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Sample records for complete photonic band

  1. Two-pattern compound photonic crystals with a large complete photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Lin; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2011-09-15

    We present a set of two-dimensional aperiodic structures with a large complete photonic band gap (PBG), which are named two-pattern photonic crystals. By superposing two substructures without regard to registration, we designed six new aperiodic PBG structures having a complete PBG larger than 15% for {epsilon}{sub 2}/{epsilon}{sub 1} = 11.4. The rod-honeycomb two-pattern photonic crystal provides the largest complete PBG to date. An aperiodic structure becomes the champion structure with the largest PBG. Surprisingly, the TM and TE gaps of a two-pattern photonic crystal are much less interdependent than the PBGs of conventional photonic crystals proposed before, affording interesting capabilities for us to tune the TM and TE PBGs separately. By altering the respective substructures, optical devices for different polarizations (TE, TM, or both) can readily be designed.

  2. Two-dimensional photonic crystals with large complete photonic band gaps in both TE and TM polarizations.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; David, Sylvain; Checoury, Xavier; El Kurdi, Moustafa; Boucaud, Philippe

    2008-08-04

    Photonic crystals exhibiting a photonic band gap in both TE and TM polarizations are particularly interesting for a better control of light confinement. The simultaneous achievement of large band gaps in both polarizations requires to reduce the symmetry properties of the photonic crystal lattice. In this letter, we propose two different designs of two-dimensional photonic crystals patterned in high refractive index thin silicon slabs. These slabs are known to limit the opening of photonic band gaps for both polarizations. The proposed designs exhibit large complete photonic band gaps: the first photonic crystal structure is based on the honey-comb lattice with two different hole radii and the second structure is based on a "tri-ellipse" pattern in a triangular lattice. Photonic band gap calculations show that these structures offer large complete photonic band gaps deltaomega/omega larger than 10% between first and second photonic bands. This figure of merit is obtained with single-mode slab waveguides and is not restricted to modes below light cone.

  3. Effect of shape of scatterers and plasma frequency on the complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathollahi Khalkhali, T.; Bananej, A.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we analyze complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals with triangular and square lattices, composed of plasma rods with different geometrical shapes in the anisotropic tellurium background. Using the finite-difference time-domain method we discuss the maximization of the complete photonic band gap width as a function of plasma frequency and plasma rods parameters with different shapes and orientations. The numerical results demonstrate that our proposed structures represent significantly wide complete photonic band gaps in comparison to previously studied dielectric-plasma photonic crystals.

  4. 2D photonic crystal complete band gap search using a cyclic cellular automaton refination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, R.; Castañón, G.; Hernández-Figueroa, H. E.

    2014-11-01

    We present a refination method based on a cyclic cellular automaton (CCA) that simulates a crystallization-like process, aided with a heuristic evolutionary method called differential evolution (DE) used to perform an ordered search of full photonic band gaps (FPBGs) in a 2D photonic crystal (PC). The solution is proposed as a combinatorial optimization of the elements in a binary array. These elements represent the existence or absence of a dielectric material surrounded by air, thus representing a general geometry whose search space is defined by the number of elements in such array. A block-iterative frequency-domain method was used to compute the FPBGs on a PC, when present. DE has proved to be useful in combinatorial problems and we also present an implementation feature that takes advantage of the periodic nature of PCs to enhance the convergence of this algorithm. Finally, we used this methodology to find a PC structure with a 19% bandgap-to-midgap ratio without requiring previous information of suboptimal configurations and we made a statistical study of how it is affected by disorder in the borders of the structure compared with a previous work that uses a genetic algorithm.

  5. Development of high refractive index poly(thiophene) for the fabrication of all organic three-dimensional photonic materials with a complete photonic band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew J.

    The field of photonics hopes to harness light to supercede in performance many of the functions carried out by electronics. To accomplish this, the flow of light can be controlled by means of a photonic band gap (PBG) the same way electronic band gaps can control the flow of electrons. PBGs, through the coherent backscattering of radiation, create frequency ranges in which light propagation is forbidden. A PBG is created when a wave propagates through a periodic array of materials with sufficient refractive index (n ) contrast (n1/n 2) where the dimensionality of the periodicity defines the dimensionality of the PBG. The n contrast required to open a PBG increases as the dimensionality increases. Currently, only inorganic materials have a sufficiently high n to open a complete 3-D PBG. The goal of this project is to fabricate a polymeric material with a complete 3-D PBG, to bring the tailorable physical, electrical, and optical properties of polymeric materials to 3-D PBG materials. The first step was to develop a polymer with a sufficiently high n. Because of its conjugated nature and the presence of a heavy sulfur atom in its repeat unit, poly(thiophene) (PT) is predicted to have one of the highest polymeric refractive indices with n = 3.9 at 700 nm1, but the reported n value for PT is 1.4 at 633 nm.2 This discrepancy is because the potential needed to electrosynthesize PT, the only method available to synthesize thick and high quality PT films, is higher than its degradation potential. It was found that by polymerizing thiophene with an optimized monomer concentration, proton trap concentration, and reaction temperature in a strong aprotic Lewis acid solvent, the polymerization potential could be reduced below the degradation potential of PT. The resultant PT film had a maximum n of 3.36, which is sufficiently high to open a 3-D PBG. Photonic templates were then constructed using a combination of Colvin's method3 with monodisperse spheres and mechanical

  6. Complete photonic band gaps and tunable self-collimation in the two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with a new structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Ding, Guo-Wen; Li, Hai-Ming; Liu, Shao-Bin

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, the properties of complete photonic band gaps (CPBGs) and tunable self-collimation in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (2D PPCs) with a new structure in square lattices, whose dielectric fillers (GaAs) are inserted into homogeneous and nomagnetized plasma background are theoretically investigated by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method with a novel technique. The novel PWE method can be utilized to compute the dispersion curves of 2D PPCs with arbitrary-shaped cross section in any lattices. As a comparison, CPBGs of PPCs for four different configurations are numerically calculated. The computed results show that the proposed design has the advantages of achieving the larger CPBGs compared to the other three configurations. The influences of geometric parameters of filled unit cell and plasma frequency on the properties of CPBGs are studied in detail. The calculated results demonstrate that CPBGs of the proposed 2D PPCs can be easily engineered by changing those parameters, and the larger CPBGs also can be obtained by optimization. The self-collimation in such 2D PPCs also is discussed in theory under TM wave. The theoretical simulations reveal that the self-collimation phenomena can be found in the TM bands, and both the frequency range of self-collimation and the equifrequency surface contours can be tuned by the parameters as mentioned above. It means that the frequency range and direction of electromagnetic wave can be manipulated by designing, as it propagates in the proposed PPCs without diffraction. Those results can hold promise for designing the tunable applications based on the proposed PPCs.

  7. Photonic band structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonovitch, E.

    1993-05-01

    We learned how to create 3-dimensionally periodic dielectric structures which are to photon waves, as semiconductor crystals are to electron waves. That is, these photonic crystals have a photonic bandgap, a band of frequencies in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, irrespective of propagation direction in space. Photonic bandgaps provide for spontaneous emission inhibition and allow for a new class of electromagnetic micro-cavities. If the perfect 3-dimensional periodicity is broken by a local defect, then local electromagnetic modes can occur within the forbidden bandgap. The addition of extra dielectric material locally, inside the photonic crystal, produces {open_quotes}donor{close_quotes} modes. Conversely, the local removal of dielectric material from the photonic crystal produces {open_quotes}acceptor{close_quotes} modes. Therefore, it will now be possible to make high-Q electromagnetic cavities of volume {approx_lt}1 cubic wavelength, for short wavelengths at which metallic cavities are useless. These new dielectric micro-resonators can cover the range all the way from millimeter waves, down to ultraviolet wavelengths.

  8. High-quality photonic crystals with a nearly complete band gap obtained by direct inversion of woodpile templates with titanium dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Marichy, Catherine; Muller, Nicolas; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal materials are based on a periodic modulation of the dielectric constant on length scales comparable to the wavelength of light. These materials can exhibit photonic band gaps; frequency regions for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden due to the depletion of the density of states. In order to exhibit a full band gap, 3D PCs must present a threshold refractive index contrast that depends on the crystal structure. In the case of the so-called woodpile photonic crystals this threshold is comparably low, approximately 1.9 for the direct structure. Therefore direct or inverted woodpiles made of high refractive index materials like silicon, germanium or titanium dioxide are sought after. Here we show that, by combining multiphoton lithography and atomic layer deposition, we can achieve a direct inversion of polymer templates into TiO2 based photonic crystals. The obtained structures show remarkable optical properties in the near-infrared region with almost perfect specular reflectance, a transmission dip close to the detection limit and a Bragg length comparable to the lattice constant. PMID:26911540

  9. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  10. Optically tuneable blue phase photonic band gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.-Y.; Wang, C.-T.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Lin, T.-H.; Liu, J.-H.

    2010-03-22

    This study investigates an optically switchable band gap of photonic crystal that is based on an azobenzene-doped liquid crystal blue phase. The trans-cis photoisomerization of azobenzene deforms the cubic unit cell of the blue phase and shifts the photonic band gap. The fast back-isomerization of azobenzene was induced by irradiation with different wavelengths light. The crystal structure is verified using Kossel diffraction diagram. An optically addressable blue phase display, based on Bragg reflection from the photonic band gap, is also demonstrated. The tunable ranges are around red, green, and blue wavelengths and exhibit a bright saturated color.

  11. Tuning photonic bands in plasma metallic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Mayank Kumar; Chaudhari, Sachin

    2016-11-01

    Introducing plasma in the background provides additional degrees of freedom for tuning dispersion curves of photonic crystals. 2D photonic crystals in triangular lattice arrangements offer more global bandgap regions and thus are of more interest for various applications. The dispersion characteristics of a two-dimensional plasma metallic photonic crystal (PMPC) in square as well as triangular lattice arrangements have been analyzed in this paper using the orthogonal finite difference time domain method. The dispersion characteristics of PMPCs for the range of r/a ratios and plasma frequencies for triangular lattice configuration have been analyzed. On introducing plasma in the background, the photonic bands of PMPC are shifted towards higher normalized frequencies. This shift is more for lower bands and increases with plasma frequency. The cut-off frequency was observed for both TE and TM polarizations in PMPC and showed strong dependence on r/a ratio as well as plasma frequency. Photonic bandgaps of PMPC may be tuned by controlling plasma parameters, giving opportunity for utilizing these PMPC structures for various applications such as fine-tuning cavities for enhanced light-matter interaction, plasmonic waveguides, and Gyrotron cavities.

  12. Effect of size of silica microspheres on photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Dhiman, N. Sharma, A. Gathania, A. K.; Singh, B. P.

    2014-04-24

    In present work photonic crystals of different size of silica microspheres have been fabricated. The optical properties of these developed photonic crystals have been studied using UV-visible spectroscopy. UV-visible spectroscopy shows that they have photonic band gap that can be tuned in visible and infrared regime by changing the size of silica microspheres. The photonic band gap structures of these photonic crystals have been calculated using MIT photonic band gap package. It also reveals that with the increase in size of silica microspheres the photonic band gap shifts to lower energy region.

  13. Photon ratchet intermediate band solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Farrell, D. J.; Phillips, C. C.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative concept for solar power conversion—the "photon ratchet" intermediate band solar cell (IBSC)—which may increase the photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency of IBSCs by increasing the lifetime of charge carriers in the intermediate state. The limiting efficiency calculation for this concept shows that the efficiency can be increased by introducing a fast thermal transition of carriers into a non-emissive state. At 1 sun, the introduction of a "ratchet band" results in an increase of efficiency from 46.8% to 48.5%, due to suppression of entropy generation.

  14. Fabrication of photonic band gap materials

    DOEpatents

    Constant, Kristen; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Biswas, Rana; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2002-01-15

    A method for forming a periodic dielectric structure exhibiting photonic band gap effects includes forming a slurry of a nano-crystalline ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material and monodisperse polymer microspheres, depositing a film of the slurry on a substrate, drying the film, and calcining the film to remove the polymer microspheres therefrom. The film may be cold-pressed after drying and prior to calcining. The ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material may be titania, and the polymer microspheres may be polystyrene microspheres.

  15. Experimental Study of Electronic Quantum Interference, Photonic Crystal Cavity, Photonic Band Edge Effects for Optical Amplification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-26

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2016-0003 TR-2016-0003 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ELECTRONIC QUANTUM INTERFERENCE, PHOTONIC CRYSTAL CAVITY, PHOTONIC BAND...2014 – 11 Jan 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Experimental Study of Electronic Quantum Interference, Photonic Crystal Cavity, Photonic Band Edge Effects...tailoring of dispersion and the photonic band gap. The band gap frequency can be matched to tailor the emission from active medium such as quantum

  16. Photonic band-edge micro lasers with quantum dot gain.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Masahiro; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Tandaechanurat, Aniwat; Ota, Yasutomo; Kumagai, Naoto; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2009-01-19

    We demonstrate optically pumped continuous-wave photonic band-edge microlasers on a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab. Lasing was observed at a photonic band-edge, where the group velocity was significantly small near the K point of the band structure having a triangular lattice. Lasing was achieved by using a quantum dot gain material, which resulted in a significant decrease in the laser threshold, compared with photonic band-edge lasers using quantum well gain material. Extremely low laser thresholds of approximately 80 nW at 6 K was achieved. Lasing was observed in a defect-free photonic crystal as small as approximately 7 microm square.

  17. Bi-directional evolutionary optimization for photonic band gap structures

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Fei; Huang, Xiaodong; Jia, Baohua

    2015-12-01

    Toward an efficient and easy-implement optimization for photonic band gap structures, this paper extends the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) method for maximizing photonic band gaps. Photonic crystals are assumed to be periodically composed of two dielectric materials with the different permittivity. Based on the finite element analysis and sensitivity analysis, BESO starts from a simple initial design without any band gap and gradually re-distributes dielectric materials within the unit cell so that the resulting photonic crystal possesses a maximum band gap between two specified adjacent bands. Numerical examples demonstrated the proposed optimization algorithm can successfully obtain the band gaps from the first to the tenth band for both transverse magnetic and electric polarizations. Some optimized photonic crystals exhibit novel patterns markedly different from traditional designs of photonic crystals.

  18. Simultaneous existence of phononic and photonic band gaps in periodic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Pennec, Y; Djafari Rouhani, B; El Boudouti, E H; Li, C; El Hassouani, Y; Vasseur, J O; Papanikolaou, N; Benchabane, S; Laude, V; Martinez, A

    2010-06-21

    We discuss the simultaneous existence of phononic and photonic band gaps in a periodic array of holes drilled in a Si membrane. We investigate in detail both the centered square lattice and the boron nitride (BN) lattice with two atoms per unit cell which include the simple square, triangular and honeycomb lattices as particular cases. We show that complete phononic and photonic band gaps can be obtained from the honeycomb lattice as well as BN lattices close to honeycomb. Otherwise, all investigated structures present the possibility of a complete phononic gap together with a photonic band gap of a given symmetry, odd or even, depending on the geometrical parameters.

  19. Method of construction of composite one-dimensional photonic crystal with extended photonic band gaps.

    PubMed

    Tolmachev, V; Perova, T; Moore, R

    2005-10-17

    A method of photonic band gap extension using mixing of periodic structures with two or more consecutively placed photonic crystals with different lattice constants is proposed. For the design of the structures with maximal photonic band gap extension the gap map imposition method is utilised. Optimal structures have been established and the gap map of photonic band gaps has been calculated at normal incidence of light for both small and large optical contrast and at oblique incidence of light for small optical contrast.

  20. Observation of localized flat-band states in Kagome photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Zong, Yuanyuan; Xia, Shiqiang; Tang, Liqin; Song, Daohong; Hu, Yi; Pei, Yumiao; Su, Jing; Li, Yigang; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-04-18

    We report the first experimental demonstration of localized flat-band states in optically induced Kagome photonic lattices. Such lattices exhibit a unique band structure with the lowest band being completely flat (diffractionless) in the tight-binding approximation. By taking the advantage of linear superposition of the flat-band eigenmodes of the Kagome lattices, we demonstrate a high-fidelity transmission of complex patterns in such two-dimensional pyrochlore-like photonic structures. Our numerical simulations find good agreement with experimental observations, upholding the belief that flat-band lattices can support distortion-free image transmission.

  1. Photonic band gaps of wurtzite GaN and AlN photonic crystals at short wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, E. G.; Alayo, M. I.

    2015-04-01

    Group III-nitride materials such as GaN and AlN have attracted a great attention in researches on photonic devices that operate at short light wavelengths. The large band gaps of these materials turn them suitable for nanophotonic devices that operate in light ranges from visible to deep ultraviolet. The physical properties of wurtzite GaN and AlN such as their second and third order nonlinear susceptibilities, and their thermal and piezoelectric coefficients, also make them excellent candidates for integrate photonic devices with electronics, microelectromechanics, microfluidics and general sensing applications. Using a plane wave expansion method (PWE) the photonic band gap maps of 36 different two-dimensional photonic crystal lattices in wurtzite GaN and AlN were obtained and analyzed. The wavelength dependence and the effects of the material anisotropy on the position of the photonic band gaps are also discussed. The results show regions with slow group velocity at the edges of a complete photonic band gap in the M-K direction of the triangular lattices with circular, hexagonal, and rhombic air holes. Was also found a very interesting disposition of the photonic band gaps in the lattices composed of rhombic air holes.

  2. Quantum electrodynamics near a photonic band-gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanbing; Houck, Andrew

    Quantum electrodynamics predicts the localization of light around an atom in photonic band-gap (PBG) medium or photonic crystal. Here we report the first experimental realization of the strong coupling between a single artificial atom and an one dimensional PBG medium using superconducting circuits. In the photonic transport measurement, we observe an anomalous Lamb shift and a large band-edge avoided crossing when the artificial atom frequency is tuned across the band-edge. The persistent peak within the band-gap indicates the single photon bound state. Furthermore, we study the resonance fluorescence of this bound state, again demonstrating the breakdown of the Born-Markov approximation near the band-edge. This novel architecture can be directly generalized to study many-body quantum electrodynamics and to construct more complicated spin chain models.

  3. Spectroscopy of photonic band gaps in mesoporous one-dimensional photonic crystals based on aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Voinov, Yu. P.; Shchavlev, V. V.; Bi, Dongxue; Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao

    2016-12-01

    Mesoporous one-dimensional photonic crystals based on aluminum oxide have been synthesized by electrochemical etching method. Reflection spectra of the obtained mesoporous samples in a wide spectral range that covers several band gaps are presented. Microscopic parameters of photonic crystals are calculated and corresponding reflection spectra for the first six band gaps are presented.

  4. Connected hexagonal photonic crystals with largest full band gap.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Chen, Y; Chern, R; Chang, Chien

    2005-10-03

    A two-dimensional photonic crystal with a large full band gap has been designed, fabricated, and characterized. The photonic crystal design was based on a calculation using inverse iteration with multigrid acceleration. The fabrication of the photonic crystal on silicon was realized by the processes of electron-beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching. It was found that the hexagonal array of circular columns and rods has an optimal full photonic band gap. In addition, we show that a larger extraction of light from our designed photonic crystal can be obtained when compared with the frequently used photonic crystals reported previously. Our designed PC structure therefore should be very useful for creating highly efficient optoelectronic devices.

  5. A complete design flow for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, James; Cone, Chris; Chrostowski, Lukas; Klein, Jackson; Flueckiger, Jonas; Liu, Amy; McGuire, Dylan; Wang, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Broad adoption of silicon photonics technology for photonic integrated circuits requires standardized design flows that are similar to what is available for analog and mixed signal electrical circuit design. We have developed a design flow that combines mature electronic design automation (EDA) software with optical simulation software. An essential component of any design flow, whether electrical or photonic, is the ability to accurately simulate largescale circuits. This is particularly important when the behavior of the circuit is not trivially related to the individual component performance. While this is clearly the case for electronic circuits consisting of hundreds to billions of transistors, it is already becoming important in photonic circuits such as WDM transmitters, where signal cross talk needs to be considered, as well as optical cross-connect switches. In addition, optical routing to connect different components requires the introduction of additional waveguide sections, waveguide bends, and waveguide crossings, which affect the overall circuit performance. Manufacturing variability can also have dramatic circuit-level consequences that need to be simulated. Circuit simulations must rely on compact models that can accurately represent the behavior of each component, and the compact model parameters must be extracted from physical level simulation and experimental results. We show how large scale circuits can be simulated in both the time and frequency domains, including the effects of bidirectional and, where appropriate, multimode and multichannel photonic waveguides. We also show how active, passive and nonlinear individual components such as grating couplers, waveguides, splitters, filters, electro-optical modulators and detectors can be simulated using a combination of electrical and optical algorithms, and good agreement with experimental results can be obtained. We then show how parameters, with inclusion of fabrication process variations, can

  6. Photonic band gap enhancement in frequency-dependent dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Toader, Ovidiu; John, Sajeev

    2004-10-01

    We illustrate a general technique for evaluating photonic band structures in periodic d -dimensional microstructures in which the dielectric constant epsilon (omega) exhibits rapid variations with frequency omega . This technique involves the evaluation of generalized electromagnetic dispersion surfaces omega ( k--> ,epsilon) in a (d+1) -dimensional space consisting of the physical d -dimensional space of wave vectors k--> and an additional dimension defined by the continuous, independent, variable epsilon . The physical band structure for the photonic crystal is obtained by evaluating the intersection of the generalized dispersion surfaces with the "cutting surface" defined by the function epsilon (omega) . We apply this method to evaluate the band structure of both two- and three-dimensional (3D) periodic microstructures. We consider metallic photonic crystals with free carriers described by a simple Drude conductivity and verify the occurrence of electromagnetic pass bands below the plasma frequency of the bulk metal. We also evaluate the shift of the photonic band structure caused by free carrier injection into semiconductor-based photonic crystals. We apply our method to two models in which epsilon (omega) describes a resonant radiation-matter interaction. In the first model, we consider the addition of independent, resonant oscillators to a photonic crystal with an otherwise frequency-independent dielectric constant. We demonstrate that for an inhomogeneously broadened distribution of resonators impregnated within an inverse opal structure, the full 3D photonic band gap (PBG) can be considerably enhanced. In the second model, we consider a coupled resonant oscillator mode in a photonic crystal. When this mode is an optical phonon, there can be a synergetic interplay between the polaritonic resonance and the geometrical scattering resonances of the structured dielectric, leading to PBG enhancement. A similar effect may arise when resonant atoms that are

  7. Parasitic Photon-Pair Suppression via Photonic Stop-Band Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helt, L. G.; Brańczyk, Agata M.; Liscidini, Marco; Steel, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    We calculate that an appropriate modification of the field associated with only one of the photons of a photon pair can suppress generation of the pair entirely. From this general result, we develop a method for suppressing the generation of undesired photon pairs utilizing photonic stop bands. For a third-order nonlinear optical source of frequency-degenerate photons, we calculate the modified frequency spectrum (joint spectral intensity) and show a significant increase in a standard metric, the coincidence to accidental ratio. These results open a new avenue for photon-pair frequency correlation engineering.

  8. Photonic band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummer, Karikkuzhi Variyath; Vijaya, Ramarao

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement in photonic band-edge-induced absorption and emission from rhodamine-B dye doped polystyrene pseudo gap photonic crystals is studied. The band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption is achieved by selecting the incident angle of the excitation beam so that the absorption spectrum of the emitter overlaps the photonic band edge. The band-edge-induced enhancement in emission, on the other hand, is possible with and without an enhancement in band-edge-induced absorption, depending on the collection angle of emission. Through a simple set of measurements with suitably chosen angles for excitation and emission, we achieve a maximum enhancement of 70% in emission intensity with band-edge-induced effects over and above the intrinsic emission in the case of self-assembled opals. This is a comprehensive effort to interpret tunable lasing in opals as well as to predict the wavelength of lasing arising as a result of band-edge-induced distributed feedback effects.

  9. Special purpose modes in photonic band gap fibers

    DOEpatents

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Campbell, Sara

    2013-04-02

    Photonic band gap fibers are described having one or more defects suitable for the acceleration of electrons or other charged particles. Methods and devices are described for exciting special purpose modes in the defects including laser coupling schemes as well as various fiber designs and components for facilitating excitation of desired modes. Results are also presented showing effects on modes due to modes in other defects within the fiber and due to the proximity of defects to the fiber edge. Techniques and devices are described for controlling electrons within the defect(s). Various applications for electrons or other energetic charged particles produced by such photonic band gap fibers are also described.

  10. Photonic crystal digital alloys and their band structure properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongkug; Kim, Dong-Uk; Jeon, Heonsu

    2011-09-26

    We investigated semi-disordered photonic crystals (PCs), digital alloys, and made thorough comparisons with their counterparts, random alloys. A set of diamond lattice PC digital alloys operating in a microwave regime were prepared by alternately stacking two kinds of sub-PC systems composed of alumina and silica spheres of the same size. Measured transmission spectra as well as calculated band structures revealed that when the digital alloy period is short, band-gaps of the digital alloys are practically the same as those of the random alloys. This study indicates that the concept of digital alloys holds for photons in PCs as well.

  11. Quantum interference of independently generated telecom-band single photons

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Monika; Altepeter, Joseph B.; Huang, Yu-Ping; Oza, Neal N.; Kumar, Prem

    2014-12-04

    We report on high-visibility quantum interference of independently generated telecom O-band (1310 nm) single photons using standard single-mode fibers. The experimental data are shown to agree well with the results of simulations using a comprehensive quantum multimode theory without the need for any fitting parameter.

  12. Mini-stop bands in single heterojunction photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, N.; Amin, M.; Naureen, S.; Anand, S.

    2013-03-01

    Spectral characteristics of mini-stop bands (MSB) in line-defect photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides and in heterostructure PhC waveguides having one abrupt interface are investigated. Tunability of the MSB position by air-fill factor heterostructure PhC waveguides is utilized to demonstrate different filter functions, at optical communication wavelengths, ranging from resonance-like to wide band pass filters with high transmission. The narrowest filter realized has a resonance-like transmission peak with a full width at half maximum of 3.4 nm. These devices could be attractive for coarse wavelength selection (pass and drop) and for sensing applications.

  13. Photonic band gap spectra in Octonacci metamaterial quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, E. R.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we study theoretically the photonic band gap spectra for a one-dimensional quasicrystal made up of SiO2 (layer A) and a metamaterial (layer B) organized following the Octonacci sequence, where its nth-stage Sn is given by the inflation rule Sn =Sn - 1Sn - 2Sn - 1 for n ≥ 3 , with initial conditions S1 = A and S2 = B . The metamaterial is characterized by a frequency dependent electric permittivity ε(ω) and magnetic permeability μ(ω) . The polariton dispersion relation is obtained analytically by employing a theoretical calculation based on a transfer-matrix approach. A quantitative analysis of the spectra is then discussed, stressing the distribution of the allowed photonic band widths for high generations of the Octonacci structure, which depict a self-similar scaling property behavior, with a power law depending on the common in-plane wavevector kx .

  14. Manipulating full photonic band gaps in two dimensional birefringent photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Verma, Prabhat; Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Shoji, Satoru; Kawata, Satoshi

    2008-09-15

    The probability to realize a full photonic band gap in two-dimensional birefringent photonic crystals can be readily manipulated by introducing symmetry reduction or air holes in the crystal elements. The results lie in either creation of new band gaps or enlargement of existing band gaps. In particular, a combination of the two processes produces an effect much stronger than a simple summation of their individual contributions. Materials with both relatively low refractive index (rutile) and high refractive index (tellurium) were considered. The combined effect of introduction of symmetry reduction and air holes resulted in a maximum enlargement of the band gaps by 8.4% and 20.2%, respectively, for the two materials.

  15. Photonic Band Gap resonators for high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, S.; Smith, D.R.; Kroll, N. |

    1993-12-31

    We have proposed that a new type of microwave resonator, based on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) structures, may be particularly useful for high energy accelerators. We provide an explanation of the PBG concept and present data which illustrate some of the special properties associated with such structures. Further evaluation of the utility of PBG resonators requires laboratory testing of model structures at cryogenic temperatures, and at high fields. We provide a brief discussion of our test program, which is currently in progress.

  16. Extreme narrow photonic bands and strong photonic localization produced by 2D defect two-segment-connected quadrangular waveguide networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Yang, Xiangbo; Timon Liu, Chengyi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of optical transmission and photonic localization of two-dimensional (2D) defect two-segment-connected quadrangular waveguide networks (DTSCQWNs) and find that many groups of extreme narrow photonic bands are created in the middle of the transmission spectra. The electromagnetic (EM) waves in DTSCQWNs with the frequencies of extreme narrow photonic bands can produce strong photonic localizations by adjusting defect broken degree. On the other hand, we obtain the formula of extreme narrow photonic bands' frequencies dependent on defect broken degree and the formula of the largest intensity of photonic localization dependent on defect broken degree, respectively. It may possess potential application for designing all-optical devices based on strong photonic localizations. Additionally, we propose a so-called defecton mode to study the splitting rules of extreme narrow photonic bands, where decomposition-decimation method is expanded from the field of electronic energy spectra to that of optical transmission spectra.

  17. Photonic band gaps in one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals with arbitrary magnetic declination

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haifeng; Liu Shaobin; Kong Xiangkun

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps and dispersion relations of one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals composed of dielectric and magnetized plasma layers with arbitrary magnetic declination are theoretically investigated for TM polarized wave based on transfer matrix method. As TM wave propagates in one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals, the electromagnetic wave can be divided into two modes due to the influence of Lorentz force. The equations for effective dielectric functions of such two modes are theoretically deduced, and the transfer matrix equation and dispersion relations for TM wave are calculated. The influences of relative dielectric constant, plasma collision frequency, incidence angle, plasma filling factor, the angle between external magnetic field and +z axis, external magnetic field and plasma frequency on transmission, and dispersion relation are investigated, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. From the numerical results, it has been shown that plasma collision frequency cannot change the locations of photonic band gaps for both modes, and also does not affect the reflection and transmission magnitudes. The characteristics of photonic band gaps for both modes can be obviously tuned by relative dielectric constant, incidence angle, plasma filling factor, the angle between external magnetic field and +z axis, external magnetic field and plasma frequency, respectively. These results would provide theoretical instructions for designing filters, microcavities, and fibers, etc.

  18. Analysis of photonic band gaps in two-dimensional photonic crystals with rods covered by a thin interfacial layer

    SciTech Connect

    Trifonov, T.; Marsal, L.F.; Pallares, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Alcubilla, R.

    2004-11-15

    We investigate different aspects of the absolute photonic band gap (PBG) formation in two-dimensional photonic structures consisting of rods covered with a thin dielectric film. Specifically, triangular and honeycomb lattices in both complementary arrangements, i.e., air rods drilled in silicon matrix and silicon rods in air, are studied. We consider that the rods are formed of a dielectric core (silicon or air) surrounded by a cladding layer of silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), or germanium (Ge). Such photonic lattices present absolute photonic band gaps, and we study the evolution of these gaps as functions of the cladding material and thickness. Our results show that in the case of air rods in dielectric media the existence of dielectric cladding reduces the absolute gap width and may cause complete closure of the gap if thick layers are considered. For the case of dielectric rods in air, however, the existence of a cladding layer can be advantageous and larger absolute PBG's can be achieved.

  19. Hollow-Core Photonic Band Gap Fibers for Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert J.; Spencer, James E.; Kuhlmey, Boris T.; /Sydney U.

    2011-08-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) dielectric fibers with hollow cores are being studied both theoretically and experimentally for use as laser driven accelerator structures. The hollow core functions as both a longitudinal waveguide for the transverse-magnetic (TM) accelerating fields and a channel for the charged particles. The dielectric surrounding the core is permeated by a periodic array of smaller holes to confine the mode, forming a photonic crystal fiber in which modes exist in frequency pass-bands, separated by band gaps. The hollow core acts as a defect which breaks the crystal symmetry, and so-called defect, or trapped modes having frequencies in the band gap will only propagate near the defect. We describe the design of 2-D hollow-core PBG fibers to support TM defect modes with high longitudinal fields and high characteristic impedance. Using as-built dimensions of industrially-made fibers, we perform a simulation analysis of the first prototype PBG fibers specifically designed to support speed-of-light TM modes.

  20. Dual-band photon sorting plasmonic MIM metamaterial sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Young Uk; Bendoym, Igor; Golovin, Andrii B.; Crouse, David T.

    2014-06-01

    We propose plasmonic metal-insulator-metal (MIM) metamaterial designs for the sensing of two infrared wavelength bands, the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) band by using a photon sorting technique. The proposed structures can capture light effectively on the metasurfaces based on coupling of free space energy to a subwavelength plasmonic mode. Photon sorting can be performed such that the incident light with a broad spectrum upon the metasurfaces can be "split" according to wavelength, channeling different spectral bands to different physical regions of the array on the surface where it is then absorbed by the insulator. Two different structures described in this work are (1) Square-type structure which consists of MIM resonators being periodically arranged to form a polarization independent sensor and (2) Meander-type structure which consists of MIM resonators being connected to form the meander shaped sensor. Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe) posts are used as absorbing material within the MIM structure to generate free carriers and allow for collection of carrier charges. The proposed structures have compact designs and exhibit efficient light splitting and absorption for the IR spectral band. Structural and material properties, the electric field distribution and Poynting vector fields at the resonance frequencies are provided. Applications include thermal imaging, night vision systems, rifle sights, missile detection and discrimination, dual bandwidth optical filters, light trapping, and electromagnetically induced transparency.

  1. Isotropic band gaps and freeform waveguides observed in hyperuniform disordered photonic solids

    PubMed Central

    Man, Weining; Florescu, Marian; Williamson, Eric Paul; He, Yingquan; Hashemizad, Seyed Reza; Leung, Brian Y. C.; Liner, Devin Robert; Torquato, Salvatore; Chaikin, Paul M.; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, disordered photonic media and random textured surfaces have attracted increasing attention as strong light diffusers with broadband and wide-angle properties. We report the experimental realization of an isotropic complete photonic band gap (PBG) in a 2D disordered dielectric structure. This structure is designed by a constrained optimization method, which combines advantages of both isotropy due to disorder and controlled scattering properties due to low-density fluctuations (hyperuniformity) and uniform local topology. Our experiments use a modular design composed of Al2O3 walls and cylinders arranged in a hyperuniform disordered network. We observe a complete PBG in the microwave region, in good agreement with theoretical simulations, and show that the intrinsic isotropy of this unique class of PBG materials enables remarkable design freedom, including the realization of waveguides with arbitrary bending angles impossible in photonic crystals. This experimental verification of a complete PBG and realization of functional defects in this unique class of materials demonstrate their potential as building blocks for precise manipulation of photons in planar optical microcircuits and has implications for disordered acoustic and electronic band gap materials. PMID:24043795

  2. Isotropic band gaps and freeform waveguides observed in hyperuniform disordered photonic solids.

    PubMed

    Man, Weining; Florescu, Marian; Williamson, Eric Paul; He, Yingquan; Hashemizad, Seyed Reza; Leung, Brian Y C; Liner, Devin Robert; Torquato, Salvatore; Chaikin, Paul M; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2013-10-01

    Recently, disordered photonic media and random textured surfaces have attracted increasing attention as strong light diffusers with broadband and wide-angle properties. We report the experimental realization of an isotropic complete photonic band gap (PBG) in a 2D disordered dielectric structure. This structure is designed by a constrained optimization method, which combines advantages of both isotropy due to disorder and controlled scattering properties due to low-density fluctuations (hyperuniformity) and uniform local topology. Our experiments use a modular design composed of Al2O3 walls and cylinders arranged in a hyperuniform disordered network. We observe a complete PBG in the microwave region, in good agreement with theoretical simulations, and show that the intrinsic isotropy of this unique class of PBG materials enables remarkable design freedom, including the realization of waveguides with arbitrary bending angles impossible in photonic crystals. This experimental verification of a complete PBG and realization of functional defects in this unique class of materials demonstrate their potential as building blocks for precise manipulation of photons in planar optical microcircuits and has implications for disordered acoustic and electronic band gap materials.

  3. Modeling of Photonic Band Gap Crystals and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kady, Ihab Fathy

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the authors have undertaken a theoretical approach to the complex problem of modeling the flow of electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals. The focus is to address the feasibility of using the exciting phenomena of photonic gaps (PBG) in actual applications. The authors start by providing analytical derivations of the computational electromagnetic methods used in their work. They also present a detailed explanation of the physics underlying each approach, as well as a comparative study of the strengths and weaknesses of each method. The Plane Wave expansion, Transfer Matrix, and Finite Difference time Domain Methods are addressed. They also introduce a new theoretical approach, the Modal Expansion Method. They then shift the attention to actual applications. They begin with a discussion of 2D photonic crystal wave guides. The structure addressed consists of a 2D hexagonal structure of air cylinders in a layered dielectric background. Comparison with the performance of a conventional guide is made, as well as suggestions for enhancing it. The studies provide an upper theoretical limit on the performance of such guides, as they assumed no crystal imperfections and non-absorbing media. Next, they study 3D metallic PBG materials at near infrared and optical wavelengths. The main objective is to study the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in such structures. They study simple cubic structures where the metallic scatters are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several metals are studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). The effect of topology is addressed and isolated metallic cubes are found to be less lossy than the connected rod structures. The results reveal that the best performance is obtained by choosing metals with a large negative real part of the dielectric function, together with a relatively small imaginary part. Finally, they point out a new direction in photonic crystal

  4. Unfolding the band structure of non-crystalline photonic band gap materials.

    PubMed

    Tsitrin, Samuel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Amoah, Timothy; Nahal, Geev; Chan, Ho Leung; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining

    2015-08-20

    Non-crystalline photonic band gap (PBG) materials have received increasing attention, and sizeable PBGs have been reported in quasi-crystalline structures and, more recently, in disordered structures. Band structure calculations for periodic structures produce accurate dispersion relations, which determine group velocities, dispersion, density of states and iso-frequency surfaces, and are used to predict a wide-range of optical phenomena including light propagation, excited-state decay rates, temporal broadening or compression of ultrashort pulses and complex refraction phenomena. However, band calculations for non-periodic structures employ large super-cells of hundreds to thousands building blocks, and provide little useful information other than the PBG central frequency and width. Using stereolithography, we construct cm-scale disordered PBG materials and perform microwave transmission measurements, as well as finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The photonic dispersion relations are reconstructed from the measured and simulated phase data. Our results demonstrate the existence of sizeable PBGs in these disordered structures and provide detailed information of the effective band diagrams, dispersion relation, iso-frequency contours, and their angular dependence. Slow light phenomena are also observed in these structures near gap frequencies. This study introduces a powerful tool to investigate photonic properties of non-crystalline structures and provides important effective dispersion information, otherwise difficult to obtain.

  5. Unfolding the band structure of non-crystalline photonic band gap materials

    PubMed Central

    Tsitrin, Samuel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Amoah, Timothy; Nahal, Geev; Chan, Ho Leung; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining

    2015-01-01

    Non-crystalline photonic band gap (PBG) materials have received increasing attention, and sizeable PBGs have been reported in quasi-crystalline structures and, more recently, in disordered structures. Band structure calculations for periodic structures produce accurate dispersion relations, which determine group velocities, dispersion, density of states and iso-frequency surfaces, and are used to predict a wide-range of optical phenomena including light propagation, excited-state decay rates, temporal broadening or compression of ultrashort pulses and complex refraction phenomena. However, band calculations for non-periodic structures employ large super-cells of hundreds to thousands building blocks, and provide little useful information other than the PBG central frequency and width. Using stereolithography, we construct cm-scale disordered PBG materials and perform microwave transmission measurements, as well as finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The photonic dispersion relations are reconstructed from the measured and simulated phase data. Our results demonstrate the existence of sizeable PBGs in these disordered structures and provide detailed information of the effective band diagrams, dispersion relation, iso-frequency contours, and their angular dependence. Slow light phenomena are also observed in these structures near gap frequencies. This study introduces a powerful tool to investigate photonic properties of non-crystalline structures and provides important effective dispersion information, otherwise difficult to obtain. PMID:26289434

  6. Photonic band gap structure for a ferroelectric photonic crystal at microwave frequencies.

    PubMed

    King, Tzu-Chyang; Chen, De-Xin; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Wu, Chien-Jang

    2015-10-10

    In this work, the photonic band gap (PBG) structure in a one-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystal (PC) is theoretically investigated. We consider a PC, air/(AB)N/air, in which layer A is a dielectric of MgO and layer B is taken to be a ferroelectric of Ba0.55Sr0.45TiO3 (BSTO). With an extremely high value in the dielectric constant in BSTO, the calculated photonic band structure at microwave frequencies exhibits some interesting features that are significantly different from those in a usual dielectric-dielectric PC. First, the photonic transmission band consists of multiple and nearly discrete transmission peaks. Second, the calculated bandwidth of the PBG is nearly unchanged as the angle of incidence varies in the TE wave. The bandwidth will slightly reduce for the TM mode. Thus, a wide omnidirectional PBG can be obtained. Additionally, the effect of the thickness of the ferroelectric layer on the PBG is much more pronounced compared to the dielectric layer thickness. That is, the increase of ferroelectric thickness can significantly decrease the PBG bandwidth.

  7. On-chip, photon-number-resolving, telecommunication-band detectors for scalable photonic information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrits, Thomas; Lita, Adriana E.; Calkins, Brice; Tomlin, Nathan A.; Fox, Anna E.; Linares, Antia Lamas; Mirin, Richard P.; Nam, Sae Woo; Thomas-Peter, Nicholas; Metcalf, Benjamin J.; Spring, Justin B.; Langford, Nathan K.; Walmsley, Ian A.; Gates, James C.; Smith, Peter G. R.

    2011-12-15

    Integration is currently the only feasible route toward scalable photonic quantum processing devices that are sufficiently complex to be genuinely useful in computing, metrology, and simulation. Embedded on-chip detection will be critical to such devices. We demonstrate an integrated photon-number-resolving detector, operating in the telecom band at 1550 nm, employing an evanescently coupled design that allows it to be placed at arbitrary locations within a planar circuit. Up to five photons are resolved in the guided optical mode via absorption from the evanescent field into a tungsten transition-edge sensor. The detection efficiency is 7.2{+-}0.5 %. The polarization sensitivity of the detector is also demonstrated. Detailed modeling of device designs shows a clear and feasible route to reaching high detection efficiencies.

  8. Photonic band gaps in quasiperiodic photonic crystals with negative refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, M. S.; Mauriz, P. W.; de Medeiros, F. F.; Albuquerque, E. L.

    2007-10-01

    We investigate the photonic band gaps in quasiperiodic photonic crystals made up of both positive (SiO2) and negative refractive index materials using a theoretical model based on a transfer matrix treatment. The quasiperiodic structures are characterized by the nature of their Fourier spectrum, which can be dense pure point (Fibonacci sequences) or singular continuous (Thue-Morse and double-period sequences). These substitutional sequences are described in terms of a series of generations that obey peculiar recursion relations. We discussed the photonic band gap spectra for both the ideal cases, where the negative refractive index material can be approximated as a constant in the frequency range considered, as well as the more realistic case, taking into account the frequency-dependent electric permittivity γ and magnetic permeability μ . We also present a quantitative analysis of the results, pointing out the distribution of the allowed photonic bandwidths for high generations, which gives a good insight about their localization and power laws.

  9. Wide-Band Microwave Receivers Using Photonic Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; Itchenko, Vladimir; Yu, Nan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy

    2008-01-01

    In wide-band microwave receivers of a type now undergoing development, the incoming microwave signals are electronically preamplified, then frequency-up-converted to optical signals that are processed photonically before being detected. This approach differs from the traditional approach, in which incoming microwave signals are processed by purely electronic means. As used here, wide-band microwave receivers refers especially to receivers capable of reception at any frequency throughout the range from about 90 to about 300 GHz. The advantage expected to be gained by following the up-conversion-and-photonic-processing approach is the ability to overcome the limitations of currently available detectors and tunable local oscillators in the frequency range of interest. In a receiver following this approach (see figure), a preamplified incoming microwave signal is up-converted by the method described in the preceeding article. The frequency up-converter exploits the nonlinearity of the electromagnetic response of a whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator made of LiNbO3. Up-conversion takes place by three-wave mixing in the resonator. The WGM resonator is designed and fabricated to function simultaneously as an electro-optical modulator and to exhibit resonance at the microwave and optical operating frequencies plus phase matching among the microwave and optical signals circulating in the resonator. The up-conversion is an efficient process, and the efficiency is enhanced by the combination of microwave and optical resonances. The up-converted signal is processed photonically by use of a tunable optical filter or local oscillator, and is then detected. Tunable optical filters can be made to be frequency agile and to exhibit high resonance quality factors (high Q values), thereby making it possible to utilize a variety of signal-processing modalities. Therefore, it is anticipated that when fully developed, receivers of this type will be compact and will be capable of both

  10. Trapping of coherence and entanglement in photonic band-gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ling-Juan; Zhang, Ying-Jie; Xing, Gui-Chao; Xia, Yun-Jie; Gong, Shang-Qing

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the coherence trapping of a two-level atom transversally interacting with a reservoir with a photonic band-gap structure function. We then focus on the multipartite entanglement dynamics via genuinely multipartite concurrence among N independent atoms each locally coupled with its own reservoir. By considering the Lorentzian width and the system size, we find that for the resonant and near-resonant conditions, the increase of Lorentzian width and the decrease of system size can lead to the occurrence of coherence trapping and entanglement trapping. By choosing the multipartite GHZ state as atomic initial state, we show that the multipartite entanglement may exhibit entanglement sudden death depending on the initial condition and the system size. In addition, we also analyze how the crossover behaviors of two dynamical regimes are influenced by the Lorentzian width and the weight ratio, in terms of the non-Markovianity.

  11. Tunable photonic band-gaps in one-dimensional photonic crystals containing linear graded index material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bipin K.; Kumar, Pawan; Pandey, Praveen C.

    2014-12-01

    We have demonstrated control of the photonic band gaps (PBGs) in 1-D photonic crystals using linear graded index material. The analysis of PBG has been done in THz region by considering photonic crystals in the form of ten periods of second, third and fourth generation of the Fibonacci sequence as unit cell. The unit cells are constituted of two kinds of layers; one is taken of linear graded index material and other of normal dielectric material. For this investigation, we used a theoretical model based on transfer matrix method. We have obtained a large number of PBGs and their bandwidths can be tuned by changing the grading profile and thicknesses of linear graded index layers. The number of PBGs increases with increase in the thicknesses of layers and their bandwidths can be controlled by the contrast of initial and final refractive index of the graded layers. In this way, we provide more design freedom for photonic devices such as reflectors, filters, optical sensors, couplers, etc.

  12. Etched distributed Bragg reflectors as three-dimensional photonic crystals: photonic bands and density of states.

    PubMed

    Pavarini, E; Andreani, L C

    2002-09-01

    The photonic band dispersion and density of states (DOS) are calculated for the three-dimensional (3D) hexagonal structure corresponding to a distributed Bragg reflector patterned with a 2D triangular lattice of circular holes. Results for the Si/SiO(2) and GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As systems determine the optimal parameters for which a gap in the 2D plane occurs and overlaps the 1D gap of the multilayer. The DOS is considerably reduced in correspondence with the overlap of 2D and 1D gaps. Also, the local density of states (i.e., the DOS weighted with the squared electric field at a given point) has strong variations depending on the position. Both results imply substantial changes of spontaneous emission rates and patterns for a local emitter embedded in the structure and make this system attractive for the fabrication of a 3D photonic crystal with controlled radiative properties.

  13. Enhancement of broadband optical absorption in photovoltaic devices by band-edge effect of photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Kawamoto, Yosuke; Fujita, Masayuki; Noda, Susumu

    2013-08-26

    We numerically investigate broadband optical absorption enhancement in thin, 400-nm thick microcrystalline silicon (µc-Si) photovoltaic devices by photonic crystals (PCs). We realize absorption enhancement by coupling the light from the free space to the large area resonant modes at the photonic band-edge induced by the photonic crystals. We show that multiple photonic band-edge modes can be produced by higher order modes in the vertical direction of the Si photovoltaic layer, which can enhance the absorption on multiple wavelengths. Moreover, we reveal that the photonic superlattice structure can produce more photonic band-edge modes that lead to further optical absorption. The absorption average in wavelengths of 500-1000 nm weighted to the solar spectrum (AM 1.5) increases almost twice: from 33% without photonic crystal to 58% with a 4 × 4 period superlattice photonic crystal; our result outperforms the Lambertian textured structure.

  14. Design and testing of photonic band gap channel-drop-filters

    SciTech Connect

    Shchegolkov, Dmitry; Earley, Lawrence M; Health, Cynthia E; Smirnova, Evgenya I

    2009-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and tested several novel passive mm-wave spectrometers based on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) structures. Our spectrometers were designed to operate in the frequency ranges of 90-130 and 220-300 GHz. We built and tested both metallic and dielectric silicon Channel-Drop-Filter (CDF) structures at 90-130 GHz. We are currently fabricating a dielectric CDF structure to operate at 220-300 GHz. The complete recent test results for the metal version and preliminary test results for the higher frequency silicon versions will be presented at the conference.

  15. Telecom-band two-photon Michelson interferometer using frequency entangled photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Akio; Fukuda, Daiji; Tsuchida, Hidemi

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate a telecom-band fiber-optic two-photon Michelson interferometer using near-degenerate and collinear photon pairs with frequency entanglement. For spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC), a continuous-wave laser diode pumps a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide. Two threshold single-photon detectors record coincidence counts to observe two-photon interference and evaluate the correlation function. Multi-pair emission events are inevitable in SPDC and photon pairs without frequency entanglement are unintentionally registered as coincidence counts. In the demonstrated experiment, a mixture of photon pairs with and without frequency entanglement is present. The effects of such a mixed state on the correlation function are experimentally investigated. Two-photon interference of photon pairs without frequency entanglement is also measured for comparison.

  16. Local density of optical states of an asymmetric waveguide grating at photonic band gap resonant wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatas, Husin; Sumaryada, Tony I.; Ahmad, Faozan

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of local density of optical states (LDOS) at photonic band gap resonant wavelength of an asymmetric waveguide grating based on Green's function formulation. It is found that the LDOS of the considered structure exhibits different characteristics in its localization between the upper and lower resonant wavelengths of the corresponding photonic band gap edges.

  17. Geometric phase and entanglement of Raman photon pairs in the presence of photonic band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Abdel-Khalek, S.

    2015-03-01

    Robustness of the geometric phase (GP) with respect to different noise effects is a basic condition for an effective quantum computation. Here, we propose a useful quantum system with real physical parameters by studying the GP of a pair of Stokes and anti-Stokes photons, involving Raman emission processes with and without photonic band gap (PBG) effect. We show that the properties of GP are very sensitive to the change of the Rabi frequency and time, exhibiting collapse phenomenon as the time becomes significantly large. The system allows us to obtain a state which remains with zero GP for longer times. This result plays a significant role to enhance the stabilization and control of the system dynamics. Finally, we investigate the nonlocal correlation (entanglement) between the pair photons by taking into account the effect of different parameters. An interesting correlation between the GP and entanglement is observed showing that the PBG stabilizes the fluctuations in the system and makes the entanglement more robust against the change of time and frequency.

  18. Geometric phase and entanglement of Raman photon pairs in the presence of photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Berrada, K.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Abdel-Khalek, S.

    2015-03-28

    Robustness of the geometric phase (GP) with respect to different noise effects is a basic condition for an effective quantum computation. Here, we propose a useful quantum system with real physical parameters by studying the GP of a pair of Stokes and anti-Stokes photons, involving Raman emission processes with and without photonic band gap (PBG) effect. We show that the properties of GP are very sensitive to the change of the Rabi frequency and time, exhibiting collapse phenomenon as the time becomes significantly large. The system allows us to obtain a state which remains with zero GP for longer times. This result plays a significant role to enhance the stabilization and control of the system dynamics. Finally, we investigate the nonlocal correlation (entanglement) between the pair photons by taking into account the effect of different parameters. An interesting correlation between the GP and entanglement is observed showing that the PBG stabilizes the fluctuations in the system and makes the entanglement more robust against the change of time and frequency.

