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Sample records for complete fusion quasifission

  1. Theoretical study of effects of the entrance channel on the relative yield of complete fusion and quasifission in heavy-ion collisions within a dinuclear system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soheyli, S.; Khanlari, M. Varasteh

    2016-09-01

    The relative yield of complete fusion and quasifission components for the 12C+204Pb , 19F+197Au , 30Si+186W , and 48Ca+168Er reactions which all lead to the compound nucleus 216Ra are analyzed to calculate the entrance channel effects by comparison of capture, complete fusion, and quasifission cross sections, emission barriers (Bfus*,Bq f ), as well as complete fusion probability estimated by statistical method within the framework of the dinuclear system model. The difference among complete fusion probabilities calculated by the dinuclear system model for different entrance channels can be explained by the hindrance to complete fusion due to the larger inner fusion barrier Bfus* for the transformation of the dinuclear system into a compound nucleus and the increase of the quasifission contribution due to the decreasing of the emission barrier Bq f of quasifission as a function of the angular momentum. Although these reactions with different entrance channels populate the same compound nucleus 216Ra at similar excitation energies, the model predicts the negligible quasifission probability for reactions having higher entrance channel mass asymmetry and the dominant decay channel is complete fission. For reactions induced by massive projectiles such as Si and Ca having lower entrance channel mass asymmetry, the quasifission component is dominant in the evolution of dinuclear system, and the fusion process is extremely hindered.

  2. Fusion, fission, and quasi-fission using TDHF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Sait; Oberacker, Volker

    2014-03-01

    We study fusion, fission, and quasi-fission reactions using the time-dependent Hartee-Fock (TDHF) approach together with the density-constrained TDHF method for fusion. The only input is the Skyrme NN interaction, there are no adjustable parameters. We discuss the identification of quasi-fission in 40Ca+238U, the scission dynamics in symmetric fission of 264Fm, as well as calculating heavy-ion interaction potentials V (R) , mass parameters M (R) , and total fusion cross sections from light to heavy systems. Some of the effects naturally included in these calculations are: neck formation, mass exchange, internal excitations, deformation effects, as well as nuclear alignment for deformed systems. Supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER40975.

  3. Analysis of quasifission competition in fusion reactions forming heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerton, Kalee; Kohley, Zachary; Morrissey, Dave; Wakhle, Aditya; Stiefel, Krystin; Hinde, David; Dasgupta, Mahananda; Williams, Elizabeth; Simenel, Cedric; Carter, Ian; Cook, Kaitlin; Jeung, Dongyun; Luong, Duc Huy; McNeil, Steven; Palshetkar, Chandani; Rafferty, Dominic

    2015-10-01

    Heavy-ion fusion reactions have provided a mechanism for the production of superheavy elements allowing for the extension of both the periodic table and chart of the nuclides. However, fusion of the projectile and target, forming a compound nucleus, is hindered by orders of magnitude by the quasifission process in heavy systems. In order to fully understand this mechanism, and make accurate predictions for superheavy element production cross sections, a clear description of the interplay between the fusion-fission and quasifission reaction channels is necessary. The mass-angle distributions of fragments formed in 8 different Cr + W reactions were measured at the Australia National University in order to explore the N/Z dependence of the quasifission process. Two sets of data were measured: one at a constant energy relative to the fusion barrier and one at a constant compound nucleus excitation energy. The results of this analysis will provide insight into the effect of using more neutron-rich beams in superheavy element production reactions.

  4. Quasifission dynamics in TDHF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E.; Simenel, C.

    2016-05-01

    For light and medium mass systems the capture cross-section may be considered to be the same as that for complete fusion, whereas for heavy systems leading to superheavy formations the evaporation residue cross-section is dramatically reduced due to the quasifission (QF) and fusion-fission processes thus making the capture cross-section to be essentially the sum of these two cross-sections, with QF occurring at a much shorter time-scale. Consequently, quasifission is the primary reaction mechanism that limits the formation of superheavy nuclei. Within the last few years the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) approach has been utilized for studying the dynamics of quasifission. The study of quasifission is showing a great promise to provide insight based on very favorable comparisons with experimental data. In this article we will focus on the TDHF calculations of quasifission observables for the 48Ca+249Bk system.

  5. Role of angular momentum in the production of complex fragments in fusion and quasifission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2011-05-15

    The influence of angular momentum on the competition between complete fusion followed by the decay of compound nucleus and quasifission channels is treated within the dinuclear system model. The charge distributions of the products in the reactions {sup 28}Si+{sup 96}Zr, {sup 4}He+{sup 130}Te, and {sup 40}Ca+{sup 82}Kr are predicted at bombarding energies above the Coulomb barrier. The results of calculations for the reactions {sup 93}Nb+{sup 9}Be,{sup 12}C,{sup 27}Al; {sup 84}Kr+{sup 27}Al; {sup 86}Kr+{sup 63}Cu; {sup 139}La+{sup 12}C,{sup 27}Al; and {sup 45}Sc+{sup 65}Cu are compared with the available experimental data.

  6. Experimental study of the quasifission, fusion-fission, and de-excitation of Cf compound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuyagbaatar, J.; Hinde, D. J.; Carter, I. P.; Dasgupta, M.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Evers, M.; Luong, D. H.; du Rietz, R.; Wakhle, A.; Williams, E.; Yakushev, A.

    2015-05-01

    Background: The fusion-evaporation reaction at energies around the Coulomb barrier is presently the only way to produce the heaviest elements. However, formation of evaporation residues is strongly hindered due to the competing fusion-fission and quasifission processes. Presently, a full understanding of these processes and their relationships has not been reached. Purpose: This work aims to use new fission measurements and existing evaporation residue and fission excitation function data for reactions forming Cf isotopes to investigate the dependence of the quasifission probability and characteristics on the identities of the two colliding nuclei in heavy element formation reactions. Method: Using the Australian National University's 14UD electrostatic accelerator and CUBE detector array, fission fragments from the 12C +235U , 34S +208Pb , 36S +206Pb , 36S +208Pb , and 44Ca +198Pt reactions were measured. Mass and angle distributions of fission fragments were extracted and compared to investigate the presence and characteristics of quasifission. Results: Mass-angle-correlated fission fragments were observed for the 44Ca +198Pt reaction; no correlation was observed in the other reactions measured. Flat-topped fission-fragment mass distributions were observed for 12C +235U at compound-nucleus excitation energies from 28 to 52 MeV. Less pronounced flat-topped distributions were observed, with very similar shapes, for all three sulfur-induced reactions at excitation energies lower than 45 MeV. Conclusions: A high probability of long-time-scale quasifission seems necessary to explain both the fission and evaporation residue data for the 34S +208Pb and 36S +206Pb reactions. Flat-topped mass distributions observed for 12C - and 34 ,36S -induced reactions are suggested to originate both from late-chance fusion-fission at low excitation energies and the persistence of shell effects at the higher energies associated with quasifission.

  7. Quasifission and fusion-fission in reactions with massive nuclei: Comparison of reactions leading to the Z=120 element

    SciTech Connect

    Nasirov, A. K.; Giardina, G.; Mandaglio, G.; Manganaro, M.; Hanappe, F.; Heinz, S.; Hofmann, S.; Muminov, A. I.; Scheid, W.

    2009-02-15

    The yields of evaporation residues, fusion-fission, and quasifission fragments in the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 144,154}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 186}W reactions are analyzed in the framework of the combined theoretical method based on the dinuclear system concept and advanced statistical model. The measured yields of evaporation residues for the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 154}Sm reaction can be well reproduced. The measured yields of fission fragments are decomposed into contributions coming from fusion-fission, quasifission, and fast-fission. The decrease in the measured yield of quasifission fragments in {sup 48}Ca+{sup 154}Sm at the large collision energies and the lack of quasifission fragments in the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 144}Sm reaction are explained by the overlap in mass angle distributions of the quasifission and fusion-fission fragments. The investigation of the optimal conditions for the synthesis of the new element Z=120 (A=302) show that the {sup 54}Cr+{sup 248}Cm reaction is preferable in comparison with the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 244}Pu and {sup 64}Ni+{sup 238}U reactions because the excitation function of the evaporation residues of the former reaction is some orders of magnitude larger than that for the last two reactions.

  8. Time scale in quasifission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Paul, P.; Nestler, J.

    1995-08-01

    The quasifission process arises from the hindrance of the complete fusion process when heavy-ion beams are used. The strong dissipation in the system tends to prevent fusion and lead the system towards reseparation into two final products of similar mass reminiscent of a fission process. This dissipation slows down the mass transfer and shape transformation and allows for the emission of high energy {gamma}-rays during the process, albeit with a low probability. Giant Dipole {gamma} rays emitted during this time have a characteristic spectral shape and may thus be discerned in the presence of a background of {gamma} rays emitted from the final fission-like fragments. Since the rate of GDR {gamma} emission is very well established, the strength of this component may therefore be used to measure the timescale of the quasifission process. In this experiment we studied the reaction between 368-MeV {sup 58}Ni and a {sup 165}Ho target, where deep inelastic scattering and quasifission processes are dominant. Coincidences between fission fragments (detected in four position-sensitive avalanche detectors) and high energy {gamma} rays (measured in a 10{close_quotes} x 10{close_quotes} actively shielded NaI detector) were registered. Beams were provided by the Stony Brook Superconducting Linac. The {gamma}-ray spectrum associated with deep inelastic scattering events is well reproduced by statistical cooling of projectile and target-like fragments with close to equal initial excitation energy sharing. The y spectrum associated with quasifission events is well described by statistical emission from the fission fragments alone, with only weak evidence for GDR emission from the mono-nucleus. A 1{sigma} limit of t{sub ss} < 11 x 10{sup -21} s is obtained for the mono-nucleus lifetime, which is consistent with the lifetime obtained from quasifission fragment angular distributions. A manuscript was accepted for publication.

  9. Fusion hindrance and quasi-fission in heavy-ion induced reactions: disentangling the effect of different parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fioretto, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Trotta, M.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Chizhov, A. Yu.; Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Kniajeva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Voskressensky, V. M.; Courtin, S.

    2006-04-26

    Experimental results on the fusion inhibition effect near the Coulomb barrier due to the onset of the quasi-fission mechanism are presented. The investigation was focused on reactions induced by 48Ca projectiles on different heavy targets and comparing them to reactions induced by light ions such as 12C and 16O leading to the same compound nuclei. Cross sections and angular distributions of evaporation residues and fission fragments have been measured.

  10. Fusion-fission and quasifission in the reactions with heavy ions leading to the formation of Hs

    SciTech Connect

    Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kozulin, E. M.

    2012-10-20

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions {sup 22}Ne+{sup 249}Cf,{sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm,{sup 36}S+{sup 238}U and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb leading to Hs isotopes have been measured. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs*, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed. In the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U the considerable part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier the symmetric fragments originate mainly from fusion-fission process for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies. The pre- and post-scission neutron multiplicities as a function of the fragment mass have been obtained for the reactions studied.

  11. Fusion-fission and quasifission in the reactions with heavy ions leading to the formation of Hs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kozulin, E. M.

    2012-10-01

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions 22Ne+249Cf,26Mg+248Cm,36S+238U and 58Fe+208Pb leading to Hs isotopes have been measured. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs*, formed in the reaction 26Mg+248Cm, is observed. In the reaction 36S+238U the considerable part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier the symmetric fragments originate mainly from fusion-fission process for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the 58Fe+208Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies. The pre- and post-scission neutron multiplicities as a function of the fragment mass have been obtained for the reactions studied.

  12. Competition between fusion and quasifission in a heavy fusing system: Diffusion of nuclear shapes through a dynamical collective potential energy landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2006-12-15

    A theory of the competition between fusion and quasifission in a heavy fusing system is proposed, which is based on a master equation and the two-center shell model. Fusion and quasifission arise from a diffusion process in an ensemble of nuclear shapes, each of which evolves toward the thermal equilibrium. The fusing system moves on a dynamical (time-dependent) collective potential energy surface that is initially diabatic and gradually becomes adiabatic. Calculations for several reactions leading to {sup 256}No are performed within a simplified two-dimensional model. Among other important conclusions, the results indicate that (i) the diabatic effects play a very important role in the onset of fusion hindrance for heavy systems and (ii) very asymmetric reactions induced by closed-shell nuclei seem to be the best suited to synthesize the heaviest compound nuclei.

  13. Dynamical Collective Potential Energy Landscape: Its Impact on the Competition Between Fusion and Quasi-fission in a Heavy Fusing System

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2006-08-14

    A realistic microscopically-based quantum approach to the competition between fusion and quasi-fission in a heavy fusing system is applied to several reactions leading to 256No. Fusion and quasi-fission are described in terms of a diffusion process of nuclear shapes through a dynamical collective potential energy landscape which is initially diabatic and gradually becomes adiabatic. The microscopic ingredients of the theory are obtained with a realistic two-center shell model based on Woods-Saxon potentials. The results indicate that (i) the diabatic effects play a very important role in the onset of fusion hindrance for heavy systems, and (ii) very asymmetric reactions induced by closed shell nuclei seem to be the best suited to synthesize the heaviest compound nuclei.

  14. Competition between fusion and quasi-fission in heavy ion induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.

    1986-09-01

    Quantitative analyses of angular distributions and angle-mass correlations have been applied to the U + Ca reaction to obtain upper limit estimates for the cross sections for complete fusion near or below the interaction barrier. Extrapolating to the systems Ca + Cm and Ca + Es using the well established scaling properties of the extra push model, an estimate of the cross sections relevant to the efforts of synthesizing super-heavy elements in the region Z = 116 and N = 184 via heavy-ion fusion reactions are obtained. A simple evaporation calculation using properties of the super heavy elements shows that the failure to observe super-heavy elements with the Ca + Cm reaction is consistent with estimates of the complete fusion process. 33 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. The fusion fission and quasi-fission processes in the reaction 48Ca + 208Pb at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorova, E. V.; Bogachev, A. A.; Itkis, M. G.; Itkis, I. M.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Pashkevich, V. V.; Rusanov, A. Ya.

    2008-04-01

    Mass-energy distributions (MEDs) and capture-fission cross sections have been measured in the reaction 48Ca + 208Pb → 256No at the energies E=206-242 MeV using a double-arm time-of-flight spectrometer CORSET. It has been observed that MED of the fragments consists of two parts, namely, the classical fusion-fission process corresponding to the symmetric fission of 256No and quasi-fission "shoulders" corresponding to the light fragment masses ˜60-90 u and complimentary heavy fragment masses. The quasi-fission "shoulders" have a higher total kinetic energy (TKE) as compared with that expected for the classical fission. A mathematical formalism was employed for the MEDs fragment decomposition into fusion-fission and quasi-fission components. In the fusion-fission process a high-energy Super-Short mode has been discovered for the masses M=130-135 u and the TKE of ≈233 MeV.

  16. Competition between fusion-fission and quasifission processes in the {sup 32}S+{sup 184}W reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. Q.; Zhang, C. L.; Lin, C. J.; Liu, Z. H.; Yang, F.; Nasirov, A. K.; Mandaglio, G.; Manganaro, M.; Giardina, G.

    2010-03-15

    The angular distributions of fission fragments for the {sup 32}S+{sup 184}W reaction at center-of-mass energies of 118.8, 123.1, 127.3, 131.5, 135.8, 141.1, and 144.4 MeV are measured. The experimental fission excitation function is obtained. The anisotropy (A{sub exp}) is found by extrapolating each fission fragment angular distribution. The measured fission cross sections of the {sup 32}S+{sup 182,184}W reaction are decomposed into fusion-fission, quasifission, and fast-fission contributions by the dinuclear system model (DNS). The angular momentum distributions of the dinuclear system and compound nucleus calculated by the DNS model are used to reproduce the experimental capture and fusion excitation functions for both reactions and quantities K{sub 0}{sup 2}, , and A{sub exp}, which characterize angular distributions of the fission products at the considered range of beam energy. The total evaporation residue excitation function for the {sup 32}S+{sup 184}W reaction calculated in the framework of the advanced statistical model is close to the available experimental data only up to about E{sub c.m.}approx =160 MeV. The underestimation of the experimental data at high excitation energies E{sub c.m.}>160 MeV is explained by the fact that the statistical model cannot reproduce the cross section of evaporation residues formed by the nonequilibrium mechanism, that is, without formation of the compound nucleus in the statistical equilibrium state.

  17. Fusion and quasifission dynamics in the reactions 48Ca+249Bk and 50Ti+249Bk using a time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E.; Simenel, C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Synthesis of superheavy elements (SHEs) with fusion-evaporation reactions is strongly hindered by the quasifission (QF) mechanism which prevents the formation of an equilibrated compound nucleus and which depends on the structure of the reactants. New SHEs have been recently produced with doubly-magic 48Ca beams. However, SHE synthesis experiments with single-magic 50Ti beams have so far been unsuccessful. Purpose: In connection with experimental searches for Z =117 ,119 superheavy elements, we perform a theoretical study of fusion and quasifission mechanisms in 48Ca,50Ti+249Bk reactions in order to investigate possible differences in reaction mechanisms induced by these two projectiles. Methods: The collision dynamics and the outcome of the reactions are studied using unrestricted time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations as well as the density-constrained TDHF method to extract the nucleus-nucleus potentials and the excitation energy in each fragment. Results: Nucleus-nucleus potentials, nuclear contact times, masses and charges of the fragments, as well as their kinetic and excitation energies strongly depend on the orientation of the prolate 249Bk nucleus. Long contact times associated with fusion are observed in collisions of both projectiles with the side of the 249Bk nucleus, but not on collisions with its tip. The energy and impact parameter dependencies of the fragment properties, as well as their mass-angle and mass-total kinetic energy correlations are investigated. Conclusions: Entrance channel reaction dynamics are similar with both 48Ca and 50Ti projectiles. Both are expected to lead to the formation of a compound nucleus by fusion if they have enough energy to get in contact with the side of the 249Bk target.

  18. Dynamics of quasifission

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, A. S. Oberacker, V. E.; Simenel, C.

    2015-10-15

    Quasifission is the primary reaction mechanism that limits the formation of superheavy nuclei and consequently an important ingredient for choosing the best target-projectile combinations for the heavy element searches. Quasifission is characterized by nuclear contact-times that are much longer than those found in deep-inelastic reactions, resulting in a substantial mass and charge transfer. In this manuscript we employ the fully microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory to study quasifission. New results are presented for the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 249}Bk system.

  19. Evidence of complete fusion in the subbarrier {sup 16}O+{sup 238}U reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, K. Ikezoe, H.; Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Mitsuoka, S.; Tsuruta, K.; Satou, K.; Lin, C. J.; Ohsawa, T.

    2006-08-15

    Evaporation residue cross sections in the {sup 16}O+{sup 238}U reaction were measured for the energy range from above-to extreme subbarrier. We used a He-gas-jet system to transport the fusion products, and the {alpha} decay of the evaporation residues was measured by using a rotating wheel system. The measured cross sections for {sup 248,249,250}Fm are reproduced by a statistical model calculation, for which partial cross sections are calculated by a coupled-channel model taking into account the prolate deformation of {sup 238}U. We conclude that complete fusion is the main process in the subbarrier energy region, and quasifission is not an important channel.

  20. Nuclear structure effects in quasifission - understanding the formation of the heaviest elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, D. J.; Williams, E.; Mohanto, G.; Simenel, C.; Jeung, D. Y.; Dasgupta, M.; Prasad, E.; Wakhle, A.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Rafferty, D. C.; Simpson, E. C.

    2016-09-01

    Quasifission is an important process suppressing the fusion of two heavy nuclei in reactions used to create superheavy elements. Quasifission results in rapid separation of the dinuclear system initially formed at contact. Achieving reliable a priori prediction of quasifission probabilities is a very diffcult problem. Through measurements with projectiles from C to Ni, the Australian National University's Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and CUBE spectrometer have been used to map out mass-angle distributions (MAD) - the fission mass-ratio as a function of centre-of-mass angle. These provide information on quasifission dynamics in the least modeldependent way. Average quasifission time-scales have been extracted, and compared with TDHF calculations of the collisions, with good agreement being found. With the baseline information from the survey of experimental MAD, strong influences of the nuclear structure of the projectile and target nuclei can be clearly determined.

  1. Shell effects in fission, quasifission and multinucleon transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozulin, E. M.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Itkis, I. M.; Kozulina, N. I.; Loktev, T. A.; Novikov, K. V.; Harca, I.

    2014-05-01

    Results of the study of mass-energy distributions of binary fragments for a wide range of nuclei with Z= 82-122 produced in reactions of ions located between 22Ne and 136Xe at energies close and below the Coulomb barrier are reported. The role of the shell effects, the influence of the entrance channel asymmetry and the deformations of colliding nuclei on the mechanism of the fusion-fission, quasifission and multinucleon transfer reactions are discussed. The observed peculiarities of the mass and energy distributions of reaction fragments are determined by the shell structure of the formed fragments. Special attention is paid on the symmetric fragment features in order to clarify the origin of these fragments (fission or quasifission). The influence of shell effects on the fragment yield in quasifission and multinucleon transfer reactions is considered. It is noted that the major part of the asymmetric quasifission fragments peaks around the region of the Z=82 and N=126 (double magic lead) and Z=28 and N=50 shells; moreover the maximum of the yield of the quasifission component is a mixing between all these shells. Hence, shell effects are everywhere present and determine the basic characteristics of fragment mass distributions.

  2. Quasifission processes in {sup 40,48}Ca+{sup 144,154}Sm reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Knyazheva, G. N.; Kozulin, E. M.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Chizhov, A. Yu.; Itkis, M. G.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Voskressensky, V. M.; Stefanini, A. M.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Szilner, S.; Trotta, M.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Haas, F.; Rowley, N.

    2007-06-15

    Mass-energy and angular distributions of fission fragments for the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 144,154}Sm{yields}{sup 192,202}Pb, {sup 40}Ca+{sup 154}Sm{yields}{sup 194}Pb reactions have been measured. Fusion suppression and the presence of quasifission at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier have been observed for the reactions with the deformed target {sup 154}Sm. In the case of the spherical {sup 144}Sm target no evidence of quasifission has been found. Quasifission cross sections have been extracted from total fission-like events by analysis of their mass and angular distributions.

  3. Equivalence of measurement space solution data fusion and complete fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccherini, Simone

    2016-10-01

    Many observation systems are operating on space-borne and airborne platforms, as well as from ground-based stations, providing measurements of vertical profiles of atmospheric parameters. When independent measurements of the same profile are available data fusion methods can be used to combine them and exploit all the available information for a more comprehensive and accurate description of the atmospheric state. Several data fusion methods can be used. Among the others, both the measurement space solution data fusion method and the complete fusion method have the remarkable properties of using all the acquired information and of providing results that are independent from a priori information used in the individual retrievals. For this reason, though the two methods use two completely different procedures, it is reasonable to expect that they give the same results and in this paper the rigorous proof of the equivalence of the two methods is given. Therefore, the choice between them is only driven by the advantages of the different implementations.

  4. Learned fusion operators based on matrix completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risko, Kelly K. D.; Hester, Charles F.

    2011-05-01

    The efficient and timely management of imagery captured in the battlefield requires methods capable of searching the voluminous databases and extracting highly symbolic concepts. When processing images, a semantic and definition gap exists between machine representations and the user's language. Based on matrix completion techniques, we present a fusion operator that fuses imagery and expert knowledge provided by user inputs during post analysis. Specifically, an information matrix is formed from imagery and a class map as labeled by an expert. From this matrix an image operator is derived for the extraction/prediction of information from future imagery. We will present results using this technique on single mode data.

  5. Neutron Emission in Fission And Quasi-Fission of Hs

    SciTech Connect

    Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kozulin, E. M.; Krupa, L.; Hanappe, F.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.

    2010-04-30

    Mass and energy distributions of fission-like fragments obtained in the reactions {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb leading to the formation of {sup 266,274}Hs are reported. From the analysis of TKE distributions for symmetric fragment it was found that at energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of {sup 274}Hs, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed, while in the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U at these energies the main part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasi-fission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier the fusion-fission is a main process leading to the formation of symmetric fragment for the both reactions. In the case of {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasi-fission process is the main reaction mechanism at all measured energies. The pre- and post-scission neutron multiplicities as a function of the fragment mass have been obtained for all studied reactions.

  6. Description of the Fusion-Fission Reactions in the Framework of Dinuclear System Conception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Wieleczko, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    Within the dinuclear system model fusion-fission reactions 78Kr+40Ca and 86Kr+48Ca is investigated. The charge distributions of the decay products are predicted at bombarding energy 10 MeV/nucleon. The competition is treated between complete fusion followed by the decay of compound nucleus and quasifission channels. The possible explanation of the odd-even staggering in the yield of the final reaction products at high excitation energies is discussed.

  7. PREFACE: International Symposium: Quasifission Process in Heavy Ion Reactions, Messina (Italy), November 8-9, 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    Conference photograph Editors:Giorgio Giardina (University of Messina) Avazbek K Nasirov (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research) Sara Pirrone (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Catania) Organizing Committee:Chairman: G Giardina (Messina - Italy)Co-Chairman: A K Nasirov (Dubna - Russia)Co-Chairman: S Pirrone (Catania - Italy)Scientific Secretary: G Mandaglio (Messina - Italy) and A Di Pietro (Catania - Italy) Organizing Institutions:University of Messina    Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo (Messina) University of Messina logo      PBP logo Topics: Capture and Deep Inelastic Collision Quasifission Complete Fusion Fast Fission Fusion-Fission Ternary Fission Synthesis of Heavy and Superheavy Elements Pre-equilibrium emission Local Organizing Committee:G Fazio (Messina), G Giardina (Messina), G Mandaglio (Messina), M Manganaro (Messina), M Romaniuk (Messina), C Saccà (Messina), A Di Pietro (Catania), S Pirrone (Catania), A Nasirov (Dubna) Sponsored by:University of Messina, Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo (Messina), INFN Sezione di Catania, INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud Catania. Website: http:/nucleo.unime.it/symp2010/

  8. Processes in massive nuclei reactions and the way to complete fusion of reactants. What perspectives for the synthesis of heavier superheavy elements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandaglio, G.; Nasirov, A. K.; Curciarello, F.; De Leo, V.; Romaniuk, M.; Fazio, G.; Giardina, G.

    2012-12-01

    By using the dinuclear system (DNS) model we determine the capture of reactants at the first stage of reaction, the competition between the DNS decay by the quasifission (QF) and the complete fusion (CF) process up to formation of the compound nucleus (CN) having compact shape. Further evolution of the CN is considered as its fission into two fragments or formation of evaporation residues (ER) by its cooling after emission of neutrons or/and charged light particles. Disappearance of the CN fission barrier due to its fast rotation leads to the fast fission (FF) by formation of fissionlike fragments. The results of calculations for the mass symmetric 136Xe+136Xe reaction, almost mass symmetric 108Mo+144Ba reaction, and mass asymmetric like 24Mg+238U and 34S+248Cm reactions are discussed. The fusion probability PCN calculated for many massive nuclei reactions leading to formation of superheavy nuclei have been analyzed. The reactions which can lead in perspective to the synthesis of superheavy elements in the Z = 120 - 126 range and, eventually, also to heaviest nuclei, are discussed.

  9. Measurement of the fusion probability, PCN, for hot fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanez, R.; Loveland, W.; Barrett, J. S.; Yao, L.; Back, B. B.; Zhu, S.; Khoo, T. L.

    2013-07-01

    Background: The cross section for forming a heavy evaporation residue in fusion reactions depends on the capture cross section, the fusion probability, PCN, i.e., the probability that the projectile-target system will evolve inside the fission saddle point to form a completely fused system rather than reseparating (quasifission), and the survival of the completely fused system against fission. PCN is the least known of these quantities.Purpose: We want to determine PCN for the reactions of 101.2 MeV 18O, 147.3 MeV 26Mg, 170.9 MeV 30Si, and 195.3 MeV 36S with 197Au.Methods: We measured the fission fragment angular distributions for these reactions and used the formalism of Back to deduce the fusion-fission and quasifission cross sections. From these quantities we deduced PCN for each reaction.Results: The values of PCN for the reactions of 101.2 MeV 18O, 147.3 MeV 26Mg, 170.9 MeV 30Si, and 195.3 MeV 36S with 197Au are 0.66, 1.00, 0.06, and 0.13, respectively.Conclusions: The new measured values of PCN agree roughly with the semiempirical systematic dependence of PCN upon fissility for excited nuclei.

  10. Fission and quasifission modes in heavy-ion-induced reactions leading to the formation of Hs{sup *}

    SciTech Connect

    Itkis, I. M.; Kozulin, E. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Bogachev, A. A.; Chernysheva, E. V.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Goennenwein, F.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.; Hanappe, F.; Vardaci, E.; Goes Brennand, E. de

    2011-06-15

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions {sup 22}Ne+{sup 249}Cf,{sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb have been measured. All reactions lead to Hs isotopes. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs{sup *}, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed. In the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, leading to the formation of a similar compound nucleus, the main part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier fusion-fission is the main process leading to the formation of symmetric fragments for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies.

  11. The fusion of MBB with VFW finally brought to completion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Two newspaper type articles describing the final, long awaited unification of the two German Air and Space companies, MBB and VFW are presented. Government participation in this "fusion" arrangement and the advantages expected to accrue are discussed.

  12. A surprising content of congenital hernia: complete splenogonadal fusion band

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Prakash Manikka; Reddy, Ajit Kumar; Nutakki, Aditya

    2014-01-01

    Splenogonadal fusion is a rare congenital anomaly. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with a left inguinoscrotal swelling. With a clinical diagnosis of left congenital inguinal hernia the patient was taken up for explorative laparotomy where a transperitoneal band was noted adherent to the left testis. Biopsy revealed normal splenic tissue. Postoperatively the boy was imaged and a diagnosis of splenogonadal fusion was made. This article illustrates the imaging features of this rare anomaly. PMID:24671325

  13. Influence of incomplete fusion on complete fusion: Observation of a large incomplete fusion fraction at E {approx_equal}5-7 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, B. P.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Singh, Devendra P.; Prasad, R.; Kumar, Rakesh; Golda, K. S.

    2008-01-15

    Experiments have been carried out to explore the reaction dynamics leading to incomplete fusion of heavy ions at moderate excitation energies. Excitation functions for {sup 168}Lu{sup m}, {sup 167}Lu, {sup 167}Yb, {sup 166}Tm, {sup 179}Re, {sup 177}Re, {sup 177}W, {sup 178}Ta, and {sup 177}Hf radio-nuclides populated via complete and/or incomplete fusion of {sup 16}O with {sup 159}Tb and {sup 169}Tm have been studied over the wide projectile energy range E{sub proj}{approx_equal}75-95 MeV. Recoil-catcher technique followed by off-line {gamma}-spectrometry has been employed in the present measurements. Experimental data have been compared with the predictions of theoretical model code PACE2. The experimentally measured production cross sections of {alpha}-emitting channels were found to be larger as compared to the theoretical model predictions and may be attributed to incomplete fusion at these energies. During the analysis of experimental data, incomplete fusion has been found to be competing with complete fusion. As such, an attempt has been made to estimate the incomplete fusion fraction for both the systems, and has been found to be sensitive for projectile energy and mass asymmetry of interacting partners.

  14. Probing systematic model dependence of complete fusion for reactions with the weakly bound projectiles Li,76

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, A.; Santra, S.; Pal, A.; Chattopadhyay, D.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Kailas, S.

    2016-07-01

    Background: Complete fusion cross section measurements involving weakly bound projectiles show suppression at above-barrier energies compared to coupled-channels (CC) calculations, but no definite conclusion could be drawn for sub-barrier energies. Different CC models often lead to contrasting results. Purpose: We aim to investigate the differences in the fusion cross sections predicted by commonly used CC calculations, using codes such as fresco and ccfull, when compared to experimental data. Methods: The fusion cross sections are normalized to a dimensionless form by isolating the effect of only dynamic channel couplings calculated by both fresco and ccfull, by the method of fusion functions, and compared to a universal fusion function. This acts as a probe for obtaining the model dependence of fusion. Results: A difference is observed between the predictions of fresco and ccfull for all the reactions involving Li,76 as projectiles, and it is noticeably more for systems involving 7Li. Conclusions: With the theoretical foundations of the two CC models being different, their calculation of fusion is different even for the same system. The conclusion about the enhancement or suppression of fusion cross sections is model dependent.

  15. Pixel-level multisensor image fusion based on matrix completion and robust principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuozheng; Deller, J. R.; Fleet, Blair D.

    2016-01-01

    Acquired digital images are often corrupted by a lack of camera focus, faulty illumination, or missing data. An algorithm is presented for fusion of multiple corrupted images of a scene using the lifting wavelet transform. The method employs adaptive fusion arithmetic based on matrix completion and self-adaptive regional variance estimation. Characteristics of the wavelet coefficients are used to adaptively select fusion rules. Robust principal component analysis is applied to low-frequency image components, and regional variance estimation is applied to high-frequency components. Experiments reveal that the method is effective for multifocus, visible-light, and infrared image fusion. Compared with traditional algorithms, the new algorithm not only increases the amount of preserved information and clarity but also improves robustness.

  16. Complete cage migration/subsidence into the adjacent vertebral body after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Corniola, Marco V; Jägersberg, Max; Stienen, Martin N; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2015-03-01

    A variety of implant-related short and long-term complications after lumbar fusion surgery are recognized. Mid to long-term complications due to cage migration and/or cage subsidence are less frequently reported. Here, we report a patient with a complete cage migration into the superior adjacent vertebral body almost 20 years after the initial posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure. In this patient, the cage migration/subsidence was clinically silent, but a selective decompression for adjacent segment degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis was performed. We discuss the risk factors for cage migration/subsidence in view of the current literature.

  17. Neutron Emission in Fission and Quasi-Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis, I.; Bogatchev, A. A.; Chizhov, A. Yu.; Itkis, M. G.; Kliman, J.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Korzyukov, I. V.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pokrovski, I. V.; Prokhorova, E. V.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Voskressenski, V. M.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Corradi, L.; Stefanini, A. M.; Trotta, M.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Chubarian, G.; Hanappe, F.; Materna, T.; Dorvaux, O.; Rowley, N.; Stuttge, L.; Giardina, G.

    2005-09-01

    The work presents the results of the study of characteristics of the neutron emission in fission and quasi-fission of heavy and super-heavy nuclei, produced in the reactions with heavy ions. These experiments have been performed at the U-400 accelerator of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (JINR), tandem accelerator in Legnaro (LNL) and VIVITRON accelerator in Strasbourg (IReS) with the use of the time-of-flight spectrometer of fission fragments CORSET and neutron multidetector DEMON. Mass-energy distributions (MED) of the 48Ca + 168Er, 208Pb, 238U and 18O + 208Pb reactions products at energies close to and below the Coulomb barrier have been studied. The pre- and post-fission neutron multiplicities as a function of the fragment mass have been obtained. A significant yield of the asymmetric component observed in the fragment mass distributions in the case of 18O + 208Pb reaction denotes the multimodal nature of the fission process. At the same time an increase in the yield of fragment masses ML ≅ 75-85 and MH ≅ 200-210 in the case 48Ca+208Pb, 238U reactions and ML ≅ 75-85 and MH ≅ 130-140 in the case 48Ca+168Er is rather connected with a quasi-fission process. The obtained neutron multiplicities dependences on fragment masses showed the validity of these assumptions.

  18. Expected production of new exotic α emitters 108Xe and 112Ba in complete fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Wieleczko, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    The production cross sections of neutron-deficient isotopes Xe-110108 and Ba-114112 in the complete fusion reactions Ni,5658+54Fe and Ni,5658+58Ni with stable and radioactive beams are studied with the dinuclear system model. The calculated results are compared with the available experimental data. The optimal beam energies and corresponding maximum production cross sections of new isotopes 108Xe and 112Ba are predicted.

  19. A transversal approach for patch-based label fusion via matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Sanroma, Gerard; Wu, Guorong; Gao, Yaozong; Thung, Kim-Han; Guo, Yanrong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-08-01

    Recently, multi-atlas patch-based label fusion has received an increasing interest in the medical image segmentation field. After warping the anatomical labels from the atlas images to the target image by registration, label fusion is the key step to determine the latent label for each target image point. Two popular types of patch-based label fusion approaches are (1) reconstruction-based approaches that compute the target labels as a weighted average of atlas labels, where the weights are derived by reconstructing the target image patch using the atlas image patches; and (2) classification-based approaches that determine the target label as a mapping of the target image patch, where the mapping function is often learned using the atlas image patches and their corresponding labels. Both approaches have their advantages and limitations. In this paper, we propose a novel patch-based label fusion method to combine the above two types of approaches via matrix completion (and hence, we call it transversal). As we will show, our method overcomes the individual limitations of both reconstruction-based and classification-based approaches. Since the labeling confidences may vary across the target image points, we further propose a sequential labeling framework that first labels the highly confident points and then gradually labels more challenging points in an iterative manner, guided by the label information determined in the previous iterations. We demonstrate the performance of our novel label fusion method in segmenting the hippocampus in the ADNI dataset, subcortical and limbic structures in the LONI dataset, and mid-brain structures in the SATA dataset. We achieve more accurate segmentation results than both reconstruction-based and classification-based approaches. Our label fusion method is also ranked 1st in the online SATA Multi-Atlas Segmentation Challenge. PMID:26160394

  20. A transversal approach for patch-based label fusion via matrix completion

    PubMed Central

    Sanroma, Gerard; Wu, Guorong; Gao, Yaozong; Thung, Kim-Han; Guo, Yanrong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, multi-atlas patch-based label fusion has received an increasing interest in the medical image segmentation field. After warping the anatomical labels from the atlas images to the target image by registration, label fusion is the key step to determine the latent label for each target image point. Two popular types of patch-based label fusion approaches are (1) reconstruction-based approaches that compute the target labels as a weighted average of atlas labels, where the weights are derived by reconstructing the target image patch using the atlas image patches; and (2) classification-based approaches that determine the target label as a mapping of the target image patch, where the mapping function is often learned using the atlas image patches and their corresponding labels. Both approaches have their advantages and limitations. In this paper, we propose a novel patch-based label fusion method to combine the above two types of approaches via matrix completion (and hence, we call it transversal). As we will show, our method overcomes the individual limitations of both reconstruction-based and classification-based approaches. Since the labeling confidences may vary across the target image points, we further propose a sequential labeling framework that first labels the highly confident points and then gradually labels more challenging points in an iterative manner, guided by the label information determined in the previous iterations. We demonstrate the performance of our novel label fusion method in segmenting the hippocampus in the ADNI dataset, subcortical and limbic structures in the LONI dataset, and mid-brain structures in the SATA dataset. We achieve more accurate segmentation results than both reconstruction-based and classification-based approaches. Our label fusion method is also ranked 1st in the online SATA Multi-Atlas Segmentation Challenge. PMID:26160394

  1. The time scale of quasifission process in reactions with heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazheva, G. N.; Itkis, I. M.; Kozulin, E. M.

    2014-05-01

    The study of mass-energy distributions of binary fragments obtained in the reactions of 36S, 48Ca, 58Fe and 64Ni ions with the 232Th, 238U, 244Pu and 248Cm at energies below and above the Coulomb barrier is presented. These data have been measured by two time-of-flight CORSET spectrometer. The mass resolution of the spectrometer for these measurements was about 3u. It allows to investigate the features of mass distributions with good accuracy. The properties of mass and TKE of QF fragments in dependence on interaction energy have been investigated and compared with characteristics of the fusion-fission process. To describe the quasifission mass distribution the simple method has been proposed. This method is based on the driving potential of the system and time dependent mass drift. This procedure allows to estimate QF time scale from the measured mass distributions. It has been found that the QF time exponentially decreases when the reaction Coulomb factor Z1Z2 increases.

  2. Fission barriers for Po nuclei produced in complete fusion reactions with heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sagaidak, R. N.; Andreyev, A. N.

    2009-05-15

    Evaporation residues and fission excitation functions obtained in complete fusion reactions leading to Po compound nuclei have been analyzed in the framework of the standard statistical model. Macroscopic fission barriers deduced from the cross-section data analysis are compared with the predictions of various theoretical models and available data. A drop in the Po barriers with the decrease in a neutron number was found, which is stronger than predicted by any theory. The presence of entrance channel effects and collective excitations in the compound nucleus decay is considered as a possible reason for the barrier reduction.

  3. Importance of lifetime effects in breakup and suppression of complete fusion in reactions of weakly bound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K. J.; Simpson, E. C.; Luong, D. H.; Kalkal, Sunil; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    Background: Complete fusion cross sections in collisions of light weakly bound nuclei and high-Z targets show suppression of complete fusion at above-barrier energies. This has been interpreted as resulting from the breakup of the weakly bound nucleus prior to reaching the fusion barrier, reducing the probability of complete charge capture. Below-barrier studies of reactions of 9Be have found that the breakup of 8Be formed by neutron stripping dominates over direct breakup and that transfer-triggered breakup may account for the observed suppression of complete fusion. Purpose: This paper investigates how the above conclusions are affected by lifetimes of the resonant states that are populated prior to breakup. If the mean life of a populated resonance (above the breakup threshold) is much longer than the fusion time scale, then its breakup (decay) cannot suppress complete fusion. For short-lived resonances, the situation is more complex. This work explicitly includes the mean life of the short-lived 2+ resonance in 8Be in classical dynamical model calculations to determine its effect on energy and angular correlations of the breakup fragments and on model predictions of suppression of cross sections for complete fusion at above-barrier energies. Method: Previously performed coincidence measurements of breakup fragments produced in reactions of 9Be with 144Sm, 168Er, 186W, 196Pt, 208Pb, and 209Bi at energies below the barrier have been reanalyzed using an improved efficiency determination of the BALiN detector array. Predictions of breakup observables and of complete and incomplete fusion at energies above the fusion barrier are then made using the classical dynamical simulation code platypus, modified to include the effect of lifetimes of resonant states. Results: The agreement of the breakup observables is much improved when lifetime effects are included explicitly. Sensitivity to subzeptosecond lifetime is observed. The predicted suppression of complete fusion

  4. Hot fusion or cold fusion, best route to the SHEs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveland, Walter

    2010-02-01

    Elements 102-113 have been synthesized using cold fusion reactions (Pb or Bi target nuclei, massive projectiles., E*=13 MeV, high survival probabilities,significant fusion hindrance). The production cross sections decrease with increasing ZCN with a cross section of 27 fb being measured for element 113. Synthesis of elements 102-108 by hot fusion reactions (actinide target nuclei, intermediate mass projectiles, E*=30-50 MeV, low survival probability, small fusion hindrance) shows decreasing production cross sections for Z=102 to Z=108 and then the cross sections level out at a few pb out to Z=118. Upper limit cross sections for the production of Z=120 nuclei in hot fusion reactions are ˜ 0.1 pb. How should one go forward to make nuclei with Z > 120 or with large neutron numbers, N ˜ 184? The cross section for the production of an evaporation residue, σEVR, is σEVR=σCNWsur where σCN is the complete fusion cross section and Wsur is the survival probability of the completely fused system. The complete fusion cross section can be written as σCN=∑J=0^J σcapture (Ec.m.,J)PCN( Ec.m.,J) where σcapture(Ec.m.,J) is the capture cross section and PCN is the probability that the projectile-target system will evolve inside the fission saddle point to form a completely fused system rather than reseparating (quasifission). I have used this formalism to make estimates of the best reactions to make new heavy nuclei using stable and radioactive beams. I conclude that stable beams offer the best opportunities to make new chemical elements and that radioactive beams offer new opportunities to make nuclei to study the atomic physics and chemistry of the heaviest elements. The radioactive beam reactions involve the light neutron-rich projectiles interacting in hot fusion reactions. If time permits I will also discuss recent experiments to make heavy nuclei using multi-nucleon transfer reactions. )

  5. Hindrance of complete fusion in the {sup 8}Li+{sup 208}Pb system at above-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, E. F.; Martinez-Quiroz, E.; Rosales, P.; Kolata, J. J.; DeYoung, P. A.; Peaslee, G. F.; Mears, P.; Guess, C.; Becchetti, F. D.; Lupton, J. H.; Chen, Yu

    2009-10-15

    The {sup 211,212}At yields resulting from the interaction of the radioactive projectile {sup 8}Li with a {sup 208}Pb target have been measured at energies between 3 and 8.5 MeV above the Coulomb barrier. They are signatures for fusion of the whole charge but not necessarily the whole mass of the projectile, so they are included in a corresponding operational definition of complete fusion. Within this definition, a fusion suppression factor of 0.70{+-}0.02 (stat.) {+-}0.04 (syst.) is deduced from a comparison to a one-dimensional barrier-penetration-model calculation using parameters extrapolated from values for {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 209}Bi and {sup 9}Be+{sup 208}Pb taken from the literature. Possible incomplete fusion processes are discussed and the results are fitted with a phenomenological model assuming breakup prior to fusion followed by capture of a {sup 7}Li fragment.

  6. Transfer-type products accompanying cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V.

    2005-12-15

    Production of nuclei heavier than the target is treated for projectile-target combinations used in cold fusion reactions leading to superheavy nuclei. These products are related to transfer-type or to asymmetry-exit-channel quasifission reactions. The production of isotopes in the transfer-type reactions emitting of {alpha} particles with large energies is discussed.

  7. Real-time detection of undersea mines: a complete screening and acoustic fusion processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacramone, Anthony; Desai, Mukund N.

