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Sample records for complete x-ray selected

  1. Soft X-Ray Observations of a Complete Sample of X-Ray--selected BL Lacertae Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Stocke, John T.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Morris, Simon L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT PSPC observations of the X-ray selected BL Lacertae objects (XBLs) in the complete Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EM MS) sample. None of the objects is resolved in their respective PSPC images, but all are easily detected. All BL Lac objects in this sample are well-fitted by single power laws. Their X-ray spectra exhibit a variety of spectral slopes, with best-fit energy power-law spectral indices between α = 0.5-2.3. The PSPC spectra of this sample are slightly steeper than those typical of flat ratio-spectrum quasars. Because almost all of the individual PSPC spectral indices are equal to or slightly steeper than the overall optical to X-ray spectral indices for these same objects, we infer that BL Lac soft X-ray continua are dominated by steep-spectrum synchrotron radiation from a broad X-ray jet, rather than flat-spectrum inverse Compton radiation linked to the narrower radio/millimeter jet. The softness of the X-ray spectra of these XBLs revives the possibility proposed by Guilbert, Fabian, & McCray (1983) that BL Lac objects are lineless because the circumnuclear gas cannot be heated sufficiently to permit two stable gas phases, the cooler of which would comprise the broad emission-line clouds. Because unified schemes predict that hard self-Compton radiation is beamed only into a small solid angle in BL Lac objects, the steep-spectrum synchrotron tail controls the temperature of the circumnuclear gas at r ≤ 1018 cm and prevents broad-line cloud formation. We use these new ROSAT data to recalculate the X-ray luminosity function and cosmological evolution of the complete EMSS sample by determining accurate K-corrections for the sample and estimating the effects of variability and the possibility of incompleteness in the sample. Our analysis confirms that XBLs are evolving "negatively," opposite in sense to quasars, with Ve/Va = 0.331±0.060. The statistically significant difference between the values for

  2. Testing the Pairs-Reflection Model with X-Ray Spectral Variability and X-Ray Properties of Complete Samples of Radio-Selected BL Lacertae Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. Megan

    1997-01-01

    This grant was awarded to Dr. C. Megan Urry of the Space Telescope Science Institute in response to two successful ADP proposals to use archival Ginga and Rosat X-ray data for 'Testing the Pairs-Reflection model with X-Ray Spectral Variability' (in collaboration with Paola Grandi, now at the University of Rome) and 'X-Ray Properties of Complete Samples of Radio-Selected BL Lacertae Objects' (in collaboration with then-graduate student Rita Sambruna, now a post-doc at Goddard Space Flight Center). In addition, post-docs Joseph Pesce and Elena Pian, and graduate student Matthew O'Dowd, have worked on several aspects of these projects. The grant was originally awarded on 3/01/94; this report covers the full period, through May 1997. We have completed our project on the X-ray properties of radio-selected BL Lacs.

  3. Morphology and Evolution of the Largest Complete Sample of X-ray Selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koekemoer, Anton

    2003-07-01

    The nature of the relationship between galaxy properties and their central supermassive black holes can be uniquely addressed by studying large, homogeneous samples of Active Galactic Nuclei {AGN} selected according to their hard X-ray emission. The combination of HST and Chandra/XMM provdes the potential to directly study the physical nature of these relationships. We propose an archival study using the GEMS survey of the Chandra Deep Field Soiuth {CDFS} which has the potential to increase by at least a factor of 5 the number of AGN from the GOODS survey, by virtue of the fact that the entire XMM field is covered {30' diameter}. The resulting sample of 700 - 800 AGN will allow us tro address the nature of the relationship between AGN and host properties, as well as their environments, as a function of cosmic time.

  4. The soft x-ray properties of a complete sample of optically selected quasars. 1: First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laor, Ari; Fiore, Fabrizio; Elvis, Martin; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations of 10 quasars. These objects are part of our ROSAT program to observe a complete sample of optically selected quasars. This sample includes all 23 quasars from the bright quasar survey with a redshift z less than or = 0.400 and a Galactic H I column density N(sup Gal sub H I) less than 1.9 x 10(exp 20)/sq cm. These selection criteria, combined with the high sensitivity and improved energy resolution of the PSPC, allow us to determine the soft (approximately 0.2-2 keV) X-ray spectra of quasars with about an order of magnitude higher precision compared with earlier soft X-ray observations. The following main results are obtained: Strong correlations are suggested between the soft X-ray spectral slope alpha(sub x) and the following emission line parameters: H beta Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM), L(sub O III), and the Fe II/H beta flux ratio. These correlations imply the following: (1) The quasar's environment is likely to be optically thin down to approximately 0.2 keV. (2) In most objects alpha(sub x) varies by less than approximately 10% on timescales shorter than a few years. (3) alpha(sub x) might be a useful absolute luminosity indicator in quasars. (4) The Galactic He I and H I column densities are well correlated. Most spectra are well characterized by a simple power law, with no evidence for either significant absorption excess or emission excess at low energies, to within approximately 30%. We find mean value of alpha(sub x) = -1.50 +/- 0.40, which is consistent with other ROSAT observations of quasars. However, this average is significantly steeper than suggested by earlier soft X-ray observations of the Einstein IPC. The 0.3 keV flux in our sample can be predicted to better than a factor of 2 once the 1.69 micrometer(s) flux is given. This implies that the X-ray variability power spectra of quasars flattens out between f approximately 10(exp -5) and f

  5. A complete hard X-ray selected sample of local, luminous AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtscher, Leonard; Davies, Ric; Lin, Ming-yi; Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Rosario, David

    2016-08-01

    Choosing a very well defined sample is essential for studying the AGN phenomenon. Only the most luminous AGNs can be expected to require a coherent feeding mechanism to sustain their activity and since host galaxy properties and AGN activity are essentially uncorrelated, nuclear scales must be resolved in order to shed light on the feeding mechanisms of AGNs. For these reasons we are compiling a sample of the most powerful, local AGNs. In this talk we present our on-going programme to observe a complete volume limited sample of nearby active galaxies selected by their 14-195 keV luminosity, and outline its rationale for studying the mechanisms regulating gas inflow and outflow.

  6. VLA observations of a complete sample of extragalactic X-ray sources. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R.; Zamorani, G.; Gioia, I. M.; Feigelson, E. D.; Maccacaro, T.

    1983-01-01

    A complete sample of 35 X-ray selected sources found with the Einstein Observatory has been observed with the Very Large Array at 6 cm to investigate the relationship between radio and X-ray emission in extragalactic objects. Detections include three active galactic nuclei (AGNs), two clusters or groups of galaxies, two individual galaxies, and two BL Lac objects. The frequency of radio emission in X-ray selected AGNs is compared with that of optically selected quasars using the integral radio-optical luminosity function. The result suggests that the probability for X-ray selected quasars to be radio sources is higher than for those optically selected. No obvious correlation is found in the sample between the richness of X-ray luminosity of the cluster and the presence of a galaxy with radio luminosity at 5 GHz larger than 10 to the 30th ergs/s/Hz.

  7. Multiwavelength studies of X-ray selected extragalactic sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.; Harutyunyan, G. S.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    The joint catalogue of Active Galactic Nuclei selected from optical identications of X-ray sources was created as a combination of two samples: Hamburg-ROSAT Catalogue (HRC) and Byurakan-Hamburg-ROSAT Catalogue (BHRC). Both are based on optical identications of X-ray sources from ROSAT catalogues using low-dispersion spectra of Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS). However, HRC and BHRC contain a number of misidentications and using the recent optical and multiwavelength (MW) catalogues we have revised both samples excluding false AGN and adding new genuine ones. Thus a new large homogeneous complete sample of 4253 X-ray selected AGN was created. 3352 of them are listed in the Catalogue of QSOs and Active Galaxies and 387 also are in Roma Multifrequency Catalogue of Blazars. 901 candidate AGN are subjects for further study. We classified 173 of these objects using their SDSS DR12 spectra. Following activity types were revealed: 61 AGN, 21 HII galaxies, 12 emission-line galaxies without definite type, 71 absorption-line galaxies, 2 stars, and 6 were classified as "Unknown". A special emphasis is made on narrow-line Sy1.0-Sy1.5 galaxies and QSOs, as many of them have soft X-ray, strong FeII lines, and relatively narrow lines coming from BLR ("narrow broad lines"). As a result, the sample of genuine AGN was enlarged to 3413 objects. We have retrieved MW data from recent catalogues and carried out statistical investigations for the whole AGN sample. An attempt to find connections between fluxes in different bands for different types of sources, and to identify their characteristics thus confirming candidate AGNs has been carried out. We have analyzed X-ray properties of these sources to nd a limit between normal galaxies and X-ray AGN.

  8. Complete Hard X-Ray Surveys, AGN Luminosity Functions and the X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, Jack

    2011-01-01

    AGN are believed to make up most of the Cosmic X-Ray Background (CXB) above a few keV, but this background cannot be fully resolved at energies less than 10 keV due to absorption. The Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL missions are performing the first complete hard x-ray surveys with minimal bias due to absorption. The most recent results for both missions will be presented. Although the fraction of the CXB resolved by these surveys is small, it is possible to derive unbiased number counts and luminosity functions for AGN in the local universe. The survey energy range from 15-150 keV contains the important reflection and cutoff spectral features dominate the shape of the AGN contribution to the CXB. Average spectral characteristics of survey detected AGN will be presented and compared with model distributions. The numbers of hard x-ray blazars detected in these surveys are finally sufficient to estimate this important component's contribution the cosmic background. Constraints on CXB models and their significance will be discussed.

  9. X-Rays and Infrared Selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirhakos, S. D.; Steiner, J. E.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. En la busqueda de nucleos activos galacticos (NAG) oscurecidos, seleccionamos una tnuestra de galaxias ernisoras de rayos S infrarrojos, Ia mayoria de las cuales son vistas de perf ii. La 6ptica de la regi6n nuclear de las galaxias seleccionadas revelan que el 76% de ellas muestran lineas de emisi5n La clasificaci6n de los es- pectros de acuerdo a los anchos y a la intensidad de cocientes de lineas muestran que existen 34 NAG, 34 objetos de tipo de transici6n y 34 galaxias de la regi6n con nucleos de tipo regi6n H II. Entre los NAG, 3 son del tipo Seyfert I y las otras son del tipo 2. Sugerimos que los objetos identificados como NAG de llneas angostas son objetos tipo Seyfert I oscurecidos ABSTRACT. Looking for obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN), we selected a sample of infrarediX-rays emitting galaxies, mos"t of which are seen as edge-on. Optical spectroscopy of the nuclear region of the selected galaxies revealed that 76 % of them show emission l 'nes. Classification of the spectra according to the widths and line intensity ratios shows that there are 34 AGN, 34 transition type objects and 43 nuclear HIl-like region galaxies. Among the AGN, three are Seyfert type 1 and the others are type 2 objects. We suggest that the objects identified as narrow line AGN are obscured Seyfert 1. o'L : GALAXIES-ACTIVE - X-RAY S-GENERAL

  10. Assembly of NASA's Most Powerful X-Ray Telescope Completed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-03-01

    Assembly of the world's most powerful X-ray telescope, NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, was completed last week with the installation of its power-generating twin solar panels. The observatory is scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-93, in December 1998. The last major components of the observatory were bolted and pinned into place March 4 at TRW Space & Electronics Group in Redondo Beach, Calif., and pre-launch testing of the fully assembled observatory began March 7. "Completion of the observatory's assembly process is a big step forward toward launch scheduled for the end of this year," said Fred Wojtalik, manager of the Observatory Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. "With all the major components in place, we are now concentrating on a thorough pre-launch checkout of the observatory." "We're delighted to reach this major milestone for the program," said Craig Staresinich, TRW's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility program manager. "The entire observatory team has worked hard to get to this point and will continue an exhaustive test program to ensure mission success. We're looking forward to delivering a truly magnificent new space capability to NASA later this summer." The first pre-launch test of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility was an acoustic test, which simulated the sound pressure environment inside the Space Shuttle cargo bay during launch. A thorough electrical checkout before and after the acoustic test verifies that the observatory and its science instruments can withstand the extreme sound levels and vibrations that accompany launch. "With 10 times the resolution and 50-100 times the sensitivity of any previous X-ray telescope, this observatory will provide us with a new perspective of our universe," said the project's chief scientist, Dr. Martin Weisskopf of Marshall Center. "We'll be able to study sources of X-rays throughout the universe, like colliding galaxies and black

  11. A COMPARISON OF X-RAY AND MID-INFRARED SELECTION OF OBSCURED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Eckart, Megan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; McGreer, Ian D.; Helfand, David J.; Stern, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We compare the relative merits of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selection at X-ray and mid-infrared wavelengths using data from moderately deep fields observed by both Chandra and Spitzer. The X-ray-selected AGN sample and associated photometric and spectroscopic optical follow-up are drawn from a subset of fields studied as part of the Serendipitous Extragalactic X-ray Source Identification (SEXSI) program. Mid-infrared data in these fields are derived from targeted and archival Spitzer imaging, and mid-infrared AGN selection is accomplished primarily through application of the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-color AGN 'wedge' selection technique. Nearly all X-ray sources in these fields which exhibit clear spectroscopic signatures of AGN activity have mid-infrared colors consistent with IRAC AGN selection. These are predominantly the most luminous X-ray sources. X-ray sources that lack high-ionization and/or broad lines in their optical spectra are far less likely to be selected as AGNs by mid-infrared color selection techniques. The fraction of X-ray sources identified as AGNs in the mid-infrared increases monotonically as the X-ray luminosity increases. Conversely, only 22% of mid-infrared-selected AGNs are detected at X-ray energies in the moderately deep ((t{sub exp}) approx 100 ks) SEXSI Chandra data. We hypothesize that IRAC sources with AGN colors that lack X-ray detections are predominantly high-luminosity AGNs that are obscured and/or lie at high redshift. A stacking analysis of X-ray-undetected sources shows that objects in the mid-infrared AGN selection wedge have average X-ray fluxes in the 2-8 keV band 3 times higher than sources that fall outside the wedge. Their X-ray spectra are also harder. The hardness ratio of the wedge-selected stack is consistent with moderate intrinsic obscuration, but is not suggestive of a highly obscured, Compton-thick source population. It is evident from this comparative study that in order to create a complete

  12. X-Ray Properties of Lensing-Selected Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew; McDonald, Michael; Gladders, Michael; Johnson, Traci; Dahle, Hakon; Rigby, Jane R.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Florian, Michael; Wuyts, Eva

    2017-08-01

    I will present preliminary results from the Michigan Swift X-ray observations of clusters from the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey (SGAS). These clusters were lensing selected based on the presence of a giant arc visible from SDSS. I will characterize the morphology of the intracluster medium (ICM) of the clusters in the sample, and discuss the offset between the X-ray centroid, the mass centroid as determined by strong lensing analysis, and the BCG position. I will also present early-stage work on the scaling relation between the lensing mass and the X-ray luminosity.

  13. Obscuration properties of hard X-ray selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, C.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is a great tool to infer the characteristics of the circumnuclear material in AGN, which can be achieved by studying both absorbed and reprocessed X-ray radiation. Because of the limited effect of absorption, hard X-ray (>10 keV) selected samples of AGN are extremely well suited to study the char- acteristics and the evolution of the torus. In my talk I will report on the results obtained by studying the broad-band X-ray emission (0.3--150 keV) of the 830 AGN reported in the Swift/BAT 70 months catalog. Our work is to date the largest study of broad-band X-ray observations of AGN ever performed, and combines observations carried out by the major X-ray facilities of the past decade, for a total of more than 1,500 X-ray spectra. Our catalog is complemented by multi-wavelength data, spanning from radio to gamma-rays. In my presentation will focus on the evolution of the spectral and absorption properties of AGN, and discuss about the link between obscuration and the physical characteristics of the SMBH, such as Eddington ratio, luminosity and black hole mass.

  14. Spectroscopy of six X-ray-selected BL Lacertae candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Margon, B.; Boroson, T.A.; Chanan, G.A.; Thompson, I.B.; Schneider, D.P.

    1986-11-01

    Results of a continuing program aimed at extending the small list of X-ray-selected BL Lac objects are reported. High-quality spectra have been obtained of six faint blue objects that lie within the positional error boxes of X-ray sources discovered serendipitously by the Einstein Observatory. Three of the objects are found to be previously uncataloged low-red-shift quasi-stellar objects, including one formerly suggested as BL Lac candidate. Two are faint galactic stars, while the final object has a featureless spectrum, and thus remains a candidate. Although X-ray selection may ultimately be an effective means of discovering faint BL Lac objects, such sources are evidently rare at the X-ray flux levels attainable by the Einstein Observatory. 15 references.

  15. Proton induced quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams for soft x-ray spectroscopy studies and selective x-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sokaras, D.; Zarkadas, Ch.; Fliegauf, R.; Beckhoff, B.; Karydas, A. G.

    2012-12-15

    We present the analytical features and performance of an x-ray spectroscopy end station of moderate energy resolution operating with proton-induced quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams. The apparatus was designed, installed and operated at the 5.5 MV Tandem VdG Accelerator Laboratory of the Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. 'Demokritos,' Athens. The setup includes a two-level ultrahigh vacuum chamber that hosts in the lower level up to six primary targets in a rotatable holder; there, the irradiation of pure element materials-used as primary targets-with few-MeV high current ({approx}{mu}A) proton beams produces intense quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams of selectable energy. In the chamber's upper level, a six-position rotatable sample holder hosts the targets considered for x-ray spectroscopy studies. The proton-induced x-ray beam, after proper collimation, is guided to the sample position whereas various filters can be also inserted along the beam's path to eliminate the backscattered protons or/and to absorb selectively components of the x-ray beam. The apparatus incorporates an ultrathin window Si(Li) spectrometer (FWHM 136 eV at 5.89 keV) coupled with low-noise electronics capable of efficiently detecting photons down to carbon K{alpha}. Exemplary soft x-ray spectroscopy studies and results of selective x-ray fluorescence analysis are presented.

  16. Scattering and absorption in soft X-ray selected AGN: an optical polarization survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupe, D.; Wills, Beverley J.; Wills, D.; Beuermann, K.

    1998-05-01

    We have surveyed the optical linear polarization of a completely identified sample of 43 bright soft-X-ray-selected ROSAT AGN. Most (40) of these AGN show low polarization (~1%), and no clear optical reddening. This supports the suggestion from rapid X-ray variability, disk-like spectral energy distributions, and lack of cold X-ray absorption, that we are viewing a bare AGN disk. IRASF12397+3333 and IRAS13349+2438 show high polarization increasing to the UV - clear evidence for scattering. As well as steep, soft-X-ray spectra, they show optical reddening and rapid X-ray variability, but almost no cold X-ray absorption - a combination that suggests dusty ionized gas along the line-of-sight. Brandt et al. suggested and found these `warm absorbers' for IRAS13349+2438. IRASF12397+3333 is a new candidate. Combining our data with the optical and X-ray spectra of the high polarization narrow-line Seyfert 1 nuclei (NLSy1s) investigated by Goodrich reveals strong correlations among optical reddening indicators (alpha_opt and Hα /Hβ ), [OIII]/Hβ_b , and cold intrinsic X-ray absorption Delta N_H. Optical reddening underpredicts the cold X-ray absorption, suggesting dusty warm absorbers in all the highly polarized AGN. The existence of these scattering-polarized and reddened NLSy1s suggests an orientation Unified Scheme within the class of NLSy1s, analogous to that linking Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 nuclei. For some highly polarized and optically selected AGN we present new analysis of archival X-ray data, and for the highly polarized AGN new optical spectroscopy is presented in an appendix.

