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Sample records for complete photonic band

  1. Two-pattern compound photonic crystals with a large complete photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Lin; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2011-09-15

    We present a set of two-dimensional aperiodic structures with a large complete photonic band gap (PBG), which are named two-pattern photonic crystals. By superposing two substructures without regard to registration, we designed six new aperiodic PBG structures having a complete PBG larger than 15% for {epsilon}{sub 2}/{epsilon}{sub 1} = 11.4. The rod-honeycomb two-pattern photonic crystal provides the largest complete PBG to date. An aperiodic structure becomes the champion structure with the largest PBG. Surprisingly, the TM and TE gaps of a two-pattern photonic crystal are much less interdependent than the PBGs of conventional photonic crystals proposed before, affording interesting capabilities for us to tune the TM and TE PBGs separately. By altering the respective substructures, optical devices for different polarizations (TE, TM, or both) can readily be designed.

  2. Two-dimensional photonic crystals with large complete photonic band gaps in both TE and TM polarizations.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; David, Sylvain; Checoury, Xavier; El Kurdi, Moustafa; Boucaud, Philippe

    2008-08-04

    Photonic crystals exhibiting a photonic band gap in both TE and TM polarizations are particularly interesting for a better control of light confinement. The simultaneous achievement of large band gaps in both polarizations requires to reduce the symmetry properties of the photonic crystal lattice. In this letter, we propose two different designs of two-dimensional photonic crystals patterned in high refractive index thin silicon slabs. These slabs are known to limit the opening of photonic band gaps for both polarizations. The proposed designs exhibit large complete photonic band gaps: the first photonic crystal structure is based on the honey-comb lattice with two different hole radii and the second structure is based on a "tri-ellipse" pattern in a triangular lattice. Photonic band gap calculations show that these structures offer large complete photonic band gaps deltaomega/omega larger than 10% between first and second photonic bands. This figure of merit is obtained with single-mode slab waveguides and is not restricted to modes below light cone.

  3. Complete Band-Gap in Two-Dimensional Quasiperiod Photonic Crystals with Hollow Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhi-Fang; Feng, Shuai; Ren, Kun; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Cheng, Bing-Ying; Zhang, Dao-Zhong

    2005-08-01

    The transmission properties of quasiperiodic photonic crystals (QPCs) based on the random square-triangle tiling system are investigated by the multiple scattering method. The hollow cylinders are introduced in our calculation. It is found that QPCs with hollow cylinders also possess a complete band gap common to s- and p-polarized waves when the inner radius of hollow cylinders is larger than a certain value. The QPCs possessing the complete band gap can be applied to the fields of light emitting, wave-guides, optical filters, high-Q resonators and antennas.

  4. Effect of shape of scatterers and plasma frequency on the complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathollahi Khalkhali, T.; Bananej, A.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we analyze complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals with triangular and square lattices, composed of plasma rods with different geometrical shapes in the anisotropic tellurium background. Using the finite-difference time-domain method we discuss the maximization of the complete photonic band gap width as a function of plasma frequency and plasma rods parameters with different shapes and orientations. The numerical results demonstrate that our proposed structures represent significantly wide complete photonic band gaps in comparison to previously studied dielectric-plasma photonic crystals.

  5. 2D photonic crystal complete band gap search using a cyclic cellular automaton refination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, R.; Castañón, G.; Hernández-Figueroa, H. E.

    2014-11-01

    We present a refination method based on a cyclic cellular automaton (CCA) that simulates a crystallization-like process, aided with a heuristic evolutionary method called differential evolution (DE) used to perform an ordered search of full photonic band gaps (FPBGs) in a 2D photonic crystal (PC). The solution is proposed as a combinatorial optimization of the elements in a binary array. These elements represent the existence or absence of a dielectric material surrounded by air, thus representing a general geometry whose search space is defined by the number of elements in such array. A block-iterative frequency-domain method was used to compute the FPBGs on a PC, when present. DE has proved to be useful in combinatorial problems and we also present an implementation feature that takes advantage of the periodic nature of PCs to enhance the convergence of this algorithm. Finally, we used this methodology to find a PC structure with a 19% bandgap-to-midgap ratio without requiring previous information of suboptimal configurations and we made a statistical study of how it is affected by disorder in the borders of the structure compared with a previous work that uses a genetic algorithm.

  6. Development of high refractive index poly(thiophene) for the fabrication of all organic three-dimensional photonic materials with a complete photonic band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew J.

    The field of photonics hopes to harness light to supercede in performance many of the functions carried out by electronics. To accomplish this, the flow of light can be controlled by means of a photonic band gap (PBG) the same way electronic band gaps can control the flow of electrons. PBGs, through the coherent backscattering of radiation, create frequency ranges in which light propagation is forbidden. A PBG is created when a wave propagates through a periodic array of materials with sufficient refractive index (n ) contrast (n1/n 2) where the dimensionality of the periodicity defines the dimensionality of the PBG. The n contrast required to open a PBG increases as the dimensionality increases. Currently, only inorganic materials have a sufficiently high n to open a complete 3-D PBG. The goal of this project is to fabricate a polymeric material with a complete 3-D PBG, to bring the tailorable physical, electrical, and optical properties of polymeric materials to 3-D PBG materials. The first step was to develop a polymer with a sufficiently high n. Because of its conjugated nature and the presence of a heavy sulfur atom in its repeat unit, poly(thiophene) (PT) is predicted to have one of the highest polymeric refractive indices with n = 3.9 at 700 nm1, but the reported n value for PT is 1.4 at 633 nm.2 This discrepancy is because the potential needed to electrosynthesize PT, the only method available to synthesize thick and high quality PT films, is higher than its degradation potential. It was found that by polymerizing thiophene with an optimized monomer concentration, proton trap concentration, and reaction temperature in a strong aprotic Lewis acid solvent, the polymerization potential could be reduced below the degradation potential of PT. The resultant PT film had a maximum n of 3.36, which is sufficiently high to open a 3-D PBG. Photonic templates were then constructed using a combination of Colvin's method3 with monodisperse spheres and mechanical

  7. Photonic band structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonovitch, E.

    1993-05-01

    We learned how to create 3-dimensionally periodic dielectric structures which are to photon waves, as semiconductor crystals are to electron waves. That is, these photonic crystals have a photonic bandgap, a band of frequencies in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, irrespective of propagation direction in space. Photonic bandgaps provide for spontaneous emission inhibition and allow for a new class of electromagnetic micro-cavities. If the perfect 3-dimensional periodicity is broken by a local defect, then local electromagnetic modes can occur within the forbidden bandgap. The addition of extra dielectric material locally, inside the photonic crystal, produces {open_quotes}donor{close_quotes} modes. Conversely, the local removal of dielectric material from the photonic crystal produces {open_quotes}acceptor{close_quotes} modes. Therefore, it will now be possible to make high-Q electromagnetic cavities of volume {approx_lt}1 cubic wavelength, for short wavelengths at which metallic cavities are useless. These new dielectric micro-resonators can cover the range all the way from millimeter waves, down to ultraviolet wavelengths.

  8. Complete photonic band gaps and tunable self-collimation in the two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with a new structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Ding, Guo-Wen; Li, Hai-Ming; Liu, Shao-Bin

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, the properties of complete photonic band gaps (CPBGs) and tunable self-collimation in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (2D PPCs) with a new structure in square lattices, whose dielectric fillers (GaAs) are inserted into homogeneous and nomagnetized plasma background are theoretically investigated by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method with a novel technique. The novel PWE method can be utilized to compute the dispersion curves of 2D PPCs with arbitrary-shaped cross section in any lattices. As a comparison, CPBGs of PPCs for four different configurations are numerically calculated. The computed results show that the proposed design has the advantages of achieving the larger CPBGs compared to the other three configurations. The influences of geometric parameters of filled unit cell and plasma frequency on the properties of CPBGs are studied in detail. The calculated results demonstrate that CPBGs of the proposed 2D PPCs can be easily engineered by changing those parameters, and the larger CPBGs also can be obtained by optimization. The self-collimation in such 2D PPCs also is discussed in theory under TM wave. The theoretical simulations reveal that the self-collimation phenomena can be found in the TM bands, and both the frequency range of self-collimation and the equifrequency surface contours can be tuned by the parameters as mentioned above. It means that the frequency range and direction of electromagnetic wave can be manipulated by designing, as it propagates in the proposed PPCs without diffraction. Those results can hold promise for designing the tunable applications based on the proposed PPCs.

  9. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  10. High-quality photonic crystals with a nearly complete band gap obtained by direct inversion of woodpile templates with titanium dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Marichy, Catherine; Muller, Nicolas; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal materials are based on a periodic modulation of the dielectric constant on length scales comparable to the wavelength of light. These materials can exhibit photonic band gaps; frequency regions for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden due to the depletion of the density of states. In order to exhibit a full band gap, 3D PCs must present a threshold refractive index contrast that depends on the crystal structure. In the case of the so-called woodpile photonic crystals this threshold is comparably low, approximately 1.9 for the direct structure. Therefore direct or inverted woodpiles made of high refractive index materials like silicon, germanium or titanium dioxide are sought after. Here we show that, by combining multiphoton lithography and atomic layer deposition, we can achieve a direct inversion of polymer templates into TiO2 based photonic crystals. The obtained structures show remarkable optical properties in the near-infrared region with almost perfect specular reflectance, a transmission dip close to the detection limit and a Bragg length comparable to the lattice constant. PMID:26911540

  11. High-quality photonic crystals with a nearly complete band gap obtained by direct inversion of woodpile templates with titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Marichy, Catherine; Muller, Nicolas; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-02-25

    Photonic crystal materials are based on a periodic modulation of the dielectric constant on length scales comparable to the wavelength of light. These materials can exhibit photonic band gaps; frequency regions for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden due to the depletion of the density of states. In order to exhibit a full band gap, 3D PCs must present a threshold refractive index contrast that depends on the crystal structure. In the case of the so-called woodpile photonic crystals this threshold is comparably low, approximately 1.9 for the direct structure. Therefore direct or inverted woodpiles made of high refractive index materials like silicon, germanium or titanium dioxide are sought after. Here we show that, by combining multiphoton lithography and atomic layer deposition, we can achieve a direct inversion of polymer templates into TiO2 based photonic crystals. The obtained structures show remarkable optical properties in the near-infrared region with almost perfect specular reflectance, a transmission dip close to the detection limit and a Bragg length comparable to the lattice constant.

  12. Optically tuneable blue phase photonic band gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.-Y.; Wang, C.-T.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Lin, T.-H.; Liu, J.-H.

    2010-03-22

    This study investigates an optically switchable band gap of photonic crystal that is based on an azobenzene-doped liquid crystal blue phase. The trans-cis photoisomerization of azobenzene deforms the cubic unit cell of the blue phase and shifts the photonic band gap. The fast back-isomerization of azobenzene was induced by irradiation with different wavelengths light. The crystal structure is verified using Kossel diffraction diagram. An optically addressable blue phase display, based on Bragg reflection from the photonic band gap, is also demonstrated. The tunable ranges are around red, green, and blue wavelengths and exhibit a bright saturated color.

  13. Tuning photonic bands in plasma metallic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Mayank Kumar; Chaudhari, Sachin

    2016-11-01

    Introducing plasma in the background provides additional degrees of freedom for tuning dispersion curves of photonic crystals. 2D photonic crystals in triangular lattice arrangements offer more global bandgap regions and thus are of more interest for various applications. The dispersion characteristics of a two-dimensional plasma metallic photonic crystal (PMPC) in square as well as triangular lattice arrangements have been analyzed in this paper using the orthogonal finite difference time domain method. The dispersion characteristics of PMPCs for the range of r/a ratios and plasma frequencies for triangular lattice configuration have been analyzed. On introducing plasma in the background, the photonic bands of PMPC are shifted towards higher normalized frequencies. This shift is more for lower bands and increases with plasma frequency. The cut-off frequency was observed for both TE and TM polarizations in PMPC and showed strong dependence on r/a ratio as well as plasma frequency. Photonic bandgaps of PMPC may be tuned by controlling plasma parameters, giving opportunity for utilizing these PMPC structures for various applications such as fine-tuning cavities for enhanced light-matter interaction, plasmonic waveguides, and Gyrotron cavities.

  14. Effect of size of silica microspheres on photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Dhiman, N. Sharma, A. Gathania, A. K.; Singh, B. P.

    2014-04-24

    In present work photonic crystals of different size of silica microspheres have been fabricated. The optical properties of these developed photonic crystals have been studied using UV-visible spectroscopy. UV-visible spectroscopy shows that they have photonic band gap that can be tuned in visible and infrared regime by changing the size of silica microspheres. The photonic band gap structures of these photonic crystals have been calculated using MIT photonic band gap package. It also reveals that with the increase in size of silica microspheres the photonic band gap shifts to lower energy region.

  15. Photon ratchet intermediate band solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Farrell, D. J.; Phillips, C. C.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative concept for solar power conversion—the "photon ratchet" intermediate band solar cell (IBSC)—which may increase the photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency of IBSCs by increasing the lifetime of charge carriers in the intermediate state. The limiting efficiency calculation for this concept shows that the efficiency can be increased by introducing a fast thermal transition of carriers into a non-emissive state. At 1 sun, the introduction of a "ratchet band" results in an increase of efficiency from 46.8% to 48.5%, due to suppression of entropy generation.

  16. Fabrication of photonic band gap materials

    DOEpatents

    Constant, Kristen; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Biswas, Rana; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2002-01-15

    A method for forming a periodic dielectric structure exhibiting photonic band gap effects includes forming a slurry of a nano-crystalline ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material and monodisperse polymer microspheres, depositing a film of the slurry on a substrate, drying the film, and calcining the film to remove the polymer microspheres therefrom. The film may be cold-pressed after drying and prior to calcining. The ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material may be titania, and the polymer microspheres may be polystyrene microspheres.

  17. Fabrication of Photonic band gap Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Constant, Kristen; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Biswas, Rana; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2000-01-05

    A method for forming a periodic dielectric structure exhibiting photonic band gap effects includes forming a slurry of a nano-crystalline ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material and monodisperse polymer microsphere, depositing a film of the slurry on a substrate, drying the film, and calcining the film to remove the polymer microsphere there from. The film may be cold-pressed after drying and prior to calcining. The ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material may be titania, and the polymer microsphere may be polystyrenemicrosphere.

  18. Two-Photon Complete Fragmentation of Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, James; Pindzola, M. S.

    2002-05-01

    A time-dependent close-coupling method is used to calculate, for the first time, fully differential cross sections for the complete fragmentation of helium by two photons. Surprising differences are found in comparisons with previous calculations. These differences are found to be due to a core-excited resonance enhancement of the two-photon proces for both single and double ionization. These calculations provide theoretical support for ground-breaking measurements expected to be obtained from free-electron X-ray laser experiments to be made at Hamburg.

  19. Photonic band gaps structure properties of two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Si-Qi; Liang, Yu; Wu, Xiang-Yao

    2017-05-01

    The tunable two-dimensional photonic crystals band gap, absolute photonic band gap and semi-Dirac point are beneficial to designing the novel optical devices. In this paper, tunable photonic band gaps structure was realized by a new type two-dimensional function photonic crystals, which dielectric constants of medium columns are functions of space coordinates. However for the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals the dielectric constant does not change with space coordinates. As the parameter adjustment, we found that the photonic band gaps structures are dielectric constant function coefficient, medium columns radius, dielectric constant function form period number and pump light intensity dependent, namely, the photonic band gaps position and width can be tuned. we also obtained absolute photonic band gaps and semi-Dirac point in the photonic band gaps structures of two-dimensional function photonic crystals. These results provide an important theoretical foundation for design novel optical devices.

  20. Band structure peculiarities of magnetic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, A. H.; Golik, S. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this work we studied light diffraction in magneto-photonic crystals (MPC) having large magneto-optical activity and modulation large depth. The case of arbitrary angles between the direction of the external static magnetic field and the normal to the border of the MPC layer is considered. The problem is solved by Ambartsumian's modified layer addition method. It is found that there is a new type of non-reciprocity, namely, the relation R (α) ≠ R (- α) takes place, where R is the reflection coefficient, and α is the incidence angle. It is shown the formation of new photonic band gap (PBG) at oblique incidence of light, which is not selective for the polarization of the incident light, in the case when the external magnetic field is directed along the medium axis. Such a system can be used as: a tunable polarization filter, polarization mirror, circular (elliptical) polarizer, tunable optical diode, etc.

  1. Photonic band-edge micro lasers with quantum dot gain.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Masahiro; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Tandaechanurat, Aniwat; Ota, Yasutomo; Kumagai, Naoto; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2009-01-19

    We demonstrate optically pumped continuous-wave photonic band-edge microlasers on a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab. Lasing was observed at a photonic band-edge, where the group velocity was significantly small near the K point of the band structure having a triangular lattice. Lasing was achieved by using a quantum dot gain material, which resulted in a significant decrease in the laser threshold, compared with photonic band-edge lasers using quantum well gain material. Extremely low laser thresholds of approximately 80 nW at 6 K was achieved. Lasing was observed in a defect-free photonic crystal as small as approximately 7 microm square.

  2. Bi-directional evolutionary optimization for photonic band gap structures

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Fei; Huang, Xiaodong; Jia, Baohua

    2015-12-01

    Toward an efficient and easy-implement optimization for photonic band gap structures, this paper extends the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) method for maximizing photonic band gaps. Photonic crystals are assumed to be periodically composed of two dielectric materials with the different permittivity. Based on the finite element analysis and sensitivity analysis, BESO starts from a simple initial design without any band gap and gradually re-distributes dielectric materials within the unit cell so that the resulting photonic crystal possesses a maximum band gap between two specified adjacent bands. Numerical examples demonstrated the proposed optimization algorithm can successfully obtain the band gaps from the first to the tenth band for both transverse magnetic and electric polarizations. Some optimized photonic crystals exhibit novel patterns markedly different from traditional designs of photonic crystals.

  3. Hypersonic modulation of light in three-dimensional photonic and phononic band-gap materials.

    PubMed

    Akimov, A V; Tanaka, Y; Pevtsov, A B; Kaplan, S F; Golubev, V G; Tamura, S; Yakovlev, D R; Bayer, M

    2008-07-18

    The elastic coupling between the a-SiO2 spheres composing opal films brings forth three-dimensional periodic structures which besides a photonic stop band are predicted to also exhibit complete phononic band gaps. The influence of elastic crystal vibrations on the photonic band structure has been studied by injection of coherent hypersonic wave packets generated in a metal transducer by subpicosecond laser pulses. These studies show that light with energies close to the photonic band gap can be efficiently modulated by hypersonic waves.

  4. Simultaneous existence of phononic and photonic band gaps in periodic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Pennec, Y; Djafari Rouhani, B; El Boudouti, E H; Li, C; El Hassouani, Y; Vasseur, J O; Papanikolaou, N; Benchabane, S; Laude, V; Martinez, A

    2010-06-21

    We discuss the simultaneous existence of phononic and photonic band gaps in a periodic array of holes drilled in a Si membrane. We investigate in detail both the centered square lattice and the boron nitride (BN) lattice with two atoms per unit cell which include the simple square, triangular and honeycomb lattices as particular cases. We show that complete phononic and photonic band gaps can be obtained from the honeycomb lattice as well as BN lattices close to honeycomb. Otherwise, all investigated structures present the possibility of a complete phononic gap together with a photonic band gap of a given symmetry, odd or even, depending on the geometrical parameters.

  5. Method of construction of composite one-dimensional photonic crystal with extended photonic band gaps.

    PubMed

    Tolmachev, V; Perova, T; Moore, R

    2005-10-17

    A method of photonic band gap extension using mixing of periodic structures with two or more consecutively placed photonic crystals with different lattice constants is proposed. For the design of the structures with maximal photonic band gap extension the gap map imposition method is utilised. Optimal structures have been established and the gap map of photonic band gaps has been calculated at normal incidence of light for both small and large optical contrast and at oblique incidence of light for small optical contrast.

  6. Observation of localized flat-band states in Kagome photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Zong, Yuanyuan; Xia, Shiqiang; Tang, Liqin; Song, Daohong; Hu, Yi; Pei, Yumiao; Su, Jing; Li, Yigang; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-04-18

    We report the first experimental demonstration of localized flat-band states in optically induced Kagome photonic lattices. Such lattices exhibit a unique band structure with the lowest band being completely flat (diffractionless) in the tight-binding approximation. By taking the advantage of linear superposition of the flat-band eigenmodes of the Kagome lattices, we demonstrate a high-fidelity transmission of complex patterns in such two-dimensional pyrochlore-like photonic structures. Our numerical simulations find good agreement with experimental observations, upholding the belief that flat-band lattices can support distortion-free image transmission.

  7. Photonic band gaps of wurtzite GaN and AlN photonic crystals at short wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, E. G.; Alayo, M. I.

    2015-04-01

    Group III-nitride materials such as GaN and AlN have attracted a great attention in researches on photonic devices that operate at short light wavelengths. The large band gaps of these materials turn them suitable for nanophotonic devices that operate in light ranges from visible to deep ultraviolet. The physical properties of wurtzite GaN and AlN such as their second and third order nonlinear susceptibilities, and their thermal and piezoelectric coefficients, also make them excellent candidates for integrate photonic devices with electronics, microelectromechanics, microfluidics and general sensing applications. Using a plane wave expansion method (PWE) the photonic band gap maps of 36 different two-dimensional photonic crystal lattices in wurtzite GaN and AlN were obtained and analyzed. The wavelength dependence and the effects of the material anisotropy on the position of the photonic band gaps are also discussed. The results show regions with slow group velocity at the edges of a complete photonic band gap in the M-K direction of the triangular lattices with circular, hexagonal, and rhombic air holes. Was also found a very interesting disposition of the photonic band gaps in the lattices composed of rhombic air holes.

  8. Quantum electrodynamics near a photonic band-gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanbing; Houck, Andrew

    Quantum electrodynamics predicts the localization of light around an atom in photonic band-gap (PBG) medium or photonic crystal. Here we report the first experimental realization of the strong coupling between a single artificial atom and an one dimensional PBG medium using superconducting circuits. In the photonic transport measurement, we observe an anomalous Lamb shift and a large band-edge avoided crossing when the artificial atom frequency is tuned across the band-edge. The persistent peak within the band-gap indicates the single photon bound state. Furthermore, we study the resonance fluorescence of this bound state, again demonstrating the breakdown of the Born-Markov approximation near the band-edge. This novel architecture can be directly generalized to study many-body quantum electrodynamics and to construct more complicated spin chain models.

  9. Spectroscopy of photonic band gaps in mesoporous one-dimensional photonic crystals based on aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Voinov, Yu. P.; Shchavlev, V. V.; Bi, Dongxue; Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao

    2016-12-01

    Mesoporous one-dimensional photonic crystals based on aluminum oxide have been synthesized by electrochemical etching method. Reflection spectra of the obtained mesoporous samples in a wide spectral range that covers several band gaps are presented. Microscopic parameters of photonic crystals are calculated and corresponding reflection spectra for the first six band gaps are presented.

  10. Connected hexagonal photonic crystals with largest full band gap.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Chen, Y; Chern, R; Chang, Chien

    2005-10-03

    A two-dimensional photonic crystal with a large full band gap has been designed, fabricated, and characterized. The photonic crystal design was based on a calculation using inverse iteration with multigrid acceleration. The fabrication of the photonic crystal on silicon was realized by the processes of electron-beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching. It was found that the hexagonal array of circular columns and rods has an optimal full photonic band gap. In addition, we show that a larger extraction of light from our designed photonic crystal can be obtained when compared with the frequently used photonic crystals reported previously. Our designed PC structure therefore should be very useful for creating highly efficient optoelectronic devices.

  11. Simultaneous two-dimensional phononic and photonic band gaps in opto-mechanical crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali A; Khelif, Abdelkrim; Adibi, Ali

    2010-04-26

    We demonstrate planar structures that can provide simultaneous two-dimensional phononic and photonic band gaps in opto-mechanical (or phoxonic) crystal slabs. Different phoxonic crystal (PxC) structures, composed of square, hexagonal (honeycomb), or triangular arrays of void cylindrical holes embedded in silicon (Si) slabs with a finite thickness, are investigated. Photonic band gap (PtBG) maps and the complete phononic band gap (PnBG) maps of PxC slabs with different radii of the holes and thicknesses of the slabs are calculated using a three-dimensional plane wave expansion code. Simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps with band gap to midgap ratios of more than 10% are shown to be readily obtainable with practical geometries in both square and hexagonal lattices, but not for the triangular lattice.

  12. Photonic band gap enhancement in frequency-dependent dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Toader, Ovidiu; John, Sajeev

    2004-10-01

    We illustrate a general technique for evaluating photonic band structures in periodic d -dimensional microstructures in which the dielectric constant epsilon (omega) exhibits rapid variations with frequency omega . This technique involves the evaluation of generalized electromagnetic dispersion surfaces omega ( k--> ,epsilon) in a (d+1) -dimensional space consisting of the physical d -dimensional space of wave vectors k--> and an additional dimension defined by the continuous, independent, variable epsilon . The physical band structure for the photonic crystal is obtained by evaluating the intersection of the generalized dispersion surfaces with the "cutting surface" defined by the function epsilon (omega) . We apply this method to evaluate the band structure of both two- and three-dimensional (3D) periodic microstructures. We consider metallic photonic crystals with free carriers described by a simple Drude conductivity and verify the occurrence of electromagnetic pass bands below the plasma frequency of the bulk metal. We also evaluate the shift of the photonic band structure caused by free carrier injection into semiconductor-based photonic crystals. We apply our method to two models in which epsilon (omega) describes a resonant radiation-matter interaction. In the first model, we consider the addition of independent, resonant oscillators to a photonic crystal with an otherwise frequency-independent dielectric constant. We demonstrate that for an inhomogeneously broadened distribution of resonators impregnated within an inverse opal structure, the full 3D photonic band gap (PBG) can be considerably enhanced. In the second model, we consider a coupled resonant oscillator mode in a photonic crystal. When this mode is an optical phonon, there can be a synergetic interplay between the polaritonic resonance and the geometrical scattering resonances of the structured dielectric, leading to PBG enhancement. A similar effect may arise when resonant atoms that are

  13. Parasitic Photon-Pair Suppression via Photonic Stop-Band Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helt, L. G.; Brańczyk, Agata M.; Liscidini, Marco; Steel, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    We calculate that an appropriate modification of the field associated with only one of the photons of a photon pair can suppress generation of the pair entirely. From this general result, we develop a method for suppressing the generation of undesired photon pairs utilizing photonic stop bands. For a third-order nonlinear optical source of frequency-degenerate photons, we calculate the modified frequency spectrum (joint spectral intensity) and show a significant increase in a standard metric, the coincidence to accidental ratio. These results open a new avenue for photon-pair frequency correlation engineering.

  14. A complete design flow for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, James; Cone, Chris; Chrostowski, Lukas; Klein, Jackson; Flueckiger, Jonas; Liu, Amy; McGuire, Dylan; Wang, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Broad adoption of silicon photonics technology for photonic integrated circuits requires standardized design flows that are similar to what is available for analog and mixed signal electrical circuit design. We have developed a design flow that combines mature electronic design automation (EDA) software with optical simulation software. An essential component of any design flow, whether electrical or photonic, is the ability to accurately simulate largescale circuits. This is particularly important when the behavior of the circuit is not trivially related to the individual component performance. While this is clearly the case for electronic circuits consisting of hundreds to billions of transistors, it is already becoming important in photonic circuits such as WDM transmitters, where signal cross talk needs to be considered, as well as optical cross-connect switches. In addition, optical routing to connect different components requires the introduction of additional waveguide sections, waveguide bends, and waveguide crossings, which affect the overall circuit performance. Manufacturing variability can also have dramatic circuit-level consequences that need to be simulated. Circuit simulations must rely on compact models that can accurately represent the behavior of each component, and the compact model parameters must be extracted from physical level simulation and experimental results. We show how large scale circuits can be simulated in both the time and frequency domains, including the effects of bidirectional and, where appropriate, multimode and multichannel photonic waveguides. We also show how active, passive and nonlinear individual components such as grating couplers, waveguides, splitters, filters, electro-optical modulators and detectors can be simulated using a combination of electrical and optical algorithms, and good agreement with experimental results can be obtained. We then show how parameters, with inclusion of fabrication process variations, can

  15. Photonic band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummer, Karikkuzhi Variyath; Vijaya, Ramarao

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement in photonic band-edge-induced absorption and emission from rhodamine-B dye doped polystyrene pseudo gap photonic crystals is studied. The band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption is achieved by selecting the incident angle of the excitation beam so that the absorption spectrum of the emitter overlaps the photonic band edge. The band-edge-induced enhancement in emission, on the other hand, is possible with and without an enhancement in band-edge-induced absorption, depending on the collection angle of emission. Through a simple set of measurements with suitably chosen angles for excitation and emission, we achieve a maximum enhancement of 70% in emission intensity with band-edge-induced effects over and above the intrinsic emission in the case of self-assembled opals. This is a comprehensive effort to interpret tunable lasing in opals as well as to predict the wavelength of lasing arising as a result of band-edge-induced distributed feedback effects.

  16. Special purpose modes in photonic band gap fibers

    DOEpatents

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Campbell, Sara

    2013-04-02

    Photonic band gap fibers are described having one or more defects suitable for the acceleration of electrons or other charged particles. Methods and devices are described for exciting special purpose modes in the defects including laser coupling schemes as well as various fiber designs and components for facilitating excitation of desired modes. Results are also presented showing effects on modes due to modes in other defects within the fiber and due to the proximity of defects to the fiber edge. Techniques and devices are described for controlling electrons within the defect(s). Various applications for electrons or other energetic charged particles produced by such photonic band gap fibers are also described.

  17. Photonic crystal digital alloys and their band structure properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongkug; Kim, Dong-Uk; Jeon, Heonsu

    2011-09-26

    We investigated semi-disordered photonic crystals (PCs), digital alloys, and made thorough comparisons with their counterparts, random alloys. A set of diamond lattice PC digital alloys operating in a microwave regime were prepared by alternately stacking two kinds of sub-PC systems composed of alumina and silica spheres of the same size. Measured transmission spectra as well as calculated band structures revealed that when the digital alloy period is short, band-gaps of the digital alloys are practically the same as those of the random alloys. This study indicates that the concept of digital alloys holds for photons in PCs as well.

  18. Quantum interference of independently generated telecom-band single photons

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Monika; Altepeter, Joseph B.; Huang, Yu-Ping; Oza, Neal N.; Kumar, Prem

    2014-12-04

    We report on high-visibility quantum interference of independently generated telecom O-band (1310 nm) single photons using standard single-mode fibers. The experimental data are shown to agree well with the results of simulations using a comprehensive quantum multimode theory without the need for any fitting parameter.

  19. Reconfigurable photonic delay line filter working in Ku band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mandeep; Raghuwanshi, Sanjeev Kumar; Srivastava, Nimish Kumar

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we experimentally demonstrate a tunable microwave photonic filter working in ‘Ku’ frequency band (12-18 GHz). We followed three different schemes: double side band (double-SB), single side band (single-SB) and optical-carrier suppression (optical-CS) for our proposed photonic link. We also derived and numerically solved the transfer function for each case. Re-configurability (change in transfer function) of the filter is achieved by using laser switching (ON/OFF) and carefully windowing (using a higher order cosine window—the Blackman window) of the time samples in the range of 1-20 GHz. Moreover, we also investigate the amplitude comparison function (difference of power fading function) with the help of a vector network analyzer. Our experimental and simulation investigations are in good agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  20. New edge-centered photonic square lattices with flat bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhong, Hua; Li, Changbiao; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Yanpeng; Belić, Milivoj R.

    2017-07-01

    We report a new class of edge-centered photonic square lattices with multiple flat bands, and consider in detail two examples: the Lieb-5 and Lieb-7 lattices. In these lattices, there are 5 and 7 sites in the unit cell and in general, the number is restricted to odd integers. The number of flat bands m in the new Lieb lattices is related to the number of sites N in the unit cell by a simple formula m =(N - 1) / 2. The flat bands reported here are independent of the pseudomagnetic field. The properties of lattices with even and odd number of flat bands are different. We consider the localization of light in such Lieb lattices. If the input beam excites the flat-band mode, it will not diffract during propagation, owing to the strong mode localization. In the Lieb-7 lattice, the beam will also oscillate during propagation and still not diffract. The period of oscillation is determined by the energy difference between the two flat bands. This study provides a new platform for investigating light trapping, photonic topological insulators, and pseudospin-mediated vortex generation.

  1. Properties of entangled photon pairs generated in one-dimensional nonlinear photonic-band-gap structures

    SciTech Connect

    Perina, Jan Jr.; Centini, Marco; Sibilia, Concita; Bertolotti, Mario; Scalora, Michael

    2006-03-15

    We have developed a rigorous quantum model of spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a nonlinear 1D photonic-band-gap structure based upon expansion of the field into monochromatic plane waves. The model provides a two-photon amplitude of a created photon pair. The spectra of the signal and idler fields, their intensity profiles in the time domain, as well as the coincidence-count interference pattern in a Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer are determined both for cw and pulsed pumping regimes in terms of the two-photon amplitude. A broad range of parameters characterizing the emitted down-converted fields can be used. As an example, a structure composed of 49 layers of GaN/AlN is analyzed as a suitable source of photon pairs having high efficiency.

  2. Properties of entangled photon pairs generated in one-dimensional nonlinear photonic-band-gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peřina, Jan, Jr.; Centini, Marco; Sibilia, Concita; Bertolotti, Mario; Scalora, Michael

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a rigorous quantum model of spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a nonlinear 1D photonic-band-gap structure based upon expansion of the field into monochromatic plane waves. The model provides a two-photon amplitude of a created photon pair. The spectra of the signal and idler fields, their intensity profiles in the time domain, as well as the coincidence-count interference pattern in a Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer are determined both for cw and pulsed pumping regimes in terms of the two-photon amplitude. A broad range of parameters characterizing the emitted down-converted fields can be used. As an example, a structure composed of 49 layers of GaN/AlN is analyzed as a suitable source of photon pairs having high efficiency.

  3. Mini-stop bands in single heterojunction photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, N.; Amin, M.; Naureen, S.; Anand, S.

    2013-03-01

    Spectral characteristics of mini-stop bands (MSB) in line-defect photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides and in heterostructure PhC waveguides having one abrupt interface are investigated. Tunability of the MSB position by air-fill factor heterostructure PhC waveguides is utilized to demonstrate different filter functions, at optical communication wavelengths, ranging from resonance-like to wide band pass filters with high transmission. The narrowest filter realized has a resonance-like transmission peak with a full width at half maximum of 3.4 nm. These devices could be attractive for coarse wavelength selection (pass and drop) and for sensing applications.

  4. Photonic band gap spectra in Octonacci metamaterial quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, E. R.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we study theoretically the photonic band gap spectra for a one-dimensional quasicrystal made up of SiO2 (layer A) and a metamaterial (layer B) organized following the Octonacci sequence, where its nth-stage Sn is given by the inflation rule Sn =Sn - 1Sn - 2Sn - 1 for n ≥ 3 , with initial conditions S1 = A and S2 = B . The metamaterial is characterized by a frequency dependent electric permittivity ε(ω) and magnetic permeability μ(ω) . The polariton dispersion relation is obtained analytically by employing a theoretical calculation based on a transfer-matrix approach. A quantitative analysis of the spectra is then discussed, stressing the distribution of the allowed photonic band widths for high generations of the Octonacci structure, which depict a self-similar scaling property behavior, with a power law depending on the common in-plane wavevector kx .

  5. Manipulating full photonic band gaps in two dimensional birefringent photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Verma, Prabhat; Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Shoji, Satoru; Kawata, Satoshi

    2008-09-15

    The probability to realize a full photonic band gap in two-dimensional birefringent photonic crystals can be readily manipulated by introducing symmetry reduction or air holes in the crystal elements. The results lie in either creation of new band gaps or enlargement of existing band gaps. In particular, a combination of the two processes produces an effect much stronger than a simple summation of their individual contributions. Materials with both relatively low refractive index (rutile) and high refractive index (tellurium) were considered. The combined effect of introduction of symmetry reduction and air holes resulted in a maximum enlargement of the band gaps by 8.4% and 20.2%, respectively, for the two materials.

  6. Photonic Band Gap resonators for high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, S.; Smith, D.R.; Kroll, N. |

    1993-12-31

    We have proposed that a new type of microwave resonator, based on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) structures, may be particularly useful for high energy accelerators. We provide an explanation of the PBG concept and present data which illustrate some of the special properties associated with such structures. Further evaluation of the utility of PBG resonators requires laboratory testing of model structures at cryogenic temperatures, and at high fields. We provide a brief discussion of our test program, which is currently in progress.

  7. Completing the K-band CRF in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Witt, A.; Bertarini, A.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; McCallum, J.; Jung, T.; Quick, J.; Horiuchi, S.; Lovell, J.; Phillips, C.; Sohn, B. Won; Ojha, R.

    2014-03-01

    K-band (22 GHz) radio observations have the potential to form the basis for the most accurate Celestial Reference Frame (CRF) ever constructed. Relative to the standard S/X (2.3/8.4 GHz) observing bands, K-band is expected to exhibit a reduction in extended source morphology and core-shift. This reduction in astrophysical systematics should allow for a more stable CRF at K-band and should also be advantageous in tying the VLBI radio frame to the Gaia optical frame. K-band CRF observations currently exist only from the all-northern Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and therefore must be complemented by observations from southern arrays in order to realise this potential. A collaboration has been formed with the goal of completing sky coverage at K-band with specific emphasis on the Southern hemisphere where K-band CRF coverage is weak. Southern hemisphere observations to densify the CRF at K-band are under way and preliminary astrometric observations were carried out on 23 August 2013 between telescopes in Australia (Hobart 26m), Korea (Tamna 21m) and South Africa (HartRAO 26m). More extensive astrometric observations were carried out on the 21st and 22nd of December 2013 that also included the Tidbinbilla 70m DSN antenna in Australia. A proposal for imaging source structure at K-band has been submitted to the Australian Telescope-Long Baseline Array (AT-LBA). We discuss some of our results as well as the implications for K-band CRF work.

  8. Extreme narrow photonic bands and strong photonic localization produced by 2D defect two-segment-connected quadrangular waveguide networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Yang, Xiangbo; Timon Liu, Chengyi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of optical transmission and photonic localization of two-dimensional (2D) defect two-segment-connected quadrangular waveguide networks (DTSCQWNs) and find that many groups of extreme narrow photonic bands are created in the middle of the transmission spectra. The electromagnetic (EM) waves in DTSCQWNs with the frequencies of extreme narrow photonic bands can produce strong photonic localizations by adjusting defect broken degree. On the other hand, we obtain the formula of extreme narrow photonic bands' frequencies dependent on defect broken degree and the formula of the largest intensity of photonic localization dependent on defect broken degree, respectively. It may possess potential application for designing all-optical devices based on strong photonic localizations. Additionally, we propose a so-called defecton mode to study the splitting rules of extreme narrow photonic bands, where decomposition-decimation method is expanded from the field of electronic energy spectra to that of optical transmission spectra.

  9. Toward an Impurity Band PV: Dynamics of Carriers Generated via Sub-band gap Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Joseph; Simmons, Christie; Akey, Austin; Aziz, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2013-03-01

    Intermediate band solar cells are a pathway to cells that surpass the Shockley-Queisser limit by enabling the utilization of sub-band gap photons. A proposed method for fabricating an intermediate band material is to use impurities that introduce electronic levels within the band gap. At sufficiently high dopant concentrations, band formation may lead to a suppression of Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination, an idea known as ``lifetime recovery''. We investigate a proposed intermediate band material, silicon hyper-doped with sulfur. This material system exhibits strong sub-band gap optical absorption and metallic conductivity at sufficiently high sulfur concentrations, which makes it a strong candidate for an impurity-band material. We employ low-temperature photoconductivity using sub-band gap light to estimate the trapping rate of electrons in the conduction band. We vary the sulfur concentration near the critical value for the metal-insulator transition to test the idea of ``lifetime recovery'' in the S:Si system.

  10. Photonic band gaps in one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals with arbitrary magnetic declination

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haifeng; Liu Shaobin; Kong Xiangkun

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps and dispersion relations of one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals composed of dielectric and magnetized plasma layers with arbitrary magnetic declination are theoretically investigated for TM polarized wave based on transfer matrix method. As TM wave propagates in one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals, the electromagnetic wave can be divided into two modes due to the influence of Lorentz force. The equations for effective dielectric functions of such two modes are theoretically deduced, and the transfer matrix equation and dispersion relations for TM wave are calculated. The influences of relative dielectric constant, plasma collision frequency, incidence angle, plasma filling factor, the angle between external magnetic field and +z axis, external magnetic field and plasma frequency on transmission, and dispersion relation are investigated, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. From the numerical results, it has been shown that plasma collision frequency cannot change the locations of photonic band gaps for both modes, and also does not affect the reflection and transmission magnitudes. The characteristics of photonic band gaps for both modes can be obviously tuned by relative dielectric constant, incidence angle, plasma filling factor, the angle between external magnetic field and +z axis, external magnetic field and plasma frequency, respectively. These results would provide theoretical instructions for designing filters, microcavities, and fibers, etc.

  11. Hollow-Core Photonic Band Gap Fibers for Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert J.; Spencer, James E.; Kuhlmey, Boris T.; /Sydney U.

    2011-08-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) dielectric fibers with hollow cores are being studied both theoretically and experimentally for use as laser driven accelerator structures. The hollow core functions as both a longitudinal waveguide for the transverse-magnetic (TM) accelerating fields and a channel for the charged particles. The dielectric surrounding the core is permeated by a periodic array of smaller holes to confine the mode, forming a photonic crystal fiber in which modes exist in frequency pass-bands, separated by band gaps. The hollow core acts as a defect which breaks the crystal symmetry, and so-called defect, or trapped modes having frequencies in the band gap will only propagate near the defect. We describe the design of 2-D hollow-core PBG fibers to support TM defect modes with high longitudinal fields and high characteristic impedance. Using as-built dimensions of industrially-made fibers, we perform a simulation analysis of the first prototype PBG fibers specifically designed to support speed-of-light TM modes.

  12. Dual-band photon sorting plasmonic MIM metamaterial sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Young Uk; Bendoym, Igor; Golovin, Andrii B.; Crouse, David T.

    2014-06-01

    We propose plasmonic metal-insulator-metal (MIM) metamaterial designs for the sensing of two infrared wavelength bands, the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) band by using a photon sorting technique. The proposed structures can capture light effectively on the metasurfaces based on coupling of free space energy to a subwavelength plasmonic mode. Photon sorting can be performed such that the incident light with a broad spectrum upon the metasurfaces can be "split" according to wavelength, channeling different spectral bands to different physical regions of the array on the surface where it is then absorbed by the insulator. Two different structures described in this work are (1) Square-type structure which consists of MIM resonators being periodically arranged to form a polarization independent sensor and (2) Meander-type structure which consists of MIM resonators being connected to form the meander shaped sensor. Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe) posts are used as absorbing material within the MIM structure to generate free carriers and allow for collection of carrier charges. The proposed structures have compact designs and exhibit efficient light splitting and absorption for the IR spectral band. Structural and material properties, the electric field distribution and Poynting vector fields at the resonance frequencies are provided. Applications include thermal imaging, night vision systems, rifle sights, missile detection and discrimination, dual bandwidth optical filters, light trapping, and electromagnetically induced transparency.

  13. Analysis of photonic band gaps in two-dimensional photonic crystals with rods covered by a thin interfacial layer

    SciTech Connect

    Trifonov, T.; Marsal, L.F.; Pallares, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Alcubilla, R.

    2004-11-15

    We investigate different aspects of the absolute photonic band gap (PBG) formation in two-dimensional photonic structures consisting of rods covered with a thin dielectric film. Specifically, triangular and honeycomb lattices in both complementary arrangements, i.e., air rods drilled in silicon matrix and silicon rods in air, are studied. We consider that the rods are formed of a dielectric core (silicon or air) surrounded by a cladding layer of silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), or germanium (Ge). Such photonic lattices present absolute photonic band gaps, and we study the evolution of these gaps as functions of the cladding material and thickness. Our results show that in the case of air rods in dielectric media the existence of dielectric cladding reduces the absolute gap width and may cause complete closure of the gap if thick layers are considered. For the case of dielectric rods in air, however, the existence of a cladding layer can be advantageous and larger absolute PBG's can be achieved.

  14. Finite element computation of grating scattering matrices and application to photonic crystal band calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dossou, Kokou . E-mail: Kokou.Dossou@uts.edu.au; Byrne, Michael A.; Botten, Lindsay C.

    2006-11-20

    We consider the calculation of the band structure and Bloch mode basis of two-dimensional photonic crystals, modelled as stacks of one-dimensional diffraction gratings. The scattering properties of each grating are calculated using an efficient finite element method (FEM) and allow the complete mode structure to be derived from a transfer matrix method. A range of numerical examples showing the accuracy, flexibility and utility of the method is presented.

  15. Modeling of Photonic Band Gap Crystals and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kady, Ihab Fathy

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the authors have undertaken a theoretical approach to the complex problem of modeling the flow of electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals. The focus is to address the feasibility of using the exciting phenomena of photonic gaps (PBG) in actual applications. The authors start by providing analytical derivations of the computational electromagnetic methods used in their work. They also present a detailed explanation of the physics underlying each approach, as well as a comparative study of the strengths and weaknesses of each method. The Plane Wave expansion, Transfer Matrix, and Finite Difference time Domain Methods are addressed. They also introduce a new theoretical approach, the Modal Expansion Method. They then shift the attention to actual applications. They begin with a discussion of 2D photonic crystal wave guides. The structure addressed consists of a 2D hexagonal structure of air cylinders in a layered dielectric background. Comparison with the performance of a conventional guide is made, as well as suggestions for enhancing it. The studies provide an upper theoretical limit on the performance of such guides, as they assumed no crystal imperfections and non-absorbing media. Next, they study 3D metallic PBG materials at near infrared and optical wavelengths. The main objective is to study the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in such structures. They study simple cubic structures where the metallic scatters are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several metals are studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). The effect of topology is addressed and isolated metallic cubes are found to be less lossy than the connected rod structures. The results reveal that the best performance is obtained by choosing metals with a large negative real part of the dielectric function, together with a relatively small imaginary part. Finally, they point out a new direction in photonic crystal

  16. Isotropic band gaps and freeform waveguides observed in hyperuniform disordered photonic solids

    PubMed Central

    Man, Weining; Florescu, Marian; Williamson, Eric Paul; He, Yingquan; Hashemizad, Seyed Reza; Leung, Brian Y. C.; Liner, Devin Robert; Torquato, Salvatore; Chaikin, Paul M.; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, disordered photonic media and random textured surfaces have attracted increasing attention as strong light diffusers with broadband and wide-angle properties. We report the experimental realization of an isotropic complete photonic band gap (PBG) in a 2D disordered dielectric structure. This structure is designed by a constrained optimization method, which combines advantages of both isotropy due to disorder and controlled scattering properties due to low-density fluctuations (hyperuniformity) and uniform local topology. Our experiments use a modular design composed of Al2O3 walls and cylinders arranged in a hyperuniform disordered network. We observe a complete PBG in the microwave region, in good agreement with theoretical simulations, and show that the intrinsic isotropy of this unique class of PBG materials enables remarkable design freedom, including the realization of waveguides with arbitrary bending angles impossible in photonic crystals. This experimental verification of a complete PBG and realization of functional defects in this unique class of materials demonstrate their potential as building blocks for precise manipulation of photons in planar optical microcircuits and has implications for disordered acoustic and electronic band gap materials. PMID:24043795

  17. Isotropic band gaps and freeform waveguides observed in hyperuniform disordered photonic solids.

    PubMed

    Man, Weining; Florescu, Marian; Williamson, Eric Paul; He, Yingquan; Hashemizad, Seyed Reza; Leung, Brian Y C; Liner, Devin Robert; Torquato, Salvatore; Chaikin, Paul M; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2013-10-01

    Recently, disordered photonic media and random textured surfaces have attracted increasing attention as strong light diffusers with broadband and wide-angle properties. We report the experimental realization of an isotropic complete photonic band gap (PBG) in a 2D disordered dielectric structure. This structure is designed by a constrained optimization method, which combines advantages of both isotropy due to disorder and controlled scattering properties due to low-density fluctuations (hyperuniformity) and uniform local topology. Our experiments use a modular design composed of Al2O3 walls and cylinders arranged in a hyperuniform disordered network. We observe a complete PBG in the microwave region, in good agreement with theoretical simulations, and show that the intrinsic isotropy of this unique class of PBG materials enables remarkable design freedom, including the realization of waveguides with arbitrary bending angles impossible in photonic crystals. This experimental verification of a complete PBG and realization of functional defects in this unique class of materials demonstrate their potential as building blocks for precise manipulation of photons in planar optical microcircuits and has implications for disordered acoustic and electronic band gap materials.

  18. Unfolding the band structure of non-crystalline photonic band gap materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitrin, Samuel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Amoah, Timothy; Nahal, Geev; Chan, Ho Leung; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining

    2015-08-01

    Non-crystalline photonic band gap (PBG) materials have received increasing attention, and sizeable PBGs have been reported in quasi-crystalline structures and, more recently, in disordered structures. Band structure calculations for periodic structures produce accurate dispersion relations, which determine group velocities, dispersion, density of states and iso-frequency surfaces, and are used to predict a wide-range of optical phenomena including light propagation, excited-state decay rates, temporal broadening or compression of ultrashort pulses and complex refraction phenomena. However, band calculations for non-periodic structures employ large super-cells of hundreds to thousands building blocks, and provide little useful information other than the PBG central frequency and width. Using stereolithography, we construct cm-scale disordered PBG materials and perform microwave transmission measurements, as well as finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The photonic dispersion relations are reconstructed from the measured and simulated phase data. Our results demonstrate the existence of sizeable PBGs in these disordered structures and provide detailed information of the effective band diagrams, dispersion relation, iso-frequency contours, and their angular dependence. Slow light phenomena are also observed in these structures near gap frequencies. This study introduces a powerful tool to investigate photonic properties of non-crystalline structures and provides important effective dispersion information, otherwise difficult to obtain.

  19. Unfolding the band structure of non-crystalline photonic band gap materials.

    PubMed

    Tsitrin, Samuel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Amoah, Timothy; Nahal, Geev; Chan, Ho Leung; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining

    2015-08-20

    Non-crystalline photonic band gap (PBG) materials have received increasing attention, and sizeable PBGs have been reported in quasi-crystalline structures and, more recently, in disordered structures. Band structure calculations for periodic structures produce accurate dispersion relations, which determine group velocities, dispersion, density of states and iso-frequency surfaces, and are used to predict a wide-range of optical phenomena including light propagation, excited-state decay rates, temporal broadening or compression of ultrashort pulses and complex refraction phenomena. However, band calculations for non-periodic structures employ large super-cells of hundreds to thousands building blocks, and provide little useful information other than the PBG central frequency and width. Using stereolithography, we construct cm-scale disordered PBG materials and perform microwave transmission measurements, as well as finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The photonic dispersion relations are reconstructed from the measured and simulated phase data. Our results demonstrate the existence of sizeable PBGs in these disordered structures and provide detailed information of the effective band diagrams, dispersion relation, iso-frequency contours, and their angular dependence. Slow light phenomena are also observed in these structures near gap frequencies. This study introduces a powerful tool to investigate photonic properties of non-crystalline structures and provides important effective dispersion information, otherwise difficult to obtain.

  20. Unfolding the band structure of non-crystalline photonic band gap materials

    PubMed Central

    Tsitrin, Samuel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Amoah, Timothy; Nahal, Geev; Chan, Ho Leung; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining

    2015-01-01

    Non-crystalline photonic band gap (PBG) materials have received increasing attention, and sizeable PBGs have been reported in quasi-crystalline structures and, more recently, in disordered structures. Band structure calculations for periodic structures produce accurate dispersion relations, which determine group velocities, dispersion, density of states and iso-frequency surfaces, and are used to predict a wide-range of optical phenomena including light propagation, excited-state decay rates, temporal broadening or compression of ultrashort pulses and complex refraction phenomena. However, band calculations for non-periodic structures employ large super-cells of hundreds to thousands building blocks, and provide little useful information other than the PBG central frequency and width. Using stereolithography, we construct cm-scale disordered PBG materials and perform microwave transmission measurements, as well as finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The photonic dispersion relations are reconstructed from the measured and simulated phase data. Our results demonstrate the existence of sizeable PBGs in these disordered structures and provide detailed information of the effective band diagrams, dispersion relation, iso-frequency contours, and their angular dependence. Slow light phenomena are also observed in these structures near gap frequencies. This study introduces a powerful tool to investigate photonic properties of non-crystalline structures and provides important effective dispersion information, otherwise difficult to obtain. PMID:26289434

  1. Reflectivity calculated for a three-dimensional silicon photonic band gap crystal with finite support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devashish, D.; Hasan, Shakeeb B.; van der Vegt, J. J. W.; Vos, Willem L.

    2017-04-01

    We study numerically the reflectivity of three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals with a complete 3D photonic band gap. We employ the finite element method to study crystals with the cubic diamondlike inverse woodpile structure. The high-index backbone has a dielectric function similar to silicon. We study crystals with a range of thicknesses up to ten unit cells (L ≤10 c ). The crystals are surrounded by vacuum, and have a finite support as in experiments. The polarization-resolved reflectivity spectra reveal Fabry-Pérot fringes related to standing waves in the finite crystal, as well as broad stop bands with nearly 100 % reflectivity, even for thin crystals. The frequency ranges of the stop bands change little with angle of incidence, which is plausible since the stop bands are part of the 3D band gap. Moreover, this result supports the previous assertion that intense reflection peaks measured with a large numerical aperture provide a faithful signature of the 3D photonic band gap. For p -polarized waves, we observe an intriguing hybridization between the Fabry-Pérot resonances and the Brewster angle that remains to be observed in experiments. From the strong reflectivity peaks, it is inferred that the maximum reflectivity observed in experiments is not limited by finite size. The frequency ranges of the stop bands agree very well with stop gaps in the photonic band structure that pertain to infinite and perfect crystals. The angle-dependent reflectivity spectra provide an improved interpretation of the reflectivity measurements performed with a certain numerical aperture and a new insight in the crystal structure, namely unequal pore radii in X and Z directions. The Bragg attenuation lengths LB are found to be smaller by a factor 6 to 9 than earlier estimates that are based on the width of the stop band. Hence, crystals with a thickness of 12 unit cells studied in experiments are in the thick crystal limit (L ≫LB ). Our reflectivity calculations suggest

  2. Photonic band gap structure for a ferroelectric photonic crystal at microwave frequencies.

    PubMed

    King, Tzu-Chyang; Chen, De-Xin; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Wu, Chien-Jang

    2015-10-10

    In this work, the photonic band gap (PBG) structure in a one-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystal (PC) is theoretically investigated. We consider a PC, air/(AB)N/air, in which layer A is a dielectric of MgO and layer B is taken to be a ferroelectric of Ba0.55Sr0.45TiO3 (BSTO). With an extremely high value in the dielectric constant in BSTO, the calculated photonic band structure at microwave frequencies exhibits some interesting features that are significantly different from those in a usual dielectric-dielectric PC. First, the photonic transmission band consists of multiple and nearly discrete transmission peaks. Second, the calculated bandwidth of the PBG is nearly unchanged as the angle of incidence varies in the TE wave. The bandwidth will slightly reduce for the TM mode. Thus, a wide omnidirectional PBG can be obtained. Additionally, the effect of the thickness of the ferroelectric layer on the PBG is much more pronounced compared to the dielectric layer thickness. That is, the increase of ferroelectric thickness can significantly decrease the PBG bandwidth.