    1999-08-01

    A complete mine detection/classification (D/C) system has been specified and implemented, which runs in real-time, and has been exercised on the latest available dual-frequency side-scan sonar acoustic image sets. The compete DC system is comprised of a collection of algorithms that has been developed and evolved at Draper Laboratory over the past decade. The detection process consists of image normalization, enhancement, segmentation, and feature extraction algorithms. The enhancement algorithm is a variant of a Markov Random Field based anomaly screener developed in FY-94. The feature that were extracted were those derived in FY-93. A distance constrained matching algorithm, which was developed in FY-95, is used to generate a list of high and low frequency fused tokens. The classification process involves the evaluation of a hierarchy of three multi-layer perceptron neural networks: HF, LF, and HF/LF fused. Research performed in FY-95 also concentrated on the development of several variants of information fusion with hierarchical neural networks. The 'discriminant-combining' variant of fusion was selected as part of this DC system. In addition, a classification post- processing and decision node statistic modification step, which was developed in FY-96, was included. This paper will describe the algorithm that were implemented. However, the emphasis will be on the performance results of processing the latest available side-scan imagery, comparison of single sensor vs dual-frequency sensor results, and the issues that were encountered while exercising the DC system on the new data set.

  8. Negligible suppression of the complete fusion of Li,76 on light targets, at energies above the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, M. F.; Zhang, G. L.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Ferioli, E.

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by a recent work performed at Australian National University by S. Kalkal et al. [Phys. Rev. C 93, 044605 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevC.93.044605] on breakup and its time scale, where it was shown that the prompt (or near-target) breakup of Li,76 is almost negligible and consequently the near-barrier complete fusion cross section induced by these weakly bound Li isotopes on light targets should not be suppressed by the breakup, as it is for heavier targets, we estimated the contributions of complete and incomplete fusion in the measured total fusions for several light systems available in the literature. The chosen systems were those for which the fusion cross sections had been measured using the γ -ray spectroscopy method and all evaporation channel cross sections were reported. For the estimation, we used, apart from the data, the predictions of the evaporation code cascade. The results show that, indeed, the complete fusion suppression is negligible for such systems at energies slightly above the barrier, in agreement with the above-mentioned recent measurements of breakup time scales.

  9. Investigation of complete and incomplete fusion dynamics of {sup 20}Ne induced reactions at energies above the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Ali, R.; Kumar, Harish; Ansari, M. Afzal; Rashid, M. H.; Guin, R.

    2014-08-14

    Experiment has been performed to explore the complete and incomplete fusion dynamics in heavy ion collisions using stacked foil activation technique. The measurement of excitation functions of the evaporation residues produced in the {sup 20}Ne+{sup 165}Ho system at projectile energies ranges ≈ 4-8 MeV/nucleon have been done. Measured cumulative and direct cross-sections have been compared with the theoretical model code PACE-2, which takes into account only the complete fusion process. The analysis indicates the presence of contributions from incomplete fusion processes in some α-emission channels following the break-up of the projectile {sup 20}Ne in the nuclear field of the target nucleus {sup 165}Ho.

  10. Possibilities of production of neutron-deficient isotopes of U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Cf in complete fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Zubov, A. S.; Scheid, W.

    2008-10-15

    Within the dinuclear system model we analyze the production of yet unknown neutron-deficient isotopes of U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Cf in various complete fusion reactions. Different deexcitation channels of the excited compound nucleus are treated. The results are obtained without special adjustment to the selected evaporation channel. The fusion probability is an important ingredient of the excitation function. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The alpha decay half-life times in the neutron-deficient actinides are discussed.

  11. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  12. The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

    2008-12-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion

  13. Possibilities of synthesis of unknown isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers Z > 108 in asymmetric actinide-based complete fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Juhee; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2016-10-01

    The possibilities of production of new isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers Z = 109-114 in various asymmetric hot fusion reactions are studied for the first time. The excitation functions of the formation of these isotopes in the xn evaporation channels are predicted and the optimal conditions for the synthesis are proposed. The products of the suggested reactions can fill a gap of unknown isotopes between the isotopes of the heaviest nuclei obtained in cold and hot complete fusion reactions.

  14. Complete and incomplete fusion reactions in the {sup 16}O+{sup 169}Tm system: Excitation functions and recoil range distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Sharma, B.K.; Singh, B.P.; Prasad, R.; Bhardwaj, H.D.; Kumar, Rakesh; Golda, K.S.

    2004-10-01

    With the view to study complete and incomplete fusion in heavy ion induced reactions, experiments have been carried out for measuring excitation functions for several reactions in the system {sup 16}O+{sup 169}Tm at energies near the Coulomb barrier to well above it, using an activation technique. The measured excitation functions have been compared with those calculated theoretically using three different computer codes viz., ALICE-91, CASCADE and PACE2. The enhancement of experimentally measured cross sections for alpha emission channels over their theoretical prediction has been attributed to the fact that these residues are formed not only by complete fusion but also through incomplete fusion. In order to separate out the relative contributions of complete and incomplete fusion, the recoil range distributions of eight residues produced in the interaction of {sup 16}O with {sup 169}Tm at {approx_equal}87 MeV have been measured. The recoil range distributions indicate significant contributions from incomplete fusion at {approx_equal}87 MeV for some of the channels.

  15. Strong evidence for quasifission in asymmetric reactions forming {sup 202}Po

    SciTech Connect

    Rafiei, R.; Thomas, R. G.; Hinde, D. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Morton, C. R.; Gasques, L. R.; Brown, M. L.; Rodriguez, M. D.

    2008-02-15

    Fission fragment mass-angle correlations and mass ratio distributions have been measured for the reactions {sup 16}O+{sup 186}Os, {sup 24}Mg+{sup 178}Hf, {sup 34}S+{sup 168}Er, and {sup 48}Ti+{sup 154}Sm, forming the {sup 202}Po composite nucleus, at near barrier energies. Systematic analysis based on the expected dependence of the variance of the mass distribution on the angular momentum and temperature of the compound nucleus indicate that the two lighter systems evolve through true compound nucleus fission. Evidence of quasifission was observed for the two most mass-symmetric reactions, through strong mass-angle correlations for the {sup 48}Ti+{sup 154}Sm reaction and a broadened mass ratio distribution for the {sup 34}S+{sup 168}Er reaction. Furthermore, the increase in mass width at near barrier energies shows the influence of the alignment of statically deformed target nuclei.

  16. Cross section systematics for the lightest Bi and Po nuclei produced in complete fusion reactions with heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A.N.; Ackermann, D.; Muenzenberg, G.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Streicher, B.; Darby, I.G.; Page, R.D.; Wiseman, D.R.; Franchoo, S.; Hessberger, F.P.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Lommel, B.; Kindler, B.; Mann, R.; Sulignano, B.; Hofmann, S.; Huyse, M.; Vel, K. van de; Duppen, P. van

    2005-07-01

    The production of the very neutron-deficient nuclides {sup 184-192}Bi and {sup 186-192}Po in the vicinity of the neutron midshell at N = 104 has been studied by using heavy-ion-induced complete fusion reactions in a series of experiments at the velocity filter SHIP. The cross sections for the xn and pxn evaporation channels of the {sup 46}Ti+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 190}Po*,{sup 98}Mo+{sup 92}Mo{yields}{sup 190}Po*,{sup 50,52}Cr+{sup 142}Nd{yields}{sup 192,194}Po*, and {sup 94,95}Mo+{sup 93}Nb{yields}{sup 187,188}Bi* reactions were measured. The results obtained, together with the previously known cross section data for the heavier Bi and Po nuclides, are compared with the results of statistical model calculations carried out with the HIVAP code. It is shown that a satisfactory description of the experimental data requires a significant (up to 35%) reduction of the theoretical fission barriers. The optimal reactions for production of the lightest Bi and Po isotopes are discussed.

  17. Projectile influence on production cross section for ^48Ca-, ^50Ti-, and ^54Cr- induced fusion-evaporation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorov, D. A.; Werke, T. A.; Alfonso, M. C.; Bennett, M. E.; Folden, C. M., III

    2013-04-01

    Evaporation residue excitation functions for ^48Ca, ^50Ti + ^159Tb and ^48Ca, ^54Cr + ^162 Dy were measured at Texas A&M University using the vacuum spectrometer MARS. The produced residues are weakly deformed nuclei near the N = 126 shell closure. However, the production cross sections are insensitive to the associated shell stabilization to the fission barrier, an observation previously reported in literature. The ratio of maximum production cross sections between the ^48Ca/^50Ti and ^48Ca/^54Cr reactions is 47 and 7100, respectively. These substantial differences can be reproduced in theoretical calculations by inclusion of collective enhancements during de-excitation of the compound nucleus. The competition between quasifission and complete fusion further contributes to the observed separation in the excitation functions. Model-dependent estimates of the compound nucleus formation probability, PCN, yield ratios of PCN(^48Ca + ^159 Tb) / PCN(^50Ti + ^159 Tb) 2.5 and PCN(^48Ca + ^162Dy) / PCN(^54Cr + ^162Dy) 5. Heavy-ion fusion reactions with ^48Ca, ^50Ti, and ^54Cr projectiles are of interest due to modern-day efforts to synthesize superheavy elements 119 and 120 in warm fusion reactions with projectiles having Z 20.

  18. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  19. Complete and incomplete fusion and emission of preequilibrium nucleons in the interaction of [sup 12]C with [sup 197]Au below 10 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Vergani, P.; Gadioli, E.; Vaciago, E.; Fabrici, E.; Gadioli Erba, E.; Galmarini, M. ); Ciavola, G.; Marchetta, C. )

    1993-10-01

    The excitation functions for production of nineteen isotopes of At, Po, Bi, Pb, and Tl in the interaction of [sup 12]C with [sup 197]Au between 57 and 97 MeV incident energy have been measured with the activation technique. The analysis of these data allows one to estimate the cross sections for complete fusion of [sup 12]C and incomplete fusion of [sup 8]Be and [alpha] fragments with gold, and shows the presence of preequilibrium emissions at incident energies only slightly higher than the Coulomb barrier acting between [sup 12]C and [sup 197]Au.

  20. Compound nucleus formation probability PCN determined within the dynamical cluster-decay model for various "hot" fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Arshdeep; Chopra, Sahila; Gupta, Raj K.

    2014-08-01

    The compound nucleus (CN) fusion/formation probability PCN is defined and its detailed variations with the CN excitation energy E*, center-of-mass energy Ec .m., fissility parameter χ, CN mass number ACN, and Coulomb interaction parameter Z1Z2 are studied for the first time within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM). The model is a nonstatistical description of the decay of a CN to all possible processes. The (total) fusion cross section σfusion is the sum of the CN and noncompound nucleus (nCN) decay cross sections, each calculated as the dynamical fragmentation process. The CN cross section σCN is constituted of evaporation residues and fusion-fission, including intermediate-mass fragments, each calculated for all contributing decay fragments (A1, A2) in terms of their formation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P. The nCN cross section σnCN is determined as the quasi-fission (qf) process, where P0=1 and P is calculated for the entrance-channel nuclei. The DCM, with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included in it, is used to study the PCN for about a dozen "hot" fusion reactions forming a CN of mass number A ˜100 to superheavy nuclei and for various different nuclear interaction potentials. Interesting results are that PCN=1 for complete fusion, but PCN<1 or PCN≪1 due to the nCN contribution, depending strongly on different parameters of the entrance-channel reaction but found to be independent of the nuclear interaction potentials used.

  1. Effect of breakup and transfer on complete and incomplete fusion in 6Li+209Bi reaction in multi-body classical molecular dynamics calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morker, Mitul R.; Godre, Subodh S.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of breakup and transfer in 6Li+209Bi reaction is studied in a multi-body classical molecular dynamics approach in which the weakly-bound projectile 6Li is constructed as a 2-body cluster of 4He and 2H in a configuration corresponding to the observed breakup energy. This 3-body system with their individual nucleon configuration in their ground state is dynamically evolved with given initial conditions using Classical Rigid Body Dynamics (CRBD) approach up to distances close to the barrier when the rigid-body constraint on the target, inter-fragment distance, and 2H itself are relaxed, allowing for possible breakup of 2H which may result in incomplete fusion following the transfer of the n or p. Relative probabilities of the possible events such as scattering with and without breakup, DCF, SCF, ICF(x) where x may be 4He, 2H, 4He+n, 4He+p, n, p are calculated. Comparison of the calculated event-probabilities, complete, and incomplete fusion cross sections with the calculation in which 2H is kept rigid demonstrates the effect of the transfer reactions on complete and incomplete fusion in the 4-body reaction. Events ICF(4He+n) corresponding to nstripping followed by breakup of the resultant 5Li to 4He+p are found to contribute significantly in the fusion process in agreement with a recent experimental observation of direct reaction processes in breakup of weakly-bound projectiles.

  2. Constitutively active IRF7/IRF3 fusion protein completely protects swine against Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most devastating livestock diseases around the world. Several serotype specific vaccine formulations exist but require about 5-7 days to induce protective immunity. Our previous studies have shown that a constitutively active fusion protein of porcine ...

  3. How the projectile neutron number influences the evaporation cross section in complete fusion reactions with heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chengbin; Zhang Jinjuan; Ren, Z. Z.; Shen, C. W.

    2010-11-15

    The influence of the projectile neutron number on the evaporation residue cross sections for the reactions {sup 208}Pb({sup 52,54}Cr,n,2n){sup 258-261}Sg and {sup 208}Pb({sup 48,50}Ti,n,2n){sup 254-257}Rf has been studied within the framework of a fusion-fission statistical model. The results obtained with the kewpie2 code are compared with recent experimental data. The excitation functions represent the experimental results well both in the maximum value and the lactation of the peak. The calculations show that the projectile neutron number greatly influences both the capture cross section and the fusion probability.

  4. Enhancement and Suppression of Fusion in Reactions Forming Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hinde, D. J.

    2006-08-14

    A new framework for comparing fusion probabilities in reactions forming heavy elements is presented, that eliminates both theoretical and experimental uncertainties, and gives new insights into systematic behavior. This should help in predicting favorable reactions to form new heavy nuclei. The framework is firstly applied to the formation of isotopes of Thorium, where it is found that production yields follow a simple systematic behavior. The data consistently show that fusion is inhibited (presumably by quasi-fission) by about a factor of 10 for projectiles ranging from Ar to Sn, with little dependence on shell structure in the projectile, target or compound nuclei. Application to formation of isotopes of Nobelium shows much more drastic changes in fusion probability as a function of entrance-channel conditions.

  5. Time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations for multinucleon transfer and quasifission processes in the 238U+64Ni reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekizawa, Kazuyuki; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Background: Multinucleon transfer (MNT) and quasifission (QF) processes are dominant processes in low-energy collisions of two heavy nuclei. They are expected to be useful to produce neutron-rich unstable nuclei. Nuclear dynamics leading to these processes depends sensitively on nuclear properties such as deformation and shell structure. Purpose: We elucidate reaction mechanisms of MNT and QF processes involving heavy deformed nuclei, making detailed comparisons between microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations and measurements for the 238U+64Ni reaction. Methods: Three-dimensional Skyrme-TDHF calculations are performed. Particle-number projection method is used to evaluate MNT cross sections from the TDHF wave function after collision. Results: Fragment masses, total kinetic energy (TKE), scattering angle, contact time, and MNT cross sections are investigated for the 238U+64Ni reaction. They show reasonable agreements with measurements. At small impact parameters, collision dynamics depends sensitively on the orientation of deformed 238U. In tip (side) collisions, we find a larger (smaller) TKE and a shorter (longer) contact time. In tip collisions, we find a strong influence of quantum shells around 208Pb. Conclusions: It is confirmed that the TDHF calculations reasonably describe both MNT and QF processes in the 238U64Ni reaction. Analyses of this system indicate the significance of the nuclear structure effects such as deformation and quantum shells in nuclear reaction dynamics at low energies.

  6. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  7. Inertial fusion commercial power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, B. Grant

    1994-09-01

    This presentation discusses the motivation for inertial fusion energy, a brief synopsis of five recently-completed inertial fusion power plant designs, some general conclusions drawn from these studies, and an exmaple of an IEE hydrogen synfuel plant to suggest that future fusion studies consider broadening fusion use to low-emission fuels production as well as electricity.

  8. Observation of the 3n evaporation channel in the complete hot-fusion reaction 26Mg + 248Cm leading to the new superheavy nuclide 271Hs.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, J; Brüchle, W; Chelnokov, M; Düllmann, Ch E; Dvorakova, Z; Eberhardt, K; Jäger, E; Krücken, R; Kuznetsov, A; Nagame, Y; Nebel, F; Nishio, K; Perego, R; Qin, Z; Schädel, M; Schausten, B; Schimpf, E; Schuber, R; Semchenkov, A; Thörle, P; Türler, A; Wegrzecki, M; Wierczinski, B; Yakushev, A; Yeremin, A

    2008-04-01

    The analysis of a large body of heavy ion fusion reaction data with medium-heavy projectiles (6 < or = Z < or = 18) and actinide targets suggests a disappearance of the 3n exit channel with increasing atomic number of the projectile. Here, we report a measurement of the excitation function of the reaction (248)Cm ((26)Mg,xn)(274-x)Hs and the observation of the new nuclide (271)Hs produced in the 3n evaporation channel at a beam energy well below the Bass fusion barrier with a cross section comparable to the maxima of the 4n and 5n channels. This indicates the possible discovery of new neutron-rich transactinide nuclei using relatively light heavy ion beams of the most neutron-rich stable isotopes and actinide targets. PMID:18517941

  9. Fusion of mature HIV-1 particles leads to complete release of a gag-GFP-based content marker and raises the intraviral pH.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Marin, Mariana; Gahlaut, Nivriti; Suter, Rolf; Kondo, Naoyuki; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2013-01-01

    By imaging the release of a GFP-based viral content marker produced upon virus maturation, we have previously found that HIV-1 fuses with endosomes. In contrast, fusion at the cell surface did not progress beyond a lipid mixing stage (hemifusion). However, recent evidence suggesting that free GFP can be trapped within the mature HIV-1 capsid raises concerns that this content marker may not be released immediately after the formation of a fusion pore. To determine whether a significant portion of GFP is trapped in the mature capsid, we first permeabilized the viral membrane with saponin. The overwhelming majority of pseudoviruses fully released GFP while the remaining particles exhibited partial loss or no loss of content. The extent of GFP release correlated with HIV-1 maturation, implying that incomplete Gag processing, but not GFP entrapment by mature capsids, causes partial content release. Next, we designed a complementary assay for visualizing pore formation by monitoring the intraviral pH with an additional pH-sensitive fluorescent marker. The loss of GFP through saponin-mediated pores was associated with a concomitant increase in the intraviral pH due to equilibration with the pH of an external buffer. We next imaged single HIV-cell fusion and found that these events were manifested in a highly correlated loss of content and increase in the intraviral pH, as it equilibrated with the cytosolic pH. Fused or saponin-permeabilized pseudoviruses that partially lost GFP did not release the remaining content marker under conditions expected to promote the capsid dissociation. We were thus unable to detect significant entrapment of GFP by the mature HIV-1 capsid. Together, our results validate the use of the GFP-based content marker for imaging single virus fusion and inferring the sites of HIV-1 entry.

  10. Effects of nuclear orientation on fusion and fission process for reactions using actinide target nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nishinaka, I.; Makii, H.; Nagame, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohtsuki, T.; Hirose, K.; Hofmann, S.

    2010-04-30

    Fission fragment mass distributions in the reaction of {sup 30}Si+{sup 238}U were measured at the energies around the Coulomb barrier. At the above-barrier energies, the mass distribution showed Gaussian shape. At the sub-barrier energies, triple-humped distribution was observed, which consists of symmetric fission and asymmetric fission peaked at A{sub L}/A{sub H}approx =90/178. The asymmetric fission should be attributed to quasifission from the results of the measured evaporation residue (ER) cross-sections produced by {sup 30}Si+{sup 238}U. The cross-section for {sup 263}Sg at the above-barrier energy agree with the statistical model calculation which assumes that the measured fission cross-sections are equal to the fusion cross-sections, whereas the one for {sup 264}Sg measured at the sub-barrier energy is smaller than the calculation, indicating the presence for quasifission. We also report the results on the fragment mass distributions for {sup 36,34}S+{sup 238}U and {sup 40}Ar+{sup 238}U.

  11. Low-Energy Fusion-Fission Dynamics of Heavy Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, Valery; Greiner, Walter

    2006-08-14

    A new approach is proposed for a unified description of strongly coupled deep-inelastic (DI) scattering, fusion, fission, and quasi-fission (QF) processes of heavy ion collisions. A unified driving-potential and a unified set of dynamic Langevin-type equations of motion are used in this approach. This makes it possible to perform a full (continuous) time analysis of the evolution of heavy nuclear systems, starting from the approaching stage, moving up to the formation of the compound nucleus or emerging into two final fragments. The calculated mass, charge, energy and angular distributions of the reaction products agree well with the corresponding experimental data for heavy and superheavy nuclear systems. Collisions of very heavy nuclei (such as 238U+248Cm) are investigated as an alternative way for production of superheavy elements. Large charge and mass transfer was found in these reactions due to the inverse (anti-symmetrizing) quasi-fission process leading to formation of surviving superheavy long-lived neutron-rich nuclei.

  12. Big fusion, little fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Frank; ddtuttle

    2016-08-01

    In reply to correspondence from George Scott and Adam Costley about the Physics World focus issue on nuclear energy, and to news of construction delays at ITER, the fusion reactor being built in France.

  13. Persistent Suppression of Type 1 Diabetes by a Multicomponent Vaccine Containing a Cholera Toxin B Subunit-Autoantigen Fusion Protein and Complete Freund's Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Dénes, Béla; Fodor, István; Langridge, William H. R.

    2013-01-01

    Data presented here demonstrate multifunctional vaccination strategies that harness vaccinia virus mediated delivery of a gene encoding an immunoenhanced diabetes autoantigen in combination with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) that can maintain safe and durable immunologic homeostasis in NOD mice. Systemic coinoculation of prediabetic mice with recombinant vaccinia virus rVV-CTB::GAD and undiluted or 10-fold diluted CFA demonstrated a significant decrease in hyperglycemia and pancreatic islet inflammation in comparison with control animals during 17–61 and 17–105 weeks of age, respectively. Synergy in these beneficial effects was observed during 43–61 and 61–105 wks of age, respectively. Inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in GAD-stimulated splenocytes isolated from vaccinated mice were generally lower than those detected in unvaccinated mice. The overall health and humoral immune responses of the vaccinated animals remained normal throughout the duration of the experiments. PMID:24319466

  14. Effects of nuclear orientation on fusion and fission process for reactions using {sup 238}U target nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nishinaka, I.; Makii, H.; Nagame, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohtsuki, T.; Hirose, K.; Hofmann, S.

    2010-06-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions in the reaction of {sup 30}Si+{sup 238}U were measured at the energies around the Coulomb barrier. At the above-barrier energies, the mass distribution showed Gaussian shape. At the sub-barrier energies, asymmetric fission mode peaked at A{sub L}/A{sub H}approx =90/178 was observed. The asymmetric fission should be attributed to quasifission from the results of the measured evaporation residue (ER) cross-sections produced by {sup 30}Si+{sup 238}U. The cross-section for {sup 263}Sg at the above-barrier energy agree with the statistical model calculation which assumes that the measured fission cross-sections are equal to the fusion cross-sections, whereas the one for {sup 264}Sg measured at the sub-barrier energy is smaller than the calculation, indicating the presence for quasifission. The fragment mass distributions are compared to those for {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U and {sup 40}Ar+{sup 238}U.

  15. Shell Effects in Fusion-Fission of Heavy and Superheavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis, M. G.; Bogatchev, A. A.; Itkis, I. M.; Jandel, M.; Kliman, J.; Kniajeva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Korzyukov, I. V.; Kozulin, E. M.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Prokhorova, E. V.; Voskresenski, V. M.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Corradi, L.; Gadea, A.; Latina, L.; Stefanini, A. M.; Szilner, S.; Trotta, M.; Vinodkumar, A. M.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Äystö, J.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Rubchenya, V. A.; Trzaska, W. H.; Vakhtin, D. N.; Goverdovski, A. A.; Hanappe, F.; Materna, T.; Dorvaux, O.; Rowley, N.; Stuttge, L.; Giardina, G.

    2003-07-01

    The process of fusion-fission of heavy and superheavy nuclei with Z=82-122 formed in the reactions with 48Ca, 58Fe and 64Ni ions at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier has been studied. The experiments were carried out at the U-400 accelerator of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (JINR, Russia), the XTU Tandem accelerator of the National Laboratory of Legnaro (LNL, Italy ) and the Accelerator of the Laboratory of University of Jyväskylä (JYFL, Finland) using the time-of-flight spectrometer of fission fragments CORSET[1] and the neutron multi-detector DEMON[2,3]. As a result of the experiments, mass and energy distributions (MED) of fission fragments, cross-sections of fission, quasi-fission and evaporation residues, multiplicities of neutrons and γ-quanta and their dependence on the mechanism of formation and decay of compound systems have been studied.

  16. Charged particle decay of hot and rotating 88Mo nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdré, S.; Piantelli, S.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Carboni, S.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Morelli, L.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Chbihi, A.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Fornal, B.; Giaz, A.; Krzysiek, M.; Leoni, S.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazumdar, I.; MÈ©czyński, W.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Myalski, S.; Nicolini, R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Prete, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Styczeń, J.; Szpak, B.; Wasilewska, B.; Wieland, O.; Wieleczko, J. P.; ZiÈ©bliński, M.

    2016-03-01

    A study of fusion-evaporation and (partly) fusion-fission channels for the 88Mo compound nucleus, produced at different excitation energies in the reaction 48Ti+40Ca at 300, 450, and 600 MeV beam energies, is presented. Fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission cross sections have been extracted and compared with the existing systematics. Experimental data concerning light charged particles have been compared with the prediction of the statistical model in its implementation in the gemini++ code, well suited even for high spin systems, in order to tune the main model parameters in a mass region not abundantly covered by exclusive experimental data. Multiplicities for light charged particles emitted in fusion evaporation events are also presented. Some discrepancies with respect to the prediction of the statistical model have been found for forward emitted α particles; they may be due both to pre-equilibrium emission and to reaction channels (such as deep inelastic collisions or quasifission/quasifusion) different from the compound nucleus formation.

  17. Nuclear Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, G.

    This chapter is devoted to the fundamental concepts of nuclear fusion. To be more precise, it is devoted to the theoretical basics of fusion reactions between light nuclei such as hydrogen, helium, boron, and lithium. The discussion is limited because our purpose is to focus on laboratory-scale fusion experiments that aim at gaining energy from the fusion process. After discussing the methods of calculating the fusion cross section, it will be shown that sustained fusion reactions with energy gain must happen in a thermal medium because, in beam-target experiments, the energy of the beam is randomized faster than the fusion rate. Following a brief introduction to the elements of plasma physics, the chapter is concluded with the introduction of the most prominent fusion reactions ongoing in the Sun.

  18. Fusion Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Schmidt

    2002-02-20

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans.

  19. Image fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: a system overview of the basic components of a system designed to improve the ability of a pilot to fly through low-visibility conditions such as fog; the role of visual sciences; fusion issues; sensor characterization; sources of information; image processing; and image fusion.

  20. Incomplete fusion dynamics by spin distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Ali, R.; Ansari, M. Afzal; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, M. K.; Singh, B. P.; Babu, K. Surendra; Sinha, Rishi K.; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2010-02-15

    Spin distributions for various evaporation residues populated via complete and incomplete fusion of {sup 16}O with {sup 124}Sn at 6.3 MeV/nucleon have been measured, using charged particles (Z=1,2)-{gamma} coincidence technique. Experimentally measured spin distributions of the residues produced as incomplete fusion products associated with 'fast'{alpha}- and 2{alpha}-emission channels observed in the 'forward cone' are found to be distinctly different from those of the residues produced as complete fusion products. Moreover, 'fast'{alpha}-particles that arise from larger angular momentum in the entrance channel are populated at relatively higher driving input angular momentum than those produced through complete fusion. The incomplete fusion residues are populated in a limited, higher-angular-momentum range, in contrast to the complete fusion products, which are populated over a broad spin range.

  1. OCULUS Sea Track Fusion Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotou, Stylianos C.; Rizogiannis, Constantinos; Katsoulis, Stavros; Lampropoulos, Vassilis; Kanellopoulos, Sotirios; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2015-06-01

    Oculus Sea is a complete solution regarding maritime surveillance and communications at Local as well as Central Command and Control level. It includes a robust and independent track fusion service whose main functions include: 1) Interaction with the User to suggest the fusion of two or more tracks, confirm Track ID and Vessel Metadata creation for the fused track, and suggest de-association of two tracks 2) Fusion of same vessel tracks arriving simultaneously from multiple radar sensors featuring track Association, track Fusion of associated tracks to produce a more accurate track, and Multiple tracking filters and fusion algorithms 3) Unique Track ID Generator for each fused track 4) Track Dissemination Service. Oculus Sea Track Fusion Service adopts a system architecture where each sensor is associated with a Kalman estimator/tracker that obtains an estimate of the state vector and its respective error covariance matrix. Finally, at the fusion center, association and track state estimation fusion are carried out. The expected benefits of this system include multi-sensor information fusion, enhanced spatial resolution, and improved target detection.

  2. Fusion Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingee, David A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the extraordinary potential, the technical difficulties, and the financial problems that are associated with research and development of fusion power plants as a major source of energy. (GA)

  3. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  4. Observation of the 3n Evaporation Channel in the Complete Hot-Fusion Reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm Leading to the New Superheavy Nuclide {sup 271}Hs

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, J.; Dvorakova, Z.; Kruecken, R.; Nebel, F.; Perego, R.; Schuber, R.; Tuerler, A.; Wierczinski, B.; Yakushev, A.; Bruechle, W.; Jaeger, E.; Schaedel, M.; Schausten, B.; Schimpf, E.; Chelnokov, M.; Kuznetsov, A.; Yeremin, A.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Nagame, Y.

    2008-04-04

    The analysis of a large body of heavy ion fusion reaction data with medium-heavy projectiles (6{<=}Z{<=}18) and actinide targets suggests a disappearance of the 3n exit channel with increasing atomic number of the projectile. Here, we report a measurement of the excitation function of the reaction {sup 248}Cm({sup 26}Mg,xn){sup 274-x}Hs and the observation of the new nuclide {sup 271}Hs produced in the 3n evaporation channel at a beam energy well below the Bass fusion barrier with a cross section comparable to the maxima of the 4n and 5n channels. This indicates the possible discovery of new neutron-rich transactinide nuclei using relatively light heavy ion beams of the most neutron-rich stable isotopes and actinide targets.

  5. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  6. Mass Producing Targets for Nuclear Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Kendall, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Metal-encapsulating technique advances prospects of controlling nuclear fusion. Prefilled fusion targets form at nozzle as molten metal such as tin flows through outer channel and pressurized deuterium/tritium gas flows through inner channel. Molten metal completely encloses gas charge as it drops off nozzle.

  7. National Ignition Facility for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Paisner, J.A.; Murray, J.R.

    1997-10-08

    The National Ignition Facility for inertial confinement fusion will contain a 1.8 MJ, 500 TW frequency-tripled neodymium glass laser system that will be used to explore fusion ignition and other problems in the physics of high temperature and density. We describe the facility briefly. The NIF is scheduled to be completed in 2003.

  8. Protoplast Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Hara, Yasuhiro; Katagi, Hiroaki; Senda, Mitsugi

    1980-01-01

    The relation between the composition of the phospholipid molecular species in a cell membrane and the velocity of protoplast fusion was studied using cells cultured at a low temperature (10 C). Cells cultured at a low temperature contained larger proportions of phospholipids of low phase transition point, the 1,2-dilinoleoyl-type, than those cultured at a normal temperature (25 C). When treated with polyethylene glycol 6000, protoplasts from cells cultured at 10 C fused and progressed to the fused sphere stage more rapidly than did those from cells cultured at 25 C. PMID:16661339

  9. Splenogonadal fusion.

    PubMed

    Tsingoglou, S; Wilkinson, A W

    1976-04-01

    The fusion between splenic tissue and the left gonad or the derivatives of the left mesonephros is a rare congenital anomaly first described in detail by Pommer in 1887/9 and divided into two forms by Putschar and Manion in 1956. In the first or continuous type a cord of splenic or fibrous tissue connects the spleen and the gonadalmesonephric structures. In the second type the fused splenomesonephric structures have lost continuity with the main spleen. An example of the continuous form is presented and the previous reports are briefly reviewed.

  10. Is Fusion Inhibited for Weakly Bound Nuclei?

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, J.; Munhoz, M.; Szanto, E.M.; Carlin, N.; Added, N.; Suaide, A.A.; de Moura, M.M.; Liguori Neto, R.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Canto, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    Complete fusion of light radioactive nuclei is predicted to be hindered at near-barrier energies. This feature is investigated in the case of the least bound stable nuclei. Evaporation residues resulting from the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 9}Be and {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 12}C fusion reactions have been measured in order to study common features in reactions involving light weakly bound nuclei. The experimental excitation functions revealed that the fusion cross section is significantly smaller than the total reaction cross section and also smaller than the fusion cross section expected from the available systematics. A clear correlation between the fusion probability and nucleon (cluster) separation energy has been established.The results suggest that the breakup process has a strong influence on the hindrance of the fusion cross section. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Feature fusion based on Wootters metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Weimin; Chen, Aihong; Gong, Zhaozhe

    2016-10-01

    For further enhancing the completeness and conciseness of the existing quantum-inspired feature fusion methods, this paper applies the quantum-related theories of Wootters metric and Fisher linear discriminant to dimension reduction and feature fusion. From the perspective of quantum metric spaces, i.e. phase space and probability space, this paper proposes two different feature fusion methods which take the Wootters statistical distance as the key factor to detect and fuse the duplicate feature data, and are different to the already developed quantum-inspired feature fusion methods. The experimental results reflect the superiority of the proposed feature fusion methods based on the Wootters metric for their better performances on relative completeness and conciseness.

  12. Mirror Fusion Test Facility magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, J.H.; Kozman, T.A.; Bulmer, R.H.; Ng, D.S.

    1981-09-11

    In 1979, R.H. Bulmer of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) discussed a proposed tandem-mirror magnet system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at the 8th symposium on Engineering Problems in Fusion Research. Since then, Congress has voted funds for expanding LLNL's MFTF to a tandem-mirror facility (designated MFTF-B). The new facility, scheduled for completion by 1985, will seek to achieve two goals: (1) Energy break-even capability (Q or the ratio of fusion energy to plasma heating energy = 1) of mirror fusion, (2) Engineering feasibility of reactor-scale machines. Briefly stated, 22 superconducting magnets contained in a 11-m-diam by 65-m-long vacuum vessel will confine a fusion plasma fueled by 80 axial streaming-plasma guns and over 40 radial neutral beams. We have already completed a preliminary design of this magnet system.

  13. Complete prewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Parry, A. O.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study continuous interfacial transitions, analagous to two-dimensional complete wetting, associated with the first-order prewetting line, which can occur on steps, patterned walls, grooves and wedges, and which are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple prototypical geometries. Using microscopic classical density functional theory to model systems with realistic Lennard-Jones fluid–fluid and fluid–substrate intermolecular potentials, we compute mean-field fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and phase diagrams for a variety of confining geometries.

  14. Method for vacuum fusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2001-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  15. Fusion bonding and alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2000-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  16. Fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989 to 1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R and D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R and D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  17. Fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  18. Viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a "fusion loop" or "fusion peptide") engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics.

  19. Magnetic fusion and project ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    It has already been demonstrated that our economics and international relationship are impacted by an energy crisis. For the continuing prosperity of the human race, a new and viable energy source must be developed within the next century. It is evident that the cost will be high and will require a long term commitment to achieve this goal due to a high degree of technological and scientific knowledge. Energy from the controlled nuclear fusion is a safe, competitive, and environmentally attractive but has not yet been completely conquered. Magnetic fusion is one of the most difficult technological challenges. In modem magnetic fusion devices, temperatures that are significantly higher than the temperatures of the sun have been achieved routinely and the successful generation of tens of million watts as a result of scientific break-even is expected from the deuterium and tritium experiment within the next few years. For the practical future fusion reactor, we need to develop reactor relevant materials and technologies. The international project called International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)'' will fulfill this need and the success of this project will provide the most attractive long-term energy source for mankind.

  20. Magnetic fusion and project ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.

    1992-09-01

    It has already been demonstrated that our economics and international relationship are impacted by an energy crisis. For the continuing prosperity of the human race, a new and viable energy source must be developed within the next century. It is evident that the cost will be high and will require a long term commitment to achieve this goal due to a high degree of technological and scientific knowledge. Energy from the controlled nuclear fusion is a safe, competitive, and environmentally attractive but has not yet been completely conquered. Magnetic fusion is one of the most difficult technological challenges. In modem magnetic fusion devices, temperatures that are significantly higher than the temperatures of the sun have been achieved routinely and the successful generation of tens of million watts as a result of scientific break-even is expected from the deuterium and tritium experiment within the next few years. For the practical future fusion reactor, we need to develop reactor relevant materials and technologies. The international project called ``International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)`` will fulfill this need and the success of this project will provide the most attractive long-term energy source for mankind.

  1. FusionDB: a database for in-depth analysis of prokaryotic gene fusion events.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2004-01-01

    FusionDB (http://igs-server.cnrs-mrs.fr/FusionDB/) constitutes a resource dedicated to in-depth analysis of bacterial and archaeal gene fusion events. Such events can provide the 'Rosetta stone' in the search for potential protein-protein interactions, as well as metabolic and regulatory networks. However, the false positive rate of this approach may be quite high, prompting a detailed scrutiny of putative gene fusion events. FusionDB readily provides much of the information required for that task. Moreover, FusionDB extends the notion of gene fusion from that of a single gene to that of a family of genes by assembling pairs of genes from different genomes that belong to the same Cluster of Orthogonal Groups (COG). Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic tree reconstruction for the N- and C-terminal parts of these 'COG fusion' events are provided to distinguish single and multiple fusion events from cases of gene fission, pseudogenes and other false positives. Finally, gene fusion events with matches to known structures of heterodimers in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are identified and may be visualized. FusionDB is fully searchable with access to sequence and alignment data at all levels. A number of different scores are provided to easily differentiate 'real' from 'questionable' cases, especially when larger database searches are performed. FusionDB is cross-linked with the 'Phylogenomic Display of Bacterial Genes' (PhydBac) online web server. Together, these servers provide the complete set of information required for in-depth analysis of non-homology-based gene function attribution. PMID:14681411

  2. FusionDB: a database for in-depth analysis of prokaryotic gene fusion events.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2004-01-01

    FusionDB (http://igs-server.cnrs-mrs.fr/FusionDB/) constitutes a resource dedicated to in-depth analysis of bacterial and archaeal gene fusion events. Such events can provide the 'Rosetta stone' in the search for potential protein-protein interactions, as well as metabolic and regulatory networks. However, the false positive rate of this approach may be quite high, prompting a detailed scrutiny of putative gene fusion events. FusionDB readily provides much of the information required for that task. Moreover, FusionDB extends the notion of gene fusion from that of a single gene to that of a family of genes by assembling pairs of genes from different genomes that belong to the same Cluster of Orthogonal Groups (COG). Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic tree reconstruction for the N- and C-terminal parts of these 'COG fusion' events are provided to distinguish single and multiple fusion events from cases of gene fission, pseudogenes and other false positives. Finally, gene fusion events with matches to known structures of heterodimers in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are identified and may be visualized. FusionDB is fully searchable with access to sequence and alignment data at all levels. A number of different scores are provided to easily differentiate 'real' from 'questionable' cases, especially when larger database searches are performed. FusionDB is cross-linked with the 'Phylogenomic Display of Bacterial Genes' (PhydBac) online web server. Together, these servers provide the complete set of information required for in-depth analysis of non-homology-based gene function attribution.

  3. Synthesis of superheavy elements and dinuclear-system concept of compound-nucleus formation

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, N.V.; Adamian, G.G.; Cherepanov, E.A.

    1996-12-31

    Dinuclear system concept is applied to the analysis of reactions used for the synthesis of elements with Z = 110, 112, 114, and 116. The inner fusion barriers obtained for these reactions are in good agreement with the experimental estimations resulted from the excitation energies of compound nuclei. A model is suggested for the calculation of the competition between complete fusion and quasifission in reactions with heavy nuclei. The fusion rate through the inner fusion barrier in mass asymmetry is found by using the multidimensional Kramers-type stationary solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. The influence of dissipative effects on the dynamics of nuclear fusion is considered.

  4. Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Wurden, G. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Intrator, T. P.; Grabowski, T. C.; Degnan, J. H.; Domonkos, M.; Turchi, P. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Sinars, D. B.; Herrmann, M. C.; et al

    2015-11-17

    In this community white paper, we describe an approach to achieving fusion which employs a hybrid of elements from the traditional magnetic and inertial fusion concepts, called magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). The status of MIF research in North America at multiple institutions is summarized including recent progress, research opportunities, and future plans.

  5. Hot and cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This article presents an overview of research in cold fusion research and development in cold fusion at the Tokomak Fusion Test Reactor at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, and at the inertial containment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. is described.

  6. Elements of Successful and Safe Fusion Experiment Operations

    SciTech Connect

    K. Rule, L. Cadwallader, Y. Takase, T. Norimatsu, O. Kaneko, M. Sato, and R. Savercool

    2009-02-03

    A group of fusion safety professionals contribute to a Joint Working Group (JWG) that performs occupational safety walkthroughs of US and Japanese fusion experiments on a routine basis to enhance the safety of visiting researchers. The most recent walkthrough was completed in Japan in March 2008 by the US Safety Monitor team. This paper gives the general conclusions on fusion facility personnel safety that can be drawn from the series of walkthroughs.

  7. Line-Tension Controlled Mechanism for Influenza Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Risselada, Herre Jelger; Smirnova, Yuliya G.; Grubmüller, Helmut; Marrink, Siewert Jan; Müller, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Our molecular simulations reveal that wild-type influenza fusion peptides are able to stabilize a highly fusogenic pre-fusion structure, i.e. a peptide bundle formed by four or more trans-membrane arranged fusion peptides. We rationalize that the lipid rim around such bundle has a non-vanishing rim energy (line-tension), which is essential to (i) stabilize the initial contact point between the fusing bilayers, i.e. the stalk, and (ii) drive its subsequent evolution. Such line-tension controlled fusion event does not proceed along the hypothesized standard stalk-hemifusion pathway. In modeled influenza fusion, single point mutations in the influenza fusion peptide either completely inhibit fusion (mutants G1V and W14A) or, intriguingly, specifically arrest fusion at a hemifusion state (mutant G1S). Our simulations demonstrate that, within a line-tension controlled fusion mechanism, these known point mutations either completely inhibit fusion by impairing the peptide’s ability to stabilize the required peptide bundle (G1V and W14A) or stabilize a persistent bundle that leads to a kinetically trapped hemifusion state (G1S). In addition, our results further suggest that the recently discovered leaky fusion mutant G13A, which is known to facilitate a pronounced leakage of the target membrane prior to lipid mixing, reduces the membrane integrity by forming a ‘super’ bundle. Our simulations offer a new interpretation for a number of experimentally observed features of the fusion reaction mediated by the prototypical fusion protein, influenza hemagglutinin, and might bring new insights into mechanisms of other viral fusion reactions. PMID:22761674

  8. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  9. Interplanetary propulsion using inertial fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, C. D.; Hogan, W. J.; Hoffman, N.; Murray, K.; Klein, G.; Diaz, F. C.

    1987-01-01

    Inertial fusion can be used to power spacecraft within the solar system and beyond. Such spacecraft have the potential for short-duration manned-mission performance exceeding other technologies. We are conducting a study to assess the systems aspects of inertial fusion as applied to such missions, based on the conceptual engine design of Hyde (1983) we describe the required systems for an entirely new spacecraft design called VISTA that is based on the use of DT fuel. We give preliminary design details for the power conversion and power conditioning systems for manned missions to Mars of total duration of about 100 days. Specific mission performance results will be published elsewhere, after the study has been completed.

  10. The fusion breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Ralph W.

    1982-10-01

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the U.S. fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the U.S. fusion program and the U.S. nuclear energy program. There is wide agreement that many approaches will work and will produce fuel for five equal-sized LWRs, and some approach as many as 20 LWRs at electricity costs within 20% of those at today's price of uranium (30/lb of U3O8). The blankets designed to suppress fissioning, called symbiotes, fusion fuel factories, or just fusion breeders, will have safety characteristics more like pure fusion reactors and will support as many as 15 equal power LWRs. The blankets designed to maximize fast fission of fertile material will have safety characteristics more like fission reactors and will support 5 LWRs. This author strongly recommends development of the fission suppressed blanket type, a point of view not agreed upon by everyone. There is, however, wide agreement that, to meet the market price for uranium which would result in LWR electricity within 20% of today's cost with either blanket type, fusion components can cost severalfold more than would be allowed for pure fusion to meet the goal of making electricity alone at 20% over today's fission costs. Also widely agreed is that the critical-path-item for the fusion breeder is fusion development itself; however, development of fusion breeder specific items (blankets, fuel cycle) should be started now in order to have the fusion breeder by the time the rise in uranium prices forces other more costly choices.

