria. Although a direct link between complement activation and autoimmune diseases has not been found, there is increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases that may have autoimmune linkage. The inhibition of complement may therefore be very important in a variety of autoimmune diseases since their activation may be detrimental to the individual involved. However, a complete and long-term inhibition of complement may have some contra side effects such as increased susceptibility to infection. The site of complement activation will, however, determine the type of inhibitor to be used, its route of application and dosage level. Compared with conventional drugs, complement inhibitors may be the best option for treatment of autoimmune diseases. The review takes a critical look at the relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate complement activation that are likely to result in sporadic autoimmune diseases or worsen already existing one. It covers the complement system, general aspects of complement inhibition therapy, therapeutic strategies and examples of complement inhibitors. It concludes by highlighting on the possibility that a better inhibitor of complement activation when found will help provide a formidable treatment for autoimmune diseases as well as preventing one.

  19. Microvascular alterations and the role of complement in dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Lahoria, Rajat; Selcen, Duygu; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the pathological basis of perifascicular muscle fibre atrophy in dermatomyositis. These include ischaemia due to immune-mediated microvascular injury, enhanced expression of type 1 interferon-induced gene transcripts in perifascicular capillaries and muscle fibres, and occlusion of larger perimysial blood vessels. Microvascular complement deposition is a feature of dermatomyositis pathology but the trigger for complement activation, the predominant complement pathway involved, or its role in the pathogenesis of the disease, has not been clearly defined. In the first step of this study we examined the density of capillaries and transverse vessels and searched for occlusion or depletion of larger perimysial blood vessels in 10 patients with dermatomyositis. This revealed an invariable association of perifascicular atrophy with capillary and transverse vessel depletion. The capillary and transverse vessel densities in non-atrophic fibre regions were not significantly different from those in muscle specimens of 10 age-matched controls. Next, in the same 10, as well as in 40 additional dermatomyositis patients, we searched for vascular deposits of IgG, IgM, and the C5b-9 complement membrane attack complex. Thirty-one of 50 dermatomyositis specimens contained C5b-9 reactive endomysial microvessels but none of these or other vessels reacted for IgG. Ten of 50 specimens harboured IgM-positive capillaries but only a few of these reacted for C5b-9. Finally, we analysed and compared different pathways of complement activation in dermatomyositis, lupus nephritis, and necrotic muscle fibres in Duchenne dystrophy. In lupus nephritis, C5-b9 deposits co-localized with IgG, IgM, C1q, and C4d, consistent with immune complex dependent activation of the classical complement pathway. In both dermatomyositis and Duchenne dystrophy, C5-b9 deposits co-localized with C1q and C4d and rarely with IgM indicating activation of the classical

  20. Carbon isotopes and water use efficiency in C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Patrick Z; Cousins, Asaph B

    2016-06-01

    Drought is a major agricultural problem worldwide. Therefore, selection for increased water use efficiency (WUE) in food and biofuel crop species will be an important trait in plant breeding programs. The leaf carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)Cleaf) has been suggested to serve as a rapid and effective high throughput phenotyping method for WUE in both C3 and C4 species. This is because WUE, leaf carbon discrimination (Δ(13)Cleaf), and δ(13)Cleaf are correlated through their relationships with intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures (Ci/Ca). However, in C4 plants, changing environmental conditions may influence photosynthetic efficiency (bundle-sheath leakiness) and post-photosynthetic fractionation that will potentially alter the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and Ci/Ca. Here we discuss how these factors influence the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and WUE, and the potential of using δ(13)Cleaf as a meaningful proxy for WUE.

  1. Inactivation of C4orf26 in toothless placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Springer, Mark S; Starrett, James; Morin, Phillip A; Lanzetti, Agnese; Hayashi, Cheryl; Gatesy, John

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have reported inactivated copies of six enamel-related genes (AMBN, AMEL, AMTN, ENAM, KLK4, MMP20) and one dentin-related gene (DSPP) in one or more toothless vertebrates and/or vertebrates with enamelless teeth, thereby providing evidence that these genes are enamel or tooth-specific with respect to their critical functions that are maintained by natural selection. Here, we employ available genome sequences for edentulous and enamelless mammals to evaluate the enamel specificity of four genes (WDR72, SLC24A4, FAM83H, C4orf26) that have been implicated in amelogenesis imperfecta, a condition in which proper enamel formation is abrogated during tooth development. Coding sequences for WDR72, SCL24A4, and FAM83H are intact in four edentulous taxa (Chinese pangolin, three baleen whales) and three taxa (aardvark, nine-banded armadillo, Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) with enamelless teeth, suggesting that these genes have critical functions beyond their involvement in tooth development. By contrast, genomic data for C4orf26 reveal inactivating mutations in pangolin and bowhead whale as well as evidence for deletion of this gene in two minke whale species. Hybridization capture of exonic regions and PCR screens provide evidence for inactivation of C4orf26 in eight additional baleen whale species. However, C4orf26 is intact in all three species with enamelless teeth that were surveyed, as well as in 95 additional mammalian species with enamel-capped teeth. Estimates of selection intensity suggest that dN/dS ratios on branches leading to taxa with enamelless teeth are similar to the dN/dS ratio on branches leading to taxa with enamel-capped teeth. Based on these results, we conclude that C4orf26 is tooth-specific, but not enamel-specific, with respect to its essential functions that are maintained by natural selection. A caveat is that an alternative splice site variant, which translates exon 3 in a different reading frame, is putatively functional in

  2. Inactivation of C4orf26 in toothless placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Springer, Mark S; Starrett, James; Morin, Phillip A; Lanzetti, Agnese; Hayashi, Cheryl; Gatesy, John

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have reported inactivated copies of six enamel-related genes (AMBN, AMEL, AMTN, ENAM, KLK4, MMP20) and one dentin-related gene (DSPP) in one or more toothless vertebrates and/or vertebrates with enamelless teeth, thereby providing evidence that these genes are enamel or tooth-specific with respect to their critical functions that are maintained by natural selection. Here, we employ available genome sequences for edentulous and enamelless mammals to evaluate the enamel specificity of four genes (WDR72, SLC24A4, FAM83H, C4orf26) that have been implicated in amelogenesis imperfecta, a condition in which proper enamel formation is abrogated during tooth development. Coding sequences for WDR72, SCL24A4, and FAM83H are intact in four edentulous taxa (Chinese pangolin, three baleen whales) and three taxa (aardvark, nine-banded armadillo, Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) with enamelless teeth, suggesting that these genes have critical functions beyond their involvement in tooth development. By contrast, genomic data for C4orf26 reveal inactivating mutations in pangolin and bowhead whale as well as evidence for deletion of this gene in two minke whale species. Hybridization capture of exonic regions and PCR screens provide evidence for inactivation of C4orf26 in eight additional baleen whale species. However, C4orf26 is intact in all three species with enamelless teeth that were surveyed, as well as in 95 additional mammalian species with enamel-capped teeth. Estimates of selection intensity suggest that dN/dS ratios on branches leading to taxa with enamelless teeth are similar to the dN/dS ratio on branches leading to taxa with enamel-capped teeth. Based on these results, we conclude that C4orf26 is tooth-specific, but not enamel-specific, with respect to its essential functions that are maintained by natural selection. A caveat is that an alternative splice site variant, which translates exon 3 in a different reading frame, is putatively functional in

  3. Analysis of gene expression and histone modification between C4 and non-C4 homologous genes of PPDK and PCK in maize.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiu-Mei; Li, Yuan; Chao, Qing; Shen, Jie; Gong, Xiu-Jie; Zhao, Biligen-Gaowa; Wang, Bai-Chen

    2016-07-01

    More efficient photosynthesis has allowed C4 plants to adapt to more diverse ecosystems (such as hot and arid conditions) than C3 plants. To better understand C4 photosynthesis, we investigated the expression patterns of C4 genes (C4PPDK and PCK1) and their non-C4 homologous genes (CyPPDK1, CyPPDK2, and PCK2) in the different organs of maize (Zea mays). Both C4 genes and non-C4 genes showed organ-dependent expression patterns. The mRNA levels of C4 genes were more abundant in leaf organ than in seeds at 25 days after pollination (DAP), while non-C4 genes were mainly expressed in developing seeds. Further, acetylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9ac) positively correlates with mRNA levels of C4 genes (C4PPDK and PCK1) in roots, stems, leaves, and seeds at 25 DAP, acetylation of histone H4 lysine 5 (H4K5ac) in the promoter regions of both C4 (C4PPDK and PCK1) and non-C4 genes (CyPPDK1, CyPPDK2, and PCK2) correlated well with their transcripts abundance in stems. In photosynthetic organs (stems and leaves), dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2) negatively correlated with mRNA levels of both C4 and non-C4 genes. Taken together, our data suggest that histone modification was involved in the transcription regulation of both C4 genes and non-C4 genes, which might provide a clue of the functional evolution of C4 genes. PMID:27161567

  4. Inhibition of the classical and lectin pathway of the complement system by recombinant LAIR-2.

    PubMed

    Olde Nordkamp, Marloes J M; Boross, Peter; Yildiz, Cafer; Jansen, J H Marco; Leusen, Jeanette H W; Wouters, Diana; Urbanus, Rolf T; Hack, C Erik; Meyaard, Linde

    2014-01-01

    Activation of complement may cause severe tissue damage in antibody-mediated allograft rejection and other antibody-mediated clinical conditions; therefore, novel potent complement inhibitors are needed. Previously, we described binding of the inhibitory receptor LAIR-1 and its soluble family member LAIR-2 to collagen. Here, we investigated binding of LAIR-1 and LAIR-2 to the complement proteins C1q and MBL, which both have collagen-like domains, and evaluated the effect of this binding on complement function. We demonstrate specific binding of recombinant LAIR proteins to both C1q and MBL. Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that LAIR-2-Fc protein bound C1q and MBL with the highest affinity compared to LAIR-2-HIS. We, therefore, hypothesized that LAIR-2-Fc is a potent complement inhibitor. Indeed, LAIR-2-Fc inhibited C4 fixation to IgG or mannan, reduced activation of C4 by aggregated IgG in plasma and inhibited iC3b deposition on cells. Finally, LAIR-2-Fc inhibited complement-mediated lysis of cells sensitized with anti-HLA antibodies in an ex vivo model for antibody-mediated transplant rejection. Thus, LAIR-2-Fc is an effective novel complement inhibitor for the treatment and prevention of antibody-mediated allograft rejection and antibody-mediated clinical conditions.

  5. Interactions of histidine-rich glycoprotein with immunoglobulins and proteins of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Manderson, G A; Martin, M; Onnerfjord, P; Saxne, T; Schmidtchen, A; Mollnes, T E; Heinegård, D; Blom, A M

    2009-10-01

    This study describes how the serum protein histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) affects the complement system. We show that HRG binds strongly to several complement proteins: C1q, factor H and C4b-binding protein and that it is found complexed with these proteins in human sera and synovial fluids of rheumatoid arthritis patients. HRG also binds C8 and to a lesser extent mannose-binding lectin, C4 and C3. However, HRG alone neither activates nor inhibits complement. Both HRG and C1q bind to necrotic cells and increase their phagocytosis. We found that C1q competes weakly with HRG for binding to necrotic cells whilst HRG does not compete with C1q. Furthermore, HRG enhances complement activation on necrotic cells measured as deposition of C3b. We show that HRG inhibits the formation of immune complexes of ovalbumin/anti-ovalbumin, whilst the reverse holds for C1q. Immune complexes formed in the presence of HRG show enhanced complement activation, whilst those formed in the presence of C1q show diminished complement activation. Taken together, HRG may assist in the maintenance of normal immune function by mediating the clearance of necrotic material, inhibiting the formation of insoluble immune complexes and enhancing their ability to activate complement, resulting in faster clearance.

  6. The potential of C4 grasses for cellulosic biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    van der Weijde, Tim; Alvim Kamei, Claire L.; Torres, Andres F.; Vermerris, Wilfred; Dolstra, Oene; Visser, Richard G. F.; Trindade, Luisa M.

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of biorefinery technologies enabling plant biomass to be processed into biofuel, many researchers set out to study and improve candidate biomass crops. Many of these candidates are C4 grasses, characterized by a high productivity and resource use efficiency. In this review the potential of five C4 grasses as lignocellulosic feedstock for biofuel production is discussed. These include three important field crops—maize, sugarcane and sorghum—and two undomesticated perennial energy grasses—miscanthus and switchgrass. Although all these grasses are high yielding, they produce different products. While miscanthus and switchgrass are exploited exclusively for lignocellulosic biomass, maize, sorghum, and sugarcane are dual-purpose crops. It is unlikely that all the prerequisites for the sustainable and economic production of biomass for a global cellulosic biofuel industry will be fulfilled by a single crop. High and stable yields of lignocellulose are required in diverse environments worldwide, to sustain a year-round production of biofuel. A high resource use efficiency is indispensable to allow cultivation with minimal inputs of nutrients and water and the exploitation of marginal soils for biomass production. Finally, the lignocellulose composition of the feedstock should be optimized to allow its efficient conversion into biofuel and other by-products. Breeding for these objectives should encompass diverse crops, to meet the demands of local biorefineries and provide adaptability to different environments. Collectively, these C4 grasses are likely to play a central role in the supply of lignocellulose for the cellulosic ethanol industry. Moreover, as these species are evolutionary closely related, advances in each of these crops will expedite improvements in the other crops. This review aims to provide an overview of their potential, prospects and research needs as lignocellulose feedstocks for the commercial production of biofuel. PMID:23653628

  7. Bayesian truthing as experimental verification of C4ISR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Forrester, Thomas; Romanov, Volodymyr; Wang, Wenjian; Nielsen, Thomas; Kostrzewski, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the general methodology for experimental verification/validation of C4ISR and other sensors' performance, is presented, based on Bayesian inference, in general, and binary sensors, in particular. This methodology, called Bayesian Truthing, defines Performance Metrics for binary sensors in: physics, optics, electronics, medicine, law enforcement, C3ISR, QC, ATR (Automatic Target Recognition), terrorism related events, and many others. For Bayesian Truthing, the sensing medium itself is not what is truly important; it is how the decision process is affected.

  8. Carbon Concentrating Mechanisms & C4 Enzymes In Marine Phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moolna, A.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R.

    2009-12-01

    Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation by marine phytoplankton is a major sink in the Earth’s carbon cycle. Understanding the molecular biogeochemistry of this carbon capture is crucial to predicting how the Earth will respond to the carbon emissions driving human-induced climate change. We are investigating the connection of phytoplankton photosynthesis to different CO2 levels using the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii and the coccolithophores Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica. Phytoplankton in equilibrium with present-day atmospheric CO2 levels have carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) that increase their internal concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to their surrounding seawater. By acclimating cultures to seawater with quadrupled DIC availability, the CCM physiology is relaxed. This is demonstrated by resuspending the phytoplankton in CO2-free seawater and then plotting the response curve of photosynthetic O2 evolution rate against the addition of specific concentrations of DIC (Figure 1). Relaxation implies less energy used for CCMs and so more energy may be available for carbon fixation. Scanning electron micrographs of high DIC G. oceanica cultures, for example, show that the size of both the coccosphere and of individual coccoliths is unchanged; but the external shield of the coccolith extends further into the central area. This suggests an increase in calcification, with implications for carbon partition between organic and inorganic fluxes to the seafloor. Of particular interest is the possibility that C4 photosynthesis could provide a CCM for marine phytoplankton. The carbon-fixing Rubisco enzyme can only use CO2 as a substrate but, due to reaction between CO2 and H2O, most of the CO2 dissolved in seawater is actually present as HCO3-. In C4 land plants, CO2 for Rubisco is provided via a four-carbon intermediate compound generated from HCO3-; and the basic C4 machinery is found in all photosynthetic life because of

  9. Critical Role and Therapeutic Control of the Lectin Pathway of Complement Activation in an Abortion-Prone Mouse Mating.

    PubMed

    Petitbarat, Marie; Durigutto, Paolo; Macor, Paolo; Bulla, Roberta; Palmioli, Alessandro; Bernardi, Anna; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Ledee, Nathalie; Chaouat, Gerard; Tedesco, Francesco

    2015-12-15

    The abortion-prone mating combination CBA/J × DBA/2 has been recognized as a model of preeclampsia, and complement activation has been implicated in the high rate of pregnancy loss observed in CBA/J mice. We have analyzed the implantation sites collected from DBA/2-mated CBA/J mice for the deposition of the complement recognition molecules using CBA/J mated with BALB/c mice as a control group. MBL-A was observed in the implantation sites of CBA/J × DBA/2 combination in the absence of MBL-C and was undetectable in BALB/c-mated CBA/J mice. Conversely, C1q was present in both mating combinations. Searching for other complement components localized at the implantation sites of CBA/J × DBA/2, we found C4 and C3, but we failed to reveal C1r. These data suggest that complement is activated through the lectin pathway and proceeds to completion of the activation sequence as revealed by C9 deposition. MBL-A was detected as early as 3.5 d of pregnancy, and MBL-A deficiency prevented pregnancy loss in the abortion-prone mating combination. The contribution of the terminal complex to miscarriage was supported by the finding that pregnancy failure was largely inhibited by the administration of neutralizing Ab to C5. Treatment of DBA/2-mated CBA/J mice with Polyman2 that binds to MBL-A with high affinity proved to be highly effective in controlling the activation of the lectin pathway and in preventing fetal loss. PMID:26561549

  10. Effect of whole and fractionated intravenous immunoglobulin on complement in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mollnes, T E; Andreassen, I H; Høgåsen, K; Hack, C E; Harboe, M

    1997-07-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) are increasingly used for treatment of inflammatory diseases, and the modulation of complement may contribute to some of its beneficial effects. IVIG may bind C1q and activated C3 and C4, and enhance inactivation of C3b. We have previously shown that IVIG inhibited complement-mediated lysis solely via its Fc part through interaction with the classical pathway. In the present study we have investigated whole IVIG (Octagam, and Sandoglobulin) and the monomer, dimer and multimer fractions of Octagam with respect to complement activation in serum and inhibition of complement lysis of red cells. The isolated fractions were found to be stable, homogeneous (monomer, dimer or multimer) and pure (virtually only IgG). Both whole IVIG and its fractions significantly activated complement in serum and inhibited hemolysis compared with human albumin. These effects were most pronounced in the monomer, less in the multimer and least in the dimer fraction. The complement activation was shown to be mediated through the classical pathway since formation of C1rs-C1inh complexes and C4bc were increased, in contrast to Bb. Surprisingly, heat aggregation of Octagam was not followed by a corresponding increase in complement activation, as would be expected, unless it was dialysed before heating, suggesting that it is stabilized to avoid excess activation. In conclusion, the results support the hypothesis that IVIG causes a mild activation of complement in vitro. We suggest that this effect may contribute to the complement inhibitory properties of IVIG by diverting complement deposition from the target to the fluid phase.

  11. C4 grasses prosper as carbon dioxide eliminates desiccation in warmed semi-arid grassland.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jack A; LeCain, Daniel R; Pendall, Elise; Blumenthal, Dana M; Kimball, Bruce A; Carrillo, Yolima; Williams, David G; Heisler-White, Jana; Dijkstra, Feike A; West, Mark

    2011-08-03

    Global warming is predicted to induce desiccation in many world regions through increases in evaporative demand. Rising CO(2) may counter that trend by improving plant water-use efficiency. However, it is not clear how important this CO(2)-enhanced water use efficiency might be in offsetting warming-induced desiccation because higher CO(2) also leads to higher plant biomass, and therefore greater transpirational surface. Furthermore, although warming is predicted to favour warm-season, C(4) grasses, rising CO(2) should favour C(3), or cool-season plants. Here we show in a semi-arid grassland that elevated CO(2) can completely reverse the desiccating effects of moderate warming. Although enrichment of air to 600 p.p.m.v. CO(2) increased soil water content (SWC), 1.5/3.0 °C day/night warming resulted in desiccation, such that combined CO(2) enrichment and warming had no effect on SWC relative to control plots. As predicted, elevated CO(2) favoured C(3) grasses and enhanced stand productivity, whereas warming favoured C(4) grasses. Combined warming and CO(2) enrichment stimulated above-ground growth of C(4) grasses in 2 of 3 years when soil moisture most limited plant productivity. The results indicate that in a warmer, CO(2)-enriched world, both SWC and productivity in semi-arid grasslands may be higher than previously expected.

  12. Neutrophil extracellular traps that are not degraded in systemic lupus erythematosus activate complement exacerbating the disease.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Jonatan; Martin, Myriam; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Tydén, Helena; Lood, Christian; Truedsson, Lennart; Bengtsson, Anders A; Blom, Anna M

    2012-04-01

    Ongoing inflammation including activation of the complement system is a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Antimicrobial neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are composed of secreted chromatin that may act as a source of autoantigens typical for SLE. In this study, we investigated how complement interacts with NETs and how NET degradation is affected by complement in SLE patients. We found that sera from a subset of patients with active SLE had a reduced ability to degrade in vitro-generated NETs, which was mostly restored when these patients were in remission. Patients that failed to degrade NETs had a more active disease and they also displayed lower levels of complement proteins C4 and C3 in blood. We discovered that NETs activated complement in vitro and that deposited C1q inhibited NET degradation including a direct inhibition of DNase-I by C1q. Complement deposition on NETs may facilitate autoantibody production, and indeed, Abs against NETs and NET epitopes were more pronounced in patients with impaired ability to degrade NETs. NET-bound autoantibodies inhibited degradation but also further increased C1q deposition, potentially exacerbating the disease. Thus, NETs are a potent complement activator, and this interaction may play an important role in SLE. Targeting complement with inhibitors or by removing complement activators such as NETs could be beneficial for patients with SLE.

  13. Interaction of toxic venoms with the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Birdsey, Vanessa; Lindorfer, Jean; Gewurz, H.

    1971-01-01

    Thirty-nine venoms from various vertebrate and invertebrate species were tested for their ability to consume haemolytic complement (C) activity upon incubation in fresh guinea-pig serum. Nineteen had `anti-complementary' activity, and these were provisionally sorted into the following groups: Pattern I—exemplified by the Naja haje (Egyptian cobra) and six other Elapidae species (all cobras), which induced selective consumption of C3—C9, and led to formation of a stable C3—C9-consuming intermediate; Pattern II—exemplified by the Agkistrodon rhodostoma (Malayan pit viper), Bitis arietans (puff adder), Bothrops jararaca (South American pit viper), Bothrops atrox (Fer de Lance) and three other species, which induced marked consumption of C4 and C2, as well as C3—C9, but did not form a stable C3—C9-consuming intermediate; and individual animals, e.g. the Lachesis muta (bushmaster), which induced other patterns (III—VI) of complement component consumption. Active fractions of representative venoms were partially purified by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography and their interactions with the complement system characterized further. It is anticipated that these enzymes, with a capacity to activate the complement system in unique ways, will prove to be of further experimental usefulness. PMID:4398349

  14. Sinugyrosanolide A, an unprecedented C-4 norcembranoid, from the Formosan soft coral Sinularia gyrosa.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Yie; Shih, Neng-Lang; Chuang, Cheng-Ta; Chiou, Shu-Fen; Yang, Chia-Ning; Wang, Shang-Kwei; Duh, Chang-Yih

    2014-03-15

    Chemical investigations on the acetone extract of the Formosan soft coral Sinularia gyrosa have obtained a novel C-4 norcembranoid possessing an unprecedented tricyclo[9.3.0.0(3,8)]tetradecane skeleton, namely sinugyrosanolide A. The NMR spectroscopic data of the novel norcembranoid were completely assigned by using a combination of 2D NMR experiments including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY. The cytotoxicities, anti-HCMV (human cytomegalovirus) endonuclease activities and antibacterial activities were evaluated in vitro. It showed moderate cytotoxicity against P-388 (mouse lymphocytic leukemia) cancer cell line with an EC50 of 11.8μM. PMID:24529868

  15. Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Green A.

    2006-01-01

    With the growth of standardized assessment benchmarks in both the public and private paradigms, testing performance matters to institutions more than ever. In an attempt to take as many hindering variables out of this process, such as test anxiety, socioeconomic influences, and latency in cognition, Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum seeks…

  16. Immunological studies of human placentae: complement components in immature and mature chorionic villi.

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, W P; Jarret, R; Keane, M; Johnson, P M; Boackle, R J

    1980-01-01

    The localization and distribution of complement components in term and pre-term normal human placentae have been studied by using haemadsorption and immunofluorescence experiments. The components Clq, C4, C5, C6 and C9 were identified in characteristic locations. Receptors for C3 and C4 were not found. Complement was associated with certain stromal cells, areas of fibrinoid necrosis within the trophoblastic mantle, and in the walls and endothelia of foetal stem vessels. Activation of the complement system on trophoblastic basement membranes (TBM) did not appear to involve the early reacting components of the classical pathway of complement activation, because C1q, C4 and C2 could not be identified on TBM. The C6 component was identified within cytoplasmic granules of foetal stem vessel endothelia, suggesting that it may be synthesized by these cells. These findings put forward the possibility that complement may play an immunobiological role in the materno-foetal relationship during normal human pregnancy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7002386

  17. The characteristic clinical symptoms of C-4 radiculopathy caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Katsumi, Keiichi; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi; Watanabe, Kei; Hirano, Toru; Ohashi, Masayuki; Endo, Naoto

    2014-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy of the C2-4 spinal nerves is a rare condition and is poorly documented in terms of clinical symptoms, hindering its detection during initial patient screening based on imaging diagnostics. The authors describe in detail the clinical symptoms and successful surgical treatment of a patient diagnosed with isolated C-4 radiculopathy. This 41-year-old man suffered from sleep disturbance because of pain behind the right ear, along the right clavicle, and at the back of his neck on the right side. The Jackson and Spurling tests were positive, with pain radiating to the area behind the patient's ear. Unlike in cases of radiculopathy involving the C5-8 spinal nerves, no loss of upper-extremity motor function was seen. Magnetic resonance imaging showed foraminal stenosis at the C3-4 level on the right side, and multiplanar reconstruction CT revealed a beak-type ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the foraminal region at the same level. In the absence of intracranial lesions or spinal cord compressive lesions, the positive Jackson and Spurling tests and the C3-4 foraminal stenosis were indicative of isolated C-4 radiculopathy. Microscopic foraminotomy was performed at the C3-4 vertebral level and the ossified lesion was resected. The patient's symptoms completely resolved immediately after surgery. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first to describe the symptomatic features of isolated C-4 radiculopathy, in a case in which the diagnosis has been confirmed by both radiological findings and surgical outcome. Based on this case study, the authors conclude that the characteristic symptoms of C-4 radiculopathy are the presence of pain behind the ear and in the clavicular region in the absence of upper-limb involvement.

  18. C4b-Binding Protein Is Present in Affected Areas of Myocardial Infarction during the Acute Inflammatory Phase and Covers a Larger Area than C3

    PubMed Central

    Trouw, Leendert A.; Okroj, Marcin; Kupreishvili, Koba; Landberg, Göran; Johansson, Bengt; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Blom, Anna M.

    2008-01-01

    Background During myocardial infarction reduced blood flow in the heart muscle results in cell death. These dying/dead cells have been reported to bind several plasma proteins such as IgM and C-reactive protein (CRP). In the present study we investigated whether fluid-phase complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein (C4BP) would also bind to the infarcted heart tissue. Methods and Findings Initial studies using immunohistochemistry on tissue arrays for several cardiovascular disorders indicated that C4BP can be found in heart tissue in several cardiac diseases but that it is most abundantly found in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This condition was studied in more detail by analyzing the time window and extent of C4BP positivity. The binding of C4BP correlates to the same locations as C3b, a marker known to correlate to the patterns of IgM and CRP staining. Based on criteria that describe the time after infarction we were able to pinpoint that C4BP binding is a relatively early marker of tissue damage in myocardial infarction with a peak of binding between 12 hours and 5 days subsequent to AMI, the phase in which infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes in the heart is the most extensive. Conclusions C4BP, an important fluid-phase inhibitor of the classical and lectin pathway of complement activation binds to jeopardized cardiomyocytes early after AMI and co-localizes to other well known markers such as C3b. PMID:18682851

  19. Complement in lupus nephritis: the good, the bad, and the unknown.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lihua; Quigg, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    The complement system consists of 3 pathways and more than 30 proteins, including those with biological activity that directly or indirectly mediate the effects of this system, plus a set of regulatory proteins necessary to prevent injudicious complement activation on host tissue. The role for complement in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is paradoxic. On one hand, the complement system appears to have protective features in that hereditary homozygous deficiencies of classic pathway components are associated with an increased risk for SLE. On the other hand, immune complex-mediated activation of complement in affected tissues is clearly evident in both experimental and human SLE along with pathologic features that are logical consequences of complement activation. By using accurate mouse models of SLE, we have gained remarkable insights into pathogenic features likely relevant to the human disease, and the ability to test potential therapies, some of which have made it to standard clinical use. Studies in genetically altered mice and using recombinant protein inhibitors of complement have confirmed what was believed but unproven-early complement proteins C1q and C4 are protective whereas complement activation later in the pathways is proinflammatory and deleterious. Two complement inhibitors, soluble complement receptor 1 (TP10, Avant Immunotherapeutics, Needham, MA) and a monoclonal anti-C5 antibody (Eculizumab, Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cheshire, CT) have been shown to inhibit complement safely and now are being investigated in a variety of clinical conditions. Although these and others earlier in their clinical development hold promise to be used therapeutically in lupus nephritis, this optimism must be tempered by the fact that the clinical trials to prove this remain fraught with obstacles.

  20. Simulation of the Reflected Blast Wave froma C-4 Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Kuhl, A L; Tringe, J W

    2011-08-01

    The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 {micro}m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 8 ranges (GR = 0, 2, 4, 8, 10, and 12 inches) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 2 inches), which were dominated by jetting effects.

  1. Strong associated C 4 absorption in low redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David

    1990-01-01

    IUE spectra of quasars were used to determine the frequency of occurrence of strong associated C 4 absorption systems at low red shifts. Four systems are found with rest frame equivalent width (REW) greater than 5 angstroms in the spectra of 38 quasars. This rate of occurrence of 0.12 is not significantly different from the rate of 0.064 determined for high red shift quasars. The detected strong associated systems are all in low red shift quasars which have been imaged from the ground. One of the quasars is unusual, having two nuclei, a close companion and distorted isotopes. Two of the others also have close companion galaxies at projected distances of under 100 kpc. The conclusion was made that a much larger sample is needed.

  2. Leukotriene C4 elimination and metabolism in man

    SciTech Connect

    Maltby, N.H.; Taylor, G.W.; Ritter, J.M.; Moore, K.; Fuller, R.W.; Dollery, C.T. )

    1990-01-01

    Three doses of radiolabeled leukotriene C4 (0.2 to 15 muCi) were infused into three subjects to investigate its metabolism and routes of elimination during 4 days. Between 12% and 20% of the infused dose was recovered in the urine within 24 hours, of which a substantial and relatively constant proportion (4.1% to 6.3% total dose) appeared as leukotriene E4 (LTE4), mainly in the first 4 hours. Polar omega-oxidation products, N-acetyl LTE4, and tritiated water were also present. Fecal elimination accounted for a further 30% to 40% of the infused dose. In the absence of altered metabolism or biliary excretion, urinary LTE4 may be a useful measure of whole body production of the cysteinyl leukotrienes.

  3. Role of complement receptor 1 (CR1; CD35) on epithelial cells: A model for understanding complement-mediated damage in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Java, Anuja; Liszewski, M Kathryn; Hourcade, Dennis E; Zhang, Fan; Atkinson, John P

    2015-10-01

    The regulators of complement activation gene cluster encodes a group of proteins that have evolved to control the amplification of complement at the critical step of C3 activation. Complement receptor 1 (CR1) is the most versatile of these inhibitors with both receptor and regulatory functions. While expressed on most peripheral blood cells, the only epithelial site of expression in the kidney is by the podocyte. Its expression by this cell population has aroused considerable speculation as to its biologic function in view of many complement-mediated renal diseases. The goal of this investigation was to assess the role of CR1 on epithelial cells. To this end, we utilized a Chinese hamster ovary cell model system. Among our findings, CR1 reduced C3b deposition by ∼ 80% during classical pathway activation; however, it was an even more potent regulator (>95% reduction in C3b deposition) of the alternative pathway. This inhibition was primarily mediated by decay accelerating activity. The deposited C4b and C3b were progressively cleaved with a t½ of ∼ 30 min to C4d and C3d, respectively, by CR1-dependent cofactor activity. CR1 functioned intrinsically (i.e, worked only on the cell on which it was expressed). Moreover, CR1 efficiently and stably bound but didn't internalize C4b/C3b opsonized immune complexes. Our studies underscore the potential importance of CR1 on an epithelial cell population as both an intrinsic complement regulator and an immune adherence receptor. These results provide a framework for understanding how loss of CR1 expression on podocytes may contribute to complement-mediated damage in the kidney.