  19. Communication: Excitation band modulation with high-order photonic band gap in PMMA:Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen; Bai, Xue; Zhu, Yongsheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Sai; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2013-05-01

    Changes in the excitation spectra of luminescent species inserted in photorefractive crystals as a function of changes in the high-order photonic band gap (PBG) have not been previously observed. In this communication, we present our results monitoring the excitation band of Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 inserted in the PMMA opal photonic crystals as a function of the changes in the high-order PBG of the crystals. We find shifts in the complex excitation band and changes in the integrated emission intensity that correlates with shifts in the high-order PBG through coupling to the excitation transition.

  20. Communication: excitation band modulation with high-order photonic band gap in PMMA:Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 opals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Bai, Xue; Zhu, Yongsheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Sai; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2013-05-14

    Changes in the excitation spectra of luminescent species inserted in photorefractive crystals as a function of changes in the high-order photonic band gap (PBG) have not been previously observed. In this communication, we present our results monitoring the excitation band of Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 inserted in the PMMA opal photonic crystals as a function of the changes in the high-order PBG of the crystals. We find shifts in the complex excitation band and changes in the integrated emission intensity that correlates with shifts in the high-order PBG through coupling to the excitation transition.

  1. Photonic-Band-Gap Traveling-Wave Gyrotron Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, E. A.; Lewis, S. M.; Shapiro, M. A.; Griffin, R. G.; Temkin, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a gyrotron traveling-wave-tube amplifier at 250 GHz that uses a photonic band gap (PBG) interaction circuit. The gyrotron amplifier achieved a peak small signal gain of 38 dB and 45 W output power at 247.7 GHz with an instantaneous −3 dB bandwidth of 0.4 GHz. The amplifier can be tuned for operation from 245–256 GHz. The widest instantaneous −3 dB bandwidth of 4.5 GHz centered at 253.25 GHz was observed with a gain of 24 dB. The PBG circuit provides stability from oscillations by supporting the propagation of transverse electric (TE) modes in a narrow range of frequencies, allowing for the confinement of the operating TE03-like mode while rejecting the excitation of oscillations at nearby frequencies. This experiment achieved the highest frequency of operation for a gyrotron amplifier; at present, there are no other amplifiers in this frequency range that are capable of producing either high gain or high output power. This result represents the highest gain observed above 94 GHz and the highest output power achieved above 140 GHz by any conventional-voltage vacuum electron device based amplifier. PMID:24476286

  2. Photonic-band-gap traveling-wave gyrotron amplifier.

    PubMed

    Nanni, E A; Lewis, S M; Shapiro, M A; Griffin, R G; Temkin, R J

    2013-12-06

    We report the experimental demonstration of a gyrotron traveling-wave-tube amplifier at 250 GHz that uses a photonic band gap (PBG) interaction circuit. The gyrotron amplifier achieved a peak small signal gain of 38 dB and 45 W output power at 247.7 GHz with an instantaneous -3  dB bandwidth of 0.4 GHz. The amplifier can be tuned for operation from 245-256 GHz. The widest instantaneous -3  dB bandwidth of 4.5 GHz centered at 253.25 GHz was observed with a gain of 24 dB. The PBG circuit provides stability from oscillations by supporting the propagation of transverse electric (TE) modes in a narrow range of frequencies, allowing for the confinement of the operating TE03-like mode while rejecting the excitation of oscillations at nearby frequencies. This experiment achieved the highest frequency of operation for a gyrotron amplifier; at present, there are no other amplifiers in this frequency range that are capable of producing either high gain or high output power. This result represents the highest gain observed above 94 GHz and the highest output power achieved above 140 GHz by any conventional-voltage vacuum electron device based amplifier.

  3. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Entanglement of Narrow-Band Photons from Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Chan; Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Zhao, Tian-Ming; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-12-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entanglement introduced in 1935 deals with two particles that are entangled in their positions and momenta. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of EPR position-momentum entanglement of narrow-band photon pairs generated from cold atoms. By using two-photon quantum ghost imaging and ghost interference, we demonstrate explicitly that the narrow-band photon pairs violate the separability criterion, confirming EPR entanglement. We further demonstrate continuous variable EPR steering for positions and momenta of the two photons. Our new source of EPR-entangled narrow-band photons is expected to play an essential role in spatially multiplexed quantum information processing, such as, storage of quantum correlated images, quantum interface involving hyperentangled photons, etc.

  4. High-Power Fiber Lasers Using Photonic Band Gap Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiDomenico, Leo; Dowling, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers (HPFLs) would be made from photonic band gap (PBG) materials, according to the proposal. Such lasers would be scalable in the sense that a large number of fiber lasers could be arranged in an array or bundle and then operated in phase-locked condition to generate a superposition and highly directed high-power laser beam. It has been estimated that an average power level as high as 1,000 W per fiber could be achieved in such an array. Examples of potential applications for the proposed single-fiber lasers include welding and laser surgery. Additionally, the bundled fibers have applications in beaming power through free space for autonomous vehicles, laser weapons, free-space communications, and inducing photochemical reactions in large-scale industrial processes. The proposal has been inspired in part by recent improvements in the capabilities of single-mode fiber amplifiers and lasers to produce continuous high-power radiation. In particular, it has been found that the average output power of a single strand of a fiber laser can be increased by suitably changing the doping profile of active ions in its gain medium to optimize the spatial overlap of the electromagnetic field with the distribution of active ions. Such optimization minimizes pump power losses and increases the gain in the fiber laser system. The proposal would expand the basic concept of this type of optimization to incorporate exploitation of the properties (including, in some cases, nonlinearities) of PBG materials to obtain power levels and efficiencies higher than are now possible. Another element of the proposal is to enable pumping by concentrated sunlight. Somewhat more specifically, the proposal calls for exploitation of the properties of PBG materials to overcome a number of stubborn adverse phenomena that have impeded prior efforts to perfect HPFLs. The most relevant of those phenomena is amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), which causes saturation of gain and power

  5. Study on the anisotropic photonic band gaps in three-dimensional tunable photonic crystals containing the epsilon-negative materials and uniaxial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Li, Bing-Xiang

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the properties of anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) for three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals (PCs) composed of the anisotropic positive-index materials (the uniaxial materials) and the epsilon-negative (ENG) materials with body-centered-cubic (bcc) lattices are theoretically studied by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method, which are the uniaxial materials spheres inserted in the epsilon-negative materials background. The anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) and one flatbands region can be achieved in first irreducible Brillouin zone. The influences of the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, the electronic plasma frequency, the dielectric constant of ENG materials and the damping factor on the properties of anisotropic PBGs for such 3D PCs are studied in detail, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. The numerical results show that the anisotropy can open partial band gaps in such 3D PCs with bcc lattices composed of the ENG materials and uniaxial materials, and the complete PBGs can be obtained compared to the conventional 3D PCs containing the isotropic materials. The calculated results also show that the anisotropic PBGs can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above except for the damping factor. Introducing the uniaxial materials into 3D PCs containing the ENG materials can obtain the larger complete PBGs as such 3D PCs with high symmetry, and also provides a way to design the tunable devices.

  6. Fabrication of 3-D Photonic Band Gap Crystals Via Colloidal Self-Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramaniam, Girija; Blank, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of photons in a Photonic Crystals, PCs, is like that of electrons in a semiconductor in that, it prohibits light propagation over a band of frequencies, called Photonic Band Gap, PBG. Photons cannot exist in these band gaps like the forbidden bands of electrons. Thus, PCs lend themselves as potential candidates for devices based on the gap phenomenon. The popular research on PCs stem from their ability to confine light with minimal losses. Large scale 3-D PCs with a PBG in the visible or near infra red region will make optical transistors and sharp bent optical fibers. Efforts are directed to use PCs for information processing and it is not long before we can have optical integrated circuits in the place of electronic ones.

  7. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Roark A.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  8. A surprising content of congenital hernia: complete splenogonadal fusion band.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Prakash Manikka; Reddy, Ajit Kumar; Nutakki, Aditya

    2014-03-26

    Splenogonadal fusion is a rare congenital anomaly. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with a left inguinoscrotal swelling. With a clinical diagnosis of left congenital inguinal hernia the patient was taken up for explorative laparotomy where a transperitoneal band was noted adherent to the left testis. Biopsy revealed normal splenic tissue. Postoperatively the boy was imaged and a diagnosis of splenogonadal fusion was made. This article illustrates the imaging features of this rare anomaly.

  9. A surprising content of congenital hernia: complete splenogonadal fusion band

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Prakash Manikka; Reddy, Ajit Kumar; Nutakki, Aditya

    2014-01-01

    Splenogonadal fusion is a rare congenital anomaly. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with a left inguinoscrotal swelling. With a clinical diagnosis of left congenital inguinal hernia the patient was taken up for explorative laparotomy where a transperitoneal band was noted adherent to the left testis. Biopsy revealed normal splenic tissue. Postoperatively the boy was imaged and a diagnosis of splenogonadal fusion was made. This article illustrates the imaging features of this rare anomaly. PMID:24671325

  10. Investigation on the properties of omnidirectional photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Li, Bing-Xiang

    2016-01-15

    The properties of omnidirectional photonic band gaps (OBGs) in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (2D PPCs) are theoretically investigated by the modified plane wave expansion method. In the simulation, we consider the off-plane incident wave vector. The configuration of 2D PPCs is the triangular lattices filled with the nonmagnetized plasma cylinders in the homogeneous and isotropic dielectric background. The calculated results show that the proposed 2D PPCs possess a flatbands region and the OBGs. Compared with the OBGs in the conventional 2D dielectric-air PCs, it can be obtained more easily and enlarged in the 2D PPCs with a similar structure. The effects of configurational parameters of the PPCs on the OBGs also are studied. The simulated results demonstrate that the locations of OBGs can be tuned easily by manipulating those parameters except for changing plasma collision frequency. The achieved OBGs can be enlarged by optimizations. The OBGs of two novel configurations of PPCs with different cross sections are computed for a comparison. Both configurations have the advantages of obtaining the larger OBGs compared with the conventional configuration, since the symmetry of 2D PPCs is broken by different sizes of periodically inserted plasma cylinders or connected by the embedded plasma cylinders with thin veins. The analysis of the results shows that the bandwidths of OBGs can be tuned by changing geometric and physical parameters of such two PPCs structures. The theoretical results may open a new scope for designing the omnidirectional reflectors or mirrors based on the 2D PPCs.

  11. Field demonstration of X-band photonic antenna remoting in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Lutes, G.; Logan, R. T., Jr.; Maleki, L.

    1994-01-01

    We designed a photonic link for antenna remoting based on our integrated system analysis. With this 12-km link, we successfully demonstrated photonic antenna-remoting capability at X-band (8.4 GHz) at one of NASA's Deep Space Stations while tracking the Magellan spacecraft.

  12. Photonics aided ultra-wideband W-band signal generation and air space transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-02-01

    We achieve several field trial demonstrations of ultra-wideband W-band millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signal generation and its long-distance air space transmission based on some enabling technologies and advanced devices. First, we demonstrated photonics generation and up to 1.7-km wireless delivery of 20-Gb/s polarization division multiplexing quadrature phase shift keying (PDM-QPSK) signal at W-band, adopting both optical and antenna polarization multiplexing. Then, we demonstrated photonics generation and up to 300-m wireless delivery of 80-Gb/s PDM-QPSK signal at W-band, adopting both optical and antenna polarization multiplexing as well as multi-band multiplexing. We also demonstrated photonics generation and up to 100-m wireless delivery of 100-Gb/s QPSK signal at W-band, adopting antenna polarization multiplexing.

  13. First High power test results for 2.1 GHz superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavities.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Haynes, W Brian; Madrid, Michael A; Romero, Frank P; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Tuzel, Walter M; Boulware, Chase H; Grimm, Terry L

    2012-10-19

    We report the results of the recent high power testing of superconducting radio frequency photonic band gap (PBG) accelerator cells. Tests of the two single-cell 2.1 GHz cavities were performed at both 4 and 2 K. An accelerating gradient of 15 MV/m and an unloaded quality factor Q(0) of 4×10(9) were achieved. It has been long realized that PBG structures have great potential in reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. A PBG structure confines the fundamental TM(01)-like accelerating mode, but does not support higher order modes. Employing PBG cavities to filter out higher order modes in superconducting particle accelerators will allow suppression of dangerous beam instabilities caused by wakefields and thus operation at higher frequencies and significantly higher beam luminosities. This may lead towards a completely new generation of colliders for high energy physics and energy recovery linacs for the free-electron lasers.

  14. Complete Esophageal Obstruction after Endoscopic Variceal Band Ligation in a Patient with a Sliding Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Munthir; Abdel-Aziz, Yousef; Awadh, Hesham; Shah, Nihar

    2017-01-01

    Complete esophageal obstruction is a rare complication of endoscopic variceal banding, with only 6 cases in the English literature since the introduction of endoscopic variceal banding in 1986. We report a case of complete esophageal obstruction following esophageal banding due to entrapment of part of a sliding hiatal hernia. To our knowledge, our case is one of few with esophageal obstruction post-banding, and the first associated with a hiatal hernia. We recommend caution when performing esophageal banding on patients with a hiatal hernia. PMID:28144613

  15. Enhanced third-harmonic generation in photonic crystals at band-gap pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Stanislav O.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Gorbunov, Evgeny A.; Yakovlev, Egor V.; Zotov, Arsen K.; Masalov, Vladimir M.; Emelchenko, Gennadi A.; Gorelik, Vladimir S.

    2017-02-01

    More than one order enhancement of third-harmonic generation is observed experimentally at band-gap pumping of globular photonic crystals. Due to a lateral modulation of the dielectric permittivity in two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals, sharp peaks of light intensity (light localization) arise in the media at the band-gap pumping. The light localization enhances significantly the nonlinear light conversion, in particular, third-harmonic generation, in the near-surface volume of photonic crystal. The observed way to enhance the nonlinear conversion can be useful for creation of novel compact elements of nonlinear and laser optics.

  16. Large-scale synthesis of a silicon photonic crystal with a complete three-dimensional bandgap near 1.5 micrometres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Alvaro; Chomski, Emmanuel; Grabtchak, Serguei; Ibisate, Marta; John, Sajeev; Leonard, Stephen W.; Lopez, Cefe; Meseguer, Francisco; Miguez, Hernan; Mondia, Jessica P.; Ozin, Geoffrey A.; Toader, Ovidiu; van Driel, Henry M.

    2000-05-01

    Photonic technology, using light instead of electrons as the information carrier, is increasingly replacing electronics in communication and information management systems. Microscopic light manipulation, for this purpose, is achievable through photonic bandgap materials, a special class of photonic crystals in which three-dimensional, periodic dielectric constant variations controllably prohibit electromagnetic propagation throughout a specified frequency band. This can result in the localization of photons, thus providing a mechanism for controlling and inhibiting spontaneous light emission that can be exploited for photonic device fabrication. In fact, carefully engineered line defects could act as waveguides connecting photonic devices in all-optical microchips, and infiltration of the photonic material with suitable liquid crystals might produce photonic bandgap structures (and hence light-flow patterns) fully tunable by an externally applied voltage. However, the realization of this technology requires a strategy for the efficient synthesis of high-quality, large-scale photonic crystals with photonic bandgaps at micrometre and sub-micrometre wavelengths, and with rationally designed line and point defects for optical circuitry. Here we describe single crystals of silicon inverse opal with a complete three-dimensional photonic bandgap centred on 1.46µm, produced by growing silicon inside the voids of an opal template of close-packed silica spheres that are connected by small `necks' formed during sintering, followed by removal of the silica template. The synthesis method is simple and inexpensive, yielding photonic crystals of pure silicon that are easily integrated with existing silicon-based microelectronics.

  17. Photonic band structure of dielectric membranes periodically textured in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacradouni, V.; Mandeville, W. J.; Cowan, A. R.; Paddon, P.; Young, Jeff F.; Johnson, S. R.

    2000-08-01

    The real and imaginary photonic band structure of modes attached to two-dimensionally textured semiconductor membranes is determined experimentally and theoretically. These porous waveguides exhibit large (1000 cm-1 at 9500 cm-1) second-order optical gaps, highly dispersive lifetimes, and bands with well-defined polarization along directions of high symmetry.

  18. Flat and self-trapping photonic bands through coupling of two unidirectional edge modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yun-tuan; He, Han-Qing; Hu, Jian-xia; Chen, Lin-kun; Wen, Zhang

    2015-03-01

    We find a flat band and a self-trapping band through the coupling of two unidirectional edge modes, which was originally achieved by Wang et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 013905 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.013905; Nature 461, 772 (2009), 10.1038/nature08293] in two-dimensional magneto-optical photonic crystals. We break up a square-lattice yttrium-iron-garnet photonic crystal forming a waveguide and two edges. Given a proper interval of the two edges, two unidirectional edge modes with opposite group velocity directions can be coupled. The coupling leads to a wide flat band in which the group velocity is near zero, and a self-trapping band in which light is totally localized around the source. The position of the flat band and the group velocity can be adjusted by the external magnetic field. Numerical simulations and theoretical analysis both demonstrate the two interesting band structures.

  19. Analysis of plasma-magnetic photonic crystal with a tunable band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdian, H.; Mohammadzahery, Z.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, electromagnetic wave propagation through the one-dimensional plasma-magnetic photonic crystal in the presence of external magnetic field has been analyzed. The dispersion relation, transmission and reflection coefficients have been obtained by using the transfer matrix method. It is investigated how photonic band gap of photonic crystals will be tuned when both dielectric function {epsilon} and magnetic permeability {mu} of the constitutive materials, depend on applied magnetic field. This is shown by one dimensional photonic crystals consisting of plasma and ferrite material layers stacked alternately.

  20. Localization and characterization of the metallic band gaps in a ternary metallo-dielectric photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo-Molina, Adalberto; Romero-Antequera, David L.; Sánchez-Mondragón, José J.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the existence of structural metallic band gaps in a ternary material, dielectric-dielectric-metal, and we show analytical equations for their computation. We show the existence of metallic band gaps not only in the lowest band but also for high frequencies. These gaps are structural ones but different and additional to the dielectric ones in the dielectric photonic crystal substrate. Therefore, as the desire properties of both, the dielectric and metallic photonic crystals, are present the applications for this particular structure are straightforward.

  1. Photonic Band Gap Structures as a Gateway to Nano-Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    FRITZ, IAN J.; GOURLEY, PAUL L.; HAMMONS, G.; HIETALA, VINCENT M.; JONES, ERIC D.; KLEM, JOHN F.; KURTZ, SHARON L.; LIN, SHAWN-YU; LYO, SUNGKWUN K.; VAWTER, GREGORY A.; WENDT, JOEL R.

    1999-08-01

    This LDRD project explored the fundamental physics of a new class of photonic materials, photonic bandgap structures (PBG), and examine its unique properties for the design and implementation of photonic devices on a nano-meter length scale for the control and confinement of light. The low loss, highly reflective and quantum interference nature of a PBG material makes it one of the most promising candidates for realizing an extremely high-Q resonant cavity, >10,000, for optoelectronic applications and for the exploration of novel photonic physics, such as photonic localization, tunneling and modification of spontaneous emission rate. Moreover, the photonic bandgap concept affords us with a new opportunity to design and tailor photonic properties in very much the same way we manipulate, or bandgap engineer, electronic properties through modern epitaxy.

  2. Analysis of Photonic Band Gaps in a Two-Dimensional Triangular Lattice with Superconducting Hollow Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Valencia, B. F.; Calero, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we use the plane wave expansion method to calculate photonic band structures in two-dimensional photonic crystals which consist of high-temperature superconducting hollow rods arranged in a triangular lattice. The variation of the photonic band structure with respect to both, the inner radius and the system temperature, is studied, taking into account temperatures below the critical temperature of the superconductor in the low frequencies regime and assuming E polarization of the incident light. Permittivity contrast and nontrivial geometry of the hollow rods lead to the appearance of new band gaps as compared with the case of solid cylinders. Such band gaps can be modulated by means of the inner radius and system temperature.

  3. Design of a three-dimensional photonic band gap cavity in a diamondlike inverse woodpile photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldering, Léon A.; Mosk, Allard P.; Vos, Willem L.

    2014-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the design of cavities in a three-dimensional (3D) inverse woodpile photonic crystal. This class of cubic diamondlike crystals has a very broad photonic band gap and consists of two perpendicular arrays of pores with a rectangular structure. The point defect that acts as a cavity is centered on the intersection of two intersecting perpendicular pores with a radius that differs from the ones in the bulk of the crystal. We have performed supercell band structure calculations with up to 5×5×5 unit cells. We find that up to five isolated and dispersionless bands appear within the 3D photonic band gap. For each isolated band, the electric-field energy is localized in a volume centered on the point defect, hence the point defect acts as a 3D photonic band gap cavity. The mode volume of the cavities resonances is as small as 0.8 λ3 (resonance wavelength cubed), indicating a strong confinement of the light. By varying the radius of the defect pores we found that only donorlike resonances appear for smaller defect radius, whereas no acceptorlike resonances appear for greater defect radius. From a 3D plot of the distribution of the electric-field energy density we conclude that peaks of energy are found in sharp edges situated at the point defect, similar to how electrons collect at such features. This is different from what is observed for cavities in noninverted woodpile structures. Since inverse woodpile crystals can be fabricated from silicon by CMOS-compatible means, we project that single cavities and even cavity arrays can be realized, for wavelength ranges compatible with telecommunication windows in the near infrared.

  4. Achieving omnidirectional photonic band gap in sputter deposited TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} one dimensional photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Jena, S. Tokas, R. B.; Sarkar, P.; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K.; Haque, S. Maidul; Misal, J. S.; Rao, K. D.

    2015-06-24

    The multilayer structure of TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} (11 layers) as one dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC) has been designed and then fabricated by using asymmetric bipolar pulse DC magnetron sputtering technique for omnidirectional photonic band gap. The experimentally measured photonic band gap (PBG) in the visible region is well matched with the theoretically calculated band structure (ω vs. k) diagram. The experimentally measured omnidirectional reflection band of 44 nm over the incident angle range of 0°-70° is found almost matching within the theoretically calculated band.

  5. Band gap characterization and slow light effects in periodic and quasiperiodic one dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghdoudi, J.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Kanzari, M.; Rezig, B.

    2008-04-01

    Slow light offers many opportunities for photonic devices by increasing the effective interaction length of imposed refractive index changes. The slow wave effect in photonic crystals is based on their unique dispersive properties and thus entirely dielectric in nature. In this work we demonstrate an interesting opportunity to decrease drastically the group velocity of light in one-dimensional photonic crystals constructed form materials with large dielectric constant without dispersion). We use numerical analysis to study the photonic properties of periodic (Bragg mirror) and quasiperiodic one dimensional photonic crystals realized to engineer slow light effects. Various geometries of the photonic pattern have been characterized and their photonic band-gap structure analyzed. Indeed, one dimensional quasi periodic photonic multilayer structure based on Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and Cantor sequences were studied. Quasiperiodic structures have a rich and highly fragmented reflectivity spectrum with many sharp resonant peaks that could be exploited in a microcavity system. A comparison of group velocity through periodic and quasiperiodic photonic crystals was discussed in the context of slow light propagation. The velocity control of pulses in materials is one of the promising applications of photonic crystals. The material systems used for the numerical analysis are TiO II/SiO II and Te/SiO II which have a refractive index contrast of approximately 1.59 and 3.17 respectively. The proposed structures were modelled using the Transfer Matrix Method.

  6. Complete three photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interference at a three port device.

    PubMed

    Mährlein, Simon; von Zanthier, Joachim; Agarwal, Girish S

    2015-06-15

    We report the possibility of completely destructive interference of three indistinguishable photons on a three port device providing a generalisation of the well known Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of two indistinguishable photons on a two port device. Our analysis is based on the underlying mathematical framework of SU(3) transformations rather than SU(2) transformations. We show the completely destructive three photon interference for a large range of parameters of the three port device and point out the physical origin of such interference in terms of the contributions from different quantum paths. As each output port can deliver zero to three photons the device generates higher dimensional entanglement. In particular, different forms of entangled states of qudits can be generated depending on the device parameters. Our system is different from a symmetric three port beam splitter which does not exhibit a three photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interference.

  7. Energy transfer from Rhodamine-B to Oxazine-170 in the presence of photonic stop band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Sunita; Sinha, Sucharita

    2015-03-01

    Photonic crystals can effectively suppress spontaneous emission of embedded emitter in the direction were photonic stop band overlaps emission band of emitter. This property of PhC has been successfully exploited to enhance energy transfer from a donor Rhodamine-B dye to an acceptor Oxazine-170 dye by inhibiting the fluorescence emission of donor in a controlled manner. Self-assembled PhC were synthesized using RhB dye doped polystyrene microspheres subsequently infiltrated with O-170 dye molecules dissolved in ethanol. An angle dependent enhancement of emission intensity of acceptor via energy transfer in photonic crystal environment was observed. These results were compared with observations made on a dye mixture solution of the same two dyes. Restricted number of available modes in photonic crystal inhibited de-excitation of donor thereby enabling efficient transfer of energy from excited donor to acceptor dye molecules.

  8. Fabrication of Ceramic Layer-by-Layer Infrared Wavelength Photonic Band Gap Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Henry Hao-Chuan

    2004-12-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals, also known as photonic crystals, are periodic dielectric structures which form a photonic band gap that prohibit the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves of certain frequencies at any incident angles. Photonic crystals have several potential applications including zero-threshold semiconductor lasers, the inhibition of spontaneous emission, dielectric mirrors, and wavelength filters. If defect states are introduced in the crystals, light can be guided from one location to another or even a sharp bending of light in micron scale can be achieved. This generates the potential for optical waveguide and optical circuits, which will contribute to the improvement in the fiber-optic communications and the development of high-speed computers.

  9. Method of manufacturing flexible metallic photonic band gap structures, and structures resulting therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Sandhya; Tuttle, Gary L.; Sigalas, Mihail; McCalmont, Jonathan S.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2001-08-14

    A method of manufacturing a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable in the infrared region, comprises the steps of spinning on a first layer of dielectric on a GaAs substrate, imidizing this first layer of dielectric, forming a first metal pattern on this first layer of dielectric, spinning on and imidizing a second layer of dielectric, and then removing the GaAs substrate. This method results in a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable with various filter characteristics in the infrared region. This method may be used to construct multi-layer flexible metallic photonic band gap structures. Metal grid defects and dielectric separation layer thicknesses are adjusted to control filter parameters.

  10. Low-frequency photonic band structures in graphene-like triangular metallic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang

    2016-11-01

    We study the low frequency photonic band structures in triangular metallic lattice, displaying Dirac points in the frequency spectrum, and constructed upon the lowest order regular polygonal tiles. We show that, in spite of the unfavourable geometrical conditions intrinsic to the structure symmetry, the lowest frequency photonic bands are formed by resonance modes sustained by local structure patterns, with the corresponding electric fields following a triangular distribution at low structure filling rate and a honeycomb distribution at high filling rate. For both cases, the lowest photonic bands, and thus the plasma gap, can be described in the framework of a tight binding model, and analysed in terms of local resonance modes and their mutual correlations. At high filling rate, the Dirac points and their movement following the structure deformation are described in the same framework, in relation with local structure patterns and their variations, as well as the particularity of the metallic lattice that enhances the topological anisotropy.

  11. Quantum speedup of an atom coupled to a photonic-band-gap reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Nan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Han-Zhuang

    2017-01-01

    For a model of an atom embedded in a photonic-band-gap reservoir, it was found that the speedup of quantum evolution is subject to the atomic frequency changes. In this work, we propose different points of view on speeding up the evolution. We show that the atomic embedded position, the width of the band gap and the defect mode also play an important role in accelerating the evolution. By changing the embedded position of the atom and the coupling strength with the defect mode, the speedup region lies even outside the band-gap region, where the non-Markovian effect is weak. The mechanism for the speedup is due to the interplay of atomic excited population and the non-Markovianity. The feasible experimental system composed of quantum dots in the photonic crystal is discussed. These results provide new degree of freedoms to depress the quantum speed limit time in photonic crystals.

  12. Zero-coupling-gap degenerate band edge resonators in silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Burr, Justin R; Reano, Ronald M

    2015-11-30

    Resonances near regular photonic band edges are limited by quality factors that scale only to the third power of the number of periods. In contrast, resonances near degenerate photonic band edges can scale to the fifth power of the number periods, yielding a route to significant device miniaturization. For applications in silicon integrated photonics, we present the design and analysis of zero-coupling-gap degenerate band edge resonators. Complex band diagrams are computed for the unit cell with periodic boundary conditions that convey characteristics of propagating and evanescent modes. Dispersion features of the band diagram are used to describe changes in resonance scaling in finite length resonators. Resonators with non-zero and zero coupling gap are compared. Analysis of quality factor and resonance frequency indicates significant reduction in the number of periods required to observe fifth power scaling when degenerate band edge resonators are realized with zero-coupling-gap. High transmission is achieved by optimizing the waveguide feed to the resonator. Compact band edge cavities with large optical field distribution are envisioned for light emitters, switches, and sensors.

  13. Differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution using heralded narrow-band single photons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Zhang, Shanchao; Zhao, Luwei; Chen, Peng; Fung, C-H F; Chau, H F; Loy, M M T; Du, Shengwang

    2013-04-22

    We demonstrate the first proof of principle differential phase shift (DPS) quantum key distribution (QKD) using narrow-band heralded single photons with amplitude-phase modulations. In the 3-pulse case, we obtain a quantum bit error rate (QBER) as low as 3.06% which meets the unconditional security requirement. As we increase the pulse number up to 15, the key creation efficiency approaches 93.4%, but with a cost of increasing the QBER. Our result suggests that narrow-band single photons maybe a promising source for the DPS-QKD protocol.

  14. Systematic design of flat band slow light in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Li, Juntao; White, Thomas P; O'Faolain, Liam; Gomez-Iglesias, Alvaro; Krauss, Thomas F

    2008-04-28

    We present a systematic procedure for designing "flat bands" of photonic crystal waveguides for slow light propagation. The procedure aims to maximize the group index - bandwidth product by changing the position of the first two rows of holes of W1 line defect photonic crystal waveguides. A nearly constant group index - bandwidth product is achieved for group indices of 30-90 and as an example, we experimentally demonstrate flat band slow light with nearly constant group indices of 32.5, 44 and 49 over 14 nm, 11 nm and 9.5 nm bandwidth around 1550 nm, respectively.

  15. Full band structure calculation of two-photon indirect absorption in bulk silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J. L.; Rioux, J.; Sipe, J. E.

    2011-03-28

    Degenerate two-photon indirect absorption in silicon is an important limiting effect on the use of silicon structures for all-optical information processing at telecommunication wavelengths. We perform a full band structure calculation to investigate two-photon indirect absorption in bulk silicon, using a pseudopotential description of the energy bands and an adiabatic bond charge model to describe phonon dispersion and polarization. Our results agree well with some recent experimental results. The transverse acoustic/optical phonon-assisted processes dominate.

  16. Photonic crystal alloys: a new twist in controlling photonic band structure properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Dong-Uk; Roh, Young-Geun; Yu, Jaejun; Jeon, Heonsu; Park, Q-Han

    2008-04-28

    We identified new photonic structures and phenomenon that are analogous to alloy crystals and the associated electronic bandgap engineering. From a set of diamond-lattice microwave photonic crystals of randomly mixed silica and alumina spheres but with a well defined mixing composition, we observed that both bandedges of the L-point bandgap monotonically shifted with very little bowing as the composition was varied. The observed results were in excellent agreement with the virtual crystal approximation theory originally developed for electronic properties of alloy crystals. This result signifies the similarity and correspondence between photonics and electronics.

  17. Generation of Narrow-Band Polarization-Entangled Photon Pairs at a Rubidium D1 Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Long; Li, Shujing; Yuan, Haoxiang; Wang, Hai

    2016-12-01

    Using the process of cavity-enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC), we generate a narrow-band polarization-entangled photon pair resonant on the rubidium (Rb) D1 line (795 nm). The degenerate single-mode photon pair is selected by multiple temperature controlled etalons. The linewidth of generated polarization-entangled photon pairs is 15 MHz which matches the typical atomic memory bandwidth. The measured Bell parameter for the polarization-entangled photons S = 2.73 ± 0.04 which violates the Bell-CHSH inequality by ˜18 standard deviations. The presented entangled photon pair source could be utilized in quantum communication and quantum computing based on quantum memories in atomic ensemble.

  18. Nonequilibrium Band Mapping of Unoccupied Bulk States below the Vacuum Level by Two-Photon Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.D.; Hao, Z.; Dadap, J.I.; Knox, K.R.; Yilmaz, M.B.; Zaki, N.; Osgood, R.M.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate angle-resolved, tunable, two-photon photoemission (2PPE) to map a bulk unoccupied band, viz. the Cu sp band 0 to 1 eV below the vacuum level, in the vicinity of the L point. This short-lived bulk band is seen due to the strong optical pump rate, and the observed transition energies and their dispersion with photon energy {h_bar}{omega}, are in excellent agreement with tight-binding band-structure calculations. The variation of the final-state energy with {h_bar}{omega} has a measured slope of -1.64 in contrast to values of 1 or 2 observed for 2PPE from two-dimensional states. This unique variation illustrates the significant role of the perpendicular momentum {h_bar}k{perpendicular} in 2PPE.

  19. Nonequilibrium Band Mapping of Unoccupied Bulk States below the Vacuum Level by Two-Photon Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Zhaofeng; Dadap, J. I.; Knox, K. R.; Zaki, N.; Osgood, R. M.; Yilmaz, M. B.; Johnson, P. D.

    2010-07-02

    We demonstrate angle-resolved, tunable, two-photon photoemission (2PPE) to map a bulk unoccupied band, viz. the Cu sp band 0 to 1 eV below the vacuum level, in the vicinity of the L point. This short-lived bulk band is seen due to the strong optical pump rate, and the observed transition energies and their dispersion with photon energy ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}, are in excellent agreement with tight-binding band-structure calculations. The variation of the final-state energy with ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega} has a measured slope of {approx}1.64 in contrast to values of 1 or 2 observed for 2PPE from two-dimensional states. This unique variation illustrates the significant role of the perpendicular momentum ({h_bar}/2{pi})k{sub perpendicular} in 2PPE.

  20. Diamond Opal-Replica Photonic Crystals and Graphitic Metallic Photonic Band Gap Structures: Fabrication and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhidov, A. A.; Baughman, R. H.; Iqbal, Z.; Khayrullin, I. I.; Ralchenko, V. G.

    1998-03-01

    We demonstrate a new method for the formation of photonic bandgap crystals that operate at optical wavelengths. This method involves the templating of a self-assempled SiO2 lattice with diamond, graphite, or amorphous forms of carbon, followed by the removal of the original SiO2 lattice matrix by chemical means. Such carbon opal replicas are the "air type" of photonic crystal (where air replaces silica spheres) that are most favourable for photonic bandgap formation. Surprisingly, the structure of the original opal lattice having a typical cubic lattice dimension of 250 nm) is reliably replicated down to the nanometer scale using either a diamond, graphite, or amorphous carbon templated material. The optical properties of these photonic bandgap crystals are reported and compared with both theory and experimental results on other types of opal-derived lattices that we have investigated. The graphitic reverse opal is the first example of a network type metallic photonic crystal for the optical domain, for which a large photonic bandgap have been predicted.

  1. Omnidirectional photonic band gap enlarged by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haifeng; Liu Shaobin; Kong Xiangkun; Bian Borui; Dai Yi

    2012-11-15

    In this paper, an omnidirectional photonic band gap realized by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure, which is composed of homogeneous unmagnetized plasma and two kinds of isotropic dielectric, is theoretically studied by the transfer matrix method. It has been shown that such an omnidirectional photonic band gap originates from Bragg gap in contrast to zero-n gap or single negative (negative permittivity or negative permeability) gap, and it is insensitive to the incidence angle and the polarization of electromagnetic wave. From the numerical results, the frequency range and central frequency of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be tuned by the thickness and density of the plasma but cease to change with increasing Fibonacci order. The bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be notably enlarged. Moreover, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap. It is shown that such new structure Fibonacci quasiperiodic one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals have a superior feature in the enhancement of frequency range of omnidirectional photonic band gap compared with the conventional ternary and conventional Fibonacci quasiperiodic ternary plasma photonic crystals.

  2. Complete Acoustic Stop-Bands in 2-D Periodic Arrays of Liquid Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, M. S.; Halevi, P.

    1996-03-01

    Periodic binary systems can give rise to complete acoustic band--gaps (i.e. stop--bands) within which sound and vibrations are forbidden. We compute the band structure for 2D periodic arrays of long water cylinders surrounded by mercury. We have neglected the wall (latex) material needed to hold the liquid, assuming that it is sufficiently light and thin. Complete acoustic stop--bands are found for both square and hexagonal lattices. We emphasize that such a simple 2D inhomogeneous system of liquids exhibits the widest stop--bands ever reported for elastic as well as for dielectric composites. We find gap/midgap ratios as high as ~ 1. For mercury cylinders surrounded by water the gaps obtained are much smaller.

  3. Research on Shore-Ship Photonic Link Performance for Two- Frequency-Band Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yanqin; Cong, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Ka and Ku bands links for shore-ship communications suffer limited bandwidth and high loss. In this paper, photonics-based links are proposed and modeled. The principle of phase modulation (PM) is elaborated and analyzed. It is showed that PM can effectively suppress high-order inter-modulation distortion (IMD), reduce the insert loss and improve the reliability of the system.

  4. Photonic band-gap formation by optical-phase-mask lithography.

    PubMed

    Chan, Timothy Y M; Toader, Ovidiu; John, Sajeev

    2006-04-01

    We demonstrate an approach for fabricating photonic crystals with large three-dimensional photonic band gaps (PBG's) using single-exposure, single-beam, optical interference lithography based on diffraction of light through an optical phase mask. The optical phase mask (OPM) consists of two orthogonally oriented binary gratings joined by a thin, solid layer of homogeneous material. Illuminating the phase mask with a normally incident beam produces a five-beam diffraction pattern which can be used to expose a suitable photoresist and produce a photonic crystal template. Optical-phase-mask Lithography (OPML) is a major simplification from the previously considered multibeam holographic lithography of photonic crystals. The diffracted five-beam intensity pattern exhibits isointensity surfaces corresponding to a diamondlike (face-centered-cubic) structure, with high intensity contrast. When the isointensity surfaces in the interference patterns define a silicon-air boundary in the resulting photonic crystal, with dielectric contrast 11.9 to 1, the optimized PBG is approximately 24% of the gap center frequency. The ideal index contrast for the OPM is in the range of 1.7-2.3. Below this range, the intensity contrast of the diffraction pattern becomes too weak. Above this range, the diffraction pattern may become too sensitive to structural imperfections of the OPM. When combined with recently demonstrated polymer-to-silicon replication methods, OPML provides a highly efficient approach, of unprecedented simplicity, for the mass production of large-scale three-dimensional photonic band-gap materials.

  5. Experimental Generation of Narrow-Band Paired Photons: from Damped Rabi Oscillation to Group Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kai-Yu; Yan, Hui; He, Jun-Yu; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Zhu, Shi-Liang

    2014-03-01

    We report the experimental generation of narrow-band paired photons through electromagnetically induced transparency and spontaneous four-wave mixing in a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap (2D MOT). By controlling the optical depth of the 2D MOT from 0 to 40, the temporal length of the generated narrow-band paired photons can be varied from 50 to 900 ns. The ‘transition’ between damped Rabi oscillation and group delay is observed undisputedly. In the damped Rabi oscillation regime, a violation factor of the Cauchy—Schwartz inequality as large as 6642 is observed. In the group delay regime, sub-MHz linewidth (~ 0.65 MHz) paired photons are obtained with a generation rate of about 0.8 × 105 s-1.

  6. Ground-based Photon Path Measurements from Solar Absorption Spectra of the O2 A-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Z.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cageao, R. P.; Pongetti, T. J.; Toon, G. C.; Sander, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution solar absorption spectra obtained from Table Mountain Facility (TMF, 34.38degN, 117.68degW, 2286 m elevation) have been analyzed in the region of the O2 A-band. The photon paths of direct sunlight in clear sky cases are retrieved from the O2 absorption lines and compared with ray-tracing calculations based on the solar zenith angle and surface pressure. At a given zenith angle, the ratios of retrieved to geometrically derived photon paths are highly precise (approx.0.2%), but they vary as the zenith angle changes. This is because current models of the spectral lineshape in this band do not properly account for the significant absorption that exists far from the centers of saturated lines. For example, use of a Voigt function with Lorentzian far wings results in an error in the retrieved photon path of as much as 5%, highly correlated with solar zenith angle. Adopting a super-Lorentz function reduces, but does not completely eliminate this problem. New lab measurements of the lineshape are required to make further progress.

  7. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome

    2001-01-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.

  8. Design of two-dimensional photonic crystals with large absolute band gaps using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Linfang; Ye, Zhuo; He, Sailing

    2003-07-01

    A two-stage genetic algorithm (GA) with a floating mutation probability is developed to design a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal of a square lattice with the maximal absolute band gap. The unit cell is divided equally into many square pixels, and each filling pattern of pixels with two dielectric materials corresponds to a chromosome consisting of binary digits 0 and 1. As a numerical example, the two-stage GA gives a 2D GaAs structure with a relative width of the absolute band gap of about 19%. After further optimization, a new 2D GaAs photonic crystal is found with an absolute band gap much larger than those reported before.

  9. 160 Gbit/s photonics wireless transmission in the 300-500 GHz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Jia, S.; Hu, H.; Galili, M.; Morioka, T.; Jepsen, P. U.; Oxenløwe, L. K.

    2016-11-01

    To accommodate the ever increasing wireless traffic in the access networks, considerable efforts have been recently invested in developing photonics-assisted wireless communication systems with very high data rates. Superior to photonic millimeter-wave systems, terahertz (THz) band (300 GHz-10 THz) provides a much larger bandwidth and thus promises an extremely high capacity. However, the capacity potential of THz wireless systems has by no means been achieved yet. Here, we successfully demonstrate 160 Gbit/s wireless transmission by using a single THz emitter and modulating 25 GHz spaced 8 channels (20 Gbps per channel) in the 300-500 GHz band, which is the highest bitrate in the frequency band above 300 GHz, to the best of our knowledge.

  10. Detailed Study of the TE band structure of two dimensional metallic photonic crystals with square symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedghi, Aliasghar; Valiaghaie, Soma; Soufiani, Ahad Rounaghi

    2014-10-01

    By virtue of the efficiency of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map method, we have calculated, for H-polarization (TE mode), the band structure of 2D photonic crystals with a square lattice composed of metallic rods embedded in an air background. The rod in the unit cell is chosen to be circular in shape. Here, from a practical point of view, in order to obtain maximum band gaps, we have studied the band structure as a function of the size of the rods. We have also studied the flat bands appearing in the band structures and have shown that for frequencies around the surface plasmon frequency, the modes are highly localized at the interface between the metallic rods and the air background.

  11. Hydrogen production by tuning the photonic band gap with the electronic band gap of TiO₂.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, G I N; Wahab, A K; Al-Oufi, M; Jovic, V; Anjum, D H; Sun-Waterhouse, D; Llorca, J; Idriss, H

    2013-10-10

    Tuning the photonic band gap (PBG) to the electronic band gap (EBG) of Au/TiO2 catalysts resulted in considerable enhancement of the photocatalytic water splitting to hydrogen under direct sunlight. Au/TiO2 (PBG-357 nm) photocatalyst exhibited superior photocatalytic performance under both UV and sunlight compared to the Au/TiO2 (PBG-585 nm) photocatalyst and both are higher than Au/TiO2 without the 3 dimensionally ordered macro-porous structure materials. The very high photocatalytic activity is attributed to suppression of a fraction of electron-hole recombination route due to the co-incidence of the PBG with the EBG of TiO2 These materials that maintain their activity with very small amount of sacrificial agents (down to 0.5 vol.% of ethanol) are poised to find direct applications because of their high activity, low cost of the process, simplicity and stability.

  12. Spin polarized photons from an axially charged plasma at weak coupling: Complete leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Mamo, Kiminad A.; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2016-03-24

    In the presence of (approximately conserved) axial charge in the QCD plasma at finite temperature, the emitted photons are spin aligned, which is a unique P- and CP-odd signature of axial charge in the photon emission observables. We compute this “P-odd photon emission rate” in a weak coupling regime at a high temperature limit to complete leading order in the QCD coupling constant: the leading log as well as the constant under the log. As in the P-even total emission rate in the literature, the computation of the P-odd emission rate at leading order consists of three parts: (1) Compton and pair annihilation processes with hard momentum exchange, (2) soft t- and u-channel contributions with hard thermal loop resummation, (3) Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal resummation of collinear bremsstrahlung and pair annihilation. In conclusion, we present analytical and numerical evaluations of these contributions to our P-odd photon emission rate observable.

  13. Spin polarized photons from an axially charged plasma at weak coupling: Complete leading order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamo, Kiminad A.; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2016-03-01

    In the presence of (approximately conserved) axial charge in the QCD plasma at finite temperature, the emitted photons are spin aligned, which is a unique P - and C P -odd signature of axial charge in the photon emission observables. We compute this "P -odd photon emission rate" in a weak coupling regime at a high temperature limit to complete leading order in the QCD coupling constant: the leading log as well as the constant under the log. As in the P -even total emission rate in the literature, the computation of the P -odd emission rate at leading order consists of three parts: (1) Compton and pair annihilation processes with hard momentum exchange, (2) soft t - and u -channel contributions with hard thermal loop resummation, (3) Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal resummation of collinear bremsstrahlung and pair annihilation. We present analytical and numerical evaluations of these contributions to our P -odd photon emission rate observable.

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Photonic Band gaps in Artificial Opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yin, Ming; Arammash, Fouzi; Datta, Timir

    2014-03-01

    Photonic band structure and band gap were numerically computed for a number of closed packed simple cubic and Hexagonal arrangements of non-conducting spheres using ``Finite Difference Time Domain Method''. Photonic gaps were found to exist in the simple cubic overlapping spheres with index of refraction (n) >3.2. Gap increased linearly from 0.117- 0.161 (1/micron) as lattice constant decreased from 0.34 to 0.18 (micron). For less than 3.2 no gap was obtained. Also, no gaps were obtained for hexagonal packing. UV-VIS reflectivity and transmission measurements of polycrystalline bulk artificial opals of silica (SiO2) spheres, ranging from 250nm to 300nm in sphere diameter indicate a reflection peak in the 500-600 nm regimes. Consistent with photonic band gap behavior we find that reflectivity is enhanced in the same wavelength where transmission is reduced. To the best of our knowledge this is the first observation of photonic gap in the visible wave length under ambient conditions. The wave length at the reflectance peak increases with the diameter of the SiO2 spheres, and is approximately twice the diameter following Bragg reflection. DOD Award No 60177-RT-H from ARO.

  15. Efficient light amplification in low gain materials due to a photonic band edge effect.

    PubMed

    Ondič, L; Pelant, I

    2012-03-26

    One of the possibilities of increasing optical gain of a light emitting source is by embedding it into a photonic crystal (PhC). If the properties of the PhC are tuned so that the emission wavelength of the light source with gain falls close to the photonic band edge of the PhC, then due to low group velocity of the light modes near the band edge caused by many multiple reflections of light on the photonic structure, the stimulated emission can be significantly enhanced. Here, we perform simulation of the photonic band edge effect on the light intensity of spectrally broad source interacting with a diamond PhC with low optical gain. We show that even for the case of low gain, up to 10-fold increase of light intensity output can be obtained for the two-dimensional PhC consisting of only 19 periodic layers of infinitely high diamond rods ordered into a square lattice. Moreover, considering the experimentally feasible structure composed of diamond rods of finite height - PhC slab - we show that the gain enhancement, even if reduced compared to the ideal case of infinite rods, still remains relatively high. For this particular structure, we show that up to 3.5-fold enhancement of light intensity can be achieved.

  16. Band structure of one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals using the Fresnel coefficients method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, A.; Rahmat, A.

    2017-04-01

    The current study has examined the band structures of two types of photonic crystals (PCs). The first is a one-dimensional metamaterial photonic crystal (1DMMPC) composed of double-layered units for which both layers of each unit are dielectric. The second type is a very similar one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal (1DPPC) also composed of double-layered units in which the first layer is a dielectric material but the second is a plasma layer. This study compares the band structures of the 1DMMPC with specific optical characteristics of the 1DPPC using the Fresnel coefficients method and also compares the results of this method with the results of the transfer matrix method. It is concluded that the dependency of the electric permittivity of the plasma layer on the incident field frequency causes differences in the band structures in 1DMMPC and 1DPPC for both TE and TM polarizations and their gaps reside in different frequencies. The band structures of the 1DMMPC and 1DPPC are confirmed by the results of the transfer matrix method.

  17. Band structure of one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals using the Fresnel coefficients method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, A.; Rahmat, A.

    2016-11-01

    The current study has examined the band structures of two types of photonic crystals (PCs). The first is a one-dimensional metamaterial photonic crystal (1DMMPC) composed of double-layered units for which both layers of each unit are dielectric. The second type is a very similar one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal (1DPPC) also composed of double-layered units in which the first layer is a dielectric material but the second is a plasma layer. This study compares the band structures of the 1DMMPC with specific optical characteristics of the 1DPPC using the Fresnel coefficients method and also compares the results of this method with the results of the transfer matrix method. It is concluded that the dependency of the electric permittivity of the plasma layer on the incident field frequency causes differences in the band structures in 1DMMPC and 1DPPC for both TE and TM polarizations and their gaps reside in different frequencies. The band structures of the 1DMMPC and 1DPPC are confirmed by the results of the transfer matrix method.

  18. Two-Dimensional Phononic-Photonic Band Gap Optomechanical Crystal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.; Hill, Jeff T.; Meenehan, Seán; Chan, Jasper; Gröblacher, Simon; Painter, Oskar

    2014-04-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of an artificial crystal structure formed from a thin film of silicon that has a full phononic band gap for microwave X-band phonons and a two-dimensional pseudo-band gap for near-infrared photons. An engineered defect in the crystal structure is used to localize optical and mechanical resonances in the band gap of the planar crystal. Two-tone optical spectroscopy is used to characterize the cavity system, showing a large coupling (g0/2π≈220 kHz) between the fundamental optical cavity resonance at ωo/2π =195 THz and colocalized mechanical resonances at frequency ωm/2π ≈9.3 GHz.

  19. Research of dual-band microwave photonic filter for WLAN based on optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Jiaqi; Jiang, Lingke; Pan, Linbing; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xindong; Ruan, Shengping

    2016-07-20

    This paper presents a dual-band microwave photonic filter for a wireless local area networks with independently tunable passband center frequencies and bandwidths. The two bands of the filter were 2.4 GHz and 5.725 GHz, respectively. The filter was based on a stimulated Brillouin scattering and an optical frequency comb (OFC) scheme. We created this filter using OFC pumps instead of a single pump. The OFC scheme consists of a cascaded Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) and a dual-parallel MZM (DPMZM) hybrid modulation that generated seven and 11 lines. The experimental results show that the two passbands of the filter were 80 and 130 MHz.

  20. Spatially graded TiO₂-SiO₂ Bragg reflector with rainbow-colored photonic band gap.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhruv Pratap; Lee, Seung Hee; Choi, Il Yong; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2015-06-29

    A simple single-step method to fabricate spatially graded TiO2-SiO2 Bragg stack with rainbow colored photonic band gap is presented. The gradation in thickness of the Bragg stack was accomplished with a modified glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique with dynamic shadow enabled by a block attached to one edge of the rotating substrate. A linear gradation in thickness over a distance of about 17 mm resulted in a brilliant colorful rainbow pattern. Interestingly, the photonic band gap position can be changed across the whole visible wavelength range by linearly translating the graded Bragg stack over a large area substrate. The spatially graded Bragg stack may find potential applications in the tunable optical devices, such as optical filters, reflection gratings, and lasers.

  1. Photonic band gaps of increasingly isotropic crystals at high dielectric contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, M. E.; Parker, G. J.; Charlton, M. D. B.