  11. Fusion probability in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tathagata; Nath, S.; Pal, Santanu

    2015-03-01

    Background: Fusion between two massive nuclei is a very complex process and is characterized by three stages: (a) capture inside the potential barrier, (b) formation of an equilibrated compound nucleus (CN), and (c) statistical decay of the CN leading to a cold evaporation residue (ER) or fission. The second stage is the least understood of the three and is the most crucial in predicting yield of superheavy elements (SHE) formed in complete fusion reactions. Purpose: A systematic study of average fusion probability, , is undertaken to obtain a better understanding of its dependence on various reaction parameters. The study may also help to clearly demarcate onset of non-CN fission (NCNF), which causes fusion probability, PCN, to deviate from unity. Method: ER excitation functions for 52 reactions leading to CN in the mass region 170-220, which are available in the literature, have been compared with statistical model (SM) calculations. Capture cross sections have been obtained from a coupled-channels code. In the SM, shell corrections in both the level density and the fission barrier have been included. for these reactions has been extracted by comparing experimental and theoretical ER excitation functions in the energy range ˜5 %-35% above the potential barrier, where known effects of nuclear structure are insignificant. Results: has been shown to vary with entrance channel mass asymmetry, η (or charge product, ZpZt ), as well as with fissility of the CN, χCN. No parameter has been found to be adequate as a single scaling variable to determine . Approximate boundaries have been obtained from where starts deviating from unity. Conclusions: This study quite clearly reveals the limits of applicability of the SM in interpreting experimental observables from fusion reactions involving two massive nuclei. Deviation of from unity marks the beginning of the domain of dynamical models of fusion. Availability of precise ER cross

  12. Spin-distribution measurement: A sensitive probe for incomplete fusion dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, B. P.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Singh, D.; Ansari, M. A.; Prasad, R.; Kumar, R.; Golda, K. S.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2008-07-15

    Spin distributions of various reaction products populated via complete and/or incomplete fusion of {sup 16}O with {sup 169}Tm have been measured at projectile energy {approx_equal}5.6 MeV/nucleon. Particle (Z=1,2) {gamma}-coincidences have been employed to achieve the information about involved reaction modes on the basis of their entry state spin populations. The experimentally measured spin distributions for incomplete fusion products have been found to be distinctly different than those observed for complete fusion products. The driving input angular momenta associated with incomplete fusion products have been found to be relatively higher than complete fusion products, and increases with direct {alpha}-multiplicity. It has also been observed that incomplete fusion products are less fed and/or the population of lower spin states are strongly hindered, while complete fusion products indicating strong feeding over a broad spin range.

  13. Materials research for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to <2 MeV on average for fission neutrons) releases significant amounts of hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  14. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  15. Fusion facility siting considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussell, G. T.

    1985-02-01

    Inherent in the fusion program's transition from hydrogen devices to commercial power machines is a general increase in the size and scope of succeeding projects. This growth will lead to increased emphasis on safety, environmental impact, and the external effects of fusion in general, and of each new device in particular. An important consideration in this regard is site selection. Major siting issues that may affect the economics, safety, and environmental impact of fusion are examined.

  16. Status of fusion maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Effective maintenance will be an essential ingredient in determining fusion system productivity. This level of productivity will result only after close attention is paid to the entire system as an entity and appropriate integration of the elements is made. The status of fusion maintenance is reviewed in the context of the entire system. While there are many challenging developmental tasks ahead in fusion maintenance, the required technologies are available in several high-technology industries, including nuclear fission.

  17. Fusion: The controversy continues

    SciTech Connect

    1989-07-01

    Nuclear fusion-the power of the stars that promises mankind an inexhaustible supply of energy-seems concurrently much closer and still distant this month. The recent flurry of announcements concerning the achievement of a cold fusion reaction has-if nothing else-underscored the historic importance of the basic fusion reaction which uses hydrogen ions to fuel an energy-producing reaction.

  18. Fusion Simulation Program Definition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R.

    2012-09-05

    We have completed our contributions to the Fusion Simulation Program Definition Project. Our contributions were in the overall planning with concentration in the definition of the area of Software Integration and Support. We contributed to the planning of multiple meetings, and we contributed to multiple planning documents.

  19. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  20. Meteorite fusion crust variability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaisen, Kevin G.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2009-06-01

    Two assumptions commonly employed in meteorite interpretation are that fusion crust compositions represent the bulk-rock chemistry of the interior meteorite and that the vesicles within the fusion crust result from the release of implanted solar wind volatiles. Electron microprobe analyses of thin sections from lunar meteorite Miller Range (MIL) 05035 and eucrite Bates Nunataks (BTN) 00300 were performed to determine if the chemical compositions of the fusion crust varied and/or represented the published bulk rock composition. It was determined that fusion crust compositions are significantly influenced by the incorporation of fragments from the substrate, and by the composition and grain size of those minerals. Because of compositional heterogeneities throughout the meteorite, one cannot assume that fusion crust composition represents the bulk rock composition. If the compositional variability within the fusion crust and mineralogical differences among thin sections goes unnoticed, then the perceived composition and petrogenetic models of formation will be incorrect. The formation of vesicles within these fusion crusts were also compared to current theories attributing vesicles to a solar wind origin. Previous work from the STONE-5 experiment, where terrestrial rocks were exposed on the exterior of a spacecraft heatshield, produced a vesicular fusion crust without prolonged exposure to solar wind suggesting that the high temperatures experienced by a meteorite during passage through the Earth's atmosphere are sufficient to cause boiling of the melt. Therefore, the assumption that all vesicles found within a fusion crust are due to the release of implanted volatiles of solar wind may not be justified.

  1. Observation of incomplete fusion reactions at l < l {sub crit}

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Abhishek Sharma, Vijay R. Singh, Devendra P. Unnati,; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Bala, Indu; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Sharma, M. K.

    2014-08-14

    In order to understand the presence of incomplete fusion at low energies i.e. 4-7MeV/nucleon and also to study its dependence on various entrance-channel parameters, the two type of measurements (i) excitation function for {sup 12}C+{sup 159}Tb, and (ii) forward recoil ranges for {sup 12}C+{sup 159}Tb systems have been performed. The experimentally measured excitation functions have been analyzed within the framework of compound nucleus decay using statistical model code PACE4. Analysis of data suggests the production of xn/px)n-channels via complete fusion, as these are found to be well reproduced by PACE4 predictions, while, a significant enhancement in the excitation functions of α-emitting channels has been observed over the theoretical ones, which has been attributed due to the incomplete fusion processes. Further, the incomplete fusion events observed in case of forward recoil range measurements have been explained on the basis of the breakup fusion model, where these events may be attributed to the fusion of {sup 8}Be and/or {sup 4}He from {sup 12}C projectile to the target nucleus. In the present work, the SUMRULE model calculations are found to highly underestimate the observed incomplete fusion cross-sections which indicate that the l-values lower than l {sub crit} (limit of complete fusion) significantly contribute to the incomplete fusion reactions.

  2. Energy Balance of Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, M.; Staudenmaier, G.

    It is shown that a discrepancy and incompatibility persist between basic physics and fusion-literature regarding the radiation losses from a thermonuclear plasma. Whereas the fusion-literature neglects the excitation or line radiation completely, according to basic physics it depends upon the prevailing conditions and cannot be neglected in general. Moreover, for a magnetized plasma, while the fusion-literature assumes a self-absorption or reabsorption of cyclotron or synchrotron radiation emitted by the electrons spiraling along the magnetic field, the basic physics does not allow any effective reabsorption of cyclotron or synchrotron radiation. As is demonstrated, fallacious assumptions and notions, which somehow or other crept into the fusion-literature, are responsible for this discrepancy. In the present work, the theory is corrected. On the grounds of basic physics, a complete energy balance of magnetized and non-magnetized plasmas is presented for pulsed, stationary and self-sustaining operations by taking into account the energy release by reactions of light nuclei as well as different kinds of diffusive (conduction) and radiative (bremsstrahlung, cyclotron or synchrotron radiation and excitation radiation) energy losses. Already the energy losses by radiation make the energy balance negative. Hence, a fusion reactor - an energy producing device - seems to be beyond the realms of realization.

  3. Direct observation of intermediate states in model membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Keidel, Andrea; Bartsch, Tobias F.; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel assay for membrane fusion of solid supported membranes on silica beads and on coverslips. Fusion of the lipid bilayers is induced by bringing an optically trapped bead in contact with the coverslip surface while observing the bead’s thermal motion with microsecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution using a three-dimensional position detector. The probability of fusion is controlled by the membrane tension on the particle. We show that the progression of fusion can be monitored by changes in the three-dimensional position histograms of the bead and in its rate of diffusion. We were able to observe all fusion intermediates including transient fusion, formation of a stalk, hemifusion and the completion of a fusion pore. Fusion intermediates are characterized by axial but not lateral confinement of the motion of the bead and independently by the change of its rate of diffusion due to the additional drag from the stalk-like connection between the two membranes. The detailed information provided by this assay makes it ideally suited for studies of early events in pure lipid bilayer fusion or fusion assisted by fusogenic molecules. PMID:27029285

  4. Direct observation of intermediate states in model membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Keidel, Andrea; Bartsch, Tobias F; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel assay for membrane fusion of solid supported membranes on silica beads and on coverslips. Fusion of the lipid bilayers is induced by bringing an optically trapped bead in contact with the coverslip surface while observing the bead's thermal motion with microsecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution using a three-dimensional position detector. The probability of fusion is controlled by the membrane tension on the particle. We show that the progression of fusion can be monitored by changes in the three-dimensional position histograms of the bead and in its rate of diffusion. We were able to observe all fusion intermediates including transient fusion, formation of a stalk, hemifusion and the completion of a fusion pore. Fusion intermediates are characterized by axial but not lateral confinement of the motion of the bead and independently by the change of its rate of diffusion due to the additional drag from the stalk-like connection between the two membranes. The detailed information provided by this assay makes it ideally suited for studies of early events in pure lipid bilayer fusion or fusion assisted by fusogenic molecules. PMID:27029285

  5. Congenital Bilateral Zygomatico-Maxillo-Mandibular Fusion Associated With Gum Fusion.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahdi, Akmam H; Koppel, David A; Al-Jumaily, Hassanien A; Mohammed, Ali Abdul Hameed; Boyd, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    A congenial syngnathia is very rare condition. It can be simple mucosal fusion (synechiae), or complete bony fusion (synostosis) between the maxilla or zygoma and the mandible. Fusion of the ascending ramus of mandible to maxilla and zygoma is less common than fusions of the alveolar ridges of the mandible to the maxilla. Bony syngnathia is either isolated or complex in form. There are 59 cases of congenital bony syngnathia reported in the literature: the first report was by Burket in 1936. There are 16 reported cases of zygomatico-maxillo-mandibular fusion. In the reported cases, women expressed the isolated form more commonly whereas men demonstrated a more complex pattern of disease. The authors present another patient of bony syngnathia involving bilateral fusion of the ascending ramus and body of the mandible with the maxillary complex in a young man. Early surgery was performed to release the bony and soft tissue fusion on the eighth day from the baby's birth. A second operation was performed for recurrence when the baby was 2.5 months old. A customized splint, an intense postoperative program of mouth exercises, and close follow-up aims to prevent further refusion.

  6. Coatings for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1981-12-18

    Optical coatings are used in lasers systems for fusion research to control beam propagation and reduce surface reflection losses. The performance of coatings is important in the design, reliability, energy output, and cost of the laser systems. Significant developments in coating technology are required for future lasers for fusion research and eventual power reactors.

  7. Fusion Science Education Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, C. A.; DIII-D Education Group

    1996-11-01

    This presentation will focus on education outreach activities at General Atomics that have been expanded to include the general population on science education with a focus on fusion energy. Outreach materials are distributed upon request both nationally and internationally. These materials include a notebook containing copies of DIII--D tour panels, fusion poster, new fusion energy video, new fusion energy brochure, and the electromagnetic spectrum curriculum. The 1996 Fusion Forum (held in the House Caucus Room) included a student/ teacher lunch with Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary and a private visit to the Forum exhibits. The continuing partnership with Kearny High School includes lectures, job shadowing, internship, equipment donations and an award-winning electric car-racing program. Development of distribution by CD of the existing interactive fusion energy kiosk and a virtual reality tour of the DIII--D facility are underway. The DIII--D fusion education WWW site includes e-mail addresses to ``Ask the Wizard,'' and/or receive GA's outreach materials. Steve Rodecker, a local science teacher, aided by DIII--D fusion staff, won his second Tapestry Award; he also was named the ``1995 National Science Teacher of the Year'' and will be present to share his experiences with the DIII--D educational outreach program.

  8. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  9. Two Horizons of Fusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Mun Ling; Chik, Pakey Pui Man

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to differentiate the internal and external horizons of "fusion." "Fusion" in the internal horizon relates to the structure and meaning of the object of learning as experienced by the learner. It clarifies the interrelationships among an object's critical features and aspects. It also illuminates the…

  10. Magnetic systems for fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.

    1985-02-01

    Mirror experiments have led the way in applying superconductivity to fusion research because of unique requirements for high and steady magnetic fields. The first significant applications were Baseball II at LLNL and IMP at ORNL. More recently, the MFTF-B yin-yang coil was successfully tested and the entire tandem configuration is nearing completion. Tokamak magnets have also enjoyed recent success with the large coil project tests at ORNL, preceded by single coil tests in Japan and Germany. In the USSR, the T-7 Tokamak has been operational for many years and the T-15 Tokamak is under construction, with the TF coils nearing completion. Also the Tore Supra is being built in France.

  11. Complete Fusion and Break-up Fusion Reactions in Light Ion Interactions at Low Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Gadioli, E.; Mairani, A.; Foertsch, S. V.; Buthelezi, E. Z.; Fujita, H.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Dlamini, J.; Cowley, A. A.; Connell, S. H.

    2007-10-26

    Experimental spectra of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) produced in the interaction of two {sup 12}C ions at incident energy of 200 MeV and their reproduction by a binary fragmentation model and the Boltzmann Master Equation theory as implemented into the Monte Carlo transport and interaction code FLUKA are shown.

  12. Fusion Physics Toward ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, R. D.

    2006-04-01

    Stars are powered by fusion, the energy released by fusing together light nuclei, using gravitational confinement of plasma. Fusion on earth will be done in a 100 million degree plasma made of deuterium and tritium and confined by magnetic fields or inertia. The worldwide fusion research community will construct ITER, the first experiment that will burn a DT plasma by copious fusion reactions. ITER's nominal goal is to create 500 MW of fusion power. An energy gain of 10 will mean the plasma is dominantly self-heated by the fusion-produced alpha particles. ITER's all superconducting magnet technology and steady-state heat removal technology will enable nominal 400 s pulses to allow the study of burning plasmas on the longest intrinsic timescale of the confined plasma - diffusive redistribution of the electrical currents in the plasma. The advances in magnetic confinement physics that have led to this opportunity will be described, as well as the research opportunities afforded by ITER. The physics of confining stable plasmas and heating them will produce the high gain state in ITER. Sustained burn will come from the physics of controlling currents in plasmas and how the hot plasma is interfaced to its room temperature surroundings. ITER will provide our first experience with how fusion plasma self-heating will profoundly affect the complex, interlinked physical processes that occur in confined plasmas.

  13. Fusion Studies in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    A new strategic energy plan decided by the Japanese Cabinet in 2014 strongly supports the steady promotion of nuclear fusion development activities, including the ITER project and the Broader Approach activities from the long-term viewpoint. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in Japan formulated the Third Phase Basic Program so as to promote an experimental fusion reactor project. In 2005 AEC has reviewed this Program, and discussed on selection and concentration among many projects of fusion reactor development. In addition to the promotion of ITER project, advanced tokamak research by JT-60SA, helical plasma experiment by LHD, FIREX project in laser fusion research and fusion engineering by IFMIF were highly prioritized. Although the basic concept is quite different between tokamak, helical and laser fusion researches, there exist a lot of common features such as plasma physics on 3-D magnetic geometry, high power heat load on plasma facing component and so on. Therefore, a synergetic scenario on fusion reactor development among various plasma confinement concepts would be important.

  14. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  15. SKIDS data fusion project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenway, Phil

    1992-04-01

    The European Community's strategic research initiative in information technology (ESPRIT) has been in place for nearly five years. An early example of the pan-European collaborative projects being conducted under this initiative is 'SKIDS': Signal and Knowledge Integration with Decisional Control for Multisensory Systems. This four year project, which is approaching completion, aims to build a real-time multisensor perception machine. This machine will be capable of performing data fusion, interpretation, situation assessment, and resource allocation tasks, under the constraints of both time and resource availability, and in the presence of uncertain data. Of the many possible applications, the surveillance and monitoring of a semi-automated 'factory environment' has been chosen as a challenging and representative test scenario. This paper presents an overview of the goals and objectives of the project, the makeup of the consortium, and roles of the members within it, and the main technical achievements to data. In particular, the following are discussed: relevant application domains, and the generic requirements that can be inferred from them; sensor configuration, including choice, placement, etc.; control paradigms, including the possible trade-offs between centralized, hierarchical, and decentralized approaches; the corresponding hardware architectural choices, including the need for parallel processing; and the appropriate software architecture and infra-structure required to support the chosen task oriented approach. Specific attention is paid to the functional decomposition of the system and how the requirements for control impact the organization of the identified interpretation tasks. Future work and outstanding problems are considered in some concluding remarks. By virtue of limited space, this paper is descriptive rather than explanatory.

  16. Some new inequalities for continuous fusion frames and fusion pairs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Yun-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses continuous fusion frames and fusion pairs which are extensions of discrete fusion frames and continuous frames. The study of equalities and inequalities for various frames has seen great achievements. In this paper, using operator methods we establish some new inequalities for continuous fusion frames and fusion pairs. Our results extend and improve ones obtained by Balan, Casazza and Găvruţa. PMID:27652173

  17. Sensor fusion for intelligent alarm analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.L.; Fitzgerald, D.S.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of an intelligent alarm analysis system is to provide complete and manageable information to a central alarm station operator by applying alarm processing and fusion techniques to sensor information. This paper discusses the sensor fusion approach taken to perform intelligent alarm analysis for the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES). The AES is an intrusion detection and assessment system designed for wide-area coverage, quick deployment, low false/nuisance alarm operation, and immediate visual assessment. It combines three sensor technologies (visible, infrared, and millimeter wave radar) collocated on a compact and portable remote sensor module. The remote sensor module rotates at a rate of 1 revolution per second to detect and track motion and provide assessment in a continuous 360` field-of-regard. Sensor fusion techniques are used to correlate and integrate the track data from these three sensors into a single track for operator observation. Additional inputs to the fusion process include environmental data, knowledge of sensor performance under certain weather conditions, sensor priority, and recent operator feedback. A confidence value is assigned to the track as a result of the fusion process. This helps to reduce nuisance alarms and to increase operator confidence in the system while reducing the workload of the operator.

  18. Label fusion strategy selection.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Nicolas; Duchesne, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Label fusion is used in medical image segmentation to combine several different labels of the same entity into a single discrete label, potentially more accurate, with respect to the exact, sought segmentation, than the best input element. Using simulated data, we compared three existing label fusion techniques-STAPLE, Voting, and Shape-Based Averaging (SBA)-and observed that none could be considered superior depending on the dissimilarity between the input elements. We thus developed an empirical, hybrid technique called SVS, which selects the most appropriate technique to apply based on this dissimilarity. We evaluated the label fusion strategies on two- and three-dimensional simulated data and showed that SVS is superior to any of the three existing methods examined. On real data, we used SVS to perform fusions of 10 segmentations of the hippocampus and amygdala in 78 subjects from the ICBM dataset. SVS selected SBA in almost all cases, which was the most appropriate method overall. PMID:22518113

  19. Fusion-power demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, C. D.; Logan, B. G.; Carlson, G. A.; Neef, W. S.; Moir, R. W.; Campbell, R. B.; Botwin, R.; Clarkson, I. R.; Carpenter, T. J.

    1983-03-01

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment.

  20. Spinal fusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles hold the graft in place until it fuses with the vertebrae. A fusion will setup within ... hollow threaded titanium or carbon fiber cylinder to fuse two vertebrae together. The diseased disk is removed ...

  1. Magnetized Target Fusion collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) may be a low cost path to fusion, in a regime that is intermediate between magnetic and inertial fusion energy. It requires compression of a magnetized target plasma and consequent heating to fusion relevant conditions inside a converging flux conserver. We hope to demonstrate the physics basis for MTF, with a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) target plasma to be translated axially to a compression region. We show recent and improved FRC formation data, example deformable liner implosions, and a conceptual design for the upcoming translation experiments, and describe a multi institution collaboration. The FRC is an elongated, compact toroid equilibrium that is extreme among magnetic configurations, and relaxed to a non force free state. There is high plasma beta, small toroidal field, cross-field diamagnetic current and flows, vanishing rotational transform, magnetic shear, helicity and anomalously large resistivity. Scientific issues include MTF with and without FRC's, and fundamental plasma physics beyond MHD, relevant to geophysical and astrophysical phenomena.

  2. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  3. ITER Fusion Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. Norbert Holtkamp

    2016-07-12

    ITER (in Latin “the way”) is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier over one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen – deuterium and tritium – fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q ? 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). The ITER Organization was officially established in Cadarache, France, on 24 October 2007. The seven members engaged in the project – China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the United States – represent more than half the world’s population. The costs for ITER are shared by the seven members. The cost for the construction will be approximately 5.5 billion Euros, a similar amount is foreseen for the twenty-year phase of operation and the subsequent decommissioning.

  4. Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is under consideration as a means of building a low mass, high specific impulse, and high thrust propulsion system for interplanetary travel. This unique combination is the result of the generation of a high temperature plasma by the nuclear fusion process. This plasma can then be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Fusion is initiated by a small traction of the energy generated in the magnetic coils due to the plasma's compression of the magnetic field. The power gain from a fusion reaction is such that inefficiencies due to thermal neutrons and coil losses can be overcome. Since the fusion reaction products are directly used for propulsion and the power to initiate the reaction is directly obtained from the thrust generation, no massive power supply for energy conversion is required. The result should be a low engine mass, high specific impulse and high thrust system. The key is to successfully initiate fusion as a proof-of-principle for this application. Currently MSFC is implementing MTF proof-of-principle experiments. This involves many technical details and ancillary investigations. Of these, selected pertinent issues include the properties, orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the target plasma's behavior under compression and the convergence and mixing of the gun plasma are under investigation. This work is to focus on the gun characterization and development as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability.

  5. Gene Fusion: A Genome Wide Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Ping; Riley, Monica

    2001-01-01

    As a well known fact, organisms form larger and complex multimodular (composite or chimeric) and mostly multi-functional proteins through gene fusion of two or more individual genes which have independent evolution histories and functions. We call each of these components a module. The existence of multimodular proteins may improves the efficiency in gene regulation and in cellular functions, and thus may give the host organism advantages in adaptation to environments. Analysis of all gene fusions in present-day organisms should allow us to examine the patterns of gene fusion in context with cellular functions, to trace back the evolution processes from the ancient smaller and uni-functional proteins to the present-day larger and complex multi-functional proteins, and to estimate the minimal number of ancestor proteins that existed in the last common ancestor for all life on earth. Although many multimodular proteins have been experimentally known, identification of gene fusion events systematically at genome scale had not been possible until recently when large number of completed genome sequences have been becoming available. In addition, technical difficulties for such analysis also exist due to the complexity of this biological and evolutionary process. We report from this study a new strategy to computationally identify multimodular proteins using completed genome sequences and the results surveyed from 22 organisms with the data from over 40 organisms to be presented during the meeting. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Cdc42 controls the dilation of the exocytotic fusion pore by regulating membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Bretou, Marine; Jouannot, Ouardane; Fanget, Isabelle; Pierobon, Paolo; Larochette, Nathanaël; Gestraud, Pierre; Guillon, Marc; Emiliani, Valentina; Gasman, Stéphane; Desnos, Claire; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Darchen, François

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion underlies multiple processes, including exocytosis of hormones and neurotransmitters. Membrane fusion starts with the formation of a narrow fusion pore. Radial expansion of this pore completes the process and allows fast release of secretory compounds, but this step remains poorly understood. Here we show that inhibiting the expression of the small GTPase Cdc42 or preventing its activation with a dominant negative Cdc42 construct in human neuroendocrine cells impaired the release process by compromising fusion pore enlargement. Consequently the mode of vesicle exocytosis was shifted from full-collapse fusion to kiss-and-run. Remarkably, Cdc42-knockdown cells showed reduced membrane tension, and the artificial increase of membrane tension restored fusion pore enlargement. Moreover, inhibiting the motor protein myosin II by blebbistatin decreased membrane tension, as well as fusion pore dilation. We conclude that membrane tension is the driving force for fusion pore dilation and that Cdc42 is a key regulator of this force. PMID:25143404

  7. Systematics for low energy incomplete fusion: Still a puzzle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Abhishek; Shuaib, Mohd; Aggarwal, Abhay V.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Bala, Indu; Singh, D. P.; Singh, P. P.; Unnati; Sharma, M. K.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2016-05-01

    In order to have a better and clear picture of incomplete fusion reactions at energies ≈4-7MeV/nucleon, the excitation function measurements have been performed for 18O+159Tb system. The experimental data have been analyzed within the framework of compound nucleus decay. The cross-section for xn/pxn-channels are found to be well reproduced by PACE4 predictions, which suggest their production via complete fusion process. However, a significant enhancement in the excitation functions of α-emitting channels has been observed over the theoretical ones, which has been attributed due to the incomplete fusion processes. The incomplete fusion fractions have been deduced at each studied energy and compared with other nearby systems for better insight into the underlying dynamics. The incomplete fusion fraction has been found to be sensitive to the projectile's energy and α-Q-value.

  8. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There is little doubt that humans will attempt to explore and develop the solar system in this century. A large amount of energy will be required for accomplishing this. The need for fusion propulsion is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important thermodynamical attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion can produce exhaust velocity up to about 5 km/s. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a hydrogen propellant increases the exhaust velocity by only a factor of about two. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. The principal advantage of the fission process is that its development is relatively mature and is available right now. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. The technical priorities for developing and applying fusion for propulsion are

  9. Improvements of image fusion methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shoshan, Yotam; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2014-03-01

    Fusion of images from different imaging modalities, obtained by conventional fusion methods, may cause artifacts, including destructive superposition and brightness irregularities, in certain cases. This paper proposes two methods for improving image multimodal fusion quality. Based on the finding that a better fusion can be achieved when the images have a more positive correlation, the first method is a decision algorithm that runs at the preprocessing fusion stage and determines whether a complementary gray level of one of the input images should be used instead of the original one. The second method is suitable for multiresolution fusion, and it suggests choosing only one image from the lowest-frequency sub-bands in the pyramids, instead of combining values from both sub-bands. Experimental results indicate that the proposed fusion enhancement can reduce fusion artifacts. Quantitative fusion quality measures that support this conclusion are shown.

  10. Matched Comparison of Fusion Rates between Hydroxyapatite Demineralized Bone Matrix and Autograft in Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Nam; Shin, Dong Ah; Yi, Seong; Kim, Keung Nyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the fusion rate of a hydroxyapatite demineralized bone matrix (DBM) with post-laminectomy acquired autograft in lumbar interbody fusion surgery and to evaluate the correlation between fusion rate and clinical outcome. Methods From January 2013 to April 2014, 98 patients underwent lumbar interbody fusion surgery with hydroxyapatite DBM (HA-DBM group) in our institute. Of those patients, 65 received complete CT scans for 12 months postoperatively in order to evaluate fusion status. For comparison with autograft, we selected another 65 patients who underwent lumbar interbody fusion surgery with post-laminectomy acquired autograft (Autograft group) during the same period. Both fusion material groups were matched in terms of age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and bone mineral density (BMD). To evaluate the clinical outcomes, we analyzed the results of visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results We reviewed the CT scans of 149 fusion levels in 130 patients (HA-DBM group, 75 levels/65 patients; Autograft group, 74 levels/65 patients). Age, sex, BMI, and BMD were not significantly different between the groups (p=0.528, p=0.848, p=0.527, and p=0.610, respectively). The HA-DBM group showed 39 of 75 fused levels (52%), and the Autograft group showed 46 of 74 fused levels (62.2%). This difference was not statistically significant (p=0.21). In the HA-DBM group, older age and low BMD were significantly associated with non-fusion (61.24 vs. 66.68, p=0.027; -1.63 vs. -2.29, p=0.015, respectively). VAS and ODI showed significant improvement after surgery when fusion was successfully achieved in both groups (p=0.004, p=0.002, HA-DBM group; p=0.012, p=0.03, Autograft group). Conclusion The fusion rates of the hydroxyapatite DBM and Autograft groups were not significantly different. In addition, clinical outcomes were similar between the groups. However, older age and low BMD are risk factors that might

  11. Multisensor Fusion for Change Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, T.; Csatho, B.

    2005-12-01

    Combining sensors that record different properties of a 3-D scene leads to complementary and redundant information. If fused properly, a more robust and complete scene description becomes available. Moreover, fusion facilitates automatic procedures for object reconstruction and modeling. For example, aerial imaging sensors, hyperspectral scanning systems, and airborne laser scanning systems generate complementary data. We describe how data from these sensors can be fused for such diverse applications as mapping surface erosion and landslides, reconstructing urban scenes, monitoring urban land use and urban sprawl, and deriving velocities and surface changes of glaciers and ice sheets. An absolute prerequisite for successful fusion is a rigorous co-registration of the sensors involved. We establish a common 3-D reference frame by using sensor invariant features. Such features are caused by the same object space phenomena and are extracted in multiple steps from the individual sensors. After extracting, segmenting and grouping the features into more abstract entities, we discuss ways on how to automatically establish correspondences. This is followed by a brief description of rigorous mathematical models suitable to deal with linear and area features. In contrast to traditional, point-based registration methods, lineal and areal features lend themselves to a more robust and more accurate registration. More important, the chances to automate the registration process increases significantly. The result of the co-registration of the sensors is a unique transformation between the individual sensors and the object space. This makes spatial reasoning of extracted information more versatile; reasoning can be performed in sensor space or in 3-D space where domain knowledge about features and objects constrains reasoning processes, reduces the search space, and helps to make the problem well-posed. We demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed multisensor fusion approach

  12. Investigation of contribution of incomplete fusion in the total fusion process induced by 9Be on 181Ta target at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharab, Rajesh; Chahal, Rajiv; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-02-01

    We have studied the relative contribution of incomplete fusion (ICF) and complete fusion (CF) in total fusion (TF) induced by 9Be on 181Ta target at energies in the vicinity of Coulomb barrier using classical dynamical model and Wong's formula in conjugation with energy dependent Woods-Saxon formula. It is found that at above barrier energies ICF contributes almost 30% in TF while at energies below the barrier qualitatively its contribution is much more than thirty percent.

  13. Spatial Statistical Data Fusion for Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hai

    2010-01-01

    Data fusion is the process of combining information from heterogeneous sources into a single composite picture of the relevant process, such that the composite picture is generally more accurate and complete than that derived from any single source alone. Data collection is often incomplete, sparse, and yields incompatible information. Fusion techniques can make optimal use of such data. When investment in data collection is high, fusion gives the best return. Our study uses data from two satellites: (1) Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), (2) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS).

  14. Mitochondrial fusion and inheritance of the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hiroyoshi; Onoue, Kenta; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2010-03-01

    Although maternal or uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial genomes is a general rule, biparental inheritance is sometimes observed in protists and fungi,including yeasts. In yeast, recombination occurs between the mitochondrial genomes inherited from both parents.Mitochondrial fusion observed in yeast zygotes is thought to set up a space for DNA recombination. In the last decade,a universal mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been uncovered, using yeast as a model. On the other hand, an alternative mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been identified in the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum.A specific mitochondrial plasmid, mF, has been detected as the genetic material that causes mitochondrial fusion in P. polycephalum. Without mF, fusion of the mitochondria is not observed throughout the life cycle, suggesting that Physarum has no constitutive mitochondrial fusion mechanism.Conversely, mitochondria fuse in zygotes and during sporulation with mF. The complete mF sequence suggests that one gene, ORF640, encodes a fusogen for Physarum mitochondria. Although in general, mitochondria are inherited uniparentally, biparental inheritance occurs with specific sexual crossing in P. polycephalum.An analysis of the transmission of mitochondrial genomes has shown that recombinations between two parental mitochondrial genomes require mitochondrial fusion,mediated by mF. Physarum is a unique organism for studying mitochondrial fusion. PMID:20196232

  15. Mitochondrial fusion and inheritance of the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hiroyoshi; Onoue, Kenta; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2010-03-01

    Although maternal or uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial genomes is a general rule, biparental inheritance is sometimes observed in protists and fungi,including yeasts. In yeast, recombination occurs between the mitochondrial genomes inherited from both parents.Mitochondrial fusion observed in yeast zygotes is thought to set up a space for DNA recombination. In the last decade,a universal mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been uncovered, using yeast as a model. On the other hand, an alternative mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been identified in the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum.A specific mitochondrial plasmid, mF, has been detected as the genetic material that causes mitochondrial fusion in P. polycephalum. Without mF, fusion of the mitochondria is not observed throughout the life cycle, suggesting that Physarum has no constitutive mitochondrial fusion mechanism.Conversely, mitochondria fuse in zygotes and during sporulation with mF. The complete mF sequence suggests that one gene, ORF640, encodes a fusogen for Physarum mitochondria. Although in general, mitochondria are inherited uniparentally, biparental inheritance occurs with specific sexual crossing in P. polycephalum.An analysis of the transmission of mitochondrial genomes has shown that recombinations between two parental mitochondrial genomes require mitochondrial fusion,mediated by mF. Physarum is a unique organism for studying mitochondrial fusion.

  16. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  17. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  18. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  19. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  20. Amodal Completion in Bonobos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagasaka, Yasuo; Brooks, Daniel I.; Wasserman, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    We trained two bonobos to discriminate among occluded, complete, and incomplete stimuli. The occluded stimulus comprised a pair of colored shapes, one of which appeared to occlude the other. The complete and incomplete stimuli involved the single shape that appeared to have been partially covered in the occluded stimulus; the complete stimulus…

  1. Low-energy fusion dynamics of weakly bound nuclei: A time dependent perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Torres, A.; Boselli, M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent dynamical fusion models for weakly bound nuclei at low incident energies, based on a time-dependent perspective, are briefly presented. The main features of both the PLATYPUS model and a new quantum approach are highlighted. In contrast to existing timedependent quantum models, the present quantum approach separates the complete and incomplete fusion from the total fusion. Calculations performed within a toy model for 6Li + 209Bi at near-barrier energies show that converged excitation functions for total, complete and incomplete fusion can be determined with the time-dependent wavepacket dynamics.

  2. Ceramics for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications.

  3. Peaceful Uses of Fusion

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Teller, E.

    1958-07-03

    Applications of thermonuclear energy for peaceful and constructive purposes are surveyed. Developments and problems in the release and control of fusion energy are reviewed. It is pointed out that the future of thermonuclear power reactors will depend upon the construction of a machine that produces more electric energy than it consumes. The fuel for thermonuclear reactors is cheap and practically inexhaustible. Thermonuclear reactors produce less dangerous radioactive materials than fission reactors and, when once brought under control, are not as likely to be subject to dangerous excursions. The interaction of the hot plasma with magnetic fields opens the way for the direct production of electricity. It is possible that explosive fusion energy released underground may be harnessed for the production of electricity before the same feat is accomplished in controlled fusion processes. Applications of underground detonations of fission devices in mining and for the enhancement of oil flow in large low-specific-yield formations are also suggested.

  4. Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    ScienceCinema

    Holland, Chris [UC San Diego, San Diego, California, United States

    2016-07-12

    The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the “burning plasma” regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

  5. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-04-04

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  6. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-01-01

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  7. CRYOGENICS FOR FUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Dauguet, P.; Bonneton, M.; Fauve, E.; Bernhardt, J. M.; Beauvisage, J.; Andrieu, F.; Gistau-Baguer, G. M.; Boissin, J. C.

    2008-03-16

    Fusion of Hydrogen to produce energy is one of the technologies under study to meet the mankind raising need in energy and as a substitute to fossil fuels for the future. This technology is under investigation for more than 30 years already, with, for example, the former construction of the experimental reactors Tore Supra, DIII-D and JET. With the construction of ITER to start, the next step to 'fusion for energy' will be done. In these projects, an extensive use of cryogenic systems is requested. Air Liquide has been involved as cryogenic partner in most of former and presently constructed fusion reactors. In the present paper, a review of the cryogenic systems we delivered to Tore Supra, JET, IPR and KSTAR will be presented.

  8. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  9. Fusion welding process

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  10. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schmidt, George R.; Santarius, John F.; Turchi, Peter J.; Siemon, Richard E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The need for fusion propulsion for interplanetary flights is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important system attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For efficient and affordable human exploration of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion obviously cannot meet the requirement in propellant exhaust velocity. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the fission energy to heat a low atomic weight propellant produces propellant velocity of the order of 10 kinds. Alternatively the fission energy can be converted into electricity that is used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. However, the necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment greatly increases the mass of the propulsion system. Fundamental considerations in waste heat rejection and power conditioning in a fission electric propulsion system place a limit on its jet specific power to the order of about 0.2 kW/kg. If fusion can be developed for propulsion, it appears to have the best of all worlds - it can provide the largest absolute amount of energy, the propellant exhaust velocity (> 100 km/s), and the high specific jet power (> 10 kW/kg). An intermediate step towards fusion propulsion might be a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. There are similarities as well as differences between applying fusion to propulsion and to terrestrial electrical power generation. The similarities are the underlying plasma and fusion physics, the enabling component technologies, the computational and the diagnostics capabilities. These physics and

  11. Atomic data for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  12. COMPLETE SURFACE MAPPING OF ICF SHELLS

    SciTech Connect

    STEPHENS,R.B; OLSON,D; HUANG,H; GIBSON,J.B

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Inertial confinement fusion shells have previously been evaluated on the basis of microscopic examination for local defects and limited surface profiling to represent their average fluctuation power. Since defects are local, and don't always have visible edges, this approach both misses some important fluctuations and doesn't properly represent the spatially dependent surface fluctuation power. they have taken the first step toward correcting this problem by demonstrating the capability to completely map the surface of a NIF shell with the resolution to account for all modes. This allows complete accounting of all the surface fluctuations. In the future this capability could be used for valuable shells to generate a complete r({theta},{psi}) surface map for accurate 3-D modeling of a shot.

  13. Complete Surface Mapping of ICF Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.B.; Olson, D.; Huang, H.; Gibson, J.B.

    2004-03-15

    Inertial confinement fusion shells have previously been evaluated on the basis of microscopic examination for local defects and limited surface profiling to represent their average fluctuation power. Since defects are local, and don't always have visible edges, this approach both misses some important fluctuations and doesn't properly represent the spatially dependent surface fluctuation power. We have taken the first step toward correcting this problem by demonstrating the capability to completely map the surface of a NIF shell with the resolution to account for all modes. This allows complete accounting of all the surface fluctuations. In the future this capability could be used for valuable shells to generate a complete r({theta}, {phi}) surface map for accurate 3-D modeling of a shot.

  14. Multisensor data fusion algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, D.A.; Chadwick, M.D.; Goudy, S.P.; Johnson, D.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a two-year LDRD research effort into multisensor data fusion. We approached the problem by addressing the available types of data, preprocessing that data, and developing fusion algorithms using that data. The report reflects these three distinct areas. First, the possible data sets for fusion are identified. Second, automated registration techniques for imagery data are analyzed. Third, two fusion techniques are presented. The first fusion algorithm is based on the two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform. Using test images, the wavelet algorithm is compared against intensity modulation and intensity-hue-saturation image fusion algorithms that are available in commercial software. The wavelet approach outperforms the other two fusion techniques by preserving spectral/spatial information more precisely. The wavelet fusion algorithm was also applied to Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT panchromatic imagery data. The second algorithm is based on a linear-regression technique. We analyzed the technique using the same Landsat and SPOT data.

  15. Epithelial fusion during neural tube morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Yun-Jin; Abdullah, N.L.; Mohd.-Zin, S.W.; Mohammed, R. S.; Rolo, Ana; Greene, Nicholas D.E.; Abdul-Aziz, Noraishah M.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion and fusion of epithelial sheets marks the completion of many morphogenetic events during embryogenesis. Neural tube closure involves an epithelial fusion sequence in which the apposing neural folds adhere initially via cellular protrusions, proceed to a more stable union, and subsequently undergo remodelling of the epithelial structures to yield a separate neural tube roof plate and overlying non-neural ectoderm. Cellular protrusions comprise lamellipodia and filopodia, and studies in several different systems emphasise the critical role of RhoGTPases in their regulation. How epithelia establish initial adhesion is poorly understood but, in neurulation, may involve interactions between EphA receptors and their ephrinA ligands. Epithelial remodelling is spatially and temporally correlated with apoptosis in the dorsal neural tube midline, but experimental inhibition of this cell death does not prevent fusion and remodelling. A variety of molecular signalling systems have been implicated in the late events of morphogenesis, but genetic redundancy, for example among the integrins and laminins, makes identification of the critical players challenging. An improved understanding of epithelial fusion can provide insights into normal developmental processes, and may also indicate the mode of origin of clinically important birth defects. PMID:22945349

  16. Fusion engineering device design description

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  17. Fusion Engineering Device design description

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  18. Human-Centered Fusion Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Posse, Christian; White, Amanda M.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2007-05-16

    In recent years the benefits of fusing signatures extracted from large amounts of distributed and/or heterogeneous data sources have been largely documented in various problems ranging from biological protein function prediction to cyberspace monitoring. In spite of significant progress in information fusion research, there is still no formal theoretical framework for defining various types of information fusion systems, defining and analyzing relations among such types, and designing information fusion systems using a formal method approach. Consequently, fusion systems are often poorly understood, are less than optimal, and/or do not suit user needs. To start addressing these issues, we outline a formal humancentered fusion framework for reasoning about fusion strategies. Our approach relies on a new taxonomy for fusion strategies, an alternative definition of information fusion in terms of parameterized paths in signature related spaces, an algorithmic formalization of fusion strategies and a library of numeric and dynamic visual tools measuring the impact as well as the impact behavior of fusion strategies. Using a real case of intelligence analysis we demonstrate that the proposed framework enables end users to rapidly 1) develop and implement alternative fusion strategies, 2) understand the impact of each strategy, 3) compare the various strategies, and 4) perform the above steps without having to know the mathematical foundations of the framework. We also demonstrate that the human impact on a fusion system is critical in the sense that small changes in strategies do not necessarily correspond to small changes in results.

  19. A fusion of minds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corfield, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Mystery still surrounds the visit of the astronomer Sir Bernard Lovell to the Soviet Union in 1963. But his collaboration - and that of other British scientists - eased geopolitical tensions at the height of the Cold War and paved the way for today's global ITER fusion project, as Richard Corfield explains.

  20. Bubble fusion: Preliminary estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    The collapse of a gas-filled bubble in disequilibrium (i.e., internal pressure {much_lt} external pressure) can occur with a significant focusing of energy onto the entrapped gas in the form of pressure-volume work and/or acoustical shocks; the resulting heating can be sufficient to cause ionization and the emission of atomic radiations. The suggestion that extreme conditions necessary for thermonuclear fusion to occur may be possible has been examined parametrically in terms of the ratio of initial bubble pressure relative to that required for equilibrium. In this sense, the disequilibrium bubble is viewed as a three-dimensional ``sling shot`` that is ``loaded`` to an extent allowed by the maximum level of disequilibrium that can stably be achieved. Values of this disequilibrium ratio in the range 10{sup {minus}5}--10{sup {minus}6} are predicted by an idealized bubble-dynamics model as necessary to achieve conditions where nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium might be observed. Harmonic and aharmonic pressurizations/decompressions are examined as means to achieve the required levels of disequilibrium required to create fusion conditions. A number of phenomena not included in the analysis reported herein could enhance or reduce the small levels of nuclear fusions predicted.

  1. Mars manned fusion spaceship

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J.; Buchholtz, B.; Ward, P.; Freuh, J.; Jensen, E.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion Propulsion has an enormous potential for space exploration in the near future. In the twenty-first century, a usable and efficient fusion rocket will be developed and in use. Because of the great distance between other planets and Earth, efficient use of time, fuel, and payload is essential. A nuclear spaceship would provide greater fuel efficiency, less travel time, and a larger payload. Extended missions would give more time for research, experiments, and data acquisition. With the extended mission time, a need for an artificial environment exists. The topics of magnetic fusion propulsion, living modules, artificial gravity, mass distribution, space connection, and orbital transfer to Mars are discussed. The propulsion system is a magnetic fusion reactor based on a tandem mirror design. This allows a faster, shorter trip time and a large thrust to weight ratio. The fuel proposed is a mixture of deuterium and helium. Helium can be obtained from lunar mining. There will be minimal external radiation from the reactor resulting in a safe, efficient propulsion system.

  2. Multilevel fusion exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Perry C.; Dasarathy, Belur V.; McCullough, Claire L.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes a project that was sponsored by the U.S. Army Space and Strategic Defense Command (USASSDC) to develop, test, and demonstrate sensor fusion algorithms for target recognition. The purpose of the project was to exploit the use of sensor fusion at all levels (signal, feature, and decision levels) and all combinations to improve target recognition capability against tactical ballistic missile (TBM) targets. These algorithms were trained with simulated radar signatures to accurately recognize selected TBM targets. The simulated signatures represent measurements made by two radars (S-band and X- band) with the targets at a variety of aspect and roll angles. Two tests were conducted: one with simulated signatures collected at angles different from those in the training database and one using actual test data. The test results demonstrate a high degree of recognition accuracy. This paper describes the training and testing techniques used; shows the fusion strategy employed; and illustrates the advantages of exploiting multi-level fusion.

  3. Mars manned fusion spaceship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedrick, James; Buchholtz, Brent; Ward, Paul; Freuh, Jim; Jensen, Eric

    1991-01-01

    Fusion Propulsion has an enormous potential for space exploration in the near future. In the twenty-first century, a usable and efficient fusion rocket will be developed and in use. Because of the great distance between other planets and Earth, efficient use of time, fuel, and payload is essential. A nuclear spaceship would provide greater fuel efficiency, less travel time, and a larger payload. Extended missions would give more time for research, experiments, and data acquisition. With the extended mission time, a need for an artificial environment exists. The topics of magnetic fusion propulsion, living modules, artificial gravity, mass distribution, space connection, and orbital transfer to Mars are discussed. The propulsion system is a magnetic fusion reactor based on a tandem mirror design. This allows a faster, shorter trip time and a large thrust to weight ratio. The fuel proposed is a mixture of deuterium and helium-3. Helium-3 can be obtained from lunar mining. There will be minimal external radiation from the reactor resulting in a safe, efficient propulsion system.