  3. Introducing Defects in Photonic Band-Gap (PBG) Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Elliott C.; /North Dakota State U. /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    Photonic Band-Gap (PBG) fibers are a periodic array of optical materials arranged in a lattice called a photonic crystal. The use of PBG fibers for particle acceleration is being studied by the Advanced Accelerator Research Department (AARD) at SLAC. By introducing defects in such fibers, e.g. removing one or more capillaries from a hexagonal lattice, spatially confined modes suitable for particle acceleration may be created. The AARD has acquired several test samples of PBG fiber arrays with varying refractive index, capillary size, and length from an external vendor for testing. The PBGs were inspected with a microscope and characteristics of the capillaries including radii, spacing, and errors in construction were determined. Transmission tests were performed on these samples using a broad-range spectrophotometer. In addition, detailed E-field simulations of different PBG configurations were done using the CUDOS and RSOFT codes. Several accelerating modes for different configurations were found and studied in detail.

  4. Absolute photonic band gap in 2D honeycomb annular photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Gao, Yihua; Tong, Aihong; Hu, Sen

    2015-01-01

    Using the plane wave expansion method, we investigate the effects of structural parameters on absolute photonic band gap (PBG) in two-dimensional honeycomb annular photonic crystals (PCs). The results reveal that the annular PCs possess absolute PBGs that are larger than those of the conventional air-hole PCs only when the refractive index of the material from which the PC is made is equal to 4.5 or larger. If the refractive index is smaller than 4.5, utilization of anisotropic inner rods in honeycomb annular PCs can lead to the formation of larger PBGs. The optimal structural parameters that yield the largest absolute PBGs are obtained.

  5. Six wave mixing process in photonic band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanyong; Rasheed Mahesar, Abdul; Wang, Zhiguo; Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Yunzhe; Gong, Rui; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2017-07-01

    For the first time, we have experimentally and theoretically researched the double dressing effect on the six wave mixing photonic band gap signal (SWM BGS), probe transmission signal (PTS) and fluorescence signal (FLS) in an inverted Y-type four level atomic system. We investigate the characteristics of the SMW BGS, PTS and FLS, which can be controlled by beam, power and detuning. At the same time, the relative phase which is caused by the incident angle of dressing beams plays a vital role in modulating the intensity of the SWM BGS, PTS and FLS. Such a scheme has potential applications in optical diodes, amplifiers and quantum information processing.

  6. Band structure of absorptive two-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lem, Han; Tip, Adriaan; Moroz, Alexander

    2003-06-01

    The band structure for an absorptive two-dimensional photonic crystal made from cylinders consisting of a Drude material is calculated. Absorption causes the spectrum to become complex and form islands in the negative complex half-plane. The boundaries of these islands are not always formed by the eigenvalues calculated for Bloch vectors on the characteristic path, and we find a hole in the spectrum. For realistic parameter values, the real part of the spectrum is hardly influenced by absorption, typically less than 0.25%. The employed method uses a Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker procedure together with analytical continuation. This results in an efficient approach that allows these band-structure calculations to be done on a Pentium III personal computer.

  7. On-chip, photon-number-resolving, telecommunication-band detectors for scalable photonic information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrits, Thomas; Lita, Adriana E.; Calkins, Brice; Tomlin, Nathan A.; Fox, Anna E.; Linares, Antia Lamas; Mirin, Richard P.; Nam, Sae Woo; Thomas-Peter, Nicholas; Metcalf, Benjamin J.; Spring, Justin B.; Langford, Nathan K.; Walmsley, Ian A.; Gates, James C.; Smith, Peter G. R.

    2011-12-15

    Integration is currently the only feasible route toward scalable photonic quantum processing devices that are sufficiently complex to be genuinely useful in computing, metrology, and simulation. Embedded on-chip detection will be critical to such devices. We demonstrate an integrated photon-number-resolving detector, operating in the telecom band at 1550 nm, employing an evanescently coupled design that allows it to be placed at arbitrary locations within a planar circuit. Up to five photons are resolved in the guided optical mode via absorption from the evanescent field into a tungsten transition-edge sensor. The detection efficiency is 7.2{+-}0.5 %. The polarization sensitivity of the detector is also demonstrated. Detailed modeling of device designs shows a clear and feasible route to reaching high detection efficiencies.

  8. Raman-tailored photonic crystal fiber for telecom band photon-pair generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, M.; Orieux, A.; Gabet, R.; Harlé, T.; Dubreuil, N.; Diamanti, E.; Delaye, P.; Zaquine, I.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the experimental characterization of a novel nonlinear liquid-filled hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber for the generation of photon pairs at telecommunication wavelength through spontaneous four-wave-mixing. We show that the optimization procedure in view of this application links the choice of the nonlinear liquid to the design parameters of the fiber, and we give an example of such an optimization at telecom wavelengths. Combining the modeling of the fiber and classical characterization techniques at these wavelengths, we identify, for the chosen fiber and liquid combination, spontaneous four-wave-mixing phase matching frequency ranges with no Raman scattering noise contamination. This is a first step toward obtaining a telecom band fibered photon-pair source with a high signal-to-noise ratio.

  9. Photonic band gaps in quasiperiodic photonic crystals with negative refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, M. S.; Mauriz, P. W.; de Medeiros, F. F.; Albuquerque, E. L.

    2007-10-01

    We investigate the photonic band gaps in quasiperiodic photonic crystals made up of both positive (SiO2) and negative refractive index materials using a theoretical model based on a transfer matrix treatment. The quasiperiodic structures are characterized by the nature of their Fourier spectrum, which can be dense pure point (Fibonacci sequences) or singular continuous (Thue-Morse and double-period sequences). These substitutional sequences are described in terms of a series of generations that obey peculiar recursion relations. We discussed the photonic band gap spectra for both the ideal cases, where the negative refractive index material can be approximated as a constant in the frequency range considered, as well as the more realistic case, taking into account the frequency-dependent electric permittivity γ and magnetic permeability μ . We also present a quantitative analysis of the results, pointing out the distribution of the allowed photonic bandwidths for high generations, which gives a good insight about their localization and power laws.

  10. Wide-Band Microwave Receivers Using Photonic Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; Itchenko, Vladimir; Yu, Nan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy

    2008-01-01

    In wide-band microwave receivers of a type now undergoing development, the incoming microwave signals are electronically preamplified, then frequency-up-converted to optical signals that are processed photonically before being detected. This approach differs from the traditional approach, in which incoming microwave signals are processed by purely electronic means. As used here, wide-band microwave receivers refers especially to receivers capable of reception at any frequency throughout the range from about 90 to about 300 GHz. The advantage expected to be gained by following the up-conversion-and-photonic-processing approach is the ability to overcome the limitations of currently available detectors and tunable local oscillators in the frequency range of interest. In a receiver following this approach (see figure), a preamplified incoming microwave signal is up-converted by the method described in the preceeding article. The frequency up-converter exploits the nonlinearity of the electromagnetic response of a whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator made of LiNbO3. Up-conversion takes place by three-wave mixing in the resonator. The WGM resonator is designed and fabricated to function simultaneously as an electro-optical modulator and to exhibit resonance at the microwave and optical operating frequencies plus phase matching among the microwave and optical signals circulating in the resonator. The up-conversion is an efficient process, and the efficiency is enhanced by the combination of microwave and optical resonances. The up-converted signal is processed photonically by use of a tunable optical filter or local oscillator, and is then detected. Tunable optical filters can be made to be frequency agile and to exhibit high resonance quality factors (high Q values), thereby making it possible to utilize a variety of signal-processing modalities. Therefore, it is anticipated that when fully developed, receivers of this type will be compact and will be capable of both

  11. Trapping of coherence and entanglement in photonic band-gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ling-Juan; Zhang, Ying-Jie; Xing, Gui-Chao; Xia, Yun-Jie; Gong, Shang-Qing

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the coherence trapping of a two-level atom transversally interacting with a reservoir with a photonic band-gap structure function. We then focus on the multipartite entanglement dynamics via genuinely multipartite concurrence among N independent atoms each locally coupled with its own reservoir. By considering the Lorentzian width and the system size, we find that for the resonant and near-resonant conditions, the increase of Lorentzian width and the decrease of system size can lead to the occurrence of coherence trapping and entanglement trapping. By choosing the multipartite GHZ state as atomic initial state, we show that the multipartite entanglement may exhibit entanglement sudden death depending on the initial condition and the system size. In addition, we also analyze how the crossover behaviors of two dynamical regimes are influenced by the Lorentzian width and the weight ratio, in terms of the non-Markovianity.

  12. Recent progress on photonic band gap accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.R.; Li, D.; Vier, D.C.; Kroll, N. |; Schultz, S.; Wang, H.

    1997-03-01

    We report on the current status of our program to apply Photonic Band Gap (PBG) concepts to produce novel high-energy, high-intensity accelerator cavities. The PBG design on which we have concentrated our inital efforts consists of a square array of metal cylinders, terminated by conducting or superconducting sheets, and surrounded by microwave absorber on the periphery of the structure. A removed cylinder from the center of the array constitutes a site defect where a localized electromagnetic mode can occur. In previous work, we have proposed that this structure could be utilized as an accelerator cavity, with advantageous properties over conventional cavity designs. In the present work, we present further studies, including MAFIA-based numerical calculations and experimental measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of using the proposed structure in a real accelerator application. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Recent progress on photonic band gap accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.R.; Li, D.; Vier, D.C.

    1997-02-01

    We report on the current status of our program to apply Photonic Band Gap (PBG) concepts to produce novel high-energy, high-intensity accelerator cavities. The PBG design on which we have concentrated our initial efforts consists of a square array of metal cylinders, terminated by conducting or superconducting sheets, and surrounded by microwave absorber on the periphery of the structure. A removed cylinder from the center of the array constitutes a site defect where a localized electromagnetic mode can occur. In previous work, we have proposed that this structure could be utilized as an accelerator cavity, with advantageous properties over conventional cavity designs. In the present work, we present further studies, including MAFIA-based numerical calculations and experimental measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of using the proposed structure in a real accelerator application.

  14. Design and Analysis of Planar Photonic Band Gap Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatadze, V.; Bijamov, A., Jr.; Kakulia, D.; Saparishvili, G.; Kakulia, D.; Zaridze, R.; Hafner, Ch.; Erni, D.

    2008-12-01

    The need for a highly efficient numerical simulation platform for designing photonic band gap (PBG) structures is outlined in the context of various functional device topologies. In this paper we therefore introduce the Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS) as a semi-analytical, frequency-domain method for computational optics, which has already proven its accuracy and efficiency in various other fields of electrodynamics. The proposed software package provides an easy-to-handle approach to full-wave analysis of two-dimensional (2D) PBG circuits, PBG-based antennas as well as to dense-integrated optics components that contain optical waveguides, scatterers, resonators and other functional elements. Experimental verifications of the numerical results have been conducted along large-scale prototypes in the microwave frequency range for several device topologies.

  15. Tunable photonic band-gaps in one-dimensional photonic crystals containing linear graded index material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bipin K.; Kumar, Pawan; Pandey, Praveen C.

    2014-12-01

    We have demonstrated control of the photonic band gaps (PBGs) in 1-D photonic crystals using linear graded index material. The analysis of PBG has been done in THz region by considering photonic crystals in the form of ten periods of second, third and fourth generation of the Fibonacci sequence as unit cell. The unit cells are constituted of two kinds of layers; one is taken of linear graded index material and other of normal dielectric material. For this investigation, we used a theoretical model based on transfer matrix method. We have obtained a large number of PBGs and their bandwidths can be tuned by changing the grading profile and thicknesses of linear graded index layers. The number of PBGs increases with increase in the thicknesses of layers and their bandwidths can be controlled by the contrast of initial and final refractive index of the graded layers. In this way, we provide more design freedom for photonic devices such as reflectors, filters, optical sensors, couplers, etc.

  16. Photonic Band Gap Materials: A New Frontier in Quantum and Nonlinear Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, S.

    Photonic band gap materials represent a new paradigm in quantum and nonlinear optics. These materials were predicted theoretically as a means to realize two fundamentally new optical principles, namely (i) the localization and trapping of light in a bulk material [1,2] and (ii) the complete inhibition of spontaneous emission [3,4] over a broad frequency range. The novel consequences of PBG materials flow directly from the realization and implementation of these two underlying principles. Unlike optical confinement of a single resonance mode in a high quality (Q) optical cavity, localized electromagnetic modes in a bulk PBG material are completely decoupled from the vacuum modes of free space and the spatial extent of the localized modes can be engineered to be an arbitrary number of optical wavelengths. Unlike Fabry-Perot resonators or distributed feedback laser cavities which confine light in one spatial dimension, the PBG material facilitates coherent localization of light in all spatial directions. Unlike microdisk or microsphere cavity resonators which perturb the local density of states (LDOS) of the electromagnetic vacuum, the PBG material completely suppresses the total photon density of states (DOS). Accordingly, the trapping of light in localized modes of a PBG material is far more robust than the resonance trapping of light in conventional microcavity modes. Moreover, it is possible to engineer an arbitrary number of individual localized states which may interact weakly with each other inside a large scale PBG material, but which maintain their immunity from vacuum modes outside the PBG material. This facilitates the development of large scale integrated optical circuits within a PBG in which the nature of radiative dynamics is controlled by the LDOS of photons within the photonic crystal rather than the free space DOS outside the photonic crystal. This unique combination of light localization and the complete control of radiative dynamics distinguishes

  17. Etched distributed Bragg reflectors as three-dimensional photonic crystals: photonic bands and density of states.

    PubMed

    Pavarini, E; Andreani, L C

    2002-09-01

    The photonic band dispersion and density of states (DOS) are calculated for the three-dimensional (3D) hexagonal structure corresponding to a distributed Bragg reflector patterned with a 2D triangular lattice of circular holes. Results for the Si/SiO(2) and GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As systems determine the optimal parameters for which a gap in the 2D plane occurs and overlaps the 1D gap of the multilayer. The DOS is considerably reduced in correspondence with the overlap of 2D and 1D gaps. Also, the local density of states (i.e., the DOS weighted with the squared electric field at a given point) has strong variations depending on the position. Both results imply substantial changes of spontaneous emission rates and patterns for a local emitter embedded in the structure and make this system attractive for the fabrication of a 3D photonic crystal with controlled radiative properties.

  18. Enhancement of broadband optical absorption in photovoltaic devices by band-edge effect of photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Kawamoto, Yosuke; Fujita, Masayuki; Noda, Susumu

    2013-08-26

    We numerically investigate broadband optical absorption enhancement in thin, 400-nm thick microcrystalline silicon (µc-Si) photovoltaic devices by photonic crystals (PCs). We realize absorption enhancement by coupling the light from the free space to the large area resonant modes at the photonic band-edge induced by the photonic crystals. We show that multiple photonic band-edge modes can be produced by higher order modes in the vertical direction of the Si photovoltaic layer, which can enhance the absorption on multiple wavelengths. Moreover, we reveal that the photonic superlattice structure can produce more photonic band-edge modes that lead to further optical absorption. The absorption average in wavelengths of 500-1000 nm weighted to the solar spectrum (AM 1.5) increases almost twice: from 33% without photonic crystal to 58% with a 4 × 4 period superlattice photonic crystal; our result outperforms the Lambertian textured structure.

  19. Photonic band structure of diamond colloidal crystals in a cholesteric liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changizrezaei, Setarehalsadat; Denniston, Colin

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the presence of a photonic band gap for a diamond lattice structure made of particles with normal anchoring inside a cholesteric liquid crystal. As is typical for liquid crystals (LCs), there is considerable contrast between the dielectric constant parallel ɛ∥ and perpendicular ɛ⊥ to the director, with ɛ∥/ɛ⊥˜4 here. It is shown that the size of the photonic band gap is directly related to the size of colloidal particles and the contrast between the dielectric constant in the particles and the extreme values of ɛ in the LC medium (one needs either ɛ in the particle much smaller than ɛ⊥ o r much bigger than ɛ∥). No opening is seen in the band diagrams for small particles. For larger particles a partial gap opens when the particles are composed of very low dielectric material but never a complete gap. On the other hand, a complete gap starts to be revealed when the size of the colloidal particles is increased and when a high dielectric constant is used for filling inside the particles. The maximum size of the gap is observed when the particles are large enough so that their surfaces overlap.

  20. Band gap and dispersion engineering of photonic crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Caihua

    Photonic crystals (PhCs) have been of great interest in a variety of fields in the past decade due to their great capability for manipulating photons in a manner similar to how electrons are controlled in a semiconductor material. In particular, PhCs are expected to revolutionize such fields as optical signal processing and optical communication by allowing the development of novel optical devices for high-density photonic integrated circuits (PICs). The development of PhC devices will be greatly accelerated by systematic designs. In this dissertation, I developed several procedures to systematically engineer the dispersion properties of PhCs. Using these procedures, I presented a variety of novel applications intended for use in future high-density PICs. These were achieved through efficient implementations of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and the plane wave method (PWM). Specifically, by combining these efficient electromagnetic tools with the direct binary search (DBS) method or simulated annealing (SA), I developed very efficient synthesis processes and used them to optimize absolute photonic band gaps (PBGs) of PhC structures and a beam steering device based on a PhC with PBG(s). I also presented another novel PhC device working in PBG, namely a PhC ring drop filter. On the other hand, I utilized the FDTD method and the PWM to shape dispersion surfaces and/or contours of PhC structures for manipulating light propagation. In particular, I engineered PhCs with square- and circle-shaped equi-frequency contours (EFCs) and presented several applications using these two unique PhCs. These applications include optical beam routing, coupling and splitting a wide beam into multiple narrow self-guiding beams, a unidirectional emitter, and an in-plane lens coupler. I also explored negative refraction and left-handed behavior in PhCs and presented a flat lens using a PhC exhibiting negative refraction and left-handed behavior.

  1. Telecom-band two-photon Michelson interferometer using frequency entangled photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Akio; Fukuda, Daiji; Tsuchida, Hidemi

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate a telecom-band fiber-optic two-photon Michelson interferometer using near-degenerate and collinear photon pairs with frequency entanglement. For spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC), a continuous-wave laser diode pumps a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide. Two threshold single-photon detectors record coincidence counts to observe two-photon interference and evaluate the correlation function. Multi-pair emission events are inevitable in SPDC and photon pairs without frequency entanglement are unintentionally registered as coincidence counts. In the demonstrated experiment, a mixture of photon pairs with and without frequency entanglement is present. The effects of such a mixed state on the correlation function are experimentally investigated. Two-photon interference of photon pairs without frequency entanglement is also measured for comparison.

  2. Design and testing of photonic band gap channel-drop-filters

    SciTech Connect

    Shchegolkov, Dmitry; Earley, Lawrence M; Health, Cynthia E; Smirnova, Evgenya I

    2009-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and tested several novel passive mm-wave spectrometers based on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) structures. Our spectrometers were designed to operate in the frequency ranges of 90-130 and 220-300 GHz. We built and tested both metallic and dielectric silicon Channel-Drop-Filter (CDF) structures at 90-130 GHz. We are currently fabricating a dielectric CDF structure to operate at 220-300 GHz. The complete recent test results for the metal version and preliminary test results for the higher frequency silicon versions will be presented at the conference.

  3. Local density of optical states of an asymmetric waveguide grating at photonic band gap resonant wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatas, Husin; Sumaryada, Tony I.; Ahmad, Faozan

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of local density of optical states (LDOS) at photonic band gap resonant wavelength of an asymmetric waveguide grating based on Green's function formulation. It is found that the LDOS of the considered structure exhibits different characteristics in its localization between the upper and lower resonant wavelengths of the corresponding photonic band gap edges.

  4. Superlattice for photonic band gap opening in monolayers of dielectric spheres.

    PubMed

    Vynck, Kevin; Cassagne, David; Centeno, Emmanuel

    2006-07-24

    Dielectric spheres synthesized for the fabrication of self-organized photonic crystals such as opals offer large opportunities for the design of novel nanophotonic devices. In this paper, we show that a hexagonal superlattice monolayer of dielectric spheres exhibits an even photonic band gap below the light cone for refractive indices higher than 1.93. The use of spheres with refractive index 2.9 and diameter 0.33 mum tunes the photonic band gap to the telecommunications range (lambda=1.55 mum). As a practical example for the use of such a photonic band gap, we demonstrate the possibility of waveguiding light linearly through the monolayer.

  5. Geometric phase and entanglement of Raman photon pairs in the presence of photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Berrada, K.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Abdel-Khalek, S.

    2015-03-28

    Robustness of the geometric phase (GP) with respect to different noise effects is a basic condition for an effective quantum computation. Here, we propose a useful quantum system with real physical parameters by studying the GP of a pair of Stokes and anti-Stokes photons, involving Raman emission processes with and without photonic band gap (PBG) effect. We show that the properties of GP are very sensitive to the change of the Rabi frequency and time, exhibiting collapse phenomenon as the time becomes significantly large. The system allows us to obtain a state which remains with zero GP for longer times. This result plays a significant role to enhance the stabilization and control of the system dynamics. Finally, we investigate the nonlocal correlation (entanglement) between the pair photons by taking into account the effect of different parameters. An interesting correlation between the GP and entanglement is observed showing that the PBG stabilizes the fluctuations in the system and makes the entanglement more robust against the change of time and frequency.

  6. Geometric phase and entanglement of Raman photon pairs in the presence of photonic band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Abdel-Khalek, S.

    2015-03-01

    Robustness of the geometric phase (GP) with respect to different noise effects is a basic condition for an effective quantum computation. Here, we propose a useful quantum system with real physical parameters by studying the GP of a pair of Stokes and anti-Stokes photons, involving Raman emission processes with and without photonic band gap (PBG) effect. We show that the properties of GP are very sensitive to the change of the Rabi frequency and time, exhibiting collapse phenomenon as the time becomes significantly large. The system allows us to obtain a state which remains with zero GP for longer times. This result plays a significant role to enhance the stabilization and control of the system dynamics. Finally, we investigate the nonlocal correlation (entanglement) between the pair photons by taking into account the effect of different parameters. An interesting correlation between the GP and entanglement is observed showing that the PBG stabilizes the fluctuations in the system and makes the entanglement more robust against the change of time and frequency.

  7. Communication: Excitation band modulation with high-order photonic band gap in PMMA:Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen; Bai, Xue; Zhu, Yongsheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Sai; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2013-05-01

    Changes in the excitation spectra of luminescent species inserted in photorefractive crystals as a function of changes in the high-order photonic band gap (PBG) have not been previously observed. In this communication, we present our results monitoring the excitation band of Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 inserted in the PMMA opal photonic crystals as a function of the changes in the high-order PBG of the crystals. We find shifts in the complex excitation band and changes in the integrated emission intensity that correlates with shifts in the high-order PBG through coupling to the excitation transition.

  8. Communication: excitation band modulation with high-order photonic band gap in PMMA:Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 opals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Bai, Xue; Zhu, Yongsheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Sai; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2013-05-14

    Changes in the excitation spectra of luminescent species inserted in photorefractive crystals as a function of changes in the high-order photonic band gap (PBG) have not been previously observed. In this communication, we present our results monitoring the excitation band of Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 inserted in the PMMA opal photonic crystals as a function of the changes in the high-order PBG of the crystals. We find shifts in the complex excitation band and changes in the integrated emission intensity that correlates with shifts in the high-order PBG through coupling to the excitation transition.

  9. Photonic bands in two-dimensional microplasma arrays. I. Theoretical derivation of band structures of electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Osamu; Sakaguchi, Takui; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2007-04-01

    Two theoretical approaches appropriate for two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals reveal dispersions of propagating waves including photonic (electromagnetic) band gaps and multiflatbands. A modified plane-wave expansion method yields dispersions of collisional periodical plasmas, and the complex-value solution of a wave equation by a finite difference method enables us to obtain dispersions with structure effects in an individual microplasma. Periodical plasma arrays form band gaps as well as normal photonic crystals, and multiflatbands are present below the electron plasma frequency in the transverse electric field mode. Electron elastic collisions lower the top frequency of the multiflatbands but have little effect on band gap properties. The spatial gradient of the local dielectric constant resulting from an electron density profile widens the frequency region of the multiflatbands, as demonstrated by the change of surface wave distributions. Propagation properties described in dispersions including band gaps and flatbands agree with experimental observations of microplasma arrays.

  10. Photonic-band-gap traveling-wave gyrotron amplifier.

    PubMed

    Nanni, E A; Lewis, S M; Shapiro, M A; Griffin, R G; Temkin, R J

    2013-12-06

    We report the experimental demonstration of a gyrotron traveling-wave-tube amplifier at 250 GHz that uses a photonic band gap (PBG) interaction circuit. The gyrotron amplifier achieved a peak small signal gain of 38 dB and 45 W output power at 247.7 GHz with an instantaneous -3  dB bandwidth of 0.4 GHz. The amplifier can be tuned for operation from 245-256 GHz. The widest instantaneous -3  dB bandwidth of 4.5 GHz centered at 253.25 GHz was observed with a gain of 24 dB. The PBG circuit provides stability from oscillations by supporting the propagation of transverse electric (TE) modes in a narrow range of frequencies, allowing for the confinement of the operating TE03-like mode while rejecting the excitation of oscillations at nearby frequencies. This experiment achieved the highest frequency of operation for a gyrotron amplifier; at present, there are no other amplifiers in this frequency range that are capable of producing either high gain or high output power. This result represents the highest gain observed above 94 GHz and the highest output power achieved above 140 GHz by any conventional-voltage vacuum electron device based amplifier.

  11. Photonic-Band-Gap Traveling-Wave Gyrotron Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, E. A.; Lewis, S. M.; Shapiro, M. A.; Griffin, R. G.; Temkin, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a gyrotron traveling-wave-tube amplifier at 250 GHz that uses a photonic band gap (PBG) interaction circuit. The gyrotron amplifier achieved a peak small signal gain of 38 dB and 45 W output power at 247.7 GHz with an instantaneous −3 dB bandwidth of 0.4 GHz. The amplifier can be tuned for operation from 245–256 GHz. The widest instantaneous −3 dB bandwidth of 4.5 GHz centered at 253.25 GHz was observed with a gain of 24 dB. The PBG circuit provides stability from oscillations by supporting the propagation of transverse electric (TE) modes in a narrow range of frequencies, allowing for the confinement of the operating TE03-like mode while rejecting the excitation of oscillations at nearby frequencies. This experiment achieved the highest frequency of operation for a gyrotron amplifier; at present, there are no other amplifiers in this frequency range that are capable of producing either high gain or high output power. This result represents the highest gain observed above 94 GHz and the highest output power achieved above 140 GHz by any conventional-voltage vacuum electron device based amplifier. PMID:24476286

  12. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Entanglement of Narrow-Band Photons from Cold Atoms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Chan; Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Zhao, Tian-Ming; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-12-16

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entanglement introduced in 1935 deals with two particles that are entangled in their positions and momenta. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of EPR position-momentum entanglement of narrow-band photon pairs generated from cold atoms. By using two-photon quantum ghost imaging and ghost interference, we demonstrate explicitly that the narrow-band photon pairs violate the separability criterion, confirming EPR entanglement. We further demonstrate continuous variable EPR steering for positions and momenta of the two photons. Our new source of EPR-entangled narrow-band photons is expected to play an essential role in spatially multiplexed quantum information processing, such as, storage of quantum correlated images, quantum interface involving hyperentangled photons, etc.

  13. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Entanglement of Narrow-Band Photons from Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Chan; Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Zhao, Tian-Ming; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-12-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entanglement introduced in 1935 deals with two particles that are entangled in their positions and momenta. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of EPR position-momentum entanglement of narrow-band photon pairs generated from cold atoms. By using two-photon quantum ghost imaging and ghost interference, we demonstrate explicitly that the narrow-band photon pairs violate the separability criterion, confirming EPR entanglement. We further demonstrate continuous variable EPR steering for positions and momenta of the two photons. Our new source of EPR-entangled narrow-band photons is expected to play an essential role in spatially multiplexed quantum information processing, such as, storage of quantum correlated images, quantum interface involving hyperentangled photons, etc.

  14. High-Power Fiber Lasers Using Photonic Band Gap Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiDomenico, Leo; Dowling, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers (HPFLs) would be made from photonic band gap (PBG) materials, according to the proposal. Such lasers would be scalable in the sense that a large number of fiber lasers could be arranged in an array or bundle and then operated in phase-locked condition to generate a superposition and highly directed high-power laser beam. It has been estimated that an average power level as high as 1,000 W per fiber could be achieved in such an array. Examples of potential applications for the proposed single-fiber lasers include welding and laser surgery. Additionally, the bundled fibers have applications in beaming power through free space for autonomous vehicles, laser weapons, free-space communications, and inducing photochemical reactions in large-scale industrial processes. The proposal has been inspired in part by recent improvements in the capabilities of single-mode fiber amplifiers and lasers to produce continuous high-power radiation. In particular, it has been found that the average output power of a single strand of a fiber laser can be increased by suitably changing the doping profile of active ions in its gain medium to optimize the spatial overlap of the electromagnetic field with the distribution of active ions. Such optimization minimizes pump power losses and increases the gain in the fiber laser system. The proposal would expand the basic concept of this type of optimization to incorporate exploitation of the properties (including, in some cases, nonlinearities) of PBG materials to obtain power levels and efficiencies higher than are now possible. Another element of the proposal is to enable pumping by concentrated sunlight. Somewhat more specifically, the proposal calls for exploitation of the properties of PBG materials to overcome a number of stubborn adverse phenomena that have impeded prior efforts to perfect HPFLs. The most relevant of those phenomena is amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), which causes saturation of gain and power

  15. Fabrication of 3-D Photonic Band Gap Crystals Via Colloidal Self-Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramaniam, Girija; Blank, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of photons in a Photonic Crystals, PCs, is like that of electrons in a semiconductor in that, it prohibits light propagation over a band of frequencies, called Photonic Band Gap, PBG. Photons cannot exist in these band gaps like the forbidden bands of electrons. Thus, PCs lend themselves as potential candidates for devices based on the gap phenomenon. The popular research on PCs stem from their ability to confine light with minimal losses. Large scale 3-D PCs with a PBG in the visible or near infra red region will make optical transistors and sharp bent optical fibers. Efforts are directed to use PCs for information processing and it is not long before we can have optical integrated circuits in the place of electronic ones.

  16. Study on the anisotropic photonic band gaps in three-dimensional tunable photonic crystals containing the epsilon-negative materials and uniaxial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Li, Bing-Xiang

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the properties of anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) for three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals (PCs) composed of the anisotropic positive-index materials (the uniaxial materials) and the epsilon-negative (ENG) materials with body-centered-cubic (bcc) lattices are theoretically studied by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method, which are the uniaxial materials spheres inserted in the epsilon-negative materials background. The anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) and one flatbands region can be achieved in first irreducible Brillouin zone. The influences of the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, the electronic plasma frequency, the dielectric constant of ENG materials and the damping factor on the properties of anisotropic PBGs for such 3D PCs are studied in detail, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. The numerical results show that the anisotropy can open partial band gaps in such 3D PCs with bcc lattices composed of the ENG materials and uniaxial materials, and the complete PBGs can be obtained compared to the conventional 3D PCs containing the isotropic materials. The calculated results also show that the anisotropic PBGs can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above except for the damping factor. Introducing the uniaxial materials into 3D PCs containing the ENG materials can obtain the larger complete PBGs as such 3D PCs with high symmetry, and also provides a way to design the tunable devices.

  17. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Roark A.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  18. Photonic bands in two-dimensionally patterned multimode GaN waveguides for light extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, A.; Meier, C.; Sharma, R.; Diana, F. S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Hu, E.; Nakamura, S.; Weisbuch, C.; Benisty, H.

    2005-09-01

    We observe experimentally by photoluminescence the band structure and specific emission properties of an in-plane, light-diffracting photonic crystal formed onto a multimode gallium nitride waveguide. Clear-cut two-dimensional photonic crystal effects are reported. Comparison with modeling results in identification of the band structure, provides insight into the light diffraction mechanism and points out design issues for enhancement of the extraction efficiency.

  19. Investigation on the properties of omnidirectional photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Li, Bing-Xiang

    2016-01-15

    The properties of omnidirectional photonic band gaps (OBGs) in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (2D PPCs) are theoretically investigated by the modified plane wave expansion method. In the simulation, we consider the off-plane incident wave vector. The configuration of 2D PPCs is the triangular lattices filled with the nonmagnetized plasma cylinders in the homogeneous and isotropic dielectric background. The calculated results show that the proposed 2D PPCs possess a flatbands region and the OBGs. Compared with the OBGs in the conventional 2D dielectric-air PCs, it can be obtained more easily and enlarged in the 2D PPCs with a similar structure. The effects of configurational parameters of the PPCs on the OBGs also are studied. The simulated results demonstrate that the locations of OBGs can be tuned easily by manipulating those parameters except for changing plasma collision frequency. The achieved OBGs can be enlarged by optimizations. The OBGs of two novel configurations of PPCs with different cross sections are computed for a comparison. Both configurations have the advantages of obtaining the larger OBGs compared with the conventional configuration, since the symmetry of 2D PPCs is broken by different sizes of periodically inserted plasma cylinders or connected by the embedded plasma cylinders with thin veins. The analysis of the results shows that the bandwidths of OBGs can be tuned by changing geometric and physical parameters of such two PPCs structures. The theoretical results may open a new scope for designing the omnidirectional reflectors or mirrors based on the 2D PPCs.

  20. Finite element method analysis of band gap and transmission of two-dimensional metallic photonic crystals at terahertz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Degirmenci, Elif; Landais, Pascal

    2013-10-20

    Photonic band gap and transmission characteristics of 2D metallic photonic crystals at THz frequencies have been investigated using finite element method (FEM). Photonic crystals composed of metallic rods in air, in square and triangular lattice arrangements, are considered for transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. The modes and band gap characteristics of metallic photonic crystal structure are investigated by solving the eigenvalue problem over a unit cell of the lattice using periodic boundary conditions. A photonic band gap diagram of dielectric photonic crystal in square lattice array is also considered and compared with well-known plane wave expansion results verifying our FEM approach. The photonic band gap designs for both dielectric and metallic photonic crystals are consistent with previous studies obtained by different methods. Perfect match is obtained between photonic band gap diagrams and transmission spectra of corresponding lattice structure.

  1. Field demonstration of X-band photonic antenna remoting in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Lutes, G.; Logan, R. T., Jr.; Maleki, L.

    1994-01-01

    We designed a photonic link for antenna remoting based on our integrated system analysis. With this 12-km link, we successfully demonstrated photonic antenna-remoting capability at X-band (8.4 GHz) at one of NASA's Deep Space Stations while tracking the Magellan spacecraft.

  2. Photonics aided ultra-wideband W-band signal generation and air space transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-02-01

    We achieve several field trial demonstrations of ultra-wideband W-band millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signal generation and its long-distance air space transmission based on some enabling technologies and advanced devices. First, we demonstrated photonics generation and up to 1.7-km wireless delivery of 20-Gb/s polarization division multiplexing quadrature phase shift keying (PDM-QPSK) signal at W-band, adopting both optical and antenna polarization multiplexing. Then, we demonstrated photonics generation and up to 300-m wireless delivery of 80-Gb/s PDM-QPSK signal at W-band, adopting both optical and antenna polarization multiplexing as well as multi-band multiplexing. We also demonstrated photonics generation and up to 100-m wireless delivery of 100-Gb/s QPSK signal at W-band, adopting antenna polarization multiplexing.

  3. A surprising content of congenital hernia: complete splenogonadal fusion band.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Prakash Manikka; Reddy, Ajit Kumar; Nutakki, Aditya

    2014-03-26

    Splenogonadal fusion is a rare congenital anomaly. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with a left inguinoscrotal swelling. With a clinical diagnosis of left congenital inguinal hernia the patient was taken up for explorative laparotomy where a transperitoneal band was noted adherent to the left testis. Biopsy revealed normal splenic tissue. Postoperatively the boy was imaged and a diagnosis of splenogonadal fusion was made. This article illustrates the imaging features of this rare anomaly.

  4. A surprising content of congenital hernia: complete splenogonadal fusion band

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Prakash Manikka; Reddy, Ajit Kumar; Nutakki, Aditya

    2014-01-01

    Splenogonadal fusion is a rare congenital anomaly. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with a left inguinoscrotal swelling. With a clinical diagnosis of left congenital inguinal hernia the patient was taken up for explorative laparotomy where a transperitoneal band was noted adherent to the left testis. Biopsy revealed normal splenic tissue. Postoperatively the boy was imaged and a diagnosis of splenogonadal fusion was made. This article illustrates the imaging features of this rare anomaly. PMID:24671325

  5. Enhanced third-harmonic generation in photonic crystals at band-gap pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Stanislav O.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Gorbunov, Evgeny A.; Yakovlev, Egor V.; Zotov, Arsen K.; Masalov, Vladimir M.; Emelchenko, Gennadi A.; Gorelik, Vladimir S.

    2017-02-01

    More than one order enhancement of third-harmonic generation is observed experimentally at band-gap pumping of globular photonic crystals. Due to a lateral modulation of the dielectric permittivity in two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals, sharp peaks of light intensity (light localization) arise in the media at the band-gap pumping. The light localization enhances significantly the nonlinear light conversion, in particular, third-harmonic generation, in the near-surface volume of photonic crystal. The observed way to enhance the nonlinear conversion can be useful for creation of novel compact elements of nonlinear and laser optics.

  6. First High power test results for 2.1 GHz superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavities.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Haynes, W Brian; Madrid, Michael A; Romero, Frank P; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Tuzel, Walter M; Boulware, Chase H; Grimm, Terry L

    2012-10-19

    We report the results of the recent high power testing of superconducting radio frequency photonic band gap (PBG) accelerator cells. Tests of the two single-cell 2.1 GHz cavities were performed at both 4 and 2 K. An accelerating gradient of 15 MV/m and an unloaded quality factor Q(0) of 4×10(9) were achieved. It has been long realized that PBG structures have great potential in reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. A PBG structure confines the fundamental TM(01)-like accelerating mode, but does not support higher order modes. Employing PBG cavities to filter out higher order modes in superconducting particle accelerators will allow suppression of dangerous beam instabilities caused by wakefields and thus operation at higher frequencies and significantly higher beam luminosities. This may lead towards a completely new generation of colliders for high energy physics and energy recovery linacs for the free-electron lasers.

  7. Compact flat band states in optically induced flatland photonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travkin, Evgenij; Diebel, Falko; Denz, Cornelia

    2017-07-01

    We realize low-dimensional tight-binding lattices that host flat bands in their dispersion relation and demonstrate the existence of optical compact flat band states. The lattices are resembled by arrays of optical waveguides fabricated by the state-of-the-art spatio-temporal Bessel beam multiplexing optical induction in photorefractive media. We work out the decisive details of the transition from the discrete theory to the real optical system ensuring that the experimental lattices stand up to numerical scrutiny exhibiting well-approximated band structures. Our highly flexible system is a promising candidate for further experimental investigation of theoretically studied disorder effects in flat band lattices.

  8. A complete characterization of the heralded noiseless amplification of photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, N.; Pini, V.; Martin, A.; Thew, R. T.

    2013-09-01

    Heralded noiseless amplification of photons has recently been shown to provide a means to overcome losses in complex quantum communication tasks. In particular, to overcome transmission losses that could allow for the violation of a Bell inequality free from the detection loophole, for device independent quantum key distribution (DI-QKD). Several implementations of a heralded photon amplifier have been proposed and the first proof of principle experiments realized. Here we present the first full characterization of such a device to test its functional limits and potential for DI-QKD. This device is tested at telecom wavelengths and is shown to be capable of overcoming losses corresponding to a transmission through 20 km of single mode telecom fibre. We demonstrate heralded photon amplifier with a gain >100 and a heralding probability >83%, required by DI-QKD protocols that use the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality. The heralded photon amplifier clearly represents a key technology for the realization of DI-QKD in the real world and over typical network distances.

  9. Photonic band structure of dielectric membranes periodically textured in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacradouni, V.; Mandeville, W. J.; Cowan, A. R.; Paddon, P.; Young, Jeff F.; Johnson, S. R.

    2000-08-01

    The real and imaginary photonic band structure of modes attached to two-dimensionally textured semiconductor membranes is determined experimentally and theoretically. These porous waveguides exhibit large (1000 cm-1 at 9500 cm-1) second-order optical gaps, highly dispersive lifetimes, and bands with well-defined polarization along directions of high symmetry.

  10. Analysis of plasma-magnetic photonic crystal with a tunable band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdian, H.; Mohammadzahery, Z.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, electromagnetic wave propagation through the one-dimensional plasma-magnetic photonic crystal in the presence of external magnetic field has been analyzed. The dispersion relation, transmission and reflection coefficients have been obtained by using the transfer matrix method. It is investigated how photonic band gap of photonic crystals will be tuned when both dielectric function {epsilon} and magnetic permeability {mu} of the constitutive materials, depend on applied magnetic field. This is shown by one dimensional photonic crystals consisting of plasma and ferrite material layers stacked alternately.

  11. Flat and self-trapping photonic bands through coupling of two unidirectional edge modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yun-tuan; He, Han-Qing; Hu, Jian-xia; Chen, Lin-kun; Wen, Zhang

    2015-03-01

    We find a flat band and a self-trapping band through the coupling of two unidirectional edge modes, which was originally achieved by Wang et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 013905 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.013905; Nature 461, 772 (2009), 10.1038/nature08293] in two-dimensional magneto-optical photonic crystals. We break up a square-lattice yttrium-iron-garnet photonic crystal forming a waveguide and two edges. Given a proper interval of the two edges, two unidirectional edge modes with opposite group velocity directions can be coupled. The coupling leads to a wide flat band in which the group velocity is near zero, and a self-trapping band in which light is totally localized around the source. The position of the flat band and the group velocity can be adjusted by the external magnetic field. Numerical simulations and theoretical analysis both demonstrate the two interesting band structures.

  12. Localization and characterization of the metallic band gaps in a ternary metallo-dielectric photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo-Molina, Adalberto; Romero-Antequera, David L.; Sánchez-Mondragón, José J.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the existence of structural metallic band gaps in a ternary material, dielectric-dielectric-metal, and we show analytical equations for their computation. We show the existence of metallic band gaps not only in the lowest band but also for high frequencies. These gaps are structural ones but different and additional to the dielectric ones in the dielectric photonic crystal substrate. Therefore, as the desire properties of both, the dielectric and metallic photonic crystals, are present the applications for this particular structure are straightforward.

  13. Photonic Band Gap Structures as a Gateway to Nano-Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    FRITZ, IAN J.; GOURLEY, PAUL L.; HAMMONS, G.; HIETALA, VINCENT M.; JONES, ERIC D.; KLEM, JOHN F.; KURTZ, SHARON L.; LIN, SHAWN-YU; LYO, SUNGKWUN K.; VAWTER, GREGORY A.; WENDT, JOEL R.

    1999-08-01

    This LDRD project explored the fundamental physics of a new class of photonic materials, photonic bandgap structures (PBG), and examine its unique properties for the design and implementation of photonic devices on a nano-meter length scale for the control and confinement of light. The low loss, highly reflective and quantum interference nature of a PBG material makes it one of the most promising candidates for realizing an extremely high-Q resonant cavity, >10,000, for optoelectronic applications and for the exploration of novel photonic physics, such as photonic localization, tunneling and modification of spontaneous emission rate. Moreover, the photonic bandgap concept affords us with a new opportunity to design and tailor photonic properties in very much the same way we manipulate, or bandgap engineer, electronic properties through modern epitaxy.

  14. Analysis of Photonic Band Gaps in a Two-Dimensional Triangular Lattice with Superconducting Hollow Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Valencia, B. F.; Calero, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we use the plane wave expansion method to calculate photonic band structures in two-dimensional photonic crystals which consist of high-temperature superconducting hollow rods arranged in a triangular lattice. The variation of the photonic band structure with respect to both, the inner radius and the system temperature, is studied, taking into account temperatures below the critical temperature of the superconductor in the low frequencies regime and assuming E polarization of the incident light. Permittivity contrast and nontrivial geometry of the hollow rods lead to the appearance of new band gaps as compared with the case of solid cylinders. Such band gaps can be modulated by means of the inner radius and system temperature.

  15. Large-scale synthesis of a silicon photonic crystal with a complete three-dimensional bandgap near 1.5 micrometres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Alvaro; Chomski, Emmanuel; Grabtchak, Serguei; Ibisate, Marta; John, Sajeev; Leonard, Stephen W.; Lopez, Cefe; Meseguer, Francisco; Miguez, Hernan; Mondia, Jessica P.; Ozin, Geoffrey A.; Toader, Ovidiu; van Driel, Henry M.

    2000-05-01

    Photonic technology, using light instead of electrons as the information carrier, is increasingly replacing electronics in communication and information management systems. Microscopic light manipulation, for this purpose, is achievable through photonic bandgap materials, a special class of photonic crystals in which three-dimensional, periodic dielectric constant variations controllably prohibit electromagnetic propagation throughout a specified frequency band. This can result in the localization of photons, thus providing a mechanism for controlling and inhibiting spontaneous light emission that can be exploited for photonic device fabrication. In fact, carefully engineered line defects could act as waveguides connecting photonic devices in all-optical microchips, and infiltration of the photonic material with suitable liquid crystals might produce photonic bandgap structures (and hence light-flow patterns) fully tunable by an externally applied voltage. However, the realization of this technology requires a strategy for the efficient synthesis of high-quality, large-scale photonic crystals with photonic bandgaps at micrometre and sub-micrometre wavelengths, and with rationally designed line and point defects for optical circuitry. Here we describe single crystals of silicon inverse opal with a complete three-dimensional photonic bandgap centred on 1.46µm, produced by growing silicon inside the voids of an opal template of close-packed silica spheres that are connected by small `necks' formed during sintering, followed by removal of the silica template. The synthesis method is simple and inexpensive, yielding photonic crystals of pure silicon that are easily integrated with existing silicon-based microelectronics.

  16. Two-photon photoemission from a copper cathode in an Χ-band photoinjector

    DOE PAGES

    Li, H.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; ...

    2016-02-24

    This study presents two-photon photoemission from a copper cathode in an X-band photoinjector. We experimentally verified that the electron bunch charge from photoemission out of a copper cathode scales with laser intensity (I) square for 400 nm wavelength photons. We compare this two-photon photoemission process with the single photon process at 266 nm. Despite the high reflectivity (R) of the copper surface for 400 nm photons (R=0.48) and higher thermal energy of photoelectrons (two-photon at 200 nm) compared to 266 nm photoelectrons, the quantum efficiency of the two-photon photoemission process (400 nm) exceeds the single-photon process (266 nm) when themore » incident laser intensity is above 300 GW/cm2. At the same laser pulse energy (E) and other experimental conditions, emitted charge scales inversely with the laser pulse duration. A thermal emittance of 2.7 mm-mrad per mm root mean square (rms) was measured on our cathode which exceeds by sixty percent larger compared to the theoretical predictions, but this discrepancy is similar to previous experimental thermal emittance on copper cathodes with 266 nm photons. The damage of the cathode surface of our first-generation X-band gun from both rf breakdowns and laser impacts mostly explains this result. Using a 400 nm laser can substantially simplify the photoinjector system, and make it an alternative solution for compact pulsed electron sources.« less

  17. Complete Esophageal Obstruction after Endoscopic Variceal Band Ligation in a Patient with a Sliding Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Munthir; Abdel-Aziz, Yousef; Awadh, Hesham; Shah, Nihar

    2017-01-01

    Complete esophageal obstruction is a rare complication of endoscopic variceal banding, with only 6 cases in the English literature since the introduction of endoscopic variceal banding in 1986. We report a case of complete esophageal obstruction following esophageal banding due to entrapment of part of a sliding hiatal hernia. To our knowledge, our case is one of few with esophageal obstruction post-banding, and the first associated with a hiatal hernia. We recommend caution when performing esophageal banding on patients with a hiatal hernia. PMID:28144613

  18. Design of a three-dimensional photonic band gap cavity in a diamondlike inverse woodpile photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldering, Léon A.; Mosk, Allard P.; Vos, Willem L.

    2014-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the design of cavities in a three-dimensional (3D) inverse woodpile photonic crystal. This class of cubic diamondlike crystals has a very broad photonic band gap and consists of two perpendicular arrays of pores with a rectangular structure. The point defect that acts as a cavity is centered on the intersection of two intersecting perpendicular pores with a radius that differs from the ones in the bulk of the crystal. We have performed supercell band structure calculations with up to 5×5×5 unit cells. We find that up to five isolated and dispersionless bands appear within the 3D photonic band gap. For each isolated band, the electric-field energy is localized in a volume centered on the point defect, hence the point defect acts as a 3D photonic band gap cavity. The mode volume of the cavities resonances is as small as 0.8 λ3 (resonance wavelength cubed), indicating a strong confinement of the light. By varying the radius of the defect pores we found that only donorlike resonances appear for smaller defect radius, whereas no acceptorlike resonances appear for greater defect radius. From a 3D plot of the distribution of the electric-field energy density we conclude that peaks of energy are found in sharp edges situated at the point defect, similar to how electrons collect at such features. This is different from what is observed for cavities in noninverted woodpile structures. Since inverse woodpile crystals can be fabricated from silicon by CMOS-compatible means, we project that single cavities and even cavity arrays can be realized, for wavelength ranges compatible with telecommunication windows in the near infrared.

  19. Achieving omnidirectional photonic band gap in sputter deposited TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} one dimensional photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Jena, S. Tokas, R. B.; Sarkar, P.; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K.; Haque, S. Maidul; Misal, J. S.; Rao, K. D.

    2015-06-24

    The multilayer structure of TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} (11 layers) as one dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC) has been designed and then fabricated by using asymmetric bipolar pulse DC magnetron sputtering technique for omnidirectional photonic band gap. The experimentally measured photonic band gap (PBG) in the visible region is well matched with the theoretically calculated band structure (ω vs. k) diagram. The experimentally measured omnidirectional reflection band of 44 nm over the incident angle range of 0°-70° is found almost matching within the theoretically calculated band.

  20. Peculiarities of the band structure of multi-component photonic crystals with different dimensions.

    PubMed

    Samusev, A K; Samusev, K B; Rybin, M V; Limonov, M F

    2010-03-24

    In this work we offer a simple analytical method which allows us to determine and study the effects of the selective switching of photonic stop-bands in multi-component photonic crystals (Mc-PhCs) of any dimensionality. The calculations for Mc-PhCs with low dielectric contrast have been performed in the framework of the model based on the scattering form factor analysis. It has been shown that the effects of selective switching of photonic stop-bands predicted theoretically and found experimentally before in three-dimensional (3D) Mc-PhC have a general character and may be observed also in one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Mc-PhCs. It is found that 1D, 2D and 3D Mc-PhCs demonstrate unexpectedly similar quasi-periodic behaviour of photonic stop-bands as a function of the reciprocal lattice vector. A proper choice of the structural and dielectric parameters can create a resonance photonic stop-band determining the Bragg wavelengths, to which a photonic crystal can never be transparent.

  1. Band gap characterization and slow light effects in periodic and quasiperiodic one dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghdoudi, J.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Kanzari, M.; Rezig, B.

    2008-04-01

    Slow light offers many opportunities for photonic devices by increasing the effective interaction length of imposed refractive index changes. The slow wave effect in photonic crystals is based on their unique dispersive properties and thus entirely dielectric in nature. In this work we demonstrate an interesting opportunity to decrease drastically the group velocity of light in one-dimensional photonic crystals constructed form materials with large dielectric constant without dispersion). We use numerical analysis to study the photonic properties of periodic (Bragg mirror) and quasiperiodic one dimensional photonic crystals realized to engineer slow light effects. Various geometries of the photonic pattern have been characterized and their photonic band-gap structure analyzed. Indeed, one dimensional quasi periodic photonic multilayer structure based on Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and Cantor sequences were studied. Quasiperiodic structures have a rich and highly fragmented reflectivity spectrum with many sharp resonant peaks that could be exploited in a microcavity system. A comparison of group velocity through periodic and quasiperiodic photonic crystals was discussed in the context of slow light propagation. The velocity control of pulses in materials is one of the promising applications of photonic crystals. The material systems used for the numerical analysis are TiO II/SiO II and Te/SiO II which have a refractive index contrast of approximately 1.59 and 3.17 respectively. The proposed structures were modelled using the Transfer Matrix Method.

  2. Energy transfer from Rhodamine-B to Oxazine-170 in the presence of photonic stop band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Sunita; Sinha, Sucharita

    2015-03-01

    Photonic crystals can effectively suppress spontaneous emission of embedded emitter in the direction were photonic stop band overlaps emission band of emitter. This property of PhC has been successfully exploited to enhance energy transfer from a donor Rhodamine-B dye to an acceptor Oxazine-170 dye by inhibiting the fluorescence emission of donor in a controlled manner. Self-assembled PhC were synthesized using RhB dye doped polystyrene microspheres subsequently infiltrated with O-170 dye molecules dissolved in ethanol. An angle dependent enhancement of emission intensity of acceptor via energy transfer in photonic crystal environment was observed. These results were compared with observations made on a dye mixture solution of the same two dyes. Restricted number of available modes in photonic crystal inhibited de-excitation of donor thereby enabling efficient transfer of energy from excited donor to acceptor dye molecules.

  3. Fabrication of Ceramic Layer-by-Layer Infrared Wavelength Photonic Band Gap Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Henry Hao-Chuan

    2004-12-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals, also known as photonic crystals, are periodic dielectric structures which form a photonic band gap that prohibit the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves of certain frequencies at any incident angles. Photonic crystals have several potential applications including zero-threshold semiconductor lasers, the inhibition of spontaneous emission, dielectric mirrors, and wavelength filters. If defect states are introduced in the crystals, light can be guided from one location to another or even a sharp bending of light in micron scale can be achieved. This generates the potential for optical waveguide and optical circuits, which will contribute to the improvement in the fiber-optic communications and the development of high-speed computers.

  4. Accidental degeneracy in photonic bands and topological phase transitions in two-dimensional core-shell dielectric photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Wang, Hai-Xiao; Xu, Ya-Dong; Chen, Huan-Yang; Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-08

    A simple core-shell two-dimensional photonic crystal is studied where the triangular lattice symmetry and the C6 point group symmetry give rich physics in accidental touching points of photonic bands. We systematically evaluate different types of accidental nodal points at the Brillouin zone center for transverse-magnetic harmonic modes when the geometry and permittivity of the core-shell material are continuously tuned. The accidental nodal points can have different dispersions and topological properties (i.e., Berry phases). These accidental nodal points can be the critical states lying between a topological phase and a normal phase of the photonic crystal. They are thus very important for the study of topological photonic states. We show that, without breaking time-reversal symmetry, by tuning the geometry of the core-shell material, a phase transition into the photonic quantum spin Hall insulator can be achieved. Here the "spin" is defined as the orbital angular momentum of a photon. We study the topological phase transition as well as the properties of the edge and bulk states and their application potentials in optics.