    2012-03-01

    Photonic band gaps (PBGs) are highly sensitive to lattice geometry and dielectric contrast. Here, we report theoretical and experimental confirmation of PBGs in photonic crystals (PhCs) with increasing levels of structural isotropy. These structures are: a standard 6-fold hexagonal lattice, a locally 12-fold Archimedean-like crystal, a true quasicrystal generated by non-random Stampfli inflation, and a biomimetic crystal based on Fibonacci phyllotaxis. Experimental transmission spectra were obtained at microwave frequencies using high-index alumina (ɛ = 9.61) rods. The results were compared to FDTD-calculated transmission spectra and PWE-calculated band diagrams. Wide and deep (> 60dB) primary TM gaps present in all high-index samples are related to reciprocal space vectors with the strongest Fourier coefficients. Their mid-gap frequencies are largely independent of the lattice geometry for comparable fill factors, whereas the gap ratios shrink monotonically as structural isotropy increases.

  2. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Ozbay, Ekmel; Tuttle, Gary; Michel, Erick; Ho, Kai-Ming; Biswas, Rana; Chan, Che-Ting; Soukoulis, Costas

    1995-01-01

    A method for fabricating a periodic dielectric structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. Alignment holes are formed in a wafer of dielectric material having a given crystal orientation. A planar layer of elongate rods is then formed in a section of the wafer. The formation of the rods includes the step of selectively removing the dielectric material of the wafer between the rods. The formation of alignment holes and layers of elongate rods and wafers is then repeated to form a plurality of patterned wafers. A stack of patterned wafers is then formed by rotating each successive wafer with respect to the next-previous wafer, and then placing the successive wafer on the stack. This stacking results in a stack of patterned wafers having a four-layer periodicity exhibiting a photonic band gap.

  3. Thermal tuning the reversible optical band gap of self-assembled polystyrene photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili Tahami, S. H.; Pourmahdian, S.; Shirkavand Hadavand, B.; Azizi, Z. S.; Tehranchi, M. M.

    2016-11-01

    Nano-sized polymeric colloidal particles could undergo self-organization into three-dimensional structures to produce desired optical properties. In this research, a facile emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization method was employed to synthesize highly mono-disperse sub-micron polystyrene colloids. A high quality photonic crystal (PhC) structure was prepared by colloidal polystyrene. The reversible thermal tuning effect on photonic band gap position as well as the attenuation of the band gap was investigated in detail. The position of PBG can be tuned from 420 nm to 400 nm by varying the temperature of the PhC structure, reversibly. This reversible effect provides a reconfigurable PhC structure which could be used as thermo-responsive shape memory polymers.

  4. Investigation of the Band Structure of Graphene-Based Plasmonic Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Pingping; Qiu, Weibin; Lin, Zhili; Chen, Houbo; Tang, Yixin; Wang, Jia-Xian; Kan, Qiang; Pan, Jiao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) graphene-based plasmonic photonic crystals (PhCs) are proposed. The band structures and density of states (DOS) have been numerically investigated. Photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in both 1D and 2D PhCs. Meanwhile, graphene-based plasmonic PhC nanocavity with resonant frequency around 175 THz, is realized by introducing point defect, where the chemical potential is from 0.085 to 0.25 eV, in a 2D PhC. Also, the bending wvaguide and the beam splitter are realized by introducing the line defect into the 2D PhC. PMID:28335295

  5. Atom-atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Hood, Jonathan D; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E; Kimble, H J

    2016-09-20

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields [Formula: see text] outside the bandgap to localized fields [Formula: see text] within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom-atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom-atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the [Formula: see text] line of atomic cesium for [Formula: see text] atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom-atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode.

  6. Atom–atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Jonathan D.; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E.; Kimble, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields E(x)∝e±ikxx outside the bandgap to localized fields E(x)∝e−κx|x| within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom–atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom–atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the D1 line of atomic cesium for N¯=3.0±0.5 atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom–atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode. PMID:27582467

  7. Photonic band gap in isotropic hyperuniform disordered solids with low dielectric contrast.

    PubMed

    Man, Weining; Florescu, Marian; Matsuyama, Kazue; Yadak, Polin; Nahal, Geev; Hashemizad, Seyed; Williamson, Eric; Steinhardt, Paul; Torquato, Salvatore; Chaikin, Paul

    2013-08-26

    We report the first experimental demonstration of a TE-polarization photonic band gap (PBG) in a 2D isotropic hyperuniform disordered solid (HUDS) made of dielectric media with a dielectric index contrast of 1.6:1, very low for PBG formation. The solid is composed of a connected network of dielectric walls enclosing air-filled cells. Direct comparison with photonic crystals and quasicrystals permitted us to investigate band-gap properties as a function of increasing rotational isotropy. We present results from numerical simulations proving that the PBG observed experimentally for HUDS at low index contrast has zero density of states. The PBG is associated with the energy difference between complementary resonant modes above and below the gap, with the field predominantly concentrated in the air or in the dielectric. The intrinsic isotropy of HUDS may offer unprecedented flexibilities and freedom in applications (i. e. defect architecture design) not limited by crystalline symmetries.

  8. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Ozbay, E.; Tuttle, G.; Michel, E.; Ho, K.M.; Biswas, R.; Chan, C.T.; Soukoulis, C.

    1995-04-11

    A method is disclosed for fabricating a periodic dielectric structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. Alignment holes are formed in a wafer of dielectric material having a given crystal orientation. A planar layer of elongate rods is then formed in a section of the wafer. The formation of the rods includes the step of selectively removing the dielectric material of the wafer between the rods. The formation of alignment holes and layers of elongate rods and wafers is then repeated to form a plurality of patterned wafers. A stack of patterned wafers is then formed by rotating each successive wafer with respect to the next-previous wafer, and then placing the successive wafer on the stack. This stacking results in a stack of patterned wafers having a four-layer periodicity exhibiting a photonic band gap. 42 figures.

  9. Coupled-mode theory for photonic band-gap inhibition of spatial instabilities.

    PubMed

    Gomila, Damià; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2005-07-01

    We study the inhibition of pattern formation in nonlinear optical systems using intracavity photonic crystals. We consider mean-field models for singly and doubly degenerate optical parametric oscillators. Analytical expressions for the new (higher) modulational thresholds and the size of the "band gap" as a function of the system and photonic crystal parameters are obtained via a coupled-mode theory. Then, by means of a nonlinear analysis, we derive amplitude equations for the unstable modes and find the stationary solutions above threshold. The form of the unstable mode is different in the lower and upper parts of the band gap. In each part there is bistability between two spatially shifted patterns. In large systems stable wall defects between the two solutions are formed and we provide analytical expressions for their shape. The analytical results are favorably compared with results obtained from the full system equations. Inhibition of pattern formation can be used to spatially control signal generation in the transverse plane.

  10. Midinfrared sensors meet nanotechnology: Trace gas sensing with quantum cascade lasers inside photonic band-gap hollow waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, Christy; Temelkuran, Burak; Dellemann, Gregor; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2005-05-01

    An integrated midinfrared sensing system for trace level (ppb) gas analysis combining a quantum cascade laser with an emission frequency of 10.3μm with a frequency matched photonic band-gap hollow core waveguide has been developed, demonstrating the sensing application of photonic band-gap fibers. The photonic band-gap fiber simultaneously acts as a wavelength selective waveguide and miniaturized gas cell. The laser emission wavelength corresponds to the vibrational C-H stretch band of ethyl chloride gas. This sensing system enabled the detection of ethyl chloride at concentration levels of 30ppb (v/v) with a response time of 8s probing a sample volume of only 1.5mL in a transmission absorption measurement within the photonic band-gap hollow core waveguide, which corresponds to a sensitivity improvement by three orders of magnitude compared to previously reported results obtained with conventional hollow waveguides.

  11. A versatile optical junction using photonic band-gap guidance and self collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Man Mohan; Medhekar, Sarang

    2014-09-29

    We show that it is possible to design two photonic crystal (PC) structures such that an optical beam of desired wavelength gets guided within the line defect of the first structure (photonic band gap guidance) and the same beam gets guided in the second structure by self-collimation. Using two dimensional simulation of a design made of the combination of these two structures, we propose an optical junction that allows for crossing of two optical signals of same wavelength and same polarization with very low crosstalk. Moreover, the junction can be operated at number of frequencies in a wide range. Crossing of multiple beams with very low cross talk is also possible. The proposed junction should be important in future integrated photonic circuits.

  12. Analysis of strategies to improve the directionality of square lattice band-edge photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Haroldo T; Schneider, Vitor M; Cazo, Rogério M; Barbosa, Carmem L

    2005-05-20

    Recently, photonic crystal band-edge structures have been analyzed in the literature. However, most devices that have been presented so far emit light in different directions. We present a modal analysis (no gain included) of a few schemes to improve the directionality of these devices, i.e., in such a way that light that exits from them will travel mainly in a certain direction, eventually coupling its energy to a wide waveguide.

  13. High brightness photonic band crystal semiconductor lasers in the passive mode locking regime

    SciTech Connect

    Rosales, R.; Kalosha, V. P.; Miah, M. J.; Bimberg, D.; Posilović, K.; Pohl, J.; Weyers, M.

    2014-10-20

    High brightness photonic band crystal lasers in the passive mode locking regime are presented. Optical pulses with peak power of 3 W and peak brightness of about 180 MW cm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} are obtained on a 5 GHz device exhibiting 15 ps pulses and a very low beam divergence in both the vertical and horizontal directions.

  14. Precision X-Band Linac Technologies for Nuclear Photonics Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Houck, T L; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Adolphsen, C E; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T O; Ighigeanu, D; Toma, M; Cutoiu, D

    2011-08-31

    Nuclear photonics is an emerging field of research requiring new tools, including high spectral brightness, tunable gamma-ray sources; high photon energy, ultrahigh-resolution crystal spectrometers; and novel detectors. This presentation focuses on the precision linac technology required for Compton scattering gamma-ray light sources, and on the optimization of the laser and electron beam pulse format to achieve unprecedented spectral brightness. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology will be shown to offer optimal performance in a compact package, when used in conjunction with the appropriate pulse format, and photocathode illumination and interaction laser technologies. The nascent field of nuclear photonics is enabled by the recent maturation of new technologies, including high-gradient X-band electron acceleration, robust fiber laser systems, and hyper-dispersion CPA. Recent work has been performed at LLNL to demonstrate isotope-specific detection of shielded materials via NRF using a tunable, quasi-monochromatic Compton scattering gamma-ray source operating between 0.2 MeV and 0.9 MeV photon energy. This technique is called Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain with Energetic Radiation (or FINDER). This work has, among other things, demonstrated the detection of {sup 7}Li shielded by Pb, utilizing gamma rays generated by a linac-driven, laser-based Compton scattering gamma-ray source developed at LLNL. Within this context, a new facility is currently under construction at LLNL, with the goal of generating tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range, at a repetition rate of 120 Hz, and with a peak brightness in the 10{sup 20} photons/(s x mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x 0.1% bw).

  15. Analogy of transistor function with modulating photonic band gap in electromagnetically induced grating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiguo; Ullah, Zakir; Gao, Mengqin; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-01-01

    Optical transistor is a device used to amplify and switch optical signals. Many researchers focus on replacing current computer components with optical equivalents, resulting in an optical digital computer system processing binary data. Electronic transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices. To replace electronic components with optical ones, an equivalent optical transistor is required. Here we compare the behavior of an optical transistor with the reflection from a photonic band gap structure in an electromagnetically induced transparency medium. A control signal is used to modulate the photonic band gap structure. Power variation of the control signal is used to provide an analogy between the reflection behavior caused by modulating the photonic band gap structure and the shifting of Q-point (Operation point) as well as amplification function of optical transistor. By means of the control signal, the switching function of optical transistor has also been realized. Such experimental schemes could have potential applications in making optical diode and optical transistor used in quantum information processing. PMID:26349444

  16. Analogy of transistor function with modulating photonic band gap in electromagnetically induced grating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguo; Ullah, Zakir; Gao, Mengqin; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-09-09

    Optical transistor is a device used to amplify and switch optical signals. Many researchers focus on replacing current computer components with optical equivalents, resulting in an optical digital computer system processing binary data. Electronic transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices. To replace electronic components with optical ones, an equivalent optical transistor is required. Here we compare the behavior of an optical transistor with the reflection from a photonic band gap structure in an electromagnetically induced transparency medium. A control signal is used to modulate the photonic band gap structure. Power variation of the control signal is used to provide an analogy between the reflection behavior caused by modulating the photonic band gap structure and the shifting of Q-point (Operation point) as well as amplification function of optical transistor. By means of the control signal, the switching function of optical transistor has also been realized. Such experimental schemes could have potential applications in making optical diode and optical transistor used in quantum information processing.

  17. Square spiral photonic crystals: robust architecture for microfabrication of materials with large three-dimensional photonic band gaps.

    PubMed

    Toader, Ovidiu; John, Sajeev

    2002-07-01

    We provide a blueprint for microfabricating photonic crystals with very large and robust three-dimensional photonic band gaps (PBG's). These crystals are based on interleaving polygonal spiral posts and can be efficiently manufactured on a large scale in a one-step process using the recently introduced technique of glancing angle deposition. We classify various families of spiral photonic crystals based on (i) the parent three-dimensional (3D) point lattice to which they are most closely related, (ii) the crystallographic axis of the parent lattice around which the spiral posts wind, and (iii) the set of points of the parent lattice which the spiral arms connect or nearly connect. We obtain optimal geometries for the spiral photonic crystals by detailed mapping of the size and location of the PBG within a multidimensional parameter space which characterizes the shape of each spiral post. For the optimum PBG, the spiral arms and elbows may deviate significantly from the points of the original point lattice. The largest 3D PBG's are obtained for square spiral posts that wind around the [001] axis of diamond (or face centered cubic) lattice and in which the spiral arm segments approximately connect either the fifth or first nearest-neighbor points of the parent lattice. In the case of silicon posts (with a dielectric constant of 11.9) in an air background, whose arm segments nearly connect fifth nearest-neighbor point of the diamond lattice, the full PBG can be as large as 16% of the gap center frequency. For the corresponding air posts in a silicon background, the maximum PBG is 24% of the gap center frequency. We compute both the total electromagnetic density of states and the electromagnetic field distributions near the PBG. It is suggested the PBG in an optimized structure is highly tolerant to various forms of disorder that may arise during the manufacturing process.

  18. Photonic band-gap modulation of blue phase liquid crystal (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2015-10-01

    Blue phase liquid crystals (BPLCs) are self-assembled 3D photonic crystals exhibiting high susceptibility to external stimuli. Two methods for the photonic bandgap tuning of BPs were demonstrated in this work. Introducing a chiral azobenzene into a cholesteric liquid crystal could formulate a photoresponsive BPLC. Under violet irradiation, the azo dye experiences trans-cis isomerization, which leads to lattice swelling as well as phase transition in different stages of the process. Ultrawide reversible tuning of the BP photonic bandgap from ultraviolet to near infrared has been achieved. The tuning is reversible and nonvolatile. We will then demonstract the electric field-induced bandgap tuning in polymer-stabilized BPLCs. Under different BPLCs material preparation conditions, both red-shift and broadening of the photonic bandgaps have been achieved respectively. The stop band can be shifted over 100 nm. The bandwidth can be expanded from ~ 30 nm to ~ 250 nm covering nearly the full visible range. It is believed that the developed approaches could strongly promote the use of BPLC in photonic applications.

  19. Extreme Band Engineering of III-Nitride Nanowire Heterostructures for Electronic and Photonic Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, ATM Golam

    Bottom-up nanowires are attractive for realizing semiconductor devices with extreme heterostructures because strain relaxation through the nanowire sidewalls allows the combination of highly lattice mismatched materials without creating dislocations. The resulting nanowires are used to fabricate light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers, solar cells, and sensors. The aim of this work is to investigate extreme heterostructures, which are impossible or very hard to realize in conventional planar films, exploiting the strain accommodation property of nanowires and engineer their band structure for novel electronic and photonic applications. To this end, in this thesis, III-Nitride semiconductor nanowires are investigated. In the first part of this work, a complete growth phase diagram of InN nanowires on silicon using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy is developed, and structural and optical characteristics are mapped as a function of growth parameters. Next, a novel up-side down pendeoepitaxial growth of InN forming mushroom-like microstructures is demonstrated and detail structural and optical characterizations are performed. Based on this, a method to grow strain-free large area single crystalline InN or thin film is proposed and the growth of InN on patterned GaN is investigated. The optimized growth conditions developed for InN are further used to grow InGaN nanowires graded over the whole composition range. Numerical energy band simulation is performed to better understand the effect of polarization charge on photo-carrier transport in these extremely graded nanowires. A novel photodetector device with negative differential photocurrent is demonstrated using the graded InGaN nanowires. In the second part of this thesis, polarization-induced nanowire light emitting diodes (PINLEDs) are investigated. The electrical and optical properties of the nanowire heterostructure are engineered and optimized for ultraviolet and deep ultraviolet applications. The electrical

  20. Hydrogen production by Tuning the Photonic Band Gap with the Electronic Band Gap of TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Waterhouse, G. I. N.; Wahab, A. K.; Al-Oufi, M.; Jovic, V.; Anjum, D. H.; Sun-Waterhouse, D.; Llorca, J.; Idriss, H.

    2013-01-01

    Tuning the photonic band gap (PBG) to the electronic band gap (EBG) of Au/TiO2 catalysts resulted in considerable enhancement of the photocatalytic water splitting to hydrogen under direct sunlight. Au/TiO2 (PBG-357 nm) photocatalyst exhibited superior photocatalytic performance under both UV and sunlight compared to the Au/TiO2 (PBG-585 nm) photocatalyst and both are higher than Au/TiO2 without the 3 dimensionally ordered macro-porous structure materials. The very high photocatalytic activity is attributed to suppression of a fraction of electron-hole recombination route due to the co-incidence of the PBG with the EBG of TiO2 These materials that maintain their activity with very small amount of sacrificial agents (down to 0.5 vol.% of ethanol) are poised to find direct applications because of their high activity, low cost of the process, simplicity and stability. PMID:24108361

  1. Spectral element method for band structures of three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ma; Liu, Qing Huo

    2009-11-01

    A spectral element method (SEM) is introduced for accurate calculation of band structures of three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals. The method is based on the finite-element framework with curvilinear hexahedral elements. Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre polynomials are used to construct the basis functions. In order to suppress spurious modes, mixed-order vector basis functions are employed and the Bloch periodic boundary condition is imposed into the basis functions with tangential components at the boundary by multiplying a Bloch phase factor. The fields and coordinates in the curvilinear hexahedral elements are mapped to the reference domain by covariant mapping, which preserves the continuity of tangential components of the field. Numerical results show that the SEM has exponential convergence for both square-lattice and triangular-lattice photonic crystals. The sampling density as small as 3.4 points per wavelength can achieve accuracy as high as 99.9%. The band structures of several modified woodpile photonic crystals are calculated by using the SEM.

  2. Spectral element method for band structures of three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ma; Liu, Qing Huo

    2009-11-01

    A spectral element method (SEM) is introduced for accurate calculation of band structures of three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals. The method is based on the finite-element framework with curvilinear hexahedral elements. Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre polynomials are used to construct the basis functions. In order to suppress spurious modes, mixed-order vector basis functions are employed and the Bloch periodic boundary condition is imposed into the basis functions with tangential components at the boundary by multiplying a Bloch phase factor. The fields and coordinates in the curvilinear hexahedral elements are mapped to the reference domain by covariant mapping, which preserves the continuity of tangential components of the field. Numerical results show that the SEM has exponential convergence for both square-lattice and triangular-lattice photonic crystals. The sampling density as small as 3.4 points per wavelength can achieve accuracy as high as 99.9%. The band structures of several modified woodpile photonic crystals are calculated by using the SEM.

  3. Complete multipactor suppression in an X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Gold, S. H.; Fischer, Richard; Gai, W.

    2016-05-09

    Multipactor is a major issue limiting the gradient of rf-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures. Theoretical models have predicted that an axial magnetic field applied to DLA structures may completely block the multipactor discharge. However, previous attempts to demonstrate this magnetic field effect in an X-band traveling-wave DLA structure were inconclusive, due to the axial variation of the applied magnetic field, and showed only partial suppression of the multipactor loading [Jing et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 213503 (2013)]. The present experiment has been performed under improved conditions with a uniform axial magnetic field extending along the length of an X-band standing-wave DLA structure. Multipactor loading began to be continuously reduced starting from 3.5 kG applied magnetic field and was completely suppressed at 8 kG. Dependence of multipactor suppression on the rf gradient inside the DLA structure was also measured.

  4. Analysis of photonic band gap in dispersive properties of tunable three-dimensional photonic crystals doped by magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang HaiFeng; Liu Shaobin; Yang Huan; Kong Xiangkun

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, the magnetooptical effects in dispersive properties for two types of three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) containing homogeneous dielectric and magnetized plasma with diamond lattices are theoretically investigated for electromagnetic (EM) wave based on plane wave expansion (PWE) method, as incidence EM wave vector is parallel to the external magnetic field. The equations for two types of MPPCs with diamond lattices (dielectric spheres immersed in magnetized plasma background or vice versa) are theoretically deduced. The influences of dielectric constant, plasma collision frequency, filling factor, the external magnetic field, and plasma frequency on the dispersive properties for both types of structures are studied in detail, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. From the numerical results, it has been shown that the photonic band gaps (PBGs) for both types of MPPCs can be manipulated by plasma frequency, filling factor, the external magnetic field, and the relative dielectric constant of dielectric, respectively. Especially, the external magnetic field can enlarge the PBG for type-2 structure (plasma spheres immersed in dielectric background). However, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the dispersive properties of two types of three-dimensional MPPCs. The locations of flatbands regions for both types of structures cannot be tuned by any parameters except for plasma frequency and the external magnetic field. The analytical results may be informative and of technical use to design the MPPCs devices.

  5. The properties of photonic band gaps for three-dimensional plasma photonic crystals in a diamond structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haifeng; Liu Shaobin; Kong Xiangkun, Chenchen; Bian Borui

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps (PBGs) for two types of three-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) composed of isotropic dielectric and unmagnetized plasma with diamond lattices are theoretically investigated for electromagnetic waves based on a modified plane wave expansion method. The equations for type-1 structure are theoretically deduced, which depend on the diamond lattices realization (dielectric spheres immersed in plasma background). The influences of dielectric constant of dielectric, plasma collision frequency, filling factor, and plasma frequency on PBGs are investigated, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations and the possible methods to realize the three-dimensional PPCs in experiments are also given. From the numerical results, it has been shown that not only the locations but also the gap/midgap ratios of the PBGs for two types of PPCs can be tuned by plasma frequency, filling factor, and the relative dielectric constant, respectively. However, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the frequency ranges and gap/midgap ratios of the PBGs for two types of PPCs.

  6. Photonic crystal film with three alternating layers for simultaneous R, G, B multi-mode photonic band-gaps.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoungchoo; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Sun Woong; Ho Park, Jin

    2008-09-15

    We studied 1-dimensional (1-D) photonic crystal (PC) films with three alternating layers to investigate multi-mode photonic band-gaps (PBGs) at red, green, and blue color regions. From simulations, it was shown that PCs with three alternating layered elements of [a/b/c] structure have sharp PBGs at the three color regions with the central wavelengths of 459 nm, 527 nm, and 626 nm, simultaneously. Experimentally, it was proven that red, green, and blue PBGs were generated clearly by the PCs, which were made of multilayers of [SiO(2)/Ta(2)O(5)/TiO(2)], based on the simulation. It was also shown that the measured wavelengths of the PBGs corresponded exactly to those of the simulated results. Moreover, it was demonstrated that a 1-D PC of [a/b/c] structure can be used for making white organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with improved color rendering index (CRI) for color display or lighting.

  7. Efficient heralding of O-band passively spatial-multiplexed photons for noise-tolerant quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mao Tong; Lim, Han Chuen

    2014-09-22

    When implementing O-band quantum key distribution on optical fiber transmission lines carrying C-band data traffic, noise photons that arise from spontaneous Raman scattering or insufficient filtering of the classical data channels could cause the quantum bit-error rate to exceed the security threshold. In this case, a photon heralding scheme may be used to reject the uncorrelated noise photons in order to restore the quantum bit-error rate to a low level. However, the secure key rate would suffer unless one uses a heralded photon source with sufficiently high heralding rate and heralding efficiency. In this work we demonstrate a heralded photon source that has a heralding efficiency that is as high as 74.5%. One disadvantage of a typical heralded photon source is that the long deadtime of the heralding detector results in a significant drop in the heralding rate. To counter this problem, we propose a passively spatial-multiplexed configuration at the heralding arm. Using two heralding detectors in this configuration, we obtain an increase in the heralding rate by 37% and a corresponding increase in the heralded photon detection rate by 16%. We transmit the O-band photons over 10 km of noisy optical fiber to observe the relation between quantum bit-error rate and noise-degraded second-order correlation function of the transmitted photons. The effects of afterpulsing when we shorten the deadtime of the heralding detectors are also observed and discussed.

  8. THz photonic wireless links with 16-QAM modulation in the 375-450 GHz band.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shi; Yu, Xianbin; Hu, Hao; Yu, Jinlong; Guan, Pengyu; Da Ros, Francesco; Galili, Michael; Morioka, Toshio; Oxenløwe, Leif K

    2016-10-17

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate THz photonic wireless communication systems with 16-QAM modulation in the 375-450 GHz band. The overall throughput reaches as high as 80 Gbit/s by exploiting four THz channels with 5 Gbaud 16-QAM baseband modulation per channel. We create a coherent optical frequency comb (OFC) for photonic generation of multiple THz carriers based on photo-mixing in a uni-travelling carrier photodiode (UTC-PD). The OFC configuration also allows us to generate reconfigurable THz carriers with low phase noise. The multiple-channel THz radiation is received by using a Schottky mixer based electrical receiver after 0.5 m free-space wireless propagation. 2-channel (40 Gbit/s) and 4-channel (80 Gbit/s) THz photonic wireless links with 16-QAM modulation are reported in this paper, and the bit error rate (BER) performance for all channels in both cases is below the hard decision forward error correction (HD-FEC) threshold of 3.8e-3 with 7% overhead. In addition, we also successfully demonstrate hybrid photonic wireless transmission of 40 Gbit/s 16-QAM signal at carrier frequencies of 400 GHz and 425 GHz over 30 km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) between the optical baseband signal transmitter and the THz wireless transmitter with negligible induced power penalty.

  9. Zero- n bar band gap in two-dimensional metamaterial photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía-Salazar, J. R.; Porras-Montenegro, N.

    2015-04-01

    We have theoretically studied metamaterial photonic crystals (PCs) composed by air and double negative (DNG) material. Numerical data were obtained by means of the finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method, with results indicating the possibility for the existence of the zero- n bar non-Bragg gap in two-dimensional metamaterial PCs, which has been previously observed only in one-dimensional photonic superlattices. Validity of the present FDTD algorithm for the study of one-dimensional metamaterial PCs is shown by comparing with results for the transmittance spectra obtained by means of the well known transfer matrix method (TMM). In the case of two-dimensional metamaterial PCs, we have calculated the photonic band structure (PBS) in the limiting case of a one-dimensional photonic superlattice and for a nearly one-dimensional PC, showing a very similar dispersion relation. Finally, we show that due to the strong electromagnetic field localization on the constitutive rods, the zero- n bar non-Bragg gap may only exist in two-dimensional systems under strict geometrical conditions.

  10. Robust topology optimization of three-dimensional photonic-crystal band-gap structures.

    PubMed

    Men, H; Lee, K Y K; Freund, R M; Peraire, J; Johnson, S G

    2014-09-22

    We perform full 3D topology optimization (in which "every voxel" of the unit cell is a degree of freedom) of photonic-crystal structures in order to find optimal omnidirectional band gaps for various symmetry groups, including fcc (including diamond), bcc, and simple-cubic lattices. Even without imposing the constraints of any fabrication process, the resulting optimal gaps are only slightly larger than previous hand designs, suggesting that current photonic crystals are nearly optimal in this respect. However, optimization can discover new structures, e.g. a new fcc structure with the same symmetry but slightly larger gap than the well known inverse opal, which may offer new degrees of freedom to future fabrication technologies. Furthermore, our band-gap optimization is an illustration of a computational approach to 3D dispersion engineering which is applicable to many other problems in optics, based on a novel semidefinite-program formulation for nonconvex eigenvalue optimization combined with other techniques such as a simple approach to impose symmetry constraints. We also demonstrate a technique for robust topology optimization, in which some uncertainty is included in each voxel and we optimize the worst-case gap, and we show that the resulting band gaps have increased robustness to systematic fabrication errors.

  11. Photonic-band-gap properties for two-component slow light

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseckas, J.; Kudriasov, V.; Juzeliunas, G.; Unanyan, R. G.; Otterbach, J.; Fleischhauer, M.

    2011-06-15

    We consider two-component ''spinor'' slow light in an ensemble of atoms coherently driven by two pairs of counterpropagating control laser fields in a double tripod-type linkage scheme. We derive an equation of motion for the spinor slow light (SSL) representing an effective Dirac equation for a massive particle with the mass determined by the two-photon detuning. By changing the detuning the atomic medium acts as a photonic crystal with a controllable band gap. If the frequency of the incident probe light lies within the band gap, the light experiences reflection from the sample and can tunnel through it. For frequencies outside the band gap, the transmission and reflection probabilities oscillate with the increasing length of the sample. In both cases the reflection takes place into the complementary mode of the probe field. We investigate the influence of the finite excited state lifetime on the transmission and reflection coefficients of the probe light. We discuss possible experimental implementations of the SSL using alkali-metal atoms such as rubidium or sodium.

  12. Micro-metric electronic patterning of a topological band structure using a photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Mark; Frantzeskakis, Emmanouil; de Jong, Nick; Huang, Yingkai; Wu, Dong; Pan, Yu; de Visser, Anne; van Heumen, Erik; van Bay, Tran; Zwartsenberg, Berend; Pronk, Pieter; Varier Ramankutty, Shyama; Tytarenko, Alona; Xu, Nan; Plumb, Nick; Shi, Ming; Radovic, Milan; Varkhalov, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    The only states crossing EF in ideal, 3D TIs are topological surface states. Single crystals of Bi2Se3andBi2Te3 are too defective to exhibit bulk-insulating behaviour, and ARPES shows topologically trivial 2DEGs at EF in the surface region due to downward band bending. Ternary & quaternary alloys of Bi /Te /Se /Sb hold promise for obtaining bulk-insulating crystals. Here we report ARPES data from quaternary, bulk-insulating, Bi-based TIs. Shortly after cleavage in UHV, downward band bending pulls the bulk conduction band below EF, once again frustrating the ``topological only'' ambition for the Fermi surface. However, there is light at the end of the tunnel: we show that a super-band-gap photon beam generates a surface photovoltage sufficient to flatten the bands, thereby recovering the ideal, ``topological only'' situation. In our bulk-insulating quaternary TIs, this effect is local in nature, and permits the writing of arbitrary, micron-sized patterns in the topological energy landscape at the surface. Support from FOM, NWO and the EU is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Photonic-band-gap engineering for volume plasmon polaritons in multiscale multilayer hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Orlov, Alexey A.; Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.; Sipe, J. E.

    2014-07-01

    We study theoretically the propagation of large-wave-vector waves (volume plasmon polaritons) in multilayer hyperbolic metamaterials with two levels of structuring. We show that when the parameters of a subwavelength metal-dielectric multilayer (substructure) are modulated (superstructured) on a larger, wavelength scale, the propagation of volume plasmon polaritons in the resulting multiscale hyperbolic metamaterials is subject to photonic-band-gap phenomena. A great degree of control over such plasmons can be exerted by varying the superstructure geometry. When this geometry is periodic, stop bands due to Bragg reflection form within the volume plasmonic band. When a cavity layer is introduced in an otherwise periodic superstructure, resonance peaks of the Fabry-Pérot nature are present within the stop bands. More complicated superstructure geometries are also considered. For example, fractal Cantor-like multiscale metamaterials are found to exhibit characteristic self-similar spectral signatures in the volume plasmonic band. Multiscale hyperbolic metamaterials are shown to be a promising platform for large-wave-vector bulk plasmonic waves, whether they are considered for use as a kind of information carrier or for far-field subwavelength imaging.

  14. Spin polarized photons from an axially charged plasma at weak coupling: Complete leading order

    DOE PAGES

    Mamo, Kiminad A.; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2016-03-24

    In the presence of (approximately conserved) axial charge in the QCD plasma at finite temperature, the emitted photons are spin aligned, which is a unique P- and CP-odd signature of axial charge in the photon emission observables. We compute this “P-odd photon emission rate” in a weak coupling regime at a high temperature limit to complete leading order in the QCD coupling constant: the leading log as well as the constant under the log. As in the P-even total emission rate in the literature, the computation of the P-odd emission rate at leading order consists of three parts: (1) Comptonmore » and pair annihilation processes with hard momentum exchange, (2) soft t- and u-channel contributions with hard thermal loop resummation, (3) Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal resummation of collinear bremsstrahlung and pair annihilation. In conclusion, we present analytical and numerical evaluations of these contributions to our P-odd photon emission rate observable.« less

  15. Acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity with Lamb waves in microwave K band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, Semere A.; Li, Huan; Liu, Qiyu; Li, Mo

    2015-11-01

    Integrating nanoscale electromechanical transducers and nanophotonic devices potentially can enable acousto-optic devices to reach unprecedented high frequencies and modulation efficiency. Here, we demonstrate acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity using Lamb waves with frequency up to 19 GHz, reaching the microwave K band. The devices are fabricated in suspended aluminum nitride membrane. Excitation of acoustic waves is achieved with interdigital transducers with period as small as 300 nm. Confining both acoustic wave and optical wave within the thickness of the membrane leads to improved acousto-optic modulation efficiency in these devices than that obtained in previous surface acoustic wave devices. Our system demonstrates a scalable optomechanical platform where strong acousto-optic coupling between cavity-confined photons and high frequency traveling phonons can be explored.

  16. Acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity with Lamb waves in microwave K band

    SciTech Connect

    Tadesse, Semere A.; Li, Huan; Liu, Qiyu; Li, Mo

    2015-11-16

    Integrating nanoscale electromechanical transducers and nanophotonic devices potentially can enable acousto-optic devices to reach unprecedented high frequencies and modulation efficiency. Here, we demonstrate acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity using Lamb waves with frequency up to 19 GHz, reaching the microwave K band. The devices are fabricated in suspended aluminum nitride membrane. Excitation of acoustic waves is achieved with interdigital transducers with period as small as 300 nm. Confining both acoustic wave and optical wave within the thickness of the membrane leads to improved acousto-optic modulation efficiency in these devices than that obtained in previous surface acoustic wave devices. Our system demonstrates a scalable optomechanical platform where strong acousto-optic coupling between cavity-confined photons and high frequency traveling phonons can be explored.

  17. Band structure and waveguide modelling of epitaxially regrown photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Richard J. E.; Williams, David M.; Orchard, Jon R.; Childs, David T. D.; Khamas, Salam; Hogg, Richard A.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we describe elements of photonic crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) design and operation, highlighting that epitaxial regrowth may provide advantages over current designs incorporating voids. High coupling coefficients are shown to be possible for all-semiconductor structures. We introduce type I and type II photonic crystals (PCs), and discuss the possible advantages of using each. We discussed band structure and coupling coefficients as a function of atom volume for a circular atom on a square lattice. Additionally we explore the effect PC atom size has on in-plane and out-of-plane coupling. We conclude by discussing designs for a PCSEL combined with a distributed Bragg reflector to maximize external efficiency.

  18. Dispersion-tolerant two-photon Michelson interferometer using telecom-band frequency-entangled photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric downconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Akio; Fukuda, Daiji; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Yamamoto, Noritsugu

    2015-05-01

    The chromatic group velocity dispersion tolerance of a fiber-optic two-photon interferometer is characterized for telecom-band photon pairs that are frequency entangled. Two indium-gallium-arsenide single-photon detectors are used to record the coincidence counts. A single-wavelength laser diode continuously pumps a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide of 1-mm length. For near-degenerate spontaneous parametric downconversion, it generates wideband entangled collinear photon pairs. The spectral width of 115.8 nm is centered at 1550 nm. It is restricted by the performance of the single-photon detectors whose efficiency is poor beyond 1610 nm. Using a Michelson interferometer, two-photon interference signals are recorded with and without frequency entanglement. The frequency-entangled photon pairs are found to exhibit dispersion-tolerant two-photon interference, even though the two paths through the interferometer have different group velocity dispersion. The observed two-photon interference signal has a correlation time of 42.7 fs, in good agreement with calculations for a 115.8-nm spectral width. For comparison, results are also presented for photon pairs lacking frequency entanglement.

  19. Numerical investigation of the flat band Bloch modes in a 2D photonic crystal with Dirac cones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Fietz, Chris; Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2015-04-20

    A numerical method combining complex-k band calculations and absorbing boundary conditions for Bloch waves is presented. We use this method to study photonic crystals with Dirac cones. We demonstrate that the photonic crystal behaves as a zero-index medium when excited at normal incidence, but that the zero-index behavior is lost at oblique incidence due to excitation of modes on the flat band. We also investigate the formation of monomodal and multimodal cavity resonances inside the photonic crystals, and the physical origins of their different line-shape features.

  20. Analysis of band structure, transmission properties, and dispersion behavior of THz wave in one-dimensional parabolic plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Askari, Nasim; Eslami, Esmaeil; Mirzaie, Reza

    2015-11-15

    The photonic band gap of obliquely incident terahertz electromagnetic waves in a one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal is studied. The periodic structure consists of lossless dielectric and inhomogeneous plasma with a parabolic density profile. The dispersion relation and the THz wave transmittance are analyzed based on the electromagnetic equations and transfer matrix method. The dependence of effective plasma frequency and photonic band gap characteristics on dielectric and plasma thickness, plasma density, and incident angle are discussed in detail. A theoretical calculation for effective plasma frequency is presented and compared with numerical results. Results of these two methods are in good agreement.

  1. Flat Supercontinuum Generation within the Telecommunication Wave Bands in a Photonic Crystal Fiber with Central Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ying; Hou, Lan-Tian; Zhou, Gui-Yao; Yuan, Jin-Hui; Xia, Chang-Ming; Wang, Wei; Wang, Chao; Hou, Zhi-Yun

    2012-05-01

    Flat supercontinuum in the telecommunication wave bands of E+S+C is generated by coupling a train of femtosecond pulses generated by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser into the fundamental mode of a photonic crystal fiber with central holes fabricated in our lab. The pulse experiences the anomalous dispersion regime, and the soliton dynamic effect plays an important role in supercontinuum generation. The output spectrum in the wavelength range of 1360-1565 nm does not include significant ripples due to higher pump peak power, and the normalized intensity shows less fluctuation.

  2. Propagation of optical vortices in a nonlinear atomic medium with a photonic band gap.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Ma, Danmeng; Zhang, Yiqi; Cao, Mingtao; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2017-03-15

    We experimentally generate a vortex beam through a four-wave mixing (FWM) process after satisfying the phase-matching condition in a rubidium atomic vapor cell with a photonic band gap (PBG) structure. The observed FWM vortex can also be viewed as the reflected part of the launched probe vortex from the PBG. Further, we investigate the propagation behaviors, including the spatial shift and splitting of the probe and FWM vortices in the medium with enhanced Kerr nonlinearity induced by electromagnetically induced transparency. This Letter can be useful for better understanding and manipulating the applications involving the interactions between optical vortices and the medium.

  3. Generation of megawatt optical solitons in hollow-core photonic band-gap fibers.

    PubMed

    Ouzounov, Dimitre G; Ahmad, Faisal R; Müller, Dirk; Venkataraman, Natesan; Gallagher, Michael T; Thomas, Malcolm G; Silcox, John; Koch, Karl W; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2003-09-19

    The measured dispersion of a low-loss, hollow-core photonic band-gap fiber is anomalous throughout most of the transmission band, and its variation with wavelength is large compared with that of a conventional step-index fiber. For an air-filled fiber, femtosecond self-frequency--shifted fundamental solitons with peak powers greater than 2megawatts can be supported. For Xe-filled fibers, nonfrequency-shifted temporal solitons with peak powers greater than 5.5 megawatts can be generated, representing an increase in the power that can be propagated in an optical fiber of two orders of magnitude. The results demonstrate a unique capability to deliver high-power pulses in a single spatial mode over distances exceeding 200 meters.

  4. A ministop band in a single-defect photonic crystal waveguide based on silicon on insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hai-Xia; Zuo, Yu-Hua; Yu, Jin-Zhong; Wang, Qi-Ming

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports that a two-dimensional single-defect photonic crystal waveguide in the Γ-K direction with triangular lattice on a silicon-on-insulator substrate is fabricated by the combination of electron beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma etching. A ministop band (MSB) is observed by the measurement of transmission characteristics. It results from the coupling between the two modes with the same symmetry, which is analysed from the stimulated band diagram by the effective index and the two-dimensional plane wave expansion methods. The parameter working on the MSB is the ratio of the radius of air holes to the lattice constant, r/a. It is obtained that the critical r/a value determining the occurrence or disappearance of MSB is 0.36. When r/a is larger than or equal to 0.36, the MSB occurs. However, when r/a is smaller than 0.36, the MSB disappears.

  5. Role of Short-Range Order and Hyperuniformity in the Formation of Band Gaps in Disordered Photonic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Engel, Michael; Damasceno, Pablo F.; Muller, Nicolas; Haberko, Jakub; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-07-01

    We study photonic band gap formation in two-dimensional high-refractive-index disordered materials where the dielectric structure is derived from packing disks in real and reciprocal space. Numerical calculations of the photonic density of states demonstrate the presence of a band gap for all polarizations in both cases. We find that the band gap width is controlled by the increase in positional correlation inducing short-range order and hyperuniformity concurrently. Our findings suggest that the optimization of short-range order, in particular the tailoring of Bragg scattering at the isotropic Brillouin zone, are of key importance for designing disordered PBG materials.

  6. Spectral and polarization structure of field-induced photonic bands in cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Geivandov, A. R.; Kasyanova, I. V.; Palto, V. S.

    2015-09-01

    Transmission of planar layers of cholesteric liquid crystals is studied in pulsed electric fields perpendicular to the helix axis at normal incidence of both linearly polarized and unpolarized light. Spectral and light polarization properties of the primary photonic band and the field-induced bands up to fourth order of Bragg selective reflection are studied in detail. In our experiments we have achieved an electric field strength several times higher than the theoretical values corresponding to the critical field of full helix unwinding. However, the experiments show that despite the high strength of the electric field applied the helix does not unwind, but strongly deforms, keeping its initial spatial period. Strong helix deformation results in distinct spectral band splitting, as well as very high field-induced selective reflectance that can be applied in lasers and other optoelectronic devices. Peculiarities of inducing and splitting the bands are discussed in terms of the scattering coefficient approach. All observed effects are confirmed by numerical simulations. The simulations also show that liquid crystal surface anchoring is not the factor that prevents the helix unwinding. Thus, the currently acknowledged concept of continuous helix unwinding in the electric field should be reconsidered.

  7. Spectral element method for band structures of two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ma; Liu, Qing Huo; Li, Zhibing

    2009-02-01

    A spectral element method (SEM) is proposed for the accurate calculation of band structures of two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals. It uses Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre polynomials as the basis functions in the finite-element framework with curvilinear quadrilateral elements. Coordination mapping is introduced to make the curved quadrilateral elements conformal with the problem geometry. Mixed order basis functions are used in the vector SEM for full vector calculation. The numerical convergence speed of the method is investigated with both square and triangular lattices, and with isotropic and in-plane anisotropic media. It is shown that this method has spectral accuracy, i.e., the numerical error decreases exponentially with the order of basis functions. With only four points per wavelength, the SEM can achieve a numerical error smaller than 0.1%. The full vector calculation method can suppress all spurious modes with nonzero eigenvalues, thus making it easy to filter out real modes. It is thus demonstrated that the SEM is an efficient alternative method for accurate determination of band structures of two-dimensional photonic crystals.

  8. Spectral element method for band structures of two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ma; Liu, Qing Huo; Li, Zhibing

    2009-02-01

    A spectral element method (SEM) is proposed for the accurate calculation of band structures of two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals. It uses Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre polynomials as the basis functions in the finite-element framework with curvilinear quadrilateral elements. Coordination mapping is introduced to make the curved quadrilateral elements conformal with the problem geometry. Mixed order basis functions are used in the vector SEM for full vector calculation. The numerical convergence speed of the method is investigated with both square and triangular lattices, and with isotropic and in-plane anisotropic media. It is shown that this method has spectral accuracy, i.e., the numerical error decreases exponentially with the order of basis functions. With only four points per wavelength, the SEM can achieve a numerical error smaller than 0.1%. The full vector calculation method can suppress all spurious modes with nonzero eigenvalues, thus making it easy to filter out real modes. It is thus demonstrated that the SEM is an efficient alternative method for accurate determination of band structures of two-dimensional photonic crystals.

  9. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and devices incorporating the same

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Kai-Ming; Chan, Che-Ting; Soukoulis, Costas

    1994-08-02

    A periodic dielectric structure which is capable of producing a photonic band gap and which is capable of practical construction. The periodic structure is formed of a plurality of layers, each layer being formed of a plurality of rods separated by a given spacing. The material of the rods contrasts with the material between the rods to have a refractive index contrast of at least two. The rods in each layer are arranged with their axes parallel and at a given spacing. Adjacent layers are rotated by 90.degree., such that the axes of the rods in any given layer are perpendicular to the axes in its neighbor. Alternating layers (that is, successive layers of rods having their axes parallel such as the first and third layers) are offset such that the rods of one are about at the midpoint between the rods of the other. A four-layer periocity is thus produced, and successive layers are stacked to form a three-dimensional structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. By virtue of forming the device in layers of elongate members, it is found that the device is susceptible of practical construction.

  10. Complete experimental characterization of stimulated Brillouin scattering in photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Beugnot, J C; Sylvestre, T; Alasia, D; Maillotte, H; Laude, V; Monteville, A; Provino, L; Traynor, N; Mafang, S Foaleng; Thévenaz, L

    2007-11-12

    We provide a complete experimental characterization of stimulated Brillouin scattering in a 160 m long solid-core photonic crystal fiber, including threshold and spectrum measurements as well as position-resolved mapping of the Brillouin frequency shift. In particular, a three-fold increase of the Brillouin threshold power is observed, in excellent agreement with the spectrally-broadened Brillouin gain spectrum. Distributed measurements additionally reveal that the rise of the Brillouin threshold results from the broadband nature of the gain spectrum all along the fiber and is strongly influenced by strain. Our experiments confirm that these unique fibers can be exploited for the passive control or the suppression of Brillouin scattering.

  11. Weather related continuity and completeness on Deep Space Ka-band links: statistics and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the concept of link 'stability' as means of measuring the continuity of the link is introduced and through it, along with the distributions of 'good' periods and 'bad' periods, the performance of the proposed Ka-band link design method using both forecasting and long-term statistics has been analyzed. The results indicate that the proposed link design method has relatively good continuity and completeness characteristics even when only long-term statistics are used and that the continuity performance further improves when forecasting is employed. .

  12. Experimental Demonstration of a Hybrid-Quantum-Emitter Producing Individual Entangled Photon Pairs in the Telecom Band

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Geng; Zou, Yang; Zhang, Wen-Hao; Zhang, Zi-Huai; Zhou, Zong-Quan; He, De-Yong; Tang, Jian-Shun; Liu, Bi-Heng; Yu, Ying; Zha, Guo-Wei; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan; Han, Yong-Jian; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-01-01

    Quantum emitters generating individual entangled photon pairs (IEPP) have significant fundamental advantages over schemes that suffer from multiple photon emission, or schemes that require post-selection techniques or the use of photon-number discriminating detectors. Quantum dots embedded within nanowires (QD-NWs) represent one of the most promising candidate for quantum emitters that provide a high collection efficiency of photons. However, a quantum emitter that generates IEPP in the telecom band is still an issue demanding a prompt solution. Here, we demonstrate in principle that IEPPs in the telecom band can be created by combining a single QD-NW and a nonlinear crystal waveguide. The QD-NW system serves as the single photon source, and the emitted visible single photons are split into IEPPs at approximately 1.55 μm through the process of spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide. The compatibility of the QD-PPLN interface is the determinant factor in constructing this novel hybrid-quantum-emitter (HQE). Benefiting from the desirable optical properties of QD-NWs and the extremely high nonlinear conversion efficiency of PPLN waveguides, we successfully generate IEPPs in the telecom band with the polarization degree of freedom. The entanglement of the generated photon pairs is confirmed by the entanglement witness. Our experiment paves the way to producing HQEs inheriting the advantages of multiple systems. PMID:27225881

  13. Wave propagation in ordered, disordered, and nonlinear photonic band gap materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lidorikis, Elefterios

    1999-12-10

    Photonic band gap materials are artificial dielectric structures that give the promise of molding and controlling the flow of optical light the same way semiconductors mold and control the electric current flow. In this dissertation the author studied two areas of photonic band gap materials. The first area is focused on the properties of one-dimensional PBG materials doped with Kerr-type nonlinear material, while, the second area is focused on the mechanisms responsible for the gap formation as well as other properties of two-dimensional PBG materials. He first studied, in Chapter 2, the general adequacy of an approximate structure model in which the nonlinearity is assumed to be concentrated in equally-spaced very thin layers, or 6-functions, while the rest of the space is linear. This model had been used before, but its range of validity and the physical reasons for its limitations were not quite clear yet. He performed an extensive examination of many aspects of the model's nonlinear response and comparison against more realistic models with finite-width nonlinear layers, and found that the d-function model is quite adequate, capturing the essential features in the transmission characteristics. The author found one exception, coming from the deficiency of processing a rigid bottom band edge, i.e. the upper edge of the gaps is always independent of the refraction index contrast. This causes the model to miss-predict that there are no soliton solutions for a positive Kerr-coefficient, something known to be untrue.

  14. Complete band gaps including non-local effects occur only in the relaxed micromorphic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeo, Angela; Neff, Patrizio; d'Agostino, Marco Valerio; Barbagallo, Gabriele

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we substantiate the claim implicitly made in previous works that the relaxed micromorphic model is the only linear, isotropic, reversibly elastic, nonlocal generalized continuum model able to describe complete band-gaps on a phenomenological level. To this end, we recapitulate the response of the standard Mindlin-Eringen micromorphic model with the full micro-distortion gradient ∇P, the relaxed micromorphic model depending only on the Curl P of the micro-distortion P, and a variant of the standard micromorphic model, in which the curvature depends only on the divergence Div P of the micro distortion. The Div-model has size-effects, but the dispersion analysis for plane waves shows the incapability of that model to even produce a partial band gap. Combining the curvature to depend quadratically on Div P and Curl P shows that such a model is similar to the standard Mindlin-Eringen model, which can eventually show only a partial band gap.

  15. Complete tight fibrous band release and resection in congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il Jae; Lim, Sung Yoon; Song, Hyun Suk; Park, Myong Chul

    2010-06-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is caused by shortening of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle, which may lead to neck movement limitation and craniofacial deformity. The authors retrospectively reviewed clinical experiences of CMT at their hospital from February 2007 to June 2008. During the study period, 20 CMT patients underwent complete tight fibrous band release and resection. Mean patient age was 47.6 months at operation. Eighteen of the 20 patients started a programme of physical therapy preoperatively. All patients received well-controlled postoperative physical therapy and wore a soft neck collar to correct head position for at least 3 months. At 3 months postoperatively, passive ranges of neck motion were determined, and compared with those of uninvolved sides. Eighteen patients showed a full range of motion of neck rotation and lateral flexion, but one patient showed a 10 degrees limitation in lateral flexion, and another showed 10 degrees limitations of neck rotation and lateral flexion. The authors recommended that the described operative technique involving complete fibrous band release and resection, combined with intensive postoperative physical therapy and application of a soft neck collar, provides good functional and cosmetic results.

  16. Relationship between quantum speed limit time and memory time in a photonic-band-gap environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Wu, Y. N.; Mo, M. L.; Zhang, H. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Non-Markovian effect is found to be able to decrease the quantum speed limit (QSL) time, and hence to enhance the intrinsic speed of quantum evolution. Although a reservoir with larger degree of non-Markovianity may seem like it should cause smaller QSL times, this seemingly intuitive thinking may not always be true. We illustrate this by investigating the QSL time of a qubit that is coupled to a two-band photonic-band-gap (PBG) environment. We show how the QSL time is influenced by the coherent property of the reservoir and the band-gap width. In particular, we find that the decrease of the QSL time is not attributed to the increasing non-Markovianity, while the memory time of the environment can be seen as an essential reflection to the QSL time. So, the QSL time provides a further insight and sharper identification of memory time in a PBG environment. We also discuss a feasible experimental realization of our prediction.