  4. Fusion reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  5. Latino College Completion: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  6. Latino College Completion: Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  7. Latino College Completion: Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  8. Latino College Completion: Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  9. Latino College Completion: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  10. Latino College Completion: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. The visual functions of the complete colorblind.

    PubMed

    HECHT, S; SHLAER, S

    1948-07-20

    1. The visual functions of a completely colorblind individual are compared with those of the normal. The sensibility distribution in the spectrum has a maximum at 520 mmicro at all brightnesses and thus corresponds to rod vision alone. This is confirmed by studies of dark adaptation which show final thresholds like those usually found for rod vision. Dark adaptation, measured both centrally and peripherally in the retina, is a single continuous function, and regardless of the brightness of the preceding light adaptation, is of the rapid type only, such as that found for the normal following low light adaptation. Visual acuity also shows a single continuous function like that for rod vision. 2. Both critical fusion frequency and intensity discrimination show two sections, one at low and the other at high intensities with a sharp transition from one to the other. Intensity discrimination is as good as for the normal eye, and covers much the same range. The maximal critical fusion frequency is only about 20 cycles per second as compared to 55 cycles for the normal. 3. The two sections shown by the colorblind eye for intensity discrimination and fusion frequency possess the spectral sensitivity of rod vision since the relative positions on the intensity scale are not influenced by using different parts of the spectrum. PMID:18870866

  13. Enhanced image capture through fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Peter J.; Hanna, Keith; Kolczynski, Raymond J.

    1993-01-01

    Image fusion may be used to combine images from different sensors, such as IR and visible cameras, to obtain a single composite with extended information content. Fusion may also be used to combine multiple images from a given sensor to form a composite image in which information of interest is enhanced. We present a general method for performing image fusion and show that this method is effective for diverse fusion applications. We suggest that fusion may provide a powerful tool for enhanced image capture with broad utility in image processing and computer vision.

  14. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1985-10-01

    Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.

  15. The path to fusion power.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn Smith, Chris; Ward, David

    2007-04-15

    Fusion is potentially an environmentally responsible and intrinsically safe source of essentially limitless power. It should be possible to build viable fusion power stations, and it looks as if the cost of fusion power will be reasonable. But time is needed to further develop the technology and to test in power station conditions the materials that would be used in their construction. Assuming no major adverse surprises, an orderly fusion development programme could lead to a prototype fusion power station putting electricity into the grid within 30 years, with commercial fusion power following some 10 or more years later. In the second half of the century, fusion could therefore be an important part of the portfolio of measures that are needed to cope with rising demand for energy in an environmentally responsible manner. In this paper, we describe the basics of fusion, its potential attractions, the status of fusion R&D, the remaining challenges and how they will be tackled at the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor and the proposed International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, and the timetable for the subsequent commercialization of fusion power. PMID:17272246

  16. The Need for Fusion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassibry, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Fusion propulsion is inevitable if the human race remains dedicated to exploration of the solar system. There are fundamental reasons why fusion surpasses more traditional approaches to routine crewed missions to Mars, crewed missions to the outer planets, and deep space high speed robotic missions, assuming that reduced trip times, increased payloads, and higher available power are desired. A recent series of informal discussions were held among members from government, academia, and industry concerning fusion propulsion. We compiled a sufficient set of arguments for utilizing fusion in space. If the U.S. is to lead the effort and produce a working system in a reasonable amount of time, NASA must take the initiative, relying on, but not waiting for, DOE guidance. In this talk those arguments for fusion propulsion are presented, along with fusion enabled mission examples, fusion technology trade space, and a proposed outline for future efforts.

  17. Acrosome Reaction as a Preparation for Gamete Fusion.

    PubMed

    Cuasnicú, Patricia S; Da Ros, Vanina G; Weigel Muñoz, Mariana; Cohen, Débora J

    2016-01-01

    The acrosome reaction (AR) is a universal requisite for sperm-egg fusion. However, whereas through the animal kingdom fusion of spermatozoa with the egg plasma membrane occurs via the inner acrosomal membrane exposed after the AR, in eutherian mammals, gamete fusion takes place through a specialized region of the acrosome known as the equatorial segment (ES) which becomes fusogenic only after the AR is completed. This chapter focuses on the different molecular mechanisms involved in the acquisition of the fusogenicity of the ES after the AR. We provide an update of the knowledge about the proteins proposed to have a role in this process either by modifying cytoskeletal and/or membrane molecules or by relocalizing to the ES after the AR to subsequently participate in gamete fusion. PMID:27194355

  18. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  19. Biochemical studies on cell fusion. II. Control of fusion response by lipid alteration

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The preceding communication (Roos, D.S. and P.W. Choppin, 1985, J. Cell Biol. 101:1578-1590) described the lipid composition of a series of mouse fibroblast cell lines which vary in susceptibility to the fusogenic effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Two alterations in lipid content were found to be directly correlated with resistance to PEG-induced cell fusion: increases in fatty acyl chain saturation, and the elevation of neutral glycerides, including an unusual ether-linked compound. In this study, we have probed the association between lipid composition and cell fusion through the use of fatty acid supplements to the cellular growth medium, and show that the fusibility of cells can be controlled by altering their acyl chain composition. The parental Clone 1D cells contain moderately unsaturated fatty acids with a ratio of saturates to polyunsaturates (S/P) approximately 1 and fuse virtually to completion following a standard PEG treatment. By contrast, the lipids of a highly fusion-resistant mutant cell line, F40, are highly saturated (S/P approximately 4). When the S/P ratio of Clone 1D cells was increased to approximate that normally found in F40 cells by growth in the presence of high concentrations of saturated fatty acids, they became highly resistant to PEG. Reduction of the S/P ratio of F40 cells by growth in cis-polyunsaturated fatty acids rendered them susceptible to fusion. Cell lines F8, F16, etc., which are normally intermediate between Clone 1D and F40 in both lipid composition and fusion response, can be altered in either direction (towards either increased or decreased susceptibility to fusion) by the addition of appropriate fatty acids to the growth medium. Although trans-unsaturated fatty acids have phase-transition temperatures roughly similar to saturated compounds, and might therefore be expected to affect membrane fluidity in a similar manner, trans-unsaturated fatty acids exerted the same effect as cis-unsaturates on the control of PEG

  20. Instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with interbody fusion device (Cage) in degenerative disc disease (DDD): 3 years outcome.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M K; Hossain, M A; Sakeb, N; Khan, S I; Zaman, N

    2013-10-01

    This prospective interventional study carried out at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University and a private hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh during the period from October 2003 to September 2011. Surgical treatment of degenerative disc disease (DDD) should aim to re-expand the interbody space and stabilize until fusion is complete. The present study conducted to find out the efficacy of using interbody fusion device (Cage) to achieve interbody space re-expansion and fusion in surgical management of DDD. We have performed the interventional study on 53 patients, 42 female and 11 male, with age between 40 to 67 years. All the patients were followed up for 36 to 60 months (average 48 months). Forty seven patients were with spondylolisthesis and 06 with desiccated disc. All subjects were evaluated with regard to immediate and long term complications, radiological fusion and interbody space re-expansion and maintenance. The clinical outcome (pain and disability) was scored by standard pre and postoperative questionnaires. Intrusion, extrusion and migration of the interbody fusion cage were also assessed. Forty seven patients were considered to have satisfactory outcome in at least 36 months follow up. Pseudoarthrosis developed in 04 cases and 06 patients developed complications. In this series posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with interbody cage and instrumentation in DDD showed significant fusion rate and maintenance of interbody space. Satisfactory outcome observed in 88.68% cases.

  1. Unconventional approaches to fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Brunelli, B.; Leotta, G.G.

    1982-01-01

    This volume is dedicated to unconventional approaches to fusionthose thermonuclear reactors that, in comparison with Tokamak and other main lines, have received little attention in the worldwide scientific community. Many of the approaches considered are still in the embryonic stages. The authors-an international group of active nuclear scientists and engineers-focus on the parameters achieved in the use of these reactors and on the meaning of the most recent physical studies and their implications for the future. They also compare these approaches with conventional ones, the Tokamak in particular, stressing the non-plasma-physics requirements of fusion reactors. Unconventional compact toroids, linear systems, and multipoles are considered, as are the ''almost conventional'' fusion machines: stellarators, mirrors, reversed-field pinches, and EBT.

  2. Fusion Data Grid Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shasharina, Svetlana; Wang, Nanbor

    2004-11-01

    Simulations and experiments in the fusion and plasma physics community generate large datasets at remote sites. Visualization and analysis of these datasets are difficult because of the incompatibility among the various data formats adopted by simulation, experiments, and analysis tools, and the large sizes of analyzed data. Grids and Web Services technologies are capable of providing solutions for such heterogeneous settings, but need to be customized to the field-specific needs and merged with distributed technologies currently used by the community. This paper describes how we are addressing these issues in the Fusion Grid Service under development. We also present performance results of relevant data transfer mechanisms including binary SOAP, DIME, GridFTP and MDSplus and CORBA. We will describe the status of data converters (between HDF5 and MDSplus data types), developed in collaboration with MIT (J. Stillerman). Finally, we will analyze bottlenecks of MDSplus data transfer mechanism (work performed in collaboration with General Atomics (D. Schissel and M. Qian).

  3. Fusion pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, D.S.

    1987-07-31

    The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Experiments in cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-03-28

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models.

  5. Late stages of the synchronized macrophage fusion in osteoclast formation depend on dynamin.

    PubMed

    Verma, Santosh K; Leikina, Evgenia; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2014-12-15

    Macrophage fusion that leads to osteoclast formation is one of the most important examples of cell-cell fusion in development, tissue homoeostasis and immune response. Protein machinery that fuses macrophages remains to be identified. In the present study, we explored the fusion stage of osteoclast formation for RAW macrophage-like murine cells and for macrophages derived from human monocytes. To uncouple fusion from the preceding differentiation processes, we accumulated fusion-committed cells in the presence of LPC (lysophosphatidylcholine) that reversibly blocks membrane merger. After 16 h, we removed LPC and observed cell fusion events that would normally develop within 16 h develop instead within 30-90 min. Thus, whereas osteoclastogenesis, generally, takes several days, our approach allowed us to focus on an hour in which we observe robust fusion between the cells. Complementing syncytium formation assay with a novel membrane merger assay let us study the synchronized fusion events downstream of a local merger between two plasma membranes, but before expansion of nascent membrane connections and complete unification of the cells. We found that the expansion of membrane connections detected as a growth of multinucleated osteoclasts depends on dynamin activity. In contrast, a merger between the plasma membranes of the two cells was not affected by inhibitors of dynamin GTPase. Thus dynamin that was recently found to control late stages of myoblast fusion also controls late stages of macrophage fusion, revealing an intriguing conserved mechanistic motif shared by diverse cell-cell fusion processes. PMID:25336256

  6. Modular Aneutronic Fusion Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Pajer, Yosef Razin, Michael Paluszek, A.H. Glasser and Samuel Cohen

    2012-05-11

    NASA's JUNO mission will arrive at Jupiter in July 2016, after nearly five years in space. Since operational costs tend to rise with mission time, minimizing such times becomes a top priority. We present the conceptual design for a 10MW aneutronic fusion engine with high exhaust velocities that would reduce transit time for a Jupiter mission to eighteen months and enable more challenging exploration missions in the solar system and beyond. __________________________________________________

  7. Inertial Confinement fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques were devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems, and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  8. (Fusion energy research)

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  9. Fusion development and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following: superconducting magnet technology; high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies--aries; ITER physics: alpha physics and alcator R D for ITER; lower hybrid current drive and heating in the ITER device; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; ITER systems studies; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development.

  10. Complete binasal hemianopia

    PubMed Central

    Pomeranz, Howard D.; Smith, Kyle H.

    2014-01-01

    Binasal hemianopia is a rarely encountered visual field defect. We examined two asymptomatic female patients, aged 17 and 83, with complete binasal hemianopia. Both patients had unremarkable eye exams except for the visual field deficits and minimally reduced visual acuity and color vision. Both patients had normal neuroimaging. These are the first reported cases of complete binasal visual field defects without an identifiable ocular or neurologic cause. PMID:25484511

  11. Cold fusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hembree, D. M.; Burchfield, L. A.; Fuller, E. L., Jr.; Perey, F. G.; Mamantov, G.

    1990-06-01

    A series of experiments designed to detect the by-products expected from deuterium fusion occurring in the palladium and titanium cathodes of heavy water, D2O, electrolysis cells is reported. The primary purpose of this account is to outline the integrated experimental design developed to test the cold fusion hypothesis and to report preliminary results that support continuing the investigation. Apparent positive indicators of deuterium fusion were observed, but could not be repeated or proved to originate from the electrochemical cells. In one instance, two large increases in the neutron count rate, the largest of which exceeded the background by 27 standard deviations, were observed. In a separate experiment, one of the calorimetry cells appeared to be producing approximately 18 percent more power that the input value, but thermistor failure prevented an accurate recording of the event as a function of time. In general, the tritium levels in most cells followed the slow enrichment expected from the electrolysis of D2O containing a small amount of tritium. However, after 576 hours of electrolysis, one cell developed a tritium concentration approximately seven times greater than expected level.

  12. Nucleus-nucleus cold fusion reactions analyzed with the l-dependent 'fusion by diffusion' model

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilczynski, J.

    2011-05-15

    We present a modified version of the Fusion by Diffusion (FBD) model aimed at describing the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, in which a low excited compound nucleus emits only one neutron. The modified FBD model accounts for the angular momentum dependence of three basic factors determining the evaporation residue cross section: the capture cross section {sigma}{sub cap}(l), the fusion probability P{sub fus}(l), and the survival probability P{sub surv}(l). The fusion hindrance factor, the inverse of P{sub fus}(l), is treated in terms of thermal fluctuations in the shape degrees of freedom and is expressed as a solution of the Smoluchowski diffusion equation. The l dependence of P{sub fus}(l) results from the l-dependent potential energy surface of the colliding system. A new parametrization of the distance of starting point of the diffusion process is introduced. An analysis of a complete set of 27 excitation functions for production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, studied in experiments at GSI Darmstadt, RIKEN Tokyo, and LBNL Berkeley, is presented. The FBD model satisfactorily reproduces shapes and absolute cross sections of all the cold fusion excitation functions. It is shown that the peak position of the excitation function for a given 1n reaction is determined by the Q value of the reaction and the height of the fission barrier of the final nucleus. This fact could possibly be used in future experiments (with well-defined beam energy) for experimental determination of the fission barrier heights.

  13. Complete Maxillo-Mandibular Syngnathia in a Newborn with Multiple Congenital Malformations.

    PubMed

    Broome, M; Vial, Y; Jacquemont, S; Sergi, C; Kamnasaran, D; Giannoni, E

    2016-02-01

    Syngnathia is an extremely rare condition involving congenital fusion of the maxilla with the mandible. Clinical presentations vary from simple mucosal bands (synechiae) to complete bony fusion (synostosis). Most cases are unilateral incomplete fusions. We report the case of a severely growth-retarded newborn infant with complete synostosis of the mandible with the maxilla and the zygoma associated with cleft palate, choanal atresia, deafness, delayed cerebral white matter development, and genital and limb malformations. Extensive genetic analysis did not reveal any mutations. This association of multiple congenital malformations may represent an entity distinct from previously described syndromes associated with syngnathia.

  14. Generation of New M2e-HA2 Fusion Chimeric Peptide to Development of a Recombinant Fusion Protein Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ameghi, Ali; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghaiypour, Khosrow; Barzegar, Abolfazl; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Yones; Moghadampour, Masood; Taghizadeh, Morteza; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to design a new construction containing influenza virus (H1N1) M2e gene and HA2 gene by bioinformatics approach, cloning the construct in to Escherichia coli and produce M2e-HA2 peptide. Methods: The procedure was done by virus cultivation in SPF eggs, hemagglutination assay (HA), RNA isolation, RT-PCR, primers designed (DNAMAN 4 and Oligo7), virtual fusion construction translation (ExPASy), N-Glycosylated sites prediction (Ensemblegly-Iowa), complete open reading frame (ORF), stop codon studied (NCBI ORF Finder), rare codon determination (GenScript), Solvent accessibility of epitopes (Swiss-PdbViewer), antigenic sites prediction (Protean), fusion PCR of M2e-HA2 gene, sequence analysis, nested PCR, gel electrophoresis, double digestion of pET22b(+) plasmid and the fusion construct, ligation of them, transformation of the ligated vector (pET22b-M2e-HA2) to E.coli (BL21), mass culture the cloned bacterium ,induction the expression by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), purification the fusion peptide by Ni-NTA column, western blot to verify the purification. Results: In this study we developed a new approach for fusion of Influenza virus M2e (96 nucleotides) and HA2 (663 nucleotides) genes based on fusion PCR strategy and produced a fused fragment with 793 nucleotides. The construct was successfully cloned and expressed. Conclusion: This construct is a 261 amino acid chimeric fusion peptide with about 30 KD molecular weight. According on the latest information; this is the first case of expression and purification M2e-HA2 fusion chimeric peptide, which could be used for development of a recombinant M2e-HA2 fusion protein vaccine. PMID:26793615

  15. Distributed data fusion across multiple hard and soft mobile sensor platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinsley, Gregory

    One of the biggest challenges currently facing the robotics field is sensor data fusion. Unmanned robots carry many sophisticated sensors including visual and infrared cameras, radar, laser range finders, chemical sensors, accelerometers, gyros, and global positioning systems. By effectively fusing the data from these sensors, a robot would be able to form a coherent view of its world that could then be used to facilitate both autonomous and intelligent operation. Another distinct fusion problem is that of fusing data from teammates with data from onboard sensors. If an entire team of vehicles has the same worldview they will be able to cooperate much more effectively. Sharing worldviews is made even more difficult if the teammates have different sensor types. The final fusion challenge the robotics field faces is that of fusing data gathered by robots with data gathered by human teammates (soft sensors). Humans sense the world completely differently from robots, which makes this problem particularly difficult. The advantage of fusing data from humans is that it makes more information available to the entire team, thus helping each agent to make the best possible decisions. This thesis presents a system for fusing data from multiple unmanned aerial vehicles, unmanned ground vehicles, and human observers. The first issue this thesis addresses is that of centralized data fusion. This is a foundational data fusion issue, which has been very well studied. Important issues in centralized fusion include data association, classification, tracking, and robotics problems. Because these problems are so well studied, this thesis does not make any major contributions in this area, but does review it for completeness. The chapter on centralized fusion concludes with an example unmanned aerial vehicle surveillance problem that demonstrates many of the traditional fusion methods. The second problem this thesis addresses is that of distributed data fusion. Distributed data fusion

  16. Sensor fusion for synthetic vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.; Larimer, J.; Ahumada, A.

    1991-01-01

    Display methodologies are explored for fusing images gathered by millimeter wave sensors with images rendered from an on-board terrain data base to facilitate visually guided flight and ground operations in low visibility conditions. An approach to fusion based on multiresolution image representation and processing is described which facilitates fusion of images differing in resolution within and between images. To investigate possible fusion methods, a workstation-based simulation environment is being developed.

  17. Inertial fusion research in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X. T.; Zhang, W. Y.

    2007-08-01

    The goal of the first milestone of the inertial fusion program in China is to reach fusion ignition and plasma burning in about 2020. Under the program, in the past years, the inertial fusion physics research achieved great progress; the laser facilities and the support technologies for laser drivers are advanced; the advanced diagnostic techniques are developed and the relatively integrated system is set up; the precise target fabrications are coordinately developed.

  18. Lithium question for nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, P.S.S.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the lithium reserve (the economically recoverable lithium) for the tritium breeding in D-T fusion reactors and other uses. Similar development patterns for fusion energy and fission energy are assumed to estimate the future lithium requirements. These requirements are grouped into three categories; the commercial uses, the lithium batteries for electric cars, and the fusion reactor uses. 5 refs.

  19. EDITORIAL: The Nuclear Fusion Award The Nuclear Fusion Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Fusion Award ceremony for 2009 and 2010 award winners was held during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. This time, both 2009 and 2010 award winners were celebrated by the IAEA and the participants of the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. The Nuclear Fusion Award is a paper prize to acknowledge the best distinguished paper among the published papers in a particular volume of the Nuclear Fusion journal. Among the top-cited and highly-recommended papers chosen by the Editorial Board, excluding overview and review papers, and by analyzing self-citation and non-self-citation with an emphasis on non-self-citation, the Editorial Board confidentially selects ten distinguished papers as nominees for the Nuclear Fusion Award. Certificates are given to the leading authors of the Nuclear Fusion Award nominees. The final winner is selected among the ten nominees by the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Board voting confidentially. 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award nominees For the 2009 award, the papers published in the 2006 volume were assessed and the following papers were nominated, most of which are magnetic confinement experiments, theory and modeling, while one addresses inertial confinement. Sabbagh S.A. et al 2006 Resistive wall stabilized operation in rotating high beta NSTX plasmas Nucl. Fusion 46 635-44 La Haye R.J. et al 2006 Cross-machine benchmarking for ITER of neoclassical tearing mode stabilization by electron cyclotron current drive Nucl. Fusion 46 451-61 Honrubia J.J. et al 2006 Three-dimensional fast electron transport for ignition-scale inertial fusion capsules Nucl. Fusion 46 L25-8 Ido T. et al 2006 Observation of the interaction between the geodesic acoustic mode and ambient fluctuation in the JFT-2M tokamak Nucl. Fusion 46 512-20 Plyusnin V.V. et al 2006 Study of runaway electron generation during major disruptions in JET Nucl. Fusion 46 277-84 Pitts R.A. et al 2006 Far SOL ELM ion energies in JET Nucl. Fusion 46 82-98 Berk H.L. et al 2006

  20. High Level Information Fusion (HLIF) with nested fusion loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, Robert; Gosnell, Michael; Fischer, Amber

    2013-05-01

    Situation modeling and threat prediction require higher levels of data fusion in order to provide actionable information. Beyond the sensor data and sources the analyst has access to, the use of out-sourced and re-sourced data is becoming common. Through the years, some common frameworks have emerged for dealing with information fusion—perhaps the most ubiquitous being the JDL Data Fusion Group and their initial 4-level data fusion model. Since these initial developments, numerous models of information fusion have emerged, hoping to better capture the human-centric process of data analyses within a machine-centric framework. 21st Century Systems, Inc. has developed Fusion with Uncertainty Reasoning using Nested Assessment Characterizer Elements (FURNACE) to address challenges of high level information fusion and handle bias, ambiguity, and uncertainty (BAU) for Situation Modeling, Threat Modeling, and Threat Prediction. It combines JDL fusion levels with nested fusion loops and state-of-the-art data reasoning. Initial research has shown that FURNACE is able to reduce BAU and improve the fusion process by allowing high level information fusion (HLIF) to affect lower levels without the double counting of information or other biasing issues. The initial FURNACE project was focused on the underlying algorithms to produce a fusion system able to handle BAU and repurposed data in a cohesive manner. FURNACE supports analyst's efforts to develop situation models, threat models, and threat predictions to increase situational awareness of the battlespace. FURNACE will not only revolutionize the military intelligence realm, but also benefit the larger homeland defense, law enforcement, and business intelligence markets.

  1. Economic potential of inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1984-04-01

    Beyond the achievement of scientific feasibility, the key question for fusion energy is: does it have the economic potential to be significantly cheaper than fission and coal energy. If fusion has this high economic potential then there are compelling commercial and geopolitical incentives to accelerate the pace of the fusion program in the near term, and to install a global fusion energy system in the long term. Without this high economic potential, fusion's success depends on the failure of all alternatives, and there is no real incentive to accelerate the program. If my conjectures on the economic potential of inertial fusion are approximately correct, then inertial fusion energy's ultimate costs may be only half to two-thirds those of advanced fission and coal energy systems. Relative cost escalation is not assumed and could increase this advantage. Both magnetic and inertial approaches to fusion potentially have a two-fold economic advantage which derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity. The wining approach to fusion may excel in three areas: electrical generating efficiency, minimum material costs, and adaptability to manufacture in automated factories. The winning approach must also rate highly in environmental potential, safety, availability factor, lifetime, small 0 and M costs, and no possibility of utility-disabling accidents.

  2. Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons in Weak Boson Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hollik, Wolfgang; Plehn, Tilman; Rauch, Michael; Rzehak, Heidi

    2009-03-06

    We compute the complete supersymmetric next-to-leading-order corrections to the production of a light Higgs boson in weak-boson fusion. The size of the electroweak corrections is of similar order as the next-to-leading-order corrections in the standard model. The supersymmetric QCD corrections turn out to be significantly smaller than expected and than their electroweak counterparts. These corrections are an important ingredient to a precision analysis of the (supersymmetric) Higgs sector at the LHC, either as a known correction factor or as a contribution to the theory error.

  3. Congenital complete atrioventricular block.

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, N J; Fenrich, A L; Friedman, R A

    1997-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular block is found in 1 of 22,000 live births. Over time, it has become apparent that these patients represent not a single distinct disease process, but several processes with the common manifestation of atrioventricular block. The evaluation of these patients to determine their risk of sudden death and need for pacing is not well defined. Images PMID:9456483

  4. Making College Completion Personal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Heather

    2011-01-01

    There are countless justifications for why young adults, faced with so many distractions, do not complete their educations. Many students fail to finish college because of a lack of information and understanding about healthy relationships and sex education. The author's own struggles and eventual successes as a student and mother compelled her to…

  5. Completing a Simple Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Timothy F.; Adams, Jeffrey P.; Brown, Thomas R.

    2000-01-01

    Students have problems successfully arranging an electric circuit to make the bulb produce light. Investigates the percentage of students able to complete a circuit with a given apparatus, and the effects of prior experience on student success. Recommends hands-on activities at the elementary and secondary school levels. (Contains 14 references.)…

  6. Beyond FASFA Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleman, Ben; Page, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)--which students must complete to qualify for most federal, state, and institutional financial aid--is a gateway to college through which many students must pass, particularly those from low- to moderate-income households (King, 2004; Kofoed, 2013). Yet given the complexity of the…

  7. The intracellular domain of Dumbfounded affects myoblast fusion efficiency and interacts with Rolling pebbles and Loner.

    PubMed

    Bulchand, Sarada; Menon, Sree Devi; George, Simi Elizabeth; Chia, William

    2010-02-23

    Drosophila body wall muscles are multinucleated syncytia formed by successive fusions between a founder myoblast and several fusion competent myoblasts. Initial fusion gives rise to a bi/trinucleate precursor followed by more fusion cycles forming a mature muscle. This process requires the functions of various molecules including the transmembrane myoblast attractants Dumbfounded (Duf) and its paralogue Roughest (Rst), a scaffold protein Rolling pebbles (Rols) and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor Loner. Fusion completely fails in a duf, rst mutant, and is blocked at the bi/trinucleate stage in rols and loner single mutants. We analysed the transmembrane and intracellular domains of Duf, by mutating conserved putative signaling sites and serially deleting the intracellular domain. These were tested for their ability to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner and to rescue the fusion defect in duf, rst mutant embryos. Studying combinations of double mutants, further tested the function of Rols, Loner and other fusion molecules. Here we show that serial truncations of the Duf intracellular domain successively compromise its function to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner in addition to affecting myoblast fusion efficiency in embryos. Putative phosphorylation sites function additively while the extreme C terminus including a PDZ binding domain is dispensable for its function. We also show that fusion is completely blocked in a rols, loner double mutant and is compromised in other double mutants. These results suggest an additive function of the intracellular domain of Duf and an early function of Rols and Loner which is independent of Duf.

  8. Cold nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, E. N.; Bavizhev, M. D.; Buryakov, M. G.; Dabagov, S. B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Lobastov, S. P.

    2015-07-01

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction's theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300-700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of 4He∗.

  9. Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.; Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  10. Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.; Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  11. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Kainz, Birgit; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Toca-Herrera, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins.

  12. Sensor fusion for improved indoor navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilsson, Erika; Rydell, Joakim

    2012-09-01

    A reliable indoor positioning system providing high accuracy has the potential to increase the safety of first responders and military personnel significantly. To enable navigation in a broad range of environments and obtain more accurate and robust positioning results, we propose a multi-sensor fusion approach. We describe and evaluate a positioning system, based on sensor fusion between a foot-mounted inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a camera-based system for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). The complete system provides accurate navigation in many relevant environments without depending on preinstalled infrastructure. The camera-based system uses both inertial measurements and visual data, thereby enabling navigation also in environments and scenarios where one of the sensors provides unreliable data during a few seconds. When sufficient light is available, the camera-based system generally provides good performance. The foot-mounted system provides accurate positioning when distinct steps can be detected, e.g., during walking and running, even in dark or smoke-filled environments. By combining the two systems, the integrated positioning system can be expected to enable accurate navigation in almost all kinds of environments and scenarios. In this paper we present results from initial tests, which show that the proposed sensor fusion improves the navigation solution considerably in scenarios where either the foot-mounted or camera-based system is unable to navigate on its own.

  13. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  14. Physics of Fusion Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Applicabilities and limitations of three techniques analyzed. NASA technical memorandum discusses physics of electron-beam, gas/ tungsten-arc, and laser-beam welding. From comparison of capabilities and limitations of each technique with regard to various welding conditions and materials, possible to develop criteria for selecting best welding technique in specific application. All three techniques classified as fusion welding; small volume of workpiece melted by intense heat source. Heat source moved along seam, leaving in wake solid metal that joins seam edges together.

  15. Implementation of multispectral image fusion system based on SoPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Lingfei; Wang, Zhihui

    2013-10-01

    Combining the theory of wavelet transform based image fusion and SOPC design method, the authors uses SOPC as the core device to design and implement a image fusion system. The fusion system adopts the Verilog hardware description language, Dsp builder and Quartus II development platform together with macro module to complete the logic design and timing control of each module. In the fusion system, we can achieve simple pixel-level image fusion of two registered images. This design not only builds up an image fusion system based on SOPC in accident, but also provides a hardware design principle in SoPC for the future design and Implementation of more comprehensive function of image processing.

  16. Experimental Test of the Polarization Persistence in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didelez, J. P.; Deutsch, C.; Fujiwara, M.; Nakai, M.; Utsuro, M.

    2016-03-01

    The complete deuteron and triton polarization in the DT fusion increases the reactivity by 50%. For Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), due to the dynamics of the fusion reaction process, the fusion rate could even be further increased. It has been argued that the polarization would survive as well in magnetic as in inertial confinements. Recently, we have proposed an experiment to test the persistence of the polarization in a fusion process, using a powerful laser hitting a polarized HD target.The polarized deuterons heated in the plasma induced by the laser can fuse. The corresponding reaction is: D + D → 3He + n. The angular distribution of the emitted neutrons and the change in the corresponding total cross section are signatures to estimate the polarization persistency. A proposal to test the persistence of the polarization in ICF has been accepted at ILE: the POLAF project (POlarization in LAser Fusion Process). It uses the polarized HD targets produced at RCNP and the powerful ILE lasers, as well as the neutron detectors existing there. Both institutions are on the same campus at Osaka University. The description of the POLAF experiment and of the corresponding set-up is given.

  17. Magnetless magnetic fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemishev, A. D.; Tajima, T.

    1994-02-01

    The authors propose a concept of thermonuclear fusion reactor in which the plasma pressure is balanced by direct gas-wall interaction in a high-pressure vessel. The energy confinement is achieved by means of the self-contained toroidal magnetic configuration sustained by an external current drive or charged fusion products. This field structure causes the plasma pressure to decrease toward the inside of the discharge and thus it should be magnetohydrodynamically stable. The maximum size, temperature and density profiles of the reactor are estimated. An important feature of confinement physics is the thin layer of cold gas at the wall and the adjacent transitional region of dense arc-like plasma. The burning condition is determined by the balance between these nonmagnetized layers and the current-carrying plasma. They suggest several questions for future investigation, such as the thermal stability of the transition layer and the possibility of an effective heating and current drive behind the dense edge plasma. The main advantage of this scheme is the absence of strong external magnets and, consequently, potentially cheaper design and lower energy consumption.

  18. Multispectral bilateral video fusion.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Eric P; Mason, John L; McMillan, Leonard

    2007-05-01

    We present a technique for enhancing underexposed visible-spectrum video by fusing it with simultaneously captured video from sensors in nonvisible spectra, such as Short Wave IR or Near IR. Although IR sensors can accurately capture video in low-light and night-vision applications, they lack the color and relative luminances of visible-spectrum sensors. RGB sensors do capture color and correct relative luminances, but are underexposed, noisy, and lack fine features due to short video exposure times. Our enhanced fusion output is a reconstruction of the RGB input assisted by the IR data, not an incorporation of elements imaged only in IR. With a temporal noise reduction, we first remove shot noise and increase the color accuracy of the RGB footage. The IR video is then normalized to ensure cross-spectral compatibility with the visible-spectrum video using ratio images. To aid fusion, we decompose the video sources with edge-preserving filters. We introduce a multispectral version of the bilateral filter called the "dual bilateral" that robustly decomposes the RGB video. It utilizes the less-noisy IR for edge detection but also preserves strong visible-spectrum edges not in the IR. We fuse the RGB low frequencies, the IR texture details, and the dual bilateral edges into a noise-reduced video with sharp details, correct chrominances, and natural relative luminances. PMID:17491451

  19. Inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, L.; Condouris, R.; Kotowski, M.; Murphy, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains seven articles that describe recent progress in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's ICF program. The Department of Energy recently initiated an effort to design a 1--2 MJ glass laser, the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). These articles span various aspects of a program which is aimed at moving forward toward such a facility by continuing to use the Nova laser to gain understanding of NIF-relevant target physics, by developing concepts for an NIF laser driver, and by envisioning a variety of applications for larger ICF facilities. This report discusses research on the following topics: Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering in Nitrogen; A Maxwell Equation Solver in LASNEX for the Simulation of Moderately Intense Ultrashort Pulse Experiments; Measurements of Radial Heat-Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Plasmas; Laser-Seeded Modulation Growth on Directly Driven Foils; Stimulated Raman Scattering in Large-Aperture, High-Fluence Frequency-Conversion Crystals; Fission Product Hazard Reduction Using Inertial Fusion Energy; Use of Inertial Confinement Fusion for Nuclear Weapons Effects Simulations.

  20. Thermonuclear Fusion Research Progress and the Way to the Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Raymond

    2006-06-01

    The paper reviews the progress of fusion research and its prospects for electricity generation. It starts with a reminder of the principles of thermonuclear fusion and a brief discussion of its potential role in the future of the world energy production. The reactions allowing energy production by fusion of nuclei in stars and on earth and the conditions required to sustain them are reviewed. At the high temperatures required for fusion (hundred millions kelvins), matter is completely ionized and has reached what is called its 4th state: the plasma state. The possible means to achieve these extreme temperatures is discussed. The remainder of the paper focuses on the most promising of these approaches, magnetic confinement. The operating principles of the presently most efficient machine of this type — the tokamak — is described in some detail. On the road to producing energy with fusion, a number of obstacles have to be overcome. The plasma, a fluid that reacts to electromagnetic forces and carries currents and charges, is a complex medium. Fusion plasma is strongly heated and is therefore a good example of a system far from equilibrium. A wide variety of instabilities can grow in this system and lead to self-organized structures and spontaneous cycles. Turbulence is generated that degrades the confinement and hinders easy achievement of long lasting hot plasmas. Physicists have learned how to quench turbulence, thereby creating sort of insulating bottles inside the plasma itself to circumvent this problem. The recent history of fusion performance is outlined and the prospect of achieving power generation by fusion in a near future is discussed in the light of the development of the "International Tokamak Experimental Reactor" project ITER.

  1. Helium Find Thaws the Cold Fusion Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, E.

    1991-01-01

    Reported is a study of cold fusion in which trace amounts of helium, possible evidence of an actual fusion reaction, were found. Research methodology is detailed. The controversy over the validity of experimental results with cold fusion are reviewed. (CW)

  2. Multi-sensor fusion development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bish, Sheldon; Rohrer, Matthew; Scheffel, Peter; Bennett, Kelly

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and McQ Inc. are developing a generic sensor fusion architecture that involves several diverse processes working in combination to create a dynamic task-oriented, real-time informational capability. Processes include sensor data collection, persistent and observational data storage, and multimodal and multisensor fusion that includes the flexibility to modify the fusion program rules for each mission. Such a fusion engine lends itself to a diverse set of sensing applications and architectures while using open-source software technologies. In this paper, we describe a fusion engine architecture that combines multimodal and multi-sensor fusion within an Open Standard for Unattended Sensors (OSUS) framework. The modular, plug-and-play architecture of OSUS allows future fusion plugin methodologies to have seamless integration into the fusion architecture at the conceptual and implementation level. Although beyond the scope of this paper, this architecture allows for data and information manipulation and filtering for an array of applications.

  3. The status of cold fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, E.

    This report attempts to update the status of the phenomenon of cold fusion. The new field is continuing to grow as a variety of nuclear reactions are discovered to occur in a variety of chemical environments at modest temperatures. However, it must be cautioned that most scientists consider cold fusion as something akin to UFO's, ESP, and numerology.

  4. Data fusion qualitative sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.A.; Lewis, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked with testing, debugging, and refining the Hanford Site data fusion workstation (DFW), with the assistance of Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), before delivering the DFW to the environmental restoration client at the Hanford Site. Data fusion is the mathematical combination (or fusion) of disparate data sets into a single interpretation. The data fusion software used in this study was developed by CRC. The data fusion software developed by CRC was initially demonstrated on a data set collected at the Hanford Site where three types of data were combined. These data were (1) seismic reflection, (2) seismic refraction, and (3) depth to geologic horizons. The fused results included a contour map of the top of a low-permeability horizon. This report discusses the results of a sensitivity analysis of data fusion software to variations in its input parameters. The data fusion software developed by CRC has a large number of input parameters that can be varied by the user and that influence the results of data fusion. Many of these parameters are defined as part of the earth model. The earth model is a series of 3-dimensional polynomials with horizontal spatial coordinates as the independent variables and either subsurface layer depth or values of various properties within these layers (e.g., compression wave velocity, resistivity) as the dependent variables.

  5. The quest for fusion power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Steven C.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion power is one of a very few sustainable options to replace fossil fuels as the world's primary energy source. Although the conditions for fusion have been reached, much remains to be done to turn scientific success into commercial electrical power.

  6. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  7. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  8. Cold fusion; Myth versus reality

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Experiments indicate that several different nuclear reactions are taking place. Some of the experiments point to D-D fusion with a cominant tritium channel as one of the reactions. The article notes a similarity between Prometheus and the discoveries of cold fusion.

  9. Deployment of membrane fusion protein domains during fusion.

    PubMed

    Bentz, J; Mittal, A

    2000-01-01

    It is clear that both viral and intracellular membrane fusion proteins contain a minimal set of domains which must be deployed at the appropriate time during the fusion process. An account of these domains and their functions is given here for the four best-described fusion systems: influenza HA, sendai virus F1, HIV gp120/41 and the neuronal SNARE core composed of synaptobrevin (syn), syntaxin (stx) and the N- and C-termini of SNAP25 (sn25), together with the Ca(2+)binding protein synaptotagmin (syt). Membrane fusion begins with the binding of the virion or vesicle to the target membrane via receptors. The committed step in influenza HA- mediated fusion begins with an aggregate of HAs (at least eight) with some of their HA2 N-termini, a.k.a. fusion peptides, embedded into the viral bilayer (Bentz, 2000 a). The hypothesis presented in Bentz (2000 b) is that the conformational change of HA to the extended coiled coil extracts the fusion peptides from the viral bilayer. When this extraction occurs from the center of the site of restricted lipid flow, it exposes acyl chains and parts of the HA transmembrane domains to the aqueous media, i.e. a hydrophobic defect is formed. This is the 'transition state' of the committed step of fusion. It is stabilized by a 'dam' of HAs, which are inhibited from diffusing away by the rest of the HAs in the aggregate and because that would initially expose more acyl chains to water. Recruitment of lipids from the apposed target membrane can heal this hydrophobic defect, initiating lipid mixing and fusion. The HA transmembrane domains are required to be part of the hydrophobic defect, because the HA aggregate must be closely packed enough to restrict lipid flow. This hypothesis provides a simple and direct coupling between the energy released by the formation of the coiled coil to the energy needed to create and stabilize the high energy intermediates of fusion. Several of these essential domains have been described for the viral fusion

  10. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  11. Is there hope for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T.K. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-04-12

    From the outset in the 1950's, fusion research has been motivated by environmental concerns as well as long-term fuel supply issues. Compared to fossil fuels both fusion and fission would produce essentially zero emissions to the atmosphere. Compared to fission, fusion reactors should offer high demonstrability of public protection from accidents and a substantial amelioration of the radioactive waste problem. Fusion still requires lengthy development, the earliest commercial deployment being likely to occur around 2025--2050. However, steady scientific progress is being made and there is a wide consensus that it is time to plan large-scale engineering development. A major international effort, called the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is being carried out under IAEA auspices to design the world's first fusion engineering test reactor, which could be constructed in the 1990's. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Magnetic fusion energy and computers

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.

    1982-01-01

    The application of computers to magnetic fusion energy research is essential. In the last several years the use of computers in the numerical modeling of fusion systems has increased substantially. There are several categories of computer models used to study the physics of magnetically confined plasmas. A comparable number of types of models for engineering studies are also in use. To meet the needs of the fusion program, the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A large central computing facility is linked to smaller computer centers at each of the major MFE laboratories by a communication network. In addition to providing cost effective computing services, the NMFECC environment stimulates collaboration and the sharing of computer codes among the various fusion research groups.

  13. Information integration for data fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, O.H.

    1997-01-01

    Data fusion has been identified by the Department of Defense as a critical technology for the U.S. defense industry. Data fusion requires combining expertise in two areas - sensors and information integration. Although data fusion is a rapidly growing area, there is little synergy and use of common, reusable, and/or tailorable objects and models, especially across different disciplines. The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project had two purposes: to see if a natural language-based information modeling methodology could be used for data fusion problems, and if so, to determine whether this methodology would help identify commonalities across areas and achieve greater synergy. The project confirmed both of the initial hypotheses: that the natural language-based information modeling methodology could be used effectively in data fusion areas and that commonalities could be found that would allow synergy across various data fusion areas. The project found five common objects that are the basis for all of the data fusion areas examined: targets, behaviors, environments, signatures, and sensors. Many of the objects and the specific facts related to these objects were common across several areas and could easily be reused. In some cases, even the terminology remained the same. In other cases, different areas had their own terminology, but the concepts were the same. This commonality is important with the growing use of multisensor data fusion. Data fusion is much more difficult if each type of sensor uses its own objects and models rather than building on a common set. This report introduces data fusion, discusses how the synergy generated by this LDRD would have benefited an earlier successful project and contains a summary information model from that project, describes a preliminary management information model, and explains how information integration can facilitate cross-treaty synergy for various arms control treaties.

  14. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

    2003-10-28

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

  15. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  16. Fusion pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

  17. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, D.L.

    1987-09-04

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

  18. Fusion pumped light source

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

  19. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  20. Soldier systems sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brubaker, Kathryne M.

    1998-08-01

    This paper addresses sensor fusion and its applications in emerging Soldier Systems integration and the unique challenges associated with the human platform. Technology that,provides the highest operational payoff in a lightweight warrior system must not only have enhanced capabilities, but have low power components resulting in order of magnitude reductions coupled with significant cost reductions. These reductions in power and cost will be achieved through partnership with industry and leveraging of commercial state of the art advancements in microelectronics and power sources. As new generation of full solution fire control systems (to include temperature, wind and range sensors) and target acquisition systems will accompany a new generation of individual combat weapons and upgrade existing weapon systems. Advanced lightweight thermal, IR, laser and video senors will be used for surveillance, target acquisition, imaging and combat identification applications. Multifunctional sensors will provide embedded training features in combat configurations allowing the soldier to 'train as he fights' without the traditional cost and weight penalties associated with separate systems. Personal status monitors (detecting pulse, respiration rate, muscle fatigue, core temperature, etc.) will provide commanders and highest echelons instantaneous medical data. Seamless integration of GPS and dead reckoning (compass and pedometer) and/or inertial sensors will aid navigation and increase position accuracy. Improved sensors and processing capability will provide earlier detection of battlefield hazards such as mines, enemy lasers and NBC (nuclear, biological, chemical) agents. Via the digitized network the situational awareness database will automatically be updated with weapon, medical, position and battlefield hazard data. Soldier Systems Sensor Fusion will ultimately establish each individual soldier as an individual sensor on the battlefield.

  1. Prospects for bubble fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, R.I.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  2. Insert tree completion system

    SciTech Connect

    Brands, K.W.; Ball, I.G.; Cegielski, E.J.; Gresham, J.S.; Saunders, D.N.

    1982-09-01

    This paper outlines the overall project for development and installation of a low-profile, caisson-installed subsea Christmas tree. After various design studies and laboratory and field tests of key components, a system for installation inside a 30-in. conductor was ordered in July 1978 from Cameron Iron Works Inc. The system is designed to have all critical-pressure-containing components below the mudline and, with the reduced profile (height) above seabed, provides for improved safety of satellite underwater wells from damage by anchors, trawl boards, and even icebergs. In addition to the innovative nature of the tree design, the completion includes improved 3 1/2-in. through flowline (TFL) pumpdown completion equipment with deep set safety valves and a dual detachable packer head for simplified workover capability. The all-hydraulic control system incorporates a new design of sequencing valve for both Christmas tree control and remote flowline connection. A semisubmersible drilling rig was used to initiate the first end flowline connection at the wellhead for subsequent tie-in to the prelaid, surface-towed, all-welded subsea pipeline bundle.