  4. Senescence, dormancy and tillering in perennial C4 grasses.

    PubMed

    Sarath, Gautam; Baird, Lisa M; Mitchell, Robert B

    2014-03-01

    Perennial, temperate, C4 grasses, such as switchgrass and miscanthus have been tabbed as sources of herbaceous biomass for the production of green fuels and chemicals based on a number of positive agronomic traits. Although there is important literature on the management of these species for biomass production on marginal lands, numerous aspects of their biology are as yet unexplored at the molecular level. Perenniality, a key agronomic trait, is a function of plant dormancy and winter survival of the below-ground parts of the plants. These include the crowns, rhizomes and meristems that will produce tillers. Maintaining meristem viability is critical for the continued survival of the plants. Plant tillers emerge from the dormant crown and rhizome meristems at the start of the growing period in the spring, progress through a phase of vegetative growth, followed by flowering and eventually undergo senescence. There is nutrient mobilization from the aerial portions of the plant to the crowns and rhizomes during tiller senescence. Signals arising from the shoots and from the environment can be expected to be integrated as the plants enter into dormancy. Plant senescence and dormancy have been well studied in several dicot species and offer a potential framework to understand these processes in temperate C4 perennial grasses. The availability of latitudinally adapted populations for switchgrass presents an opportunity to dissect molecular mechanisms that can impact senescence, dormancy and winter survival. Given the large increase in genomic and other resources for switchgrass, it is anticipated that projected molecular studies with switchgrass will have a broader impact on related species. PMID:24467906

  5. Hydrogen peroxide regulated photosynthesis in C4-pepc transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Ren, C G; Li, X; Liu, X L; Wei, X D; Dai, C C

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the photosynthetic physiological basis in 'PC' transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.), showing high-level expression of the gene encoding C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (pepc), by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The C4-PEPC gene (pepc) from maize in the transgenic rice plants was checked by PCR. Comparison of yield components and photosynthetic indices between PC and untransformed wild-type (WT) plants indicated that increased yield in PC was associated with higher net photosynthetic rate and higher activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Both PC and WT plants were treated with 1 mmol L(-1) abscisic acid (ABA), 0.04% 1-butanol (BA), 2 mmol L(-1) neomycin (NS), or 2 mmol L(-1) diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) to investigate the relationship between photosynthesis and levels of H2O2 and phosphatidic acid. In both PC and WT, ABA induced H2O2 generation and simultaneous decrease in stomatal conductance (g(s)). PC plants treated with BA showed decreased H2O2 content and strongly increased g(s) within 2 h of treatment. Similar results were observed in response to DPI treatment in PC. However, WT did not observe the decrease of H2O2 during the treatments of BA and DPI. The reduced H2O2 content in PC caused by BA treatment differed to that induced by DPI because BA did not inhibit NADPH oxidase activities. While BA induced a larger PEPC activity in PC, and higher catalase activity as well. These results indicated that the regulation of endogenous H2O2 metabolism of PC could be helpful for enhancing photosynthetic capability.

  6. Serological and Genetic Evidence for Altered Complement System Functionality in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Findings of the GAPAID Consortium.

    PubMed

    Prechl, József; Papp, Krisztián; Hérincs, Zoltán; Péterfy, Hajna; Lóránd, Veronika; Szittner, Zoltán; Estonba, Andone; Rovero, Paolo; Paolini, Ilaria; Del Amo, Jokin; Uribarri, Maria; Alcaro, Maria Claudia; Ruiz-Larrañaga, Otsanda; Migliorini, Paola; Czirják, László

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with multifactorial ethiopathogenesis. The complement system is involved in both the early and late stages of disease development and organ damage. To better understand autoantibody mediated complement consumption we examined ex vivo immune complex formation on autoantigen arrays. We recruited patients with SLE (n = 211), with other systemic autoimmune diseases (n = 65) and non-autoimmune control subjects (n = 149). Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected and serum complement levels were determined. The genotype of SNP rs1143679 in the ITGAM gene was also determined. Ex vivo formation of immune complexes, with respect to IgM, IgG, complement C4 and C3 binding, was examined using a functional immunoassay on autoantigen microarray comprising nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Complement consumption of nucleic acids increased upon binding of IgM and IgG even when serum complement levels were decreased due to consumption in SLE patients. A negative correlation between serum complement levels and ex vivo complement deposition on nucleic acid autoantigens is demonstrated. On the contrary, complement deposition on tested protein and lipid autoantigens showed positive correlation with C4 levels. Genetic analysis revealed that the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 in complement receptor type 3 is associated with an increased production of anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies. Notwithstanding, homozygous carriers of the previously reported susceptible allele (AA) had lower levels of dsDNA specific IgM among SLE patients. Both the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 and the high ratio of nucleic acid specific IgG/IgM were associated with multiple organ involvement. In summary, secondary complement deficiency in SLE does not impair opsonization of nucleic-acid-containing autoantigens but does affect other antigens and potentially other complement dependent processes. Dysfunction of the receptor recognizing complement

  7. Serological and Genetic Evidence for Altered Complement System Functionality in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Findings of the GAPAID Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Prechl, József; Papp, Krisztián; Hérincs, Zoltán; Péterfy, Hajna; Lóránd, Veronika; Szittner, Zoltán; Estonba, Andone; Rovero, Paolo; Paolini, Ilaria; del Amo, Jokin; Uribarri, Maria; Alcaro, Maria Claudia; Ruiz-Larrañaga, Otsanda; Migliorini, Paola; Czirják, László

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with multifactorial ethiopathogenesis. The complement system is involved in both the early and late stages of disease development and organ damage. To better understand autoantibody mediated complement consumption we examined ex vivo immune complex formation on autoantigen arrays. We recruited patients with SLE (n = 211), with other systemic autoimmune diseases (n = 65) and non-autoimmune control subjects (n = 149). Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected and serum complement levels were determined. The genotype of SNP rs1143679 in the ITGAM gene was also determined. Ex vivo formation of immune complexes, with respect to IgM, IgG, complement C4 and C3 binding, was examined using a functional immunoassay on autoantigen microarray comprising nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Complement consumption of nucleic acids increased upon binding of IgM and IgG even when serum complement levels were decreased due to consumption in SLE patients. A negative correlation between serum complement levels and ex vivo complement deposition on nucleic acid autoantigens is demonstrated. On the contrary, complement deposition on tested protein and lipid autoantigens showed positive correlation with C4 levels. Genetic analysis revealed that the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 in complement receptor type 3 is associated with an increased production of anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies. Notwithstanding, homozygous carriers of the previously reported susceptible allele (AA) had lower levels of dsDNA specific IgM among SLE patients. Both the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 and the high ratio of nucleic acid specific IgG/IgM were associated with multiple organ involvement. In summary, secondary complement deficiency in SLE does not impair opsonization of nucleic-acid-containing autoantigens but does affect other antigens and potentially other complement dependent processes. Dysfunction of the receptor recognizing complement

  8. Serological and Genetic Evidence for Altered Complement System Functionality in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Findings of the GAPAID Consortium.

    PubMed

    Prechl, József; Papp, Krisztián; Hérincs, Zoltán; Péterfy, Hajna; Lóránd, Veronika; Szittner, Zoltán; Estonba, Andone; Rovero, Paolo; Paolini, Ilaria; Del Amo, Jokin; Uribarri, Maria; Alcaro, Maria Claudia; Ruiz-Larrañaga, Otsanda; Migliorini, Paola; Czirják, László

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with multifactorial ethiopathogenesis. The complement system is involved in both the early and late stages of disease development and organ damage. To better understand autoantibody mediated complement consumption we examined ex vivo immune complex formation on autoantigen arrays. We recruited patients with SLE (n = 211), with other systemic autoimmune diseases (n = 65) and non-autoimmune control subjects (n = 149). Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected and serum complement levels were determined. The genotype of SNP rs1143679 in the ITGAM gene was also determined. Ex vivo formation of immune complexes, with respect to IgM, IgG, complement C4 and C3 binding, was examined using a functional immunoassay on autoantigen microarray comprising nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Complement consumption of nucleic acids increased upon binding of IgM and IgG even when serum complement levels were decreased due to consumption in SLE patients. A negative correlation between serum complement levels and ex vivo complement deposition on nucleic acid autoantigens is demonstrated. On the contrary, complement deposition on tested protein and lipid autoantigens showed positive correlation with C4 levels. Genetic analysis revealed that the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 in complement receptor type 3 is associated with an increased production of anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies. Notwithstanding, homozygous carriers of the previously reported susceptible allele (AA) had lower levels of dsDNA specific IgM among SLE patients. Both the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 and the high ratio of nucleic acid specific IgG/IgM were associated with multiple organ involvement. In summary, secondary complement deficiency in SLE does not impair opsonization of nucleic-acid-containing autoantigens but does affect other antigens and potentially other complement dependent processes. Dysfunction of the receptor recognizing complement

  9. Systemic complement profiling in multiple sclerosis as a biomarker of disease state

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, G; Hakobyan, S; Hirst, CL; Harris, CL; Loveless, S; Mitchell, JP; Pickersgill, TP; Robertson, NP

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence of significant and dynamic systemic activation and upregulation of complement in multiple sclerosis (MS), which may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Objective: We aimed to investigate the pathological role of complement in MS and the potential role for complement profiling as a biomarker of MS disease state. Methods: Key components of the classical, alternative and terminal pathways of complement were measured in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with MS in different clinical phases of disease and in matched controls. Results: Increased plasma levels of C3 (p<0.003), C4 (p<0.001), C4a (p<0.001), C1 inhibitor (p<0.001), and factor H (p<0.001), and reduced levels of C9 (p<0.001) were observed in MS patients compared with controls. Combined profiling of these analytes produced a statistical model with a predictive value of 97% for MS and 73% for clinical relapse when combined with selected demographic data. CSF-plasma correlations suggested that source of synthesis of these components was both systemic and central. Conclusion: These data provide further evidence of alterations in both local and systemic expression and activation of complement in MS and suggest that complement profiling may be informative as a biomarker of MS disease, although further work is needed to determine its use in distinguishing MS from its differential. PMID:22354735

  10. Alternative pathway of complement activation in full term and premature infants.

    PubMed

    Strunk, R C; Fenton, L J; Gaines, J A

    1979-05-01

    Classical and alternative pathway complement levels were measured in the cord blood sera of 60 newly born infants, with weights ranging from 1200--4165 g. The impact of maternal illness and infant illness on the complement levels was also evaluated. The mean values for CH50, C3, C4, PH50, factor B, and properdin were all significantly less than normal adult levels (P less than 0.0001). All of the above determinations were significantly correlated with one another except for the relationship between properdin and factor B. CH50, PH50, C4, and properdin levels were significantly correlated with birth weight although there was much residual scatter. Neither maternal illness nor mild to moderate illness in the newborn altered the birth weight-complement relationships. Severe infant illness did significantly alter the relationship between birth weight and complement. However, the impact of this variable on the birth weight-complement relationships was not consistent among the various components. These inconsistencies and the small sample size preclude drawing any strong conclusions about severe illness and complement levels. PMID:471596

  11. Alternative pathway of complement activation in full term and premature infants.

    PubMed

    Strunk, R C; Fenton, L J; Gaines, J A

    1979-05-01

    Classical and alternative pathway complement levels were measured in the cord blood sera of 60 newly born infants, with weights ranging from 1200--4165 g. The impact of maternal illness and infant illness on the complement levels was also evaluated. The mean values for CH50, C3, C4, PH50, factor B, and properdin were all significantly less than normal adult levels (P less than 0.0001). All of the above determinations were significantly correlated with one another except for the relationship between properdin and factor B. CH50, PH50, C4, and properdin levels were significantly correlated with birth weight although there was much residual scatter. Neither maternal illness nor mild to moderate illness in the newborn altered the birth weight-complement relationships. Severe infant illness did significantly alter the relationship between birth weight and complement. However, the impact of this variable on the birth weight-complement relationships was not consistent among the various components. These inconsistencies and the small sample size preclude drawing any strong conclusions about severe illness and complement levels.

  12. Invasive C4 Perennial Grass Alters Net Ecosystem Exchange in Mixed C3/C4 Savanna Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basham, T. S.; Litvak, M.

    2006-12-01

    The invasion of ecosystems by non-native plants that differ from native plants in physiological characteristics and phenology has the potential to alter ecosystem function. In Texas and other regions of the southern central plains of the United States, the introduced C4 perennial grass, Bothriochloa ischaemum, invades C3/C4 mixed grasslands and savannas, resulting in decreased plant community diversity (Gabbard 2003; Harmoney et al 2004). The objective of this study was to quantify how the conversion of these mixed grass communities to C4 dominated, B. ischaemum monocultures impacts carbon cycling and sequestration. Seasonal measurements of Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of CO2, leaf level gas exchange and soil respiration were compared between savanna grassland plots composed of either naturally occurring B. ischaemum monocultures or native mixed grasses (n=16). NEE was measured using a closed system chamber that attached to permanently installed stainless steel bases. Temperature, soil moisture, aerial percent species cover and leaf area index were also monitored in plots to explain variability in measured responses. Results showed that NEE differed seasonally between invaded and native plots due to 1) greater leaf surface area per unit ground area in invaded plots, 2) differences in phenological patterns of plant activity and 3) differences in responses to water limitation between invaded and native plots. Cold season and summer drought NEE were driven primarily by belowground respiration in both plot types, however spring uptake activity commenced two months later in invaded plots. This later start in invaded plots was compensated for by greater uptake throughout the growing season and in particular during the drier summer months. Differences in NEE between plot types were not due to differences in soil respiration nor were they due to greater leaf level photosynthetic capabilities of B. ischaemum relative to the dominant native grasses. NEE, soil respiration and

  13. Evolution of C4 Photosynthesis in the Genus Flaveria: How Many and Which Genes Does It Take to Make C4?[W

    PubMed Central

    Gowik, Udo; Bräutigam, Andrea; Weber, Katrin L.; Weber, Andreas P.M.; Westhoff, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Selective pressure exerted by a massive decline in atmospheric CO2 levels 55 to 40 million years ago promoted the evolution of a novel, highly efficient mode of photosynthetic carbon assimilation known as C4 photosynthesis. C4 species have concurrently evolved multiple times in a broad range of plant families, and this multiple and parallel evolution of the complex C4 trait indicates a common underlying evolutionary mechanism that might be elucidated by comparative analyses of related C3 and C4 species. Here, we use mRNA-Seq analysis of five species within the genus Flaveria, ranging from C3 to C3-C4 intermediate to C4 species, to quantify the differences in the transcriptomes of closely related plant species with varying degrees of C4-associated characteristics. Single gene analysis defines the C4 cycle enzymes and transporters more precisely and provides new candidates for yet unknown functions as well as identifies C4 associated pathways. Molecular evidence for a photorespiratory CO2 pump prior to the establishment of the C4 cycle-based CO2 pump is provided. Cluster analysis defines the upper limit of C4-related gene expression changes in mature leaves of Flaveria as 3582 alterations. PMID:21705644

  14. Classical complement activation as a footprint for murine and human antiphospholipid antibody-induced fetal loss.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Danielle; Buurma, Aletta; Goemaere, Natascha N; Girardi, Guillermina; le Cessie, Saskia; Scherjon, Sicco; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W M; de Heer, Emile; Bruijn, Jan A; Bajema, Ingeborg M

    2011-12-01

    Recurrent miscarriage, fetal growth restriction and intrauterine fetal death are frequently occurring complications of pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythaematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Murine models show that complement activation plays a pivotal role in antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity, but the exact pathways of complement activation and their potential role in human pregnancy are insufficiently understood. We hypothesized that the classical pathway would play a major role in inducing fetal loss. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice and mice deficient in C1q and factor D were injected with antiphospholipid antibodies or normal human IgG. Mouse placentas were subsequently stained with an anti-C4 antibody and anti-normal human IgG to determine the presence of classical complement activation and IgG binding. Findings in mice were validated in 88 human placentae from 83 women (SLE and APS cases versus controls), which were immunohistochemically stained for C4d, C1q, properdin and MBL. Staining patterns were compared to pregnancy outcome. In murine placentae of mice pretreated with antiphospholipid antibodies, increased C4 deposition was observed, which was associated with adverse fetal outcome but not with IgG binding. In humans, diffuse C4d staining at the feto-maternal interface was present almost exclusively in patients with SLE and/or APS (p < 0.001) and was related to intrauterine fetal death (p = 0.03). Our data show that presence of C4d in murine and human placentae is strongly related to adverse fetal outcome in the setting of SLE and APS. The excessive deposition of C4d supports the concept of severe autoantibody-mediated injury at the fetal-maternal interface. We suggest C4d as a potential biomarker of autoantibody-mediated fetal loss in SLE and APS.

  15. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J.; Julian, Bruce A.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan–binding lectin–associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome–wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H–related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1–containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease. PMID:25694468

  16. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J; Julian, Bruce A; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Novak, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome-wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H-related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1-containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease.

  17. Alternative Complement Pathway Deregulation Is Correlated with Dengue Severity

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Silva, Ana M.; Cordeiro, Marli T.; Brito, Carlos A.; Gil, Laura H. V. G.; Braga-Neto, Ulisses; Marques, Ernesto T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The complement system, a key component that links the innate and adaptive immune responses, has three pathways: the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. In the present study, we have analyzed the levels of various complement components in blood samples from dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients and found that the level of complement activation is associated with disease severity. Methods and Results Patients with DHF had lower levels of complement factor 3 (C3; p = 0.002) and increased levels of C3a, C4a and C5a (p<0.0001) when compared to those with the less severe form, DF. There were no significant differences between DF and DHF patients in the levels of C1q, immunocomplexes (CIC-CIq) and CRP. However, small but statistically significant differences were detected in the levels of MBL. In contrast, the levels of two regulatory proteins of the alternative pathway varied widely between DF and DHF patients: DHF patients had higher levels of factor D (p = 0.01), which cleaves factor B to yield the active (C3bBb) C3 convertase, and lower levels of factor H (p = 0.03), which inactivates the (C3bBb) C3 convertase, than did DF patients. When we considered the levels of factors D and H together as an indicator of (C3bBb) C3 convertase regulation, we found that the plasma levels of these regulatory proteins in DHF patients favored the formation of the (C3bBb) C3 convertase, whereas its formation was inhibited in DF patients (p<0.0001). Conclusion The data suggest that an imbalance in the levels of regulatory factors D and H is associated with an abnormal regulation of complement activity in DHF patients. PMID:19707565

  18. Role of complement and NK cells in antibody mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Takurin; Hirohashi, Tsutomu; Alessandrini, Alessandro; Chase, Catherine M; Farkash, Evan A; Neal Smith, R; Madsen, Joren C; Russell, Paul S; Colvin, Robert B

    2012-12-01

    Despite extensive research on T cells and potent immunosuppressive regimens that target cellular mediated rejection, few regimens have been proved to be effective on antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), particularly in the chronic setting. C4d deposition in the graft has been proved to be a useful marker for AMR; however, there is an imperfect association between C4d and AMR. While complement has been considered as the main player in acute AMR, the effector mechanisms in chronic AMR are still debated. Recent studies support the role of NK cells and direct effects of antibody on endothelium cells in a mechanism suggesting the presence of a complement-independent pathway. Here, we review the history, currently available systems and progress in experimental animal research. Although there are consistent findings from human and animal research, transposing the experimental results from rodent to human has been hampered by the differences in endothelial functions between species. We briefly describe the findings from patients and compare them with results from animals, to propose a combined perspective.

  19. Epitaxial Stabilization between Intermetallic and Carbide Domains in the Structures of Mn16SiC4 and Mn17Si2C4.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Rie T; Guo, Yiming; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2016-01-13

    The concept of frustration between competing geometrical or bonding motifs is frequently evoked in explaining complex phenomena in the structures and properties of materials. This idea is of particular importance for metallic systems, where frustration forms the basis for the design of metallic glasses, a source of diverse magnetic phenomena, and a rationale for the existence of intermetallics with giant unit cells containing thousands of atoms. Unlike soft materials, however, where conflicts can be synthetically encoded in the molecular structure, staging frustration in the metallic state is challenging due to the ease of macroscopic segregation of incompatible components. In this Article, we illustrate one approach for inducing the intergrowth of incompatible bonding motifs with the synthesis and characterization of two new intermetallic carbides: Mn16SiC4 (mC42) and Mn17Si2C4 (mP46). Similar to the phases Mn5SiC and Mn8Si2C in the Mn-Si-C system, these compounds appear as intergrowths of Mn3C and tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) regions reminiscent of Mn-rich Mn-Si phases. The nearly complete spatial segregation of Mn-Si (intermetallic) and Mn-C (carbide) interactions in these structures can be understood from the differing geometrical requirements of C and Si. Rather than macroscopically separating into distinct phases, though, the two bonding types are tightly interwoven, with most Mn atoms being on the interfaces. DFT chemical pressure analysis reveals a driving force stabilizing these interfaces: the major local pressures acting between the Mn atoms in the Mn-Si and Mn-C systems are of opposite signs. Joining the intermetallic and carbide domains together then provides substantial relief to these local pressures, an effect we term epitaxial stabilization.

  20. Evaluation of EIGEN-6C4 by means of various functions of the gravity potential, and by GPS/Leveling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klokocnik, Jaroslav; Kostelecky, Jan; Bucha, Blazej; Bezdek, Ales; Foerste, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The combined gravity field model EIGEN-6C4 (Foerste et al., 2014) is the latest combined global gravity field model of GFZ Potsdam and GRGS Toulouse. EIGEN-6C4 has been generated including the satellite gravity gradiometry data of the entire GOCE mission (November 2009 till October 2013) and is of maximum spherical degree and order 2190. In this study EIGEN-6C4 has been compared with EGM 2008 to its maximum degree and order via gravity disturbancies, the Marussi tensor of the second derivatives of the disturbing potential, the invariants of the gravity field, their specific combinations, strike angles and virtual deformations over the whole world. The emphasis is put on such areas where GOCE data (complete set of gradiometry measurements after reductions) in EIGEN-6C4 obviously contributes to an improvement of the gravity field description. GNSS/Leveling geoid heights are independent data source for the evaluation of gravity field models. Therefore, we use the GNSS/Leveling data sets over the territories of several countries in Europe, Brazil, the USA, Canada and Japan for the evaluation of EIGEN-6C4 w.r.t. EGM 2008.

  1. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  2. The complement system and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Regal, Jean F; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Burwick, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the fetal allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child.

  3. Active C4 Electrodes for Local Field Potential Recording Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Freedman, David; Sahin, Mesut; Ünlü, M. Selim; Knepper, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular neural recording, with multi-electrode arrays (MEAs), is a powerful method used to study neural function at the network level. However, in a high density array, it can be costly and time consuming to integrate the active circuit with the expensive electrodes. In this paper, we present a 4 mm × 4 mm neural recording integrated circuit (IC) chip, utilizing IBM C4 bumps as recording electrodes, which enable a seamless active chip and electrode integration. The IC chip was designed and fabricated in a 0.13 μm BiCMOS process for both in vitro and in vivo applications. It has an input-referred noise of 4.6 μVrms for the bandwidth of 10 Hz to 10 kHz and a power dissipation of 11.25 mW at 2.5 V, or 43.9 μW per input channel. This prototype is scalable for implementing larger number and higher density electrode arrays. To validate the functionality of the chip, electrical testing results and acute in vivo recordings from a rat barrel cortex are presented. PMID:26861324

  4. Active C4 Electrodes for Local Field Potential Recording Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Freedman, David; Sahin, Mesut; Ünlü, M Selim; Knepper, Ronald

    2016-02-04

    Extracellular neural recording, with multi-electrode arrays (MEAs), is a powerful method used to study neural function at the network level. However, in a high density array, it can be costly and time consuming to integrate the active circuit with the expensive electrodes. In this paper, we present a 4 mm × 4 mm neural recording integrated circuit (IC) chip, utilizing IBM C4 bumps as recording electrodes, which enable a seamless active chip and electrode integration. The IC chip was designed and fabricated in a 0.13 μm BiCMOS process for both in vitro and in vivo applications. It has an input-referred noise of 4.6 μV rms for the bandwidth of 10 Hz to 10 kHz and a power dissipation of 11.25 mW at 2.5 V, or 43.9 μW per input channel. This prototype is scalable for implementing larger number and higher density electrode arrays. To validate the functionality of the chip, electrical testing results and acute in vivo recordings from a rat barrel cortex are presented.

  5. Membrane localization and topology of leukotriene C4 synthase.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Peter; Weber, Brittany M; McKee, Mary; Brown, Dennis; Soberman, Roy J

    2002-08-01

    Leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4)) synthase conjugates LTA(4) with GSH to form LTC(4). Determining the site of LTC(4) synthesis and the topology of LTC(4) synthase may uncover unappreciated intracellular roles for LTC(4), as well as how LTC(4) is transferred to its export carrier, the multidrug resistance protein-1. We have determined the membrane localization of LTC(4) synthase by immunoelectron microscopy. In contrast to the closely related five-lipoxygenase-activating protein, LTC(4) synthase is distributed in the outer nuclear membrane and peripheral endoplasmic reticulum but is excluded from the inner nuclear membrane. We have combined immunofluorescence with differential membrane permeabilization to determine the topology of LTC(4) synthase. The active site of LTC(4) synthase is localized in the lumen of the nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that the synthesis of LTB(4) and LTC(4) occurs in different subcellular locations and suggests that LTC(4) must be returned to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane for export by multidrug resistance protein-1. The differential localization of two very similar integral membrane proteins suggests that mechanisms other than size-dependent exclusion regulate their passage to the inner nuclear membrane.

  6. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid influence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang-shuai; Li, Qing-feng; Dong, Ming-min; Zan, Tao; Ding, Shuang; Liu, Lin-bo

    2016-01-01

    Nerve regeneration conditioned fluid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the proteinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis confirmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8β and complement factor D) in the nerve regeneration conditioned fluid and each varied at different time points. These findings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration. PMID:27212935

  7. In vitro and in vivo changes in human complement caused by silage.

    PubMed Central

    Olenchock, S A; May, J J; Pratt, D S; Lewis, D M; Mull, J C; Stallones, L

    1986-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of silage samples from four farms in up-state New York were reacted in vitro with normal human serum. Hemolytic levels of complement component C3 were consumed in a dose-dependent fashion, and the four extracts differed in their relative activity rankings. Studies with chelated serum indicate that the alternative complement pathway is involved in the activation, and the active fragment C3b was demonstrated. Serum levels of hemolytic C3 and C4 in vivo were quantified before and after farmers performed their normal silo unloading operations. Although the study groups were small, suggestive evidence of in vivo complement consumption was found. IgE-related allergy did not appear to be of significance to the study groups. Complement activation may be an initiator of or contributor to adverse reactions in farmers who are exposed to airborne silage dusts. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. PMID:3709488

  8. Complement activation by apoptotic cells occurs predominantly via IgM and is limited to late apoptotic (secondary necrotic) cells.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Bas; Ciurana, Caroline; Rensink, Irma; Manoe, Rishi; Hack, C Erik; Aarden, Lucien A

    2004-03-01

    Apoptotic cells activate complement via various molecular mechanisms. It is not known which of these mechanisms predominate in a physiological environment. Using Jurkat cells as a model, we investigated complement deposition on vital, early and late apoptotic (secondary necrotic) cells in a physiological medium, human plasma, and established the main molecular mechanism involved in this activation. Upon incubation with recalcified plasma, binding of C3 and C4 to early apoptotic cells was similar to background binding on vital cells. In contrast, late apoptotic (secondary necrotic) cells consistently displayed substantial binding of C4 and C3 and low, but detectable, binding of C1q. Binding of C3 and C4 to the apoptotic cells was abolished by EDTA or Mg-EGTA, and also by C1-inhibitor or a monoclonal antibody that inhibits C1q binding, indicating that complement fixation by the apoptotic cells was mainly dependent on the classical pathway. Late apoptotic cells also consistently bound IgM, in which binding significantly correlated with that of C4 and C3. Depletion of plasma for IgM abolished most of the complement fixation by apoptotic cells, which was restored by supplementation with purified IgM. We conclude that complement binding by apoptotic cells in normal human plasma occurs mainly to late apoptotic, secondary necrotic cells, and that the dominant mechanism involves classical pathway activation by IgM.

  9. The recombinant LIC10508 is a plasma fibronectin, plasminogen, fibrinogen and C4BP-binding protein of Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Gabriela H; Teixeira, Aline F; Fernandes, Luis G; de Souza, Gisele O; Kirchgatter, Karin; Romero, Eliete C; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Vieira, Monica L; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T O

    2016-03-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. In this study, we report that the recombinant proteins LIC10507, LIC10508 and LIC10509 are recognized by confirmed leptospirosis serum samples at both phases of the disease. The recombinant rLIC10508 and rLIC10507 are plasminogen (PLG)-binding proteins, capable of generating plasmin in the presence of a PLG activator. The proteins bind to PLG in a dose-dependent and saturable manner, fulfilling host-ligand interaction. Furthermore, rLIC10508 interacts with fibrinogen (Fg), plasma fibronectin and C4b binding protein (C4BP). The binding of rLIC10508 to Fg decreases the fibrin clotting in a thrombin-catalyzed reaction. The incubation with 4 μM of protein promoted 40% inhibition upon clotting formation. C4BP bound to rLIC10508 retained its cofactor activity for factor I promoting the cleavage of C4b protein, which may reduce the membrane attack complex formation. Although these proteins have high amino acid sequence similarity, rLIC10508 is the most talented of the three, a behavior that might be explained by its unique putative 3D structure, whereas structures of rLIC10507 and rLIC10509 are very similar. Plasmin generation (rLIC10507 and rLIC10508), together with decreasing fibrin clot formation (rLIC10508) and impairment of the complement system (rLIC10508) may help the bacteria to overcome host defense, facilitating the infection process.

  10. Studies of serum complement in the hypocomplementaemic nephritides

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D. Gwyn; Peters, D. K.; Fallows, Jane; Petrie, Aviva; Kourilsky, O.; Morel-Maroger, Liliane; Cameron, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The sera from forty patients with mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis (MCGN), fifty-two patients with acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) and twenty-five patients with the nephritis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were examined for concentrations of C1q, C4, C3, C5, C6, C7, glycine-rich beta glycoprotein (GBG) and properdin, for their ability to generate cobra factor-dependent convertase, and for the presence of C3 splitting activity. Two types of C3 splitting activity were found. The first, which caused C3 breakdown in normal human serum in the presence of Mg2+–EGTA, was in MCGN and in a minority of patients with AGN. The second, which failed to break down C3 in either Mg2+–EGTA or EDTA, was found in SLE and AGN. In MCGN and AGN low values of C1q and C4 were found, and there was a significant correlation between the concentrations of these components, suggesting activation of the classical pathway. In SLE much greater reduction in C1q and C4 was observed. Significant reduction in GBG was found in each disease with a significant correlation of GBG with C4 and, in MCGN and SLE, with C3. In AGN and SLE there were significant overall reductions in properdin levels and a good correlation between C3 and properdin, whereas in MCGN, although five of the forty patients had a low properdin there was no correlation between C3 and properdin, and no overall reduction in properdin. These data suggest that complement is activated via the classical and C3b-feedback pathways in MCGN, AGN and SLE, but do not provide evidence for a role for properdin in causing hypocomplementaemia in MCGN. The two histological variants of MCGN were found to differ in their complement concentrations; patients with intramembranous deposits had a lower C3 concentration and those with subendothelial deposits a lower C4 concentration, suggesting different pathogenetic mechanisms in these two types of MCGN. PMID:4219908

  11. Observations of Titan 3C-4 Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan 3C-4 Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper will present a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots will also be shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) believed to be associated with the Titan break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9-m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN# 25001, 33509, 33510) and the parent rocket body. Color index data will be used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In 2012, the SSN added 16 additional fragments to the catalogue. MODEST acquired magnitude data on ten Titan fragments in late 2012 and early 2013. The magnitude distribution of all the observed fragments are analyzed as a function of time. In order to better characterize the breakup fragments spectral measurements were acquired on the original rocket body and five Titan fragments using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., Aluminum and various paints) and categorized based on known absorption features for spacecraft materials.

  12. Complement in the Homeostatic and Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Alawieh, Ali; Elvington, Andrew; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a component of the immune system involved in both recognition and response to pathogens, and it is implicated in an increasing number of homeostatic and disease processes. It is well documented that reperfusion of ischemic tissue results in complement activation and an inflammatory response that causes post-reperfusion injury. This occurs following cerebral ischemia and reperfusion and triggers secondary damage that extends beyond the initial infarcted area, an outcome that has rationalized the use of complement inhibitors as candidate therapeutics after stroke. In the central nervous system, however, recent studies have revealed that complement also has essential roles in synaptic pruning, neurogenesis, and neuronal migration. In the context of recovery after stroke, these apparent divergent functions of complement may account for findings that the protective effect of complement inhibition in the acute phase after stroke is not always maintained in the subacute and chronic phases. The development of effective stroke therapies based on modulation of the complement system will require a detailed understanding of complement-dependent processes in both early neurodegenerative events and delayed neuro-reparatory processes. Here, we review the role of complement in normal brain physiology, the events initiating complement activation after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, and the contribution of complement to both injury and recovery. We also discuss how the design of future experiments may better characterize the dual role of complement in recovery after ischemic stroke. PMID:26322048

  13. Studies of low-lying triplet states in 1,3-C4F6, c-C4F6 and 2-C4F6 by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limão-Vieira, P.; Duflot, D.; Anzai, K.; Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Silva, F. Ferreira da; Mogi, D.; Tanioka, T.; Tanaka, H.