  17. Relationship between quantum speed limit time and memory time in a photonic-band-gap environment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.; Wu, Y. N.; Mo, M. L.; Zhang, H. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Markovian effect is found to be able to decrease the quantum speed limit (QSL) time, and hence to enhance the intrinsic speed of quantum evolution. Although a reservoir with larger degree of non-Markovianity may seem like it should cause smaller QSL times, this seemingly intuitive thinking may not always be true. We illustrate this by investigating the QSL time of a qubit that is coupled to a two-band photonic-band-gap (PBG) environment. We show how the QSL time is influenced by the coherent property of the reservoir and the band-gap width. In particular, we find that the decrease of the QSL time is not attributed to the increasing non-Markovianity, while the memory time of the environment can be seen as an essential reflection to the QSL time. So, the QSL time provides a further insight and sharper identification of memory time in a PBG environment. We also discuss a feasible experimental realization of our prediction. PMID:28008937

  18. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome

    2001-06-27

    Over the last ten years, photonic band gap (PBG) theory and technology have become an important area of research because of the numerous possible applications ranging from high-efficiency laser diodes to optical circuitry. This research concentrates on reducing the length scale in the fabrication of layered photonic band gap structures and developing procedures to improve processing consistency. Various procedures and materials have been used in the fabrication of layered PBG structures. This research focused on an economical micro transfer molding approach to create the final PBG structure. A poly dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber mold was created from a silicon substrate. It was filled with epoxy and built layer-by-layer to create a 3-D epoxy structure. This structure was infiltrated with nanoparticle titania or a titania sol-gel, then fired to remove the polymer mold, leaving a monolithic ceramic inverse of the epoxy structure. The final result was a lattice of titania rolds that resembles a face-centered tetragonal structure. The original intent of this research was to miniaturize this process to a bar size small enough to create a photonic band gap for wavelengths of visible electro-magnetic radiation. The factor limiting progress was the absence of a silicon master mold of small enough dimensions. The Iowa State Microelectronics Research Center fabricated samples with periodicities of 2.5 and 1.0 microns with the existing technology, but a sample was needed on the order of 0.3 microns or less. A 0.4 micron sample was received from Sandia National Laboratory, which was made through an electron beam lithography process, but it contained several defects. The results of the work are primarily from the 2.5 and 1.0 micron samples. Most of the work focused on changing processing variables in order to optimize the infiltration procedure for the best results. Several critical parameters were identified, ranging from the ambient conditions to the specifics of the

  19. Design of full-k-space flat bands in photonic crystals beyond the tight-binding picture

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Changqing; Wang, Gang; Hang, Zhi Hong; Luo, Jie; Chan, C. T.; Lai, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Based on a band engineering method, we propose a theoretical prescription to create a full-k-space flat band in dielectric photonic crystals covering the whole Brillouin Zone. With wave functions distributed in air instead of in the dielectrics, such a flat band represents a unique mechanism for achieving flat dispersions beyond the tight-binding picture, which can enormously reduce the requirement of permittivity contrast in the system. Finally, we propose and numerically demonstrate a unique application based on the full-k-space coverage of the flat band: ultra-sensitive detection of small scatterers. PMID:26656882

  20. Frequency-selective plasmonic wave propagation through the overmoded waveguide with photonic-band-gap slab arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min

    2012-05-15

    Confined propagation of guided waves through the periodically corrugated channel sandwiched between two staggered dielectric photonic-band-gap slab arrays is investigated with the band-response analysis. Numerical simulations show that longitudinally polarized evanescent waves within the band gap propagate with insertion loss of {approx}-0.2 to 1 dB (-0.05 to 0.4 dB/mm at G-band) in the hybrid band filter. This structure significantly suppresses low energy modes and higher-order-modes beyond the band-gap, including background noises, down to {approx}-45 dB. This would enable the single-mode propagation in the heavily over-moded waveguide (TEM-type), minimizing abnormal excitation probability of trapped modes. This band filter could be integrated with active and passive RF components for electron beam and optoelectronic devices.

  1. Ultra stable all-fiber telecom-band entangled photon-pair source for turnkey quantum communication applications.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chuang; Lee, Kim Fook; Levin, Todd; Chen, Jun; Kumar, Prem

    2006-07-24

    We demonstrate a novel alignment-free all-fiber source for generating telecom-band polarization-entangled photon pairs. Polarization entanglement is created by injecting two relatively delayed, orthogonally polarized pump pulses into a piece of dispersion-shifted fiber, where each one independently engages in four-photon scattering, and then removing any distinguishability between the correlated photon-pairs produced by each pulse at the fiber output. Our scheme uses a Michelson-interferometer configuration with Faraday mirrors to achieve practically desirable features such as ultra-stable performance and turnkey operation. Up to 91.7% two-photon-interference visibility is observed without subtracting the accidental coincidences that arise from background photons while operating the source at room temperature.

  2. High-power narrow-vertical-divergence photonic band crystal laser diodes with optimized epitaxial structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lei; Qu, Hongwei; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Yejin; Zheng, Wanhua; Wang, Yufei; Qi, Aiyi

    2014-12-08

    900 nm longitudinal photonic band crystal (PBC) laser diodes with optimized epitaxial structure are fabricated. With a same calculated fundamental-mode divergence, stronger mode discrimination is achieved by a quasi-periodic index modulation in the PBC waveguide than a periodic one. Experiments show that the introduction of over 5.5 μm-thick PBC waveguide contributes to only 10% increment of the internal loss for the laser diodes. For broad area PBC lasers, output powers of 5.75 W under continuous wave test and over 10 W under quasi-continuous wave test are reported. The vertical divergence angles are 10.5° at full width at half maximum and 21.3° with 95% power content, in conformity with the simulated angles. Such device shows a prospect for high-power narrow-vertical-divergence laser emission from single diode laser and laser bar.

  3. Multiwavelength L-band fiber laser with bismuth-oxide EDF and photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramzia Salem, A. M.; Al-Mansoori, M. H.; Hizam, H.; Mohd Noor, S. B.; Abu Bakar, M. H.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2011-05-01

    A multiwavelength laser comb using a bismuth-based erbium-doped fiber and 50 m photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated in a ring cavity configuration. The fiber laser is solely pumped by a single 1455 nm Raman pump laser to exploit its higher power delivery compared to that of a single-mode laser diode pump. At 264 mW Raman pump power and 1 mW Brillouin pump power, 38 output channels in the L-band have been realized with an optical signal-to-noise ratio above 15 dB and a Stokes line spacing of 0.08 nm. The laser exhibits a tuning range of 12 nm and produces stable Stokes lines across the tuning range between Brillouin pump wavelengths of 1603 nm and 1615 nm.

  4. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Arsenyev, Sergey A; Buechler, Cynthia E; Edwards, Randall L; Romero, William P; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G; Wisniewski, Eric E; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-12

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  5. Transparent, metallo-dielectric, one-dimensional, photonic band-gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalora, M.; Bloemer, M. J.; Pethel, A. S.; Dowling, J. P.; Bowden, C. M.; Manka, A. S.

    1998-03-01

    We investigate numerically the properties of metallo-dielectric, one-dimensional, photonic band-gap structures. Our theory predicts that interference effects give rise to a new transparent metallic structure that permits the transmission of light over a tunable range of frequencies, for example, the ultraviolet, the visible, or the infrared wavelength range. The structure can be designed to block ultraviolet light, transmit in the visible range, and reflect all other electromagnetic waves of lower frequencies, from infrared to microwaves and beyond. The transparent metallic structure is composed of a stack of alternating layers of a metal and a dielectric material, such that the complex index of refraction alternates between a high and a low value. The structure remains transparent even if the total amount of metal is increased to hundreds of skin depths in net thickness.

  6. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-01

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  7. Scanning nonreciprocity spatial four-wave mixing process in moving photonic band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hang; Zhang, Yunzhe; Li, Mingyue; Ma, Danmeng; Guo, Ji; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2017-03-01

    We experimentally investigate the scanning nonreciprocity of four-wave mixing process induced by optical parametric amplification in moving photonic band gap, which is different from the propagation nonreciprocity in the optical diode. Meanwhile the frequency offset and the intensity difference are observed when we scan the frequency of the beams on two arm ramps of one round trip. Such scanning nonreciprocities can be controlled by changing the frequency detuning of the dressing beams. For the first time, we find that the intensity difference can cause the nonreciprocity in spatial image. In the nonreciprocity process, the focusing or defocusing is resulted from the feedback dressing self-phase modulation while shift and split is attributed to feedback dressing cross-phase modulation. Our study could have a potential application in the controllable optical diode.

  8. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; ...

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. Wemore » conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Lastly, excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.« less

  9. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Lastly, excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  10. Pushing the Gradient Limitations of Superconducting Photonic Band Gap Structure Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Haynes, William B.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.

    2012-06-07

    Superconducting photonic band gap resonators present us with unique means to place higher order mode couples in an accelerating cavity and efficiently extract HOMs. An SRF PBG resonator with round rods was successfully tested at LANL demonstrating operation at 15 MV/m. Gradient in the SRF PBG resonator was limited by magnetic quench. To increase the quench threshold in PBG resonators one must design the new geometry with lower surface magnetic fields and preserve the resonator's effectiveness for HOM suppression. The main objective of this research is to push the limits for the high-gradient operation of SRF PBG cavities. A NCRF PBG cavity technology is established. The proof-of-principle operation of SRF PBG cavities is demonstrated. SRF PBG resonators are effective for outcoupling HOMs. PBG technology can significantly reduce the size of SRF accelerators and increase brightness for future FELs.

  11. Photonic band-gap engineering in UV fiber gratings by the arc discharge technique.

    PubMed

    Cusano, Andrea; Iadicicco, Agostino; Paladino, Domenico; Campopiano, Stefania; Cutolo, Antonello

    2008-09-29

    Localized heat treatments combined with local non-adiabatic tapering is proposed as suitable tool for the engineering of photonic band-gaps in UV-written fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). In particular, here, we propose the use of the electric arc discharge to achieve localized defects along the FBG structure, however differently from previously reported works, we demonstrate how this post processing tool properly modified can be exploited to achieve the full control of the spectral characteristics of the final device. Also, we show how the suitable choice of the grating features and the correct selection of the defect geometry can be efficiently used to achieve interesting features for both communication and sensing applications.

  12. Optical processes of photonic band gap structure with dressing field in atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun-Zhe; Liu, Zhe; Cai, Kang-Ning; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Wei-Tao; Liu, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Yan-Peng

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally investigate probe transmission signals (PTS), the four-wave mixing photonic band gap signal (FWM BGS), and the fluorescence signal (FLS) in an inverted Y-type four level atomic system. For the first time, we compare the FLS of the two ground-state hyperfine levels of Rb 85. In particular, the second-order and the fourth-order fluorescence signals perform dramatic dressing discrepancies under the two hyperfine levels. Moreover, we find that the dressing field has some dressing effects on three such types of signals. Therefore, we demonstrate that the characteristics of PTS, FWM BGS, and FLS can be controlled by frequency detunings, the powers or phases of the dressing field. Such research could have potential applications in optical diodes, amplifiers, and quantum information processing.

  13. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV /m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  14. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette M.; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kinds of hollow core band gap fibers. The light source for this experiment consists of ytterbium-doped double clad fiber aeroGAIN-ROD-PM85 in a high power amplifier setup. It provided 22ps pulses with a maximum average power of 95W, 40MHz repetition rate at 1032nm (~2.4μJ pulse energy), with M2 <1.3. We determined the facet damage threshold for a 7-cells hollow core photonic bandgap fiber and showed up to 59W average power output for a 5 meters fiber. The damage threshold for a 19-cell hollow core photonic bandgap fiber exceeded the maximum power provided by the light source and up to 76W average output power was demonstrated for a 1m fiber. In both cases, no special attention was needed to mitigate bend sensitivity. The fibers were coiled on 8 centimeters radius spools and even lower bending radii were present. In addition, stimulated rotational Raman scattering arising from nitrogen molecules was measured through a 42m long 19 cell hollow core fiber.

  15. Wide-band acousto-optic deflectors for large field of view two-photon microscope.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Runhua; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic deflector (AOD) is an attractive scanner for two-photon microscopy because it can provide fast and versatile laser scanning and does not involve any mechanical movements. However, due to the small scan range of available AOD, the field of view (FOV) of the AOD-based microscope is typically smaller than that of the conventional galvanometer-based microscope. Here, we developed a novel wide-band AOD to enlarge the scan angle. Considering the maximum acceptable acoustic attenuation in the acousto-optic crystal, relatively lower operating frequencies and moderate aperture were adopted. The custom AOD was able to provide 60 MHz 3-dB bandwidth and 80% peak diffraction efficiency at 840 nm wavelength. Based on a pair of such AOD, a large FOV two-photon microscope was built with a FOV up to 418.5 μm (40× objective). The spatiotemporal dispersion was compensated simultaneously with a single custom-made prism. By means of dynamic power modulation, the variation of laser intensity within the FOV was reduced below 5%. The lateral and axial resolution of the system were 0.58-2.12 μm and 2.17-3.07 μm, respectively. Pollen grain images acquired by this system were presented to demonstrate the imaging capability at different positions across the entire FOV.

  16. Observation of nonlinear bands in near-field scanning optical microscopy of a photonic-crystal waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Huisman, S. R.; Ctistis, G. Mosk, A. P.; Pinkse, P. W. H.; Korterik, J. P.; Herek, J. L.

    2015-01-21

    We have measured the photonic bandstructure of GaAs photonic-crystal waveguides with high resolution in energy as well as in momentum using near-field scanning optical microscopy. Intriguingly, we observe additional bands that are not predicted by eigenmode solvers, as was recently demonstrated by Huisman et al. [Phys. Rev. B 86, 155154 (2012)]. We study the presence of these additional bands by performing measurements of these bands while varying the incident light power, revealing a non-linear power dependence. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the observed additional bands are caused by a waveguide-specific near-field tip effect not previously reported, which can significantly phase-modulate the detected field.

  17. Report: Manchester Band of Pomo Indians Needs to Improve Its Financial Management System and Demonstrate Completion of Grant Work

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #16-P-0320, September 21, 2016. The Manchester Band of Pomo Indians' inadequate financial management system, and shortfalls in completing grant tasks, resulted in all costs claimed being questioned.

  18. Towards two-dimensional complete photonic bandgap structures below infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lem, Han; Moroz, Alexander

    2000-09-01

    Bandgaps in two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals are hard to achieve due to the limited contrast in the dielectric permeability available with conventional dielectric materials. The situation changes for periodic arrangements of scatterers consisting of materials with a Drude-like behaviour of the dielectric function. We show for two-dimensional square and triangular lattices that such systems have in-plane complete photonic bandgaps (CPBGs) below infrared wavelengths. Of the two geometries, the optimal one for ideal Drude-like behaviour is a square lattice, whereas for Drude-like behaviour in silver, using experimental data (Palik E D 1991 Handbook of Optical Constants of Solids vol 1 (San Diego: Academic)), the optimal geometry is a triangular lattice. If the lattice spacing is tuned to a characteristic plasma wavelength, several CPBGs open in the spectrum and their relative gap width can be as large as 36.9% (9.9% in a nonabsorptive window) even if the host dielectric constant ɛh = 1. Such structures can provide CPBG structures with bandgaps down to ultraviolet wavelengths.

  19. Complete genomic sequence of Pepper vein banding virus (PVBV): a distinct member of the genus Potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Anindya, R; Joseph, J; Gowri, T D S; Savithri, H S

    2004-03-01

    The complete genomic sequence of Pepper vein banding virus (PVBV), a potyvirus infecting chilli and other solanaceous plants in south India, was determined and compared with those of other potyviruses. The viral genome contained 9711 nucleotides, excluding the poly-A tail. The length of the 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) were 163 and 281 nucleotides respectively. As for other potyviruses, the PVBV genome has a single open reading frame (ORF) starting at nucleotide 164 and ending at nt 9430, which encodes a polyprotein of 3088 amino acid residues. There are nine putative conserved cleavage sites within the polyprotein, which can result in ten functionally distinct protein products. Phylogenetic analysis of the potyviral polyprotein sequences showed that PVBV is a distinct species of this genus.

  20. Junction-type photonic crystal waveguides for notch- and pass-band filtering.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Naeem; Amin, Muhammad; Naureen, Shagufta; Swillo, Marcin; Anand, Srinivasan

    2011-10-10

    Evolution of the mode gap and the associated transmission mini stop-band (MSB) as a function of photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide width is theoretically and experimentally investigated. The change of line-defect width is identified to be the most appropriate way since it offers a wide MSB wavelength tuning range. A high transmission narrow-band filter is experimentally demonstrated in a junction-type waveguide composed of two PhC waveguides with slightly different widths. The full width at half maximum is 5.6 nm; the peak transmission is attenuated by only ~5 dB and is ~20 dB above the MSBs. Additionally, temperature tuning of the filter were also performed. The results show red-shift of the transmission peak and the MSB edges with a gradient of dλ/dT = 0.1 nm/°C. It is proposed that the transmission MSBs in such junction-type cascaded PhC waveguides can be used to obtain different types of filters.

  1. Fratricide-preventing friend identification tag based on photonic band structure coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliyahu, Danny; Sadovnik, Lev S.; Manasson, Vladimir A.

    2000-07-01

    A new friend foe identification tag based on photonic band structure (PBS) is presented. The tag utilizes frequency-coded radar signal return. Targets that include the passive tag responds selectively to slightly different frequencies generated by interrogating MMW radar. It is possible to use in- and out-of-band gap frequencies or defect modes of the PBS in order to obtain frequency dependent radar waves reflections. This tag can be made in the form of patch attachable such as plate or corner reflectors, to be worn by an individual marine, or to be integrated into the platform camouflage. Ultimately, it can be incorporated as smart skin or a ground or airborne vehicle. The proposed tag takes full advantage of existing sensors for interrogation (minimal chances required), it is lightweight and small in dimensions, it operates in degraded environments, it has no impact on platform vulnerability, it has low susceptibility to spoofing and mimicking (code of the day) and it has low susceptibility to active jamming. We demonstrated the operation of the tag using multi-layer dielectric (Duroid) having periodic structure of metal on top of each of the layers (metal strips in this case). The experimental results are consistent with numerical simulation. The device can be combined with temporal coding to increase target detection and identification resolution.

  2. A super narrow band filter based on silicon 2D photonic crystal resonator and reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Deyuan; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Juebin; Tao, Shangbin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a novel structure of super narrow band filter based on two-dimensional square lattice photonic crystals of silicon rods in air for 1.5 um communication is proposed and studied. COMSOL Multiphysics4.3b software is used to simulate the optical behavior of the filter. The filter consists of one point-defect-based resonator and two line-defect-based reflectors. The resonance frequency, transmission coefficient and quality factor are investigated by varying the parameters of the structure. In design, a silicon rod is removed to form the resonator; for the rows of rods above and below the resonator, a part of the rods are removed to form the reflectors. By optimizing the parameters of the filter, the quality factor and transmission coefficient of the filter at the resonance frequency of 2e14 Hz can reach 1330 and 0.953, respectively. The super narrow band filter can be integrated into optical circuit for its micron size. Also, it can be used for wavelength selection and noise filtering of optical amplifier in future communication application.

  3. Simultaneous multi-channel CMW-band and MMW-band UWB monocycle pulse generation using FWM effect in a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangzheng; Wu, Jian; Fu, Songnian; Xu, Kun; Li, Yan; Hong, Xiaobin; Shum, Ping; Lin, Jintong

    2010-07-19

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme to simultaneously realize multi-channel centimeter wave (CMW) band and millimeter wave (MMW) band ultra-wideband (UWB) monocycle pulse generation using four wave mixing (FWM) effect in a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (HNL-PCF). Two lightwaves carrying polarity-reversed optical Gaussian pulses with appropriate time delay and another lightwave carrying a 20 GHz clock signal are launched into the HNL-PCF together. By filtering out the FWM idlers, two CMW-band UWB monocycle signals and two MMW-band UWB monocycle signals at 20 GHz are obtained simultaneously. Experimental measurements of the generated UWB monocycle pulses at individual wavelength, which comply with the FCC regulations, verify the feasibility and flexibility of proposed scheme for use in practical UWB communication systems.

  4. Localized photonic band edge modes and orbital angular momenta of light in a golden-angle spiral.

    PubMed

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Noh, Heeso; Trevino, Jacob; Negro, Luca Dal; Cao, Hui

    2011-11-21

    We present a numerical study on photonic bandgap and band edge modes in the golden-angle spiral array of air cylinders in dielectric media. Despite the lack of long-range translational and rotational order, there is a large PBG for the TE polarized light. Due to spatial inhomogeneity in the air hole spacing, the band edge modes are spatially localized by Bragg scattering from the parastichies in the spiral structure. They have discrete angular momenta that originate from different families of the parastichies whose numbers correspond to the Fibonacci numbers. The unique structural characteristics of the golden-angle spiral lead to distinctive features of the band edge modes that are absent in both photonic crystals and quasicrystals.

  5. Analytic expressions for the electromagnetic mode density in finite, one-dimensional, photonic band-gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendickson, Jon M.; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Scalora, Michael

    1996-04-01

    We derive an exact expression for the electromagnetic mode density, and hence the group velocity, for a finite, N-period, one-dimensional, photonic band-gap structure. We begin by deriving a general formula for the mode density in terms of the complex transmission coefficient of an arbitrary index profile. Then we develop a specific formula that gives the N-period mode density in terms of the complex transmission coefficient of the unit cell. The special cases of mode-density enhancement and suppression at the photonic band edge and also at midgap, respectively, are derived. The specific example of a quarter-wave stack is analyzed, and applications to three-dimensional structures, spontaneous emission control, delay lines, band-edge lasers, and superluminal tunneling times are discussed.

  6. Atom-atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Jonathan D.; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E.; Kimble, H. J.

    2016-09-01

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields E(x)e±ikxxE(x)∝e±ikxx outside the bandgap to localized fields E(x)e-κx|x|E(x)∝e-κx|x| within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom-atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom-atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the D1D1 line of atomic cesium for N¯=3.0±0.5

  7. True-time-delay photonic beamformer for an L-band phased array radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmuda, Henry; Toughlian, Edward N.; Payson, Paul M.; Malowicki, John E.

    1995-10-01

    The problem of obtaining a true-time-delay photonic beamformer has recently been a topic of great interest. Many interesting and novel approaches to this problem have been studied. This paper examines the design, construction, and testing of a dynamic optical processor for the control of a 20-element phased array antenna operating at L-band (1.2-1.4 GHz). The approach taken here has several distinct advantages. The actual optical control is accomplished with a class of spatial light modulator known as a segmented mirror device (SMD). This allows for the possibility of controlling an extremely large number (tens of thousands) of antenna elements using integrated circuit technology. The SMD technology is driven by the HDTV and laser printer markets so ultimate cost reduction as well as technological improvements are expected. Optical splitting is efficiently accomplished using a diffractive optical element. This again has the potential for use in antenna array systems with a large number of radiating elements. The actual time delay is achieved using a single acousto-optic device for all the array elements. Acousto-optic device technologies offer sufficient delay as needed for a time steered array. The topological configuration is an optical heterodyne system, hence high, potentially millimeter wave center frequencies are possible by mixing two lasers of slightly differing frequencies. Finally, the entire system is spatially integrated into a 3D glass substrate. The integrated system provides the ruggedness needed in most applications and essentially eliminates the drift problems associated with free space optical systems. Though the system is presently being configured as a beamformer, it has the ability to operate as a general photonic signal processing element in an adaptive (reconfigurable) transversal frequency filter configuration. Such systems are widely applicable in jammer/noise canceling systems, broadband ISDN, and for spread spectrum secure communications

  8. High power breakdown testing of a photonic band-gap accelerator structure with elliptical rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Cook, Alan M.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A. Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; Marsh, Roark A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved single-cell photonic band-gap (PBG) structure with an inner row of elliptical rods (PBG-E) was tested with high power at a 60 Hz repetition rate at X-band (11.424 GHz), achieving a gradient of 128MV/m at a breakdown probability of 3.6×10-3 per pulse per meter at a pulse length of 150 ns. The tested standing-wave structure was a single high-gradient cell with an inner row of elliptical rods and an outer row of round rods; the elliptical rods reduce the peak surface magnetic field by 20% and reduce the temperature rise of the rods during the pulse by several tens of degrees, while maintaining good damping and suppression of high order modes. When compared with a single-cell standing-wave undamped disk-loaded waveguide structure with the same iris geometry under test at the same conditions, the PBG-E structure yielded the same breakdown rate within measurement error. The PBG-E structure showed a greatly reduced breakdown rate compared with earlier tests of a PBG structure with round rods, presumably due to the reduced magnetic fields at the elliptical rods vs the fields at the round rods, as well as use of an improved testing methodology. A post-testing autopsy of the PBG-E structure showed some damage on the surfaces exposed to the highest surface magnetic and electric fields. Despite these changes in surface appearance, no significant change in the breakdown rate was observed in testing. These results demonstrate that PBG structures, when designed with reduced surface magnetic fields and operated to avoid extremely high pulsed heating, can operate at breakdown probabilities comparable to undamped disk-loaded waveguide structures and are thus viable for high-gradient accelerator applications.

  9. Topologically evolved photonic crystals: breaking the world record in band gap size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal, Osama R.; El-Beltagy, Mohammed A.; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2012-04-01

    Using topology optimization, a photonic crystal (PtC) unit cell can be designed to exhibit favorable electromagnetic wave propagation properties. Among these is the opening of a band gap (BG) with the largest possible ratio of width to midgap frequency. In this paper the aim is to maximize the relative size of the first and fourth relative BGs of two-dimensional (2D) PtCs with a square lattice configuration. In addition, we examine the effects of the degree of unit cell symmetry on the relative BG size and on the geometric traits of the optimized topologies. We use a specialized genetic algorithm (GA) for our search. The results show that the type of symmetry constraint imposed has a significant, and rather subtle, effect on the unit cell topology and BG size of the emerging optimal designs. In pursuit of record values of BG size, we report two low-symmetry unit cells as an outcome of our search efforts to date: one with a relative BG size of 46% for TE waves and the other with a relative BG size of 47% for TM waves.

  10. High efficiency single transverse mode photonic band crystal lasers with low vertical divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shaoyu; Qu, Hongwei; Liu, Yun; Li, Lunhua; Chen, Yang; Zhou, Xuyan; Lin, Yuzhe; Liu, Anjin; Qi, Aiyi; Zheng, Wanhua

    2016-10-01

    High efficiency 980 nm longitudinal photonic band crystal (PBC) edge emitting laser diodes are designed and fabricated. The calculated results show that eight periods of Al0.1Ga0.9As and Al0.25Ga0.75As layer pairs can reduce the vertical far field divergence to 10.6° full width at half maximum (FWHM). The broad area (BA) lasers show a very high internal quantum efficiency ηi of 98% and low internal loss αi of 1.92 cm-1. Ridge waveguide (RW) lasers with 3 mm cavity length and 5um strip width provide 430 mW stable single transverse mode output at 500 mA injection current with power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 47% under continuous wave (CW) mode. A maximum PCE of 50% is obtained at the 300 mA injection current. A very low vertical far field divergence of 9.4° is obtained at 100 mA injection. At 500 mA injection, the vertical far field divergence increases to 11°, the beam quality factors M2 values are 1.707 in vertical direction and 1.769 in lateral direction.

  11. Recent progress in chiral photonic band-gap liquid crystals for laser applications.

    PubMed

    Furumi, Seiichi

    2010-12-01

    This article describes a brief review of recent research advances in chiral liquid crystals (CLCs) for laser applications. The CLC molecules have an intrinsic capability to spontaneously organize supramolecular helical assemblages consisting of liquid crystalline layers through their helical twisting power. Such CLC supramolecular helical structures can be regarded as one-dimensional photonic crystals (PhCs). Owing to their supramolecular helical structures, the CLCs show negative birefringence along the helical axis. Selective reflection of circularly polarized light is the most unique and important optical property in order to generate internal distributed feedback effect for optically-excited laser emission. When a fluorescent dye is embedded in the CLC medium, optical excitation gives rise to stimulated laser emission peak(s) at the band edge(s) and/or within the CLC selective reflection. Furthermore, the optically-excited laser emission peaks can be controlled by external stimuli through the self-organization of CLC molecules. This review introduces the research background of CLCs carried out on the PhC realm, and highlights intriguing precedents of various CLC materials for laser applications. It would be greatly advantageous to fabricate active CLC laser devices by controlling the supramolecular helical structures. Taking account of the peculiar features, we can envisage that a wide variety of supramolecular helical structures of CLC materials will play leading roles in next-generation optoelectronic molecular devices.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Mulberry Vein Banding Associated Virus, a New Tospovirus Infecting Mulberry.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jiaorong; Liu, Pingping; Zhu, Liling; Zou, Chengwu; Li, Jieqiu; Chen, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Mulberry vein banding associated virus (MVBaV) that infects mulberry plants with typical vein banding symptoms had been identified as a tentative species of the genus Tospovirus based on the homology of N gene sequence to those of tospoviruses. In this study, the complete sequence of the tripartite RNA genome of MVBaV was determined and analyzed. The L RNA has 8905 nucleotides (nt) and encodes the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of 2877 aa amino acids (aa) in the viral complementary (vc) strand. The RdRp of MVBaV shares the highest aa sequence identity (85.9%) with that of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), and contains conserved motifs shared with those of the species of the genus Tospovirus. The M RNA contains 4731 nt and codes in ambisense arrangement for the NSm protein of 309 aa in the sense strand and the Gn/Gc glycoprotein precursor (GP) of 1,124 aa in the vc strand. The NSm and GP of MVBaV share the highest aa sequence identities with those of Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) and Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) (83.2% and 84.3%, respectively). The S RNA is 3294 nt in length and contains two open reading frames (ORFs) in an ambisense coding strategy, encoding a 439-aa non-structural protein (NSs) and the 277-aa nucleocapsid protein (N), respectively. The NSs and N also share the highest aa sequence identity (71.1% and 74.4%, respectively) with those of CaCV. Phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp, NSm, GP, NSs, and N proteins showed that MVBaV is most closely related to CaCV and GBNV and that these proteins cluster with those of the WSMoV serogroup, and that MVBaV seems to be a species bridging the two subgroups within the WSMoV serogroup of tospoviruses in evolutionary aspect, suggesting that MVBaV represents a distinct tospovirus. Analysis of S RNA sequence uncovered the highly conserved 5'-/3'-ends and the coding regions, and the variable region of IGR with divergent patterns among MVBaV isolates.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Mulberry Vein Banding Associated Virus, a New Tospovirus Infecting Mulberry

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jiaorong; Liu, Pingping; Zhu, Liling; Zou, Chengwu; Li, Jieqiu; Chen, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Mulberry vein banding associated virus (MVBaV) that infects mulberry plants with typical vein banding symptoms had been identified as a tentative species of the genus Tospovirus based on the homology of N gene sequence to those of tospoviruses. In this study, the complete sequence of the tripartite RNA genome of MVBaV was determined and analyzed. The L RNA has 8905 nucleotides (nt) and encodes the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of 2877 aa amino acids (aa) in the viral complementary (vc) strand. The RdRp of MVBaV shares the highest aa sequence identity (85.9%) with that of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), and contains conserved motifs shared with those of the species of the genus Tospovirus. The M RNA contains 4731 nt and codes in ambisense arrangement for the NSm protein of 309 aa in the sense strand and the Gn/Gc glycoprotein precursor (GP) of 1,124 aa in the vc strand. The NSm and GP of MVBaV share the highest aa sequence identities with those of Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) and Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) (83.2% and 84.3%, respectively). The S RNA is 3294 nt in length and contains two open reading frames (ORFs) in an ambisense coding strategy, encoding a 439-aa non-structural protein (NSs) and the 277-aa nucleocapsid protein (N), respectively. The NSs and N also share the highest aa sequence identity (71.1% and 74.4%, respectively) with those of CaCV. Phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp, NSm, GP, NSs, and N proteins showed that MVBaV is most closely related to CaCV and GBNV and that these proteins cluster with those of the WSMoV serogroup, and that MVBaV seems to be a species bridging the two subgroups within the WSMoV serogroup of tospoviruses in evolutionary aspect, suggesting that MVBaV represents a distinct tospovirus. Analysis of S RNA sequence uncovered the highly conserved 5’-/3’-ends and the coding regions, and the variable region of IGR with divergent patterns among MVBaV isolates. PMID:26291718

  14. Molecular analysis of complete genomic sequences of four isolates of Gooseberry vein banding associated virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presence of Gooseberry vein banding associated virus (GVBaV), a badnavirus in the family Caulimoviridae, is strongly correlated with gooseberry vein banding disease in Ribes spp. In this study, full-length genomic sequences of four GVBaV isolates from different hosts and geographic regions were det...

  15. AFM-Patterned 2-D Thin-Film Photonic Crystal Analyzed by Complete Angle Scatter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Scatter Distribution Function of Photonic Crystals,” Air Force Institute of Technology, Dayton, OH, Thesis 2009. [5] I. Prieto , B. Galiana, P. A... Francisco : Addison Wesley, 2002. 76 [38] Bahaa E. A. Saleh and Malvin Carl Teich, Fundamentals of Photonics, 2nd ed. Hoboken: Wiley, 2007. [39

  16. Broad-band, RF-photonic antennas: System and integrated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ligeng

    1997-07-01

    We analyze an optically controlled microwave phased array antenna system whereby beam forming is accomplished with a large number of antenna elements that can receive any of several different true-time-delays from a single fiber using multi-channel optical heterodyne techniques. The system performance such as the signal-to-noise ratio, signal-to-interchannel interference ratio, and dynamic range (DR) for various modulation-demodulation schemes (i.e., AM, FM and PM) are quantitatively analyzed. An experimental system insensitive to laser linewidth and IF frequency instabilities is demonstrated for the first time. We demonstrate accurate true-time delay across the L band (from 0.8 to 1.5 GHz). The DR for one channel is 52 dB/MHz. For a narrow channel spacing of 1 A at 1.55 μm wavelength, the interchannel interference is <- 50dB. It is found that this system provides improved controllability over direct detection methods, and can meet the stringent requirements of modern high resolution microwave antenna systems. Monolithic photonic integration using vertical twin- waveguide (TG) structure based on a single-step MBE grown InP/InGaAsP material is also studied as a means for practically implementing large scale photonic systems such as the above system. Specifically, integration of a MQW laser with a passive waveguide is demonstrated in this material with a record high 45% light coupling. An InGaAs loss layer is introduced for the first time to ensure a constant laser feedback and output coupling by eliminating even mode propagation, while having little effect on the odd mode. Finally, we have investigated means to obtain high efficiency, high power semiconductor lasers for use in high DR, and high density RF-optical links, employing a 1.5 μm wavelength InGaAsP/InP separate confinement multi-quantum well structure with broadened waveguides. A record low internal loss of 1.3 cm -1 (compared to a previous value of 3.5 cm-1) and threshold current density of 73 A/cm2 per

  17. Spin-wave band-pass filters based on yttrium iron garnet films for tunable microwave photonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. B.; Drozdovskii, A. V.; Nikitin, A. A.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports on development of tunable band-pass microwave filters for microwave photonic generators. The filters were fabricated with the use of epitaxial yttrium iron garnet films. Principle of operation of the filters was based on excitation, propagation, and reception of spin waves. In order to obtain narrow pass band, the filtering properties of excitation and reception antennas were exploited. The filters demonstrated insertion losses of 2-3 dB, bandwidth of 25-35 MHz, and tuning range of up to 1.5 GHz in the range 3-7 GHz.

  18. Band structure of cavity-type hypersonic phononic crystals fabricated by femtosecond laser-induced two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhymzhanov, A. M.; Gueddida, A.; Alonso-Redondo, E.; Utegulov, Z. N.; Perevoznik, D.; Kurselis, K.; Chichkov, B. N.; El Boudouti, E. H.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Fytas, G.

    2016-05-01

    The phononic band diagram of a periodic square structure fabricated by femtosecond laser pulse-induced two photon polymerization is recorded by Brillouin light scattering (BLS) at hypersonic (GHz) frequencies and computed by finite element method. The theoretical calculations along the two main symmetry directions quantitatively capture the band diagrams of the air- and liquid-filled structure and moreover represent the BLS intensities. The theory helps identify the observed modes, reveals the origin of the observed bandgaps at the Brillouin zone boundaries, and unravels direction dependent effective medium behavior.

  19. Measurement of spontaneous-emission enhancement near the one-dimensional photonic band edge of semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tocci, Michael D.; Scalora, Michael; Bloemer, Mark J.; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Bowden, Charles M.

    1996-04-01

    We present results of an experimental investigation into alteration of the spontaneous emission spectrum of GaAs from within one-dimensional photonic band gap (PBG) structures. The PBG samples are multilayer AlAs/Al0.2Ga0.8As/GaAs p-i-n light-emitting diodes, with layers arranged as a distributed Bragg reflector. The emission spectra normal to the layers are measured, and we use a simple method to model the power spectrum of spontaneous emission from within the structures. We find that the emitted power is enhanced by a factor of 3.5 at the frequencies near the photonic band edge.

  20. Spontaneous emission from a two-level atom in anisotropic one-band photonic crystals: A fractional calculus approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.-N.; Huang, C.-H.; Cheng, S.-C.; Hsieh, W.-F.

    2010-02-15

    Spontaneous emission (SE) from a two-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal (PC) is investigated by the fractional calculus. Physical phenomena of the SE are studied analytically by solving the fractional kinetic equations of the SE. There is a dynamical discrepancy between the SE of anisotropic and isotropic PCs. We find that, contrary to the SE phenomenon of the isotropic PC, the SE near the band edge of an anisotropic PC shows no photon-atom bound state. It is consistent with the experimental results of Barth, Schuster, Gruber, and Cichos [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 243902 (2006)] that the anisotropic property of the system enhances the SE. We also study effects of dispersion curvatures on the changes of the photonic density of states and the appearance of the diffusion fields in the SE.

  1. Defect guidance in kagome-clad fibers: the role of photonic band gaps and self-similarity of the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, H.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the influence of the structural self-similarity of the kagome lattice on the defect modes and waveguiding properties of hollow-core kagome-cladding fibers. We show that the guidance of such fibers is influenced by photonic band gaps (PBGs) which appear for a subset of the kagome lattice. Using these insights, we provide design considerations to further decrease loss in kagome-clad fibers.

  2. A theoretical roadmap for optical lithography of photonic band gap microchips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Timothy Y. M.

    This thesis presents designs and fabrication algorithms for 3D photonic band gap (PBG) material synthesis and embedded optical waveguide networks. These designs are suitable for large scale micro-fabrication using optical lithography methods. The first of these is a criss-crossing pore structure based on fabrication by direct photo-electrochemical etching in single-crystal silicon. We demonstrate that a modulation of the pore radius between pore crossing points leads to a moderately large PBG. We delineate a variety of PBG architectures amenable to fabrication by holographic lithography. In this technique, an optical interference pattern exposes a photo-sensitive material, leading to a template structure in the photoresist whose dielectric-air interface corresponds to an iso-intensity surface in the exposing interference pattern. We demonstrate PBG architectures obtainable from the interference patterns from four independent beams. The PBG materials may be fabricated by replicating the developed photoresist with established silicon replication methods. We identify optical beam configurations that optimize the intensity contrast in the photoresist. We describe the invention of a new approach to holographic lithography of PBG materials using the diffraction of light through a three-layer optical phase mask (OPM). We show how the diffraction-interference pattern resulting from single beam illumination of our OPM closely resembles a diamondlike architecture for suitable designs of the phase mask. It is suggested that OPML may both simplify and supercede all previous optical lithography approaches to PBG material synthesis. Finally, we demonstrate theoretically the creation of three-dimensional optical waveguide networks in holographically defined PBG materials. This requires the combination of direct laser writing (DLW) of lines of defects within the holographically-defined photoresist and the replication of the microchip template with a high refractive index

  3. Dual-function photonic integrated circuit for frequency octo-tupling or single-side-band modulation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mehedi; Maldonado-Basilio, Ramón; Hall, Trevor J

    2015-06-01

    A dual-function photonic integrated circuit for microwave photonic applications is proposed. The circuit consists of four linear electro-optic phase modulators connected optically in parallel within a generalized Mach-Zehnder interferometer architecture. The photonic circuit is arranged to have two separate output ports. A first port provides frequency up-conversion of a microwave signal from the electrical to the optical domain; equivalently single-side-band modulation. A second port provides tunable millimeter wave carriers by frequency octo-tupling of an appropriate amplitude RF carrier. The circuit exploits the intrinsic relative phases between the ports of multi-mode interference couplers to provide substantially all the static optical phases needed. The operation of the proposed dual-function photonic integrated circuit is verified by computer simulations. The performance of the frequency octo-tupling and up-conversion functions is analyzed in terms of the electrical signal to harmonic distortion ratio and the optical single side band to unwanted harmonics ratio, respectively.

  4. Tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with square-like Archimedean lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Liu, Shao-Bin E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, the tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional (2D) plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) composed of homogeneous plasma and dielectric (GaAs) with square-like Archimedean lattices (ladybug and bathroom lattices) for TM wave are theoretically investigated based on a modified plane wave expansion method. The type-1 structure is dielectric rods immersed in the plasma background, and the complementary structure is named as type-2 PPCs. Theoretical simulations demonstrate that the both types of PPCs with square-like Archimedean lattices have some advantages in obtaining the higher cut-off frequency, the larger PBGs, more number of PBGs, and the relative bandwidths compared to the conventional square lattices as the filling factor or radius of inserted rods is same. The influences of plasma frequency and radius of inserted rod on the properties of PBGs for both types of PPCs also are discussed in detail. The calculated results show that PBGs can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. The possibilities of all-angle negative refraction in such two types of PPCs at low bands also are discussed. Our calculations reveal that the all-angle negative phenomena can be observed in the first two TM bands, and the frequency range of all-angle negative refraction can be tuned by changing plasma frequency. Those properties can be used to design the optical switching and sensor.

  5. Tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with square-like Archimedean lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional (2D) plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) composed of homogeneous plasma and dielectric (GaAs) with square-like Archimedean lattices (ladybug and bathroom lattices) for TM wave are theoretically investigated based on a modified plane wave expansion method. The type-1 structure is dielectric rods immersed in the plasma background, and the complementary structure is named as type-2 PPCs. Theoretical simulations demonstrate that the both types of PPCs with square-like Archimedean lattices have some advantages in obtaining the higher cut-off frequency, the larger PBGs, more number of PBGs, and the relative bandwidths compared to the conventional square lattices as the filling factor or radius of inserted rods is same. The influences of plasma frequency and radius of inserted rod on the properties of PBGs for both types of PPCs also are discussed in detail. The calculated results show that PBGs can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. The possibilities of all-angle negative refraction in such two types of PPCs at low bands also are discussed. Our calculations reveal that the all-angle negative phenomena can be observed in the first two TM bands, and the frequency range of all-angle negative refraction can be tuned by changing plasma frequency. Those properties can be used to design the optical switching and sensor.

  6. An Unusual Content in a Congenital Hernia - Complete Spleno -gonadal Fusion Band.

    PubMed

    Mahalakshmi, V N; Barathi, S Deepak

    2013-06-01

    Six years old boy underwent elective inguinal exploration for left congenital hernia. Per- operatively, an elongated, purplish-red, fleshy band of tissue was found inside the sac, adherent to the upper pole of testis. Biopsy was taken and the wound closed. An MRI done after 4 weeks proved the origin of the band from spleen. Laparotomy and excision of the band was done. The histo-pathology of the specimen was reported as normal splenic tissue. The above features are consistent with a diagnosis of spleno - gonadal fusion (SGF).

  7. Complete band gaps in a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) phononic plate with cross-like holes: numerical design and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Miniaci, Marco; Marzani, Alessandro; Testoni, Nicola; De Marchi, Luca

    2015-02-01

    In this work the existence of band gaps in a phononic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plate with a square lattice of cross-like holes is numerically and experimentally investigated. First, a parametric analysis is carried out to find plate thickness and cross-like holes dimensions capable to nucleate complete band gaps. In this analysis the band structures of the unitary cell in the first Brillouin zone are computed by exploiting the Bloch-Floquet theorem. Next, time transient finite element analyses are performed to highlight the shielding effect of a finite dimension phononic region, formed by unitary cells arranged into four concentric square rings, on the propagation of guided waves. Finally, ultrasonic experimental tests in pitch-catch configuration across the phononic region, machined on a PVC plate, are executed and analyzed. Very good agreement between numerical and experimental results are found confirming the existence of the predicted band gaps.

  8. One-photon band gap engineering of borate glass doped with ZnO for photonics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Baki, Manal; Abdel-Wahab, Fathy A.; El-Diasty, Fouad

    2012-04-01

    Lithium tungsten borate glass of the composition (0.56-x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0.4Li{sub 2}O-xZnO-0.04WO{sub 3} (0 {<=}x{<=} 0.1 mol. %) is prepared for photonics applications. The glass is doped with ZnO to tune the glass absorption characteristics in a wide spectrum range (200-2500 nm). Chemical bond approach, including chemical structure, electronegativity, bond ionicity, nearest-neighbor coordination, and other chemical bonding aspect, is used to analyze and to explain the obtained glass properties such as: transmittance, absorption, electronic structure parameters (bandgap, Fermi level, and Urbach exciton-phonon coupling), Wannier free excitons excitation (applying Elliott's model), and two-photon absorption coefficient as a result of replacement of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} by ZnO.

  9. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed. PMID:25822135

  10. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-03-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed.

  11. Photonic dual RF beam reception of an X band phased array antenna using a photonic crystal fiber-based true-time-delay beamformer.

    PubMed

    Subbaraman, Harish; Chen, Maggie Yihong; Chen, Ray T

    2008-12-01

    We report dual RF beam reception of an X band phased array antenna using a photonic crystal fiber (PCF)-based delay network. Each incoming RF signal can be independently received, and the angle of arrival can be determined based on the delay time-dependent wavelength. Two RF signals with frequencies 8.4 and 12 GHz impinge upon an X-band antenna array from -7.4 degrees and -21.2 degrees . These signals are detected, and the angle of arrival is determined with a very good degree of accuracy using PCF-based true-time delay. The total number of RF beams that can be simultaneously detected is limited by the hardware availability and the bandwidth of the wavelength differentiation capability of the system.

  12. Photonic band gap and defect mode of one-dimensional photonic crystal coated from a mixture of (HMDSO, N2) layers deposited by PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amri, R.; Sahel, S.; Gamra, D.; Lejeune, M.; Clin, M.; Zellama, K.; Bouchriha, H.

    2017-04-01

    One dimensional photonic crystal based on a mixture of an organic compound HMDSO and nitrogen N2, is elaborated by radiofrequency Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (RF-PECVD) at different radiofrequency powers. The variation of the radiofrequency power for a flow of N2/HMDSO ratio equal to 0.4, leads to obtain two kinds of layers A and B with refractive index nA = 2 and nB = 1.55 corresponding to RF power of 200 W and 20 W, respectively. The analysis of the infrared results shows that these layers have the same chemical composition element with different structure. These layers, which exhibit a good indexes difference (nA - nB) contrast, allowed then the elaboration of a one-photonic crystal from the same initial gas mixture, which is the aim of this work. After the optimization of the layers thickness, we have measured transmission and reflection spectra and we found that the photonic band gap (PBG) appears after 15 periods of alternating A and B deposited layers. The introduction of defect in the structure leads to obtain a localized mode in the center of the PBG corresponding to the telecommunication wave length 1.55 μm. Finally, we have successfully interpreted our experimental results by using a theoretical model based on transfer matrix method.

  13. Experimental evidence of the photonic band gap in hybrid one-dimensional photonic crystal based on a mixture of (HMDSO, O2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amri, R.; Sahel, S.; Manaa, C.; Bouaziz, L.; Gamra, D.; Lejeune, M.; Clin, M.; Zellama, K.; Bouchriha, H.

    2016-08-01

    Hybrid One-dimensional photonic crystal coated from a mixture of an organic compound (HMDSO) and oxygen (O2) is elaborated by PECVD technique. The originality of the method consists in obtaining layers of different permittivity with the same gas mixture, but with different flow. The change in flow is optimized to obtain organic/inorganic layers of good quality with high and low refractive index of 2.1 and 1.4 corresponding respectively to HMDSO and SiO2 materials as assigned by IR measurement. Evidence of the photonic band gap is obtained by measuring the transmissions and reflections spectra which show that it appears only after 13 periods with a width of 325 nm corresponding to energy 3.8 eV. We have also introduced a defect in this photonic structure by changing the thickness of central layer, and observed the presence of a frequency mode corresponding to this defect. Our results are interpreted by using a theoretical model based on transfer matrix wich well reproduced the experimental data.

  14. Photonic band structures of periodic arrays of pores in a metallic host: tight-binding beyond the quasistatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangmoo; Stroud, David

    2014-03-01

    We have calculated the photonic band structures of metallic inverse opals and of periodic linear chains of spherical pores in a metallic host, below a plasma frequency ωp. In both cases, we use a tight-binding approximation, assuming a Drude dielectric function for the metallic component, but without making the quasistatic approximation. The tight-binding modes are linear combinations of the single-cavity transverse magnetic (TM) modes. For the inverse-opal structures, the lowest modes are analogous to those constructed from the three degenerate atomic p-states in fcc crystals. For the linear chains, in the limit of small spheres compared to a wavelength, the results bear some qualitative resemblance to the dispersion relation for metal spheres in an insulating host, as calculated by Brongersma et al. [Phys. Rev. B 62, R16356 (2000)]. Because the electromagnetic fields of these modes decay exponentially in the metal, there are no radiative losses, in contrast to the case of arrays of metallic spheres in air. We suggest that this tight-binding approach to photonic band structures of such metallic inverse materials may be a useful approach for studying photonic crystals containing metallic components. This work was supported by KIAS, by NSF-MRSEC at OSU (DMR-0820414), and by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER46424. Computing resources were provided by OSC and by Abacus at KIAS.

  15. Photonic band structures of periodic arrays of pores in a metallic host: tight-binding beyond the quasistatic approximation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangmoo; Stroud, D

    2013-08-26

    We have calculated the photonic band structures of metallic inverse opals and of periodic linear chains of spherical pores in a metallic host, below a plasma frequency ωp. In both cases, we use a tight-binding approximation, assuming a Drude dielectric function for the metallic component, but without making the quasistatic approximation. The tight-binding modes are linear combinations of the single-cavity transverse magnetic (TM) modes. For the inverse-opal structures, the lowest modes are analogous to those constructed from the three degenerate atomic p-states in fcc crystals. For the linear chains, in the limit of small spheres compared to a wavelength, the results bear some qualitative resemblance to the dispersion relation for metal spheres in an insulating host, as calculated by Brongersma et al. [Phys. Rev. B 62, R16356 (2000)]. Because the electromagnetic fields of these modes decay exponentially in the metal, there are no radiative losses, in contrast to the case of arrays of metallic spheres in air. We suggest that this tight-binding approach to photonic band structures of such metallic inverse materials may be a useful approach for studying photonic crystals containing metallic components, even beyond the quasistatic approximation.

  16. Femtosecond Pulse Characterization as Applied to One-Dimensional Photonic Band Edge Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Gamble, Lisa J.; Diffey, William M.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to control the group velocity and phase of an optical pulse is important to many current active areas of research. Electronically addressable one-dimensional photonic crystals are an attractive candidate to achieve this control. This report details work done toward the characterization of photonic crystals and improvement of the characterization technique. As part of the work, the spectral dependence of the group delay imparted by a GaAs/AlAs photonic crystal was characterized. Also, a first generation an electrically addressable photonic crystal was tested for the ability to electronically control the group delay. The measurement technique, using 100 femtosecond continuum pulses was improved to yield high spectral resolution (1.7 nanometers) and concurrently with high temporal resolution (tens of femtoseconds). Conclusions and recommendations based upon the work done are also presented.