  3. Fission-fusion neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinnan; Yu, Gang

    2009-04-01

    In order to meet the requirements of fusion power reactors and nuclear waste treatment, a concept of fission-fusion neutron source is proposed, which consists of a LiD assembly located in the heavy water region of the China Advanced Research Reactor. This assembly of LiD fuel rods will be irradiated with slow neutrons and will produce fusion neutrons in the central hole via the reaction 6Li(n, α). More precisely, tritium ions with a high energy of 2.739 MeV will be produced in LiD by the impinging slow neutrons. The tritium ions will in turn bombard the deuterium ions present in the LiD assembly, which will induce fusion reaction and then the production of 14 MeV neutrons. The fusion reaction rate will increase with the accumulation of tritium in LiD by the reaction between tritium and deuteron recoils produced by the 14 MeV neutrons. When the concentration of tritium reaches 0.5 · 10 22 and the fraction of fusion reactions between tritium and deuteron recoils approaches 1, the 14 MeV neutron flux is doubled and redoubled, an so forth, approaching saturation in which the tritium produced at a time t is exhausted by the fusion reactions to keep constant the tritium concentration in LiD.

  4. Future of Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J H; Wood, L L

    2002-09-04

    In the past 50 years, fusion R&D programs have made enormous technical progress. Projected billion-dollar scale research facilities are designed to approach net energy production. In this century, scientific and engineering progress must continue until the economics of fusion power plants improves sufficiently to win large scale private funding in competition with fission and non-nuclear energy systems. This economic advantage must be sustained: trillion dollar investments will be required to build enough fusion power plants to generate ten percent of the world's energy. For Inertial Fusion Energy, multi-billion dollar driver costs must be reduced by up to an order of magnitude, to a small fraction of the total cost of the power plant. Major cost reductions could be achieved via substantial improvements in target performance-both higher gain and reduced ignition energy. Large target performance improvements may be feasible through a combination of design innovations, e.g., ''fast ignition,'' propagation down density gradients, and compression of fusion fuel with a combination of driver and chemical energy. The assumptions that limit projected performance of fusion targets should be carefully examined. The National Ignition Facility will enable development and testing of revolutionary targets designed to make possible economically competitive fusion power plants.

  5. Poxvirus entry and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Bernard . E-mail: bmoss@nih.gov

    2006-01-05

    The study of poxvirus entry and membrane fusion has been invigorated by new biochemical and microscopic findings that lead to the following conclusions: (1) the surface of the mature virion (MV), whether isolated from an infected cell or by disruption of the membrane wrapper of an extracellular virion, is comprised of a single lipid membrane embedded with non-glycosylated viral proteins; (2) the MV membrane fuses with the cell membrane, allowing the core to enter the cytoplasm and initiate gene expression; (3) fusion is mediated by a newly recognized group of viral protein components of the MV membrane, which are conserved in all members of the poxvirus family; (4) the latter MV entry/fusion proteins are required for cell to cell spread necessitating the disruption of the membrane wrapper of extracellular virions prior to fusion; and furthermore (5) the same group of MV entry/fusion proteins are required for virus-induced cell-cell fusion. Future research priorities include delineation of the roles of individual entry/fusion proteins and identification of cell receptors.

  6. Completely bootstrapped tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. ); Boozer, A.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields have been developed using a mean-field Ohm's law. The Ohm's law is coupled to a {Delta}{prime} stabilty analysis and a magnetic island growth equation in order to simulate the behavior of tokamak plasmas that are subject to tearing modes. In one set of calculations, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-stable regime of the tokamak is examined via the construction of an {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} diagram. The results confirm previous calculations that show that tearing modes introduce a stability boundary into the {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} space. In another series of simulations, the interaction between tearing modes and the bootstrap current is investigated. The results indicate that a completely bootstrapped tokamak may be possible, even in the absence of any externally applied loop voltage or current drive.

  7. SCUBA 2 Nears Completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, I.; Holland, W.; Fairley, A.; MacIntosh, M.; Walton, A.; Parker, W.; Irwin, K.; Hilton, G.; Peter, A.; Halpern, M.; Fich, M.

    2005-12-01

    The second generation submillimetre camera for the JCMT, SCUBA-2, is now in the Assembly-Integration-Test phase in the lab at the UK ATC Edinburgh. The prototype 850 and 450 micron arrays have both been tested at Cardiff and are well within specification. The cryogenic performance of the instrument has been verified with sub 100mK performance achieved and the prototype arrays will receive first light in the instrument before Christmas 2005. The science grade arrays are currently under production from NIST, University of Edinburgh and Raytheon and the first devices will arrive in the UK in November 2005. Testing of the complete system with the Multi-Channel-Electronics from UBC will commence in January and SCUBA-2 will be delivered to the JCMT in August 2006.

  8. Beyond complete positivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominy, Jason M.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-04-01

    We provide a general and consistent formulation for linear subsystem quantum dynamical maps, developed from a minimal set of postulates, primary among which is a relaxation of the usual, restrictive assumption of uncorrelated initial system-bath states. We describe the space of possibilities admitted by this formulation, namely that, far from being limited to only completely positive (CP) maps, essentially any C-linear, Hermiticity-preserving, trace-preserving map can arise as a legitimate subsystem dynamical map from a joint unitary evolution of a system coupled to a bath. The price paid for this added generality is a trade-off between the set of admissible initial states and the allowed set of joint system-bath unitary evolutions. As an application, we present a simple example of a non-CP map constructed as a subsystem dynamical map that violates some fundamental inequalities in quantum information theory, such as the quantum data processing inequality.

  9. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Zhaoqing; Jin Genming; Li Junqing; Scheid, Werner

    2007-10-15

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus, and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118, and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  10. Time of fusion of greater cornu with body of hyoid bone in Northwest Indians.

    PubMed

    Harjeet, Kaur; Synghal, Sanjeev; Kaur, Gagandeep; Aggarwal, Anjali; Wahee, Pratima

    2010-09-01

    Time of fusion of hyoid is of considerable interest for forensic experts in estimating the age of an individual when unrecognized decomposed bodies or skeletal remains are available. The present investigation was carried out to study the age of fusion in 200 hyoid bones (133 males and 67 females) varying in age from 18 to 85years. Fusion of greater cornu with the body of the hyoid bone was not seen till the age of 25years in both sexes. In the males complete fusion was seen in 22(16.5%) bilaterally and 16(6.0%) unilaterally while in females it was observed in 18(26.9%) bilaterally and 10(7.5%) unilaterally. No significant sexual and side differences were found between the incidence of fusion of greater cornu with the body of hyoid in almost all the age groups except in the last age group (61 & above) where the sexual difference was highly significant (p<0.001) in unilateral complete fusion and in total cases in bilateral complete fusion (p<0.01). The lesser cornu was not fused with the junction or with greater cornu till the age of 35years in males and 40years in females. The maximum incidence of fusion of lesser cornu was observed in last age group of 61years and above (55.6% males and 66.7% females). In conclusion estimation of age by using hyoid bone is not reliable as time of fusion of greater cornu with the body of hyoid is irregular. Subjects above the age of 60 years had either unilateral (13.2%) or bilateral (42.1%) nonfusion or also fusion (21.1% bilateral, 13.2% unilateral). The present method can be a supplementary approach for estimating age when the other skeletal remains are not available. PMID:20630786

  11. Control of mechanically activated polymersome fusion: Factors affecting fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2014-12-15

    Previously we have studied the mechanically-activated fusion of extruded (200 nm) polymer vesicles into giant polymersomes using agitation in the presence of salt. In this study we have investigated several factors contributing to this phenomenon, including the effects of (i) polymer vesicle concentration, (ii) agitation speed and duration, and iii) variation of the salt and its concentration. It was found that increasing the concentration of the polymer dramatically increases the production of giant vesicles through the increased collisions of polymersomes. Our investigations also found that increasing the frequency of agitation increased the efficiency of fusion, though ultimately limited the size of vesicle which could be produced due to the high shear involved. Finally it was determined that salt-mediation of the fusion process was not limited to NaCl, but is instead a general effect facilitated by the presence of solvated ionic compounds, albeit with different salts initiating fusion at different concentration.

  12. Control of mechanically activated polymersome fusion: Factors affecting fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2014-12-15

    Previously we have studied the mechanically-activated fusion of extruded (200 nm) polymer vesicles into giant polymersomes using agitation in the presence of salt. In this study we have investigated several factors contributing to this phenomenon, including the effects of (i) polymer vesicle concentration, (ii) agitation speed and duration, and iii) variation of the salt and its concentration. It was found that increasing the concentration of the polymer dramatically increases the production of giant vesicles through the increased collisions of polymersomes. Our investigations also found that increasing the frequency of agitation increased the efficiency of fusion, though ultimately limited the sizemore » of vesicle which could be produced due to the high shear involved. Finally it was determined that salt-mediation of the fusion process was not limited to NaCl, but is instead a general effect facilitated by the presence of solvated ionic compounds, albeit with different salts initiating fusion at different concentration.« less

  13. Pubertal growth and epiphyseal fusion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The complex networks of nutritional, cellular, paracrine, and endocrine factors are closely related with pubertal growth and epiphyseal fusion. Important influencing factors include chondrocyte differentiation capacity, multiple molecular pathways active in the growth plate, and growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I axis activation and epiphyseal fusion through estrogen and its receptors. However, the exact mechanisms of these phenomena are still unclear. A better understanding of the detailed processes involved in the pubertal growth spurt and growth plate closure in longitudinal bone growth will help us develop methods to efficiently promote pubertal growth and delay epiphyseal fusion with fewer adverse effects. PMID:25883921

  14. The path to fusion power†

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Chris Llewellyn; Cowley, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The promise, status and challenges of developing fusion power are outlined. The key physics and engineering principles are described and recent progress quantified. As the successful demonstration of 16 MW of fusion in 1997 in the Joint European Torus showed, fusion works. The central issue is therefore to make it work reliably and economically on the scale of a power station. We argue that to meet this challenge in 30 years we must follow the aggressive programme known as the ‘Fast Track to Fusion’. This programme is described in some detail. PMID:20123748

  15. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac. (MOW)

  16. Fusion bonding of non-pressurized process piping: A new technology and a new approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.J.; Pinder, R.

    1996-07-01

    Perhaps the best-known method of thermoplastic fusion bonding for process piping is hot-plate or heated-tool butt welding. Despite the age of this method and the considerable research available on the subject, in practice, this method of heat fusion relies largely on the skill and knowledge of the machine operator. Hence, the quality of the completed fusion bond is largely dependent on human factors. Another method for joining thermoplastic process piping with heat fusion has been through the use of electrofusion fittings or couplings. A sleeve with an embedded resistance wire is slipped onto mating pipe ends, and welding takes place by electrically heating the resistance wire and forming a molecular bond on the outside surface of the mated pipes. While butt welding tends to rely heavily on the knowledge and experience of the machine operator, electrofusion fittings tend to rely more on automated mechanisms such as the software in the computerized fusion box. An alternative form of thermoplastic welding that employs the features of both butt welding and electrofusion couplings has recently been developed. This unique method employs the principles of electrofusion for performing butt welding. The authors have successfully demonstrated this technology at a major US chemical manufacturer`s facility to produce reliable, leak-tight fusion joints in non-pressurized, process piping applications. Research and practical experience were blended to provide consistent fusion quality based on monitoring key fusion parameters, while still relying on the experience and training of a fusion operator.

  17. Fusion materials irradiations at MaRIE's fission fusion facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pitcher, Eric J

    2010-10-06

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's proposed signature facility, MaRIE, will provide scientists and engineers with new capabilities for modeling, synthesizing, examining, and testing materials of the future that will enhance the USA's energy security and national security. In the area of fusion power, the development of new structural alloys with better tolerance to the harsh radiation environments expected in fusion reactors will lead to improved safety and lower operating costs. The Fission and Fusion Materials Facility (F{sup 3}), one of three pillars of the proposed MaRIE facility, will offer researchers unprecedented access to a neutron radiation environment so that the effects of radiation damage on materials can be measured in-situ, during irradiation. The calculated radiation damage conditions within the F{sup 3} match, in many respects, that of a fusion reactor first wall, making it well suited for testing fusion materials. Here we report in particular on two important characteristics of the radiation environment with relevancy to radiation damage: the primary knock-on atom spectrum and the impact of the pulse structure of the proton beam on temporal characteristics of the atomic displacement rate. With respect to both of these, analyses show the F{sup 3} has conditions that are consistent with those of a steady-state fusion reactor first wall.

  18. Characterization of fusion genes and the significantly expressed fusion isoforms in breast cancer by hybrid sequencing.

    PubMed

    Weirather, Jason L; Afshar, Pegah Tootoonchi; Clark, Tyson A; Tseng, Elizabeth; Powers, Linda S; Underwood, Jason G; Zabner, Joseph; Korlach, Jonas; Wong, Wing Hung; Au, Kin Fai

    2015-10-15

    We developed an innovative hybrid sequencing approach, IDP-fusion, to detect fusion genes, determine fusion sites and identify and quantify fusion isoforms. IDP-fusion is the first method to study gene fusion events by integrating Third Generation Sequencing long reads and Second Generation Sequencing short reads. We applied IDP-fusion to PacBio data and Illumina data from the MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Compared with the existing tools, IDP-fusion detects fusion genes at higher precision and a very low false positive rate. The results show that IDP-fusion will be useful for unraveling the complexity of multiple fusion splices and fusion isoforms within tumorigenesis-relevant fusion genes. PMID:26040699

  19. Characterization of fusion genes and the significantly expressed fusion isoforms in breast cancer by hybrid sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Weirather, Jason L.; Afshar, Pegah Tootoonchi; Clark, Tyson A.; Tseng, Elizabeth; Powers, Linda S.; Underwood, Jason G.; Zabner, Joseph; Korlach, Jonas; Wong, Wing Hung; Au, Kin Fai

    2015-01-01

    We developed an innovative hybrid sequencing approach, IDP-fusion, to detect fusion genes, determine fusion sites and identify and quantify fusion isoforms. IDP-fusion is the first method to study gene fusion events by integrating Third Generation Sequencing long reads and Second Generation Sequencing short reads. We applied IDP-fusion to PacBio data and Illumina data from the MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Compared with the existing tools, IDP-fusion detects fusion genes at higher precision and a very low false positive rate. The results show that IDP-fusion will be useful for unraveling the complexity of multiple fusion splices and fusion isoforms within tumorigenesis-relevant fusion genes. PMID:26040699

  20. Prospects for fusion: The winds of change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, R. C.

    This paper addresses the following topics: (1) national energy circumstances and policy, and the implications for fusion; (2) the intrinsic merit of fusion research and development as it contributes to the national science and technology base; (3) the research opportunities and priorities in inertial confinement fusion; and (4) the research opportunities and priorities in magnetic fusion.

  1. Reprogramming of Xist against the pluripotent state in fusion hybrids.

    PubMed

    Do, Jeong Tae; Han, Dong Wook; Gentile, Luca; Sobek-Klocke, Ingeborg; Wutz, Anton; Schöler, Hans R

    2009-11-15

    The fusion of somatic cells with pluripotent cells results in the generation of pluripotent hybrid cells. Because the ;memory' of somatic cells seems to be erased during fusion-induced reprogramming, genetic reprogramming is thought to be a largely unidirectional process. Here we show that fusion-induced reprogramming, which brings about the formation of pluripotent hybrids, does not always follow a unidirectional route. Xist is a unique gene in that it is reprogrammed to the state of somatic cells in fusion-induced pluripotent hybrids. In hybrids formed from the cell fusion of embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs) with male neural stem cells (mNSCs), the Xist gene was found to be reprogrammed to the somatic cell state, whereas the pluripotency-related and tissue-specific marker genes were reprogrammed to the pluripotent cell state. Specifically, Xist is not expressed in hybrids, because the ;memory' of the somatic cell has been retained (i.e. mNSCs do not exhibit Xist expression) and that of the pluripotent cell erased (i.e. inactivation of the partially active Xist gene of ECCs, complete methylation of the Xist region). The latter phenomenon is induced by male, but not by female, NSCs.

  2. Fusion energy for space: Feasibility demonstration. A proposal to NASA

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, N.R.

    1992-10-01

    This proposed program is to initiate a space flight research and development program to develop fusion energy for the space applications of direct space propulsion and direct space power, that is, a Space Fusion Energy (SFE) program. 'Direct propulsion' refers to the use of plasma energy directly for thrust without requiring other energy conversion systems. Further, to provide space missions with large electrical power, 'direct space power' is proposed whereby the direct conversion of charged particles into electricity is used, thereby avoiding thermal conversion system losses. The energy release from nuclear fusion reactions makes these highly efficient, high power space systems possible. The program as presented conducts in an orderly, hierarchical manner the necessary planning, analyses, and testing to demonstrate the practical use of fusion energy for space. There is nothing discussed that is known to be theoretically impossible. Validation of the engineering principles is sought in this program which uses a cost-benefit approach. Upon successful program completion, space will become more accessible and space missions more safely conducted. The country will have taken a giant step toward the commercialization of space. The mission enabling capability provided by fusion energy is well beyond mission planners' current dreams.

  3. Fusion Safety Program annual report, Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Dolan, T.J.; Herring, J.S.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Motloch, C.G.; Petti, D.A.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in Fiscal Year 1993. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been designated by DOE as the lead laboratory for fusion safety, and EG&G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for INEL operations. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating organizations, including universities and private companies. Technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, beryllium safety, activation product release, reactions involving potential plasma-facing materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions and edge physics modeling, risk assessment failure rates, computer codes for reactor transient analysis, and regulatory support. These areas include work completed in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed at the INEL for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor projects at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and a summary of the technical support for the ARIES/PULSAR commercial reactor design studies.

  4. Fusion energy for space: Feasibility demonstration. A proposal to NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1992-01-01

    This proposed program is to initiate a space flight research and development program to develop fusion energy for the space applications of direct space propulsion and direct space power, that is, a Space Fusion Energy (SFE) program. 'Direct propulsion' refers to the use of plasma energy directly for thrust without requiring other energy conversion systems. Further, to provide space missions with large electrical power, 'direct space power' is proposed whereby the direct conversion of charged particles into electricity is used, thereby avoiding thermal conversion system losses. The energy release from nuclear fusion reactions makes these highly efficient, high power space systems possible. The program as presented conducts in an orderly, hierarchical manner the necessary planning, analyses, and testing to demonstrate the practical use of fusion energy for space. There is nothing discussed that is known to be theoretically impossible. Validation of the engineering principles is sought in this program which uses a cost-benefit approach. Upon successful program completion, space will become more accessible and space missions more safely conducted. The country will have taken a giant step toward the commercialization of space. The mission enabling capability provided by fusion energy is well beyond mission planners' current dreams.

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Complete Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Simon

    2000-03-01

    This book contains all the essential concepts for GCSE (or equivalent) physics courses or for general science courses at Key Stage 4. It claims to be ideal for use as a bridging resource for those intending to take physics beyond GCSE: it is no surprise, then, that the book is written at a level above that of the average Key Stage 4 student. It includes material not included in many GCSE syllabuses; this is clearly identified in the contents pages. It would be a useful resource for more able students at GCSE or for beginning A-level students. The layout of the book is attractive. It is well illustrated and colourful. Some of the illustrations are striking: each of the 12 main sections of the book begins with a title page that includes some unusual photographs illustrating physical ideas. Section 2, Forces and Motion, has a photograph of a bungee jumper leaping from the Sky Tower in New Zealand, taken at night looking along the length of the tower from its foot. Section 9, Magnets and Currents, has a computer-generated picture of the magnetic field in a fusion generator. These pictures, as well as contributing to the attractiveness of the book, could be used to initiate discussions of some of the physics. However, there are pictures that serve little useful purpose: a photograph of a recording station for seismic waves looks like any other building lit up at night. A photograph of a rock band in the middle of a section on sound carries no explanatory caption at all and is purely decorative. Other illustrations - in a variety of styles - do illustrate some physical ideas very well: the diagrams of motors and generators, for instance, are far clearer than my efforts on the blackboard! The book is divided into 14 sections with titles reflecting the traditional divisions of physics syllabuses, together with a beginning section on measurement and units and two final sections, `History of Key Ideas' and `Experimental Physics'. The first section, `Measurement and Units

  6. Condensed hydrogen for thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kucheyev, S. O.; Hamza, A. V.

    2010-11-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power, in either pure fusion or fission-fusion hybrid reactors, is a possible solution for future world's energy demands. Formation of uniform layers of a condensed hydrogen fuel in ICF targets has been a long standing materials physics challenge. Here, we review the progress in this field. After a brief discussion of the major ICF target designs and the basic properties of condensed hydrogens, we review both liquid and solid layering methods, physical mechanisms causing layer nonuniformity, growth of hydrogen single crystals, attempts to prepare amorphous and nanostructured hydrogens, and mechanical deformation behavior. Emphasis is given to current challenges defining future research areas in the field of condensed hydrogens for fusion energy applications.

  7. Membrane tension and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Michael M; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2015-08-01

    Diverse cell biological processes that involve shaping and remodeling of cell membranes are regulated by membrane lateral tension. Here we focus on the role of tension in driving membrane fusion. We discuss the physics of membrane tension, forces that can generate the tension in plasma membrane of a cell, and the hypothesis that tension powers expansion of membrane fusion pores in late stages of cell-to-cell and exocytotic fusion. We propose that fusion pore expansion can require unusually large membrane tensions or, alternatively, low line tensions of the pore resulting from accumulation in the pore rim of membrane-bending proteins. Increase of the inter-membrane distance facilitates the reaction. PMID:26282924

  8. Information fusion for palmprint authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiangqian; Wang, Kuanquan; Zhang, David

    2006-04-01

    A palmprint can be represented using different features and the different representations reflect the different characteristic of a palmprint. Fusion of multiple palmprint features may enhance the performance of a palmprint authentication system. This paper investigates the fusion of two types of palmprint information: the phase (called PalmCode) and the orientation (called OrientationCode). The PalmCode is extracted using the 2-D Gabor filters based algorithm and the OrientationCode is computed using several directional templates. Then several fusion strategies are investigated and compared. The experimental results show that the fusion of the PalmCode and OrientationCode using the Product, Sum and Weighted Sum strategies can greatly improve the accuracy of palmprint authentication, which is up to 99.6%.

  9. Pulsed Power Driven Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.

    1999-11-22

    Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology for obtaining high powers. Considerable progress has been made on developing light ion beams as a means of transporting this power to inertial fusion capsules. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of an adequate ion source. Alternatively, z-pinches can efficiently convert pulsed power into thermal radiation, which can be used to drive an inertial fusion capsule. However, a z-pinch driven fusion explosion will destroy a portion of the transmission line that delivers the electrical power to the z-pinch. They investigate several options for providing standoff for z-pinch driven fusion. Recyclable Transmission Lines (RTLs) appear to be the most promising approach.

  10. Mulitvariate Visualization with Data Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Foote, Harlan P.; Kao, David L.; Leung, Lai R.; Thomas, James J.

    2002-12-26

    We discuss a fusion-based visualization method to analyze a 2D flow field together with its related scalars. The primary difference between a conventional visualization and a fusion-based visuali-zation is that the former draws on a single image whereas the latter draws on multiple see-through layers, which are then over-laid on each other to form the final visualization. We propose uniquely designed colormaps to highlight flow features that would not be shown with conventional colormaps. We present fusion techniques that integrate multiple single-purpose flow visualiza-tion techniques into the same viewing space. Our highly flexible fusion approach allows scientists to explore multiple parameters concurrently by mixing and matching images without frequently reconstructing new visualizations from its data for every possible combination. Sample datasets collected from a climate modeling study are used to demonstrate our approach

  11. Mulitvariate Visualization with Data Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Foote, Harlan P.; Kao, David L.; Leung, Lai R.; Thomas, James J.

    2002-12-31

    We discuss a fusion-based visualization method to analyze a 2D flow field together with its related scalars. The primary difference between a conventional visualization and a fusion-based visuali-zation is that the former draws on a single image whereas the latter draws on multiple see-through layers, which are then over-laid on each other to form the final visualization. We propose uniquely designed colormaps to highlight flow features that would not be shown with conventional colormaps. We present fusion techniques that integrate multiple single-purpose flow visualiza-tion techniques into the same viewing space. Our highly flexible fusion approach allows scientists to explore multiple parameters concurrently by mixing and matching images without frequently reconstructing new visualizations from its data for every possible combination. Sample datasets collected from a climate modeling study are used to demonstrate our approach

  12. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J. G.

    Use of deuterium-tritium fusion reactors requires examination of several major safety and environmental issues: (1) tritium inventory control; (2) neutron activation of structural materials, fluid streams and reactor hall environment; (3) release of radioactivity from energy sources including lithium spill reactions, superconducting magnet stored energy release, and plasma disruptions; (4) high magnetic and electromagnetic fields associated with fusion reactor superconducting magnets and radio frequency heating devices; and (5) handling and disposal of radioactive waste. Early recognition of potential safety problems with fusion reactors provides the opportunity for improvement in design and materials to eliminate or greatly reduce these problems. With an early start in this endeavor, fusion should be among the lower risk technologies for generation of commercial electrical power.

  13. ER-associated SNAREs and Sey1p mediate nuclear fusion at two distinct steps during yeast mating.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jason V; Arlow, Tim; Inkellis, Elizabeth R; Koo, Timothy S; Rose, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    During yeast mating, two haploid nuclei fuse membranes to form a single diploid nucleus. However, the known proteins required for nuclear fusion are unlikely to function as direct fusogens (i.e., they are unlikely to directly catalyze lipid bilayer fusion) based on their predicted structure and localization. Therefore we screened known fusogens from vesicle trafficking (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors [SNAREs]) and homotypic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusion (Sey1p) for additional roles in nuclear fusion. Here we demonstrate that the ER-localized SNAREs Sec20p, Ufe1p, Use1p, and Bos1p are required for efficient nuclear fusion. In contrast, Sey1p is required indirectly for nuclear fusion; sey1Δ zygotes accumulate ER at the zone of cell fusion, causing a block in nuclear congression. However, double mutants of Sey1p and Sec20p, Ufe1p, or Use1p, but not Bos1p, display extreme ER morphology defects, worse than either single mutant, suggesting that retrograde SNAREs fuse ER in the absence of Sey1p. Together these data demonstrate that SNAREs mediate nuclear fusion, ER fusion after cell fusion is necessary to complete nuclear congression, and there exists a SNARE-mediated, Sey1p-independent ER fusion pathway.

  14. Laser fusion monthly -- August 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-08-01

    This report documents the monthly progress for the laser fusion research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. First it gives facilities report for both the Shiva and Argus projects. Topics discussed include; laser system for the Nova Project; the fusion experiments analysis facility; optical/x-ray streak camera; Shiva Dante System temporal response; 2{omega}{sub 0} experiment; and planning for an ICF engineering test facility.

  15. Cavitation and Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringham, Roger S.

    2005-12-01

    Natural cavitation phenomena in D2O using piezo devices, is now amplified initiating DD fusion events that produce heat and helium. The transient cavitation bubble produces micro accelerators in the form of jets containing high densities of deuterons, 1024-25/cc from the cavitating D2O. An electrically driven piezo device in a reactor filled with D2O produces jets that implant deuterons into a target foil producing 4He and T plus heat. There is no long range radiation associated with this process. We are moving in the direction of utilizing smaller systems by gaining faster and less expensive technology growth moving from successes at 0.2 and 0.4 MHz to 1.7 MHz. One of the results of our low frequency studies is a 1 to 3 MHz induced standing wave in our target foils. We are using sonoluminescence intensity as a tool to guide us in finding highest plasma density in the adiabatic bubble collapse process in the jet plasma formation. The generation of these sonoluminescence photons relates to conditions for the target implantation process. These experiments and the analytical methods have concentrated on the mass spectroscopy of reactor gases, calorimetry of the reactor and power supply, and the scanning electron microscope photographs of target foils. This work provides a path for an ecological and hydrocarbon-free energy source for all energy applications.

  16. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-04-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant.

  17. TRITIUM ACCOUNTANCY IN FUSION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Farmer, D. A.; Moore, M. L.; Tovo, L. L.; Poore, A. S.; Clark, E. A.; Harvel, C. D.

    2014-03-06

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has clearly defined requirements for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) of tritium whereas the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not since tritium is not a fissile material. MC&A requirements are expected for tritium fusion machines and will be dictated by the host country or regulatory body where the machine is operated. Material Balance Areas (MBAs) are defined to aid in the tracking and reporting of nuclear material movements and inventories. Material subaccounts (MSAs) are established along with key measurement points (KMPs) to further subdivide a MBA to localize and minimize uncertainties in the inventory difference (ID) calculations for tritium accountancy. Fusion systems try to minimize tritium inventory which may require continuous movement of material through the MSAs. The ability of making meaningful measurements of these material transfers is described in terms of establishing the MSA structure to perform and reconcile ID calculations. For fusion machines, changes to the traditional ID equation will be discussed which includes breading, burn-up, and retention of tritium in the fusion device. The concept of “net” tritium quantities consumed or lost in fusion devices is described in terms of inventory taking strategies and how it is used to track the accumulation of tritium in components or fusion machines.

  18. Tritium accountancy in fusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.; Clark, E.A.; Harvel, C.D.; Farmer, D.A.; Tovo, L.L.; Poore, A.S.; Moore, M.L.

    2015-03-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has clearly defined requirements for nuclear material control and accountability (MCA) of tritium whereas the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not since tritium is not a fissile material. MCA requirements are expected for tritium fusion machines and will be dictated by the host country or regulatory body where the machine is operated. Material Balance Areas (MBA) are defined to aid in the tracking and reporting of nuclear material movements and inventories. Material sub-accounts (MSA) are established along with key measurement points (KMP) to further subdivide a MBA to localize and minimize uncertainties in the inventory difference (ID) calculations for tritium accountancy. Fusion systems try to minimize tritium inventory which may require continuous movement of material through the MSA. The ability of making meaningful measurements of these material transfers is described in terms of establishing the MSA structure to perform and reconcile ID calculations. For fusion machines, changes to the traditional ID equation will be discussed which includes breeding, burn-up, and retention of tritium in the fusion device. The concept of 'net' tritium quantities consumed or lost in fusion devices is described in terms of inventory taking strategies and how it is used to track the accumulation of tritium in components or fusion machines. (authors)

  19. Role of Surface Energy Coefficients and Temperature in the Fusion Reactions Induced by Weakly Bound Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaei, R.; O. N., Ghodsi

    2015-08-01

    A systematic study is provided to analyze the behaviors of the interaction potential and complete fusion cross section which are influenced by the effects of the surface energy coefficients γ and temperature T. Our framework is restricted to the proximity formalism for fusion reactions induced by weakly bound projectiles 6Li, 7Li and 9Be. The different surface energy coefficients (γ-MN76, γ-MN95, γ-MS00 and γ-PD03) are used to study the role of the parameter γ in the proximity potentials AW 95 and BW 91. Comparison of the theoretical and the experimental values of the barrier characteristics (barrier heights and its positions) indicates that the modified versions AW 95 (γ-MS00) and BW 91 (γ-MS00) give the least deviations for fusion barrier heights. Moreover, it is shown that the temperature-dependence improves the calculated barrier heights based on the potentials AW 95 and BW 91. In the present study, the analysis of the mentioned effects on the complete fusion cross sections has been also discussed for the systems of interest. The obtained results reveal that the above-modified versions provide a more accurate description for behavior of the complete fusion cross sections than the original potentials at above-barrier energies. It is demonstrated that the increase of the temperature T enhances the complete fusion suppression at this energy range.

  20. Incomplete fusion in 16O+159Tb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vijay R.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Shuaib, Mohd.; Yadav, Abhishek; Bala, Indu; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, S.; Singh, D. P.; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2016-02-01

    In heavy-ion induced reactions, incomplete fusion (ICF) has been found to be a process of greater importance and of distinct nature even at slightly above the barrier energies where complete fusion (CF) is supposed to be dominant. However, the studies are limited to a few projectile target combinations only. To confirm the distinctly different decay patterns observed in case of CF and ICF residues, and to understand the role of high ℓ-values in the onset of ICF, a particle-γ-coincidence technique has been employed to measure spin-distributions and feeding intensity profiles of CF and ICF residues populated via xn / pxn / αxn-channels in 16O+159Tb interactions at Elab ≈ 83.5 ± 1.5, 88.5 ± 1.5, 93.5 ± 1.5 and 97.6 ± 1.4 MeV. The Gamma Detector Array and the Charged Particles Detector Array have been used to detect prompt γ-rays in coincidence with charged particles (p and α). CF-α and ICF-α channels have been identified from backward (B)- and forward (F)-α-gated-γ-spectra, respectively. Reaction dependent decay patterns (thus, the feeding intensity profiles) have been observed in different α emitting channels. The CF channels are found to be widely populated and strongly fed over a broad spin range. In case of ICF-α channels, narrow range feeding was observed only for high-spin states or the low spin states were not populated. The mean ℓ-values involved in the production of ICF- αxn-channels are found to be higher than those involved in the production of CF- αxn-channels associated with fusion-evaporation reactions.

  1. Novel Hydrophobin Fusion Tags for Plant-Produced Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ritala, Anneli; Linder, Markus; Joensuu, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobin fusion technology has been applied in the expression of several recombinant proteins in plants. Until now, the technology has relied exclusively on the Trichoderma reesei hydrophobin HFBI. We screened eight novel hydrophobin tags, T. reesei HFBII, HFBIII, HFBIV, HFBV, HFBVI and Fusarium verticillioides derived HYD3, HYD4 and HYD5, for production of fusion proteins in plants and purification by two-phase separation. To study the properties of the hydrophobins, we used N-terminal and C-terminal GFP as a fusion partner. Transient expression of the hydrophobin fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed large variability in accumulation levels, which was also reflected in formation of protein bodies. In two-phase separations, only HFBII and HFBIV were able to concentrate GFP into the surfactant phase from a plant extract. The separation efficiency of both tags was comparable to HFBI. When the accumulation was tested side by side, HFBII-GFP gave a better yield than HFBI-GFP, while the yield of HFBIV-GFP remained lower. Thus we present here two alternatives for HFBI as functional fusion tags for plant-based protein production and first step purification. PMID:27706254

  2. Target plane imager for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, C.D.; Bliss, E.S.; Jones, W.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1985-01-30

    The Nova laser, completed in December 1984 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is being used to conduct inertial confinement fusion experiments. It is capable of focusing more than 100 kJ of energy on small fusion targets. This paper discusses an optical system called the target plane imager that is used during the beam alignment phase of these experiments. The TPI includes a three meter long periscope with a wide field of view, F/3 objective. The telescope relays images of the target focal plane to viewing optics and a video sensor located outside the target chamber. Operation of the system is possible at three wavelengths: 1.05..mu.., 0.527..mu.., and 0.351..mu... These are the three wavelengths at which the ten Nova laser beams can irradiate targets. Both nearfield and farfield images of the ten beams can be viewed with the TPI. This instrument is used to properly align the laser to the target before each target irradiation.

  3. Natural fueling of a tokamak fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Weigang; Parker, Scott E.; Chen, Yang; Perkins, Francis W.

    2010-04-01

    A natural fueling mechanism that helps to maintain the main core deuterium and tritium (DT) density profiles in a tokamak fusion reactor is presented. In H-mode plasmas dominated by ion-temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence, cold DT ions near the edge will naturally pinch radially inward toward the core. This mechanism is due to the quasineutral heat flux dominated nature of ITG turbulence and still applies when trapped and passing kinetic electron effects are included. Fueling using shallow pellet injection is augmented by an inward pinch of cold DT fuel. The natural fueling mechanism is investigated using the gyrokinetic turbulence code GEM [Y. Chen and S. E. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 220, 839 (2007)] and is analyzed using quasilinear theory. Profiles similar to those used for conservative International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)] transport modeling that have a completely flat density profile are examined and it is found that natural fueling actually reduces the linear growth rate and energy transport. Natural fueling requires a two-component plasma and ion-ion and charge-exchange collisions set limits on this favorable effect.

  4. Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

  5. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Xiaoming

    2012-09-26

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  6. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoming

    2012-09-01

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  7. Fusion-power-core design of a Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N. M.; Krakowski, R. A.; Hagenson, R. L.; Mynard, R. C.; Cappiello, C.; Lujan, R. E.; Davidson, J. W.; Chaffee, A. D.; Battat, M. E.

    A conceptual design of a fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, coils) based on a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) has been completed. After a brief statement of rationale and description of the reactor configuraton, the FPC integration is described in terms of power balance, thermal-hydraulics, and mechanical design. The engineering versatility, promise, and problems of this high-power-density approach to fusion are addressed.

  8. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes > 1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa ("displacement-per-atom", the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  9. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  10. Burning nuclear wastes in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Meldner, H.W.; Howard, W.M.

    1980-02-20

    We have studied actinide burn-up in ICF reactor pellets; i.e., 14 MeV neutron fission of the very long-lived actinides that pose storage problems. A major advantage of pellet fuel region burn-up is safety: only milligrams of highly toxic and active material need to be present in the fusion chamber, whereas blanket burn-up requires the continued presence of tons of actinides in a small volume. The actinide data tables required for Monte Carlo calculations of the burn-up of /sup 241/Am and /sup 243/Am are discussed in connection with a study of the sensitivity to cross section uncertainties. More accurate and complete cross sections are required for realistic quantitative calculations.

  11. The role of the National Ignition Facility in the development of inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.

    1996-06-01

    The authors have completed a conceptual design for a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW, 0.35-{mu}m solid-state laser system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), which will demonstrate inertial fusion ignition and gain for national security, energy, and science applications. The technical goal of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program as stated in the current ICF Five-Year Program Plan is {open_quotes}to produce pure fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, with fusion yields of 200 to 1000 MJ, in support of three missions: (1) to play an essential role in accessing physics regimes of interest in nuclear weapon design...; (2) to provide an above-ground simulation capability for nuclear weapon effects...; and (3) to develop inertial fusion energy for civilian power production.{close_quotes} This article addresses the third goal-- the development of inertial fusion energy (IFE). This article reports a variety of potential contributions the NIF could make to the development of IFE, drawn from a nationally attended workshop held at the University of California at Berkeley in Feb, 1994. In addition to demonstrating fusion ignition as a fundamental basis for IFE, the findings of the workshop, are that the NIF could also provide important data for target physics and fabrication technology, for IFE target chamber phenomena such as materials responses to target emissions, and for fusion power technology-relevant tests.

  12. Synaptic proteins promote calcium-triggered fast transition from point contact to full fusion

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jiajie; Grob, Patricia; Cipriano, Daniel J; Kyoung, Minjoung; Zhang, Yunxiang; Shah, Sachi; Nguyen, Amie; Padolina, Mark; Srivastava, Ankita; Vrljic, Marija; Shah, Ankita; Nogales, Eva; Chu, Steven; Brunger, Axel T

    2012-01-01

    The molecular underpinnings of synaptic vesicle fusion for fast neurotransmitter release are still unclear. Here, we used a single vesicle–vesicle system with reconstituted SNARE and synaptotagmin-1 proteoliposomes to decipher the temporal sequence of membrane states upon Ca2+-injection at 250–500 μM on a 100-ms timescale. Furthermore, detailed membrane morphologies were imaged with cryo-electron microscopy before and after Ca2+-injection. We discovered a heterogeneous network of immediate and delayed fusion pathways. Remarkably, all instances of Ca2+-triggered immediate fusion started from a membrane–membrane point-contact and proceeded to complete fusion without discernible hemifusion intermediates. In contrast, pathways that involved a stable hemifusion diaphragm only resulted in fusion after many seconds, if at all. When complexin was included, the Ca2+-triggered fusion network shifted towards the immediate pathway, effectively synchronizing fusion, especially at lower Ca2+-concentration. Synaptic proteins may have evolved to select this immediate pathway out of a heterogeneous network of possible membrane fusion pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00109.001 PMID:23240085

  13. Synaptic proteins promote calcium-triggered fast transition from point contact to full fusion.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jiajie; Grob, Patricia; Cipriano, Daniel J; Kyoung, Minjoung; Zhang, Yunxiang; Shah, Sachi; Nguyen, Amie; Padolina, Mark; Srivastava, Ankita; Vrljic, Marija; Shah, Ankita; Nogales, Eva; Chu, Steven; Brunger, Axel T

    2012-12-13

    The molecular underpinnings of synaptic vesicle fusion for fast neurotransmitter release are still unclear. Here, we used a single vesicle-vesicle system with reconstituted SNARE and synaptotagmin-1 proteoliposomes to decipher the temporal sequence of membrane states upon Ca(2+)-injection at 250-500 μM on a 100-ms timescale. Furthermore, detailed membrane morphologies were imaged with cryo-electron microscopy before and after Ca(2+)-injection. We discovered a heterogeneous network of immediate and delayed fusion pathways. Remarkably, all instances of Ca(2+)-triggered immediate fusion started from a membrane-membrane point-contact and proceeded to complete fusion without discernible hemifusion intermediates. In contrast, pathways that involved a stable hemifusion diaphragm only resulted in fusion after many seconds, if at all. When complexin was included, the Ca(2+)-triggered fusion network shifted towards the immediate pathway, effectively synchronizing fusion, especially at lower Ca(2+)-concentration. Synaptic proteins may have evolved to select this immediate pathway out of a heterogeneous network of possible membrane fusion pathways.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00109.001.

  14. Object recognition by active fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prantl, Manfred; Kopp-Borotschnig, Hermann; Ganster, Harald; Sinclair, David; Pinz, Axel J.

    1996-10-01

    Today's computer vision applications often have to deal with multiple, uncertain, and incomplete visual information. In this paper, we apply a new method, termed 'active fusion', to the problem of generic object recognition. Active fusion provides a common framework for active selection and combination of information from multiple sources in order to arrive at a reliable result at reasonable costs. In our experimental setup we use a camera mounted on a 2m by 1.5m x/z-table observing objects placed on a rotating table. Zoom, pan, tilt, and aperture setting of the camera can be controlled by the system. We follow a part-based approach, trying to decompose objects into parts, which are modeled as geons. The active fusion system starts from an initial view of the objects placed on the table and is continuously trying to refine its current object hypotheses by requesting additional views. The implementation of active fusion on the basis of probability theory, Dempster-Shafer's theory of evidence and fuzzy set theory is discussed. First results demonstrating segmentation improvements by active fusion are presented.

  15. A Model for Membrane Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngatchou, Annita

    2010-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor of the adrenal gland which originates from chromaffin cells and is characterized by the secretion of excessive amounts of neurotransmitter which lead to high blood pressure and palpitations. Pheochromocytoma contain membrane bound granules that store neurotransmitter. The release of these stored molecules into the extracellular space occurs by fusion of the granule membrane with the cell plasma membrane, a process called exocytosis. The molecular mechanism of this membrane fusion is not well understood. It is proposed that the so called SNARE proteins [1] are the pillar of vesicle fusion as their cleavage by clostridial toxin notably, Botulinum neurotoxin and Tetanus toxin abrogate the secretion of neurotransmitter [2]. Here, I describe how physical principles are applied to a biological cell to explore the role of the vesicle SNARE protein synaptobrevin-2 in easing granule fusion. The data presented here suggest a paradigm according to which the movement of the C-terminal of synaptobrevin-2 disrupts the lipid bilayer to form a fusion pore through which molecules can exit.

  16. Fusion genes in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Aman, P

    1999-08-01

    Tumor development in different cell types and tissue locations involves many pathways, distinct genes and exogenous factors. Tumor type-specific chromosome rearrangements resulting in fusion genes or promoter swapping are believed to be involved in the early development of many tumor types. They are present in almost all cases of a particular tumor type and cases have been described that carry only tumor type-specific translocations without any signs of other cytogenetic changes. The mechanisms behind chromosome rearrangements in solid tumors are largely unknown. Radiation is an important factor in thyroid carcinomas but no com-$bmon sequence motifs are made out in the break points of solid tumors. The fusion genes found in sarcomas are dominated by the transcription factor type of genes with the TLS/FUS and EWS series of fusion genes as the largest group. More than 50% of papillary thyroid carcinomas carry fusion proteins with tyrosine kinase activity. Rearrangements involving HMGIC, HMGIY, and PLAG1 are common in benign mesenchymal tumors and salivary gland adenomas. Many recurrent tumor translocations show a strict specificity for tumor type. This specificity can most likely be explained by the specific sets of target genes that are deregulated by the fusion gene products. Identification of the downstream target genes is currently the object of intense research and may provide us with information that will help design better diagnostic tools and eventually find a cure for these diseases.

  17. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  18. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-Yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  19. The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, Stewart

    2011-05-04

    When the possibility of fusion as an energy source for electricity generation was realized in the 1950s, understanding of the plasma state was primitive. The fusion goal has been paced by, and has stimulated, the development of plasma physics. Our understanding of complex, nonlinear processes in plasmas is now mature. We can routinely produce and manipulate 100 million degree plasmas with remarkable finesse, and we can identify a path to commercial fusion power. The international experiment, ITER, will create a burning (self-sustained) plasma and produce 500 MW of thermal fusion power. This talk will summarize the progress in fusion research to date, and the remaining steps to fusion power.