    2013-06-01

    This Letter reports on the first measurements of the lowest lying triplet states as studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy for C4F6 isomers, hexafluoro-1,3-butadiene (1,3-C4F6), hexafluorocyclobutene (c-C4F6) and hexafluoro-2-butyne (2-C4F6). This study has been performed at an incident electron energy of 30 eV, 30°, whilst sweeping the energy loss over the range 2.0-15.0 eV. The electronic state spectroscopy has been investigated and the assignments supported by multi-reference quantum chemical calculations. The transition to the steepest electronic excited potential energy curve, is suggested to be dominant for 2-C4F6, due to the large broadening in its energy profile.

  14. Complement activation in relation to capillary leakage in children with septic shock and purpura.

    PubMed

    Hazelzet, J A; de Groot, R; van Mierlo, G; Joosten, K F; van der Voort, E; Eerenberg, A; Suur, M H; Hop, W C; Hack, C E

    1998-11-01

    To assess the relationship between capillary leakage and inflammatory mediators during sepsis, blood samples were taken on hospital admission, as well as 24 and 72 h later, from 52 children (median age, 3.3 years) with severe meningococcal sepsis, of whom 38 survived and 14 died. Parameters related to cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6] IL-8, plasma phospholipase A2, and C-reactive protein [CRP]), to neutrophil degranulation (elastase and lactoferrin), to complement activation (C3a, C3b/c, C4b/c, and C3- and C4-CRP complexes), and to complement regulation (functional and inactivated C1 inhibitor and C4BP) were determined. The degree of capillary leakage was derived from the amount of plasma infused and the severity of disease by assessing the pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) score. Levels of IL-6, IL-8, C3b/c, C3-CRP complexes, and C4BP on admission, adjusted for the duration of skin lesions, were significantly different in survivors and nonsurvivors (C3b/c levels were on average 2.2 times higher in nonsurvivors, and C3-CRP levels were 1.9 times higher in survivors). Mortality was independently related to the levels of C3b/c and C3-CRP complexes. In agreement with this, levels of complement activation products correlated well with the PRISM score or capillary leakage. Thus, these data show that complement activation in patients with severe meningococcal sepsis is associated with a poor outcome and a more severe disease course. Further studies should reveal whether complement activation may be a target for therapeutical intervention in this disease.

  15. Mesophilic Aeromonas sp. serogroup O:11 resistance to complement-mediated killing.

    PubMed Central

    Merino, S; Rubires, X; Aguilar, A; Albertí, S; Hernandez-Allés, S; Benedí, V J; Tomas, J M

    1996-01-01

    The complement activation by and resistance to complement-mediated killing of Aeromonas sp. strains from serogroup O:11 were investigated by using different wild-type strains (with an S-layer characteristic of this serogroup) and their isogenic mutants characterized for their surface components (S-layer and lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). All of the Aeromonas sp. serogroup O:11 wild-type strains are unable to activate complement, which suggested that the S-layer completely covered the LPS molecules. We found that the classical complement pathway is involved in serum killing of susceptible Aeromonas sp. mutant strains of serogroup O11, while the alternative complement pathway seems not to be involved, and that the complement activation seems to be independent of antibody. The smooth mutant strains devoid of the S-layer (S-layer isogenic mutants) or isogenic LPS mutant strains with a complete or rather complete LPS core (also without the S-layer) are able to activate complement but are resistant to complement-mediated killing. The reasons for this resistance are that C3b is rapidly degraded, and therefore the lytic membrane attack complex (C5b-9) is not formed. Isogenic LPS rough mutants with an incomplete LPS core are serum sensitive because they bind more C3b than the resistant strains, the C3b is not completely degraded, and therefore the lytic complex (C5b-9) is formed. PMID:8945581

  16. SHOCK INITIATION OF COMPOSITION B AND C-4 EXPLOSIVES; EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Forbes, J W

    2006-08-18

    Shock initiation experiments on the explosives Composition B and C-4 were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data for the purpose of providing the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model with proper modeling parameters. A 100 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges containing manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages embedded in the explosive sample. Experimental data provided new information on the shock velocity--particle velocity relationship for each of the investigated material in their respective pressure range. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement with previously published data, and Ignition and Growth modeling calculations resulted in a good fit to the experimental data. Identical ignition and growth reaction rate parameters were used for C-4 and Composition B, and the Composition B model also included a third reaction rate to simulate the completion of reaction by the TNT component. This model can be applied to shock initiation scenarios that have not or cannot be tested experimentally with a high level of confidence in its predictions.

  17. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING OF COMPOSITION B AND C-4

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Forbes, J W

    2006-06-13

    Shock initiation experiments on the explosives Composition B and C-4 were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data for the purpose of determining the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model with proper modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges containing manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages embedded in the explosive sample. Experimental data provided new information on the shock velocity versus particle velocity relationship for each of the investigated materials in their respective pressure range. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement with previously published data, and Ignition and Growth modeling calculations resulted in a good fit to the experimental data. These experimental data were used to determine Ignition and Growth reactive flow model parameters for these explosives. Identical ignition and growth reaction rate parameters were used for C-4 and Composition B, and the Composition B model also included a third reaction rate to simulate the completion of reaction by the TNT component. The Composition B model was then tested on existing short pulse duration, gap test, and projectile impact shock initiation with good results. This Composition B model can be applied to shock initiation scenarios that have not or cannot be tested experimentally with a high level of confidence in its predictions.

  18. Developmental Genetic Mechanisms of C4 Syndrome Based on Transcriptome Analysis of C3 Cotyledons and C4 Assimilating Shoots in Haloxylon ammodendron

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanyuan; Ma, Xiuling; Zhao, Jialei; Xu, Jiajia; Shi, Junfeng; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Zhao, Yanxiu; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that transferring the C4 engine into C3 crops will greatly increase the yields of major C3 crops. Many efforts have been made since the 1960s, but relatively little success has been achieved because C4plant traits, referred to collectively as C4 syndrome, are very complex, and little is known about the genetic mechanisms involved. Unfortunately, there exists no ideal genetic model system to study C4 syndrome. It was previously reported that the Haloxylon species have different photosynthetic pathways in different photosynthetic organs, cotyledons and assimilating shoots. Here, we took advantage of the developmental switch from the C3 to the C4 pathway to study the genetic mechanisms behind this natural transition. We compared the transcriptomes of cotyledons and assimilating shoots using mRNA-Seq to gain insight into the molecular and cellular events associated with C4 syndrome. A total of 2959 differentially expressed genes [FDR≤0.001 and abs (|log2(Fold change)|≥1)] were identified, revealing that the transcriptomes of cotyledons and assimilating shoots are considerably different. We further identified a set of putative regulators of C4 syndrome. This study expands our understanding of the development of C4 syndrome and provides a new model system for future studies on the C3-to- C4 switch mechanism. PMID:25643361

  19. Complement the hemostatic system: an intimate relationship.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Ilene Ceil

    2014-05-01

    The complement system is important part of our innate immune system and interacts directly with the hemostatic system. Disorders of complement activation or dysregulation resulting in excess complement generation, such as Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH), atypical Hemolytic uremic Syndrome (aHUS) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) have been associated with significant thrombophilia. Terminal Complement (C5b-9) deposition on endothelial and tumor cell membranes has also been reported in a variety of cancer. Recent developments in complement inhibition have given us new insights into the mechanism of thrombosis in these disorders.

  20. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Deficiencies of Early Components of the Complement Classical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Ana Catarina Lunz; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in the innate and acquired immune response against pathogens. It consists of more than 30 proteins found in soluble form or attached to cell membranes. Most complement proteins circulate in inactive forms and can be sequentially activated by the classical, alternative, or lectin pathways. Biological functions, such as opsonization, removal of apoptotic cells, adjuvant function, activation of B lymphocytes, degranulation of mast cells and basophils, and solubilization and clearance of immune complex and cell lysis, are dependent on complement activation. Although the activation of the complement system is important to avoid infections, it also can contribute to the inflammatory response triggered by immune complex deposition in tissues in autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, the deficiency of early complement proteins from the classical pathway (CP) is strongly associated with development of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) – mainly C1q deficiency (93%) and C4 deficiency (75%). The aim of this review is to focus on the deficiencies of early components of the CP (C1q, C1r, C1s, C4, and C2) proteins in SLE patients. PMID:26941740

  1. Complement Split Products in Amniotic Fluid in Pregnancies Subsequently Developing Early-Onset Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Banadakoppa, Manu; Vidaeff, Alex C.; Yallampalli, Uma; Ramin, Susan M.; Belfort, Michael A.; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the second-trimester amniotic fluid concentrations of complement split products in pregnancies subsequently affected by early-onset preeclampsia. Study Design. Cohort of 731 women with singleton pregnancies undergoing second-trimester genetic amniocentesis followed up to delivery and analyzed as a nested case-control study. Cases of preeclampsia developing before 34 weeks' gestation (n = 15) were compared with 47 uncomplicated term controls. Amniotic fluid collected at amniocentesis was tested for complement split products Bb, C4a, C3a, and C5a. Results. Women who developed early-onset preeclampsia as compared with the term pregnant controls had significantly higher (P = 0.04) median amniotic fluid C3a levels (318.7 ng/mL versus 254.5 ng/mL). Median amniotic fluid Bb levels were also significantly higher (P = 0.03) in preeclamptic women than in normal pregnant women (1127 ng/mL versus 749 ng/mL). Median levels of C4a and C5a were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusion. Our data suggest that complement activation in early pregnancy is associated with early-onset preeclampsia. We believe this to be the first prospective study to link complement activation in amniotic fluid in early pregnancy and later development of preeclampsia. Our findings provide evidence that immune dysregulation may precede the clinical manifestations of preeclampsia and that the alternative complement pathway is principally involved. PMID:26556948

  2. The Semantics of Complementation in English: A Cognitive Semantic Account of Two English Complement Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Studies on complementation in English and other languages have traditionally focused on syntactic issues, most notably on the constituent structures of different complement types. As a result, they have neglected the role of meaning in the choice of different complements. This paper investigates the semantics of complementation within the…

  3. Kranz and single-cell forms of C4 plants in the subfamily Suaedoideae show kinetic C4 convergence for PEPC and Rubisco with divergent amino acid substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Rosnow, Josh J.; Evans, Marc A.; Kapralov, Maxim V.; Cousins, Asaph B.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Roalson, Eric H.

    2015-01-01

    The two carboxylation reactions performed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) are vital in the fixation of inorganic carbon for C4 plants. The abundance of PEPC is substantially elevated in C4 leaves, while the location of Rubisco is restricted to one of two chloroplast types. These differences compared with C3 leaves have been shown to result in convergent enzyme optimization in some C4 species. Investigation into the kinetic properties of PEPC and Rubisco from Kranz C4, single cell C4, and C3 species in Chenopodiaceae s. s. subfamily Suaedoideae showed that these major carboxylases in C4 Suaedoideae species lack the same mutations found in other C4 systems which have been examined; but still have similar convergent kinetic properties. Positive selection analysis on the N-terminus of PEPC identified residues 364 and 368 to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 using Bayes empirical Bayes. Compared with previous analyses on other C4 species, PEPC from C4 Suaedoideae species have different convergent amino acids that result in a higher K m for PEP and malate tolerance compared with C3 species. Kinetic analysis of Rubisco showed that C4 species have a higher catalytic efficiency of Rubisco (k catc in mol CO2 mol–1 Rubisco active sites s–1), despite lacking convergent substitutions in the rbcL gene. The importance of kinetic changes to the two-carboxylation reactions in C4 leaves related to amino acid selection is discussed. PMID:26417023

  4. Role of complement in experiment silicosis

    SciTech Connect

    Callis, A.H.; Sohnle, P.G.; Mandel, G.S.; Mandel, N.S.

    1986-08-01

    The role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of crystal-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis was evaluated using a mouse model of silicosis and congenitally complement-deficient mice. Mice lacking the fifth component of complement (B10.D2/o) were compared to C5-sufficient animals (B10.D2/n) for pulmonary changes following intratracheal instillation of silica crystals. Complement-deficient mice demonstrated a significant reduction compared to complement-sufficient mice in both cell number and protein content of lung lavage fluid throughout the 12 weeks following silica exposure. Lung hydroxyproline content (indicative of collagen deposition) was equivalent for both strains and significantly higher than controls at all times points following silica instillation. Moreover, studies in vitro have shown that silica crystals are capable of activating complement via the alternative pathway. These studies indicate that the complement system may be responsible for some of the pulmonary inflammation, but not fibrosis elicited by silica exposure.

  5. Meningococcal disease and the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lisa A; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of meningococcal disease, this infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. The role of the complement system in innate immune defenses against invasive meningococcal disease is well established. Individuals deficient in components of the alternative and terminal complement pathways are highly predisposed to invasive, often recurrent meningococcal infections. Genome-wide analysis studies also point to a central role for complement in disease pathogenesis. Here we review the pathophysiologic events pertinent to the complement system that accompany meningococcal sepsis in humans. Meningococci use several often redundant mechanisms to evade killing by human complement. Capsular polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide glycan composition play critical roles in complement evasion. Some of the newly described protein vaccine antigens interact with complement components and have sparked considerable research interest. PMID:24104403

  6. The complement system in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Jain, Umang; Otley, Anthony R; Van Limbergen, Johan; Stadnyk, Andrew W

    2014-09-01

    Complement is well appreciated to be a potent innate immune defense against microbes and is important in the housekeeping act of removal of apoptotic and effete cells. It is also understood that hyperactivation of complement, or the lack of regulators, may underlie chronic inflammatory diseases. A pipeline of products to intervene in complement activation, some already in clinical use, is being studied in various chronic inflammatory diseases. To date, the role of complement in inflammatory bowel disease has not received a lot of research interest. Novel genetically modified laboratory animals and experiments using antagonists to complement effector molecules have kindled important research observations implicating the complement system in inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis. We review the evidence base for the role and potential therapeutic manipulation of the complement cascade in inflammatory bowel disease.

  7. Overview of Complement Activation and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Noris, Marina; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Summary Complement is an important component of the innate immune system that is crucial for defense from microbial infections and for clearance of immune complexes and injured cells. In normal conditions complement is tightly controlled by a number of fluid-phase and cell surface proteins to avoid injury to autologous tissues. When complement is hyperactivated, as occurs in autoimmune diseases or in subjects with dysfunctional regulatory proteins, it drives a severe inflammatory response in numerous organs. The kidney appears to be particularly vulnerable to complement-mediated inflammatory injury. Injury may derive from deposition of circulating active complement fragments in glomeruli, but complement locally produced and activated in the kidney also may have a role. Many kidney disorders have been linked to abnormal complement activation, including immune-complex–mediated glomerulonephritis and rare genetic kidney diseases, but also tubulointerstitial injury associated with progressive proteinuric diseases or ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:24161035

  8. Anti-complementary constituents of Houttuynia cordata and their targets in complement activation cascade.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Yun-Yi; Chen, Dao-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Activity-guided fractionation for complement inhibitors led to the isolation of 23 known compounds from Houttuynia cordata Thunb. Seven flavonoids, two alkaloids, one coumarin and two phenols showed anti-complementary activity. Preliminary inhibitory mechanism of four flavonoids, including quercitrin, afzelin, isoquercitrin and quercetin in the complement activation cascade were examined for the first time. The results indicated that the target components of flavonols are different from those of flavonosides, and the glycoside moieties may be necessary to block C3 and C4 components. PMID:24423008

  9. Development of an upper extremity FES system for individuals with C4 tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Smith, B T; Mulcahey, M J; Betz, R R

    1996-12-01

    The application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to provide upper extremity function for individuals with C4 tetraplegia is under investigation. In this study, a FES system was designed that allowed one individual with complete C4 tetraplegia to coordinate stimulated lateral or palmar prehension with stimulated arm movements using contralateral shoulder position. The system consisted of percutaneous intramuscular electrodes implanted to muscles for hand grasp and release, supination, elbow flexion, and extension and arm adduction. Due to peripheral denervation, transposition and subsequent stimulation of the paralyzed latissimus dorsi muscle provided elbow flexion and transfer and stimulation of the paralyzed extensor carpi ulnaris muscle provided forearm supination. A suspended sling provided shoulder joint stability. The subject controlled stimulation proportionally using contralateral shoulder motion sensed by a position transducer. Control of stimulated hand grasp and release were coupled with stimulated arm motions so that hand-to-mouth activities could be accomplished with one motion of the contralateral shoulder. With this system, the subject was able to grasp a milk carton placed in the hand and lift and lower it from his mouth to drink from a short straw. He could also scoop a semisolid substance with an adapted spoon and lift and lower it from the work surface to his mouth to eat. The subject required assistance to place the milk carton or spoon in his hand and position the plate for scooping. Further investigation is needed to generate the necessary arm movements to make completion of these tasks possible without assistance and to expand the range of activities possible with the FES system.

  10. Development of an upper extremity FES system for individuals with C4 tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Smith, B T; Mulcahey, M J; Betz, R R

    1996-12-01

    The application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to provide upper extremity function for individuals with C4 tetraplegia is under investigation. In this study, a FES system was designed that allowed one individual with complete C4 tetraplegia to coordinate stimulated lateral or palmar prehension with stimulated arm movements using contralateral shoulder position. The system consisted of percutaneous intramuscular electrodes implanted to muscles for hand grasp and release, supination, elbow flexion, and extension and arm adduction. Due to peripheral denervation, transposition and subsequent stimulation of the paralyzed latissimus dorsi muscle provided elbow flexion and transfer and stimulation of the paralyzed extensor carpi ulnaris muscle provided forearm supination. A suspended sling provided shoulder joint stability. The subject controlled stimulation proportionally using contralateral shoulder motion sensed by a position transducer. Control of stimulated hand grasp and release were coupled with stimulated arm motions so that hand-to-mouth activities could be accomplished with one motion of the contralateral shoulder. With this system, the subject was able to grasp a milk carton placed in the hand and lift and lower it from his mouth to drink from a short straw. He could also scoop a semisolid substance with an adapted spoon and lift and lower it from the work surface to his mouth to eat. The subject required assistance to place the milk carton or spoon in his hand and position the plate for scooping. Further investigation is needed to generate the necessary arm movements to make completion of these tasks possible without assistance and to expand the range of activities possible with the FES system. PMID:8973952

  11. EFFECTS OF MECHANICAL AGITATION AND OF TEMPERATURE UPON COMPLEMENT.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-02-01

    1. Under certain conditions, mechanical agitation destroys the complementary activity of guinea pig serum. It is most injurious when carried out constantly at a temperature of 37 degrees C., but it is extremely insignificant at 10 degrees C. After the first few hours at 37 degrees C., the destruction of complement proceeded much more rapidly, and after six hours it was almost complete. On the other hand, within one hour shaking had almost no destructive effect on complement, even at 37 degrees C. From this we may conclude that the several shakings which are necessary for fixation experiments during incubation do not modify perceptibly the outcome of the reactions. 2. The rate of destruction of the complement of guinea pig serum at temperatures above 45 degrees C. is progressively greater as it approaches 55 degrees C., at which temperature the activity is reduced in thirty minutes to one-thirtieth to one-fortieth of the original strength of the unheated serum; but it is not completely destroyed, as is commonly assumed. The velocity of destruction of guinea pig complement when exposed to 55 degrees C. for various lengths of time is found to be quite irregular, and not proportional to the length of time. This irregularity, however, presents a certain rhythm, a period of greater destruction alternating with one of less destruction.

  12. The ultraviolet photochemistry of diacetylene - Direct detection of primary products of the metastable C4H2* + C4H2 reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandy, Ralph E.; Lakshminarayan, Chitra; Frost, Rex K.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    The products of diacetylene's ultraviolet photochemistry over the 245-220 nm region were directly determined in experiments where C4H2 was excited within a small reaction tube attached to a pulsed nozzle. The products formed in the collisions of C4H2* with C4H2 were subsequently ionized by vacuum UV radiation (at 118 nm) in the ion source of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It was found that the reaction of C4H2* with C4H2 produces C6H2 (+C2H2), C8H2 (+2H,H2), and C8H3 (+H), confirming the results of Glicker and Okabe (1987). Under certain conditions, secondary products were observed. Mechanisms for the observed reactions are proposed.

  13. Dependence on vitamin K-dependent protein S for eukaryotic cell secretion of the beta-chain of C4b-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Sofia; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2010-10-15

    The anticoagulant vitamin K-dependent protein S (PS) circulates in plasma in two forms, 30% free and 70% being bound to the complement regulatory protein C4b-binding protein (C4BP). The major C4BP isoform consists of 7 α-chains and 1 β-chain (C4BPβ(+)), the chains being linked by disulfide bridges. PS binds to the β-chain with high affinity. In plasma, PS is in molar excess over C4BPβ(+) and due to the high affinity, all C4BPβ(+) molecules contain a bound PS. Taken together with the observation that PS-deficient patients have decreased levels of C4BPβ(+), this raises the question of whether PS is important for secretion of the β-chain from the cell. To test this hypothesis, HEK293 cells were stably and transiently transfected with β-chain cDNA in combinations with cDNAs for PS and/or the α-chain. The concentration of β-chains in the medium increased after co-transfection with PS cDNA, but not by α-chain cDNA, suggesting secretion of the β-chains from the cells to be dependent on concomitant synthesis of PS, but not of the α-chains. Thus, β-chains that were not disulfide-linked to the α-chains were secreted in complex with PS, either as monomers or dimers. Pulse-chase demonstrated that the complexes between PS and β-chain were formed intracellularly, in the endoplasmic reticulum. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that successful secretion of β-chains depends on intracellular complex formation with PS, but not on the α-chains. This provides an explanation for the decreased β-chain levels observed in PS-deficient patients.

  14. Revealing diversity in structural and biochemical forms of C4 photosynthesis and a C3–C4 intermediate in genus Portulaca L. (Portulacaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Voznesenskaya, Elena V.; Koteyeva, Nuria K.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Ocampo, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Portulacaceae is one of 19 families of terrestrial plants in which species having C4 photosynthesis have been found. Representative species from major clades of the genus Portulaca were studied to characterize the forms of photosynthesis structurally and biochemically. The species P. amilis, P. grandiflora, P. molokiniensis, P. oleracea, P. pilosa, and P. umbraticola belong to the subgenus Portulaca and are C4 plants based on leaf carbon isotope values, Kranz anatomy, and expression of key C4 enzymes. Portulaca umbraticola, clade Umbraticola, is NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME)-type C4 species, while P. oleracea and P. molokiniensis in clade Oleracea are NAD-ME-type C4 species, all having different forms of Atriplicoid-type leaf anatomy. In clade Pilosa, P. amilis, P. grandiflora, and P. pilosa are NADP-ME-type C4 species. They have Pilosoid-type anatomy in which Kranz tissues enclose peripheral vascular bundles with water storage in the centre of the leaf. Portulaca cf. bicolor, which belongs to subgenus Portulacella, is an NADP-ME C4 species with Portulacelloid-type anatomy; it has well-developed Kranz chlorenchyma surrounding lateral veins distributed in one plane under the adaxial epidermis with water storage cells underneath. Portulaca cryptopetala (clade Oleracea), an endemic species from central South America, was identified as a C3–C4 based on its intermediate CO2 compensation point and selective localization of glycine decarboxylase of the photorespiratory pathway in mitochondria of bundle sheath cells. The C4 Portulaca species which were examined also have cotyledons with Kranz-type anatomy, while the stems of all species have C3-type photosynthetic cells. The results indicate that multiple structural and biochemical forms of C4 photosynthesis evolved in genus Portulaca. PMID:20591900

  15. Evolution of the C4 photosynthetic pathway: events at the cellular and molecular levels.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Martha

    2013-11-01

    The biochemistry and leaf anatomy of plants using C4 photosynthesis promote the concentration of atmospheric CO2 in leaf tissue that leads to improvements in growth and yield of C4 plants over C3 species in hot, dry, high light, and/or saline environments. C4 plants like maize and sugarcane are significant food, fodder, and bioenergy crops. The C4 photosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of convergent evolution, having evolved in multiple independent lineages of land plants from ancestors employing C3 photosynthesis. In addition to C3 and C4 species, some plant lineages contain closely related C3-C4 intermediate species that demonstrate leaf anatomical, biochemical, and physiological characteristics between those of C3 plants and species using C4 photosynthesis. These groups of plants have been extremely useful in dissecting the modifications to leaf anatomy and molecular biology, which led to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. It is now clear that great variation exists in C4 leaf anatomy, and diverse molecular mechanisms underlie C4 biochemistry and physiology. However, all these different paths have led to the same destination-the expression of a C4 CO2 concentrating mechanism. Further identification of C4 leaf anatomical traits and molecular biological components, and understanding how they are controlled and assembled will not only allow for additional insights into evolutionary convergence, but also contribute to sustainable food and bioenergy production strategies.

  16. Expression analysis of kenaf cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) ortholog during developmental and stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to clone and analyze the expression pattern of a C4H gene encoding cinnamate 4-hydroxylase from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.). A full-length C4H ortholog was cloned using degenerate primers and the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) method. The full-length C4H ortholog...

  17. Effects of complement activation on allograft injury

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Joong Hyuk; Heeger, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize the current knowledge regarding mechanisms linking the complement system to transplant injury, highlighting findings reported since 2013. Recent findings Building upon the documentation that complement activation is a pathogenic mediator of post-transplant ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, emerging evidence indicates blocking either the classical or lectin pathways attenuates IR injury in animal models. Immune cell-derived and locally activated complement, including intracellular C3 positively modulates allo-reactive T cell activation and expansion, while simultaneously inhibiting regulatory T cell induction and function, together promoting transplant rejection. While alloantibody-initiated complement activation directly injures target cells, complement-dependent signals activate endothelial cells to facilitate T cell dependent inflammation. Complement activation within allografts contributes to progressive chronic injury and fibrosis. Summary The complement cascade, traditionally considered relevant to transplantation only as an effector mechanism of antibody-initiated allograft injury, is now understood to damage the allograft through multiple mechanisms. Complement activation promotes post-transplant IR injury, formation and function of allo-antibody, differentiation and function of alloreactive T cells, and contributes to chronic progressive allograft failure. The recognition that complement impacts transplant injury at many levels provides a foundation for targeting complement as a therapy to prolong transplant survival and improve patient health. PMID:26132735

  18. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  19. The complement system in human cardiometabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Hertle, E; Stehouwer, C D A; van Greevenbroek, M M J

    2014-10-01

    The complement system has been implicated in obesity, fatty liver, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Complement factors are produced in adipose tissue and appear to be involved in adipose tissue metabolism and local inflammation. Thereby complement links adipose tissue inflammation to systemic metabolic derangements, such as low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, complement has been implicated in pathophysiological mechanisms of diet- and alcohol induced liver damage, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and fibrinolysis. In this review, we summarize current evidence on the role of the complement system in several processes of human cardiometabolic disease. C3 is the central component in complement activation, and has most widely been studied in humans. C3 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, liver dysfunction, risk of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. C3 can be activated by the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathway of complement activation; and downstream activation of C3 activates the terminal pathway. Complement may also be activated via extrinsic proteases of the coagulation, fibrinolysis and the kinin systems. Studies on the different complement activation pathways in human cardiometabolic disease are limited, but available evidence suggests that they may have distinct roles in processes underlying cardiometabolic disease. The lectin pathway appeared beneficial in some studies on type 2 diabetes and CVD, while factors of the classical and the alternative pathway were related to unfavourable cardiometabolic traits. The terminal complement pathway was also implicated in insulin resistance and liver disease, and appears to have a prominent role in acute and advanced CVD. The available human data suggest a complex and potentially causal role for the complement system in human cardiometabolic disease. Further, preferably longitudinal studies are needed to

  20. Complement System in the Pathogenesis of Benign Lymphoepithelial Lesions of the Lacrimal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Ge, Xin; Wang, Xiaona; Liu, Xiao; Ma, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to examine the potential involvement of local complement system gene expression in the pathogenesis of benign lymphoepithelial lesions (BLEL) of the lacrimal gland. Methods We collected data from 9 consecutive pathologically confirmed patients with BLEL of the lacrimal gland and 9 cases with orbital cavernous hemangioma as a control group, and adopted whole genome microarray to screen complement system-related differential genes, followed by RT-PCR verification and in-depth enrichment analysis (Gene Ontology analysis) of the gene sets. Results The expression of 14 complement system-related genes in the pathologic tissue, including C2, C3, ITGB2, CR2, C1QB, CR1, ITGAX, CFP, C1QA, C4B|C4A, FANCA, C1QC, C3AR1 and CFHR4, were significantly upregulated while 7 other complement system-related genes, C5, CFI, CFHR1|CFH, CFH, CD55, CR1L and CFD were significantly downregulated in the lacrimal glands of BLEL patients. The microarray results were consistent with RT-PCR analysis results. Immunohistochemistry analysis of C3c and C1q complement component proteins in the resected tissue were positive in BLEL patients, while the control group had negative expression of these proteins. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that activation of the genes of complement system-mediated signaling pathways were the most enriched differential gene group in BLEL patients. Conclusions Local expression of complement components is prominently abnormal in BLEL, and may well play a role in its pathogenesis. PMID:26849056

  1. Eosinophil granule cationic proteins regulate the classical pathway of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, J M; Edens, R E; Bell, C S; Gleich, G J

    1995-01-01

    Major basic protein, the primary constituent of eosinophil granules, regulates the alternative and classical pathways of complement. Major basic protein and other eosinophil granule cationic proteins, which are important in mediating tissue damage in allergic disease, regulate the alternative pathway by interfering with C3b interaction with factor B to assemble an alternative pathway C3 convertase. In the present study, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, as well as major basic protein, were examined for capacity to regulate the classical pathway. Eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and major basic protein inhibited formation of cell-bound classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a), causing 50% inhibition of complement-mediated lysis at about 0.19, 0.75 and 0.5 micrograms/10(7) cellular intermediates, respectively. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin had no activity on this pathway of complement. The eosinophil granule proteins were examined for activity on the formation of the membrane attack complex. Major basic protein and eosinophil cationic protein had no activity on terminal lysis. In contrast, eosinophil peroxidase inhibited lysis of EAC1,4b,2a,3b,5b, but had only minimal activity on later events in complement lysis. These polycations were then examined to determine the site(s) at which they regulated the early classical pathway. Eosinophil granule polycationic proteins: (1) reduced the Zmax at all time points but had only minimal effect on the Tmax during the formation of the classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a); (2) inhibited formation of EAC1,4b,2a proportional to C4 but independent of C2 concentration; (3) inhibited fluid phase formation of C1,4b,2a, as reflected by a decrease in C1-induced consumption of C2 over time; and (4) inhibited C1 activity over time without a direct effect on either C4 or C2. These observations suggest that polycations regulate the early classical pathway by

  2. Solvation Thermodynamic Properties of Hydrogen Sulfide in [C4mim][PF6], [C4mim][BF4], and [C4mim][Cl] Ionic Liquids, Determined by Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Badillo, Joel; Gallo, Marco; Alvarado, Sandra; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2015-08-20

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and acid gases from natural gas is accomplished by absorption processes using a solvent. The gas solubility in a liquid can be used to measure the degree of removal of the gas and is quantified by the Henry's constant, the free energy of solvation at infinite dilution, or the excess chemical potential. In this work, Henry's constants and thermodynamic properties of solvation of H2S were calculated in three ionic liquids: [C4mim][PF6], [C4mim][BF4], and [C4mim][Cl] ([C4mim], 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium). The first step in this work was the evaluation of the force fields for the gas and condensed phases in order to obtain accurate values for the excess chemical potential for H2S on each ionic liquid using free energy perturbation techniques. In the H2S-[C4mim][PF6] and H2S-[C4mim][BF4] systems, the results obtained by molecular simulation agree with the experimental values reported in the literature. However, the solvation free energy calculated for the H2S-[C4mim][Cl] system can be considered predictive because of the lack of experimental data at the simulated conditions. Based on these results, the best solvent for removing H2S is [C4mim][Cl] because it has the highest affinity for this species (lowest value of the Henry's constant). Also, solvation thermodynamic properties such as enthalpy and entropy were calculated in order to evaluate their contribution to the free energy of solvation.