  17. Analyzing the photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with fractal Sierpinski gasket structure based on the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional plasma-dielectric photonic crystals (2D PPCs) under a transverse-magnetic (TM) wave are theoretically investigated by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method where Monte Carlo method is introduced. The proposed PWE method can be used to calculate the band structures of 2D PPCs which possess arbitrary-shaped filler and any lattice. The efficiency and convergence of the present method are discussed by a numerical example. The configuration of 2D PPCs is the square lattices with fractal Sierpinski gasket structure whose constituents are homogeneous and isotropic. The type-1 PPCs is filled with the dielectric cylinders in the plasma background, while its complementary structure is called type-2 PPCs, in which plasma cylinders behave as the fillers in the dielectric background. The calculated results reveal that the enough accuracy and good convergence can be obtained, if the number of random sampling points of Monte Carlo method is large enough. The band structures of two types of PPCs with different fractal orders of Sierpinski gasket structure also are theoretically computed for a comparison. It is demonstrate that the PBGs in higher frequency region are more easily produced in the type-1 PPCs rather than in the type-2 PPCs. Sierpinski gasket structure introduced in the 2D PPCs leads to a larger cutoff frequency, enhances and induces more PBGs in high frequency region. The effects of configurational parameters of two types of PPCs on the PBGs are also investigated in detail. The results show that the PBGs of the PPCs can be easily manipulated by tuning those parameters. The present type-1 PPCs are more suitable to design the tunable compacted devices.

  18. Efficient frequency downconversion at the single photon level from the red spectral range to the telecommunications C-band.

    PubMed

    Zaske, Sebastian; Lenhard, Andreas; Becher, Christoph

    2011-06-20

    We report on single photon frequency downconversion from the red part of the spectrum (738 nm) to the telecommunications C-band. By mixing attenuated laser pulses with an average photon number per pulse < 1 with a strong continuous light field at 1403 nm in a periodically poled Zn:LiNbO3 ridge waveguide an internal conversion efficiency of ∼ 73% is achieved. We further investigate the noise properties of the process by measuring the output spectrum. Our results indicate that by narrow spectral filtering a quantum interface should be feasible which bridges the wavelength gap between quantum emitters like color centers in diamond emitting in the red part of the spectrum and low-loss fiber-optic telecommunications wavelengths.

  19. Alcohol sensing over O+E+S+C+L+U transmission band based on porous cored octagonal photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bikash Kumar; Islam, Md. Shadidul; Ahmed, Kawsar; Asaduzzaman, Sayed

    2017-03-01

    A micro structure porous cored octagonal photonic crystal fiber (P-OPCF) has been proposed to sense aqueous analysts (alcohol series) over a wavelength range of 0.80 μm to 2.0 μm. By implementing a full vectorial finite element method (FEM), the numerical simulation on the proposed O-PCF has been analyzed. Numerical investigation shows that high sensitivity can be gained by changing the structural parameters. The obtained result shows the sensitivities of 66.78%, 67.66%, 68.34%, 68.72%, and 69.09%, and the confinement losses of 2.42×10-10 dB/m, 3.28×10-11 dB/m, 1.21×10-6 dB/m, 4.79×10-10 dB/m, and 4.99×10-9 dB/m at the 1.33 μm wavelength for methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, and pentanol, respectively can satisfy the condition of much legibility to install an optical system. The effects of the varying core and cladding diameters, pitch distance, operating wavelength, and effective refractive index are also reported here. It reflects that a significant sensitivity and low confinement loss can be achieved by the proposed P-OPCF. The proposed P-OPCF also covers the wavelength band (O+E+S+C+L+U). The investigation also exhibits that the sensitivity increases when the wavelength increases like S O-bandband band < S C-band band band. This research observation has much pellucidity which has remarkable impact on the field of optical fiber sensor.

  20. Fiber-optic CATV system performance improvement by using split-band technique and photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hai-Han; Tzeng, Shah-Jye; Chuang, Yao-Wei; Chen, Guan-Lin; Peng, Hsiang-Chun

    2007-03-01

    A directly-modulated amplitude modulation-vestigial sideband (AM-VSB) cable television (CATV) erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA)-repeated system that uses split-band technique and photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as a broadband dispersion compensation device is proposed and demonstrated. In contrast to a conventional externally-modulated fiber-optic CATV system, good performance of carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR), composite second order (CSO) and composite triple beat (CTB) were obtained in our proposed systems over a combination of 100-km single-mode fiber (SMF) and 3.6 km PCF.

  1. Ultrashort pulse propagation at the photonic band edge: Large tunable group delay with minimal distortion and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalora, M.; Flynn, R. J.; Reinhardt, S. B.; Fork, R. L.; Bloemer, M. J.; Tocci, M. D.; Bowden, C. M.; Ledbetter, H. S.; Bendickson, J. M.; Dowling, J. P.; Leavitt, R. P.

    1996-08-01

    We examine optical pulse propagation through a 30-period, GaAs/AlAs, one-dimensional, periodic structure at the photonic band-edge transmission resonance. We predict theoretically-and demonstrate experimentally-an approximate energy, momentum, and form invariance of the transmitted pulse, as well as large group index (up to 13.5). The group index is tunable and many orders of magnitude more sensitive to variation in material refractive index than for bulk material. We interpret this observation in terms of time-dependent electromagnetic states of the pulse-crystal system.

  2. A compact dual-band bandpass filter based on porous silicon dual-microcavity of one-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Zhang, Hong-yan

    2015-03-01

    We propose a compact dual-band bandpass filter (BPF) based on one-dimensional porous silicon (PS) photonic crystal by electrochemical etching. By inserting three periods of high and low reflective index layers in the center of porous silicon microcavity (PSM), two sharp resonant peaks appear in the high reflectivity stop band on both sides of the resonance wavelength. Through simulation and experiment, the physical mechanisms of the two resonance peaks and the resonance wavelength are also studied. It is found that the resonance wavelength can be tuned only by adjusting the effective optical thickness (EOT) of each PS layer, in which different resonance wavelengths have different widths between the two sharp resonance peaks. Besides, the analysis indicates that oxidization makes the blue shift become larger for high wavelength than that for low wavelength. Such a fabricated BPF based on PS dual-microcavity is easy to be fabricated and low cost, which benefits the application of integrated optical devices.

  3. Group-index independent coupling to band engineered SOI photonic crystal waveguide with large slow-down factor.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Somayyeh; Hosseini, Amir; Xu, Xiaochuan; Subbaraman, Harish; Chen, Ray T

    2011-10-24

    Group-index independent coupling to a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) based band-engineered photonic crystal (PCW) waveguide is presented. A single hole size is used for designing both the PCW coupler and the band-engineered PCW to improve fabrication yield. Efficiency of several types of PCW couplers is numerically investigated. An on-chip integrated Fourier transform spectral interferometry device is used to experimentally determine the group-index while excluding the effect of the couplers. A low-loss, low-dispersion slow light transmission over 18 nm bandwidth under the silica light line with a group index of 26.5 is demonstrated, that corresponds to the largest slow-down factor of 0.31 ever demonstrated for a PCW with oxide bottom cladding.

  4. The properties of photonic band gap and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional magnetized photonic crystals as the mixed polarized modes considered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gap (PBG) and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated based on the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, in which the homogeneous magnetized plasma spheres are immersed in the homogeneous dielectric background, as the Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered (the incidence electromagnetic wave vector is perpendicular to the external magnetic field at any time). The dispersive properties of all of the EM modes are studied because the PBG is not only for the extraordinary and ordinary modes but also for the mixed polarized modes. The equations for PBGs also are theoretically deduced. The numerical results show that the PBG and a flatbands region can be observed. The effects of the dielectric constant of dielectric background, filling factor, plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency (the external magnetic field) on the dispersive properties of all of the EM modes in such 3D MPPCs are investigated in detail, respectively. Theoretical simulations show that the PBG can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. Compared to the conventional dielectric-air PCs with similar structure, the larger PBG can be obtained in such 3D MPPCs. It is also shown that the upper edge of flatbands region cannot be tuned by the filling factor and dielectric constant of dielectric background, but it can be manipulated by the plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency.

  5. Controllable transmission photonic band gap and all-optical switching behaviors of 1-D InAs/GaAs quantum-dot photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Xiang, Bowen; Xing, Yunsheng

    2016-12-01

    Transmission optical properties of one-dimensional (1-D) InAs/GaAs quantum-dot photonic crystal (QD-PC), composed of 400 elementary cells, were analyzed by using transfer matrix method. In our calculations, a homogeneous broadening with temperature and other inhomogeneous broadening with quantum dot (QD) size fluctuations are introduced. Our results show that a large optical Stark shift occurs at the high energy edge of the transmission photonic band-gap (TPBG) when, which exhibits the function of light with light, an external laser field acts resonantly on the excitons in the InAs QDs. Utilized this TPBG based on the pump-probe geometry, an all-optical switch can be constructed and the on-off switching extinction ratio (SER) is varied with both the temperature and the inhomogeneity of QDs. Significantly, it still maintains switching behavior and can process the data sequence of return-to-zero codes of 250 Gb/s even if the QD standard deviation of relative size fluctuations (SD-RSF) is up to 3% and the temperature is at 100 K.

  6. Wide-Band Spatially Tunable Photonic Bandgap in Visible Spectral Range and Laser based on a Polymer Stabilized Blue Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jia-De; Wang, Tsai-Yen; Mo, Ting-Shan; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2016-07-01

    This work successfully develops a largely-gradient-pitched polymer-stabilized blue phase (PSBP) photonic bandgap (PBG) device with a wide-band spatial tunability in nearly entire visible region within a wide blue phase (BP) temperature range including room temperature. The device is fabricated based on the reverse diffusion of two injected BP-monomer mixtures with a low and a high chiral concentrations and afterwards through UV-curing. This gradient-pitched PSBP can show a rainbow-like reflection appearance in which the peak wavelength of the PBG can be spatially tuned from the blue to the red regions at room temperature. The total tuning spectral range for the cell is as broad as 165 nm and covers almost the entire visible region. Based on the gradient-pitched PSBP, a spatially tunable laser is also demonstrated in this work. The temperature sensitivity of the lasing wavelength for the laser is negatively linear and approximately ‑0.26 nm/°C. The two devices have a great potential for use in applications of photonic devices and displays because of their multiple advantages, such as wide-band tunability, wide operated temperature range, high stability and reliability, no issue of hysteresis, no need of external controlling sources, and not slow tuning speed (mechanically).

  7. Wide-Band Spatially Tunable Photonic Bandgap in Visible Spectral Range and Laser based on a Polymer Stabilized Blue Phase

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia-De; Wang, Tsai-Yen; Mo, Ting-Shan; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2016-01-01

    This work successfully develops a largely-gradient-pitched polymer-stabilized blue phase (PSBP) photonic bandgap (PBG) device with a wide-band spatial tunability in nearly entire visible region within a wide blue phase (BP) temperature range including room temperature. The device is fabricated based on the reverse diffusion of two injected BP-monomer mixtures with a low and a high chiral concentrations and afterwards through UV-curing. This gradient-pitched PSBP can show a rainbow-like reflection appearance in which the peak wavelength of the PBG can be spatially tuned from the blue to the red regions at room temperature. The total tuning spectral range for the cell is as broad as 165 nm and covers almost the entire visible region. Based on the gradient-pitched PSBP, a spatially tunable laser is also demonstrated in this work. The temperature sensitivity of the lasing wavelength for the laser is negatively linear and approximately −0.26 nm/°C. The two devices have a great potential for use in applications of photonic devices and displays because of their multiple advantages, such as wide-band tunability, wide operated temperature range, high stability and reliability, no issue of hysteresis, no need of external controlling sources, and not slow tuning speed (mechanically). PMID:27456475

  8. The Relationship between Oxygen A-band Photon Pathlength Distributions and 3D Structures of Heating Rate Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L.; Min, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Broadband heating directly drives the global atmospheric and oceanic circulation and its vertical profiles strongly depend upon cloud three-dimensional (3D) structures. Due to the complexity of cloud 3D problems and the difficulties in observations of broadband heating rate profiles (BBHRP), there are still large uncertainties in the relationship of clouds, radiation and climate feedback. Oxygen A-band photon pathlength distributions (PPLD) contain rich information about the 3D structures of clouds and BBHRP and can be observed by both ground based and space based measurements. Therefore, it is meaningful to explore the possibility of connecting A-band PPLD and BBHRP and consequently to describe the internal relationship between them together with the cloud 3D effects on BBHRP. A 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer model is applied to simulate solar broadband heating rate profiles and oxygen A-band photon pathlength distributions of several ideal cloud fields and two typical cloud fields generated by cloud resolving model (CRM). Principal components (PCs) and the first four moments are selected to represent the vertical structures of BBHRP and PPLD, respectively. In ideal cloud fields, the moments show clear constraint to PCs of BBHRP. The results demonstrate the feasibility to describe the vertical structures of BBHRP by PPLD. The relationship between moments and PCs turns complicated in CRM cloud fields due to the composition of various 3D effects. However, detailed analysis still show that the moments, the PCs and total cloud optical depth are effective factors in defining BBHRP, especially for the vertical structures of relative low clouds. Further, a statistical fitting between the PCs and the moments by a two-layer neural network is applied to provide a quantitative representation of the linkages.

  9. Photonic band gap effect and structural color from silver nanoparticle gelatin emulsion.

    PubMed

    Kok, Mang Hin; Ma, Rui; Lee, Jeffrey Chi Wai; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C T; Sheng, Ping; Cheah, Kok Wai

    2005-10-01

    We have fabricated planar structures of silver nanoparticles in monochromatic gelatin emulsion with a continuous spacing ranging from 0.15-0.40 micron using a two-beam interference of a single laser source. Our planar holograms display a colorful "rainbow" pattern and photonic bandgaps covering the visible and IR ranges. We model the planar silver nanoparticle-gelatin composite system using an effective medium approach and good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment.

  10. W-Band Technology and Techniques for Analog Millimeter-Wave Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-19

    available technology and standard techniques for millimeter-wave photonics at frequencies up to 110 GHz. Measured data for commercial electro-optic...Measured data for commercial electro- optic phase modulators, electro-optic intensity modulators, p-i-n photodiodes and waveguide photodetectors...millimeter-wave application is associated with wireless links [5-7], radio astronomy [8], or military systems, the main components that determine the

  11. Broad-band optical parametric gain on a silicon photonic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Mark A.; Turner, Amy C.; Sharping, Jay E.; Schmidt, Bradley S.; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2006-06-01

    Developing an optical amplifier on silicon is essential for the success of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic integrated circuits. Recently, optical gain with a 1-nm bandwidth was demonstrated using the Raman effect, which led to the demonstration of a Raman oscillator, lossless optical modulation and optically tunable slow light. A key strength of optical communications is the parallelism of information transfer and processing onto multiple wavelength channels. However, the relatively narrow Raman gain bandwidth only allows for amplification or generation of a single wavelength channel. If broad gain bandwidths were to be demonstrated on silicon, then an array of wavelength channels could be generated and processed, representing a critical advance for densely integrated photonic circuits. Here we demonstrate net on/off gain over a wavelength range of 28nm through the optical process of phase-matched four-wave mixing in suitably designed SOI channel waveguides. We also demonstrate wavelength conversion in the range 1,511-1,591nm with peak conversion efficiencies of +5.2dB, which represents more than 20 times improvement on previous four-wave-mixing efficiencies in SOI waveguides. These advances allow for the implementation of dense wavelength division multiplexing in an all-silicon photonic integrated circuit. Additionally, all-optical delays, all-optical switches, optical signal regenerators and optical sources for quantum information technology, all demonstrated using four-wave mixing in silica fibres, can now be transferred to the SOI platform.

  12. Ultrahigh-Q photonic crystal nanocavities in wide optical telecommunication bands.

    PubMed

    Terawaki, Ryo; Takahashi, Yasushi; Chihara, Masahiro; Inui, Yoshitaka; Noda, Susumu

    2012-09-24

    We have studied the feasibility of extending the operating wavelength range of high-Q silicon nanocavities above and below the 1.55 μm wavelength band, while maintaining Q factors of more than one million. We have succeeded in developing such nanocavities in the optical telecommunication bands from 1.27 μm to 1.50 μm. Very high Q values of more than two million were obtained even for the 1.30 μm band. The Q values increase proportionally to the resonant wavelength because the scattering loss decreases. We have also analyzed the influence of absorption due to surface water. We conclude that high-Q nanocavities are feasible for an even wider wavelength region including parts of the mid-infrared.

  13. Distance between Cys-201 in erythrocyte band 3 and the bilayer measured by single-photon radioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Thevenin, B J; Bicknese, S E; Park, J; Verkman, A S; Shohet, S B

    1996-01-01

    Single-photon radioluminescence (SPR), the excitation of fluorophores by short-range beta-decay electrons, was developed for the measurement of submicroscopic distances. The cytoplasmic domain of band 3 (cdb3) is the primary, multisite anchorage for the erythrocyte skeleton. To begin to define the membrane arrangement of the highly asymmetrical cdb3 structure, the distance from the bilayer of Cys-201 next to the "hinge" of cdb3 was measured by both SPR and resonance energy transfer (RET). cdb3 was labeled at Cys-201 with fluorescein maleimide. For SPR measurements, the bilayer was labeled with [3H]oleic acid. The corrected cdb3-specific SPR signal was 98 +/- 2 cps microCi-1 [mumol band 3]-1. From this and the signal from a parallel sample in which 3H2O was substituted for [3H]oleic acid to create uniform geometry between 3H and the fluorophores, a Cys-201-to-bilayer separation of 39 +/- 7 A was calculated. Confirmatory distances of 40 and 43 A were obtained by RET between fluorescein on Cys-201 and eosin and rhodamine B lipid probes, respectively. This distance indicates that Cys-201 lies near band 3's vertical axis of symmetry and that the subdomain of cdb3 between the hinge and the membrane is not significantly extended. In addition, these results validate SPR as a measure of molecular distances in biological systems. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8913602

  14. Systematic study of the hybrid plasmonic-photonic band structure underlying lasing action of diffractive plasmon particle lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schokker, A. Hinke; van Riggelen, Floor; Hadad, Yakir; Alù, Andrea; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2017-02-01

    We study lasing in distributed feedback lasers made from square lattices of silver particles in a dye-doped waveguide. We present a systematic analysis and experimental study of the band structure underlying the lasing process as a function of the detuning between the particle plasmon resonance and the lattice Bragg diffraction condition. To this end, as gain medium we use either a polymer doped with Rh6G only, or polymer doped with a pair of dyes (Rh6G and Rh700) that act as a Förster energy transfer (FRET) pair. This allows for gain, respectively, at 590 or 700 nm when pumped at 532 nm, compatible with the achievable size tunability of silver particles embedded in the polymer. By polarization-resolved spectroscopic Fourier microscopy, we are able to observe the plasmonic/photonic band structure of the array, unraveling both the stop gap width, as well as the loss properties of the four involved bands at fixed lattice Bragg diffraction condition and as a function of detuning of the plasmon resonance. To explain the measurements we derive an analytical model that sheds insights on the lasing process in plasmonic lattices, highlighting the interaction between two competing resonant processes, one localized at the particle level around the plasmon resonance, and one distributed across the lattice. Both are shown to contribute to the lasing threshold and the overall emission properties of the array.

  15. Photonic band structure and effective medium properties of doubly-resonant core-shell metallo-dielectric nanowire arrays: low-loss, isotropic optical negative-index behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abujetas, D. R.; Paniagua-Domínguez, R.; Nieto-Vesperinas, M.; Sánchez-Gil, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate theoretically and numerically the photonic band structure in the optical domain of an array of core-shell metal-semiconductor nanowires. Corresponding negative-index photonic bands are calculated, showing isotropic equifrequency surfaces. The effective (negative) electric permittivity and magnetic permeability, retrieved from S-parameters, are used to compare the performance of such nanowire arrays with homogeneous media in canonical examples, such as refraction through a prism and flat-lens focusing. Very good agreement is found, confirming the effective medium behavior of the nanowire array as a low-loss, isotropic (2D) and bulk, optical negative index metamaterial. Indeed, disorder is introduced to further stress its robustness.

  16. Photon counting as a probe of superfluidity in a two-band Bose-Hubbard system coupled to a cavity field.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Sara; Trivedi, Nandini

    2013-12-13

    We show that photon number measurement can be used to detect superfluidity for a two-band Bose-Hubbard model coupled to a cavity field. The atom-photon coupling induces transitions between the two internal atomic levels and results in entangled polaritonic states. In the presence of a cavity field, we find different photon numbers in the Mott-insulating versus superfluid phases, providing a method of distinguishing the atomic phases by photon counting. Furthermore, we examine the dynamics of the photon field after a rapid quench to zero atomic hopping by increasing the well depth. We find a robust correlation between the field's quench dynamics and the initial superfluid order parameter, thereby providing a novel and accurate method of determining the order parameter.

  17. Ultrashort pulse propagation at the photonic band edge: Large tunable group delay with minimal distortion and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fork, Richard; Scalora, Michael; Flynn, Rachel; Reinhardt, Senter; Dowling, John; Bloemer, Mark; Tocci, Michael; Bowden, Chuck; Leavitt, Rich

    1996-03-01

    We examine optical pulse propagation through a 30 period, GaAs/AIAs, one-dimensional, photnic crystal at the photonic band-edge transmission resonance. We predict theoretically -- and demonstrated experimentally -- an approximate energy, momentum, and form invariance of the transmitted pulse, as well as large group index (up to 13.5). The group index is tunable and many orders of magnitude more sensitive to variation in material refractive index than for bulk material. We interpret this observation in terms of novel, time-dependent electromagnetic states of the pulse-crystal system.We discuss this novel state and potential applications in the context of ongoing work on high dielectric constant materials. Multi-order of magnitude improvements appear possible invarious applications.

  18. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of higher order mode (HOM) damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  19. Modeling of chirped pulse propagation through a mini-stop band in a two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Tun; Cryan, Martin J.; Ivanov, Pavel S.; Ho, Daniel; Ren, Bob; Craddock, Ian J.; Rorison, Judy M.; Railton, Chris J.

    2007-07-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and frequency-domain finite-element (FE) methods are used to study chirped pulse propagation in 2D photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides. Chirped pulse FDTD has been implemented, which allows the study of pulse propagation in a direct way. The carrier wavelength of the pulse is swept across the bandwidth of a mini-stop-band (MSB) feature, and pulse compression behavior is observed. Both round-hole and square-hole PhC waveguides are studied, with the latter giving increased pulse compression. A group-delay analysis is then used to understand the compression behavior, and this shows how the fast-light regime that occurs within the MSB plays an important role in the observed pulse compression.

  20. Photonic band gap in an imperfect atomic diamond lattice: Penetration depth and effects of finite size and vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antezza, Mauro; Castin, Yvan

    2013-09-01

    We study the effects of finite size and of vacancies on the photonic band gap recently predicted for an atomic diamond lattice. Close to a Jg=0→Je=1 atomic transition, and for atomic lattices containing up to N≈3×104 atoms, we show how the density of states can be affected by both the shape of the system and the possible presence of a fraction of unoccupied lattice sites. We numerically predict and theoretically explain the presence of shape-induced border states and of vacancy-induced localized states appearing in the gap. We also investigate the penetration depth of the electromagnetic field which we compare to the case of an infinite system.

  1. Octave-wide photonic band gap in three-dimensional plasmonic Bragg structures and limitations of radiative coupling.

    PubMed

    Taubert, Richard; Dregely, Daniel; Stroucken, Tineke; Christ, Andre; Giessen, Harald

    2012-02-21

    Radiative coupling between oscillators is one of the most fundamental subjects of research in optics, where particularly a Bragg-type arrangement is of interest and has already been applied to atoms and excitons in quantum wells. Here we explore this arrangement in a plasmonic structure. We observe the emergence of an octave-wide photonic band gap in the optical regime. Compared with atomic or excitonic systems, the coupling efficiency of the particle plasmons utilized here is several orders of magnitude larger and widely tunable by changing the size and geometry of the plasmonic nanowires. We are thus able to explore the regime where the coupling distance is even limited by the large radiative decay rate of the oscillators. This Bragg-stacked coupling scheme will open a new route for future plasmonic applications such as far-field coupling to quantum emitters without quenching, plasmonic cavity structures and plasmonic distributed gain schemes for spasers.

  2. Nonaqueous sol-gel chemistry applied to atomic layer deposition: tuning of photonic band gap properties of silica opals.

    PubMed

    Marichy, Catherine; Dechézelles, Jean-Francois; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Pinna, Nicola; Ravaine, Serge; Vallée, Renaud

    2010-05-01

    Combining both electromagnetic simulations and experiments, it is shown that the photonic pseudo band gap (PPBG) exhibited by a silica opal can be fully controlled by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) of titania into the pores of the silica spheres constituting the opal. Different types of opals were assembled by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique: homogeneous closed packed structures set up of, respectively, 260 and 285 nm silica spheres, as well as opal heterostructures consisting of a monolayer of 430 nm silica spheres embedded within 10 layers of 280 nm silica spheres. For the stepwise infiltration of the opals with titania, titanium isopropoxide and acetic acid were used as metal and oxygen sources, in accordance with a recently published non-aqueous approach to ALD. A shift of the direct PPBG, its disappearance, and the subsequent appearance and shifting of the inverse PPBG are observed as the opal is progressively filled. The close agreement between simulated and experimental results is striking, and promising in terms of predicting the properties of advanced photonic materials. Moreover, this work demonstrates that the ALD process is rather robust and can be applied to the coating of complex nanostructures.

  3. Complete four-photon cluster-state analyzer based on cross-Kerr nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Long; Su, Shi-Lei; Guo, Qi; Cheng, Liu-Yong; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2013-09-01

    We propose a method to construct an optical cluster-state analyzer based on cross-Kerr nonlinearity combined with linear optics elements. In the scheme, we employ two four-qubit parity gates and the controlled phase gate (CPG) from only the cross-Kerr nonlinearity and show that all the orthogonal four-qubit cluster states can be completely identified. The scheme is significant for the large-scale quantum communication and quantum information processing networks. In addition, the scheme is feasible and deterministic under current experimental conditions.

  4. High-depth-resolution 3-dimensional radar-imaging system based on a few-cycle W-band photonic millimeter-wave pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tzu-Fang; Wun, Jhih-Min; Chen, Wei; Peng, Sui-Wei; Shi, Jin-Wei; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2013-06-17

    We demonstrate that a near-single-cycle photonic millimeter-wave short-pulse generator at W-band is capable to provide high spatial resolution three-dimensional (3-D) radar imaging. A preliminary study indicates that 3-D radar images with a state-of-the-art ranging resolution of around 1.2 cm at the W-band can be achieved.

  5. Modulation of the photonic band structure topology of a honeycomb lattice in an atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yiqi; Liu, Xing; Belić, Milivoj R.; Wu, Zhenkun; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-12-15

    In an atomic vapor, a honeycomb lattice can be constructed by utilizing the three-beam interference method. In the method, the interference of the three beams splits the dressed energy level periodically, forming a periodic refractive index modulation with the honeycomb profile. The energy band topology of the honeycomb lattice can be modulated by frequency detunings, thereby affecting the appearance (and disappearance) of Dirac points and cones in the momentum space. This effect can be usefully exploited for the generation and manipulation of topological insulators.

  6. Magnonic band structure, complete bandgap, and collective spin wave excitation in nanoscale two-dimensional magnonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, D.; Barman, A.; Kłos, J. W.; Krawczyk, M.

    2014-01-28

    We present the observation of a complete bandgap and collective spin wave excitation in two-dimensional magnonic crystals comprised of arrays of nanoscale antidots and nanodots, respectively. Considering that the frequencies dealt with here fall in the microwave band, these findings can be used for the development of suitable magnonic metamaterials and spin wave based signal processing. We also present the application of a numerical procedure, to compute the dispersion relations of spin waves for any high symmetry direction in the first Brillouin zone. The results obtained from this procedure have been reproduced and verified by the well established plane wave method for an antidot lattice, when magnetization dynamics at antidot boundaries are pinned. The micromagnetic simulation based method can also be used to obtain iso–frequency contours of spin waves. Iso–frequency contours are analogous of the Fermi surfaces and hence, they have the potential to radicalize our understanding of spin wave dynamics. The physical origin of bands, partial and full magnonic bandgaps have been explained by plotting the spatial distribution of spin wave energy spectral density. Although, unfettered by rigid assumptions and approximations, which afflict most analytical methods used in the study of spin wave dynamics, micromagnetic simulations tend to be computationally demanding. Thus, the observation of collective spin wave excitation in the case of nanodot arrays, which can obviate the need to perform simulations, may also prove to be valuable.

  7. Micro-metric electronic patterning of a topological band structure using a photon beam

    PubMed Central

    Frantzeskakis, E.; De Jong, N.; Zwartsenberg, B.; Huang, Y. K.; Bay, T. V.; Pronk, P.; Van Heumen, E.; Wu, D.; Pan, Y.; Radovic, M.; Plumb, N. C.; Xu, N.; Shi, M.; De Visser, A.; Golden, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    In an ideal 3D topological insulator (TI), the bulk is insulating and the surface conducting due to the existence of metallic states that are localized on the surface; these are the topological surface states. Quaternary Bi-based compounds of Bi2−xSbxTe3−ySey with finely-tuned bulk stoichiometries are good candidates for realizing ideal 3D TI behavior due to their bulk insulating character. However, despite its insulating bulk in transport experiments, the surface region of Bi2−xSbxTe3−ySey crystals cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum also exhibits occupied states originating from the bulk conduction band. This is due to adsorbate-induced downward band-bending, a phenomenon known from other Bi-based 3D TIs. Here we show, using angle-resolved photoemission, how an EUV light beam of moderate flux can be used to exclude these topologically trivial states from the Fermi level of Bi1.46Sb0.54Te1.7Se1.3 single crystals, thereby re-establishing the purely topological character of the low lying electronic states of the system. We furthermore prove that this process is highly local in nature in this bulk-insulating TI, and are thus able to imprint structures in the spatial energy landscape at the surface. We illustrate this by ‘writing’ micron-sized letters in the Dirac point energy of the system. PMID:26543011

  8. An Update on the DOE Early Career Project on Photonic Band Gap Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Edwards, Randall L.; Haynes, William B.; Madrid, Michael A.; Romero, Frank P.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Tuzel, Walter M.; Boulware , Chase H.; Grimm, Terry

    2012-06-07

    We performed fabrication of two SRF PBG resonators at 2.1 GHz and demonstrated their proof-of-principle operation at high gradients. Measured characteristics of the resonators were in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We demonstrated that SRF PBG cavities can be operated at 15 MV/m accelerating gradients. We completed the design and started fabrication of the 16-cell PBG accelerating structure at 11.7 GHz for wakefield testing at AWA.

  9. Measurement of the resonant polaron effect in the Reststrahlen band of GaAs:Si using far-infrared two-photon excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Wenckebach, W.Th.; Planken, P.C.M.; Son, P.C. van

    1995-12-31

    We present the results of photoconductivity measurements of the resonant electron-phonon interaction in the middle of the Reststrahlen band using two-photon excitation with intense picosecond pulses with frequency around 143 cm{sup -1} (70 {mu}m). We use two photons rather than a single photon for the excitation of the resonant-polaron to avoid the problems of strong reflection and dielectric artifacts encountered in direct single-photon excitation in the Reststrahlen band. The sample is a 10 {mu}m thick Si-doped GaAs epitaxial layer on a 400 {mu}m semi-insulating GaAs substrate. The electronic levels of the Si shallow donor can be tuned by the application of a magnetic field. Intense tunable picosecond pulses with a frequency of around 143 cm{sup -1} from the Dutch free-electron laser FELIX are weakly focussed onto the sample, which is kept at 8 K. Electrons excited to the 3d{sup +2} state via the electric-dipole allowed two-photon transition out of the 1s{sub 0-} ground state, decay to the conduction band and give rise to an increase in the photoconductivity. The figure shows the energy-peak position of the 3d{sup +2} transition thus obtained as a function of the magnetic-field strength. The figure clearly shows the avoided crossing around the LO-phonon energy where the coupling shows the avoided crossing around the LO-phonon energy where the coupling between the 3d{sup +2} state and the LO phonon is strongest. Note that the data between 267 cm{sup -1} and 296 cm{sup -1} are extremely difficult to obtain with single-photon excitation because of their position in the middle of the Reststrahlen band.

  10. Switching of the photonic band gap in three-dimensional film photonic crystals based on opal-VO{sub 2} composites in the 1.3-1.6 {mu}m spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Pevtsov, A. B. Grudinkin, S. A.; Poddubny, A. N.; Kaplan, S. F.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Golubev, V. G.

    2010-12-15

    The parameters of three-dimensional photonic crystals based on opal-VO{sub 2} composite films in the 1.3-1.6 {mu}m spectral range important for practical applications (Telecom standard) are numerically calculated. For opal pores, the range of filling factors is established (0.25-0.6) wherein the composite exhibits the properties of a three-dimensional insulator photonic crystal. On the basis of the opal-VO{sub 2} composites, three-dimensional photonic film crystals are synthesized with specified parameters that provide a maximum shift of the photonic band gap in the vicinity of the wavelength {approx}1.5 {mu}m ({approx}170 meV) at the semiconductor-metal transition in VO{sub 2}.

  11. Coherent all-optical switching by resonant quantum-dot distributions in photonic band-gap waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujic, Dragan; John, Sajeev

    2007-12-01

    We study the detailed propagative characteristics of optical pulses in photonic band-gap (PBG) waveguides, coupled near resonantly to inhomogeneously broadened distributions of quantum dots. The line centers of the quantum-dot (QD) distributions are placed near a sharp discontinuity in the local electromagnetic density of states. Using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations of optical pulse dynamics and independent QD susceptibilities associated with resonance fluorescence, we demonstrate subpicosecond switching from pulse absorption to pulse amplification using steady-state optical holding and gate fields with power levels on the order of 1 milliwatt. In the case of collective response of QDs within the periodic dielectric microstructure, the gate power level is reduced to 200 microwatt for room temperature operation. In principle, this enables 200 Gbits per second optical information processing at wavelengths near 1.5 microns in various wavelength channels. The allowed pulse bandwidth in a given waveguide channel exceeds 0.5 THz allowing switching of subpicosecond laser pulses without pulse distortion. The switching contrast from absorption to gain is governed by the QD oscillator strength and dipole dephasing time scale. We consider dephasing time scales ranging from nanoseconds (low-temperature operation) to one picosecond (room-temperature operation). This all-optical transistor action is based on simple Markovian models of single-dot and collective-dot inversion and switching by coherent resonant pumping near the photon density of states discontinuity. The structured electromagnetic vacuum is provided by two-mode waveguide architectures in which one waveguide mode has a cutoff that occurs, with very large Purcell factor, near the QDs resonance, while the other waveguide mode exhibits nearly linear dispersion for fast optical propagation and modulation. Unlike optical switching based on Kerr nonlinearities in an optical cavity resonator, switching

  12. Temperature dependence of beat-length and confinement loss in an air-core photonic band-gap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Li, Xuyou; Hong, Yong; Liu, Pan; Yang, Hanrui; Ling, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of polarization-maintaining (PM) property and loss in a highly-birefringent air-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) is investigated. The effects of temperature variation on the effective index, beat-length and confinement loss are studied numerically by using the full-vector finite element method (FEM). It is found that, the PM property of this PBF is insensitive to the temperature, and the temperature-dependent beat-length coefficient can be as low as 2.86×10-8 m/°C, which is typically 200 times less than those of conventional panda fibers, the PBF has a stable confinement loss of 0.01 dB/m over the temperature range of -30 to 20 °C for the slow axis at the wavelength of 1.55 μm. The PBF with ultra-low temperature-dependent PM property and low loss can reduce the thermally induced polarization instability apparently in interferometric applications such as resonant fiber optic gyroscope (RFOG), optical fiber sensors, and so on.

  13. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE041-like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code "CST Particle Studio" has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ˜108 kW with ˜15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE041-like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  14. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of the red-banded lobster Metanephrops thomsoni (Crustacea, Astacidea, Nephropidae): a novel gene order.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Dong-Ha; Min, Gi-Sik; Park, Joong-Ki; Kim, Sanghee

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the red-banded lobster, Metanephrops thomsoni (Decapoda, Astacidea, Nephropidae), is 19,835 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNAs, 24 transfer RNAs (including additional copies of trnW and trnL1), and 2 control regions (CR). The mitogenome of M. thomsoni has 10 long intergenic sequences (71-237 bp) with a high AT content (70.0%). The two CRs show 59.6% similarity and have an identical sequence region with a length of 295 bp. The mitogenome of M. thomsoni shows a novel gene arrangement compared with the pancrustacean ground pattern and is identical to that of M. sibogae, except for the two additional tRNAs (trnW and trnL1). Phylogenetic tree from maximum likelihood analysis using the concatenated sequences of 13 PCGs depicted M. thomsoni as one of the members of the superfamily Nephropoidea within Astacidea.

  16. Plant lighting system with five wavelength-band light-emitting diodes providing photon flux density and mixing ratio control

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant growth and development depend on the availability of light. Lighting systems therefore play crucial roles in plant studies. Recent advancements of light-emitting diode (LED) technologies provide abundant opportunities to study various plant light responses. The LED merits include solidity, longevity, small element volume, radiant flux controllability, and monochromaticity. To apply these merits in plant light response studies, a lighting system must provide precisely controlled light spectra that are useful for inducing various plant responses. Results We have developed a plant lighting system that irradiated a 0.18 m2 area with a highly uniform distribution of photon flux density (PFD). The average photosynthetic PFD (PPFD) in the irradiated area was 438 micro-mol m–2 s–1 (coefficient of variation 9.6%), which is appropriate for growing leafy vegetables. The irradiated light includes violet, blue, orange-red, red, and far-red wavelength bands created by LEDs of five types. The PFD and mixing ratio of the five wavelength-band lights are controllable using a computer and drive circuits. The phototropic response of oat coleoptiles was investigated to evaluate plant sensitivity to the light control quality of the lighting system. Oat coleoptiles irradiated for 23 h with a uniformly distributed spectral PFD (SPFD) of 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 at every peak wavelength (405, 460, 630, 660, and 735 nm) grew almost straight upwards. When they were irradiated with an SPFD gradient of blue light (460 nm peak wavelength), the coleoptiles showed a phototropic curvature in the direction of the greater SPFD of blue light. The greater SPFD gradient induced the greater curvature of coleoptiles. The relation between the phototropic curvature (deg) and the blue-light SPFD gradient (micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1) was 2 deg per 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1. Conclusions The plant lighting system, with a computer with a graphical user interface

  17. Band structure of a 2D photonic crystal based on ferrofluids of Co(1-x)Znx Fe2O4 nanoparticles under perpendicular applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Javier; Gonzalez, Luz Esther; Quinonez, Mario; Porras, Nelson; Zambrano, Gustavo; Gomez, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Using a ferrfluid of cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles Co(1 - x)ZnxFe2O4 coated with oleic acid and suspended in ethanol, we have fabricated a 2D photonic crystal (PC) by the application of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the ferrofluid. The 2D PC is made by rods of nanoparticles organized in a hexagonal structure. By means of the plane-wave expansion method, we study its photonic band structure (PBS) which depends on the effective permittivity and on the area ratio of the liquid phase. Additionaly, taking into account the Maxwell-Garnett theory we calculated the effective permittivity of the rods. We have found that the effective refractive index of the ferrofluid increases with its magnetization. Using these results we calculate the band structure of the photonic crystal at different applied magnetic fields, finding that the increase of the applied magnetic field shifts the band structure to lower frequencies with the appearance of more band gaps. Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali, Colombia

  18. Complete hyperentangled-Bell-state analysis for photonic qubits assisted by a three-level Λ-type system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperentangled Bell-state analysis (HBSA) is an essential method in high-capacity quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here by replacing the two-qubit controlled-phase gate with the two-qubit SWAP gate, we propose a scheme to distinguish the 16 hyperentangled Bell states completely in both the polarization and the spatial-mode degrees of freedom (DOFs) of two-photon systems. The proposed scheme reduces the use of two-qubit interaction which is fragile and cumbersome, and only one auxiliary particle is required. Meanwhile, it reduces the requirement for initializing the auxiliary particle which works as a temporary quantum memory, and does not have to be actively controlled or measured. Moreover, the state of the auxiliary particle remains unchanged after the HBSA operation, and within the coherence time, the auxiliary particle can be repeatedly used in the next HBSA operation. Therefore, the engineering complexity of our HBSA operation is greatly simplified. Finally, we discuss the feasibility of our scheme with current technologies. PMID:26780930

  19. Effects of refractive index changes on four-wave mixing bands in Er-doped photonic crystal fibers pumped at 976 nm.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Ibarra, L; Díez, A; Andrés, M V; Lucio, J L

    2012-04-01

    An experimental study of the effects of an auxiliary 976 nm pump signal on the four-wave mixing parametric bands generated with a 1064 nm pump in a normal dispersion Er-doped photonic crystal fiber is presented. The four-wave mixing signal and idler bands shift to shorter and longer wavelengths, respectively, with increasing 976 nm pump power. It is shown that the wavelength-dependent resonant refractive index change in the erbium-doped core under 976 nm pumping is at the origin of the effect.

  20. Polarization and field dependent two-photon absorption in GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum well waveguides in the half-band gap spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, H. K.; Penty, R. V.; White, I. H.; Grant, R. S.; Sibbett, W.; Soole, J. B. D.; LeBlanc, H. P.; Andreadakis, N. C.; Colas, E.; Kim, M. S.

    1991-12-01

    We report the observation of two photon absorption which is strongly dependent on the applied electric field and the optical polarization. At 1.55 μm wavelength, the two-photon absorption coefficient of the GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum well (MQW) waveguides for transverse-magnetic light is about seven times lower than for transverse-electric polarized light and changes by a factor of approximately 4 for a change in applied direct-current electric field of ˜140 kV/cm. Ultrafast nonlinear refraction causing phase changes of over π radians without appreciable excess loss is observed. These measurements demonstrate that GaAs/AlGaAs MQW waveguides could be successfully used for subpicosecond all-optical switching near half-band gap, at wavelengths corresponding to the 1.55 μm optical communications band.

  1. A program for calculating photonic band structures, Green's functions and transmission/reflection coefficients using a non-orthogonal FDTD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. J.; Pendry, J. B.

    2000-06-01

    In this paper we present an updated version of our ONYX program for calculating photonic band structures using a non-orthogonal finite difference time domain method. This new version employs the same transparent formalism as the first version with the same capabilities for calculating photonic band structures or causal Green's functions but also includes extra subroutines for the calculation of transmission and reflection coefficients. Both the electric and magnetic fields are placed onto a discrete lattice by approximating the spacial and temporal derivatives with finite differences. This results in discrete versions of Maxwell's equations which can be used to integrate the fields forwards in time. The time required for a calculation using this method scales linearly with the number of real space points used in the discretization so the technique is ideally suited to handling systems with large and complicated unit cells.

  2. Telecommunication Wavelength-Band Single-Photon Emission from Single Large InAs Quantum Dots Nucleated on Low-Density Seed Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ze-Sheng; Ma, Ben; Shang, Xiang-Jun; He, Yu; Zhang, Li-Chun; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Wang, Jin-Liang; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    Single-photon emission in the telecommunication wavelength band is realized with self-assembled strain-coupled bilayer InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a planar microcavity on GaAs substrate. Low-density large QDs in the upper layer active for ~1.3 μm emission are fabricated by precisely controlling the indium deposition amount and applying a gradient indium flux in both QD layers. Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) intensity suggested that the radiative lifetime of their exciton emission is 1.5~1.6 ns. The second-order correlation function of g (2)(0) < 0.5 which demonstrates a pure single-photon emission.

  3. Direct Observation of Two-Step Photon Absorption in an InAs/GaAs Single Quantum Dot for the Operation of Intermediate-Band Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Tomohiro; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-08

    We present the first direct observation of two-step photon absorption in an InAs/GaAs single quantum dot (QD) using photocurrent spectroscopy with two lasers. The sharp peaks of the photocurrent are shifted due to the quantum confined Stark effect, indicating that the photocurrent from a single QD is obtained. In addition, the intensity of the peaks depends on the power of the secondary laser. These results reveal the direct demonstration of the two-step photon absorption in a single QD. This is an essential result for both the fundamental operation and the realization of ultrahigh solar-electricity energy conversion in quantum dot intermediate-band solar cells.

  4. Photonic module: An on-demand resource for photonic entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Devitt, Simon J.; Greentree, Andrew D.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Ionicioiu, Radu; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Munro, William J.

    2007-11-15

    Photonic entanglement has a wide range of applications in quantum computation and communication. Here we introduce a device: the photonic module, which allows for the rapid, deterministic preparation of a large class of entangled photon states. The module is an application independent, ''plug and play'' device, with sufficient flexibility to prepare entanglement for all major quantum computation and communication applications in a completely deterministic fashion without number-discriminated photon detection. We present two alternative constructions for the module, one using free-space components and one in a photonic band-gap structure. The natural operation of the module is to generate states within the stabilizer formalism and we present an analysis on the cavity requirements to experimentally realize this device.

  5. Theoretical analysis of a palladium-based one-dimensional metallo-dielectric photonic band gap structure for applications to H2 sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, Maria Antonietta; Trevisi, Simona; De Sario, Marco; Petruzzelli, Vincenzo; D'Orazio, Antonella; Prudenzano, Francesco; Cioffi, Nicola; de Ceglia, Domenico; Scalora, Michael

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we report a numerical study of a palladium-based metallo-dielectric photonic band gap structure for the purpose of detecting H2. In particular, and as an example, we will explore applications to the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption, more commonly known as lactose intolerance condition. This pathology occurs as a result of an incomplete absorption or digestion of different substances, causing an increased spontaneous emission of H2 in human breath. Palladium is considered in order to exploit its well known ability to absorb hydrogen spontaneously. The proposed structure is particularly able to detect the lactose malabsorption level of the patient with relatively high sensitivity and rapidity.

  6. Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Rana; Christensen, C.; Muehlmeier, J.; Tuttle, G.; Ho, K.-M.

    2008-04-07

    Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals with complete photonic band gaps are simulated with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations, and compared with measurements on microwave scale photonic crystals. The transmission through waveguide bends critically depends on the photonic crystal architecture in the bend region. We have found experimentally and theoretically, a new waveguide bend configuration consisting of overlapping rods in the bend region, that performs better than the simple waveguide bend of terminated rods, especially in the higher frequency portion of the band. Efficient beam splitters with this junction geometry are also simulated.

  7. Simple Experimental Verification of the Relation between the Band-Gap Energy and the Energy of Photons Emitted by LEDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Precker, Jurgen W.

    2007-01-01

    The wavelength of the light emitted by a light-emitting diode (LED) is intimately related to the band-gap energy of the semiconductor from which the LED is made. We experimentally estimate the band-gap energies of several types of LEDs, and compare them with the energies of the emitted light, which ranges from infrared to white. In spite of…

  8. Label-free antibody detection using band edge fringes in SOI planar photonic crystal waveguides in the slow-light regime.

    PubMed

    García-Rupérez, Jaime; Toccafondo, Veronica; Bañuls, María José; Castelló, Javier García; Griol, Amadeu; Peransi-Llopis, Sergio; Maquieira, Ángel

    2010-11-08

    We report experimental results of label-free anti-bovine serum albumin (anti-BSA) antibody detection using a SOI planar photonic crystal waveguide previously bio-functionalized with complementary BSA antigen probes. Sharp fringes appearing in the slow-light regime near the edge of the guided band are used to perform the sensing. We have modeled the presence of these band edge fringes and demonstrated the possibility of using them for sensing purposes by performing refractive index variations detection, achieving a sensitivity of 174.8 nm/RIU. Then, label-free anti-BSA biosensing experiments have been carried out, estimating a surface mass density detection limit below 2.1 pg/mm2 and a total mass detection limit below 0.2 fg.

  9. Band alignment and photon extraction studies of Na-doped MgZnO/Ga-doped ZnO heterojunction for light-emitter applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Sushil Kumar; Awasthi, Vishnu; Sengar, Brajendra Singh; Garg, Vivek; Sharma, Pankaj; Mukherjee, Shaibal; Kumar, Shailendra; Mukherjee, C.

    2015-10-28

    Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is carried out to measure the energy discontinuity at the interface of p-type Na-doped MgZnO (NMZO)/n-type Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) heterojunction grown by dual ion beam sputtering. The offset values at valence band and conduction band of NMZO/GZO heterojunction are calculated to be 1.93 and −2.36 eV, respectively. The p-type conduction in NMZO film has been confirmed by Hall measurement and band structure. Moreover, the effect of Ar{sup +} ion sputtering on the valence band onset values of NMZO and GZO thin films has been investigated. This asymmetric waveguide structure formed by the lower refractive index of GZO than that of NMZO indicates that easy extraction of photons generated in GZO through the NMZO layer into free space. The asymmetric waveguide structure has potential applications to produce ZnO-based light emitters with high extraction efficiency.

  10. Two-level system immersed in a photonic band-gap material: A non-Markovian stochastic Schroedinger-equation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Ines de; Alonso, Daniel; Gaspard, Pierre

    2005-02-01

    It is our aim to study the dynamics of a two-level atom immersed in the modified radiation field of a photonic band-gap material using non-Markovian stochastic Schroedinger equations. Up to now, such methodology has only been applied to toy models and not to physically realistic systems as the one presented here. In order to check its validity, we shall study several of the physical phenomena already described in the literature within non-Markovian master equations, such as the long-time-limit residual population in the excited level of the atom and the population inversion which occurs in the atomic system when applying an external laser field. In addition to the stochastic equation, we propose a non-Markovian master equation derived from the stochastic formalism, which in contrast to the current models of master equation preserves positivity. We propose a correlation function for the radiation field (environment) that captures many of the physically relevant aspects of the problem and describes the short-time behavior in a more accurate way than previously proposed ones. This characteristic permits a correct description of the fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, which in the stochastic formalism are represented by the noise, and a better description of the non-Markovian effects in the atomic dynamics. The methodology presented in this paper to apply stochastic Schroedinger equations can be followed to study more complex systems, like many-level atoms embedded in more complicated photonic band-gap structures.

  11. Temperature dependence of band gap ratio and Q-factor defect mode in a semiconductor quaternary alloy hexagonal photonic-crystal hole slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Cano, R.; Porras-Montenegro, N.

    2016-04-01

    We present numerical predictions for the photonic TE-like band gap ratio and the quality factors of symmetric localized defect as a function of the thickness slab and temperature by the use of plane wave expansion and the finite-difference time-domain methods. The photonic-crystal hole slab is composed of a 2D hexagonal array with identical air holes and a circular cross section, embedded in a non-dispersive III-V semiconductor quaternary alloy slab, which has a high value of dielectric function in the near-infrared region, and the symmetric defect is formed by increasing the radius of a single hole in the 2D hexagonal lattice. We show that the band gap ratio depends linearly on the temperature in the range 150-400 K. Our results show a strong temperature dependence of the quality factor Q, the maximum (Q = 7000) is reached at T = 350 hbox {K}, but if the temperature continues to increase, the efficiency drops sharply. Furthermore, we present numerical predictions for the electromagnetic field distribution at T = 350 hbox {K}.

  12. Role of charge separation on two-step two photon absorption in InAs/GaAs quantum dot intermediate band solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creti, A.; Tasco, V.; Cola, A.; Montagna, G.; Tarantini, I.; Salhi, A.; Al-Muhanna, A.; Passaseo, A.; Lomascolo, M.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we report on the competition between two-step two photon absorption, carrier recombination, and escape in the photocurrent generation mechanisms of high quality InAs/GaAs quantum dot intermediate band solar cells. In particular, the different role of holes and electrons is highlighted. Experiments of external quantum efficiency dependent on temperature and electrical or optical bias (two-step two photon absorption) highlight a relative increase as high as 38% at 10 K under infrared excitation. We interpret these results on the base of charge separation by phonon assisted tunneling of holes from quantum dots. We propose the charge separation as an effective mechanism which, reducing the recombination rate and competing with the other escape processes, enhances the infrared absorption contribution. Meanwhile, this model explains why thermal escape is found to predominate over two-step two photon absorption starting from 200 K, whereas it was expected to prevail at lower temperatures (≥70 K), solely on the basis of the relatively low electron barrier height in such a system.