  20. Multimeric Disintegrin Protein Polymer Fusions That Target Tumor Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant protein therapeutics have increased in number and frequency since the introduction of human insulin, 25 years ago. Presently, proteins and peptides are commonly used in the clinic. However, the incorporation of peptides into clinically approved nanomedicines has been limited. Reasons for this include the challenges of decorating pharmaceutical-grade nanoparticles with proteins by a process that is robust, scalable, and cost-effective. As an alternative to covalent bioconjugation between a protein and nanoparticle, we report that biologically active proteins may themselves mediate the formation of small multimers through steric stabilization by large protein polymers. Unlike multistep purification and bioconjugation, this approach is completed during biosynthesis. As proof-of-principle, the disintegrin protein called vicrostatin (VCN) was fused to an elastin-like polypeptide (A192). A significant fraction of fusion proteins self-assembled into multimers with a hydrodynamic radius of 15.9 nm. The A192-VCN fusion proteins compete specifically for cell-surface integrins on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435. Confocal microscopy revealed that, unlike linear RGD-containing protein polymers, the disintegrin fusion protein undergoes rapid cellular internalization. To explore their potential clinical applications, fusion proteins were characterized using small animal positron emission tomography (microPET). Passive tumor accumulation was observed for control protein polymers; however, the tumor accumulation of A192-VCN was saturable, which is consistent with integrin-mediated binding. The fusion of a protein polymer and disintegrin results in a higher intratumoral contrast compared to free VCN or A192 alone. Given the diversity of disintegrin proteins with specificity for various cell-surface integrins, disintegrin fusions are a new source of biomaterials with potential diagnostic and

  1. Calculation of Formation and Decay of Heavy Compound Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, E. A.

    2001-04-01

    The report describes a method for calculating fusion and decay probabilities in reactions leading to the production of transfermium elements. The competition between quasi-fission and fussion is described on the basis of the Dinuclear System Concept (DNSC). The both competition between fusion and quasi-fission and statistical decay of heavy highly fissionable excited compound nuclei is described in an approach based on the Monte-Carlo method.

  2. Survey of geothermal completion fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of oil field fluids companies indicates that there are no geothermal completion fluids on the market. It is recommended that development of a completion fluid and appropriate support testing be funded.

  3. Incomplete fusion reactions at low energies in 13C+169Tm system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vijay R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Devendra P.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Bala, Indu; Kumar, R.; Sharma, M. K.; Gupta, S.; Murlithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2014-03-01

    Aiming to investigate the incomplete fusion processes at low projectile energies, experiments have been carried out for the 13C + 169Tm system at ≈ 4-7 MeV/A. Excitation functions for several heavy residues likely to be populated via complete and incomplete fusion processes have been measured using heavy recoil residue catcher technique followed by γ- ray spectroscopy. The measured cross-sections for the complete fusion (xn and pxn) channels are compared with the statistical model code PACE4, consistently using the same set of parameters. The complete fusion channels are found to be consistent with the model calculations. However, the cross-sections for all the measured α-emitting channels are found to be significantly enhanced over the calculations. Analysis of data indicate a significant fraction of incomplete fusion even at energies as low as 17% above barrier. The present results are discussed in light of the Morgenstern's systematics. Incomplete fusion strength function is found to be relatively large for alpha cluster projectile i.e. for 12C as compared to one neutron excess 13C projectile.

  4. (Meeting on fusion reactor materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H. ); Klueh, R.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Wiffen, F.W. ); Loomis, B.A. )

    1990-11-01

    During his visit to the KfK, Karlsruhe, F. W. Wiffen attended the IEA 12th Working Group Meeting on Fusion Reactor Materials. Plans were made for a low-activation materials workshop at Culham, UK, for April 1991, a data base workshop in Europe for June 1991, and a molecular dynamics workshop in the United States in 1991. At the 11th IEA Executive Committee on Fusion Materials, discussions centered on the recent FPAC and Colombo panel review in the United States and EC, respectively. The Committee also reviewed recent progress toward a neutron source in the United States (CWDD) and in Japan (ESNIT). A meeting with D. R. Harries (consultant to J. Darvas) yielded a useful overview of the EC technology program for fusion. Of particular interest to the US program is a strong effort on a conventional ferritic/martensitic steel for fist wall/blanket operation beyond NET/ITER.

  5. Bioenergetic roles of mitochondrial fusion.

    PubMed

    Silva Ramos, Eduardo; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Mourier, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are bioenergetic hotspots, producing the bulk of ATP by the oxidative phosphorylation process. Mitochondria are also structurally dynamic and undergo coordinated fusion and fission to maintain their function. Recent studies of the mitochondrial fusion machinery have provided new evidence in detailing their role in mitochondrial metabolism. Remarkably, mitofusin 2, in addition to its role in fusion, is important for maintaining coenzyme Q levels and may be an integral player in the mevalonate synthesis pathway. Here, we review the bioenergetic roles of mitochondrial dynamics and emphasize the importance of the in vitro growth conditions when evaluating mitochondrial respiration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016,' edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060252

  6. Superconducting magnets for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.

    1987-07-02

    Fusion magnet technology has made spectacular advances in the past decade; to wit, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility and the Large Coil Project. However, further advances are still required for advanced economical fusion reactors. Higher fields to 14 T and radiation-hardened superconductors and insulators will be necessary. Coupled with high rates of nuclear heating and pulsed losses, the next-generation magnets will need still higher current density, better stability and quench protection. Cable-in-conduit conductors coupled with polyimide insulations and better steels seem to be the appropriate path. Neutron fluences up to 10/sup 19/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ in niobium tin are achievable. In the future, other amorphous superconductors could raise these limits further to extend reactor life or decrease the neutron shielding and corresponding reactor size.

  7. Fusion Blanket Development in FDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. P. C.; Smith, J. P.; Stambaugh, R. D.

    2008-11-01

    To satisfy the electricity and tritium self-sufficiency missions of a Fusion Development Facility (FDF), suitable blanket designs will need to be evaluated, selected and developed. To demonstrate closure of the fusion fuel cycle, 2-3 main tritium breeding blankets will be used to cover most of the available chamber surface area in order to reach the project goal of achieving a tritium breeding ratio, TBR > 1. To demonstrate the feasibility of electricity and tritium production for subsequent devices such as the fusion demonstration power reactor (DEMO), several advanced test blankets will need to be selected and tested on the FDF to demonstrate high coolant outlet temperature necessary for efficient electricity production. Since the design goals for the main and test blankets are different, the design criteria of these blankets will also be different. The considerations in performing the evaluation of blanket and structural material options in concert with the maintenance approach for the FDF will be reported in this paper.

  8. Congress turns cold on fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, E.

    1984-06-22

    A 5% cut in fusion research budgets will force some programs to be dropped in order to keep the large machinery running unless US and European scientists collaborate instead of competing. Legislators became uneasy about the escalating costs of the new devices. The 1984 budget of $470 million for magnetic fusion research is only half the projected cost of the Tokomak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) planned to ignite, for the first time, a self-sustaining burn. Planning for the TCFX continued despite the message from Congress. Work at the large institutions at Princeton, MIT, etc. may survive at the expense of other programs, some of which will lose academic programs as well. Scientists point to the loss of new ideas and approaches when projects are cancelled. Enthusiasm is growing for international collaboration.

  9. Laser fusion experiments at LLL

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-06-16

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLL. Two other chapters, one authored by K.A. Brueckner and the other by C. Max, present the theoretical implosion physics and laser plasma interaction physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first is an introductory section which provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  10. Tissue fusion over nonadhering surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nier, Vincent; Deforet, Maxime; Duclos, Guillaume; Yevick, Hannah G.; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Marcq, Philippe; Silberzan, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Tissue fusion eliminates physical voids in a tissue to form a continuous structure and is central to many processes in development and repair. Fusion events in vivo, particularly in embryonic development, often involve the purse-string contraction of a pluricellular actomyosin cable at the free edge. However, in vitro, adhesion of the cells to their substrate favors a closure mechanism mediated by lamellipodial protrusions, which has prevented a systematic study of the purse-string mechanism. Here, we show that monolayers can cover well-controlled mesoscopic nonadherent areas much larger than a cell size by purse-string closure and that active epithelial fluctuations are required for this process. We have formulated a simple stochastic model that includes purse-string contractility, tissue fluctuations, and effective friction to qualitatively and quantitatively account for the dynamics of closure. Our data suggest that, in vivo, tissue fusion adapts to the local environment by coordinating lamellipodial protrusions and purse-string contractions. PMID:26199417

  11. Review of the Strategic Plan for International Collaboration on Fusion Science and Technology Research. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1998-01-23

    The United States Government has employed international collaborations in magnetic fusion energy research since the program was declassified in 1958. These collaborations have been successful not only in producing high quality scientific results that have contributed to the advancement of fusion science and technology, they have also allowed us to highly leverage our funding. Thus, in the 1980s, when the funding situation made it necessary to reduce the technical breadth of the U.S. domestic program, these highly leveraged collaborations became key strategic elements of the U.S. program, allowing us to maintain some degree of technical breadth. With the recent, nearly complete declassification of inertial confinement fusion, the use of some international collaboration is expected to be introduced in the related inertial fusion energy research activities as well. The United States has been a leader in establishing and fostering collaborations that have involved scientific and technological exchanges, joint planning, and joint work at fusion facilities in the U.S. and worldwide. These collaborative efforts have proven mutually beneficial to the United States and our partners. International collaborations are a tool that allows us to meet fusion program goals in the most effective way possible. Working with highly qualified people from other countries and other cultures provides the collaborators with an opportunity to see problems from new and different perspectives, allows solutions to arise from the diversity of the participants, and promotes both collaboration and friendly competition. In short, it provides an exciting and stimulating environment resulting in a synergistic effect that is good for science and good for the people of the world.

  12. Proceedings of the Office of Fusion Energy/DOE workshop on ceramic matrix composites for structural applications in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H. ); Lucas, G.E. )

    1990-11-01

    A workshop to assess the potential application of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for structural applications in fusion reactors was held on May 21--22, 1990, at University of California, Santa Barbara. Participants included individuals familiar with materials and design requirements in fusion reactors, ceramic composite processing and properties and radiation effects. The primary focus was to list the feasibility issues that might limit the application of these materials in fusion reactors. Clear advantages for the use of CMCs are high-temperature operation, which would allow a high-efficiency Rankine cycle, and low activation. Limitations to their use are material costs, fabrication complexity and costs, lack of familiarity with these materials in design, and the lack of data on radiation stability at relevant temperatures and fluences. Fusion-relevant feasibility issues identified at this workshop include: hermetic and vacuum properties related to effects of matrix porosity and matrix microcracking; chemical compatibility with coolant, tritium, and breeder and multiplier materials, radiation effects on compatibility; radiation stability and integrity; and ability to join CMCs in the shop and at the reactor site, radiation stability and integrity of joints. A summary of ongoing CMC radiation programs is also given. It was suggested that a true feasibility assessment of CMCs for fusion structural applications could not be completed without evaluation of a material tailored'' to fusion conditions or at least to radiation stability. It was suggested that a follow-up workshop be held to design a tailored composite after the results of CMC radiation studies are available and the critical feasibility issues are addressed.

  13. Energy dependence of fusion evaporation-residue cross sections in the sup 28 Si+ sup 28 Si reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vineyard, M.F.; Bauer, J.S.; Gosdin, C.H.; Trotter, R.S. ); Kovar, D.G.; Beck, C.; Henderson, D.J.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Wilkins, B.D.; Rosner, G.; Chowdhury, P.; Ikezoe, H.; Kuhn, W. ); Kolata, J.J.; Hinnefeld, J.D. ); Maguire, C.F. ); Mateja, J.F. ); Prosser, F.W. ); Stephans, G.S.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Velocity distributions of mass-identified evaporation residues produced in the {sup 28}Si+{sup 28}Si reaction have been measured at bombarding energies of 174, 215, 240, 309, 397, and 452 MeV using time-of-flight techniques. These distributions were used to identify evaporation residues and to separate the complete-fusion and incomplete-fusion components. Angular distributions and total cross sections were extracted at all six bombarding energies. The complete-fusion evaporation-residue cross sections and the deduced critical angular momenta are compared with lower energy data and the predictions of existing models.

  14. Plasma physics goes beyond fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Raoul

    2008-11-01

    I was interested to read the fusion supplement published with the October issue of Physics World. However, in asserting that fusion created the need to recognize plasma physics as a separate branch of the subject, Stephen Cowley, the new director of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, was not quite correct. In fact, the word "plasma" was appropriated from the Greek by the chemical physicist (and later Nobel laureate) Irving Langmuir in 1928. It was used to describe the positive column of a gas discharge, which was then the subject of research into better lighting sources and advertising displays, as well as the underlying science.

  15. Electromagnetic computations for fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.

    1989-09-01

    Among the difficulties in making nuclear fusion a useful energy source, two important ones are producing the magnetic fields needed to drive and confine the plasma, and controlling the eddy currents induced in electrically conducting components by changing fields. All over the world, researchers are developing electromagnetic codes and employing them to compute electromagnetic effects. Ferromagnetic components of a fusion reactor introduce field distortions. Eddy currents are induced in the vacuum vessel, blanket and other torus components of a tokamak when the plasma current disrupts. These eddy currents lead to large forces, and 3-D codes are being developed to study the currents and forces. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, Janie

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Shorter trips are better for humans in the harmful radiation environment of deep space. Nuclear propulsion and power plants can enable high Ispand payload mass fractions because they require less fuel mass. Fusion energy research has characterized the Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method. (1) Lightning is form of pinched plasma electrical discharge phenomena. (2) Wire array Z-Pinch experiments are commonly studied and nuclear power plant configurations have been proposed. (3) Used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects (NWE) testing in the defense industry, nuclear weapon x-rays are simulated through Z-Pinch phenomena.

  17. Fusion Breeder Program interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.

    1982-06-11

    This interim report for the FY82 Fusion Breeder Program covers work performed during the scoping phase of the study, December, 1981-February 1982. The goals for the FY82 study are the identification and development of a reference blanket concept using the fission suppression concept and the definition of a development plan to further the fusion breeder application. The context of the study is the tandem mirror reactor, but emphasis is placed upon blanket engineering. A tokamak driver and blanket concept will be selected and studied in more detail during FY83.

  18. Calculation of fusion product angular correlation coefficients for fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1987-08-01

    The angular correlation coefficients for fusion products are calculated in the cases of Maxwellian and beam-target plasmas. Measurement of these coefficients as a localized ion temperature or fast-ion diagnostic is discussed. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A Plan for the Development of Fusion Energy. Final Report to Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, Fusion Development Path Panel

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2003-03-05

    This report presents a plan for the deployment of a fusion demonstration power plant within 35 years, leading to commercial application of fusion energy by mid-century. The plan is derived from the necessary features of a demonstration fusion power plant and from the time scale defined by President Bush. It identifies critical milestones, key decision points, needed major facilities and required budgets.

  20. Advanced Concepts: Aneutronic Fusion Power and Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Aneutronic Fusion for In-Space thrust, power. Clean energy & potential nuclear gains. Fusion plant concepts, potential to use advanced fuels. Methods to harness ionic momentum for high Isp thrust plus direct power conversion into electricity will be presented.

  1. Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1990-10-01

    Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed.

  2. Decisions-to-Data using Level 5 information fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik

    2014-06-01

    Over the last decade, there has been interest in presenting information fusion solutions to the user and ways to incorporate visualization, interaction, and command and control. In this paper, we explore Decisions-to-Data (D2D) in information fusion design: (1) sensing: from data to information (D2I) processing, (2) reporting: from human computer interaction (HCI) visualizations to user refinement (H2U), and (3) disseminating: from collected to resourced (C2R) information management. D2I supports net-centric intelligent situation awareness that includes processing of information from non-sensor resources for mission effectiveness. H2U reflects that completely automated systems are not realizable requiring Level 5 user refinement for efficient decision making. Finally, C2R moves from immediate data collection to fusion of information over an enterprise (e.g., data mining, database queries and storage, and source analysis for pedigree). By using D2I, H2U, and C2R concepts, they serve as informative themes for future complex information fusion interoperability standards, integration of man and machines, and efficient networking for distribution user situation understanding.

  3. Inertial fusion program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.B.

    1980-11-01

    Progress at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements to LASL's two-beam system, Gemini, are outlined and experimental results are discussed. Our eight-beam system, Helios, was fired successfully on target for the first time, and became the world's most powerful gas laser for laser fusion studies. Work on Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is summarized, indicating that design work and building construction are 70 and 48% complete, respectively. A baseline design for automatic centering of laser beams onto the various relay mirrors and the optical design of the Antares front end are discussed. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, as well as investigations of synthetic-fuel production through application of fusion energy to hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting. Studies on increased efficiency of energy extraction in CO/sub 2/ lasers and on lifetimes of cryogenic pellets in a reactor environment are summarized, as well as the results of studies on pellet injection, tracking, and beam synchronization.

  4. Epiphyseal fusion in Pan troglodytes relative to dental age.

    PubMed

    Brimacombe, Conrad S; Kuykendall, Kevin L; Nystrom, Pia

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies on different aspects of chimpanzee growth and development have documented dental eruption and development, long bone and somatic growth, and to a lesser extent, skeletal fusion. Such data are useful in comparative and evolutionary studies of growth and some aspects of life history evolution in apes and early hominids. However, few studies have integrated dental development and other aspects of skeletal development, and none of these have been able to incorporate a large study sample. This study documents dental mineralization and skeletal epiphyseal fusion in a mixed-sex sample of 155 Pan troglodytes skeletons, and aims to: a) document the pattern of dental and skeletal developmental in chimpanzees; b) compare male and female developmental patterns in chimpanzees; and c) compare these chimpanzee developmental patterns to general patterns of dental and skeletal development in published human studies. The analysis of both dental and skeletal development in this sample demonstrates clearly that dental development is complete before the fusion of the many skeletal epiphyses, in contrast to the pattern observed in humans. Age estimates for individuals were calculated using previously published regression equations for dental development and used to estimate fusion ages. These appear to be accurate in that our estimates are similar to published ranges. These data improve our understanding about chimpanzee dental and skeletal development and provide a basis for further comparison between extant apes and humans, as well as those extinct species represented by fossil partial skeletons.

  5. Inertial fusion program, January 1-June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Skoberne, F.

    1981-06-01

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse carbon dioxide laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements are outlined for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Gemini System, which permitted over 500 shots in support of 10 different target experiments; the transformation of our eight-beam system, Helios, from a developmental to an operational facility that is capable of irradiating targets on a routine basis is described; and progress made toward completion of Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is detailed. Investigations of phenomena such as phase conjugation by degenerate four-wave mixing and its applicability to laser fusion systems, and frequency multiplexing as a means toward multipulse energy extraction are summarized. Also discussed are experiments with targets designed for adiabatic compression. Progress is reported in the development of accurate diagnostics, especially for the detection of expanding ions, of neutron yield, and of x-ray emission. Significant advances in our theoretical efforts are summarized, such as the adaptation of our target design codes for use with the CRAY-1 computer, and new results leading to a better understanding of implosion phenomena are reported. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, including the development of an ICF reactor blanket that offers a promising alternative to the usual lithium blanket, and the formulation of a capital-cost data base for laser fusion reactors to permit meaningful comparisons with other technologies.

  6. Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    SPIELMAN,RICK B.

    2000-01-01

    Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999.

  7. Exo-endo cellulase fusion protein

    DOEpatents

    Bower, Benjamin S.; Larenas, Edmund A.; Mitchinson, Colin

    2012-01-17

    The present invention relates to a heterologous exo-endo cellulase fusion construct, which encodes a fusion protein having cellulolytic activity comprising a catalytic domain derived from a fungal exo-cellobiohydrolase and a catalytic domain derived from an endoglucanase. The invention also relates to vectors and fungal host cells comprising the heterologous exo-endo cellulase fusion construct as well as methods for producing a cellulase fusion protein and enzymatic cellulase compositions.

  8. Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) review

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, D.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Novick, B.; Panofsky, W.; Rosenbluth, M.; Treiman, S.; York, H.

    1996-03-01

    During its 1996 winter study JASON reviewed the DOE Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. This included the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and proposed studies. The result of the review was to comment on the role of the ICF program in support of the DOE Science Based Stockpile Stewardship program.

  9. Seismic data fusion anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrity, Kyle; Blasch, Erik; Alford, Mark; Ezekiel, Soundararajan; Ferris, David

    2014-06-01

    Detecting anomalies in non-stationary signals has valuable applications in many fields including medicine and meteorology. These include uses such as identifying possible heart conditions from an Electrocardiography (ECG) signals or predicting earthquakes via seismographic data. Over the many choices of anomaly detection algorithms, it is important to compare possible methods. In this paper, we examine and compare two approaches to anomaly detection and see how data fusion methods may improve performance. The first approach involves using an artificial neural network (ANN) to detect anomalies in a wavelet de-noised signal. The other method uses a perspective neural network (PNN) to analyze an arbitrary number of "perspectives" or transformations of the observed signal for anomalies. Possible perspectives may include wavelet de-noising, Fourier transform, peak-filtering, etc.. In order to evaluate these techniques via signal fusion metrics, we must apply signal preprocessing techniques such as de-noising methods to the original signal and then use a neural network to find anomalies in the generated signal. From this secondary result it is possible to use data fusion techniques that can be evaluated via existing data fusion metrics for single and multiple perspectives. The result will show which anomaly detection method, according to the metrics, is better suited overall for anomaly detection applications. The method used in this study could be applied to compare other signal processing algorithms.

  10. Magnetic fusion: progress -> stagnation -> degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Leonid

    2012-10-01

    ``The theory of the failure of magnetic fusion,'' created in 2004 and presented to APS-2007 introduced the notion of the ``difficult'' and ``complicated'' stages of the program and described them details. At the first phase the emerging fusion science was created under strong leadership. Progress was visible on year to year basis, and the program was easy to manage. The complicated phase started in the late 1980s, when the plasma physics appeared to be incapable to implement the mission of ITER to test nuclear components of a fusion reactor. Then, the failure of TFTR (PPPL, USA) and JET (Culham, UK) in the mid 1990 to demonstrate QDT=1 and the blindness of their leaders to already visible means to resolve the problem, were a clear indication of an irreversible stagnation. In fact, right after 2007, it became clear that in the case of a large system of human ``particles'' (scientists) two phases have a continuation. The internal degrees of freedom, otherwise protected from external perturbations by a strong dedication to the scientific method, are now eroding and collapsing. The loss of science in addressing confinement, stability, power extraction, fueling, stationary regimes issues makes the current program irrelevant to fusion energy. A fresh approach should be taken.

  11. Fusion blanket inherent safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, D.K.; Jung, J.; Cheng, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    The inherent safety aspect of TPSS reactor blankets has been investigated. The idea is to design the blanket so safe that cost savings can be realized such as through non-nuclear grading construction. If the blanket materials are carefully selected, inherent safety is feasible for fusion reactor blankets up to 5 to 10 MW/m/sup 2/ neutron wall loading.

  12. Proton Collimators for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, George H.; Momota, Hiromu

    2003-01-01

    Proton collimators have been proposed for incorporation into inertial-electrostatic-confinement (IEC) fusion reactors. Such reactors have been envisioned as thrusters and sources of electric power for spacecraft and as sources of energetic protons in commercial ion-beam applications.

  13. Membrane fusion during phage lysis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Joel; Kongari, Rohit; Cahill, Jesse; Young, Ry

    2015-01-01

    In general, phages cause lysis of the bacterial host to effect release of the progeny virions. Until recently, it was thought that degradation of the peptidoglycan (PG) was necessary and sufficient for osmotic bursting of the cell. Recently, we have shown that in Gram-negative hosts, phage lysis also requires the disruption of the outer membrane (OM). This is accomplished by spanins, which are phage-encoded proteins that connect the cytoplasmic membrane (inner membrane, IM) and the OM. The mechanism by which the spanins destroy the OM is unknown. Here we show that the spanins of the paradigm coliphage lambda mediate efficient membrane fusion. This supports the notion that the last step of lysis is the fusion of the IM and OM. Moreover, data are provided indicating that spanin-mediated fusion is regulated by the meshwork of the PG, thus coupling fusion to murein degradation by the phage endolysin. Because endolysin function requires the formation of μm-scale holes by the phage holin, the lysis pathway is seen to require dramatic dynamics on the part of the OM and IM, as well as destruction of the PG. PMID:25870259

  14. Superior protective and therapeutic effects of IL-12 and IL-18 gene-transduced dendritic neuroblastoma fusion cells on liver metastasis of murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Hisae; Okinaga, Kota; Fukushima, Ryoji; Inaba, Tsuyoshi; Iwasaki, Kota; Okinaga, Akira; Takahashi, Ichiro; Kaneko, Michio

    2006-03-15

    Fusion vaccine of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumor cells has the advantage of inducing an immune response against multiple tumor Ags, including unknown tumor Ags. Using the liver metastasis model of C1300 neuroblastoma cells, we assessed the protective and therapeutic effects of fusion cells transduced with the IL-12 gene and/or the IL-18 gene. Improving the fusion method by combining polyethylene glycol and electroporation increased loading efficiency. In the A/J mice vaccinated with fusion cells modified with the LacZ gene (fusion/LacZ), IFN-gamma production and CTL activity increased significantly compared with that of DCs/LacZ, C1300/LacZ, or a mixture of the two (mixture/LacZ). With the transduction of IL-12 and IL-18 genes into the fusion cells (fusion/IL-12/IL-18), the level of IFN-gamma increased more than five times that of other fusion groups. In addition, NK cell activity and CTL activity increased significantly compared with that of mixture/LacZ, fusion/LacZ, DC/LacZ, or C1300/LacZ. In the protective and therapeutic studies of fusion cell vaccine, mice vaccinated with fusion/LacZ, fusion/IL-12, fusion/IL-18, or fusion/IL-12/IL-18 showed a significant decrease in liver metastasis and a significant increase in survival compared with mice given a mixture/LacZ, DCs/LacZ, or C1300/LacZ. In particular, the mice receiving fusion/IL-12/IL-18 vaccine showed a complete protective effect and the highest therapeutic effects. The present study investigates the improved loading efficiency of fusion cells and suggests that the introduction of IL-12 and IL-18 genes can induce extremely strong protective and therapeutic effects on liver metastasis of neuroblastoma.

  15. Absence of closed shell effect in the fusion reaction 40Ca + 48Ca at 330 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, J.; Tassan-Got, L.; Stephan, C.; Garron, J. P.; Langevin, M.

    1982-03-01

    A direct comparison of the complete fusion cross section of the reaction 40Ar + 48Ti with the double magic 40Ca + 48Ca fusion cross section has been done with 330 MeV projectile energy. The compound nucleus 88Zr was formed with nearly the same excitation energy and identical angular momentum population in both reactions. A ΔE-E telescope placed in the focal plane of a spectrometer, associated with a time of flight allowed a complete identification of the reaction products. Evaporation residues were also detected inside the scattering chamber with a ΔE-E silicon telescope. From both measurements, there was no evidence for a closed shell effect in the complete fusion reaction. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 40Ca + 48Ca, 40Ar + 48Ti, Elab=330 MeV, measured fusion cross sections.

  16. Complete to Compete: Common College Completion Metrics. Technical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Ryan; Reindl, Travis; Witham, Keith; Stanley, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Improved college completion rates are critical to the future of the United States, and states must have better data to understand the nature of the challenges they confront or target areas for policy change. The 2010-2011 National Governors Association (NGA) Chair's initiative, "Complete to Compete", recommends that all states collect data from…

  17. Experimental study of incomplete fusion reactions in the O16 + Te130 system below 6 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Devendra P.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Unnati, Sharma, M. K.; Kumar, R.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2014-02-01

    Background: The measurement and analysis of excitation functions may be used as an important tool to understand incomplete fusion reaction dynamics. Purpose: Several studies have been carried out to study incomplete fusion reactions at low energies, but a clear picture of incomplete fusion reaction processes at energies below 6 MeV/nucleon has yet to emerge. Further, there is no theoretical model which may give a good representation of incomplete fusion processes. Method: Off-line γ-ray spectrometry has been used to measure the excitation functions in the 16O+130Te system at energies ≈3-6 MeV/nucleon. Results: Excitation functions for five reaction products populated via complete and/or incomplete fusion processes in the O16 + Te130 system have been measured. Measured cross-sections have been compared with the predictions of the statistical model code pace4. A significant enhancement in the measured excitation functions compared to theoretical predictions for α-emitting channels has been observed and is attributed to incomplete fusion processes. The relative strength of incomplete fusion has been found to increase with projectile energy. In the case of the Xe133(3αn) channel, the isomeric cross-section ratios have been deduced and found to increase rapidly with beam energy, indicating the importance of imparted angular momentum. The angular momentum at different energies has also been calculated. The analysis of the data indicates that incomplete fusion is associated even for angular momentum values smaller than the critical angular momentum for complete fusion. The results have been discussed in terms of the α-cluster structure of the projectile for various fusion reactions. Conclusions: It may be concluded that, apart from complete fusion, incomplete fusion processes are of greater importance even at energies as low as ≈3-6 MeV/nucleon, where fusion evaporation channels are expected to be dominant. The measured isomeric cross-section ratio for the

  18. Magnetized Target Fusion: Prospects for Low-Cost Fusion Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter J.; Barnes, Daniel C.; Degnan, James; Parks, Paul; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) has attracted renewed interest in recent years because it has the potential to resolve one of the major problems with conventional fusion energy research - the high cost of facilities to do experiments and in general develop practical fusion energy. The requirement for costly facilities can be traced to fundamental constraints. The Lawson condition implies large system size in the case of conventional magnetic confinement, or large heating power in the case of conventional inertial confinement. The MTF approach is to use much higher fuel density than with conventional magnetic confinement (corresponding to megabar pressures), which results in a much-reduced system size to achieve Lawson conditions. Intrinsically the system must be pulsed because the pressures exceed the strength of any known material. To facilitate heating the fuel (or "target") to thermonuclear conditions with a high-power high-intensity source of energy, magnetic fields are used to insulate the high-pressure fuel from material surroundings (thus "magnetized target"). Because of magnetic insulation, the required heating power intensity is reduced by many orders of magnitude compared to conventional inertial fusion, even with relatively poor energy confinement in the magnetic field, such as that characterized by Bohm diffusion. In this paper we show semi-quantitatively why MTF-should allow fusion energy production without costly facilities within the same generally accepted physical constraints used for conventional magnetic and inertial fusion. We also briefly discuss potential applications of this technology ranging from nuclear rockets for space propulsion to a practical commercial energy system. Finally, we report on the exploratory research underway, and the interesting physics issues that arise in the MTF regime of parameters. Experiments at Los Alamos are focused on formation of a suitable plasma target for compression, utilizing the knowledge base for compact

  19. Analysis of the role of neutron transfer in asymmetric fusion reactions at subbarrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogloblin, A. A.; Zhang, H. Q.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Kuzmin, E. A.; Danilov, A. N.; Demyanova, A. S.; Trzaska, W. H.; Xu, X. X.; Yang, F.; Sargsyan, V. V. Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2015-12-15

    The excitation functions were measured for the {sup 28}Si + {sup 208}Pb complete-fusion (capture) reaction at deep subbarrier energies. The results were compared with the cross sections predicted within the quantum diffusion approach. The role of neutron transfer in the case of positive Q values in the {sup 28}Si + {sup 124}Sn, {sup 208}Pb; {sup 30}Si + {sup 124}Sn, {sup 208}Pb; {sup 20}Ne + {sup 208}Pb; {sup 40}Ca + {sup 96}Zr; and {sup 134}Te + {sup 40}Ca complete-fusion (capture) reactions is discussed.

  20. Diamond Wire Cutting of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Keith Rule; Erik Perry; Robert Parsells

    2003-01-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 MeV neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies, while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the technology was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. Ten complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of D&D (Decontamination and Decommissioning) activity.

  1. Adjacent level spondylodiscitis after anterior cervical decompression and fusion.

    PubMed

    Basu, Saumyajit; Sreeramalingam, Rathinavelu

    2012-05-01

    Postoperative spondylodiscitis after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) is rare, but the same occurring at adjacent levels without disturbing the operated level is very rare. We report a case, with 5 year followup, who underwent ACDF from C5 to C7 for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. He showed neurological improvement after surgery but developed discharging sinus after 2 weeks, which healed with antibiotics. He improved on his preoperative symptoms well for the first 2 months. He started developing progressive neck pain and myelopathy after 3 months and investigations revealed spondylodiscitis at C3 and C4 with erosion, collapse, and kyphosis, without any evidence of implant failure or graft rejection at the operated level. He underwent reexploration and implant removal at the operated level (there was good fusion from C5 to C7) followed by debridement/decompression at C3, C4 along with iliac crest bone grafting and stabilization with plate and screws after maximum correction of kyphosis. The biopsy specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa and appropriate sensitive antibiotics (gentamycin and ciprofloxacin) were given for 6 weeks. He was under regular followup for 5 years his myelopathy resolved completely and he is back to work. Complete decompression of the cord and fusion from C2 to C7 was demonstrable on postoperative imaging studies without any evidence of implant loosening or C1/C2 instability at the last followup. PMID:22719127

  2. Exploiting phase transitions for fusion optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenson, Pontus

    2005-05-01

    Many optimization problems that arise in multi-target tracking and fusion applications are known to be NP-complete, ie, believed to have worst-case complexities that are exponential in problem size. Recently, many such NP-complete problems have been shown to display threshold phenomena: it is possible to define a parameter such that the probability of a random problem instance having a solution jumps from 1 to 0 at a specific value of the parameter. It is also found that the amount of resources needed to solve the problem instance peaks at the transition point. Among the problems found to display this behavior are graph coloring (aka clustering, relevant for multi-target tracking), satisfiability (which occurs in resource allocation and planning problem), and the travelling salesperson problem. Physicists studying these problems have found intriguing similarities to phase transitions in spin models of statistical mechanics. Many methods previously used to analyze spin glasses have been used to explain some of the properties of the behavior at the transition point. It turns out that the transition happens because the fitness landscape of the problem changes as the parameter is varied. Some algorithms have been introduced that exploit this knowledge of the structure of the fitness landscape. In this paper, we review some of the experimental and theoretical work on threshold phenomena in optimization problems and indicate how optimization problems from tracking and sensor resource allocation could be analyzed using these results.

  3. An introduction to multisensor data fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.L.; Llinas, J.

    1997-01-01

    Multisensor data fusion is an emerging technology applied to Department of Defense (DoD) areas such as automated target recognition, battlefield surveillance, and guidance and control of autonomous vehicles, and to non-DoD applications such as monitoring of complex machinery, medical diagnosis, and smart buildings. Techniques for multisensor data fusion are drawn from a wide range of areas including artificial intelligence, pattern recognition, statistical estimation, and other areas. This paper provides a tutorial on data fusion, introducing data fusion applications, process models, and identification of applicable techniques. Comments are made on the state-of-the-art in data fusion.

  4. Fusion energy calorimeter for the tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Imel, G.R.

    1981-04-01

    One and two-dimensional neutronic analyses treating the transport and scattering of neutrons and the production and transport of gamma rays in the TFTR demonstrate that the fusion energy production in a D-T pulse in the TFTR can be determined with an uncertainty of +- 15% or less, simply by integrating the measured profile of temperature increase along the central radial axis of a large hydrocarbon moderator that fills the bay between adjacent toroidal-field coils, just outside the vacuum vessel. Limitations in thermopile temperature measurements dictate a minimum fusion-neutron fluence at the vacuum vessel of the order of 10/sup 12/ n/cm/sup 2/ per pulse (a source strength of 10/sup 18/ n/pulse in TFTR), in order that this simple calorimeter can provide useful accuracy.

  5. Particle beam fusion progress report for 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the progress on the pulsed power approach to inertial confinement fusion. In 1989, the authors achieved a proton focal intensity of 5 TW/cm{sup 2} on PBFA-II in a 15-cm-radius applied magnetic-field (applied-B) ion diode. This is an improvement by a factor of 4 compared to previous PBFA-II experiments. They completed development of the three-dimensional (3-D), electromagnetic, particle-in-cell code QUICKSILVER and obtained the first 3-D simulations of an applied-B ion diode. The simulations, together with analytic theory, suggest that control of electromagnetic instabilities could reduce ion divergence. In experiments using a lithium fluoride source, they delivered 26 kJ of lithium energy to the diode axis. Rutherford-scattered ion diagnostics have been developed and tested using a conical foil located inside the diode. They can now obtain energy density profiles by using range filters and recording ion images on nuclear track recording film. Timing uncertainties in power flow experiments on PBFA-II have been reduced by a factor of 5. They are investigating three plasma opening switches that use magnetic fields to control and confine the injected plasma. These new switches provide better power flow than the standard plasma erosion switch. Advanced pulsed-power fusion drivers will require extraction-geometry applied-B ion diodes. During this reporting period, progress was made in evaluating the generation, transport, and focus of multiple ion beams in an extraction geometry and in assessing the probable damage to a target chamber first wall.

  6. Sensor fusion for intelligent process control.

    SciTech Connect

    Connors, John J.; Hill, Kevin; Hanekamp, David; Haley, William F.; Gallagher, Robert J.; Gowin, Craig; Farrar, Arthur R.; Sheaffer, Donald A.; DeYoung, Mark A.; Bertram, Lee A.; Dodge, Craig; Binion, Bruce; Walsh, Peter M.; Houf, William G.; Desam, Padmabhushana R.; Tiwary, Rajiv; Stokes, Michael R.; Miller, Alan J.; Michael, Richard W.; Mayer, Raymond M.; Jiao, Yu; Smith, Philip J.; Arbab, Mehran; Hillaire, Robert G.

    2004-08-01

    An integrated system for the fusion of product and process sensors and controls for production of flat glass was envisioned, having as its objective the maximization of throughput and product quality subject to emission limits, furnace refractory wear, and other constraints. Although the project was prematurely terminated, stopping the work short of its goal, the tasks that were completed show the value of the approach and objectives. Though the demonstration was to have been done on a flat glass production line, the approach is applicable to control of production in the other sectors of the glass industry. Furthermore, the system architecture is also applicable in other industries utilizing processes in which product uniformity is determined by ability to control feed composition, mixing, heating and cooling, chemical reactions, and physical processes such as distillation, crystallization, drying, etc. The first phase of the project, with Visteon Automotive Systems as industrial partner, was focused on simulation and control of the glass annealing lehr. That work produced the analysis and computer code that provide the foundation for model-based control of annealing lehrs during steady state operation and through color and thickness changes. In the second phase of the work, with PPG Industries as the industrial partner, the emphasis was on control of temperature and combustion stoichiometry in the melting furnace, to provide a wider operating window, improve product yield, and increase energy efficiency. A program of experiments with the furnace, CFD modeling and simulation, flow measurements, and sensor fusion was undertaken to provide the experimental and theoretical basis for an integrated, model-based control system utilizing the new infrastructure installed at the demonstration site for the purpose. In spite of the fact that the project was terminated during the first year of the second phase of the work, the results of these first steps toward implementation

  7. West European magnetic confinement fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    McKenney, B.L.; McGrain, M. . Foreign Applied Sciences Assessment Center); Hazeltine, R.D. . Inst. for Fusion Studies); Gentle, K.W. ); Hogan, J.T. ); Porkolab, M. . Dept. of Physics); Sigmar

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a technical assessment and review of the West European program in magnetic confinement fusion by a panel of US scientists and engineers active in fusion research. Findings are based on the scientific and technical literature, on laboratory reports and preprints, and on the personal experiences and collaborations of the panel members. Concerned primarily with developments during the past 10 years, from 1979 to 1989, the report assesses West European fusion research in seven technical areas: tokamak experiments; magnetic confinement technology and engineering; fusion nuclear technology; alternate concepts; theory; fusion computations; and program organization. The main conclusion emerging from the analysis is that West European fusion research has attained a position of leadership in the international fusion program. This distinction reflects in large measure the remarkable achievements of the Joint European Torus (JET). However, West European fusion prominence extends beyond tokamak experimental physics: the program has demonstrated a breadth of skill in fusion science and technology that is not excelled in the international effort. It is expected that the West European primacy in central areas of confinement physics will be maintained or even increased during the early 1990s. The program's maturity and commitment kindle expectations of dramatic West European advances toward the fusion energy goal. For example, achievement of fusion breakeven is expected first in JET, before 1995.

  8. Fusion of Enveloped Viruses in Endosomes.

    PubMed

    White, Judith M; Whittaker, Gary R

    2016-06-01

    Ari Helenius launched the field of enveloped virus fusion in endosomes with a seminal paper in the Journal of Cell Biology in 1980. In the intervening years, a great deal has been learned about the structures and mechanisms of viral membrane fusion proteins as well as about the endosomes in which different enveloped viruses fuse and the endosomal cues that trigger fusion. We now recognize three classes of viral membrane fusion proteins based on structural criteria and four mechanisms of fusion triggering. After reviewing general features of viral membrane fusion proteins and viral fusion in endosomes, we delve into three characterized mechanisms for viral fusion triggering in endosomes: by low pH, by receptor binding plus low pH and by receptor binding plus the action of a protease. We end with a discussion of viruses that may employ novel endosomal fusion-triggering mechanisms. A key take-home message is that enveloped viruses that enter cells by fusing in endosomes traverse the endocytic pathway until they reach an endosome that has all of the environmental conditions (pH, proteases, ions, intracellular receptors and lipid composition) to (if needed) prime and (in all cases) trigger the fusion protein and to support membrane fusion.

  9. High School Completion Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    While Alberta enjoys proven high, world-class results in student achievement, raising high school completion rates is one of the top priorities in improving the provincial education system. The 2011-12 targeted high school completion rate is 82% five years after entering Grade 10--a 2.5% increase from the current average rate of 79.5%. The purpose…

  10. Latino College Completion: North Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: South Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Latino College Completion: United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Latino College Completion: West Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. Latino College Completion: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  15. Latino College Completion: New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  16. Latino College Completion: New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Strictly homogeneous laterally complete modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilin, V. I.; Karimov, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Let A be a laterally complete commutative regular algebra and X be a laterally complete A-module. In this paper we introduce a notion of homogeneous and strictly homogeneous A-modules. It is proved that any homogeneous A-module is strictly homogeneous A-module, if the Boolean algebra of all idempotents in A is multi-σ-finite.

  18. Point mutations in EBV gH that abrogate or differentially affect B cell and epithelial cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Liguo; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M. . E-mail: lhuttf@lsuhsc.edu

    2007-06-20

    Cell fusion mediated by Epstein-Barr virus requires three conserved glycoproteins, gB and gHgL, but activation is cell type specific. B cell fusion requires interaction between MHC class II and a fourth virus glycoprotein, gp42, which complexes non-covalently with gHgL. Epithelial cell fusion requires interaction between gHgL and a novel epithelial cell coreceptor and is blocked by excess gp42. We show here that gp42 interacts directly with gH and that point mutations in the region of gH recognized by an antibody that differentially inhibits epithelial and B cell fusion significantly impact both the core fusion machinery and cell-specific events. Substitution of alanine for glycine at residue 594 completely abrogates fusion with either B cells or epithelial cells. Substitution of alanine for glutamic acid at residue 595 reduces fusion with epithelial cells, greatly enhances fusion with B cells and allows low levels of B cell fusion even in the absence of gL.

  19. Pure-state informationally complete and 'really' complete measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.

    2004-11-01

    I construct a positive-operator-valued measure (POVM) which has 2d rank-1 elements and which is informationally complete for generic pure states in d dimensions, thus confirming a conjecture made by Flammia, Silberfarb, and Caves (e-print quant-ph/0404137). I show that if a rank-1 POVM is required to be informationally complete for all pure states in d dimensions, it must have at least 3d-2 elements. I also show that, in a POVM which is informationally complete for all pure states in d dimensions, for any vector there must be at least 2d-1 POVM elements which do not annihilate that vector.

  20. Molecular mechanism of mitochondrial membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Erik E; Detmer, Scott A; Chan, David C

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial fusion requires coordinated fusion of the outer and inner membranes. This process leads to exchange of contents, controls the shape of mitochondria, and is important for mitochondrial function. Two types of mitochondrial GTPases are essential for mitochondrial fusion. On the outer membrane, the fuzzy onions/mitofusin proteins form complexes in trans that mediate homotypic physical interactions between adjacent mitochondria and are likely directly involved in outer membrane fusion. Associated with the inner membrane, the OPA1 dynamin-family GTPase maintains membrane structure and is a good candidate for mediating inner membrane fusion. In yeast, Ugo1p binds to both of these GTPases to form a fusion complex, although a related protein has yet to be found in mammals. An understanding of the molecular mechanism of fusion may have implications for Charcot-Marie-Tooth subtype 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy, neurodegenerative diseases caused by mutations in Mfn2 and OPA1.

  1. Security on the US Fusion Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  2. Data security on the national fusion grid

    SciTech Connect

    Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  3. 2002 Fusion Summer Study Executive Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangerter, Roger; Navratil, Gerald; Sauthoff, Ned

    2001-09-01

    The 2002 Fusion Summer Study was conducted July 8-19, 2002, in Snowmass, CO, and carried out a critical assessment of major next steps in the fusion energy sciences program in both magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). The conclusions of this study were based on analysis led by over 60 conveners working with hundreds of members of the fusion energy sciences community extending over eight months. This effort culminated in two weeks of intense discussion by over 250 U.S. and 30 foreign fusion physicists and engineers present at the 2002 Fusion Summer Study. This is the Executive Summary of the study report. Details are posted at http://web.gat.com/snowmass

  4. Fission Fusion Hybrids: a nearer term application of Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Valanju, P.; Mahajan, S.; Covele, B.

    2011-10-01

    Fission-fusion hybrids enjoy unique advantages for addressing long standing societal acceptability issues of nuclear fission power at a much lower level of technical development than a competitive fusion power plant. For waste incineration, hybrids burn intransigent transuranic residues (with the long lived biohazard) from light water reactors (LWRs). The number of hybrids needed is 5-10 times less than the corresponding number of fast reactors (FRs). The highly sub-critical hybrids, with a thermal/epithermal spectrum, incinerate > 95% of the waste in decades rather than the centuries needed for FRs. For fuel production, hybrids can produce fuel for 3-4 times as many LWRs with no fuel reprocessing. Thorium fuel rods exposed to neutrons in the hybrid reach fissile concentrations that enable efficient burning in LWR without the proliferation risks of reprocessing. The proliferation risks of this method are far less than other fuel breeding approaches, including today's gas centrifuge. With this cycle, US Thorium reserves could supply the entire US electricity supply for centuries. The centerpiece of the fuel cycle is a high power density Compact Fusion Neutron Source (major+minor radius ~ 2.5-3.5 m), which is made feasible by the super-X divertor.