  3. C4MIP – The Coupled Climate–Carbon Cycle Model Intercomparison Project: Experimental protocol for CMIP6

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, Chris D.; Arora, Vivek; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Bopp, Laurent; Brovkin, Victor; Dunne, John; Graven, Heather; Hoffman, Forrest; Ilyina, Tatiana; John, Jasmin G.; et al

    2016-08-25

    Coordinated experimental design and implementation has become a cornerstone of global climate modelling. Model Intercomparison Projects (MIPs) enable systematic and robust analysis of results across many models, by reducing the influence of ad hoc differences in model set-up or experimental boundary conditions. As it enters its 6th phase, the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6) has grown significantly in scope with the design and documentation of individual simulations delegated to individual climate science communities. The Coupled Climate–Carbon Cycle Model Intercomparison Project (C4MIP) takes responsibility for design, documentation, and analysis of carbon cycle feedbacks and interactions in climate simulations. These feedbacks aremore » potentially large and play a leading-order contribution in determining the atmospheric composition in response to human emissions of CO2 and in the setting of emissions targets to stabilize climate or avoid dangerous climate change. For over a decade, C4MIP has coordinated coupled climate–carbon cycle simulations, and in this paper we describe the C4MIP simulations that will be formally part of CMIP6. While the climate–carbon cycle community has created this experimental design, the simulations also fit within the wider CMIP activity, conform to some common standards including documentation and diagnostic requests, and are designed to complement the CMIP core experiments known as the Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima (DECK). C4MIP has three key strands of scientific motivation and the requested simulations are designed to satisfy their needs: (1) pre-industrial and historical simulations (formally part of the common set of CMIP6 experiments) to enable model evaluation, (2) idealized coupled and partially coupled simulations with 1 % per year increases in CO2 to enable diagnosis of feedback strength and its components, (3) future scenario simulations to project how the Earth system will

  4. C4MIP - The Coupled Climate-Carbon Cycle Model Intercomparison Project: experimental protocol for CMIP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris D.; Arora, Vivek; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Bopp, Laurent; Brovkin, Victor; Dunne, John; Graven, Heather; Hoffman, Forrest; Ilyina, Tatiana; John, Jasmin G.; Jung, Martin; Kawamiya, Michio; Koven, Charlie; Pongratz, Julia; Raddatz, Thomas; Randerson, James T.; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-08-01

    Coordinated experimental design and implementation has become a cornerstone of global climate modelling. Model Intercomparison Projects (MIPs) enable systematic and robust analysis of results across many models, by reducing the influence of ad hoc differences in model set-up or experimental boundary conditions. As it enters its 6th phase, the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6) has grown significantly in scope with the design and documentation of individual simulations delegated to individual climate science communities. The Coupled Climate-Carbon Cycle Model Intercomparison Project (C4MIP) takes responsibility for design, documentation, and analysis of carbon cycle feedbacks and interactions in climate simulations. These feedbacks are potentially large and play a leading-order contribution in determining the atmospheric composition in response to human emissions of CO2 and in the setting of emissions targets to stabilize climate or avoid dangerous climate change. For over a decade, C4MIP has coordinated coupled climate-carbon cycle simulations, and in this paper we describe the C4MIP simulations that will be formally part of CMIP6. While the climate-carbon cycle community has created this experimental design, the simulations also fit within the wider CMIP activity, conform to some common standards including documentation and diagnostic requests, and are designed to complement the CMIP core experiments known as the Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima (DECK). C4MIP has three key strands of scientific motivation and the requested simulations are designed to satisfy their needs: (1) pre-industrial and historical simulations (formally part of the common set of CMIP6 experiments) to enable model evaluation, (2) idealized coupled and partially coupled simulations with 1 % per year increases in CO2 to enable diagnosis of feedback strength and its components, (3) future scenario simulations to project how the Earth system will respond to

  5. Africa's wild C4 plant foods and possible early hominid diets.

    PubMed

    Peters, Charles R; Vogel, John C

    2005-03-01

    A small minority of Africa's wild plant foods are C4. These are primarily the seeds of some of the C4 grasses, the rootstocks and stem/leaf bases of some of the C4 sedges (especially papyrus), and the leaves of some of the C4 herbaceous dicots (forbs). These wild food plants are commonly found in disturbed ground and wetlands (particularly the grasses and sedges). Multiple lines of evidence indicate that C4 grasses were present in Africa by at least the late Miocene. It is a reasonable hypothesis that the prehistory of the C4 sedges parallels that of the C4 grasses, but the C4 forbs may not have become common until the late Pleistocene. CAM plants may have a more ancient history, but offer few opportunities for an additional C4-like dietary signal. The environmental reconstructions available for the early South African hominid sites do not indicate the presence of large wetlands, and therefore probably the absence of a strong potential for a C4 plant food diet. However, carbon isotope analyses of tooth enamel from three species of early South African hominids have shown that there was a significant but not dominant contribution of C4 biomass in their diets. Since it appears unlikely that this C4 component could have come predominantly from C4 plant foods, a broad range of potential animal contributors is briefly considered, namely invertebrates, reptiles, birds, and small mammals. It is concluded that the similar average C4 dietary intake seen in the three South African hominid species could have been acquired by differing contributions from the various sources, without the need to assume scavenging or hunting of medium to large grazing ungulates. Effectively similar dominantly dryland paleo-environments may also be part of the explanation. Theoretically, elsewhere in southern and eastern Africa, large wetlands would have offered early hominids greater opportunities for a C4 plant diet.

  6. Complement diagnostics: concepts, indications, and practical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Bo; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in the complement system have been shown to be direct or indirect pathophysiological mechanisms in a number of diseases and pathological conditions such as autoimmune disease, infections, cancer, allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantation, and inflammation. Complement analyses have been performed on these conditions in both prospective and retrospective studies and significant differences have been found between groups of patients, but in many diseases, it has not been possible to make predictions for individual patients because of the lack of sensitivity and specificity of many of the assays used. The basic indications for serological diagnostic complement analysis today may be divided into three major categories: (a) acquired and inherited complement deficiencies; (b) disorders with complement activation; (c) inherited and acquired C1INH deficiencies. Here, we summarize indications, techniques, and interpretations for basic complement analyses and present an algorithm, which we follow in our routine laboratory.

  7. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  8. An Anti-C1s Monoclonal, TNT003, Inhibits Complement Activation Induced by Antibodies Against HLA.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K A; Valenzuela, N M; Gjertson, D; Mulder, A; Fishbein, M C; Parry, G C; Panicker, S; Reed, E F

    2015-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants (SOT) is characterized by damage triggered by donor-specific antibodies (DSA) binding donor Class I and II HLA (HLA-I and HLA-II) expressed on endothelial cells. While F(ab')2 portions of DSA cause cellular activation and proliferation, Fc regions activate the classical complement cascade, resulting in complement deposition and leukocyte recruitment, both hallmark features of AMR. We characterized the ability of an anti-C1s monoclonal antibody, TNT003, to inhibit HLA antibody (HLA-Ab)-induced complement activation. Complement deposition induced by HLA-Ab was evaluated using novel cell- and bead-based assays. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured with HLA-Ab and human complement; production of activated complement proteins was measured by flow cytometry. Additionally, C3d deposition was measured on single antigen beads (SAB) mixed with HLA-Ab and human complement. TNT003 inhibited HLA-Ab mediated complement deposition on HAEC in a concentration-dependent manner; C3a, C4a and C5a anaphylatoxin production was also diminished by TNT003. Finally, TNT003 blocked C3d deposition induced by Class I (HLAI-Ab)- and Class II (HLAII-Ab)-specific antibodies on SAB. These data suggest TNT003 may be useful for modulating the effects of DSA, as TNT003 inhibits complement deposition and split product formation generated by HLA-I/II-Ab in vitro. PMID:25904443

  9. An Anti-C1s Monoclonal, TNT003, Inhibits Complement Activation Induced by Antibodies Against HLA

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, K A; Valenzuela, N M; Gjertson, D; Mulder, A; Fishbein, M C; Parry, G C; Panicker, S; Reed, E F

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants (SOT) is characterized by damage triggered by donor-specific antibodies (DSA) binding donor Class I and II HLA (HLA-I and HLA-II) expressed on endothelial cells. While F(ab′)2 portions of DSA cause cellular activation and proliferation, Fc regions activate the classical complement cascade, resulting in complement deposition and leukocyte recruitment, both hallmark features of AMR. We characterized the ability of an anti-C1s monoclonal antibody, TNT003, to inhibit HLA antibody (HLA-Ab)-induced complement activation. Complement deposition induced by HLA-Ab was evaluated using novel cell- and bead-based assays. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured with HLA-Ab and human complement; production of activated complement proteins was measured by flow cytometry. Additionally, C3d deposition was measured on single antigen beads (SAB) mixed with HLA-Ab and human complement. TNT003 inhibited HLA-Ab mediated complement deposition on HAEC in a concentration-dependent manner; C3a, C4a and C5a anaphylatoxin production was also diminished by TNT003. Finally, TNT003 blocked C3d deposition induced by Class I (HLAI-Ab)- and Class II (HLAII-Ab)-specific antibodies on SAB. These data suggest TNT003 may be useful for modulating the effects of DSA, as TNT003 inhibits complement deposition and split product formation generated by HLA-I/II-Ab in vitro. PMID:25904443

  10. Human L-ficolin, a recognition molecule of the lectin activation pathway of complement, activates complement by binding to pneumolysin, the major toxin of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ali, Youssif M; Kenawy, Hany I; Muhammad, Adnan; Sim, Robert B; Andrew, Peter W; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is an essential component of the immune response, providing a critical line of defense against different pathogens including S. pneumoniae. Complement is activated via three distinct pathways: the classical (CP), the alternative (AP) and the lectin pathway (LP). The role of Pneumolysin (PLY), a bacterial toxin released by S. pneumoniae, in triggering complement activation has been studied in vitro. Our results demonstrate that in both human and mouse sera complement was activated via the CP, initiated by direct binding of even non-specific IgM and IgG3 to PLY. Absence of CP activity in C1q(-/-) mouse serum completely abolished any C3 deposition. However, C1q depleted human serum strongly opsonized PLY through abundant deposition of C3 activation products, indicating that the LP may have a vital role in activating the human complement system on PLY. We identified that human L-ficolin is the critical LP recognition molecule that drives LP activation on PLY, while all of the murine LP recognition components fail to bind and activate complement on PLY. This work elucidates the detailed interactions between PLY and complement and shows for the first time a specific role of the LP in PLY-mediated complement activation in human serum.

  11. Evolutionary implications of C3 -C4 intermediates in the grass Alloteropsis semialata.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Marjorie R; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Escobar, Emmanuel Gonzalez; Ripley, Brad S; Besnard, Guillaume; Long, Christine M; Hattersley, Paul W; Ellis, Roger P; Leegood, Richard C; Osborne, Colin P

    2016-09-01

    C4 photosynthesis is a complex trait resulting from a series of anatomical and biochemical modifications to the ancestral C3 pathway. It is thought to evolve in a stepwise manner, creating intermediates with different combinations of C4 -like components. Determining the adaptive value of these components is key to understanding how C4 photosynthesis can gradually assemble through natural selection. Here, we decompose the photosynthetic phenotypes of numerous individuals of the grass Alloteropsis semialata, the only species known to include both C3 and C4 genotypes. Analyses of δ(13) C, physiology and leaf anatomy demonstrate for the first time the existence of physiological C3 -C4 intermediate individuals in the species. Based on previous phylogenetic analyses, the C3 -C4 individuals are not hybrids between the C3 and C4 genotypes analysed, but instead belong to a distinct genetic lineage, and might have given rise to C4 descendants. C3 A. semialata, present in colder climates, likely represents a reversal from a C3 -C4 intermediate state, indicating that, unlike C4 photosynthesis, evolution of the C3 -C4 phenotype is not irreversible. PMID:26524631

  12. Evolutionary implications of C3 -C4 intermediates in the grass Alloteropsis semialata.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Marjorie R; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Escobar, Emmanuel Gonzalez; Ripley, Brad S; Besnard, Guillaume; Long, Christine M; Hattersley, Paul W; Ellis, Roger P; Leegood, Richard C; Osborne, Colin P

    2016-09-01

    C4 photosynthesis is a complex trait resulting from a series of anatomical and biochemical modifications to the ancestral C3 pathway. It is thought to evolve in a stepwise manner, creating intermediates with different combinations of C4 -like components. Determining the adaptive value of these components is key to understanding how C4 photosynthesis can gradually assemble through natural selection. Here, we decompose the photosynthetic phenotypes of numerous individuals of the grass Alloteropsis semialata, the only species known to include both C3 and C4 genotypes. Analyses of δ(13) C, physiology and leaf anatomy demonstrate for the first time the existence of physiological C3 -C4 intermediate individuals in the species. Based on previous phylogenetic analyses, the C3 -C4 individuals are not hybrids between the C3 and C4 genotypes analysed, but instead belong to a distinct genetic lineage, and might have given rise to C4 descendants. C3 A. semialata, present in colder climates, likely represents a reversal from a C3 -C4 intermediate state, indicating that, unlike C4 photosynthesis, evolution of the C3 -C4 phenotype is not irreversible.

  13. An assessment of the capacity for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase to contribute to C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Edwards, Gerald E

    2015-06-01

    Three C4 acid decarboxylases, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) were recruited from C3 plants to support C4 photosynthesis. In Poaceae, there are established lineages having PEPCK type species, and some NADP-ME lineages in which PEPCK contributes to C4. Besides family Poaceae, recently PEPCK has been reported to function in C4 photosynthesis in eudicot species including Cleome gynandra (Cleomaceae), Trianthema portulacastrum and Zaleya pentandra (Aizoaceae). We evaluated PEPCK by enzyme assay and western blots in representatives of Poaceae, Aizoaceae, Cleomaceae, and Chenopodiaceae compared to that in the PEPCK type C4 grass Spartina anglica. Eragrostis nutans was identified as the first NAD-ME type C4 grass having substantial amounts of PEPCK. In the eudicots, including C. gynandra, Cleome angustifolia, T. portulacastrum, Z. pentandra, and nine C4 members of family Chenopodiaceae (which has the most C4 species and diversity in forms among eudicot families), amounts of PEPCK were generally very low (barely detectable up to 4% of that in S. anglica). Based on these results, C4 species can be classified biochemically according to the dominant decarboxylase recruited for C4 function; and, Poaceae remains the only family in which PEPCK is known to have a significant role in C4 photosynthesis.

  14. An assessment of the capacity for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase to contribute to C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Edwards, Gerald E

    2015-06-01

    Three C4 acid decarboxylases, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) were recruited from C3 plants to support C4 photosynthesis. In Poaceae, there are established lineages having PEPCK type species, and some NADP-ME lineages in which PEPCK contributes to C4. Besides family Poaceae, recently PEPCK has been reported to function in C4 photosynthesis in eudicot species including Cleome gynandra (Cleomaceae), Trianthema portulacastrum and Zaleya pentandra (Aizoaceae). We evaluated PEPCK by enzyme assay and western blots in representatives of Poaceae, Aizoaceae, Cleomaceae, and Chenopodiaceae compared to that in the PEPCK type C4 grass Spartina anglica. Eragrostis nutans was identified as the first NAD-ME type C4 grass having substantial amounts of PEPCK. In the eudicots, including C. gynandra, Cleome angustifolia, T. portulacastrum, Z. pentandra, and nine C4 members of family Chenopodiaceae (which has the most C4 species and diversity in forms among eudicot families), amounts of PEPCK were generally very low (barely detectable up to 4% of that in S. anglica). Based on these results, C4 species can be classified biochemically according to the dominant decarboxylase recruited for C4 function; and, Poaceae remains the only family in which PEPCK is known to have a significant role in C4 photosynthesis. PMID:25900567

  15. Complement: an overview for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Varela, Juan Carlos; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    The complement system is an essential component of the immune system. It is a highly integrative system and has a number of functions, including host defense, removal of injured cells and debris, modulation of metabolic and regenerative processes, and regulation of adaptive immunity. Complement is activated via different pathways and it is regulated tightly by several mechanisms to prevent host injury. Imbalance between complement activation and regulation can manifest in disease and injury to self. This article provides an outline of complement activation pathways, regulatory mechanisms, and normal physiologic functions of the system.

  16. Glycosylated and nonglycosylated complement control protein of the lister strain of vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Meseda, Clement A; Kuhn, Jordan; Atukorale, Vajini; Campbell, Joseph; Weir, Jerry P

    2014-09-01

    The vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP) is a secreted viral protein that binds the C3b and C4b complement components and inhibits the classic and alternative complement pathways. Previously, we reported that an attenuated smallpox vaccine, LC16m8, which was derived from the Lister strain of vaccinia virus (VV-Lister), expressed a glycosylated form of VCP, whereas published sequence data at that time indicated that the VV-Lister VCP has no motif for N-linked glycosylation. We were interested in determining whether the glycosylation of VCP impairs its biological activity, possibly contributing to the attenuation of LC16m8, and the likely origin of the glycosylated VCP. Expression analysis indicated that VV-Lister contains substrains expressing glycosylated VCP and substrains expressing nonglycosylated VCP. Other strains of smallpox vaccine, as well as laboratory strains of vaccinia virus, all expressed nonglycosylated VCP. Individual Lister virus clones expressing either the glycosylated VCP or the nonglycosylated species were isolated, and partially purified VCP from the isolates were found to be functional equivalents in binding human C3b and C4b complement proteins and inhibiting hemolysis and in immunogenicity. Recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing FLAG-tagged glycosylated VCP (FLAG-VCPg) and nonglycosylated VCP (FLAG-VCP) were constructed based on the Western Reserve strain. Purified FLAG-VCP and FLAG-VCPg bind human C3b and C4b and blocked complement-mediated hemolysis. Our data suggest that glycosylation did not affect the biological activity of VCP and thus may not have contributed to the attenuation of LC16m8. In addition, the LC16m8 virus likely originated from a substrain of VV-Lister that expresses glycosylated VCP.

  17. Complement activation plays a key role in the side-effects of rituximab treatment.

    PubMed

    van der Kolk, L E; Grillo-López, A J; Baars, J W; Hack, C E; van Oers, M H

    2001-12-01

    Treatment with rituximab, a chimaeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, can be associated with moderate to severe first-dose side-effects, notably in patients with high numbers of circulating tumour cells. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of these side-effects. At multiple early time points during the first infusion of rituximab, complement activation products (C3b/c and C4b/c) and cytokines [tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8] were measured in five relapsed low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients. Infusion of rituximab induced rapid complement activation, preceding the release of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-8. Although the study group was small, the level of complement activation appeared to be correlated both with the number of circulating B cells prior to the infusion (r = 0.85; P = 0.07) and with the severity of the side-effects. We conclude that complement plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of side-effects of rituximab treatment. As complement activation can not be prevented by corticosteroids, it might be relevant to study the possible role of complement inhibitors during the first administration of rituximab.

  18. Controlling the complement system in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M

    1997-12-01

    Inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system can lead to harmful, potentially life-threatening consequences due to severe inflammatory tissue destruction. These consequences are clinically manifested in various disorders, including septic shock, multiple organ failure and hyperacute graft rejection. Genetic complement deficiencies or complement depletion have been proven to be beneficial in reducing tissue injury in a number of animal models of severe complement-dependent inflammation. It is therefore believed that therapeutic inhibition of complement is likely to arrest the process of certain diseases. Attempts to efficiently inhibit complement include the application of endogenous soluble complement inhibitors (C1-inhibitor, recombinant soluble complement receptor 1- rsCR1), the administration of antibodies, either blocking key proteins of the cascade reaction (e.g. C3, C5), neutralizing the action of the complement-derived anaphylatoxin C5a, or interfering with complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD18/11b)-mediated adhesion of inflammatory cells to the vascular endothelium. In addition, incorporation of membrane-bound complement regulators (DAF-CD55, MCP-CD46, CD59) has become possible by transfection of the correspondent cDNA into xenogeneic cells. Thereby, protection against complement-mediated inflammatory tissue damage could be achieved in various animal models of sepsis, myocardial as well as intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury, adult respiratory distress syndrome, nephritis and graft rejection. Supported by results from first clinical trials, complement inhibition appears to be a suitable therapeutic approach to control inflammation. Current strategies to specifically inhibit complement in inflammation have been discussed at a recent meeting on the 'Immune Consequences of Trauma, Shock and Sepsis', held from March 4-8, 1997, in Munich, Germany. The Congress (chairman: E. Faist, Munich, Germany), which was held in close cooperation with various

  19. Inhibition of heparin/protamine complex-induced complement activation by Compstatin in baboons.

    PubMed

    Soulika, A M; Khan, M M; Hattori, T; Bowen, F W; Richardson, B A; Hack, C E; Sahu, A; Edmunds, L H; Lambris, J D

    2000-09-01

    Complement activation products are major components of the inflammatory response induced by cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass which contribute to postoperative organ dysfunction, fluid accumulation, and morbidity. Activation of the complement system occurs during extracorporeal circulation, during reperfusion of ischemic tissue, and after the formation of heparin-protamine complexes. In this study we examine the efficacy of Compstatin, a recently discovered peptide inhibitor of complement, in preventing heparin/protamine-induced complement activation in baboons. The study was performed in baboons because Compstatin binds to baboon C3 and is resistant to proteolytic cleavage in baboon blood (similar to humans); Compstatin inhibits only the activation of primates' complement system. After testing various doses and administration regimens, Compstatin produced complete inhibition at a total dose of 21 mg/kg when given as a combination of bolus injection and infusion. Compstatin completely inhibited in vivo heparin/protamine-induced complement activation without adverse effects on heart rate or systemic arterial, central venous, and pulmonary arterial pressures. This study indicates that Compstatin is a safe and effective complement inhibitor that has the potential to prevent complement activation during and after clinical cardiac surgery. Furthermore, Compstatin can serve as the prototype for designing an orally administrated drug.

  20. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-07-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies.

  1. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-01-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies. PMID

  2. Heparin-protamine complexes and C-reactive protein induce activation of the classical complement pathway: studies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bruins, P; te Velthuis, H; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Yazdanbakhsh, A P; de Beaumont, E M; Eijsman, L; Trouwborst, A; Hack, C E

    2000-08-01

    The administration of protamine to patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) to neutralize heparin and to reduce the risk of bleeding, induces activation of the classical complement pathway mainly by heparin-protamine complexes. We investigated whether C-reactive protein (CRP) contributes to protamine-induced complement activation. In 24 patients during myocardial revascularization, we measured complement, CRP, and complement-CRP complexes, reflecting CRP-mediated complement activation in vivo. We also incubated plasma from healthy volunteers and patients with heparin and protamine in vitro to study CRP-mediated complement activation. During CPB, CRP levels remained unchanged while C3 activation products increased. C4 activation occurred after protamine administration. CRP-complement complexes increased at the end of CPB and upon protamine administration. Incubation of plasma with heparin and protamine in vitro generated complement-CRP complexes, which was blocked by phosphorylcholine and stimulated by exogenous CRP. C4d-CRP complex formation after protamine administration correlated clinically with the incidence of postoperative arrhythmia. Protamine administration during cardiac surgery induces complement activation which in part is CRP-dependent, and correlates with postoperative arrhythmia.

  3. [Modification of complement factors and their inhibitors during meningococcal sepsis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Blanco, A; Solís, P; Alvarez Guisasola, F J; Valbuena, C; Gómez, C; Prieto, P; Ruíz, C

    1980-08-01

    Various complement components (C'1s, C'3, C'4, C'5, C'8, C'9, C'3 act., C'1 inh., C'3b inact.) and seric immunocomplexes (by polyethylene glycol, PEG) were evaluated in 43 children with meningococcal sepsis. 28 patients had disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), group I, and 15 did not show it, group II; 14 patients died in group I and none of group II. In 21 cases studies were repeated 24 hours later. In group I all complement components were decreased, specially C'3 (x: 67 mg./100 ml., p < 0.01) and C'5 (x: 8 mg./100 ml., p < 0.01) and they were lower 24 h. later. Results of group II were normal, except a decrease of C'5. Catabolic products of C'3 were founded in 11/14 cases of group I and two/nine of group II and products of C'3 act. in four/14 and one/10. PEG precipitation was positive in 10/14 cases of group I and 10/12 of group II and IgG, IgM, C'3 and C'4 were found in precipitations. This complement components were more frequently present in sepsis without DIC and after 24 h. of evolution. C'1 and C'3b inhibitors decreased after evolution in group I and by contrast increased in group II. This fall enhances complement activation.

  4. Evolutionary switch and genetic convergence on rbcL following the evolution of C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Salamin, Nicolas; Muasya, A Muthama; Roalson, Eric H; Russier, Flavien; Besnard, Guillaume

    2008-11-01

    Rubisco is responsible for the fixation of CO2 into organic compounds through photosynthesis and thus has a great agronomic importance. It is well established that this enzyme suffers from a slow catalysis, and its low specificity results into photorespiration, which is considered as an energy waste for the plant. However, natural variations exist, and some Rubisco lineages, such as in C4 plants, exhibit higher catalytic efficiencies coupled to lower specificities. These C4 kinetics could have evolved as an adaptation to the higher CO2 concentration present in C4 photosynthetic cells. In this study, using phylogenetic analyses on a large data set of C3 and C4 monocots, we showed that the rbcL gene, which encodes the large subunit of Rubisco, evolved under positive selection in independent C4 lineages. This confirms that selective pressures on Rubisco have been switched in C4 plants by the high CO2 environment prevailing in their photosynthetic cells. Eight rbcL codons evolving under positive selection in C4 clades were involved in parallel changes among the 23 independent monocot C4 lineages included in this study. These amino acids are potentially responsible for the C4 kinetics, and their identification opens new roads for human-directed Rubisco engineering. The introgression of C4-like high-efficiency Rubisco would strongly enhance C3 crop yields in the future CO2-enriched atmosphere. PMID:18695049

  5. Fire and fire-adapted vegetation promoted C4 expansion in the late Miocene.

    PubMed

    Scheiter, Simon; Higgins, Steven I; Osborne, Colin P; Bradshaw, Catherine; Lunt, Dan; Ripley, Brad S; Taylor, Lyla L; Beerling, David J

    2012-08-01

    Large proportions of the Earth's land surface are covered by biomes dominated by C(4) grasses. These C(4)-dominated biomes originated during the late Miocene, 3-8 million years ago (Ma), but there is evidence that C(4) grasses evolved some 20 Ma earlier during the early Miocene/Oligocene. Explanations for this lag between evolution and expansion invoke changes in atmospheric CO(2), seasonality of climate and fire. However, there is still no consensus about which of these factors triggered C(4) grassland expansion. We use a vegetation model, the adaptive dynamic global vegetation model (aDGVM), to test how CO(2), temperature, precipitation, fire and the tolerance of vegetation to fire influence C(4) grassland expansion. Simulations are forced with late Miocene climates generated with the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere-vegetation general circulation model. We show that physiological differences between the C(3) and C(4) photosynthetic pathways cannot explain C(4) grass invasion into forests, but that fire is a crucial driver. Fire-promoting plant traits serve to expand the climate space in which C(4)-dominated biomes can persist. We propose that three mechanisms were involved in C(4) expansion: the physiological advantage of C(4) grasses under low atmospheric CO(2) allowed them to invade C(3) grasslands; fire allowed grasses to invade forests; and the evolution of fire-resistant savanna trees expanded the climate space that savannas can invade. PMID:22712748

  6. Anatomical constraints to C4 evolution: light harvesting capacity in the bundle sheath.

    PubMed

    Bellasio, Chandra; Lundgren, Marjorie R

    2016-10-01

    In C4 photosynthesis CO2 assimilation and reduction are typically coordinated across mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS) cells, respectively. This system consequently requires sufficient light to reach BS to generate enough ATP to allow ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration in BS. Leaf anatomy influences BS light penetration and therefore constrains C4 cycle functionality. Using an absorption scattering model (coded in Excel, and freely downloadable) we simulate light penetration profiles and rates of ATP production in BS across the C3 , C3 -C4 and C4 anatomical continua. We present a trade-off for light absorption between BS pigment concentration and space allocation. C3 BS anatomy limits light absorption and benefits little from high pigment concentrations. Unpigmented BS extensions increase BS light penetration. C4 and C3 -C4 anatomies have the potential to generate sufficient ATP in the BS, whereas typical C3 anatomy does not, except some C3 taxa closely related to C4 groups. Insufficient volume of BS, relative to M, will hamper a C4 cycle via insufficient BS light absorption. Thus, BS ATP production and RuBP regeneration, coupled with increased BS investments, allow greater operational plasticity. We propose that larger BS in C3 lineages may be co-opted for C3 -C4 and C4 biochemistry requirements.

  7. One decade after the discovery of single-cell C4 species in terrestrial plants: what did we learn about the minimal requirements of C4 photosynthesis?

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Richard M; Offermann, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Until about 10 years ago the general accepted textbook knowledge was that terrestrial C4 photosynthesis requires separation of photosynthetic functions into two specialized cell types, the mesophyll and bundle sheath cells forming the distinctive Kranz anatomy typical for C4 plants. This paradigm has been broken with the discovery of Suaeda aralocaspica, a chenopod from central Asia, performing C4 photosynthesis within individual chlorenchyma cells. Since then, three more single-cell C4 (SCC4) species have been discovered in the genus Bienertia. They are interesting not only because of their unusual mode of photosynthesis but also present a puzzle for cell biologists. In these species, two morphological and biochemical specialized types of chloroplasts develop within individual chlorenchyma cells, a situation that has never been observed in plants before. Here we review recent literature concerning the biochemistry, physiology, and molecular biology of SCC4 photosynthesis. Particularly, we focus on what has been learned in relation to the following questions: How does the specialized morphology required for the operation of SCC4 develop and is there a C3 intermediate type of photosynthesis during development? What is the degree of specialization between the two chloroplast types and how does this compare to the chloroplasts of Kranz C4 species? How do nucleus-encoded proteins that are targeted to chloroplasts accumulate differentially in the two chloroplast types and how efficient is the CO2 concentrating mechanism in SCC4 species compared to the Kranz C4 forms?

  8. Review on complement analysis method and the roles of glycosaminoglycans in the complement system.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Li, Yan; Ijaz, Muhammad; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Lian, Qianqian; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-12-10

    Complement system is composed of over 30 proteins and it plays important roles in self-defence and inflammation. There are three activation pathways, including classical pathway, alternative pathway and lectin pathway, in complement system, and they are associated with many diseases such as osteoarthritis and age-related macular degeneration. Modulation of the complement system may be a promising strategy in the treatment of related diseases. Glycosaminoglycans are anionic linear polysaccharides without branches. They are one kind of multi-functional macromolecules which have great potential in regulating complement system. This review is organized around two aspects between the introduction of complement system and the interaction of glycosaminoglycans with complement system. Three complement activation pathways and the biological significance were introduced first. Then functional analysis methods were compared to provide a strategy for potential glycosaminoglycans screen. Finally, the roles of glycosaminoglycans played in the complement system were summed up.

  9. Familial systemic lupus erythematosus: evidence for separate loci controlling C4 deficiency and formation of antibodies to DNA, nRNP, Ro and La.

    PubMed

    Verrier Jones, J; Jones, E; Forsyth, S J; Skanes, V M; Reichlin, M; MacSween, J M; Eastwood, S; Carr, R I

    1987-04-01

    A family has been identified in the Canadian province of Prince Edward Island in which 2 sisters have systemic lupus erythematosus in a sibship of 14. Studies are reported on 11 of the siblings and 16 other family members. The affected siblings, and 4 other members of their sibship, are halfnull homozygotes for the C4A component of complement. We studied the distribution in family members of antibodies to ss and dsDNA, and to Ro(SSA), La(SSB), Sm and nRNP. Eight of 11 members of the affected sibship are antibody producers, compared to only 3 of 13 members of the parental generation. Our study provides further evidence for an association between null genes for C4A and familial lupus, and suggests, in an unusually large kindred, that several other genetic factors are involved in the production of antinuclear antibodies.