  5. Low-frequency photonic band structures in graphene-like triangular metallic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang

    2016-11-01

    We study the low frequency photonic band structures in triangular metallic lattice, displaying Dirac points in the frequency spectrum, and constructed upon the lowest order regular polygonal tiles. We show that, in spite of the unfavourable geometrical conditions intrinsic to the structure symmetry, the lowest frequency photonic bands are formed by resonance modes sustained by local structure patterns, with the corresponding electric fields following a triangular distribution at low structure filling rate and a honeycomb distribution at high filling rate. For both cases, the lowest photonic bands, and thus the plasma gap, can be described in the framework of a tight binding model, and analysed in terms of local resonance modes and their mutual correlations. At high filling rate, the Dirac points and their movement following the structure deformation are described in the same framework, in relation with local structure patterns and their variations, as well as the particularity of the metallic lattice that enhances the topological anisotropy.

  6. Quantum speedup of an atom coupled to a photonic-band-gap reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Nan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Han-Zhuang

    2017-01-01

    For a model of an atom embedded in a photonic-band-gap reservoir, it was found that the speedup of quantum evolution is subject to the atomic frequency changes. In this work, we propose different points of view on speeding up the evolution. We show that the atomic embedded position, the width of the band gap and the defect mode also play an important role in accelerating the evolution. By changing the embedded position of the atom and the coupling strength with the defect mode, the speedup region lies even outside the band-gap region, where the non-Markovian effect is weak. The mechanism for the speedup is due to the interplay of atomic excited population and the non-Markovianity. The feasible experimental system composed of quantum dots in the photonic crystal is discussed. These results provide new degree of freedoms to depress the quantum speed limit time in photonic crystals.

  7. Method of manufacturing flexible metallic photonic band gap structures, and structures resulting therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Sandhya; Tuttle, Gary L.; Sigalas, Mihail; McCalmont, Jonathan S.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2001-08-14

    A method of manufacturing a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable in the infrared region, comprises the steps of spinning on a first layer of dielectric on a GaAs substrate, imidizing this first layer of dielectric, forming a first metal pattern on this first layer of dielectric, spinning on and imidizing a second layer of dielectric, and then removing the GaAs substrate. This method results in a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable with various filter characteristics in the infrared region. This method may be used to construct multi-layer flexible metallic photonic band gap structures. Metal grid defects and dielectric separation layer thicknesses are adjusted to control filter parameters.

  8. Experimental Work With Photonic Band Gap Fiber: Building A Laser Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Melissa; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Nobel, Robert; Siemann, Robert; /SLAC

    2006-09-29

    In the laser acceleration project E-163 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, work is being done toward building a traveling wave accelerator that uses as its accelerating structure a length of photonic band gap fiber. The small scale of the optical fiber allows radiation at optical wavelengths to be used to provide the necessary accelerating energy. Optical wavelength driving energy in a small structure yields higher accelerating fields. The existence of a speed-of-light accelerating mode in a photonic band gap fiber has been calculated previously [1]. This paper presents an overview of several of the experimental challenges posed in the development of the proposed photonic band gap fiber accelerator system.

  9. Zero-coupling-gap degenerate band edge resonators in silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Burr, Justin R; Reano, Ronald M

    2015-11-30

    Resonances near regular photonic band edges are limited by quality factors that scale only to the third power of the number of periods. In contrast, resonances near degenerate photonic band edges can scale to the fifth power of the number periods, yielding a route to significant device miniaturization. For applications in silicon integrated photonics, we present the design and analysis of zero-coupling-gap degenerate band edge resonators. Complex band diagrams are computed for the unit cell with periodic boundary conditions that convey characteristics of propagating and evanescent modes. Dispersion features of the band diagram are used to describe changes in resonance scaling in finite length resonators. Resonators with non-zero and zero coupling gap are compared. Analysis of quality factor and resonance frequency indicates significant reduction in the number of periods required to observe fifth power scaling when degenerate band edge resonators are realized with zero-coupling-gap. High transmission is achieved by optimizing the waveguide feed to the resonator. Compact band edge cavities with large optical field distribution are envisioned for light emitters, switches, and sensors.

  10. Photonic bands and group-velocity dispersion in Si/SiO2 photonic crystals from white-light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, M.; Bajoni, D.; Marabelli, F.; Andreani, L. C.; Pavesi, L.; Pucker, G.

    2004-03-01

    The phase delay of a light beam transmitted through (Si/SiO2)m multilayers with m=2,4,6,8 is measured by white-light interferometry based on a fixed Mach-Zehnder interferometer coupled to a scanning Michelson interferometer. Results for photonic band and group velocity dispersion are obtained in a wide frequency spectrum and compare successfully with the predictions of electromagnetic theory. In particular, a strong slowing down of the group velocity at the band edges and superluminal propagation within the gap are demonstrated.

  11. Differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution using heralded narrow-band single photons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Zhang, Shanchao; Zhao, Luwei; Chen, Peng; Fung, C-H F; Chau, H F; Loy, M M T; Du, Shengwang

    2013-04-22

    We demonstrate the first proof of principle differential phase shift (DPS) quantum key distribution (QKD) using narrow-band heralded single photons with amplitude-phase modulations. In the 3-pulse case, we obtain a quantum bit error rate (QBER) as low as 3.06% which meets the unconditional security requirement. As we increase the pulse number up to 15, the key creation efficiency approaches 93.4%, but with a cost of increasing the QBER. Our result suggests that narrow-band single photons maybe a promising source for the DPS-QKD protocol.

  12. Full band structure calculation of two-photon indirect absorption in bulk silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J. L.; Rioux, J.; Sipe, J. E.

    2011-03-28

    Degenerate two-photon indirect absorption in silicon is an important limiting effect on the use of silicon structures for all-optical information processing at telecommunication wavelengths. We perform a full band structure calculation to investigate two-photon indirect absorption in bulk silicon, using a pseudopotential description of the energy bands and an adiabatic bond charge model to describe phonon dispersion and polarization. Our results agree well with some recent experimental results. The transverse acoustic/optical phonon-assisted processes dominate.

  13. Nonlinear Photonic Systems for V- and W-Band Antenna Remoting Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-22

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0088 Nonlinear Photonic Systems for V- and W-Band Antenna Remoting Applications Sheng-Kwang Hwang NATIONAL CHENG KUNG...Antenna Remoting Applications 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-15-1-4026 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Sheng-Kwang Hwang...AOARD Grant FA2386-15-1-4026 Project Title Nonlinear Photonic Systems for V- and W-Band Antenna Remoting Applications – Microwave Generation and

  14. Systematic design of flat band slow light in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Li, Juntao; White, Thomas P; O'Faolain, Liam; Gomez-Iglesias, Alvaro; Krauss, Thomas F

    2008-04-28

    We present a systematic procedure for designing "flat bands" of photonic crystal waveguides for slow light propagation. The procedure aims to maximize the group index - bandwidth product by changing the position of the first two rows of holes of W1 line defect photonic crystal waveguides. A nearly constant group index - bandwidth product is achieved for group indices of 30-90 and as an example, we experimentally demonstrate flat band slow light with nearly constant group indices of 32.5, 44 and 49 over 14 nm, 11 nm and 9.5 nm bandwidth around 1550 nm, respectively.

  15. Self-consistent photonic band structure of dielectric superlattices containing nonlinear optical materials.

    PubMed

    Lousse, V; Vigneron, J P

    2001-02-01

    The theory of photonic crystals is extended to include the optical Kerr effect taking place in weak third-order, nonlinear materials present in the unit cell. The influence on the dispersion relations of the illumination caused by a single Bloch mode transiting through the crystal structure is examined. Special attention is given to the modification of the photonic gap width and position. Assuming an instantaneous change of refractive index with illumination, the nonlinear band structure problem is solved as a sequence of ordinary, linear band structure calculations, carried out in a plane-wave field representation.

  16. Photonic crystal alloys: a new twist in controlling photonic band structure properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Dong-Uk; Roh, Young-Geun; Yu, Jaejun; Jeon, Heonsu; Park, Q-Han

    2008-04-28

    We identified new photonic structures and phenomenon that are analogous to alloy crystals and the associated electronic bandgap engineering. From a set of diamond-lattice microwave photonic crystals of randomly mixed silica and alumina spheres but with a well defined mixing composition, we observed that both bandedges of the L-point bandgap monotonically shifted with very little bowing as the composition was varied. The observed results were in excellent agreement with the virtual crystal approximation theory originally developed for electronic properties of alloy crystals. This result signifies the similarity and correspondence between photonics and electronics.

  17. Complete three photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interference at a three port device.

    PubMed

    Mährlein, Simon; von Zanthier, Joachim; Agarwal, Girish S

    2015-06-15

    We report the possibility of completely destructive interference of three indistinguishable photons on a three port device providing a generalisation of the well known Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of two indistinguishable photons on a two port device. Our analysis is based on the underlying mathematical framework of SU(3) transformations rather than SU(2) transformations. We show the completely destructive three photon interference for a large range of parameters of the three port device and point out the physical origin of such interference in terms of the contributions from different quantum paths. As each output port can deliver zero to three photons the device generates higher dimensional entanglement. In particular, different forms of entangled states of qudits can be generated depending on the device parameters. Our system is different from a symmetric three port beam splitter which does not exhibit a three photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interference.

  18. Quantum correlation of fiber-based telecom-band photon pairs through standard loss and random media.

    PubMed

    Sua, Yong Meng; Malowicki, John; Lee, Kim Fook

    2014-08-15

    We study quantum correlation and interference of fiber-based telecom-band photon pairs with one photon of the pair experiencing multiple scattering in a random medium. We measure joint probability of two-photon detection for signal photon in a normal channel and idler photon in a channel, which is subjected to two independent conditions: standard loss (neutral density filter) and random media. We observe that both conditions degrade the correlation of signal and idler photons, and depolarization of the idler photon in random medium can enhance two-photon interference at certain relative polarization angles. Our theoretical calculation on two-photon polarization correlation and interference as a function of mean free path is in agreement with our experiment data. We conclude that quantum correlation of a polarization-entangled photon pair is better preserved than a polarization-correlated photon pair as one photon of the pair scatters through a random medium.

  19. Band structure of germanium carbides for direct bandgap silicon photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, C. A. Stillwell, R. A.; Wistey, M. A.; O'Brien, W. A.; Penninger, M. W.; Schneider, W. F.; Gillett-Kunnath, M.; Zajicek, J.; Yu, K. M.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2016-08-07

    Compact optical interconnects require efficient lasers and modulators compatible with silicon. Ab initio modeling of Ge{sub 1−x}C{sub x} (x = 0.78%) using density functional theory with HSE06 hybrid functionals predicts a splitting of the conduction band at Γ and a strongly direct bandgap, consistent with band anticrossing. Photoreflectance of Ge{sub 0.998}C{sub 0.002} shows a bandgap reduction supporting these results. Growth of Ge{sub 0.998}C{sub 0.002} using tetrakis(germyl)methane as the C source shows no signs of C-C bonds, C clusters, or extended defects, suggesting highly substitutional incorporation of C. Optical gain and modulation are predicted to rival III–V materials due to a larger electron population in the direct valley, reduced intervalley scattering, suppressed Auger recombination, and increased overlap integral for a stronger fundamental optical transition.

  20. Nonequilibrium Band Mapping of Unoccupied Bulk States below the Vacuum Level by Two-Photon Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.D.; Hao, Z.; Dadap, J.I.; Knox, K.R.; Yilmaz, M.B.; Zaki, N.; Osgood, R.M.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate angle-resolved, tunable, two-photon photoemission (2PPE) to map a bulk unoccupied band, viz. the Cu sp band 0 to 1 eV below the vacuum level, in the vicinity of the L point. This short-lived bulk band is seen due to the strong optical pump rate, and the observed transition energies and their dispersion with photon energy {h_bar}{omega}, are in excellent agreement with tight-binding band-structure calculations. The variation of the final-state energy with {h_bar}{omega} has a measured slope of -1.64 in contrast to values of 1 or 2 observed for 2PPE from two-dimensional states. This unique variation illustrates the significant role of the perpendicular momentum {h_bar}k{perpendicular} in 2PPE.

  1. Nonequilibrium Band Mapping of Unoccupied Bulk States below the Vacuum Level by Two-Photon Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Zhaofeng; Dadap, J. I.; Knox, K. R.; Zaki, N.; Osgood, R. M.; Yilmaz, M. B.; Johnson, P. D.

    2010-07-02

    We demonstrate angle-resolved, tunable, two-photon photoemission (2PPE) to map a bulk unoccupied band, viz. the Cu sp band 0 to 1 eV below the vacuum level, in the vicinity of the L point. This short-lived bulk band is seen due to the strong optical pump rate, and the observed transition energies and their dispersion with photon energy ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}, are in excellent agreement with tight-binding band-structure calculations. The variation of the final-state energy with ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega} has a measured slope of {approx}1.64 in contrast to values of 1 or 2 observed for 2PPE from two-dimensional states. This unique variation illustrates the significant role of the perpendicular momentum ({h_bar}/2{pi})k{sub perpendicular} in 2PPE.

  2. Omnidirectional photonic band gap enlarged by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haifeng; Liu Shaobin; Kong Xiangkun; Bian Borui; Dai Yi

    2012-11-15

    In this paper, an omnidirectional photonic band gap realized by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure, which is composed of homogeneous unmagnetized plasma and two kinds of isotropic dielectric, is theoretically studied by the transfer matrix method. It has been shown that such an omnidirectional photonic band gap originates from Bragg gap in contrast to zero-n gap or single negative (negative permittivity or negative permeability) gap, and it is insensitive to the incidence angle and the polarization of electromagnetic wave. From the numerical results, the frequency range and central frequency of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be tuned by the thickness and density of the plasma but cease to change with increasing Fibonacci order. The bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be notably enlarged. Moreover, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap. It is shown that such new structure Fibonacci quasiperiodic one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals have a superior feature in the enhancement of frequency range of omnidirectional photonic band gap compared with the conventional ternary and conventional Fibonacci quasiperiodic ternary plasma photonic crystals.

  3. Diamond Opal-Replica Photonic Crystals and Graphitic Metallic Photonic Band Gap Structures: Fabrication and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhidov, A. A.; Baughman, R. H.; Iqbal, Z.; Khayrullin, I. I.; Ralchenko, V. G.

    1998-03-01

    We demonstrate a new method for the formation of photonic bandgap crystals that operate at optical wavelengths. This method involves the templating of a self-assempled SiO2 lattice with diamond, graphite, or amorphous forms of carbon, followed by the removal of the original SiO2 lattice matrix by chemical means. Such carbon opal replicas are the "air type" of photonic crystal (where air replaces silica spheres) that are most favourable for photonic bandgap formation. Surprisingly, the structure of the original opal lattice having a typical cubic lattice dimension of 250 nm) is reliably replicated down to the nanometer scale using either a diamond, graphite, or amorphous carbon templated material. The optical properties of these photonic bandgap crystals are reported and compared with both theory and experimental results on other types of opal-derived lattices that we have investigated. The graphitic reverse opal is the first example of a network type metallic photonic crystal for the optical domain, for which a large photonic bandgap have been predicted.

  4. Research on Shore-Ship Photonic Link Performance for Two- Frequency-Band Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yanqin; Cong, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Ka and Ku bands links for shore-ship communications suffer limited bandwidth and high loss. In this paper, photonics-based links are proposed and modeled. The principle of phase modulation (PM) is elaborated and analyzed. It is showed that PM can effectively suppress high-order inter-modulation distortion (IMD), reduce the insert loss and improve the reliability of the system.

  5. Photonic band-gap formation by optical-phase-mask lithography.

    PubMed

    Chan, Timothy Y M; Toader, Ovidiu; John, Sajeev

    2006-04-01

    We demonstrate an approach for fabricating photonic crystals with large three-dimensional photonic band gaps (PBG's) using single-exposure, single-beam, optical interference lithography based on diffraction of light through an optical phase mask. The optical phase mask (OPM) consists of two orthogonally oriented binary gratings joined by a thin, solid layer of homogeneous material. Illuminating the phase mask with a normally incident beam produces a five-beam diffraction pattern which can be used to expose a suitable photoresist and produce a photonic crystal template. Optical-phase-mask Lithography (OPML) is a major simplification from the previously considered multibeam holographic lithography of photonic crystals. The diffracted five-beam intensity pattern exhibits isointensity surfaces corresponding to a diamondlike (face-centered-cubic) structure, with high intensity contrast. When the isointensity surfaces in the interference patterns define a silicon-air boundary in the resulting photonic crystal, with dielectric contrast 11.9 to 1, the optimized PBG is approximately 24% of the gap center frequency. The ideal index contrast for the OPM is in the range of 1.7-2.3. Below this range, the intensity contrast of the diffraction pattern becomes too weak. Above this range, the diffraction pattern may become too sensitive to structural imperfections of the OPM. When combined with recently demonstrated polymer-to-silicon replication methods, OPML provides a highly efficient approach, of unprecedented simplicity, for the mass production of large-scale three-dimensional photonic band-gap materials.

  6. Simulation of pulsed optical logic gates based on photonic band gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedov, Igor; Morozov, Yurii; Gusyatnikov, Viktor; Zheltikov, Aleksei

    2001-04-01

    The change in the refractive index of GaAs due to the light-induced generation of nonequilibrium charge carriers is shown to substantially change the transmission of a one-dimensional GaAs/GaAlAs photonic band-gap structure, allowing low-threshold photonic-crystal optical logic gates to be created. Elementary logic operations of the Boolean algebra performed with nonlinear PBG structures, including the biconditional implication, modulo-two addition, Peirce's arrow, and disjunction, are demonstrated. It is demonstrated that different results of optical switching can be achieved and, consequently, different logic operations can be performed with the same photonic band-gap structure at different delay times by varying the energy of the control light pulse.

  7. Experimental Generation of Narrow-Band Paired Photons: from Damped Rabi Oscillation to Group Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kai-Yu; Yan, Hui; He, Jun-Yu; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Zhu, Shi-Liang

    2014-03-01

    We report the experimental generation of narrow-band paired photons through electromagnetically induced transparency and spontaneous four-wave mixing in a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap (2D MOT). By controlling the optical depth of the 2D MOT from 0 to 40, the temporal length of the generated narrow-band paired photons can be varied from 50 to 900 ns. The ‘transition’ between damped Rabi oscillation and group delay is observed undisputedly. In the damped Rabi oscillation regime, a violation factor of the Cauchy—Schwartz inequality as large as 6642 is observed. In the group delay regime, sub-MHz linewidth (~ 0.65 MHz) paired photons are obtained with a generation rate of about 0.8 × 105 s-1.

  8. Carrier dynamics in GaAs photonic crystal cavities near the material band edge.

    PubMed

    Bose, Ranojoy; Pelc, Jason S; Vo, Sonny; Santori, Charles M; Beausoleil, Raymond G

    2015-05-18

    We measure fast carrier decay rates (6 ps) in GaAs photonic crystal cavities with resonances near the GaAs bandgap energy at room temperature using a pump-probe measurement. Carriers generated via photoexcitation using an above-band femtosecond pulse cause a substantial blue-shift of three time the cavity linewidth for the cavity peak. The experimental results are compared to theoretical models based on free carrier effects near the GaAs band edge. The probe transmission is modified by nearly 30% for an estimated above-band pump energy of 4.2 fJ absorbed in the GaAs slab.

  9. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome

    2001-01-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.

  10. Complete Acoustic Stop-Bands in 2-D Periodic Arrays of Liquid Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, M. S.; Halevi, P.

    1996-03-01

    Periodic binary systems can give rise to complete acoustic band--gaps (i.e. stop--bands) within which sound and vibrations are forbidden. We compute the band structure for 2D periodic arrays of long water cylinders surrounded by mercury. We have neglected the wall (latex) material needed to hold the liquid, assuming that it is sufficiently light and thin. Complete acoustic stop--bands are found for both square and hexagonal lattices. We emphasize that such a simple 2D inhomogeneous system of liquids exhibits the widest stop--bands ever reported for elastic as well as for dielectric composites. We find gap/midgap ratios as high as ~ 1. For mercury cylinders surrounded by water the gaps obtained are much smaller.

  11. Design of two-dimensional photonic crystals with large absolute band gaps using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Linfang; Ye, Zhuo; He, Sailing

    2003-07-01

    A two-stage genetic algorithm (GA) with a floating mutation probability is developed to design a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal of a square lattice with the maximal absolute band gap. The unit cell is divided equally into many square pixels, and each filling pattern of pixels with two dielectric materials corresponds to a chromosome consisting of binary digits 0 and 1. As a numerical example, the two-stage GA gives a 2D GaAs structure with a relative width of the absolute band gap of about 19%. After further optimization, a new 2D GaAs photonic crystal is found with an absolute band gap much larger than those reported before.

  12. 160 Gbit/s photonics wireless transmission in the 300-500 GHz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Jia, S.; Hu, H.; Galili, M.; Morioka, T.; Jepsen, P. U.; Oxenløwe, L. K.

    2016-11-01

    To accommodate the ever increasing wireless traffic in the access networks, considerable efforts have been recently invested in developing photonics-assisted wireless communication systems with very high data rates. Superior to photonic millimeter-wave systems, terahertz (THz) band (300 GHz-10 THz) provides a much larger bandwidth and thus promises an extremely high capacity. However, the capacity potential of THz wireless systems has by no means been achieved yet. Here, we successfully demonstrate 160 Gbit/s wireless transmission by using a single THz emitter and modulating 25 GHz spaced 8 channels (20 Gbps per channel) in the 300-500 GHz band, which is the highest bitrate in the frequency band above 300 GHz, to the best of our knowledge.

  13. Ground-based Photon Path Measurements from Solar Absorption Spectra of the O2 A-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Z.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cageao, R. P.; Pongetti, T. J.; Toon, G. C.; Sander, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution solar absorption spectra obtained from Table Mountain Facility (TMF, 34.38degN, 117.68degW, 2286 m elevation) have been analyzed in the region of the O2 A-band. The photon paths of direct sunlight in clear sky cases are retrieved from the O2 absorption lines and compared with ray-tracing calculations based on the solar zenith angle and surface pressure. At a given zenith angle, the ratios of retrieved to geometrically derived photon paths are highly precise (approx.0.2%), but they vary as the zenith angle changes. This is because current models of the spectral lineshape in this band do not properly account for the significant absorption that exists far from the centers of saturated lines. For example, use of a Voigt function with Lorentzian far wings results in an error in the retrieved photon path of as much as 5%, highly correlated with solar zenith angle. Adopting a super-Lorentz function reduces, but does not completely eliminate this problem. New lab measurements of the lineshape are required to make further progress.

  14. Theoretical aspects of photonic band gap in 1D nano structure of LN: MgLN periodic layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sisodia, Namita

    2015-06-24

    By using the transfer matrix method, we have analyzed the photonic band gap properties in a periodic layer of LN:MgLN medium. The Width of alternate layers of LN and MgLN is in the range of hundred nanometers. The birefringent and ferroelectric properties of the medium (i.e ordinary, extraordinary refractive indices and electric dipole moment) is given due considerations in the formulation of photonic band gap. Effect of electronic transition dipole moment of the medium on photonic band gap is also taken into account. We find that photonic band gap can be modified by the variation in the ratio of the width of two medium. We explain our findings by obtaining numerical values and the effect on the photonic band gap due to variation in the ratio of alternate medium is shown graphically.

  15. Detailed Study of the TE band structure of two dimensional metallic photonic crystals with square symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedghi, Aliasghar; Valiaghaie, Soma; Soufiani, Ahad Rounaghi

    2014-10-01

    By virtue of the efficiency of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map method, we have calculated, for H-polarization (TE mode), the band structure of 2D photonic crystals with a square lattice composed of metallic rods embedded in an air background. The rod in the unit cell is chosen to be circular in shape. Here, from a practical point of view, in order to obtain maximum band gaps, we have studied the band structure as a function of the size of the rods. We have also studied the flat bands appearing in the band structures and have shown that for frequencies around the surface plasmon frequency, the modes are highly localized at the interface between the metallic rods and the air background.

  16. Generation of Nondegenerate Narrow-Band Photon Pairs for a Hybrid Quantum Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Lv, Peng-YinJie; Cui, Jin-Ming; Liu, Bi-Heng; Tang, Jian-Shun; Huang, Yun-Feng; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-12-01

    In a hybrid quantum network, the linking of two types of quantum nodes through photonic channels requires excellent matching of the central frequency and bandwidth between both nodes and their interfacing photons. However, preexisting photon sources cannot fulfill this requirement. Using a novel conjoined double-cavity strategy, we report the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band photon pairs by cavity-enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The central frequencies and bandwidths of the signal and idler photons are independently set to match with trapped ions and solid-state quantum memories. With this source we achieve the bandwidths and central wavelengths of 4 MHz at 935 nm and 5 MHz at 880 nm for the signal and idler photons, respectively, with a normalized spectral brightness of 4.9 photon pairs /(s MHz mW ) . Because of its ability to be independently locked to two different wavelengths, the conjoined double cavity is universally suitable for a hybrid quantum network consisting of various quantum nodes.

  17. Hydrogen production by tuning the photonic band gap with the electronic band gap of TiO₂.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, G I N; Wahab, A K; Al-Oufi, M; Jovic, V; Anjum, D H; Sun-Waterhouse, D; Llorca, J; Idriss, H

    2013-10-10

    Tuning the photonic band gap (PBG) to the electronic band gap (EBG) of Au/TiO2 catalysts resulted in considerable enhancement of the photocatalytic water splitting to hydrogen under direct sunlight. Au/TiO2 (PBG-357 nm) photocatalyst exhibited superior photocatalytic performance under both UV and sunlight compared to the Au/TiO2 (PBG-585 nm) photocatalyst and both are higher than Au/TiO2 without the 3 dimensionally ordered macro-porous structure materials. The very high photocatalytic activity is attributed to suppression of a fraction of electron-hole recombination route due to the co-incidence of the PBG with the EBG of TiO2 These materials that maintain their activity with very small amount of sacrificial agents (down to 0.5 vol.% of ethanol) are poised to find direct applications because of their high activity, low cost of the process, simplicity and stability.

  18. Efficient light amplification in low gain materials due to a photonic band edge effect.

    PubMed

    Ondič, L; Pelant, I

    2012-03-26

    One of the possibilities of increasing optical gain of a light emitting source is by embedding it into a photonic crystal (PhC). If the properties of the PhC are tuned so that the emission wavelength of the light source with gain falls close to the photonic band edge of the PhC, then due to low group velocity of the light modes near the band edge caused by many multiple reflections of light on the photonic structure, the stimulated emission can be significantly enhanced. Here, we perform simulation of the photonic band edge effect on the light intensity of spectrally broad source interacting with a diamond PhC with low optical gain. We show that even for the case of low gain, up to 10-fold increase of light intensity output can be obtained for the two-dimensional PhC consisting of only 19 periodic layers of infinitely high diamond rods ordered into a square lattice. Moreover, considering the experimentally feasible structure composed of diamond rods of finite height - PhC slab - we show that the gain enhancement, even if reduced compared to the ideal case of infinite rods, still remains relatively high. For this particular structure, we show that up to 3.5-fold enhancement of light intensity can be achieved.

  19. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Photonic Band gaps in Artificial Opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yin, Ming; Arammash, Fouzi; Datta, Timir

    2014-03-01

    Photonic band structure and band gap were numerically computed for a number of closed packed simple cubic and Hexagonal arrangements of non-conducting spheres using ``Finite Difference Time Domain Method''. Photonic gaps were found to exist in the simple cubic overlapping spheres with index of refraction (n) >3.2. Gap increased linearly from 0.117- 0.161 (1/micron) as lattice constant decreased from 0.34 to 0.18 (micron). For less than 3.2 no gap was obtained. Also, no gaps were obtained for hexagonal packing. UV-VIS reflectivity and transmission measurements of polycrystalline bulk artificial opals of silica (SiO2) spheres, ranging from 250nm to 300nm in sphere diameter indicate a reflection peak in the 500-600 nm regimes. Consistent with photonic band gap behavior we find that reflectivity is enhanced in the same wavelength where transmission is reduced. To the best of our knowledge this is the first observation of photonic gap in the visible wave length under ambient conditions. The wave length at the reflectance peak increases with the diameter of the SiO2 spheres, and is approximately twice the diameter following Bragg reflection. DOD Award No 60177-RT-H from ARO.

  20. Band structure of one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals using the Fresnel coefficients method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, A.; Rahmat, A.

    2017-04-01

    The current study has examined the band structures of two types of photonic crystals (PCs). The first is a one-dimensional metamaterial photonic crystal (1DMMPC) composed of double-layered units for which both layers of each unit are dielectric. The second type is a very similar one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal (1DPPC) also composed of double-layered units in which the first layer is a dielectric material but the second is a plasma layer. This study compares the band structures of the 1DMMPC with specific optical characteristics of the 1DPPC using the Fresnel coefficients method and also compares the results of this method with the results of the transfer matrix method. It is concluded that the dependency of the electric permittivity of the plasma layer on the incident field frequency causes differences in the band structures in 1DMMPC and 1DPPC for both TE and TM polarizations and their gaps reside in different frequencies. The band structures of the 1DMMPC and 1DPPC are confirmed by the results of the transfer matrix method.

  1. Band structure of one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals using the Fresnel coefficients method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, A.; Rahmat, A.

    2016-11-01

    The current study has examined the band structures of two types of photonic crystals (PCs). The first is a one-dimensional metamaterial photonic crystal (1DMMPC) composed of double-layered units for which both layers of each unit are dielectric. The second type is a very similar one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal (1DPPC) also composed of double-layered units in which the first layer is a dielectric material but the second is a plasma layer. This study compares the band structures of the 1DMMPC with specific optical characteristics of the 1DPPC using the Fresnel coefficients method and also compares the results of this method with the results of the transfer matrix method. It is concluded that the dependency of the electric permittivity of the plasma layer on the incident field frequency causes differences in the band structures in 1DMMPC and 1DPPC for both TE and TM polarizations and their gaps reside in different frequencies. The band structures of the 1DMMPC and 1DPPC are confirmed by the results of the transfer matrix method.

  2. Photonic band gaps in three-dimensional network structures with short-range order

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Noh, Heeso; Yang, Jin-Kyu; Schreck, Carl F.; Dufresne, Eric R.; O'Hern, Corey S.; Cao, Hui

    2011-12-15

    We present a systematic study of photonic band gaps (PBGs) in three-dimensional (3D) photonic amorphous structures (PASs) with short-range order. From calculations of the density of optical states (DOS) for PASs with different topologies, we find that tetrahedrally connected dielectric networks produce the largest isotropic PBGs. Local uniformity and tetrahedral order are essential to the formation of PBGs in PASs, in addition to short-range geometric order. This work demonstrates that it is possible to create broad, isotropic PBGs for vector light fields in 3D PASs without long-range order.

  3. Wide-field-of-view narrow-band spectral filters based on photonic crystal nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Wataru; Sun, Pang-Chen; Chen, Chyong-Hua; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2002-02-01

    We describe a novel approach to implementing wide-field-of-view narrow-band spectral filters, using an array of resonant nanocavities consisting of periodic defects in a two-dimensional three-material photonic-crystal nanostructure. We analyze the transmissivity of this type of filter for a range of wavelengths and in-plane incidence angles as a function of the defect's refractive index, the number of layers in the photonic-crystal reflectors, and the period of the defects and find that this structure diminishes the angular sensitivity of the resonance condition relative to that of a standard multilayer filter.

  4. Generation of nondegenerate narrow-band photon pairs for hybrid quantum network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Lv, Pengyinjie; Cui, Jinming; Liu, Biheng; Tang, Jianshun; Huang, Yunfeng; Li, Chuanfeng; Guo, Guangcan

    In a hybrid quantum network, the linking two types of quantum nodes through photonic channels requires excellent matching of the central frequency and bandwidth between both nodes and their interfacing photons. However, pre-existing photon sources cannot fulfill this requirement. Using a novel conjoined double-cavity strategy, we report the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band photon pairs by cavity-enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The central frequencies and bandwidths of the signal and idler photons are independently set to match with trapped ions and solid-state quantum memories. With this source we achieve the bandwidths and central frequencies of 4 MHz at 935 nm and 5 MHz at 880 nm for the signal and idler photons, respectively, with a normalized spectral brightness of 4.9/s/MHz/mW. Due to its ability to be independently locked to two different wavelengths, the conjoined double-cavity is universally suitable for a hybrid quantum network consisting of various quantum nodes.

  5. Spin polarized photons from an axially charged plasma at weak coupling: Complete leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Mamo, Kiminad A.; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2016-03-24

    In the presence of (approximately conserved) axial charge in the QCD plasma at finite temperature, the emitted photons are spin aligned, which is a unique P- and CP-odd signature of axial charge in the photon emission observables. We compute this “P-odd photon emission rate” in a weak coupling regime at a high temperature limit to complete leading order in the QCD coupling constant: the leading log as well as the constant under the log. As in the P-even total emission rate in the literature, the computation of the P-odd emission rate at leading order consists of three parts: (1) Compton and pair annihilation processes with hard momentum exchange, (2) soft t- and u-channel contributions with hard thermal loop resummation, (3) Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal resummation of collinear bremsstrahlung and pair annihilation. In conclusion, we present analytical and numerical evaluations of these contributions to our P-odd photon emission rate observable.

  6. Spin polarized photons from an axially charged plasma at weak coupling: Complete leading order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamo, Kiminad A.; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2016-03-01

    In the presence of (approximately conserved) axial charge in the QCD plasma at finite temperature, the emitted photons are spin aligned, which is a unique P - and C P -odd signature of axial charge in the photon emission observables. We compute this "P -odd photon emission rate" in a weak coupling regime at a high temperature limit to complete leading order in the QCD coupling constant: the leading log as well as the constant under the log. As in the P -even total emission rate in the literature, the computation of the P -odd emission rate at leading order consists of three parts: (1) Compton and pair annihilation processes with hard momentum exchange, (2) soft t - and u -channel contributions with hard thermal loop resummation, (3) Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal resummation of collinear bremsstrahlung and pair annihilation. We present analytical and numerical evaluations of these contributions to our P -odd photon emission rate observable.

  7. Two-Dimensional Phononic-Photonic Band Gap Optomechanical Crystal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.; Hill, Jeff T.; Meenehan, Seán; Chan, Jasper; Gröblacher, Simon; Painter, Oskar

    2014-04-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of an artificial crystal structure formed from a thin film of silicon that has a full phononic band gap for microwave X-band phonons and a two-dimensional pseudo-band gap for near-infrared photons. An engineered defect in the crystal structure is used to localize optical and mechanical resonances in the band gap of the planar crystal. Two-tone optical spectroscopy is used to characterize the cavity system, showing a large coupling (g0/2π≈220 kHz) between the fundamental optical cavity resonance at ωo/2π =195 THz and colocalized mechanical resonances at frequency ωm/2π ≈9.3 GHz.

  8. Deep-subwavelength plasmonic-photonic hybrid band gap opening by acoustic Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jin-Chen; Shih, Jheng-Hong; Lin, Tzy-Rong

    2017-07-01

    In this letter, the efficient generation of tunable optical band gaps with the help of acousto-optic (AO) interactions in the deep subwavelength regime is proposed. The optical system consists of a thin dielectric slab and a metal surface separated by a nanoscale air gap. This structure allowed for the confinement of hybridized plasmonic-photonic gap modes, which are highly guided within the air gap. The enhanced AO interaction originated from the disturbance of the acoustic Lamb waves of the slab that can strongly boost the AO interface effect and scatter the optical fields. Therefore, wide optical band gaps and forbidden transmissions were observed in hybrid gap modes at telecommunication wavelengths.

  9. Research of dual-band microwave photonic filter for WLAN based on optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Jiaqi; Jiang, Lingke; Pan, Linbing; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xindong; Ruan, Shengping

    2016-07-20

    This paper presents a dual-band microwave photonic filter for a wireless local area networks with independently tunable passband center frequencies and bandwidths. The two bands of the filter were 2.4 GHz and 5.725 GHz, respectively. The filter was based on a stimulated Brillouin scattering and an optical frequency comb (OFC) scheme. We created this filter using OFC pumps instead of a single pump. The OFC scheme consists of a cascaded Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) and a dual-parallel MZM (DPMZM) hybrid modulation that generated seven and 11 lines. The experimental results show that the two passbands of the filter were 80 and 130 MHz.

  10. Photonic band-gap and defect modes of a one-dimensional photonic crystal under localized compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, A.; Porta, A. V.; Orozco, S.

    2017-05-01

    The rupture of periodicity caused by one defect (defect layer) in a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPhC) results in a narrow transmission spectral line in the photonic band-gap, and the field distribution shows a strong confinement in the proximity of the defect layer. In this work, we present a theoretical model to calculate the frequency of defect modes caused by defect layers induced by localized mechanical stress. Two periodical arrangements were studied: one with layers of poly(methyl-methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS), PMMA-PS; the other with layers of PMMA and fused silica (SiO2), PMMA-SiO2. The defect layers were induced by localized compression (tension). The frequencies of the defect modes were calculated using elasto-optical theory and plane wave expansion and perturbation methods. Numerical results show that the frequency of the defect mode increases (decreases) when the compression (tension) increases. Based on the theoretical model developed, we show that compression of n layers of a 1DPhC induces n defect modes whose frequencies depend on the compression magnitude in the case of normal incidence of electromagnetic waves, in accordance with the results reported for other types of defect layers. The methodology shows the feasibility of the plane wave expansion and perturbation methods to study the frequency of the defect modes. Both periodical arrangements are suitable for designing mechanically tunable (1DPhC)-based narrow pass band filters and narrow reflectors in the (60, 65) THz range.

  11. Midinfrared sensors meet nanotechnology: Trace gas sensing with quantum cascade lasers inside photonic band-gap hollow waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, Christy; Temelkuran, Burak; Dellemann, Gregor; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2005-05-01

    An integrated midinfrared sensing system for trace level (ppb) gas analysis combining a quantum cascade laser with an emission frequency of 10.3μm with a frequency matched photonic band-gap hollow core waveguide has been developed, demonstrating the sensing application of photonic band-gap fibers. The photonic band-gap fiber simultaneously acts as a wavelength selective waveguide and miniaturized gas cell. The laser emission wavelength corresponds to the vibrational C-H stretch band of ethyl chloride gas. This sensing system enabled the detection of ethyl chloride at concentration levels of 30ppb (v/v) with a response time of 8s probing a sample volume of only 1.5mL in a transmission absorption measurement within the photonic band-gap hollow core waveguide, which corresponds to a sensitivity improvement by three orders of magnitude compared to previously reported results obtained with conventional hollow waveguides.

  12. Atom–atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Jonathan D.; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E.; Kimble, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields E(x)∝e±ikxx outside the bandgap to localized fields E(x)∝e−κx|x| within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom–atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom–atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the D1 line of atomic cesium for N¯=3.0±0.5 atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom–atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode. PMID:27582467

  13. Atom-atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Hood, Jonathan D; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E; Kimble, H J

    2016-09-20

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields [Formula: see text] outside the bandgap to localized fields [Formula: see text] within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom-atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom-atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the [Formula: see text] line of atomic cesium for [Formula: see text] atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom-atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode.

  14. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Ozbay, E.; Tuttle, G.; Michel, E.; Ho, K.M.; Biswas, R.; Chan, C.T.; Soukoulis, C.

    1995-04-11

    A method is disclosed for fabricating a periodic dielectric structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. Alignment holes are formed in a wafer of dielectric material having a given crystal orientation. A planar layer of elongate rods is then formed in a section of the wafer. The formation of the rods includes the step of selectively removing the dielectric material of the wafer between the rods. The formation of alignment holes and layers of elongate rods and wafers is then repeated to form a plurality of patterned wafers. A stack of patterned wafers is then formed by rotating each successive wafer with respect to the next-previous wafer, and then placing the successive wafer on the stack. This stacking results in a stack of patterned wafers having a four-layer periodicity exhibiting a photonic band gap. 42 figures.

  15. Photonic band gap in isotropic hyperuniform disordered solids with low dielectric contrast.

    PubMed

    Man, Weining; Florescu, Marian; Matsuyama, Kazue; Yadak, Polin; Nahal, Geev; Hashemizad, Seyed; Williamson, Eric; Steinhardt, Paul; Torquato, Salvatore; Chaikin, Paul

    2013-08-26

    We report the first experimental demonstration of a TE-polarization photonic band gap (PBG) in a 2D isotropic hyperuniform disordered solid (HUDS) made of dielectric media with a dielectric index contrast of 1.6:1, very low for PBG formation. The solid is composed of a connected network of dielectric walls enclosing air-filled cells. Direct comparison with photonic crystals and quasicrystals permitted us to investigate band-gap properties as a function of increasing rotational isotropy. We present results from numerical simulations proving that the PBG observed experimentally for HUDS at low index contrast has zero density of states. The PBG is associated with the energy difference between complementary resonant modes above and below the gap, with the field predominantly concentrated in the air or in the dielectric. The intrinsic isotropy of HUDS may offer unprecedented flexibilities and freedom in applications (i. e. defect architecture design) not limited by crystalline symmetries.

  16. Photonic band gaps of increasingly isotropic crystals at high dielectric contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, M. E.; Parker, G. J.; Charlton, M. D. B.

    2012-03-01

    Photonic band gaps (PBGs) are highly sensitive to lattice geometry and dielectric contrast. Here, we report theoretical and experimental confirmation of PBGs in photonic crystals (PhCs) with increasing levels of structural isotropy. These structures are: a standard 6-fold hexagonal lattice, a locally 12-fold Archimedean-like crystal, a true quasicrystal generated by non-random Stampfli inflation, and a biomimetic crystal based on Fibonacci phyllotaxis. Experimental transmission spectra were obtained at microwave frequencies using high-index alumina (ɛ = 9.61) rods. The results were compared to FDTD-calculated transmission spectra and PWE-calculated band diagrams. Wide and deep (> 60dB) primary TM gaps present in all high-index samples are related to reciprocal space vectors with the strongest Fourier coefficients. Their mid-gap frequencies are largely independent of the lattice geometry for comparable fill factors, whereas the gap ratios shrink monotonically as structural isotropy increases.

  17. Investigation of the Band Structure of Graphene-Based Plasmonic Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Pingping; Qiu, Weibin; Lin, Zhili; Chen, Houbo; Tang, Yixin; Wang, Jia-Xian; Kan, Qiang; Pan, Jiao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) graphene-based plasmonic photonic crystals (PhCs) are proposed. The band structures and density of states (DOS) have been numerically investigated. Photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in both 1D and 2D PhCs. Meanwhile, graphene-based plasmonic PhC nanocavity with resonant frequency around 175 THz, is realized by introducing point defect, where the chemical potential is from 0.085 to 0.25 eV, in a 2D PhC. Also, the bending wvaguide and the beam splitter are realized by introducing the line defect into the 2D PhC. PMID:28335295

  18. Thermal tuning the reversible optical band gap of self-assembled polystyrene photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili Tahami, S. H.; Pourmahdian, S.; Shirkavand Hadavand, B.; Azizi, Z. S.; Tehranchi, M. M.

    2016-11-01

    Nano-sized polymeric colloidal particles could undergo self-organization into three-dimensional structures to produce desired optical properties. In this research, a facile emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization method was employed to synthesize highly mono-disperse sub-micron polystyrene colloids. A high quality photonic crystal (PhC) structure was prepared by colloidal polystyrene. The reversible thermal tuning effect on photonic band gap position as well as the attenuation of the band gap was investigated in detail. The position of PBG can be tuned from 420 nm to 400 nm by varying the temperature of the PhC structure, reversibly. This reversible effect provides a reconfigurable PhC structure which could be used as thermo-responsive shape memory polymers.

  19. Spatially graded TiO₂-SiO₂ Bragg reflector with rainbow-colored photonic band gap.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhruv Pratap; Lee, Seung Hee; Choi, Il Yong; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2015-06-29

    A simple single-step method to fabricate spatially graded TiO2-SiO2 Bragg stack with rainbow colored photonic band gap is presented. The gradation in thickness of the Bragg stack was accomplished with a modified glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique with dynamic shadow enabled by a block attached to one edge of the rotating substrate. A linear gradation in thickness over a distance of about 17 mm resulted in a brilliant colorful rainbow pattern. Interestingly, the photonic band gap position can be changed across the whole visible wavelength range by linearly translating the graded Bragg stack over a large area substrate. The spatially graded Bragg stack may find potential applications in the tunable optical devices, such as optical filters, reflection gratings, and lasers.

  20. Investigation of the Band Structure of Graphene-Based Plasmonic Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Pingping; Qiu, Weibin; Lin, Zhili; Chen, Houbo; Tang, Yixin; Wang, Jia-Xian; Kan, Qiang; Pan, Jiao-Qing

    2016-09-09

    In this paper, one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) graphene-based plasmonic photonic crystals (PhCs) are proposed. The band structures and density of states (DOS) have been numerically investigated. Photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in both 1D and 2D PhCs. Meanwhile, graphene-based plasmonic PhC nanocavity with resonant frequency around 175 THz, is realized by introducing point defect, where the chemical potential is from 0.085 to 0.25 eV, in a 2D PhC. Also, the bending wvaguide and the beam splitter are realized by introducing the line defect into the 2D PhC.

  1. Coupled-mode theory for photonic band-gap inhibition of spatial instabilities.

    PubMed

    Gomila, Damià; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2005-07-01

    We study the inhibition of pattern formation in nonlinear optical systems using intracavity photonic crystals. We consider mean-field models for singly and doubly degenerate optical parametric oscillators. Analytical expressions for the new (higher) modulational thresholds and the size of the "band gap" as a function of the system and photonic crystal parameters are obtained via a coupled-mode theory. Then, by means of a nonlinear analysis, we derive amplitude equations for the unstable modes and find the stationary solutions above threshold. The form of the unstable mode is different in the lower and upper parts of the band gap. In each part there is bistability between two spatially shifted patterns. In large systems stable wall defects between the two solutions are formed and we provide analytical expressions for their shape. The analytical results are favorably compared with results obtained from the full system equations. Inhibition of pattern formation can be used to spatially control signal generation in the transverse plane.

  2. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Ozbay, Ekmel; Tuttle, Gary; Michel, Erick; Ho, Kai-Ming; Biswas, Rana; Chan, Che-Ting; Soukoulis, Costas

    1995-01-01

    A method for fabricating a periodic dielectric structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. Alignment holes are formed in a wafer of dielectric material having a given crystal orientation. A planar layer of elongate rods is then formed in a section of the wafer. The formation of the rods includes the step of selectively removing the dielectric material of the wafer between the rods. The formation of alignment holes and layers of elongate rods and wafers is then repeated to form a plurality of patterned wafers. A stack of patterned wafers is then formed by rotating each successive wafer with respect to the next-previous wafer, and then placing the successive wafer on the stack. This stacking results in a stack of patterned wafers having a four-layer periodicity exhibiting a photonic band gap.

  3. A versatile optical junction using photonic band-gap guidance and self collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Man Mohan; Medhekar, Sarang

    2014-09-29

    We show that it is possible to design two photonic crystal (PC) structures such that an optical beam of desired wavelength gets guided within the line defect of the first structure (photonic band gap guidance) and the same beam gets guided in the second structure by self-collimation. Using two dimensional simulation of a design made of the combination of these two structures, we propose an optical junction that allows for crossing of two optical signals of same wavelength and same polarization with very low crosstalk. Moreover, the junction can be operated at number of frequencies in a wide range. Crossing of multiple beams with very low cross talk is also possible. The proposed junction should be important in future integrated photonic circuits.

  4. High brightness photonic band crystal semiconductor lasers in the passive mode locking regime

    SciTech Connect

    Rosales, R.; Kalosha, V. P.; Miah, M. J.; Bimberg, D.; Posilović, K.; Pohl, J.; Weyers, M.

    2014-10-20

    High brightness photonic band crystal lasers in the passive mode locking regime are presented. Optical pulses with peak power of 3 W and peak brightness of about 180 MW cm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} are obtained on a 5 GHz device exhibiting 15 ps pulses and a very low beam divergence in both the vertical and horizontal directions.

  5. Analysis of strategies to improve the directionality of square lattice band-edge photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Haroldo T; Schneider, Vitor M; Cazo, Rogério M; Barbosa, Carmem L

    2005-05-20

    Recently, photonic crystal band-edge structures have been analyzed in the literature. However, most devices that have been presented so far emit light in different directions. We present a modal analysis (no gain included) of a few schemes to improve the directionality of these devices, i.e., in such a way that light that exits from them will travel mainly in a certain direction, eventually coupling its energy to a wide waveguide.

  6. Precision X-Band Linac Technologies for Nuclear Photonics Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Houck, T L; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Adolphsen, C E; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T O; Ighigeanu, D; Toma, M; Cutoiu, D

    2011-08-31

    Nuclear photonics is an emerging field of research requiring new tools, including high spectral brightness, tunable gamma-ray sources; high photon energy, ultrahigh-resolution crystal spectrometers; and novel detectors. This presentation focuses on the precision linac technology required for Compton scattering gamma-ray light sources, and on the optimization of the laser and electron beam pulse format to achieve unprecedented spectral brightness. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology will be shown to offer optimal performance in a compact package, when used in conjunction with the appropriate pulse format, and photocathode illumination and interaction laser technologies. The nascent field of nuclear photonics is enabled by the recent maturation of new technologies, including high-gradient X-band electron acceleration, robust fiber laser systems, and hyper-dispersion CPA. Recent work has been performed at LLNL to demonstrate isotope-specific detection of shielded materials via NRF using a tunable, quasi-monochromatic Compton scattering gamma-ray source operating between 0.2 MeV and 0.9 MeV photon energy. This technique is called Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain with Energetic Radiation (or FINDER). This work has, among other things, demonstrated the detection of {sup 7}Li shielded by Pb, utilizing gamma rays generated by a linac-driven, laser-based Compton scattering gamma-ray source developed at LLNL. Within this context, a new facility is currently under construction at LLNL, with the goal of generating tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range, at a repetition rate of 120 Hz, and with a peak brightness in the 10{sup 20} photons/(s x mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x 0.1% bw).

  7. All-optical dynamical Casimir effect in a three-dimensional terahertz photonic band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenmüller, David

    2016-06-01

    We identify an architecture for the observation of all-optical dynamical Casimir effect in realistic experimental conditions. We suggest that by integrating quantum wells in a three-dimensional (3D) photonic band-gap material made out of large-scale (˜200 -μ m ) germanium logs, it is possible to achieve ultrastrong light-matter coupling at terahertz frequencies for the cyclotron transition of a two-dimensional electron gas interacting with long-lived optical modes, in which vacuum Rabi splitting is comparable to the Landau level spacing. When a short, intense electromagnetic transient of duration ˜250 fs and carrying a peak magnetic field ˜5 T is applied to the structure, the cyclotron transition can be suddenly tuned on resonance with a desired photon mode, switching on the light-matter interaction and leading to a Casimir radiation emitted parallel to the quantum well plane. The radiation spectrum consists of sharp peaks with frequencies coinciding with engineered optical modes within the 3D photonic band gap, and its characteristics are extremely robust to the nonradiative damping which can be large in our system. Furthermore, the absence of continuum with associated low-energy excitations for both electromagnetic and electronic quantum states can prevent the rapid absorption of the photon flux which is likely to occur in other proposals for all-optical dynamical Casimir effect.

  8. Analogy of transistor function with modulating photonic band gap in electromagnetically induced grating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguo; Ullah, Zakir; Gao, Mengqin; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-09-09

    Optical transistor is a device used to amplify and switch optical signals. Many researchers focus on replacing current computer components with optical equivalents, resulting in an optical digital computer system processing binary data. Electronic transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices. To replace electronic components with optical ones, an equivalent optical transistor is required. Here we compare the behavior of an optical transistor with the reflection from a photonic band gap structure in an electromagnetically induced transparency medium. A control signal is used to modulate the photonic band gap structure. Power variation of the control signal is used to provide an analogy between the reflection behavior caused by modulating the photonic band gap structure and the shifting of Q-point (Operation point) as well as amplification function of optical transistor. By means of the control signal, the switching function of optical transistor has also been realized. Such experimental schemes could have potential applications in making optical diode and optical transistor used in quantum information processing.

  9. Analogy of transistor function with modulating photonic band gap in electromagnetically induced grating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiguo; Ullah, Zakir; Gao, Mengqin; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-01-01

    Optical transistor is a device used to amplify and switch optical signals. Many researchers focus on replacing current computer components with optical equivalents, resulting in an optical digital computer system processing binary data. Electronic transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices. To replace electronic components with optical ones, an equivalent optical transistor is required. Here we compare the behavior of an optical transistor with the reflection from a photonic band gap structure in an electromagnetically induced transparency medium. A control signal is used to modulate the photonic band gap structure. Power variation of the control signal is used to provide an analogy between the reflection behavior caused by modulating the photonic band gap structure and the shifting of Q-point (Operation point) as well as amplification function of optical transistor. By means of the control signal, the switching function of optical transistor has also been realized. Such experimental schemes could have potential applications in making optical diode and optical transistor used in quantum information processing. PMID:26349444

  10. Analogy of transistor function with modulating photonic band gap in electromagnetically induced grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Ullah, Zakir; Gao, Mengqin; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-09-01

    Optical transistor is a device used to amplify and switch optical signals. Many researchers focus on replacing current computer components with optical equivalents, resulting in an optical digital computer system processing binary data. Electronic transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices. To replace electronic components with optical ones, an equivalent optical transistor is required. Here we compare the behavior of an optical transistor with the reflection from a photonic band gap structure in an electromagnetically induced transparency medium. A control signal is used to modulate the photonic band gap structure. Power variation of the control signal is used to provide an analogy between the reflection behavior caused by modulating the photonic band gap structure and the shifting of Q-point (Operation point) as well as amplification function of optical transistor. By means of the control signal, the switching function of optical transistor has also been realized. Such experimental schemes could have potential applications in making optical diode and optical transistor used in quantum information processing.

  11. Square spiral photonic crystals: robust architecture for microfabrication of materials with large three-dimensional photonic band gaps.

    PubMed

    Toader, Ovidiu; John, Sajeev

    2002-07-01

    We provide a blueprint for microfabricating photonic crystals with very large and robust three-dimensional photonic band gaps (PBG's). These crystals are based on interleaving polygonal spiral posts and can be efficiently manufactured on a large scale in a one-step process using the recently introduced technique of glancing angle deposition. We classify various families of spiral photonic crystals based on (i) the parent three-dimensional (3D) point lattice to which they are most closely related, (ii) the crystallographic axis of the parent lattice around which the spiral posts wind, and (iii) the set of points of the parent lattice which the spiral arms connect or nearly connect. We obtain optimal geometries for the spiral photonic crystals by detailed mapping of the size and location of the PBG within a multidimensional parameter space which characterizes the shape of each spiral post. For the optimum PBG, the spiral arms and elbows may deviate significantly from the points of the original point lattice. The largest 3D PBG's are obtained for square spiral posts that wind around the [001] axis of diamond (or face centered cubic) lattice and in which the spiral arm segments approximately connect either the fifth or first nearest-neighbor points of the parent lattice. In the case of silicon posts (with a dielectric constant of 11.9) in an air background, whose arm segments nearly connect fifth nearest-neighbor point of the diamond lattice, the full PBG can be as large as 16% of the gap center frequency. For the corresponding air posts in a silicon background, the maximum PBG is 24% of the gap center frequency. We compute both the total electromagnetic density of states and the electromagnetic field distributions near the PBG. It is suggested the PBG in an optimized structure is highly tolerant to various forms of disorder that may arise during the manufacturing process.