  5. Research on the strategy of underwater united detection fusion and communication using multi-sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenhua; Huang, Jianguo; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Qunfei

    2011-09-01

    In order to solve the distributed detection fusion problem of underwater target detection, when the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the acoustic channel is low, a new strategy for united detection fusion and communication using multiple sensors was proposed. The performance of detection fusion was studied and compared based on the Neyman-Pearson principle when the binary phase shift keying (BPSK) and on-off keying (OOK) modes were used by the local sensors. The comparative simulation and analysis between the optimal likelihood ratio test and the proposed strategy was completed, and both the theoretical analysis and simulation indicate that using the proposed new strategy could improve the detection performance effectively. In theory, the proposed strategy of united detection fusion and communication is of great significance to the establishment of an underwater target detection system.

  6. Reconciliation of mass-asymmetry systematics for incomplete fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pushpendra P.; Yadav, Abhishek; Sharma, Vijay R.; Kumar, R.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Singh, B. P.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Prasad, R.; AMU-IUAC Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The onset and strength of incomplete fusion (ICF) has been studied in the framework of Morgenstern's mass-asymmetry systematics. The fraction of ICF has been deduced in 12C+169Tm system at energies ranging from 1.02Vb to 1.64Vb (Vb = 54.94 MeV from the analysis of excitation functions (EFs). It has been found that the ICF starts influencing complete fusion at noticeably lower, β-values (i.e., 0.025 or 2. 5% of c) than that proposed by Morgenstern (i.e., ≈ 6% of c). The fraction of ICF increases with entrance channel mass-asymmetry for individual projectiles, termed as projectile dependent mass-asymmetry (ProMass-) systematics. The proposed ProMass- systematics has withstood all tests that have been done for fairly large number of systems to verify its validness.

  7. The elementary fusion modalities of osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Søe, Kent; Hobolt-Pedersen, Anne-Sofie; Delaisse, Jean-Marie

    2015-04-01

    The last step of the osteoclast differentiation process is cell fusion. Most efforts to understand the fusion mechanism have focused on the identification of molecules involved in the fusion process. Surprisingly, the basic fusion modalities, which are well known for fusion of other cell types, are not known for the osteoclast. Here we show that osteoclast fusion partners are characterized by differences in mobility, nuclearity, and differentiation level. Our demonstration was based on time-laps videos of human osteoclast preparations from three donors where 656 fusion events were analyzed. Fusions between a mobile and an immobile partner were most frequent (62%), while fusion between two mobile (26%) or two immobile partners (12%) was less frequent (p<0.001). In general, the immobile fusion partner contained more nuclei than the mobile one (p<0.01). Furthermore, enrichment in nuclei of an osteoclast with three or more nuclei resulted from fusion with a mono-nucleated cell in 67% of the cases (p<0.001), while mono-nucleated cells fused with a multinucleated cell in 61% of the cases (p<0.05). This observation suggested that a more mature osteoclast prefers to fuse with a less mature pre-osteoclast. This hypothesis was supported by a nucleus-tracing approach in a co-culture of more and less differentiated pre-osteoclasts/osteoclasts. Furthermore, we found that osteoclast fusion proceeds through primarily two different types of cell contacts: phagocytic-cup and broad-contact-surfaces (>80% of all fusions). We conclude that osteoclasts most often gain nuclei by addition of one nucleus at a time, and that this nucleus is most often delivered by a moving cell to an immobile cell. These characteristics fit the in vivo observations where mono-nucleated precursors migrating from the bone marrow fuse with more mature osteoclasts sitting on the bone surface. They also fit the fusion modalities of other cell types.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype VI Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated from Pigeons in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Wajid, Abdul; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Sharma, Poonam; Goraichuk, Iryna V.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.

    2016-01-01

    Two complete genome sequences of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are described here. Virulent isolates pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/21A/2015 and pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/25A/2015 were obtained from racing pigeons sampled in the Pakistani province of Punjab during 2015. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion protein genes and complete genomes classified the isolates as members of NDV class II, genotype VI. PMID:27540069

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype VI Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated from Pigeons in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Abdul; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Sharma, Poonam; Goraichuk, Iryna V; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    Two complete genome sequences of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are described here. Virulent isolates pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/21A/2015 and pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/25A/2015 were obtained from racing pigeons sampled in the Pakistani province of Punjab during 2015. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion protein genes and complete genomes classified the isolates as members of NDV class II, genotype VI. PMID:27540069

  10. Distributed data fusion across multiple hard and soft mobile sensor platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinsley, Gregory

    One of the biggest challenges currently facing the robotics field is sensor data fusion. Unmanned robots carry many sophisticated sensors including visual and infrared cameras, radar, laser range finders, chemical sensors, accelerometers, gyros, and global positioning systems. By effectively fusing the data from these sensors, a robot would be able to form a coherent view of its world that could then be used to facilitate both autonomous and intelligent operation. Another distinct fusion problem is that of fusing data from teammates with data from onboard sensors. If an entire team of vehicles has the same worldview they will be able to cooperate much more effectively. Sharing worldviews is made even more difficult if the teammates have different sensor types. The final fusion challenge the robotics field faces is that of fusing data gathered by robots with data gathered by human teammates (soft sensors). Humans sense the world completely differently from robots, which makes this problem particularly difficult. The advantage of fusing data from humans is that it makes more information available to the entire team, thus helping each agent to make the best possible decisions. This thesis presents a system for fusing data from multiple unmanned aerial vehicles, unmanned ground vehicles, and human observers. The first issue this thesis addresses is that of centralized data fusion. This is a foundational data fusion issue, which has been very well studied. Important issues in centralized fusion include data association, classification, tracking, and robotics problems. Because these problems are so well studied, this thesis does not make any major contributions in this area, but does review it for completeness. The chapter on centralized fusion concludes with an example unmanned aerial vehicle surveillance problem that demonstrates many of the traditional fusion methods. The second problem this thesis addresses is that of distributed data fusion. Distributed data fusion

  11. Applications of high-speed dust injection to magnetic fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Li, Yangfang

    2012-08-08

    It is now an established fact that a significant amount of dust is produced in magnetic fusion devices due to plasma-wall interactions. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular for the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and degrade performance. Safety concerns are due to tritium retention, dust radioactivity, toxicity, and flammability. Performance concerns include high-Z impurities carried by dust to the fusion core that can reduce plasma temperature and may even induce sudden termination of the plasma. We have recognized that dust transport, dust-plasma interactions in magnetic fusion devices can be effectively studied experimentally by injection of dust with known properties into fusion plasmas. Other applications of injected dust include diagnosis of fusion plasmas and edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. In diagnostic applications, dust can be regarded as a source of transient neutrals before complete ionization. ELM's pacing is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion machines. Different implementation schemes are available depending on applications of dust injection. One of the simplest dust injection schemes is through gravitational acceleration of dust in vacuum. Experiments at Los Alamos and Princeton will be described, both of which use piezoelectric shakers to deliver dust to plasma. In Princeton experiments, spherical particles (40 micron) have been dropped in a systematic and reproducible manner using a computer-controlled piezoelectric bending actuator operating at an acoustic (0,2) resonance. The circular actuator was constructed with a 2.5 mm diameter central hole. At resonance ({approx} 2 kHz) an applied sinusoidal voltage has been used to control the flux of particles exiting the hole. A simple screw throttle located {approx}1mm above the hole has been used to set the magnitude of the flux achieved for a given

  12. High-Energy Space Propulsion Based on Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Freeze, B.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Landrum, B.; Gerrish, H.; Schmidt, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    components are within the current state of the art for pulsed power technology. Experimental facilities with the required pulsed power capabilities already exist. 7) The scheme does not require prefabricated fuel target and liner hardware in any esoteric form or state. All necessary fuel and liner material are introduced into the engine in the form of ordinary matter in gaseous state at room temperature, greatly simplifying their handling on board. They are delivered into the fusion reaction chamber in a completely standoff manner.

  13. National mirror fusion program plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchers, R. R.; Vanatta, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments are under way in the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) facility at Livermore. Recently this idea was greatly improved by incorporating a new element called the thermal barrier, a concept that promises a higher power gain factor (Q = 10 to 20) with much less demanding neutral beam and magnet technology and a higher fusion power density in the reactor. In addition to the tandem-mirror experiments in TMX, a new attempt will be made in the Beta 2 facility during FY 1980 to create and sustain a field-reversed mirror configuration, which is a different mirror fusion approach that could lead to early commercialization of small reactors. The plan presented here is designed to exploit the results of these and other mirror experiments and theoretical developments toward a variety of applications. The main objective is electric power generation.

  14. Interpreting inertial fusion neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, David H.

    2016-03-01

    A burning laser fusion plasma produces a neutron spectrum first described by Brysk (1973 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 15 611). This and more recent work deals with the spectrum produced by a single fluid element. The distribution of temperatures and velocities in multiple fluid elements combine in any real spectrum; we derive formulas for how the neutron spectrum averages these contributions. The single element momentum spectrum is accurately Gaussian, but the multi-element spectrum exhibits higher moments. In particular, the skew and kurtosis are likely to be large enough to measure. Even the single fluid element spectrum may exhibit measurable directional anisotropy, so that instruments with different lines of sight should see different yields, mean velocities, mean temperatures, and higher moments. Finally, we briefly discuss how scattering in the imploded core modifies the neutron spectrum by changing the relative weighting of fuel regions with different temperatures and velocities.

  15. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.D.

    1994-06-01

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, {approximately}2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges.

  16. Investigation of condensed matter fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.; Berrondo, M.; Czirr, J.B.; Decker, D.L.; Harrison, K.; Jensen, G.L.; Palmer, E.P.; Rees, L.B.; Taylor, S.; Vanfleet, H.B.; Wang, J.C.; Bennion, D.N.; Harb, J.N.; Pitt, W.G.; Thorne, J.M.; Anderson, A.N.; McMurtry, G.; Murphy, N.; Goff, F.E.

    1990-12-01

    Work on muon-catalyzed fusion led to research on a possible new type of fusion occurring in hydrogen isotopes embedded in metal lattices. While the nuclear-product yields observed to date are so small as to require careful further checking, rates observed over short times appear sufficiently large to suggest that significant neutrons and triton yields could be realized -- if the process could be understood and controlled. During 1990, we have developed two charged-particle detection systems and three new neutron detectors. A segmented, high-efficiency neutron counter was taken into 600 m underground in a mine in Colorado for studies out of the cosmic-ray background. Significant neutron emissions were observed in this environment in both deuterium-gas-loaded metals and in electrolytic cells, confirming our earlier observations.

  17. Mirror fusion vacuum technology developments

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1983-11-21

    Magnetic Mirror Fusion experiments, such as MFTF-B+T (Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B, Tritium Upgrade) and foreseeable follow-on devices, have operational and maintenance requirements that have not yet been fully demonstrated. Among those associated with vacuum technology are the very-high continuous-pumping speeds, 10/sup 7/ to 10/sup 8/ l/s for D/sub 2/, T/sub 2/ and, to a lesser extent, He; the early detection of water leaks from the very-high heat-flux neutral-beam dumps and the detection and location of leaks in the superconducting magnets not protected by guard vacuums. Possible solutions to these problems have been identified and considerable progress has been made toward successfully demonstrating their feasibility.

  18. [Biological review of completed suicide].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ikuo; Sora, Ichiro; Hishimoto, Akitoyo

    2016-06-01

    Family, twin and adoption studies have revealed genetic factors involved in suicide, while the accumulation of stress and mental illnesses are major contributing factors of suicide. Since higher lethality of suicidal behavior is considered to increase familial liability to suicidal behavior, we believe biological research of completed suicide is most important for a better understanding of the pathophysiology in suicide. Dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has gained a special interest in the neurobiology of suicide, mostly because of the findings using a dexamethasone suppression test (DST), in which DST non-suppressors show a nearly 10-fold higher risk of completed suicide than DST suppressors in a depressed cohort. Other data mainly from postmortem brain studies indicate abnormalities of the noradrenergic-locus coeruleus system, serotonergic system, endogenous opioid system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, inflammatory cytokines and omega-3 fatty acid in completed suicide. However, genetic research of complete suicide is behind other mental problems because it is extremely difficult to obtain tissue samples of completed suicide. Under the difficult situation, we now retain over 800 blood samples of suicide completers thanks to bereaved families' cooperation. We are actively working on the research of suicide, for instance, by performing a GWAS using 500 samples of suicide completers.

  19. [Biological review of completed suicide].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ikuo; Sora, Ichiro; Hishimoto, Akitoyo

    2016-06-01

    Family, twin and adoption studies have revealed genetic factors involved in suicide, while the accumulation of stress and mental illnesses are major contributing factors of suicide. Since higher lethality of suicidal behavior is considered to increase familial liability to suicidal behavior, we believe biological research of completed suicide is most important for a better understanding of the pathophysiology in suicide. Dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has gained a special interest in the neurobiology of suicide, mostly because of the findings using a dexamethasone suppression test (DST), in which DST non-suppressors show a nearly 10-fold higher risk of completed suicide than DST suppressors in a depressed cohort. Other data mainly from postmortem brain studies indicate abnormalities of the noradrenergic-locus coeruleus system, serotonergic system, endogenous opioid system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, inflammatory cytokines and omega-3 fatty acid in completed suicide. However, genetic research of complete suicide is behind other mental problems because it is extremely difficult to obtain tissue samples of completed suicide. Under the difficult situation, we now retain over 800 blood samples of suicide completers thanks to bereaved families' cooperation. We are actively working on the research of suicide, for instance, by performing a GWAS using 500 samples of suicide completers. PMID:27506081

  20. The Fusion Model of Intelligent Transportation Systems Based on the Urban Traffic Ontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wang-Dong; Wang, Tao

    On these issues unified representation of urban transport information using urban transport ontology, it defines the statute and the algebraic operations of semantic fusion in ontology level in order to achieve the fusion of urban traffic information in the semantic completeness and consistency. Thus this paper takes advantage of the semantic completeness of the ontology to build urban traffic ontology model with which we resolve the problems as ontology mergence and equivalence verification in semantic fusion of traffic information integration. Information integration in urban transport can increase the function of semantic fusion, and reduce the amount of data integration of urban traffic information as well enhance the efficiency and integrity of traffic information query for the help, through the practical application of intelligent traffic information integration platform of Changde city, the paper has practically proved that the semantic fusion based on ontology increases the effect and efficiency of the urban traffic information integration, reduces the storage quantity, and improve query efficiency and information completeness.

  1. Heavy Ion Fusion Injector Program

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W.W.

    1993-05-01

    A program is underway to construct a 2 MV, 800 mA, K{sup +} injector for heavy ion fusion. The Electrostatic Quadrupole (ESQ) injector configuration consists of a zeolite source, a diode of up to 1 MV, together with several electrostatic quadrupole units to simultaneously focus and accelerate the beam to 2 MV. The key issues of source technology, high voltage breakdown, beam aberrations, and transient effects will be discussed. Results from ongoing experiments and simulations will be presented.

  2. FUSION WELDING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, W.L.; Steinkamp, W.I.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus for the fusion welding of metal pieces at a joint is described. The apparatus comprises a highvacuum chamber enclosing the metal pieces and a thermionic filament emitter. Sufficient power is applied to the emitter so that when the electron emission therefrom is focused on the joint it has sufficient energy to melt the metal pieces, ionize the metallic vapor abcve the molten metal, and establish an arc discharge between the joint and the emitter.

  3. Enhanced bactericidal potency of nanoliposomes by modification of the fusion activity between liposomes and bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yufan; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Wen; Lu, Tingli; Wang, Rutao; Mei, Qibing; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a good model of antibiotic resistance. These organisms have an outer membrane with a low level of permeability to drugs that is often combined with multidrug efflux pumps, enzymatic inactivation of the drug, or alteration of its molecular target. The acute and growing problem of antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas to conventional antibiotics made it imperative to develop new liposome formulations to overcome these mechanisms, and investigate the fusion between liposome and bacterium. Methods The rigidity, stability and charge properties of phospholipid vesicles were modified by varying the cholesterol, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), and negatively charged lipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol sodium salt (DMPG), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phopho-L-serine sodium salt (DMPS), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate monosodium salt (DMPA), nature phosphatidylserine sodium salt from brain and nature phosphatidylinositol sodium salt from soybean concentrations in liposomes. Liposomal fusion with intact bacteria was monitored using a lipid-mixing assay. Results It was discovered that the fluid liposomes-bacterium fusion is not dependent on liposomal size and lamellarity. A similar degree of fusion was observed for liposomes with a particle size from 100 to 800 nm. The fluidity of liposomes is an essential pre-request for liposomes fusion with bacteria. Fusion was almost completely inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol into fluid liposomes. The increase in the amount of negative charges in fluid liposomes reduces fluid liposomes-bacteria fusion when tested without calcium cations due to electric repulsion, but addition of calcium cations brings the fusion level of fluid liposomes to similar or higher levels. Among the negative phospholipids examined, DMPA gave the highest degree of fusion, DMPS and DMPG had intermediate fusion levels, and PI resulted in the lowest degree of fusion

  4. Comparison of Two Synthetic Bone Graft Products in a Rabbit Posterolateral Fusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, Douglas; Petersen, Emily B.; Watson, Nicole; Grosland, Nicole; Gibson-Corley, Katherine; Smucker, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background The drawbacks of iliac crest autograft as graft material for spine fusion are well reported. Despite continued modifications to improve bone healing capacity, the efficacy of synthetic graft materials as stand-alone replacements remains uncertain. The rabbit posterolateral fusion model is an established environment for testing of fusion concepts. It offers the opportunity to obtain radiographic, biomechanical and histological data on novel fusion materials. The objective of this study was to compare the spine fusion capability of two synthetic bone graft products in an established rabbit posterolateral spine fusion (PLF) model: Signafuse® Bioactive Bone Graft Putty and Actifuse® ABX. Methods Bilateral intertransverse spine fusion was performed at the L5-L6 transverse processes (TPs) of New Zealand White rabbits using either Signafuse or Actifuse ABX as the bone graft material. Bone remodeling and spine fusion were assessed at 6 and 12 weeks using radiographic, biomechanical and histological endpoints. Results Fusion rate by manual palpation at 6 weeks was greater for Signafuse (33%) compared to Actifuse ABX (0%), and equivalent in both groups at 12 weeks (50%). Biomechanical fusion rate based on flexion-extension data was 80% in Signafuse group and 44% for Actifuse ABX. Histology revealed a normal healing response in both groups. MicroCT and histomorphometric data at 6 weeks showed greater new bone formation in the Signafuse group compared to Actifuse ABX (p <0.05), with no differences detected at 12 weeks. Histological fusion scores were greater in the Signafuse group at 6 and 12 weeks, indicated by higher degree structural remodeling and tendency towards complete bridging of the fusion bed compared to the Actifuse ABX group. Conclusion Confirmed by several metrics, Signafuse outperformed Actifuse ABX as a standalone synthetic bone graft in an established PLF model, demonstrating greater rates of bone remodeling and spine fusion. The combination of 45

  5. Genotype imputation via matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Chi, Eric C; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  6. Fusion for Earth and Space

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E

    2009-03-16

    The compact reactor concept (Williams, 2007) has the potential to provide clean, safe and unlimited supply of energy for Earth and Space applications. The concept is a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for individual home and space power. The concept also would make it possible for each plant or remote location to have it's own power source, on site, without the need for a connection to the power grid. This would minimize, or eliminate, power blackouts. The concept could replace large fission reactors and fossil fuel power plants plus provide energy for ships, locomotives, trucks and autos. It would make an ideal source of energy for space power applications and for space propulsion.

  7. Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear fusion appears to be the most promising concept for producing extremely high specific impulse rocket engines. One particular fusion concept which seems to be particularly well suited for fusion propulsion applications is the gasdynamic mirror (GDM). This device would operate at much higher plasma densities and with much larger LD ratios than previous mirror machines. Several advantages accrue from such a design. First, the high LA:) ratio minimizes to a large extent certain magnetic curvature effects which lead to plasma instabilities causing a loss of plasma confinement. Second, the high plasma density will result in the plasma behaving much more Re a conventional fluid with a mean free path shorter than the length of the device. This characteristic helps reduce problems associated with "loss cone" microinstabilities. An experimental GDM device is currently being constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to provide an initial assessment of the feasibility of this type of propulsion system. Initial experiments are expected to commence in the late fall of 2000.

  8. Fusion product measurements in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    Diagnostic methods and the applications of fusion product measurements in tokamaks are reviewed with emphasis on results from PLT, PDX, and TFTR. Measurements have been made using the 2.5-MeV neutron from the d(d, n)/sup 3/ He reaction, the 3-MeV proton from the d(d, p)t reaction, both the 3.7-MeV alpha and the 14.7-MeV proton from the d(/sup 3/He, p)..cap alpha.. reaction, and the 14-MeV neutron from the d(t, n)..cap alpha.. reaction. The common use of these measurements is the determination of the ion temperature from the magnitude of the d-d neutron emission. For tokamak plasmas, these results are usually in good agreement with the charge exchange ion temperature. Recently, the charged fusion products have been used for high-resolution spectroscopic purposes, and emission profile measurements. Pitch angle resolution of the escaping 3-MeV proton emission has been used to determine the poloidal magnetic field inside the tokamak. Major issues in this field include the expected tritium operation on TFTR where the neutron measurements will determine when tritium will be introduced into the TFTR vessel and provide a measurement of the fusion power multiplication value (Q). The TFTR Q approx. 1 experiments will also provide a chance to measure the confinement of 3.5-MeV alphas in a tokamak.

  9. Complete sternal cleft — A rare congenital malformation and its repair in a 3-month-old boy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Paras; Gupta, Abhaya; Patil, Prashant S.; Kekre, Geeta; Kamble, Ravi; Dikshit, Kiran Vishesh

    2016-01-01

    Complete midline sternal cleft is a rare congenital anomaly resulting from failed midline ventral fusion of the sternal bars. Very few cases of complete sternal cleft have been described in literature. We present a case of complete sternal cleft in a 3-month-old child. The patient underwent primary closure of the defect using stainless steel wires. PMID:27046980

  10. Observations of membrane fusion in a liposome dispersion: the missing fusion intermediate?

    PubMed Central

    Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Early intermediate structures of liposome-liposome fusion events were captured by freeze-fracture electron microscopic (EM) technique. The images show the morphology of the fusion interface at several different stages of the fusion event. One of the intermediates was captured at a serendipitous stage of two vesicles’ membranes (both leaflets) merging and their contents starting to intermix clearly showing the fusion interface with a previously unseen fusion rim. From the morphological information a hypothetical sequence of the fusion event and corresponding lipid structural arrangements are described. PMID:26069726

  11. Is complete seizure control imperative?

    PubMed

    Andermann, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    Is complete control imperative? The answer depends on whether complete control is indeed possible, on the possibility of achieving modifications of lifestyle, and on the type of epilepsy, with particular reference to the presence of progressive dysfunction. This may be seen in patients with temporal lobe or other forms of focal epilepsy, in the epileptic encephalopathies such as West and Lennox Gastaut Syndromes and even in some patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Progressive memory changes and global cognitive problems are examples. Progressive language deterioration, secondary epileptogenesis and phenomena analogous to kindling are also important issues. How long treatment should be continued depends on many factors, not least the preference of the patient and of the family. Weighing the benefits of complete control versus the side effects and risks of medication or surgery is crucial. There are obvious benefits to complete control; it is imperative if these benefits are greater than the cost.

  12. JWST Primary Mirror Installation Complete

    NASA Video Gallery

    Completing the assembly of the primary mirror, which took place at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is a significant milestone and the culmination of over a decade of desi...

  13. Is complete seizure control imperative?

    PubMed

    Andermann, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    Is complete control imperative? The answer depends on whether complete control is indeed possible, on the possibility of achieving modifications of lifestyle, and on the type of epilepsy, with particular reference to the presence of progressive dysfunction. This may be seen in patients with temporal lobe or other forms of focal epilepsy, in the epileptic encephalopathies such as West and Lennox Gastaut Syndromes and even in some patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Progressive memory changes and global cognitive problems are examples. Progressive language deterioration, secondary epileptogenesis and phenomena analogous to kindling are also important issues. How long treatment should be continued depends on many factors, not least the preference of the patient and of the family. Weighing the benefits of complete control versus the side effects and risks of medication or surgery is crucial. There are obvious benefits to complete control; it is imperative if these benefits are greater than the cost. PMID:12143366

  14. Complete Blood Count (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... Metabolic Panel (BMP) Blood Test: Hemoglobin Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Word! Complete Blood Count (CBC) Medical Tests ...

  15. Non-coplanar compact configurations of nuclei and non-compound-nucleus contribution in the fusion cross section of the 12C+93Nb reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sahila; Hemdeep, Kaur, Arshdeep; Gupta, Raj K.

    2016-02-01

    Background: In our earlier study of the 12C+93Nb→*105Ag reaction at three near- and below-barrier energies (Ec .m .=41.097 , 47.828, and 54.205 MeV), using the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) with various nuclear interaction potentials (the Blocki et al. pocket formula and others derived from the Skyrme energy density formalism) for compact, coplanar (Φc=00 ) nuclei, we found a large non-compound-nucleus (nCN) contribution in the measured fusion cross section of this reaction. Purpose: In the present work, we look for the effect of using non-coplanar, compact configurations (Φc≠00 ), in the Blocki et al. pocket formula of the nuclear proximity potential, on the non-compound-nucleus (nCN) contribution, using the DCM. Methods: Allowing the Φ degree of freedom in the DCM formalism, we calculate the compound-nucleus (CN) and nCN cross sections. The only parameter of the DCM is the neck-length parameter Δ R , which also fits the empirically determined nCN cross section nearly exactly, under the assumption of considering it like a quasifission process where the fragment preformation factor P0=1 . Results: With the Φ degree of freedom included, at the higher two energies the nCN cross section gets enhanced, and hence the pure CN cross section is decreased, since the calculated (total) fusion cross section is fitted to experimental data. The parameter Δ R for the nCN contribution is smaller, and hence the reaction time larger, than for the CN decay process. Also, the contributing angular momentum ℓmax value increases in going from Φc=00 to Φc≠00 for both the CN and nCN processes. The intermediate mass fragments (IMFs), measured up to mass 13 in this reaction, are shown extended up to mass 16, and the fusion-fission (f f ) region is identified as A /2 ±16 , the same as for the Φc=00 case. Conclusions: As a result of enhanced nCN cross section due to Φc≠00 , the CN fusion probability PCN for *105Ag changes its behavior from an increasing to a

  16. Fusion Nuclear Science Pathways Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Kessel, et. al.

    2012-02-23

    With the strong commitment of the US to the success of the ITER burning plasma mission, and the project overall, it is prudent to consider how to take the most advantage of this investment. The production of energy from fusion has been a long sought goal, and the subject of several programmatic investigations and time line proposals [1]. The nuclear aspects of fusion research have largely been avoided experimentally for practical reasons, resulting in a strong emphasis on plasma science. Meanwhile, ITER has brought into focus how the interface between the plasma and engineering/technology, presents the most challenging problems for design. In fact, this situation is becoming the rule and no longer the exception. ITER will demonstrate the deposition of 0.5 GW of neutron heating to the blanket, deliver a heat load of 10-20 MW/m2 or more on the divertor, inject 50-100 MW of heating power to the plasma, all at the expected size scale of a power plant. However, in spite of this, and a number of other technologies relevant power plant, ITER will provide a low neutron exposure compared to the levels expected to a fusion power plant, and will purchase its tritium entirely from world reserves accumulated from decades of CANDU reactor operations. Such a decision for ITER is technically well founded, allowing the use of conventional materials and water coolant, avoiding the thick tritium breeding blankets required for tritium self-sufficiency, and allowing the concentration on burning plasma and plasma-engineering interface issues. The neutron fluence experienced in ITER over its entire lifetime will be ~ 0.3 MW-yr/m2, while a fusion power plant is expected to experience 120-180 MW-yr/m2 over its lifetime. ITER utilizes shielding blanket modules, with no tritium breeding, except in test blanket modules (TBM) located in 3 ports on the midplane [2], which will provide early tests of the fusion nuclear environment with very low tritium production (a few g per year).

  17. Materials issues in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, A. K.; Krishnamurthy, N.; Batra, I. S.

    2010-02-01

    The world scientific community is presently engaged in one of the toughest technological tasks of the current century, namely, exploitation of nuclear fusion in a controlled manner for the benefit of mankind. Scientific feasibility of controlled fusion of the light elements in plasma under magnetic confinement has already been proven. International efforts in a coordinated and co-operative manner are presently being made to build ITER - the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - to test, in this first step, the concept of 'Tokamak' for net fusion energy production. To exploit this new developing option of making energy available through the route of fusion, India too embarked on a robust fusion programme under which we now have a working tokamak - the Aditya and a steady state tokamak (SST-1), which is on the verge of functioning. The programme envisages further development in terms of making SST-2 followed by a DEMO and finally the fusion power reactor. Further, with the participation of India in the ITER program in 2005, and recent allocation of half - a - port in ITER for placing our Lead - Lithium Ceramic Breeder (LLCB) based Test Blanket Module (TBM), meant basically for breeding tritium and extracting high grade heat, the need to understand and address issues related to materials for these complex systems has become all the more necessary. Also, it is obvious that with increasing power from the SST stages to DEMO and further to PROTOTYPE, the increasing demands on performance of materials would necessitate discovery and development of new materials. Because of the 14.1 MeV neutrons that are generated in the D+T reaction exploited in a tokamak, the materials, especially those employed for the construction of the first wall, the diverter and the blanket segments, suffer crippling damage due to the high He/dpa ratios that result due to the high energy of the neutrons. To meet this challenge, the materials that need to be developed for the tokamaks

  18. Imaging multiple intermediates of single-virus membrane fusion mediated by distinct fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kye-Il; Tai, April; Lee, Chi-Lin; Wong, Clement; Wang, Pin

    2010-09-01

    Membrane fusion plays an essential role in the entry of enveloped viruses into target cells. The merging of viral and target cell membranes is catalyzed by viral fusion proteins, which involves multiple sequential steps in the fusion process. However, the fusion mechanisms mediated by different fusion proteins involve multiple transient intermediates that have not been well characterized. Here, we report a synthetic virus platform that allows us to better understand the different fusion mechanisms driven by the diverse types fusion proteins. The platform consists of lentiviral particles coenveloped with a surface antibody, which serves as the binding protein, along with a fusion protein derived from either influenza virus (HAmu) or Sindbis virus (SINmu). By using a single virus tracking technique, we demonstrated that both HAmu- and SINmu-bearing viruses enter cells through clathrin-dependent endocytosis, but they required different endosomal trafficking routes to initiate viral fusion. Direct observation of single viral fusion events clearly showed that hemifusion mediated by SINmu upon exposure to low pH occurs faster than that mediated by HAmu. Monitoring sequential fusion processes by dual labeling the outer and inner leaflets of viral membranes also revealed that the SINmu-mediated hemifusion intermediate is relatively long-lived as compared with that mediated by HAmu. Taken together, we have demonstrated that the combination of this versatile viral platform with the techniques of single virus tracking can be a powerful tool for revealing molecular details of fusion mediated by various fusion proteins.

  19. Study of fusion Q-value rule in sub-barrier fusion of heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Gao-Long; Zhang, Huan-Qiao

    2015-07-01

    A vast body of fusion data has been analyzed for different projectiles and target nuclei. It is indicated that the sub-barrier fusion depends on the fusion Q-value. In terms of a recently introduced fusion Q-value rule and an energy scaling reduction procedure, the experimental fusion excitation functions are reduced and compared with each other. It is found that the reduced fusion excitations of selected fusion systems show a similar trend. The fusion data for massive nuclei are in agreement with the Q-value rule. In the fusion process, the Q contribution should be considered. Within this approach, the sub-barrier fusion cross sections of most fusion systems can be predicted without involving any structure effects of colliding nuclei. Instances of disagreement are presented in a few fusion systems. The use of the energy scaling as a criterion of possible experimental data inconsistency is discussed. More precise experimental fusion data need to be measured. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (11475013, 11035007, 11175011), State Key Laboratory of Software Development Environment (SKLSDE-2014ZX-08), Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities and the Key Laboratory of High Precision Nuclear Spectroscopy, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

  20. Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Steven Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This is an exceptional moment in my career, and so I want to thank all of my teachers, colleagues and mentors who have made this possible. From my co-authors and myself, many thanks to the International Atomic Energy Agency, IOP Publishing, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, and the selection committee for the great honor of receiving this award. Also gratitude to Kikuchi-sensei, not only for the inventive and visionary creation of this award, but also for being a key mentor dating back to his efforts in producing high neutron output in JT-60U. It was also a great honor to receive the award directly from IAEA Deputy Director General Burkart during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. Receiving the award at this venue is particularly exciting as Daejeon is home to the new, next-generation KSTAR tokamak device that will lead key magnetic fusion research areas going forward. I would also like to thank the mayor of Daejeon, Dr Yum Hong-Chul, and all of the meeting organizers for giving us all a truly spectacular and singular welcoming event during which the award was presented. The research leading to the award would not have been possible without the support of the US Department of Energy, and I thank the Department for the continued funding of this research. Special mention must be made to a valuable co-author who is no longer with us, Professor A. Bondeson, who was a significant pioneer in resistive wall mode (RWM) research. I would like to thank my wife, Mary, for her infinite patience and encouragement. Finally, I would like to personally thank all of you that have approached and congratulated me directly. There are no units to measure how important your words have been in this regard. When notified that our paper had been shortlisted for the 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award, my co-authors responded echoing how I felt—honored to be included in such a fine collection of research by colleagues. It was unfathomable—would this paper follow the brilliant work

  1. Influence of breakup on fusion barrier distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, D.; Nayak, B. K.; Mukherjee, S.; Biswas, D. C.; Mirgule, E. T.; John, B. V.; Gupta, Y. K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Prajapati, G.; Danu, L. S.; Rath, P. K.; Desai, V.; Deshmukh, N.; Saxena, A.

    2013-04-01

    Fusion barrier distributions have been extracted from the quasi-elastic scattering excitation functions, measured at backward angle θlab = 160° in reactions of 6,7Li+209Bi. The present results have been compared with the barrier distributions obtained from the fusion excitation function measurements for the above mentioned systems. The fusion barrier distributions from the quasi-elastic scattering excitation functions have been analyzed with simplified Coupled Channels calculations using Fresco. Inclusions of resonant states for both 6,7Li projectiles improve the predictions to describe the measured quasi-elastic scattering excitation functions and barrier distributions. For both the reactions peak positions of fusion barrier distributions are shifted towards a lower energy side in comparison to that obtained from the fusion excitation function measurements. The observed discrepancy in peak positions of barrier distributions obtained from quasi-elastic scattering and fusion excitation function measurements has been discussed in terms of total reaction threshold distribution.

  2. The Dark Side of Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bastida-Ruiz, Daniel; Van Hoesen, Kylie; Cohen, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion is a physiological cellular process essential for fertilization, viral entry, muscle differentiation and placental development, among others. In this review, we will highlight the different cancer cell-cell fusions and the advantages obtained by these fusions. We will specially focus on the acquisition of metastatic features by cancer cells after fusion with bone marrow-derived cells. The mechanism by which cancer cells fuse with other cells has been poorly studied thus far, but the presence in several cancer cells of syncytin, a trophoblastic fusogen, leads us to a cancer cell fusion mechanism similar to the one used by the trophoblasts. The mechanism by which cancer cells perform the cell fusion could be an interesting target for cancer therapy. PMID:27136533

  3. Conceptual exploration package for data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousselme, Anne-Laure; Grenier, Dominic; Bosse, Eloi

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, we present a software package designed to explore data fusion area applied to different contexts. This tool, called CEPfuse (Conceptual Exploration Package for Data Fusion) provides a good support to become familiar with all concepts and vocabulary linked to data fusion. Developed with Matlab 5.2, it's also a good tool to test, compare and analyze algorithms. Although the core of this package is evidential reasoning and identity information fusion, it has been conceived to develop all the interesting part of the Multi-Sensor Data Fusion system. Actually, because we concentrate our research work on identity information fusion, the principal included algorithms are Dempster- Shafer rules of combination, Shafer-Logan algorithms for hierarchical structures, and several decision rules.

  4. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Fusion contains 13 informative papers that were initially presented at the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety held in Vienna, Austria, 10-13 July 2006. Following recommendation from the International Fusion Research Council, the IAEA organizes Technical Meetings on Fusion Safety with the aim to bring together experts to discuss the ongoing work, share new ideas and outline general guidance and recommendations on different issues related to safety and environmental (S&E) aspects of fusion research and power facilities. Previous meetings in this series were held in Vienna, Austria (1980), Ispra, Italy (1983), Culham, UK (1986), Jackson Hole, USA (1989), Toronto, Canada (1993), Naka, Japan (1996) and Cannes, France (2000). The recognized progress in fusion research and technology over the last quarter of a century has boosted the awareness of the potential of fusion to be a practically inexhaustible and clean source of energy. The decision to construct the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents a landmark in the path to fusion power engineering. Ongoing activities to license ITER in France look for an adequate balance between technological and scientific deliverables and complying with safety requirements. Actually, this is the first instance of licensing a representative fusion machine, and it will very likely shape the way in which a more common basis for establishing safety standards and policies for licensing future fusion power plants will be developed. Now that ITER licensing activities are underway, it is becoming clear that the international fusion community should strengthen its efforts in the area of designing the next generations of fusion power plants—demonstrational and commercial. Therefore, the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Safety focused on the safety aspects of power facilities. Some ITER-related safety issues were reported and discussed owing to their potential

  5. Lunar Helium-3 and Fusion Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Office of Exploration sponsored the NASA Lunar Helium-3 and Fusion Power Workshop. The meeting was held to understand the potential of using He-3 from the moon for terrestrial fusion power production. It provided an overview, two parallel working sessions, a review of sessions, and discussions. The lunar mining session concluded that mining, beneficiation, separation, and return of He-3 from the moon would be possible but that a large scale operation and improved technology is required. The fusion power session concluded that: (1) that He-3 offers significant, possibly compelling, advantages over fusion of tritium, principally increased reactor life, reduced radioactive wastes, and high efficiency conversion, (2) that detailed assessment of the potential of the D/He-3 fuel cycle requires more information, and (3) D/He-3 fusion may be best for commercial purposes, although D/T fusion is more near term.

  6. Inertial-confinement fusion with lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Hurricane, O. A.

    2016-05-01

    The quest for controlled fusion energy has been ongoing for over a half century. The demonstration of ignition and energy gain from thermonuclear fuels in the laboratory has been a major goal of fusion research for decades. Thermonuclear ignition is widely considered a milestone in the development of fusion energy, as well as a major scientific achievement with important applications in national security and basic sciences. The US is arguably the world leader in the inertial confinement approach to fusion and has invested in large facilities to pursue it, with the objective of establishing the science related to the safety and reliability of the stockpile of nuclear weapons. Although significant progress has been made in recent years, major challenges still remain in the quest for thermonuclear ignition via laser fusion. Here, we review the current state of the art in inertial confinement fusion research and describe the underlying physical principles.

  7. History of Nuclear Fusion Research in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Harukazu; Matsuoka, Keisuke; Kimura, Kazue; Namba, Chusei; Matsuda, Shinzaburo

    In the late 1950s just after the atomic energy research was opened worldwide, there was a lively discussion among scientists on the strategy of nuclear fusion research in Japan. Finally, decision was made that fusion research should be started from the basic, namely, research on plasma physics and from cultivation of human resources at universities under the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture (MOE). However, an endorsement was given that construction of an experimental device for fusion research would be approved sooner or later. Studies on toroidal plasma confinement started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) under the Science and Technology Agency (STA) in the mid-1960s. Dualistic fusion research framework in Japan was established. This structure has lasted until now. Fusion research activities over the last 50 years are described by the use of a flowchart, which is convenient to glance the historical development of fusion research in Japan.

  8. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-04-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called `lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors.

  9. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called 'lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors. PMID:27113279

  10. Adaptive sensor fusion using genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, D.S.; Adams, D.G.

    1994-08-01

    Past attempts at sensor fusion have used some form of Boolean logic to combine the sensor information. As an alteniative, an adaptive ``fuzzy`` sensor fusion technique is described in this paper. This technique exploits the robust capabilities of fuzzy logic in the decision process as well as the optimization features of the genetic algorithm. This paper presents a brief background on fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms and how they are used in an online implementation of adaptive sensor fusion.

  11. An Alternate Development Path for Magnetic Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manheimer, Wallace

    2001-12-01

    Mid-century requirements for carbon free energy are daunting. Perhaps fusion could play a vital role. One of rather few possible solutions for sustainable development might be the fission fusion hybrid coupled with transmutation of the long lived actinide wastes. This paper suggests such an alternate development path for fusion, one that could lead to the production of multi-terawatts of carbon free power by 2050.

  12. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Already while making his famous contributions in uncontrolled nuclear fusion for wartime uses, Edward Teller contemplated how the abundant energy release through nuclear fusion might serve peacetime uses as well. His legacy in controlled nuclear fusion, and the associated physics of plasmas, spans both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches. His contributions in plasma physics, both the intellectual and the administrative, continue to impact the field.

  13. Review of alternative concepts for magnetic fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Although the Tokamak represents the mainstay of the world's quest for magnetic fusion power, with the tandem mirror serving as a primary backup concept in the US fusion program, a wide range of alternative fusion concepts (AFC's) have been and are being pursued. This review presents a summary of past and present reactor projections of a majority of AFC's. Whenever possible, quantitative results are given.

  14. Indirect drive targets for fusion power

    DOEpatents

    Amendt, Peter A.; Miles, Robin R.

    2016-10-11

    A hohlraum for an inertial confinement fusion power plant is disclosed. The hohlraum includes a generally cylindrical exterior surface, and an interior rugby ball-shaped surface. Windows over laser entrance holes at each end of the hohlraum enclose inert gas. Infrared reflectors on opposite sides of the central point reflect fusion chamber heat away from the capsule. P2 shields disposed on the infrared reflectors help assure an enhanced and more uniform x-ray bath for the fusion fuel capsule.

  15. Review of accelerator conceptual design for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Berwald, D.H.; Rathke, J.W.; Bruhwiler, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    A Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) will be completed in December 1996. The IFMIF accelerator system, comprising two 125 mA, 40 MeV deuterium accelerators is a key element of the IFMIF facility. This paper describes the status of the accelerator design as of June, 1996. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Inertial fusion: strategy and economic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Inertial fusion must demonstrate that the high target gains required for practical fusion energy can be achieved with driver energies not larger than a few megajoules. Before a multi-megajoule scale driver is constructed, inertial fusion must provide convincing experimental evidence that the required high target gains are feasible. This will be the principal objective of the NOVA laser experiments. Implosions will be conducted with scaled targets which are nearly hydrodynamically equivalent to the high gain target implosions. Experiments which demonstrate high target gains will be conducted in the early nineties when multi-megajoule drivers become available. Efficient drivers will also be demonstrated by this time period. Magnetic fusion may demonstrate high Q at about the same time as inertial fusion demonstrates high gain. Beyond demonstration of high performance fusion, economic considerations will predominate. Fusion energy will achieve full commercial success when it becomes cheaper than fission and coal. Analysis of the ultimate economic potential of inertial fusion suggests its costs may be reduced to half those of fission and coal. Relative cost escalation would increase this advantage. Fusions potential economic advantage derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy (which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity).

  17. Mitochondrial Fusion Is Essential for Steroid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Mariana; Soria, Gastón; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Podestá, Ernesto J.

    2012-01-01

    Although the contribution of mitochondrial dynamics (a balance in fusion/fission events and changes in mitochondria subcellular distribution) to key biological process has been reported, the contribution of changes in mitochondrial fusion to achieve efficient steroid production has never been explored. The mitochondria are central during steroid synthesis and different enzymes are localized between the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum to produce the final steroid hormone, thus suggesting that mitochondrial fusion might be relevant for this process. In the present study, we showed that the hormonal stimulation triggers mitochondrial fusion into tubular-shaped structures and we demonstrated that mitochondrial fusion does not only correlate-with but also is an essential step of steroid production, being both events depend on PKA activity. We also demonstrated that the hormone-stimulated relocalization of ERK1/2 in the mitochondrion, a critical step during steroidogenesis, depends on mitochondrial fusion. Additionally, we showed that the SHP2 phosphatase, which is required for full steroidogenesis, simultaneously modulates mitochondrial fusion and ERK1/2 localization in the mitochondrion. Strikingly, we found that mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) expression, a central protein for mitochondrial fusion, is upregulated immediately after hormone stimulation. Moreover, Mfn2 knockdown is sufficient to impair steroid biosynthesis. Together, our findings unveil an essential role for mitochondrial fusion during steroidogenesis. These discoveries highlight the importance of organelles’ reorganization in specialized cells, prompting the exploration of the impact that organelle dynamics has on biological processes that include, but are not limited to, steroid synthesis. PMID:23029265

  18. Fusion Concept Exploration Experiments at PPPL

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart Zweben; Samuel Cohen; Hantao Ji; Robert Kaita; Richard Majeski; Masaaki Yamada

    1999-05-01

    Small ''concept exploration'' experiments have for many years been an important part of the fusion research program at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). this paper describes some of the present and planned fusion concept exploration experiments at PPPL. These experiments are a University-scale research level, in contrast with the larger fusion devices at PPPL such as the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), which are at ''proof-of-principle'' and ''proof-of-performance'' levels, respectively.