  10. Progress and Trends in Complement Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The past few years have proven to be a highly successful and exciting period for the field of complement-directed drug discovery and development. Driven by promising experiences with the first marketed complement drugs, increased knowledge about the involvement of complement in health and disease, and improvements in structural and analytical techniques as well as animal models of disease, the field has seen a surge in creative approaches to therapeutically intervene at various stages of the cascade. An impressive panel of compounds that show promise in clinical trials is meanwhile being lined up in the pipelines of both small biotechnology and big pharmaceutical companies. Yet with this new focus on complement-targeted therapeutics, important questions concerning target selection, point and length of intervention, safety, and drug delivery emerge. In view of the diversity of the clinical disorders involving abnormal complement activity or regulation, which include both acute and chronic diseases and affect a wide range of organs, diverse yet specifically tailored therapeutic approaches may be needed to shift complement back into balance. This chapter highlights the key changes in the field that shape our current perception of complement-targeted drugs and provides a brief overview of recent strategies and emerging trends. Selected examples of complement-related diseases and inhibitor classes are highlighted to illustrate the diversity and creativity in field. PMID:22990692

  11. Commitment and Evidence in Arabic Complementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awad, Maher

    The study examines one component of the system of complementation in Palestinian Arabic. It is argued that the complementizer in question has an inherent semantics capable of influencing the meaning of sentences in which it is embedded. Specifically, its presence in a complex sentence communicates modal meanings distinct from those communicated by…

  12. Structural and Metabolic Transitions of C4 Leaf Development and Differentiation Defined by Microscopy and Quantitative Proteomics in Maize[W

    PubMed Central

    Majeran, Wojciech; Friso, Giulia; Ponnala, Lalit; Connolly, Brian; Huang, Mingshu; Reidel, Edwin; Zhang, Cankui; Asakura, Yukari; Bhuiyan, Nazmul H.; Sun, Qi; Turgeon, Robert; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2010-01-01

    C4 grasses, such as maize (Zea mays), have high photosynthetic efficiency through combined biochemical and structural adaptations. C4 photosynthesis is established along the developmental axis of the leaf blade, leading from an undifferentiated leaf base just above the ligule into highly specialized mesophyll cells (MCs) and bundle sheath cells (BSCs) at the tip. To resolve the kinetics of maize leaf development and C4 differentiation and to obtain a systems-level understanding of maize leaf formation, the accumulation profiles of proteomes of the leaf and the isolated BSCs with their vascular bundle along the developmental gradient were determined using large-scale mass spectrometry. This was complemented by extensive qualitative and quantitative microscopy analysis of structural features (e.g., Kranz anatomy, plasmodesmata, cell wall, and organelles). More than 4300 proteins were identified and functionally annotated. Developmental protein accumulation profiles and hierarchical cluster analysis then determined the kinetics of organelle biogenesis, formation of cellular structures, metabolism, and coexpression patterns. Two main expression clusters were observed, each divided in subclusters, suggesting that a limited number of developmental regulatory networks organize concerted protein accumulation along the leaf gradient. The coexpression with BSC and MC markers provided strong candidates for further analysis of C4 specialization, in particular transporters and biogenesis factors. Based on the integrated information, we describe five developmental transitions that provide a conceptual and practical template for further analysis. An online protein expression viewer is provided through the Plant Proteome Database. PMID:21081695

  13. Complement activation in progressive renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Fearn, Amy; Sheerin, Neil Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and the cause of significant morbidity and mortality. The replacement of functioning nephrons by fibrosis is characteristic of progressive disease. The pathways that lead to fibrosis are not fully understood, although chronic non-resolving inflammation in the kidney is likely to drive the fibrotic response that occurs. In patients with progressive CKD there is histological evidence of inflammation in the interstitium and strategies that reduce inflammation reduce renal injury in pre-clinical models of CKD. The complement system is an integral part of the innate immune system but also augments adaptive immune responses. Complement activation is known to occur in many diverse renal diseases, including glomerulonephritis, thrombotic microangiopathies and transplant rejection. In this review we discuss current evidence that complement activation contributes to progression of CKD, how complement could cause renal inflammation and whether complement inhibition would slow progression of renal disease. PMID:25664245

  14. Potentiation of C1 inhibitor by glycosaminoglycans: dextran sulfate species are effective inhibitors of in vitro complement activation in plasma.

    PubMed

    Wuillemin, W A; te Velthuis, H; Lubbers, Y T; de Ruig, C P; Eldering, E; Hack, C E

    1997-08-15

    Activation of the complement system may contribute to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Hence, an effective inhibitor of complement might be useful to reduce tissue damage. Some glycosaminoglycans (GAG), such as heparin, are known to inhibit the interaction of C1q with activators and the assembly of the classical and the alternative pathway C3 convertases. Furthermore, they may potentiate C1 inhibitor-mediated inactivation of C1s. To search for potential complement inhibitors, we systematically investigated the complement inhibitory properties of various synthetic and naturally occurring GAG (dextran sulfates 500,000 and 5,000, heparin, N-acetylheparin, heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfates A and C). First, we assessed the effect of GAG on the second-order rate constant of the inactivation of C1s by C1 inhibitor. This rate constant increased 6- to 130-fold in the presence of the GAG, dextran sulfate being the most effective. Second, all tested GAG were found to reduce deposition of C4 and C3 on immobilized aggregated human IgG (AHG) and to reduce fluid phase formation of C4b/c and C3b/c in recalcified plasma upon incubation with AHG. Dextran sulfate again was found to be most effective. We conclude that GAG modulate complement activation in vitro and that the low molecular weight dextran sulfate (m.w. 5000) may be a candidate for pharmacologic manipulation of complement activation via potentiation of C1 inhibitor.

  15. Salivary agglutinin is the major component in human saliva that modulates the lectin pathway of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Gunput, Sabrina Tg; Wouters, Diana; Nazmi, Kamran; Cukkemane, Nivedita; Brouwer, Mieke; Veerman, Enno Ci; Ligtenberg, Antoon Jm

    2016-05-01

    Saliva interacts with blood after mucosal damage or leakage of gingival crevicular fluid. Surface-adsorbed salivary agglutinin (SAG) activates the lectin pathway (LP) of the complement system via mannose-binding lectin, while SAG in solution inhibits complement activation. In the present study we investigated if, next to SAG, whole and glandular saliva itself and other salivary glycoproteins activate or inhibit the LP. Complement activation was measured by detecting C4 deposition on microtiter plates coated with saliva or purified proteins. Complement inhibition was measured after incubating serum with saliva or proteins in microtiter plates coated with mannan, an LP activator. Adsorbed whole, sublingual and submandibular saliva showed LP-dependent complement activation. Blood group secretors, but not non-secretors, activated the LP. Saliva of both secretors and non-secretors inhibited C4 deposition on mannan. After depletion of SAG, saliva no longer inhibited the LP. Other salivary proteins, including amylase, MUC5B and histatin 2, did not activate or inhibit the LP. Surface-adsorbed whole saliva and glandular saliva samples activate the LP of complement, depending on the presence of SAG and the secretor status of the donor. In solution, saliva inhibits the LP, depending on the presence of SAG, but independent of the secretor status. PMID:27048414

  16. Oxamic acid analogues as LDH-C4-specific competitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Páez, Lorena; Chena-Taboada, Miguel Angel; Cabrera-Hernández, Arturo; Cordero-Martínez, Joaquín; Wong, Carlos

    2011-08-01

    We performed kinetic studies to determine whether oxamate analogues are selective inhibitors of LDH-C4, owing to their potential usefulness in fertility control and treatment of some cancers. These substances were shown to be competitive inhibitors of LDH isozymes and are able to discriminate among subtle differences that differentiate the active sites of LDH-A4, LDH-B4 and LDH-C4. N-Ethyl oxamate was the most potent inhibitor showing the highest affinity for LDH-C4. However, N-propyl oxamate was the most selective inhibitor showing a high degree of selectivity towards LDH-C4. Non-polar four carbon atoms chains, linear or branched, dramatically diminished the affinity and selectivity towards LDH-C4. N-Propyl oxamate significantly reduced ATP levels, capacitation and mouse sperm motility, in line with results shown by others, suggesting that LDH-C4 plays an essential role in mouse fertility.

  17. Antigens of monoclonal antibody NB3C4 are novel markers for oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, K; Kametani, F; Shimoda, Y; Fujimaki, K; Sakurai, Y; Kitamura, K; Asou, H; Nomura, M

    2001-02-12

    We produced NB3C4, a novel monoclonal antibody specific for oligodendrocytes, using human neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells. NB3C4 specifically recognized oligodendrocytes in the CNS, although it bound to neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells and oligodendrocytes in vitro. Double immunofluorescence staining of rat brain using NB3C4 and anti-GST-pi, anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), or anti-neurofilament 200 (NF) antibody revealed that anti-GST-pi antibody identified an oligodendrocyte marker recognizing NB3C4-positive cells, while both anti-GFAP and anti-NF antibody did not. Western blotting of rat brain homogenates showed that NB3C4 bound three proteins of 22-28 kDa, while the anti-GST-pi recognized a 27 kDa protein. Therefore, antigens recognized by NB3C4 could be novel markers for oligodendrocytes.

  18. Molecules Great and Small: The Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Mathern, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    The complement cascade, traditionally considered an effector arm of innate immunity required for host defense against pathogens, is now recognized as a crucial pathogenic mediator of various kidney diseases. Complement components produced by the liver and circulating in the plasma undergo activation through the classical and/or mannose-binding lectin pathways to mediate anti-HLA antibody-initiated kidney transplant rejection and autoantibody-initiated GN, the latter including membranous glomerulopathy, antiglomerular basement membrane disease, and lupus nephritis. Inherited and/or acquired abnormalities of complement regulators, which requisitely limit restraint on alternative pathway complement activation, contribute to the pathogenesis of the C3 nephropathies and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Increasing evidence links complement produced by endothelial cells and/or tubular cells to the pathogenesis of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and progressive kidney fibrosis. Data emerging since the mid-2000s additionally show that immune cells, including T cells and antigen-presenting cells, produce alternative pathway complement components during cognate interactions. The subsequent local complement activation yields production of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, which bind to their respective receptors (C3aR and C5aR) on both partners to augment effector T-cell proliferation and survival, while simultaneously inhibiting regulatory T-cell induction and function. This immune cell–derived complement enhances pathogenic alloreactive T-cell immunity that results in transplant rejection and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of other T cell–mediated kidney diseases. C5a/C5aR ligations on neutrophils have additionally been shown to contribute to vascular inflammation in models of ANCA-mediated renal vasculitis. New translational immunology efforts along with the development of pharmacologic agents that block human complement components and receptors now permit

  19. Molecules Great and Small: The Complement System.

    PubMed

    Mathern, Douglas R; Heeger, Peter S

    2015-09-01

    The complement cascade, traditionally considered an effector arm of innate immunity required for host defense against pathogens, is now recognized as a crucial pathogenic mediator of various kidney diseases. Complement components produced by the liver and circulating in the plasma undergo activation through the classical and/or mannose-binding lectin pathways to mediate anti-HLA antibody-initiated kidney transplant rejection and autoantibody-initiated GN, the latter including membranous glomerulopathy, antiglomerular basement membrane disease, and lupus nephritis. Inherited and/or acquired abnormalities of complement regulators, which requisitely limit restraint on alternative pathway complement activation, contribute to the pathogenesis of the C3 nephropathies and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Increasing evidence links complement produced by endothelial cells and/or tubular cells to the pathogenesis of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and progressive kidney fibrosis. Data emerging since the mid-2000s additionally show that immune cells, including T cells and antigen-presenting cells, produce alternative pathway complement components during cognate interactions. The subsequent local complement activation yields production of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, which bind to their respective receptors (C3aR and C5aR) on both partners to augment effector T-cell proliferation and survival, while simultaneously inhibiting regulatory T-cell induction and function. This immune cell-derived complement enhances pathogenic alloreactive T-cell immunity that results in transplant rejection and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of other T cell-mediated kidney diseases. C5a/C5aR ligations on neutrophils have additionally been shown to contribute to vascular inflammation in models of ANCA-mediated renal vasculitis. New translational immunology efforts along with the development of pharmacologic agents that block human complement components and receptors now permit

  20. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  1. Complement system and rheumatoid arthritis: relationships with autoantibodies, serological, clinical features, and anti-TNF treatment.

    PubMed

    Di Muzio, G; Perricone, C; Ballanti, E; Kroegler, B; Greco, E; Novelli, L; Conigliaro, P; Cipriani, P; Giacomelli, R; Perricone, R

    2011-01-01

    Autoantibodies (rheumatoid factor, RF; anti-citrullinated-protein antibodies, ACPA) and complement system are involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ACPA and anti-TNF agents are capable of in vitro modulating complement activity. We investigated the relationships between complement, autoantibodies, and anti-TNF treatment in vivo. One-hundred fourteen RA patients (89F/25M), diagnosed according to 1987 ACR criteria, and 30 healthy controls were enrolled. Serological analysis included ESR, CRP, complement C3, C4 and CH50, RF and ACPA (ELISA, cut-off>20 U/ml). Split-products (SP) of C3 and B were studied by immunoelectrophoresis/counterimmunoelectrophoresis. Seventy-six patients started anti-TNF treatment and were studied at baseline and after 22 weeks. Disease activity was measured with DAS28 and response to therapy with EULAR criteria. At baseline, RA patients showed significantly higher levels of C3 and C4 than controls (C3 127.9±26.5 vs 110±25 mg/dl, P=0.0012; C4 29.7±10.2 vs 22.7±8.3mg/dl, P=0.0003). No differences in C3, C4 and CH50 levels were observed between ACPA+ (n=76) and ACPA- (n=38) patients. After 22 weeks of anti-TNF, C3, C4 and RF were significantly reduced (P<0.003, <0.005 and <0.04, respectively) and RF changes showed negative correlation with CH50. SP of C3 and B were observed neither at baseline nor after 22 weeks. DAS28 significantly improved after 22 weeks. Patients showing higher baseline C3 or lower reduction of C3 levels after 22 weeks had a worse EULAR outcome (X2=22.793, P<0.001). RF levels seem to correlate with complement CH50. The presence of high levels of C3 in RA patients may reflect a pro-inflammatory status and represent a negative prognostic factor for anti-TNF therapy.

  2. 26 CFR 1.613A-5 - Election under section 613A(c)(4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Election under section 613A(c)(4). 1.613A-5... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613A-5 Election under section 613A(c)(4). The election under section 613A(c)(4) is an annual election which the taxpayer may make by...

  3. 26 CFR 1.613A-5 - Election under section 613A(c)(4).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Election under section 613A(c)(4). 1.613A-5 Section 1.613A-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613A-5 Election under section 613A(c)(4). The election under section 613A(c)(4) is...

  4. Shared origins of a key enzyme during the evolution of C4 and CAM metabolism.

    PubMed

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Arakaki, Monica; Osborne, Colin P; Bräutigam, Andrea; Sage, Rowan F; Hibberd, Julian M; Kelly, Steven; Covshoff, Sarah; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Hancock, Lillian; Edwards, Erika J

    2014-07-01

    CAM and C4 photosynthesis are two key plant adaptations that have evolved independently multiple times, and are especially prevalent in particular groups of plants, including the Caryophyllales. We investigate the origin of photosynthetic PEPC, a key enzyme of both the CAM and C4 pathways. We combine phylogenetic analyses of genes encoding PEPC with analyses of RNA sequence data of Portulaca, the only plants known to perform both CAM and C4 photosynthesis. Three distinct gene lineages encoding PEPC exist in eudicots (namely ppc-1E1, ppc-1E2 and ppc-2), one of which (ppc-1E1) was recurrently recruited for use in both CAM and C4 photosynthesis within the Caryophyllales. This gene is present in multiple copies in the cacti and relatives, including Portulaca. The PEPC involved in the CAM and C4 cycles of Portulaca are encoded by closely related yet distinct genes. The CAM-specific gene is similar to genes from related CAM taxa, suggesting that CAM has evolved before C4 in these species. The similar origin of PEPC and other genes involved in the CAM and C4 cycles highlights the shared early steps of evolutionary trajectories towards CAM and C4, which probably diverged irreversibly only during the optimization of CAM and C4 phenotypes. PMID:24638902

  5. Genetic enablers underlying the clustered evolutionary origins of C4 photosynthesis in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Arakaki, Mónica; Osborne, Colin P; Edwards, Erika J

    2015-04-01

    The evolutionary accessibility of novel adaptations varies among lineages, depending in part on the genetic elements present in each group. However, the factors determining the evolutionary potential of closely related genes remain largely unknown. In plants, CO2-concentrating mechanisms such as C4 and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis have evolved numerous times in distantly related groups of species, and constitute excellent systems to study constraints and enablers of evolution. It has been previously shown for multiple proteins that grasses preferentially co-opted the same gene lineage for C4 photosynthesis, when multiple copies were present. In this work, we use comparative transcriptomics to show that this bias also exists within Caryophyllales, a distantly related group with multiple C4 origins. However, the bias is not the same as in grasses and, when all angiosperms are considered jointly, the number of distinct gene lineages co-opted is not smaller than that expected by chance. These results show that most gene lineages present in the common ancestor of monocots and eudicots produced gene descendants that were recruited into C4 photosynthesis, but that C4-suitability changed during the diversification of angiosperms. When selective pressures drove C4 evolution, some copies were preferentially co-opted, probably because they already possessed C4-like expression patterns. However, the identity of these C4-suitable genes varies among clades of angiosperms, and C4 phenotypes in distant angiosperm groups thus represent genuinely independent realizations, based on different genetic precursors. PMID:25582594

  6. Is C4 photosynthesis less phenotypically plastic than C3 photosynthesis?

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; McKown, Athena D

    2006-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis is a complex specialization that enhances carbon gain in hot, often arid habitats where photorespiration rates can be high. Certain features unique to C4 photosynthesis may reduce the potential for phenotypic plasticity and photosynthetic acclimation to environmental change relative to what is possible with C3 photosynthesis. During acclimation, the structural and physiological integrity of the mesophyll-bundle sheath (M-BS) complex has to be maintained if C4 photosynthesis is to function efficiently in the new environment. Disruption of the M-BS structure could interfere with metabolic co-ordination between the C3 and C4 cycles, decrease metabolite flow rate between the tissues, increase CO2 leakage from the bundle sheath, and slow enzyme activity. C4 plants have substantial acclimation potential, but in most cases lag behind the acclimation responses in C3 plants. For example, some C4 species are unable to maintain high quantum yields when grown in low-light conditions. Others fail to reduce carboxylase content in shade, leaving substantial over-capacity of Rubisco and PEP carboxylase in place. Shade-tolerant C4 grasses lack the capacity for maintaining a high state of photosynthetic induction following sunflecks, and thus may be poorly suited to exploit subsequent sunflecks compared with C3 species. In total, the evidence indicates that C4 photosynthesis is less phenotypically plastic than C3 photosynthesis, and this may contribute to the more restricted ecological and geographical distribution of C4 plants across the Earth.

  7. Insights into the regulation of C4 leaf development from comparative transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Fa; Chang, Yao-Ming; Lin, Jinn-Jy; Yu, Chun-Ping; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Liu, Wen-Yu; Yeh, Suying; Tu, Shih-Long; Wu, Shu-Hsing; Ku, Maurice Sb; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2016-04-01

    C4 photosynthesis is more efficient than C3 photosynthesis for two reasons. First, C4 plants have evolved a repertoire of C4 enzymes to enhance CO2 fixation. Second, C4 leaves have Kranz anatomy with a high vein density in which the veins are surrounded by one layer of bundle sheath (BS) cells and one layer of mesophyll (M) cells. The BS and M cells are not only functionally well differentiated, but also well-coordinated for rapid transport of photo-assimilates between the two types of photosynthetic cells. Recent comparative transcriptomic and anatomical analyses of C3 and C4 leaves have revealed early onset of C4-related processes in leaf development, suggesting that delayed mesophyll differentiation contributes to higher C4 vein density, and have identified some candidate regulators for the higher vein density in C4 leaves. Moreover, comparative transcriptomics of maize husk (C3) and foliar leaves (C4) has identified a cohort of candidate regulators of Kranz anatomy development. In addition, there has been major progress in the identification of transcription factor binding sites, greatly increasing our knowledge of gene regulation in plants. PMID:26828378

  8. C4 photosynthesis boosts growth by altering physiology, allocation and size.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Rebecca R L; Mockford, Emily J; Bennett, Christopher; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Spriggs, Elizabeth L; Freckleton, Robert P; Thompson, Ken; Rees, Mark; Osborne, Colin P

    2016-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis is a complex set of leaf anatomical and biochemical adaptations that have evolved more than 60 times to boost carbon uptake compared with the ancestral C3 photosynthetic type(1-3). Although C4 photosynthesis has the potential to drive faster growth rates(4,5), experiments directly comparing C3 and C4 plants have not shown consistent effects(1,6,7). This is problematic because differential growth is a crucial element of ecological theory(8,9) explaining C4 savannah responses to global change(10,11), and research to increase C3 crop productivity by introducing C4 photosynthesis(12). Here, we resolve this long-standing issue by comparing growth across 382 grass species, accounting for ecological diversity and evolutionary history. C4 photosynthesis causes a 19-88% daily growth enhancement. Unexpectedly, during the critical seedling establishment stage, this enhancement is driven largely by a high ratio of leaf area to mass, rather than fast growth per unit leaf area. C4 leaves have less dense tissues, allowing more leaves to be produced for the same carbon cost. Consequently, C4 plants invest more in roots than C3 species. Our data demonstrate a general suite of functional trait divergences between C3 and C4 species, which simultaneously drive faster growth and greater investment in water and nutrient acquisition, with important ecological and agronomic implications. PMID:27243645

  9. Genetic enablers underlying the clustered evolutionary origins of C4 photosynthesis in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Arakaki, Mónica; Osborne, Colin P; Edwards, Erika J

    2015-04-01

    The evolutionary accessibility of novel adaptations varies among lineages, depending in part on the genetic elements present in each group. However, the factors determining the evolutionary potential of closely related genes remain largely unknown. In plants, CO2-concentrating mechanisms such as C4 and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis have evolved numerous times in distantly related groups of species, and constitute excellent systems to study constraints and enablers of evolution. It has been previously shown for multiple proteins that grasses preferentially co-opted the same gene lineage for C4 photosynthesis, when multiple copies were present. In this work, we use comparative transcriptomics to show that this bias also exists within Caryophyllales, a distantly related group with multiple C4 origins. However, the bias is not the same as in grasses and, when all angiosperms are considered jointly, the number of distinct gene lineages co-opted is not smaller than that expected by chance. These results show that most gene lineages present in the common ancestor of monocots and eudicots produced gene descendants that were recruited into C4 photosynthesis, but that C4-suitability changed during the diversification of angiosperms. When selective pressures drove C4 evolution, some copies were preferentially co-opted, probably because they already possessed C4-like expression patterns. However, the identity of these C4-suitable genes varies among clades of angiosperms, and C4 phenotypes in distant angiosperm groups thus represent genuinely independent realizations, based on different genetic precursors.

  10. Properdin in complement activation and tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Lesher, Allison M; Nilsson, Bo; Song, Wen-Chao

    2013-12-15

    The plasma protein properdin is the only known positive regulator of complement activation. Although regarded as an initiator of the alternative pathway of complement activation at the time of its discovery more than a half century ago, the role and mechanism of action of properdin in the complement cascade has undergone significant conceptual evolution since then. Despite the long history of research on properdin, however, new insight and unexpected findings on the role of properdin in complement activation, pathogen infection and host tissue injury are still being revealed by ongoing investigations. In this article, we provide a brief review on recent studies that shed new light on properdin biology, focusing on the following three topics: (1) its role as a pattern recognition molecule to direct and trigger complement activation, (2) its context-dependent requirement in complement activation on foreign and host cell surfaces, and (3) its involvement in alternative pathway complement-mediated immune disorders and considerations of properdin as a potential therapeutic target in human diseases.

  11. The role of complement in membranous nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hong; Sandor, Dana G.; Beck, Laurence H.

    2013-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) describes a histopathological pattern of injury marked by glomerular subepithelial immune deposits and collectively represents one of the most common causes of adult nephrotic syndrome. Studies in Heymann nephritis, an experimental model of MN, have established a paradigm in which these deposits locally activate complement to cause podocyte injury, culminating in cytoskeletal reorganization, loss of slit diaphragms, and proteinuria. There is much circumstantial evidence for a prominent role of complement in human MN, as C3 and C5b-9 are consistently found within immune deposits. Secondary MN often exhibits the additional presence of C1q, implicating the classical pathway of complement activation. Primary MN, however, is IgG4-predominant and IgG4 is considered incapable of binding C1q and activating the complement pathway. Recent studies have identified the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) as the major target antigen in primary MN. Early evidence hints that IgG4 anti-PLA2R autoantibodies can bind mannan-binding lectin and activate the lectin complement pathway. The identification of anti-PLA2R antibodies as likely participants in the pathogenesis of disease will allow focused investigation into the role of complement in MN. Definitive therapy for MN is immunosuppression, although future therapeutic agents that specifically target complement activation may represent an effective temporizing measure to forestall further glomerular injury. PMID:24161038

  12. Complement regulation: physiology and disease relevance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is part of the innate immune response and as such defends against invading pathogens, removes immune complexes and damaged self-cells, aids organ regeneration, confers neuroprotection, and engages with the adaptive immune response via T and B cells. Complement activation can either benefit or harm the host organism; thus, the complement system must maintain a balance between activation on foreign or modified self surfaces and inhibition on intact host cells. Complement regulators are essential for maintaining this balance and are classified as soluble regulators, such as factor H, and membrane-bound regulators. Defective complement regulators can damage the host cell and result in the accumulation of immunological debris. Moreover, defective regulators are associated with several autoimmune diseases such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, dense deposit disease, age-related macular degeneration, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms by which the complement system is regulated is important for the development of novel therapies for complement-associated diseases. PMID:26300937

  13. Complete prewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Parry, A. O.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study continuous interfacial transitions, analagous to two-dimensional complete wetting, associated with the first-order prewetting line, which can occur on steps, patterned walls, grooves and wedges, and which are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple prototypical geometries. Using microscopic classical density functional theory to model systems with realistic Lennard-Jones fluid–fluid and fluid–substrate intermolecular potentials, we compute mean-field fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and phase diagrams for a variety of confining geometries.

  14. Atmosphere, ecology and evolution: what drove the Miocene expansion of C(4) grasslands?

    PubMed

    Osborne, Colin P

    2008-01-01

    Grasses using the C(4) photosynthetic pathway dominate today's savanna ecosystems and account for approximately 20% of terrestrial carbon fixation. However, this dominant status was reached only recently, during a period of C(4) grassland expansion in the Late Miocene and Early Pliocene (4-8 Myr ago). Declining atmospheric CO(2) has long been considered the key driver of this event, but new geological evidence casts doubt on the idea, forcing a reconsideration of the environmental cues for C(4) plant success.Here, I evaluate the current hypotheses and debate in this field, beginning with a discussion of the role of CO(2) in the evolutionary origins, rather than expansion, of C(4) grasses. Atmospheric CO(2) starvation is a plausible selection agent for the C(4) pathway, but a time gap of around 10 Myr remains between major decreases in CO(2) during the Oligocene, and the earliest current evidence of C(4) plants.An emerging ecological perspective explains the Miocene expansion of C(4) grasslands via changes in climatic seasonality and the occurrence of fire. However, the climatic drivers of this event are debated and may vary among geographical regions.Uncertainty in these areas could be reduced significantly by new directions in ecological research, especially the discovery that grass species richness along rainfall gradients shows contrasting patterns in different C(4) clades. By re-evaluating a published data set, I show that increasing seasonality of rainfall is linked to changes in the relative abundance of the major C(4) grass clades Paniceae and Andropogoneae. I propose that the explicit inclusion of these ecological patterns would significantly strengthen climate change hypotheses of Miocene C(4) grassland expansion. Critically, they allow a new series of testable predictions to be made about the fossil record.Synthesis. This paper offers a novel framework for integrating modern ecological patterns into theories about the geological history of C(4) plants.

  15. Vaccinia virus protein C4 inhibits NF-κB activation and promotes virus virulence.

    PubMed

    Ember, Stuart W J; Ren, Hongwei; Ferguson, Brian J; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2012-10-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) strain Western Reserve protein C4 has been characterized and its function and contribution to virus virulence assessed. Bioinformatic analysis showed that C4 is conserved in six orthopoxvirus species and shares 43 % amino acid identity with VACV protein C16, a known virulence factor. A recombinant VACV expressing a C-terminally tagged version of C4 showed that, like C16, this 37 kDa protein is expressed early during infection and localizes to both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Functional assays using a firefly luciferase reporter plasmid under the control of a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent promoter demonstrated that C4 inhibits NF-κB activation at, or downstream of, the inhibitor of kappa kinase (IKK) complex. Consistent with this, C4 inhibited interleukin-1β-induced translocation of p65 into the nucleus. A VACV lacking the C4L gene (vΔC4) showed no significant differences from wild-type virus in growth kinetics or spread in cell culture, but had reduced virulence in a murine intranasal model of infection. vΔC4-infected mice exhibited fewer symptoms, lost less weight and recovered 7 days earlier than animals infected with control viruses expressing C4. Furthermore, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from vΔC4-infected mice had increased cell numbers at day 5 post-infection, which correlated with reduced lung virus titres from this time onward. C4 represents the ninth VACV protein to inhibit NF-κB activation and remarkably, in every case examined, loss of each protein individually caused an alteration in virus virulence, despite the presence of other NF-κB inhibitors. PMID:22791606

  16. Vaccinia virus protein C4 inhibits NF-κB activation and promotes virus virulence.

    PubMed

    Ember, Stuart W J; Ren, Hongwei; Ferguson, Brian J; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2012-10-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) strain Western Reserve protein C4 has been characterized and its function and contribution to virus virulence assessed. Bioinformatic analysis showed that C4 is conserved in six orthopoxvirus species and shares 43 % amino acid identity with VACV protein C16, a known virulence factor. A recombinant VACV expressing a C-terminally tagged version of C4 showed that, like C16, this 37 kDa protein is expressed early during infection and localizes to both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Functional assays using a firefly luciferase reporter plasmid under the control of a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent promoter demonstrated that C4 inhibits NF-κB activation at, or downstream of, the inhibitor of kappa kinase (IKK) complex. Consistent with this, C4 inhibited interleukin-1β-induced translocation of p65 into the nucleus. A VACV lacking the C4L gene (vΔC4) showed no significant differences from wild-type virus in growth kinetics or spread in cell culture, but had reduced virulence in a murine intranasal model of infection. vΔC4-infected mice exhibited fewer symptoms, lost less weight and recovered 7 days earlier than animals infected with control viruses expressing C4. Furthermore, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from vΔC4-infected mice had increased cell numbers at day 5 post-infection, which correlated with reduced lung virus titres from this time onward. C4 represents the ninth VACV protein to inhibit NF-κB activation and remarkably, in every case examined, loss of each protein individually caused an alteration in virus virulence, despite the presence of other NF-κB inhibitors.

  17. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  18. The Carbohydrate-linked Phosphorylcholine of the Parasitic Nematode Product ES-62 Modulates Complement Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Umul Kulthum; Maller, N. Claire; Iqbal, Asif J.; Al-Riyami, Lamyaa; Harnett, William; Raynes, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes manufacture various carbohydrate-linked phosphorylcholine (PCh)-containing molecules, including ES-62, a protein with an N-linked glycan terminally substituted with PCh. The PCh component is biologically important because it is required for immunomodulatory effects. We showed that most ES-62 was bound to a single protein, C-reactive protein (CRP), in normal human serum, displaying a calcium-dependent, high-avidity interaction and ability to form large complexes. Unexpectedly, CRP binding to ES-62 failed to efficiently activate complement as far as the C3 convertase stage in comparison with PCh-BSA and PCh-containing Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall polysaccharide. C1q capture assays demonstrated an ES-62-CRP-C1q interaction in serum. The three ligands all activated C1 and generated C4b to similar extents. However, a C2a active site was not generated following ES-62 binding to CRP, demonstrating that C2 cleavage was far less efficient for ES-62-containing complexes. We proposed that failure of C2 cleavage was due to the flexible nature of carbohydrate-bound PCh and that reduced proximity of the C1 complex was the reason that C2 was poorly cleaved. This was confirmed using synthetic analogues that were similar to ES-62 only in respect of having a flexible PCh. Furthermore, ES-62 was shown to deplete early complement components, such as the rate-limiting C4, following CRP interaction and thereby inhibit classical pathway activation. Thus, flexible PCh-glycan represents a novel mechanism for subversion of complement activation. These data illustrate the importance of the rate-limiting C4/C2 stage of complement activation and reveal a new addition to the repertoire of ES-62 immunomodulatory mechanisms with possible therapeutic applications. PMID:27044740

  19. Synthesis of C-4 and C-7 Triazole Analogs of Zanamivir as Multivalent Sialic Acid Containing Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2007-01-01

    The relative reactivities of C-4 and C-7 azides derived from zanamivir were compared in cycloadition reactions with a panel of alkynes. All of the reactions proceeded efficiently with no observable differences between primary and secondary azides. Significant rate differences were observed between several members of the alkyne panel. Most notably, a trialkyne derived from a 1,3,5-triazine core underwent complete reaction within four hours whereas an analogous trialkyne with an all carbon aromatic core required 18 hours. These results suggest that the triazine core serves as an internal catalyst. PMID:17597592

  20. Resolving the Compartmentation and Function of C4 Photosynthesis in the Single-Cell C4 Species Bienertia sinuspersici1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Offermann, Sascha; Okita, Thomas W.; Edwards, Gerald E.