  13. Wide Band to ''Double Band'' upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, P.; Currier, R.; Garbincius, P.; Butler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The Wide Band beam currently uses electrons obtained from secondary photon conversions to produce the photon beam incident on the experimental targets. By transporting the positrons produced in these conversions as well as the electrons it is possible to almost double the number of photons delivered to the experiments per primary beam proton. 11 figs.

  14. Photonic quantum well composed of photonic crystal and quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaohui; Zhu, Yiping; Wang, Lianwei; Yang, Pingxiong; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-02-01

    A photonic quantum well structure composed of photonic crystal and Fibonacci quasicrystal is investigated by analyzing the transmission spectra and electric field distributions. The defect band in the photonic well can form confined quantized photonic states that can change in the band-gap of the photonic barriers by varying the thickness ratio of the two stacking layers. The number of confined states can be tuned by adjusting the period of the photonic well. The photons traverse the photonic quantum well by resonance tunneling and the coupling effect leads to the high transmission intensity of the confined photonic states.

  15. InGaAsP/InP Nanocavity for Single-Photon Source at 1.55-μm Telecommunication Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hai-Zhi; Hadi, Mukhtar; Zheng, Yanzhen; Shen, Bizhou; Zhang, Lei; Ren, Zhilei; Gao, Ruoyao; Wang, Zhiming M.

    2017-02-01

    A new structure of 1.55-μm pillar cavity is proposed. Consisting of InP-air-aperture and InGaAsP layers, this cavity can be fabricated by using a monolithic process, which was difficult for previous 1.55-μm pillar cavities. Owing to the air apertures and tapered distributed Bragg reflectors, such a pillar cavity with nanometer-scaled diameters can give a quality factor of 104-105 at 1.55 μm. Capable of weakly and strongly coupling a single quantum dot with an optical mode, this nanocavity could be a prospective candidate for quantum-dot single-photon sources at 1.55-μm telecommunication band.

  16. InGaAsP/InP Nanocavity for Single-Photon Source at 1.55-μm Telecommunication Band.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai-Zhi; Hadi, Mukhtar; Zheng, Yanzhen; Shen, Bizhou; Zhang, Lei; Ren, Zhilei; Gao, Ruoyao; Wang, Zhiming M

    2017-12-01

    A new structure of 1.55-μm pillar cavity is proposed. Consisting of InP-air-aperture and InGaAsP layers, this cavity can be fabricated by using a monolithic process, which was difficult for previous 1.55-μm pillar cavities. Owing to the air apertures and tapered distributed Bragg reflectors, such a pillar cavity with nanometer-scaled diameters can give a quality factor of 10(4)-10(5) at 1.55 μm. Capable of weakly and strongly coupling a single quantum dot with an optical mode, this nanocavity could be a prospective candidate for quantum-dot single-photon sources at 1.55-μm telecommunication band.

  17. Strong interlayer coupling mediated giant two-photon absorption in MoS e2 /graphene oxide heterostructure: Quenching of exciton bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rituraj; Aneesh, J.; Yadav, Rajesh Kumar; Sanda, Suresh; Barik, A. R.; Mishra, Ashish Kumar; Maji, Tuhin Kumar; Karmakar, Debjani; Adarsh, K. V.

    2016-04-01

    A complex few-layer MoS e2 /graphene oxide (GO) heterostructure with strong interlayer coupling was prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. In this strongly coupled heterostructure, we demonstrate a giant enhancement of two-photon absorption that is in stark contrast to the reverse saturable absorption of a weakly coupled MoS e2 /GO heterostructure and saturable absorption of isolated MoS e2 . Spectroscopic evidence of our study indicates that the optical signatures of isolated MoS e2 and GO domains are significantly modified in the heterostructure, displaying a direct coupling of both domains. Furthermore, our first-principles calculations indicate that strong interlayer coupling between the layers dramatically suppresses the MoS e2 excitonic bands. We envision that our findings provide a powerful tool to explore different optical functionalities as a function of interlayer coupling, which may be essential for the development of device technologies.

  18. Photonic frequency-quadrupling and balanced pre-coding technologies for W-band QPSK vector mm-wave signal generation based on a single DML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanyi; Yang, Chao; Chi, Nan; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel scheme for high-frequency quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) photonic vector signal generation based on a single directly modulated laser (DML) employing photonic frequency quadrupling and balanced pre-coding technologies. In order to realize frequency quadrupling, a wavelength selective switch (WSS) is intruded in our experiment. The intruded WSS combined with DML can not only realize high-frequency vector signal generation but also simplify the architecture. We experimentally demonstrate 1-or 2-Gbaud QPSK vector signal generation at 88 GHz based on our proposed scheme. The generated 1-Gbaud balanced pre-coded QPSK vector signal is transmitted 0.5-m wireless distance with the bit-error-ratio (BER) below hard-decision forward-error-correction (HD-FEC) threshold of 3.8×10-3. To our knowledge, this is the first time to demonstrate W-band mm-wave vector signal based on a single DML with quadrupling frequency and pre-coding technologies.

  19. InGaAsP/InP-air-aperture microcavities for single-photon sources at 1.55-μm telecommunication band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Sijie; Zheng, Yanzhen; Weng, Zhuo; Yao, Haicheng; Ju, Yuhao; Zhang, Lei; Ren, Zhilei; Gao, Ruoyao; Wang, Zhiming M.; Song, Hai-Zhi

    2016-11-01

    InGaAsP/InP-air-aperture micropillar cavities are proposed to serve as 1.55-μm single photon sources, which are indispensable in silica-fiber based quantum information processing. Owing to air-apertures introduced to InP layers, and adiabatically tapered distributed Bragg-reflector structures used in the central cavity layers, the pillar diameters can be less than 1 μm, achieving mode volume as small as (λ/n)3, and the quality factors are more than 104 - 105, sufficient to increase the quantum dot emission rate for 100 times and create strong coupling between the optical mode and the 1.55- μm InAs/InP quantum dot emitter. The mode wavelengths and quality factors are found weakly changing with the cavity size and the deviation from the ideal shape, indicating the robustness against the imperfection of the fabrication technique. The fabrication, simply epitaxial growth, dry and chemical etching, is a damage-free and monolithic process, which is advantageous over previous hybrid cavities. The above properties satisfy the requirements of efficient, photonindistinguishable and coherent 1.55-μm quantum dot single photon sources, so the proposed InGaAsP/InP-air-aperture micropillar cavities are prospective candidates for quantum information devices at telecommunication band.

  20. Optical Fabry-Perot filter based on photonic band gap quasi-periodic one-dimensional multilayer according to the definite Rudin-Shapiro distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazzi, Y.; Kanzari, M.

    2012-06-01

    In this work, a new type of optical filter using photonic band gap materials has been suggested. Indeed, a combination of periodic H(LH)J and Rudin-Shapiro quasi-periodic one-dimensional photonic multilayer systems (RSM) were used. SiO2 (L) and TiO2 (H) were chosen as two elementary layers with refractive indexes nL = 1.45 and nH = 2.30 respectively. The study configuration is H(LH)J[RSM]PH(LH)J, which forms an effective Fabry-Perot filter (FPF), where J and P are respectively the repetition number of periodic and (RSM) stacks. We have numerically investigated by means of transfer-matrix approach the transmission properties in the visible spectral range of FPF system. We show that the number and position of resonator peaks are dependent on the (RSM) repetition number P and incidence angle of exciting light. The effect of these two parameters for producing an improved polychromatic filter with high finesse coefficient (F) and quality factor (Q) is studied in details.

  1. W-band photonic-wireless link with a Schottky diode envelope detector and bend insensitive fiber.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Simon; Cavalcante, Lucas C P; Quintero, Alexander G; Mishra, Arvind K; Vegas Olmos, J J; Monroy, Idelfonso Tafur

    2016-05-30

    The performance and potential of a W-band radio-over-fiber link is analyzed, including a characterization of the wireless channel. The presented setup focuses on minimizing complexity in the radio frequency domain, using a passive radio frequency transmitter and a Schottky diode based envelope detector. Performance is experimentally validated with carriers at 75-87GHz over wireless distances of 30-70m. Finally the necessity for and impact of bend insensitive fiber for on-site installation are discussed and experimentally investigated.

  2. Surface passivation of a photonic crystal band-edge laser by atomic layer deposition of SiO2 and its application for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Hyungrae; Lee, Jeongkug; Jordan, Luke R.; Lee, Si Hoon; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Hyo Jin; Park, Juhun; Hong, Seunghun; Jeon, Heonsu

    2015-02-01

    We report on the conformal surface passivation of photonic crystal (PC) laser devices with an ultrathin dielectric layer. Air-bridge-type Γ-point band-edge lasers (BELs) are fabricated by forming a honeycomb lattice two-dimensional PC structure into an InGaAsP multiple-quantum-well epilayer. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is employed for conformal deposition of a few-nanometer-thick SiO2 layer over the entire device surface, not only on the top and bottom surfaces of the air-bridge membrane but also on the air-hole sidewalls. Despite its extreme thinness, the ALD passivation layer is found to protect the InGaAsP BEL devices from harsh chemicals. In addition, the ALD-SiO2 is compatible with the silane-based surface chemistry, which allows us to use ALD-passivated BEL devices as label-free biosensors. The standard streptavidin-biotin interaction shifts the BEL lasing wavelength by ~1 nm for the dipole-like Γ-point band-edge mode. A sharp lasing line (<0.2 nm, full width at half-maximum) and a large refractive index sensitivity (~163 nm per RIU) produce a figure of merit as high as ~800 for our BEL biosensor, which is at least an order of magnitude higher than those of more common biosensors that rely on a broad resonance peak, showing that our nanolaser structures are suitable for highly sensitive biosensor applications.

  3. Competitive behavior of photons contributing to junction voltage jump in narrow band-gap semiconductor multi-quantum-well laser diodes at lasing threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Liefeng E-mail: lihongru@nankai.edu.cn; Yang, Xiufang; Wang, Cunda; Yao, Dongsheng; Li, Yang; Li, Ding; Hu, Xiaodong; Li, Hongru E-mail: lihongru@nankai.edu.cn

    2015-04-15

    The junction behavior of different narrow band-gap multi-quantum-well (MQW) laser diodes (LDs) confirmed that the jump in the junction voltage in the threshold region is a general characteristic of narrow band-gap LDs. The relative change in the 1310 nm LD is the most obvious. To analyze this sudden voltage change, the threshold region is divided into three stages by I{sub th}{sup l} and I{sub th}{sup u}, as shown in Fig. 2; I{sub th}{sup l} is the conventional threshold, and as long as the current is higher than this threshold, lasing exists and the IdV/dI-I plot drops suddenly; I{sub th}{sup u} is the steady lasing point, at which the separation of the quasi-Fermi levels of electron and holes across the active region (V{sub j}) is suddenly pinned. Based on the evolutionary model of dissipative structure theory, the rate equations of the photons in a single-mode LD were deduced in detail at I{sub th}{sup l} and I{sub th}{sup u}. The results proved that the observed behavior of stimulated emission suddenly substituting for spontaneous emission, in a manner similar to biological evolution, must lead to a sudden increase in the injection carriers in the threshold region, which then causes the sudden increase in the junction voltage in this region.

  4. Line parameters measurements and modeling for the ν6 band of CH3F: Generation of a complete line list for atmospheric databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemart, D.; Guinet, M.

    2016-12-01

    The 8.5 μm-spectral region of methyl fluoride was studied in terms of line positions, intensities and self-broadening coefficients at room temperature. A multispectrum fitting was used to retrieve from 7 high-resolution Fourier transform spectra line parameters for 787 transitions belonging to the ν6 band between 1078 and 1240 cm-1. The accuracy of line intensities and widths measurements were estimated to be around 5% and 5-10% respectively. J- and K-rotational dependences of the transition dipole moment squared and the self-broadening coefficients were observed and modeled from the measurements. A complete line list of almost 1500 transitions was generated for atmospheric or industrial detection of CH3F. Comparisons with previous studies from the literature were also performed.

  5. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  6. Sub-GHz-resolution C-band Nyquist-filtering interleaver on a high-index-contrast photonic integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Zhu, Chen; Corcoran, Bill; Burla, Maurizio; Roeloffzen, Chris G H; Leinse, Arne; Schröder, Jochen; Lowery, Arthur J

    2016-03-21

    Modern optical communications rely on high-resolution, high-bandwidth filtering to maximize the data-carrying capacity of fiber-optic networks. Such filtering typically requires high-speed, power-hungry digital processes in the electrical domain. Passive optical filters currently provide high bandwidths with low power consumption, but at the expense of resolution. Here, we present a passive filter chip that functions as an optical Nyquist-filtering interleaver featuring sub-GHz resolution and a near-rectangular passband with 8% roll-off. This performance is highly promising for high-spectral-efficiency Nyquist wavelength division multiplexed (N-WDM) optical super-channels. The chip provides a simple two-ring-resonator-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which has a sub-cm2 footprint owing to the high-index-contrast Si3N4/SiO2 waveguide, while manifests low wavelength-dependency enabling C-band (> 4 THz) coverage with more than 160 effective free spectral ranges of 25 GHz. This device is anticipated to be a critical building block for spectrally-efficient, chip-scale transceivers and ROADMs for N-WDM super-channels in next-generation optical communication networks.

  7. L(alpha)-induced two-photon absorption of visible light emitted from an O-type star by H2(+) ions located near the surface of the Stromgren sphere surrounding the star: A possible explanation for the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIDs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glownia, James H.; Sorokin, Peter P.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, a new model is proposed to account for the DIB's (Diffuse Interstellar Bands). In this model, the DIB's result from a non-linear effect: resonantly-enhanced two-photon absorption of H(2+) ions located near the surface of the Stromgren sphere that surrounds an O- or B- type star. The strong light that is required to 'drive' the two-photon transition is provided by L(alpha) light emerging from the Stromgren sphere that bounds the H II region surrounding the star. A value of approximately 100 micro W/sq cm is estimated for the L(alpha) flux at the Stromgren radius, R(s), of a strong (O5) star. It is shown that a c.w. L(alpha) flux of this intensity should be sufficient to induce a few percent absorption for visible light radiated by the same star at a frequency (omega2) that completes an allowed two-photon transition, provided (1) the L(alpha) radiation happens to be nearly resonant with the frequency of a fully-allowed absorber transition that effectively represents the first step in the two-photon transition, and (2) an effective column density approximately 10(sup18)/sq cm of the absorber is present near the Stromgren sphere radius, R(sub s).

  8. Design of photonic band gap fibers with suppressed higher-order modes: Towards the development of effectively single mode large hollow-core fiber platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Kunimasa; Florous, Nikolaos J.; Murao, Tadashi; Koshiba, Masanori

    2006-08-01

    The objective of the present investigation is to propose and theoretically demonstrate the effective suppression of higher-order modes in large-hollow-core photonic band gap fibers (PBGFs), mainly for low-loss data transmission platforms and/or high power delivery systems. The proposed design strategy is based on the index-matching mechanism of central air-core modes with defected outer core modes. By incorporating several air-cores in the cladding of the PBGF with 6-fold symmetry it is possible to resonantly couple the light corresponding to higher-order modes into the outer core, thus significantly increasing the leakage losses of the higher-order modes in comparison to the fundamental mode, thus making our proposed design to operate in an effectively single mode fashion with polarization independent propagation characteristics. The validation of the procedure is ensured with a detailed PBGF analysis based on an accurate finite element modal solver. Extensive numerical results show that the leakage losses of the higher-order modes can be enhanced in a level of at least 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to those of the fundamental mode. Our investigation is expected to remove an essential obstacle in the development of large-core single-mode hollow-core fibers, thus enabling them to surpass the attenuation of conventional fibers.

  9. Design of photonic band gap fibers with suppressed higher-order modes: towards the development of effectively single mode large hollow-core fiber platforms.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kunimasa; Florous, Nikolaos J; Murao, Tadashi; Koshiba, Masanori

    2006-08-07

    The objective of the present investigation is to propose and theoretically demonstrate the effective suppression of higher-order modes in large-hollow-core photonic band gap fibers (PBGFs), mainly for low-loss data transmission platforms and/or high power delivery systems. The proposed design strategy is based on the index-matching mechanism of central air-core modes with defected outer core modes. By incorporating several air-cores in the cladding of the PBGF with 6-fold symmetry it is possible to resonantly couple the light corresponding to higher-order modes into the outer core, thus significantly increasing the leakage losses of the higher-order modes in comparison to the fundamental mode, thus making our proposed design to operate in an effectively single mode fashion with polarization independent propagation characteristics. The validation of the procedure is ensured with a detailed PBGF analysis based on an accurate finite element modal solver. Extensive numerical results show that the leakage losses of the higher-order modes can be enhanced in a level of at least 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to those of the fundamental mode. Our investigation is expected to remove an essential obstacle in the development of large-core single-mode hollow-core fibers, thus enabling them to surpass the attenuation of conventional fibers.

  10. Design of single-polarization coupler based on dual-core photonic band-gap fiber implied in resonant fiber optic gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Li, Xuyou; Zhang, Chunmei; Ling, Weiwei; Liu, Pan; Xia, Linlin; Yang, Hanrui

    2016-12-01

    A novel (to our knowledge) type of single-polarization (SP) coupler based on a dual-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) is proposed. The effects of structure parameters on the performance of this coupler are studied numerically based on the full vector finite element method (FEM). Finally, an optimal design with a length of 0.377 mm at the wavelength of 1.55 μm is achieved, and its implication in PBF-based fiber ring resonator (FRR), the effect of angular misalignment on the SP coupler are analyzed as well. When the SP coupler is incorporated into a PBF-based FRR, it functions as the power splitter and the polarizer simultaneously, and can extinct the secondary eigenstate of polarization (ESOP) propagating in the FRR. The mode field of SP coupler can match with the polarization-maintaining (PM) PBF with ultra-low temperature sensitivity proposed in previous study, and an all PM-PBF based FRR can be established, which is of great significance in suppressing the temperature-related polarization fluctuation and improving the long-term stability for RFOG, and the SP coupler has high angular misalignment tolerance as well.

  11. Pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} on amorphous dielectric layers towards monolithic 3D photonic integration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haofeng; Brouillet, Jeremy; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrate pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} crystallized on amorphous layers at <450 °C towards 3D Si photonic integration. We developed two approaches to seed the lateral single crystal growth: (1) utilize the Gibbs-Thomson eutectic temperature depression at the tip of an amorphous GeSn nanotaper for selective nucleation; (2) laser-induced nucleation at one end of a GeSn strip. Either way, the crystallized Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} is dominated by a single grain >18 μm long that forms optoelectronically benign twin boundaries with others grains. These pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} patterns are suitable for monolithic 3D integration of active photonic devices on Si.

  12. NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey + Herschel PACS-SPIRE: Constraining the Infrared Properties of a Mass-Complete Sample of 5000 Galaxies at 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesini, Danilo

    Understanding the formation mechanisms and evolution with cosmic time of massive galaxies is one of the key unsolved problems in astrophysics. At the endpoint of the hierarchical merging process, massive galaxies are most sensitive to various model assumptions, offering a strong opportunity to constrain models of galaxy formation. For the first time, the NEWFIRM Medium-band Survey (NMBS) made it possible to construct mass-complete samples of massive galaxies with accurate photometric redshifts at 1 < z < 4. Recent measurements show a dramatic evolution of the stellar mass function of galaxies with redshift and evidence of mass-dependent evolution. Moreover, it has become established that a substantial fraction of the massive quiescent galaxies that dominate the red-sequence at z=0 are already in place at z~2.3. The rapid assembly and quiescent nature of this population, and the remarkable lack of evolution in the number density of massive galaxies seems inconsistent with predictions from models of galaxy formation. To further our understanding of the evolution of massive galaxies, detailed characterization of the infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and emission from dust, and accurate estimates of (dust-obscured) star-formation rates (SFRs) and AGN contribution are needed for a large, complete sample of massive galaxies with accurate redshifts at z>1. We propose to augment the well-sampled UV-to-MIPS SEDs delivered by the NMBS with the photometry from Herschel PACS and SPIRE (100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 micron). The NMBS uses a set of five medium-bandwidth NIR filters to provide very precise photometric redshifts and well-sampled SEDs at z>1.5. The public NMBS catalogs consist of about 60,000 objects at z<4 with photometry in the UV (GALEX), optical, NIR (broad- and medium-band filters), and mid-IR (Spitzer). The proposed program will extend the NMBS SEDs into the IR (100-500 micron). The construction and public release of the combined NMBS

  13. Photonic Bandgaps in Photonic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Gates, Amanda L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will focus on photonic bandgaps that arise due to nearly free photon and tight-binding effects in coupled microparticle and ring-resonator systems. The Mie formulation for homogeneous spheres is generalized to handle core/shell systems and multiple concentric layers in a manner that exploits an analogy with stratified planar systems, thereby allowing concentric multi-layered structures to be treated as photonic bandgap (PBG) materials. Representative results from a Mie code employing this analogy demonstrate that photonic bands arising from nearly free photon effects are easily observed in the backscattering, asymmetry parameter, and albedo for periodic quarter-wave concentric layers, though are not readily apparent in extinction spectra. Rather, the periodicity simply alters the scattering profile, enhancing the ratio of backscattering to forward scattering inside the bandgap, in direct analogy with planar quarter-wave multilayers. PBGs arising from tight-binding may also be observed when the layers (or rings) are designed such that the coupling between them is weak. We demonstrate that for a structure consisting of N coupled micro-resonators, the morphology dependent resonances split into N higher-Q modes, in direct analogy with other types of oscillators, and that this splitting ultimately results in PBGs which can lead to enhanced nonlinear optical effects.

  14. Photonic Bell-state analysis based on semiconductor-superconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabag, Evyatar; Bouscher, Shlomi; Marjieh, Raja; Hayat, Alex

    2017-03-01

    We propose a compact and highly efficient scheme for complete Bell-state analysis using two-photon absorption in a superconducting proximity region of a semiconductor avalanche photodiode. One-photon transitions to the superconducting Cooper-pair based condensate in the conduction band are forbidden, whereas two-photon transitions are allowed and are strongly enhanced by superconductivity. This Cooper-pair based two-photon absorption results in a strong detection preference of a specified entangled state. Our analysis shows high detection purity of the desired Bell state with negligible false detection probability. The theoretically demonstrated concept can pave the way towards practical realizations of advanced quantum information schemes.

  15. Landau-Zener Bloch Oscillations with Perturbed Flat Bands.

    PubMed

    Khomeriki, Ramaz; Flach, Sergej

    2016-06-17

    Sinusoidal Bloch oscillations appear in band structures exposed to external fields. Landau-Zener (LZ) tunneling between different bands is usually a counteracting effect limiting Bloch oscillations. Here we consider a flat band network with two dispersive and one flat band, e.g., for ultracold atoms and optical waveguide networks. Using external synthetic gauge and gravitational fields we obtain a perturbed yet gapless band structure with almost flat parts. The resulting Bloch oscillations consist of two parts-a fast scan through the nonflat part of the dispersion structure, and an almost complete halt for substantial time when the atomic or photonic wave packet is trapped in the original flat band part of the unperturbed spectrum, made possible due to LZ tunneling.

  16. Landau-Zener Bloch Oscillations with Perturbed Flat Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomeriki, Ramaz; Flach, Sergej

    2016-06-01

    Sinusoidal Bloch oscillations appear in band structures exposed to external fields. Landau-Zener (LZ) tunneling between different bands is usually a counteracting effect limiting Bloch oscillations. Here we consider a flat band network with two dispersive and one flat band, e.g., for ultracold atoms and optical waveguide networks. Using external synthetic gauge and gravitational fields we obtain a perturbed yet gapless band structure with almost flat parts. The resulting Bloch oscillations consist of two parts—a fast scan through the nonflat part of the dispersion structure, and an almost complete halt for substantial time when the atomic or photonic wave packet is trapped in the original flat band part of the unperturbed spectrum, made possible due to LZ tunneling.

  17. Fabrication of novel three-dimensional photonic crystals using multi-beam interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanan, Vinayak

    Optical Communications has seen an explosion in recent times with new types of devices and materials. In the last decade, considerable study has been devoted to the control of the optical properties of materials and guiding the propagation of light through the use of photonic crystals. Photonic crystals are materials with a periodic arrangement of dielectric medium in one, two or three dimensions, with periodicities on the order of the wavelength of the electromagnetic radiation in use. Photonic crystals exhibit photonic band gaps depending on their geometry and refractive index. Holographic lithography has been proven to be an attractive technique for the creation of large area, defect-free, three-dimensional photonic crystals. Structures with potential in photonic applications are fabricated in the photoresist SU-8, through concurrent exposure with four non-coplanar coherent beams of laser radiation. Polymer-air structures with face centered cubic symmetry are used as a template to create higher refractive index contrast photonic crystals by infilling using Atomic Layer Deposition and Chemical Vapor Deposition. These photonic crystals exhibit excellent optical properties with strong reflectance peaks at the calculated band gap frequencies. Two-photon polymerization is used to demonstrate the ability to create designed defect structures such as waveguides in silicon-air photonic crystals. Genetic algorithms are demonstrated as a technique to design an interference lithography experiment. A four-beam setup with beams originating in opposite hemispheres and linear polarizations is found to generate a structure with diamond symmetry and a large complete photonic band gap. Band gap studies on structures that possess both high band gap and high contrast are performed. The optical setup for a diamond structure utilizing two right-angled prisms is discussed and promising experimental results are presented.

  18. Narrow-band single photon emission at room temperature based on a single nitrogen-vacancy center coupled to an all-fiber-cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Roland; Bommer, Alexander; Becher, Christoph; Pauly, Christoph; Mücklich, Frank; Schell, Andreas W.; Engel, Philip; Benson, Oliver; Schröder, Tim; Reichel, Jakob

    2014-08-18

    We report the realization of a device based on a single Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) center in diamond coupled to a fiber-cavity for use as single photon source (SPS). The device consists of two concave mirrors each directly fabricated on the facets of two optical fibers and a preselected nanodiamond containing a single NV center deposited onto one of these mirrors. Both, cavity in- and out-put are directly fiber-coupled, and the emission wavelength is easily tunable by variation of the separation of the two mirrors with a piezo-electric crystal. By coupling to the cavity, we achieve an increase of the spectral photon rate density by two orders of magnitude compared to free-space emission of the NV center. With this work, we establish a simple all-fiber based SPS with promising prospects for the integration into photonic quantum networks.

  19. Gallium Nitride Based Logpile Photonic Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Li, Qiming; Lee, Yun-Ju; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Wang, George T.; Fischer, Arthur J.

    2011-11-09

    A nine-layer logpile three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) is demonstrated composed of single crystalline gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods, ~ 100 nm in size with lattice constants of 260, 280, and 300 nm with photonic band gap in the visible region. This unique GaN structure is created through a combined approach of a layer-by-layer template fabrication technique and selective metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These GaN 3DPC exhibit a stacking direction band gap characterized by strong optical reflectance between 380 and 500 nm. By introducing a ''line-defect'' cavity in the fifth (middle) layer of the 3DPC, a localized transmission mode with a quality factor of 25–30 is also observed within the photonic band gap. The realization of a group III nitride 3DPC with uniform features and a band gap at wavelengths in the visible region is an important step toward realizing complete control of the electromagnetic environment for group III nitride-based optoelectronic devices.

  20. Gallium nitride based logpile photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Li, Qiming; Lee, Yun-Ju; Figiel, Jeffrey J; Wang, George T; Fischer, Arthur J

    2011-11-09

    We demonstrate a nine-layer logpile three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) composed of single crystalline gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods, ∼100 nm in size with lattice constants of 260, 280, and 300 nm with photonic band gap in the visible region. This unique GaN structure is created through a combined approach of a layer-by-layer template fabrication technique and selective metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These GaN 3DPC exhibit a stacking direction band gap characterized by strong optical reflectance between 380 and 500 nm. By introducing a "line-defect" cavity in the fifth (middle) layer of the 3DPC, a localized transmission mode with a quality factor of 25-30 is also observed within the photonic band gap. The realization of a group III nitride 3DPC with uniform features and a band gap at wavelengths in the visible region is an important step toward realizing complete control of the electromagnetic environment for group III nitride based optoelectronic devices.

  1. Complete measurement of three-body photodisintegration of 3He for photon energies between 0.35 and 1.55 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolai, Silvia; Audit, Gerard; Berman, Barry; Laget, Jean; Strauch, Steffen; et. Al.

    2004-12-01

    The three-body photodisintegration of 3He has been measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab, using tagged photons of energies between 0.35 GeV and 1.55 GeV. The large acceptance of the spectrometer allowed us for the first time to cover a wide momentum and angular range for the two outgoing protons. Three kinematic regions dominated by either two- or three-body contributions have been distinguished and analyzed. The measured cross sections have been compared with results of a theoretical model, which, in certain kinematic ranges, have been found to be in reasonable agreement with the data.

  2. Microresonator and associated method for producing and controlling photonic signals with a photonic bandgap delay apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard Lynn (Inventor); Jones, Darryl Keith (Inventor); Keys, Andrew Scott (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    By applying a photonic signal to a microresonator that includes a photonic bandgap delay apparatus having a photonic band edge transmission resonance at the frequency of the photonic signal, the microresonator imparts a predetermined delay to the photonic signal. The photonic bandgap delay apparatus also preferably has a photonic band edge transmission resonance bandwidth which is at least as wide as the bandwidth of the photonic signal such that a uniform delay is imparted over the entire bandwidth of the photonic signal. The microresonator also includes a microresonator cavity, typically defined by a pair of switchable mirrors, within which the photonic bandgap delay apparatus is disposed. By requiring the photonic signal to oscillate within the microresonator cavity so as to pass through the photonic bandgap delay apparatus several times, the microresonator can controllably impart an adjustable delay to the photonic signal.

  3. EL2 deep level defects and above-band gap two-photon absorption in high gain lateral semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Wei; Niu, Hongjian; Zhang, Xianbin; Ji, Weili

    2005-01-01

    Experiments of a lateral semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switch, both linear and nonlinear mode of the switch were observed when the switch was triggered by 1064 nm laser pulses, with energy of 1.9 mJ and the pulse width of 60 ns, and operated at biased electric field of 4.37 kV/cm. It"s wavelength is longer than 876nm, but the experiments indicate that the semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switches can absorb 1064 nm laser obviously, which is out of the absorption range of the GaAs material. It is not possible to explain this behavior by using intrinsic absorption mechanism. We think that there are two mostly kinds of absorption mechanisms play a key part in absorption process, they are the two-steps-single-photon absorption that based on the EL2 energy level and two-photon absorption.

  4. Photoresponse beyond the red border of the internal photoeffect: designing problems of photon counting schemes in 10μm band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresvyannikov, Maxim A.; Karuzskii, Aleksandr L.; Perestoronin, Anatoly V.; Tskhovrebov, Andrey M.; Zherikhina, Larisa N.

    2014-12-01

    In the context of all-weather tracking distant cosmic objects issues, six original schemes of detecting far-infrared radiation are presented here, which approach in their sensitivity to the level that allows their use in photon counting mode. The first one is a modernized version of the Up-converter (with the placement of nonlinear crystal/mixer inside of resonator in a single laser unit) for the transfer of far-infrared photons in the visible range, where the photon counting is possible via PMT or APD. The second scheme of registration far IR is based on the forward bias LED at a current, which is still not enough for the generation of radiation. The experiments allowed to observe photoresponse of such a system for the red border of the internal photoelectric effect. The following three schemes are cryogenic. And the last one is an Up-converter, where instead of the classical mixing on nonlinear crystal is used quantum effect of releasing energy metastable state under the influence of the far-infrared radiation quanta.

  5. Monolithic phononic crystals with a surface acoustic band gap from surface phonon-polariton coupling.

    PubMed

    Yudistira, D; Boes, A; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Pennec, Y; Yeo, L Y; Mitchell, A; Friend, J R

    2014-11-21

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the existence of complete surface acoustic wave band gaps in surface phonon-polariton phononic crystals, in a completely monolithic structure formed from a two-dimensional honeycomb array of hexagonal shape domain-inverted inclusions in single crystal piezoelectric Z-cut lithium niobate. The band gaps appear at a frequency of about twice the Bragg band gap at the center of the Brillouin zone, formed through phonon-polariton coupling. The structure is mechanically, electromagnetically, and topographically homogeneous, without any physical alteration of the surface, offering an ideal platform for many acoustic wave applications for photonics, phononics, and microfluidics.

  6. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  7. The two-photon absorptivity of rotational transitions in the A2 Sigma hyperon + (v prime = O) - X-2 pion (v prime prime = O) gamma band of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A predominantly single-mode pulsed dye laser system giving a well characterized spatial and temporal output suitable for absolute two-photon absorptivity measurements was used to study the NO gamma(0,0) S11 + R21 (J double prime = 7-1/2) transition. Using a calibrated induced-fluorescence technique, an absorptivity parameter of 2.8 + or - 1.4 x 10 to the minus 51st power cm to the 6th power was obtained. Relative strengths of other rotational transitions in the gamma(0,0) band were also measured and shown to compare well with predicted values in all cases except the O12 (J double prime = 10-1/2) transition.

  8. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals

    PubMed Central

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states. PMID:27877676

  9. Electrical anharmonicity in hydrogen bonded systems: complete interpretation of the IR spectra of the Cl-H[combining right harpoon above] stretching band in the gaseous (CH3)2OHCl complex.

    PubMed

    Rekik, Najeh; Suleiman, Jamal; Blaise, Paul; Wojcik, Marek J; Flakus, Henryk T; Nakajima, Takahito

    2017-02-22

    Following the previous developments to simulate the fully infrared spectra of weak hydrogen bond systems within the linear response theory, an extension of the adiabatic model is presented here. A general formulation including the electrical anharmonicities in the calculation of the damped autocorrelation function of weak H-bonds is adopted to facilitate the support of the additional properties, and thus the IR spectra of the Cl-H[combining right harpoon above] stretching band in the gaseous (CH3)2OHCl complex. We have explored the origins of the broadening of the Cl-H[combining right harpoon above] stretching band. We found that the main features of the lineshape are attributed to electrical anharmonicity as a consequence of the large mixed second derivatives of the dipole moment with respect to the Cl-H[combining right harpoon above] bond and of the intermonomer elongations . In addition to providing more accurate theoretical band shapes, inclusion of the electrical anharmonicity in the present model paves the way for a more complete interpretation by generating three new Franck-Condon superposed distributions.

  10. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  11. X-band continuously variable true-time delay lines using air-guiding photonic bandgap fibers and a broadband light source.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hanyi; Guo, Yili; Zhou, Binggun

    2006-09-15

    We propose a novel implementation of true-time delay (TTD) using air-guiding photonic bandgap fibers (PBGFs) and a broadband light source. The air-guiding PBGFs are experimentally studied and used in the TTD module for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The proposed approach shows the advantages of simple architecture, compact size, larger dispersion, low-temperature sensitivity, and high immunity to nonlinear effects in our experiments. The PBGFs were spliced with single-mode fibers with a 2 dB loss, and the characteristics of the PBGFs were measured. The PBGF-TTD with a continuously tunable time delays from 0 to 500 ps was demonstrated using the amplified spontaneous emission light of an erbium-doped filter amplifier as a broadband light source.

  12. Engineering and Characterizing Light-Matter Interactions in Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    loss-less waveguides that are ultra- compact and can have bends with zero radius of curvature [9-13]. Inside of a photonic crystal with a complete band...ultra- compact waveguides [86,87] for telecommunications. These applications require the precise sub-micron 3D-patterning of high refractive index...gap, a zero-loss waveguide can be created by introducing a line defect into an otherwise perfect structure. Analogous to semiconductors, the defect

  13. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Ma, Ji; Zhang, Si-Qi; Li, Hong; Wu, Xiang-Yao; Wu, Yi-Heng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied two-dimensional function photonic crystals, in which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates , that can become true easily by electro-optical effect and optical kerr effect. We calculated the band gap structures of TE and TM waves, and found the TE (TM) wave band gaps of function photonic crystals are wider (narrower) than the conventional photonic crystals. For the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, when the dielectric constant functions change, the band gaps numbers, width and position should be changed, and the band gap structures of two-dimensional function photonic crystals can be adjusted flexibly, the needed band gap structures can be designed by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, and it can be of help to design optical devices.

  14. Photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, Song Liang; Lu, Ling; Soljacic, Marin

    2015-06-23

    A photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) includes a gain medium electromagnetically coupled to a photonic crystal whose energy band structure exhibits a Dirac cone of linear dispersion at the center of the photonic crystal's Brillouin zone. This Dirac cone's vertex is called a Dirac point; because it is at the Brillouin zone center, it is called an accidental Dirac point. Tuning the photonic crystal's band structure (e.g., by changing the photonic crystal's dimensions or refractive index) to exhibit an accidental Dirac point increases the photonic crystal's mode spacing by orders of magnitudes and reduces or eliminates the photonic crystal's distributed in-plane feedback. Thus, the photonic crystal can act as a resonator that supports single-mode output from the PCSEL over a larger area than is possible with conventional PCSELs, which have quadratic band edge dispersion. Because output power generally scales with output area, this increase in output area results in higher possible output powers.

  15. Spatial filtering with photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maigyte, Lina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-03-15

    Photonic crystals are well known for their celebrated photonic band-gaps—the forbidden frequency ranges, for which the light waves cannot propagate through the structure. The frequency (or chromatic) band-gaps of photonic crystals can be utilized for frequency filtering. In analogy to the chromatic band-gaps and the frequency filtering, the angular band-gaps and the angular (spatial) filtering are also possible in photonic crystals. In this article, we review the recent advances of the spatial filtering using the photonic crystals in different propagation regimes and for different geometries. We review the most evident configuration of filtering in Bragg regime (with the back-reflection—i.e., in the configuration with band-gaps) as well as in Laue regime (with forward deflection—i.e., in the configuration without band-gaps). We explore the spatial filtering in crystals with different symmetries, including axisymmetric crystals; we discuss the role of chirping, i.e., the dependence of the longitudinal period along the structure. We also review the experimental techniques to fabricate the photonic crystals and numerical techniques to explore the spatial filtering. Finally, we discuss several implementations of such filters for intracavity spatial filtering.

  16. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  17. Photonics with multiwall carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Lidorikis, Elefterios; Ferrari, Andrea C

    2009-05-26

    We investigate the photonic properties of two-dimensional nanotube arrays for photon energies up to 40 eV and unveil the physics of two distinct applications: deep-UV photonic crystals and total visible absorbers. We find three main regimes: for small intertube spacing of 20-30 nm, we obtain strong Bragg scattering and photonic band gaps in the deep-UV range of 25 approximately 35 eV. For intermediate spacing of 40-100 nm, the photonic bands anticross with the graphite plasmon bands resulting into a complex photonic structure, and a generally reduced Bragg scattering. For large spacing >150 nm, the Bragg gap moves into the visible and decreases due to absorption. This leads to nanotube arrays behaving as total optical absorbers. Our results can guide the design of photonic applications in the visible and deep UV ranges.

  18. Thulium-doped fiber laser utilizing a photonic crystal fiber-based optical low-pass filter with application in 1.7 μm and 1.8 μm band.

    PubMed

    Emami, Siamak Dawazdah; Khodaei, Amin; Gandan, Shumithira; Penny, Richard; Lim, Kok Sing; Abdul-Rashid, Hairul Azhar; Ahmad, Harith

    2015-07-27

    This paper describes a low pass filter based on photonics crystal fiber (PCF) partial ASE suppression, and its application within a 1.7 µm to 1.8 µm band thulium-doped fiber amplifier (TDFA) and a thulium-doped fiber laser (TDFL). The enlargement of air holes around the doped core region of the PCF resulted in a low-pass filter device that was able to attenuate wavelengths above the conventional long cut-off wavelength. These ensuing long cut-off wavelengths were 1.85 μm and 1.75 μm, and enabled a transmission mechanism that possessed a number of desirable characteristics. The proposed optical low-pass filter was applied within a TDFA and TDFL system. Peak spectrum was observed at around 1.9 μm for conventional TDF lasers, while the proposed TDF laser with PCF setup had fiber laser peak wavelengths measured at downshifted values of 1.74 μm and 1.81 μm.

  19. Fiber-mesh photonic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Subodha; Satpathy, Sashi

    2008-03-01

    Analogous to the photonic crystal, we introduce the concept of a fiber-mesh photonic molecule made up of optical fibers and study its transmission characteristics. We consider a specific example of a photonic molecule, inspired by the well-known C60 molecule, with the arms of the molecule formed out of single-moded optical fibers. The transmittance consists of sharp peaks determined by the pole structure of the scattering matrix in the complex energy plane. A molecule can be designed to control the positions and the widths of the transmission peaks, opening up the possibility of building new photonic devices such as high quality band-pass filters.

  20. Resonant photonic States in coupled heterostructure photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jd; Sabarinathan, J; Singh, Mr

    2010-02-09

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  1. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  2. Higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Gansch, Roman; Kalchmair, Stefan; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron M; Klang, Pavel; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2011-08-15

    We present a detailed investigation of higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs. In such structures the resonances exhibit a blue-shift compared to an ideal two-dimensional photonic crystal, which depends on the order of the slab mode and the polarization. By fabricating a series of photonic crystal slab photo detecting devices, with varying ratios of slab thickness to photonic crystal lattice constant, we are able to distinguish between 0th and 1st order slab modes as well as the polarization from the shift of resonances in the photocurrent spectra. This method complements the photonic band structure mapping technique for characterization of photonic crystal slabs.

  3. Compact localized states and flat-band generators in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimaiti, Wulayimu; Andreanov, Alexei; Park, Hee Chul; Gendelman, Oleg; Flach, Sergej

    2017-03-01

    Flat bands (FB) are strictly dispersionless bands in the Bloch spectrum of a periodic lattice Hamiltonian, recently observed in a variety of photonic and dissipative condensate networks. FB Hamiltonians are fine-tuned networks, still lacking a comprehensive generating principle. We introduce a FB generator based on local network properties. We classify FB networks through the properties of compact localized states (CLS) which are exact FB eigenstates and occupy U unit cells. We obtain the complete two-parameter FB family of two-band d =1 networks with nearest unit cell interaction and U =2 . We discover a novel high symmetry sawtooth chain with identical hoppings in a transverse dc field, easily accessible in experiments. Our results pave the way towards a complete description of FBs in networks with more bands and in higher dimensions.

  4. Slow-light-induced Doppler shift in photonic-crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Baba, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this Rapid Communication, we theoretically discuss a large Doppler shift in a signal slow-light pulse in a photonic-crystal waveguide by considering its reflection at a quasilight speed mirror. The mirror is formed by the photonic band-gap shift induced by the high nonlinearity of a control slow-light pulse, which could be possible in a realistic device. In the simulation, the Doppler shift appears at multiple frequencies due to the Bloch nature of the photonic lattice. Larger but inefficient Doppler shifts occur through nonadiabatic processes, whereas the smallest but more efficient shift (i.e., the intraband Doppler shift) occurs through an adiabatic process. The occurrence of the intraband shift depends on whether the adiabatic process produces a complete reflection of the incident pulse, despite the fact that the pulse penetrates the mirror. A large band-gap shift and a moderately slow mirror satisfy this condition; otherwise, the shift ends at the halfway point.

  5. Theory and applications of light-matter interactions in quantum dot nanowire photonic crystal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelatos, Gerasimos

    Photonic crystal slabs coupled with quantum dipole emitters allow one to control quantum light-matter interactions and are a promising platform for quantum information science technologies; however their development has been hindered by inherent fabrication issues. Inspired by recent nanowire growth techniques and opportunities in fundamental quantum nanophotonics, in this thesis we theoretically investigate light-matter interactions in nanowire photonic crystal structures with embedded quantum dots, a novel engineered quantum system, for applications in quantum optics. We develop designs for currently fabricable structures, including finite-size effects and radiative loss, and investigate their fundamental properties using photonic band structure calculations, finite-difference time-domain computations, and a rigorous photonic Green function technique. We study and engineer realistic nanowire photonic crystal waveguides for single photon applications whose performance can exceed that of state-of-the-art slab photonic crystals, and design a directed single photon source. We then develop a powerful quantum optical formalism using master equation techniques and the photonic Green function to understand the quantum dynamics of these exotic structures in open and lossy photonic environments. This is used to explore the coupling of a pair of quantum dots in a nanowire photonic crystal waveguide, demonstrating long-lived entangled states and a system with a completely controllable Hamiltonian capable of simulating a wide variety of quantum systems and entering a unique regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics characterized by strong exchange-splitting. Lastly, we propose and study a "metamaterial" polariton waveguide comprised of a nanowire photonic crystal waveguide with an embedded quantum dot in each unit cell, and explain the properties of both infinite and finite-sized structures using a Green function approach. We show that an external quantum dot can be strongly

  6. Photon path length retrieval from GOSAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremmling, Beke; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Deutschmann, Tim; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The influence of clouds on the atmospheric radiation budget is investigated, focussing on the photon path length distributions of the scattered sunlight. Apart from the reflection of incoming solar radiation at the cloud top, clouds can also introduce a large number of additional scattering events causing an enhancement of the photon paths. In certain cloud formations, these scattering events also result in a ``ping-pong`` behaviour between different cloud patches and cloud layers. It has been shown from ground based measurements that it is possible to retrieve photon path lengths by analysis of high resolution oxygen A-band spectra (O. Funk et al.). This study uses similar space based measurements of the oxygen A-band for the path length retrieval. The oxygen A-band spectra are retrieved from the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) which was successfully launched in 2009. The high spectral resolution of the GOSAT TANSO-FTS instrument allows to almost completely resolve the individual absorption lines. The considered spectral range is particularly suitable for this study because it shows clear absorption structures of different strength. From the analysis of the spectral signatures, cloud properties and the underlying path length distributions can be derived. The retrieval is done by analysis and comparison of the extracted TANSO-FTS spectra with simulations from the Monte Carlo radiative transfer Model McArtim. The model permits modelling of altitude dependent oxygen absorption cross sections and three-dimensional cloud patterns. Case studies of clear and cloudy sky scenarios will be presented. Future studies will focus on more complicated cloud structures, especially considering three-dimensional geometries and heterogeneities.

  7. High-extinction ratio integrated photonic filters for silicon quantum photonics.

    PubMed

    Piekarek, Mateusz; Bonneau, Damien; Miki, Shigehito; Yamashita, Taro; Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide; Terai, Hirotaka; Tanner, Michael G; Natarajan, Chandra M; Hadfield, Robert H; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Thompson, Mark G

    2017-02-15

    We present the generation of quantum-correlated photon pairs and subsequent pump rejection across two silicon-on-insulator photonic integrated circuits. Incoherently cascaded lattice filters are used to provide over 100 dB pass-band to stop-band contrast with no additional external filtering. Photon pairs generated in a microring resonator are successfully separated from the input pump, confirmed by temporal correlations measurements.

  8. Chronic myeloid leukemia: a prospective comparison of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and chromosome banding analysis for the definition of complete cytogenetic response: a study of the GIMEMA CML WP.

    PubMed

    Testoni, Nicoletta; Marzocchi, Giulia; Luatti, Simona; Amabile, Marilina; Baldazzi, Carmen; Stacchini, Monica; Nanni, Mauro; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; Giugliano, Emilia; Giussani, Ursula; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Kerim, Simonetta; Grimoldi, Maria Grazia; Gozzetti, Alessandro; Crescenzi, Barbara; Carcassi, Carlo; Bernasconi, Paolo; Cuneo, Antonio; Albano, Francesco; Fugazza, Giuseppina; Zaccaria, Alfonso; Martinelli, Giovanni; Pane, Fabrizio; Rosti, Gianantonio; Baccarani, Michele

    2009-12-03

    In chronic myeloid leukemia, different methods are available to monitor the response to therapy: chromosome banding analysis (CBA), interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH), and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-Q-PCR). The GIMEMA CML WP (Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche Adulto Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Working Party) has performed a prospective study to compare CBA and I-FISH for the definition of complete cytogenetic response (CCgR). Samples (n = 664) were evaluated simultaneously by CBA and I-FISH. Of 537 cases in CCgR, the number of positive nuclei by I-FISH was less than 1% in 444 cases (82.7%). Of 451 cases with less than 1% positive nuclei by I-FISH, 444 (98.4%) were classified as CCgR by CBA. The major molecular response rate was significantly greater in cases with I-FISH less than 1% than in those with I-FISH 1% to 5% (66.8% vs 51.6%, P < .001) and in cases with CCgR and I-FISH less than 1% than in cases with CCgR and I-FISH 1% to 5% (66.1% vs 49.4%, P = .004). I-FISH is more sensitive than CBA and can be used to monitor CCgR. With appropriate probes, the cutoff value of I-FISH may be established at 1%. These trials are registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00514488 and NCT00510926.

  9. Nuclear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  10. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  11. New Kronig-Penney Equation Emphasizing the Band Edge Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szmulowicz, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Kronig-Penney problem is a textbook example for discussing band dispersions and band gap formation in periodic layered media. For example, in photonic crystals, the behaviour of bands next to the band edges is important for further discussions of such effects as inhibited light emission, slow light and negative index of refraction. However,…

  12. Band heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Alam, M S; Naila, N

    2010-01-01

    Band heterotopias are one of the rarest groups of congenital disorder that result in variable degree of structural abnormality of brain parenchyma. Band of heterotopic neurons result from a congenital or acquired deficiency of the neuronal migration. MRI is the examination of choice for demonstrating these abnormalities because of the superb gray vs. white matter differentiation, detail of cortical anatomy and ease of multiplanar imaging. We report a case of band heterotopia that showed a bilateral band of gray matter in deep white matter best demonstrated on T2 Wt. and FLAIR images.

  13. Photonic crystals as optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevi, P.; Krokhin, A. A.; Arriaga, J.

    1999-11-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have already found numerous applications associated with the photonic band gap. We point out that PCs could be also employed as custom-made optical components in the linear region well below the photonic gap. As an example, we discuss a birefringent PC lens that acts as a polarizing beam splitter. This idea is supported by a precise method of calculation of the optical constants of a transparent two-dimensional (2D) PC. Such a process of homogenization is performed for hexagonal arrays of polymer-based PCs and also for the mammalian cornea. Finally, 2D PCs are classified as optically uniaxial or biaxial.

  14. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  15. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  16. Photonic Hypercrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new "universality class" of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  17. Topological photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2008-03-01

    We associate intrinsic energy equal to hν /2 with the spin angular momentum of photon, and propose a topological model based on orbifold in space and tifold in time as topological obstructions. The model is substantiated using vector wavefield disclinations. The physical photon is suggested to be a particlelike topological photon and a propagating wave such that the energy hν of photon is equally divided between spin energy and translational energy, corresponding to linear momentum of hν /c. The enigma of wave-particle duality finds natural resolution, and the proposed model gives new insights into the phenomena of interference and emission of radiation.

  18. Transmission properties of one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shiveshwari, Laxmi; Awasthi, S. K.

    2015-09-15

    Omnidirectional photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals (PPC) composed of single negative metamaterials. The band characteristics and transmission properties are investigated through the transfer matrix method. We show that the proposed structure can trap light in three-dimensional space due to the elimination of Brewster's angle transmission resonance allowing the existence of complete PBG. The results are discussed in terms of incident angle, layer thickness, dielectric constant of the dielectric material, and number of unit cells (N) for TE and TM polarizations. It is seen that PBG characteristics is apparent even in an N ≥ 2 system, which is weakly sensitive to the incident angle and completely insensitive to the polarization. Finite PPC could be used for multichannel transmission filter without introducing any defect in the geometry. We show that the locations of the multichannel transmission peaks are in the allowed band of the infinite structure. The structure can work as a single or multichannel filter by varying the number of unit cells. Binary PPC can also work as a polarization sensitive tunable filter.

  19. Thermally tunable ferroelectric thin film photonic crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P. T.; Wessels, B. W.; Imre, A.; Ocola, L. E.; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Thermally tunable PhCs are fabricated from ferroelectric thin films. Photonic band structure and temperature dependent diffraction are calculated by FDTD. 50% intensity modulation is demonstrated experimentally. This device has potential in active ultra-compact optical circuits.