  12. Photonic band-gap modulation of blue phase liquid crystal (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2015-10-01

    Blue phase liquid crystals (BPLCs) are self-assembled 3D photonic crystals exhibiting high susceptibility to external stimuli. Two methods for the photonic bandgap tuning of BPs were demonstrated in this work. Introducing a chiral azobenzene into a cholesteric liquid crystal could formulate a photoresponsive BPLC. Under violet irradiation, the azo dye experiences trans-cis isomerization, which leads to lattice swelling as well as phase transition in different stages of the process. Ultrawide reversible tuning of the BP photonic bandgap from ultraviolet to near infrared has been achieved. The tuning is reversible and nonvolatile. We will then demonstract the electric field-induced bandgap tuning in polymer-stabilized BPLCs. Under different BPLCs material preparation conditions, both red-shift and broadening of the photonic bandgaps have been achieved respectively. The stop band can be shifted over 100 nm. The bandwidth can be expanded from ~ 30 nm to ~ 250 nm covering nearly the full visible range. It is believed that the developed approaches could strongly promote the use of BPLC in photonic applications.

  13. Completing the K-band Celestial Reference Frame in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Witt, A.; Bertarini, A.; Horiuchi, S.; Jacobs, C. S.; Jung, T.; Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J. N.; Quick, J. F. H.; Sohn, B. W.; Phillips, C.; Ojha, R.

    2014-12-01

    K-band (22 GHz) radio observations have the potential to form the basis for the most accurate Celestial Reference Frame (CRF) ever constructed. Relative to the standard S/X (2.3/8.4 GHz) observing bands, K-band is expected to exhibit a reduction in extended source morphology and core-shift. This reduction in astrophysical systematics should allow for a more stable CRF at K-band and should also be advantageous in tying the VLBI radio frame to the Gaia optical frame. K-band CRF observations currently exist only from the all-northern Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and therefore must be complemented by observations from southern arrays in order to realize this potential. A collaboration was formed with the goal of completing sky coverage at K-band with specific emphasis on the Southern hemisphere where K-band CRF coverage is weak. Southern hemisphere observations to densify the CRF at K-band are under way and preliminary astrometric observations were carried out on 23 August 2013 between telescopes in Australia (Hobart 26 m), Korea (Tamna 21 m), and South Africa (HartRAO 26 m). More extensive astrometric observations were carried out on 21/22 December 2013 that also included the Tidbinbilla 70-m DSN antenna in Australia. A proposal for imaging source structure at K-band has been submitted to the Australian Telescope-Long Baseline Array (AT-LBA). We discuss some of our results as well as the implications for K-band CRF work.

  14. Extreme Band Engineering of III-Nitride Nanowire Heterostructures for Electronic and Photonic Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, ATM Golam

    Bottom-up nanowires are attractive for realizing semiconductor devices with extreme heterostructures because strain relaxation through the nanowire sidewalls allows the combination of highly lattice mismatched materials without creating dislocations. The resulting nanowires are used to fabricate light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers, solar cells, and sensors. The aim of this work is to investigate extreme heterostructures, which are impossible or very hard to realize in conventional planar films, exploiting the strain accommodation property of nanowires and engineer their band structure for novel electronic and photonic applications. To this end, in this thesis, III-Nitride semiconductor nanowires are investigated. In the first part of this work, a complete growth phase diagram of InN nanowires on silicon using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy is developed, and structural and optical characteristics are mapped as a function of growth parameters. Next, a novel up-side down pendeoepitaxial growth of InN forming mushroom-like microstructures is demonstrated and detail structural and optical characterizations are performed. Based on this, a method to grow strain-free large area single crystalline InN or thin film is proposed and the growth of InN on patterned GaN is investigated. The optimized growth conditions developed for InN are further used to grow InGaN nanowires graded over the whole composition range. Numerical energy band simulation is performed to better understand the effect of polarization charge on photo-carrier transport in these extremely graded nanowires. A novel photodetector device with negative differential photocurrent is demonstrated using the graded InGaN nanowires. In the second part of this thesis, polarization-induced nanowire light emitting diodes (PINLEDs) are investigated. The electrical and optical properties of the nanowire heterostructure are engineered and optimized for ultraviolet and deep ultraviolet applications. The electrical

  15. Hydrogen production by Tuning the Photonic Band Gap with the Electronic Band Gap of TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Waterhouse, G. I. N.; Wahab, A. K.; Al-Oufi, M.; Jovic, V.; Anjum, D. H.; Sun-Waterhouse, D.; Llorca, J.; Idriss, H.

    2013-01-01

    Tuning the photonic band gap (PBG) to the electronic band gap (EBG) of Au/TiO2 catalysts resulted in considerable enhancement of the photocatalytic water splitting to hydrogen under direct sunlight. Au/TiO2 (PBG-357 nm) photocatalyst exhibited superior photocatalytic performance under both UV and sunlight compared to the Au/TiO2 (PBG-585 nm) photocatalyst and both are higher than Au/TiO2 without the 3 dimensionally ordered macro-porous structure materials. The very high photocatalytic activity is attributed to suppression of a fraction of electron-hole recombination route due to the co-incidence of the PBG with the EBG of TiO2 These materials that maintain their activity with very small amount of sacrificial agents (down to 0.5 vol.% of ethanol) are poised to find direct applications because of their high activity, low cost of the process, simplicity and stability. PMID:24108361

  16. Giant gain enhancement in photonic crystals with a degenerate band edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Yazdi, Farshad; Figotin, Alex; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new approach leading to giant gain enhancement. It is based on unconventional slow-wave resonance associated with a degenerate band edge (DBE) in the dispersion diagram for a special class of photonic crystals supporting four modes at each frequency. We show that the gain enhancement in a Fabry-Pérot cavity (FPC) when operating at the DBE is several orders of magnitude stronger when compared to a cavity of the same length made of a standard photonic crystal with a regular band edge (RBE). The giant gain condition is explained by a significant increase in the photon lifetime and in the local density of states. We have demonstrated the existence of DBE operated special cavities that provide for superior gain conditions for solid-state lasers, quantum cascade lasers, traveling wave tubes, and distributed solid-state amplifiers. We also report the possibility to achieve low-threshold lasing in FPC with DBE compared to RBE-based lasers.

  17. Spectral element method for band structures of three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ma; Liu, Qing Huo

    2009-11-01

    A spectral element method (SEM) is introduced for accurate calculation of band structures of three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals. The method is based on the finite-element framework with curvilinear hexahedral elements. Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre polynomials are used to construct the basis functions. In order to suppress spurious modes, mixed-order vector basis functions are employed and the Bloch periodic boundary condition is imposed into the basis functions with tangential components at the boundary by multiplying a Bloch phase factor. The fields and coordinates in the curvilinear hexahedral elements are mapped to the reference domain by covariant mapping, which preserves the continuity of tangential components of the field. Numerical results show that the SEM has exponential convergence for both square-lattice and triangular-lattice photonic crystals. The sampling density as small as 3.4 points per wavelength can achieve accuracy as high as 99.9%. The band structures of several modified woodpile photonic crystals are calculated by using the SEM.

  18. Spectral element method for band structures of three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ma; Liu, Qing Huo

    2009-11-01

    A spectral element method (SEM) is introduced for accurate calculation of band structures of three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals. The method is based on the finite-element framework with curvilinear hexahedral elements. Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre polynomials are used to construct the basis functions. In order to suppress spurious modes, mixed-order vector basis functions are employed and the Bloch periodic boundary condition is imposed into the basis functions with tangential components at the boundary by multiplying a Bloch phase factor. The fields and coordinates in the curvilinear hexahedral elements are mapped to the reference domain by covariant mapping, which preserves the continuity of tangential components of the field. Numerical results show that the SEM has exponential convergence for both square-lattice and triangular-lattice photonic crystals. The sampling density as small as 3.4 points per wavelength can achieve accuracy as high as 99.9%. The band structures of several modified woodpile photonic crystals are calculated by using the SEM.

  19. Analysis of photonic band gap in dispersive properties of tunable three-dimensional photonic crystals doped by magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang HaiFeng; Liu Shaobin; Yang Huan; Kong Xiangkun

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, the magnetooptical effects in dispersive properties for two types of three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) containing homogeneous dielectric and magnetized plasma with diamond lattices are theoretically investigated for electromagnetic (EM) wave based on plane wave expansion (PWE) method, as incidence EM wave vector is parallel to the external magnetic field. The equations for two types of MPPCs with diamond lattices (dielectric spheres immersed in magnetized plasma background or vice versa) are theoretically deduced. The influences of dielectric constant, plasma collision frequency, filling factor, the external magnetic field, and plasma frequency on the dispersive properties for both types of structures are studied in detail, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. From the numerical results, it has been shown that the photonic band gaps (PBGs) for both types of MPPCs can be manipulated by plasma frequency, filling factor, the external magnetic field, and the relative dielectric constant of dielectric, respectively. Especially, the external magnetic field can enlarge the PBG for type-2 structure (plasma spheres immersed in dielectric background). However, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the dispersive properties of two types of three-dimensional MPPCs. The locations of flatbands regions for both types of structures cannot be tuned by any parameters except for plasma frequency and the external magnetic field. The analytical results may be informative and of technical use to design the MPPCs devices.

  20. The properties of photonic band gaps for three-dimensional plasma photonic crystals in a diamond structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haifeng; Liu Shaobin; Kong Xiangkun, Chenchen; Bian Borui

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps (PBGs) for two types of three-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) composed of isotropic dielectric and unmagnetized plasma with diamond lattices are theoretically investigated for electromagnetic waves based on a modified plane wave expansion method. The equations for type-1 structure are theoretically deduced, which depend on the diamond lattices realization (dielectric spheres immersed in plasma background). The influences of dielectric constant of dielectric, plasma collision frequency, filling factor, and plasma frequency on PBGs are investigated, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations and the possible methods to realize the three-dimensional PPCs in experiments are also given. From the numerical results, it has been shown that not only the locations but also the gap/midgap ratios of the PBGs for two types of PPCs can be tuned by plasma frequency, filling factor, and the relative dielectric constant, respectively. However, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the frequency ranges and gap/midgap ratios of the PBGs for two types of PPCs.

  1. Absolute photonic band gaps of two-dimensional square-lattice photonic crystals with Taiji-shaped dielectric rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xing-Dao; Du, Shou-Xiao; Liu, Bin; Li, Shu-Jing; Li, Shan

    2011-07-01

    A novel structure of two-dimensional (2D) square-lattice photonic crystal (SLPC) composed of Taiji-shaped dielectric rods imbedded in air is constructed and the properties of absolute photonic band gap (PBG) are theoretically analyzed in both the number and width by Plane Wave Expansion Method (PWM). By comparing the absolute PBGs in 2D SLPCs consisting of four shapes of rods with different symmetries (circle, button, semicircle and Taiji) at the same filling ratio, we find that both the number and width of absolute PBG significantly increase with the breaking of scatterer's symmetry, and the Taiji-shaped rods with the poorest symmetry can attain both the most number and the largest width of absolute PBGs. Additionally, we also study the influence of dielectric constant ɛ and three geometric parameters of Taiji-shaped scatterer on the absolute PBG and discover that the SLPC with Taiji-shaped rods can generate at most nine absolute PBGs and the largest absolute PBG with the width 0.0485 (ωa/2πc).

  2. Photonic crystal film with three alternating layers for simultaneous R, G, B multi-mode photonic band-gaps.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoungchoo; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Sun Woong; Ho Park, Jin

    2008-09-15

    We studied 1-dimensional (1-D) photonic crystal (PC) films with three alternating layers to investigate multi-mode photonic band-gaps (PBGs) at red, green, and blue color regions. From simulations, it was shown that PCs with three alternating layered elements of [a/b/c] structure have sharp PBGs at the three color regions with the central wavelengths of 459 nm, 527 nm, and 626 nm, simultaneously. Experimentally, it was proven that red, green, and blue PBGs were generated clearly by the PCs, which were made of multilayers of [SiO(2)/Ta(2)O(5)/TiO(2)], based on the simulation. It was also shown that the measured wavelengths of the PBGs corresponded exactly to those of the simulated results. Moreover, it was demonstrated that a 1-D PC of [a/b/c] structure can be used for making white organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with improved color rendering index (CRI) for color display or lighting.

  3. Effect of standard deviation, strength of magnetic field and electron density on the photonic band gap of an extrinsic disorder plasma photonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Chittaranjan; Aghajamali, Alireza; Scotognella, Francesco; Saha, Ardhendu

    2017-10-01

    Transmission properties of electromagnetic waves within microwave region of the one-dimensional random extrinsic plasma photonic crystals were computed using the transfer matrix method. The layers thicknesses of the extrinsic random photonic structure follow a Gaussian distribution. Compared with the periodic extrinsic photonic crystal, wider photonic band gaps (PBGs) were found in case of random extrinsic plasma photonic crystals with few resonant peaks. The PBGs are much wider while the randomness was increased and the number and the strength of resonant peaks were enhanced. The above observations were confirmed through analysis of histogram of normalized average transmissions for four different values of standard deviation with one thousand random samples for each group. The normalized average transmission was controlled by changing the strength of external magnetic field and the electron density of magnetized cold plasma. These features of disordered extrinsic plasma photonic structures would have potential applications such as omnidirectional reflectors and random multichannel filters with lower and higher rate of disorder.

  4. Efficient heralding of O-band passively spatial-multiplexed photons for noise-tolerant quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mao Tong; Lim, Han Chuen

    2014-09-22

    When implementing O-band quantum key distribution on optical fiber transmission lines carrying C-band data traffic, noise photons that arise from spontaneous Raman scattering or insufficient filtering of the classical data channels could cause the quantum bit-error rate to exceed the security threshold. In this case, a photon heralding scheme may be used to reject the uncorrelated noise photons in order to restore the quantum bit-error rate to a low level. However, the secure key rate would suffer unless one uses a heralded photon source with sufficiently high heralding rate and heralding efficiency. In this work we demonstrate a heralded photon source that has a heralding efficiency that is as high as 74.5%. One disadvantage of a typical heralded photon source is that the long deadtime of the heralding detector results in a significant drop in the heralding rate. To counter this problem, we propose a passively spatial-multiplexed configuration at the heralding arm. Using two heralding detectors in this configuration, we obtain an increase in the heralding rate by 37% and a corresponding increase in the heralded photon detection rate by 16%. We transmit the O-band photons over 10 km of noisy optical fiber to observe the relation between quantum bit-error rate and noise-degraded second-order correlation function of the transmitted photons. The effects of afterpulsing when we shorten the deadtime of the heralding detectors are also observed and discussed.

  5. THz photonic wireless links with 16-QAM modulation in the 375-450 GHz band.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shi; Yu, Xianbin; Hu, Hao; Yu, Jinlong; Guan, Pengyu; Da Ros, Francesco; Galili, Michael; Morioka, Toshio; Oxenløwe, Leif K

    2016-10-17

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate THz photonic wireless communication systems with 16-QAM modulation in the 375-450 GHz band. The overall throughput reaches as high as 80 Gbit/s by exploiting four THz channels with 5 Gbaud 16-QAM baseband modulation per channel. We create a coherent optical frequency comb (OFC) for photonic generation of multiple THz carriers based on photo-mixing in a uni-travelling carrier photodiode (UTC-PD). The OFC configuration also allows us to generate reconfigurable THz carriers with low phase noise. The multiple-channel THz radiation is received by using a Schottky mixer based electrical receiver after 0.5 m free-space wireless propagation. 2-channel (40 Gbit/s) and 4-channel (80 Gbit/s) THz photonic wireless links with 16-QAM modulation are reported in this paper, and the bit error rate (BER) performance for all channels in both cases is below the hard decision forward error correction (HD-FEC) threshold of 3.8e-3 with 7% overhead. In addition, we also successfully demonstrate hybrid photonic wireless transmission of 40 Gbit/s 16-QAM signal at carrier frequencies of 400 GHz and 425 GHz over 30 km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) between the optical baseband signal transmitter and the THz wireless transmitter with negligible induced power penalty.

  6. Zero- n bar band gap in two-dimensional metamaterial photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía-Salazar, J. R.; Porras-Montenegro, N.

    2015-04-01

    We have theoretically studied metamaterial photonic crystals (PCs) composed by air and double negative (DNG) material. Numerical data were obtained by means of the finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method, with results indicating the possibility for the existence of the zero- n bar non-Bragg gap in two-dimensional metamaterial PCs, which has been previously observed only in one-dimensional photonic superlattices. Validity of the present FDTD algorithm for the study of one-dimensional metamaterial PCs is shown by comparing with results for the transmittance spectra obtained by means of the well known transfer matrix method (TMM). In the case of two-dimensional metamaterial PCs, we have calculated the photonic band structure (PBS) in the limiting case of a one-dimensional photonic superlattice and for a nearly one-dimensional PC, showing a very similar dispersion relation. Finally, we show that due to the strong electromagnetic field localization on the constitutive rods, the zero- n bar non-Bragg gap may only exist in two-dimensional systems under strict geometrical conditions.

  7. Photonic-band-gap properties for two-component slow light

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseckas, J.; Kudriasov, V.; Juzeliunas, G.; Unanyan, R. G.; Otterbach, J.; Fleischhauer, M.

    2011-06-15

    We consider two-component ''spinor'' slow light in an ensemble of atoms coherently driven by two pairs of counterpropagating control laser fields in a double tripod-type linkage scheme. We derive an equation of motion for the spinor slow light (SSL) representing an effective Dirac equation for a massive particle with the mass determined by the two-photon detuning. By changing the detuning the atomic medium acts as a photonic crystal with a controllable band gap. If the frequency of the incident probe light lies within the band gap, the light experiences reflection from the sample and can tunnel through it. For frequencies outside the band gap, the transmission and reflection probabilities oscillate with the increasing length of the sample. In both cases the reflection takes place into the complementary mode of the probe field. We investigate the influence of the finite excited state lifetime on the transmission and reflection coefficients of the probe light. We discuss possible experimental implementations of the SSL using alkali-metal atoms such as rubidium or sodium.

  8. Robust topology optimization of three-dimensional photonic-crystal band-gap structures.

    PubMed

    Men, H; Lee, K Y K; Freund, R M; Peraire, J; Johnson, S G

    2014-09-22

    We perform full 3D topology optimization (in which "every voxel" of the unit cell is a degree of freedom) of photonic-crystal structures in order to find optimal omnidirectional band gaps for various symmetry groups, including fcc (including diamond), bcc, and simple-cubic lattices. Even without imposing the constraints of any fabrication process, the resulting optimal gaps are only slightly larger than previous hand designs, suggesting that current photonic crystals are nearly optimal in this respect. However, optimization can discover new structures, e.g. a new fcc structure with the same symmetry but slightly larger gap than the well known inverse opal, which may offer new degrees of freedom to future fabrication technologies. Furthermore, our band-gap optimization is an illustration of a computational approach to 3D dispersion engineering which is applicable to many other problems in optics, based on a novel semidefinite-program formulation for nonconvex eigenvalue optimization combined with other techniques such as a simple approach to impose symmetry constraints. We also demonstrate a technique for robust topology optimization, in which some uncertainty is included in each voxel and we optimize the worst-case gap, and we show that the resulting band gaps have increased robustness to systematic fabrication errors.

  9. Micro-metric electronic patterning of a topological band structure using a photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Mark; Frantzeskakis, Emmanouil; de Jong, Nick; Huang, Yingkai; Wu, Dong; Pan, Yu; de Visser, Anne; van Heumen, Erik; van Bay, Tran; Zwartsenberg, Berend; Pronk, Pieter; Varier Ramankutty, Shyama; Tytarenko, Alona; Xu, Nan; Plumb, Nick; Shi, Ming; Radovic, Milan; Varkhalov, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    The only states crossing EF in ideal, 3D TIs are topological surface states. Single crystals of Bi2Se3andBi2Te3 are too defective to exhibit bulk-insulating behaviour, and ARPES shows topologically trivial 2DEGs at EF in the surface region due to downward band bending. Ternary & quaternary alloys of Bi /Te /Se /Sb hold promise for obtaining bulk-insulating crystals. Here we report ARPES data from quaternary, bulk-insulating, Bi-based TIs. Shortly after cleavage in UHV, downward band bending pulls the bulk conduction band below EF, once again frustrating the ``topological only'' ambition for the Fermi surface. However, there is light at the end of the tunnel: we show that a super-band-gap photon beam generates a surface photovoltage sufficient to flatten the bands, thereby recovering the ideal, ``topological only'' situation. In our bulk-insulating quaternary TIs, this effect is local in nature, and permits the writing of arbitrary, micron-sized patterns in the topological energy landscape at the surface. Support from FOM, NWO and the EU is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Photonic-band-gap engineering for volume plasmon polaritons in multiscale multilayer hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Orlov, Alexey A.; Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.; Sipe, J. E.

    2014-07-01

    We study theoretically the propagation of large-wave-vector waves (volume plasmon polaritons) in multilayer hyperbolic metamaterials with two levels of structuring. We show that when the parameters of a subwavelength metal-dielectric multilayer (substructure) are modulated (superstructured) on a larger, wavelength scale, the propagation of volume plasmon polaritons in the resulting multiscale hyperbolic metamaterials is subject to photonic-band-gap phenomena. A great degree of control over such plasmons can be exerted by varying the superstructure geometry. When this geometry is periodic, stop bands due to Bragg reflection form within the volume plasmonic band. When a cavity layer is introduced in an otherwise periodic superstructure, resonance peaks of the Fabry-Pérot nature are present within the stop bands. More complicated superstructure geometries are also considered. For example, fractal Cantor-like multiscale metamaterials are found to exhibit characteristic self-similar spectral signatures in the volume plasmonic band. Multiscale hyperbolic metamaterials are shown to be a promising platform for large-wave-vector bulk plasmonic waves, whether they are considered for use as a kind of information carrier or for far-field subwavelength imaging.

  11. Acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity with Lamb waves in microwave K band

    SciTech Connect

    Tadesse, Semere A.; Li, Huan; Liu, Qiyu; Li, Mo

    2015-11-16

    Integrating nanoscale electromechanical transducers and nanophotonic devices potentially can enable acousto-optic devices to reach unprecedented high frequencies and modulation efficiency. Here, we demonstrate acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity using Lamb waves with frequency up to 19 GHz, reaching the microwave K band. The devices are fabricated in suspended aluminum nitride membrane. Excitation of acoustic waves is achieved with interdigital transducers with period as small as 300 nm. Confining both acoustic wave and optical wave within the thickness of the membrane leads to improved acousto-optic modulation efficiency in these devices than that obtained in previous surface acoustic wave devices. Our system demonstrates a scalable optomechanical platform where strong acousto-optic coupling between cavity-confined photons and high frequency traveling phonons can be explored.

  12. Acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity with Lamb waves in microwave K band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, Semere A.; Li, Huan; Liu, Qiyu; Li, Mo

    2015-11-01

    Integrating nanoscale electromechanical transducers and nanophotonic devices potentially can enable acousto-optic devices to reach unprecedented high frequencies and modulation efficiency. Here, we demonstrate acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity using Lamb waves with frequency up to 19 GHz, reaching the microwave K band. The devices are fabricated in suspended aluminum nitride membrane. Excitation of acoustic waves is achieved with interdigital transducers with period as small as 300 nm. Confining both acoustic wave and optical wave within the thickness of the membrane leads to improved acousto-optic modulation efficiency in these devices than that obtained in previous surface acoustic wave devices. Our system demonstrates a scalable optomechanical platform where strong acousto-optic coupling between cavity-confined photons and high frequency traveling phonons can be explored.

  13. Band structure and waveguide modelling of epitaxially regrown photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Richard J. E.; Williams, David M.; Orchard, Jon R.; Childs, David T. D.; Khamas, Salam; Hogg, Richard A.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we describe elements of photonic crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) design and operation, highlighting that epitaxial regrowth may provide advantages over current designs incorporating voids. High coupling coefficients are shown to be possible for all-semiconductor structures. We introduce type I and type II photonic crystals (PCs), and discuss the possible advantages of using each. We discussed band structure and coupling coefficients as a function of atom volume for a circular atom on a square lattice. Additionally we explore the effect PC atom size has on in-plane and out-of-plane coupling. We conclude by discussing designs for a PCSEL combined with a distributed Bragg reflector to maximize external efficiency.

  14. Dispersion-tolerant two-photon Michelson interferometer using telecom-band frequency-entangled photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric downconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Akio; Fukuda, Daiji; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Yamamoto, Noritsugu

    2015-05-01

    The chromatic group velocity dispersion tolerance of a fiber-optic two-photon interferometer is characterized for telecom-band photon pairs that are frequency entangled. Two indium-gallium-arsenide single-photon detectors are used to record the coincidence counts. A single-wavelength laser diode continuously pumps a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide of 1-mm length. For near-degenerate spontaneous parametric downconversion, it generates wideband entangled collinear photon pairs. The spectral width of 115.8 nm is centered at 1550 nm. It is restricted by the performance of the single-photon detectors whose efficiency is poor beyond 1610 nm. Using a Michelson interferometer, two-photon interference signals are recorded with and without frequency entanglement. The frequency-entangled photon pairs are found to exhibit dispersion-tolerant two-photon interference, even though the two paths through the interferometer have different group velocity dispersion. The observed two-photon interference signal has a correlation time of 42.7 fs, in good agreement with calculations for a 115.8-nm spectral width. For comparison, results are also presented for photon pairs lacking frequency entanglement.

  15. Analysis of band structure, transmission properties, and dispersion behavior of THz wave in one-dimensional parabolic plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Askari, Nasim; Eslami, Esmaeil; Mirzaie, Reza

    2015-11-15

    The photonic band gap of obliquely incident terahertz electromagnetic waves in a one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal is studied. The periodic structure consists of lossless dielectric and inhomogeneous plasma with a parabolic density profile. The dispersion relation and the THz wave transmittance are analyzed based on the electromagnetic equations and transfer matrix method. The dependence of effective plasma frequency and photonic band gap characteristics on dielectric and plasma thickness, plasma density, and incident angle are discussed in detail. A theoretical calculation for effective plasma frequency is presented and compared with numerical results. Results of these two methods are in good agreement.

  16. Numerical investigation of the flat band Bloch modes in a 2D photonic crystal with Dirac cones

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Peng; Fietz, Chris; Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2015-04-14

    A numerical method combining complex-k band calculations and absorbing boundary conditions for Bloch waves is presented. We use this method to study photonic crystals with Dirac cones. We demonstrate that the photonic crystal behaves as a zero-index medium when excited at normal incidence, but that the zero-index behavior is lost at oblique incidence due to excitation of modes on the flat band. We also investigate the formation of monomodal and multimodal cavity resonances inside the photonic crystals, and the physical origins of their different line-shape features.

  17. Numerical investigation of the flat band Bloch modes in a 2D photonic crystal with Dirac cones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Fietz, Chris; Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2015-04-20

    A numerical method combining complex-k band calculations and absorbing boundary conditions for Bloch waves is presented. We use this method to study photonic crystals with Dirac cones. We demonstrate that the photonic crystal behaves as a zero-index medium when excited at normal incidence, but that the zero-index behavior is lost at oblique incidence due to excitation of modes on the flat band. We also investigate the formation of monomodal and multimodal cavity resonances inside the photonic crystals, and the physical origins of their different line-shape features.

  18. Narrow-band single-photon emission in the near infrared for quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Wu, E; Jacques, Vincent; Zeng, Heping; Grangier, Philippe; Treussart, François; Roch, Jean-François

    2006-02-06

    We present a detailed study of photophysical properties of single color centers in natural diamond samples emitting in the near infrared under optical excitation. Photoluminescence of these single emitters has several striking features, including narrow-band (FWHM 2 nm) fully polarized emission around 780 nm, a short excited-state lifetime of about 2 ns, and perfect photostability at room temperature under our excitation conditions. Development of a triggered single-photon source relying on this single color center is discussed for application to quantum key distribution.

  19. Propagation of optical vortices in a nonlinear atomic medium with a photonic band gap.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Ma, Danmeng; Zhang, Yiqi; Cao, Mingtao; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2017-03-15

    We experimentally generate a vortex beam through a four-wave mixing (FWM) process after satisfying the phase-matching condition in a rubidium atomic vapor cell with a photonic band gap (PBG) structure. The observed FWM vortex can also be viewed as the reflected part of the launched probe vortex from the PBG. Further, we investigate the propagation behaviors, including the spatial shift and splitting of the probe and FWM vortices in the medium with enhanced Kerr nonlinearity induced by electromagnetically induced transparency. This Letter can be useful for better understanding and manipulating the applications involving the interactions between optical vortices and the medium.

  20. Exceptional Contours and Band Structure Design in Parity-Time Symmetric Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Cerjan, Alexander; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-05-20

    We investigate the properties of two-dimensional parity-time symmetric periodic systems whose non-Hermitian periodicity is an integer multiple of the underlying Hermitian system's periodicity. This creates a natural set of degeneracies that can undergo thresholdless PT transitions. We derive a k·p perturbation theory suited to the continuous eigenvalues of such systems in terms of the modes of the underlying Hermitian system. In photonic crystals, such thresholdless PT transitions are shown to yield significant control over the band structure of the system, and can result in all-angle supercollimation, a PT-superprism effect, and unidirectional behavior.

  1. Telecom-band degenerate-frequency photon pair generation in silicon microring cavities.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Zhang, Wei; Dong, Shuai; Huang, Yidong; Peng, Jiangde

    2014-04-15

    In this Letter, telecom-band degenerate-frequency photon pairs are generated in a specific mode of a silicon microring cavity by the nondegenerate spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) process, under two continuous-wave pumps at resonance wavelength of two different cavity modes. The ratio of coincidence to accidental coincidence is up to 100 under a time bin width of 5 ns, showing their characteristics of quantum correlation. Their quantum interference in balanced and unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometers is investigated theoretically and experimentally, and the results show potential in quantum metrology and quantum information.

  2. Flat Supercontinuum Generation within the Telecommunication Wave Bands in a Photonic Crystal Fiber with Central Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ying; Hou, Lan-Tian; Zhou, Gui-Yao; Yuan, Jin-Hui; Xia, Chang-Ming; Wang, Wei; Wang, Chao; Hou, Zhi-Yun

    2012-05-01

    Flat supercontinuum in the telecommunication wave bands of E+S+C is generated by coupling a train of femtosecond pulses generated by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser into the fundamental mode of a photonic crystal fiber with central holes fabricated in our lab. The pulse experiences the anomalous dispersion regime, and the soliton dynamic effect plays an important role in supercontinuum generation. The output spectrum in the wavelength range of 1360-1565 nm does not include significant ripples due to higher pump peak power, and the normalized intensity shows less fluctuation.

  3. Complete multipactor suppression in an X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Gold, S. H.; Fischer, Richard; Gai, W.

    2016-05-09

    Multipactor is a major issue limiting the gradient of rf-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures. Theoretical models have predicted that an axial magnetic field applied to DLA structures may completely block the multipactor discharge. However, previous attempts to demonstrate this magnetic field effect in an X-band traveling-wave DLA structure were inconclusive, due to the axial variation of the applied magnetic field, and showed only partial suppression of the multipactor loading [Jing et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 213503 (2013)]. The present experiment has been performed under improved conditions with a uniform axial magnetic field extending along the length of an X-band standing-wave DLA structure. Multipactor loading began to be continuously reduced starting from 3.5 kG applied magnetic field and was completely suppressed at 8 kG. Dependence of multipactor suppression on the rf gradient inside the DLA structure was also measured.

  4. Observation of the four wave mixing photonic band gap signal in electromagnetically induced grating.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Zakir; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Mengqin; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2014-12-01

    For the first time, we experimentally and theoretically research about the probe transmission signal (PTS), the reflected four wave mixing band gap signal(FWM BGS) and fluorescence signal (FLS) under the double dressing effect in an inverted Y-type four level system. FWM BGS results from photonic band gap structure. We demonstrate that the characteristics of PTS, FWM BGS and FLS can be controlled by power, phase and the frequency detuning of the dressing beams. It is observed in our experiment that FWM BGS switches from suppression to enhancement, corresponding to the switch from transmission enhancement to absorption enhancement in the PTS with changing the relative phase. We also observe the relation among the three signals, which satisfy the law of conservation of energy. Such scheme could have potential applications in optical diodes, amplifiers and quantum information processing.

  5. A ministop band in a single-defect photonic crystal waveguide based on silicon on insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hai-Xia; Zuo, Yu-Hua; Yu, Jin-Zhong; Wang, Qi-Ming

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports that a two-dimensional single-defect photonic crystal waveguide in the Γ-K direction with triangular lattice on a silicon-on-insulator substrate is fabricated by the combination of electron beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma etching. A ministop band (MSB) is observed by the measurement of transmission characteristics. It results from the coupling between the two modes with the same symmetry, which is analysed from the stimulated band diagram by the effective index and the two-dimensional plane wave expansion methods. The parameter working on the MSB is the ratio of the radius of air holes to the lattice constant, r/a. It is obtained that the critical r/a value determining the occurrence or disappearance of MSB is 0.36. When r/a is larger than or equal to 0.36, the MSB occurs. However, when r/a is smaller than 0.36, the MSB disappears.

  6. Generation of megawatt optical solitons in hollow-core photonic band-gap fibers.

    PubMed

    Ouzounov, Dimitre G; Ahmad, Faisal R; Müller, Dirk; Venkataraman, Natesan; Gallagher, Michael T; Thomas, Malcolm G; Silcox, John; Koch, Karl W; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2003-09-19

    The measured dispersion of a low-loss, hollow-core photonic band-gap fiber is anomalous throughout most of the transmission band, and its variation with wavelength is large compared with that of a conventional step-index fiber. For an air-filled fiber, femtosecond self-frequency--shifted fundamental solitons with peak powers greater than 2megawatts can be supported. For Xe-filled fibers, nonfrequency-shifted temporal solitons with peak powers greater than 5.5 megawatts can be generated, representing an increase in the power that can be propagated in an optical fiber of two orders of magnitude. The results demonstrate a unique capability to deliver high-power pulses in a single spatial mode over distances exceeding 200 meters.

  7. Role of Short-Range Order and Hyperuniformity in the Formation of Band Gaps in Disordered Photonic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Engel, Michael; Damasceno, Pablo F.; Muller, Nicolas; Haberko, Jakub; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-07-01

    We study photonic band gap formation in two-dimensional high-refractive-index disordered materials where the dielectric structure is derived from packing disks in real and reciprocal space. Numerical calculations of the photonic density of states demonstrate the presence of a band gap for all polarizations in both cases. We find that the band gap width is controlled by the increase in positional correlation inducing short-range order and hyperuniformity concurrently. Our findings suggest that the optimization of short-range order, in particular the tailoring of Bragg scattering at the isotropic Brillouin zone, are of key importance for designing disordered PBG materials.

  8. Spin polarized photons from an axially charged plasma at weak coupling: Complete leading order

    DOE PAGES

    Mamo, Kiminad A.; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2016-03-24

    In the presence of (approximately conserved) axial charge in the QCD plasma at finite temperature, the emitted photons are spin aligned, which is a unique P- and CP-odd signature of axial charge in the photon emission observables. We compute this “P-odd photon emission rate” in a weak coupling regime at a high temperature limit to complete leading order in the QCD coupling constant: the leading log as well as the constant under the log. As in the P-even total emission rate in the literature, the computation of the P-odd emission rate at leading order consists of three parts: (1) Comptonmore » and pair annihilation processes with hard momentum exchange, (2) soft t- and u-channel contributions with hard thermal loop resummation, (3) Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal resummation of collinear bremsstrahlung and pair annihilation. In conclusion, we present analytical and numerical evaluations of these contributions to our P-odd photon emission rate observable.« less

  9. Photonic and omnidirectional band gap engineering in stack of exponential graded index material and negative index material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bipin K.; Dikshit, Ashutosh K.; Thapa, Khem B.; Pandey, Praveen C.

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the photonic band gaps (PBG) and omnidirectional band gaps in one-dimensional photonic crystals made up of alternate layer of exponential graded index material and negative index material. We have considered the influence of material properties, geometrical parameters and material composition on the PBG and omnidirectional band gap. Results show that the parameters of exponential graded index material and negative index material can change the photonic and omnidirectional band structures remarkably. Number and bandwidth of PBG increases with increasing the negative index material layer thicknesses while thicknesses of graded index layer only have an effect on the bandwidth of PBGs. The bandwidth of PBG also depends on grading profile parameter of exponential graded index layers and bandwidth can be tuned with increase the value of grading profile parameter. This work can facilitate the design of filters and reflectors, and provide the basic understanding of the influence of graded index materials and metamaterials on the PBG properties.

  10. Dynamical behavior of atom-photon entanglement for a four-level atom near the band edge of a 3D-anisotropic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahrai, M.; Boroojerdi, V. Tahmoorian Askari

    2017-06-01

    Time evolution of the entanglement between a four-level atom near the band edge of a photonic crystal and its spontaneous emission field is investigated. It is shown that the quantum entropy has a faster oscillator behavior as the upper levels move further into the band gap. Entanglement oscillations can be controlled by the intensity and the detuning of the coupling field. An enhanced entanglement is achieved in the presence of quantum interference resulting from the two possible decay channels. In addition, the atom-photon entanglement will be influenced noticeably by the reservoir coupling constant, intensity of coupling field, and the detuning.

  11. Spectral and polarization structure of field-induced photonic bands in cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Geivandov, A. R.; Kasyanova, I. V.; Palto, V. S.

    2015-09-01

    Transmission of planar layers of cholesteric liquid crystals is studied in pulsed electric fields perpendicular to the helix axis at normal incidence of both linearly polarized and unpolarized light. Spectral and light polarization properties of the primary photonic band and the field-induced bands up to fourth order of Bragg selective reflection are studied in detail. In our experiments we have achieved an electric field strength several times higher than the theoretical values corresponding to the critical field of full helix unwinding. However, the experiments show that despite the high strength of the electric field applied the helix does not unwind, but strongly deforms, keeping its initial spatial period. Strong helix deformation results in distinct spectral band splitting, as well as very high field-induced selective reflectance that can be applied in lasers and other optoelectronic devices. Peculiarities of inducing and splitting the bands are discussed in terms of the scattering coefficient approach. All observed effects are confirmed by numerical simulations. The simulations also show that liquid crystal surface anchoring is not the factor that prevents the helix unwinding. Thus, the currently acknowledged concept of continuous helix unwinding in the electric field should be reconsidered.

  12. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and devices incorporating the same

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Kai-Ming; Chan, Che-Ting; Soukoulis, Costas

    1994-08-02

    A periodic dielectric structure which is capable of producing a photonic band gap and which is capable of practical construction. The periodic structure is formed of a plurality of layers, each layer being formed of a plurality of rods separated by a given spacing. The material of the rods contrasts with the material between the rods to have a refractive index contrast of at least two. The rods in each layer are arranged with their axes parallel and at a given spacing. Adjacent layers are rotated by 90.degree., such that the axes of the rods in any given layer are perpendicular to the axes in its neighbor. Alternating layers (that is, successive layers of rods having their axes parallel such as the first and third layers) are offset such that the rods of one are about at the midpoint between the rods of the other. A four-layer periocity is thus produced, and successive layers are stacked to form a three-dimensional structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. By virtue of forming the device in layers of elongate members, it is found that the device is susceptible of practical construction.

  13. Spectral element method for band structures of two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ma; Liu, Qing Huo; Li, Zhibing

    2009-02-01

    A spectral element method (SEM) is proposed for the accurate calculation of band structures of two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals. It uses Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre polynomials as the basis functions in the finite-element framework with curvilinear quadrilateral elements. Coordination mapping is introduced to make the curved quadrilateral elements conformal with the problem geometry. Mixed order basis functions are used in the vector SEM for full vector calculation. The numerical convergence speed of the method is investigated with both square and triangular lattices, and with isotropic and in-plane anisotropic media. It is shown that this method has spectral accuracy, i.e., the numerical error decreases exponentially with the order of basis functions. With only four points per wavelength, the SEM can achieve a numerical error smaller than 0.1%. The full vector calculation method can suppress all spurious modes with nonzero eigenvalues, thus making it easy to filter out real modes. It is thus demonstrated that the SEM is an efficient alternative method for accurate determination of band structures of two-dimensional photonic crystals.

  14. Spectral element method for band structures of two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ma; Liu, Qing Huo; Li, Zhibing

    2009-02-01

    A spectral element method (SEM) is proposed for the accurate calculation of band structures of two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals. It uses Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre polynomials as the basis functions in the finite-element framework with curvilinear quadrilateral elements. Coordination mapping is introduced to make the curved quadrilateral elements conformal with the problem geometry. Mixed order basis functions are used in the vector SEM for full vector calculation. The numerical convergence speed of the method is investigated with both square and triangular lattices, and with isotropic and in-plane anisotropic media. It is shown that this method has spectral accuracy, i.e., the numerical error decreases exponentially with the order of basis functions. With only four points per wavelength, the SEM can achieve a numerical error smaller than 0.1%. The full vector calculation method can suppress all spurious modes with nonzero eigenvalues, thus making it easy to filter out real modes. It is thus demonstrated that the SEM is an efficient alternative method for accurate determination of band structures of two-dimensional photonic crystals.

  15. Experimental Demonstration of a Hybrid-Quantum-Emitter Producing Individual Entangled Photon Pairs in the Telecom Band.

    PubMed

    Chen, Geng; Zou, Yang; Zhang, Wen-Hao; Zhang, Zi-Huai; Zhou, Zong-Quan; He, De-Yong; Tang, Jian-Shun; Liu, Bi-Heng; Yu, Ying; Zha, Guo-Wei; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan; Han, Yong-Jian; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-05-26

    Quantum emitters generating individual entangled photon pairs (IEPP) have significant fundamental advantages over schemes that suffer from multiple photon emission, or schemes that require post-selection techniques or the use of photon-number discriminating detectors. Quantum dots embedded within nanowires (QD-NWs) represent one of the most promising candidate for quantum emitters that provide a high collection efficiency of photons. However, a quantum emitter that generates IEPP in the telecom band is still an issue demanding a prompt solution. Here, we demonstrate in principle that IEPPs in the telecom band can be created by combining a single QD-NW and a nonlinear crystal waveguide. The QD-NW system serves as the single photon source, and the emitted visible single photons are split into IEPPs at approximately 1.55 μm through the process of spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide. The compatibility of the QD-PPLN interface is the determinant factor in constructing this novel hybrid-quantum-emitter (HQE). Benefiting from the desirable optical properties of QD-NWs and the extremely high nonlinear conversion efficiency of PPLN waveguides, we successfully generate IEPPs in the telecom band with the polarization degree of freedom. The entanglement of the generated photon pairs is confirmed by the entanglement witness. Our experiment paves the way to producing HQEs inheriting the advantages of multiple systems.

  16. Experimental Demonstration of a Hybrid-Quantum-Emitter Producing Individual Entangled Photon Pairs in the Telecom Band

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Geng; Zou, Yang; Zhang, Wen-Hao; Zhang, Zi-Huai; Zhou, Zong-Quan; He, De-Yong; Tang, Jian-Shun; Liu, Bi-Heng; Yu, Ying; Zha, Guo-Wei; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan; Han, Yong-Jian; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-01-01

    Quantum emitters generating individual entangled photon pairs (IEPP) have significant fundamental advantages over schemes that suffer from multiple photon emission, or schemes that require post-selection techniques or the use of photon-number discriminating detectors. Quantum dots embedded within nanowires (QD-NWs) represent one of the most promising candidate for quantum emitters that provide a high collection efficiency of photons. However, a quantum emitter that generates IEPP in the telecom band is still an issue demanding a prompt solution. Here, we demonstrate in principle that IEPPs in the telecom band can be created by combining a single QD-NW and a nonlinear crystal waveguide. The QD-NW system serves as the single photon source, and the emitted visible single photons are split into IEPPs at approximately 1.55 μm through the process of spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide. The compatibility of the QD-PPLN interface is the determinant factor in constructing this novel hybrid-quantum-emitter (HQE). Benefiting from the desirable optical properties of QD-NWs and the extremely high nonlinear conversion efficiency of PPLN waveguides, we successfully generate IEPPs in the telecom band with the polarization degree of freedom. The entanglement of the generated photon pairs is confirmed by the entanglement witness. Our experiment paves the way to producing HQEs inheriting the advantages of multiple systems. PMID:27225881

  17. Effect of photonic crystal stop-band on photoluminescence of a -Si1 -xCx:H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Zherzdev, Alexander V.; Feoktistov, Nikolay A.; Pevtsov, Alexander B.

    2017-04-01

    Effects associated with the change in the local density of photonic states in a periodic structure based on alternating a -Si1 -xCx:H and a -SiO2 amorphous layers forming a one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal have been analyzed. The use of a -Si1 -xCx:H as the emitting material made it possible to examine the transformation of the photoluminescence spectrum contour that is comparable in width with the photonic stop-band. It was experimentally demonstrated that the emission is enhanced and suppressed in the vicinity of the stop-band. The relative intensities of the luminescence peaks at different edges of the stop-band vary with the detuning of the stop-band position and photoluminescence peak of a single a -Si1 -xCx:H film. The Purcell effect in the system under consideration was theoretically described by the method in which the local density of photonic states is calculated in terms of a 1D model. It was shown that the specific part of local density of states substantially increases at the long-wavelength (low-frequency) edge of the stop-band of a 1D photonic crystal as a result of the predominant localization of the electric field of the light wave in the spatial regions of a -Si1 -xCx:H which have a higher relative permittivity as compared with a -SiO2 .

  18. Wave propagation in ordered, disordered, and nonlinear photonic band gap materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lidorikis, Elefterios

    1999-12-10

    Photonic band gap materials are artificial dielectric structures that give the promise of molding and controlling the flow of optical light the same way semiconductors mold and control the electric current flow. In this dissertation the author studied two areas of photonic band gap materials. The first area is focused on the properties of one-dimensional PBG materials doped with Kerr-type nonlinear material, while, the second area is focused on the mechanisms responsible for the gap formation as well as other properties of two-dimensional PBG materials. He first studied, in Chapter 2, the general adequacy of an approximate structure model in which the nonlinearity is assumed to be concentrated in equally-spaced very thin layers, or 6-functions, while the rest of the space is linear. This model had been used before, but its range of validity and the physical reasons for its limitations were not quite clear yet. He performed an extensive examination of many aspects of the model's nonlinear response and comparison against more realistic models with finite-width nonlinear layers, and found that the d-function model is quite adequate, capturing the essential features in the transmission characteristics. The author found one exception, coming from the deficiency of processing a rigid bottom band edge, i.e. the upper edge of the gaps is always independent of the refraction index contrast. This causes the model to miss-predict that there are no soliton solutions for a positive Kerr-coefficient, something known to be untrue.

  19. Relationship between quantum speed limit time and memory time in a photonic-band-gap environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Wu, Y. N.; Mo, M. L.; Zhang, H. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Non-Markovian effect is found to be able to decrease the quantum speed limit (QSL) time, and hence to enhance the intrinsic speed of quantum evolution. Although a reservoir with larger degree of non-Markovianity may seem like it should cause smaller QSL times, this seemingly intuitive thinking may not always be true. We illustrate this by investigating the QSL time of a qubit that is coupled to a two-band photonic-band-gap (PBG) environment. We show how the QSL time is influenced by the coherent property of the reservoir and the band-gap width. In particular, we find that the decrease of the QSL time is not attributed to the increasing non-Markovianity, while the memory time of the environment can be seen as an essential reflection to the QSL time. So, the QSL time provides a further insight and sharper identification of memory time in a PBG environment. We also discuss a feasible experimental realization of our prediction.

  20. Relationship between quantum speed limit time and memory time in a photonic-band-gap environment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.; Wu, Y. N.; Mo, M. L.; Zhang, H. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Markovian effect is found to be able to decrease the quantum speed limit (QSL) time, and hence to enhance the intrinsic speed of quantum evolution. Although a reservoir with larger degree of non-Markovianity may seem like it should cause smaller QSL times, this seemingly intuitive thinking may not always be true. We illustrate this by investigating the QSL time of a qubit that is coupled to a two-band photonic-band-gap (PBG) environment. We show how the QSL time is influenced by the coherent property of the reservoir and the band-gap width. In particular, we find that the decrease of the QSL time is not attributed to the increasing non-Markovianity, while the memory time of the environment can be seen as an essential reflection to the QSL time. So, the QSL time provides a further insight and sharper identification of memory time in a PBG environment. We also discuss a feasible experimental realization of our prediction. PMID:28008937

  1. Complete experimental characterization of stimulated Brillouin scattering in photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Beugnot, J C; Sylvestre, T; Alasia, D; Maillotte, H; Laude, V; Monteville, A; Provino, L; Traynor, N; Mafang, S Foaleng; Thévenaz, L

    2007-11-12

    We provide a complete experimental characterization of stimulated Brillouin scattering in a 160 m long solid-core photonic crystal fiber, including threshold and spectrum measurements as well as position-resolved mapping of the Brillouin frequency shift. In particular, a three-fold increase of the Brillouin threshold power is observed, in excellent agreement with the spectrally-broadened Brillouin gain spectrum. Distributed measurements additionally reveal that the rise of the Brillouin threshold results from the broadband nature of the gain spectrum all along the fiber and is strongly influenced by strain. Our experiments confirm that these unique fibers can be exploited for the passive control or the suppression of Brillouin scattering.

  2. Resonant behavior and selective switching of stop bands in three-dimensional photonic crystals with inhomogeneous components.

    PubMed

    Baryshev, A V; Khanikaev, A B; Inoue, M; Lim, P B; Sel'kin, A V; Yushin, G; Limonov, M F

    2007-08-10

    We demonstrate that, in contrast with the well-studied photonic crystals consisting of two homogeneous components, photonic crystals comprised of inhomogeneous or multiple (three or more) components may bring new opportunities to photonics due to the discovered quasiperiodic resonant behavior of their (hkl) stop bands as a function of the reciprocal lattice vector. A resonant stop band cannot be switched off for any permittivity of structural components. Tuning the permittivity or structural parameters allows the selective on-off switching of nonresonant (hkl) stop bands. This independent manipulation of light at different Bragg wavelengths provides a new degree of freedom to design selective optical switches and waveguides. Transmission experiments performed on synthetic opals confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  3. Observation of self-trapping and rotation of higher-band gap solitons in two-dimensional photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shiqiang; Song, Daohong; Zong, Yuanyuan; Tang, Liqin; Chen, Zhigang

    2015-02-23

    We demonstrate self-trapping and rotation of higher-band dipole and quadruple-like gap solitons by single-site excitation in a two-dimensional square photonic lattice under self-focusing nonlinearity. Experimental results show that the second-band dipole gap solitons reside in the first photonic (Bragg reflection) gap, whereas the quadruple-like gap solitons are formed in an even higher photonic gap, resulting from modes of the third-band. Moreover, both dipole and quadruple-like gap solitons exhibit dynamical rotation around the lattice principle axes and the direction of rotation is changing periodically during propagation, provided that they are excited under appropriate initial conditions. In the latter case, the nonlinear rotation is accompanied by periodic transitions between quadruple and doubly-charged vortex states. Our numerical simulations find good agreement with the experimental observations.

  4. Weather related continuity and completeness on Deep Space Ka-band links: statistics and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the concept of link 'stability' as means of measuring the continuity of the link is introduced and through it, along with the distributions of 'good' periods and 'bad' periods, the performance of the proposed Ka-band link design method using both forecasting and long-term statistics has been analyzed. The results indicate that the proposed link design method has relatively good continuity and completeness characteristics even when only long-term statistics are used and that the continuity performance further improves when forecasting is employed. .

  5. Weather related continuity and completeness on Deep Space Ka-band links: statistics and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the concept of link 'stability' as means of measuring the continuity of the link is introduced and through it, along with the distributions of 'good' periods and 'bad' periods, the performance of the proposed Ka-band link design method using both forecasting and long-term statistics has been analyzed. The results indicate that the proposed link design method has relatively good continuity and completeness characteristics even when only long-term statistics are used and that the continuity performance further improves when forecasting is employed. .

  6. Design of full-k-space flat bands in photonic crystals beyond the tight-binding picture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changqing; Wang, Gang; Hang, Zhi Hong; Luo, Jie; Chan, C T; Lai, Yun

    2015-12-11

    Based on a band engineering method, we propose a theoretical prescription to create a full-k-space flat band in dielectric photonic crystals covering the whole Brillouin Zone. With wave functions distributed in air instead of in the dielectrics, such a flat band represents a unique mechanism for achieving flat dispersions beyond the tight-binding picture, which can enormously reduce the requirement of permittivity contrast in the system. Finally, we propose and numerically demonstrate a unique application based on the full-k-space coverage of the flat band: ultra-sensitive detection of small scatterers.

  7. Design of full-k-space flat bands in photonic crystals beyond the tight-binding picture

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Changqing; Wang, Gang; Hang, Zhi Hong; Luo, Jie; Chan, C. T.; Lai, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Based on a band engineering method, we propose a theoretical prescription to create a full-k-space flat band in dielectric photonic crystals covering the whole Brillouin Zone. With wave functions distributed in air instead of in the dielectrics, such a flat band represents a unique mechanism for achieving flat dispersions beyond the tight-binding picture, which can enormously reduce the requirement of permittivity contrast in the system. Finally, we propose and numerically demonstrate a unique application based on the full-k-space coverage of the flat band: ultra-sensitive detection of small scatterers. PMID:26656882

  8. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome

    2001-06-27

    Over the last ten years, photonic band gap (PBG) theory and technology have become an important area of research because of the numerous possible applications ranging from high-efficiency laser diodes to optical circuitry. This research concentrates on reducing the length scale in the fabrication of layered photonic band gap structures and developing procedures to improve processing consistency. Various procedures and materials have been used in the fabrication of layered PBG structures. This research focused on an economical micro transfer molding approach to create the final PBG structure. A poly dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber mold was created from a silicon substrate. It was filled with epoxy and built layer-by-layer to create a 3-D epoxy structure. This structure was infiltrated with nanoparticle titania or a titania sol-gel, then fired to remove the polymer mold, leaving a monolithic ceramic inverse of the epoxy structure. The final result was a lattice of titania rolds that resembles a face-centered tetragonal structure. The original intent of this research was to miniaturize this process to a bar size small enough to create a photonic band gap for wavelengths of visible electro-magnetic radiation. The factor limiting progress was the absence of a silicon master mold of small enough dimensions. The Iowa State Microelectronics Research Center fabricated samples with periodicities of 2.5 and 1.0 microns with the existing technology, but a sample was needed on the order of 0.3 microns or less. A 0.4 micron sample was received from Sandia National Laboratory, which was made through an electron beam lithography process, but it contained several defects. The results of the work are primarily from the 2.5 and 1.0 micron samples. Most of the work focused on changing processing variables in order to optimize the infiltration procedure for the best results. Several critical parameters were identified, ranging from the ambient conditions to the specifics of the

  9. Frequency-selective plasmonic wave propagation through the overmoded waveguide with photonic-band-gap slab arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min

    2012-05-15

    Confined propagation of guided waves through the periodically corrugated channel sandwiched between two staggered dielectric photonic-band-gap slab arrays is investigated with the band-response analysis. Numerical simulations show that longitudinally polarized evanescent waves within the band gap propagate with insertion loss of {approx}-0.2 to 1 dB (-0.05 to 0.4 dB/mm at G-band) in the hybrid band filter. This structure significantly suppresses low energy modes and higher-order-modes beyond the band-gap, including background noises, down to {approx}-45 dB. This would enable the single-mode propagation in the heavily over-moded waveguide (TEM-type), minimizing abnormal excitation probability of trapped modes. This band filter could be integrated with active and passive RF components for electron beam and optoelectronic devices.