    2011-01-01

    Bienertia sinuspersici is a land plant known to perform C4 photosynthesis through the location of dimorphic chloroplasts in separate cytoplasmic domains within a single photosynthetic cell. A protocol was developed with isolated protoplasts to obtain peripheral chloroplasts (P-CP), a central compartment (CC), and chloroplasts from the CC (C-CP) to study the subcellular localization of photosynthetic functions. Analyses of these preparations established intracellular compartmentation of processes to support a NAD-malic enzyme (ME)-type C4 cycle. Western-blot analyses indicated that the CC has Rubisco from the C3 cycle, the C4 decarboxylase NAD-ME, a mitochondrial isoform of aspartate aminotransferase, and photorespiratory markers, while the C-CP and P-CP have high levels of Rubisco and pyruvate, Pidikinase, respectively. Other enzymes for supporting a NAD-ME cycle via an aspartate-alanine shuttle, carbonic anhydrase, phosophoenolpyruvate carboxylase, alanine, and an isoform of aspartate aminotransferase are localized in the cytosol. Functional characterization by photosynthetic oxygen evolution revealed that only the C-CP have a fully operational C3 cycle, while both chloroplast types have the capacity to photoreduce 3-phosphoglycerate. The P-CP were enriched in a putative pyruvate transporter and showed light-dependent conversion of pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate. There is a larger investment in chloroplasts in the central domain than in the peripheral domain (6-fold more chloroplasts and 4-fold more chlorophyll). The implications of this uneven distribution for the energetics of the C4 and C3 cycles are discussed. The results indicate that peripheral and central compartment chloroplasts in the single-cell C4 species B. sinuspersici function analogous to mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts of Kranz-type C4 species. PMID:21263039

  1. Complement-Mediated Death of Ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis Caused by Human Blood Serum.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P A; Faktor, M I; Karpova, N S; Cheremnykh, E G; Brusov, O S

    2016-04-01

    Toxicity of human blood serum for ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis is determined by the complement system. When ciliate are dying after being exposed to blood serum, cell membrane permeability for low-molecular-weight compounds significantly increases, probably due to pore formation. Serine protease inhibitors or exposure to physical factors inducing complement inactivation (e.g., heating up to 56°C) completely prevented ciliate death under the effect of human serum. Activation of serum complement upon interaction with Tetrahymena cells occurred by the classical or lectin pathway, while the contribution of the alternative activation pathway was negligible.

  2. Germination Shifts of C3 and C4 Species under Simulated Global Warming Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongxiang; Yu, Qiang; Huang, Yingxin; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yu; Song, Yantao; Li, Guangdi; Zhou, Daowei

    2014-01-01

    Research efforts around the world have been increasingly devoted to investigating changes in C3 and C4 species' abundance or distribution with global warming, as they provide important insight into carbon fluxes and linked biogeochemical cycles. However, changes in the early life stage (e.g. germination) of C3 and C4 species in response to global warming, particularly with respect to asymmetric warming, have received less attention. We investigated germination percentage and rate of C3 and C4 species under asymmetric (+3/+6°C at day/night) and symmetric warming (+5/+5°C at day/night), simulated by alternating temperatures. A thermal time model was used to calculate germination base temperature and thermal time constant. Two additional alternating temperature regimes were used to test temperature metrics effect. The germination percentage and rate increased continuously for C4 species, but increased and then decreased with temperature for C3 species under both symmetric and asymmetric warming. Compared to asymmetric warming, symmetric warming significantly overestimated the speed of germination percentage change with temperature for C4 species. Among the temperature metrics (minimum, maximum, diurnal temperature range and average temperature), maximum temperature was most correlated with germination of C4 species. Our results indicate that global warming may favour germination of C4 species, at least for the C4 species studied in this work. The divergent effects of asymmetric and symmetric warming on plant germination also deserve more attention in future studies. PMID:25137138

  3. Germination shifts of C3 and C4 species under simulated global warming scenario.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxiang; Yu, Qiang; Huang, Yingxin; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yu; Song, Yantao; Li, Guangdi; Zhou, Daowei

    2014-01-01

    Research efforts around the world have been increasingly devoted to investigating changes in C3 and C4 species' abundance or distribution with global warming, as they provide important insight into carbon fluxes and linked biogeochemical cycles. However, changes in the early life stage (e.g. germination) of C3 and C4 species in response to global warming, particularly with respect to asymmetric warming, have received less attention. We investigated germination percentage and rate of C3 and C4 species under asymmetric (+3/+6°C at day/night) and symmetric warming (+5/+5°C at day/night), simulated by alternating temperatures. A thermal time model was used to calculate germination base temperature and thermal time constant. Two additional alternating temperature regimes were used to test temperature metrics effect. The germination percentage and rate increased continuously for C4 species, but increased and then decreased with temperature for C3 species under both symmetric and asymmetric warming. Compared to asymmetric warming, symmetric warming significantly overestimated the speed of germination percentage change with temperature for C4 species. Among the temperature metrics (minimum, maximum, diurnal temperature range and average temperature), maximum temperature was most correlated with germination of C4 species. Our results indicate that global warming may favour germination of C4 species, at least for the C4 species studied in this work. The divergent effects of asymmetric and symmetric warming on plant germination also deserve more attention in future studies.

  4. Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase (C4H) genes from Leucaena leucocephala: a pulp yielding leguminous tree.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Omer, Sumita; Patel, Krunal; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-02-01

    Leucaena leucocephala is a leguminous tree species accounting for one-fourth of raw material supplied to paper and pulp industry in India. Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase (C4H, EC 1.14.13.11) is the second gene of phenylpropanoid pathway and a member of cytochrome P450 family. There is currently intense interest to alter or modify lignin content of L. leucocephala. Three highly similar C4H alleles of LlC4H1 gene were isolated and characterized. The alleles shared more than 98 % sequence identity at amino acid level to each other. Binding of partial promoter of another C4H gene LlC4H2, to varying amounts of crude nuclear proteins isolated from leaf and stem tissues of L. leucocephala formed two loose and one strong complex, respectively, suggesting that the abundance of proteins that bind with the partial C4H promoter is higher in stem tissue than in leaf tissue. Quantitative Real Time PCR study suggested that among tissues of same age, root tissues had highest level of C4H transcripts. Maximum transcript level was observed in 30 day old root tissue. Among the tissues investigated, C4H activity was highest in 60 day old root tissues. Tissue specific quantitative comparison of lignin from developing seedling stage to 1 year old tree stage indicated that Klason lignin increased in tissues with age. PMID:23070917

  5. Engineering C4 photosynthesis into C3 chassis in the synthetic biology age.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Mara L; Mantegazza, Otho; Weber, Andreas P M

    2016-07-01

    C4 photosynthetic plants outperform C3 plants in hot and arid climates. By concentrating carbon dioxide around Rubisco C4 plants drastically reduce photorespiration. The frequency with which plants evolved C4 photosynthesis independently challenges researchers to unravel the genetic mechanisms underlying this convergent evolutionary switch. The conversion of C3 crops, such as rice, towards C4 photosynthesis is a long-standing goal. Nevertheless, at the present time, in the age of synthetic biology, this still remains a monumental task, partially because the C4 carbon-concentrating biochemical cycle spans two cell types and thus requires specialized anatomy. Here we review the advances in understanding the molecular basis and the evolution of the C4 trait, advances in the last decades that were driven by systems biology methods. In this review we emphasise essential genetic engineering tools needed to translate our theoretical knowledge into engineering approaches. With our current molecular understanding of the biochemical C4 pathway, we propose a simplified rational engineering model exclusively built with known C4 metabolic components. Moreover, we discuss an alternative approach to the progressing international engineering attempts that would combine targeted mutagenesis and directed evolution. PMID:26945781

  6. Engineering C4 photosynthesis into C3 chassis in the synthetic biology age.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Mara L; Mantegazza, Otho; Weber, Andreas P M

    2016-07-01

    C4 photosynthetic plants outperform C3 plants in hot and arid climates. By concentrating carbon dioxide around Rubisco C4 plants drastically reduce photorespiration. The frequency with which plants evolved C4 photosynthesis independently challenges researchers to unravel the genetic mechanisms underlying this convergent evolutionary switch. The conversion of C3 crops, such as rice, towards C4 photosynthesis is a long-standing goal. Nevertheless, at the present time, in the age of synthetic biology, this still remains a monumental task, partially because the C4 carbon-concentrating biochemical cycle spans two cell types and thus requires specialized anatomy. Here we review the advances in understanding the molecular basis and the evolution of the C4 trait, advances in the last decades that were driven by systems biology methods. In this review we emphasise essential genetic engineering tools needed to translate our theoretical knowledge into engineering approaches. With our current molecular understanding of the biochemical C4 pathway, we propose a simplified rational engineering model exclusively built with known C4 metabolic components. Moreover, we discuss an alternative approach to the progressing international engineering attempts that would combine targeted mutagenesis and directed evolution.

  7. New introductions of enterovirus 71 subgenogroup C4 strains, France, 2012.

    PubMed

    Schuffenecker, Isabelle; Henquell, Cécile; Mirand, Audrey; Coste-Burel, Marianne; Marque-Juillet, Stéphanie; Desbois, Delphine; Lagathu, Gisèle; Bornebusch, Laure; Bailly, Jean-Luc; Lina, Bruno

    2014-08-01

    In France during 2012, human enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) subgenogroup C4 strains were detected in 4 children hospitalized for neonatal fever or meningitis. Phylogenetic analysis showed novel and independent EV-A71 introductions, presumably from China, and suggested circulation of C4 strains throughout France. This observation emphasizes the need for monitoring EV-A71 infections in Europe.

  8. 26 CFR 1.381(c)(4)-1 - Method of accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Method of accounting. 1.381(c)(4)-1 Section 1... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Insolvency Reorganizations § 1.381(c)(4)-1 Method of accounting. (a... section 381(a) applies, an acquiring corporation shall use the same method of accounting used by...

  9. The role of photorespiration during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in the genus Flaveria.

    PubMed

    Mallmann, Julia; Heckmann, David; Bräutigam, Andrea; Lercher, Martin J; Weber, Andreas P M; Westhoff, Peter; Gowik, Udo

    2014-06-16

    C4 photosynthesis represents a most remarkable case of convergent evolution of a complex trait, which includes the reprogramming of the expression patterns of thousands of genes. Anatomical, physiological, and phylogenetic and analyses as well as computational modeling indicate that the establishment of a photorespiratory carbon pump (termed C2 photosynthesis) is a prerequisite for the evolution of C4. However, a mechanistic model explaining the tight connection between the evolution of C4 and C2 photosynthesis is currently lacking. Here we address this question through comparative transcriptomic and biochemical analyses of closely related C3, C3-C4, and C4 species, combined with Flux Balance Analysis constrained through a mechanistic model of carbon fixation. We show that C2 photosynthesis creates a misbalance in nitrogen metabolism between bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. Rebalancing nitrogen metabolism requires anaplerotic reactions that resemble at least parts of a basic C4 cycle. Our findings thus show how C2 photosynthesis represents a pre-adaptation for the C4 system, where the evolution of the C2 system establishes important C4 components as a side effect.

  10. Elements required for an efficient NADP-malic enzyme type C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Long, Stephen P; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2014-04-01

    C4 photosynthesis has higher light, nitrogen, and water use efficiencies than C3 photosynthesis. Although the basic anatomical, cellular, and biochemical features of C4 photosynthesis are well understood, the quantitative significance of each element of C4 photosynthesis to the high photosynthetic efficiency are not well defined. Here, we addressed this question by developing and using a systems model of C4 photosynthesis, which includes not only the Calvin-Benson cycle, starch synthesis, sucrose synthesis, C4 shuttle, and CO₂ leakage, but also photorespiration and metabolite transport between the bundle sheath cells and mesophyll cells. The model effectively simulated the CO₂ uptake rates, and the changes of metabolite concentrations under varied CO₂ and light levels. Analyses show that triose phosphate transport and CO₂ leakage can help maintain a high photosynthetic rate by balancing ATP and NADPH amounts in bundle sheath cells and mesophyll cells. Finally, we used the model to define the optimal enzyme properties and a blueprint for C4 engineering. As such, this model provides a theoretical framework for guiding C4 engineering and studying C4 photosynthesis in general.

  11. Setaria viridis: A Model for C4 Photosynthesis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Brutnell, Thomas P.; Wang, Lin; Swartwood, Kerry; Goldschmidt, Alexander; Jackson, David; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Kellogg, Elizabeth; Van Eck, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis drives productivity in several major food crops and bioenergy grasses, including maize (Zea mays), sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), Miscanthus x giganteus, and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Gains in productivity associated with C4 photosynthesis include improved water and nitrogen use efficiencies. Thus, engineering C4 traits into C3 crops is an attractive target for crop improvement. However, the lack of a small, rapid cycling genetic model system to study C4 photosynthesis has limited progress in dissecting the regulatory networks underlying the C4 syndrome. Setaria viridis is a member of the Panicoideae clade and is a close relative of several major feed, fuel, and bioenergy grasses. It is a true diploid with a relatively small genome of ~510 Mb. Its short stature, simple growth requirements, and rapid life cycle will greatly facilitate genetic studies of the C4 grasses. Importantly, S. viridis uses an NADP-malic enzyme subtype C4 photosynthetic system to fix carbon and therefore is a potentially powerful model system for dissecting C4 photosynthesis. Here, we summarize some of the recent advances that promise greatly to accelerate the use of S. viridis as a genetic system. These include our recent successful efforts at regenerating plants from seed callus, establishing a transient transformation system, and developing stable transformation. PMID:20693355

  12. Effects of complement inhibition with soluble complement receptor-1 on vascular injury and inflammation during renal allograft rejection in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, J. R.; Hibbs, M. J.; Laver, A. J.; Smith, R. A.; Sacks, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    Complement is both an effector of the humoral immune response and a stimulator of leukocyte activation. To examine the influence of complement on the allograft response, we inhibited complement using recombinant human soluble complement receptor-1 (sCR1; TP10), in an unsensitized model of rat renal allograft rejection. Lewis to DA renal transplant recipients were treated daily with 25 mg/kg sCR1 or saline and sacrificed on days 1 to 5 after transplant. Transplanted organs were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for leukocyte subset markers and for the third component of complement, C3, and membrane attack complex deposition. A second set of recipients was followed from day 5 to day 9 to assess graft survival. sCR1-treated recipients displayed > 90% inhibition of plasma complement activity and a marked reduction in tissue C3 and membrane attack complex deposition. Inactivation of complement reduced the vascular injury such that there was almost complete sparing of vascular damage in day 5 sCR1-treated rats. There was a significant reduction in infiltrating leukocytes by day 5 after transplant, and complement inhibition delayed the time to reach a histologically defined end point of graft survival from 5 days in controls to 9 days in the sCR1-treated group. These results imply that the vascular and cell-mediated injury arises, in part, from complement activation. The partial inhibition of these injuries by sCR1 may have functional implications for strategies to inhibit allograft rejection. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8952538

  13. Fire ecology of C3 and C4 grasses depends on evolutionary history and frequency of burning but not photosynthetic type.

    PubMed

    Ripley, Brad; Visser, Vernon; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Archibald, Sally; Martin, Tarryn; Osborne, Colin

    2015-10-01

    Grasses using the C4 photosynthetic pathway dominate frequently burned savannas, where the pathway is hypothesized to be adaptive. However, independent C4 lineages also sort among different fire environments. Adaptations to fire may thus depend on evolutionary history, which could be as important as the possession of the C4 photosynthetic pathway for life in these environments. Here, using a comparative pot experiment and controlled burn, we examined C3 and C4 grasses belonging to four lineages from the same regional flora, and asked the following questions: Do lineages differ in their responses to fire, are responses consistent between photosynthetic types, and are responses related to fire frequency in natural habitats? We found that in the C4 Andropogoneae lineage, frost killed a large proportion of aboveground biomass and produced a large dry fuel load, which meant that only a small fraction of the living tissue was lost in the fire. C3 species from the Paniceae and Danthonioideae lineages generated smaller fuel loads and lost more living biomass, while species from the C4 lineage Aristida generated the smallest fuel loads and lost the most living tissue. Regrowth after the fire was more rapid and complete in the C4 Andropogoneae and C3 Paniceae, but incomplete and slower in the C3 Danthonioideae and C4 Aristida. Rapid recovery was associated with high photosynthetic rates, high specific leaf area, delayed flowering, and frequent fires in natural habitats. Results demonstrated that phylogenetic lineage was more important than photosynthetic type in determining the fire response of these grasses and that fire responses were related to the frequency that natural habitats burned.

  14. Estrogen replacement raises rat CRP without evidence of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, S X; Diaz Padilla, N; Zhu, Q; Ma, X M; Sasso, D; Prestwood, K; Hack, C E; Kuchel, G A

    2005-01-01

    Given current controversies regarding anti- and pro-inflammatory effects of estrogen, there is a need to explore relationships between gonadal hormones and inflammation using appropriate animal models. It has been proposed that rats are not appropriate for such research since, contrary to the effect of estrogen in humans, earlier animal studies had reported that estrogen downregulates serum C-reactive protein (rCRP) levels in the rat. With these considerations in mind, we re-examined the effects of estrogen withdrawal and replacement on CRP expression and complement activation in the rat. F-344 rats underwent bilateral ovariectomy or sham surgery at 9-10 months of age. Four months later, ovariectomized rats were treated with traditional high-dose 17beta-estradiol (Hi-E2) capsules, lower-dose (Lo-E2) 17beta-estradiol capsules, or placebo capsules for 7 days prior to sacrifice. Levels of plasma rat C-reactive protein (rCRP) were significantly lower in ovariectomized vs. sham-operated animals (415.5 +/- 10.6 vs. 626.6 +/- 23.0 mg/L, p < 0.001). Estrogen replacement significantly raised rCRP levels in ovariectomized animals (690.0 +/- 28.0 mg/L in Lo-E2 and 735.5 +/- 35.8 mg/L in Hi-E2, respectively, p < 0.001). Plasma rCRP levels correlated significantly with both hepatic rCRP (r = 0.79, p < 0.001) and serum estradiol (r = 0.70, p < 0.001) levels. However, no significant differences were observed in indices of complement activation (C4b/c) or CRP-complement complex generation (rCRP-C3 complex). In the mature female rat, ovariectomy reduces and estrogen replacement raises rCRP. Effects of estrogen on plasma rCRP induction are mediated, at least in part, through hepatic mechanisms and do not appear to require or be associated with complement activation.

  15. Association of complement receptor 2 polymorphisms with innate resistance to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Herrero, R; Real, L M; Rivero-Juárez, A; Pineda, J A; Camacho, Á; Macías, J; Laplana, M; Konieczny, P; Márquez, F J; Souto, J C; Soria, J M; Saulle, I; Lo Caputo, S; Biasin, M; Rivero, A; Fibla, J; Caruz, A

    2015-03-01

    HIV-1 induces activation of complement through the classical and lectin pathways. However, the virus incorporates several membrane-bound or soluble regulators of complement activation (RCA) that inactivate complement. HIV-1 can also use the complement receptors (CRs) for complement-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of infection (Ć-ADE). We hypothesize that hypofunctional polymorphisms in RCA or CRs may protect from HIV-1 infection. For this purpose, 139 SNPs located in 19 RCA and CRs genes were genotyped in a population of 201 Spanish HIV-1-exposed seronegative individuals (HESN) and 250 HIV-1-infected patients. Two SNPs were associated with infection susceptibility, rs1567190 in CR2 (odds ratio (OR) = 2.27, P = 1 × 10(-4)) and rs2842704 in C4BPA (OR = 2.11, P = 2 × 10(-4)). To replicate this finding, we analyzed a cohort of Italian, sexually HESN individuals. Although not significant (P = 0.25, OR = 1.57), similar genotypic proportions were obtained for the CR2 marker rs1567190. The results of the two association analyses were combined through a random effect meta-analysis, with a significant P-value of 2.6 x 10(-5) (OR = 2.07). Furthermore, we found that the protective CR2 genotype is correlated with lower levels CR2 mRNA as well as differences in the ratio of the long and short CR2 isoforms.

  16. Transcriptome comparisons shed light on the pre-condition and potential barrier for C4 photosynthesis evolution in eudicots.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yimin; Lyu, Ming-Ju Amy; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-05-01

    C4 photosynthesis evolved independently from C3 photosynthesis in more than 60 lineages. Most of the C4 lineages are clustered together in the order Poales and the order Caryophyllales while many other angiosperm orders do not have C4 species, suggesting the existence of biological pre-conditions in the ancestral C3 species that facilitate the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in these lineages. To explore pre-adaptations for C4 photosynthesis evolution, we classified C4 lineages into the C4-poor and the C4-rich groups based on the percentage of C4 species in different genera and conducted a comprehensive comparison on the transcriptomic changes between the non-C4 species from the C4-poor and the C4-rich groups. Results show that species in the C4-rich group showed higher expression of genes related to oxidoreductase activity, light reaction components, terpene synthesis, secondary cell synthesis, C4 cycle related genes and genes related to nucleotide metabolism and senescence. In contrast, C4-poor group showed up-regulation of a PEP/Pi translocator, genes related to signaling pathway, stress response, defense response and plant hormone metabolism (ethylene and brassinosteroid). The implications of these transcriptomic differences between the C4-rich and C4-poor groups to C4 evolution are discussed.

  17. Differential positioning of chloroplasts in C4 mesophyll and bundle sheath cells.

    PubMed

    Maai, Eri; Miyake, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka

    2011-08-01

    Chloroplast photorelocation movement is extensively studied in C3 but not C4 plants. C4 plants have 2 types of photosynthetic cells: mesophyll and bundle sheath cells. Mesophyll chloroplasts are randomly distributed along cell walls, whereas bundle sheath chloroplasts are located close to the vascular tissues or mesophyll cells depending on the plant species. The cell-specific C 4 chloroplast arrangement is established during cell maturation, and is maintained throughout the life of the cell. However, only mesophyll chloroplasts can change their positions in response to environmental stresses. The migration pattern is unique to C4 plants and differs from that of C3 chloroplasts. In this mini-review, we highlight the cell-specific disposition of chloroplasts in C4 plants and discuss the possible physiological significances.

  18. On complements of coradicals of finite groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, V. A.; Sorokina, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Let F be an ω-local Fitting formation, and G a finite group that can be represented in the form of a product of n subnormal subgroups whose F-coradicals are ω-soluble, and whose Sylow p-subgroups are abelian for any p\\inω. It is established that there exist ω-complements of the F-coradical of G. New theorems on the existence of complements of coradicals of a group are obtained as corollaries. For an ω-local formation F, conditions are established for the existence of complements and ω-complements of the F-coradical of a group in any of its extensions. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  19. Regulation of humoral immunity by complement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael C; Isenman, David E

    2012-08-24

    The complement system of innate immunity is important in regulating humoral immunity largely through the complement receptor CR2, which forms a coreceptor on B cells during antigen-induced activation. However, CR2 also retains antigens on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs). Display of antigen on FDCs is critical for clonal selection and affinity maturation of activated B cells. This review will discuss the role of complement in adaptive immunity in general with a focus on the interplay between CR2-associated antigen on B cells with CR2 expressed on FDCs. This latter interaction provides an opportunity for memory B cells to sample antigen over prolonged periods. The cocrystal structure of CR2 with its ligand C3d provides insight into how the complement system regulates access of antigen by B cells with implications for therapeutic manipulations to modulate aberrant B cell responses in the case of autoimmunity.

  20. Autocrine effects of tumor-derived complement.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Soon; Vasquez, Hernan G; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Pradeep, Sunila; Wu, Sherry; Zand, Behrouz; Han, Hee-Dong; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Huang, Jie; Miyake, Takahito; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Dalton, Heather J; Ivan, Cristina; Baggerly, Keith; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2014-03-27

    We describe a role for the complement system in enhancing cancer growth. Cancer cells secrete complement proteins that stimulate tumor growth upon activation. Complement promotes tumor growth via a direct autocrine effect that is partially independent of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T cells. Activated C5aR and C3aR signal through the PI3K/AKT pathway in cancer cells, and silencing the PI3K or AKT gene in cancer cells eliminates the progrowth effects of C5aR and C3aR stimulation. In patients with ovarian or lung cancer, higher tumoral C3 or C5aR mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival. These data identify a role for tumor-derived complement proteins in promoting tumor growth, and they therefore have substantial clinical and therapeutic implications.

  1. [Complement system regulation and C3 glomerulopathy].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hui-jie; He, Rui-juan

    2013-04-18

    Complement system is a key system for immune surveillance and homeostasis. Excessive activation of complement system,especially the activation of alternative pathway may play a very important role in the pathogenesis of primary and secondary glomerulonephritis. C3 glomerulopathy is a newly named disease characterized by evident C3 deposition in the glomeruli with little or no immunoglobulin under immunofluorescence (IF). Its clinical and pathological manifestations vary a lot. The decreased plasma C3 and Factor H(FH)suggest that abnormal regulation of complement system plays an importment role in its pathogenesis. C3 glomerulopathy varies a lot as to its clinical manifestation, treatment and prognosis. The inhibition of excessive complement activation might be the key to treating C3 glomerulopathy.

  2. The Citrus transcription factor, CitERF13, regulates citric acid accumulation via a protein-protein interaction with the vacuolar proton pump, CitVHA-c4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-jia; Yin, Xue-ren; Xie, Xiu-lan; Allan, Andrew C.; Ge, Hang; Shen, Shu-ling; Chen, Kun-song

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are essential to fruit flavor. The vacuolar H+ transporting adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) plays an important role in organic acid transport and accumulation. However, less is known of V-ATPase interacting proteins and their relationship with organic acid accumulation. The relationship between V-ATPase and citric acid was investigated, using the citrus tangerine varieties ‘Ordinary Ponkan (OPK)’ and an early maturing mutant ‘Zaoshu Ponkan (ZPK)’. Five V-ATPase genes (CitVHA) were predicted as important to citric acid accumulation. Among the genes, CitVHA-c4 was observed, using a yeast two-hybrid screen, to interact at the protein level with an ethylene response factor, CitERF13. This was verified using bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. A similar interaction was also observed between Arabidopsis AtERF017 (a CitERF13 homolog) and AtVHA-c4 (a CitVHA-c4 homolog). A synergistic effect on citric acid levels was observed between V-ATPase proteins and interacting ERFs when analyzed using transient over-expression in tobacco and Arabidopsis mutants. Furthermore, the transcript abundance of CitERF13 was concomitant with CitVHA-c4. CitERF13 or AtERF017 over-expression leads to significant citric acid accumulation. This accumulation was abolished in an AtVHA-c4 mutant background. ERF-VHA interactions appear to be involved in citric acid accumulation, which was observed in both citrus and Arabidopsis. PMID:26837571

  3. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2010-05-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via the classical pathway has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated diseases such as cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, the role of complement is somewhat paradoxical. It is involved in autoantibody-initiated tissue damage on the one hand, but, on the other hand, it appears to have protective features as hereditary deficiencies of classical pathway components are associated with an increased risk for SLE. There is increasing evidence that the alternative pathway of complement, even more than the classical pathway, is involved in many systemic autoimmune diseases. This is true for IgA-dominant Henoch Schönlein Purpura, in which additional activation of the lectin pathway contributes to more severe disease. In anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis the complement system was considered not to be involved since immunoglobulin deposition is generally absent in the lesions. However, recent studies, both in human and animal models, demonstrated complement activation via the alternative pathway as a major pathogenic mechanism. Insight into the role of the various pathways of complement in the systemic autoimmune diseases including the vasculitides opens up new ways of treatment by blocking effector pathways of complement. This has been demonstrated for monoclonal antibodies to C5 or C5a in experimental anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome and ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  4. Mesophyll Chloroplast Investment in C3, C4 and C2 Species of the Genus Flaveria.

    PubMed

    Stata, Matt; Sage, Tammy L; Hoffmann, Natalie; Covshoff, Sarah; Ka-Shu Wong, Gane; Sage, Rowan F

    2016-05-01

    The mesophyll (M) cells of C4 plants contain fewer chloroplasts than observed in related C3 plants; however, it is uncertain where along the evolutionary transition from C3 to C4 that the reduction in M chloroplast number occurs. Using 18 species in the genus Flaveria, which contains C3, C4 and a range of C3-C4 intermediate species, we examined changes in chloroplast number and size per M cell, and positioning of chloroplasts relative to the M cell periphery. Chloroplast number and coverage of the M cell periphery declined in proportion to increasing strength of C4 metabolism in Flaveria, while chloroplast size increased with increasing C4 cycle strength. These changes increase cytosolic exposure to the cell periphery which could enhance diffusion of inorganic carbon to phosphenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a cytosolic enzyme. Analysis of the transcriptome from juvenile leaves of nine Flaveria species showed that the transcript abundance of four genes involved in plastid biogenesis-FtsZ1, FtsZ2, DRP5B and PARC6-was negatively correlated with variation in C4 cycle strength and positively correlated with M chloroplast number per planar cell area. Chloroplast size was negatively correlated with abundance of FtsZ1, FtsZ2 and PARC6 transcripts. These results indicate that natural selection targeted the proteins of the contractile ring assembly to effect the reduction in chloroplast numbers in the M cells of C4 Flaveria species. If so, efforts to engineer the C4 pathway into C3 plants might evaluate whether inducing transcriptome changes similar to those observed in Flaveria could reduce M chloroplast numbers, and thus introduce a trait that appears essential for efficient C4 function. PMID:26985020

  5. A Specific Transcriptome Signature for Guard Cells from the C4 Plant Gynandropsis gynandra.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Sylvain; Aresheva, Olga; Reyna-Llorens, Ivan; Smith-Unna, Richard D; Hibberd, Julian M; Genty, Bernard

    2016-03-01

    C4 photosynthesis represents an excellent example of convergent evolution that results in the optimization of both carbon and water usage by plants. In C4 plants, a carbon-concentrating mechanism divided between bundle sheath and mesophyll cells increases photosynthetic efficiency. Compared with C3 leaves, the carbon-concentrating mechanism of C4 plants allows photosynthetic operation at lower stomatal conductance, and as a consequence, transpiration is reduced. Here, we characterize transcriptomes from guard cells in C3 Tareneya hassleriana and C4 Gynandropsis gynandra belonging to the Cleomaceae. While approximately 60% of Gene Ontology terms previously associated with guard cells from the C3 model Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are conserved, there is much less overlap between patterns of individual gene expression. Most ion and CO2 signaling modules appear unchanged at the transcript level in guard cells from C3 and C4 species, but major variations in transcripts associated with carbon-related pathways known to influence stomatal behavior were detected. Genes associated with C4 photosynthesis were more highly expressed in guard cells of C4 compared with C3 leaves. Furthermore, we detected two major patterns of cell-specific C4 gene expression within the C4 leaf. In the first, genes previously associated with preferential expression in the bundle sheath showed continually decreasing expression from bundle sheath to mesophyll to guard cells. In the second, expression was maximal in the mesophyll compared with both guard cells and bundle sheath. These data imply that at least two gene regulatory networks act to coordinate gene expression across the bundle sheath, mesophyll, and guard cells in the C4 leaf.

  6. A Specific Transcriptome Signature for Guard Cells from the C4 Plant Gynandropsis gynandra1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aresheva, Olga; Reyna-Llorens, Ivan; Genty, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis represents an excellent example of convergent evolution that results in the optimization of both carbon and water usage by plants. In C4 plants, a carbon-concentrating mechanism divided between bundle sheath and mesophyll cells increases photosynthetic efficiency. Compared with C3 leaves, the carbon-concentrating mechanism of C4 plants allows photosynthetic operation at lower stomatal conductance, and as a consequence, transpiration is reduced. Here, we characterize transcriptomes from guard cells in C3 Tareneya hassleriana and C4 Gynandropsis gynandra belonging to the Cleomaceae. While approximately 60% of Gene Ontology terms previously associated with guard cells from the C3 model Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are conserved, there is much less overlap between patterns of individual gene expression. Most ion and CO2 signaling modules appear unchanged at the transcript level in guard cells from C3 and C4 species, but major variations in transcripts associated with carbon-related pathways known to influence stomatal behavior were detected. Genes associated with C4 photosynthesis were more highly expressed in guard cells of C4 compared with C3 leaves. Furthermore, we detected two major patterns of cell-specific C4 gene expression within the C4 leaf. In the first, genes previously associated with preferential expression in the bundle sheath showed continually decreasing expression from bundle sheath to mesophyll to guard cells. In the second, expression was maximal in the mesophyll compared with both guard cells and bundle sheath. These data imply that at least two gene regulatory networks act to coordinate gene expression across the bundle sheath, mesophyll, and guard cells in the C4 leaf. PMID:26818731

  7. Mesophyll Chloroplast Investment in C3, C4 and C2 Species of the Genus Flaveria.

    PubMed

    Stata, Matt; Sage, Tammy L; Hoffmann, Natalie; Covshoff, Sarah; Ka-Shu Wong, Gane; Sage, Rowan F

    2016-05-01

    The mesophyll (M) cells of C4 plants contain fewer chloroplasts than observed in related C3 plants; however, it is uncertain where along the evolutionary transition from C3 to C4 that the reduction in M chloroplast number occurs. Using 18 species in the genus Flaveria, which contains C3, C4 and a range of C3-C4 intermediate species, we examined changes in chloroplast number and size per M cell, and positioning of chloroplasts relative to the M cell periphery. Chloroplast number and coverage of the M cell periphery declined in proportion to increasing strength of C4 metabolism in Flaveria, while chloroplast size increased with increasing C4 cycle strength. These changes increase cytosolic exposure to the cell periphery which could enhance diffusion of inorganic carbon to phosphenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a cytosolic enzyme. Analysis of the transcriptome from juvenile leaves of nine Flaveria species showed that the transcript abundance of four genes involved in plastid biogenesis-FtsZ1, FtsZ2, DRP5B and PARC6-was negatively correlated with variation in C4 cycle strength and positively correlated with M chloroplast number per planar cell area. Chloroplast size was negatively correlated with abundance of FtsZ1, FtsZ2 and PARC6 transcripts. These results indicate that natural selection targeted the proteins of the contractile ring assembly to effect the reduction in chloroplast numbers in the M cells of C4 Flaveria species. If so, efforts to engineer the C4 pathway into C3 plants might evaluate whether inducing transcriptome changes similar to those observed in Flaveria could reduce M chloroplast numbers, and thus introduce a trait that appears essential for efficient C4 function.