  17. X-Ray Selected AGN in A Merging Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Joanna M.; Norman, D.; Soechting, I.; Coldwell, G.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the X-ray AGN population and evolution in the merging galaxy cluster DLSCL J0522.2-4820 discovered via weak gravitational lensing shear from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). Since weak lensing shear is dependent only on mass, it does not introduce the biases that typical cluster selection methods do. This cluster is of particular interest due to both its extended multiple X-ray emission peaks and the large number of X-ray point sources identified in the field. We measured the redshifts of X-ray AGN as well as cluster galaxies in order to investigate the 3-dimensional distribution and possible clustering of AGN in galaxy clusters. Of the 125 objects in our sample, 54 are galaxies in the cluster; the cluster redshift is determined to be z=0.2997±0.0096. This agrees well with a previous value of z=0.296±0.001. We identified several broad line AGN at high redshift including a quasar pair at redshift z=1.8. Currently, we have found no X-ray point sources to be within the cluster. This project was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program and the Department of Defense ASSURE program through Scientific Program Order No. 13 (AST-0754223) of the Cooperative Agreement No. AST-0132798 between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and the NSF.

  18. Element Selective X-ray Detected Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Goulon, J.; Rogalev, A.; Wilhelm, F.; Jaouen, N.; Goulon-Ginet, C.; Goujon, G.; Youssef, J. Ben; Indenbom, M. V.

    2007-01-19

    Element selective X-ray Detected Magnetic Resonance (XDMR) was measured on exciting the Fe K-edge in a high quality YIG thin film. Resonant pumping at high microwave power was achieved in the nonlinear foldover regime and X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) was used to probe the time-invariant change of the magnetization {delta}Mz due to the precession of orbital magnetization densities of states (DOS) at the Fe sites. This challenging experiment required us to design a specific instrumentation which is briefly described.

  19. Optical variability of X-ray-selected QSOs

    SciTech Connect

    Pica, A.J.; Webb, J.R.; Smith, A.G.; Leacock, R.J.; Bitran, M.

    1987-08-01

    Photometric data for ten X-ray-selected quasistellar objects have been obtained from archival records of the Rosemary Hill Observatory. Reliable magnitudes were obtained for seven of the ten sources and six displayed optical variations significant at the 95 percent confidence level or greater. One source appeared to exhibit optically violent behavior. Light curves and photographic magnitudes are presented and discussed. 22 references.

  20. Optical variability of X-ray-selected QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pica, Andrew J.; Webb, James R.; Smith, Alex G.; Leacock, Robert J.; Bitran, Mauricio

    1987-08-01

    Photometric data for ten X-ray-selected quasistellar objects have been obtained from archival records of the Rosemary Hill Observatory. Reliable magnitudes were obtained for seven of the ten sources and six displayed optical variations significant at the 95 percent confidence level or greater. One source appeared to exhibit optically violent behavior. Light curves and photographic magnitudes are presented and discussed.

  1. Spectroscopic observations of X-ray selected late type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takalo, L. O.

    1988-01-01

    A spectroscopic survey of nine X-ray selected late type stars was conducted. These stars are serendipitously discovered EINSTEIN X-ray sources, selected from two large x-ray surveys: the Columbia Astrophysical Laboratory survey (five stars) and the CFA Medium Sensitivity survey (four stars). Four of the Columbia survey stars were found to be short period binaries. The fifth was found to be an active single G dwarf. None of the Medium Sensitivity survey stars were found to be either binaries or active stars. Activity was measured by comparing the H-alpha and the CaII infrared triplet (8498, 8542) lines in these stars to the lines in inactive stars of similar spectral type. A correlation was found between the excess H-alpha lime emission and V sin(i) and between the excess H-alpha line emission and X-ray luminosity. No correlation was found between the infrared line emission and any other measured quantity.

  2. X-ray selected quasars and Seyfert galaxies - Cosmological evolution, luminosity function, and contribution to the X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Stocke, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of quasars and Seyfert galaxies (active galactic nuclei /AGNs/) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 56 objects extracted from the expanded Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey, and it is exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space of X-ray selected AGNs is confirmed to be strongly nonuniform; the amount of cosmological evolution required by the data is in agreement with a previous determination based on a smaller sample of objects. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) is derived. The high-luminosity part of the XLF is satisfactorily described by a power law of slope gamma approximately 3.6. A significant flattening is observed at low luminosities. The simultaneous determination of the cosmological evolution and of the X-ray luminosity function of AGNs is then used to estimate the contribution to the extragalactic diffuse X-ray background. Using the best fit values for the evolution of AGNs and for their volume density, it is found that they contribute approximately 80 percent of the 2 keV diffuse X-ray background. Uncertainties in this estimate are still rather large; however, it seems difficult to reconcile the data with a contribution much less than 50 percent.

  3. X-ray Properties of Deep Radio-Selected Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the research supported by the ADP grant entitled 'X-ray Properties of Deep Radio-Selected Quasars'. The primary effort consisted of correlating the ROSAT All-Sky Survey catalog with the April 1997 release of the FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters) radio catalog. We found that a matching radius of 60 sec excluded most false matches while retaining most of the true radio-X-ray sources. The correlation of the approx. 80,000 source RASS and approx. 268,000 FIRST catalogs matched 2,588 FIRST sources with 1,649 RASS sources out of a possible 5,520 RASS sources residing in the FIRST survey area. This number is much higher than expected from our previous experience of correlating the RASS with radio surveys and indicates we detected new classes of objects not seen in the correlations with less sensitive radio surveys.

  4. X-ray spectroscopic study of the largest X-ray selected spectroscopic AGN sample in the XMM-XXL north

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Merloni, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Menzel, M.; Buchner, J.; Nandra, K.

    2014-07-01

    The XMM-XXL survey is a large public XMM survey which covers two ˜25 deg^2 sky regions with rich multi-wavelength coverage. In the northern field, we have extracted about ˜8000 unique point-like sources, identified their optical counterparts in SDSS imaging, and obtained spectroscopic redshift for ˜2400 AGN (with high completeness down to r-band optical magnitude of r˜22) thanks to a dedicated ancillary program of the SDSS-III/BOSS survey. This is to date the largest contiguous X-ray selected AGN sample with spectroscopic redshift information. Here we present the overall X-ray spectral properties of these ˜2400 reliable AGN. We fitted each X-ray spectrum with a simple power law model, modified by Galactic and intrinsic absorption. By dividing the sample into different redshift and luminosity bins, it possible to study the average X-ray spectrum properties of AGN in different cosmic epoch. We can also study the correlations between the X-ray spectrum and the optical spectrum parameters, and how those correlations change with redshift and the other physical parameters of the source (e.g. BH mass, accretion disc luminosity, broad emission line shapes etc.). Using the X-ray spectrum stacking method, we also study the properties of the iron K line in different redshift and luminosity bins.

  5. Properties of the EMSS Sample of X-Ray-Selected BL Lacertae Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rector, T. A.; Stocke, J. T.; Perlman, E. S.; Morris, S. L.; Gioia, I. M.

    1998-12-01

    We present updated, complete radio, optical and X-ray data for BL Lacs in the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS). The complete ``M91" sample first presented in Morris et al. (1991) is updated; and we define a new, virtually complete sample consisting of 40 EMSS BL Lacs (the ``D40" sample). New high signal-to-noise, arcsecond-resolution VLA maps are also presented for ten EMSS BL Lacs, completing VLA observations of the M91 sample. The addition of four new objects and updated X-ray flux and redshift information has increased the < V/Vmax >\\ value for the M91 sample to 0.399+/-0.057; and < V/Vmax >\\ = 0.416+/-0.046 for the newly defined D40 sample. In conjunction with the results of Bade et al. (1998) these results strongly establish negative evolution for X-ray-selected BL Lac Objects. The positive evolution seen in radio-selected BL Lacs poses a significant problem for the unified model. Also, our VLA observations of the M91 sample confirm that X-ray-selected BL Lacs are too core-dominated to be consistent with a beamed population of FR-1s seen at an intermediate angles for the moderate outflow velocities (gamma ~ 5) suggested for XBL emitting regions. The observed spectral and radio properties of XBLs, however, are completely consistent with XBLs being the beamed population of low-luminosity, FR-1 radio galaxies.

  6. The nature of X-ray selected star candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Gigoyan, K. S.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Kostandyan, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    The joint HRC/BHRC catalogue of optical identifications of ROSAT BSC and FSC X-ray sources is based on merging the Hamburg-ROSAT Catalogue (HRC) and Byurakan-Hamburg-ROSAT Catalogue (BHRC). Both have been made by optical identifications of X-ray sources based on low-dispersion spectra of the Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS) using the ROSAT Catalogues. HRC/BHRC contains a sample of 8132 (5341+2791) optically identified X-ray sources with count rate (CR) of photons > 0.04 ct/s in the area of the low-dispersion Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS), [b] > 20 and DEC > 0 degrees. Based on low-dispersion spectral classification, there are 4253 AGN, 492 galaxies, 1800 stars and 1587 unknown objects in the sample. 1800 star candidates include 1429 objects listed in SDSS DR12 photometric catalogue and 433 given in SDSS spectroscopic catalogue. Using these spectra, we have carried out classification of these star candidates to reveal new interesting objects, as well as to define the true content of our sample. 34 cataclysmic variables (including 7 new ones), 19 white dwarfs, 19 late-type stars (K-M and C types), 16 early type stars (O-B), 40 hot coronal stars (A-F types), 2 composite spectrum objects, and 17 bright stars have been revealed, as well as 286 objects which turned out to be extragalactic ones; 75 emission-line galaxies (HII/SB and AGN, including QSOs, Seyferts, and LINERs) and 211 absorption line galaxies were revealed (wrong classifications in HRC/BHRC due to their faint images and low-quality spectra). We have retrieved multiwavelength data from recent catalogues and carried out statistical investigations of the multiwavelength properties for the whole sample of stars. All stars have been found in GSC 2.3.2, as well as most of them are in GALEX, USNO-B1.0, 2MASS and WISE catalogues. Relations between the radiation fluxes in different bands from X-ray to radio for different types of sources are studied and analysis of their characteristics is made. X-ray selected stars are an

  7. X-ray properties of BzK-selected galaxies in the deepest X-ray fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel, C.; Nandra, K.; Laird, E. S.; Orange, P.

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the X-ray properties of BzK-selected galaxies at z ˜ 2 using deep X-ray data in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDFS) and Chandra Deep Field-North (CDFN). A subset of these BzK galaxies have been proposed as Compton-thick active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates based on a high ratio of infrared (IR) to ultraviolet (UV) star formation rates (SFRs). With the benefit of deep 24 μm observations, our sample of these IR-excess galaxies is larger than previous studies and combined with the deepest X-ray data yield new insights into the population. We identify 701 and 534 star-forming BzK galaxies (sBzK galaxies) in the range z = 1.2-3.0 in CDFS and CDFN, respectively. Of these we directly detect in X-rays 49 sBzK galaxies in CDFS and 32 sBzK galaxies in CDFN. Stacking the undetected sources also reveals a significant X-ray signal. Investigating the X-ray detection rate and stacked flux versus the IR-excess parameter (i.e. SFRtotal/SFRUV, corr), we find no strong evidence for an increased X-ray detection rate, or a harder X-ray spectrum in IR-excess sBzK galaxies. This is particularly the case when one accounts for the strong correlation between the IR-excess parameter and the bolometric IR luminosity (LIR); when controlling for LIR, the IR-non-excess sBzK galaxies show a detection rate at least as high. While both direct detections and stacking suggest that the AGN fraction in sBzK galaxies is high, there is no clear evidence for widespread Compton-thick activity in either the sBzK population generally or the IR-excess sBzK subsample. The very hard X-ray signal obtained for the latter in earlier work was most likely contaminated by a few hard X-ray sources now directly detected in deeper X-ray data. The X-ray detection fraction of passive BzK galaxies in our sample is anything higher than that of sBZK galaxies, so there is no evidence for coeval black hole growth and star formation from X-ray analysis of the BzK populations. Because increased AGN activity

  8. Dimensionality and noise in energy selective x-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and test a method to quantify the effect of dimensionality on the noise in energy selective x-ray imaging. Methods: The Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB), a universal lower limit of the covariance of any unbiased estimator, is used to quantify the noise. It is shown that increasing dimensionality always increases, or at best leaves the same, the variance. An analytic formula for the increase in variance in an energy selective x-ray system is derived. The formula is used to gain insight into the dependence of the increase in variance on the properties of the additional basis functions, the measurement noise covariance, and the source spectrum. The formula is also used with computer simulations to quantify the dependence of the additional variance on these factors. Simulated images of an object with three materials are used to demonstrate the trade-off of increased information with dimensionality and noise. The images are computed from energy selective data with a maximum likelihood estimator. Results: The increase in variance depends most importantly on the dimension and on the properties of the additional basis functions. With the attenuation coefficients of cortical bone, soft tissue, and adipose tissue as the basis functions, the increase in variance of the bone component from two to three dimensions is 1.4 × 103. With the soft tissue component, it is 2.7 × 104. If the attenuation coefficient of a high atomic number contrast agent is used as the third basis function, there is only a slight increase in the variance from two to three basis functions, 1.03 and 7.4 for the bone and soft tissue components, respectively. The changes in spectrum shape with beam hardening also have a substantial effect. They increase the variance by a factor of approximately 200 for the bone component and 220 for the soft tissue component as the soft tissue object thickness increases from 1 to 30 cm. Decreasing the energy resolution of the detectors increases the

  9. Multicolor photometry of x ray selected Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Cruz, Omar

    1993-01-01

    Strong evidence of evolution in cluster of galaxies at relatively low redshift has been indicated by recent x-ray studies. We are conducting a comprehensive optical study of a sample of Abell clusters that are strong x-ray emitters in order to test the x-ray evolution scenarios that have been proposed. The initial observations consist of three-color (B, R, I) imaging of low-redshift (0.025 less than z less than 0.25) Abell clusters using the T2KA CCD on the 0.9m telescope at KPNO the large field (23 ft. x 23 ft., approx. 1 Mpc at z = 0.025 and approx. 7 Mpc at z = 0.25) gives the unprecedented ability to sample most of the extent of the field of low-redshift clusters using a CCD. Given the advantages of CCDs over photographic plates, we expect to improve on many of the previous studies. A list of x-ray selected cluster of galaxies provides a homogeneous sample of true clusters that cannot be mistaken from apparent over-densities due to projection effects of field galaxies. Some optical indicators of cluster evolution are the population of ratios of cluster galaxies and their spatial distribution, a regular spiral-poor cluster is expected to be more evolved than an irregular spiral-rich cluster. Also regular spiral-poor clusters present high central concentrations while irregular spiral-rich are less concentrated. Variations in the Luminosity Function (LF) can indicate evolution. But in order to build reliable LFs it is necessary to determine the Hubble types of the cluster galaxies. In the past the classifications of cluster galaxies have been done by visual inspection on photographic material, this technique is very limited and can lead to errors when the galaxies are faint. The Hubble types of cluster galaxies can be determined in an objective manner by comparing colors and profiles from surface photometry. To show that this approach is feasible, I have presented preliminary results from the photometric analysis of the Abell-cluster A1213. Colors and profiles of

  10. The Complete Local-Volume Groups Sample (CLoGS): Early results from X-ray and radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtilek, Jan M.; O'Sullivan, Ewan; David, Laurence P.; Giacintucci, Simona; Kolokythas, Konstantinos

    2017-08-01

    Although the group environment is the dominant locus of galaxy evolution (in contrast to rich clusters, which contain only a few percent of galaxies), there has been a lack of reliable, representative group samples in the local Universe. In particular, X-ray selected samples are strongly biased in favor of the X-ray bright, centrally-concentrated cool-core systems. In response, we have designed the Complete Local-Volume Groups Sample (CLoGS), an optically-selected statistically-complete sample of 53 groups within 80 Mpc which is intended to overcome the limitations of X-ray selected samples and serve as a representative survey of groups in the local Universe. We have supplemented X-ray data from Chandra and XMM (70% complete to date, using both archival and new observations, with a 26-group high richness subsample 100% complete) with GMRT radio continuum observations (at 235 and 610 MHz, complete for the entire sample). CLoGS includes groups with a wide variety of properties in terms of galaxy population, hot gas content, and AGN power. We here describe early results from the survey, including the range of AGN activity observed in the dominant galaxies, the relative fraction of cool-core and non-cool-core groups in our sample, and the degree of disturbance observed in the IGM.

  11. Chemically selective soft x-ray patterning of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Stover, H.D.; Hitchcock, A.P.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2007-06-19

    The chemically selective modification of polymer mixtures by monochromated soft X-rays has been explored using the high-brightness fine-focused 50 nm beam of a scanning transmission X-ray microscope. Four different polymer systems were examined: a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) bilayer film; a PMMA-blend-PAN microphase-separated film; a poly(MMA-co-AN) copolymer film; and a poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate) homopolymer film. A high level of chemically selective modification was achieved for the PMMA/PAN bilayer; in particular, irradiation at 288.45 eV selectively removed the carbonyl group from PMMA while irradiation at 286.80 eV selectively reduced the nitrile group of PAN, even when these irradiations were carried out at the same (x,y) position of the sample. In the last two homogeneous polymer systems, similar amounts of damage to the nitrile and carbonyl groups occurred during irradiation at either 286.80 or 288.45 eV. This is attributed to damage transfer between the C=N and C=O groups mediated by primary electrons, secondary electrons or radical/ionic processes, aided by their close spatial proximity. Although the overall thickness of the bilayer sample at 70 nm is smaller than the lateral line spreading of 100 nm, the interface between the layers appears to effectively block the transport of energy, and hence damage, between the two layers. The origins of the line spreading in homogeneous phases and possible origins of the damage blocking effect of the interface are discussed. To demonstrate chemically selective patterning, high-resolution multi-wavelength patterns were created in the PMMA/PAN bilayer system.

  12. An X-ray survey of a complete sample of 3CR radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Trinchieri, G.; Elvis, M.; Miller, L.; Longair, M.

    1984-01-01

    The X-ray survey of the galaxies, 40 in all, was made with the Einstein Observatory. By comparing the distributions of X-ray luminosities, it is found that 3CR galaxies with double radio morphology (FR 2) and optical emission-line spectra tend to be the more powerful X-ray emitters, with broad-line galaxies at the top of the distribution. It is also found that the X-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with the 5 GHz radio nuclear luminosity. Through an analysis of the complete optical and radio sample with the Spearman partial rank correlation technique, it is determined that nuclear radio luminosity at 5 GHz is correlated with both total radio luminosity at 178 MHz and with galaxy optical luminosity. Other weaker correlations are found of the X-ray luminosity with the total radio luminosity at 178 MHz and the optical luminosity of the galaxy. The results are seen as underlining the importance of nuclear phenomena in radio galaxies and indicating a nuclear origin of their X-ray emission. In addition, it is found that the 3CR emission-line galaxies are similar to both Seyfert galaxies and quasars with double radio morphology in their X-ray properties, strongly reinforcing a unified picture of active nuclei.

  13. PRIMUS: INFRARED AND X-RAY AGN SELECTION TECHNIQUES AT 0.2 < z < 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, Alexander J.; Coil, Alison L.; Aird, James; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Moustakas, John; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu Guangtun

    2013-06-10

    We present a study of Spitzer/IRAC and X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) selection techniques in order to quantify the overlap, uniqueness, contamination, and completeness of each. We investigate how the overlap and possible contamination of the samples depend on the depth of both the IR and X-ray data. We use Spitzer/IRAC imaging, Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray imaging, and spectroscopic redshifts from the PRism MUlti-object Survey to construct galaxy and AGN samples at 0.2 < z < 1.2 over 8 deg{sup 2}. We construct samples over a wide range of IRAC flux limits (SWIRE to GOODS depth) and X-ray flux limits (10 ks to 2 Ms). We compare IR-AGN samples defined using both the IRAC color selection of Stern et al. and Donley et al. with X-ray-detected AGN samples. For roughly similar depth IR and X-ray surveys, we find that {approx}75% of IR-selected AGNs are also identified as X-ray AGNs. This fraction increases to {approx}90% when comparing against the deepest X-ray data, indicating that at most {approx}10% of IR-selected AGNs may be heavily obscured. The IR-AGN selection proposed by Stern et al. suffers from contamination by star-forming galaxies at various redshifts when using deeper IR data, though the selection technique works well for shallow IR data. While similar overall, the IR-AGN samples preferentially contain more luminous AGNs, while the X-ray AGN samples identify a wider range of AGN accretion rates including low specific accretion rate AGNs, where the host galaxy light dominates at IR wavelengths. The host galaxy populations of the IR and X-ray AGN samples have similar rest-frame colors and stellar masses; both selections identify AGNs in blue, star-forming and red, quiescent galaxies.