  10. Complete band gaps including non-local effects occur only in the relaxed micromorphic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeo, Angela; Neff, Patrizio; d'Agostino, Marco Valerio; Barbagallo, Gabriele

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we substantiate the claim implicitly made in previous works that the relaxed micromorphic model is the only linear, isotropic, reversibly elastic, nonlocal generalized continuum model able to describe complete band-gaps on a phenomenological level. To this end, we recapitulate the response of the standard Mindlin-Eringen micromorphic model with the full micro-distortion gradient ∇P, the relaxed micromorphic model depending only on the Curl P of the micro-distortion P, and a variant of the standard micromorphic model, in which the curvature depends only on the divergence Div P of the micro distortion. The Div-model has size-effects, but the dispersion analysis for plane waves shows the incapability of that model to even produce a partial band gap. Combining the curvature to depend quadratically on Div P and Curl P shows that such a model is similar to the standard Mindlin-Eringen model, which can eventually show only a partial band gap.

  11. Proposal for in-fiber generation of telecom-band polarization-entangled photon pairs using a periodically poled fiber.

    PubMed

    Helt, L G; Zhu, Eric Y; Liscidini, Marco; Qian, Li; Sipe, J E

    2009-07-15

    We treat spontaneous parametric downconversion in a periodically poled fiber, quasi-phase matched to allow for the generation of photon pairs at wavelengths within the low-loss telecommunications window. For an appropriate pump polarization, the unusual properties of such a fiber's effective chi(2) result in a biphoton wave function that is symmetric upon simultaneous exchange of downconverted photon frequencies and polarizations and that is nonzero over a wide range of downconverted frequencies. This could lead to a significant technical simplification of sources of in-fiber telecom-band polarization-entangled photons.

  12. Polarisation-preserving photon frequency conversion from a trapped-ion-compatible wavelength to the telecom C-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutyanskiy, V.; Meraner, M.; Schupp, J.; Lanyon, B. P.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate polarisation-preserving frequency conversion of single-photon-level light at 854 nm, resonant with a trapped-ion transition and qubit, to the 1550-nm telecom C band. A total photon in / fiber-coupled photon out efficiency of ˜30% is achieved, for a free-running photon noise rate of ˜60 Hz. This performance would enable telecom conversion of 854 nm polarisation qubits, produced in existing trapped-ion systems, with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 1. In combination with near-future trapped-ion systems, our converter would enable the observation of entanglement between an ion and a photon that has travelled more than 100 km in optical fiber: three orders of magnitude further than the state-of-the-art.

  13. Ultra stable all-fiber telecom-band entangled photon-pair source for turnkey quantum communication applications.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chuang; Lee, Kim Fook; Levin, Todd; Chen, Jun; Kumar, Prem

    2006-07-24

    We demonstrate a novel alignment-free all-fiber source for generating telecom-band polarization-entangled photon pairs. Polarization entanglement is created by injecting two relatively delayed, orthogonally polarized pump pulses into a piece of dispersion-shifted fiber, where each one independently engages in four-photon scattering, and then removing any distinguishability between the correlated photon-pairs produced by each pulse at the fiber output. Our scheme uses a Michelson-interferometer configuration with Faraday mirrors to achieve practically desirable features such as ultra-stable performance and turnkey operation. Up to 91.7% two-photon-interference visibility is observed without subtracting the accidental coincidences that arise from background photons while operating the source at room temperature.

  14. Transparent, metallo-dielectric, one-dimensional, photonic band-gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalora, M.; Bloemer, M. J.; Pethel, A. S.; Dowling, J. P.; Bowden, C. M.; Manka, A. S.

    1998-03-01

    We investigate numerically the properties of metallo-dielectric, one-dimensional, photonic band-gap structures. Our theory predicts that interference effects give rise to a new transparent metallic structure that permits the transmission of light over a tunable range of frequencies, for example, the ultraviolet, the visible, or the infrared wavelength range. The structure can be designed to block ultraviolet light, transmit in the visible range, and reflect all other electromagnetic waves of lower frequencies, from infrared to microwaves and beyond. The transparent metallic structure is composed of a stack of alternating layers of a metal and a dielectric material, such that the complex index of refraction alternates between a high and a low value. The structure remains transparent even if the total amount of metal is increased to hundreds of skin depths in net thickness.

  15. Pushing the Gradient Limitations of Superconducting Photonic Band Gap Structure Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Haynes, William B.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.

    2012-06-07

    Superconducting photonic band gap resonators present us with unique means to place higher order mode couples in an accelerating cavity and efficiently extract HOMs. An SRF PBG resonator with round rods was successfully tested at LANL demonstrating operation at 15 MV/m. Gradient in the SRF PBG resonator was limited by magnetic quench. To increase the quench threshold in PBG resonators one must design the new geometry with lower surface magnetic fields and preserve the resonator's effectiveness for HOM suppression. The main objective of this research is to push the limits for the high-gradient operation of SRF PBG cavities. A NCRF PBG cavity technology is established. The proof-of-principle operation of SRF PBG cavities is demonstrated. SRF PBG resonators are effective for outcoupling HOMs. PBG technology can significantly reduce the size of SRF accelerators and increase brightness for future FELs.

  16. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Lastly, excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  17. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Arsenyev, Sergey A; Buechler, Cynthia E; Edwards, Randall L; Romero, William P; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G; Wisniewski, Eric E; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-12

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  18. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-01

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  19. Scanning nonreciprocity spatial four-wave mixing process in moving photonic band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hang; Zhang, Yunzhe; Li, Mingyue; Ma, Danmeng; Guo, Ji; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2017-03-01

    We experimentally investigate the scanning nonreciprocity of four-wave mixing process induced by optical parametric amplification in moving photonic band gap, which is different from the propagation nonreciprocity in the optical diode. Meanwhile the frequency offset and the intensity difference are observed when we scan the frequency of the beams on two arm ramps of one round trip. Such scanning nonreciprocities can be controlled by changing the frequency detuning of the dressing beams. For the first time, we find that the intensity difference can cause the nonreciprocity in spatial image. In the nonreciprocity process, the focusing or defocusing is resulted from the feedback dressing self-phase modulation while shift and split is attributed to feedback dressing cross-phase modulation. Our study could have a potential application in the controllable optical diode.

  20. High-power narrow-vertical-divergence photonic band crystal laser diodes with optimized epitaxial structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lei; Qu, Hongwei; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Yejin; Zheng, Wanhua; Wang, Yufei; Qi, Aiyi

    2014-12-08

    900 nm longitudinal photonic band crystal (PBC) laser diodes with optimized epitaxial structure are fabricated. With a same calculated fundamental-mode divergence, stronger mode discrimination is achieved by a quasi-periodic index modulation in the PBC waveguide than a periodic one. Experiments show that the introduction of over 5.5 μm-thick PBC waveguide contributes to only 10% increment of the internal loss for the laser diodes. For broad area PBC lasers, output powers of 5.75 W under continuous wave test and over 10 W under quasi-continuous wave test are reported. The vertical divergence angles are 10.5° at full width at half maximum and 21.3° with 95% power content, in conformity with the simulated angles. Such device shows a prospect for high-power narrow-vertical-divergence laser emission from single diode laser and laser bar.

  1. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; ...

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. Wemore » conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Lastly, excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.« less

  2. Multiwavelength L-band fiber laser with bismuth-oxide EDF and photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramzia Salem, A. M.; Al-Mansoori, M. H.; Hizam, H.; Mohd Noor, S. B.; Abu Bakar, M. H.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2011-05-01

    A multiwavelength laser comb using a bismuth-based erbium-doped fiber and 50 m photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated in a ring cavity configuration. The fiber laser is solely pumped by a single 1455 nm Raman pump laser to exploit its higher power delivery compared to that of a single-mode laser diode pump. At 264 mW Raman pump power and 1 mW Brillouin pump power, 38 output channels in the L-band have been realized with an optical signal-to-noise ratio above 15 dB and a Stokes line spacing of 0.08 nm. The laser exhibits a tuning range of 12 nm and produces stable Stokes lines across the tuning range between Brillouin pump wavelengths of 1603 nm and 1615 nm.

  3. Photonic band-gap engineering in UV fiber gratings by the arc discharge technique.

    PubMed

    Cusano, Andrea; Iadicicco, Agostino; Paladino, Domenico; Campopiano, Stefania; Cutolo, Antonello

    2008-09-29

    Localized heat treatments combined with local non-adiabatic tapering is proposed as suitable tool for the engineering of photonic band-gaps in UV-written fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). In particular, here, we propose the use of the electric arc discharge to achieve localized defects along the FBG structure, however differently from previously reported works, we demonstrate how this post processing tool properly modified can be exploited to achieve the full control of the spectral characteristics of the final device. Also, we show how the suitable choice of the grating features and the correct selection of the defect geometry can be efficiently used to achieve interesting features for both communication and sensing applications.

  4. Optical processes of photonic band gap structure with dressing field in atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun-Zhe; Liu, Zhe; Cai, Kang-Ning; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Wei-Tao; Liu, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Yan-Peng

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally investigate probe transmission signals (PTS), the four-wave mixing photonic band gap signal (FWM BGS), and the fluorescence signal (FLS) in an inverted Y-type four level atomic system. For the first time, we compare the FLS of the two ground-state hyperfine levels of Rb 85. In particular, the second-order and the fourth-order fluorescence signals perform dramatic dressing discrepancies under the two hyperfine levels. Moreover, we find that the dressing field has some dressing effects on three such types of signals. Therefore, we demonstrate that the characteristics of PTS, FWM BGS, and FLS can be controlled by frequency detunings, the powers or phases of the dressing field. Such research could have potential applications in optical diodes, amplifiers, and quantum information processing.

  5. Optical crosstalk in single photon avalanche diode arrays: a new complete model.

    PubMed

    Rech, Ivan; Ingargiola, Antonino; Spinelli, Roberto; Labanca, Ivan; Marangoni, Stefano; Ghioni, Massimo; Cova, Sergio

    2008-06-09

    One of the main issues of Single Photon Avalanche Diode arrays is optical crosstalk. Since its intensity increases with reducing the distance between devices, this phenomenon limits the density of integration within arrays. In the past optical crosstalk was ascribed essentially to the light propagating from one detector to another through direct optical paths. Accordingly, reflecting trenches between devices were proposed to prevent it, but they proved to be not completely effective. In this paper we will present experimental evidence that a significant contribution to optical crosstalk comes from light reflected internally off the bottom of the chip, thus being impossible to eliminate it completely by means of trenches. We will also propose an optical model to predict the dependence of crosstalk on the distance between devices.

  6. Complete tight fibrous band release and resection in congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il Jae; Lim, Sung Yoon; Song, Hyun Suk; Park, Myong Chul

    2010-06-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is caused by shortening of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle, which may lead to neck movement limitation and craniofacial deformity. The authors retrospectively reviewed clinical experiences of CMT at their hospital from February 2007 to June 2008. During the study period, 20 CMT patients underwent complete tight fibrous band release and resection. Mean patient age was 47.6 months at operation. Eighteen of the 20 patients started a programme of physical therapy preoperatively. All patients received well-controlled postoperative physical therapy and wore a soft neck collar to correct head position for at least 3 months. At 3 months postoperatively, passive ranges of neck motion were determined, and compared with those of uninvolved sides. Eighteen patients showed a full range of motion of neck rotation and lateral flexion, but one patient showed a 10 degrees limitation in lateral flexion, and another showed 10 degrees limitations of neck rotation and lateral flexion. The authors recommended that the described operative technique involving complete fibrous band release and resection, combined with intensive postoperative physical therapy and application of a soft neck collar, provides good functional and cosmetic results.

  7. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV /m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  8. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette M.; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kinds of hollow core band gap fibers. The light source for this experiment consists of ytterbium-doped double clad fiber aeroGAIN-ROD-PM85 in a high power amplifier setup. It provided 22ps pulses with a maximum average power of 95W, 40MHz repetition rate at 1032nm (~2.4μJ pulse energy), with M2 <1.3. We determined the facet damage threshold for a 7-cells hollow core photonic bandgap fiber and showed up to 59W average power output for a 5 meters fiber. The damage threshold for a 19-cell hollow core photonic bandgap fiber exceeded the maximum power provided by the light source and up to 76W average output power was demonstrated for a 1m fiber. In both cases, no special attention was needed to mitigate bend sensitivity. The fibers were coiled on 8 centimeters radius spools and even lower bending radii were present. In addition, stimulated rotational Raman scattering arising from nitrogen molecules was measured through a 42m long 19 cell hollow core fiber.

  9. Wide-band acousto-optic deflectors for large field of view two-photon microscope.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Runhua; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic deflector (AOD) is an attractive scanner for two-photon microscopy because it can provide fast and versatile laser scanning and does not involve any mechanical movements. However, due to the small scan range of available AOD, the field of view (FOV) of the AOD-based microscope is typically smaller than that of the conventional galvanometer-based microscope. Here, we developed a novel wide-band AOD to enlarge the scan angle. Considering the maximum acceptable acoustic attenuation in the acousto-optic crystal, relatively lower operating frequencies and moderate aperture were adopted. The custom AOD was able to provide 60 MHz 3-dB bandwidth and 80% peak diffraction efficiency at 840 nm wavelength. Based on a pair of such AOD, a large FOV two-photon microscope was built with a FOV up to 418.5 μm (40× objective). The spatiotemporal dispersion was compensated simultaneously with a single custom-made prism. By means of dynamic power modulation, the variation of laser intensity within the FOV was reduced below 5%. The lateral and axial resolution of the system were 0.58-2.12 μm and 2.17-3.07 μm, respectively. Pollen grain images acquired by this system were presented to demonstrate the imaging capability at different positions across the entire FOV.

  10. Observation of nonlinear bands in near-field scanning optical microscopy of a photonic-crystal waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Huisman, S. R.; Ctistis, G. Mosk, A. P.; Pinkse, P. W. H.; Korterik, J. P.; Herek, J. L.

    2015-01-21

    We have measured the photonic bandstructure of GaAs photonic-crystal waveguides with high resolution in energy as well as in momentum using near-field scanning optical microscopy. Intriguingly, we observe additional bands that are not predicted by eigenmode solvers, as was recently demonstrated by Huisman et al. [Phys. Rev. B 86, 155154 (2012)]. We study the presence of these additional bands by performing measurements of these bands while varying the incident light power, revealing a non-linear power dependence. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the observed additional bands are caused by a waveguide-specific near-field tip effect not previously reported, which can significantly phase-modulate the detected field.

  11. Junction-type photonic crystal waveguides for notch- and pass-band filtering.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Naeem; Amin, Muhammad; Naureen, Shagufta; Swillo, Marcin; Anand, Srinivasan

    2011-10-10

    Evolution of the mode gap and the associated transmission mini stop-band (MSB) as a function of photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide width is theoretically and experimentally investigated. The change of line-defect width is identified to be the most appropriate way since it offers a wide MSB wavelength tuning range. A high transmission narrow-band filter is experimentally demonstrated in a junction-type waveguide composed of two PhC waveguides with slightly different widths. The full width at half maximum is 5.6 nm; the peak transmission is attenuated by only ~5 dB and is ~20 dB above the MSBs. Additionally, temperature tuning of the filter were also performed. The results show red-shift of the transmission peak and the MSB edges with a gradient of dλ/dT = 0.1 nm/°C. It is proposed that the transmission MSBs in such junction-type cascaded PhC waveguides can be used to obtain different types of filters.

  12. A super narrow band filter based on silicon 2D photonic crystal resonator and reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Deyuan; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Juebin; Tao, Shangbin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a novel structure of super narrow band filter based on two-dimensional square lattice photonic crystals of silicon rods in air for 1.5 um communication is proposed and studied. COMSOL Multiphysics4.3b software is used to simulate the optical behavior of the filter. The filter consists of one point-defect-based resonator and two line-defect-based reflectors. The resonance frequency, transmission coefficient and quality factor are investigated by varying the parameters of the structure. In design, a silicon rod is removed to form the resonator; for the rows of rods above and below the resonator, a part of the rods are removed to form the reflectors. By optimizing the parameters of the filter, the quality factor and transmission coefficient of the filter at the resonance frequency of 2e14 Hz can reach 1330 and 0.953, respectively. The super narrow band filter can be integrated into optical circuit for its micron size. Also, it can be used for wavelength selection and noise filtering of optical amplifier in future communication application.

  13. Fratricide-preventing friend identification tag based on photonic band structure coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliyahu, Danny; Sadovnik, Lev S.; Manasson, Vladimir A.

    2000-07-01

    A new friend foe identification tag based on photonic band structure (PBS) is presented. The tag utilizes frequency-coded radar signal return. Targets that include the passive tag responds selectively to slightly different frequencies generated by interrogating MMW radar. It is possible to use in- and out-of-band gap frequencies or defect modes of the PBS in order to obtain frequency dependent radar waves reflections. This tag can be made in the form of patch attachable such as plate or corner reflectors, to be worn by an individual marine, or to be integrated into the platform camouflage. Ultimately, it can be incorporated as smart skin or a ground or airborne vehicle. The proposed tag takes full advantage of existing sensors for interrogation (minimal chances required), it is lightweight and small in dimensions, it operates in degraded environments, it has no impact on platform vulnerability, it has low susceptibility to spoofing and mimicking (code of the day) and it has low susceptibility to active jamming. We demonstrated the operation of the tag using multi-layer dielectric (Duroid) having periodic structure of metal on top of each of the layers (metal strips in this case). The experimental results are consistent with numerical simulation. The device can be combined with temporal coding to increase target detection and identification resolution.

  14. Simultaneous multi-channel CMW-band and MMW-band UWB monocycle pulse generation using FWM effect in a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangzheng; Wu, Jian; Fu, Songnian; Xu, Kun; Li, Yan; Hong, Xiaobin; Shum, Ping; Lin, Jintong

    2010-07-19

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme to simultaneously realize multi-channel centimeter wave (CMW) band and millimeter wave (MMW) band ultra-wideband (UWB) monocycle pulse generation using four wave mixing (FWM) effect in a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (HNL-PCF). Two lightwaves carrying polarity-reversed optical Gaussian pulses with appropriate time delay and another lightwave carrying a 20 GHz clock signal are launched into the HNL-PCF together. By filtering out the FWM idlers, two CMW-band UWB monocycle signals and two MMW-band UWB monocycle signals at 20 GHz are obtained simultaneously. Experimental measurements of the generated UWB monocycle pulses at individual wavelength, which comply with the FCC regulations, verify the feasibility and flexibility of proposed scheme for use in practical UWB communication systems.

  15. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): A Wavelength-Tunable Fiber-Coupled Narrow-Band Twin-Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian-Fa; Liu, Bi-Heng; Fang, Bin; Huang, Yun-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2009-07-01

    We present a wavelength-tunable narrow-band fiber-coupled source to generate correlated photon pairs at 539nm and 1550nm. Using a 10-mm PPLN crystal, we obtain more than 50mm tunable range near 1550nm. This source, given its spectral property and tunable property, is well suited for tasks in fiber-optic quantum communication and cryptography networks.

  16. Towards two-dimensional complete photonic bandgap structures below infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lem, Han; Moroz, Alexander

    2000-09-01

    Bandgaps in two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals are hard to achieve due to the limited contrast in the dielectric permeability available with conventional dielectric materials. The situation changes for periodic arrangements of scatterers consisting of materials with a Drude-like behaviour of the dielectric function. We show for two-dimensional square and triangular lattices that such systems have in-plane complete photonic bandgaps (CPBGs) below infrared wavelengths. Of the two geometries, the optimal one for ideal Drude-like behaviour is a square lattice, whereas for Drude-like behaviour in silver, using experimental data (Palik E D 1991 Handbook of Optical Constants of Solids vol 1 (San Diego: Academic)), the optimal geometry is a triangular lattice. If the lattice spacing is tuned to a characteristic plasma wavelength, several CPBGs open in the spectrum and their relative gap width can be as large as 36.9% (9.9% in a nonabsorptive window) even if the host dielectric constant ɛh = 1. Such structures can provide CPBG structures with bandgaps down to ultraviolet wavelengths.

  17. Report: Manchester Band of Pomo Indians Needs to Improve Its Financial Management System and Demonstrate Completion of Grant Work

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #16-P-0320, September 21, 2016. The Manchester Band of Pomo Indians' inadequate financial management system, and shortfalls in completing grant tasks, resulted in all costs claimed being questioned.

  18. Complete genomic sequence of Pepper vein banding virus (PVBV): a distinct member of the genus Potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Anindya, R; Joseph, J; Gowri, T D S; Savithri, H S

    2004-03-01

    The complete genomic sequence of Pepper vein banding virus (PVBV), a potyvirus infecting chilli and other solanaceous plants in south India, was determined and compared with those of other potyviruses. The viral genome contained 9711 nucleotides, excluding the poly-A tail. The length of the 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) were 163 and 281 nucleotides respectively. As for other potyviruses, the PVBV genome has a single open reading frame (ORF) starting at nucleotide 164 and ending at nt 9430, which encodes a polyprotein of 3088 amino acid residues. There are nine putative conserved cleavage sites within the polyprotein, which can result in ten functionally distinct protein products. Phylogenetic analysis of the potyviral polyprotein sequences showed that PVBV is a distinct species of this genus.

  19. Complete Analysis of Four-Photon χ-Type Entangled State via Cross-Kerr Nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhi; Li, Xi-Han; Wang, Chun; Wang, Li-Li; Liu, Zhen-Zhen; Wei, Hua

    2015-09-01

    We propose an efficient method to construct an optical four-photon |χ> state analyzer via the cross-Kerr nonlinearity combined with linear optical elements. In this protocol, two four-qubit parity-check gates and two controlled phase gates are employed. We show that all the 16 orthogonal four-qubit |χ> states can be completely discriminated with our apparatus. The scheme is feasible and realizable with current technology. It may have useful potential applications in quantum information processing which based on |χ> state. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11004258, and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities Project under Grant No. CQDXWL-2012-014, the Natural Science Foundation Project of CQ CSTC 2011jjA90017

  20. Analytic expressions for the electromagnetic mode density in finite, one-dimensional, photonic band-gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendickson, Jon M.; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Scalora, Michael

    1996-04-01

    We derive an exact expression for the electromagnetic mode density, and hence the group velocity, for a finite, N-period, one-dimensional, photonic band-gap structure. We begin by deriving a general formula for the mode density in terms of the complex transmission coefficient of an arbitrary index profile. Then we develop a specific formula that gives the N-period mode density in terms of the complex transmission coefficient of the unit cell. The special cases of mode-density enhancement and suppression at the photonic band edge and also at midgap, respectively, are derived. The specific example of a quarter-wave stack is analyzed, and applications to three-dimensional structures, spontaneous emission control, delay lines, band-edge lasers, and superluminal tunneling times are discussed.

  1. Localized photonic band edge modes and orbital angular momenta of light in a golden-angle spiral.

    PubMed

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Noh, Heeso; Trevino, Jacob; Negro, Luca Dal; Cao, Hui

    2011-11-21

    We present a numerical study on photonic bandgap and band edge modes in the golden-angle spiral array of air cylinders in dielectric media. Despite the lack of long-range translational and rotational order, there is a large PBG for the TE polarized light. Due to spatial inhomogeneity in the air hole spacing, the band edge modes are spatially localized by Bragg scattering from the parastichies in the spiral structure. They have discrete angular momenta that originate from different families of the parastichies whose numbers correspond to the Fibonacci numbers. The unique structural characteristics of the golden-angle spiral lead to distinctive features of the band edge modes that are absent in both photonic crystals and quasicrystals.

  2. Atom-atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Jonathan D.; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E.; Kimble, H. J.

    2016-09-01

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields E(x)e±ikxxE(x)∝e±ikxx outside the bandgap to localized fields E(x)e-κx|x|E(x)∝e-κx|x| within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom-atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom-atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the D1D1 line of atomic cesium for N¯=3.0±0.5

  3. True-time-delay photonic beamformer for an L-band phased array radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmuda, Henry; Toughlian, Edward N.; Payson, Paul M.; Malowicki, John E.

    1995-10-01

    The problem of obtaining a true-time-delay photonic beamformer has recently been a topic of great interest. Many interesting and novel approaches to this problem have been studied. This paper examines the design, construction, and testing of a dynamic optical processor for the control of a 20-element phased array antenna operating at L-band (1.2-1.4 GHz). The approach taken here has several distinct advantages. The actual optical control is accomplished with a class of spatial light modulator known as a segmented mirror device (SMD). This allows for the possibility of controlling an extremely large number (tens of thousands) of antenna elements using integrated circuit technology. The SMD technology is driven by the HDTV and laser printer markets so ultimate cost reduction as well as technological improvements are expected. Optical splitting is efficiently accomplished using a diffractive optical element. This again has the potential for use in antenna array systems with a large number of radiating elements. The actual time delay is achieved using a single acousto-optic device for all the array elements. Acousto-optic device technologies offer sufficient delay as needed for a time steered array. The topological configuration is an optical heterodyne system, hence high, potentially millimeter wave center frequencies are possible by mixing two lasers of slightly differing frequencies. Finally, the entire system is spatially integrated into a 3D glass substrate. The integrated system provides the ruggedness needed in most applications and essentially eliminates the drift problems associated with free space optical systems. Though the system is presently being configured as a beamformer, it has the ability to operate as a general photonic signal processing element in an adaptive (reconfigurable) transversal frequency filter configuration. Such systems are widely applicable in jammer/noise canceling systems, broadband ISDN, and for spread spectrum secure communications

  4. High power experimental studies of hybrid photonic band gap accelerator structures

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, JieXi; Munroe, Brian J.; Xu, Haoran; ...

    2016-08-31

    This paper reports the first high power tests of hybrid photonic band gap (PBG) accelerator structures. Three hybrid PBG (HPBG) structures were designed, built and tested at 17.14 GHz. Each structure had a triangular lattice array with 60 inner sapphire rods and 24 outer copper rods sandwiched between copper disks. The dielectric PBG band gap map allows the unique feature of overmoded operation in a TM02 mode, with suppression of both lower order modes, such as the TM11 mode, as well as higher order modes. The use of sapphire rods, which have negligible dielectric loss, required inclusion of the dielectricmore » birefringence in the design. The three structures were designed to sequentially reduce the peak surface electric field. Simulations showed relatively high surface fields at the triple point as well as in any gaps between components in the clamped assembly. The third structure used sapphire rods with small pin extensions at each end and obtained the highest gradient of 19 MV/m, corresponding to a surface electric field of 78 MV/m, with a breakdown probability of 5×10–1 per pulse per meter for a 100-ns input power pulse. Operation at a gradient above 20 MV/m led to runaway breakdowns with extensive light emission and eventual damage. For all three structures, multipactor light emission was observed at gradients well below the breakdown threshold. As a result, this research indicated that multipactor triggered at the triple point limited the operational gradient of the hybrid structure.« less

  5. High power breakdown testing of a photonic band-gap accelerator structure with elliptical rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Cook, Alan M.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A. Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; Marsh, Roark A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved single-cell photonic band-gap (PBG) structure with an inner row of elliptical rods (PBG-E) was tested with high power at a 60 Hz repetition rate at X-band (11.424 GHz), achieving a gradient of 128MV/m at a breakdown probability of 3.6×10-3 per pulse per meter at a pulse length of 150 ns. The tested standing-wave structure was a single high-gradient cell with an inner row of elliptical rods and an outer row of round rods; the elliptical rods reduce the peak surface magnetic field by 20% and reduce the temperature rise of the rods during the pulse by several tens of degrees, while maintaining good damping and suppression of high order modes. When compared with a single-cell standing-wave undamped disk-loaded waveguide structure with the same iris geometry under test at the same conditions, the PBG-E structure yielded the same breakdown rate within measurement error. The PBG-E structure showed a greatly reduced breakdown rate compared with earlier tests of a PBG structure with round rods, presumably due to the reduced magnetic fields at the elliptical rods vs the fields at the round rods, as well as use of an improved testing methodology. A post-testing autopsy of the PBG-E structure showed some damage on the surfaces exposed to the highest surface magnetic and electric fields. Despite these changes in surface appearance, no significant change in the breakdown rate was observed in testing. These results demonstrate that PBG structures, when designed with reduced surface magnetic fields and operated to avoid extremely high pulsed heating, can operate at breakdown probabilities comparable to undamped disk-loaded waveguide structures and are thus viable for high-gradient accelerator applications.

  6. High efficiency single transverse mode photonic band crystal lasers with low vertical divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shaoyu; Qu, Hongwei; Liu, Yun; Li, Lunhua; Chen, Yang; Zhou, Xuyan; Lin, Yuzhe; Liu, Anjin; Qi, Aiyi; Zheng, Wanhua

    2016-10-01

    High efficiency 980 nm longitudinal photonic band crystal (PBC) edge emitting laser diodes are designed and fabricated. The calculated results show that eight periods of Al0.1Ga0.9As and Al0.25Ga0.75As layer pairs can reduce the vertical far field divergence to 10.6° full width at half maximum (FWHM). The broad area (BA) lasers show a very high internal quantum efficiency ηi of 98% and low internal loss αi of 1.92 cm-1. Ridge waveguide (RW) lasers with 3 mm cavity length and 5um strip width provide 430 mW stable single transverse mode output at 500 mA injection current with power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 47% under continuous wave (CW) mode. A maximum PCE of 50% is obtained at the 300 mA injection current. A very low vertical far field divergence of 9.4° is obtained at 100 mA injection. At 500 mA injection, the vertical far field divergence increases to 11°, the beam quality factors M2 values are 1.707 in vertical direction and 1.769 in lateral direction.

  7. Recent progress in chiral photonic band-gap liquid crystals for laser applications.

    PubMed

    Furumi, Seiichi

    2010-12-01

    This article describes a brief review of recent research advances in chiral liquid crystals (CLCs) for laser applications. The CLC molecules have an intrinsic capability to spontaneously organize supramolecular helical assemblages consisting of liquid crystalline layers through their helical twisting power. Such CLC supramolecular helical structures can be regarded as one-dimensional photonic crystals (PhCs). Owing to their supramolecular helical structures, the CLCs show negative birefringence along the helical axis. Selective reflection of circularly polarized light is the most unique and important optical property in order to generate internal distributed feedback effect for optically-excited laser emission. When a fluorescent dye is embedded in the CLC medium, optical excitation gives rise to stimulated laser emission peak(s) at the band edge(s) and/or within the CLC selective reflection. Furthermore, the optically-excited laser emission peaks can be controlled by external stimuli through the self-organization of CLC molecules. This review introduces the research background of CLCs carried out on the PhC realm, and highlights intriguing precedents of various CLC materials for laser applications. It would be greatly advantageous to fabricate active CLC laser devices by controlling the supramolecular helical structures. Taking account of the peculiar features, we can envisage that a wide variety of supramolecular helical structures of CLC materials will play leading roles in next-generation optoelectronic molecular devices. Copyright © 2010 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Topologically evolved photonic crystals: breaking the world record in band gap size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal, Osama R.; El-Beltagy, Mohammed A.; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2012-04-01

    Using topology optimization, a photonic crystal (PtC) unit cell can be designed to exhibit favorable electromagnetic wave propagation properties. Among these is the opening of a band gap (BG) with the largest possible ratio of width to midgap frequency. In this paper the aim is to maximize the relative size of the first and fourth relative BGs of two-dimensional (2D) PtCs with a square lattice configuration. In addition, we examine the effects of the degree of unit cell symmetry on the relative BG size and on the geometric traits of the optimized topologies. We use a specialized genetic algorithm (GA) for our search. The results show that the type of symmetry constraint imposed has a significant, and rather subtle, effect on the unit cell topology and BG size of the emerging optimal designs. In pursuit of record values of BG size, we report two low-symmetry unit cells as an outcome of our search efforts to date: one with a relative BG size of 46% for TE waves and the other with a relative BG size of 47% for TM waves.

  9. Broad-band, RF-photonic antennas: System and integrated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ligeng

    1997-07-01

    We analyze an optically controlled microwave phased array antenna system whereby beam forming is accomplished with a large number of antenna elements that can receive any of several different true-time-delays from a single fiber using multi-channel optical heterodyne techniques. The system performance such as the signal-to-noise ratio, signal-to-interchannel interference ratio, and dynamic range (DR) for various modulation-demodulation schemes (i.e., AM, FM and PM) are quantitatively analyzed. An experimental system insensitive to laser linewidth and IF frequency instabilities is demonstrated for the first time. We demonstrate accurate true-time delay across the L band (from 0.8 to 1.5 GHz). The DR for one channel is 52 dB/MHz. For a narrow channel spacing of 1 A at 1.55 μm wavelength, the interchannel interference is <- 50dB. It is found that this system provides improved controllability over direct detection methods, and can meet the stringent requirements of modern high resolution microwave antenna systems. Monolithic photonic integration using vertical twin- waveguide (TG) structure based on a single-step MBE grown InP/InGaAsP material is also studied as a means for practically implementing large scale photonic systems such as the above system. Specifically, integration of a MQW laser with a passive waveguide is demonstrated in this material with a record high 45% light coupling. An InGaAs loss layer is introduced for the first time to ensure a constant laser feedback and output coupling by eliminating even mode propagation, while having little effect on the odd mode. Finally, we have investigated means to obtain high efficiency, high power semiconductor lasers for use in high DR, and high density RF-optical links, employing a 1.5 μm wavelength InGaAsP/InP separate confinement multi-quantum well structure with broadened waveguides. A record low internal loss of 1.3 cm -1 (compared to a previous value of 3.5 cm-1) and threshold current density of 73 A/cm2 per

  10. Band structure of cavity-type hypersonic phononic crystals fabricated by femtosecond laser-induced two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhymzhanov, A. M.; Gueddida, A.; Alonso-Redondo, E.; Utegulov, Z. N.; Perevoznik, D.; Kurselis, K.; Chichkov, B. N.; El Boudouti, E. H.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Fytas, G.

    2016-05-01

    The phononic band diagram of a periodic square structure fabricated by femtosecond laser pulse-induced two photon polymerization is recorded by Brillouin light scattering (BLS) at hypersonic (GHz) frequencies and computed by finite element method. The theoretical calculations along the two main symmetry directions quantitatively capture the band diagrams of the air- and liquid-filled structure and moreover represent the BLS intensities. The theory helps identify the observed modes, reveals the origin of the observed bandgaps at the Brillouin zone boundaries, and unravels direction dependent effective medium behavior.

  11. Band structure of cavity-type hypersonic phononic crystals fabricated by femtosecond laser-induced two-photon polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhymzhanov, A. M.; Utegulov, Z. N. E-mail: fytas@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Gueddida, A.; Alonso-Redondo, E.; Perevoznik, D.; Kurselis, K.; Chichkov, B. N.; El Boudouti, E. H.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Fytas, G. E-mail: fytas@mpip-mainz.mpg.de

    2016-05-16

    The phononic band diagram of a periodic square structure fabricated by femtosecond laser pulse-induced two photon polymerization is recorded by Brillouin light scattering (BLS) at hypersonic (GHz) frequencies and computed by finite element method. The theoretical calculations along the two main symmetry directions quantitatively capture the band diagrams of the air- and liquid-filled structure and moreover represent the BLS intensities. The theory helps identify the observed modes, reveals the origin of the observed bandgaps at the Brillouin zone boundaries, and unravels direction dependent effective medium behavior.

  12. Spin-wave band-pass filters based on yttrium iron garnet films for tunable microwave photonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. B.; Drozdovskii, A. V.; Nikitin, A. A.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports on development of tunable band-pass microwave filters for microwave photonic generators. The filters were fabricated with the use of epitaxial yttrium iron garnet films. Principle of operation of the filters was based on excitation, propagation, and reception of spin waves. In order to obtain narrow pass band, the filtering properties of excitation and reception antennas were exploited. The filters demonstrated insertion losses of 2-3 dB, bandwidth of 25-35 MHz, and tuning range of up to 1.5 GHz in the range 3-7 GHz.

  13. Measurement of spontaneous-emission enhancement near the one-dimensional photonic band edge of semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tocci, Michael D.; Scalora, Michael; Bloemer, Mark J.; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Bowden, Charles M.

    1996-04-01

    We present results of an experimental investigation into alteration of the spontaneous emission spectrum of GaAs from within one-dimensional photonic band gap (PBG) structures. The PBG samples are multilayer AlAs/Al0.2Ga0.8As/GaAs p-i-n light-emitting diodes, with layers arranged as a distributed Bragg reflector. The emission spectra normal to the layers are measured, and we use a simple method to model the power spectrum of spontaneous emission from within the structures. We find that the emitted power is enhanced by a factor of 3.5 at the frequencies near the photonic band edge.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Mulberry Vein Banding Associated Virus, a New Tospovirus Infecting Mulberry

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jiaorong; Liu, Pingping; Zhu, Liling; Zou, Chengwu; Li, Jieqiu; Chen, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Mulberry vein banding associated virus (MVBaV) that infects mulberry plants with typical vein banding symptoms had been identified as a tentative species of the genus Tospovirus based on the homology of N gene sequence to those of tospoviruses. In this study, the complete sequence of the tripartite RNA genome of MVBaV was determined and analyzed. The L RNA has 8905 nucleotides (nt) and encodes the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of 2877 aa amino acids (aa) in the viral complementary (vc) strand. The RdRp of MVBaV shares the highest aa sequence identity (85.9%) with that of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), and contains conserved motifs shared with those of the species of the genus Tospovirus. The M RNA contains 4731 nt and codes in ambisense arrangement for the NSm protein of 309 aa in the sense strand and the Gn/Gc glycoprotein precursor (GP) of 1,124 aa in the vc strand. The NSm and GP of MVBaV share the highest aa sequence identities with those of Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) and Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) (83.2% and 84.3%, respectively). The S RNA is 3294 nt in length and contains two open reading frames (ORFs) in an ambisense coding strategy, encoding a 439-aa non-structural protein (NSs) and the 277-aa nucleocapsid protein (N), respectively. The NSs and N also share the highest aa sequence identity (71.1% and 74.4%, respectively) with those of CaCV. Phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp, NSm, GP, NSs, and N proteins showed that MVBaV is most closely related to CaCV and GBNV and that these proteins cluster with those of the WSMoV serogroup, and that MVBaV seems to be a species bridging the two subgroups within the WSMoV serogroup of tospoviruses in evolutionary aspect, suggesting that MVBaV represents a distinct tospovirus. Analysis of S RNA sequence uncovered the highly conserved 5’-/3’-ends and the coding regions, and the variable region of IGR with divergent patterns among MVBaV isolates. PMID:26291718

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Mulberry Vein Banding Associated Virus, a New Tospovirus Infecting Mulberry.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jiaorong; Liu, Pingping; Zhu, Liling; Zou, Chengwu; Li, Jieqiu; Chen, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Mulberry vein banding associated virus (MVBaV) that infects mulberry plants with typical vein banding symptoms had been identified as a tentative species of the genus Tospovirus based on the homology of N gene sequence to those of tospoviruses. In this study, the complete sequence of the tripartite RNA genome of MVBaV was determined and analyzed. The L RNA has 8905 nucleotides (nt) and encodes the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of 2877 aa amino acids (aa) in the viral complementary (vc) strand. The RdRp of MVBaV shares the highest aa sequence identity (85.9%) with that of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), and contains conserved motifs shared with those of the species of the genus Tospovirus. The M RNA contains 4731 nt and codes in ambisense arrangement for the NSm protein of 309 aa in the sense strand and the Gn/Gc glycoprotein precursor (GP) of 1,124 aa in the vc strand. The NSm and GP of MVBaV share the highest aa sequence identities with those of Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) and Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) (83.2% and 84.3%, respectively). The S RNA is 3294 nt in length and contains two open reading frames (ORFs) in an ambisense coding strategy, encoding a 439-aa non-structural protein (NSs) and the 277-aa nucleocapsid protein (N), respectively. The NSs and N also share the highest aa sequence identity (71.1% and 74.4%, respectively) with those of CaCV. Phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp, NSm, GP, NSs, and N proteins showed that MVBaV is most closely related to CaCV and GBNV and that these proteins cluster with those of the WSMoV serogroup, and that MVBaV seems to be a species bridging the two subgroups within the WSMoV serogroup of tospoviruses in evolutionary aspect, suggesting that MVBaV represents a distinct tospovirus. Analysis of S RNA sequence uncovered the highly conserved 5'-/3'-ends and the coding regions, and the variable region of IGR with divergent patterns among MVBaV isolates.

  16. Spontaneous emission from a two-level atom in anisotropic one-band photonic crystals: A fractional calculus approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.-N.; Huang, C.-H.; Cheng, S.-C.; Hsieh, W.-F.

    2010-02-15

    Spontaneous emission (SE) from a two-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal (PC) is investigated by the fractional calculus. Physical phenomena of the SE are studied analytically by solving the fractional kinetic equations of the SE. There is a dynamical discrepancy between the SE of anisotropic and isotropic PCs. We find that, contrary to the SE phenomenon of the isotropic PC, the SE near the band edge of an anisotropic PC shows no photon-atom bound state. It is consistent with the experimental results of Barth, Schuster, Gruber, and Cichos [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 243902 (2006)] that the anisotropic property of the system enhances the SE. We also study effects of dispersion curvatures on the changes of the photonic density of states and the appearance of the diffusion fields in the SE.

  17. Defect guidance in kagome-clad fibers: the role of photonic band gaps and self-similarity of the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, H.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the influence of the structural self-similarity of the kagome lattice on the defect modes and waveguiding properties of hollow-core kagome-cladding fibers. We show that the guidance of such fibers is influenced by photonic band gaps (PBGs) which appear for a subset of the kagome lattice. Using these insights, we provide design considerations to further decrease loss in kagome-clad fibers.

  18. A theoretical roadmap for optical lithography of photonic band gap microchips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Timothy Y. M.

    This thesis presents designs and fabrication algorithms for 3D photonic band gap (PBG) material synthesis and embedded optical waveguide networks. These designs are suitable for large scale micro-fabrication using optical lithography methods. The first of these is a criss-crossing pore structure based on fabrication by direct photo-electrochemical etching in single-crystal silicon. We demonstrate that a modulation of the pore radius between pore crossing points leads to a moderately large PBG. We delineate a variety of PBG architectures amenable to fabrication by holographic lithography. In this technique, an optical interference pattern exposes a photo-sensitive material, leading to a template structure in the photoresist whose dielectric-air interface corresponds to an iso-intensity surface in the exposing interference pattern. We demonstrate PBG architectures obtainable from the interference patterns from four independent beams. The PBG materials may be fabricated by replicating the developed photoresist with established silicon replication methods. We identify optical beam configurations that optimize the intensity contrast in the photoresist. We describe the invention of a new approach to holographic lithography of PBG materials using the diffraction of light through a three-layer optical phase mask (OPM). We show how the diffraction-interference pattern resulting from single beam illumination of our OPM closely resembles a diamondlike architecture for suitable designs of the phase mask. It is suggested that OPML may both simplify and supercede all previous optical lithography approaches to PBG material synthesis. Finally, we demonstrate theoretically the creation of three-dimensional optical waveguide networks in holographically defined PBG materials. This requires the combination of direct laser writing (DLW) of lines of defects within the holographically-defined photoresist and the replication of the microchip template with a high refractive index

  19. Dual-function photonic integrated circuit for frequency octo-tupling or single-side-band modulation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mehedi; Maldonado-Basilio, Ramón; Hall, Trevor J

    2015-06-01

    A dual-function photonic integrated circuit for microwave photonic applications is proposed. The circuit consists of four linear electro-optic phase modulators connected optically in parallel within a generalized Mach-Zehnder interferometer architecture. The photonic circuit is arranged to have two separate output ports. A first port provides frequency up-conversion of a microwave signal from the electrical to the optical domain; equivalently single-side-band modulation. A second port provides tunable millimeter wave carriers by frequency octo-tupling of an appropriate amplitude RF carrier. The circuit exploits the intrinsic relative phases between the ports of multi-mode interference couplers to provide substantially all the static optical phases needed. The operation of the proposed dual-function photonic integrated circuit is verified by computer simulations. The performance of the frequency octo-tupling and up-conversion functions is analyzed in terms of the electrical signal to harmonic distortion ratio and the optical single side band to unwanted harmonics ratio, respectively.

  20. Tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with square-like Archimedean lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Liu, Shao-Bin E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, the tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional (2D) plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) composed of homogeneous plasma and dielectric (GaAs) with square-like Archimedean lattices (ladybug and bathroom lattices) for TM wave are theoretically investigated based on a modified plane wave expansion method. The type-1 structure is dielectric rods immersed in the plasma background, and the complementary structure is named as type-2 PPCs. Theoretical simulations demonstrate that the both types of PPCs with square-like Archimedean lattices have some advantages in obtaining the higher cut-off frequency, the larger PBGs, more number of PBGs, and the relative bandwidths compared to the conventional square lattices as the filling factor or radius of inserted rods is same. The influences of plasma frequency and radius of inserted rod on the properties of PBGs for both types of PPCs also are discussed in detail. The calculated results show that PBGs can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. The possibilities of all-angle negative refraction in such two types of PPCs at low bands also are discussed. Our calculations reveal that the all-angle negative phenomena can be observed in the first two TM bands, and the frequency range of all-angle negative refraction can be tuned by changing plasma frequency. Those properties can be used to design the optical switching and sensor.

  1. Tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with square-like Archimedean lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional (2D) plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) composed of homogeneous plasma and dielectric (GaAs) with square-like Archimedean lattices (ladybug and bathroom lattices) for TM wave are theoretically investigated based on a modified plane wave expansion method. The type-1 structure is dielectric rods immersed in the plasma background, and the complementary structure is named as type-2 PPCs. Theoretical simulations demonstrate that the both types of PPCs with square-like Archimedean lattices have some advantages in obtaining the higher cut-off frequency, the larger PBGs, more number of PBGs, and the relative bandwidths compared to the conventional square lattices as the filling factor or radius of inserted rods is same. The influences of plasma frequency and radius of inserted rod on the properties of PBGs for both types of PPCs also are discussed in detail. The calculated results show that PBGs can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. The possibilities of all-angle negative refraction in such two types of PPCs at low bands also are discussed. Our calculations reveal that the all-angle negative phenomena can be observed in the first two TM bands, and the frequency range of all-angle negative refraction can be tuned by changing plasma frequency. Those properties can be used to design the optical switching and sensor.

  2. Enhancement of negligible transmission band using hybrid periodic/Fibonacci photonic crystal in near infrared and microwave domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouldi, Abir; Kanzari, Mounir

    2012-06-01

    A hybrid structure of the type Bragg mirror-(Fibonacci)S is proposed to enhance the zero transmission band through the one dimensional photonic crystal in microwave domain and in the infrared. The efficiency of the configuration is proved in microwave domain for angles below 57°. In the infrared, the use of the configuration exhibits a large photonic band gap at any angle of incidence and for both polarizations. The proposed structure is a quarter wavelength omnidirectional mirror of 37 layers with a bandwidth larger than that of the periodic structure with an increasing ratio 3.7 and it covers all the optical telecommunication wavelengths 0.85, 1.3 and 1.55 μm. Unlike the previous devices, the structure is simple to fabricate and it shows interesting optical properties. The configuration Bragg mirror-(Fibonacci)S-Bragg mirror is also investigated to more extend the photonic band gap. Since different physical phenomena have their own appropriate physical scales, we exploited the physical properties of the proposed hybrid structure in different wavelength domains.

  3. AFM-Patterned 2-D Thin-Film Photonic Crystal Analyzed by Complete Angle Scatter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Scatter Distribution Function of Photonic Crystals,” Air Force Institute of Technology, Dayton, OH, Thesis 2009. [5] I. Prieto , B. Galiana, P. A... Francisco : Addison Wesley, 2002. 76 [38] Bahaa E. A. Saleh and Malvin Carl Teich, Fundamentals of Photonics, 2nd ed. Hoboken: Wiley, 2007. [39

  4. The complete mitochondrial genomes of two band-winged grasshoppers, Gastrimargus marmoratus and Oedaleus asiaticus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chuan; Liu, Chunxiang; Yang, Pengcheng; Kang, Le

    2009-01-01

    Background The two closely related species of band-winged grasshoppers, Gastrimargus marmoratus and Oedaleus asiaticus, display significant differences in distribution, biological characteristics and habitat preferences. They are so similar to their respective congeneric species that it is difficult to differentiate them from other species within each genus. Hoppers of the two species have quite similar morphologies to that of Locusta migratoria, hence causing confusion in species identification. Thus we determined and compared the mitochondrial genomes of G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus to address these questions. Results The complete mitochondrial genomes of G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus are 15,924 bp and 16,259 bp in size, respectively, with O. asiaticus being the largest among all known mitochondrial genomes in Orthoptera. Both mitochondrial genomes contain a standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and an A+T-rich region in the same order as those of the other analysed caeliferan species, but different from those of the ensiferan species by the rearrangement of trnD and trnK. The putative initiation codon for the cox1 gene in the two species is ATC. The presence of different sized tandem repeats in the A+T-rich region leads to size variation between their mitochondrial genomes. Except for nad2, nad4L, and nad6, most of the caeliferan mtDNA genes exhibit low levels of divergence. In phylogenetic analyses, the species from the suborder Caelifera form a monophyletic group, as is the case for the Ensifera. Furthermore, the two suborders cluster as sister groups, supporting the monophyly of Orthoptera. Conclusion The mitochondrial genomes of both G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus harbor the typical 37 genes and an A+T-rich region, exhibiting similar characters to those of other grasshopper species. Characterization of the two mitochondrial genomes has enriched our knowledge on mitochondrial genomes of Orthoptera. PMID

  5. The complete mitochondrial genomes of two band-winged grasshoppers, Gastrimargus marmoratus and Oedaleus asiaticus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuan; Liu, Chunxiang; Yang, Pengcheng; Kang, Le

    2009-04-10

    The two closely related species of band-winged grasshoppers, Gastrimargus marmoratus and Oedaleus asiaticus, display significant differences in distribution, biological characteristics and habitat preferences. They are so similar to their respective congeneric species that it is difficult to differentiate them from other species within each genus. Hoppers of the two species have quite similar morphologies to that of Locusta migratoria, hence causing confusion in species identification. Thus we determined and compared the mitochondrial genomes of G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus to address these questions. The complete mitochondrial genomes of G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus are 15,924 bp and 16,259 bp in size, respectively, with O. asiaticus being the largest among all known mitochondrial genomes in Orthoptera. Both mitochondrial genomes contain a standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and an A+T-rich region in the same order as those of the other analysed caeliferan species, but different from those of the ensiferan species by the rearrangement of trnD and trnK. The putative initiation codon for the cox1 gene in the two species is ATC. The presence of different sized tandem repeats in the A+T-rich region leads to size variation between their mitochondrial genomes. Except for nad2, nad4L, and nad6, most of the caeliferan mtDNA genes exhibit low levels of divergence. In phylogenetic analyses, the species from the suborder Caelifera form a monophyletic group, as is the case for the Ensifera. Furthermore, the two suborders cluster as sister groups, supporting the monophyly of Orthoptera. The mitochondrial genomes of both G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus harbor the typical 37 genes and an A+T-rich region, exhibiting similar characters to those of other grasshopper species. Characterization of the two mitochondrial genomes has enriched our knowledge on mitochondrial genomes of Orthoptera.

  6. Molecular analysis of complete genomic sequences of four isolates of Gooseberry vein banding associated virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Presence of Gooseberry vein banding associated virus (GVBaV), a badnavirus in the family Caulimoviridae, is strongly correlated with gooseberry vein banding disease in Ribes spp. In this study, full-length genomic sequences of four GVBaV isolates from different hosts and geographic regions were det...

  7. One-photon band gap engineering of borate glass doped with ZnO for photonics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Baki, Manal; Abdel-Wahab, Fathy A.; El-Diasty, Fouad

    2012-04-01

    Lithium tungsten borate glass of the composition (0.56-x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0.4Li{sub 2}O-xZnO-0.04WO{sub 3} (0 {<=}x{<=} 0.1 mol. %) is prepared for photonics applications. The glass is doped with ZnO to tune the glass absorption characteristics in a wide spectrum range (200-2500 nm). Chemical bond approach, including chemical structure, electronegativity, bond ionicity, nearest-neighbor coordination, and other chemical bonding aspect, is used to analyze and to explain the obtained glass properties such as: transmittance, absorption, electronic structure parameters (bandgap, Fermi level, and Urbach exciton-phonon coupling), Wannier free excitons excitation (applying Elliott's model), and two-photon absorption coefficient as a result of replacement of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} by ZnO.

  8. An Unusual Content in a Congenital Hernia - Complete Spleno -gonadal Fusion Band.

    PubMed

    Mahalakshmi, V N; Barathi, S Deepak

    2013-06-01

    Six years old boy underwent elective inguinal exploration for left congenital hernia. Per- operatively, an elongated, purplish-red, fleshy band of tissue was found inside the sac, adherent to the upper pole of testis. Biopsy was taken and the wound closed. An MRI done after 4 weeks proved the origin of the band from spleen. Laparotomy and excision of the band was done. The histo-pathology of the specimen was reported as normal splenic tissue. The above features are consistent with a diagnosis of spleno - gonadal fusion (SGF).

  9. Photonic dual RF beam reception of an X band phased array antenna using a photonic crystal fiber-based true-time-delay beamformer.

    PubMed

    Subbaraman, Harish; Chen, Maggie Yihong; Chen, Ray T

    2008-12-01

    We report dual RF beam reception of an X band phased array antenna using a photonic crystal fiber (PCF)-based delay network. Each incoming RF signal can be independently received, and the angle of arrival can be determined based on the delay time-dependent wavelength. Two RF signals with frequencies 8.4 and 12 GHz impinge upon an X-band antenna array from -7.4 degrees and -21.2 degrees . These signals are detected, and the angle of arrival is determined with a very good degree of accuracy using PCF-based true-time delay. The total number of RF beams that can be simultaneously detected is limited by the hardware availability and the bandwidth of the wavelength differentiation capability of the system.

  10. A design of intermediate band solar cell for photon ratchet with multi-layer MoS2 nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo-Fan; Wu, Yuh-Renn

    2017-05-01

    We presented an idea to increase the efficiency of the MoS2 solar cells with the special E-k relation of the intermediate band in MoS2 nanoribbon structures. From the calculations of armchair nanoribbon structures by the tight binding method, we found that the continuous surface states forming at the middle bandgap has the lowest energy states at X-valley. This dispersion relation will allow phonons to rapidly scatter electrons to the lower X valley of the intermediate band in pico-second scale. Simulations show that this will prevent electrons to be directly recombined with the holes in the Γ valley. After modelling the transition rates of photon absorption and emission with the solar spectrum, it shows a significant improvement of the short circuit current compared to the bulk MoS2 structures without intermediate bands.