  20. Virtual and real photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulenberg, Andrew, Jr.

    2011-09-01

    Maxwell did not believe in photons. However, his equations lead to electro-magnetic field structures that are considered to be photonic by Quantum ElectroDynamics (QED). They are complete, relativistically correct, and unchallenged after nearly 150 years. However, even though his far-field solution has been considered as the basis for photons, as they stand and are interpreted, they are better fitted to the concept of virtual rather than to real photons. Comparison between staticcharge fields, near-field coupling, and photonic radiation will be made and the distinctions identified. The question of similarities in, and differences between, the two will be addressed. Implied assumptions in Feynman's "Lectures" could lead one to believe that he had provided a general classical electrodynamics proof that an orbital electron must radiate. While his derivation is correct, two of the conditions defined do not always apply in this case. As a result, the potential for misinterpretation of his proof (as he himself did earlier) for this particular case has some interesting implications. He did not make the distinction between radiation from a bound electron driven by an external alternating field and one falling in a nuclear potential. Similar failures lead to misinterpreting the differences between virtual and real photons.

  1. All-dielectric photonic-assisted wireless receiver.

    PubMed

    Ayazi, Ali; Hsu, Rick C J; Houshmand, Bijan; Steier, William H; Jalali, Bahram

    2008-02-04

    High Power Microwave (HPM) weapons and other sources of intense microwave power pose a growing threat to modern RF receivers. To address this problem, all-dielectric photonic-assisted receivers have been proposed and demonstrated. Here, we describe a new configuration of this type with 15 dB better sensitivity over prior designs. The complete lack of metal and electronics in the front-end offers immunity against damage from intense electromagnetic radiation. In this experiment, detection of C band electromagnetic signal at 6.54 GHz with a sensitivity of -112 dBm/Hz is demonstrated.

  2. Fabrication of ten-fold photonic quasicrystalline structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, XiaoHong Wu, YuLong; Liu, Wen; Liu, Wei; Han, Juan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-05-15

    Compared to periodic crystals, quasicrystals have higher point group symmetry and are more favorable in achieving complete band-gaps. In this report, a top-cut prism interferometer is designed to fabricate ten-fold photonic quasicrystalline structures. By optimizing the exposing conditions and material characteristics, appropriate quasicrystals have been obtained in the SU8 photoresist films. Atomic Force Microscopy and laser diffraction are used to characterize the fabricated structures. The measurement results show the consistence between the theoretical design and experiments. This will provide guidance for the large-area and fast production of ten-fold quasicrystalline structures with high quality.

  3. The photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Russell L.

    2009-10-01

    There are no TEM waves, only photons. Lets build a photon, using a radio antenna. A short antenna (2L<< λ) simplifies the calculation, letting B fall off everywhere as 1/r^2. The Biot-Savart law finds B = (μ0/4π)(LI0/r^2)θφt. The magnetic flux thru a semi-circle of radius λ/2 is set equal to the flux quantum h/e, determining the needed source strength, LI0. From this, one can integrate the magnetic energy density over a sphere of radius λ/2 and finds it to be 1.0121 hc/λ. Pretty close. A B field collapses when the current ceases, but the photon evades this by creating a ɛ0E / t displacement current at center that fully supports the toroidal B assembly as it moves at c. This E=vxB arises because the photon moves at c. Stopped, a photon decays. At every point along the photon's path, an observer will note a transient oscillation of an E field. This sources the EM ``guiding wave'', carrying little or no energy and expanding at c. At the head of the photon, all these spherical guiding waves gather ``in-phase'' as a planar wavefront. This model speaks to all the many things we know about light. The photon is tiny, but its guiding wave is huge.

  4. Curriculum Guide for Advanced Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazar, W. Gayre

    The advanced band of the Vermilion Parish School System is a selective organization comprised of school instrumental students who have successfully completed all phases of the beginning and intermediate band programs. It functions largely as a performing group for varied school and community activities. This guide describes the advanced band…

  5. Photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect based on dynamic modulation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kejie; Yu, Zongfu; Fan, Shanhui

    2012-04-13

    We show that when the refractive index of a photonic system is harmonically modulated, the phase of the modulation introduces an effective gauge potential for photons. This effective gauge potential can be used to create a photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect. We show that the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect provides the optimal mechanism for achieving complete on-chip nonmagnetic optical isolation.

  6. Optically decomposed near-band-edge structure and excitonic transitions in Ga2S3

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ching-Hwa; Chen, Hsin-Hung

    2014-01-01

    The band-edge structure and band gap are key parameters for a functional chalcogenide semiconductor to its applications in optoelectronics, nanoelectronics, and photonics devices. Here, we firstly demonstrate the complete study of experimental band-edge structure and excitonic transitions of monoclinic digallium trisulfide (Ga2S3) using photoluminescence (PL), thermoreflectance (TR), and optical absorption measurements at low and room temperatures. According to the experimental results of optical measurements, three band-edge transitions of EA = 3.052 eV, EB = 3.240 eV, and EC = 3.328 eV are respectively determined and they are proven to construct the main band-edge structure of Ga2S3. Distinctly optical-anisotropic behaviors by orientation- and polarization-dependent TR measurements are, respectively, relevant to distinguish the origins of the EA, EB, and EC transitions. The results indicated that the three band-edge transitions are coming from different origins. Low-temperature PL results show defect emissions, bound-exciton and free-exciton luminescences in the radiation spectra of Ga2S3. The below-band-edge transitions are respectively characterized. On the basis of experimental analyses, the optical property of near-band-edge structure and excitonic transitions in the monoclinic Ga2S3 crystal is revealed. PMID:25142550

  7. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  8. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen; Zhang, Ru; Wang, Chuan

    2016-06-01

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  9. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen; Zhang, Ru; Wang, Chuan

    2016-06-15

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  10. Photonic lanterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Argyros, Alexander; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-12-01

    Multimode optical fibers have been primarily (and almost solely) used as "light pipes" in short distance telecommunications and in remote and astronomical spectroscopy. The modal properties of the multimode waveguides are rarely exploited and mostly discussed in the context of guiding light. Until recently, most photonic applications in the applied sciences have arisen from developments in telecommunications. However, the photonic lantern is one of several devices that arose to solve problems in astrophotonics and space photonics. Interestingly, these devices are now being explored for use in telecommunications and are likely to find commercial use in the next few years, particularly in the development of compact spectrographs. Photonic lanterns allow for a low-loss transformation of a multimode waveguide into a discrete number of single-mode waveguides and vice versa, thus enabling the use of single-mode photonic technologies in multimode systems. In this review, we will discuss the theory and function of the photonic lantern, along with several different variants of the technology. We will also discuss some of its applications in more detail. Furthermore, we foreshadow future applications of this technology to the field of nanophotonics.

  11. Photon diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2009-11-01

    In current light models, a particle-like model of light is inconsistent with diffraction observations. A model of light is proposed wherein photon inferences are combined with the cosmological scalar potential model (SPM). That the photon is a surface with zero surface area in the travel direction is inferred from the Michelson-Morley experiment. That the photons in slits are mathematically treated as a linear antenna array (LAA) is inferred from the comparison of the transmission grating interference pattern and the single slit diffraction pattern. That photons induce a LAA wave into the plenum is inferred from the fractal model. Similarly, the component of the photon (the hod) is treated as a single antenna radiating a potential wave into the plenum. That photons are guided by action on the surface of the hod is inferred from the SPM. The plenum potential waves are a real field (not complex) that forms valleys, consistent with the pilot waves of the Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics. Therefore, the Afshar experiment result is explained, supports Bohm, and falsifies Copenhagen. The papers may be viewed at http://web.citcom.net/˜scjh/.

  12. Tantalum(V) nitride inverse opals as photonic structures for visible wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Rugge, Alessandro; Park, Jin-Seong; Gordon, Roy G; Tolbert, Sarah H

    2005-03-10

    The development of materials with a complete photonic band gap at visible wavelengths is believed to have the potential to lead to new control over long-lived emissive excited states, single molecule lasers, and nearly lossless nanoscale waveguides. In this work we move toward that goal with the synthesis of an inverse opal thin film of Ta3N5 produced through atomic layer deposition. The highly regular architecture achievable by atomic layer deposition is combined with an unusually high refractive index and transparency in at least part of the visible spectrum. The result is a material that represents the closest example to date of a photonic crystal with a band gap at optical wavelengths.

  13. Photonic crystal slab quantum well infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchmair, S.; Detz, H.; Cole, G. D.; Andrews, A. M.; Klang, P.; Nobile, M.; Gansch, R.; Ostermaier, C.; Schrenk, W.; Strasser, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this letter we present a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), which is fabricated as a photonic crystal slab (PCS). With the PCS it is possible to enhance the absorption efficiency by increasing photon lifetime in the detector active region. To understand the optical properties of the device we simulate the PCS photonic band structure, which differs significantly from a real two-dimensional photonic crystal. By fabricating a PCS-QWIP with 100x less quantum well doping, compared to a standard QWIP, we are able to see strong absorption enhancement and sharp resonance peaks up to temperatures of 170 K.

  14. Weyl points and line nodes in gapless gyroid photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ling; Fu, Liang; Joannopoulos, John; Soljacic, Marin; MIT Team

    2013-03-01

    Weyl points and line nodes are three-dimensional linear point- and line-degeneracies between two bands. In contrast to Dirac points, which are their two-dimensional analogues, Weyl points are stable in the momentum space and the associated surface states are predicted to be topologically non-trivial. However, Weyl points are yet to be discovered in nature. Here, we report photonic crystals, based on the double-gyroid structures, exhibiting frequency-isolated Weyl points with complete phase diagrams by breaking the parity and time-reversal symmetries. The surface states associated with the non-zero Chern numbers are demonstrated. Line nodes are also found in similar geometries; the associated surface states are shown to be at bands. Our results are based on realistic ``numerical experiments'' with true predictive power and should be readily experimentally realizable at both microwave and optical frequencies.

  15. Weyl points and line nodes in gyroid photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ling; Fu, Liang; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2013-04-01

    Weyl points and line nodes are three-dimensional linear point and line degeneracies between two bands. In contrast to two-dimensional Dirac points, which are their lower-dimensional analogues, Weyl points are stable in momentum space, and the associated surface states are predicted to be topologically non-trivial. However, Weyl points are yet to be discovered in nature. Here, we report photonic crystals based on double-gyroid structures, exhibiting frequency-isolated Weyl points with complete phase diagrams by breaking the parity and time-reversal symmetries. Gapless surface dispersions associated with non-zero Chern numbers are demonstrated. Line nodes are also found in similar geometries, the associated surface states forming flat dispersion bands. Our results are based on realistic ab initio calculations with true predictive power and should be readily realizable experimentally from microwave to optical frequencies.

  16. A polariton condensate in a photonic crystal potential landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Karol; Fischer, Julian; Schade, Anne; Amthor, Matthias; Dall, Robert; Geßler, Jonas; Emmerling, Monika; Ostrovskaya, Elena A.; Kamp, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven

    2015-02-01

    The possibility of investigating macroscopic coherent quantum states in polariton condensates and of engineering polariton landscapes in semiconductors has triggered interest in using polaritonic systems to simulate complex many-body phenomena. However, advanced experiments require superior trapping techniques that allow for the engineering of periodic and arbitrary potentials with strong on-site localization, clean condensate formation, and nearest-neighbor coupling. Here we establish a technology that meets these demands and enables strong, potentially tunable trapping without affecting the favorable polariton characteristics. The traps are based on a locally elongated microcavity which can be formed by standard lithography. We observe polariton condensation with non-resonant pumping in single traps and photonic crystal square lattice arrays. In the latter structures, we observe pronounced energy bands, complete band gaps, and spontaneous condensation at the M-point of the Brillouin zone.

  17. Photonic density of states of two-dimensional quasicrystalline photonic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Lin; Bita, Ion; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2011-08-15

    A large photonic band gap (PBG) is highly favorable for photonic crystal devices. One of the most important goals of PBG materials research is identifying structural design strategies for maximizing the gap size. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the PBG properties of two-dimensional (2D) quasicrystals (QCs), where rotational symmetry, dielectric fill factor, and structural morphology were varied systematically in order to identify correlations between structure and PBG width at a given dielectric contrast (13:1, Si:air). The transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) PBGs of 12 types of QCs are investigated (588 structures). We discovered a 12mm QC with a 56.5% TE PBG, the largest reported TE PBG for an aperiodic crystal to date. We also report here a QC morphology comprising ''throwing star''-like dielectric domains, with near-circular air cores and interconnecting veins emanating radially around the core. This interesting morphology leads to a complete PBG of {approx}20% , which is the largest reported complete PBG for aperiodic crystals.

  18. Production of photocurrent due to intermediate-to-conduction-band transitions: a demonstration of a key operating principle of the intermediate-band solar cell.

    PubMed

    Martí, A; Antolín, E; Stanley, C R; Farmer, C D; López, N; Díaz, P; Cánovas, E; Linares, P G; Luque, A

    2006-12-15

    We present intermediate-band solar cells manufactured using quantum dot technology that show for the first time the production of photocurrent when two sub-band-gap energy photons are absorbed simultaneously. One photon produces an optical transition from the intermediate-band to the conduction band while the second pumps an electron from the valence band to the intermediate-band. The detection of this two-photon absorption process is essential to verify the principles of operation of the intermediate-band solar cell. The phenomenon is the cornerstone physical principle that ultimately allows the production of photocurrent in a solar cell by below band gap photon absorption, without degradation of its output voltage.

  19. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  20. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  1. Quantum Logic with Cavity Photons From Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleczek, Annemarie; Barter, Oliver; Rubenok, Allison; Dilley, Jerome; Nisbet-Jones, Peter B. R.; Langfahl-Klabes, Gunnar; Marshall, Graham D.; Sparrow, Chris; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Poulios, Konstantinos; Kuhn, Axel; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate quantum logic using narrow linewidth photons that are produced with an a priori nonprobabilistic scheme from a single 87Rb atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity. We use a controlled-not gate integrated into a photonic chip to entangle these photons, and we observe nonclassical correlations between photon detection events separated by periods exceeding the travel time across the chip by 3 orders of magnitude. This enables quantum technology that will use the properties of both narrow-band single photon sources and integrated quantum photonics.

  2. Theoretical investigation of photonic quantum wells and defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuankai

    In this dissertation, band gaps of photonic crystal slabs are calculated and single and multiple photonic quantum well systems are theoretically investigated. A comprehensive study of defects in the photonic crystal is also presented in the dissertation. The major milestones and current developments in the photonic crystal research are briefly outlined in the introduction. Four theoretical approaches most commonly applied in the photonic crystal studies are reviewed. They are the plane wave expansion method, finite difference time domain method, transfer matrix method and modal expansion with R-matrix propagation algorithm. A comparison of these theoretical methods is discussed and the R-matrix formalism is implemented in the present work. The modal expansion with R-matrix propagation algorithm is applied to calculate the band gap for two-dimensional photonic crystal slabs and the results are compared with experimental measurements and with other numerical calculations. Excellent agreement with experiments is found and the R-matrix formalism proves to be more advantageous than other approaches. These advantages include its stability, efficiency and the fact that it can deal with finite photonic crystal slabs. The effect of the finite photonic slab on the band gap is also discussed. It is demonstrated that the band gap for a photonic slab structure can be controlled by the dielectric contrast, filling factor, filling geometry, lattice structure and polarization of the electric field. A photonic quantum well structure is proposed and investigated by the R-matrix algorithm. The band gap of photonic materials with periodic spatial modulation of the refractive index greater than unity can actually be regarded as a potential barrier for photons. Similar to the semiconductor quantum well systems, a photonic quantum well can be constructed by sandwiching a uniform medium between two photonic barriers due to the photonic band gap mismatch. The transmission and reflection

  3. Complete prewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Parry, A. O.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study continuous interfacial transitions, analagous to two-dimensional complete wetting, associated with the first-order prewetting line, which can occur on steps, patterned walls, grooves and wedges, and which are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple prototypical geometries. Using microscopic classical density functional theory to model systems with realistic Lennard-Jones fluid-fluid and fluid-substrate intermolecular potentials, we compute mean-field fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and phase diagrams for a variety of confining geometries.

  4. Green photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-02-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas.

  5. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  6. Frequency-bin entangled photons

    SciTech Connect

    Olislager, L.; Emplit, P.; Nguyen, A. T.; Massar, S.; Merolla, J.-M.; Huy, K. Phan

    2010-07-15

    A monochromatic laser pumping a parametric down-conversion crystal generates frequency-entangled photon pairs. We study this experimentally by addressing such frequency-entangled photons at telecommunication wavelengths (around 1550 nm) with fiber-optics components such as electro-optic phase modulators and narrow-band frequency filters. The theory underlying our approach uses the notion of frequency-bin entanglement. Our results show that the phase modulators address coherently up to eleven frequency bins, leading to an interference pattern which can violate by more than five standard deviations a Bell inequality adapted to our setup.

  7. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Foteinopoulou, Stavroula

    2003-01-01

    negatively refractive phenomena. They found that in the PC system, negative refraction is neither a prerequisite nor guarantees left-handed behavior. They examined carefully the condition to obtain left-handed behavior in the PC. They proposed a wedge type of experiment, in accordance with the experiment performed on the traditional LHM, to test these conditions. They found that for certain frequencies the PC shows left-handed behavior and acts in some respects like a homogeneous medium with a negative refractive index. they used the realistic PC system for this case to show how negative refraction occurs at the interface between a material with a positive and a material with a negative refractive index. Their findings indicate that the formation of the negatively refracted beam is not instantaneous and involves a transient time. With this time-dependent analysis, they were able to address previous controversial issues about negative refraction concerning causality and the speed of light limit. Finally, they attempt a systematic study of anomalous refractive phenomena that can occur at the air-PC interface. They observe cases where only a single refracted beam (in the positive or negative direction) is present, as well as cases with birefringence. they classify these different effects according to their origin and type of propagation (left-handed or not). For a complete study of the system, they also obtain expressions for the energy and group velocities, and show their equality. For cases with very low index contrast, band folding becomes an artificiality. They discuss the validity of their findings when they move to the limit of photonic crystals with a low index modulation.

  8. In vitro activation of the medial septum-diagonal band complex generates atropine-sensitive and atropine-resistant hippocampal theta rhythm: an investigation using a complete septohippocampal preparation.

    PubMed

    Goutagny, Romain; Manseau, Frédéric; Jackson, Jesse; Danik, Marc; Williams, Sylvain

    2008-01-01

    The medial septum and diagonal band complex (MS-DB) is believed to play a key role in generating theta oscillations in the hippocampus, a phenomenon critical for learning and memory. Although the importance of the MS-DB in hippocampal theta rhythm generation is generally accepted, it remains to be determined whether the MS-DB alone can generate hippocampal oscillations or is only a transducer of rhythmic activity from other brain areas. Secondly, it is known that hippocampal theta rhythm can be separated into an atropine-sensitive and insensitive component. However, it remains to be established if the MS-DB can generate both types of rhythm. To answer these questions, we used a new in vitro rat septohippocampal preparation placed in a hermetically separated two side recording chamber. We showed that carbachol activation of the MS-DB generated large theta oscillations in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. These oscillations were blocked by applying either the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline or the AMPA/kainate antagonist DNQX to the hippocampus. Interestingly, the application of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine produced only a partial decrease in the amplitude, without modification of the frequency, of theta. These results show for the first time, that upon optimal excitation, the MS-DB alone is able to generate hippocampal oscillations in the theta frequency band. Moreover, these MS-DB generated theta oscillations are mediated by muscarinic and nonmuscarinic receptors and have a pharmacological profile similar to theta rhythm observed in awake animals.

  9. Topological Photonic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Cheng; Lin, Liang; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    As exotic phenomena in optics, topological states in photonic crystals have drawn much attention due to their fundamental significance and great potential applications. Because of the broken time-reversal symmetry under the influence of an external magnetic field, the photonic crystals composed of magneto-optical materials will lead to the degeneracy lifting and show particular topological characters of energy bands. The upper and lower bulk bands have nonzero integer topological numbers. The gapless edge states can be realized to connect two bulk states. This topological photonic states originated from the topological property can be analogous to the integer quantum Hall effect in an electronic system. The gapless edge state only possesses a single sign of gradient in the whole Brillouin zone, and thus the group velocity is only in one direction leading to the one-way energy flow, which is robust to disorder and impurity due to the nontrivial topological nature of the corresponding electromagnetic states. Furthermore, this one-way edge state would cross the Brillouin center with nonzero group velocity, where the negative-zero-positive phase velocity can be used to realize some interesting phenomena such as tunneling and backward phase propagation. On the other hand, under the protection of time-reversal symmetry, a pair of gapless edge states can also be constructed by using magnetic-electric coupling meta-materials, exhibiting Fermion-like spin helix topological edge states, which can be regarded as an optical counterpart of topological insulator originating from the spin-orbit coupling. The aim of this article is to have a comprehensive review of recent research literatures published in this emerging field of photonic topological phenomena. Photonic topological states and their related phenomena are presented and analyzed, including the chiral edge states, polarization dependent transportation, unidirectional waveguide and nonreciprocal optical transmission, all

  10. Strongly-Refractive One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal prisms can separate a beam of polychromatic electromagnetic waves into constituent wavelength components and can utilize unconventional refraction properties for wavelength dispersion over significant portions of an entire photonic band rather than just near the band edges outside the photonic band gaps. Using a ID photonic crystal simplifies the design and fabrication process and allows the use of larger feature sizes. The prism geometry broadens the useful wavelength range, enables better optical transmission, and exhibits angular dependence on wavelength with reduced non-linearity. The properties of the 1 D photonic crystal prism can be tuned by varying design parameters such as incidence angle, exit surface angle, and layer widths. The ID photonic crystal prism can be fabricated in a planar process, and can be used as optical integrated circuit elements.

  11. Manipulation of electronic states and photonic states in nanosilicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Qi; Huang, Zhong-Mei; Miao, Xin-Jian; Qin, Chao-Jian; Lv, Quan

    2014-04-01

    On different size hierarchy, period symmetry provides energy band structure, and symmetry breaking produces localized states in gap, for example nanostructures open electronic band gap by confining electrons, but defects in symmetry system produce localized electronic states in gap. The experimental results demonstrate that controlling localized states in gap by changing passivation environment can manipulate emission wavelength, such as stimulated emission at 700 nm due to oxygen passivation and enhanced electroluminescence near 1600 nm due to ytterbium passivation on nanosilicon. In same way, modulating filling fraction and period parameters in photonic crystal enlarges width of photonic band gap (PBG) by confining photons. Symmetry breaking due to defects is effective in manipulating photonic states. New applications for selecting modes in nanolaser and for building single photon source in quantum information are explored by manipulating and coupling between electronic states and photonic states.

  12. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjustable gastric banding; Bariatric surgery - laparoscopic gastric banding; Obesity - gastric banding; Weight loss - gastric banding ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ...

  13. Ultra-refractive and extended-range one-dimensional photonic crystal superprisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, D. Z. Y.

    2003-01-01

    We describe theoretical analysis and design of one-dimensional photonic crystal prisms. We found that inside the photonic crystal, for frequencies near the band edges, light propagation direction is extremely sensitive to the variations in wavelength and incident angle.

  14. Mechanically tunable photonic crystal lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Tamma, V. A.; Lee, J.-B.; Park, W.

    2010-08-01

    We designed, fabricated and characterized MEMS-enabled mechanically-tunable photonic crystal lens comprised of 2D photonic crystal and symmetrical electro-thermal actuators. The 2D photonic crystal was made of a honeycomb-lattice of 340 nm thick, 260 nm diameter high-index silicon rods embedded in low-index 10 μm thick SU-8 cladding. Silicon input waveguide and deflection block were also fabricated for light in-coupling and monitoring of focused spot size, respectively. When actuated, the electro-thermal actuators induced mechanical strain which changed the lattice constant of the photonic crystal and consequently modified the photonic band structure. This in turn modified the focal-length of the photonic crystal lens. The fabricated device was characterized using a tunable laser (1400~1602 nm) and an infrared camera during actuation. At the wavelength of 1450 nm, the lateral light spot size observed at the deflection block gradually decreased 40%, as applied current increased from 0 to 0.7 A, indicating changes in focal length in response to the mechanical stretching.

  15. Band Structures of Plasmonic Polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Fabio; Lambert, Henry; Giustino, Feliciano

    2015-03-01

    In angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), the acceleration of a photo-electron upon photon absorption may trigger shake-up excitations in the sample, leading to the emission of phonons, electron-hole pairs, and plasmons, the latter being collective charge-density fluctuations. Using state-of-the-art many-body calculations based on the `GW plus cumulant' approach, we show that electron-plasmon interactions induce plasmonic polaron bands in group IV transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2). We find that the energy vs. momentum dispersion relations of these plasmonic structures closely follow the standard valence bands, although they appear broadened and blueshifted by the plasmon energy. Based on our results we identify general criteria for observing plasmonic polaron bands in the angle-resolved photoelectron spectra of solids.

  16. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  17. Polymeric photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Yoel

    Two novel and practical methods for controlling the propagation of light are presented: First, a design criterion that permits truly omnidirectional reflectivity for all polarizations of incident light over a wide selectable range of frequencies is derived and used in fabricating an alldielectric omnidirectional reflector consisting of multilayer films. Because the omnidirectionality criterion is general, it can be used to design omnidirectional reflectors in many frequency ranges of interest. Potential uses depend on the geometry of the system. For example, coating of an enclosure will result in an optical cavity. A hollow tube will produce a low-loss, broadband waveguide, planar film could be used as an efficient radiative heat barrier or collector in thermoelectric devices. A comprehensive framework for creating one-, two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals out of self- assembling block copolymers has been formulated. In order to form useful band gaps in the visible regime, periodic dielectric structures made of typical block copolymers need to be modified to obtain appropriate characteristic distances and dielectric constants. Moreover, the absorption and defect concentration must also be controlled. This affords the opportunity to tap into the large structural repertoire, the flexibility and intrinsic tunability that these self-assembled block copolymer systems offer. A block copolymer was used to achieve a self assembled photonic band gap in the visible regime. By swelling the diblock copolymer with lower molecular weight constituents control over the location of the stop band across the visible regime is achieved. One and three- dimensional crystals have been formed by changing the volume fraction of the swelling media. Methods for incorporating defects of prescribed dimensions into the self-assembled structures have been explored leading to the construction of a self assembled microcavity light- emitting device. (Copies available exclusively from MIT

  18. Slow-light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Xiong, C; Monat, Christelle; Clark, Alex S; Grillet, Christian; Marshall, Graham D; Steel, M J; Li, Juntao; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F; Rarity, John G; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2011-09-01

    We report the generation of correlated photon pairs in the telecom C-band at room temperature from a dispersion-engineered silicon photonic crystal waveguide. The spontaneous four-wave mixing process producing the photon pairs is enhanced by slow-light propagation enabling an active device length of less than 100 μm. With a coincidence to accidental ratio of 12.8 at a pair generation rate of 0.006 per pulse, this ultracompact photon pair source paves the way toward scalable quantum information processing realized on-chip.

  19. Radiating dipoles in photonic crystals

    PubMed

    Busch; Vats; John; Sanders

    2000-09-01

    The radiation dynamics of a dipole antenna embedded in a photonic crystal are modeled by an initially excited harmonic oscillator coupled to a non-Markovian bath of harmonic oscillators representing the colored electromagnetic vacuum within the crystal. Realistic coupling constants based on the natural modes of the photonic crystal, i.e., Bloch waves and their associated dispersion relation, are derived. For simple model systems, well-known results such as decay times and emission spectra are reproduced. This approach enables direct incorporation of realistic band structure computations into studies of radiative emission from atoms and molecules within photonic crystals. We therefore provide a predictive and interpretative tool for experiments in both the microwave and optical regimes.

  20. Microalgae photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floume, Timmy; Coquil, Thomas; Sylvestre, Julien

    2011-05-01

    Due to their metabolic flexibility and fast growth rate, microscopic aquatic phototrophs like algae have a potential to become industrial photochemical converters. Algae photosynthesis could enable the large scale production of clean and renewable liquid fuels and chemicals with major environmental, economic and societal benefits. Capital and operational costs are the main issues to address through optical, process and biochemical engineering improvements. In this perspective, a variety of photonic approaches have been proposed - we introduce them here and describe their potential, limitations and compatibility with separate biotechnology and engineering progresses. We show that only sunlight-based approaches are economically realistic. One of photonics' main goals in the algae field is to dilute light to overcome photosaturation effects that impact upon cultures exposed to full sunlight. Among other approaches, we introduce a widely-compatible broadband spectral adaptation technique called AlgoSun® that uses luminescence to optimize sunlight spectrum in view of the bioconverter's requirements.

  1. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  2. Complete Makeover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released July 23, 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    We finish our look at Mars's dynamic atmosphere with an image of the surface that has been completely modified by the wind. Even the small ridges that remain have been ground down to a cliff-face with a 'tail' of eroded material. The crosshatching shows that the wind regime has remained mainly E/W to ENE/WSW.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.9, Longitude 221 East (139 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  3. Photonic homeostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Li, Fan-Hui

    2010-11-01

    Photonic homeostatics is a discipline to study the establishment, maintenance, decay, upgrading and representation of function-specific homoestasis (FSH) by using photonics. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stress may increase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activities above FSH-specific SIRT1 activity to induce a function far from its FSH. On the one hand, low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LLL) can not modulate a function in its FSH or a stress in its stress-specific homeostasis (StSH), but modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. On the other hand, the biophotons from a biosystem with its function in its FSH should be less than the one from the biosystem with its function far from its FSH. The non-resonant interaction of low intensity laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LIL) and a kind of membrane protein can be amplified by all the membrane proteins if the function is far from its FSH. This amplification might hold for biophoton emission of the membrane protein so that the photonic spectroscopy can be used to represent the function far from its FSH, which is called photonomics.

  4. Butterfly wing color: A photonic crystal demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically modeled the optical behavior of a natural occurring photonic crystal, as defined by the geometrical characteristics of the Teinopalpus Imperialis butterfly. In particular, following a genetic algorithm approach, we demonstrate how its wings follow a triclinic crystal geometry with a tetrahedron unit base. By performing both photonic band analysis and transmission/reflection simulations, we are able to explain the characteristic colors emerging by the butterfly wings, thus confirming their crystal form.

  5. Suppression of thermal carrier escape and efficient photo-carrier generation by two-step photon absorption in InAs quantum dot intermediate-band solar cells using a dot-in-well structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahi, S.; Teranishi, H.; Kasamatsu, N.; Kada, T.; Kaizu, T.; Kita, T.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the effects of an increase in the barrier height on the enhancement of the efficiency of two-step photo-excitation in InAs quantum dot (QD) solar cells with a dot-in-well structure. Thermal carrier escape of electrons pumped in QD states was drastically reduced by sandwiching InAs/GaAs QDs with a high potential barrier of Al0.3Ga0.7As. The thermal activation energy increased with the introduction of the barrier. The high potential barrier caused suppression of thermal carrier escape and helped realize a high electron density in the QD states. We observed efficient two-step photon absorption as a result of the high occupancy of the QD states at room temperature.

  6. Fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals with tunable photonic properties by biotemplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Opdenbosch, Daniel; Johannes, Maren; Wu, Xia; Fabritius, Helge; Zollfrank, Cordt

    2012-10-01

    Photonic crystals with tunable D-surface structures for possible high-temperature gas- and temperature-sensing applications were prepared by a biotemplating method. This included infiltrating colored scales of the beetle Entimus imperialis with an organopolysiloxane mixture followed by simultaneous combustion of the template and calcination of the cured organopolysiloxane. A high-yield inorganic silica-based replica of the original structure was obtained, which is capable of withstanding temperatures up to 600 °C. Light- and scanning electron microscopy combined with focused ion beam milling showed a precise replication of the whole scales and their internal D-surface structure. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the complete curing of the organopolysiloxanes and their transformation into amorphous silica during calcination. The dielectric constant of the manufactured materials determined by Abbé refractometry was ɛ = 2.3180 and used to perform band structure calculations utilizing the plane wave expansion method. By changing the chain length and degree of crosslinking of the organopolysiloxane precursor mixture, the lattice parameters and filling factors, and therefore the photonic properties of the replicas, could be tuned.

  7. Role of non-Condon vibronic coupling and conformation change on two-photon absorption spectra of green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yuejie; Tian, Guangjun; Luo, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Two-photon absorption spectra of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) often show a blue-shift band compared to their conventional one-photon absorption spectra, which is an intriguing feature that has not been well understood. We present here a systematic study on one- and two-photon spectra of GFP chromophore by means of the density functional response theory and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods. It shows that the popular density functional fails to provide correct vibrational progression for the spectra. The non-Condon vibronic coupling, through the localised intrinsic vibrational modes of the chromophore, is responsible for the blue-shift in the TPA spectra. The cis to trans isomerisation can be identified in high-resolution TPA spectra. Our calculations demonstrate that the high level ab initio multiconfigurational CASSCF method, rather than the conventional density functional theory is required for investigating the essential excited-state properties of the GFP chromophore.

  8. Some observations on hyperuniform disordered photonic bandgap materials, from microwave scale study to infrared scale study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitrin, Sam; Nahal, Geev; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining; San Francisco State University Team; University of Surrey Team

    2015-03-01

    A novel class of disordered photonic materials, hyperuniform disordered solids (HUDS), attracted more attention. Recently they have been experimentally proven to provide complete photonic band gap (PBG) when made with Alumina or Si; as well as single-polarization PBG when made with plastic with refract index of 1.6. These PBGs were shown to be real energy gaps with zero density of photonic states, instead of mobility gaps of low transmission due to scattering, etc. Using cm-scale samples and microwave experiments, we reveal the nature of photonic modes existing in these disordered materials by analyzing phase delay and mapping field distribution profile inside them. We also show how to extend the proof-of-concept microwave studies of these materials to proof-of-scale studies for real applications, by designing and fabricating these disordered photonic materials at submicron-scale with functional devices for 1.55 micron wavelength. The intrinsic isotropy of the disordered structure is an inherent advantage associated with the absence of limitations of orientational order, which is shown to provide valuable freedom in defect architecture design impossible in periodical structures. NSF Award DMR-1308084, the University of Surrey's FRSF and Santander awards.

  9. Energy bands and gaps near an impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihóková, E.; Schulman, L. S.

    2016-10-01

    It has been suggested that in the neighborhood of a certain kind of defect in a crystal there is a bend in the electronic band. We confirm that this is indeed possible using the Kronig-Penney model. Our calculations also have implications for photonic crystals.

  10. Ultrafast optical switching using photonic molecules in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanhui; Qian, Chenjiang; Qiu, Kangsheng; Gao, Yunan; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-04-06

    We study the coupling between photonic molecules and waveguides in photonic crystal slab structures using finite-difference time-domain method and coupled mode theory. In a photonic molecule with two cavities, the coupling of cavity modes results in two super-modes with symmetric and anti-symmetric field distributions. When two super-modes are excited simultaneously, the energy of electric field oscillates between the two cavities. To excite and probe the energy oscillation, we integrate photonic molecule with two photonic crystal waveguides. In coupled structure, we find that the quality factors of two super-modes might be different because of different field distributions of super-modes. After optimizing the radii of air holes between two cavities of photonic molecule, nearly equal quality factors of two super-modes are achieved, and coupling strengths between the waveguide modes and two super-modes are almost the same. In this case, complete energy oscillations between two cavities can be obtained with a pumping source in one waveguide, which can be read out by another waveguide. Finally, we demonstrate that the designed structure can be used for ultrafast optical switching with a time scale of a few picoseconds.

  11. Photonic Nanojets.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, Alexander; Kong, Soon-Cheol; Sahakian, Alan V; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews the substantial body of literature emerging since 2004 concerning photonic nanojets. The photonic nanojet is a narrow, high-intensity, non-evanescent light beam that can propagate over a distance longer than the wavelength λ after emerging from the shadow-side surface of an illuminated lossless dielectric microcylinder or microsphere of diameter larger than λ. The nanojet's minimum beamwidth can be smaller than the classical diffraction limit, in fact as small as ~λ/3 for microspheres. It is a nonresonant phenomenon appearing for a wide range of diameters of the microcylinder or microsphere if the refractive index contrast relative to the background is less than about 2:1. Importantly, inserting within a nanojet a nanoparticle of diameter d(ν) perturbs the far-field backscattered power of the illuminated microsphere by an amount that varies as d(ν)3 for a fixed λ. This perturbation is much slower than the d(ν)6 dependence of Rayleigh scattering for the same nanoparticle, if isolated. This leads to a situation where, for example, the measured far-field backscattered power of a 3-μm diameter microsphere could double if a 30-nm diameter nanoparticle were inserted into the nanojet emerging from the microsphere, despite the nanoparticle having only 1/10,000(th) the cross-section area of the microsphere. In effect, the nanojet serves to project the presence of the nanoparticle to the far field. These properties combine to afford potentially important applications of photonic nanojets for detecting and manipulating nanoscale objects, subdiffraction-resolution nanopatterning and nanolithography, low-loss waveguiding, and ultrahigh-density optical storage.

  12. Photonic Nanojets

    PubMed Central

    Heifetz, Alexander; Kong, Soon-Cheol; Sahakian, Alan V.; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the substantial body of literature emerging since 2004 concerning photonic nanojets. The photonic nanojet is a narrow, high-intensity, non-evanescent light beam that can propagate over a distance longer than the wavelength λ after emerging from the shadow-side surface of an illuminated lossless dielectric microcylinder or microsphere of diameter larger than λ. The nanojet’s minimum beamwidth can be smaller than the classical diffraction limit, in fact as small as ~λ/3 for microspheres. It is a nonresonant phenomenon appearing for a wide range of diameters of the microcylinder or microsphere if the refractive index contrast relative to the background is less than about 2:1. Importantly, inserting within a nanojet a nanoparticle of diameter dν perturbs the far-field backscattered power of the illuminated microsphere by an amount that varies as dν3 for a fixed λ. This perturbation is much slower than the dν6 dependence of Rayleigh scattering for the same nanoparticle, if isolated. This leads to a situation where, for example, the measured far-field backscattered power of a 3-μm diameter microsphere could double if a 30-nm diameter nanoparticle were inserted into the nanojet emerging from the microsphere, despite the nanoparticle having only 1/10,000th the cross-section area of the microsphere. In effect, the nanojet serves to project the presence of the nanoparticle to the far field. These properties combine to afford potentially important applications of photonic nanojets for detecting and manipulating nanoscale objects, subdiffraction-resolution nanopatterning and nanolithography, low-loss waveguiding, and ultrahigh-density optical storage. PMID:19946614

  13. Multi-Band and Broad-Band Infrared Detectors Based on III-V Materials for Spectral Imaging Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandara, S. V.; Gunapala, S. D.; Liu, J. K.; Rafol, S. B.; Hill, C. J.; Ting, D. Z.; Mumolo, J. M.; Trinh, T. Q.

    2005-01-01

    Quantum well infrared photodetector technology has shown remarkable success by realizing large-format focal plane arrays in both broad-bands and in multi-bands. The spectral response of these detectors based on the III-V material system are tailorable within the mid and long wavelength IR bands (similar to 3-25 mu m) and possibly beyond. Multi-band and broad-band detector arrays have been developed by vertically integrating stacks of multi quantum wells tailored for response in different wavelengths bands. Each detector stack absorbs photons within the specified wavelength band while allowing the transmission other photons, thus efficiently permitting multiband detection. Flexibility in many design parameters of these detectors allows for tuning and tailoring the spectral shape according to application requirements, specifically for spectral imaging instruments.

  14. Photon Calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1989-01-01

    A photon calorimeter (20, 40) is provided that comprises a laminar substrate (10, 22, 42) that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating (28, 48, 52), that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions (30, 50, 54) are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly.

  15. Photon calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1988-04-22

    A photon calorimeter is provided that comprises a laminar substrate that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating, that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions, are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly. 4 figs.

  16. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  17. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  18. Photonic crystals with topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Knitter, Sebastian; Xiong, Wen; Cao, Hui

    2015-02-01

    We introduce topological defects to a square lattice of elliptical cylinders. Despite the broken translational symmetry, the long-range positional order of the cylinders leads to a residual photonic band gap in the local density of optical states. However, the band-edge modes are strongly modified by the spatial variation of the ellipse orientation. The Γ -X band-edge mode splits into four regions of high intensity and the output flux becomes asymmetric due to the formation of crystalline domains with different orientation. The Γ -M band-edge mode has the energy flux circulating around the topological defect center, creating an optical vortex. By removing the elliptical cylinders at the center, we create localized defect states, which are dominated by either clockwise or counterclockwise circulating waves. The flow direction can be switched by changing the ellipse orientation. The deterministic aperiodic variation of the unit cell orientation adds another dimension to the control of light in photonic crystals, enabling the creation of a diversified field pattern and energy flow landscape.

  19. Ferrofluid Photonic Dipole Contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Michael; Frederick, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Understanding magnetic fields is important to facilitate magnetic applications in diverse fields in industry, commerce, and space exploration to name a few. Large electromagnets can move heavy loads of metal. Magnetic materials attached to credit cards allow for fast, accurate business transactions. And the Earth's magnetic field gives us the colorful auroras observed near the north and south poles. Magnetic fields are not visible, and therefore often hard to understand or characterize. This investigation describes and demonstrates a novel technique for the visualization of magnetic fields. Two ferrofluid Hele-Shaw cells have been constructed to facilitate the imaging of magnetic field lines [1,2,3,4]. We deduce that magnetically induced photonic band gap arrays similar to electrostatic liquid crystal operation are responsible for the photographed images and seek to mathematically prove the images are of exact dipole nature. We also note by comparison that our photographs are very similar to solar magnetic Heliosphere photographs.

  20. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  1. Photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers enabled by an accidental Dirac point

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, Song Liang; Lu, Ling; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-12-02

    A photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) includes a gain medium electromagnetically coupled to a photonic crystal whose energy band structure exhibits a Dirac cone of linear dispersion at the center of the photonic crystal's Brillouin zone. This Dirac cone's vertex is called a Dirac point; because it is at the Brillouin zone center, it is called an accidental Dirac point. Tuning the photonic crystal's band structure (e.g., by changing the photonic crystal's dimensions or refractive index) to exhibit an accidental Dirac point increases the photonic crystal's mode spacing by orders of magnitudes and reduces or eliminates the photonic crystal's distributed in-plane feedback. Thus, the photonic crystal can act as a resonator that supports single-mode output from the PCSEL over a larger area than is possible with conventional PCSELs, which have quadratic band edge dispersion. Because output power generally scales with output area, this increase in output area results in higher possible output powers.

  2. Octonacci photonic quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, E. R.; Costa, C. H.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Anselmo, D. H. A. L.; Mello, V. D.

    2015-08-01

    We study theoretically the transmission spectra in one-dimensional photonic quasicrystals, made up of SiO2(A) and TiO2(B) materials, organized following the Octonacci sequence, where the nth-stage of the multilayer Sn is given by the rule Sn =Sn-1Sn-2Sn-1 , for n ⩾ 3 and with S1 = A and S2 = B . The expression for transmittance was obtained by employing a theoretical calculation based on the transfer-matrix method. For normally incident waves, we observe that, for a same generation, the transmission spectra for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) waves are equal, at least qualitatively, and they present a scaling property where a self-similar behavior is obtained, as an evidence that these spectra are fractals. The spectra show regions where the omnidirectional band gaps emerges for specific generations of Octonacci photonic structure, except to TM waves. For TE waves, we note that all of them have almost the same width, for different generations. We also report the localization of modes as a consequence of the quasiperiodicity of the heterostructure.

  3. Manipulation of photons at the surface of three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu

    2009-07-16

    In three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals, refractive-index variations with a periodicity comparable to the wavelength of the light passing through the crystal give rise to so-called photonic bandgaps, which are analogous to electronic bandgaps for electrons moving in the periodic electrostatic potential of a material's crystal structure. Such 3D photonic bandgap crystals are envisioned to become fundamental building blocks for the control and manipulation of photons in optical circuits. So far, such schemes have been pursued by embedding artificial defects and light emitters inside the crystals, making use of 3D bandgap directional effects. Here we show experimentally that photons can be controlled and manipulated even at the 'surface' of 3D photonic crystals, where 3D periodicity is terminated, establishing a new and versatile route for photon manipulation. By making use of an evanescent-mode coupling technique, we demonstrate that 3D photonic crystals possess two-dimensional surface states, and we map their band structure. We show that photons can be confined and propagate through these two-dimensional surface states, and we realize their localization at arbitrary surface points by designing artificial surface-defect structures through the formation of a surface-mode gap. Surprisingly, the quality factors of the surface-defect mode are the largest reported for 3D photonic crystal nanocavities (Q up to approximately 9,000). In addition to providing a new approach for photon manipulation by photonic crystals, our findings are relevant for the generation and control of plasmon-polaritons in metals and the related surface photon physics. The absorption-free nature of the 3D photonic crystal surface may enable new sensing applications and provide routes for the realization of efficient light-matter interactions.

  4. Doppler-free two-photon excitation spectroscopy and the Zeeman effects of the S1 1B1u(v21=1) <-- S0 1Ag(v=0) band of naphthalene-d8.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Mitsushi; Wang, Jinguo; Baba, Masaaki; Misono, Masatoshi; Kasahara, Shunji; Katô, Hajime

    2005-04-08

    Doppler-free two-photon excitation spectrum and the Zeeman effect of the S1 1B1u(v21=1) <-- S0 1Ag(v=0) transition of naphthalene-d8 have been measured. 908 lines of Q(Ka)Q(J)KaKc transition of J=0-41, Ka=0-20 were assigned, and the molecular constants of the S1 1B1u(v21=1) state were determined. Perturbations were observed, and those were identified as originating from Coriolis interaction. No perturbation originating from an interaction with triplet state was observed. The Zeeman splittings from lines of a given J were observed to increase with Kc, and those of the Kc=J levels increased linearly with J. The Zeeman effects are shown to be originating from the magnetic moment of the S1 1B1u state, which is along the c axis and is induced by mixing of the S2 1B3u state to the S1 1B1u state by J-L coupling. Rotationally resolved levels were found not to be mixed with a triplet state from the Zeeman spectra. Accordingly, it is concluded that nonradiative decay of an isolated naphthalene excited to low rovibronic levels in the S1 1B1u state does not occur through the intersystem mixing. This is at variance with generally accepted understanding of the pathways of the nonradiative decay.

  5. Single-photon transistor in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Neumeier, Lukas; Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J

    2013-08-09

    We introduce a circuit quantum electrodynamical setup for a "single-photon" transistor. In our approach photons propagate in two open transmission lines that are coupled via two interacting transmon qubits. The interaction is such that no photons are exchanged between the two transmission lines but a single photon in one line can completely block or enable the propagation of photons in the other line. High on-off ratios can be achieved for feasible experimental parameters. Our approach is inherently scalable as all photon pulses can have the same pulse shape and carrier frequency such that output signals of one transistor can be input signals for a consecutive transistor.

  6. Photon path length distributions for cloudy atmospheres from GOSAT satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremmling, Beke; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The presence of clouds in the atmosphere has significant influence on the photon paths of the scattered sunlight. Besides reflections of radiation at the cloud top, additional scattering events inside the cloud may occur and thus lengthening or shortening of the photon path in the atmosphere. Clouds consisting of multiple layers or patches may lead to a "ping pong" behaviour of the photons due to reflections at the individual surfaces. The objective of our study is the retrieval of photon path length distributions for various atmospheric cloud situations which will lead to a better understanding of the influence of clouds on the atmospheric radiative transport. Following principles from ground based photon path length retrieval (Funk et al., 2003), our research uses the combination of space based measurements of the oxygen A-band and radiative transfer simulations. The experimental spectra originate from the Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), more precisely the Fourier Transform Spectrometer TANSO-FTS. Its high spectral resolution allows to almost completely resolve the individual absorption lines which is a prerequisite to our study. The Monte Carlo radiative transfer model McArtim (Deutschmann et al., 2011) is used to model the measured spectra. This model allows user-defined input for the altitude dependent cross sections and furthermore the incorporation of three dimensional cloud shapes and properties. From the simulation output and the sun-satellite geometry, photon path length distributions can be obtained. Distributions of photon path lengths are presented for a selection of GOSAT observations of entirely cloud covered atmospheres with similar measurement geometries.

  7. Structuring β-Ga2O3 photonic crystal photocatalyst for efficient degradation of organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofang; Zhen, Xiuzheng; Meng, Sugang; Xian, Jiangjun; Shao, Yu; Fu, Xianzhi; Li, Danzhen

    2013-09-03

    Coupling photocatalysts with photonic crystals structure is based on the unique property of photonic crystals in confining, controlling, and manipulating the incident photons. This combination enhances the light absorption in photocatalysts and thus greatly improves their photocatalytic performance. In this study, Ga2O3 photonic crystals with well-arranged skeleton structures were prepared via a dip-coating infiltration method. The positions of the electronic band absorption for Ga2O3 photonic crystals could be made to locate on the red edge, on the blue edge, and away from the edge of their photonic band gaps by changing the pore sizes of the samples, respectively. Particularly, the electronic band absorption of the Ga2O3 photonic crystal with a pore size of 135 nm was enhanced more than other samples by making it locate on the red edge of its photonic band gap, which was confirmed by the higher instantaneous photocurrent and photocatalytic activity for the degradation of various organic pollutants under ultraviolet light irradiation. Furthermore, the degradation mechanism over Ga2O3 photonic crystals was discussed. The design of Ga2O3 photonic crystals presents a prospective application of photonic crystals in photocatalysis to address light harvesting and quantum efficiency problems through manipulating photons or constructing photonic crystal structure as groundwork.

  8. Quantum Dot Detector Enhancement for Narrow Band Multispectral Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    in conduction band and the holes in valence band. The increase of electron-hole pairs is bonding to the variation of the physical parameters. By...analyzing the physical parameters through associated circuitry or systems, the characteristic of the incident photons can be identified. 15. SUBJECT... Properties of QDs.............................................................................................5 1.2.2 Advantage of QDIPs

  9. Wide-band quantum interface for visible-to-telecommunication wavelength conversion.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Rikizo; Kusaka, Yoshiaki; Kitano, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2011-11-15

    Although near-infrared photons in telecommunication bands are required for long-distance quantum communication, various quantum information tasks have been performed by using visible photons for the past two decades. Recently, such visible photons from diverse media including atomic quantum memories have also been studied. Optical frequency down-conversion from visible to telecommunication bands while keeping the quantum states is thus required for bridging such wavelength gaps. Here we report demonstration of a quantum interface of frequency down-conversion from visible to telecommunication bands by using a nonlinear crystal, which has a potential to work over wide bandwidths, leading to a high-speed interface of frequency conversion. We achieved the conversion of a picosecond visible photon at 780  nm to a 1,522-nm photon, and observed that the conversion process retained entanglement between the down-converted photon and another photon.

  10. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  11. Optical limiter based on two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belabbas, Amirouche; Lazoul, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The aim behind this work is to investigate the capabilities of nonlinear photonic crystals to achieve ultra-fast optical limiters based on third order nonlinear effects. The purpose is to combine the actions of nonlinear effects with the properties of photonic crystals in order to activate the photonic band according to the magnitude of the nonlinear effects, themselves a function of incident laser power. We are interested in designing an optical limiter based nonlinear photonic crystal operating around 1064 nm and its second harmonic at 532 nm. Indeed, a very powerful solid-state laser that can blind or destroy optical sensors and is widely available and easy to handle. In this work, we perform design and optimization by numerical simulations to determine the better structure for the nonlinear photonic crystal to achieve compact and efficient integrated optical limiter. The approach consists to analyze the band structures in Kerr-nonlinear two-dimensional photonic crystals as a function of the optical intensity. We confirm that these bands are dynamically red-shifted with regard to the bands observed in linear photonic crystals or in the case of weak nonlinear effects. The implemented approach will help to understand such phenomena as intensitydriven optical limiting with Kerr-nonlinear photonic crystals.

  12. Dust bands in the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Greenberg, Richard; Dermott, Stanley F.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Burns, Joseph A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the original IRAS observations leading to the discovery of the three dust bands in the asteroid belt and the analysis of data. Special attention is given to an analytical model of the dust band torus and to theories concerning the origin of the dust bands, with special attention given to the collisional equilibrium (asteroid family), the nonequilibrium (random collision), and the comet hypotheses of dust-band origin. It is noted that neither the equilibrium nor nonequilibrium models, as currently formulated, present a complete picture of the IRAS dust-band observations.