  14. X-ray-selected broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. J.; Carrera, F. J.; Ceballos, M.; Corral, A.; Ebrero, J.; Esquej, P.; Krumpe, M.; Mateos, S.; Rosen, S.; Schwope, A.; Streblyanska, A.; Symeonidis, M.; Tedds, J. A.; Watson, M. G.

    2017-02-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray-selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index α = 0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, αOX, of the X-ray-selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of <αOX> = 1.69 ± 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray-selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of a similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically selected BALQSOs typically have much larger αOX and so are characterized as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray spectra are absorbed by a similar degree to that seen in optically selected BALQSO samples; X-ray absorption appears to be ubiquitous in BALQSOs, but X-ray weakness is not. We argue that BALQSOs sit at one end of a spectrum of X-ray absorption properties in QSOs related to the degree of ultraviolet absorption in C IV 1550 Å.

  15. Optical and X-Ray Studies of 10 X-Ray-selected Cataclysmic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorstensen, John R.; Halpern, Jules

    2013-11-01

    We report on ground-based optical observations of 10 cataclysmic binaries that were discovered through their X-ray emission. Time-resolved radial velocity spectroscopy yields unambiguous orbital periods for eight objects and ambiguous results for the remaining two. The orbital periods range from 87 minutes to 9.38 hr. We also obtained time-series optical photometry for six targets, four of which have coherent pulsations. These periods are 1218 s for 1RXS J045707.4+452751, 628 s for AX J1740.2-2903, 477 s for AX J1853.3-0128, and 935 s for IGR J19267+1325. A total of seven of the sources have coherent oscillations in X-rays or optical, indicating that they are intermediate polars (DQ Herculis stars). Time-resolved spectroscopy of one object, Swift J2218.4+1925, shows that it is an AM Herculis star, or polar, and IGR J19552+0044 may also be in that class. For another object, Swift J0746.2-1611, we find an orbital period of 9.384 hr and detect the spectrum of the secondary star. The secondary's spectral contribution implies a distance of 900 (+190, -150) pc, where the error bars are estimated using a Monte Carlo technique to account for correlated uncertainties. Based on observations obtained at the MDM Observatory, operated by Dartmouth College, Columbia University, Ohio State University, Ohio University, and the University of Michigan.

  16. OPTICAL AND X-RAY STUDIES OF 10 X-RAY-SELECTED CATACLYSMIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Thorstensen, John R.; Halpern, Jules

    2013-11-01

    We report on ground-based optical observations of 10 cataclysmic binaries that were discovered through their X-ray emission. Time-resolved radial velocity spectroscopy yields unambiguous orbital periods for eight objects and ambiguous results for the remaining two. The orbital periods range from 87 minutes to 9.38 hr. We also obtained time-series optical photometry for six targets, four of which have coherent pulsations. These periods are 1218 s for 1RXS J045707.4+452751, 628 s for AX J1740.2–2903, 477 s for AX J1853.3–0128, and 935 s for IGR J19267+1325. A total of seven of the sources have coherent oscillations in X-rays or optical, indicating that they are intermediate polars (DQ Herculis stars). Time-resolved spectroscopy of one object, Swift J2218.4+1925, shows that it is an AM Herculis star, or polar, and IGR J19552+0044 may also be in that class. For another object, Swift J0746.2–1611, we find an orbital period of 9.384 hr and detect the spectrum of the secondary star. The secondary's spectral contribution implies a distance of 900 (+190, –150) pc, where the error bars are estimated using a Monte Carlo technique to account for correlated uncertainties.

  17. The X-ray properties of optically selected clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Pratt, G. W.; Donahue, M.; Ellingson, E.; Gladders, M.; Böhringer, H.; Yee, H. K. C.; Yan, R.; Croston, J. H.; Gilbank, D. G.

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of Chandra and Suzaku X-ray observations of nine moderate-redshift (0.16 < z < 0.42) clusters discovered via the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS). Surface brightness profiles are fitted to β-models, gas masses are determined, integrated spectra are extracted within R2500, and X-ray temperatures and luminosities are inferred. The LX-TX relationship expected from self-similar evolution is tested by comparing this sample to our previous X-ray investigation of nine high-redshift (0.6 < z < 1.0) optically selected clusters. We find that optically selected clusters are systematically less luminous than X-ray selected clusters of similar X-ray temperature at both moderate and high z. We are unable to constrain evolution in the LX-TX relation with these data, but find it consistent with no evolution, within relatively large uncertainties. To investigate selection effects, we compare the X-ray properties of our sample to those of clusters in the representative X-ray selected sample, also determined within R2500. We find that while RCS cluster X-ray properties span the entire range of those of massive clusters selected by other methods, their average X-ray properties are most similar to those of dynamically disturbed X-ray selected clusters. This similarity suggests that the true cluster distribution might contain a higher fraction of disturbed objects than are typically detected in X-ray selected surveys.

  18. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging With Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray source for mammography: Feasibility study...W81XWH-04-1-0481 TITLE: High Resolution X - ray Phase Contrast Imaging With Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement PRINCIPAL...REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Jun 2005 – 31 May 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER High Resolution X - ray

  19. The X-ray properties of high redshift, optically selected QSOs. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the X-ray properties of high redshift QSOs, grism/grens plates covering 17 deg. of sky previously imaged to very sensitive X-ray flux levels with the Einstein Observatory were taken. Following optical selection of the QSO, the archived X-ray image is examined to extract an X-ray flux detection or a sensitive upper limit.

  20. Hard X-Rays from a Complete Sample of the Brightest Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, David B.

    2003-01-01

    We were awarded 70kS of XMM-Newton spacecraft time using the Epic pn camera to observe three ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIGs) in order to measure the spectral shape of their hard X-Ray emission, and to use this information to search for the presence of an highly obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN), and to separate out the contributions from a putative starburst. By observing three objects we hope to be able to better assess the role of AGN in the complete class of ULIGs and therefore to better constrain their contribution to the X-ray background. XMM-Newton was deemed to be better suited to our proposed measurements of ULIGs than the Chandra X-ray observatory due to its larger aperture and better sensitivity to hard (2-10 keV) X-rays.

  1. Hard X-Rays from a Complete Sample of the Brightest Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, David B.

    2003-01-01

    We were awarded 70kS of XMM-Newton spacecraft time using the Epic pn camera to observe three ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIGs) in order to measure the spectral shape of their hard X-Ray emission, and to use this information to search for the presence of an highly obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN), and to separate out the contributions from a putative starburst. By observing three objects we hope to be able to better assess the role of AGN in the complete class of ULIGs and therefore to better constrain their contribution to the X-ray background. XMM-Newton was deemed to be better suited to our proposed measurements of ULIGs than the Chandra X-ray observatory due to its larger aperture and better sensitivity to hard (2-10 keV) X-rays.

  2. Optical nebulosity in X-ray-selected, early type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joseph C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an H-alpha + N II forbidden line narrowband imaging survey of X-ray-selected E and S0 galaxies. A novel technique is described for objectively optimizing the removal of stellar continuum light while providing well-defined estimates of systematic errors. The procedure has the additional benefit of eliminating sky contamination, specifically in image regions occupied by galaxy light. Consideration of the measured spectral energy distributions is included in the flux calibration procedure, and emission-line luminosities (or upper limits), corrected for Galactic foreground extinction, are tabulated for metric apertures. No connection is found between the 'boxiness' or 'diskiness' of stellar isophotes and emission-line or far-infrared luminosity. It is suggested that optical nebulosity in early-type galaxies contains a significant multiparameter dependence on active Galactic nuclei behavior, accretion from the hot interstellar medium, and mass injection from external sources.

  3. The Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey - Optical identifications for a complete sample of X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocke, J. T.; Liebert, J.; Gioia, I. M.; Maccacaro, T.; Griffiths, R. E.; Danziger, I. J.; Kunth, D.; Lub, J.

    1983-01-01

    It is suggested that virtually all the X-ray sources in the Einstein Observatory's Medium Sensitivity Survey flux range can be identified with objects visible on the POSS, on the basis of the complete identification of all sources north of -25 deg declination. There is no evidence for a significant population of 'blank field' X-ray sources at this flux level, and therefore no evidence for any new X-ray source class with very high L(x)/L(v). Most of the quasars detected in the present survey are spectroscopically similar to optical or radio-selected quasars. About 25 percent of the quasar sample, however, had reddish colors, and permitted lines dominated by a narrow-line component. These objects form a second sequence of active galactic nuclei, distinct in their optical properties from the broad line objects.

  4. The completeness of chest X-ray procedure codes in the Danish National Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Hjertholm, Peter; Flarup, Kaare Rud; Guldbrandt, Louise Mahncke; Vedsted, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this validation study was to assess the completeness of the registrations of chest X-rays (CXR) in two different versions of the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR). Material and methods We included electronic record data on CXR performed on patients aged 40 to 99 years from nine radiology departments covering 20 Danish hospitals. From each department, we included data from three randomly selected weeks between 2004 and 2011 (reference standard). In two versions of the DNPR from the State Serum Institute (SSI) and Statistics Denmark, respectively, we investigated the proportion of registered CXR compared to the reference standard. Furthermore, we compared the completeness of the recorded data according to the responsible department (main department). Results We identified 11,235 patients and 12,513 CXR in the reference standard. The data from the SSI contained 12,265 (98%) CXR, whereas the data from Statistics Denmark comprised 9,151 (73.1%) CXR. The completeness of the SSI data was fairly constant across years, radiology departments, medical specialties, and age groups. The data from Statistics Denmark was almost complete in 2011 (95.8%). However, for the remaining study period, the data with radiology departments registered as the main department were lacking in the version from Statistics Denmark, and so the overall completeness was 73.1%. Conclusion The completeness of CXR registrations varied between 98% and 73% depending on the information source, and this should be considered when investigating radiology services in the basis of DNPR. PMID:28293121

  5. Toward An Understanding of Cluster Evolution: A Deep X-Ray Selected Cluster Catalog from ROSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christine; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the past year, we have focussed on studying individual clusters found in this sample with Chandra, as well as using Chandra to measure the luminosity-temperature relation for a sample of distant clusters identified through the ROSAT study, and finally we are continuing our study of fossil groups. For the luminosity-temperature study, we compared a sample of nearby clusters with a sample of distant clusters and, for the first time, measured a significant change in the relation as a function of redshift (Vikhlinin et al. in final preparation for submission to Cape). We also used our ROSAT analysis to select and propose for Chandra observations of individual clusters. We are now analyzing the Chandra observations of the distant cluster A520, which appears to have undergone a recent merger. Finally, we have completed the analysis of the fossil groups identified in ROM observations. In the past few months, we have derived X-ray fluxes and luminosities as well as X-ray extents for an initial sample of 89 objects. Based on the X-ray extents and the lack of bright galaxies, we have identified 16 fossil groups. We are comparing their X-ray and optical properties with those of optically rich groups. A paper is being readied for submission (Jones, Forman, and Vikhlinin in preparation).

  6. The X-Ray Weakness of GPS Radio Galaxies: A Volume-Limited Complete Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotsky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2005-01-01

    The XMM-Newton observations of the GPS sample was completed last summer. We are in process of finalizing the paper describing the data and the results. The main goal of the project was to determine the X-ray spectra of the GPS galaxies in comparison to regular radio galaxies. Our XMM observations show evidence that the GPS galaxies are heavily obscured with the large absorbing columns exceeding N(H)greater than le22 cm^-2. Taking into account the obscuration we determined that the intrinsic X-ray luminosities of GPS galaxies are of order le43-le44 erg/s, comparable to low luminosity radio loud quasars. The large GPS samples can confirm the result, as at this moment our evidence is based only on 7 GPS galaxies observed with good S/N/ in X-rays. The first paper summarizing the results of the XMM observation of Mkn 668 has been published Astronomy & Astrophysics. We found soft X-ray signatures of a hot plasma (kT approximately 10^7K) and a hard X-ray emission from the nucleus. The X-ray spectrum above 2.5-keV is characterized by a very flat (observed photon index, Gamma-0.5) power-law continuum, alongside with a strong Fe-K-alpha neutral iron fluorescent line (EW600-eV). The best explanation for the origin of this high energy X-ray emission is in terms of the Compton-reflection of the nuclear emission. The primary X-ray emission is obscured by a Compton-thick (N_H to 10^24 cm-2) matter which becomes transparent at higher energies. The observed above 2.5-keV X-rays are mostly due to reflection which is indicated by a strong Fe-K-alpha line. This source represented the second hard X-ray detection of the GPS galaxy ever (the first one being 1345+125; O'Dea et al. 2000). The observations of the other GPS galaxies in our sample confirmed the trend of the large obscuration present in the spectra. However, we do not have a compelling evidence for a hot gas in the nucleus. The two other GPS galaxies observed with Chandra were added to the total of 7 GPS galaxies. This GPS

  7. Energy-selective filtration of dental x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gelskey, D.E.; Baker, C.G.

    1981-11-01

    Samarium is known for its ability to filter simultaneously low- and high-energy x-ray photons from an x-ray beam that are not useful in producing a diagnostic radiograph. This study was undertaken to determine the optimum thickness of samarium required to minimize patient exposure and exposure time. The results indicate that use of a filter thickness of 0.16 mm. minimized patient radiation exposure and permitted the use of an exposure time sufficiently short to minimize motion unsharpness. The incorporation of a 0.16 mm. samarium filter in the x-ray beam reduced exposure by about 40 percent as compared to a 2.5 mm. aluminum filter; the exposure time must be increased approximately twice to obtain optical densities equivalent to those produced with aluminum filtration.

  8. The cosmological evolution and luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Avni, Y.; Giommi, P.; Griffiths, R. E.; Liebert, J.; Stocke, J.; Danziger, J.

    1983-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 31 AGNs extracted from a fully identified sample of X-ray sources from the Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey and is therefore exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space is found to be strongly nonuniform. The amount of cosmological evolution required by the X-ray data is derived in the framework of pure luminosity evolution and is found to be smaller than the amount determined from optically selected samples. The X-ray luminosity function is derived. It can be satisfactorily represented by a single power law only over a limited range of absolute luminosities. Evidence that the luminosity function flattens at low luminosity or steepens at high luminosity, or both, is presented and discussed.

  9. Studies of an x ray selected sample of cataclysmic variables. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silber, Andrew D.

    1986-01-01

    Just prior to the thesis research, an all-sky survey in hard x rays with the HEAO-1 satellite and further observations in the optical resulted in a catalog of about 700 x-ray sources with known optical counterparts. This sample includes 43 cataclysmic variables, which are binaries consisting of a detached white-dwarf and a Roche lobe filling companion star. This thesis consists of studies of the x-ray selected sample of catalcysmic variables.

  10. X-RAY EMISSION FROM OPTICALLY SELECTED RADIO-INTERMEDIATE AND RADIO-LOUD QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Wu Jianfeng; Gibson, R. R.; Steffen, A. T. E-mail: niel@astro.psu.edu E-mail: jfwu@astro.psu.edu E-mail: rgibson@astro.washington.edu

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an investigation into the X-ray properties of radio-intermediate and radio-loud quasars (RIQs and RLQs, respectively). We combine large, modern optical (e.g., SDSS) and radio (e.g., FIRST) surveys with archival X-ray data from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT to generate an optically selected sample that includes 188 RIQs and 603 RLQs. This sample is constructed independently of X-ray properties but has a high X-ray detection rate (85%); it provides broad and dense coverage of the l-z plane, including at high redshifts (22% of objects have z = 2-5), and it extends to high radio-loudness values (33% of objects have R* = 3-5, using logarithmic units). We measure the 'excess' X-ray luminosity of RIQs and RLQs relative to radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) as a function of radio loudness and luminosity, and parameterize the X-ray luminosity of RIQs and RLQs both as a function of optical/UV luminosity and also as a joint function of optical/UV and radio luminosity. RIQs are only modestly X-ray bright relative to RQQs; it is only at high values of radio loudness (R* {approx}> 3.5) and radio luminosity that RLQs become strongly X-ray bright. We find no evidence for evolution in the X-ray properties of RIQs and RLQs with redshift (implying jet-linked IC/CMB emission does not contribute substantially to the nuclear X-ray continuum). Finally, we consider a model in which the nuclear X-ray emission contains both disk/corona-linked and jet-linked components and demonstrate that the X-ray jet-linked emission is likely beamed but to a lesser degree than applies to the radio jet. This model is used to investigate the increasing dominance of jet-linked X-ray emission at low inclinations.

  11. Discovery of low-redshift X-ray selected quasars - New clues to the QSO phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Forman, W. R.; Steiner, J. E.; Canizares, C. R.; Mcclintock, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The identification of six X-ray sources discovered by the Einstein Observatory with X-ray quasars is reported, and the properties of these X-ray selected quasars are discussed. The four high-latitude fields of 1 sq deg each in which the Einstein imaging proportional counter detected serendipitous X-ray sources at intermediate exposures of 10,000 sec were observed by 4-m and 1.5-m telescopes, and optical sources with uv excesses and emission line spectra typical of many low-redshift quasars and Seyfert 1 galaxies were found within the 1-arcsec error boxes of the X-ray sources. All six quasars identified were found to be radio quiet, with low redshift and relatively faint optical magnitudes, and to be similar in space density, colors and magnitude versus redshift relation to an optically selected sample at the same mean magnitude. X-ray luminosity was found to be well correlated with both continuum and broad-line emission luminosities for the known radio-quiet quasars and Seyfert 1 galaxies, and it was observed that the five objects with the lowest redshifts have very similar X-ray/optical luminosity ratios despite tenfold variations in X-ray luminosity. It is concluded that photoionization by a continuum extending to X-ray energies is the dominant excitation mechanism in radio-quiet quasars.

  12. Covering complete proteomes with X-ray structures: A current snapshot

    DOE PAGES

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Fan, Xiao; Yan, Jing; ...

    2014-10-23

    Structural genomics programs have developed and applied structure-determination pipelines to a wide range of protein targets, facilitating the visualization of macromolecular interactions and the understanding of their molecular and biochemical functions. The fundamental question of whether three-dimensional structures of all proteins and all functional annotations can be determined using X-ray crystallography is investigated. A first-of-its-kind large-scale analysis of crystallization propensity for all proteins encoded in 1953 fully sequenced genomes was performed. It is shown that current X-ray crystallographic knowhow combined with homology modeling can provide structures for 25% of modeling families (protein clusters for which structural models can be obtainedmore » through homology modeling), with at least one structural model produced for each Gene Ontology functional annotation. The coverage varies between superkingdoms, with 19% for eukaryotes, 35% for bacteria and 49% for archaea, and with those of viruses following the coverage values of their hosts. It is shown that the crystallization propensities of proteomes from the taxonomic superkingdoms are distinct. The use of knowledge-based target selection is shown to substantially increase the ability to produce X-ray structures. It is demonstrated that the human proteome has one of the highest attainable coverage values among eukaryotes, and GPCR membrane proteins suitable for X-ray structure determination were determined.« less

  13. Covering complete proteomes with X-ray structures: A current snapshot

    SciTech Connect

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Fan, Xiao; Yan, Jing; Chalmers, Eric; Woloschuk, Christopher; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-10-23

    Structural genomics programs have developed and applied structure-determination pipelines to a wide range of protein targets, facilitating the visualization of macromolecular interactions and the understanding of their molecular and biochemical functions. The fundamental question of whether three-dimensional structures of all proteins and all functional annotations can be determined using X-ray crystallography is investigated. A first-of-its-kind large-scale analysis of crystallization propensity for all proteins encoded in 1953 fully sequenced genomes was performed. It is shown that current X-ray crystallographic knowhow combined with homology modeling can provide structures for 25% of modeling families (protein clusters for which structural models can be obtained through homology modeling), with at least one structural model produced for each Gene Ontology functional annotation. The coverage varies between superkingdoms, with 19% for eukaryotes, 35% for bacteria and 49% for archaea, and with those of viruses following the coverage values of their hosts. It is shown that the crystallization propensities of proteomes from the taxonomic superkingdoms are distinct. The use of knowledge-based target selection is shown to substantially increase the ability to produce X-ray structures. It is demonstrated that the human proteome has one of the highest attainable coverage values among eukaryotes, and GPCR membrane proteins suitable for X-ray structure determination were determined.