  11. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed. PMID:25822135

  12. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein distribution in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-03-30

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed.

  13. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-03-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed.

  14. Complete band gaps in a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) phononic plate with cross-like holes: numerical design and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Miniaci, Marco; Marzani, Alessandro; Testoni, Nicola; De Marchi, Luca

    2015-02-01

    In this work the existence of band gaps in a phononic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plate with a square lattice of cross-like holes is numerically and experimentally investigated. First, a parametric analysis is carried out to find plate thickness and cross-like holes dimensions capable to nucleate complete band gaps. In this analysis the band structures of the unitary cell in the first Brillouin zone are computed by exploiting the Bloch-Floquet theorem. Next, time transient finite element analyses are performed to highlight the shielding effect of a finite dimension phononic region, formed by unitary cells arranged into four concentric square rings, on the propagation of guided waves. Finally, ultrasonic experimental tests in pitch-catch configuration across the phononic region, machined on a PVC plate, are executed and analyzed. Very good agreement between numerical and experimental results are found confirming the existence of the predicted band gaps.

  15. Experimental evidence of the photonic band gap in hybrid one-dimensional photonic crystal based on a mixture of (HMDSO, O2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amri, R.; Sahel, S.; Manaa, C.; Bouaziz, L.; Gamra, D.; Lejeune, M.; Clin, M.; Zellama, K.; Bouchriha, H.

    2016-08-01

    Hybrid One-dimensional photonic crystal coated from a mixture of an organic compound (HMDSO) and oxygen (O2) is elaborated by PECVD technique. The originality of the method consists in obtaining layers of different permittivity with the same gas mixture, but with different flow. The change in flow is optimized to obtain organic/inorganic layers of good quality with high and low refractive index of 2.1 and 1.4 corresponding respectively to HMDSO and SiO2 materials as assigned by IR measurement. Evidence of the photonic band gap is obtained by measuring the transmissions and reflections spectra which show that it appears only after 13 periods with a width of 325 nm corresponding to energy 3.8 eV. We have also introduced a defect in this photonic structure by changing the thickness of central layer, and observed the presence of a frequency mode corresponding to this defect. Our results are interpreted by using a theoretical model based on transfer matrix wich well reproduced the experimental data.

  16. Photonic band gap and defect mode of one-dimensional photonic crystal coated from a mixture of (HMDSO, N2) layers deposited by PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amri, R.; Sahel, S.; Gamra, D.; Lejeune, M.; Clin, M.; Zellama, K.; Bouchriha, H.

    2017-04-01

    One dimensional photonic crystal based on a mixture of an organic compound HMDSO and nitrogen N2, is elaborated by radiofrequency Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (RF-PECVD) at different radiofrequency powers. The variation of the radiofrequency power for a flow of N2/HMDSO ratio equal to 0.4, leads to obtain two kinds of layers A and B with refractive index nA = 2 and nB = 1.55 corresponding to RF power of 200 W and 20 W, respectively. The analysis of the infrared results shows that these layers have the same chemical composition element with different structure. These layers, which exhibit a good indexes difference (nA - nB) contrast, allowed then the elaboration of a one-photonic crystal from the same initial gas mixture, which is the aim of this work. After the optimization of the layers thickness, we have measured transmission and reflection spectra and we found that the photonic band gap (PBG) appears after 15 periods of alternating A and B deposited layers. The introduction of defect in the structure leads to obtain a localized mode in the center of the PBG corresponding to the telecommunication wave length 1.55 μm. Finally, we have successfully interpreted our experimental results by using a theoretical model based on transfer matrix method.

  17. Photonic band structures of periodic arrays of pores in a metallic host: tight-binding beyond the quasistatic approximation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangmoo; Stroud, D

    2013-08-26

    We have calculated the photonic band structures of metallic inverse opals and of periodic linear chains of spherical pores in a metallic host, below a plasma frequency ωp. In both cases, we use a tight-binding approximation, assuming a Drude dielectric function for the metallic component, but without making the quasistatic approximation. The tight-binding modes are linear combinations of the single-cavity transverse magnetic (TM) modes. For the inverse-opal structures, the lowest modes are analogous to those constructed from the three degenerate atomic p-states in fcc crystals. For the linear chains, in the limit of small spheres compared to a wavelength, the results bear some qualitative resemblance to the dispersion relation for metal spheres in an insulating host, as calculated by Brongersma et al. [Phys. Rev. B 62, R16356 (2000)]. Because the electromagnetic fields of these modes decay exponentially in the metal, there are no radiative losses, in contrast to the case of arrays of metallic spheres in air. We suggest that this tight-binding approach to photonic band structures of such metallic inverse materials may be a useful approach for studying photonic crystals containing metallic components, even beyond the quasistatic approximation.

  18. Photonic band structures of periodic arrays of pores in a metallic host: tight-binding beyond the quasistatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangmoo; Stroud, David

    2014-03-01

    We have calculated the photonic band structures of metallic inverse opals and of periodic linear chains of spherical pores in a metallic host, below a plasma frequency ωp. In both cases, we use a tight-binding approximation, assuming a Drude dielectric function for the metallic component, but without making the quasistatic approximation. The tight-binding modes are linear combinations of the single-cavity transverse magnetic (TM) modes. For the inverse-opal structures, the lowest modes are analogous to those constructed from the three degenerate atomic p-states in fcc crystals. For the linear chains, in the limit of small spheres compared to a wavelength, the results bear some qualitative resemblance to the dispersion relation for metal spheres in an insulating host, as calculated by Brongersma et al. [Phys. Rev. B 62, R16356 (2000)]. Because the electromagnetic fields of these modes decay exponentially in the metal, there are no radiative losses, in contrast to the case of arrays of metallic spheres in air. We suggest that this tight-binding approach to photonic band structures of such metallic inverse materials may be a useful approach for studying photonic crystals containing metallic components. This work was supported by KIAS, by NSF-MRSEC at OSU (DMR-0820414), and by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER46424. Computing resources were provided by OSC and by Abacus at KIAS.

  19. Control of spontaneous emission of a single quantum emitter through a time-modulated photonic-band-gap environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calajò, Giuseppe; Rizzuto, Lucia; Passante, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    We consider the spontaneous emission of a two-level quantum emitter, such as an atom or a quantum dot, in a modulated time-dependent environment with a photonic band gap. An example of such an environment is a dynamical photonic crystal or any other environment with a band gap whose properties are modulated in time, in the effective mass approximation. After introducing our model of a dynamical photonic crystal, we show that it allows new possibilities to control and tailor the physical features of the emitted radiation, specifically its frequency spectrum. In the weak-coupling limit and in an adiabatic case, we obtain the emitted spectrum and we show the appearance of two lateral peaks due to the presence of the modulated environment, separated from the central peak by the modulation frequency. We show that the two side peaks are not symmetric in height, and that their height ratio can be exploited to investigate the density of states of the environment. Our results show that a dynamical environment can give further possibilities to modify the spontaneous emission features, such as its spectrum and emission rate, with respect to a static one. Observability of the phenomena we obtain is discussed, as well as relevance for tailoring and engineering radiative processes.

  20. Femtosecond Pulse Characterization as Applied to One-Dimensional Photonic Band Edge Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Gamble, Lisa J.; Diffey, William M.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to control the group velocity and phase of an optical pulse is important to many current active areas of research. Electronically addressable one-dimensional photonic crystals are an attractive candidate to achieve this control. This report details work done toward the characterization of photonic crystals and improvement of the characterization technique. As part of the work, the spectral dependence of the group delay imparted by a GaAs/AlAs photonic crystal was characterized. Also, a first generation an electrically addressable photonic crystal was tested for the ability to electronically control the group delay. The measurement technique, using 100 femtosecond continuum pulses was improved to yield high spectral resolution (1.7 nanometers) and concurrently with high temporal resolution (tens of femtoseconds). Conclusions and recommendations based upon the work done are also presented.

  1. Designing photonic band gaps in SiO2-based face-centered cubic-structured crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Mei; Volotinen, Tarja T.; Kulkarni, Sulabha K.; Belova, Lyubov; Rao, K. Venkat

    2011-01-01

    We designed face-centered cubic-structured (fcc) photonic crystals whose lattice parameters were tuned by varying the size of the constituent spherical silica particles in the range 100 to 520 nm. From wide-angle optical transmission investigations and Gaussian fitting of the absorbance spectra over UV-Vis-Near IR range, we found that in these crystals the Bragg wavelengths of the photonic band gaps (PBGs) corresponding to the reflected crystal planes linearly increase with the size of the spheres as expected. From this data, the average refractive index along the different crystal planes of the fcc structure was found to be in the 1.24 to 1.32 range. The Bragg wavelengths were tuned between 400 and 1100 nm. Thus, photonic crystals of the same structure can be designed to tune the Bragg wavelengths of PBGs by selecting the sphere size. These studies open up possibilities to design a new class of ``smart'' photonic crystals consisting of dielectric entities of sub-micron silica spheres with added functionality from magnetic or piezoelectric nanoparticles embedded in them.

  2. Analyzing the photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with fractal Sierpinski gasket structure based on the Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional plasma-dielectric photonic crystals (2D PPCs) under a transverse-magnetic (TM) wave are theoretically investigated by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method where Monte Carlo method is introduced. The proposed PWE method can be used to calculate the band structures of 2D PPCs which possess arbitrary-shaped filler and any lattice. The efficiency and convergence of the present method are discussed by a numerical example. The configuration of 2D PPCs is the square lattices with fractal Sierpinski gasket structure whose constituents are homogeneous and isotropic. The type-1 PPCs is filled with the dielectric cylinders in the plasma background, while its complementary structure is called type-2 PPCs, in which plasma cylinders behave as the fillers in the dielectric background. The calculated results reveal that the enough accuracy and good convergence can be obtained, if the number of random sampling points of Monte Carlo method is large enough. The band structures of two types of PPCs with different fractal orders of Sierpinski gasket structure also are theoretically computed for a comparison. It is demonstrate that the PBGs in higher frequency region are more easily produced in the type-1 PPCs rather than in the type-2 PPCs. Sierpinski gasket structure introduced in the 2D PPCs leads to a larger cutoff frequency, enhances and induces more PBGs in high frequency region. The effects of configurational parameters of two types of PPCs on the PBGs are also investigated in detail. The results show that the PBGs of the PPCs can be easily manipulated by tuning those parameters. The present type-1 PPCs are more suitable to design the tunable compacted devices.

  3. Analyzing the photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with fractal Sierpinski gasket structure based on the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional plasma-dielectric photonic crystals (2D PPCs) under a transverse-magnetic (TM) wave are theoretically investigated by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method where Monte Carlo method is introduced. The proposed PWE method can be used to calculate the band structures of 2D PPCs which possess arbitrary-shaped filler and any lattice. The efficiency and convergence of the present method are discussed by a numerical example. The configuration of 2D PPCs is the square lattices with fractal Sierpinski gasket structure whose constituents are homogeneous and isotropic. The type-1 PPCs is filled with the dielectric cylinders in the plasma background, while its complementary structure is called type-2 PPCs, in which plasma cylinders behave as the fillers in the dielectric background. The calculated results reveal that the enough accuracy and good convergence can be obtained, if the number of random sampling points of Monte Carlo method is large enough. The band structures of two types of PPCs with different fractal orders of Sierpinski gasket structure also are theoretically computed for a comparison. It is demonstrate that the PBGs in higher frequency region are more easily produced in the type-1 PPCs rather than in the type-2 PPCs. Sierpinski gasket structure introduced in the 2D PPCs leads to a larger cutoff frequency, enhances and induces more PBGs in high frequency region. The effects of configurational parameters of two types of PPCs on the PBGs are also investigated in detail. The results show that the PBGs of the PPCs can be easily manipulated by tuning those parameters. The present type-1 PPCs are more suitable to design the tunable compacted devices.

  4. Efficient frequency downconversion at the single photon level from the red spectral range to the telecommunications C-band.

    PubMed

    Zaske, Sebastian; Lenhard, Andreas; Becher, Christoph

    2011-06-20

    We report on single photon frequency downconversion from the red part of the spectrum (738 nm) to the telecommunications C-band. By mixing attenuated laser pulses with an average photon number per pulse < 1 with a strong continuous light field at 1403 nm in a periodically poled Zn:LiNbO3 ridge waveguide an internal conversion efficiency of ∼ 73% is achieved. We further investigate the noise properties of the process by measuring the output spectrum. Our results indicate that by narrow spectral filtering a quantum interface should be feasible which bridges the wavelength gap between quantum emitters like color centers in diamond emitting in the red part of the spectrum and low-loss fiber-optic telecommunications wavelengths.

  5. Broadband source of telecom-band polarization-entangled photon-pairs for wavelength-multiplexed entanglement distribution.

    PubMed

    Lim, Han Chuen; Yoshizawa, Akio; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2008-09-29

    Studies on telecom-band entangled photon-pair sources for entanglement distribution have so far focused on their narrowband operations. Fiber-based sources are seriously limited by spontaneous Raman scattering while sources based on quasi-phase-matched crystals or waveguides are usually narrowband because of long device lengths and/or operations far from degeneracy. An entanglement distributor would have to multiplex many such narrowband sources before entanglement distribution to fully utilize the available fiber transmission bandwidth. In this work, we demonstrate a broadband source of polarization-entangled photon-pairs suitable for wavelength-multiplexed entanglement distribution over optical fiber. We show that our source is potentially capable of simultaneously supporting up to forty-four independent wavelength channels.

  6. Alcohol sensing over O+E+S+C+L+U transmission band based on porous cored octagonal photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bikash Kumar; Islam, Md. Shadidul; Ahmed, Kawsar; Asaduzzaman, Sayed

    2017-06-01

    A micro structure porous cored octagonal photonic crystal fiber (P-OPCF) has been proposed to sense aqueous analysts (alcohol series) over a wavelength range of 0.80 μm to 2.0 μm. By implementing a full vectorial finite element method (FEM), the numerical simulation on the proposed O-PCF has been analyzed. Numerical investigation shows that high sensitivity can be gained by changing the structural parameters. The obtained result shows the sensitivities of 66.78%, 67.66%, 68.34%, 68.72%, and 69.09%, and the confinement losses of 2.42×10-10 dB/m, 3.28×10-11 dB/m, 1.21×10-6 dB/m, 4.79×10-10 dB/m, and 4.99×10-9 dB/m at the 1.33 μm wavelength for methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, and pentanol, respectively can satisfy the condition of much legibility to install an optical system. The effects of the varying core and cladding diameters, pitch distance, operating wavelength, and effective refractive index are also reported here. It reflects that a significant sensitivity and low confinement loss can be achieved by the proposed P-OPCF. The proposed P-OPCF also covers the wavelength band (O+E+S+C+L+U). The investigation also exhibits that the sensitivity increases when the wavelength increases like S O-band< S E-band < S S-band < S C-band < S L-band < S U-band. This research observation has much pellucidity which has remarkable impact on the field of optical fiber sensor.

  7. Alcohol sensing over O+E+S+C+L+U transmission band based on porous cored octagonal photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bikash Kumar; Islam, Md. Shadidul; Ahmed, Kawsar; Asaduzzaman, Sayed

    2017-03-01

    A micro structure porous cored octagonal photonic crystal fiber (P-OPCF) has been proposed to sense aqueous analysts (alcohol series) over a wavelength range of 0.80 μm to 2.0 μm. By implementing a full vectorial finite element method (FEM), the numerical simulation on the proposed O-PCF has been analyzed. Numerical investigation shows that high sensitivity can be gained by changing the structural parameters. The obtained result shows the sensitivities of 66.78%, 67.66%, 68.34%, 68.72%, and 69.09%, and the confinement losses of 2.42×10-10 dB/m, 3.28×10-11 dB/m, 1.21×10-6 dB/m, 4.79×10-10 dB/m, and 4.99×10-9 dB/m at the 1.33 μm wavelength for methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, and pentanol, respectively can satisfy the condition of much legibility to install an optical system. The effects of the varying core and cladding diameters, pitch distance, operating wavelength, and effective refractive index are also reported here. It reflects that a significant sensitivity and low confinement loss can be achieved by the proposed P-OPCF. The proposed P-OPCF also covers the wavelength band (O+E+S+C+L+U). The investigation also exhibits that the sensitivity increases when the wavelength increases like S O-bandband band < S C-band band band. This research observation has much pellucidity which has remarkable impact on the field of optical fiber sensor.

  8. Ultrashort pulse propagation at the photonic band edge: Large tunable group delay with minimal distortion and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalora, M.; Flynn, R. J.; Reinhardt, S. B.; Fork, R. L.; Bloemer, M. J.; Tocci, M. D.; Bowden, C. M.; Ledbetter, H. S.; Bendickson, J. M.; Dowling, J. P.; Leavitt, R. P.

    1996-08-01

    We examine optical pulse propagation through a 30-period, GaAs/AlAs, one-dimensional, periodic structure at the photonic band-edge transmission resonance. We predict theoretically-and demonstrate experimentally-an approximate energy, momentum, and form invariance of the transmitted pulse, as well as large group index (up to 13.5). The group index is tunable and many orders of magnitude more sensitive to variation in material refractive index than for bulk material. We interpret this observation in terms of time-dependent electromagnetic states of the pulse-crystal system.

  9. Fiber-optic CATV system performance improvement by using split-band technique and photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hai-Han; Tzeng, Shah-Jye; Chuang, Yao-Wei; Chen, Guan-Lin; Peng, Hsiang-Chun

    2007-03-01

    A directly-modulated amplitude modulation-vestigial sideband (AM-VSB) cable television (CATV) erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA)-repeated system that uses split-band technique and photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as a broadband dispersion compensation device is proposed and demonstrated. In contrast to a conventional externally-modulated fiber-optic CATV system, good performance of carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR), composite second order (CSO) and composite triple beat (CTB) were obtained in our proposed systems over a combination of 100-km single-mode fiber (SMF) and 3.6 km PCF.

  10. Stellar Multi-Photon Absorption Materials: Beyond the Telecommunication Wavelength Band.

    PubMed

    Schwich, Torsten; Barlow, Adam; Cifuentes, Marie P; Szeremeta, Janusz; Samoc, Marek; Humphrey, Mark G

    2017-06-22

    Very large molecular two- and three-photon absorption cross-sections are achieved by appending ligated bis(diphosphine)ruthenium units to oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) (OPE)-based "stars" with arms up to 7 phenyleneethynylene (PE) units in length. Extremely large three- and four-photon absorption cross-sections, through the telecommunications wavelengths range and beyond, are obtained for these complexes upon optimizing OPE length and the ruthenium-coordinated peripheral ligand. Multi-photon absorption (MPA) cross-sections are optimized with stars possessing arms 2 PE units in length. Peripheral ligand variation modifies MPA merit and, in particular, 4-nitrophenylethynyl ligand incorporation enhances maximal MPA values and "switches on" four-photon absorption (4PA) in these low molecular-weight complexes. The 4-nitrophenylethynyl-ligated 2PE-armed star possesses a maximal four-photon absorption cross-section of 1.8×10(-108)  cm(8)  s(3) at 1750 nm, and significant MPA activity extending beyond 2000 nm. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Low-light-level nonlinear optics with rubidium atoms in hollow-core photonic band-gap fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, Amar Ramdas

    Low-light-level optical nonlinearities are of significant interest for performing operations such as single-photon switching and quantum non-demolition measurements on single-photons. To evoke strong nonlinearities from single-photons, one can enhance the matter-photon interaction using strongly nonlinear materials such as alkali vapors in combination with an appropriate geometry such as a waveguide, which provides a long interaction length while maintaining a small light mode area. We demonstrate for the first time that such a system can be experimentally realized by loading rubidium vapor inside a hollow-core photonic band-gap fiber. Using the technique of light-induced atomic desorption in this geometry, we have generated optical depths greater than 1000. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with control powers 1000 times lower than those used for hot vapor cells in a focused beam geometry. Working with such a high aspect ratio geometry requires us to identify and measure the various sources of decoherence via spectroscopy of desorbed atoms in the fiber. Using such techniques, we also estimate the temperature of the desorbing atoms inside the fiber. The desorption mechanism is studied, and we show that pulsed desorption beams of the right amplitude and duration can be used for generating precisely controlled optical depths. Finally, we investigate the use of various buffer gas techniques for increasing the effective transverse path of the atoms as they move across the fiber in order to reduce their ground state decoherence and map this effect as a function of buffer gas pressure.

  12. A compact dual-band bandpass filter based on porous silicon dual-microcavity of one-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Zhang, Hong-yan

    2015-03-01

    We propose a compact dual-band bandpass filter (BPF) based on one-dimensional porous silicon (PS) photonic crystal by electrochemical etching. By inserting three periods of high and low reflective index layers in the center of porous silicon microcavity (PSM), two sharp resonant peaks appear in the high reflectivity stop band on both sides of the resonance wavelength. Through simulation and experiment, the physical mechanisms of the two resonance peaks and the resonance wavelength are also studied. It is found that the resonance wavelength can be tuned only by adjusting the effective optical thickness (EOT) of each PS layer, in which different resonance wavelengths have different widths between the two sharp resonance peaks. Besides, the analysis indicates that oxidization makes the blue shift become larger for high wavelength than that for low wavelength. Such a fabricated BPF based on PS dual-microcavity is easy to be fabricated and low cost, which benefits the application of integrated optical devices.

  13. Group-index independent coupling to band engineered SOI photonic crystal waveguide with large slow-down factor.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Somayyeh; Hosseini, Amir; Xu, Xiaochuan; Subbaraman, Harish; Chen, Ray T

    2011-10-24

    Group-index independent coupling to a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) based band-engineered photonic crystal (PCW) waveguide is presented. A single hole size is used for designing both the PCW coupler and the band-engineered PCW to improve fabrication yield. Efficiency of several types of PCW couplers is numerically investigated. An on-chip integrated Fourier transform spectral interferometry device is used to experimentally determine the group-index while excluding the effect of the couplers. A low-loss, low-dispersion slow light transmission over 18 nm bandwidth under the silica light line with a group index of 26.5 is demonstrated, that corresponds to the largest slow-down factor of 0.31 ever demonstrated for a PCW with oxide bottom cladding.

  14. Investigation of the effect of noncircular scatterers on the band structure of anisotropic photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Fathollahi Khalkhali, T; Rezaei, B; Soltani Vala, A; Kalafi, M

    2013-06-01

    Using the supercell approach based on the plane wave expansion method, we analyze the photonic bandgap (PBG) of square and triangular photonic crystal slabs composed of air holes in an anisotropic tellurium background with SiO(2) as cladding material. Two shapes (square and hexagonal) are considered for air holes. We discuss the maximization of the full PBG width as a function of noncircular air hole parameters, their orientation, and also slab thickness. The numerical results show that both structures represent a full PBG with noticeable width, which can be helpful for designing optical devices.

  15. Flat-Band Slow Light in a Photonic Crystal Slab Waveguide by Vertical Geometry Adjustment and Selective Infiltration of Optofluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri-Birjandi, Mohammad Ali; Janfaza, Morteza; Tavousi, Alireza

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a photonic crystal slab waveguide (PhCSW) for slow light applications is presented. To obtain widest possible flat-bands of slow light regions—regions with large group index (n g), and very low group velocity dispersion (GVD)—two core parameters of PhCSW structure are investigated. The design procedure is based on vertical shifting of the first row of the air holes adjacent to the waveguide center and concurrent selective optofluidic infiltration of the second row. The criteria of {{< n_g \\rangle}} ± 10% variations is used for ease of definition and comparison of flat-band regions. By applying various geometry optimizations for the first row, our results suggest that a waveguide core of W 1.09 would provide a reasonable wide flat-band. Furthermore, infiltration of optofluidics in the second row alongside with geometry adjustments of the first row result in flexible control of 10 < n g < 32 and provide flat-band regions with large bandwidth (10 nm < Δλ < 21.5 nm). Also, negligible GVD as low as β 2 = 10-24 (s2/m) is achieved. Numerical simulations are calculated by means of the three-dimensional plane wave expansion method.

  16. CW-pumped telecom band polarization entangled photon pair generation in a Sagnac interferometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Shi, Bao-Sen

    2015-11-02

    Polarization entangled photon pair source is widely used in many quantum information processing applications such as teleportation, quantum communications, quantum computation and high precision quantum metrology. We report on the generation of a continuous-wave pumped 1550 nm polarization entangled photon pair source at telecom wavelength using a type-II periodically poled KTiOPO(4) (PPKTP) crystal in a Sagnac interferometer. Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference measurement yields signal and idler photon bandwidth of 2.4 nm. High quality of entanglement is verified by various kinds of measurements, for example two-photon interference fringes, Bell inequality and quantum states tomography. The source can be tuned over a broad range against temperature or pump power without loss of visibilities. This source will be used in our future experiments such as generation of orbital angular momentum entangled source at telecom wavelength for quantum frequency up-conversion, entanglement based quantum key distributions and many other quantum optics experiments at telecom wavelengths.

  17. Controllable transmission photonic band gap and all-optical switching behaviors of 1-D InAs/GaAs quantum-dot photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Xiang, Bowen; Xing, Yunsheng

    2016-12-01

    Transmission optical properties of one-dimensional (1-D) InAs/GaAs quantum-dot photonic crystal (QD-PC), composed of 400 elementary cells, were analyzed by using transfer matrix method. In our calculations, a homogeneous broadening with temperature and other inhomogeneous broadening with quantum dot (QD) size fluctuations are introduced. Our results show that a large optical Stark shift occurs at the high energy edge of the transmission photonic band-gap (TPBG) when, which exhibits the function of light with light, an external laser field acts resonantly on the excitons in the InAs QDs. Utilized this TPBG based on the pump-probe geometry, an all-optical switch can be constructed and the on-off switching extinction ratio (SER) is varied with both the temperature and the inhomogeneity of QDs. Significantly, it still maintains switching behavior and can process the data sequence of return-to-zero codes of 250 Gb/s even if the QD standard deviation of relative size fluctuations (SD-RSF) is up to 3% and the temperature is at 100 K.

  18. The properties of photonic band gap and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional magnetized photonic crystals as the mixed polarized modes considered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gap (PBG) and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated based on the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, in which the homogeneous magnetized plasma spheres are immersed in the homogeneous dielectric background, as the Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered (the incidence electromagnetic wave vector is perpendicular to the external magnetic field at any time). The dispersive properties of all of the EM modes are studied because the PBG is not only for the extraordinary and ordinary modes but also for the mixed polarized modes. The equations for PBGs also are theoretically deduced. The numerical results show that the PBG and a flatbands region can be observed. The effects of the dielectric constant of dielectric background, filling factor, plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency (the external magnetic field) on the dispersive properties of all of the EM modes in such 3D MPPCs are investigated in detail, respectively. Theoretical simulations show that the PBG can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. Compared to the conventional dielectric-air PCs with similar structure, the larger PBG can be obtained in such 3D MPPCs. It is also shown that the upper edge of flatbands region cannot be tuned by the filling factor and dielectric constant of dielectric background, but it can be manipulated by the plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency.

  19. Wide-Band Spatially Tunable Photonic Bandgap in Visible Spectral Range and Laser based on a Polymer Stabilized Blue Phase

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia-De; Wang, Tsai-Yen; Mo, Ting-Shan; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2016-01-01

    This work successfully develops a largely-gradient-pitched polymer-stabilized blue phase (PSBP) photonic bandgap (PBG) device with a wide-band spatial tunability in nearly entire visible region within a wide blue phase (BP) temperature range including room temperature. The device is fabricated based on the reverse diffusion of two injected BP-monomer mixtures with a low and a high chiral concentrations and afterwards through UV-curing. This gradient-pitched PSBP can show a rainbow-like reflection appearance in which the peak wavelength of the PBG can be spatially tuned from the blue to the red regions at room temperature. The total tuning spectral range for the cell is as broad as 165 nm and covers almost the entire visible region. Based on the gradient-pitched PSBP, a spatially tunable laser is also demonstrated in this work. The temperature sensitivity of the lasing wavelength for the laser is negatively linear and approximately −0.26 nm/°C. The two devices have a great potential for use in applications of photonic devices and displays because of their multiple advantages, such as wide-band tunability, wide operated temperature range, high stability and reliability, no issue of hysteresis, no need of external controlling sources, and not slow tuning speed (mechanically). PMID:27456475

  20. Wide-Band Spatially Tunable Photonic Bandgap in Visible Spectral Range and Laser based on a Polymer Stabilized Blue Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jia-De; Wang, Tsai-Yen; Mo, Ting-Shan; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2016-07-01

    This work successfully develops a largely-gradient-pitched polymer-stabilized blue phase (PSBP) photonic bandgap (PBG) device with a wide-band spatial tunability in nearly entire visible region within a wide blue phase (BP) temperature range including room temperature. The device is fabricated based on the reverse diffusion of two injected BP-monomer mixtures with a low and a high chiral concentrations and afterwards through UV-curing. This gradient-pitched PSBP can show a rainbow-like reflection appearance in which the peak wavelength of the PBG can be spatially tuned from the blue to the red regions at room temperature. The total tuning spectral range for the cell is as broad as 165 nm and covers almost the entire visible region. Based on the gradient-pitched PSBP, a spatially tunable laser is also demonstrated in this work. The temperature sensitivity of the lasing wavelength for the laser is negatively linear and approximately ‑0.26 nm/°C. The two devices have a great potential for use in applications of photonic devices and displays because of their multiple advantages, such as wide-band tunability, wide operated temperature range, high stability and reliability, no issue of hysteresis, no need of external controlling sources, and not slow tuning speed (mechanically).

  1. Optimizing pulse compressibility in completely all-fibered Ytterbium chirped pulse amplifiers for in vivo two photon laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fernández, A; Grüner-Nielsen, L; Andreana, M; Stadler, M; Kirchberger, S; Sturtzel, C; Distel, M; Zhu, L; Kautek, W; Leitgeb, R; Baltuska, A; Jespersen, K; Verhoef, A

    2017-08-01

    A simple and completely all-fiber Yb chirped pulse amplifier that uses a dispersion matched fiber stretcher and a spliced-on hollow core photonic bandgap fiber compressor is applied in nonlinear optical microscopy. This stretching-compression approach improves compressibility and helps to maximize the fluorescence signal in two-photon laser scanning microscopy as compared with approaches that use standard single mode fibers as stretcher. We also show that in femtosecond all-fiber systems, compensation of higher order dispersion terms is relevant even for pulses with relatively narrow bandwidths for applications relying on nonlinear optical effects. The completely all-fiber system was applied to image green fluorescent beads, a stained lily-of-the-valley root and rat-tail tendon. We also demonstrated in vivo imaging in zebrafish larvae, where we simultaneously measure second harmonic and fluorescence from two-photon excited red-fluorescent protein. Since the pulses are compressed in a fiber, this source is especially suited for upgrading existing laser scanning (confocal) microscopes with multiphoton imaging capabilities in space restricted settings or for incorporation in endoscope-based microscopy.

  2. Production of degenerate polarization entangled photon pairs in the telecom-band from a pump enhanced parametric downconversion process.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P J; Chunnilall, C J; Stothard, D J M; Walsh, D A; Dunn, M H

    2010-12-06

    The design and implementation of a novel source of degenerate polarization entangled photon pairs in the telecom band, based on a cavity enhanced parametric downconversion process, is presented. Two of the four maximally entangled Bell states are produced; the remaining two are obtainable by the addition of a half wave plate into the setup. The coincident photon detection rate in the A/D basis between two detectors at the output of the device revealed the production of highly entangled states, resulting in quantum interference visibilities of 0.971 ± 0.041 (ϕ = 0 state) and 0.932 ± 0.036 (ϕ = π state) respectively. The entangled states were found to break the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality by around 6 standard deviations. From the measured coincidence counting rates and the optical system losses, an entangled photon pair production rate of 8.9 × 10(4) s(-1) mW(-1) pump was estimated.

  3. The Relationship between Oxygen A-band Photon Pathlength Distributions and 3D Structures of Heating Rate Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L.; Min, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Broadband heating directly drives the global atmospheric and oceanic circulation and its vertical profiles strongly depend upon cloud three-dimensional (3D) structures. Due to the complexity of cloud 3D problems and the difficulties in observations of broadband heating rate profiles (BBHRP), there are still large uncertainties in the relationship of clouds, radiation and climate feedback. Oxygen A-band photon pathlength distributions (PPLD) contain rich information about the 3D structures of clouds and BBHRP and can be observed by both ground based and space based measurements. Therefore, it is meaningful to explore the possibility of connecting A-band PPLD and BBHRP and consequently to describe the internal relationship between them together with the cloud 3D effects on BBHRP. A 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer model is applied to simulate solar broadband heating rate profiles and oxygen A-band photon pathlength distributions of several ideal cloud fields and two typical cloud fields generated by cloud resolving model (CRM). Principal components (PCs) and the first four moments are selected to represent the vertical structures of BBHRP and PPLD, respectively. In ideal cloud fields, the moments show clear constraint to PCs of BBHRP. The results demonstrate the feasibility to describe the vertical structures of BBHRP by PPLD. The relationship between moments and PCs turns complicated in CRM cloud fields due to the composition of various 3D effects. However, detailed analysis still show that the moments, the PCs and total cloud optical depth are effective factors in defining BBHRP, especially for the vertical structures of relative low clouds. Further, a statistical fitting between the PCs and the moments by a two-layer neural network is applied to provide a quantitative representation of the linkages.

  4. Scalable multiplexed detector system for high-rate telecom-band single-photon detection.

    PubMed

    Brida, G; Degiovanni, I P; Piacentini, F; Schettini, V; Polyakov, S V; Migdall, A

    2009-11-01

    We present an actively multiplexed photon-counting detection system at telecom wavelengths that overcomes the difficulties of photon-counting at high rates. We find that for gated detectors, the heretofore unconsidered deadtime associated with the detector gate is a critical parameter, that limits the overall scalability of the scheme to just a few detectors. We propose and implement a new scheme that overcomes this problem and restores full scalability that allows an order of magnitude improvement with systems with as few as 4 detectors. When using just two multiplexed detectors, our experimental results show a 5x improvement over a single detector and a greater than 2x improvement over multiplexed schemes that do not consider gate deadtime.

  5. Photonic band gap effect and structural color from silver nanoparticle gelatin emulsion.

    PubMed

    Kok, Mang Hin; Ma, Rui; Lee, Jeffrey Chi Wai; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C T; Sheng, Ping; Cheah, Kok Wai

    2005-10-01

    We have fabricated planar structures of silver nanoparticles in monochromatic gelatin emulsion with a continuous spacing ranging from 0.15-0.40 micron using a two-beam interference of a single laser source. Our planar holograms display a colorful "rainbow" pattern and photonic bandgaps covering the visible and IR ranges. We model the planar silver nanoparticle-gelatin composite system using an effective medium approach and good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment.

  6. W-Band Technology and Techniques for Analog Millimeter-Wave Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-19

    available technology and standard techniques for millimeter-wave photonics at frequencies up to 110 GHz. Measured data for commercial electro-optic...Measured data for commercial electro- optic phase modulators, electro-optic intensity modulators, p-i-n photodiodes and waveguide photodetectors...millimeter-wave application is associated with wireless links [5-7], radio astronomy [8], or military systems, the main components that determine the

  7. Broad-band optical parametric gain on a silicon photonic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Mark A.; Turner, Amy C.; Sharping, Jay E.; Schmidt, Bradley S.; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2006-06-01

    Developing an optical amplifier on silicon is essential for the success of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic integrated circuits. Recently, optical gain with a 1-nm bandwidth was demonstrated using the Raman effect, which led to the demonstration of a Raman oscillator, lossless optical modulation and optically tunable slow light. A key strength of optical communications is the parallelism of information transfer and processing onto multiple wavelength channels. However, the relatively narrow Raman gain bandwidth only allows for amplification or generation of a single wavelength channel. If broad gain bandwidths were to be demonstrated on silicon, then an array of wavelength channels could be generated and processed, representing a critical advance for densely integrated photonic circuits. Here we demonstrate net on/off gain over a wavelength range of 28nm through the optical process of phase-matched four-wave mixing in suitably designed SOI channel waveguides. We also demonstrate wavelength conversion in the range 1,511-1,591nm with peak conversion efficiencies of +5.2dB, which represents more than 20 times improvement on previous four-wave-mixing efficiencies in SOI waveguides. These advances allow for the implementation of dense wavelength division multiplexing in an all-silicon photonic integrated circuit. Additionally, all-optical delays, all-optical switches, optical signal regenerators and optical sources for quantum information technology, all demonstrated using four-wave mixing in silica fibres, can now be transferred to the SOI platform.

  8. Ultrahigh-Q photonic crystal nanocavities in wide optical telecommunication bands.

    PubMed

    Terawaki, Ryo; Takahashi, Yasushi; Chihara, Masahiro; Inui, Yoshitaka; Noda, Susumu

    2012-09-24

    We have studied the feasibility of extending the operating wavelength range of high-Q silicon nanocavities above and below the 1.55 μm wavelength band, while maintaining Q factors of more than one million. We have succeeded in developing such nanocavities in the optical telecommunication bands from 1.27 μm to 1.50 μm. Very high Q values of more than two million were obtained even for the 1.30 μm band. The Q values increase proportionally to the resonant wavelength because the scattering loss decreases. We have also analyzed the influence of absorption due to surface water. We conclude that high-Q nanocavities are feasible for an even wider wavelength region including parts of the mid-infrared.

  9. Systematic study of the hybrid plasmonic-photonic band structure underlying lasing action of diffractive plasmon particle lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schokker, A. Hinke; van Riggelen, Floor; Hadad, Yakir; Alù, Andrea; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2017-02-01

    We study lasing in distributed feedback lasers made from square lattices of silver particles in a dye-doped waveguide. We present a systematic analysis and experimental study of the band structure underlying the lasing process as a function of the detuning between the particle plasmon resonance and the lattice Bragg diffraction condition. To this end, as gain medium we use either a polymer doped with Rh6G only, or polymer doped with a pair of dyes (Rh6G and Rh700) that act as a Förster energy transfer (FRET) pair. This allows for gain, respectively, at 590 or 700 nm when pumped at 532 nm, compatible with the achievable size tunability of silver particles embedded in the polymer. By polarization-resolved spectroscopic Fourier microscopy, we are able to observe the plasmonic/photonic band structure of the array, unraveling both the stop gap width, as well as the loss properties of the four involved bands at fixed lattice Bragg diffraction condition and as a function of detuning of the plasmon resonance. To explain the measurements we derive an analytical model that sheds insights on the lasing process in plasmonic lattices, highlighting the interaction between two competing resonant processes, one localized at the particle level around the plasmon resonance, and one distributed across the lattice. Both are shown to contribute to the lasing threshold and the overall emission properties of the array.

  10. Distance between Cys-201 in erythrocyte band 3 and the bilayer measured by single-photon radioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Thevenin, B J; Bicknese, S E; Park, J; Verkman, A S; Shohet, S B

    1996-01-01

    Single-photon radioluminescence (SPR), the excitation of fluorophores by short-range beta-decay electrons, was developed for the measurement of submicroscopic distances. The cytoplasmic domain of band 3 (cdb3) is the primary, multisite anchorage for the erythrocyte skeleton. To begin to define the membrane arrangement of the highly asymmetrical cdb3 structure, the distance from the bilayer of Cys-201 next to the "hinge" of cdb3 was measured by both SPR and resonance energy transfer (RET). cdb3 was labeled at Cys-201 with fluorescein maleimide. For SPR measurements, the bilayer was labeled with [3H]oleic acid. The corrected cdb3-specific SPR signal was 98 +/- 2 cps microCi-1 [mumol band 3]-1. From this and the signal from a parallel sample in which 3H2O was substituted for [3H]oleic acid to create uniform geometry between 3H and the fluorophores, a Cys-201-to-bilayer separation of 39 +/- 7 A was calculated. Confirmatory distances of 40 and 43 A were obtained by RET between fluorescein on Cys-201 and eosin and rhodamine B lipid probes, respectively. This distance indicates that Cys-201 lies near band 3's vertical axis of symmetry and that the subdomain of cdb3 between the hinge and the membrane is not significantly extended. In addition, these results validate SPR as a measure of molecular distances in biological systems. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8913602

  11. Subfemtosecond determination of transmission delay times for a dielectric mirror (photonic band gap) as a function of the angle of incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Aephraim M.; Chiao, Raymond Y.

    1995-05-01

    Using a two-photon interference technique, we measure the delay for single-photon wave packets to be transmitted through a multilayer dielectric mirror, which functions as a ``photonic band-gap'' medium. By varying the angle of incidence, we are able to confirm the behavior predicted by the group delay (stationary-phase approximation), including a variation of the delay time from superluminal to subluminal as the band edge is tuned toward the wavelength of our photons. The agreement with theory is better than 0.5 fs (less than one-quarter of an optical period) except at large angles of incidence. The source of the remaining discrepancy is not yet fully understood.

  12. Fast Purcell-enhanced single photon source in 1,550-nm telecom band from a resonant quantum dot-cavity coupling

    PubMed Central

    Birowosuto, Muhammad Danang; Sumikura, Hisashi; Matsuo, Shinji; Taniyama, Hideaki; van Veldhoven, Peter J.; Nötzel, Richard; Notomi, Masaya

    2012-01-01

    High-bit-rate nanocavity-based single photon sources in the 1,550-nm telecom band are challenges facing the development of fibre-based long-haul quantum communication networks. Here we report a very fast single photon source in the 1,550-nm telecom band, which is achieved by a large Purcell enhancement that results from the coupling of a single InAs quantum dot and an InP photonic crystal nanocavity. At a resonance, the spontaneous emission rate was enhanced by a factor of 5 resulting a record fast emission lifetime of 0.2 ns at 1,550 nm. We also demonstrate that this emission exhibits an enhanced anti-bunching dip. This is the first realization of nanocavity-enhanced single photon emitters in the 1,550-nm telecom band. This coupled quantum dot cavity system in the telecom band thus provides a bright high-bit-rate non-classical single photon source that offers appealing novel opportunities for the development of a long-haul quantum telecommunication system via optical fibres. PMID:22432053

  13. Fast Purcell-enhanced single photon source in 1,550-nm telecom band from a resonant quantum dot-cavity coupling.

    PubMed

    Birowosuto, Muhammad Danang; Sumikura, Hisashi; Matsuo, Shinji; Taniyama, Hideaki; van Veldhoven, Peter J; Nötzel, Richard; Notomi, Masaya

    2012-01-01

    High-bit-rate nanocavity-based single photon sources in the 1,550-nm telecom band are challenges facing the development of fibre-based long-haul quantum communication networks. Here we report a very fast single photon source in the 1,550-nm telecom band, which is achieved by a large Purcell enhancement that results from the coupling of a single InAs quantum dot and an InP photonic crystal nanocavity. At a resonance, the spontaneous emission rate was enhanced by a factor of 5 resulting a record fast emission lifetime of 0.2 ns at 1,550 nm. We also demonstrate that this emission exhibits an enhanced anti-bunching dip. This is the first realization of nanocavity-enhanced single photon emitters in the 1,550-nm telecom band. This coupled quantum dot cavity system in the telecom band thus provides a bright high-bit-rate non-classical single photon source that offers appealing novel opportunities for the development of a long-haul quantum telecommunication system via optical fibres.

  14. Photonic band structure and effective medium properties of doubly-resonant core-shell metallo-dielectric nanowire arrays: low-loss, isotropic optical negative-index behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abujetas, D. R.; Paniagua-Domínguez, R.; Nieto-Vesperinas, M.; Sánchez-Gil, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate theoretically and numerically the photonic band structure in the optical domain of an array of core-shell metal-semiconductor nanowires. Corresponding negative-index photonic bands are calculated, showing isotropic equifrequency surfaces. The effective (negative) electric permittivity and magnetic permeability, retrieved from S-parameters, are used to compare the performance of such nanowire arrays with homogeneous media in canonical examples, such as refraction through a prism and flat-lens focusing. Very good agreement is found, confirming the effective medium behavior of the nanowire array as a low-loss, isotropic (2D) and bulk, optical negative index metamaterial. Indeed, disorder is introduced to further stress its robustness.

  15. Photon counting as a probe of superfluidity in a two-band Bose-Hubbard system coupled to a cavity field.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Sara; Trivedi, Nandini

    2013-12-13

    We show that photon number measurement can be used to detect superfluidity for a two-band Bose-Hubbard model coupled to a cavity field. The atom-photon coupling induces transitions between the two internal atomic levels and results in entangled polaritonic states. In the presence of a cavity field, we find different photon numbers in the Mott-insulating versus superfluid phases, providing a method of distinguishing the atomic phases by photon counting. Furthermore, we examine the dynamics of the photon field after a rapid quench to zero atomic hopping by increasing the well depth. We find a robust correlation between the field's quench dynamics and the initial superfluid order parameter, thereby providing a novel and accurate method of determining the order parameter.

  16. Ultrashort pulse propagation at the photonic band edge: Large tunable group delay with minimal distortion and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fork, Richard; Scalora, Michael; Flynn, Rachel; Reinhardt, Senter; Dowling, John; Bloemer, Mark; Tocci, Michael; Bowden, Chuck; Leavitt, Rich

    1996-03-01

    We examine optical pulse propagation through a 30 period, GaAs/AIAs, one-dimensional, photnic crystal at the photonic band-edge transmission resonance. We predict theoretically -- and demonstrated experimentally -- an approximate energy, momentum, and form invariance of the transmitted pulse, as well as large group index (up to 13.5). The group index is tunable and many orders of magnitude more sensitive to variation in material refractive index than for bulk material. We interpret this observation in terms of novel, time-dependent electromagnetic states of the pulse-crystal system.We discuss this novel state and potential applications in the context of ongoing work on high dielectric constant materials. Multi-order of magnitude improvements appear possible invarious applications.

  17. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of higher order mode (HOM) damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  18. Modeling of chirped pulse propagation through a mini-stop band in a two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Tun; Cryan, Martin J.; Ivanov, Pavel S.; Ho, Daniel; Ren, Bob; Craddock, Ian J.; Rorison, Judy M.; Railton, Chris J.

    2007-07-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and frequency-domain finite-element (FE) methods are used to study chirped pulse propagation in 2D photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides. Chirped pulse FDTD has been implemented, which allows the study of pulse propagation in a direct way. The carrier wavelength of the pulse is swept across the bandwidth of a mini-stop-band (MSB) feature, and pulse compression behavior is observed. Both round-hole and square-hole PhC waveguides are studied, with the latter giving increased pulse compression. A group-delay analysis is then used to understand the compression behavior, and this shows how the fast-light regime that occurs within the MSB plays an important role in the observed pulse compression.

  19. Photonic band gap in an imperfect atomic diamond lattice: Penetration depth and effects of finite size and vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antezza, Mauro; Castin, Yvan

    2013-09-01

    We study the effects of finite size and of vacancies on the photonic band gap recently predicted for an atomic diamond lattice. Close to a Jg=0→Je=1 atomic transition, and for atomic lattices containing up to N≈3×104 atoms, we show how the density of states can be affected by both the shape of the system and the possible presence of a fraction of unoccupied lattice sites. We numerically predict and theoretically explain the presence of shape-induced border states and of vacancy-induced localized states appearing in the gap. We also investigate the penetration depth of the electromagnetic field which we compare to the case of an infinite system.

  20. Octave-wide photonic band gap in three-dimensional plasmonic Bragg structures and limitations of radiative coupling.

    PubMed

    Taubert, Richard; Dregely, Daniel; Stroucken, Tineke; Christ, Andre; Giessen, Harald

    2012-02-21

    Radiative coupling between oscillators is one of the most fundamental subjects of research in optics, where particularly a Bragg-type arrangement is of interest and has already been applied to atoms and excitons in quantum wells. Here we explore this arrangement in a plasmonic structure. We observe the emergence of an octave-wide photonic band gap in the optical regime. Compared with atomic or excitonic systems, the coupling efficiency of the particle plasmons utilized here is several orders of magnitude larger and widely tunable by changing the size and geometry of the plasmonic nanowires. We are thus able to explore the regime where the coupling distance is even limited by the large radiative decay rate of the oscillators. This Bragg-stacked coupling scheme will open a new route for future plasmonic applications such as far-field coupling to quantum emitters without quenching, plasmonic cavity structures and plasmonic distributed gain schemes for spasers.

  1. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    DOE PAGES

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; ...

    2016-03-29

    In this paper, we report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power ofmore » up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV=m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 × 10–1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV=m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV=m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 × 10–1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.« less

  2. Effect of photonic stop-band on the modes of a weakly scattering DCM-PVA waveguide random laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Anirban; Ojha, N. N. Subhashree; Bhaktha, B. N. Shivakiran

    2017-06-01

    We present an experimental study on the effect of the photonic stop-band (PSB) on the random laser (RL) emission characteristics of a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM) doped polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film (DCM-PVA). The film, having its refractive index greater than the substrate and density variations at the microscopic scale, acts as a disordered active planar waveguide. The propagation losses for the transverse magnetic (TM) and transverse electric (TE) modes of the waveguide are observed to be 0.50 and 0.74 dB/cm, respectively, at λ = 632.8 nm. The waveguiding DCM-PVA film is then sandwiched between two silica 3-D photonic crystals (opals). The overlap of the DCM-PVA photoluminescence with the PSB of the opals is controlled by the choice of the particle size used for opal fabrication. The random lasing threshold studies have been carried out for both TM and TE polarizations for opals with different particle sizes. A reduction in the threshold of RL emission, with respect to the DCM-PVA waveguide, by about 20 times (to 0.67 mJ/cm2) is observed when the photoluminescence of the DCM-PVA film overlaps with the PSB of the opal structure for TM polarization, showing that the embedding of an RL in an engineered PSB material is an effective way to reduce the thresholds of RLs.

  3. Compact photonic crystal circulator with flat-top transmission band created by cascading magneto-optical resonance cavities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Lin, Mi; Liu, Qiang

    2015-11-20

    A new type of compact three-port circulator with flat-top transmission band (FTTB) in a two-dimensional photonic crystal has been proposed, through coupling the cascaded magneto-optical resonance cavities to waveguides. The coupled-mode theory is applied to investigate the coupled structure and analyze the condition to achieve FTTB. According to the theoretical analysis, the structure is further optimized to ensure that the condition for achieving FTTB can be satisfied for both cavity-cavity coupling and cavity-waveguide coupling. Through the finite-element method, it is demonstrated that the design can realize a high quality, nonreciprocal circulating propagation of waves with an insertion loss of 0.023 dB and an isolation of 23.3 dB, covering a wide range of operation frequency. Such a wideband circulator has potential applications in large-scale integrated photonic circuits for guiding or isolating harmful optical reflections from load elements.

  4. Nonaqueous sol-gel chemistry applied to atomic layer deposition: tuning of photonic band gap properties of silica opals.

    PubMed

    Marichy, Catherine; Dechézelles, Jean-Francois; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Pinna, Nicola; Ravaine, Serge; Vallée, Renaud

    2010-05-01

    Combining both electromagnetic simulations and experiments, it is shown that the photonic pseudo band gap (PPBG) exhibited by a silica opal can be fully controlled by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) of titania into the pores of the silica spheres constituting the opal. Different types of opals were assembled by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique: homogeneous closed packed structures set up of, respectively, 260 and 285 nm silica spheres, as well as opal heterostructures consisting of a monolayer of 430 nm silica spheres embedded within 10 layers of 280 nm silica spheres. For the stepwise infiltration of the opals with titania, titanium isopropoxide and acetic acid were used as metal and oxygen sources, in accordance with a recently published non-aqueous approach to ALD. A shift of the direct PPBG, its disappearance, and the subsequent appearance and shifting of the inverse PPBG are observed as the opal is progressively filled. The close agreement between simulated and experimental results is striking, and promising in terms of predicting the properties of advanced photonic materials. Moreover, this work demonstrates that the ALD process is rather robust and can be applied to the coating of complex nanostructures.

  5. Fabrication of solid-cladding photonic band gap fiber with air core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawa, I.; Pysz, D.; Buczyński, R.; Filipkowski, A.; Nowosielski, J.; Stępień, R.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we report on fabrication of all-Solid photonic Cladding and Air Core fiber (SCAC fiber). As far as we know it is a first reported fabrication of such PCF. Microrods are made of commercially available lead-oxide F2 glass (SCHOTT Inc.) with a refractive index nD=1.619, while as background we use a borosilicate NC21 glass synthesized in-house at ITME with a refractive index nD=1.533. A fabricated fiber has a lattice constant of Λ~7.49μm and microrods diameter of d~4.0μm. Air core has a diameter of DR=3.67μm and total fiber diameter is Dfiber=123.80μm.

  6. High-depth-resolution 3-dimensional radar-imaging system based on a few-cycle W-band photonic millimeter-wave pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tzu-Fang; Wun, Jhih-Min; Chen, Wei; Peng, Sui-Wei; Shi, Jin-Wei; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2013-06-17

    We demonstrate that a near-single-cycle photonic millimeter-wave short-pulse generator at W-band is capable to provide high spatial resolution three-dimensional (3-D) radar imaging. A preliminary study indicates that 3-D radar images with a state-of-the-art ranging resolution of around 1.2 cm at the W-band can be achieved.

  7. Modulation of the photonic band structure topology of a honeycomb lattice in an atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yiqi; Liu, Xing; Belić, Milivoj R.; Wu, Zhenkun; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-12-15

    In an atomic vapor, a honeycomb lattice can be constructed by utilizing the three-beam interference method. In the method, the interference of the three beams splits the dressed energy level periodically, forming a periodic refractive index modulation with the honeycomb profile. The energy band topology of the honeycomb lattice can be modulated by frequency detunings, thereby affecting the appearance (and disappearance) of Dirac points and cones in the momentum space. This effect can be usefully exploited for the generation and manipulation of topological insulators.