  13. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  15. Using Correlated Photons to Suppress Background Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah; Hockney, George; Dowling, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    A proposed method of suppressing the effect of background noise in an optical communication system would exploit the transmission and reception of correlated photons at the receiver. The method would not afford any advantage in a system in which performance is limited by shot noise. However, if the performance of the system is limited by background noise (e.g., sunlight in the case of a free-space optical communication system or incoherently scattered in-band photons in the case of a fiber-optic communication system), then the proposed method could offer an advantage: the proposed method would make it possible to achieve a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) significantly greater than that of an otherwise equivalent background- noise-limited optical communication system based on the classical transmission and reception of uncorrelated photons. The figure schematically depicts a classical optical-communication system and a system according to the proposed method. In the classical system, a modulated laser beam is transmitted along an optical path to a receiver, the optics of which include a narrow-band-pass filter that suppresses some of the background noise. A photodetector in the receiver detects the laser-beam and background photons, most or all of which are uncorrelated. In the proposed system, correlated photons would be generated at the transmitter by making a modulated laser beam pass through a nonlinear parametric down-conversion crystal. The sum of frequencies of the correlated photons in each pair would equal the frequency of the incident photon from which they were generated. As in the classical system, the correlated photons would travel along an optical path to a receiver, where they would be band-pass filtered and detected. Unlike in the classical system, the photodetector in the receiver in this system would be one that intrinsically favors the detection of pairs of correlated photons over the detection of uncorrelated photons. Even though there would be no

  16. Preparing technicians for photonics industries and organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souders, John; Hull, Dan

    2012-10-01

    U.S. photonics organizations need about 800 new photonics technicians each year. Thirty-one community and technical colleges have approximately 700 students enrolled in photonics related programs; about 275 of them complete their coursework and enter the workforce each year. A disparity exists between the demand and supply of qualified photonics technicians in the U.S. OP-TEC, the National Center for Optics and Photonics Education is a consortium of seven colleges, under the leadership of the University of Central Florida, and sponsored by NSF. OP-TEC's mission is to increase the quantity and quality of photonics technicians prepared at two-year colleges. OP-TEC maintains the National Photonics Skill Standards for Technicians, provides curriculum models, teaching materials, faculty training/professional development and planning services to strengthen existing college photonics programs and to attract and support new ones. OP-TEC is converting its text materials to E-Books to support students in technical programs. Through OP-TEC's recruitment efforts 84 additional colleges are interested in initiating new photonics programs. The OP-TEC Photonics College Network (OPCN) consists of 28 colleges that are currently providing photonics education. This fall OPCN will lead an additional national effort to further educate employed photonics technicians through on-line courses, complemented by lab experiences at nearby colleges. OP-TEC is expanding its outreach to photonics employers and colleges by regionalizing its approach to offering its services. OP-TEC is also planning to develop new curricula and instructional materials for AAS programs to prepare Precision Optics Technicians. This paper will detail OP-TEC's work with particular emphases on its materials and services.

  17. Silicon active photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    transfer can take place between the 1300nm and 1500nm bands which are important for communications. Because of the importance of this process as a potential wavelength converter we examine the fundamental noise figure and photon statistics involved (when FCA losses are absent). We find that the wavelength conversion process has a minimum noise figure close to 3dB. The deviation from that number depends on a single parameter which itself depends on: the ratio of the Raman susceptibilities, the ratio of the indices of refraction and the ratio of frequencies between Stokes and anti-Stokes waves.

  18. Design of an efficient terahertz source using triply resonant nonlinear photonic crystal cavities.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ian B; Zhang, Yinan; McCutcheon, Murray W; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Bravo-Abad, Jorge; Johnson, Steven G; Loncar, Marko

    2009-10-26

    We propose a scheme for efficient cavity-enhanced nonlinear THz generation via difference-frequency generation (DFG) processes using a triply resonant system based on photonic crystal cavities. We show that high nonlinear overlap can be achieved by coupling a THz cavity to a doubly-resonant, dual-polarization near-infrared (e.g. telecom band) photonic-crystal nanobeam cavity, allowing the mixing of three mutually orthogonal fundamental cavity modes through a chi((2)) nonlinearity. We demonstrate through coupled-mode theory that complete depletion of the pump frequency - i.e., quantum-limited conversion - is possible. We show that the output power at the point of optimal total conversion efficiency is adjustable by varying the mode quality (Q) factors.

  19. Preparation and formation mechanism of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) MgO, MgSO{sub 4}, CaCO{sub 3}, and SrCO{sub 3}, and photonic stop band properties of 3DOM CaCO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Sadakane, Masahiro; Kato, Rika; Murayama, Toru; Ueda, Wataru

    2011-08-15

    Three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) magnesium (Mg) oxide (MgO), MgSO{sub 4}, calcium (Ca) carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), and strontium (Sr) carbonate (SrCO{sub 3}) were prepared using a colloidal crystal of polymer spheres as a template. Ethanol or ethanol-water solution of metal salts (acetate or nitrate) and citric acid was infiltrated into the void of the colloidal crystal template of a monodispersed poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sphere. Heating of this PMMA-metal salt-citric acid composite produced the desired well-ordered 3DOM materials with a high pore fraction, which was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) diffuse reflectance spectra. The presence of citric acid is crucial for production of the 3DOM structures. Reaction of citric acid with metal salt produces metal citrate solid in the void of PMMA spheres, which is necessary to maintain the 3DOM structure during the calcination process. 3DOM CaCO{sub 3} shows opalescent colors because of it's photonic stop band properties. - Graphical abstract: Well-ordered 3-dimensionally ordered macroporous MgO, MgSO{sub 4}, CaCO{sub 3}, and SrCO{sub 3} materials were obtained in a high pore fraction. Highlights: > An easy preparation method of 3D ordered macroporous (3DOM) MgO, MgSO{sub 4}, CaCO{sub 3}, and SrCO{sub 3} materials. > Their structural characterization. > Their formation mechanism. > Photonic properties of 3DOM CaCO{sub 3}.

  20. Fabrication and Analysis of Photonic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Korte, Kylee E.; Xia, Younan

    2007-01-01

    These laboratory experiments are designed to explore aspects of nanoscale chemistry by constructing and spectroscopically analyzing thin films of photonic crystals. Films comprised of colloidal spheres and polydimethylsiloxane exhibit diffraction-based stop bands that shift reversibly upon exposure to some common solvents. Topics covered in these…

  1. Hexagonal photonic crystal waveguide based on barium titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianheng; Liu, Zhifu; Wessels, Bruce W.; Tu, Yongming; Ho, Seng-Tiong; Joshi-Imre, Alexandra; Ocola, Leonidas E.

    2011-03-01

    The simulation, fabrication and measurement of nonlinear photonic crystals (PhCs) with hexagonal symmetry in epitaxial BaTiO3 were investigated. The optical transmission properties of a PhC were simulated by a 2-D finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method. A complete bandgap exists for both the TE and TM optical modes. The fabricated PhC has a well-defined stop band over the spectral region of 1525 to 1575 nm. A microcavity structure was also fabricated by incorporation of a line defect in the PhC. Transmission of the microcavity structure over the spectral region from 1456 to 1584nm shows a well-defined 5 nm wide window at 1495nm. Simulations indicate that the phase velocity matched PhC microcavity device of 0.5 mm long can potentially serve as modulator with a 3 dB bandwidth of 4 THz.

  2. Generation of Wannier functions for photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Christian; Mack, Patrick; Busch, Kurt

    2013-08-01

    We present an approach for the efficient generation of Wannier functions for Photonic Crystal computations that is based on a combination of group-theoretical analysis and efficient minimization strategies. In particular, we describe the symmetry properties that allow for exponential localization of Wannier functions and how they are related to the underlying Bloch mode symmetries of the photonic band structure and we show that no exponentially localized Wannier functions can be created from the physical modes of a three-dimensional crystal. Moreover, we comment on the use of conjugate gradient and randomized minimization algorithms that—together with the group theoretical considerations—facilitate the efficient numerical determination of maximally localized Wannier functions for many bands. This is a requirement for the accurate computation of Photonic Crystal functional elements and devices.

  3. Photoluminescence of ZnO infiltrated into a three-dimensional photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzintsev, A. N. Emelchenko, G. A.; Masalov, V. M.

    2009-08-15

    The effect of the photonic band gap (stopband) of the photonic crystal, the synthesized SiO{sub 2} opal with embedded zinc oxide, on its luminescence in the violet spectral region is studied. It is shown that the position of the photonic band gap in the luminescence and reflectance spectra of the infiltrated opal depends on the diameter of the constituent nanoglobules, the volume fraction of zinc oxide, and on the signal's acceptance angle. It is found that, for the ZnO-opal nanocomposites, the emission intensity is decreased and the luminescence decay time is increased in the spatial directions, in which the photonic band gap coincides in spectral position with the luminescence peak of zinc oxide. The change in the decay time can be attributed to the change in the local density of photonic states in the photonic band gap.

  4. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave mixing between photons and phonons, and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong non-local effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a multicavity optomechanical device in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of this 'photon see-saw', are modulated antisymmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation, which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other empty cavity during every oscillation cycle in a well-regulated fashion.

  5. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  6. Efficient room-temperature source of polarized single photons

    DOEpatents

    Lukishova, Svetlana G.; Boyd, Robert W.; Stroud, Carlos R.

    2007-08-07

    An efficient technique for producing deterministically polarized single photons uses liquid-crystal hosts of either monomeric or oligomeric/polymeric form to preferentially align the single emitters for maximum excitation efficiency. Deterministic molecular alignment also provides deterministically polarized output photons; using planar-aligned cholesteric liquid crystal hosts as 1-D photonic-band-gap microcavities tunable to the emitter fluorescence band to increase source efficiency, using liquid crystal technology to prevent emitter bleaching. Emitters comprise soluble dyes, inorganic nanocrystals or trivalent rare-earth chelates.

  7. Dual exposure, two-photon, conformal phasemask lithography for three dimensional silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shir, Daniel J.; Nelson, Erik C.; Chanda, Debashis; Brzezinski, Andrew; Braun, Paul V.; Rogers, John A.; Wiltzius, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the fabrication and characterization of three dimensional silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystals. A dual exposure, two-photon, conformal phasemask technique is used to create high quality polymer woodpile structures over large areas with geometries that quantitatively match expectations based on optical simulations. Depositing silicon into these templates followed by the removal of the polymer results in silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystals for which calculations indicate a wide, complete photonic bandgap over a range of structural fill fractions. Spectroscopic measurements of normal incidence reflection from both the polymer and siliconphotonic crystals reveal good optical properties.

  8. Complete Photo-production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, A.; Bartalini, O.; Fantini, A.; Schaerf, C.; Vegna, V.; Ardashev, K.; Bade, C.; Hicks, K.; Kizilgul, S.; Lucas, M.; Mahon, J.; Bellini, V.; Blecher, M.; Bocquet, J.-P.; Lleres, A.; Rebreyend, D.; Capogni, M.; Caracappa, A.; Kistner, O. C.; Miceli, L.

    2011-10-24

    The extraction of resonance parameters from meson photo-reaction data is a challenging effort, that would greatly benefit from the availability of several polarization observables, measured for each reaction channel on both proton and neutron targets. In the aim of obtaining such complete experiments, polarized photon beams and targets have been developed at facilities, worldwide. We report on the latest results from the LEGS and GRAAL collaborations, providing single and double polarization measurements on pseudo-scalar meson photo-production from the nucleon.

  9. Parametric wavelength conversion in photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sigang; Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Yi; Chen, Minghua; Xie, Shizhong

    2016-11-01

    Nonlinear wavelength conversion provides flexible solutions for generating wideband tunable radiation in novel wavelength band. Parametric process in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) has attracted comprehensive interests since it can act as broadband tunable light sources in non-conventional wavelength bands. The current state-of-the-art photonic crystal fibers can provide more freedom for customizing the dispersion and nonlinearity which is critical to the nonlinear process, such as four wave mixing (FWM), compared with the traditional fibers fabricated with doping techniques. Here we demonstrate broadband parametric wavelength conversion in our homemade photonic crystal fibers. The zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of PCFs is critical for the requirement of phase matching condition in the parametric four wave mixing process. Firstly a procedure of the theoretical design of PCF with the ZDW at 1060 nm is proposed through our homemade simulation software. A group of PCF samples with gradually variable parameters are fabricated according to the theoretical design. The broadband parametric gain around 1060 nm band is demonstrated pumped with our homemade mode locked fiber laser in the anomalous dispersion region. Also a narrow gain band with very large wavelength detune with the pump wavelength in the normal dispersion region is realized. Wavelength conversion with a span of 194 nm is realized. Furthermore a fiber optical parametric oscillator based on the fabricated PCF is built up. A wavelength tunable range as high as 340 nm is obtained. This report demonstrates a systematic procedure to realize wide band wavelength conversion based on PCFs.

  10. Quantum electrodynamics near a photonic bandgap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanbing; Houck, Andrew A.

    2017-01-01

    Photonic crystals are a powerful tool for the manipulation of optical dispersion and density of states, and have thus been used in applications from photon generation to quantum sensing with nitrogen vacancy centres and atoms. The unique control provided by these media makes them a beautiful, if unexplored, playground for strong-coupling quantum electrodynamics, where a single, highly nonlinear emitter hybridizes with the band structure of the crystal. Here we demonstrate that such a hybridization can create localized cavity modes that live within the photonic bandgap, whose localization and spectral properties we explore in detail. We then demonstrate that the coloured vacuum of the photonic crystal can be employed for efficient dissipative state preparation. This work opens exciting prospects for engineering long-range spin models in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, as well as new opportunities for dissipative quantum state engineering.

  11. Quadratic band touching points and flat bands in two-dimensional topological Floquet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Liang; Zhou, Xiaoting; Fiete, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we theoretically study, using Floquet-Bloch theory, the influence of circularly and linearly polarized light on two-dimensional band structures with Dirac and quadratic band touching points, and flat bands, taking the nearest neighbor hopping model on the kagome lattice as an example. We find circularly polarized light can invert the ordering of this three-band model, while leaving the flat band dispersionless. We find a small gap is also opened at the quadratic band touching point by two-photon and higher order processes. By contrast, linearly polarized light splits the quadratic band touching point (into two Dirac points) by an amount that depends only on the amplitude and polarization direction of the light, independent of the frequency, and generally renders dispersion to the flat band. The splitting is perpendicular to the direction of the polarization of the light. We derive an effective low-energy theory that captures these key results. Finally, we compute the frequency dependence of the optical conductivity for this three-band model and analyze the various interband contributions of the Floquet modes. Our results suggest strategies for optically controlling band structure and interaction strength in real systems.

  12. Teleporting photonic qudits using multimode quantum scissors.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sandeep K; Konrad, Thomas

    2013-12-19

    Teleportation plays an important role in the communication of quantum information between the nodes of a quantum network and is viewed as an essential ingredient for long-distance Quantum Cryptography. We describe a method to teleport the quantum information carried by a photon in a superposition of a number d of light modes (a "qudit") by the help of d additional photons based on transcription. A qudit encoded into a single excitation of d light modes (in our case Laguerre-Gauss modes which carry orbital angular momentum) is transcribed to d single-rail photonic qubits, which are spatially separated. Each single-rail qubit consists of a superposition of vacuum and a single photon in each one of the modes. After successful teleportation of each of the d single-rail qubits by means of "quantum scissors" they are converted back into a qudit carried by a single photon which completes the teleportation scheme.

  13. Voltage-controlled photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Savchenkov, A A; Ilchenko, V S; Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2010-05-15

    We report the development and demonstration of an X-band voltage-controlled photonic oscillator based on a whispering gallery mode resonator made of an electro-optic crystalline material. The oscillator has good spectral purity and wide, agile, linear tunability. We have modified the existing theoretical model of the opto-electronic oscillator to describe the performance of our tunable oscillator and have found a good agreement between the theoretical predictions and the measurement results. We show that the device is promising for higher-frequency applications where high-performance tunable oscillators with wide tunability do not exist.

  14. Valley-dependent beam manipulators based on photonic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Fu-Sheng; Sun, Yong; Dong, Li-Juan; Liu, Yan-Hong; Shi, Yun-Long

    2017-02-01

    Trigonal warping distortion in energy band lifts the degeneracy of two valleys (K and K' points) of graphene. In this situation, electron transport becomes valley dependent, which can be used to design the valley beam splitter, collimator, or guiding device. Here, valley-dependent beam manipulators are designed based on artificial photonic graphene. In this scheme, the finite-size artificial photonic graphene is intentionally designed to realize the novel device functionalities. This kind of valley-dependent beam manipulators can work at an arbitrary range of electromagnetic waves from microwave to visible light. It potentially paves the way for the application of photonic graphene in future integrated photonic devices.

  15. The Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John N.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 7-GeV third-generation synchrotron radiation storage ring and full-energy positron injector. Construction project funding began in 1989, and ground breaking took place on 5 May 1990. Construction of all accelerator facilities was completed in January 1995 and storage ring commissioning is underway. First observation of x-rays from a bending magnet source took place on 26 March 1995. Nearly all performance specifications of the injector have been reached, and first observations indicate that the reliability, dynamic aperture, emittance, and orbit stability in the storage ring are satisfactory. Observation of radiation from the first of 20 insertion device beamlines is scheduled for October 1995. Start of regular operations is expected to take place well before the APS Project target date of December 1996.

  16. The advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, J.N.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 7-GeV third-generation synchrotron radiation storage ring and full-energy positron injector. Construction project funding began in 1989, and ground breaking took place on 5 May 1990. Construction of all accelerator facilities was completed in January 1995 and storage ring commissioning is underway. First observation of x-rays from a bending magnet source took place on 26 March 1995. Nearly all performance specifications of the injector have been reached, and first observations indicate that the reliability, dynamic aperture, emittance, and orbit stability in the storage ring are satisfactory. Observation of radiation from the first of 20 insertion device beamlines is scheduled for October 1995. Start of regular operations is expected to take place well before the APS Project target date of December 1996.

  17. A Complete Sample of Bright Swift Long Gamma-Ray Bursts. I. Sample Presentation, Luminosity Function and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvaterra, R.; Campana, S.; Vergani, S. D.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Nava, L.; Sbarufatti, B.; Flores, H.; Piranomonte, S.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2012-04-01

    We present a carefully selected sub-sample of Swift long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that is complete in redshift. The sample is constructed by considering only bursts with favorable observing conditions for ground-based follow-up searches, which are bright in the 15-150 keV Swift/BAT band, i.e., with 1-s peak photon fluxes in excess to 2.6 photons s-1 cm-2. The sample is composed of 58 bursts, 52 of them with redshift for a completeness level of 90%, while another two have a redshift constraint, reaching a completeness level of 95%. For only three bursts we have no constraint on the redshift. The high level of redshift completeness allows us for the first time to constrain the GRB luminosity function and its evolution with cosmic times in an unbiased way. We find that strong evolution in luminosity (δ l = 2.3 ± 0.6) or in density (δ d = 1.7 ± 0.5) is required in order to account for the observations. The derived redshift distributions in the two scenarios are consistent with each other, in spite of their different intrinsic redshift distributions. This calls for other indicators to distinguish among different evolution models. Complete samples are at the base of any population studies. In future works we will use this unique sample of Swift bright GRBs to study the properties of the population of long GRBs.

  18. Come Join the Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of students in Blue Springs, Missouri, are joining the band, drawn by a band director who emphasizes caring and inclusiveness. In the four years since Melissia Goff arrived at Blue Springs High School, the school's extensive band program has swelled. The marching band alone has gone from 100 to 185 participants. Also under Goff's…

  19. Incompressible Polaritons in a Flat Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Matteo; van Nieuwenburg, Evert P. L.; Blatter, Gianni; Huber, Sebastian D.; Schmidt, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    We study the interplay of geometric frustration and interactions in a nonequilibrium photonic lattice system exhibiting a polariton flat band as described by a variant of the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model. We show how to engineer strong photonic correlations in such a driven, dissipative system by quenching the kinetic energy through frustration. This produces an incompressible state of photons characterized by short-ranged crystalline order with period doubling. The latter manifests itself in strong spatial correlations, i.e., on-site and nearest-neighbor antibunching combined with extended density-wave oscillations at larger distances. We propose a state-of-the-art circuit QED realization of our system, which is tunable in situ.

  20. One-dimensional photonic crystals with an amplitude-modulated dielectric constant in the unit cell.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Luis; Ulibarrena, Manuel; Blaya, Salvador; Fimia, Antonio

    2004-05-10

    Photonic band structures of one-dimensional photonic crystals with an amplitude-modulated dielectric constant in the unit cell were studied. With this structure two bandgaps in the visible and one in the IR region were predicted. Experimental measurements of the two photonic bandgaps in the visible spectrum were made in a photonic crystal recorded in a holographic emulsion. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical results was obtained.

  1. Slow light and band gaps in metallodielectric cylinder arrays.

    PubMed

    Shainline, Jeffrey M; Xu, Jimmy

    2009-05-25

    We consider two-dimensional three-component photonic crystals wherein one component is modeled as a drude-dispersive metal. It is found that the dispersion relation of light in this environment depends critically on the configuration of the metallic and dielectric components. In particular, for the case of an incident electromagnetic wave with electric field vector parallel to the axis of the cylinders it is shown that the presence of dielectric shells covering the metallic cylinders leads to a closing of the structural band gap with increased filling factor, as would be expected for a purely dielectric photonic crystal. For the same polarization, the photonic band structure of an array of metallic shell cylinders with dielectric cores do not show the closing of the structural band gap with increased filling factor of the metallic component. In this geometry, the photonic band structure contains bands with very small values of group velocity with some bands having a maximum of group velocity as small as .05c.

  2. Photon Emission and Reabsorption Processes in CH3NH3PbBr3 Single Crystals Revealed by Time-Resolved Two-Photon-Excitation Photoluminescence Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takumi; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Nakaike, Yumi; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical processes of radiative recombination of photocarriers and reabsorption of emitted photons in CH3NH3PbBr3 single crystals are studied using time-resolved two-photon-excitation photoluminescence (PL) microscopy. We find that the PL spectrum and its decay dynamics depend on the excitation-depth profile. As the excitation depth increases, the PL spectrum becomes asymmetric, the peak energy redshifts, and the PL decay time becomes longer. These observations can be well explained by a simple model including photon recycling (photon emission and reabsorption) in thick samples with strong band-to-band transitions and high radiative recombination efficiencies.

  3. Photonic-magnonic crystals: Multifunctional periodic structures for magnonic and photonic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kłos, J. W. Krawczyk, M.; Dadoenkova, Yu. S.; Dadoenkova, N. N.; Lyubchanskii, I. L.

    2014-05-07

    We investigate the properties of a photonic-magnonic crystal, a complex multifunctional one-dimensional structure with magnonic and photonic band gaps in the GHz and PHz frequency ranges for spin waves and light, respectively. The system consists of periodically distributed dielectric magnetic slabs of yttrium iron garnet and nonmagnetic spacers with an internal structure of alternating TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} layers which form finite-size dielectric photonic crystals. We show that the spin-wave coupling between the magnetic layers, and thus the formation of the magnonic band structure, necessitates a nonzero in-plane component of the spin-wave wave vector. A more complex structure perceived by light is evidenced by the photonic miniband structure and the transmission spectra in which we have observed transmission peaks related to the repetition of the magnetic slabs in the frequency ranges corresponding to the photonic band gaps of the TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} stack. Moreover, we show that these modes split to very high sharp (a few THz wide) subpeaks in the transmittance spectra. The proposed novel multifunctional artificial crystals can have interesting applications and be used for creating common resonant cavities for spin waves and light to enhance the mutual influence between them.

  4. Direct Photon Production in a Nuclear Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaofeng

    The photon is a very good probe of short distance physics in strong interactions. It can be produced directly at short-distance or through fragmentation processes. Through one-loop order in perturbation theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), this thesis provides complete analytic expressions for both the inclusive and the isolated prompt photon production cross sections in hadronic final states of e^+e ^- annihilations. It is the first time that the full angular dependence of the cross sections is derived. Extraction of photon fragmentation functions from e^+e ^- annihilations is addressed. Using e ^+e^--->gamma+X as an example, this work demonstrates for the first time that conventional perturbative QCD factorization breaks down for isolated photon production in e^+e ^- annihilations in a specific region of phase space. The impact of this breakdown for computations of prompt photon production in hadron-hadron reactions is also discussed. In hadron-nucleus collisions, high energy photons can be produced through a single hard scattering as well as through multiple scattering. The contribution from the multiple scattering can be presented in terms of multi-parton correlation functions. Using information on the multi-parton correlation functions extracted from photon-nucleus experiments, for the first time, the nuclear dependence of direct photon production in hadron-nucleus collisions was predicted without any free parameter, and was tested at Fermi Lab experiment E706.

  5. Nonlinear Shock Acceleration and Photon Emission in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Berezhko, Evgeny G.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2000-01-01

    We have extended a simple model of nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (Berezhko & Ellison 1999: Ellison &, Berezhko 1999a) to include the injection and acceleration of electrons and the production of photons from bremsstrahlung, synchrotron, inverse Compton, and pion-decay processes. We argue that, the results of this model, which is simpler to use than more elaborate ones, offer a significant improvement, over test-particle, power-law spectra which are often used in astrophysical applications of diffusive shock acceleration. With an evolutionary supernova remnant (SNR) model to obtain shock parameters as functions of ambient interstellar medium parameters and time, we predict broad-band continuum photon emission from supernova remnants in general, and SN1006 in particular, showing that our results compare well with the more complete time-dependent and spherically symmetric nonlinear model of Berezhko, Ksenofontov, & Petukhov (1999a). We discuss the implications nonlinear shock acceleration has for X-ray line emission, and use our model to describe how ambient conditions determine the TeV/radio flux ratio, an important parameter for gamma-ray observations of radio SNRs.

  6. Ultrafast terahertz electrodynamics of photonic and electronic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on using ultrafast laser pulses to study Terahertz (THz) electrodynamics of photonic and electronic nanostructures and microstructures. Ultrafast timeresolved (optical, NIR, MIR, THz) pump-probe spectroscopy setup has been successfully built, which enables me to perform a series of relevant experiments. Firstly, a novel high e ciency and compact THz wave emitter based on split-ring-resonators has been developed and characterized. The emitter can be pumped at any wavelength by tailoring the magnetic resonance and could generate gapless THz waves covering the entire THz band. Secondly, two kinds of new photonic structures for THz wave manipulation have been successfully designed and characterized. One is based on the 1D and 2D photo-imprinted di ractive elements. The other is based on the photoexcited double-split-ring-resonator metamaterials. Both structures are exible and can modulate THz waves with large tunability. Thirdly, the dark excitons in semiconducting singlewalled carbon nanotubes are studied by optical pump and THz probe spectroscopy, which provides the rst insights into the THz responses of nonequilibrium excitonic correlations and dynamics from the dark ground states in carbon nanotubes. Next, several on-going projects are brie y presented such as the study of ultrafast THz dynamics of Dirac fermions in topological insulator Bi2Se3 with Mid-infrared excitation. Finally, the thesis ends with a summary of the completed experiments and an outlook of the future plan.

  7. Linear-optic heralded photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, Thiago; Amaral, Gustavo C.; Temporão, Guilherme P.; von der Weid, Jean Pierre

    2015-09-01

    We present a heralded photon source based only on linear optics and weak coherent states. By time-tuning a Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer fed with frequency-displaced coherent states, the output photons can be synchronously heralded following sub-Poisson statistics, which is indicated by the second-order correlation function [ g2(0 )=0.556 ]. The absence of phase-matching restrictions makes the source widely tunable, with 100-nm spectral tunability on the telecom bands. The technique presents yield comparable to state-of-the-art spontaneous parametric down-conversion-based sources, with high coherence and fiber-optic quantum communication compatibility.

  8. Dielectric matrices with air cavities as a waveguide photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanov, D. A.; Skripal', A. V.; Merdanov, M. K.; Gorlitskii, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    Frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient of a microwave photonic crystal that represents a structure containing alternating layers of ceramic material (Al2O3) with a relatively large number of cavities and foam plastic are studied in the presence and absence of distortions of the periodicity of a photonic structure. The frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient can be analyzed using a model of effective medium that makes it possible to consider the interaction of electromagnetic wave and photonic crystal using a transfer matrix of a 1D photonic crystal. The band character of the frequency dependence of the transmission coefficient of the photonic crystal related to the periodicity of the photonic crystal in the transverse plane for the waveguide with a standard cross section is not manifested in a certain range of material permittivities.

  9. Network technologies for O-band quantum telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew A.

    We have developed and characterized the preliminary network components necessary to realize practical quantum telecommunications in the 1310-nm O-band of the existing fiber optic infrastructure. Quantum network components available, at classical-telecommunicationsspeed, in the O-band would allow single-photon-level quantum data to be multiplexed with the bright 1550-nm C-band data that the telecommunications infrastructure already supports, therefore enabling quantum information---be it for quantum computing, cryptography, games or other purposes---to be easily distributed to remote parties. Two necessary network components are presented: a high-quality source of O-band entangled photon pairs and a switch capable of routing single photons while preserving the entanglement between the photon and its partner. The pairs are created in standard optical fiber, allowing for near-lossless coupling to the existing telecommunications infrastructure. The method used is also scalable, both in creating future identical sources and operating at much higher repetition rates. Such higher rates will ensure that a meaningful number of entangled photon pairs survive distribution, which is inherently lossy (though fiber optics minimize this loss over long distances). The other component required to establish a network more advanced than a point-to-point link is a single-photon switch. In order to successfully implement such a switch for the quantum data of interest, the design must be able to switch single-photon level signals with very low loss and near unity probability of success. It is capable of operating at network speeds while preserving the photon's quantum state.

  10. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  11. High energy photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  12. Accelerator prospects for photon-photon physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, A.

    1992-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the accelerators in the world where two-photon physics could be carried out in the future. The list includes facilities where two-photon physics is already an integral part of the scientific program but also mentions some other machines where initiating new programs may be possible.

  13. Simulating single photons with realistic photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao; Zhang, Zhen; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-12-01

    Quantum information processing provides remarkable advantages over its classical counterpart. Quantum optical systems have been proved to be sufficient for realizing general quantum tasks, which, however, often rely on single-photon sources. In practice, imperfect single-photon sources, such as a weak-coherent-state source, are used instead, which will inevitably limit the power in demonstrating quantum effects. For instance, with imperfect photon sources, the key rate of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol will be very low, which fortunately can be resolved by utilizing the decoy-state method. As a generalization, we investigate an efficient way to simulate single photons with imperfect ones to an arbitrary desired accuracy when the number of photonic inputs is small. Based on this simulator, we can thus replace the tasks that involve only a few single-photon inputs with the ones that make use of only imperfect photon sources. In addition, our method also provides a quantum simulator to quantum computation based on quantum optics. In the main context, we take a phase-randomized coherent state as an example for analysis. A general photon source applies similarly and may provide some further advantages for certain tasks.

  14. Photon structure function - theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    The theoretical status of the photon structure function is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the hadronic mixing problem and the ability of perturbative QCD to make definitive predictions for the photon structure function. 11 references.

  15. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  16. Acousto-optics studied in polaritonic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Racknor, C.

    2010-10-01

    We have studied the acousto-optic effect on the photon transmission and the spontaneous emission in polaritonic photonic crystal. We have considered that photonic crystals are fabricated from polaritonic materials such as GaP, MgO, LiNbO3 , and LiTaO3 . A two-level quantum dot is doped in a polaritonic crystal to study the decay rate of the spontaneous emission. The decay rate of quantum dots, band structure, and photon transmission coefficient have been calculated. It is found that band-gap width and the decay rate of quantum dots depends strongly on the high-frequency dielectric constant of the polaritonic crystals while the photonic band edges vary inversely by the ratio of longitudinal- to transverse-optical phonon energies. The spontaneous decay rate of the quantum dot can be controlled by the external strain field. This finding is significant because it is well known that the spontaneous emission is source of undesirable noise in different types of electronic and optical devices. Finally, we have also found the system can be switched from transmitting state to reflecting state by applying an external strain field. These are distinct and interesting results and can be used to fabricate new types of photonic couplers and fibers which in turn can be used to fabricate all photonic switches.

  17. Photon track evolution.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A D

    2005-01-01

    Given the time scale of biological, biochemical, biophysical and physical effects in a radiation exposure of living tissue, the first physical stage can be considered to be independent of time. All the physical interactions caused by the incident photons happen at the same starting time. From this point of view it would seem that the evolution of photon tracks is not a relevant topic for analysis; however, if the photon track is considered as a sequence of several interactions, there are several steps until the total degradation of the energy of the primary photon. We can characterise the photon track structure by the probability p(E,j), that is, the probability that a photon with energy E suffers j secondary interactions. The aim of this work is to analyse the photon track structure by considering j as a step of the photon track evolution towards the total degradation of the photon energy. Low energy photons (<150 keV) are considered, with water phantoms and half-extended geometry. The photon track evolution concept is presented and compared with the energy deposition along the track and also with the spatial distribution of the several steps in the photon track.

  18. Voltage-matched, monolithic, multi-band-gap devices

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2006-08-22

    Monolithic, tandem, photonic cells include at least a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor layer, wherein each semiconductor layer includes an n-type region, a p-type region, and a given band-gap energy. Formed within each semiconductor layer is a sting of electrically connected photonic sub-cells. By carefully selecting the numbers of photonic sub-cells in the first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s), and by carefully selecting the manner in which the sub-cells in a first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s) are electrically connected, each of the first and second layer sub-cell strings may be made to achieve one or more substantially identical electrical characteristics.

  19. Voltage-Matched, Monolithic, Multi-Band-Gap Devices

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M. W.; Mascarenhas, A.

    2006-08-22

    Monolithic, tandem, photonic cells include at least a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor layer, wherein each semiconductor layer includes an n-type region, a p-type region, and a given band-gap energy. Formed within each semiconductor layer is a string of electrically connected photonic sub-cells. By carefully selecting the numbers of photonic sub-cells in the first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s), and by carefully selecting the manner in which the sub-cells in a first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s) are electrically connected, each of the first and second layer sub-cell strings may be made to achieve one or more substantially identical electrical characteristics.

  20. Use of optical speckle patterns for compressive sensing of RF signals in the GHz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, George C.; Sefler, George A.; Shaw, T. Justin

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that speckle patterns at the output of multimode optical waveguides can be used for a compressive sensing (CS) measurement matrix (MM) to measure sparse RF signals in the GHz band (1-100 GHz). In our system mode-locked femtosecond laser pulses are stretched to a width on the order of the interpulse time, modulated by the RF, and injected into a multimode waveguide. The speckle pattern out of the guide is imaged onto an array of photodiodes whose output is digitized by a bank of ADCs. We have measured the CS MM for multimode fibers and used these MMs to demonstrate that sparse RF signals (sparsity K) modulated on a chirped optical carrier can be recovered from M measurements (the number of photodiodes) consistent with the CS relation M ~ K log(N/K) (N is the number of samples needed for Nyquist rate sampling). We demonstrate experimentally that speckle sampling gives comparable results to the photonic WDM sampling system used previously for periodic undersampling (multi-coset sampling) of RF chirp pulses. We have also calculated MMs for both multimode fibers and planar waveguides using their respective mode solutions to determine optimal waveguide parameters for a CS system. Our results suggest a path to a CS system for GHz band RF signals that can be completely constructed using photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology.

  1. Adjustable gastric banding (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal digestive process. In this procedure, a hollow band made of special material is placed around the ... pouch and causes a feeling of fullness. The band can be tightened or loosened over time to ...

  2. Theory of two-photon interactions with broadband down-converted light and entangled photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayan, Barak

    2007-10-01

    When two-photon interactions are induced by down-converted light with a bandwidth that exceeds the pump bandwidth, they can obtain a behavior that is pulselike temporally, yet spectrally narrow. At low photon fluxes this behavior reflects the time and energy entanglement between the down-converted photons. However, two-photon interactions such as two-photon absorption (TPA) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) can exhibit such a behavior even at high power levels, as long as the final state (i.e., the atomic level in TPA, or the generated light in SFG) is narrow-band enough. This behavior does not depend on the squeezing properties of the light, is insensitive to linear losses, and has potential applications. In this paper we describe analytically this behavior for traveling-wave down conversion with continuous or pulsed pumping, both for high- and low-power regimes. For this we derive a quantum-mechanical expression for the down-converted amplitude generated by an arbitrary pump, and formulate operators that represent various two-photon interactions induced by broadband light. This model is in excellent agreement with experimental results of TPA and SFG with high-power down-converted light and with entangled photons [Dayan , Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 023005 (2004); 94, 043602 (2005); Pe’er , ibid. 94, 073601 (2005)].

  3. Wave properties of Fibonacci-sequence photonic crystals containing single-negative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei-Soong; Wu, Chien-Jang; Yang, Tzong-Jer; Fuh, Andy Ying-Guey

    2013-08-01

    Electromagnetic wave properties of a Fibonacci-sequence photonic crystal (FSPC) made of single-negative materials are theoretically investigated. It is found that, in the oblique incidence, such a kind of photonic crystal exhibits additional photonic bands or dips in the vicinity of either magnetic plasma frequency or electric plasma frequency. The additional photonic bands or dips corresponding to magnetic plasma frequency occur only for the TE wave, whereas those corresponding to electric plasma frequency occur only for the TM wave. In addition, we find that there exist omnidiretional gaps in such a single-negative FSPC.

  4. Exotic radiation from a photonic crystal excited by an ultrarelativistic electron beam.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, N; Ochiai, T; Inoue, J; Segawa, Y; Shibata, Y; Ishi, K; Kondo, Y; Kanbe, M; Miyazaki, H; Hinode, F; Yamaguti, S; Ohtaka, K

    2006-11-01

    We report the observation of an exotic radiation (unconventional Smith-Purcell radiation) from a one-dimensional photonic crystal. The physical origin of the exotic radiation is direct excitation of the photonic bands by an ultrarelativistic electron beam. The spectrum of the exotic radiation follows photonic bands of a certain parity, in striking contrast to the conventional Smith-Purcell radiation, which shows solely a linear dispersion. Key ingredients for the observation are the facts that the electron beam is in an ultrarelativistic region and that the photonic crystal is finite. The origin of the radiation was identified by comparison of experimental and theoretical results.

  5. Systematic variations in microvilli banding patterns along fiddler crab rhabdoms.

    PubMed

    Alkaladi, Ali; How, Martin J; Zeil, Jochen

    2013-02-01

    Polarisation sensitivity is based on the regular alignment of dichroic photopigment molecules within photoreceptor cells. In crustaceans, this is achieved by regularly stacking photopigment-rich microvilli in alternating orthogonal bands within fused rhabdoms. Despite being critical for the efficient detection of polarised light, very little research has focused on the detailed arrangement of these microvilli bands. We report here a number of hitherto undescribed, but functionally relevant changes in the organisation of microvilli banding patterns, both within receptors, and across the compound eye of fiddler crabs. In all ommatidia, microvilli bands increase in length from the distal to the proximal ends of the rhabdom. In equatorial rhabdoms, horizontal bands increase gradually from 3 rows of microvilli distally to 20 rows proximally. In contrast, vertical equatorial microvilli bands contain 15-20 rows of microvilli in the distal 30 µm of the rhabdom, shortening to 10 rows over the next 30 µm and then increase in length to 20 rows in parallel with horizontal bands. In the dorsal eye, horizontal microvilli occupy only half the cross-sectional area as vertical microvilli bands. Modelling absorption along the length of fiddler crab rhabdoms suggests that (1) increasing band length assures that photon absorption probability per band remains constant along the length of photoreceptors, indicating that individual bands may act as units of transduction or adaptation; (2) the different organisation of microvilli bands in equatorial and dorsal rhabdoms tune receptors to the degree and the information content of polarised light in the environment.

  6. Low Power Band to Band Tunnel Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-15

    the E-field and tunneling at the source- pocket junction you form a parasitic NPN + transistor and the injection mechanism of carriers into the...hypothesis that the 1000 ° C, 5s anneal split lead to a very wide pocket and the accidental formation of a NPN + transistor , while the 1000 ° C, 1s anneal...Low Power Band to Band Tunnel Transistors Anupama Bowonder Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley

  7. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  8. The Advanced LIGO photon calibrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, S.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Kandhasamy, S.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, T. D.; Anders, E. H.; Berliner, J.; Betzwieser, J.; Cahillane, C.; Canete, L.; Conley, C.; Daveloza, H. P.; De Lillo, N.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Izumi, K.; Kissel, J. S.; Mendell, G.; Quetschke, V.; Rodruck, M.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Schwinberg, P. B.; Sottile, A.; Wade, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; West, M.; Savage, R. L.

    2016-11-01

    The two interferometers of the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) recently detected gravitational waves from the mergers of binary black hole systems. Accurate calibration of the output of these detectors was crucial for the observation of these events and the extraction of parameters of the sources. The principal tools used to calibrate the responses of the second-generation (Advanced) LIGO detectors to gravitational waves are systems based on radiation pressure and referred to as photon calibrators. These systems, which were completely redesigned for Advanced LIGO, include several significant upgrades that enable them to meet the calibration requirements of second-generation gravitational wave detectors in the new era of gravitational-wave astronomy. We report on the design, implementation, and operation of these Advanced LIGO photon calibrators that are currently providing fiducial displacements on the order of 1 0-18m /√{Hz } with accuracy and precision of better than 1%.

  9. Radiation damping in atomic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Horsley, S A R; Artoni, M; La Rocca, G C

    2011-07-22

    The force exerted on a material by an incident beam of light is dependent upon the material's velocity in the laboratory frame of reference. This velocity dependence is known to be difficult to measure, as it is proportional to the incident optical power multiplied by the ratio of the material velocity to the speed of light. Here we show that this typically tiny effect is greatly amplified in multilayer systems composed of resonantly absorbing atoms exhibiting ultranarrow photonic band gaps. The amplification effect for optically trapped 87Rb is shown to be as much as 3 orders of magnitude greater than for conventional photonic-band-gap materials. For a specific pulsed regime, damping remains observable without destroying the system and significant for material velocities of a few ms(-1).

  10. One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical calculations indicate that it should be possible for one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystals (see figure) to exhibit giant dispersions known as the superprism effect. Previously, three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal superprisms have demonstrated strong wavelength dispersion - about 500 times that of conventional prisms and diffraction gratings. Unlike diffraction gratings, superprisms do not exhibit zero-order transmission or higher-order diffraction, thereby eliminating cross-talk problems. However, the fabrication of these 3D photonic crystals requires complex electron-beam substrate patterning and multilayer thin-film sputtering processes. The proposed 1D superprism is much simpler in structural complexity and, therefore, easier to design and fabricate. Like their 3D counterparts, the 1D superprisms can exhibit giant dispersions over small spectral bands that can be tailored by judicious structure design and tuned by varying incident beam direction. Potential applications include miniature gas-sensing devices.

  11. Nonclassical photon pair generation in atomic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhya, S. N.

    2007-07-15

    A scheme for the generation of nonclassical pairs of photons in atomic vapors is proposed. The scheme exploits the fact that the cross correlation of the emission of photons from the extreme transitions of a four-level cascade system shows antibunching, unlike the case of the three-level cascade emission, which shows bunching. The Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, which is the ratio of the cross-correlation to the autocorrelation function, in this case is estimated to be 10{sup 3}-10{sup 6} for controllable time delay, and is one to four orders of magnitude larger compared to previous experiments. The choice of Doppler-free geometry, in addition to the fact that at three-photon resonance the excitation and deexcitation processes occur in a very narrow frequency band, ensures cleaner signa0008.

  12. A computational study of dielectric photonic-crystal-based accelerator cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, C. A.

    Future particle accelerator cavities may use dielectric photonic crystals to reduce harmful wakefields and increase the accelerating electric field (or gradient). Reduced wakefields are predicted based on the bandgap property of some photonic crystals (i.e. frequency-selective reflection/transmission). Larger accelerating gradients are predicted based on certain dielectrics' strong resistance to electrical breakdown. Using computation, this thesis investigated a hybrid design of a 2D sapphire photonic crystal and traditional copper conducting cavity. The goals were to test the claim of reduced wakefields and, in general, judge the effectiveness of such structures as practical accelerating cavities. In the process, we discovered the following: (1) resonant cavities in truncated photonic crystals may confine radiation weakly compared to conducting cavities (depending on the level of truncation); however, confinement can be dramatically increased through optimizations that break lattice symmetry (but retain certain rotational symmetries); (2) photonic crystal cavities do not ideally reduce wakefields; using band structure calculations, we found that wakefields are increased by flat portions of the frequency dispersion (where the waves have vanishing group velocities). A complete comparison was drawn between the proposed photonic crystal cavities and the copper cavities for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC); CLIC is one of the candidates for a future high-energy electron-positron collider that will study in greater detail the physics learned at the Large Hadron Collider. We found that the photonic crystal cavity, when compared to the CLIC cavity: (1) can lower maximum surface magnetic fields on conductors (growing evidence suggests this limits accelerating gradients by inducing electrical breakdown); (2) shows increased transverse dipole wakefields but decreased longitudinal monopole wakefields; and (3) exhibits lower accelerating efficiencies (unless

  13. Reversibly phototunable TiO{sub 2} photonic crystal modulated by Ag nanoparticles' oxidation/reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jian; Zhou Jinming; Ye Changqing; Li Mingzhu; Wang Jingxia; Jiang Lei; Song Yanlin

    2011-01-10

    We report a reversibly phototunable photonic crystal system whose reflectance at the stop band position can be modulated by alternating UV/visible (UV/Vis) irradiation. The phototunable system consists of Ag nanoparticles and TiO{sub 2} photonic crystal. The stop bands intensity of Ag loaded TiO{sub 2} photonic crystals were found to be dependent on the redox states of Ag nanoparticles. The quasi 'on' and 'off' states of the stop band were reversibly modulated by the Ag nanoparticles' oxidation/reduction through alternating UV/Vis light irradiation.

  14. Photonic crystal waveguides based on wide-gap semiconductor alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Aude; Combrié, Sylvain; De Rossi, Alfredo

    2017-03-01

    This review is devoted to integrated photonic platforms based on large band-gap semiconductors, alternatives to silicon photonics. The large electronic band gap of the material employed is chosen to address the specific needs of nonlinear optics, and, in particular, lower nonlinear losses and the capability of handling larger optical power densities. Moreover, these new platforms offer broader transmission spectra, extending to the visible spectral region, which is also required for other applications, particularly sensing and bio-related photonics. The focus is on nanoscale patterned waveguiding structures, which, owing to the tight confinement of light, have demonstrated a large nonlinear response. The third-order nonlinear response and the related parametric interactions will be considered here, encompassing four-wave mixing, phase-sensitive amplification, wavelength conversion, and also nonlinear pulse propagation and soliton dynamics. The comparison between different materials and waveguide design highlights specific features of photonic crystal waveguides.

  15. Density of photonic states in cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolganov, P. V.

    2015-04-01

    Density of photonic states ρ (ω ) , group vg, and phase vph velocity of light, and the dispersion relation between wave vector k , and frequency ω (k ) were determined in a cholesteric photonic crystal. A highly sensitive method (measurement of rotation of the plane of polarization of light) was used to determine ρ (ω ) in samples of different quality. In high-quality samples a drastic increase in ρ (ω ) near the boundaries of the stop band and oscillations related to Pendellösung beatings are observed. In low-quality samples photonic properties are strongly modified. The maximal value of ρ (ω ) is substantially smaller, and density of photonic states increases near the selective reflection band without oscillations in ρ (ω ) . Peculiarities of ρ (ω ) , vg, and ω (k ) are discussed. Comparison of the experimental results with theory was performed.

  16. Metallic dielectric photonic crystals and methods of fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Jeffrey Brian; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2016-12-20

    A metallic-dielectric photonic crystal is formed with a periodic structure defining a plurality of resonant cavities to selectively absorb incident radiation. A metal layer is deposited on the inner surfaces of the resonant cavities and a dielectric material fills inside the resonant cavities. This photonic crystal can be used to selectively absorb broadband solar radiation and then reemit absorbed radiation in a wavelength band that matches the absorption band of a photovoltaic cell. The photonic crystal can be fabricated by patterning a sacrificial layer with a plurality of holes, into which is deposited a supporting material. Removing the rest of the sacrificial layer creates a supporting structure, on which a layer of metal is deposited to define resonant cavities. A dielectric material then fills the cavities to form the photonic crystal.

  17. Tunable Bragg extraction of light in photonic quasi crystals: dispersed liquid crystalline metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rippa, Massimo; Bobeico, Eugenia; Umeton, Cesare P.; Petti, Lucia

    2015-09-01

    By exploiting Metamaterials (MTMs) and Photonic Quasi-Crystals (PQCs), it is possible to realize man-made structures characterized by a selective EM response, which can be also controlled by combining the distinctive properties of reconfigurable soft-matter. By finely controlling lattice parameters of a given photonic structure, it is possible to optimize its extraction characteristics at a precise wavelength, or minimize the extraction of undesired modes. In general, however, once a structure is realized, its extraction properties cannot be varied. To cross this problem, it is possible to combine capabilities offered by both MTMs and PQCs with the reconfigurable properties of smart materials, such as Liquid Crystals (LCs); in this way, a completely new class of "reconfigurable metamaterials" (R-MTM) can be realized. We report here on the realization and characterization of a switchable photonic device, working in the visible range, based on nanostructured photonic quasi-crystals, layered with an azodye-doped nematic LC (NLC). The experimental characterization shows that its filtering effect is remarkable with its extraction spectra which can be controlled by applying an external voltage or by means of a laser light. The vertical extraction of the light, by the coupling of the modes guided by the PQC slab to the free radiation via Bragg scattering, consists of an extremely narrow orange emission band at 621 nm with a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 8 nm. In our opinion, these results represent a breakthrough in the realization of innovative MTMs based active photonic devices such as tunable MTMs or reconfigurable lasers and active filters.

  18. Highly Mismatched Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Shan, W.; Scrapulla, M.A.; Dubon, O.D.; Becla, P.

    2005-03-21

    It has long been recognized that the introduction of a narrow band of states in a semiconductor band gap could be used to achieve improved power conversion efficiency in semiconductor-based solar cells. The intermediate band would serve as a ''stepping stone'' for photons of different energy to excite electrons from the valence to the conduction band. An important advantage of this design is that it requires formation of only a single p-n junction, which is a crucial simplification in comparison to multijunction solar cells. A detailed balance analysis predicts a limiting efficiency of more than 50% for an optimized, single intermediate band solar cell. This is higher than the efficiency of an optimized two junction solar cell. Using ion beam implantation and pulsed laser melting we have synthesized Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys with x<0.03. These highly mismatched alloys have a unique electronic structure with a narrow oxygen-derived intermediate band. The width and the location of the band is described by the Band Anticrossing model and can be varied by controlling the oxygen content. This provides a unique opportunity to optimize the absorption of solar photons for best solar cell performance. We have carried out systematic studies of the effects of the intermediate band on the optical and electrical properties of Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys. We observe an extension of the photovoltaic response towards lower photon energies, which is a clear indication of optical transitions from the valence to the intermediate band.

  19. Long period gratings in photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jian; Jin, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The authors review the recent advances in fabricating long-period gratings (LPGs) in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). The novel light-guiding properties of the PCFs allow the demonstration of novel sensors and devices based on such LPGs. The sensitivity of these PCF LPGs to temperature, strain and refractive index is discussed and compared with LPGs made on conventional single-mode fibers. In-fiber devices such as tunable band rejection filters, Mach-Zehnder interferometers are discussed.

  20. Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiency Using Photon Upconversion Materials.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yunfei; Hao, Shuwei; Yang, Chunhui; Chen, Guanying

    2015-10-27

    Photovoltaic cells are able to convert sunlight into electricity, providing enough of the most abundant and cleanest energy to cover our energy needs. However, the efficiency of current photovoltaics is significantly impeded by the transmission loss of sub-band-gap photons. Photon upconversion is a promising route to circumvent this problem by converting these transmitted sub-band-gap photons into above-band-gap light, where solar cells typically have high quantum efficiency. Here, we summarize recent progress on varying types of efficient upconversion materials as well as their outstanding uses in a series of solar cells, including silicon solar cells (crystalline and amorphous), gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, and other types of solar cells. The challenge and prospect of upconversion materials for photovoltaic applications are also discussed.