  14. Covering the Complete Proteomes with X-ray Structures - a Current Snapshot

    SciTech Connect

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Fan, Xiao; Yan, Jing; Chalmers, Eric; Woloschuk, Christopher; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-10-23

    Abstract Structural genomics programs developed and applied structure determination pipelines to a wide range of protein targets, facilitating visualization of macromolecular interactions and understanding of their molecular and biochemical functions. We investigate a fundamental question whether three-dimensional structures of all proteins and all functional annotations can be determined using X-ray crystallography. We performed a first-of-its-kind large scale analysis of crystallization propensity for all proteins encoded in 1,953 fully sequenced genomes. We show that current X-ray crystallography know-how combined with homology modeling can provide structures for 25% of modeling families (protein clusters for which structural models can be obtained through homology modeling) with at least one structural model produced for each Gene Ontology functional annotation. The coverage varies between superkingdoms with 19% in eukaryotes, 35% in bacteria, 49% in archaea, and viruses following coverage values of their hosts. We show that the crystallization propensities of proteomes are distinctive of the taxonomic superkingdoms. The use of knowledge-based target selection is shown to substantially increase ability to produce X-ray structures. We demonstrate that the human proteome has one of the highest attainable coverage values among eukaryotes and we identify GPCR membrane proteins suitable for the X-ray structure determination.

  15. Covering complete proteomes with X-ray structures: a current snapshot

    PubMed Central

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Fan, Xiao; Yan, Jing; Chalmers, Eric; Woloschuk, Christopher; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    Structural genomics programs have developed and applied structure-determination pipelines to a wide range of protein targets, facilitating the visualization of macromolecular interactions and the understanding of their molecular and biochemical functions. The fundamental question of whether three-dimensional structures of all proteins and all functional annotations can be determined using X-ray crystallography is investigated. A first-of-its-kind large-scale analysis of crystallization propensity for all proteins encoded in 1953 fully sequenced genomes was performed. It is shown that current X-ray crystallographic knowhow combined with homology modeling can provide structures for 25% of modeling families (protein clusters for which structural models can be obtained through homology modeling), with at least one structural model produced for each Gene Ontology functional annotation. The coverage varies between superkingdoms, with 19% for eukaryotes, 35% for bacteria and 49% for archaea, and with those of viruses following the coverage values of their hosts. It is shown that the crystallization propensities of proteomes from the taxonomic superkingdoms are distinct. The use of knowledge-based target selection is shown to substantially increase the ability to produce X-ray structures. It is demonstrated that the human proteome has one of the highest attainable coverage values among eukaryotes, and GPCR membrane proteins suitable for X-ray structure determination were determined. PMID:25372670

  16. X-ray spectra of a complete sample of extragalactic core-dominated radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunner, H.; Lamer, G.; Worrall, D. M.; Staubert, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present ROSAT soft X-ray spectra for the members of a complete sample of 13 core-dominated, flat radio spectrum sources. The sample comprises all radio sources from a flux-limited radio catalog (S(sub 5GHz) greater than 1 Jy; Kuehr et al. 1981) which are north of delta = 70 deg, at galactic latitudes b greater than 10 deg, and have a flat radio spectrum between 1.4 and 5 GHz (alpha(sub r) less than 0.5; f approximately nu(sup -alpha)). The sources have already undergone much study at radio and optical wavelengths and are classified in broad terms as quasars (8 sources) and BL Lac objects (5 sources). We find mean X-ray power-law energy indices of alpha(sub x) = 0.59 +/- 0.19 for the quasars and 1.36 +/- 0.27 for the BL Lac objects (68% confidence range for two parameters of interest as determined by a maximum likelihood method), supporting earlier Einstein Observatory results for heterogeneous samples of sources (Worrall & Wilkes 1990). A non-zero dispersion on alpha(sub x) is found for both the quasars and the BL Lac objects. When we incorporate published radio, mm, and optical measurements and compare the X-ray and broad-band spectral indices alpha(sub x), alpha(sub rx), alpha(sub mm,x), and alpha(sub ox), the most obvious difference between the quasar and BL Lac subsamples lies within the X-ray band. We have fitted the multi-wavelength data to inhomogeneous synchotron-self-Compton models and find that, for the BL Lac objects with steep X-ray spectra, synchotron emission can account for the radio to soft X-ray measurements, whereas the BL Lac objects with hard X-ray spectra and the quasars require significant Compton emission to model the spectral flattening indicated by alpha(sub x) less than alpha(sub ox).

  17. X-ray spectra of a complete sample of extragalactic core-dominated radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunner, H.; Lamer, G.; Worrall, D. M.; Staubert, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present ROSAT soft X-ray spectra for the members of a complete sample of 13 core-dominated, flat radio spectrum sources. The sample comprises all radio sources from a flux-limited radio catalog (S(sub 5GHz) greater than 1 Jy; Kuehr et al. 1981) which are north of delta = 70 deg, at galactic latitudes b greater than 10 deg, and have a flat radio spectrum between 1.4 and 5 GHz (alpha(sub r) less than 0.5; f approximately nu(sup -alpha)). The sources have already undergone much study at radio and optical wavelengths and are classified in broad terms as quasars (8 sources) and BL Lac objects (5 sources). We find mean X-ray power-law energy indices of alpha(sub x) = 0.59 +/- 0.19 for the quasars and 1.36 +/- 0.27 for the BL Lac objects (68% confidence range for two parameters of interest as determined by a maximum likelihood method), supporting earlier Einstein Observatory results for heterogeneous samples of sources (Worrall & Wilkes 1990). A non-zero dispersion on alpha(sub x) is found for both the quasars and the BL Lac objects. When we incorporate published radio, mm, and optical measurements and compare the X-ray and broad-band spectral indices alpha(sub x), alpha(sub rx), alpha(sub mm,x), and alpha(sub ox), the most obvious difference between the quasar and BL Lac subsamples lies within the X-ray band. We have fitted the multi-wavelength data to inhomogeneous synchotron-self-Compton models and find that, for the BL Lac objects with steep X-ray spectra, synchotron emission can account for the radio to soft X-ray measurements, whereas the BL Lac objects with hard X-ray spectra and the quasars require significant Compton emission to model the spectral flattening indicated by alpha(sub x) less than alpha(sub ox).

  18. Two component model for X-ray emission of radio selected QSO's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isobe, T.; Feigelson, E. D.; Singh, K. P.; Kembhavi, A.

    1986-01-01

    Using a large database of radio, optical, and x ray luminosities of AGNs with survival analysis, it was found that the x ray emission of the radio selected quasars has two components. One is related to the optical luminosity and the other is related to the radio luminosity.

  19. An exponential modeling algorithm for protein structure completion by X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Shneerson, V L; Wild, D L; Saldin, D K

    2001-03-01

    An exponential modeling algorithm is developed for protein structure completion by X-ray crystallography and tested on experimental data from a 59-residue protein. An initial noisy difference Fourier map of missing residues of up to half of the protein is transformed by the algorithm into one that allows easy identification of the continuous tube of electron density associated with that polypeptide chain. The method incorporates the paradigm of phase hypothesis generation and cross validation within an automated scheme.

  20. Covering complete proteomes with X-ray structures: a current snapshot

    SciTech Connect

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Fan, Xiao; Yan, Jing; Chalmers, Eric; Woloschuk, Christopher; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-11-01

    The current and the attainable coverage by X-ray structures of proteins and their functions on the scale of the ‘protein universe’ are estimated. A detailed analysis of the coverage across nearly 2000 proteomes from all superkingdoms of life and functional annotations is performed, with particular focus on the human proteome and the family of GPCR proteins. Structural genomics programs have developed and applied structure-determination pipelines to a wide range of protein targets, facilitating the visualization of macromolecular interactions and the understanding of their molecular and biochemical functions. The fundamental question of whether three-dimensional structures of all proteins and all functional annotations can be determined using X-ray crystallography is investigated. A first-of-its-kind large-scale analysis of crystallization propensity for all proteins encoded in 1953 fully sequenced genomes was performed. It is shown that current X-ray crystallographic knowhow combined with homology modeling can provide structures for 25% of modeling families (protein clusters for which structural models can be obtained through homology modeling), with at least one structural model produced for each Gene Ontology functional annotation. The coverage varies between superkingdoms, with 19% for eukaryotes, 35% for bacteria and 49% for archaea, and with those of viruses following the coverage values of their hosts. It is shown that the crystallization propensities of proteomes from the taxonomic superkingdoms are distinct. The use of knowledge-based target selection is shown to substantially increase the ability to produce X-ray structures. It is demonstrated that the human proteome has one of the highest attainable coverage values among eukaryotes, and GPCR membrane proteins suitable for X-ray structure determination were determined.

  1. Comparing Cool Cores in the Planck SZ Selected Samples of Clusters of Galaxies with Cool Cores in X-ray Selected Cluster Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine; Santos, Felipe A.; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Lovisari, Lorenzo; Arnaud, Monique; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Churazov, Eugene; Ferrari, Chiara; Borgani, Stefano; Chandra-Planck Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The Planck mission provided a representative sample of clusters of galaxies over the entire sky. With completed Chandra observations of 165 Planck ESZ and cosmology sample clusters at z<0.35, we can now characterize each cluster in terms of its X-ray luminosity, gas temperature, gas mass, total mass, gas entropy, gas central cooling time, presence of active AGN, gas cavities, radio emission, and cluster morphology. In this presentation we compare the percentages of cool core and non-cool core clusters in the Planck-selected clusters with the percentages in X-ray selected cluster samples. We find a significantly smaller percentage of cool core clusters in the Planck sample than in X-ray selected cluster samples. We will discuss the primary reasons for this smaller percentage of cool-core clusters in the Planck-selected cluster sample than in X-ray-selected samples.

  2. Probing X-Ray Jet Emission Mechanisms in a Complete Blazar Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharb, Preeti

    2008-09-01

    We propose deep (70 ksec) followup Chandra X-ray observations and new HST WFPC2/F450W observations of two quasars belonging to the complete flux-limited MOJAVE Chandra blazar sample. These two quasars have HST WFPC2/F702W data available in the archive. Combining the existing optical and radio data with the new Chandra and HST data at an additional optical band we aim to construct asignificantly more accurate multi-waveband (four frequency) spectral energy distributions for distinct knots in the jets. This will serve as a first step towards resolving longstanding ambiguities surrounding the primary X-ray emission mechanisms in a well-defined sample of powerful FR-II class jets.

  3. Probing X-Ray Jet Emission Mechanisms in a Complete Blazar Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharb, Preeti

    2009-07-01

    We propose deep {70 ksec} followup Chandra X-ray observations and new HST ACS/WFC/F475W observations of two quasars, viz., 0106+013 and 1641+399, belonging to the complete flux-limited MOJAVE Chandra blazar sample. These two quasars have HST WFPC2/F702W data available in the archive. Combining the existing optical and radio data with the new Chandra and HST data at an additional optical band we aim to construct a significantly more accurate multi-waveband {four frequency} spectral energy distributions for distinct knots in the jets. This will serve as a first step towards resolving longstanding ambiguities surrounding the primary X-ray emission mechanisms in a well-defined sample of powerful FR-II class jets.

  4. X-ray image enhancement via determinant based feature selection.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, R; Hegarty, J; Broughton, R; Butler, A; Coope, I; Renaud, P

    2013-12-01

    Previous work has investigated the feasibility of using Eigenimage-based enhancement tools to highlight abnormalities on chest X-rays (Butler et al in J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol 52:244-253, 2008). While promising, this approach has been limited by computational restrictions of standard clinical workstations, and uncertainty regarding what constitutes an adequate sample size. This paper suggests an alternative mathematical model to the above referenced singular value decomposition method, which can significantly reduce both the required sample size and the time needed to perform analysis. Using this approach images can be efficiently separated into normal and abnormal parts, with the potential for rapid highlighting of pathology.

  5. The BL LAC phenomenon: X-ray observations of transition objects and determination of the x-ray spectrum of a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrall, Diana M.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities related to two ROSAT investigations: (1) x-ray properties of radio galaxies thought to contain BL Lac type nuclei; and (2) x-ray spectra of a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio sources. The following papers describing the research are provided as attachments: Multiple X-ray Emission Components in Low Power Radio Galaxies; New X-ray Results on Radio Galaxies; Analysis Techniques for a Multiwavelength Study of Radio Galaxies; Separation of X-ray Emission Components in Radio Galaxies; X-ray Emission in Powerful Radio Galaxies and Quasars; Extended and Compact X-ray Emission in Powerful Radio Galaxies; and X-ray Spectra of a Complete Sample of Extragalactic Core-dominated Radio Sources.

  6. X-ray selected stars in HRC and BHRC catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    A joint HRC/BHRC Catalogue has been created based on merging of Hamburg ROSAT Catalogue (HRC) and Byurakan Hamburg ROSAT Catalogue (BHRC). Both have been made by optical identifications of X-ray sources based on low-dispersion spectra of the Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS) using ROSAT Catalogues. As a result, the largest sample of 8132 (5341+2791) optically identified X-ray sources was created having count rate (CR) of photons ≤ 0.04 ct/s in the area with galactic latitudes |b|≤ 20° and declinations d≤ 0°.There are 4253 AGN, 492 galaxies, 1800 stars and 1587 unknown objects in the sample. All stars have been found in GSC 2.3.2, as well as most of them are in GALEX, USNO-B1.0, 2MASS and WISE catalogues. In addition, 1429 are in SDSS DR9 and 204 have SDSS spectra. For these stars we have carried out spectral classification and along with the bright stars, many new cataclysmic variables (CV), white dwarfs (WD) and late-type stars (K-M and C) have been revealed. For all stars, statistical studies of their multiwavelength properties have been made. An attempt to find a connection between the radiation fluxes in different bands for different types of sources, and identify their characteristics was made as well.

  7. Large homogeneous sample of X-ray selected AGN and its study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg; Paronyan, Gurgen; Abrahamyan, Hayk

    The combined catalogue of AGN selected from optical identifications of X-ray sources based on Hamburg-ROSAT and Byurakan-Hamburg-ROSAT catalogues is a homogeneous sample for statistical studies. Optically identified X-ray sources from ROSAT BSC and FSC are included, 4253 X-ray selected AGN in total. We carried out classification for 210 of these candidate sources based on available SDSS spectra and enlarged the sample of confirmed AGN. Statistical investigations of the sample were also carried out. Multiwavelength SEDs have also been constructed to link them to classifications.

  8. X-ray Scaling Relations of SPT Selected Galaxy Clusters Observed with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulbul, Esra; Chiu, Inon; McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Mark W.; Benson, Bradford; Bleem, Lindsey; Miller, Eric D.; Mohr, Joseph J.

    2017-01-01

    We will present results of X-ray observations of a sample of 68 South Pole Telescope selected galaxy clusters observed with XMM-Newton. Using X-ray follow-up observations with XMM-Newton, we estimate the temperature, luminosity, and mass of the intracluster medium within R500 for each cluster. From these, we constrain the Mg-Tx, Lx-Tx, and Yx-Mgas scaling relations for a sample of massive clusters at 0.1X-ray-selected samples in the literature

  9. NASA X-Ray Observatory Completes Tests Under Harsh Simulated Space Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-07-01

    NASA's most powerful X-ray observatory has successfully completed a month-long series of tests in the extreme heat, cold, and airless conditions it will encounter in space during its five-year mission to shed new light on some of the darkest mysteries of the universe. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility was put through the rigorous testing as it was alternately heated and cooled in a special vacuum chamber at TRW Space and Electronics Group in Redondo Beach, Calif., NASA's prime contractor for the observatory. "Successful completion of thermal vacuum testing marks a significant step in readying the observatory for launch aboard the Space Shuttle in January," said Fred Wojtalik, manager of the Observatory Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. "The observatory is a complex, highly sophisticated, precision instrument," explained Wojtalik. "We are pleased with the outcome of the testing, and are very proud of the tremendous team of NASA and contractor technicians, engineers and scientists that came together and worked hard to meet this challenging task." Testing began in May after the observatory was raised into the 60-foot thermal vacuum chamber at TRW. Testing was completed on June 20. During the tests the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility was exposed to 232 degree heat and 195 degree below zero Fahrenheit cold. During four temperature cycles, all elements of the observatory - the spacecraft, telescope, and science instruments - were checked out. Computer commands directing the observatory to perform certain functions were sent from test consoles at TRW to all Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility components. A team of contractor and NASA engineers and scientists monitored and evaluated the results. Commands were also sent from, and test data monitored at, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility Operations Control Center in Cambridge, Mass., as part of the test series. The observatory will be managed and controlled from

  10. X-ray luminescence computed tomography via selective excitation: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Pratx, Guillem; Carpenter, Colin M; Sun, Conroy; Xing, Lei

    2010-12-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is proposed as a new molecular imaging modality based on the selective excitation and optical detection of X-ray-excitable phosphor nanoparticles. These nano-sized particles can be fabricated to emit near-infrared (NIR) light when excited with X-rays, and, because because both X-rays and NIR photons propagate long distances in tissue, they are particularly well suited for in vivo biomedical imaging. In XLCT, tomographic images are generated by irradiating the subject using a sequence of programmed X-ray beams, while sensitive photo-detectors measure the light diffusing out of the subject. By restricting the X-ray excitation to a single, narrow beam of radiation, the origin of the optical photons can be inferred regardless of where these photons were detected, and how many times they scattered in tissue. This study presents computer simulations exploring the feasibility of imaging small objects with XLCT, such as research animals. The accumulation of 50 nm phosphor nanoparticles in a 2-mm-diameter target can be detected and quantified with subpicomolar sensitivity using less than 1 cGy of radiation dose. Provided sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, the spatial resolution of the system can be made as high as needed by narrowing the beam aperture. In particular, 1 mm spatial resolution was achieved for a 1-mm-wide X-ray beam. By including an X-ray detector in the system, anatomical imaging is performed simultaneously with molecular imaging via standard X-ray computed tomography (CT). The molecular and anatomical images are spatially and temporally co-registered, and, if a single-pixel X-ray detector is used, they have matching spatial resolution.

  11. Comparison of X-ray and optically selected galaxy clusters in the XXL-N field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alis, Sinan; Pacaud, Florian; Pierre, Marguerite; Benoist, Christophe; Maurogordato, Sophie; Clerc, Nicolas; Faccioli, Lorenzo; Sadibekova, Tatyana

    2016-07-01

    Optically selected clusters from the CFHTLS and X-ray selected clusters from the intersecting XXL Survey are compared. We first compare the properties of the ˜100 galaxy clusters common to both catalogues in the redshift range of 0.1 < z < 1.2. Then we focus on the properties of the missed clusters on both sides and stress the impact of AGN contamination in this comparison. Finally scaling relations involving optical and X-ray quantities will be presented.

  12. The complete optical spectrum of liquid water measured by inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Noboru; Udagawa, Yasuo; Kao, C.-C.