  8. Complete nucleotide sequence of strawberry vein banding virus Chinese isolate and infectivity of its full-length DNA clone.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingfeng; Zhang, Hanping; Pan, Yuan; Hu, Yahui; Chen, Jing; Zuo, Dengpan; Jiang, Tong

    2016-10-06

    Strawberry vein banding virus (SVBV) is a double-stranded DNA plant virus, which has been found in North America, Australia, Brazil, Japan, Europe and several provinces of China. Infected strawberry plants exhibit mild vein-banding symptoms and chlorosis along the veins. It is one of the most economically important diseases in Asiatic, European and North American strawberry-growing areas. The complete genome of an SVBV Chinese isolate (SVBV-CN) was isolated and cloned from a naturally infected strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa cv. Sachinoka) sample found in Shenyang city of Liaoning province. Sequence analysis revealed a complete genome of 7864 nucleotides (nts) that indicated SVBV-CN was most closely related to SVBV from the United States (SVBV-US) with a sequence similarity of 85.8 %. Two major clades were identified based on phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome sequences of caulimoviruses. SVBV-CN clustered together with SVBV-US, whereas other caulimoviruses formed a separate branch. Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of Fragaria vesca with an infectious clone of SVBV-CN results in systemic infection with distinct symptoms of yellowing bands along the main leaf veins. This suggests that the SVBV-CN infectious clone can recapitulate the symptoms observed in naturally infected strawberries, and therefore is likely the causal agent of the original disease observed in strawberries. Furthermore, strawberry plants inoculated with the infectious clone using vacuum infiltration developed symptoms with a very high infection rate of 86-100 % in 4-5 weeks post-inoculation. This compares to an infection rate of 20-40 % in 8-9 weeks post-inoculation using syringe-inoculation. The complete nucleotide sequence of SVBV from a naturally infected strawberry was determined. Agroinfiltration of strawberry plants using an infectious clone of SVBV-CN resulted in symptoms typically found in infected strawberries from Shenyang city of Liaoning province in China. This is

  9. Micro-metric electronic patterning of a topological band structure using a photon beam

    PubMed Central

    Frantzeskakis, E.; De Jong, N.; Zwartsenberg, B.; Huang, Y. K.; Bay, T. V.; Pronk, P.; Van Heumen, E.; Wu, D.; Pan, Y.; Radovic, M.; Plumb, N. C.; Xu, N.; Shi, M.; De Visser, A.; Golden, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    In an ideal 3D topological insulator (TI), the bulk is insulating and the surface conducting due to the existence of metallic states that are localized on the surface; these are the topological surface states. Quaternary Bi-based compounds of Bi2−xSbxTe3−ySey with finely-tuned bulk stoichiometries are good candidates for realizing ideal 3D TI behavior due to their bulk insulating character. However, despite its insulating bulk in transport experiments, the surface region of Bi2−xSbxTe3−ySey crystals cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum also exhibits occupied states originating from the bulk conduction band. This is due to adsorbate-induced downward band-bending, a phenomenon known from other Bi-based 3D TIs. Here we show, using angle-resolved photoemission, how an EUV light beam of moderate flux can be used to exclude these topologically trivial states from the Fermi level of Bi1.46Sb0.54Te1.7Se1.3 single crystals, thereby re-establishing the purely topological character of the low lying electronic states of the system. We furthermore prove that this process is highly local in nature in this bulk-insulating TI, and are thus able to imprint structures in the spatial energy landscape at the surface. We illustrate this by ‘writing’ micron-sized letters in the Dirac point energy of the system. PMID:26543011

  10. Optical properties of an atomic ensemble coupled to a band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Ewan; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Chang, Darrick E.

    2017-08-01

    We study the optical properties of an ensemble of two-level atoms coupled to a 1D photonic crystal waveguide (PCW), which mediates long-range coherent dipole-dipole interactions between the atoms. We show that the long-range interactions can dramatically alter the linear and nonlinear optical behavior, as compared to a typical atomic ensemble. In particular, in the linear regime, we find that the transmission spectrum contains multiple transmission dips, whose properties we characterize. Moreover, we show how the linear spectrum may be used to infer the number of atoms present in the system, constituting an important experimental tool in a regime where techniques for conventional ensembles break down. We also show that some of the transmission dips are associated with an effective ‘two-level’ resonance that forms due to the long-range interactions. In particular, under strong global driving and appropriate conditions, we find that the atomic ensemble is only capable of absorbing and emitting single collective excitations at a time. Our results are of direct relevance to atom-PCW experiments that should soon be realizable.

  11. Complete four-photon cluster-state analyzer based on cross-Kerr nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Long; Su, Shi-Lei; Guo, Qi; Cheng, Liu-Yong; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2013-09-01

    We propose a method to construct an optical cluster-state analyzer based on cross-Kerr nonlinearity combined with linear optics elements. In the scheme, we employ two four-qubit parity gates and the controlled phase gate (CPG) from only the cross-Kerr nonlinearity and show that all the orthogonal four-qubit cluster states can be completely identified. The scheme is significant for the large-scale quantum communication and quantum information processing networks. In addition, the scheme is feasible and deterministic under current experimental conditions.

  12. Measurement of the resonant polaron effect in the Reststrahlen band of GaAs:Si using far-infrared two-photon excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Wenckebach, W.Th.; Planken, P.C.M.; Son, P.C. van

    1995-12-31

    We present the results of photoconductivity measurements of the resonant electron-phonon interaction in the middle of the Reststrahlen band using two-photon excitation with intense picosecond pulses with frequency around 143 cm{sup -1} (70 {mu}m). We use two photons rather than a single photon for the excitation of the resonant-polaron to avoid the problems of strong reflection and dielectric artifacts encountered in direct single-photon excitation in the Reststrahlen band. The sample is a 10 {mu}m thick Si-doped GaAs epitaxial layer on a 400 {mu}m semi-insulating GaAs substrate. The electronic levels of the Si shallow donor can be tuned by the application of a magnetic field. Intense tunable picosecond pulses with a frequency of around 143 cm{sup -1} from the Dutch free-electron laser FELIX are weakly focussed onto the sample, which is kept at 8 K. Electrons excited to the 3d{sup +2} state via the electric-dipole allowed two-photon transition out of the 1s{sub 0-} ground state, decay to the conduction band and give rise to an increase in the photoconductivity. The figure shows the energy-peak position of the 3d{sup +2} transition thus obtained as a function of the magnetic-field strength. The figure clearly shows the avoided crossing around the LO-phonon energy where the coupling shows the avoided crossing around the LO-phonon energy where the coupling between the 3d{sup +2} state and the LO phonon is strongest. Note that the data between 267 cm{sup -1} and 296 cm{sup -1} are extremely difficult to obtain with single-photon excitation because of their position in the middle of the Reststrahlen band.

  13. Advanced Microwave Frequency Sources and Filters Based on Superconducting Photonic Band Gap (PBG) Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-16

    high Q PBG resonators and who also have strong interests in microwave technology. As a result, we have formed a collaborative effort with Conductus Inc... Conductus has participated in the preparation of our Phase II proposal and will be a key team member if this work is funded. (6) - Complete a report...division multiplexing and power combining. Conductus has a close relationship with a small company, Endgate Technology, which is designing antenna systems

  14. An Update on the DOE Early Career Project on Photonic Band Gap Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Edwards, Randall L.; Haynes, William B.; Madrid, Michael A.; Romero, Frank P.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Tuzel, Walter M.; Boulware , Chase H.; Grimm, Terry

    2012-06-07

    We performed fabrication of two SRF PBG resonators at 2.1 GHz and demonstrated their proof-of-principle operation at high gradients. Measured characteristics of the resonators were in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We demonstrated that SRF PBG cavities can be operated at 15 MV/m accelerating gradients. We completed the design and started fabrication of the 16-cell PBG accelerating structure at 11.7 GHz for wakefield testing at AWA.

  15. Magnonic band structure, complete bandgap, and collective spin wave excitation in nanoscale two-dimensional magnonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, D.; Barman, A.; Kłos, J. W.; Krawczyk, M.

    2014-01-28

    We present the observation of a complete bandgap and collective spin wave excitation in two-dimensional magnonic crystals comprised of arrays of nanoscale antidots and nanodots, respectively. Considering that the frequencies dealt with here fall in the microwave band, these findings can be used for the development of suitable magnonic metamaterials and spin wave based signal processing. We also present the application of a numerical procedure, to compute the dispersion relations of spin waves for any high symmetry direction in the first Brillouin zone. The results obtained from this procedure have been reproduced and verified by the well established plane wave method for an antidot lattice, when magnetization dynamics at antidot boundaries are pinned. The micromagnetic simulation based method can also be used to obtain iso–frequency contours of spin waves. Iso–frequency contours are analogous of the Fermi surfaces and hence, they have the potential to radicalize our understanding of spin wave dynamics. The physical origin of bands, partial and full magnonic bandgaps have been explained by plotting the spatial distribution of spin wave energy spectral density. Although, unfettered by rigid assumptions and approximations, which afflict most analytical methods used in the study of spin wave dynamics, micromagnetic simulations tend to be computationally demanding. Thus, the observation of collective spin wave excitation in the case of nanodot arrays, which can obviate the need to perform simulations, may also prove to be valuable.

  16. Switching of the photonic band gap in three-dimensional film photonic crystals based on opal-VO{sub 2} composites in the 1.3-1.6 {mu}m spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Pevtsov, A. B. Grudinkin, S. A.; Poddubny, A. N.; Kaplan, S. F.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Golubev, V. G.

    2010-12-15

    The parameters of three-dimensional photonic crystals based on opal-VO{sub 2} composite films in the 1.3-1.6 {mu}m spectral range important for practical applications (Telecom standard) are numerically calculated. For opal pores, the range of filling factors is established (0.25-0.6) wherein the composite exhibits the properties of a three-dimensional insulator photonic crystal. On the basis of the opal-VO{sub 2} composites, three-dimensional photonic film crystals are synthesized with specified parameters that provide a maximum shift of the photonic band gap in the vicinity of the wavelength {approx}1.5 {mu}m ({approx}170 meV) at the semiconductor-metal transition in VO{sub 2}.

  17. Coherent all-optical switching by resonant quantum-dot distributions in photonic band-gap waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujic, Dragan; John, Sajeev

    2007-12-01

    We study the detailed propagative characteristics of optical pulses in photonic band-gap (PBG) waveguides, coupled near resonantly to inhomogeneously broadened distributions of quantum dots. The line centers of the quantum-dot (QD) distributions are placed near a sharp discontinuity in the local electromagnetic density of states. Using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations of optical pulse dynamics and independent QD susceptibilities associated with resonance fluorescence, we demonstrate subpicosecond switching from pulse absorption to pulse amplification using steady-state optical holding and gate fields with power levels on the order of 1 milliwatt. In the case of collective response of QDs within the periodic dielectric microstructure, the gate power level is reduced to 200 microwatt for room temperature operation. In principle, this enables 200 Gbits per second optical information processing at wavelengths near 1.5 microns in various wavelength channels. The allowed pulse bandwidth in a given waveguide channel exceeds 0.5 THz allowing switching of subpicosecond laser pulses without pulse distortion. The switching contrast from absorption to gain is governed by the QD oscillator strength and dipole dephasing time scale. We consider dephasing time scales ranging from nanoseconds (low-temperature operation) to one picosecond (room-temperature operation). This all-optical transistor action is based on simple Markovian models of single-dot and collective-dot inversion and switching by coherent resonant pumping near the photon density of states discontinuity. The structured electromagnetic vacuum is provided by two-mode waveguide architectures in which one waveguide mode has a cutoff that occurs, with very large Purcell factor, near the QDs resonance, while the other waveguide mode exhibits nearly linear dispersion for fast optical propagation and modulation. Unlike optical switching based on Kerr nonlinearities in an optical cavity resonator, switching

  18. Temperature dependence of beat-length and confinement loss in an air-core photonic band-gap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Li, Xuyou; Hong, Yong; Liu, Pan; Yang, Hanrui; Ling, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of polarization-maintaining (PM) property and loss in a highly-birefringent air-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) is investigated. The effects of temperature variation on the effective index, beat-length and confinement loss are studied numerically by using the full-vector finite element method (FEM). It is found that, the PM property of this PBF is insensitive to the temperature, and the temperature-dependent beat-length coefficient can be as low as 2.86×10-8 m/°C, which is typically 200 times less than those of conventional panda fibers, the PBF has a stable confinement loss of 0.01 dB/m over the temperature range of -30 to 20 °C for the slow axis at the wavelength of 1.55 μm. The PBF with ultra-low temperature-dependent PM property and low loss can reduce the thermally induced polarization instability apparently in interferometric applications such as resonant fiber optic gyroscope (RFOG), optical fiber sensors, and so on.

  19. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE041-like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code "CST Particle Studio" has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ˜108 kW with ˜15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE041-like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  20. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  1. Plant lighting system with five wavelength-band light-emitting diodes providing photon flux density and mixing ratio control

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant growth and development depend on the availability of light. Lighting systems therefore play crucial roles in plant studies. Recent advancements of light-emitting diode (LED) technologies provide abundant opportunities to study various plant light responses. The LED merits include solidity, longevity, small element volume, radiant flux controllability, and monochromaticity. To apply these merits in plant light response studies, a lighting system must provide precisely controlled light spectra that are useful for inducing various plant responses. Results We have developed a plant lighting system that irradiated a 0.18 m2 area with a highly uniform distribution of photon flux density (PFD). The average photosynthetic PFD (PPFD) in the irradiated area was 438 micro-mol m–2 s–1 (coefficient of variation 9.6%), which is appropriate for growing leafy vegetables. The irradiated light includes violet, blue, orange-red, red, and far-red wavelength bands created by LEDs of five types. The PFD and mixing ratio of the five wavelength-band lights are controllable using a computer and drive circuits. The phototropic response of oat coleoptiles was investigated to evaluate plant sensitivity to the light control quality of the lighting system. Oat coleoptiles irradiated for 23 h with a uniformly distributed spectral PFD (SPFD) of 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 at every peak wavelength (405, 460, 630, 660, and 735 nm) grew almost straight upwards. When they were irradiated with an SPFD gradient of blue light (460 nm peak wavelength), the coleoptiles showed a phototropic curvature in the direction of the greater SPFD of blue light. The greater SPFD gradient induced the greater curvature of coleoptiles. The relation between the phototropic curvature (deg) and the blue-light SPFD gradient (micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1) was 2 deg per 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1. Conclusions The plant lighting system, with a computer with a graphical user interface

  2. Band structure of a 2D photonic crystal based on ferrofluids of Co(1-x)Znx Fe2O4 nanoparticles under perpendicular applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Javier; Gonzalez, Luz Esther; Quinonez, Mario; Porras, Nelson; Zambrano, Gustavo; Gomez, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Using a ferrfluid of cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles Co(1 - x)ZnxFe2O4 coated with oleic acid and suspended in ethanol, we have fabricated a 2D photonic crystal (PC) by the application of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the ferrofluid. The 2D PC is made by rods of nanoparticles organized in a hexagonal structure. By means of the plane-wave expansion method, we study its photonic band structure (PBS) which depends on the effective permittivity and on the area ratio of the liquid phase. Additionaly, taking into account the Maxwell-Garnett theory we calculated the effective permittivity of the rods. We have found that the effective refractive index of the ferrofluid increases with its magnetization. Using these results we calculate the band structure of the photonic crystal at different applied magnetic fields, finding that the increase of the applied magnetic field shifts the band structure to lower frequencies with the appearance of more band gaps. Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali, Colombia

  3. Effect of temperature on terahertz photonic and omnidirectional band gaps in one-dimensional quasi-periodic photonic crystals composed of semiconductor InSb.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bipin K; Pandey, Praveen C

    2016-07-20

    Engineering of thermally tunable terahertz photonic and omnidirectional bandgaps has been demonstrated theoretically in one-dimensional quasi-periodic photonic crystals (PCs) containing semiconductor and dielectric materials. The considered quasi-periodic structures are taken in the form of Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and double periodic sequences. We have shown that the photonic and omnidirectional bandgaps in the quasi-periodic structures with semiconductor constituents are strongly depend on the temperature, thickness of the constituted semiconductor and dielectric material layers, and generations of the quasi-periodic sequences. It has been found that the number of photonic bandgaps increases with layer thickness and generation of the quasi-periodic sequences. Omnidirectional bandgaps in the structures have also been obtained. Results show that the bandwidths of photonic and omnidirectional bandgaps are tunable by changing the temperature and lattice parameters of the structures. The generation of quasi-periodic sequences can also change the properties of photonic and omnidirectional bandgaps remarkably. The frequency range of the photonic and omnidirectional bandgaps can be tuned by the change of temperature and layer thickness of the considered quasi-periodic structures. This work will be useful to design tunable terahertz PC devices.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of the red-banded lobster Metanephrops thomsoni (Crustacea, Astacidea, Nephropidae): a novel gene order.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Dong-Ha; Min, Gi-Sik; Park, Joong-Ki; Kim, Sanghee

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the red-banded lobster, Metanephrops thomsoni (Decapoda, Astacidea, Nephropidae), is 19,835 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNAs, 24 transfer RNAs (including additional copies of trnW and trnL1), and 2 control regions (CR). The mitogenome of M. thomsoni has 10 long intergenic sequences (71-237 bp) with a high AT content (70.0%). The two CRs show 59.6% similarity and have an identical sequence region with a length of 295 bp. The mitogenome of M. thomsoni shows a novel gene arrangement compared with the pancrustacean ground pattern and is identical to that of M. sibogae, except for the two additional tRNAs (trnW and trnL1). Phylogenetic tree from maximum likelihood analysis using the concatenated sequences of 13 PCGs depicted M. thomsoni as one of the members of the superfamily Nephropoidea within Astacidea.

  5. Effects of refractive index changes on four-wave mixing bands in Er-doped photonic crystal fibers pumped at 976 nm.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Ibarra, L; Díez, A; Andrés, M V; Lucio, J L

    2012-04-01

    An experimental study of the effects of an auxiliary 976 nm pump signal on the four-wave mixing parametric bands generated with a 1064 nm pump in a normal dispersion Er-doped photonic crystal fiber is presented. The four-wave mixing signal and idler bands shift to shorter and longer wavelengths, respectively, with increasing 976 nm pump power. It is shown that the wavelength-dependent resonant refractive index change in the erbium-doped core under 976 nm pumping is at the origin of the effect.

  6. A program for calculating photonic band structures, Green's functions and transmission/reflection coefficients using a non-orthogonal FDTD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. J.; Pendry, J. B.

    2000-06-01

    In this paper we present an updated version of our ONYX program for calculating photonic band structures using a non-orthogonal finite difference time domain method. This new version employs the same transparent formalism as the first version with the same capabilities for calculating photonic band structures or causal Green's functions but also includes extra subroutines for the calculation of transmission and reflection coefficients. Both the electric and magnetic fields are placed onto a discrete lattice by approximating the spacial and temporal derivatives with finite differences. This results in discrete versions of Maxwell's equations which can be used to integrate the fields forwards in time. The time required for a calculation using this method scales linearly with the number of real space points used in the discretization so the technique is ideally suited to handling systems with large and complicated unit cells.

  7. Complete hyperentangled-Bell-state analysis for photonic qubits assisted by a three-level Λ-type system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperentangled Bell-state analysis (HBSA) is an essential method in high-capacity quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here by replacing the two-qubit controlled-phase gate with the two-qubit SWAP gate, we propose a scheme to distinguish the 16 hyperentangled Bell states completely in both the polarization and the spatial-mode degrees of freedom (DOFs) of two-photon systems. The proposed scheme reduces the use of two-qubit interaction which is fragile and cumbersome, and only one auxiliary particle is required. Meanwhile, it reduces the requirement for initializing the auxiliary particle which works as a temporary quantum memory, and does not have to be actively controlled or measured. Moreover, the state of the auxiliary particle remains unchanged after the HBSA operation, and within the coherence time, the auxiliary particle can be repeatedly used in the next HBSA operation. Therefore, the engineering complexity of our HBSA operation is greatly simplified. Finally, we discuss the feasibility of our scheme with current technologies. PMID:26780930

  8. Application of Novel High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method to Photonic Band-Gap Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R; White, D; Rodrigue, G

    2004-01-13

    In this paper we motivate the use of a novel high order time domain vector finite element method that is of arbitrary order accuracy in space and up to 5th order accurate in time; and in particular, we apply it to the case of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures. Such structures have been extensively studied in the literature with several practical applications; in particular, for the low loss transmission of electromagnetic energy around sharp 90 degree bends [1]. Typically, such structures are simulated via a numerical solution of Maxwell's equations either in the frequency domain or directly in the time domain over a computational grid. The majority of numerical simulations performed for such structures make use of the widely popular finite difference time domain (FDTD) method [2], where the time dependent electric and magnetic fields are discretized over a ''dual'' grid to second order accuracy in space and time. However, such methods do not generalize to unstructured, non-orthogonal grids or to higher order spatial discretization schemes. To simulate more complicated structures with curved boundaries, such as the structure of [3], a cell based finite element method with curvilinear elements is preferred over standard stair-stepped Cartesian meshes; and to more efficiently reduce the effects of numerical dispersion, a higher order method is highly desirable. In this paper, the high order basis functions of [5] are used in conjunction with the high order energy conserving symplectic time integration algorithms of [6] resulting in a high order, fully mimetic, mixed vector finite element method.

  9. A 0.2-0.5 THz single-band heterodyne receiver based on a photonic local oscillator and a superconductor-insulator-superconductor mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Maezawa, Masaaki; Furuta, Tomofumi; Wakatsuki, Atsushi; Ito, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Naofumi; Nagatsuma, Tadao; Kado, Yuichi

    2008-09-01

    We have demonstrated that a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer pumped by a photonic local oscillator (LO) covers the whole frequency range of 0.2-0.5THz. In the bandwidth of 74% of the center frequency, this single-band receiver exhibits noise temperature of TRX⩽20hf/kB, where h is Planck's constant, f is the frequency, and kB is Boltzmann's constant. Resultant TRX is almost equal to TRX of the identical SIS mixer pumped by three conventional frequency-multiplier-based LOs which share the 0.2-0.5THz band. This technique will contribute to simple, wide-band, and low-noise heterodyne receivers in the terahertz region.

  10. Multi-level diffractive optics for single laser exposure fabrication of telecom-band diamond-like 3-dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Debashis; Abolghasemi, Ladan E; Haque, Moez; Ng, Mi Li; Herman, Peter R

    2008-09-29

    We present a novel multi-level diffractive optical element for diffractive optic near-field lithography based fabrication of large-area diamond-like photonic crystal structure in a single laser exposure step. A multi-level single-surface phase element was laser fabricated on a thin polymer film by two-photon polymerization. A quarter-period phase shift was designed into the phase elements to generate a 3D periodic intensity distribution of double basis diamond-like structure. Finite difference time domain calculation of near-field diffraction patterns and associated isointensity surfaces are corroborated by definitive demonstration of a diamond-like woodpile structure formed inside thick photoresist. A large number of layers provided a strong stopband in the telecom band that matched predictions of numerical band calculation. SEM and spectral observations indicate good structural uniformity over large exposure area that promises 3D photonic crystal devices with high optical quality for a wide range of motif shapes and symmetries. Optical sensing is demonstrated by spectral shifts of the Gamma-Zeta stopband under liquid emersion.

  11. Coupling a vertically looking K-band radar and a C-band weather radar to obtain a complete profile of reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Seltmann, J.; Diederich, M.; Peters, G.

    2003-04-01

    In a project funded under the German Climate Research Programme (DEKLIM), data from novel ground-based sensors are combined with data of the German weather radar network in order to retrieve quantitative precipitation data over land and sea. Usually, rain gauge measurements have to be interpolated for areal precipitation. Alternatively, areal radar reflectivity measurements taken somewhere aloft are often forcefully adjusted to rain gauge data at the ground not considering the low areal representativity of the latter. In this project, ambiguities of the relation between radar reflectivity and surface precipitation rates shall be mitigated on a physical basis using auxiliary profile measurements. A low-power vertically pointing K-Band Doppler micro rain radar (MRR) provides profiles of Doppler spectra from precipitation in the lower 3000 meters of the atmosphere. Thus, information about the modification of precipitation on its way to the ground is gained, e.g. the vertical reflectivity profile (VRP) including the melting zone. Disdrometers and ombrometers are used to convert MRR data into rain rates at the bottom of this column. At its top, the VRP has to be matched to the areal measurement of the weather radar. To ensure continuity at this point, a comparison has been conducted between the Rostock weather radar at the German Baltic coast and the MRR at Zingst 50 kms northeast. The MRR Doppler spectra are converted to drop-size-distributions from which the reflectivity factor Z can be derived. For an eight-weeks-period, this is directly compared to weather radar measurements at C-band. The best correlation achieved using dBZ time series was 0.912.

  12. Direct Observation of Two-Step Photon Absorption in an InAs/GaAs Single Quantum Dot for the Operation of Intermediate-Band Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Tomohiro; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-08

    We present the first direct observation of two-step photon absorption in an InAs/GaAs single quantum dot (QD) using photocurrent spectroscopy with two lasers. The sharp peaks of the photocurrent are shifted due to the quantum confined Stark effect, indicating that the photocurrent from a single QD is obtained. In addition, the intensity of the peaks depends on the power of the secondary laser. These results reveal the direct demonstration of the two-step photon absorption in a single QD. This is an essential result for both the fundamental operation and the realization of ultrahigh solar-electricity energy conversion in quantum dot intermediate-band solar cells.

  13. Telecommunication Wavelength-Band Single-Photon Emission from Single Large InAs Quantum Dots Nucleated on Low-Density Seed Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ze-Sheng; Ma, Ben; Shang, Xiang-Jun; He, Yu; Zhang, Li-Chun; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Wang, Jin-Liang; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    Single-photon emission in the telecommunication wavelength band is realized with self-assembled strain-coupled bilayer InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a planar microcavity on GaAs substrate. Low-density large QDs in the upper layer active for ~1.3 μm emission are fabricated by precisely controlling the indium deposition amount and applying a gradient indium flux in both QD layers. Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) intensity suggested that the radiative lifetime of their exciton emission is 1.5~1.6 ns. The second-order correlation function of g (2)(0) < 0.5 which demonstrates a pure single-photon emission.

  14. An approach to control tuning range and speed in 1D ternary photonic band gap material nano-layered optical filter structures electro-optically

    SciTech Connect

    Zia, Shahneel Banerjee, Anirudh

    2016-05-06

    This paper demonstrates a way to control spectrum tuning capability in one-dimensional (1D) ternary photonic band gap (PBG) material nano-layered structures electro-optically. It is shown that not only tuning range, but also tuning speed of tunable optical filters based on 1D ternary PBG structures can be controlled Electro-optically. This approach finds application in tuning range enhancement of 1D Ternary PBG structures and compensating temperature sensitive transmission spectrum shift in 1D Ternary PBG structures.

  15. Theoretical analysis of a palladium-based one-dimensional metallo-dielectric photonic band gap structure for applications to H2 sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, Maria Antonietta; Trevisi, Simona; De Sario, Marco; Petruzzelli, Vincenzo; D'Orazio, Antonella; Prudenzano, Francesco; Cioffi, Nicola; de Ceglia, Domenico; Scalora, Michael

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we report a numerical study of a palladium-based metallo-dielectric photonic band gap structure for the purpose of detecting H2. In particular, and as an example, we will explore applications to the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption, more commonly known as lactose intolerance condition. This pathology occurs as a result of an incomplete absorption or digestion of different substances, causing an increased spontaneous emission of H2 in human breath. Palladium is considered in order to exploit its well known ability to absorb hydrogen spontaneously. The proposed structure is particularly able to detect the lactose malabsorption level of the patient with relatively high sensitivity and rapidity.

  16. Photonic module: An on-demand resource for photonic entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Devitt, Simon J.; Greentree, Andrew D.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Ionicioiu, Radu; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Munro, William J.

    2007-11-15

    Photonic entanglement has a wide range of applications in quantum computation and communication. Here we introduce a device: the photonic module, which allows for the rapid, deterministic preparation of a large class of entangled photon states. The module is an application independent, ''plug and play'' device, with sufficient flexibility to prepare entanglement for all major quantum computation and communication applications in a completely deterministic fashion without number-discriminated photon detection. We present two alternative constructions for the module, one using free-space components and one in a photonic band-gap structure. The natural operation of the module is to generate states within the stabilizer formalism and we present an analysis on the cavity requirements to experimentally realize this device.

  17. Simple Experimental Verification of the Relation between the Band-Gap Energy and the Energy of Photons Emitted by LEDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Precker, Jurgen W.

    2007-01-01

    The wavelength of the light emitted by a light-emitting diode (LED) is intimately related to the band-gap energy of the semiconductor from which the LED is made. We experimentally estimate the band-gap energies of several types of LEDs, and compare them with the energies of the emitted light, which ranges from infrared to white. In spite of…

  18. Simple Experimental Verification of the Relation between the Band-Gap Energy and the Energy of Photons Emitted by LEDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Precker, Jurgen W.

    2007-01-01

    The wavelength of the light emitted by a light-emitting diode (LED) is intimately related to the band-gap energy of the semiconductor from which the LED is made. We experimentally estimate the band-gap energies of several types of LEDs, and compare them with the energies of the emitted light, which ranges from infrared to white. In spite of…

  19. Label-free antibody detection using band edge fringes in SOI planar photonic crystal waveguides in the slow-light regime.

    PubMed

    García-Rupérez, Jaime; Toccafondo, Veronica; Bañuls, María José; Castelló, Javier García; Griol, Amadeu; Peransi-Llopis, Sergio; Maquieira, Ángel

    2010-11-08

    We report experimental results of label-free anti-bovine serum albumin (anti-BSA) antibody detection using a SOI planar photonic crystal waveguide previously bio-functionalized with complementary BSA antigen probes. Sharp fringes appearing in the slow-light regime near the edge of the guided band are used to perform the sensing. We have modeled the presence of these band edge fringes and demonstrated the possibility of using them for sensing purposes by performing refractive index variations detection, achieving a sensitivity of 174.8 nm/RIU. Then, label-free anti-BSA biosensing experiments have been carried out, estimating a surface mass density detection limit below 2.1 pg/mm2 and a total mass detection limit below 0.2 fg.

  20. Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Rana; Christensen, C.; Muehlmeier, J.; Tuttle, G.; Ho, K.-M.

    2008-04-07

    Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals with complete photonic band gaps are simulated with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations, and compared with measurements on microwave scale photonic crystals. The transmission through waveguide bends critically depends on the photonic crystal architecture in the bend region. We have found experimentally and theoretically, a new waveguide bend configuration consisting of overlapping rods in the bend region, that performs better than the simple waveguide bend of terminated rods, especially in the higher frequency portion of the band. Efficient beam splitters with this junction geometry are also simulated.

  1. Band alignment and photon extraction studies of Na-doped MgZnO/Ga-doped ZnO heterojunction for light-emitter applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Sushil Kumar; Awasthi, Vishnu; Sengar, Brajendra Singh; Garg, Vivek; Sharma, Pankaj; Mukherjee, Shaibal; Kumar, Shailendra; Mukherjee, C.

    2015-10-28

    Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is carried out to measure the energy discontinuity at the interface of p-type Na-doped MgZnO (NMZO)/n-type Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) heterojunction grown by dual ion beam sputtering. The offset values at valence band and conduction band of NMZO/GZO heterojunction are calculated to be 1.93 and −2.36 eV, respectively. The p-type conduction in NMZO film has been confirmed by Hall measurement and band structure. Moreover, the effect of Ar{sup +} ion sputtering on the valence band onset values of NMZO and GZO thin films has been investigated. This asymmetric waveguide structure formed by the lower refractive index of GZO than that of NMZO indicates that easy extraction of photons generated in GZO through the NMZO layer into free space. The asymmetric waveguide structure has potential applications to produce ZnO-based light emitters with high extraction efficiency.

  2. Two-level system immersed in a photonic band-gap material: A non-Markovian stochastic Schroedinger-equation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Ines de; Alonso, Daniel; Gaspard, Pierre

    2005-02-01

    It is our aim to study the dynamics of a two-level atom immersed in the modified radiation field of a photonic band-gap material using non-Markovian stochastic Schroedinger equations. Up to now, such methodology has only been applied to toy models and not to physically realistic systems as the one presented here. In order to check its validity, we shall study several of the physical phenomena already described in the literature within non-Markovian master equations, such as the long-time-limit residual population in the excited level of the atom and the population inversion which occurs in the atomic system when applying an external laser field. In addition to the stochastic equation, we propose a non-Markovian master equation derived from the stochastic formalism, which in contrast to the current models of master equation preserves positivity. We propose a correlation function for the radiation field (environment) that captures many of the physically relevant aspects of the problem and describes the short-time behavior in a more accurate way than previously proposed ones. This characteristic permits a correct description of the fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, which in the stochastic formalism are represented by the noise, and a better description of the non-Markovian effects in the atomic dynamics. The methodology presented in this paper to apply stochastic Schroedinger equations can be followed to study more complex systems, like many-level atoms embedded in more complicated photonic band-gap structures.

  3. Temperature dependence of band gap ratio and Q-factor defect mode in a semiconductor quaternary alloy hexagonal photonic-crystal hole slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Cano, R.; Porras-Montenegro, N.

    2016-04-01

    We present numerical predictions for the photonic TE-like band gap ratio and the quality factors of symmetric localized defect as a function of the thickness slab and temperature by the use of plane wave expansion and the finite-difference time-domain methods. The photonic-crystal hole slab is composed of a 2D hexagonal array with identical air holes and a circular cross section, embedded in a non-dispersive III-V semiconductor quaternary alloy slab, which has a high value of dielectric function in the near-infrared region, and the symmetric defect is formed by increasing the radius of a single hole in the 2D hexagonal lattice. We show that the band gap ratio depends linearly on the temperature in the range 150-400 K. Our results show a strong temperature dependence of the quality factor Q, the maximum (Q = 7000) is reached at T = 350 hbox {K}, but if the temperature continues to increase, the efficiency drops sharply. Furthermore, we present numerical predictions for the electromagnetic field distribution at T = 350 hbox {K}.

  4. Role of charge separation on two-step two photon absorption in InAs/GaAs quantum dot intermediate band solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creti, A.; Tasco, V.; Cola, A.; Montagna, G.; Tarantini, I.; Salhi, A.; Al-Muhanna, A.; Passaseo, A.; Lomascolo, M.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we report on the competition between two-step two photon absorption, carrier recombination, and escape in the photocurrent generation mechanisms of high quality InAs/GaAs quantum dot intermediate band solar cells. In particular, the different role of holes and electrons is highlighted. Experiments of external quantum efficiency dependent on temperature and electrical or optical bias (two-step two photon absorption) highlight a relative increase as high as 38% at 10 K under infrared excitation. We interpret these results on the base of charge separation by phonon assisted tunneling of holes from quantum dots. We propose the charge separation as an effective mechanism which, reducing the recombination rate and competing with the other escape processes, enhances the infrared absorption contribution. Meanwhile, this model explains why thermal escape is found to predominate over two-step two photon absorption starting from 200 K, whereas it was expected to prevail at lower temperatures (≥70 K), solely on the basis of the relatively low electron barrier height in such a system.

  5. Fast broad-band photon detector based on quantum well devices and charge-integrating electronics for non-invasive FEL monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, M. Cautero, G.; Sergo, R.; Castellaro, C.; Menk, R. H.; Ganbold, T.; Biasiol, G.

    2016-07-27

    The recent evolution of free-electron lasers has not been matched by the development of adequate beam-monitoring instrumentation. However, for both experimental and diagnostics purposes, it is crucial to keep such photon beams under control, avoiding at the same time the absorption of the beam and the possible destruction of the detector. These requirements can be fulfilled by utilizing fast and non-invasive photon detectors operated in situ, upstream from the experimental station. From this perspective, sensors based on Quantum Well (QW) devices can be the key to detecting ultra-short light pulses. In fact, owing to their high electron mobility, InGaAs/InAlAs QW devices operated at room temperature exhibit sub-nanosecond response times. Their direct, low-energy band gap renders them capable of detecting photons ranging from visible to X-ray. Furthermore, the 2D electron gas forming inside the QW is responsible for a charge amplification mechanism, which increases the charge collection efficiency of these devices. In order to acquire the signals produced by these QW sensors, a novel readout electronics has been developed. It is based on a high-speed charge integrator, which allows short, low-intensity current pulses to be read within a 50-ns window. The integrated signal is acquired through an ADC and the entire process can be performed at a 10-MHz repetition rate. This work provides a detailed description of the development of the QW detectors and the acquisition electronics, as well as reporting the main experimental results, which show how these tools are well suited for the realization of fast, broad-band beam monitors.

  6. Wide Band to ''Double Band'' upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, P.; Currier, R.; Garbincius, P.; Butler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The Wide Band beam currently uses electrons obtained from secondary photon conversions to produce the photon beam incident on the experimental targets. By transporting the positrons produced in these conversions as well as the electrons it is possible to almost double the number of photons delivered to the experiments per primary beam proton. 11 figs.

  7. Measuring the complete spatio-temporal field of focused ultrashort laser pulses for multi-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowlan, Pamela; Gabolde, Pablo; Trebino, Rick

    2007-05-01

    We present two complementary interferometric techniques for measuring the complete spatio-temporal intensity and phase, E(x,y,z,t), of ultrashort pulses. The first technique, called SEA TADPOLE, allows for the first time the complete measurement of pulses near a focus, while the second technique, called STRIPED FISH, allows the complete measurement of mostly collimated pulses, but on a single-shot basis.

  8. Nonempirical Simulations of Inhomogeneous Broadening of Electronic Transitions in Solution: Predicting Band Shapes in One- and Two-Photon Absorption Spectra of Chalcones.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Joanna; Zaleśny, Robert; Tian, Guangjun; Murugan, Natarajan Arul; Ågren, Hans; Bartkowiak, Wojciech

    2017-09-30

    We have examined several approaches relying on the Polarizable Embedding (PE) scheme to predict optical band shapes for two chalcone molecules in methanol solution. The PE-TDDFT and PERI-CC2 methods were combined with molecular dynamics simulations, where the solute geometry was kept either as rigid, flexible or partly-flexible (restrained) body. The first approach, termed RBMD-PE-TDDFT, was employed to estimate the inhomogeneous broadening for subsequent convolution with the vibrationally-resolved spectra of the molecule in solution determined quantum-mechanically (QM). As demonstrated, the RBMD-PE-TDDFT/QM-PCM approach delivers accurate band widths, also reproducing their correct asymmetric shapes. Further refinement can be obtained by the estimation of the inhomogeneous broadening using the RBMD-PERI-CC2 method. On the other hand, the remaining two approaches (FBMD-PE-TDDFT and ResBMD-PE-TDDFT), which lack quantum-mechanical treatment of molecular vibrations, lead to underestimated band widths. In this study, we also proposed a simple strategy regarding the rapid selection of the exchange-correlation functional for the simulations of vibrationally-resolved one- and two-photon absorption spectra based on two easy-to-compute metrics.

  9. High average power, high energy 1.55 μm ultra-short pulse laser beam delivery using large mode area hollow core photonic band-gap fiber.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiang; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy

    2011-01-17

    We demonstrate high average power, high energy 1.55 μm ultra-short pulse (<1 ps) laser delivery using helium-filled and argon-filled large mode area hollow core photonic band-gap fibers and compare relevant performance parameters. The ultra-short pulse laser beam-with pulse energy higher than 7 μJ and pulse train average power larger than 0.7 W-is output from a 2 m long hollow core fiber with diffraction limited beam quality. We introduce a pulse tuning mechanism of argon-filled hollow core photonic band-gap fiber. We assess the damage threshold of the hollow core photonic band-gap fiber and propose methods to further increase pulse energy and average power handling.

  10. The angular electronic band structure and free particle model of aromatic molecules: High-frequency photon-induced ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öncan, Mehmet; Koç, Fatih; Şahin, Mehmet; Köksal, Koray

    2017-05-01

    This work introduces an analysis of the relationship of first-principles calculations based on DFT method with the results of free particle model for ring-shaped aromatic molecules. However, the main aim of the study is to reveal the angular electronic band structure of the ring-shaped molecules. As in the case of spherical molecules such as fullerene, it is possible to observe a parabolic dispersion of electronic states with the variation of angular quantum number in the planar ring-shaped molecules. This work also discusses the transition probabilities between the occupied and virtual states by analyzing the angular electronic band structure and the possibility of ring currents in the case of spin angular momentum (SAM) or orbital angular momentum (OAM) carrying light. Current study focuses on the benzene molecule to obtain its angular electronic band structure. The obtained electronic band structure can be considered as a useful tool to see the transition probabilities between the electronic states and possible contribution of the states to the ring currents. The photoinduced current due to the transfer of SAM into the benzene molecule has been investigated by using analytical calculations within the frame of time-dependent perturbation theory.

  11. Photonic quantum well composed of photonic crystal and quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaohui; Zhu, Yiping; Wang, Lianwei; Yang, Pingxiong; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-02-01

    A photonic quantum well structure composed of photonic crystal and Fibonacci quasicrystal is investigated by analyzing the transmission spectra and electric field distributions. The defect band in the photonic well can form confined quantized photonic states that can change in the band-gap of the photonic barriers by varying the thickness ratio of the two stacking layers. The number of confined states can be tuned by adjusting the period of the photonic well. The photons traverse the photonic quantum well by resonance tunneling and the coupling effect leads to the high transmission intensity of the confined photonic states.

  12. Widely tunable monolithic dual-mode laser for W-band photonic millimeter-wave generation and all-optical clock recovery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Biwei; Guo, Lu; Zhang, Limeng; Lu, Dna; Huo, Li; Lou, Caiyun; Zhao, Lingjuan

    2016-04-10

    We demonstrate a monolithic dual-mode amplified feedback laser for photonic millimeter-wave generation and all-optical clock recovery. Dual-mode lasing with beating frequency around 100 GHz was realized by using a single-mode distributed feedback (DFB) laser with a short feedback cavity that was integrated by simple quantum-well intermixing technology. By tuning the bias currents of the laser sections, the beating-frequency can be continuously tuned from 75 to 109 GHz, almost covering the entire W-band (75-110 GHz). Furthermore, by using this device, an all-optical clock recovery for 100 Gbit/s return-to-zero on-off-keying signal was achieved with a timing jitter of 301 fs.

  13. Strong interlayer coupling mediated giant two-photon absorption in MoS e2 /graphene oxide heterostructure: Quenching of exciton bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rituraj; Aneesh, J.; Yadav, Rajesh Kumar; Sanda, Suresh; Barik, A. R.; Mishra, Ashish Kumar; Maji, Tuhin Kumar; Karmakar, Debjani; Adarsh, K. V.

    2016-04-01

    A complex few-layer MoS e2 /graphene oxide (GO) heterostructure with strong interlayer coupling was prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. In this strongly coupled heterostructure, we demonstrate a giant enhancement of two-photon absorption that is in stark contrast to the reverse saturable absorption of a weakly coupled MoS e2 /GO heterostructure and saturable absorption of isolated MoS e2 . Spectroscopic evidence of our study indicates that the optical signatures of isolated MoS e2 and GO domains are significantly modified in the heterostructure, displaying a direct coupling of both domains. Furthermore, our first-principles calculations indicate that strong interlayer coupling between the layers dramatically suppresses the MoS e2 excitonic bands. We envision that our findings provide a powerful tool to explore different optical functionalities as a function of interlayer coupling, which may be essential for the development of device technologies.

  14. InGaAsP/InP Nanocavity for Single-Photon Source at 1.55-μm Telecommunication Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hai-Zhi; Hadi, Mukhtar; Zheng, Yanzhen; Shen, Bizhou; Zhang, Lei; Ren, Zhilei; Gao, Ruoyao; Wang, Zhiming M.

    2017-02-01

    A new structure of 1.55-μm pillar cavity is proposed. Consisting of InP-air-aperture and InGaAsP layers, this cavity can be fabricated by using a monolithic process, which was difficult for previous 1.55-μm pillar cavities. Owing to the air apertures and tapered distributed Bragg reflectors, such a pillar cavity with nanometer-scaled diameters can give a quality factor of 104-105 at 1.55 μm. Capable of weakly and strongly coupling a single quantum dot with an optical mode, this nanocavity could be a prospective candidate for quantum-dot single-photon sources at 1.55-μm telecommunication band.

  15. InGaAsP/InP Nanocavity for Single-Photon Source at 1.55-μm Telecommunication Band.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai-Zhi; Hadi, Mukhtar; Zheng, Yanzhen; Shen, Bizhou; Zhang, Lei; Ren, Zhilei; Gao, Ruoyao; Wang, Zhiming M

    2017-12-01

    A new structure of 1.55-μm pillar cavity is proposed. Consisting of InP-air-aperture and InGaAsP layers, this cavity can be fabricated by using a monolithic process, which was difficult for previous 1.55-μm pillar cavities. Owing to the air apertures and tapered distributed Bragg reflectors, such a pillar cavity with nanometer-scaled diameters can give a quality factor of 10(4)-10(5) at 1.55 μm. Capable of weakly and strongly coupling a single quantum dot with an optical mode, this nanocavity could be a prospective candidate for quantum-dot single-photon sources at 1.55-μm telecommunication band.

  16. InGaAsP/InP-air-aperture microcavities for single-photon sources at 1.55-μm telecommunication band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Sijie; Zheng, Yanzhen; Weng, Zhuo; Yao, Haicheng; Ju, Yuhao; Zhang, Lei; Ren, Zhilei; Gao, Ruoyao; Wang, Zhiming M.; Song, Hai-Zhi

    2016-11-01

    InGaAsP/InP-air-aperture micropillar cavities are proposed to serve as 1.55-μm single photon sources, which are indispensable in silica-fiber based quantum information processing. Owing to air-apertures introduced to InP layers, and adiabatically tapered distributed Bragg-reflector structures used in the central cavity layers, the pillar diameters can be less than 1 μm, achieving mode volume as small as (λ/n)3, and the quality factors are more than 104 - 105, sufficient to increase the quantum dot emission rate for 100 times and create strong coupling between the optical mode and the 1.55- μm InAs/InP quantum dot emitter. The mode wavelengths and quality factors are found weakly changing with the cavity size and the deviation from the ideal shape, indicating the robustness against the imperfection of the fabrication technique. The fabrication, simply epitaxial growth, dry and chemical etching, is a damage-free and monolithic process, which is advantageous over previous hybrid cavities. The above properties satisfy the requirements of efficient, photonindistinguishable and coherent 1.55-μm quantum dot single photon sources, so the proposed InGaAsP/InP-air-aperture micropillar cavities are prospective candidates for quantum information devices at telecommunication band.

  17. Photonic frequency-quadrupling and balanced pre-coding technologies for W-band QPSK vector mm-wave signal generation based on a single DML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanyi; Yang, Chao; Chi, Nan; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel scheme for high-frequency quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) photonic vector signal generation based on a single directly modulated laser (DML) employing photonic frequency quadrupling and balanced pre-coding technologies. In order to realize frequency quadrupling, a wavelength selective switch (WSS) is intruded in our experiment. The intruded WSS combined with DML can not only realize high-frequency vector signal generation but also simplify the architecture. We experimentally demonstrate 1-or 2-Gbaud QPSK vector signal generation at 88 GHz based on our proposed scheme. The generated 1-Gbaud balanced pre-coded QPSK vector signal is transmitted 0.5-m wireless distance with the bit-error-ratio (BER) below hard-decision forward-error-correction (HD-FEC) threshold of 3.8×10-3. To our knowledge, this is the first time to demonstrate W-band mm-wave vector signal based on a single DML with quadrupling frequency and pre-coding technologies.

  18. Optical Fabry-Perot filter based on photonic band gap quasi-periodic one-dimensional multilayer according to the definite Rudin-Shapiro distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazzi, Y.; Kanzari, M.

    2012-06-01

    In this work, a new type of optical filter using photonic band gap materials has been suggested. Indeed, a combination of periodic H(LH)J and Rudin-Shapiro quasi-periodic one-dimensional photonic multilayer systems (RSM) were used. SiO2 (L) and TiO2 (H) were chosen as two elementary layers with refractive indexes nL = 1.45 and nH = 2.30 respectively. The study configuration is H(LH)J[RSM]PH(LH)J, which forms an effective Fabry-Perot filter (FPF), where J and P are respectively the repetition number of periodic and (RSM) stacks. We have numerically investigated by means of transfer-matrix approach the transmission properties in the visible spectral range of FPF system. We show that the number and position of resonator peaks are dependent on the (RSM) repetition number P and incidence angle of exciting light. The effect of these two parameters for producing an improved polychromatic filter with high finesse coefficient (F) and quality factor (Q) is studied in details.

  19. Competitive behavior of photons contributing to junction voltage jump in narrow band-gap semiconductor multi-quantum-well laser diodes at lasing threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Liefeng E-mail: lihongru@nankai.edu.cn; Yang, Xiufang; Wang, Cunda; Yao, Dongsheng; Li, Yang; Li, Ding; Hu, Xiaodong; Li, Hongru E-mail: lihongru@nankai.edu.cn

    2015-04-15

    The junction behavior of different narrow band-gap multi-quantum-well (MQW) laser diodes (LDs) confirmed that the jump in the junction voltage in the threshold region is a general characteristic of narrow band-gap LDs. The relative change in the 1310 nm LD is the most obvious. To analyze this sudden voltage change, the threshold region is divided into three stages by I{sub th}{sup l} and I{sub th}{sup u}, as shown in Fig. 2; I{sub th}{sup l} is the conventional threshold, and as long as the current is higher than this threshold, lasing exists and the IdV/dI-I plot drops suddenly; I{sub th}{sup u} is the steady lasing point, at which the separation of the quasi-Fermi levels of electron and holes across the active region (V{sub j}) is suddenly pinned. Based on the evolutionary model of dissipative structure theory, the rate equations of the photons in a single-mode LD were deduced in detail at I{sub th}{sup l} and I{sub th}{sup u}. The results proved that the observed behavior of stimulated emission suddenly substituting for spontaneous emission, in a manner similar to biological evolution, must lead to a sudden increase in the injection carriers in the threshold region, which then causes the sudden increase in the junction voltage in this region.

  20. Surface passivation of a photonic crystal band-edge laser by atomic layer deposition of SiO2 and its application for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Hyungrae; Lee, Jeongkug; Jordan, Luke R.; Lee, Si Hoon; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Hyo Jin; Park, Juhun; Hong, Seunghun; Jeon, Heonsu

    2015-02-01

    We report on the conformal surface passivation of photonic crystal (PC) laser devices with an ultrathin dielectric layer. Air-bridge-type Γ-point band-edge lasers (BELs) are fabricated by forming a honeycomb lattice two-dimensional PC structure into an InGaAsP multiple-quantum-well epilayer. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is employed for conformal deposition of a few-nanometer-thick SiO2 layer over the entire device surface, not only on the top and bottom surfaces of the air-bridge membrane but also on the air-hole sidewalls. Despite its extreme thinness, the ALD passivation layer is found to protect the InGaAsP BEL devices from harsh chemicals. In addition, the ALD-SiO2 is compatible with the silane-based surface chemistry, which allows us to use ALD-passivated BEL devices as label-free biosensors. The standard streptavidin-biotin interaction shifts the BEL lasing wavelength by ~1 nm for the dipole-like Γ-point band-edge mode. A sharp lasing line (<0.2 nm, full width at half-maximum) and a large refractive index sensitivity (~163 nm per RIU) produce a figure of merit as high as ~800 for our BEL biosensor, which is at least an order of magnitude higher than those of more common biosensors that rely on a broad resonance peak, showing that our nanolaser structures are suitable for highly sensitive biosensor applications.

  1. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  2. Complete Permittivity Tensor in Sputtered CuFe2O4 Thin Films at Photon Energies between 2 and 5 eV

    PubMed Central

    Veis, Martin; Antos, Roman; Visnovsky, Stefan; Kulkarni, Prasanna D.; Venkataramani, Narayanan; Prasad, Shiva; Mistrik, Jan; Krishnan, Ramanathan

    2013-01-01

    This work is devoted to the systematic study of the optical and magneto-optical properties of sputter deposited CuFe2O4 thin films in the photon energy region between 2 and 5 eV using spectroscopic ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr spectroscopy. The spectral dependence of both the diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the permittivity tensor is determined. A complete picture about the electron transitions in CuFe2O4 is suggested in the frame of intervalence charge transfer and intersublattice charge transfer transitions. The effect of deposition conditions and post-deposition treatment in CuFe2O4 films upon the optical and magneto-optical properties is discussed. PMID:28788320

  3. Sub-GHz-resolution C-band Nyquist-filtering interleaver on a high-index-contrast photonic integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Zhu, Chen; Corcoran, Bill; Burla, Maurizio; Roeloffzen, Chris G H; Leinse, Arne; Schröder, Jochen; Lowery, Arthur J

    2016-03-21

    Modern optical communications rely on high-resolution, high-bandwidth filtering to maximize the data-carrying capacity of fiber-optic networks. Such filtering typically requires high-speed, power-hungry digital processes in the electrical domain. Passive optical filters currently provide high bandwidths with low power consumption, but at the expense of resolution. Here, we present a passive filter chip that functions as an optical Nyquist-filtering interleaver featuring sub-GHz resolution and a near-rectangular passband with 8% roll-off. This performance is highly promising for high-spectral-efficiency Nyquist wavelength division multiplexed (N-WDM) optical super-channels. The chip provides a simple two-ring-resonator-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which has a sub-cm2 footprint owing to the high-index-contrast Si3N4/SiO2 waveguide, while manifests low wavelength-dependency enabling C-band (> 4 THz) coverage with more than 160 effective free spectral ranges of 25 GHz. This device is anticipated to be a critical building block for spectrally-efficient, chip-scale transceivers and ROADMs for N-WDM super-channels in next-generation optical communication networks.

  4. Line parameters measurements and modeling for the ν6 band of CH3F: Generation of a complete line list for atmospheric databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemart, D.; Guinet, M.

    2016-12-01

    The 8.5 μm-spectral region of methyl fluoride was studied in terms of line positions, intensities and self-broadening coefficients at room temperature. A multispectrum fitting was used to retrieve from 7 high-resolution Fourier transform spectra line parameters for 787 transitions belonging to the ν6 band between 1078 and 1240 cm-1. The accuracy of line intensities and widths measurements were estimated to be around 5% and 5-10% respectively. J- and K-rotational dependences of the transition dipole moment squared and the self-broadening coefficients were observed and modeled from the measurements. A complete line list of almost 1500 transitions was generated for atmospheric or industrial detection of CH3F. Comparisons with previous studies from the literature were also performed.

  5. The analyzation of 2D complicated regular polygon photonic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jing; Gao, Yuanmei

    2017-06-01

    We have numerically simulated the light intensity distribution, phase distribution, far-field diffraction of the two dimensional (2D) regular octagon and regular dodecagon lattices in detail. In addition, using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, we numerically calculate the energy band of the two lattices. Both of the photonic lattices have the band gap. And the regular octagon lattice possesses the wide complete band gap while the regular dodecagon lattice has the incomplete gap. Moreover, we simulated the preliminary transmission image of photonic lattices. It may inspire the academic research both in light control and soliton.

  6. Wide-band tunable photonic bandgap device and laser in dye-doped liquid crystal refilled cholesteric liquid crystal polymer template system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jia-De; Lin, Hong-Lin; Lin, Hsin-Yu; Wei, Guan-Jhong; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2017-02-01

    The scientists in the field of liquid crystal (LC) have paid significant attention in the exploration of novel cholesteric LC (CLC) polymer template (simply called template) in recent years. The self-assembling nanostructural template with chirality can effectively overcome the limitation in the optical features of traditional CLCs, such as enhancement of reflectivity over 50%, multiple photonic bandgaps (PBGs), and changeable optical characteristics by flexibly replacing the refilling LC materials, and so on. This work fabricates two gradient-pitched CLC templates with two opposite handednesses, which are then merged as a spatially tunable and highly reflective CLC template sample. This sample can simultaneously reflect right- and left-circularly polarized lights and the tunable spectral range includes the entire visible region. By increasing the temperature of the template sample exceeding the clearing point of the refilling LC, the light scattering significantly decreases and the reflectance effectively increase to exceed 50% in the entire visible region. This device has a maximum reflectance over 85% and a wide-band spatial tunability in PBG between 400 nm and 800 nm which covers the entire visible region. Not only the sample can be employed as a wide-band spatially tunable filter, but also the system doping with two suitable laser dyes which emitted fluorescence can cover entire visible region can develop a low-threshold, mirror-less laser with a spatial tunability at spectral regions including blue to red region (from 484 nm to 634 nm) and simultaneous lasing emission of left- and right-circular polarizations.