  8. Language and Theory of Mind in Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Relationship between Complement Syntax and False Belief Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Sophie E.; Bowler, Dermot M.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to test the hypothesis that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) use their knowledge of complement syntax as a means of "hacking out" solutions to false belief tasks, despite lacking a representational theory of mind (ToM). Participants completed a "memory for complements" task, a measure of receptive vocabulary, and…

  9. Polyphosphate suppresses complement via the terminal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wat, Jovian M.; Foley, Jonathan H.; Krisinger, Michael J.; Ocariza, Linnette Mae; Lei, Victor; Wasney, Gregory A.; Lameignere, Emilie; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate, synthesized by all cells, is a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate. When released into the circulation, it exerts prothrombotic and proinflammatory activities by modulating steps in the coagulation cascade. We examined the role of polyphosphate in regulating the evolutionarily related proteolytic cascade complement. In erythrocyte lysis assays, polyphosphate comprising more than 1000 phosphate units suppressed total hemolytic activity with a concentration to reduce maximal lysis to 50% that was 10-fold lower than with monophosphate. In the ion- and enzyme-independent terminal pathway complement assay, polyphosphate suppressed complement in a concentration- and size-dependent manner. Phosphatase-treated polyphosphate lost its ability to suppress complement, confirming that polymer integrity is required. Sequential addition of polyphosphate to the terminal pathway assay showed that polyphosphate interferes with complement only when added before formation of the C5b-7 complex. Physicochemical analyses using native gels, gel filtration, and differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that polyphosphate binds to and destabilizes C5b,6, thereby reducing the capacity of the membrane attack complex to bind to and lyse the target cell. In summary, we have added another function to polyphosphate in blood, demonstrating that it dampens the innate immune response by suppressing complement. These findings further establish the complex relationship between coagulation and innate immunity. PMID:24335501

  10. Complement and thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oku, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kono, Michihiro; Ohmura, Kazumasa; Kato, Masaru; Bohgaki, Toshiyuki; Horita, Tetsuya; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Amengual, Olga; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of complement activation in the pathophysiology of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was first reported in murine models of antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-related pregnancy morbidities. We previously reported that complement activation is prevalent and may function as a source of procoagulant cell activation in the sera of APS patients. Recently, autoantibodies against C1q, a component of complement 1, were reported to be correlated with complement activation in systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies target neoepitopes of deformed C1q bound to various molecules (i.e., anionic phospholipids) and induce accelerated complement activation. We found that anti-C1q antibodies are more frequently detected in primary APS patients than in control patients and in refractory APS patients with repeated thrombotic events. The titer of anti-C1q antibodies was significantly higher in refractory APS patients than in APS patients without flare. The binding of C1q to anionic phospholipids may be associated with the surge in complement activation in patients with anti-C1q antibodies when triggered by 'second-hit' biological stressors such as infection. Such stressors will induce overexpression of anionic phospholipids, with subsequent increases in deformed C1q that is targeted by anti-C1q antibodies.

  11. Humoral pattern recognition and the complement system.

    PubMed

    Degn, S E; Thiel, S

    2013-08-01

    In the context of immunity, pattern recognition is the art of discriminating friend from foe and innocuous from noxious. The basis of discrimination is the existence of evolutionarily conserved patterns on microorganisms, which are intrinsic to these microorganisms and necessary for their function and existence. Such immutable or slowly evolving patterns are ideal handles for recognition and have been targeted by early cellular immune defence mechanisms such as Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, RIG-I-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors and by humoral defence mechanisms such as the complement system. Complement is a proteolytic cascade system comprising around 35 different soluble and membrane-bound proteins. It constitutes a central part of the innate immune system, mediating several major innate effector functions and modulating adaptive immune responses. The complement cascade proceeds via controlled, limited proteolysis and conformational changes of constituent proteins through three activation pathways: the classical pathway, the alternative pathway and the lectin pathway, which converge in common effector functions. Here, we review the nature of the pattern recognition molecules involved in complement activation, as well as their close relatives with no or unknown capacity for activating complement. We proceed to examine the composition of the pattern recognition complexes involved in complement activation, focusing on those of the lectin pathway, and arrive at a new model for their mechanism of operation, supported by recently emerging evidence.

  12. A metalloproteinase mirolysin of Tannerella forsythia inhibits all pathways of the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Mizgalska, Danuta; Bielecka, Ewa; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Riesbeck, Kristian; Garred, Peter; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports focusing on virulence factors of periodontal pathogens implicated proteinases as major determinants of remarkable pathogenicity of these species, with special emphasis on their capacity to modulate complement activity. In particular, bacteria-mediated cleavage of C5 and subsequent release of C5a seems to be an important phenomenon in the manipulation of the local inflammatory response in periodontitis. Here we present mirolysin, a novel metalloproteinase secreted by Tannerella forsythia, a well-recognized pathogen strongly associated with periodontitis. Mirolysin exhibited a strong effect on all complement pathways. It inhibited the classical and lectin complement pathways due to efficient degradation of mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-2, ficolin-3 and C4, while inhibition of the alternative pathway was caused by degradation of C5. This specificity toward complement largely resembled the activity of a previously characterized metalloproteinase of T. forsythia, karilysin. Interestingly, mirolysin released the biologically active C5a peptide in human plasma and induced migration of neutrophils. Importantly, we demonstrated that combination of mirolysin with karilysin, as well as a cysteine proteinase of another periodontal pathogen, Prevotella intermedia, resulted in a strong synergistic effect on complement. Furthermore, mutant strains of T. forsythia, devoid of either mirolysin or karilysin, showed diminished survival in human serum, providing further evidence for the synergistic inactivation of complement by these metalloproteinases. Taken together, our findings on interactions of mirolysin with complement significantly add to the understanding of immune evasion strategies of T. forsythia, and expand the knowledge on molecular mechanisms driving pathogenic events in the infected periodontium. PMID:26209620

  13. A Metalloproteinase Mirolysin of Tannerella forsythia Inhibits All Pathways of the Complement System.

    PubMed

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Mizgalska, Danuta; Bielecka, Ewa; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Riesbeck, Kristian; Garred, Peter; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M

    2015-09-01

    Recent reports focusing on virulence factors of periodontal pathogens implicated proteinases as major determinants of remarkable pathogenicity of these species, with special emphasis on their capacity to modulate complement activity. In particular, bacteria-mediated cleavage of C5 and subsequent release of C5a seems to be an important phenomenon in the manipulation of the local inflammatory response in periodontitis. In this study, we present mirolysin, a novel metalloproteinase secreted by Tannerella forsythia, a well-recognized pathogen strongly associated with periodontitis. Mirolysin exhibited a strong effect on all complement pathways. It inhibited the classical and lectin complement pathways due to efficient degradation of mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-2, ficolin-3, and C4, whereas inhibition of the alternative pathway was caused by degradation of C5. This specificity toward complement largely resembled the activity of a previously characterized metalloproteinase of T. forsythia, karilysin. Interestingly, mirolysin released the biologically active C5a peptide in human plasma and induced migration of neutrophils. Importantly, we demonstrated that combination of mirolysin with karilysin, as well as a cysteine proteinase of another periodontal pathogen, Prevotella intermedia, resulted in a strong synergistic effect on complement. Furthermore, mutant strains of T. forsythia, devoid of either mirolysin or karilysin, showed diminished survival in human serum, providing further evidence for the synergistic inactivation of complement by these metalloproteinases. Taken together, our findings on interactions of mirolysin with complement significantly add to the understanding of immune evasion strategies of T. forsythia and expand the knowledge on molecular mechanisms driving pathogenic events in the infected periodontium.

  14. Novel scabies mite serpins inhibit the three pathways of the human complement system.

    PubMed

    Mika, Angela; Reynolds, Simone L; Mohlin, Frida C; Willis, Charlene; Swe, Pearl M; Pickering, Darren A; Halilovic, Vanja; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C; Pike, Robert N; Blom, Anna M; Kemp, David J; Fischer, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Scabies is a parasitic infestation of the skin by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei that causes significant morbidity worldwide, in particular within socially disadvantaged populations. In order to identify mechanisms that enable the scabies mite to evade human immune defenses, we have studied molecules associated with proteolytic systems in the mite, including two novel scabies mite serine protease inhibitors (SMSs) of the serpin superfamily. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that within mite-infected human skin SMSB4 (54 kDa) and SMSB3 (47 kDa) were both localized in the mite gut and feces. Recombinant purified SMSB3 and SMSB4 did not inhibit mite serine and cysteine proteases, but did inhibit mammalian serine proteases, such as chymotrypsin, albeit inefficiently. Detailed functional analysis revealed that both serpins interfered with all three pathways of the human complement system at different stages of their activation. SMSB4 inhibited mostly the initial and progressing steps of the cascades, while SMSB3 showed the strongest effects at the C9 level in the terminal pathway. Additive effects of both serpins were shown at the C9 level in the lectin pathway. Both SMSs were able to interfere with complement factors without protease function. A range of binding assays showed direct binding between SMSB4 and seven complement proteins (C1, properdin, MBL, C4, C3, C6 and C8), while significant binding of SMSB3 occurred exclusively to complement factors without protease function (C4, C3, C8). Direct binding was observed between SMSB4 and the complement proteases C1s and C1r. However no complex formation was observed between either mite serpin and the complement serine proteases C1r, C1s, MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3. No catalytic inhibition by either serpin was observed for any of these enzymes. In summary, the SMSs were acting at several levels mediating overall inhibition of the complement system and thus we propose that they may protect scabies mites from complement

  15. Dimerization of complement factor H-related proteins modulates complement activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Caesar, Joseph J E; Malik, Talat H; Patel, Mitali; Colledge, Matthew; Johnson, Steven; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Morgan, B Paul; Harris, Claire L; Pickering, Matthew C; Lea, Susan M

    2013-03-19

    The complement system is a key component regulation influences susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration, meningitis, and kidney disease. Variation includes genomic rearrangements within the complement factor H-related (CFHR) locus. Elucidating the mechanism underlying these associations has been hindered by the lack of understanding of the biological role of CFHR proteins. Here we present unique structural data demonstrating that three of the CFHR proteins contain a shared dimerization motif and that this hitherto unrecognized structural property enables formation of both homodimers and heterodimers. Dimerization confers avidity for tissue-bound complement fragments and enables these proteins to efficiently compete with the physiological complement inhibitor, complement factor H (CFH), for ligand binding. Our data demonstrate that these CFHR proteins function as competitive antagonists of CFH to modulate complement activation in vivo and explain why variation in the CFHRs predisposes to disease.

  16. The ancestral complement system in sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Smith, L C; Clow, L A; Terwilliger, D P

    2001-04-01

    The origin of adaptive immunity in the vertebrates can be traced to the appearance of the ancestral RAG genes in the ancestral jawed vertebrate; however, the innate immune system is more ancient. A central subsystem within innate immunity is the complement system, which has been identified throughout and seems to be restricted to the deuterostomes. The evolutionary history of complement can be traced from the sea urchins (members of the echinoderm phylum), which have a simplified system homologous to the alternative pathway, through the agnathans (hagfish and lamprey) and the elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) to the teleosts (bony fish) and tetrapods, with increases in the numbers of complement components and duplications in complement pathways. Increasing complexity in the complement system parallels increasing complexity in the deuterostome animals. This review focuses on the simplest of the complement systems that is present in the sea urchin. Two components have been identified that show significant homology to vertebrate C3 and factor B (Bf), called SpC3 and SpBf, respectively. Sequence analysis from both molecules reveals their ancestral characteristics. Immune challenge of sea urchins indicates that SpC3 is inducible and is present in coelomic fluid (the body fluids) in relatively high concentrations, while SpBf expression is constitutive and is present in much lower concentrations. Opsonization of foreign cells and particles followed by augmented uptake by phagocytic coelomocytes appears to be a central function for this simpler complement system and important for host defense in the sea urchin. These activities are similar to some of the functions of the homologous proteins in the vertebrate complement system. The selective advantage for the ancestral deuterostome may have been the amplification feedback loop that is still of central importance in the alternative pathway of complement in higher vertebrates. Feedback loop functions would quickly coat

  17. Three distinct biochemical subtypes of C4 photosynthesis? A modelling analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Bräutigam, Andrea; Weber, Andreas P M; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2014-07-01

    C4 photosynthesis has higher light-use, nitrogen-use, and water-use efficiencies than C3 photosynthesis. Historically, most of C4 plants were classified into three subtypes (NADP-malic enzyme (ME), NAD-ME, or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) subtypes) according to their major decarboxylation enzyme. However, a wealth of historic and recent data indicates that flexibility exists between different decarboxylation pathways in many C4 species, and this flexibility might be controlled by developmental and environmental cues. This work used systems modelling to theoretically explore the significance of flexibility in decarboxylation mechanisms and transfer acids utilization. The results indicate that employing mixed C4 pathways, either the NADP-ME type with the PEPCK type or the NAD-ME type with the PEPCK type, effectively decreases the need to maintain high concentrations and concentration gradients of transport metabolites. Further, maintaining a mixture of C4 pathways robustly affords high photosynthetic efficiency under a broad range of light regimes. A pure PEPCK-type C4 photosynthesis is not beneficial because the energy requirements in bundle sheath cells cannot be fulfilled due to them being shaded by mesophyll cells. Therefore, only two C4 subtypes should be considered as distinct subtypes, the NADP-ME type and NAD-ME types, which both inherently involve a supplementary PEPCK cycle.

  18. C4 Photosynthesis in the Rice Paddy: Insights from the Noxious Weed Echinochloa glabrescens1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Covshoff, Sarah; Szecowka, Marek; Hughes, Thomas E.; Kelly, Steven; Bailey, Karen J.; Sage, Tammy L.; Pachebat, Justin A.; Leegood, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The C4 pathway is a highly complex trait that increases photosynthetic efficiency in more than 60 plant lineages. Although the majority of C4 plants occupy disturbed, arid, and nutrient-poor habitats, some grow in high-nutrient, waterlogged conditions. One such example is Echinochloa glabrescens, which is an aggressive weed of rice paddies. We generated comprehensive transcriptome datasets for C4 E. glabrescens and C3 rice to identify genes associated with adaption to waterlogged, nutrient-replete conditions, but also used the data to better understand how C4 photosynthesis operates in these conditions. Leaves of E. glabrescens exhibited classical Kranz anatomy with lightly lobed mesophyll cells having low chloroplast coverage. As with rice and other hygrophytic C3 species, leaves of E. glabrescens accumulated a chloroplastic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein, albeit at reduced amounts relative to rice. The arid-grown species Setaria italica (C4) and Brachypodium distachyon (C3) were also found to accumulate chloroplastic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. We identified a molecular signature associated with C4 photosynthesis in nutrient-replete, waterlogged conditions that is highly similar to those previously reported from C4 plants that grow in more arid conditions. We also identified a cohort of genes that have been subjected to a selective sweep associated with growth in paddy conditions. Overall, this approach highlights the value of using wild species such as weeds to identify adaptions to specific conditions associated with high-yielding crops in agriculture. PMID:26527656

  19. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G T T; Erlenkamp, G; Jäck, O; Küberl, A; Bott, M; Fiorani, F; Gohlke, H; Groth, G

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world's most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2',3',4',3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2',3',4'-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15-45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme.

  20. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, G. T. T.; Erlenkamp, G.; Jäck, O.; Küberl, A.; Bott, M.; Fiorani, F.; Gohlke, H.; Groth, G.

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world’s most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2′,3′,4′,3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2′,3′,4′-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15–45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme. PMID:27263468

  1. C4 protein of Beet severe curly top virus is a pathomorphogenetic factor in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungan; Hwang, Hyun-Sik; Buckley, Kenneth J; Park, Jong-Bum; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Kim, Dong-Giun; Lee, Sukchan; Davis, Keith R

    2010-12-01

    The Curtovirus C4 protein is required for symptom development during infection of Arabidopsis. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing C4 from either Beet curly top virus or Beet severe curly top virus produced phenotypes that were similar to symptoms seen during infection with wild-type viruses. The pseudosymptoms caused by C4 protein alone were novel to transgenic Arabidopsis and included bumpy trichomes, severe enations, disorientation of vascular bundles and stomata, swelling, callus-like structure formation, and twisted siliques. C4 induced abnormal cell division and altered cell fate in a variety of tissues depending on the C4 expression level. C4 protein expression increased the expression levels of cell-cycle-related genes CYCs, CDKs and PCNA, and suppressed ICK1 and the retinoblastoma-related gene RBR1, resulting in activation of host cell division. These results suggest that the Curtovirus C4 proteins are involved actively in host cell-cycle regulation to recruit host factors for virus replication and symptom development. PMID:20960205

  2. C4 Photosynthesis in the Rice Paddy: Insights from the Noxious Weed Echinochloa glabrescens.

    PubMed

    Covshoff, Sarah; Szecowka, Marek; Hughes, Thomas E; Smith-Unna, Richard; Kelly, Steven; Bailey, Karen J; Sage, Tammy L; Pachebat, Justin A; Leegood, Richard; Hibberd, Julian M

    2016-01-01

    The C4 pathway is a highly complex trait that increases photosynthetic efficiency in more than 60 plant lineages. Although the majority of C4 plants occupy disturbed, arid, and nutrient-poor habitats, some grow in high-nutrient, waterlogged conditions. One such example is Echinochloa glabrescens, which is an aggressive weed of rice paddies. We generated comprehensive transcriptome datasets for C4 E. glabrescens and C3 rice to identify genes associated with adaption to waterlogged, nutrient-replete conditions, but also used the data to better understand how C4 photosynthesis operates in these conditions. Leaves of E. glabrescens exhibited classical Kranz anatomy with lightly lobed mesophyll cells having low chloroplast coverage. As with rice and other hygrophytic C3 species, leaves of E. glabrescens accumulated a chloroplastic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein, albeit at reduced amounts relative to rice. The arid-grown species Setaria italica (C4) and Brachypodium distachyon (C3) were also found to accumulate chloroplastic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. We identified a molecular signature associated with C4 photosynthesis in nutrient-replete, waterlogged conditions that is highly similar to those previously reported from C4 plants that grow in more arid conditions. We also identified a cohort of genes that have been subjected to a selective sweep associated with growth in paddy conditions. Overall, this approach highlights the value of using wild species such as weeds to identify adaptions to specific conditions associated with high-yielding crops in agriculture.

  3. Phenotypic landscape inference reveals multiple evolutionary paths to C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ben P; Johnston, Iain G; Covshoff, Sarah; Hibberd, Julian M

    2013-09-28

    C4 photosynthesis has independently evolved from the ancestral C3 pathway in at least 60 plant lineages, but, as with other complex traits, how it evolved is unclear. Here we show that the polyphyletic appearance of C4 photosynthesis is associated with diverse and flexible evolutionary paths that group into four major trajectories. We conducted a meta-analysis of 18 lineages containing species that use C3, C4, or intermediate C3-C4 forms of photosynthesis to parameterise a 16-dimensional phenotypic landscape. We then developed and experimentally verified a novel Bayesian approach based on a hidden Markov model that predicts how the C4 phenotype evolved. The alternative evolutionary histories underlying the appearance of C4 photosynthesis were determined by ancestral lineage and initial phenotypic alterations unrelated to photosynthesis. We conclude that the order of C4 trait acquisition is flexible and driven by non-photosynthetic drivers. This flexibility will have facilitated the convergent evolution of this complex trait. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00961.001.

  4. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, G. T. T.; Erlenkamp, G.; Jäck, O.; Küberl, A.; Bott, M.; Fiorani, F.; Gohlke, H.; Groth, G.

    2016-06-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world’s most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2‧,3‧,4‧,3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2‧,3‧,4‧-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15–45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme.

  5. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G T T; Erlenkamp, G; Jäck, O; Küberl, A; Bott, M; Fiorani, F; Gohlke, H; Groth, G

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world's most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2',3',4',3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2',3',4'-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15-45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme. PMID:27263468

  6. Protein engineering to target complement evasion in cancer.

    PubMed

    Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2014-01-21

    The complement system is composed of soluble factors in plasma that enhance or "complement" immune-mediated killing through innate and adaptive mechanisms. Activation of complement causes recruitment of immune cells; opsonization of coated cells; and direct killing of affected cells through a membrane attack complex (MAC). Tumor cells up-regulate complement inhibitory factors - one of several strategies to evade the immune system. In many cases as the tumor progresses, dramatic increases in complement inhibitory factors are found on these cells. This review focuses on the classic complement pathway and the role of major complement inhibitory factors in cancer immune evasion as well as on how current protein engineering efforts are being employed to increase complement fixing or to reverse complement resistance leading to better therapeutic outcomes in oncology. Strategies discussed include engineering of antibodies to enhance complement fixation, antibodies that neutralize complement inhibitory proteins as well as engineered constructs that specifically target inhibition of the complement system.

  7. Direct binding of C1q to apoptotic cells and cell blebs induces complement activation.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Alma J; Trouw, Leendert A; Daha, Mohamed R; Tijsma, Odette; Nieuwland, Rienk; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Gingras, Alexandre R; Mantovani, Alberto; Hack, Erik C; Roos, Anja

    2002-06-01

    Deficiency of early components of the classical pathway of complement, particularly C1q, predisposes to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. Several studies have suggested an association between the classical complement pathway and the clearance of apoptotic cells. Mice with a targeted deletion of the C1q gene develop a lupus-like renal disease, which is associated with the presence of multiple apoptotic bodies in the kidney. In the present study we demonstrate that highly purified C1q binds to apoptotic cells and isolated blebs derived from these apoptotic cells. Binding of C1q to apoptotic cells occurs via the globular heads of C1q and induces activation of the classical complement pathway, as shown by the deposition of C4 and C3 on the surface of these cells and on cell-derived blebs. In addition, for the first time, we demonstrate that surface-bound C1q is present on a subpopulation of microparticles isolated from human plasma. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that C1q binds directly to apoptotic cells and blebs derived therefrom and support a role for C1q, possibly in concert with C4 and C3, in the clearance of apoptotic cells and blebs by the phagocytic system.

  8. Evidence of shift in C4 species range in central Argentina during the late Holocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silva, L.C.R.; Giorgis, M.A.; Anand, M.; Enrico, L.; Perez-Harguindeguy, N.; Falczuk, V.; Tieszen, L.L.; Cabido, M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Millennial-scale biogeographic changes are well understood in many parts of the world, but little is known about long-term vegetation dynamics in subtropical regions. Here we investigate shifts in C3/C4 plant abundance occurred in central Argentina during the past few millenniaMethods: We determined present day soil organic matter ??13C signatures of grasslands, shrublands and woodlands, containing different mixtures of C3 and C4 plants. We measured past changes in the relative cover of C3/C4 plants by comparing ??13C values in soil profiles with present day ??13C signatures. We analyzed 14C activity in soil depths that showed major changes in vegetation. Results: Present day relative cover of C3/C4 plants determines whole ecosystem ??13C signatures integrated as litter and superficial soil organic matter (R2 = 0. 78; p < 0. 01). Deeper soils show a consistent shift in ??13C, indicating a continuous replacement of C4 by C3 plants since 3,870 (??210) YBP. During this period, the relative abundance of C3 plants increased 32% (average across sites) with significant changes being observed in all studied ecosystems. Conclusions: Our results show that C4 species were more abundant in the past, but C3 species became dominant during the late Holocene. We identified increases in the relative C3/C4 cover in grasslands, shrublands and woodlands, suggesting a physiological basis for changes in vegetation. The replacement of C4 by C3 plants coincided with changes in climate towards colder and wetter conditions and could represent a climatically driven shift in the C4 species optimum range. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  9. Radiological study of C3–C4 level surgical cases of cervical spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Tomii, Masato; Mizuno, Junichi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the pathological characteristics of C3-C4 cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) from the radiological study. Materials and Methods: A total of 31 patients with single level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) at C3-C4 and 46 patients with single level ACDF at C5-C6 were included in this study. We selected C5-C6 level as a representative of the lower cervical level. The C3-C4 and C5-C6 levels were routinely examined to investigate the areas of the vertebral canal, subarachnoid space, and spinal cord in the cervical canal. Results: The clinical study of C3-C4 ACDF patients showed that as for the C3-C4 area, the area of the cervical vertebral canal, the area of the subarachnoid space, and he transverse surface area of the spinal cord were all significantly smaller in C3-C4 ACDF patients than in C5-C6 ACDF patients. Moreover, as for the C5-C6 area, only the area of the subarachnoid space was significantly smaller in C5-C6 ACDF patients than in C3-C4 ACDF patients. Spondylotic changes predominated at both the C3-C4 and C5-C6 levels. However, in the C5-C6 ACDF patients, spondylotic changes tended to predominate only at the operation level at C5-C6. Conclusions: Aging process develops from lower cervical to upper cervical level. Moreover, this static factor in conjunction with dynamic factor (instability) was the causative factors for the CSM in C3-C4 ACDF patients. PMID:27366255

  10. Complement in therapy and disease: Regulating the complement system with antibody-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Melis, Joost P M; Strumane, Kristin; Ruuls, Sigrid R; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I

    2015-10-01

    Complement is recognized as a key player in a wide range of normal as well as disease-related immune, developmental and homeostatic processes. Knowledge of complement components, structures, interactions, and cross-talk with other biological systems continues to grow and this leads to novel treatments for cancer, infectious, autoimmune- or age-related diseases as well as for preventing transplantation rejection. Antibodies are superbly suited to be developed into therapeutics with appropriate complement stimulatory or inhibitory activity. Here we review the design, development and future of antibody-based drugs that enhance or dampen the complement system.

  11. Layers and tubes of fluorographene C4F: Stability, structural and electronic properties from DFTB calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enyashin, A. N.; Ivanovskii, A. L.

    2013-06-01

    By means of the DFTB band structure calculations we have explored the layers' isomerism of fluorographene C4F. The relative stability, structural and electronic properties of the C4F layers and nanotubes have been revealed depending on the possible types of fluorine coverage: single-sided, double-sided or so-called non-uniform variants. Our main finding is that the aforementioned types of fluorine coverage are crucial for the morphology of these materials. At the non-uniform or single-sided coverage types the C4F structures aspire to the spontaneous folding in order to minimize their surface tension.

  12. Electron attachment properties of c-C4F8O in different environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chachereau, A.; Fedor, J.; Janečková, R.; Kočišek, J.; Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    The electron attachment properties of octafluorotetrahydrofuran (c-C4F8O) are investigated using two complementary experimental setups. The attachment and ionization cross sections of c-C4F8O are measured using an electron beam experiment. The effective ionization rate coefficient, electron drift velocity and electron diffusion coefficient in c-C4F8O diluted to concentrations lower than 0.6% in the buffer gases N2, CO2 and Ar, are measured using a pulsed Townsend experiment. A kinetic model is proposed, which combines the results of the two experiments.

  13. Abundant C4 plants on the Tibetan Plateau during the Lateglacial and early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Elizabeth K.; Huang, Yongsong; Morrill, Carrie; Zhao, Jiangtao; Wegener, Pamela; Clemens, Steven C.; Colman, Steven M.; Gao, Li

    2014-03-01

    Plants using the C4 (Hatch-Slack) photosynthetic pathway are key for global food production and account for ca 25% of terrestrial primary productivity, mostly in relatively warm, dry regions. The discovery of modern naturally-occurring C4 plant species at elevations up to 4500 m in Tibet and 3000 m in Africa and South America, however, suggests that C4 plants are present in a wider range of environments than previously thought. Environmental conditions on the Tibetan Plateau, including high irradiance, rainfall focused in summer, and saline soils, can favor C4 plants by offsetting the deleterious effects of low growing season temperature. We present evidence based on leaf wax carbon isotope ratios from Lake Qinghai that C4 plants accounted for 50% of terrestrial primary productivity on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau throughout the Lateglacial and early Holocene. Despite cold conditions, C4 plants flourished due to a combination of factors, including maximum summer insolation, pCO2 ca 250 ppmv, and sufficient summer precipitation. The modern C3 plant-dominated ecosystem around Lake Qinghai was established ca 6 thousand years ago as pCO2 increased and summer temperature and precipitation decreased. C4 plants were also intermittently abundant during the Last Glacial period; we propose that C4 plants contributed a significant portion of local primary productivity by colonizing the exposed, saline Qinghai Lake bed during low stands. Our results contrast with state-of-the-art ecosystem models that simulate <0.5% C4 plant abundance on the Tibetan Plateau in modern and past environments. The past abundance of C4 plants on the Tibetan Plateau suggests a wider temperature range for C4 plants than can be inferred from modern distributions and model simulations, and provides paleoecological evidence to support recent findings that C4 plant evolution and distribution was determined by a combination of climatic and environmental factors (temperature, irradiance, precipitation

  14. Role of complement in the development of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Boackle, Susan A; Holers, V Michael

    2003-01-01

    B cell complement receptors have been shown to be important in the generation of normal humoral immune responses, and they likely also participate in the development of autoimmunity. Complement component and receptor deficiencies have been associated with SLE in both animal models and patients with disease. Recent data suggest that Cr2 is a lupus susceptibility gene in the NZM2410 mouse model for lupus, as it generates complement receptors that are structurally and functionally altered. Complement deficiency may result in autoimmune disease because of the inability to appropriately clear immune complexes or apoptotic cells or by the impaired generation of C3-coated autoantigens for CR1/CR2. In turn, CR1/CR2 may participate in the maintenance of B cell tolerance by lowering the threshold for negative selection of autoreactive B cells, by targeting autoantigen to FDCs in secondary lymphoid organs, or by regulating autoreactive T cell function. The effect of CR2 has not been dissected from that of CR1 in the animal studies performed to date. Furthermore, the effects of CR1/CR2 dysfunction or partial deficiency, which are found in the NZM2410 mouse model and in patients with SLE respectively, have not been delineated from those of complete deficiency, which has been studied in several animal models of autoimmunity and tolerance. Although CR1/CR2 dysfunction or deficiency may confer only a modest phenotype in isolation, it is likely that when combined with other disease susceptibility genes it will result in a fully penetrant end-stage disease phenotype. Understanding the mechanisms by which these receptors participate in the maintenance of B cell tolerance will be critical in developing appropriate therapeutic interventions for patients with autoimmune diseases such as SLE.

  15. Role of complement in the development of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Boackle, Susan A; Holers, V Michael

    2003-01-01

    B cell complement receptors have been shown to be important in the generation of normal humoral immune responses, and they likely also participate in the development of autoimmunity. Complement component and receptor deficiencies have been associated with SLE in both animal models and patients with disease. Recent data suggest that Cr2 is a lupus susceptibility gene in the NZM2410 mouse model for lupus, as it generates complement receptors that are structurally and functionally altered. Complement deficiency may result in autoimmune disease because of the inability to appropriately clear immune complexes or apoptotic cells or by the impaired generation of C3-coated autoantigens for CR1/CR2. In turn, CR1/CR2 may participate in the maintenance of B cell tolerance by lowering the threshold for negative selection of autoreactive B cells, by targeting autoantigen to FDCs in secondary lymphoid organs, or by regulating autoreactive T cell function. The effect of CR2 has not been dissected from that of CR1 in the animal studies performed to date. Furthermore, the effects of CR1/CR2 dysfunction or partial deficiency, which are found in the NZM2410 mouse model and in patients with SLE respectively, have not been delineated from those of complete deficiency, which has been studied in several animal models of autoimmunity and tolerance. Although CR1/CR2 dysfunction or deficiency may confer only a modest phenotype in isolation, it is likely that when combined with other disease susceptibility genes it will result in a fully penetrant end-stage disease phenotype. Understanding the mechanisms by which these receptors participate in the maintenance of B cell tolerance will be critical in developing appropriate therapeutic interventions for patients with autoimmune diseases such as SLE. PMID:12408051

  16. C4-Dicarboxylic acid metabolism in bundle-sheath chloroplasts, mitochondria and strands of Eriochloa borumensis Hack., a phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase type C4 species.