    2000-01-01

    Interaction of light with matter is of paramount importance in nature. The most fundamental property of a material in relation to light is its oscillator strength distribution, i.e., how strongly it absorbs light as a function of wavelength. Once the oscillator strength distribution is determined precisely for a wide enough energy range, the optical constants such as absorbance and reflectance as well as a number of other properties of the material, some of which are seemingly unrelated to photoabsorption, can be deduced. Most important of all is the fact that the interaction of matter with fast charged particles can be described by its complete optical spectra [Inokuti, M. (1986) Photochem. Photobiol. 44, 279–285]. Despite their importance, however, the complete optical spectra of volatile liquids including water have never been obtained accurately because of experimental difficulties inherent in vacuum UV spectroscopy. Inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy can provide quantitative data equivalent to those from vacuum UV absorption spectra. Herein, we show the complete optical spectrum of liquid water determined by making use of intense monochromatic x-rays supplied by the wiggler line X21 of the National Synchrotron Light Source. PMID:10829074

  13. The radio structure source of X-ray-selected BL Lacertae objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Stocke, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Arcsecond-size radio structure for a complete sample of 14 X-ray-selected BL Lac objects (XBLs) from the Einstein Extended Medium-Sensitivity Survey is presented. Most objects possess radio morphologies which are similar to those of nearby Fanaroff-Riley type 1 (FR 1) radio galaxies once the effects of surface brightness dimming and beam dilution as a function of redshift are taken into account. In order to test the beamed FR 1 hypothesis for BL Lac objects, the core and extended power levels are determined for these sources and compared with samples of radio-selected BL Lac objects (RBLs) and FR 1 from galaxies from the literature. RBLs and XBLs are found to possess extended (and thus unbeamed) power levels and the largest angular sizes similar to those of the FR 1 galaxies both supporting the beaming hypothesis and a common parent population for XBLs and RBLs.

  14. SPIDERS: selection of spectroscopic targets using AGN candidates detected in all-sky X-ray surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwelly, T.; Salvato, M.; Merloni, A.; Brusa, M.; Buchner, J.; Anderson, S. F.; Boller, Th.; Brandt, W. N.; Budavári, T.; Clerc, N.; Coffey, D.; Del Moro, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Green, P. J.; Jin, C.; Menzel, M.-L.; Myers, A. D.; Nandra, K.; Nichol, R. C.; Ridl, J.; Schwope, A. D.; Simm, T.

    2017-07-01

    SPIDERS (SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources) is a Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV) survey running in parallel to the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) cosmology project. SPIDERS will obtain optical spectroscopy for large numbers of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) and galaxy cluster members detected in wide-area eROSITA, XMM-Newton and ROSAT surveys. We describe the methods used to choose spectroscopic targets for two sub-programmes of SPIDERS X-ray selected AGN candidates detected in the ROSAT All Sky and the XMM-Newton Slew surveys. We have exploited a Bayesian cross-matching algorithm, guided by priors based on mid-IR colour-magnitude information from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer survey, to select the most probable optical counterpart to each X-ray detection. We empirically demonstrate the high fidelity of our counterpart selection method using a reference sample of bright well-localized X-ray sources collated from XMM-Newton, Chandra and Swift-XRT serendipitous catalogues, and also by examining blank-sky locations. We describe the down-selection steps which resulted in the final set of SPIDERS-AGN targets put forward for spectroscopy within the eBOSS/TDSS/SPIDERS survey, and present catalogues of these targets. We also present catalogues of ˜12 000 ROSAT and ˜1500 XMM-Newton Slew survey sources that have existing optical spectroscopy from SDSS-DR12, including the results of our visual inspections. On completion of the SPIDERS programme, we expect to have collected homogeneous spectroscopic redshift information over a footprint of ˜7500 deg2 for >85 per cent of the ROSAT and XMM-Newton Slew survey sources having optical counterparts in the magnitude range 17 < r < 22.5, producing a large and highly complete sample of bright X-ray-selected AGN suitable for statistical studies of AGN evolution and clustering.

  15. A multi-frequency study of an X ray selected sample of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossan, Bruce Alan

    1992-01-01

    The LASS (Large Area Sky Survey) experiment, which flew aboard the HEAO-1 spacecraft, carried out a 2-20 keV survey of the sky during 1977-1978. The X-ray sources from this survey make up the LASS catalog (Wood et al. 1979). Optical counterparts have been identified for greater than 86 percent of the LASS sources above a flux of approx. 0.95 microns (mu)Jy Q 5 keV (Remillard 1992b). The LASS error boxes, along with the more precise positions from the Modulation Collimator (MC) X-ray experiment (also aboard HEAO-1), subsequent X-ray imaging, and optical search techniques were all used to identify the LASS sources. From these identifications, a high-latitude (absolute value of b greater than 20 deg.), flux limited (greater than or equal to 0.95 (mu)Jy) sample of 96 emission line Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) have been selected for study. The sample is referred to as the LMA (for the LASS/MC identified sample of AGN). The objective of this work is to produce multi-frequency spectra of this sample of objects, in order to determine and interpret the statistical properties of the sample over nearly the full range of observable wavelengths. Data were obtained for as much of the radio through hard X-ray (less than 20 keV) spectrum as possible for each object in the LMA. Radio, near infrared, and other measurements were taken from the literature, far IR fluxes were extracted from co-added observations from IRAS, UV spectra were obtained from the IUE archives, and original observations were performed (with the help of collaborators) in the radio, near IR, optical, UV, and X-ray to fulfill this goal. Correlation studies of the continuum bands found poor correlations of X-ray and radio flux, good correlations for 12 and 26 micron flux with X-ray flux, excellent correlations for optical and near IR fluxes with X-rays, and poor correlations of UV and X-ray fluxes. Correlation studies of the line and X-ray continuum flux yield a good correlation between the flux of (OIII), the

  16. Complete optical stack modeling for CMOS-based medical x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyazin, Alexander S.; Peters, Inge M.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a simulation tool for modeling the performance of CMOS-based medical x-ray detectors, based on the Monte Carlo toolkit GEANT4. Following the Fujita-Lubberts-Swank approach recently reported by Star-Lack et al., we calculate modulation transfer function MTF(f), noise power spectrum NPS(f) and detective quantum efficiency DQE(f) curves. The complete optical stack is modeled, including scintillator, fiber optic plate (FOP), optical adhesive and CMOS image sensor. For critical parts of the stack, detailed models have been developed, taking into account their respective microstructure. This includes two different scintillator types: Gd2O2S:Tb (GOS) and CsI:Tl. The granular structure of the former is modeled using anisotropic Mie scattering. The columnar structure of the latter is introduced into calculations directly, using the parameterization capabilities of GEANT4. The underlying homogeneous CsI layer is also incorporated into the model as well as the optional reflective layer on top of the scintillator screen or the protective polymer top coat. The FOP is modeled as an array of hexagonal bundles of fibers. The simulated CMOS stack consists of layers of Si3N4 and SiO2 on top of a silicon pixel array. The model is validated against measurements of various test detector structures, using different x-ray spectra (RQA5 and RQA-M2), showing good match between calculated and measured MTF(f) and DQE(f) curves.

  17. A complete software application for automatic registration of x-ray mammography and magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Solves-Llorens, J. A.; Rupérez, M. J. Monserrat, C.; Lloret, M.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: This work presents a complete and automatic software application to aid radiologists in breast cancer diagnosis. The application is a fully automated method that performs a complete registration of magnetic resonance (MR) images and x-ray (XR) images in both directions (from MR to XR and from XR to MR) and for both x-ray mammograms, craniocaudal (CC), and mediolateral oblique (MLO). This new approximation allows radiologists to mark points in the MR images and, without any manual intervention, it provides their corresponding points in both types of XR mammograms and vice versa. Methods: The application automatically segments magnetic resonance images and x-ray images using the C-Means method and the Otsu method, respectively. It compresses the magnetic resonance images in both directions, CC and MLO, using a biomechanical model of the breast that distinguishes the specific biomechanical behavior of each one of its three tissues (skin, fat, and glandular tissue) separately. It makes a projection of both compressions and registers them with the original XR images using affine transformations and nonrigid registration methods. Results: The application has been validated by two expert radiologists. This was carried out through a quantitative validation on 14 data sets in which the Euclidean distance between points marked by the radiologists and the corresponding points obtained by the application were measured. The results showed a mean error of 4.2 ± 1.9 mm for the MRI to CC registration, 4.8 ± 1.3 mm for the MRI to MLO registration, and 4.1 ± 1.3 mm for the CC and MLO to MRI registration. Conclusions: A complete software application that automatically registers XR and MR images of the breast has been implemented. The application permits radiologists to estimate the position of a lesion that is suspected of being a tumor in an imaging modality based on its position in another different modality with a clinically acceptable error. The results show that the

  18. A complete software application for automatic registration of x-ray mammography and magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Solves-Llorens, J A; Rupérez, M J; Monserrat, C; Feliu, E; García, M; Lloret, M

    2014-08-01

    This work presents a complete and automatic software application to aid radiologists in breast cancer diagnosis. The application is a fully automated method that performs a complete registration of magnetic resonance (MR) images and x-ray (XR) images in both directions (from MR to XR and from XR to MR) and for both x-ray mammograms, craniocaudal (CC), and mediolateral oblique (MLO). This new approximation allows radiologists to mark points in the MR images and, without any manual intervention, it provides their corresponding points in both types of XR mammograms and vice versa. The application automatically segments magnetic resonance images and x-ray images using the C-Means method and the Otsu method, respectively. It compresses the magnetic resonance images in both directions, CC and MLO, using a biomechanical model of the breast that distinguishes the specific biomechanical behavior of each one of its three tissues (skin, fat, and glandular tissue) separately. It makes a projection of both compressions and registers them with the original XR images using affine transformations and nonrigid registration methods. The application has been validated by two expert radiologists. This was carried out through a quantitative validation on 14 data sets in which the Euclidean distance between points marked by the radiologists and the corresponding points obtained by the application were measured. The results showed a mean error of 4.2 ± 1.9 mm for the MRI to CC registration, 4.8 ± 1.3 mm for the MRI to MLO registration, and 4.1 ± 1.3 mm for the CC and MLO to MRI registration. A complete software application that automatically registers XR and MR images of the breast has been implemented. The application permits radiologists to estimate the position of a lesion that is suspected of being a tumor in an imaging modality based on its position in another different modality with a clinically acceptable error. The results show that the application can accelerate the

  19. The secondary maxima in black hole X-ray nova light curves - Clues toward a complete picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wan; Livio, Mario; Gehrels, Neil

    1993-01-01

    We study the secondary maxima observed commonly in the X-ray/optical light curves of black hole X-ray novae and show that they can play an important role in our understanding of the X-ray nova phenomenon. We discuss the observational characteristics of the secondary maxima and possible mechanisms to produce them. We propose a complete scenario for black hole X-ray nova events. The main outburst is caused by a disk instability. The second maximum is caused by X-ray evaporation of the matter near the inner Lagrangian (L1) region when the disk becomes optically thin. The third maximum (or the final minioutburst) is due to a mass transfer instability caused by hard X-ray heating of the subphotospheric layers of the secondary during the outburst. We predict that the newly discovered X-ray nova GRO J0422 + 32 may develop a final minioutburst in early 1993 and that its binary orbital period is less than 7 hr.

  20. The secondary maxima in black hole X-ray nova light curves - Clues toward a complete picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wan; Livio, Mario; Gehrels, Neil

    1993-01-01

    We study the secondary maxima observed commonly in the X-ray/optical light curves of black hole X-ray novae and show that they can play an important role in our understanding of the X-ray nova phenomenon. We discuss the observational characteristics of the secondary maxima and possible mechanisms to produce them. We propose a complete scenario for black hole X-ray nova events. The main outburst is caused by a disk instability. The second maximum is caused by X-ray evaporation of the matter near the inner Lagrangian (L1) region when the disk becomes optically thin. The third maximum (or the final minioutburst) is due to a mass transfer instability caused by hard X-ray heating of the subphotospheric layers of the secondary during the outburst. We predict that the newly discovered X-ray nova GRO J0422 + 32 may develop a final minioutburst in early 1993 and that its binary orbital period is less than 7 hr.

  1. Broad-band study of hard X-ray-selected absorbed active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rosa, A.; Panessa, F.; Bassani, L.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A.; Landi, R.; Malizia, A.; Molina, M.; Ubertini, P.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we report on the broad-band X-ray properties of a complete sample of absorbed Seyfert galaxies hard X-ray selected with INTEGRAL. Our sample is composed of 33 sources, of which 15 are newly discovered active galactic nuclei (AGN) above 20 keV (IGR sources), while 18 are already known type 2 AGN ('known'). For 17 sources (15 IGR + 2 'known' sources) we have performed a broad-band analysis using both XMM-Newton, and INTEGRAL-IBIS data. To have a full view of the complete sample we have then complemented the analysis of the 16 remaining sources with already existing broad-band studies in the same range. The high-quality broad-band spectra are well reproduced with an absorbed primary emission with a high-energy cut-off and its scattered fraction below 2-3 keV, plus the Compton reflection features (Compton hump and Fe line emission). This study permitted a very good characterization of the primary continuum and, in turn, of all the spectral features. A high-energy cut-off is found in 30 per cent of the sample, with an average value below 150 keV, suggesting that this feature has to be present in the X-ray spectra of obscured AGN. The hard X-ray selection favours the detection of more obscured sources, with the log NH average value of 23.15 (standard deviation of 0.89). The diagnostic plot NH versus Foss(2-10 keV)/F(20-100 keV) allowed the isolation of the Compton-thick objects, and may represent a useful tool for future hard X-ray observations of newly discovered AGN. We are unable to associate the reflection components (both continuum and Fe line) with the absorbing gas as a torus (as envisaged in the Unified Model), a more complex scenario being necessary. In the Compton-thin sources, a fraction (but not all) of the Fe K line needs to be produced in a gas located closer to the black hole than the Compton-thick torus, and this is possibly associated with the optical broad-line region, responsible also for the absorption. We still need a Compton

  2. Measuring the dynamical state of Planck SZ-selected clusters: X-ray peak - BCG offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, M.; Gastaldello, F.; Ferioli, G.; Bersanelli, M.; De Grandi, S.; Eckert, D.; Ghizzardi, S.; Maino, D.; Molendi, S.

    2016-04-01

    We want to characterize the dynamical state of galaxy clusters detected with the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect by Planck and compare them with the dynamical state of clusters selected in X-rays survey. We analysed a representative subsample of the Planck SZ catalogue, containing the 132 clusters with the highest signal to noise ratio and characterize their dynamical state using as an indicator the projected offset between the peak of the X-ray emission and the position of the Brightest cluster galaxy. We compare the distribution of this indicator for the Planck SZ-selected sample and three X-ray-selected samples (HIFLUGCS, MACS and REXCESS). The distributions are significantly different and the fraction of relaxed objects is smaller in the Planck sample (52 ± 4 per cent) than in X-ray samples (≃74 per cent) We interpret this result as an indication of different selection effects affecting X-rays (e.g. `cool core bias') and SZ surveys of galaxy clusters.

  3. The X-ray luminosity-temperature relation of a complete sample of low-mass galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Maughan, B. J.; Giles, P. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Pacaud, F.; Burenin, R.; Hornstrup, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present Chandra observations of 23 galaxy groups and low-mass galaxy clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.15 with a median temperature of {˜ }2{keV}. The sample is a statistically complete flux-limited subset of the 400 deg2 survey. We investigated the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity (L) and temperature (T), taking selection biases fully into account. The logarithmic slope of the bolometric L-T relation was found to be 3.29 ± 0.33, consistent with values typically found for samples of more massive clusters. In combination with other recent studies of the L-T relation, we show that there is no evidence for the slope, normalization, or scatter of the L-T relation of galaxy groups being different than that of massive clusters. The exception to this is that in the special case of the most relaxed systems, the slope of the core-excised L-T relation appears to steepen from the self-similar value found for massive clusters to a steeper slope for the lower mass sample studied here. Thanks to our rigorous treatment of selection biases, these measurements provide a robust reference against which to compare predictions of models of the impact of feedback on the X-ray properties of galaxy groups.

  4. Complete polarization analysis of an APPLE II undulator using a soft X-ray polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Bencok, Peter; Steadman, Paul; Longhi, Emily; Zhu, Jingtao; Wang, Zhanshan

    2012-11-01

    Two APPLE II undulators installed on the Diamond I10 beamline have all four magnet arrays shiftable and thus can generate linear polarization at any arbitrary angle from 0° to 180°, as well as all other states of elliptical polarization. To characterize the emitted radiation polarization state from one APPLE II undulator, the complete polarization measurement was performed using a multilayer-based soft X-ray polarimeter. The measurement results appear to show that the linear polarization angle offset is about 6° compared with other measurements at 712 eV, equivalent to an undulator jaw phase offset of 1.1 mm. In addition, the polarization states of various ellipticities have also been measured as a function of the undulator row phase.

  5. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  6. X-ray reflection and scatter measurements on selected optical samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, S. A.; Reynolds, J. M.; Holland, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The results from an experimental program to determine the reflection efficiency and scatter parameters of selected optical samples are presented. The measurements were made using 8.34A X-rays at various angles of incidence. Selected samples were contaminated after being measured and then remeasured to determine the effects of contamination. The instrumentation involved in taking the data, including the X-ray reflectometer and data processing equipment, is discussed in detail. The condition of the optical surfaces, the total reflection measurements, the scatter measurements, and the analysis are discussed.

  7. X-ray Selected Symbiotic Candidates in the Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Wetuski, Joshua` D.; Jonker, Peter; Torres, Manuel; Heinke, Craig O.; Maccarone, Tom; Steeghs, Danny; Britt, Christopher; Johnson, Christopher; Nelemans, Gijs

    2017-06-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a broad, shallow survey of Bulge X-ray sources with extensive multiwavelength support. The limiting sensitivity, about 2×1032 erg/s at the Bulge distance, is well suited to finding symbiotic X-ray binaries (SyXBs) containing neutron stars accreting from a cool giant wind, as well as X-ray bright white dwarf systems. Giant counterparts can be securely detected in IR photometry, allowing us to estimate the total number of symbiotics detected by the GBS, and identify a good number of promising candidates. Such an X-ray selected symbiotic sample may be quite different to the traditional symbiotic star population which is usually selected by optical spectroscopy, and consequently biased towards systems with rich line emission. Of the 1640 unique X-ray sources identified by the GBS we find 91 significant matches with candidate Bulge giants. We expect 68 coincidences, so estimate a total sample of about 23 X-ray emitting cool giants detected by the GBS. Most of these are likely to be SyXBs or symbiotics of some type. Narrowing our search to sources coincident to 1", we find 23 matches, with only 8 coincidences expected, so this subsample has a relatively high purity, and likely includes most of the GBS symbiotics. The properties of this subsample are mostly consistent with cool giants, with typical SEDs, long-term lightcurves, and spectra. The sources are inconsistent in color with nearby M dwarfs and show small proper motions, so the foreground contamination is likely small. We present a selection of the best studied objects, focusing on one extremely variable X-ray source coincident with a carbon giant. This is quite an unusual object as carbon stars are rare in the Bulge. The scientific results reported in this article are based on observations made by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive. Support for this work was provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through Chandra

  8. A Survey of Distant Clusters of Galaxies Selected by X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Brian

    1997-01-01

    I will discuss the results of a new survey of X-ray selected, distant clusters of galaxies that has been undertaken by our group at.CfA (Vikhlinin, McNamara, Forman, Jones). We have analyzed the inner 17.5 arcminute region of roughly 650 ROSAT PSPC images of high latitude fields to compile a complete, flux-limited sample of clusters with a mean flux limit roughly 20 times more sensitive than the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey. The goal of our survey, which presently contains 233 extended X-ray sources, is to study cluster evolution over cosmological timescales. We have obtained optical images for nearly all of the faintest sources using the 1.2 m telescope of the Fred L. Whipple Observatory, and when including POSS images of the brighter sources, we have nearly completed the identification of all of the extended sources. Roughly 80% of the sources were identified as clusters of galaxies. We have measured redshifts for 42 clusters using the MMT, and including additional measurements from the literature, roughly 70 clusters in our catalog have spectroscopic redshifts. Using CCD photometry and spectroscopic redshifts, we have determined a magnitude-redshift relation which will allow redshifts of the remaining clusters in our sample to be determined photometrically to within a delta z over z of roughly ten percent. I will discuss the Log(N)-Log(S) relation for our sample and compare it to other determinations. In addition, I will discuss the evolution of core radii of clusters.