  7. L(alpha)-induced two-photon absorption of visible light emitted from an O-type star by H2(+) ions located near the surface of the Stromgren sphere surrounding the star: A possible explanation for the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIDs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glownia, James H.; Sorokin, Peter P.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, a new model is proposed to account for the DIB's (Diffuse Interstellar Bands). In this model, the DIB's result from a non-linear effect: resonantly-enhanced two-photon absorption of H(2+) ions located near the surface of the Stromgren sphere that surrounds an O- or B- type star. The strong light that is required to 'drive' the two-photon transition is provided by L(alpha) light emerging from the Stromgren sphere that bounds the H II region surrounding the star. A value of approximately 100 micro W/sq cm is estimated for the L(alpha) flux at the Stromgren radius, R(s), of a strong (O5) star. It is shown that a c.w. L(alpha) flux of this intensity should be sufficient to induce a few percent absorption for visible light radiated by the same star at a frequency (omega2) that completes an allowed two-photon transition, provided (1) the L(alpha) radiation happens to be nearly resonant with the frequency of a fully-allowed absorber transition that effectively represents the first step in the two-photon transition, and (2) an effective column density approximately 10(sup18)/sq cm of the absorber is present near the Stromgren sphere radius, R(sub s).

  8. Design of single-polarization coupler based on dual-core photonic band-gap fiber implied in resonant fiber optic gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Li, Xuyou; Zhang, Chunmei; Ling, Weiwei; Liu, Pan; Xia, Linlin; Yang, Hanrui

    2016-12-01

    A novel (to our knowledge) type of single-polarization (SP) coupler based on a dual-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) is proposed. The effects of structure parameters on the performance of this coupler are studied numerically based on the full vector finite element method (FEM). Finally, an optimal design with a length of 0.377 mm at the wavelength of 1.55 μm is achieved, and its implication in PBF-based fiber ring resonator (FRR), the effect of angular misalignment on the SP coupler are analyzed as well. When the SP coupler is incorporated into a PBF-based FRR, it functions as the power splitter and the polarizer simultaneously, and can extinct the secondary eigenstate of polarization (ESOP) propagating in the FRR. The mode field of SP coupler can match with the polarization-maintaining (PM) PBF with ultra-low temperature sensitivity proposed in previous study, and an all PM-PBF based FRR can be established, which is of great significance in suppressing the temperature-related polarization fluctuation and improving the long-term stability for RFOG, and the SP coupler has high angular misalignment tolerance as well.

  9. Design of photonic band gap fibers with suppressed higher-order modes: Towards the development of effectively single mode large hollow-core fiber platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Kunimasa; Florous, Nikolaos J.; Murao, Tadashi; Koshiba, Masanori

    2006-08-01

    The objective of the present investigation is to propose and theoretically demonstrate the effective suppression of higher-order modes in large-hollow-core photonic band gap fibers (PBGFs), mainly for low-loss data transmission platforms and/or high power delivery systems. The proposed design strategy is based on the index-matching mechanism of central air-core modes with defected outer core modes. By incorporating several air-cores in the cladding of the PBGF with 6-fold symmetry it is possible to resonantly couple the light corresponding to higher-order modes into the outer core, thus significantly increasing the leakage losses of the higher-order modes in comparison to the fundamental mode, thus making our proposed design to operate in an effectively single mode fashion with polarization independent propagation characteristics. The validation of the procedure is ensured with a detailed PBGF analysis based on an accurate finite element modal solver. Extensive numerical results show that the leakage losses of the higher-order modes can be enhanced in a level of at least 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to those of the fundamental mode. Our investigation is expected to remove an essential obstacle in the development of large-core single-mode hollow-core fibers, thus enabling them to surpass the attenuation of conventional fibers.

  10. Design of photonic band gap fibers with suppressed higher-order modes: towards the development of effectively single mode large hollow-core fiber platforms.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kunimasa; Florous, Nikolaos J; Murao, Tadashi; Koshiba, Masanori

    2006-08-07

    The objective of the present investigation is to propose and theoretically demonstrate the effective suppression of higher-order modes in large-hollow-core photonic band gap fibers (PBGFs), mainly for low-loss data transmission platforms and/or high power delivery systems. The proposed design strategy is based on the index-matching mechanism of central air-core modes with defected outer core modes. By incorporating several air-cores in the cladding of the PBGF with 6-fold symmetry it is possible to resonantly couple the light corresponding to higher-order modes into the outer core, thus significantly increasing the leakage losses of the higher-order modes in comparison to the fundamental mode, thus making our proposed design to operate in an effectively single mode fashion with polarization independent propagation characteristics. The validation of the procedure is ensured with a detailed PBGF analysis based on an accurate finite element modal solver. Extensive numerical results show that the leakage losses of the higher-order modes can be enhanced in a level of at least 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to those of the fundamental mode. Our investigation is expected to remove an essential obstacle in the development of large-core single-mode hollow-core fibers, thus enabling them to surpass the attenuation of conventional fibers.

  11. Large negative dispersion in dual-concentric-core photonic crystal fiber with hybrid cladding structure based on complete leaky mode coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinhui; Sang, Xinzhu; Yu, Chongxiu; Jin, Cang; Shen, Xiangwei; Zhou, Guiyao; Li, Shuguang; Hou, Lantian

    2011-12-01

    Considering the optical stability of solution, the sugar-solution is infused into the outer core ring of dual-concentric-core photonic crystal fiber (DCCPCF). The influences of structure parameters and solution concentration on the phase and loss matching are comprehensively analyzed. By choosing the appropriate outer core mode to completely couple with the inner core fundamental mode, the large negative dispersion PCF around 1.55 μm is designed, which has the dispersion value of - 39,500 ps/km/nm as well as bandwidth of 7.4 nm and effective mode area of 28.3 μm 2. The designed PCF with hybrid cladding structure can effectively compensate the positive dispersion of conventional single mode fiber, and suppress the system perturbation caused by a series of nonlinear effects. Considering the mode field mismatching between the DCCPCF and the tapered fiber, the calculated connection loss around 1.55 μm is below 3 dB. In addition, the equivalent propagation constants of two leaky modes are deduced from the coupled-mode theory, and the complete mode coupling case can be well predicted by comparing the real and imaginary parts of propagation constants.

  12. Pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} on amorphous dielectric layers towards monolithic 3D photonic integration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haofeng; Brouillet, Jeremy; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrate pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} crystallized on amorphous layers at <450 °C towards 3D Si photonic integration. We developed two approaches to seed the lateral single crystal growth: (1) utilize the Gibbs-Thomson eutectic temperature depression at the tip of an amorphous GeSn nanotaper for selective nucleation; (2) laser-induced nucleation at one end of a GeSn strip. Either way, the crystallized Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} is dominated by a single grain >18 μm long that forms optoelectronically benign twin boundaries with others grains. These pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} patterns are suitable for monolithic 3D integration of active photonic devices on Si.

  13. Theoretical and experimental study of the Suzuki-phase photonic crystal lattice by angle-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Alija, Alfonso R; Martínez, Luis J; Postigo, Pablo A; Sánchez-Dehesa, Jose; Galli, Matteo; Politi, Alberto; Patrini, Maddalena; Andreani, Lucio C; Seassal, Christian; Viktorovitch, Pierre

    2007-01-22

    A complete theoretical and experimental analysis of the photonic band structure for the Suzuki-phase lattice is presented. The band diagrams were calculated by two-dimensional plane wave expansion and three-dimensional guided-mode expansion methods. Angle resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy has been used to measure the emission of the photonic crystal structure realized in active InAsP/InP slabs. Photonic bands with a very low group velocity along an entire direction of the reciprocal lattice have been measured, which may have important applications on future photonic devices. The experimentally determined dispersion is in very good agreement with the calculated photonic bands. The presence of defect modes produced by microcavities in the Suzuki-phase lattice has also been established.

  14. NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey + Herschel PACS-SPIRE: Constraining the Infrared Properties of a Mass-Complete Sample of 5000 Galaxies at 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesini, Danilo

    Understanding the formation mechanisms and evolution with cosmic time of massive galaxies is one of the key unsolved problems in astrophysics. At the endpoint of the hierarchical merging process, massive galaxies are most sensitive to various model assumptions, offering a strong opportunity to constrain models of galaxy formation. For the first time, the NEWFIRM Medium-band Survey (NMBS) made it possible to construct mass-complete samples of massive galaxies with accurate photometric redshifts at 1 < z < 4. Recent measurements show a dramatic evolution of the stellar mass function of galaxies with redshift and evidence of mass-dependent evolution. Moreover, it has become established that a substantial fraction of the massive quiescent galaxies that dominate the red-sequence at z=0 are already in place at z~2.3. The rapid assembly and quiescent nature of this population, and the remarkable lack of evolution in the number density of massive galaxies seems inconsistent with predictions from models of galaxy formation. To further our understanding of the evolution of massive galaxies, detailed characterization of the infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and emission from dust, and accurate estimates of (dust-obscured) star-formation rates (SFRs) and AGN contribution are needed for a large, complete sample of massive galaxies with accurate redshifts at z>1. We propose to augment the well-sampled UV-to-MIPS SEDs delivered by the NMBS with the photometry from Herschel PACS and SPIRE (100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 micron). The NMBS uses a set of five medium-bandwidth NIR filters to provide very precise photometric redshifts and well-sampled SEDs at z>1.5. The public NMBS catalogs consist of about 60,000 objects at z<4 with photometry in the UV (GALEX), optical, NIR (broad- and medium-band filters), and mid-IR (Spitzer). The proposed program will extend the NMBS SEDs into the IR (100-500 micron). The construction and public release of the combined NMBS

  15. Photonic Bandgaps in Photonic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Gates, Amanda L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will focus on photonic bandgaps that arise due to nearly free photon and tight-binding effects in coupled microparticle and ring-resonator systems. The Mie formulation for homogeneous spheres is generalized to handle core/shell systems and multiple concentric layers in a manner that exploits an analogy with stratified planar systems, thereby allowing concentric multi-layered structures to be treated as photonic bandgap (PBG) materials. Representative results from a Mie code employing this analogy demonstrate that photonic bands arising from nearly free photon effects are easily observed in the backscattering, asymmetry parameter, and albedo for periodic quarter-wave concentric layers, though are not readily apparent in extinction spectra. Rather, the periodicity simply alters the scattering profile, enhancing the ratio of backscattering to forward scattering inside the bandgap, in direct analogy with planar quarter-wave multilayers. PBGs arising from tight-binding may also be observed when the layers (or rings) are designed such that the coupling between them is weak. We demonstrate that for a structure consisting of N coupled micro-resonators, the morphology dependent resonances split into N higher-Q modes, in direct analogy with other types of oscillators, and that this splitting ultimately results in PBGs which can lead to enhanced nonlinear optical effects.

  16. Photonic Bell-state analysis based on semiconductor-superconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabag, Evyatar; Bouscher, Shlomi; Marjieh, Raja; Hayat, Alex

    2017-03-01

    We propose a compact and highly efficient scheme for complete Bell-state analysis using two-photon absorption in a superconducting proximity region of a semiconductor avalanche photodiode. One-photon transitions to the superconducting Cooper-pair based condensate in the conduction band are forbidden, whereas two-photon transitions are allowed and are strongly enhanced by superconductivity. This Cooper-pair based two-photon absorption results in a strong detection preference of a specified entangled state. Our analysis shows high detection purity of the desired Bell state with negligible false detection probability. The theoretically demonstrated concept can pave the way towards practical realizations of advanced quantum information schemes.

  17. Landau-Zener Bloch Oscillations with Perturbed Flat Bands.

    PubMed

    Khomeriki, Ramaz; Flach, Sergej

    2016-06-17

    Sinusoidal Bloch oscillations appear in band structures exposed to external fields. Landau-Zener (LZ) tunneling between different bands is usually a counteracting effect limiting Bloch oscillations. Here we consider a flat band network with two dispersive and one flat band, e.g., for ultracold atoms and optical waveguide networks. Using external synthetic gauge and gravitational fields we obtain a perturbed yet gapless band structure with almost flat parts. The resulting Bloch oscillations consist of two parts-a fast scan through the nonflat part of the dispersion structure, and an almost complete halt for substantial time when the atomic or photonic wave packet is trapped in the original flat band part of the unperturbed spectrum, made possible due to LZ tunneling.

  18. Landau-Zener Bloch Oscillations with Perturbed Flat Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomeriki, Ramaz; Flach, Sergej

    2016-06-01

    Sinusoidal Bloch oscillations appear in band structures exposed to external fields. Landau-Zener (LZ) tunneling between different bands is usually a counteracting effect limiting Bloch oscillations. Here we consider a flat band network with two dispersive and one flat band, e.g., for ultracold atoms and optical waveguide networks. Using external synthetic gauge and gravitational fields we obtain a perturbed yet gapless band structure with almost flat parts. The resulting Bloch oscillations consist of two parts—a fast scan through the nonflat part of the dispersion structure, and an almost complete halt for substantial time when the atomic or photonic wave packet is trapped in the original flat band part of the unperturbed spectrum, made possible due to LZ tunneling.

  19. Narrow-band single photon emission at room temperature based on a single nitrogen-vacancy center coupled to an all-fiber-cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Roland; Bommer, Alexander; Becher, Christoph; Pauly, Christoph; Mücklich, Frank; Schell, Andreas W.; Engel, Philip; Benson, Oliver; Schröder, Tim; Reichel, Jakob

    2014-08-18

    We report the realization of a device based on a single Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) center in diamond coupled to a fiber-cavity for use as single photon source (SPS). The device consists of two concave mirrors each directly fabricated on the facets of two optical fibers and a preselected nanodiamond containing a single NV center deposited onto one of these mirrors. Both, cavity in- and out-put are directly fiber-coupled, and the emission wavelength is easily tunable by variation of the separation of the two mirrors with a piezo-electric crystal. By coupling to the cavity, we achieve an increase of the spectral photon rate density by two orders of magnitude compared to free-space emission of the NV center. With this work, we establish a simple all-fiber based SPS with promising prospects for the integration into photonic quantum networks.

  20. Fabrication of novel three-dimensional photonic crystals using multi-beam interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanan, Vinayak

    Optical Communications has seen an explosion in recent times with new types of devices and materials. In the last decade, considerable study has been devoted to the control of the optical properties of materials and guiding the propagation of light through the use of photonic crystals. Photonic crystals are materials with a periodic arrangement of dielectric medium in one, two or three dimensions, with periodicities on the order of the wavelength of the electromagnetic radiation in use. Photonic crystals exhibit photonic band gaps depending on their geometry and refractive index. Holographic lithography has been proven to be an attractive technique for the creation of large area, defect-free, three-dimensional photonic crystals. Structures with potential in photonic applications are fabricated in the photoresist SU-8, through concurrent exposure with four non-coplanar coherent beams of laser radiation. Polymer-air structures with face centered cubic symmetry are used as a template to create higher refractive index contrast photonic crystals by infilling using Atomic Layer Deposition and Chemical Vapor Deposition. These photonic crystals exhibit excellent optical properties with strong reflectance peaks at the calculated band gap frequencies. Two-photon polymerization is used to demonstrate the ability to create designed defect structures such as waveguides in silicon-air photonic crystals. Genetic algorithms are demonstrated as a technique to design an interference lithography experiment. A four-beam setup with beams originating in opposite hemispheres and linear polarizations is found to generate a structure with diamond symmetry and a large complete photonic band gap. Band gap studies on structures that possess both high band gap and high contrast are performed. The optical setup for a diamond structure utilizing two right-angled prisms is discussed and promising experimental results are presented.

  1. Electron energy loss and Smith-Purcell radiation in two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki; Ohtaka, Kazuo

    2005-09-01

    A theoretical description of the electron energy loss and the Smith-Purcell radiation is presented for an electron moving near a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab and a three-dimensional woodpile photonic crystal. The electron energy loss and the Smith-Purcell radiation spectra are well correlated with the photonic band structures of these crystals and thus can be used as a probe of them. In particular, there is a selection rule concerning the symmetries of the photonic band modes to be excited when the electron moves in a mirror plane of the crystals. In the woodpile, a highly directional Smith-Purcell radiation is realized by using the planar defect mode inside the complete band gap.

  2. Electron energy loss and Smith-Purcell radiation in two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki; Ohtaka, Kazuo

    2005-09-19

    A theoretical description of the electron energy loss and the Smith-Purcell radiation is presented for an electron moving near a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab and a three-dimensional woodpile photonic crystal. The electron energy loss and the Smith-Purcell radiation spectra are well correlated with the photonic band structures of these crystals and thus can be used as a probe of them. In particular, there is a selection rule concerning the symmetries of the photonic band modes to be excited when the electron moves in a mirror plane of the crystals. In the woodpile, a highly directional Smith-Purcell radiation is realized by using the planar defect mode inside the complete band gap.

  3. Full-band Monte Carlo simulation of high-energy carrier transport in single photon avalanche diodes with multiplication layers made of InP, InAlAs, and GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgos, Denis; Meier, Hektor; Schenk, Andreas; Witzigmann, Bernd

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the high-energy charge dynamics of electrons and holes in the multiplication process of single photon avalanche diodes. The technologically important multiplication layer materials InP and In0.52Al0.48As, used in near infrared photon detectors, are analyzed and compared with GaAs. We use the full-band Monte Carlo technique to solve the Boltzmann transport equation which improves the state-of-the-art treatment of high-field carrier transport in the multiplication process. As a result of the computationally efficient treatment of the scattering rates and the parallel central processing unit power of modern computer clusters, the full-band Monte Carlo calculation of the breakdown characteristics has become feasible. The breakdown probability features a steeper rise versus the reverse bias for smaller multiplication layer widths for InP, In0.52Al0.48As, and GaAs. Both the time to avalanche breakdown and jitter decrease with shrinking size of the multiplication region for the three examined III-V semiconductors.

  4. Gallium Nitride Based Logpile Photonic Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Li, Qiming; Lee, Yun-Ju; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Wang, George T.; Fischer, Arthur J.

    2011-11-09

    A nine-layer logpile three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) is demonstrated composed of single crystalline gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods, ~ 100 nm in size with lattice constants of 260, 280, and 300 nm with photonic band gap in the visible region. This unique GaN structure is created through a combined approach of a layer-by-layer template fabrication technique and selective metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These GaN 3DPC exhibit a stacking direction band gap characterized by strong optical reflectance between 380 and 500 nm. By introducing a ''line-defect'' cavity in the fifth (middle) layer of the 3DPC, a localized transmission mode with a quality factor of 25–30 is also observed within the photonic band gap. The realization of a group III nitride 3DPC with uniform features and a band gap at wavelengths in the visible region is an important step toward realizing complete control of the electromagnetic environment for group III nitride-based optoelectronic devices.

  5. Gallium nitride based logpile photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Li, Qiming; Lee, Yun-Ju; Figiel, Jeffrey J; Wang, George T; Fischer, Arthur J

    2011-11-09

    We demonstrate a nine-layer logpile three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) composed of single crystalline gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods, ∼100 nm in size with lattice constants of 260, 280, and 300 nm with photonic band gap in the visible region. This unique GaN structure is created through a combined approach of a layer-by-layer template fabrication technique and selective metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These GaN 3DPC exhibit a stacking direction band gap characterized by strong optical reflectance between 380 and 500 nm. By introducing a "line-defect" cavity in the fifth (middle) layer of the 3DPC, a localized transmission mode with a quality factor of 25-30 is also observed within the photonic band gap. The realization of a group III nitride 3DPC with uniform features and a band gap at wavelengths in the visible region is an important step toward realizing complete control of the electromagnetic environment for group III nitride based optoelectronic devices.

  6. Microresonator and associated method for producing and controlling photonic signals with a photonic bandgap delay apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard Lynn (Inventor); Jones, Darryl Keith (Inventor); Keys, Andrew Scott (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    By applying a photonic signal to a microresonator that includes a photonic bandgap delay apparatus having a photonic band edge transmission resonance at the frequency of the photonic signal, the microresonator imparts a predetermined delay to the photonic signal. The photonic bandgap delay apparatus also preferably has a photonic band edge transmission resonance bandwidth which is at least as wide as the bandwidth of the photonic signal such that a uniform delay is imparted over the entire bandwidth of the photonic signal. The microresonator also includes a microresonator cavity, typically defined by a pair of switchable mirrors, within which the photonic bandgap delay apparatus is disposed. By requiring the photonic signal to oscillate within the microresonator cavity so as to pass through the photonic bandgap delay apparatus several times, the microresonator can controllably impart an adjustable delay to the photonic signal.

  7. EL2 deep level defects and above-band gap two-photon absorption in high gain lateral semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Wei; Niu, Hongjian; Zhang, Xianbin; Ji, Weili

    2005-01-01

    Experiments of a lateral semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switch, both linear and nonlinear mode of the switch were observed when the switch was triggered by 1064 nm laser pulses, with energy of 1.9 mJ and the pulse width of 60 ns, and operated at biased electric field of 4.37 kV/cm. It"s wavelength is longer than 876nm, but the experiments indicate that the semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switches can absorb 1064 nm laser obviously, which is out of the absorption range of the GaAs material. It is not possible to explain this behavior by using intrinsic absorption mechanism. We think that there are two mostly kinds of absorption mechanisms play a key part in absorption process, they are the two-steps-single-photon absorption that based on the EL2 energy level and two-photon absorption.

  8. Metallic photonic crystals for thermophotovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Timothy A.

    can be measured. It is found that by concentrating the thermal emission in a narrow band at the photovoltaic cell bandgap energy, the photonic crystal radiator can produce approximate 80% of the electrical power density that is possible with the blackbody while increasing the efficiency of the energy conversion by a significant amount. Photonic crystal manufacture is studied with the fabrication of a six layer copper woodpile structure. The fabrication proceeds with a layer by layer technique utilizing 8" silicon wafer substrates. Back end of the line integrated circuit manufacturing techniques are used to fabricate this interconnected multilayer structure. The completed wafers show good uniformity die to die and within a single die, demonstrating the feasibility of large scale production of woodpile photonic crystal structures. Structural and optical characterization of the fabricated woodpile are presented. The final section of this work deals with materials considerations for short wavelength high temperature photonic crystal emitters. In the mid infrared and microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum, all metals effectively behave as ideal conductors. However at shorter wavelengths, material absorption increases and has a significant effect on the optical properties of a woodpile photonic crystal designed for operation at these wavelengths. Tungsten was explored for woodpile photonic crystal thermal emitters due to its high melting point, however the optical properties are not well suited to devices with emission peaks below ˜2 mum. Iridium is an alternate high temperature material with more ideal optical behavior in the 1--2 mum range than tungsten. It is found that by coating tungsten woodpile structures with a thin layer of iridium using atomic layer deposition, the photonic band edge can be moved below 1 mum, which was not possible in tungsten simply by scaling the feature sizes to smaller values.

  9. Photoresponse beyond the red border of the internal photoeffect: designing problems of photon counting schemes in 10μm band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresvyannikov, Maxim A.; Karuzskii, Aleksandr L.; Perestoronin, Anatoly V.; Tskhovrebov, Andrey M.; Zherikhina, Larisa N.

    2014-12-01

    In the context of all-weather tracking distant cosmic objects issues, six original schemes of detecting far-infrared radiation are presented here, which approach in their sensitivity to the level that allows their use in photon counting mode. The first one is a modernized version of the Up-converter (with the placement of nonlinear crystal/mixer inside of resonator in a single laser unit) for the transfer of far-infrared photons in the visible range, where the photon counting is possible via PMT or APD. The second scheme of registration far IR is based on the forward bias LED at a current, which is still not enough for the generation of radiation. The experiments allowed to observe photoresponse of such a system for the red border of the internal photoelectric effect. The following three schemes are cryogenic. And the last one is an Up-converter, where instead of the classical mixing on nonlinear crystal is used quantum effect of releasing energy metastable state under the influence of the far-infrared radiation quanta.

  10. Complete measurement of three-body photodisintegration of 3He for photon energies between 0.35 and 1.55 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolai, Silvia; Audit, Gerard; Berman, Barry; Laget, Jean; Strauch, Steffen; et. Al.

    2004-12-01

    The three-body photodisintegration of 3He has been measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab, using tagged photons of energies between 0.35 GeV and 1.55 GeV. The large acceptance of the spectrometer allowed us for the first time to cover a wide momentum and angular range for the two outgoing protons. Three kinematic regions dominated by either two- or three-body contributions have been distinguished and analyzed. The measured cross sections have been compared with results of a theoretical model, which, in certain kinematic ranges, have been found to be in reasonable agreement with the data.

  11. Monolithic phononic crystals with a surface acoustic band gap from surface phonon-polariton coupling.

    PubMed

    Yudistira, D; Boes, A; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Pennec, Y; Yeo, L Y; Mitchell, A; Friend, J R

    2014-11-21

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the existence of complete surface acoustic wave band gaps in surface phonon-polariton phononic crystals, in a completely monolithic structure formed from a two-dimensional honeycomb array of hexagonal shape domain-inverted inclusions in single crystal piezoelectric Z-cut lithium niobate. The band gaps appear at a frequency of about twice the Bragg band gap at the center of the Brillouin zone, formed through phonon-polariton coupling. The structure is mechanically, electromagnetically, and topographically homogeneous, without any physical alteration of the surface, offering an ideal platform for many acoustic wave applications for photonics, phononics, and microfluidics.

  12. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  13. Zero-n gap in one dimensional photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chobey, Mahesh K. Suthar, B.

    2016-05-06

    We study a one-dimensional (1-D) photonic crystal composed of Double Positive (DPS) and Double Negative (DNG) material. This structure shows omnidirectional photonic bandgap, which is insensitive with angle of incidence and polarization. To study the effect of structural parameters on the photonic band structure, we have calculated photonic band gap at various thicknesses of DPS and DNG.

  14. Complete description of ionization energy and electron affinity in organic solids: Determining contributions from electronic polarization, energy band dispersion, and molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Kazuto; Tsutsumi, Jun'ya; Sato, Naoki

    2015-08-01

    Ionization energy and electron affinity in organic solids are understood in terms of a single molecule perturbed by solid-state effects such as polarization energy, band dispersion, and molecular orientation as primary factors. However, no work has been done to determine the individual contributions experimentally. In this work, the electron affinities of thin films of pentacene and perfluoropentacene with different molecular orientations are determined to a precision of 0.1 eV using low-energy inverse photoemission spectroscopy. Based on the precisely determined electron affinities in the solid state together with the corresponding data of the ionization energies and other energy parameters, we quantitatively evaluate the contribution of these effects. It turns out that the bandwidth as well as the polarization energy contributes to the ionization energy and electron affinity in the solid state while the effect of the surface dipole is at most a few eV and does not vary with the molecular orientation. As a result, we conclude that the molecular orientation dependence of the ionization energy and electron affinity of organic solids originates from the orientation-dependent polarization energy in the film.

  15. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states.

  16. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals

    PubMed Central

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states. PMID:27877676

  17. The two-photon absorptivity of rotational transitions in the A2 Sigma hyperon + (v prime = O) - X-2 pion (v prime prime = O) gamma band of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A predominantly single-mode pulsed dye laser system giving a well characterized spatial and temporal output suitable for absolute two-photon absorptivity measurements was used to study the NO gamma(0,0) S11 + R21 (J double prime = 7-1/2) transition. Using a calibrated induced-fluorescence technique, an absorptivity parameter of 2.8 + or - 1.4 x 10 to the minus 51st power cm to the 6th power was obtained. Relative strengths of other rotational transitions in the gamma(0,0) band were also measured and shown to compare well with predicted values in all cases except the O12 (J double prime = 10-1/2) transition.

  18. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  19. X-band continuously variable true-time delay lines using air-guiding photonic bandgap fibers and a broadband light source.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hanyi; Guo, Yili; Zhou, Binggun

    2006-09-15

    We propose a novel implementation of true-time delay (TTD) using air-guiding photonic bandgap fibers (PBGFs) and a broadband light source. The air-guiding PBGFs are experimentally studied and used in the TTD module for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The proposed approach shows the advantages of simple architecture, compact size, larger dispersion, low-temperature sensitivity, and high immunity to nonlinear effects in our experiments. The PBGFs were spliced with single-mode fibers with a 2 dB loss, and the characteristics of the PBGFs were measured. The PBGF-TTD with a continuously tunable time delays from 0 to 500 ps was demonstrated using the amplified spontaneous emission light of an erbium-doped filter amplifier as a broadband light source.

  20. Electrical anharmonicity in hydrogen bonded systems: complete interpretation of the IR spectra of the Cl-H[combining right harpoon above] stretching band in the gaseous (CH3)2OHCl complex.

    PubMed

    Rekik, Najeh; Suleiman, Jamal; Blaise, Paul; Wojcik, Marek J; Flakus, Henryk T; Nakajima, Takahito

    2017-02-22

    Following the previous developments to simulate the fully infrared spectra of weak hydrogen bond systems within the linear response theory, an extension of the adiabatic model is presented here. A general formulation including the electrical anharmonicities in the calculation of the damped autocorrelation function of weak H-bonds is adopted to facilitate the support of the additional properties, and thus the IR spectra of the Cl-H[combining right harpoon above] stretching band in the gaseous (CH3)2OHCl complex. We have explored the origins of the broadening of the Cl-H[combining right harpoon above] stretching band. We found that the main features of the lineshape are attributed to electrical anharmonicity as a consequence of the large mixed second derivatives of the dipole moment with respect to the Cl-H[combining right harpoon above] bond and of the intermonomer elongations . In addition to providing more accurate theoretical band shapes, inclusion of the electrical anharmonicity in the present model paves the way for a more complete interpretation by generating three new Franck-Condon superposed distributions.

  1. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  2. Hamiltonian tomography of photonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruichao; Owens, Clai; LaChapelle, Aman; Schuster, David I.; Simon, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we introduce an approach to Hamiltonian tomography of noninteracting tight-binding photonic lattices. To begin with, we prove that the matrix element of the low-energy effective Hamiltonian between sites α and β may be obtained directly from Sα β(ω ) , the (suitably normalized) two-port measurement between sites α and β at frequency ω . This general result enables complete characterization of both on-site energies and tunneling matrix elements in arbitrary lattice networks by spectroscopy, and suggests that coupling between lattice sites is a topological property of the two-port spectrum. We further provide extensions of this technique for measurement of band projectors in finite, disordered systems with good band flatness ratios, and apply the tool to direct real-space measurement of the Chern number. Our approach demonstrates the extraordinary potential of microwave quantum circuits for exploration of exotic synthetic materials, providing a clear path to characterization and control of single-particle properties of Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard lattices. More broadly, we provide a robust, unified method of spectroscopic characterization of linear networks from photonic crystals to microwave lattices and everything in between.

  3. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Ma, Ji; Zhang, Si-Qi; Li, Hong; Wu, Xiang-Yao; Wu, Yi-Heng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied two-dimensional function photonic crystals, in which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates , that can become true easily by electro-optical effect and optical kerr effect. We calculated the band gap structures of TE and TM waves, and found the TE (TM) wave band gaps of function photonic crystals are wider (narrower) than the conventional photonic crystals. For the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, when the dielectric constant functions change, the band gaps numbers, width and position should be changed, and the band gap structures of two-dimensional function photonic crystals can be adjusted flexibly, the needed band gap structures can be designed by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, and it can be of help to design optical devices.

  4. Photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, Song Liang; Lu, Ling; Soljacic, Marin

    2015-06-23

    A photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) includes a gain medium electromagnetically coupled to a photonic crystal whose energy band structure exhibits a Dirac cone of linear dispersion at the center of the photonic crystal's Brillouin zone. This Dirac cone's vertex is called a Dirac point; because it is at the Brillouin zone center, it is called an accidental Dirac point. Tuning the photonic crystal's band structure (e.g., by changing the photonic crystal's dimensions or refractive index) to exhibit an accidental Dirac point increases the photonic crystal's mode spacing by orders of magnitudes and reduces or eliminates the photonic crystal's distributed in-plane feedback. Thus, the photonic crystal can act as a resonator that supports single-mode output from the PCSEL over a larger area than is possible with conventional PCSELs, which have quadratic band edge dispersion. Because output power generally scales with output area, this increase in output area results in higher possible output powers.

  5. Spatial filtering with photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maigyte, Lina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-03-15

    Photonic crystals are well known for their celebrated photonic band-gaps—the forbidden frequency ranges, for which the light waves cannot propagate through the structure. The frequency (or chromatic) band-gaps of photonic crystals can be utilized for frequency filtering. In analogy to the chromatic band-gaps and the frequency filtering, the angular band-gaps and the angular (spatial) filtering are also possible in photonic crystals. In this article, we review the recent advances of the spatial filtering using the photonic crystals in different propagation regimes and for different geometries. We review the most evident configuration of filtering in Bragg regime (with the back-reflection—i.e., in the configuration with band-gaps) as well as in Laue regime (with forward deflection—i.e., in the configuration without band-gaps). We explore the spatial filtering in crystals with different symmetries, including axisymmetric crystals; we discuss the role of chirping, i.e., the dependence of the longitudinal period along the structure. We also review the experimental techniques to fabricate the photonic crystals and numerical techniques to explore the spatial filtering. Finally, we discuss several implementations of such filters for intracavity spatial filtering.

  6. Photon Absorption Improvement in Reststrahlen Band of Mn1.56Co0.96- x Ni0.48Fe x O4 Series Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Shi, Qin; Ren, Wei; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Hewei; Bao, Shuai; Wang, Lei; Bian, Liang; Xu, Jinbao; Chang, Aimin

    2017-08-01

    Mn1.56Co0.96- x Ni0.48Fe x O4 series films have been fabricated on SiO2/Si(100) substrates by chemical solution deposition and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and their structural and mid-infrared (IR) properties investigated. The results indicate slight improvement in the microstructure and density of the films with increasing Fe content. The results of Raman spectroscopy showed variation in the local distortion and cation distribution at octahedral sites with elevated Fe content. The IR optical properties of the films were investigated at room temperature in the wavelength range from 1.5 μm to 25 μm. A strong absorption peak corresponding to Reststrahlen band located at 19.5 μm was observed and its absorption intensity found to improve with increasing Fe content in the films. The maximum absorption coefficient was calculated to be about 18,000 cm-1. The results bear technological significance for the design and fabrication of devices for IR detection applications.

  7. One-dimensional photonic crystals bound by light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Liyong; Li, Xiao; Chen, Jun; Cao, Yongyin; Du, Guiqiang; Ng, Jack

    2017-08-01

    Through rigorous simulations, the light scattering induced optical binding of one-dimensional (1D) dielectric photonic crystals is studied. The optical forces corresponding to the pass band, band gap, and band edge are qualitatively different. It is shown that light can induce self-organization of dielectric slabs into stable photonic crystals, with its lower band edge coinciding with the incident light frequency. Incident light at normal and oblique incidence and photonic crystals with parity-time symmetry are also considered.

  8. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  9. Photonics with multiwall carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Lidorikis, Elefterios; Ferrari, Andrea C

    2009-05-26

    We investigate the photonic properties of two-dimensional nanotube arrays for photon energies up to 40 eV and unveil the physics of two distinct applications: deep-UV photonic crystals and total visible absorbers. We find three main regimes: for small intertube spacing of 20-30 nm, we obtain strong Bragg scattering and photonic band gaps in the deep-UV range of 25 approximately 35 eV. For intermediate spacing of 40-100 nm, the photonic bands anticross with the graphite plasmon bands resulting into a complex photonic structure, and a generally reduced Bragg scattering. For large spacing >150 nm, the Bragg gap moves into the visible and decreases due to absorption. This leads to nanotube arrays behaving as total optical absorbers. Our results can guide the design of photonic applications in the visible and deep UV ranges.

  10. Amplified Photon Upconversion by Photonic Shell of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2017-04-26

    As an effective platform to exploit triplet-triplet-annihilation-based photon upconversion (TTA-UC), microcapsules composed of a fluidic UC core and photonic shell are microfluidically prepared using a triple emulsion as the template. The photonic shell consists of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) with a periodic helical structure, exhibiting a photonic band gap. Combined with planar anchoring at the boundaries, the shell serves as a resonance cavity for TTA-UC emission and enables spectral tuning of the UC under low-power-density excitation. The CLC shell can be stabilized by introducing a polymerizable mesogen in the LC host. Because of the microcapsule spherical symmetry, spontaneous emission of the delayed fluorescence is omnidirectionally amplified at the edge of the stop band. These results demonstrate the range of opportunities provided by TTA-UC systems for the future design of low-threshold photonic devices.

  11. Non-Hermiticity-induced flat band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Hamidreza

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate the emergence of an entire flat band with no complex component embedded in dispersive bands at the exceptional point of a PT -symmetric photonic lattice. For this to occur, the gain and loss parameter effectively alters the size of the partial flat band windows and band gap of the photonic lattice simultaneously. The mode associated with the entire flat band is robust against changes in the system size and survives even at the edge of the lattice. Our proposal offers a route for controllable localization of light in non-Hermitian systems and a technique for measuring non-Hermiticity via localization.

  12. Thulium-doped fiber laser utilizing a photonic crystal fiber-based optical low-pass filter with application in 1.7 μm and 1.8 μm band.

    PubMed

    Emami, Siamak Dawazdah; Khodaei, Amin; Gandan, Shumithira; Penny, Richard; Lim, Kok Sing; Abdul-Rashid, Hairul Azhar; Ahmad, Harith

    2015-07-27

    This paper describes a low pass filter based on photonics crystal fiber (PCF) partial ASE suppression, and its application within a 1.7 µm to 1.8 µm band thulium-doped fiber amplifier (TDFA) and a thulium-doped fiber laser (TDFL). The enlargement of air holes around the doped core region of the PCF resulted in a low-pass filter device that was able to attenuate wavelengths above the conventional long cut-off wavelength. These ensuing long cut-off wavelengths were 1.85 μm and 1.75 μm, and enabled a transmission mechanism that possessed a number of desirable characteristics. The proposed optical low-pass filter was applied within a TDFA and TDFL system. Peak spectrum was observed at around 1.9 μm for conventional TDF lasers, while the proposed TDF laser with PCF setup had fiber laser peak wavelengths measured at downshifted values of 1.74 μm and 1.81 μm.

  13. Fiber-mesh photonic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Subodha; Satpathy, Sashi

    2008-03-01

    Analogous to the photonic crystal, we introduce the concept of a fiber-mesh photonic molecule made up of optical fibers and study its transmission characteristics. We consider a specific example of a photonic molecule, inspired by the well-known C60 molecule, with the arms of the molecule formed out of single-moded optical fibers. The transmittance consists of sharp peaks determined by the pole structure of the scattering matrix in the complex energy plane. A molecule can be designed to control the positions and the widths of the transmission peaks, opening up the possibility of building new photonic devices such as high quality band-pass filters.

  14. Resonant photonic States in coupled heterostructure photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jd; Sabarinathan, J; Singh, Mr

    2010-02-09

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  15. Resonant Photonic States in Coupled Heterostructure Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors. PMID:20672066

  16. Simultaneous large band gaps and localization of electromagnetic and elastic waves in defect-free quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianbao; Wang, Zhong; Liu, Wenxing; Wang, Tongbiao; Liu, Nianhua; Liao, Qinghua

    2016-04-18

    We report numerically large and complete photonic and phononic band gaps that simultaneously exist in eight-fold phoxonic quasicrystals (PhXQCs). PhXQCs can possess simultaneous photonic and phononic band gaps over a wide range of geometric parameters. Abundant localized modes can be achieved in defect-free PhXQCs for all photonic and phononic polarizations. These defect-free localized modes exhibit multiform spatial distributions and can confine simultaneously electromagnetic and elastic waves in a large area, thereby providing rich selectivity and enlarging the interaction space of optical and elastic waves. The simulated results based on finite element method show that quasiperiodic structures formed of both solid rods in air and holes in solid materials can simultaneously confine and tailor electromagnetic and elastic waves; these structures showed advantages over the periodic counterparts.

  17. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  18. A three-dimensional photonic crystal model: Hollow-spherical non-closed-packed face-centered cubic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Bo; Cao, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Yong-Zheng; Wang, Yan-Ping; Chi, Yuan-Bin

    2006-05-01

    We report a photonic crystal model, which consists of hollow spheres located at face-centered cubic lattice sites and each sphere connected to all of its 12 nearest neighbors by cylindrical rods. Theoretical calculations show that this kind of structure exhibits two large complete photonic band gaps. The maximum relative gap sizes reach 17.3% between the eighth and ninth bands, and 15.1% between the 13th and 14th bands for a dielectric contrast of 11.9, and the minimal dielectric contrasts needed to open the two gaps are 5.8 and 7.3, respectively, which are lower than that of other face-centered cubic photonic crystal structures.

  19. Compact localized states and flat-band generators in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimaiti, Wulayimu; Andreanov, Alexei; Park, Hee Chul; Gendelman, Oleg; Flach, Sergej

    2017-03-01

    Flat bands (FB) are strictly dispersionless bands in the Bloch spectrum of a periodic lattice Hamiltonian, recently observed in a variety of photonic and dissipative condensate networks. FB Hamiltonians are fine-tuned networks, still lacking a comprehensive generating principle. We introduce a FB generator based on local network properties. We classify FB networks through the properties of compact localized states (CLS) which are exact FB eigenstates and occupy U unit cells. We obtain the complete two-parameter FB family of two-band d =1 networks with nearest unit cell interaction and U =2 . We discover a novel high symmetry sawtooth chain with identical hoppings in a transverse dc field, easily accessible in experiments. Our results pave the way towards a complete description of FBs in networks with more bands and in higher dimensions.

  20. Slow-light-induced Doppler shift in photonic-crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Baba, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this Rapid Communication, we theoretically discuss a large Doppler shift in a signal slow-light pulse in a photonic-crystal waveguide by considering its reflection at a quasilight speed mirror. The mirror is formed by the photonic band-gap shift induced by the high nonlinearity of a control slow-light pulse, which could be possible in a realistic device. In the simulation, the Doppler shift appears at multiple frequencies due to the Bloch nature of the photonic lattice. Larger but inefficient Doppler shifts occur through nonadiabatic processes, whereas the smallest but more efficient shift (i.e., the intraband Doppler shift) occurs through an adiabatic process. The occurrence of the intraband shift depends on whether the adiabatic process produces a complete reflection of the incident pulse, despite the fact that the pulse penetrates the mirror. A large band-gap shift and a moderately slow mirror satisfy this condition; otherwise, the shift ends at the halfway point.

  1. Photonic Band Gap Devices for Commercial Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-12

    plasma displays, accounted for more than 82% of the 2004 nanophotonics market. Near-field optics and nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells accounted...consisted of air holes in silicon, the lattice configuration was triangular , and the wavelength was -1.6 microns. Beam splitting was accomplished by...Crespo. A 1-to- 8 fan-out was fabricated using the 10%-90% splitters: that were designed using EMPLab. Here, the lattice was triangular with a

  2. High-extinction ratio integrated photonic filters for silicon quantum photonics.

    PubMed

    Piekarek, Mateusz; Bonneau, Damien; Miki, Shigehito; Yamashita, Taro; Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide; Terai, Hirotaka; Tanner, Michael G; Natarajan, Chandra M; Hadfield, Robert H; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Thompson, Mark G

    2017-02-15

    We present the generation of quantum-correlated photon pairs and subsequent pump rejection across two silicon-on-insulator photonic integrated circuits. Incoherently cascaded lattice filters are used to provide over 100 dB pass-band to stop-band contrast with no additional external filtering. Photon pairs generated in a microring resonator are successfully separated from the input pump, confirmed by temporal correlations measurements.

  3. Theory and applications of light-matter interactions in quantum dot nanowire photonic crystal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelatos, Gerasimos

    Photonic crystal slabs coupled with quantum dipole emitters allow one to control quantum light-matter interactions and are a promising platform for quantum information science technologies; however their development has been hindered by inherent fabrication issues. Inspired by recent nanowire growth techniques and opportunities in fundamental quantum nanophotonics, in this thesis we theoretically investigate light-matter interactions in nanowire photonic crystal structures with embedded quantum dots, a novel engineered quantum system, for applications in quantum optics. We develop designs for currently fabricable structures, including finite-size effects and radiative loss, and investigate their fundamental properties using photonic band structure calculations, finite-difference time-domain computations, and a rigorous photonic Green function technique. We study and engineer realistic nanowire photonic crystal waveguides for single photon applications whose performance can exceed that of state-of-the-art slab photonic crystals, and design a directed single photon source. We then develop a powerful quantum optical formalism using master equation techniques and the photonic Green function to understand the quantum dynamics of these exotic structures in open and lossy photonic environments. This is used to explore the coupling of a pair of quantum dots in a nanowire photonic crystal waveguide, demonstrating long-lived entangled states and a system with a completely controllable Hamiltonian capable of simulating a wide variety of quantum systems and entering a unique regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics characterized by strong exchange-splitting. Lastly, we propose and study a "metamaterial" polariton waveguide comprised of a nanowire photonic crystal waveguide with an embedded quantum dot in each unit cell, and explain the properties of both infinite and finite-sized structures using a Green function approach. We show that an external quantum dot can be strongly

  4. Photon path length retrieval from GOSAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremmling, Beke; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Deutschmann, Tim; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The influence of clouds on the atmospheric radiation budget is investigated, focussing on the photon path length distributions of the scattered sunlight. Apart from the reflection of incoming solar radiation at the cloud top, clouds can also introduce a large number of additional scattering events causing an enhancement of the photon paths. In certain cloud formations, these scattering events also result in a ``ping-pong`` behaviour between different cloud patches and cloud layers. It has been shown from ground based measurements that it is possible to retrieve photon path lengths by analysis of high resolution oxygen A-band spectra (O. Funk et al.). This study uses similar space based measurements of the oxygen A-band for the path length retrieval. The oxygen A-band spectra are retrieved from the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) which was successfully launched in 2009. The high spectral resolution of the GOSAT TANSO-FTS instrument allows to almost completely resolve the individual absorption lines. The considered spectral range is particularly suitable for this study because it shows clear absorption structures of different strength. From the analysis of the spectral signatures, cloud properties and the underlying path length distributions can be derived. The retrieval is done by analysis and comparison of the extracted TANSO-FTS spectra with simulations from the Monte Carlo radiative transfer Model McArtim. The model permits modelling of altitude dependent oxygen absorption cross sections and three-dimensional cloud patterns. Case studies of clear and cloudy sky scenarios will be presented. Future studies will focus on more complicated cloud structures, especially considering three-dimensional geometries and heterogeneities.

  5. Photonic spectrum of bichromatic optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Rist, Stefan; Morigi, Giovanna; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2009-05-15

    We study the photonic spectrum of a one-dimensional optical lattice possessing a double primitive cell, when the atoms are well localized at the lattice minima. While a one-dimensional lattice with a simple Wigner-Seitz cell always possesses a photonic band gap at the atomic resonance, in this configuration the photonic transmission spectrum may exhibit no, double, or multiple photonic band gaps depending on the ratio between the interparticle distance {rho} inside the cell and the cell size a. The transmission spectra of a weak incident probe are evaluated when the atoms are trapped in free space and inside an optical resonator for realistic experimental parameters.

  6. Photonic Crystal Devices for Quantum and Nanoscale Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    2005-03-01

    Photonic crystal structures can be built to operate in two opposite regimes: one is a suppression of photon states inside the photonic band gap, and the other is a large enhancement of the density of photon states. Both regimes are of consequence to a number of applications in nanoscale and nonlinear optics, as well as to photonic quantum information technologies. Our work on the employment of photonic crystals to build hardware of solid-state photonic quantum information systems, as well as to construct miniaturized optical devices will be reviewed in this talk. We have demonstrated sources of single photons on demand based on quantum dots in micropost microcavities that exhibit a large spontaneous emission rate enhancement (Purcell factor of five) together with a small multi-photon probability (2% compared to a Poisson-distributed source of the same intensity). We have also tested the indistinguishability of emitted single photons from such a source through a Hong-Ou-Mandel-type two-photon interference experiment, and found that consecutive photons exhibit a mean wave-packet overlap as large as 0.81, making this source useful in a variety of experiments in quantum optics and quantum information. The applications of such a device include secure quantum cryptography and linear optical quantum computation. We have also developed two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavities of finite depth with embedded quantum dots that exhibit large quality factors (˜3000) together with small mode volumes (˜0.5(λ/n)^3) and with a maximum field intensity in the high-index region, which is of importance for enhanced interaction with quantum dot excitons. We have performed spectroscopy on a single quantum dot coupled to such a cavity, and demonstrated a very strong modification of its radiative properties, as well as a single-photon generation on demand. A strong interaction between a quantum dot exciton and the field enabled by such a microcavity is of importance for

  7. Chalcogenide Photonic Crystal Filters For Optical Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Suthar, B.; Bhargava, A.

    2011-12-12

    A proper arrangement of photonic crystal waveguide and a point defect cavity gives an important application of photonic filter device in optical communications. We have studied a narrow band filter and a channel drop filter device using 2-D photonic crystal with square lattice structure. A narrow band filter is applied to select a narrow frequency band signal from incoming light, while a channel drop filter is used to drop a particular frequency signal from incoming light. Chalcogenide As{sub 2}S{sub 3} is compared with conventional Si material regarding applications as feasible material for optical devices.

  8. Nuclear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  9. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  10. Photonic Paint Developed with Metallic Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Po; Williams, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This work details the design and simulation of an inconspicuous photonic paint that can be applied onto an object for anticounterfeit and tag, track, and locate (TTL) applications. The paint consists of three-dimensional metallic tilted woodpile photonic crystals embedded into a visible and infrared transparent polymer film, which can be applied to almost any surface. The tilted woodpile photonic crystals are designed with a specific pass band detectable at nearly all incident angles of light. When painted onto a surface, these crystals provide a unique reflective infra-red optical signature that can be easily observed and recorded to verify the location or contents of a package.

  11. New Kronig-Penney Equation Emphasizing the Band Edge Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szmulowicz, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Kronig-Penney problem is a textbook example for discussing band dispersions and band gap formation in periodic layered media. For example, in photonic crystals, the behaviour of bands next to the band edges is important for further discussions of such effects as inhibited light emission, slow light and negative index of refraction. However,…

  12. New Kronig-Penney Equation Emphasizing the Band Edge Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szmulowicz, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Kronig-Penney problem is a textbook example for discussing band dispersions and band gap formation in periodic layered media. For example, in photonic crystals, the behaviour of bands next to the band edges is important for further discussions of such effects as inhibited light emission, slow light and negative index of refraction. However,…

  13. Chronic myeloid leukemia: a prospective comparison of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and chromosome banding analysis for the definition of complete cytogenetic response: a study of the GIMEMA CML WP.

    PubMed

    Testoni, Nicoletta; Marzocchi, Giulia; Luatti, Simona; Amabile, Marilina; Baldazzi, Carmen; Stacchini, Monica; Nanni, Mauro; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; Giugliano, Emilia; Giussani, Ursula; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Kerim, Simonetta; Grimoldi, Maria Grazia; Gozzetti, Alessandro; Crescenzi, Barbara; Carcassi, Carlo; Bernasconi, Paolo; Cuneo, Antonio; Albano, Francesco; Fugazza, Giuseppina; Zaccaria, Alfonso; Martinelli, Giovanni; Pane, Fabrizio; Rosti, Gianantonio; Baccarani, Michele

    2009-12-03

    In chronic myeloid leukemia, different methods are available to monitor the response to therapy: chromosome banding analysis (CBA), interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH), and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-Q-PCR). The GIMEMA CML WP (Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche Adulto Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Working Party) has performed a prospective study to compare CBA and I-FISH for the definition of complete cytogenetic response (CCgR). Samples (n = 664) were evaluated simultaneously by CBA and I-FISH. Of 537 cases in CCgR, the number of positive nuclei by I-FISH was less than 1% in 444 cases (82.7%). Of 451 cases with less than 1% positive nuclei by I-FISH, 444 (98.4%) were classified as CCgR by CBA. The major molecular response rate was significantly greater in cases with I-FISH less than 1% than in those with I-FISH 1% to 5% (66.8% vs 51.6%, P < .001) and in cases with CCgR and I-FISH less than 1% than in cases with CCgR and I-FISH 1% to 5% (66.1% vs 49.4%, P = .004). I-FISH is more sensitive than CBA and can be used to monitor CCgR. With appropriate probes, the cutoff value of I-FISH may be established at 1%. These trials are registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00514488 and NCT00510926.

  14. Band heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Alam, M S; Naila, N

    2010-01-01

    Band heterotopias are one of the rarest groups of congenital disorder that result in variable degree of structural abnormality of brain parenchyma. Band of heterotopic neurons result from a congenital or acquired deficiency of the neuronal migration. MRI is the examination of choice for demonstrating these abnormalities because of the superb gray vs. white matter differentiation, detail of cortical anatomy and ease of multiplanar imaging. We report a case of band heterotopia that showed a bilateral band of gray matter in deep white matter best demonstrated on T2 Wt. and FLAIR images.

  15. Photonic crystals as optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevi, P.; Krokhin, A. A.; Arriaga, J.

    1999-11-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have already found numerous applications associated with the photonic band gap. We point out that PCs could be also employed as custom-made optical components in the linear region well below the photonic gap. As an example, we discuss a birefringent PC lens that acts as a polarizing beam splitter. This idea is supported by a precise method of calculation of the optical constants of a transparent two-dimensional (2D) PC. Such a process of homogenization is performed for hexagonal arrays of polymer-based PCs and also for the mammalian cornea. Finally, 2D PCs are classified as optically uniaxial or biaxial.

  16. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  17. Photonic Hypercrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new "universality class" of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  18. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  19. Approximation for Horizontal Photon Transport in Cloud Remote Sensing Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plantnick, Steven

    1999-01-01

    The effect of horizontal photon transport within real-world clouds can be of consequence to remote sensing problems based on plane-parallel cloud models. An analytic approximation for the root-mean-square horizontal displacement of reflected and transmitted photons relative to the incident cloud-top location is derived from random walk theory. The resulting formula is a function of the average number of photon scatterings, and particle asymmetry parameter and single scattering albedo. In turn, the average number of scatterings can be determined from efficient adding/doubling radiative transfer procedures. The approximation is applied to liquid water clouds for typical remote sensing solar spectral bands, involving both conservative and non-conservative scattering. Results compare well with Monte Carlo calculations. Though the emphasis is on horizontal photon transport in terrestrial clouds, the derived approximation is applicable to any multiple scattering plane-parallel radiative transfer problem. The complete horizontal transport probability distribution can be described with an analytic distribution specified by the root-mean-square and average displacement values. However, it is shown empirically that the average displacement can be reasonably inferred from the root-mean-square value. An estimate for the horizontal transport distribution can then be made from the root-mean-square photon displacement alone.

  20. Topological photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2008-03-01

    We associate intrinsic energy equal to hν /2 with the spin angular momentum of photon, and propose a topological model based on orbifold in space and tifold in time as topological obstructions. The model is substantiated using vector wavefield disclinations. The physical photon is suggested to be a particlelike topological photon and a propagating wave such that the energy hν of photon is equally divided between spin energy and translational energy, corresponding to linear momentum of hν /c. The enigma of wave-particle duality finds natural resolution, and the proposed model gives new insights into the phenomena of interference and emission of radiation.