    PubMed

    Rathnam, C K; Edwards, G E

    1977-01-01

    C4-acid metabolism by isolated bundlesheath chloroplasts, mitochondria and strands of Eriochloa borumensis Hack., a phosphoennolpyruvate-carboxykinase (PEP-CK) species, was investigated. Aspartate, oxaloacetate (OAA) and malate were decarboxylated by strands with several-fold stimulation upon illumination. There was strictly light-dependent decarboxylation of OAA and malate by the chloroplasts, but the chloroplasts did not decarboxylate aspartate in light or dark. PEP was a primary product of OAA or malate decarboxylation by the chloroplasts and its formation was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea or NH4Cl. There was very little conversion of PEP to pyruvate by bundle-sheath chloroplasts, mitochondria or strands. Decarboxylation of the three C4-acids by mitochondria was light-independent. Pyruvate was the only product of mitochondrial metabolism of C4-acids, and was apparently transaminated in the cytoplasm since PEP and alanine were primarily exported out of the bundle-sheath strands. Light-dependent C4-acid decarboxylation by the chloroplasts is suggested to be through the PEP-CK, while the mitochondrial C4-acid decarboxylation may proceed through the NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) system. In vivo both aspartate and malate are considered as transport metobolites from mesophyll to bundle-sheath cells in PEP-CK species. Aspartate would be metabolized by the mitochondria to OAA. Part of the OAA may be converted to malate and decarboxylated through NAD-ME, and part may be transported to the chloroplasts for decarboxylation through PEP-CK localized in the chloroplasts. Malate transported from mesophyll cells may serve as carboxyl donor to chloroplasts through the chloroplastic NAD-malate dehydrogenase and PEP-CK. Bundle-sheath strands and chloroplasts fixed (14)CO2 at high rates and exhibited C4-acid-dependent O2 evolution in the light. Studies with 3-mercaptopicolinic acid, a specific inhibitor of PEP-CK, have indicated that most (about 70%) of the OAA

  17. Inhibition of Complement Retards Ankylosing Spondylitis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chaoqun; Ding, Peipei; Wang, Qingkai; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Jianquan; Xu, Enjie; Wang, Na; Chen, Jianfeng; Yang, Guang; Hu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) resulting in back pain and progressive spinal ankyloses. Currently, there are no effective therapeutics targeting AS largely due to elusive pathogenesis mechanisms, even as potential candidates such as HLA-B27 autoantigen have been identified. Herein, we employed a proteoglycan (PG)-induced AS mouse model together with clinical specimens, and found that the complement system was substantially activated in the spinal bone marrow, accompanied by a remarkable proportion alteration of neutrophils and macrophage in bone marrow and spleen, and by the significant increase of TGF-β1 in serum. The combined treatment with a bacteria-derived complement inhibitor Efb-C (C-terminal of extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus) remarkably retarded the progression of mouse AS by reducing osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that two important modulators involved in AS disease, TGF-β1 and RANKL, were elevated upon in vitro complement attack in osteoblast and/or osteoclast cells. These findings further unravel that complement activation is closely related with the pathogenesis of AS, and suggest that complement inhibition may hold great potential for AS therapy. PMID:27698377

  18. Complement in monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Laura M; Veeramani, Suresh; Weiner, George J

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have been used as targeted treatments against cancer for more than a decade, with mixed results. Research is needed to understand mAb mechanisms of action with the goal of improving the efficacy of currently used mAbs and guiding the design of novel mAbs. While some mAb-induced tumor cell killing is a result of direct effects on tumor cell signaling, mAb opsonization of tumor cells also triggers activation of immune responses due to complement activation and engagement of antibody receptors on immune effector cells. In fact, complement has been shown to play an important role in modulating the anti-tumor activity of many mAb through complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, and through indirect effects by modulating the tumor microenvironment. Complement activity can have both agonistic and antagonistic effects on these processes. How the balance of such effects impacts on the clinical efficacy of mAb therapy remains unclear. In this review, we discuss the mAbs currently approved for cancer treatment and examine how complement can impact their efficacy with a focus on how this information might be used to improve the clinical efficacy of mAb treatment.

  19. Interallelic complementation at the mouse Mitf locus.

    PubMed Central

    Steingrímsson, Eiríkur; Arnheiter, Heinz; Hallsson, Jón Hallsteinn; Lamoreux, M Lynn; Copeland, Neal G; Jenkins, Nancy A

    2003-01-01

    Mutations at the mouse microphthalmia locus (Mitf) affect the development of different cell types, including melanocytes, retinal pigment epithelial cells of the eye, and osteoclasts. The MITF protein is a member of the MYC supergene family of basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine-zipper (bHLHZip) transcription factors and is known to regulate the expression of cell-specific target genes by binding DNA as homodimer or as heterodimer with related proteins. The many mutations isolated at the locus have different effects on the phenotype and can be arranged in an allelic series in which the phenotypes range from near normal to white microphthalmic animals with osteopetrosis. Previous investigations have shown that certain combinations of Mitf alleles complement each other, resulting in a phenotype more normal than that of each homozygote alone. Here we analyze this interallelic complementation in detail and show that it is limited to one particular allele, Mitf(Mi-white) (Mitf(Mi-wh)), a mutation affecting the DNA-binding domain. Both loss- and gain-of-function mutations are complemented, as are other Mitf mutations affecting the DNA-binding domain. Furthermore, this behavior is not restricted to particular cell types: Both eye development and coat color phenotypes are complemented. Our analysis suggests that Mitf(Mi-wh)-associated interallelic complementation is due to the unique biochemical nature of this mutation. PMID:12586714

  20. Rotationally resolved infrared spectra of the explosive bouquet compounds associated with C-4 explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clasp, Trocia N.; Johnson, Tiffani; Sullivan, Michael N.; Reeve, Scott W.

    2011-05-01

    The explosive material known as Composition C4, or simply C4, is an RDX based military grade explosive. RDX itself possesses a negligible vapor pressure at room temperature suggesting it is not a good target for conventional instruments designed to detect vapor phase chemical compounds. Recent research with canines has indicated that a better approach for detecting explosive vapors such as C4 is to focus on a characteristic mixture of impurities associated with the material. These characteristic mixtures of impurity vapors are referred to by canine researchers as the explosive bouquet and are fairly unique to the specific energetic material. In this paper, we will examine and report rotationally resolved infrared spectral signatures for the known compounds comprising the explosive bouquet for C4 based explosives including isobutylene, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and cyclohexanone.

  1. Chronic effects of the ionic liquid [C4mim][Cl] towards the microalga Scenedesmus quadricauda.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun; Beadham, Ian; Wu, Jie; Chen, Xiao-Di; Hu, Lan; Gu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Chronic effects of the ionic liquid [C4mim][Cl] (mp 73 °C) towards the microalga, Scenedesmus quadricauda were studied by flow cytometry, monitoring multiple endpoints of cell density, esterase activity, membrane integrity, reactive oxygen species and chlorophyll fluorescence. Toxicity was clearly in evidence, and although increased esterase activity indicated hormesis during initial exposure to [C4mim][Cl], inhibition of both esterase activity and chlorophyll fluorescence became apparent after 3 days. Cell density was also decreased by culturing with [C4mim][Cl], but this effect was clearly concentration-dependent and only became significant during the second half of the experiment. In contrast, [C4mim][Cl] had only a modest effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caused little damage to cell membranes. PMID:25989452

  2. C4 expansion in the central Inner Mongolia during the latest Miocene and early Pliocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunfu; Wang, Yang; Deng, Tao; Wang, Xiaoming; Biasatti, Dana; Xu, Yingfeng; Li, Qiang

    2009-10-01

    The emergence of C4 photosynthesis in plants as a significant component of terrestrial ecosystems is thought to be an adaptive response to changes in atmospheric CO 2 concentration and/or climate during Neogene times and has had a profound effect on the global terrestrial biosphere. Although expansion of C4 grasses in the latest Miocene and Pliocene has been widely documented around the world, the spatial and temporal variations in the C4 expansion are still not well understood and its driving mechanisms remain a contentious issue. Here we present the results of carbon and oxygen isotope analyses of fossil and modern mammalian tooth enamel samples from the central Inner Mongolia. Our samples represent a diverse group of herbivorous mammals including deer, elephants, rhinos, horses and giraffes, ranging in age from the late Oligocene to modern. The δ13C values of 91 tooth enamel samples of early late-Miocene age or older, with the exception of two 13 Ma rhino samples (- 7.8 and - 7.6‰) and one 8.5 Ma suspected rhino sample (- 7.6‰), were all less than - 8.0‰ (VPDB), indicating that there were no C4 grasses present in their diets and thus probably few or no C4 grasses in the ecosystems of the central Inner Mongolia prior to ~ 8 Ma. However, 12 out of 26 tooth enamel samples of younger ages (~ 7.5 Ma to ~ 3.9 Ma) have δ13C values higher than - 8.0‰ (up to - 2.4‰), indicating that herbivores in the area had variable diets ranging from pure C3 to mixed C3-C4 vegetation during that time interval. The presence of C4 grasses in herbivores' diets (up to ~ 76% C4) suggests that C4 grasses were a significant component of the local ecosystems in the latest Miocene and early Pliocene, consistent with the hypothesis of a global factor as the driving mechanism of the late Miocene C4 expansion. Today, C3 grasses dominate grasslands in the central Inner Mongolia area. The retreat of C4 grasses from this area after the early Pliocene may have been driven by regional

  3. Spatiotemporal variation in C4-grass abundance during the early to middle Miocene in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, M. A.; Nelson, D. M.; Jimenez-Moreno, G.; Hu, F.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon-isotope analyses on a variety of substrates (e.g., leaf waxes, teeth, carbonates) suggest a pronounced increase in C4 plant biomass during the late Miocene and early Pliocene in many regions of the world. This spread of C4-dominated grasslands is thought to have occurred at the expense of C3-dominated grasslands. However, the earlier history of C4 grasses is uncertain, primarily because of difficulty assessing the presence and abundance of C4 grasses when they are relatively rare on the landscape. We measure d13C of individual grass pollen grains using SPIRAL (Single Pollen Isotope Ratio AnaLysis) to distinguish the relative abundance of C3 and C4 grasses during the early to middle Miocene in Spain. We analyzed a total of 3251 pollen grains isolated from 7 samples from Andalucia A1 (10-13.5 Ma), 7 samples from Gor (13-15 Ma) and 24 sediment samples from (Rubielos de Mora, (16-22 Ma). Palynological data indicate that grasses were not a significant component (5-20% of total terrestrial pollen) of the regional vegetation, which was composed of herbs, shrubs, and thermophilous (e.g., Taxodiaceae, Engelhardia) and mesothermic (Quercus, Carya) trees. Based on our SPIRAL data, 21-72% of the grasses were C4, with the older northern site (Rubielos de Mora) having lower C4-grass abundance (average of 39%) than the younger and more southern sites (average of 62%). Paleoclimate reconstructions suggest that the region was mainly subtropical (warm and semi-arid/highly seasonal) at that time, and pollen spectra suggest that the regional vegetation was similar to that found today in northern Africa where C4 grasses dominate. Our pollen-isotope results imply an increase in C4-grass abundance through time, and/or a north-south climatic gradient, with wetter and less seasonal conditions that were less favorable to C4 grasses in the north. Overall, these results suggest that C4 grasses were relatively abundant in southwestern Europe during the early and middle Miocene, prior to

  4. New introductions of enterovirus 71 subgenogroup C4 strains, France, 2012.

    PubMed

    Schuffenecker, Isabelle; Henquell, Cécile; Mirand, Audrey; Coste-Burel, Marianne; Marque-Juillet, Stéphanie; Desbois, Delphine; Lagathu, Gisèle; Bornebusch, Laure; Bailly, Jean-Luc; Lina, Bruno

    2014-08-01

    In France during 2012, human enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) subgenogroup C4 strains were detected in 4 children hospitalized for neonatal fever or meningitis. Phylogenetic analysis showed novel and independent EV-A71 introductions, presumably from China, and suggested circulation of C4 strains throughout France. This observation emphasizes the need for monitoring EV-A71 infections in Europe. PMID:25061698

  5. The efficiency of the CO2-concentrating mechanism during single-cell C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    King, Jenny L; Edwards, Gerald E; Cousins, Asaph B

    2012-03-01

    The photosynthetic efficiency of the CO(2)-concentrating mechanism in two forms of single-cell C(4) photosynthesis in the family Chenopodiaceae was characterized. The Bienertioid-type single-cell C(4) uses peripheral and central cytoplasmic compartments (Bienertia sinuspersici), while the Borszczowioid single-cell C(4) uses distal and proximal compartments of the cell (Suaeda aralocaspica). C(4) photosynthesis within a single-cell raises questions about the efficiency of this type of CO(2) -concentrating mechanism compared with the Kranz-type. We used measurements of leaf CO(2) isotope exchange (Δ(13) C) to compare the efficiency of the single-cell and Kranz-type forms of C(4) photosynthesis under various temperature and light conditions. Comparisons were made between the single-cell C(4) and a sister Kranz form, S. eltonica[NAD malic enzyme (NAD ME) type], and with Flaveria bidentis[NADP malic enzyme (NADP-ME) type with Kranz Atriplicoid anatomy]. There were similar levels of Δ(13) C discrimination and CO(2) leakiness (Φ) in the single-cell species compared with the Kranz-type. Increasing leaf temperature (25 to 30 °C) and light intensity caused a decrease in Δ(13) C and Φ across all C(4) types. Notably, B. sinuspersici had higher Δ(13) C and Φ than S. aralocaspica under lower light. These results demonstrate that rates of photosynthesis and efficiency of the CO(2) -concentrating mechanisms in single-cell C(4) plants are similar to those in Kranz-type.

  6. Chemical bonding in electron-deficient boron oxide clusters: core boronyl groups, dual 3c-4e hypervalent bonds, and rhombic 4c-4e bonds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lu, Haigang; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2014-04-28

    We explore the structural and bonding properties of the electron-deficient boron oxide clusters, using a series of B3On(-/0/+) (n = 2-4) clusters as examples. Global-minimum structures of these boron oxide clusters are identified via unbiased Coalescence Kick and Basin Hopping searches, which show a remarkable size and charge-state dependence. An array of new bonding elements are revealed: core boronyl groups, dual 3c-4e hypervalent bonds (ω-bonds), and rhombic 4c-4e bonds (o-bonds). In favorable cases, oxygen can exhaust all its 2s/2p electrons to facilitate the formation of B-O bonds. The current findings should help understand the bonding nature of low-dimensional boron oxide nanomaterials and bulk boron oxides.

  7. Eculizumab treatment during pregnancy does not affect the complement system activity of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Hallstensen, Randi Fykse; Bergseth, Grethe; Foss, Stian; Jæger, Steinar; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Holt, Jan; Christiansen, Dorte; Lau, Corinna; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Armstrong, Elina; Stefanovic, Vedran; Andersen, Jan Terje; Sandlie, Inger; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-04-01

    Eculizumab is a humanized IgG2/4 chimeric anti-complement C5 antibody used to treat patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) or atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether or not the complement activity in newborns from pregnant women who receive eculizumab is impaired. A novel eculizumab-C5 complex (E-C5) specific assay was developed and revealed that two newborns carried only 6-7% of the E-C5 detected in their eculizumab-treated PNH mothers. Serum from the pregnant women completely lacked terminal complement pathway activity, whereas the complement activity in the serum of the newborns was completely normal. Data from the pregnant women and their newborns were compared with that of healthy age-matched female controls and healthy newborns, as well as a non-treated pregnant woman with PNH and her newborn. These all showed normal complement activity without detectable E-C5 complexes. Furthermore, absence of eculizumab or E-C5 in the newborn could not be explained by lack of eculizumab binding to the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), as eculizumab bound strongly to the receptor in vitro. In conclusion, despite binding to FcRn neither eculizumab nor E-C5 accumulates in fetal plasma, and eculizumab treatment during pregnancy does not impair the complement function in the newborn.

  8. Complement activation in discordant hepatic xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Tector, A J; Chen, X; Soderland, C; Tchervenkov, J I

    1998-11-01

    Little is known about hyperacute rejection in hepatic xenotransplantation. Information from clinical xenoperfusions suggests that the liver may be rejected by a mechanism less vigorous than either kidney or heart xenografts. We used the in vitro model of porcine hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (PHEC) incubated with either complement replete or deficient human serum to determine the relative roles of the classical and alternate pathways of complement in the immediate response to hepatic xenotransplantation. Our results suggest that either the classical or alternate pathways are capable of independently activating the complement cascade upon exposure to the porcine hepatic sinusoidal endothelium. Our results also imply that either pathway alone is capable of initiating similar degrees of injury as the entire cascade. PMID:9915253

  9. Supramolecular Control over Split-Luciferase Complementation.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Ralph P G; Briels, Jeroen M; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; de Greef, Tom F A; Merkx, Maarten; Brunsveld, Luc

    2016-07-25

    Supramolecular split-enzyme complementation restores enzymatic activity and allows for on-off switching. Split-luciferase fragment pairs were provided with an N-terminal FGG sequence and screened for complementation through host-guest binding to cucurbit[8]uril (Q8). Split-luciferase heterocomplex formation was induced in a Q8 concentration dependent manner, resulting in a 20-fold upregulation of luciferase activity. Supramolecular split-luciferase complementation was fully reversible, as revealed by using two types of Q8 inhibitors. Competition studies with the weak-binding FGG peptide revealed a 300-fold enhanced stability for the formation of the ternary heterocomplex compared to binding of two of the same fragments to Q8. Stochiometric binding by the potent inhibitor memantine could be used for repeated cycling of luciferase activation and deactivation in conjunction with Q8, providing a versatile module for in vitro supramolecular signaling networks.

  10. The Complement System in Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, Daniel J; Hebert, Lee A

    2015-09-01

    The complement system is composed of a family of soluble and membrane-bound proteins that historically has been viewed as a key component of the innate immune system, with a primary role of providing a first-line defense against microorganisms. Although this role indeed is important, complement has many other physiological roles, including the following: (1) influencing appropriate immune responses, (2) disposing of waste in the circulation (immune complexes, cellular debris), and (3) contributing to damage of self-tissue through inflammatory pathways. These three roles are believed to be significant factors in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, particularly its renal manifestation (lupus nephritis), contributing both protective and damaging effects. In this review, we provide an overview of the human complement system and its functions, and discuss its intricate and seemingly contradictory roles in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

  11. Complement inhibition in C3 glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    Nester, Carla M; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-06-01

    C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) describes a spectrum of glomerular diseases defined by shared renal biopsy pathology: a predominance of C3 deposition on immunofluorescence with electron microscopy permitting disease sub-classification. Complement dysregulation underlies the observed pathology, a causal relationship that is supported by well described studies of genetic and acquired drivers of disease. In this article, we provide an overview of the features of C3G, including a discussion of disease definition and a review of the causal role of complement. We discuss molecular markers of disease and how biomarkers are informing our evolving understanding of underlying pathology. Research advances are laying the foundation for complement inhibition as a targeted approach to treatment of C3G. PMID:27402056

  12. Applying complement therapeutics to rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Reis, Edimara S; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Yancopoulou, Despina; Risitano, Antonio M; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2015-12-01

    Around 350 million people worldwide suffer from rare diseases. These may have a genetic, infectious, or autoimmune basis, and several include an inflammatory component. Launching of effective treatments can be very challenging when there is a low disease prevalence and limited scientific insights into the disease mechanisms. As a key trigger of inflammatory processes, complement has been associated with a variety of diseases and has become an attractive therapeutic target for conditions involving inflammation. In view of the clinical experience acquired with drugs licensed for the treatment of rare diseases such as hereditary angioedema and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, growing evidence supports the safety and efficacy of complement therapeutics in restoring immune balance and preventing aggravation of clinical outcomes. This review provides an overview of the candidates currently in the pharmaceutical pipeline with potential to treat orphan diseases and discusses the molecular mechanisms triggered by complement involved with the disease pathogenesis.

  13. Differential resource utilization by extant great apes and australopithecines: towards solving the C4 conundrum.

    PubMed

    Sponheimer, Matt; Lee-Thorp, Julia A

    2003-09-01

    Morphological and biogeochemical evidence suggest that australopithecines had diets markedly different from those of extant great apes. Stable carbon isotope analysis, for example, has shown that significant amounts of the carbon consumed by australopithecines were derived from C(4) photosynthesis in plants. This means that australopithecines were eating large quantities of C(4) plants such as tropical grasses and sedges, or were eating animals that were themselves eating C(4) plants. In contrast, there is no evidence that modern apes consume appreciable amounts of any of these foods, even in the most arid extents of their ranges where these foods are most prevalent. Environmental reconstructions of early australopithecine environments overlap with modern chimpanzee habitats. This, in conjunction with the stable isotope evidence, suggests that australopithecines and great apes, even in similar environments, would utilize available resources differently. Thus, the desire or capacity to use C(4) foods may be a basal character of our lineage. We do not know, however, which of the nutritionally disparate C(4) foods were utilized by hominids. Here we discuss which C(4) resources were most likely consumed by australopithecines, as well as the potential nutritional, physiological, and social consequences of eating these foods. PMID:14527627

  14. Carbon dioxide starvation, the development of C4 ecosystems, and mammalian evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Cerling, T E; Ehleringer, J R; Harris, J M

    1998-01-01

    The decline of atmospheric CO2 over the last 65 million years (Ma) resulted in the 'CO2-starvation' of terrestrial ecosystems and led to the widespread distribution of C4 plants, which are less sensitive to CO2 levels than are C3 plants. Global expansion of C4 biomass is recorded in the diets of mammals from Asia, Africa, North America, and South America during the interval from about 8 to 5 Ma. This was accompanied by the most significant Cenozoic faunal turnover on each of these continents, indicating that ecological changes at this time were an important factor in mammalian extinction. Further expansion of tropical C4 biomass in Africa also occurred during the last glacial interval confirming the link between atmospheric CO2 levels and C4 biomass response. Changes in fauna and flora at the end of the Miocene, and between the last glacial and interglacial, have previously been attributed to changes in aridity; however, an alternative explanation for a global expansion of C4 biomass is CO2 starvation of C3 plants when atmospheric CO2 levels dropped below a threshold significant to C3 plants. Aridity may also have been a factor in the expansion of C4 ecosystems but one that was secondary to, and perhaps because of, gradually decreasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. Mammalian evolution in the late Neogene, then, may be related to the CO2 starvation of C3 ecosystems. PMID:9507562

  15. Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and the future of C4 crops for food and fuel.

    PubMed

    Leakey, Andrew D B

    2009-07-01

    Crops with the C(4) photosynthetic pathway are vital to global food supply, particularly in the tropical regions where human well-being and agricultural productivity are most closely linked. While rising atmospheric [CO(2)] is the driving force behind the greater temperatures and water stress, which threaten to reduce future crop yields, it also has the potential to directly benefit crop physiology. The nature of C(4) plant responses to elevated [CO(2)] has been controversial. Recent evidence from free-air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) experiments suggests that elevated [CO(2)] does not directly stimulate C(4) photosynthesis. Nonetheless, drought stress can be ameliorated at elevated [CO(2)] as a result of lower stomatal conductance and greater intercellular [CO(2)]. Therefore, unlike C(3) crops for which there is a direct enhancement of photosynthesis by elevated [CO(2)], C(4) crops will only benefit from elevated [CO(2)] in times and places of drought stress. Current projections of future crop yields have assumed that rising [CO(2)] will directly enhance photosynthesis in all situations and, therefore, are likely to be overly optimistic. Additional experiments are needed to evaluate the extent to which amelioration of drought stress by elevated [CO(2)] will improve C(4) crop yields for food and fuel over the range of C(4) crop growing conditions and genotypes.

  16. Using evolution as a guide to engineer kranz-type c4 photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Slewinski, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Kranz-type C4 photosynthesis has independently and rapidly evolved over 60 times to dramatically increase radiation use efficiency in both monocots and eudicots. Indeed, it is one of the most exceptional examples of convergent evolution in the history of life. The repeated and rapid evolution of Kranz-type C4 suggests that it may be a derivative of a conserved developmental pathway that is present in all angiosperms. Here, I argue that the Kranz-type C4 photosynthetic system is an extension of the endodermis/starch sheath, that is normally only found in the roots and stems, into photosynthetic structures such as leaves. Support for this hypothesis was recently provided by a study that showed that the same genetic pathway that gives rise to the endodermis in roots, the SCARECROW/SHORT-ROOT radial patterning system, also regulates the development of Kranz anatomy and C4 physiology in leaves. This new hypothesis for the evolution of Kranz-type C4 photosynthesis has opened new opportunities to explore the underlying genetic networks that regulate the development and physiology of C4 and provides new potential avenues for the engineering of the mechanism into C3 crops. PMID:23847626

  17. Angle-Dependent Irradiation of C4 in Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Feng-Shou; Zhu, Yun; Xie, Guan-Hao

    2012-07-01

    We study the angle-dependent irradiation of linear C4 in the strong femtosecond laser pulses with the help of time-dependent local density approximation applied to valence electrons, coupled non-adiabatically to molecular dynamics of ions. It is found that the excitation of C4 including the electrons and ions has a strong relation to the angle between the laser polarization and the internuclear axis of C4. The ionization yield decreases when the angle ranges from 0 to π/2. A clear suppression in the ionization yield is found when the laser polarization is perpendicular to the internuclear axis of C4. We track the dynamic motion of ionized C4 even in the relaxation time. It shows that the ionized C4 keeps on oscillating without fragmenting after the irradiation in different cases, while it is more excited when the laser polarization is along the internuclear axis. Furthermore, it is found that the change of the ELF takes place mainly in the xy plane and xz plane and the electron ejection mainly comes from the middle two atoms for the θ = 0 case.

  18. Differential resource utilization by extant great apes and australopithecines: towards solving the C4 conundrum.

    PubMed

    Sponheimer, Matt; Lee-Thorp, Julia A

    2003-09-01

    Morphological and biogeochemical evidence suggest that australopithecines had diets markedly different from those of extant great apes. Stable carbon isotope analysis, for example, has shown that significant amounts of the carbon consumed by australopithecines were derived from C(4) photosynthesis in plants. This means that australopithecines were eating large quantities of C(4) plants such as tropical grasses and sedges, or were eating animals that were themselves eating C(4) plants. In contrast, there is no evidence that modern apes consume appreciable amounts of any of these foods, even in the most arid extents of their ranges where these foods are most prevalent. Environmental reconstructions of early australopithecine environments overlap with modern chimpanzee habitats. This, in conjunction with the stable isotope evidence, suggests that australopithecines and great apes, even in similar environments, would utilize available resources differently. Thus, the desire or capacity to use C(4) foods may be a basal character of our lineage. We do not know, however, which of the nutritionally disparate C(4) foods were utilized by hominids. Here we discuss which C(4) resources were most likely consumed by australopithecines, as well as the potential nutritional, physiological, and social consequences of eating these foods.

  19. Macro-Climatic Distribution Limits Show Both Niche Expansion and Niche Specialization among C4 Panicoids

    PubMed Central

    Aagesen, Lone; Biganzoli, Fernando; Bena, Julia; Godoy-Bürki, Ana C.; Reinheimer, Renata; Zuloaga, Fernando O.

    2016-01-01

    Grasses are ancestrally tropical understory species whose current dominance in warm open habitats is linked to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. C4 grasses maintain high rates of photosynthesis in warm and water stressed environments, and the syndrome is considered to induce niche shifts into these habitats while adaptation to cold ones may be compromised. Global biogeographic analyses of C4 grasses have, however, concentrated on diversity patterns, while paying little attention to distributional limits. Using phylogenetic contrast analyses, we compared macro-climatic distribution limits among ~1300 grasses from the subfamily Panicoideae, which includes 4/5 of the known photosynthetic transitions in grasses. We explored whether evolution of C4 photosynthesis correlates with niche expansions, niche changes, or stasis at subfamily level and within the two tribes Paniceae and Paspaleae. We compared the climatic extremes of growing season temperatures, aridity, and mean temperatures of the coldest months. We found support for all the known biogeographic distribution patterns of C4 species, these patterns were, however, formed both by niche expansion and niche changes. The only ubiquitous response to a change in the photosynthetic pathway within Panicoideae was a niche expansion of the C4 species into regions with higher growing season temperatures, but without a withdrawal from the inherited climate niche. Other patterns varied among the tribes, as macro-climatic niche evolution in the American tribe Paspaleae differed from the pattern supported in the globally distributed tribe Paniceae and at family level. PMID:26950074

  20. Endoreduplication is not involved in bundle-sheath formation in the C4 species Cleome gynandra.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Sylvain; Kneřová, Jana; Hibberd, Julian M

    2014-07-01

    There is currently significant interest in engineering the two-celled C4 photosynthesis pathway into crops such as rice in order to increase yield. This will require alterations to the biochemistry of photosynthesis in both mesophyll (M) and bundle-sheath (BS) cells, but also alterations to leaf anatomy. For example, the BS of C4 species is enlarged compared with that in C3 species. Because cell and nucleus size are often correlated, this study investigated whether nuclear endoreduplication is associated with increased differentiation and expansion of BS cells. Nuclei in the BS of C4 Cleome gynandra were tagged with green fluorescent protein. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy and flow cytometry of isolated nuclei were used to quantify size and DNA content in BS cells. The results showed a significant endoreduplication in BS cells of C. gynandra but not in additional C4 lineages from both the monocotyledonous and dicotyledenous plants. Furthermore, in the C3 species Arabidopsis thaliana, BS cells undergo endoreduplication. Due to this significant endoreduplication in the small BS cells of C3 A. thaliana, it was concluded that endoreduplication of BS nuclei in C4 plants is not linked to expansion and differentiation of BS cells, and therefore that alternative strategies to increase this compartment need to be sought in order to engineer C4 traits into C3 crops such as rice. PMID:24220652

  1. Carbon dioxide starvation, the development of C4 ecosystems, and mammalian evolution.

    PubMed

    Cerling, T E; Ehleringer, J R; Harris, J M

    1998-01-29

    The decline of atmospheric CO2 over the last 65 million years (Ma) resulted in the 'CO2-starvation' of terrestrial ecosystems and led to the widespread distribution of C4 plants, which are less sensitive to CO2 levels than are C3 plants. Global expansion of C4 biomass is recorded in the diets of mammals from Asia, Africa, North America, and South America during the interval from about 8 to 5 Ma. This was accompanied by the most significant Cenozoic faunal turnover on each of these continents, indicating that ecological changes at this time were an important factor in mammalian extinction. Further expansion of tropical C4 biomass in Africa also occurred during the last glacial interval confirming the link between atmospheric CO2 levels and C4 biomass response. Changes in fauna and flora at the end of the Miocene, and between the last glacial and interglacial, have previously been attributed to changes in aridity; however, an alternative explanation for a global expansion of C4 biomass is CO2 starvation of C3 plants when atmospheric CO2 levels dropped below a threshold significant to C3 plants. Aridity may also have been a factor in the expansion of C4 ecosystems but one that was secondary to, and perhaps because of, gradually decreasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. Mammalian evolution in the late Neogene, then, may be related to the CO2 starvation of C3 ecosystems. PMID:9507562

  2. Macro-Climatic Distribution Limits Show Both Niche Expansion and Niche Specialization among C4 Panicoids.

    PubMed

    Aagesen, Lone; Biganzoli, Fernando; Bena, Julia; Godoy-Bürki, Ana C; Reinheimer, Renata; Zuloaga, Fernando O

    2016-01-01

    Grasses are ancestrally tropical understory species whose current dominance in warm open habitats is linked to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. C4 grasses maintain high rates of photosynthesis in warm and water stressed environments, and the syndrome is considered to induce niche shifts into these habitats while adaptation to cold ones may be compromised. Global biogeographic analyses of C4 grasses have, however, concentrated on diversity patterns, while paying little attention to distributional limits. Using phylogenetic contrast analyses, we compared macro-climatic distribution limits among ~1300 grasses from the subfamily Panicoideae, which includes 4/5 of the known photosynthetic transitions in grasses. We explored whether evolution of C4 photosynthesis correlates with niche expansions, niche changes, or stasis at subfamily level and within the two tribes Paniceae and Paspaleae. We compared the climatic extremes of growing season temperatures, aridity, and mean temperatures of the coldest months. We found support for all the known biogeographic distribution patterns of C4 species, these patterns were, however, formed both by niche expansion and niche changes. The only ubiquitous response to a change in the photosynthetic pathway within Panicoideae was a niche expansion of the C4 species into regions with higher growing season temperatures, but without a withdrawal from the inherited climate niche. Other patterns varied among the tribes, as macro-climatic niche evolution in the American tribe Paspaleae differed from the pattern supported in the globally distributed tribe Paniceae and at family level.

  3. Macro-Climatic Distribution Limits Show Both Niche Expansion and Niche Specialization among C4 Panicoids.

    PubMed

    Aagesen, Lone; Biganzoli, Fernando; Bena, Julia; Godoy-Bürki, Ana C; Reinheimer, Renata; Zuloaga, Fernando O

    2016-01-01

    Grasses are ancestrally tropical understory species whose current dominance in warm open habitats is linked to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. C4 grasses maintain high rates of photosynthesis in warm and water stressed environments, and the syndrome is considered to induce niche shifts into these habitats while adaptation to cold ones may be compromised. Global biogeographic analyses of C4 grasses have, however, concentrated on diversity patterns, while paying little attention to distributional limits. Using phylogenetic contrast analyses, we compared macro-climatic distribution limits among ~1300 grasses from the subfamily Panicoideae, which includes 4/5 of the known photosynthetic transitions in grasses. We explored whether evolution of C4 photosynthesis correlates with niche expansions, niche changes, or stasis at subfamily level and within the two tribes Paniceae and Paspaleae. We compared the climatic extremes of growing season temperatures, aridity, and mean temperatures of the coldest months. We found support for all the known biogeographic distribution patterns of C4 species, these patterns were, however, formed both by niche expansion and niche change