  9. Low X-Ray Luminosity Galaxy Clusters: Main Goals, Sample Selection, Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilo Castellón, José Luis; Alonso, M. Victoria; García Lambas, Diego; Valotto, Carlos; O'Mill, Ana Laura; Cuevas, Héctor; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Ramírez, Amelia; Astudillo, José M.; Ramos, Felipe; Jaque Arancibia, Marcelo; Ulloa, Natalie; Órdenes, Yasna

    2016-06-01

    We present our study of 19 low X-ray luminosity galaxy clusters (L{}X ˜ 0.5-45 × 1043 erg s-1), selected from the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counters Pointed Observations and the revised version of Mullis et al. in the redshift range of 0.16-0.7. This is the introductory paper of a series presenting the sample selection, photometric and spectroscopic observations, and data reduction. Photometric data in different passbands were taken for eight galaxy clusters at Las Campanas Observatory; three clusters at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory; and eight clusters at the Gemini Observatory. Spectroscopic data were collected for only four galaxy clusters using Gemini telescopes. Using the photometry, the galaxies were defined based on the star-galaxy separation taking into account photometric parameters. For each galaxy cluster, the catalogs contain the point-spread function and aperture magnitudes of galaxies within the 90% completeness limit. They are used together with structural parameters to study the galaxy morphology and to estimate photometric redshifts. With the spectroscopy, the derived galaxy velocity dispersion of our clusters ranged from 507 km s-1 for [VMF98]022 to 775 km s-1 for [VMF98]097 with signs of substructure. Cluster membership has been extensively discussed taking into account spectroscopic and photometric redshift estimates. In this sense, members are the galaxies within a projected radius of 0.75 Mpc from the X-ray emission peak and with clustercentric velocities smaller than the cluster velocity dispersion or 6000 km s-1, respectively. These results will be used in forthcoming papers to study, among the main topics, the red cluster sequence, blue cloud and green populations, the galaxy luminosity function, and cluster dynamics.

  10. A spectroscopic survey of X-ray-selected AGNs in the northern XMM-XXL field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, M.-L.; Merloni, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Salvato, M.; Aubourg, E.; Brandt, W. N.; Brusa, M.; Buchner, J.; Dwelly, T.; Nandra, K.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Schwope, A.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a survey of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with optical spectroscopic follow-up in a ˜ 18 deg2 area of the equatorial XMM-XXL north field. A sample of 8445 point-like X-ray sources detected by XMM-Newton above a limiting flux of F_{0.5-10 keV} > 10^{-15} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} was matched to optical (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS) and infrared (IR; WISE) counterparts. We followed up 3042 sources brighter than r = 22.5 mag with the SDSS Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectrograph. The spectra yielded a reliable redshift measurement for 2578 AGNs in the redshift range z = 0.02-5.0, with 0.5-2 keV luminosities ranging from 1039-1046 erg s- 1. This is currently the largest published spectroscopic sample of X-ray-selected AGNs in a contiguous area. The BOSS spectra of AGN candidates show a distribution of optical line widths which is clearly bimodal, allowing an efficient separation between broad- and narrow-emission line AGNs. The former dominate our sample (70 per cent) due to the relatively bright X-ray flux limit and the optical BOSS magnitude limit. We classify the narrow-emission line objects (22 per cent of the full sample) using standard optical emission line diagnostics: the majority have line ratios indicating the dominant source of ionization is the AGN. A small number (8 per cent of the full sample) exhibit the typical narrow line ratios of star-forming galaxies, or only have absorption lines in their spectra. We term the latter two classes `elusive' AGN, which would not be easy to identify correctly without their X-ray emission. We also compare X-ray (XMM-Newton), optical colour (SDSS) and and IR (WISE) AGN selections in this field. X-ray observations reveal, by far, the largest number of AGN. The overlap between the selections, which is a strong function of the imaging depth in a given band, is also remarkably small. We show using spectral stacking that a large fraction of the X-ray AGNs would not be

  11. The complete Einstein Observatory X-ray survey of the Orion Nebula region.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagne, Marc; Caillault, Jean-Pierre

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed archival Einstein Observatory images of a roughly 4.5 square degree region centered on the Orion Nebula. In all, 245 distinct X-ray sources have been detected in six High Resolution Imager (HRI) and 17 Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) observations. An optical database of over 2700 stars has been assembled to search for candidate counterparts to the X-ray sources. Roughly half the X-ray sources are identified with a single Orion Nebula cluster member. The 10 main-sequence O6-B5 cluster stars detected in Orion have X-ray activity levels comparable to field O and B stars. X-ray emission has also been detected in the direction of four main-sequence late-B and early-A type stars. Since the mechanisms producing X-rays in late-type coronae and early-type winds cannot operate in the late-B and early-A type atmospheres, we argue that the observed X-rays, with L(sub X) approximately = 3 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s, are probably produced in the coronae of unseen late-type binary companions. Over 100 X-ray sources have been associated with late-type pre-main sequence stars. The upper envelope of X-ray activity rises sharply from mid-F to late-G, with L(sub x)/L(sub bol) in the range 10(exp -4) to 2 x 10(exp -3) for stars later than approximately G7. We have looked for variability of the late-type cluster members on timescales of a day to a year and find that 1/4 of the stars show significantly variable X-ray emission. A handful of the late-type stars have published rotational periods and spectroscopic rotational velocities; however, we see no correlation between X-ray activity and rotation. Thus, for this sample of pre-main-sequence stars, the large dispersion in X-ray activity does not appear to be caused by the dispersion in rotation, in contrast with results obtained for low-mass main-sequence stars in the Pleiades and pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus-Auriga.

  12. Narrow-line X-Ray-selected Galaxies in the Chandra-COSMOS Field. II. Optically Elusive X-Ray AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, E.; Elvis, M.; Civano, F.; Watson, M. G.

    2016-06-01

    In the Chandra-COSMOS (C-COSMOS) survey, we have looked for X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs), which are not detected as such in the optical, the so-called elusive AGNs. A previous study based on XMM-Newton and Sloan Digital Sky Survey observations has found a sample of 31 X-ray AGNs optically misclassified as star-forming (SF) galaxies at z\\lt 0.4, including 17 elusive Sy2s. Using Chandra observations provides a sample of fainter X-ray sources and so, for a given X-ray luminosity, extends to higher redshifts. To study the elusive Sy2s in the C-COSMOS field, we have removed the NLS1s that contaminate the narrow-line sample. Surprisingly, the contribution of NLS1s is much lower in the C-COSMOS sample (less than 10% of the optically misclassified X-ray AGNs) than in Pons & Watson. The optical misclassification of the X-ray AGNs ({L}{{X}}\\gt {10}42 {erg} {{{s}}}-1) can be explained by the intrinsic weakness of these AGNs, in addition to, in some cases, optical dilution by the host galaxies. Interestingly, we found the fraction of elusive Sy2s (narrow emission-line objects) optically misclassified as SF galaxies up to z˜ 1.4 to be 10% ± 3% to 17% ± 4%, compared to the 6% ± 1.5% of the Pons & Watson work (up to z˜ 0.4). This result seems to indicate an evolution with redshift of the number of elusive Sy2s.

  13. Broad-band characteristics of seven new hard X-ray selected cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, F.; de Martino, D.; Mukai, K.; Russell, D. M.; Falanga, M.; Masetti, N.; Ferrigno, C.; Israel, G.

    2017-10-01

    We present timing and spectral analysis of a sample of seven hard X-ray selected cataclysmic variable candidates based on simultaneous X-ray and optical observations collected with XMM-Newton, complemented with Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL /IBIS hard X-ray data and ground-based optical photometry. For six sources, X-ray pulsations are detected for the first time in the range of ˜296-6098 s, identifying them as members of the magnetic class. Swift J0927.7-6945, Swift J0958.0-4208, Swift J1701.3-4304, Swift J2113.5+5422 and possibly PBC J0801.2-4625 are intermediate polars (IPs), while Swift J0706.8+0325 is a short (1.7 h) orbital period polar, the 11th hard X-ray-selected identified so far. X-ray orbital modulation is also observed in Swift J0927.7-6945 (5.2 h) and Swift J2113.5+5422 (4.1 h). Swift J1701.3-4304 is discovered as the longest orbital period (12.8 h) deep eclipsing IP. The spectra of the magnetic systems reveal optically thin multitemperature emission between 0.2 and 60 keV. Energy-dependent spin pulses and the orbital modulation in Swift J0927.7-6945 and Swift J2113.5+5422 are due to intervening local high-density absorbing material (NH ˜ 1022 - 23 cm-2). In Swift J0958.0-4208 and Swift J1701.3-4304, a soft X-ray blackbody (kT ˜ 50 and ˜80 eV) is detected, adding them to the growing group of `soft' IPs. White dwarf masses are determined in the range of ˜ 0.58-1.18 M⊙, indicating massive accreting primaries in five of them. Most sources accrete at rates lower than the expected secular value for their orbital period. Formerly proposed as a long-period (9.4 h) nova-like CV, Swift J0746.3-1608 shows peculiar spectrum and light curves suggesting either an atypical low-luminosity CV or a low-mass X-ray binary.

  14. X-ray selected AGN in groups at redshifts z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Gerke, Brian F.; Nandra, K.; Laird, E. S.; Coil, A. L.; Cooper, M. C.; Newman, J. A.

    2008-11-01

    We explore the role of the group environment in the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGN) at the redshift interval 0.7 < z < 1.4, by combining deep Chandra observations with extensive optical spectroscopy from the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS). The sample consists of 3902 optical sources and 71 X-ray AGN. Compared to the overall optically selected galaxy population, X-ray AGN are more frequently found in groups at the 99 per cent confidence level. This is partly because AGN are hosted by red luminous galaxies, which are known to reside, on average, in dense environments. Relative to these sources, the excess of X-ray AGN in groups is significant at the 91 per cent level only. Restricting the sample to 0.7 < z < 0.9 and MB < -20mag in order to control systematics, we find that X-ray AGN represent (4.7 +/- 1.6) and (4.5 +/- 1.0) per cent of the optical galaxy population in groups and in the field, respectively. These numbers are consistent with the AGN fraction in low-redshift clusters, groups and the field. The above results, although affected by small number statistics, suggest that X-ray AGN are spread over a range of environments, from groups to the field, once the properties of their hosts (e.g. colour, luminosity) are accounted for. There is also tentative evidence, significant at the 98 per cent level, that the field produces more X-ray luminous AGN compared to groups, extending similar results at low redshift to z ~ 1. This trend may be because of either cold gas availability or the nature of the interactions occurring in the denser group environment (i.e. prolonged tidal encounters).

  15. The complete Hard X Ray Burst Spectrometer event list, 1980-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Orwig, L. E.; Kennard, G. S.; Labow, G. J.; Schwartz, R. A.; Shaver, A. R.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1991-01-01

    This event list is a comprehensive reference for all Hard X ray bursts detected with the Hard X Ray Burst Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission from the time of launch on Feb. 14, 1980 to the end of the mission in Dec. 1989. Some 12,776 events were detected in the energy range 30 to 600 keV with the vast majority being solar flares. This list includes the start time, peak time, duration, and peak rate of each event.

  16. Hard-X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei in the INTEGRAL complete sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, M.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Bird, A. J.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present the hard-X-ray spectral analysis of a complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by INTEGRAL/IBIS. In conjunction with IBIS spectra, we make use of Swift/BAT data, with the aim of cross-calibrating the two instruments, studying source variability and constraining some important spectral parameters. We find that flux variability is present in at least 14 per cent of the sample, while spectral variability is found only in one object. There is general good agreement between BAT and IBIS spectra, despite a systematic mismatch of about 22 per cent in normalization. When fitted with a simple power-law model, type 1 and type 2 sources appear to have very similar average photon indices, suggesting that they are powered by the same mechanism. As expected, we also find that a simple power law does not always describe the data sufficiently well, thus indicating a certain degree of spectral complexity, which can be ascribed to features like a high energy cut-off and/or a reflection component. Fixing the reflection to be 0, 1 or 2, we find that our sample covers quite a large range in photon indices as well as cut-off energies; however, the spread is due only to a small number of objects, while the majority of the AGNs lie within well-defined boundaries of photon index (1 ≤ Γ ≤ 2) and cut-off energy (30 ≤ Ecut ≤ 300 keV).

  17. The X-Ray Weakness of GPS Radio Galaxies: A Volume-Limited Complete Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Siemiginowska, Aneta (Principal Investigator)

    2004-01-01

    The XMM observations of Mkn 668 have been analyzed. We found soft X-ray signatures of a hot plasma (kT approximately 10^7 approximately K) and a hard X-ray emission from the nucleus. The X-ray spectrum above 2.5 approximately keV is characterized by a very flat (observed photon index, Gamma approximately 0.5) power-law continuum, alongside with a strong Fe-K-alpha neutral iron fluorescent line (EW approximately 600 approximately eV). The best explanation for the origin of this high energy X-ray emission is in terms of the Compton-reflection of the nuclear emission. The primary X-ray emission is obscured by a Compton-thick (N_H approximately 10^24 approximately cm-2) matter which becomes transparent at higher energies. The observed above 2.5-keV X-rays are mostly due to reflection which is indicated by a strong Fe-K-alpha line. This represents the second hard X-ray detection of the GPS galaxy ever (the first one being 1345+125; O Dea et al. 2000). Interestingly, the both such trend is confirmed by our on going XMM-Newton observations of a larger GPS sample, it would lead us to looking into the question on how the dense nuclear environment impacts the nature and evolution of a GPS source, and more generally, on the history of radio power in the universe. The paper summarizing the results has been submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics in December 2003.

  18. Effects of selection and covariance on X-ray scaling relations of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, B.; Stanek, R.; Rasia, E.; Evrard, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    We explore how the behaviour of galaxy cluster scaling relations are affected by flux-limited selection biases and intrinsic covariance among observable properties. Our models presume log-normal covariance between luminosity (L) and temperature (T) at fixed mass (M), centred on evolving, power-law mean relations as a function of host halo mass. Selection can mimic evolution; the L-M and L-T relations from shallow X-ray flux-limited samples will deviate from mass-limited expectations at nearly all scales while the relations from deep surveys (10-14ergs-1cm-2) become complete, and therefore unbiased, at masses above ~2 × 1014h-1Msolar. We derive expressions for low-order moments of the luminosity distribution at fixed temperature, and show that the slope and scatter of the L-T relation observed in flux-limited samples is sensitive to the assumed L-T correlation coefficient. In addition, L-T covariance affects the redshift behaviour of halo counts and mean luminosity in a manner that is nearly degenerate with intrinsic population evolution.

  19. Selective X-ray contrast enhancement of the spleen of living mice mediated by gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wathen, Connor A; Caldwell, Chuck; Chanda, Nripen; Upendran, Anandhi; Zambre, Ajit; Afrasiabi, Zahra; Chapaman, Sarah E; Foje, Nathan; Leevy, W Matthew; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanomaterials (AuNPs) represent a promising new class of contrast agents for X-ray computed tomographic (CT) imaging in both research and clinical settings. These materials exhibit superior X-ray absorption properties compared with other iodinated agents, and thus require lower injection doses. Gold is nonimmunogenic and therefore contributes to safety profile in living specimens. Unfortunately, most reports on the use of AuNPs as X-ray CT enhancers only demonstrate marginal enhancement of the intended anatomical structure. In this study, we demonstrate the dramatic properties of gold nanorods (GNR) to serve as robust X-ray CT contrast-enhancing agent for selective imaging of the spleen. These organ-specific uptake properties were delineated by performing longitudinal CT imaging of living mice that were dosed with GNR at 2 day intervals. Rapid uptake in spleen was noted within 12 h of first systemic administration with a change in contrast enhancement of 90 Hounsfield units (ΔHU = 90) and with two subsequent injections a total contrast enhancement of over 200 HU was observed. The resulting images provide excellent contrast that will enable the detailed anatomical visualization and study of a range of pre-clinical models of spleen disease including infection and cancer. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Optical Scaling Relations of X-ray Selected Clusters at Moderate Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, Dylan; Rines, K.; Svoboda, B. E.; Arnold, R. L.; Welch, T. J.; Finn, R. A.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2011-01-01

    The relation between dark matter and galaxies is a fundamental problem in astrophysics. Here, we study this relation using optical observations of an X-ray-selected sample of clusters at moderate redshift (z=0.35-0.90). We collected griz images of 30 clusters with WIYN/OPTIC to measure the bright end of the luminosity function. Our imaging extends approximately 2 magnitudes fainter than M*, thus including most of the total cluster light. We use the red sequence and statistical background subtraction to estimate the richnesses and stellar luminosities of the clusters. We measure scaling relations by comparing the optical properties to X-ray mass estimates derived from Chandra observations. At low redshift, some studies indicate that total stellar luminosity is a better predictor of cluster mass than X-ray luminosity. We test whether a similar result holds at moderate redshift. In the future, we will compare the optical and X-ray properties to virial mass estimates from optical spectroscopy and to Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect observations. If photometric properties of clusters are good predictors of cluster mass, these relations could be applied to large surveys like SPT, Planck, DES, eROSITA, and LSST to improve constraints on the properties of dark energy.

  1. Fraction of the X-ray selected AGNs with optical emission lines in galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Yuan, Qirong; Bian, Weihao; Chen, Xi; Yan, Pengfei

    2017-04-01

    Compared with numerous X-ray dominant active galactic nuclei (AGNs) without emission-line signatures in their optical spectra, the X-ray selected AGNs with optical emission lines are probably still in the high-accretion phase of black hole growth. This paper presents an investigation on the fraction of these X-ray detected AGNs with optical emission-line spectra in 198 galaxy groups at z<1 in a rest frame 0.1-2.4 keV luminosity range 41.3 < log(LX/erg s^{-1}) < 44.1 within the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field, as well as its variations with redshift and group richness. For various selection criteria of member galaxies, the numbers of galaxies and the AGNs with optical emission lines in each galaxy group are obtained. It is found that, in total 198 X-ray groups, there are 27 AGNs detected in 26 groups. AGN fraction is on average less than 4.6 (±1.2)% for individual groups hosting at least one AGN. The corrected overall AGN fraction for whole group sample is less than 0.98 (±0.11) %. The normalized locations of group AGNs show that 15 AGNs are found to be located in group centers, including all 6 low-luminosity group AGNs (L_{ 0.5-2 keV} < 10^{42.5} erg s^{-1}). A week rising tendency with z are found: overall AGN fraction is 0.30-0.43% for the groups at z<0.5, and 0.55-0.64% at 0.5 < z < 1.0. For the X-ray groups at z>0.5, most member AGNs are X-ray bright, optically dull, which results in a lower AGN fractions at higher redshifts. The AGN fraction in isolated fields also exhibits a rising trend with redshift, and the slope is consistent with that in groups. The environment of galaxy groups seems to make no difference in detection probability of the AGNs with emission lines. Additionally, a larger AGN fractions are found in poorer groups, which implies that the AGNs in poor groups might still be in the high-accretion phase, whereas the AGN population in rich clusters is mostly in the low-accretion, X-ray dominant phase.