  19. Mitochondrial fusion is essential for steroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Alejandra; Poderoso, Cecilia; Cooke, Mariana; Soria, Gastón; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2012-01-01

    Although the contribution of mitochondrial dynamics (a balance in fusion/fission events and changes in mitochondria subcellular distribution) to key biological process has been reported, the contribution of changes in mitochondrial fusion to achieve efficient steroid production has never been explored. The mitochondria are central during steroid synthesis and different enzymes are localized between the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum to produce the final steroid hormone, thus suggesting that mitochondrial fusion might be relevant for this process. In the present study, we showed that the hormonal stimulation triggers mitochondrial fusion into tubular-shaped structures and we demonstrated that mitochondrial fusion does not only correlate-with but also is an essential step of steroid production, being both events depend on PKA activity. We also demonstrated that the hormone-stimulated relocalization of ERK1/2 in the mitochondrion, a critical step during steroidogenesis, depends on mitochondrial fusion. Additionally, we showed that the SHP2 phosphatase, which is required for full steroidogenesis, simultaneously modulates mitochondrial fusion and ERK1/2 localization in the mitochondrion. Strikingly, we found that mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) expression, a central protein for mitochondrial fusion, is upregulated immediately after hormone stimulation. Moreover, Mfn2 knockdown is sufficient to impair steroid biosynthesis. Together, our findings unveil an essential role for mitochondrial fusion during steroidogenesis. These discoveries highlight the importance of organelles' reorganization in specialized cells, prompting the exploration of the impact that organelle dynamics has on biological processes that include, but are not limited to, steroid synthesis.

  20. Complete nitrification by Nitrospira bacteria.

    PubMed

    Daims, Holger; Lebedeva, Elena V; Pjevac, Petra; Han, Ping; Herbold, Craig; Albertsen, Mads; Jehmlich, Nico; Palatinszky, Marton; Vierheilig, Julia; Bulaev, Alexandr; Kirkegaard, Rasmus H; von Bergen, Martin; Rattei, Thomas; Bendinger, Bernd; Nielsen, Per H; Wagner, Michael

    2015-12-24

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate, has always been considered to be a two-step process catalysed by chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms oxidizing either ammonia or nitrite. No known nitrifier carries out both steps, although complete nitrification should be energetically advantageous. This functional separation has puzzled microbiologists for a century. Here we report on the discovery and cultivation of a completely nitrifying bacterium from the genus Nitrospira, a globally distributed group of nitrite oxidizers. The genome of this chemolithoautotrophic organism encodes the pathways both for ammonia and nitrite oxidation, which are concomitantly activated during growth by ammonia oxidation to nitrate. Genes affiliated with the phylogenetically distinct ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase genes of Nitrospira are present in many environments and were retrieved on Nitrospira-contigs in new metagenomes from engineered systems. These findings fundamentally change our picture of nitrification and point to completely nitrifying Nitrospira as key components of nitrogen-cycling microbial communities. PMID:26610024

  1. QCD Corrections to Higgs Pair Production in Bottom Quark Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Sally; Kao, Chung; Wang, Yili; Williams, Peter; /Oklahoma U.

    2006-10-01

    We present a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation for the total cross section of inclusive Higgs pair production via bottom-quark fusion (b{bar b} {yields} hh) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the Standard Model. The NLO QCD corrections lead to less dependence on the renormalization scale ({mu}{sub R}) and the factorization scale ({mu}{sub F}) than the leading-order (LO) cross section, and they significantly increase the LO cross section. The rate for inclusive Higgs pair production is small in the Standard Model, but can be large in models with enhanced couplings of the b quark to the Higgs bosons.

  2. Best practices in record completion.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Cindy

    2004-01-01

    Completion of hospital and office (clinic) medical records is one of the least popular of clinicians' duties. Adherence to Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) requirements and submission of hospital and provider bills to insurers and patients, however, are predicated on patient charts being completed and signed in a timely manner. This article details the rules and regulations that many institutions impose on providers to assure that records are up to date. It also discusses the carrot-and-stick approaches that are frequently used to assure compliance.

  3. Vacuum fusion bonded glass plates having microstructures thereon

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.; Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  4. Pre-Amplifier Module for Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Heebner, J E; Bowers, M W

    2008-02-06

    The Pre-Amplifier Modules (PAMs) are the heart of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), providing most of the energy gain for the most energetic laser in the world. Upon completion, NIF will be the only laboratory in which scientists can examine the fusion processes that occur inside stars, supernovae, and exploding nuclear weapons and that may someday serve as a virtually inexhaustible energy source for electricity. Consider that in a fusion power plant 50 cups of water could provide the energy comparable to 2 tons of coal. Of paramount importance for achieving laser-driven fusion ignition with the least energy input is the synchronous and symmetric compression of the target fuel--a condition known as laser power balance. NIF's 48 PAMs thus must provide energy gain in an exquisitely stable and consistent manner. While building one module that meets performance requirements is challenging enough, our design has already enabled the construction and fielding of 48 PAMs that are stable, uniform, and interchangeable. PAM systems are being tested at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and the Atomic Weapons Enterprise of Great Britain has purchased the PAM power system.

  5. Progress toward high-gain laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, E.

    1988-09-28

    A 1985-1986 Review of the US inertial confinement fusion program by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that five more years might be required to obtain enough data to determine the future course of the program. Since then, data from the Nova laser and from the Halite/Centurion program have resolved most of the outstanding problems identified by the NAS review. In particular, we now believe that we can produce a sufficiently uniform target; that we can keep the energy content in hot electrons and high-energy photons low enough (/approximately/1--10% of drive energy, depending on target design) and achieve enough pulse-shaping accuracy (/approximately/10%, with a dynamic range of 100:1) to keep the fuel on a near-Fermi-degenerate adiabat; that we can produce an /approximately/100-Mbar pressure pulse of sufficient uniformity (/approximately/1%), and can we control hydrodynamic instabilities so that the mix of the pusher into the hot spot is low enough to permit marginal ignition. These results are sufficiently encouraging that the US Department of Energy is planning to complete a 10-MJ laboratory microfusion facility to demonstrate high-gain ICF in the laboratory within a decade. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Experiences with remote collaborations in fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A.; Davis, S.; Barnes, D.

    1998-03-01

    The magnetic fusion research community has considerable experience in placing remote collaboration tools in the hands of real user. The ability to remotely view operations and to control selected instrumentation and analysis tasks has been demonstrated. University of Wisconsin scientists making turbulence measurements on TFTR: (1) were provided with a remote control room from which they could operate their diagnostic, while keeping in close contact with their colleagues in Princeton. LLNL has assembled a remote control room in Livermore in support of a large, long term collaboration on the DIII-D tokamak in San Diego. (2) From the same control room, a joint team of MIT and LLNL scientists has conducted full functional operation of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak located 3,000 miles away in Cambridge Massachusetts. (3) These early efforts have been highly successful, but are only the first steps needed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a complete facilities on line environment. These efforts have provided a proof of principle for the collaboratory concept and they have also pointed out shortcomings in current generation tools and approaches. Current experiences and future directions will be discussed.

  7. Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, John

    2011-01-01

    Following the suggestion of Earl Marmar in 1995, I installed a compact von Hamos type x-ray spectrometer (originally built with Elisabeth Rachlew and Jan Kallne) on a tangentially viewing port on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The spectrometer views the plasma through a 2 cm diameter hole, and is tuned to H-like argon, suitable for passive measurement of the core toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler shift. It soon became evident that the rotation in Ohmic L-mode discharges, while for the most part directed counter-current, depends in a very complicated fashion on plasma parameters, notably the electron density, current and magnetic configuration. The rotation can even flip sign for almost no apparent reason! In Ohmic and ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heated H-mode plasmas the rotation is in the co-current direction and has a relatively simple dependence on plasma parameters, proportional to the stored energy normalized to the current. Rotation velocities as high as 130 km s-1 have been observed without external momentum input. In dimensionless terms this intrinsic (or spontaneous rotation) depends on the normalized plasma pressure. The association of toroidal rotation with plasma pressure in ICRF H-modes was first observed by Lars-Goran Eriksson in JET discharges. Similar results were subsequently reported for Tore Supra enhanced confinement plasmas. In the early 2000s concerns began to surface about the lack of substantial neutral beam driven rotation in ITER, and intrinsic rotation became a topic of interest in the ITPA Transport Group. Through that connection, similar observations from DIII-D, TCV and JT-60U were added to the growing list. A database of intrinsic rotation observations was assembled with the goal of extrapolating to the expected values for ITER. Both dimensional and dimensionless scalings were developed and formed the backbone of the 2007 Nuclear Fusion paper. I gratefully acknowledge the important contributions to this paper from

  8. Interplanetary propulsion using inertial fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, Charles D.; Hoffman, Nate; Murray, Kathy; Klein, Gail; Diaz, Franklin Chang

    1987-01-01

    Inertial fusion can be used to power spacecraft within the solar system and beyond. Such spacecraft have the potential for short duration manned mission performance exceeding other technologies. A study was conducted to assess the systems aspects of inertial as applied to such missions, based on the conceptual engine design of Hyde (1983). The required systems for an entirely new spacecraft design called VISTA that is based on the use of DT fuel is described. Preliminary design details are given for the power conversion and power conditioning systems for manned missions to Mars of total duration of about 100 days.

  9. Modular stellarator fusion reactor concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. L.; Krakowski, R. A.

    1981-08-01

    A steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, magnetic fusion reactor is proposed for use as a central electric-power station. The MSR concept combines the physics of the classic stellarator confinement topology with an innovative, modular-coil design. Parametric tradeoff calculations are described, leading to the selection of an interim design point for a 4-GWt plant based on Alcator transport scaling and an average beta value of 0.04 in an 1 = 2 system with a plasma aspect ratio of 11. The physical basis of the design point is described together with supporting magnetics, coil-force, and stress computations.

  10. Tokamak Diagnostics Using Fusion Products.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidbrink, William Walter

    Measurements of neutrons and protons produced by the d(d,n)('3)He, d(t,n)(alpha), d(d,p)t, and d(('3)He,p)(alpha) fusion reactions are used to diagnose plasmas in the PLT and PDX tokamaks. An expression for the efficiency of proton detection is derived and confirmed experimentally. The time evolution of the ('3)He density indicates that a scoop limiter may pump ('3)He from the plasma faster than conventional limiters. The confinement of 1.0 MeV tritons and of 0.8 MeV ('3)He ions is studied by measuring the fraction of these fusion-produced ions that burn up in subsequent fusion reactions. In discharges with sawtooth activity and with B(,(phi)) > 2 T, the triton and ('3)He 'burnup' is consistent (within a factor of three) with predictions based on classical theories of ion confinement and slowing down. In discharges with large m = 2 or fishbone instabilities, the ('3)He burnup is less than classically predicted and, in PLT discharges at B(,(phi)) = 1.8 T, the triton burnup is over an order of magnitude smaller than predicted. Expressions for the energy spectrum of ions produced in beam-target fusion reactions are derived. Collimated measurements of the spectrum of 15 MeV protons produced by reactions between energetic ('3)He ions and relatively cold deuterons during fast wave minority heating indicate that the velocity distribution of fast ('3)He ions is peaked perpendicular to the tokamak magnetic field. The ion temperature profile and density of fast deuterons are measured with an array of collimated 3 MeV proton detectors. The fast ions produced by neutral beam injection and by launching lower hybrid waves are concentrated near the magnetic axis. Poloidal field measurements using 3 MeV protons also appear possible. In discharges in which the line radiation from central impurities does not decay, the plasma current profile is broader than in more typical discharges.

  11. Thomson scattering at general fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, W. C.; Parfeniuk, D.

    2016-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Thomson scattering diagnostic in use at General Fusion, including recent upgrades and upcoming plans. The plasma experiment under examination produces temperatures in the 50-500 eV range with density on the order of 1020 m-3. A four spatial point collection optics scheme has been implemented, with plans to expand to six spatial points. Recent changes to the optics of the laser beamline have reduced stray light. The system employs a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm), a grating spectrometer, and a photomultiplier array based detector.

  12. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOEpatents

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  13. A. Sakharov and Fusion Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, Bruno

    2012-02-01

    In the landmark paper by Tamm and Sakharov [1], a controlled nuclear fusion reactor based on an axisymmetric magnetic confinement configuration whose principles remain valid to this day, was proposed. In the light of present understanding of plasma physics the virtues (e.g. that of considering the D-D reaction) and the shortcomings of this paper are pointed out. In fact, relatively recent results of theoretical plasma physics (e.g. discovery of the so called second stability region) and advances in high field magnet technology have made it possible to identify the parameters of meaningful experiments capable of exploring D-D and D-^3He burn conditions. At the same time an experimental program (IGNIR) has been undertaken through a (funded) collaboration between Italy and Russia to investigate D-T plasmas close to ignition conditions based on an advanced high field toroidal confinement configuration. A. Sakharov envisioned a bolder approach to fusion research than that advocated by some of his contemporaries. The time taken to design and decide to fabricate the first experiment capable of reaching ignition conditions is due in part to the problem of gaining an adequate understanding the expected physics of fusion burning plasmas. However, most of the relevant financial effort has gone in the pursuit of slow and indirect enterprises complying with the ``playing it safe'' tendencies of large organizations or motivated by the purpose to develop technologies or maintain a high level of expertise in plasma physics to the expected benefit of other kinds of endeavors. The creativity demonstrated by A. Sakharov in dealing with civil rights and disarmament issues is needed, while maintaining our concerns for energy and the environment on a global scale, to orient the funding for fusion research toward a direct and well based scientific effort on concepts for which a variety of developments can be envisioned. These can span from uncovering new physics relevant, for instance

  14. Introduction to Nuclear Fusion Power and the Design of Fusion Reactors. An Issue-Oriented Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillo, J. A.

    This three-part module focuses on the principles of nuclear fusion and on the likely nature and components of a controlled-fusion power reactor. The physical conditions for a net energy release from fusion and two approaches (magnetic and inertial confinement) which are being developed to achieve this goal are described. Safety issues associated…

  15. The temperature arrested intermediate of virus-cell fusion is a functional step in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Hamani I; Hope, Thomas J

    2006-05-25

    HIV entry occurs via membrane-mediated fusion of virus and target cells. Interactions between gp120 and cellular co-receptors lead to both the formation of fusion pores and release of the HIV genome into target cells. Studies using cell-cell fusion assays have demonstrated that a temperature-arrested state (TAS) can generate a stable intermediate in fusion related events. Other studies with MLV pseudotyped with HIV envelope also found that a temperature sensitive intermediate could be generated as revealed by the loss of a fluorescently labeled membrane. However, such an intermediate has never been analyzed in the context of virus infection. Therefore, we used virus-cell infection with replication competent HIV to gain insights into virus-cell fusion. We find that the TAS is an intermediate in the process culminating in the HIV infection of a target cell. In the virion-cell TAS, CD4 has been engaged, the heptad repeats of gp41 are exposed and the complex is kinetically predisposed to interact with coreceptor to complete the fusion event leading to infection.

  16. Structure–function analysis of myomaker domains required for myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Millay, Douglas P.; Gamage, Dilani G.; Quinn, Malgorzata E.; Min, Yi-Li; Mitani, Yasuyuki; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    During skeletal muscle development, myoblasts fuse to form multinucleated myofibers. Myomaker [Transmembrane protein 8c (TMEM8c)] is a muscle-specific protein that is essential for myoblast fusion and sufficient to promote fusion of fibroblasts with muscle cells; however, the structure and biochemical properties of this membrane protein have not been explored. Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis to disrupt myomaker expression in the C2C12 muscle cell line, which resulted in complete blockade to fusion. To define the functional domains of myomaker required to direct fusion, we established a heterologous cell–cell fusion system, in which fibroblasts expressing mutant versions of myomaker were mixed with WT myoblasts. Our data indicate that the majority of myomaker is embedded in the plasma membrane with seven membrane-spanning regions and a required intracellular C-terminal tail. We show that myomaker function is conserved in other mammalian orthologs; however, related family members (TMEM8a and TMEM8b) do not exhibit fusogenic activity. These findings represent an important step toward deciphering the cellular components and mechanisms that control myoblast fusion and muscle formation. PMID:26858401

  17. 40,48Ca+144,154Sm: Deformation and Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Knyazheva, G. N.; Kozulin, E. M.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Szilner, S.; Trotta, M.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Haas, F.; Rowley, N.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Szanto de Toledo, A.

    2007-05-22

    Mass-energy and angular distributions of fission fragments for the 48Ca+144,154Sm{yields}192,202Pb, 40Ca+154Sm{yields}194Pb reactions have been measured. Fusion suppression and the presence of quasi-fission at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier have been observed for the reactions with the deformed target 154Sm. In the case of the spherical 144Sm target no evidence of quasi-fission has been found.

  18. A-3 steel work completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center engineers celebrated a key milestone in construction of the A-3 Test Stand on April 9 - completion of structural steel work. Workers with Lafayette (La.) Steel Erector Inc. placed the last structural steel beam atop the stand during a noon ceremony attended by more than 100 workers and guests.

  19. Review of "A Complete Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Beth

    2010-01-01

    The research summary, "A Complete Education," presents the Obama administration's proposal for ensuring that all students have a comprehensive education. The key areas include: strengthening instruction in literacy and in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM); increasing access to instruction in a broader range of subject…

  20. Indiana College Completion. 2014 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Commission for Higher Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Indiana Commission for Higher Education is committed to providing a clearer and more comprehensive picture of college completion in order to inform and advance Indiana's collective efforts to boost education attainment. In partnership with Indiana public colleges and the National Student Clearinghouse, the Commission has collected completion…

  1. Program Costs and Student Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Terri M.; Crosta, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges are under pressure to increase completion rates, prepare students for the workplace, and contain costs. Colleges need to know the financial implications of what are often perceived as routine decisions: course scheduling, program offerings, and the provision of support services. This chapter presents a methodology for estimating…

  2. Complete feeds-intensive systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most commercially cultivated fish are raised in high-density culture systems where the assumption is that the contribution of natural foods to the nutrition of the fish is insignificant. Thus, intensively cultured fish must be fed a nutritionally complete feed. A short section on the concept and im...

  3. Magnetized Target Fusion in Advanced Propulsion Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cylar, Rashad

    2003-01-01

    The Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) Propulsion lab at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama has a program in place that has adopted to attempt to create a faster, lower cost and more reliable deep space transportation system. In this deep space travel the physics and development of high velocity plasma jets must be understood. The MTF Propulsion lab is also in attempt to open up the solar system for human exploration and commercial use. Fusion, as compared to fission, is just the opposite. Fusion involves the light atomic nuclei combination to produce denser nuclei. In the process, the energy is created by destroying the mass according to the distinguished equation: E = mc2 . Fusion energy development is being pursued worldwide as a very sustainable form of energy that is environmentally friendly. For the purposes of space exploration fusion reactions considered include the isotopes of hydrogen-deuterium (D2) and tritium (T3). Nuclei have an electrostatic repulsion between them and in order for the nuclei to fuse this repulsion must be overcome. One technique to bypass repulsion is to heat the nuclei to very high temperatures. The temperatures vary according to the type of reactions. For D-D reactions, one billion degrees Celsius is required, and for D-T reactions, one hundred million degrees is sufficient. There has to be energy input for useful output to be obtained form the fusion To make fusion propulsion practical, the mass, the volume, and the cost of the equipment to produce the reactions (generally called the reactor) need to be reduced by an order of magnitude or two from the state-of-the-art fusion machines. Innovations in fusion schemes are therefore required, especially for obtaining thrust for propulsive applications. Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is one of the innovative fusion concepts that have emerged over the last several years. MSFC is working with Los Alamos National Laboratory and other research groups in studying the

  4. Ch. 37, Inertial Fusion Energy Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2010-06-09

    Nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and renewable energy (including biofuels) are the only energy sources capable of satisfying the Earth's need for power for the next century and beyond without the negative environmental impacts of fossil fuels. Substantially increasing the use of nuclear fission and renewable energy now could help reduce dependency on fossil fuels, but nuclear fusion has the potential of becoming the ultimate base-load energy source. Fusion is an attractive fuel source because it is virtually inexhaustible, widely available, and lacks proliferation concerns. It also has a greatly reduced waste impact, and no danger of runaway reactions or meltdowns. The substantial environmental, commercial, and security benefits of fusion continue to motivate the research needed to make fusion power a reality. Replicating the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars to meet Earth's energy needs has been a long-sought scientific and engineering challenge. In fact, this technological challenge is arguably the most difficult ever undertaken. Even after roughly 60 years of worldwide research, much more remains to be learned. the magnitude of the task has caused some to declare that fusion is 20 years away, and always will be. This glib criticism ignores the enormous progress that has occurred during those decades, progress inboth scientific understanding and essential technologies that has enabled experiments producing significant amounts of fusion energy. For example, more than 15 megawatts of fusion power was produced in a pulse of about half a second. Practical fusion power plants will need to produce higher powers averaged over much longer periods of time. In addition, the most efficient experiments to date have required using about 50% more energy than the resulting fusion reaction generated. That is, there was no net energy gain, which is essential if fusion energy is to be a viable source of electricity. The simplest fusion fuels, the heavy isotopes of

  5. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an emerging, relatively unexplored approach to fusion for electrical power and propulsion application. The physical principles of the concept are founded upon both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). It attempts to combine the favorable attributes of both these orthogonal approaches to fusion, but at the same time, avoiding the extreme technical challenges of both by exploiting a fusion regime intermediate between them. It uses a material liner to compress, heat and contain the fusion reacting plasma (the target plasma) mentally. By doing so, the fusion burn could be made to occur at plasma densities as high as six orders of magnitude higher than conventional MCF such as tokamak, thus leading to an approximately three orders of magnitude reduction in the plasma energy required for ignition. It also uses a transient magnetic field, compressed to extremely high intensity (100's T to 1000T) in the target plasma, to slow down the heat transport to the liner and to increase the energy deposition of charged-particle fusion products. This has several compounding beneficial effects. It leads to longer energy confinement time compared with conventional ICF without magnetized target, and thus permits the use of much lower plasma density to produce reasonable burn-up fraction. The compounding effects of lower plasma density and the magneto-insulation of the target lead to greatly reduced compressional heating power on the target. The increased energy deposition rate of charged-particle fusion products also helps to lower the energy threshold required for ignition and increasing the burn-up fraction. The reduction in ignition energy and the compressional power compound to lead to reduced system size, mass and R&D cost. It is a fusion approach that has an affordable R&D pathway, and appears attractive for propulsion application in the nearer term.

  6. The adaptive significance of mandibular symphyseal fusion in mammals.

    PubMed

    Scott, J E; Hogue, A S; Ravosa, M J

    2012-04-01

    The mandibular symphyseal joint is remarkably variable across major mammalian clades, ranging in adults from unfused (amphiarthrosis) to partially fused (synarthrosis) to completely ossified (synostosis). Experimental work conducted on primates suggests that greater ossification of the symphysis is a response to increased recruitment of the balancing-side (i.e. nonchewing side) jaw-adductor muscles during forceful unilateral biting and chewing, with increased fusion strengthening the symphysis against correspondingly elevated joint stresses. It is thus expected that species with diets composed primarily of foods that require high-magnitude bite forces and/or repetitive loading to process will be characterized by greater degrees of symphyseal ossification than species with relatively easy-to-process diets (i.e. food items typified by low toughness and/or low stiffness). However, comparative support for this idea is limited. We tested this hypothesis in four dietarily diverse mammalian clades characterized by variation in symphyseal fusion - the Strepsirrhini, Marsupialia, Feliformia, and Caniformia. We scored fusion in adult specimens of 292 species, assigned each to a dietary category based on literature accounts, and tested for an association between these two variables using Pagel's test for the correlated evolution of binary characters. Results indicate that greater fusion is associated with diets composed of resistant items in strepsirrhines, marsupials, and feliforms, providing some support for the hypothesis. However, no such relationship was detected in caniforms, suggesting that factors other than dietary mechanical properties influence symphyseal ossification. Future work should focus on such factors, as well as those that favour an unfused mandibular symphysis. PMID:22268953

  7. Distributed fusion and automated sensor tasking in ISR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preden, Jurgo; Pahtma, Raido; Astapov, Sergei; Ehala, Johannes; Riid, Andri; Motus, Leo

    2014-06-01

    Modern Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) systems are increasingly being assembled from autonomous systems, so the resulting ISR system is a System of Systems (SoS). In order to take full advantage of the capabilities of the ISR SoS, the architecture and the design of these SoS should be able to facilitate the benefits inherent in a SoS approach - high resilience, higher level of adaptability and higher diversity, enabling on-demand system composition. The tasks performed by ISR SoS can well go beyond basic data acquisition, conditioning and communication as data processing can be easily integrated in the SoS. Such an ISR SoS can perform data fusion, classification and tracking (and conditional sensor tasking for additional data acquisition), these are extremely challenging tasks in this context, especially if the fusion is performed in a distributed manner. Our premise for the ISR SoS design and deployment is that the system is not designed as a complete system, where the capabilities of individual data providers are considered and the interaction paths, including communication channel capabilities, are specified at design time. Instead, we assume a loosely coupled SoS, where the data needs for a specific fusion task are described at a high level at design time and data providers (i.e., sensor systems) required for a specific fusion task are discovered dynamically at run time, the selection criteria for the data providers being the type and properties of data that can be provided by the specific data provider. The paper describes some of the aspects of a distributed ISR SoS design and implementation, bringing examples on both architectural design as well as on algorithm implementations.

  8. Experiments in predictive sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, James M.; Auephanwiriyakul, Sansanee; Gader, Paul D.

    2001-10-01

    Data fusion is a process of combining evidence from different information sources in order to make a better judgement. However, multiple sources can provide complementary information that can be used to increase the performance in detection and recognition. There are many frameworks within which to combine these pieces into a more meaningful answer. However, new information added might be redundant or even conflicting with the existing information. These questions arise: can we predict the value added by fusing their outputs together, if we know the general characteristics of a set of sensors. Can we specify the needed characteristics of a new sensor/algorithm to add to an existing suite to gain a desired improvement performance. The characteristic of a new sensor can be in any forms, e.g., the ratio of a target's signal to the clutter's signal, the position resolution etc. In this paper, we consider these questions in the context of fuzzy set theory and in particular, a soft decision level fusion scheme we developed for land mine detection scenarios. Here, we primarily consider the ratio of a target's signal. We develop a tool to estimate a final d-metric when the information form several sensor is fused through the linguistic Choquet fuzzy integral. We utilize this tool in the examination of the performance of d-metrics in a simulation environment. The approach is demonstrated for data obtained from an Advanced Technology Demonstration in vehicle-based mine detection.

  9. Large excimer lasers for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Important goals in DOE and DOD programs require multimegajoule laser pulses. For inertial confinement fusion there is also a requirement to deliver the pulse in about 25 nsec with a very particular power vs time profile - all at high overall efficiency and low cost per joule. After exhaustive consideration of various alternatives, our studies have shown that the most cost effective approach to energy scaling is to increase the size of the final amplifiers up to the 200 to 300 kJ level. This conclusion derives largely from the fact that, at a given complexity, costs increase slowly with increasing part size while output energy should increase dramatically. Extrapolations to low cost by drastic cuts in the unit cost of smaller devices through mass production are considered highly risky. At a minimum the requirement to provide, space, optics and mounts for such systems will remain expensive. In recent years there have been dramatic advances in scaling. The Los Alamos LAM has produced over 10 kJ in a single 1/2 nsec pulse. In this paper we explore the issues involved in scaling to higher energy while still maintaining high efficiencies. In the remainder of this paper we will discuss KrF laser scaling for the fusion mission. We will omit most of the discussion of the laser system design, but address only KrF amplifiers.

  10. Fusion of infrared and visible images based on BEMD and NSDFB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Pan; Huang, Zhanhua; Lei, Hai

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new fusion method based on the adaptive multi-scale decomposition of bidimensional empirical mode decomposition (BEMD) and the flexible directional expansion of nonsubsampled directional filter banks (NSDFB) for visible-infrared images. Compared with conventional multi-scale fusion methods, BEMD is non-parametric and completely data-driven, which is relatively more suitable for non-linear signals decomposition and fusion. NSDFB can provide direction filtering on the decomposition levels to capture more geometrical structure of the source images effectively. In our fusion framework, the entropies of the two patterns of source images are firstly calculated and the residue of the image whose entropy is larger is extracted to make it highly relevant with the other source image. Then, the residue and the other source image are decomposed into low-frequency sub-bands and a sequence of high-frequency directional sub-bands in different scales by using BEMD and NSDFB. In this fusion scheme, two relevant fusion rules are used in low-frequency sub-bands and high-frequency directional sub-bands, respectively. Finally, the fused image is obtained by applying corresponding inverse transform. Experimental results indicate that the proposed fusion algorithm can obtain state-of-the-art performance for visible-infrared images fusion in both aspects of objective assessment and subjective visual quality even for the source images obtained in different conditions. Furthermore, the fused results have high contrast, remarkable target information and rich details information that are more suitable for human visual characteristics or machine perception.

  11. Computer Modeling of a Fusion Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I

    2000-12-15

    Progress in the study of plasma physics and controlled fusion has been profoundly influenced by dramatic increases in computing capability. Computational plasma physics has become an equal partner with experiment and traditional theory. This presentation illustrates some of the progress in computer modeling of plasma physics and controlled fusion.

  12. Application of polarized nuclei to fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    It is shown that the d-t fusion reaction can be modified by polarizing nuclear spins. The ways in which this improves reactor performance are mentioned and the feasibility of the process of spin polarization for magnetic fusion is discussed. 18 refs.

  13. Plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, R. )

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings contains papers on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion. Included are the following topics: Plasma focus and Z-pinch, Review of mirror fusion research, Progress in studies of x-ray and ion-beam emission from plasma focus facilities.

  14. Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cool

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cold. The DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) collaborates to develop fusion as a safe, clean and abundant energy source for the future. This video discusses PPPL's research and development on plasma, the fourth state of matter.

  15. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOEpatents

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Furth, Harold P.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Goldhaber, Maurice

    1988-01-01

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  16. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOEpatents

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Furth, Harold P.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Goldhaber, Maurice

    1988-03-01

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  17. Controlled Nuclear Fusion: Status and Outlook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, David J.

    1971-01-01

    Presents the history, current concerns and potential developments of nuclear fusion as a major energy source. Controlled fusion research is summarized, technological feasibility is discussed and environmental factors are examined. Relationships of alternative energy sources as well as energy utilization are considered. (JM)

  18. Fusion Propulsion Z-Pinch Engine Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, J.; Statham, G.; Fabisinski, L.; Maples, C. D.; Adams, R.; Polsgrove, T.; Fincher, S.; Cassibry, J.; Cortez, R.; Turner, M.; Percy, T.

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Due to the great distances between the planets of our solar system and the harmful radiation environment of interplanetary space, high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion in vehicles with high payload mass fractions must be developed to provide practical and safe vehicles for human spaceflight missions. The Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method is a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) approach that may potentially lead to a small, low cost fusion reactor/engine assembly1. Recent advancements in experimental and theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield 2. The magnetic field resulting from the large current compresses the plasma to fusion conditions, and this process can be pulsed over short timescales (10(exp -6 sec). This type of plasma formation is widely used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects testing in the defense industry, as well as in fusion energy research. A Decade Module 2 (DM2), approx.500 KJ pulsed-power is coming to the RSA Aerophysics Lab managed by UAHuntsville in January, 2012. A Z-Pinch propulsion concept was designed for a vehicle based on a previous fusion vehicle study called "Human Outer Planet Exploration" (HOPE), which used Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) 3 propulsion. The reference mission is the transport of crew and cargo to Mars and back, with a reusable vehicle.

  19. Socio-economic Aspects of Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Schmidt

    2004-10-21

    Fusion power systems, if developed and deployed, would have many attractive features including power production not dependant on weather or solar conditions, flexible siting, and minimal carbon dioxide production. In this paper, we quantify the benefit of these features. In addition, fusion deployment scenarios are developed for the last half of this century and these scenarios are analyzed for resource requirements and waste production.

  20. The social evolution of somatic fusion.

    PubMed

    Aanen, Duur K; Debets, Alfons J M; de Visser, J Arjan G M; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    2008-11-01

    The widespread potential for somatic fusion among different conspecific multicellular individuals suggests that such fusion is adaptive. However, because recognition of non-kin (allorecognition) usually leads to a rejection response, successful somatic fusion is limited to close kin. This is consistent with kin-selection theory, which predicts that the potential cost of fusion and the potential for somatic parasitism decrease with increasing relatedness. Paradoxically, however, Crozier found that, in the short term, positive-frequency-dependent selection eliminates the required genetic polymorphism at allorecognition loci. The 'Crozier paradox' may be solved if allorecognition is based on extrinsically balanced polymorphisms, for example at immune loci. Alternatively, the assumption of most models that self fusion is mutually beneficial is wrong. If fusion is on average harmful, selection will promote unconditional rejection. However, we propose that fusion within individuals is beneficial, selecting for the ability to fuse, but fusion between individuals on average costly, selecting for non-self recognition (rather than non-kin recognition). We discuss experimental data on fungi that are consistent with this hypothesis. PMID:18937373

  1. Fusion breeder: its potential role and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The fusion breeder is a concept that utilizes 14 MeV neutrons from D + T ..-->.. n(14.1 MeV) + ..cap alpha..(3.5 MeV) fusion reactions to produce more fuel than the tritium (T) needed to sustain the fusion process. This excess fuel production capacity is used to produce fissile material (Pu-239 or U-233) for subsequent use in fission reactors. We are concentrating on a class of blankets we call fission suppressed. The blanket is the region surrounding the fusion plasma in which fusion neutrons interact to produce fuel and heat. The fission-suppressed blanket uses non-fission reactions (mainly (n,2n) or (n,n't)) to generate excess neutrons for the production of net fuel. This is in contrast to the fast fission class of blankets which use (n,fiss) reactions to generate excess neutrons. Fusion reactors with fast fission blankets are commony known as fusion-fission hybrids because they combine fusion and fission in the same device.

  2. [La(3+)-induced fusion of plant protoplasts].

    PubMed

    Sheremet'ev, Iu A; Smirnova, D V; Sheremet'eva, A V

    2009-01-01

    The effect of La(3+) on the fusion of plant protoplasts has been studied. It was shown that La(3+) induced the aggregation of plant protoplasts. The incubation of a suspension of aggregated protoplasts at 42 degrees C for 30 min resulted in their fusion.

  3. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    SciTech Connect

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Meier, W.R.

    1982-08-17

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. Produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithiumceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  4. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; et al

    2015-06-02

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurementsmore » of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.« less

  5. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using fusion burn imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C.; Pino, J.; Atzeni, S.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Marshall, F. J.; and others

    2015-06-15

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D{sup 3}He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, N{sub K}) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (N{sub K} ∼ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  6. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Wilks, S. C.; Pino, J.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-06-02

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  7. Fusion research: the past is prologue

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F

    1998-10-14

    At this juncture fusion research can be viewed as being at a turning point, a time to review its past and to imagine its future. Today, almost 50 years since the first serious attempts to address the daunting problem of achieving controlled fusion, we have both an opportunity and a challenge. Some predictions place fusion research today at a point midway between its first inception and its eventual maturation - in the middle of the 21st century - when fusion would become a major source of energy. Our opportunity therefore is to assess what we have learned from 50 years of hard work and use that knowledge as a starting point for new and better approaches to solving the fusion problem. Our challenge is to prove the "50 more years" prophesy wrong, by finding ways to shorten the time when fusion power becomes a reality. The thesis will be advanced that in the magnetic confinement approach to fusion open-ended magnetic confinement geometries offer much in responding to the challenge. A major advantage of open systems is that, owing to their theoretically and experimentally demonstrated ability to suppress plasma instabilities of both the MHD and the high-frequency wave-particle variety, the confinement becomes predictable from "classical," i.e., Fokker-Planck-type analysis. In a time of straitened budgetary circumstances for magnetic fusion research now being faced in the United States, the theoretical tractability of mirror-based systems is a substantial asset. In pursuing this avenue it is also necessary to keep an open mind as to the forms that mirror-based fusion power plants might take. For example, one can look to the high-energy physics community for a possible model: This community has shown the feasibility of constructing large and complex particle accelerators using superconducting magnets, vacuum chambers and complicated particle-handling technology, housed in underground tunnels that are 20 or more kilometers long. In the paper examples of mirror

  8. The fusion diagnostic gamma experiment: A high-bandwidth fusion diagnostic of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility/inertial confinement fusion program must include good characterization of the fusion source. Ideally, diagnostics would measure the spatially resolved history of the fusion reaction rate and temperature. Existing diagnostics can satisfy this goal only partially. One class of new techniques that could play a major role in high-yield diagnostics is measurements based on fusion {gamma} rays. The fusion diagnostic gamma experiment can perform energy-resolved measurements of (D,T) fusion reaction rates. This diagnostic is based on the 16.7 MeV {gamma} rays that are produced by (D,T) fusion. The {gamma} rays are free of spectral dispersion and can be detected (via Compton recoil electrons) with a high bandwidth Cherenkov detector. A simple magnetic monochromator selects signals from the 16.7 MeV {gamma} rays and reduces background signals from nonfusion {gamma} rays. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Estimating the melting point, entropy of fusion, and enthalpy of fusion of organic compounds via SPARC.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, T S; Hilal, S H; Brenner, A; Carreira, L A

    2016-08-01

    The entropy of fusion, enthalpy of fusion, and melting point of organic compounds can be estimated through three models developed using the SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) platform. The entropy of fusion is modelled through a combination of interaction terms and physical descriptors. The enthalpy of fusion is modelled as a function of the entropy of fusion, boiling point, and flexibility of the molecule. The melting point model is the enthalpy of fusion divided by the entropy of fusion. These models were developed in part to improve SPARC's vapour pressure and solubility models. These models have been tested on 904 unique compounds. The entropy model has a RMS of 12.5 J mol(-1) K(-1). The enthalpy model has a RMS of 4.87 kJ mol(-1). The melting point model has a RMS of 54.4°C. PMID:27586365

  10. Estimating the melting point, entropy of fusion, and enthalpy of fusion of organic compounds via SPARC.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, T S; Hilal, S H; Brenner, A; Carreira, L A

    2016-08-01

    The entropy of fusion, enthalpy of fusion, and melting point of organic compounds can be estimated through three models developed using the SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) platform. The entropy of fusion is modelled through a combination of interaction terms and physical descriptors. The enthalpy of fusion is modelled as a function of the entropy of fusion, boiling point, and flexibility of the molecule. The melting point model is the enthalpy of fusion divided by the entropy of fusion. These models were developed in part to improve SPARC's vapour pressure and solubility models. These models have been tested on 904 unique compounds. The entropy model has a RMS of 12.5 J mol(-1) K(-1). The enthalpy model has a RMS of 4.87 kJ mol(-1). The melting point model has a RMS of 54.4°C.

  11. Subsea completion technology needs advances

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, R.

    1995-09-18

    Subsea technology needs further advances to reduce operational costs before operators will expand the use of subsea well completions in the Gulf of Mexico. They will continue to choose surface completion-oriented systems as long as these are more economical operationally than subsea system. Designs of subsea equipment such as trees, connectors, control pods, umbilicals, and flow lines, must bring about reductions in the cost of both installation and workover compatibility. Remote operated vehicle (ROV) manipulation is one avenue that should be exploited. The bottom line is that significant cooperation between equipment manufacturers and ROV companies is needed to develop advanced ROV technology, and operators should be involved to help guide operational strategies.

  12. Contour Completion Without Region Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yansheng; Li, Hongdong; He, Xuming

    2016-08-01

    Contour completion plays an important role in visual perception, where the goal is to group fragmented low-level edge elements into perceptually coherent and salient contours. Most existing methods for contour completion have focused on pixelwise detection accuracy. In contrast, fewer methods have addressed the global contour closure effect, despite psychological evidences for its importance. This paper proposes a purely contour-based higher order CRF model to achieve contour closure, through local connectedness approximation. This leads to a simplified problem structure, where our higher order inference problem can be transformed into an integer linear program and be solved efficiently. Compared with the methods based on the same bottom-up edge detector, our method achieves a superior contour grouping ability (measured by Rand index), a comparable precision-recall performance, and more visually pleasing results. Our results suggest that contour closure can be effectively achieved in contour domain, in contrast to a popular view that segmentation is essential for this purpose.

  13. Complete EOS for PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph S

    2009-10-08

    PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic-bonded explosive based on triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB). A complete equation of state (EOS) is constructed for unreacted PBX 9502 suitable for reactive burn models, i.e., high pressure regime in which material strength is unimportant. The PBX EOS is composed of two parts: a complete EOS for TATB and a porosity model which allows for variations in the initial PBX density. The TATB EOS is based on a cold curve and a thermal model for lattice vibrations. The heat capacity, and hence thermal model, is determined by the vibrational spectrum from Raman scattering. The cold curve is calibrated to diamond anvil cell data for isothermal compression using a two-piece Keane fitting form. Hugoniot data for PBX 9502 is used as a consistency check.

  14. Inertial-confinement fusion with lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Betti, R.; Hurricane, O. A.

    2016-05-03

    The quest for controlled fusion energy has been ongoing for over a half century. The demonstration of ignition and energy gain from thermonuclear fuels in the laboratory has been a major goal of fusion research for decades. Thermonuclear ignition is widely considered a milestone in the development of fusion energy, as well as a major scientific achievement with important applications to national security and basic sciences. The U.S. is arguably the world leader in the inertial con fment approach to fusion and has invested in large facilities to pursue it with the objective of establishing the science related to themore » safety and reliability of the stockpile of nuclear weapons. Even though significant progress has been made in recent years, major challenges still remain in the quest for thermonuclear ignition via laser fusion.« less

  15. Cancer Cell Fusion: Mechanisms Slowly Unravel

    PubMed Central

    Noubissi, Felicite K.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Although molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways driving invasion and metastasis have been studied for many years, the origin of the population of metastatic cells within the primary tumor is still not well understood. About a century ago, Aichel proposed that cancer cell fusion was a mechanism of cancer metastasis. This hypothesis gained some support over the years, and recently became the focus of many studies that revealed increasing evidence pointing to the possibility that cancer cell fusion probably gives rise to the metastatic phenotype by generating widespread genetic and epigenetic diversity, leading to the emergence of critical populations needed to evolve resistance to the treatment and development of metastasis. In this review, we will discuss the clinical relevance of cancer cell fusion, describe emerging mechanisms of cancer cell fusion, address why inhibiting cancer cell fusion could represent a critical line of attack to limit drug resistance and to prevent metastasis, and suggest one new modality for doing so. PMID:27657058

  16. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-09-27

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm/sup -1/, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs.

  17. A Reliability-Based Track Fusion Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Pan, Liqiang; Jin, Shuilin; Liu, Haibo; Yin, Guisheng

    2015-01-01

    The common track fusion algorithms in multi-sensor systems have some defects, such as serious imbalances between accuracy and computational cost, the same treatment of all the sensor information regardless of their quality, high fusion errors at inflection points. To address these defects, a track fusion algorithm based on the reliability (TFR) is presented in multi-sensor and multi-target environments. To improve the information quality, outliers in the local tracks are eliminated at first. Then the reliability of local tracks is calculated, and the local tracks with high reliability are chosen for the state estimation fusion. In contrast to the existing methods, TFR reduces high fusion errors at the inflection points of system tracks, and obtains a high accuracy with less computational cost. Simulation results verify the effectiveness and the superiority of the algorithm in dense sensor environments. PMID:25950174

  18. Magnetic-fusion energy and computers

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.

    1982-01-01

    The application of computers to magnetic fusion energy research is essential. In the last several years the use of computers in the numerical modeling of fusion systems has increased substantially. There are several categories of computer models used to study the physics of magnetically confined plasmas. A comparable number of types of models for engineering studies are also in use. To meet the needs of the fusion program, the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A large central computing facility is linked to smaller computer centers at each of the major MFE laboratories by a communication network. In addition to providing cost effective computing services, the NMFECC environment stimulates collaboration and the sharing of computer codes among the various fusion research groups.

  19. Fusion-protein-assisted protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kobe, Bostjan; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J

    2015-07-01

    Fusion proteins can be used directly in protein crystallization to assist crystallization in at least two different ways. In one approach, the `heterologous fusion-protein approach', the fusion partner can provide additional surface area to promote crystal contact formation. In another approach, the `fusion of interacting proteins approach', protein assemblies can be stabilized by covalently linking the interacting partners. The linker connecting the proteins plays different roles in the two applications: in the first approach a rigid linker is required to reduce conformational heterogeneity; in the second, conversely, a flexible linker is required that allows the native interaction between the fused proteins. The two approaches can also be combined. The recent applications of fusion-protein technology in protein crystallization from the work of our own and other laboratories are briefly reviewed.

  20. INTRODUCTION: Status report on fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, Werner

    2005-10-01

    A major milestone on the path to fusion energy was reached in June 2005 on the occasion of the signing of the joint declaration of all parties to the ITER negotiations, agreeing on future arrangements and on the construction site at Cadarache in France. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been promoting fusion activities since the late 1950s; it took over the auspices of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities in 1988, and of the ITER Engineering and Design Activities in 1992. The Agency continues its support to Member States through the organization of consultancies, workshops and technical meetings, the most prominent being the series of International Fusion Energy Conferences (formerly called the International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research). The meetings serve as a platform for experts from all Member States to have open discussions on their latest accomplishments as well as on their problems and eventual solutions. The papers presented at the meetings and conferences are routinely published, many being sent to the journal it Nuclear Fusion, co-published monthly by Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol, UK. The journal's reputation is reflected in the fact that it is a world-renowned publication, and the International Fusion Research Council has used it for the publication of a Status Report on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion in 1978 and 1990. This present report marks the conclusion of the preparatory phases of ITER activities. It provides background information on the progress of fusion research within the last 15 years. The International Fusion Research Council (IFRC), which initiated the report, was fully aware of the complexities of including all scientific results in just one paper, and so decided to provide an overview and extensive references for the interested reader who need not necessarily be a fusion specialist. Professor Predhiman K. Kaw, Chairman, prepared the report on behalf of the IFRC, reflecting