  2. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray ...high spatial coherence, such as synchrotrons 46, microfocus x - ray tubes 7, or laser plasma x - ray sources 8,9are employed is the phase contrast component...imaging apparatus to determine the deflection of the bead as a function of acoustic pressure. The x - rays , generated by a microfocus x - ray tube

  3. A NEW SAMPLE OF CANDIDATE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES SELECTED BY X-RAY VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kamizasa, Naoya; Terashima, Yuichi; Awaki, Hisamitsu

    2012-05-20

    We present the results of X-ray variability and spectral analysis of a sample of 15 new candidates for active galactic nuclei with relatively low-mass black holes (BHs). They are selected from the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue based on strong variability quantified by normalized excess variances. Their BH masses are estimated to be (1.1-6.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} by using a correlation between excess variance and BH mass. Seven sources have estimated BH masses smaller than 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, which are in the range for intermediate-mass black holes. Eddington ratios of sources with known redshifts range from 0.07 to 0.46 and the mean Eddington ratio is 0.24. These results imply that some of our sources are growing supermassive black holes, which are expected to have relatively low masses with high Eddington ratios. X-ray photon indices of the 15 sources are in the range of Almost-Equal-To 0.57-2.57 and 5 among them have steep (>2) photon indices, which are the range for narrow-line Seyfert 1s. Soft X-ray excess is seen in 12 sources and is expressed by a blackbody model with kT Almost-Equal-To 83-294 eV. We derive a correlation between X-ray photon indices and Eddington ratios, and find that the X-ray photon indices of about a half of our sources are flatter than the positive correlation suggested previously.

  4. Biotransformation of selected iodinated X-ray contrast media and characterization of microbial transformation pathways.

    PubMed

    Kormos, Jennifer Lynne; Schulz, Manoj; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Ternes, Thomas A

    2010-07-01

    Iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) are commonly detected in the aquatic environment at concentrations up to the low microgram per liter range. In this study, the biotransformation of selected ICM (diatrizoate, iohexol, iomeprol, and iopamidol) in aerobic soil-water and river sediment-water batch systems was investigated. In addition, microbial transformation pathways were proposed. Diatrizoate, an ionic ICM, was not biotransformed, while three nonionic ICM were transformed into several biotransformation products (TPs) at neutral pH. Iohexol and iomeprol were biotransformed to eleven TPs and fifteen TPs, respectively, while eight TPs were detected for iopamidol. Since seven of the TPs detected during biotransformation had not been previously identified, mass fragmentation experiments were completed to elucidate the chemical structures. Oxidation of primary alcoholic moieties, cleavage of the N-C bonds (i.e., deacetylation and removal of hydroxylated propanoic acids), and decarboxylation are potential reactions that can explain the formation of the identified TPs. Iohexol and iomeprol had similar biotransformation rates, while iopamidol was biotransformed slower and to a lesser extent. A LC tandem MS method confirmed the presence of ICM TPs in aqueous environmental samples. Fifteen of the ICM TPs were even detected in drinking water with concentrations up to 120 ng/L.

  5. Accretion Properties of a Sample of Hard X-Ray (<60 keV) Selected Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Mao, Y. F.; Wei, J. Y.

    2009-02-01

    We examine the accretion properties in a sample of 42 hard (3-60 keV) X-ray selected nearby broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The energy range in the sample is harder than that usually used in similar previous studies. These AGNs are mainly complied from the RXTE All Sky Survey, and complemented by the released INTEGRAL AGN catalog. The black hole masses, bolometric luminosities of AGN, and Eddington ratios are derived from their optical spectra in terms of the broad Hβ emission line. The tight correlation between the hard X-ray (3-20 keV) and bolometric/line luminosity is well identified in our sample. Also identified is a strong inverse Baldwin relationship of the Hβ emission line. In addition, all of these hard X-ray AGNs are biased toward luminous objects with a high Eddington ratio (mostly between 0.01 and 0.1) and a low column density (<1022 cm-2), which is most likely due to the selection effect of the surveys. The hard X-ray luminosity is consequently found to be strongly correlated with the black hole mass. We believe the sample completeness will be improved in the next few years by the ongoing Swift and the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory missions, and by the next advanced missions, such as NuSTAR, Simbol-X, and NeXT. Finally, the correlation between RFe (= optical Fe II/Hβ) and disk temperature as assessed by T vprop (L/L Edd)M -1 BH leads us to suggest that the strength of the Fe II emission is mainly determined by the shape of the ionizing spectrum.

  6. An adapted modulation transfer function for x-ray backscatter radiography by selective detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, Nissia; Dugan, Edward T.; Jacobs, Alan M.; Shedlock, Daniel

    2007-09-01

    The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is a quantitative function based on frequency resolution that characterizes imaging system performance. In this study, a new MTF methodology is investigated for application to Radiography by Selective Detection (RSD), an enhanced single-side x-ray Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) technique which detects selected scatter components. The RSD imaging modality is a unique type of real-time radiography that uses a set of fin and sleeve collimators to preferentially select different components of the x-ray backscattered field. Radiography by selective detection has performed successfully in different non-destructive evaluation (NDE) applications. A customized RSD imaging system was built at the University of Florida for inspection of the space shuttle external tank spray-on foam insulation (SOFI). The x-ray backscatter RSD imaging system has been successfully used for crack and corrosion detection in a variety of materials. The conventional transmission x-ray image quality characterization tools do not apply for RSD because of the different physical process involved. Thus, the main objective of this project is to provide an adapted tool for dynamic evaluation of RSD system image quality. For this purpose, an analytical model of the RSD imaging system response is developed and supported. Two approaches are taken for the MTF calculations: one using the Fourier Transform of a line spread function and the other one using a sine function pattern. Calibration and test targets are then designed according to this proposed model. A customized Matlab code using image contrast and digital curve recognition is developed to support the experimental data and provide the Modulation Transfer Functions for RSD.

  7. Morphologies of Radio-, X-ray-, and Mid-infrared-selected Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Roger L.; Stern, Daniel

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the optical morphologies of candidate active galaxies identified at radio, X-ray, and mid-infrared wavelengths. We use the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog (ACS-GC) to identify 372, 1360, and 1238 active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies from Very Large Array, XMM-Newton, and Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the COSMOS field, respectively. We investigate both quantitative (GALFIT) and qualitative (visual) morphologies of these AGN host galaxies, split by brightness in their selection band. We find that the samples are largely distinct, though extensive overlap exists between certain samples, most particularly for the X-ray- and mid-IR-selected sources with unresolved optical morphologies. We find that the radio-selected AGNs are most distinct, with a very low incidence of having unresolved optical morphologies and a high incidence of being hosted by early-type galaxies. In comparison to X-ray-selected AGNs, mid-IR-selected AGNs have a slightly higher incidence of being hosted by disk galaxies. These morphological results conform to the results of Hickox et al. who studied the colors and large-scale clustering of AGNs and found a general association of radio-selected AGNs with "red sequence" galaxies, mid-IR-selected AGNs with "blue cloud" galaxies, and X-ray-selected AGNs straddling these samples in the "green valley." We also find that optical brightness scales with X-ray and mid-IR brightnesses, while little correlation is evident between optical and radio brightnesses. This suggests that X-ray- and mid-IR-selected AGNs have similar Eddington ratios, while radio-selected AGNs represent a different accretion mechanism with a lower and wider range of Eddington ratios. In the general scenario where AGN activity marks and regulates the transition from late-type disk galaxies into massive elliptical galaxies, this work suggests that the earlier stages are most evident as mid-IR-selected AGNs. Mid-IR emission is less susceptible to

  8. General equations for optimal selection of diagnostic image acquisition parameters in clinical X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoming

    2017-08-18

    The purpose of this work was to examine the effects of relationship functions between diagnostic image quality and radiation dose on the governing equations for image acquisition parameter variations in X-ray imaging. Various equations were derived for the optimal selection of peak kilovoltage (kVp) and exposure parameter (milliAmpere second, mAs) in computed tomography (CT), computed radiography (CR), and direct digital radiography. Logistic, logarithmic, and linear functions were employed to establish the relationship between radiation dose and diagnostic image quality. The radiation dose to the patient, as a function of image acquisition parameters (kVp, mAs) and patient size (d), was used in radiation dose and image quality optimization. Both logistic and logarithmic functions resulted in the same governing equation for optimal selection of image acquisition parameters using a dose efficiency index. For image quality as a linear function of radiation dose, the same governing equation was derived from the linear relationship. The general equations should be used in guiding clinical X-ray imaging through optimal selection of image acquisition parameters. The radiation dose to the patient could be reduced from current levels in medical X-ray imaging.

  9. Variegate galaxy cluster gas content: Mean fraction, scatter, selection effects, and covariance with X-ray luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreon, S.; Wang, J.; Trinchieri, G.; Moretti, A.; Serra, A. L.

    2017-10-01

    We use a cluster sample selected independently of the intracluster medium content with reliable masses to measure the mean gas mass fraction and its scatter, the biases of the X-ray selection on gas mass fraction, and the covariance between the X-ray luminosity and gas mass. The sample is formed by 34 galaxy clusters in the nearby (0.050 < z < 0.135) Universe, mostly with 14 < log M500/M⊙ ≲ 14.5, and with masses calculated with the caustic technique. First, we found that integrated gas density profiles have similar shapes, extending earlier results based on subpopulations of clusters such as those that are relaxed or X-ray bright for their mass. Second, the X-ray unbiased selection of our sample allows us to unveil a variegate population of clusters; the gas mass fraction shows a scatter of 0.17 ± 0.04 dex, possibly indicating a quite variable amount of feedback from cluster to cluster, which is larger than is found in previous samples targeting subpopulations of galaxy clusters, such as relaxed or X-ray bright clusters. The similarity of the gas density profiles induces an almost scatterless relation between X-ray luminosity, gas mass, and halo mass, and modulates selection effects in the halo gas mass fraction: gas-rich clusters are preferentially included in X-ray selected samples. The almost scatterless relation also fixes the relative scatters and slopes of the LX-M and Mgas-M relations and makes core-excised X-ray luminosities and gas masses fully covariant. Therefore, cosmological or astrophysical studies involving X-ray or SZ selected samples need to account for both selection effects and covariance of the studied quantities with X-ray luminosity/SZ strength.

  10. A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Soria, Roberto; Tennant, Allyn F.; Yukita, Mihoko

    2011-11-01

    One hundred seven ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with 0.3-10.0 keV luminosities in excess of 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} are identified in a complete sample of 127 nearby galaxies. The sample includes all galaxies within 14.5 Mpc above the completeness limits of both the Uppsala Galaxy Catalogue and the Infrared Astronomical Satellite survey. The galaxy sample spans all Hubble types, a four-decade range in mass, 7.5 < log (M/M{sub sun}) < 11.4, and in star formation rate, 0.0002 < SFR(M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) {<=} 3.6. ULXs are detected in this sample at rates of one per 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, one per {approx}0.5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} star formation rate, and one per 57 Mpc{sup 3} corresponding to a luminosity density of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3}. At these rates we estimate as many as 19 additional ULXs remain undetected in fainter dwarf galaxies within the survey volume. An estimated 14 objects, or 13%, of the 107 ULX candidates are expected to be background sources. The differential ULX luminosity function shows a power-law slope {alpha} {approx} -0.8 to -2.0 with an exponential cutoff at {approx}20 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} with precise values depending on the model and on whether the ULX luminosities are estimated from their observed numbers of counts or, for a subset of candidates, from their spectral shapes. Extrapolating the observed luminosity function predicts at most one very luminous ULX, L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}, within a distance as small as 100 Mpc. The luminosity distribution of ULXs within the local universe cannot account for the recent claims of luminosities in excess of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}, requiring a new population class to explain these extreme objects.

  11. A complete sample of bright Swift Gamma-ray bursts: X-ray afterglow luminosity and its correlation with the prompt emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avanzo, P.; Salvaterra, R.; Sbarufatti, B.; Nava, L.; Melandri, A.; Bernardini, M. G.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Parola, V. La; Perri, M.; Vergani, S. D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate whether there is any correlation between the X-ray afterglow luminosity and the prompt emission properties of a carefully selected sub-sample of bright Swift long Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) nearly complete in redshift (˜90 per cent). Being free of selection effects (except flux limit), this sample provides the possibility to compare the rest frame physical properties of GRB prompt and afterglow emission in an unbiased way. The afterglow X-ray luminosities are computed at four different rest frame times (5 min, 1 h, 11 h and 24 h after trigger) and compared with the prompt emission isotropic energy Eiso, the isotropic peak luminosity Liso and the rest frame peak energy Epeak. We find that the rest frame afterglow X-ray luminosity do correlate with these prompt emission quantities, but the significance of each correlation decreases over time. This result is in agreement with the idea that the GRB X-ray light curve can be described as the result of a combination of different components whose relative contribution and weight change with time, with the prompt and afterglow emission dominating at early and late time, respectively. In particular, we found evidence that the plateau and the shallow decay phase often observed in GRB X-ray light curves are powered by activity from the central engine. The existence of the LX - Eiso correlation at late times (trf≥11h) suggests a similar radiative efficiency among different bursts with on average about 6 per cent of the total kinetic energy powering the prompt emission.

  12. Radio morphology and parent population of X-ray selected BL Lacertae objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.; Kollgaard, R. I.; Moellenbrock, G. A.; Feigelson, E. D.

    1993-01-01

    High-dynamic range (typically 1700:1) radio maps of 15 X-ray BL Lac (XBL) objects from the HEAO-1 Large Area Sky Survey are presented. Morphological characteristics of these sources are compared with Fanaroff-Riley (FR) class I radio galaxies in the context of unified schemes, with reference to one-sided kiloparsec-scale emission. Evidence that cluster membership of XBLs is significantly higher than previously thought is also presented. It is shown that the extended radio powers, X-ray emission, core-to-lobe ratios, and linear sizes of the radio selected BL Lac (RBL) and XBL populations are consistent with an FR I radio galaxy parent population. A source list and VLA observing log and map parameters are provided.

  13. Selective gating to vibrational modes through resonant X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Rafael C.; Cruz, Vinícius V.; Ertan, Emelie; Eckert, Sebastian; Fondell, Mattis; Dantz, Marcus; Kennedy, Brian; Schmitt, Thorsten; Pietzsch, Annette; Guimarães, Freddy F.; Ågren, Hans; Gel'Mukhanov, Faris; Odelius, Michael; Kimberg, Victor; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of fragmentation and vibration of molecular systems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom are key aspects for understanding chemical reactivity and properties. Here we present a resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) study to show how it is possible to break down such a complex multidimensional problem into elementary components. Local multimode nuclear wave packets created by X-ray excitation to different core-excited potential energy surfaces (PESs) will act as spatial gates to selectively probe the particular ground-state vibrational modes and, hence, the PES along these modes. We demonstrate this principle by combining ultra-high resolution RIXS measurements for gas-phase water with state-of-the-art simulations.

  14. Selective gating to vibrational modes through resonant X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Couto, Rafael C; Cruz, Vinícius V; Ertan, Emelie; Eckert, Sebastian; Fondell, Mattis; Dantz, Marcus; Kennedy, Brian; Schmitt, Thorsten; Pietzsch, Annette; Guimarães, Freddy F; Ågren, Hans; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Odelius, Michael; Kimberg, Victor; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2017-01-20

    The dynamics of fragmentation and vibration of molecular systems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom are key aspects for understanding chemical reactivity and properties. Here we present a resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) study to show how it is possible to break down such a complex multidimensional problem into elementary components. Local multimode nuclear wave packets created by X-ray excitation to different core-excited potential energy surfaces (PESs) will act as spatial gates to selectively probe the particular ground-state vibrational modes and, hence, the PES along these modes. We demonstrate this principle by combining ultra-high resolution RIXS measurements for gas-phase water with state-of-the-art simulations.

  15. Radio morphology and parent population of X-ray selected BL Lacertae objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.; Kollgaard, R. I.; Moellenbrock, G. A.; Feigelson, E. D.

    1993-01-01

    High-dynamic range (typically 1700:1) radio maps of 15 X-ray BL Lac (XBL) objects from the HEAO-1 Large Area Sky Survey are presented. Morphological characteristics of these sources are compared with Fanaroff-Riley (FR) class I radio galaxies in the context of unified schemes, with reference to one-sided kiloparsec-scale emission. Evidence that cluster membership of XBLs is significantly higher than previously thought is also presented. It is shown that the extended radio powers, X-ray emission, core-to-lobe ratios, and linear sizes of the radio selected BL Lac (RBL) and XBL populations are consistent with an FR I radio galaxy parent population. A source list and VLA observing log and map parameters are provided.

  16. Far-ultraviolet and optical spectrophotometry of X-ray selected Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, J. T.; Bowyer, S.; Grewing, M.

    1986-01-01

    Five X-ray selected Seyfert galaxies were examined via near-simultaneous far-ultraviolet and optical spectrophotometry in an effort to test models for excitation of emission lines by X-ray and ultraviolet continuum photoionization. The observed Ly-alpha/H-beta ratio in the present sample averages 22, with an increase found toward the high-velocity wings of the H lines in the spectrum of at least one of the Seyfert I nuclei. It is suggested that Seyfert galaxies with the most high-velocity gas exhibit the highest Ly-alpha/H-beta ratios at all velocities in the line profiles, and that sometimes this ratio may be highest for the highest velocity material in the broad-line clouds. Since broad-lined objects are least affected by Ly-alpha trapping effects, they have Ly-alpha/H-beta ratios much closer to those predicted by early photoionization calculations.

  17. Selective gating to vibrational modes through resonant X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Rafael C.; Cruz, Vinícius V.; Ertan, Emelie; Eckert, Sebastian; Fondell, Mattis; Dantz, Marcus; Kennedy, Brian; Schmitt, Thorsten; Pietzsch, Annette; Guimarães, Freddy F.; Ågren, Hans; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Odelius, Michael; Kimberg, Victor; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of fragmentation and vibration of molecular systems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom are key aspects for understanding chemical reactivity and properties. Here we present a resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) study to show how it is possible to break down such a complex multidimensional problem into elementary components. Local multimode nuclear wave packets created by X-ray excitation to different core-excited potential energy surfaces (PESs) will act as spatial gates to selectively probe the particular ground-state vibrational modes and, hence, the PES along these modes. We demonstrate this principle by combining ultra-high resolution RIXS measurements for gas-phase water with state-of-the-art simulations. PMID:28106058

  18. 4U1722 + 11 - The discovery of an X-ray selected BL Lac object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, R. E.; Wilson, A. S.; Ward, M. J.; Tapia, S.; Ulvestad, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    The Uhuru X-ray source 4U1722 + 11 was observed using the microchannel-plate detector (High Resolution Imager) on the Einstein Observatory, and its coordinates measured to a precision of about 5 arcsec. A 16th-magnitude stellar object within the error circle was observed spectroscopically at CTIO, and at the AAT, and found to have a featureless continuum. Subsequent radio observations at the VLA have established that the object is a radio source at the level of 60 mJy, and optical polarization measurements have determined that the source exhibits variable polarization at the level of 10 percent. On the basis of these observations, it is concluded that 4U1722 + 11 is a member of the class of objects known as X-ray selected blazars of BL Lac objects.

  19. Large homogeneous sample of X-ray selected AGN and its study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.; Paronyan, Gurgen M.; Abrahamyan, Hayk V.

    2015-08-01

    The combined catalogue of AGN (ROSAT BSC/FSC AGN) selected from optical identifications of X-ray sources based on Hamburg--ROSAT Catalogue (HRC) and Byurakan--Hamburg--ROSAT Catalogue (BHRC) is a homogeneous sample for statistical studies. Optically identified X-ray sources from ROSAT Bright Source Catalogue (BSC) and Faint Source Catalogue (FSC) are included, 4253 X-ray selected AGN in total. All these sources are confirmed or candidate AGN based on Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS) low-dispersion spectra. 3352 of them are listed in the Catalogue of QSOs and Active Galaxies (Véron-Cetty & Véron (2010; 13th version) and 387 are in the Multifrequency Catalogue of Blazars (Roma--BZCAT) by Massaro et al. (2012). We carried out classification for 210 of these candidate sources based on available SDSS spectra and enlarged the sample of confirmed AGN to 3650. A special emphasis is made on narrow-line Sy1.0-Sy1.5 galaxies and QSOs, as many of them have soft X-ray, strong FeII lines, and relatively narrow lines coming from BLR (“narrow broad lines”) we have classified 45 new AGN as such objects. We carried out statistical investigations of the sample, including study of luminosity function, flux-ratios for different ranges, luminosity evolution, etc. Multiwavelength SEDs have also been constructed to follow their behavior for different kinds of AGN and link these SEDs to classifications. The sample is a relevant sources for identification of new blazars.

  20. HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES OF THE SWIFT BAT ULTRA HARD X-RAY SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa M.; Baumgartner, Wayne; Tueller, Jack; Gehrels, Neil; Valencic, Lynne

    2011-10-01

    We have assembled the largest sample of ultra hard X-ray selected (14-195 keV) active galactic nucleus (AGN) with host galaxy optical data to date, with 185 nearby (z < 0.05), moderate luminosity AGNs from the Swift BAT sample. The BAT AGN host galaxies have intermediate optical colors (u - r and g - r) that are bluer than a comparison sample of inactive galaxies and optically selected AGNs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are chosen to have the same stellar mass. Based on morphological classifications from the RC3 and the Galaxy Zoo, the bluer colors of BAT AGNs are mainly due to a higher fraction of mergers and massive spirals than in the comparison samples. BAT AGNs in massive galaxies (log M{sub *} >10.5) have a 5-10 times higher rate of spiral morphologies than in SDSS AGNs or inactive galaxies. We also see enhanced far-infrared emission in BAT AGN suggestive of higher levels of star formation compared to the comparison samples. BAT AGNs are preferentially found in the most massive host galaxies with high concentration indexes indicative of large bulge-to-disk ratios and large supermassive black holes. The narrow-line (NL) BAT AGNs have similar intrinsic luminosities as the SDSS NL Seyferts based on measurements of [O III] {lambda}5007. There is also a correlation between the stellar mass and X-ray emission. The BAT AGNs in mergers have bluer colors and greater ultra hard X-ray emission compared to the BAT sample as a whole. In agreement with the unified model of AGNs, and the relatively unbiased nature of the BAT sources, the host galaxy colors and morphologies are independent of measures of obscuration such as X-ray column density or Seyfert type. The high fraction of massive spiral galaxies and galaxy mergers in BAT AGNs suggest that host galaxy morphology is related to the activation and fueling of local AGN.

  1. Host Galaxy Properties of the Swift BAT Ultra Hard X-Ray Selected AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa M.; Baumgartner, Wayne; Tueller, Jack; Gehrels, Neil; Valencic, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    We have assembled the largest sample of ultra hard X-ray selected (14-195 keV) AGN with host galaxy optical data to date, with 185 nearby (z<0.05), moderate luminosity AGN from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample. The BAT AGN host galaxies have intermediate optical colors (u -- r and g -- r) that are bluer than a comparison sample of inactive galaxies and optically selected AGN from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are chosen to have the same stellar mass. Based on morphological classifications from the RC3 and the Galaxy Zoo, the bluer colors of BAT AGN are mainly due to a higher fraction of mergers and massive spirals than in the comparison samples. BAT AGN in massive galaxies (log Stellar Mass >10.5) have a 5 to 10 times higher rate of spiral morphologies than in SDSS AGN or inactive galaxies. We also see enhanced far-IR emission in BAT AGN suggestive of higher levels of star formation compared to the comparison samples. BAT AGN are preferentially found in the most massive host galaxies with high concentration indexes indicative of large bulge-to-disk ratios and large supermassive black holes. The narrow-line (NL) BAT AGN have similar intrinsic luminosities as the SDSS NL Seyferts based on measurements of [O III] Lambda 5007. There is also a correlation between the stellar mass and X-ray emission. The BAT AGN in mergers have bluer colors and greater ultra hard X-ray emission compared to the BAT sample as whole. In agreement with the Unified Model of AGN, and the relatively unbiased nature of the BAT sources, the host galaxy colors and morphologies are independent of measures of obscuration such as X-ray column density or Seyfert type. The high fraction of massive spiral galaxies and galaxy mergers in BAT AGN suggest that host galaxy morphology is related to the activation and fueling of local AGN.

  2. The Einstein database of IPC x-ray observations of optically selected and radio-selected quasars, 1.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Tananbaum, Harvey; Worrall, D. M.; Avni, Yoram; Oey, M. S.; Flanagan, Joan

    1994-05-01

    We present the first volume of the Einstein quasar database. The database includes estimates of the X-ray count rates, fluxes, and luminosities for 514 quasars and Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) aboard the Einstein Observatory. All were previously known optically selected or radio-selected objects, and most were the targets of the X-ray observations. The X-ray properties of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) have been derived by reanalyzing the IPC data in a systematic manner to provide a uniform database for general use by the astronomical community. We use the database to extend earlier quasar luminosity studies which were made using only a subset of the currently available data. The database can be accessed on internet via the SAO Einstein on-line system ('Einline') and is available in ASCII format on magnetic tape and DOS diskette.

  3. The Einstein database of IPC x-ray observations of optically selected and radio-selected quasars, 1.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Tananbaum, Harvey; Worrall, D. M.; Avni, Yoram; Oey, M. S.; Flanagan, Joan

    1994-01-01

    We present the first volume of the Einstein quasar database. The database includes estimates of the X-ray count rates, fluxes, and luminosities for 514 quasars and Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) aboard the Einstein Observatory. All were previously known optically selected or radio-selected objects, and most were the targets of the X-ray observations. The X-ray properties of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) have been derived by reanalyzing the IPC data in a systematic manner to provide a uniform database for general use by the astronomical community. We use the database to extend earlier quasar luminosity studies which were made using only a subset of the currently available data. The database can be accessed on internet via the SAO Einstein on-line system ('Einline') and is available in ASCII format on magnetic tape and DOS diskette.

  4. The Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of X-Ray-selected Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna K.; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Hooper, Eric J.; McLeod, Kim K.; Wood, Kenneth; Bjorkman, Jon; Delain, Kisha M.; Hughes, David H.; Elvis, Martin S.; Impey, Chris D.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Malkan, Matt A.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Whitney, Barbara

    2003-06-01

    Hard X-ray selection is, arguably, the optimal method for defining a representative sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Hard X-rays are unbiased by the effects of obscuration and reprocessing along the line of sight intrinsic/external to the AGN, which result in unknown fractions of the population being missed from traditional optical/soft X-ray samples. We present the far-infrared (far-IR) observations of 21 hard X-ray-selected AGNs from the HEAO 1 A2 sample observed with Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). We characterize the far-IR continua of these X-ray-selected AGNs and compare them with those of various radio and optically selected AGN samples and with models for an AGN-heated, dusty disk. The X-ray-selected AGNs show broad, warm IR continua covering a wide temperature range (~20-1000 K in a thermal emission scenario). Where a far-IR turnover is clearly observed, the slopes are less than 2.5 in all but three cases so that nonthermal emission remains a possibility, although the presence of cooler dust resulting in a turnover at wavelengths longward of the ISO range is considered more likely. The sample also shows a wider range of optical/UV shapes than the optical/radio-selected samples, extending to redder near-IR colors. The bluer objects are type 1 Seyfert galaxies, while the redder AGNs are mostly intermediate or type 2 Seyfert galaxies. This is consistent with a modified unification model in which obscuration increases as we move from a face-on toward a more edge-on line of sight. However, this relation does not extend to the mid-infrared as the 25/60 μm ratios are similar in Seyfert galaxies with differing type and optical/UV reddening. The resulting limits on the column density of obscuring material through which we are viewing the redder AGNs (NH~1022 cm-2) are inconsistent with standard optically thick torus models (NH~1024 cm-2) and simple unification models. Instead our results support more complex models in which the amount of obscuring

  5. X-ray emission from a complete sample of Abell clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briel, Ulrich G.; Henry, J. Patrick

    1993-01-01

    The Rosat all sky survey is used to investigate the X-ray properties of a sample of Abell clusters with measured redshifts and accurate positions. The sample comprises the 145 clusters within a 561 square degree region at high galactic latitude. The mean redshift is 0.17. The sample mean exposure time is higher than average and its mean galactic column density is very low. These together produce a flux limit of about 4.2 x 10(exp -13) erg/sq cm/s in the 0.5 to 2.5 keV energy band. By analyzing the excess of positive fluctuations of the X-ray flux at the cluster positions, compared with the fluctuations of randomly drawn background fields, it is possible to extend these results below the nominal flux limit. It is found that 80 of richness R equal to or greater than 0 and 86 of R equal to or greater than 1 clusters are X-ray emitters with fluxes above 1.10 to the power of minus 13 erg/sq cm/s. Nearly 90 of the clusters meeting the requirements to be in Abell's statistical sample emit above the same level. It is concluded that almost all Abell clusters are real clusters and the Abell catalogue is not strongly contaminated by projection effects. The Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator is used to calculate the cumulative X-ray luminosity function. It is shown that the shape of the luminosity functions are similar for different richness classes, but the characteristic luminosities of richness 2 clusters are about twice of those of richness 1 clusters which are in turn about twice of those of richness zero clusters. This result is another manifestation of the luminosity richness relation for Abell cluster.

  6. X-Ray Dust Scattering At Small Angles: The Complete Halo Around GX13+1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Randall K.

    2007-01-01

    The exquisite angular resolution available with Chandra should allow precision measurements of faint diffuse emission surrounding bright sources, such as the X-ray scattering halos created by interstellar dust. However, the ACIS CCDs suffer from pileup when observing bright sources, and this creates difficulties when trying to extract the scattered halo near the source. The initial study of the X-ray halo around GX13+1 using only the ACIS-I detector done by Smith, Edgar & Shafer (2002) suffered from a lack of sensitivity within 50" of the source, limiting what conclusions could be drawn. To address this problem, observations of GX13+1 were obtained with the Chandra HRC-I and simultaneously with the RXTE PCA. Combined with the existing ACIS-I data, this allowed measurements of the X-ray halo between 2-1000". After considering a range of dust models, each assumed to be smoothly distributed with or without a dense cloud along the line of sight, the results show that there is no evidence in this data for a dense cloud near the source, as suggested by Xiang et al. (2005). In addition, although no model leads to formally acceptable results, the Weingartner & Draine (2001) and all but one of the composite grain models from Zubko, Dwek & Arendt (2004) give particularly poor fits.

  7. X-Ray Dust Scattering at Small Angles: The Complete Halo around GX13+1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Randall K.

    2008-07-01

    The exquisite angular resolution available with Chandra should allow precision measurements of faint diffuse emission surrounding bright sources, such as the X-ray scattering halos created by interstellar dust. However, the ACIS CCDs suffer from pileup when observing bright sources, and this creates difficulties when trying to extract the scattered halo near the source. The initial study of the X-ray halo around GX13+1 using only the ACIS-I detector performed by Smith, Edgar, & Shafer suffered from a lack of sensitivity within 50'' of the source, limiting what conclusions could be drawn. To address this problem, observations of GX13+1 were obtained with the Chandra HRC-I and simultaneously with the RXTE PCA. Combined with the existing ACIS-I data, this allowed measurements of the X-ray halo between 2'' and 1000''. After considering a range of dust models, each assumed to be smoothly distributed with or without a dense cloud along the line of sight; the results show that there is no evidence in these data for a dense cloud near the source, as suggested by Xiang et al. Finally, although no model leads to formally acceptable results, the Weingartner & Draine model and nearly all of the composite grain models from Zubko, Dwek, & Arendt give poor fits.

  8. Entrance surface doses to patients undergoing selected diagnostic X-ray examinations in Sudan.

    PubMed

    Suliman, I I; Abbas, N; Habbani, F I

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the entrance surface doses (ESDs) to patients undergoing selected diagnostic X-ray examinations in major Sudanese hospitals. ESD per examination was estimated from X-ray tube output parameters in four hospitals comprising eight X-ray units and a sample of 346 radiographs. Hospital mean ESDs estimated range from 0.17 to 0.27 mGy for chest AP, 1.04-2.26 mGy for Skull AP/PA, 0.83-1.32 mGy for Skull LAT, 1.31-1.89 mGy for Pelvis AP, 1.46-3.33 mGy for Lumbar Spine AP and 2.9-9.9 mGy for Lumbar Spine LAT. With exception of chest PA examination at two hospitals, mean ESDs were found to be within the established international reference doses. The results are useful to national and professional organisations and can be used as a baseline upon which future dose measurements may be compared.

  9. AN X-RAY-SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTER IN THE LOCKMAN HOLE AT REDSHIFT 1.753

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Henry, J.; Salvato, Mara; Hasinger, Guenther; Finoguenov, Alexis; Brunner, Hermann; Burwitz, Vadim; Buschkamp, Peter; Foerster-Schreiber, Natasha; Genzel, Reinhard; Rovilos, Manolis; Szokoly, Gyula; Bouche, Nicolas; Egami, Eiichi; Fotopoulou, Sotiria; Mainieri, Vincenzo

    2010-12-10

    We have discovered an X-ray-selected galaxy cluster with a spectroscopic redshift of 1.753. The redshift is of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), which is coincident with the peak of the X-ray surface brightness. We also have concordant photometric redshifts for seven additional candidate cluster members. The X-ray luminosity of the cluster is (3.68 {+-} 0.70) x 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.1-2.4 keV band. The optical/IR properties of the BCG imply that its formation redshift was {approx}5 if its stars formed in a short burst. This result continues the trend from lower redshift in which the observed properties of BCGs are most simply explained by a single monolithic collapse at very high redshift instead of the theoretically preferred gradual hierarchical assembly at later times. However, the models corresponding to different formation redshifts are more clearly separated as our observation epoch approaches the galaxy formation epoch. Although our infrared photometry is not deep enough to define a red sequence, we do identify a few galaxies at the cluster redshift that have the expected red sequence photometric properties.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of DNA damage induction by x-rays and selected radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Y; Stewart, R D

    2008-01-07

    To better assess the potential biological consequences of diagnostic x-rays and selected gamma-emitting radioisotopes used in brachytherapy, we used the PENELOPE Monte Carlo radiation transport code to estimate the spectrum of initial electrons produced by photons in single cells and in an irradiation geometry similar to those used in cell culture experiments. We then combined estimates of the initial spectrum of electrons from PENELOPE with DNA damage yields for monoenergetic electrons from the fast Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS). The predicted absolute yields (Gbp(-1) Gy(-1)) and RBE values for single-strand break (SSB) and double-strand break (DSB) induction by 220 kVp x-rays are within 1% of the results from detailed track-structure simulations (Friedland et al 1999 Radiat. Environ. Biophys. 38 39). The measured RBE for DSB induction reported by Kühne et al (2005 Radiat. Res. 164 669) for gamma-rays from (60)Co and for 29 kVp x-rays with a 50 microm Rh (mammography) filter are in excellent agreement (1.15 versus 1.16). DSB yields predicted by the MCDS also agree to within 7% with the absolute DSB yields reported by de Lara et al (2001 Radiat. Res. 155 440) and Botchway et al (1997 Radiat. Res. 148 317) for the irradiation of V79 cells by low energy (<2 keV) characteristic x-rays. The predicted RBE for DSB induction by gamma-rays from bare (169)Yb and (131)Cs to (60)Co are 1.06 and 1.14, respectively. Tabulated RBE values for the single-cell and monolayer cell culture geometries differ by at most 15%. The proposed methodology is computationally efficient and may also be useful for the prediction of damage yields for mixtures of other types of charged particles, such as those found in proton therapy, space applications or internal dosimetry.

  11. Anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering for atom specific and excited state selective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Josefsson, Ida; Rajkovic, Ivan; Schreck, Simon; Quevedo, Wilson; Beye, Martin; Grübel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko; Nordlund, Dennis; Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Kennedy, Brian; Hennies, Franz; Techert, Simone; Wernet, Philippe; Odelius, Michael; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Ultrafast electronic and structural dynamics of matter govern rate and selectivity of chemical reactions, as well as phase transitions and efficient switching in functional materials. Since x-rays determine electronic and structural properties with elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity, short pulse x-ray sources have become central enablers of ultrafast science. Despite of these strengths, ultrafast x-rays have been poor at picking up excited state moieties from the unexcited ones. With time-resolved anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering (AS-RXRS) performed at the LCLS, and ab initio theory we establish background free excited state selectivity in addition to the elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity of x-rays. This unparalleled selectivity extracts low concentration excited state species along the pathway of photo induced ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 in ethanol. Conceptually a full theoretical treatment of all accessible insights to excited state dynamics with AS-RXRS with transform-limited x-ray pulses is given—which will be covered experimentally by upcoming transform-limited x-ray sources.

  12. Anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering for atom specific and excited state selective dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Josefsson, Ida; Rajkovic, Ivan; ...

    2016-10-07

    Here, ultrafast electronic and structural dynamics of matter govern rate and selectivity of chemical reactions, as well as phase transitions and efficient switching in functional materials. Since x-rays determine electronic and structural properties with elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity, short pulse x-ray sources have become central enablers of ultrafast science. Despite of these strengths, ultrafast x-rays have been poor at picking up excited state moieties from the unexcited ones. With time-resolved anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering (AS-RXRS) performed at the LCLS, and ab initio theory we establish background free excited state selectivity in addition to the elemental, chemical, orbitalmore » and magnetic selectivity of x-rays. This unparalleled selectivity extracts low concentration excited state species along the pathway of photo induced ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 in ethanol. Conceptually a full theoretical treatment of all accessible insights to excited state dynamics with AS-RXRS with transform-limited x-ray pulses is given—which will be covered experimentally by upcoming transform-limited x-ray sources.« less

  13. Anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering for atom specific and excited state selective dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Josefsson, Ida; Rajkovic, Ivan; Schreck, Simon; Quevedo, Wilson; Beye, Martin; Grübel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko; Nordlund, Dennis; Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Kennedy, Brian; Hennies, Franz; Techert, Simone; Wernet, Philippe; Odelius, Michael; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-10-07

    Here, ultrafast electronic and structural dynamics of matter govern rate and selectivity of chemical reactions, as well as phase transitions and efficient switching in functional materials. Since x-rays determine electronic and structural properties with elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity, short pulse x-ray sources have become central enablers of ultrafast science. Despite of these strengths, ultrafast x-rays have been poor at picking up excited state moieties from the unexcited ones. With time-resolved anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering (AS-RXRS) performed at the LCLS, and ab initio theory we establish background free excited state selectivity in addition to the elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity of x-rays. This unparalleled selectivity extracts low concentration excited state species along the pathway of photo induced ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 in ethanol. Conceptually a full theoretical treatment of all accessible insights to excited state dynamics with AS-RXRS with transform-limited x-ray pulses is given—which will be covered experimentally by upcoming transform-limited x-ray sources.

  14. Selection effects on the orbital period distribution of Low Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arur, Kavitha; Maccarone, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Observations show a lack of Low Mass Black Hole Binaries with orbital periods below 4 hours. While it is known that Black Hole Binaries (BHBs) tend to have lower peak luminosities in outburst compared to their Neutron Star counterparts, it is unclear if selection effects can account for the difference in the numbers. Studying the effect of these selection biases is important for binary population studies. Here we report on the implications for the inferred orbital period distribution of these BHBs after a simulation that accounts for extinction of the optical counterpart, absorption of X-ray counts and detectability of the outburst.

  15. Search For Gamma-Ray Emission From X-Ray-Selected Seyfert Galaxies With Fermi -LAT

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.

    2012-02-23

    We report on a systematic investigation of the γ-ray properties of 120 hard Xray– selected Seyfert galaxies classified as ‘radio-quiet’ objects, utilizing the threeyear accumulation of Fermi–LAT data. Our sample of Seyfert galaxies is selected using the Swift–BAT 58-month catalog, restricting the analysis to the bright sources with average hard X-ray fluxes F14-195 keV ≥ 2.5 × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1 at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10°). In order to remove ‘radio-loud’ objects from the sample, we use the ‘hard X-ray radio loudness parameter’, RrX , defined as the ratio of the total 1.4 GHz radio to 14 -more » 195 keV hard X-ray energy fluxes. Among 120 X-ray bright Seyfert galaxies with RrX < 10-4, we did not find a statistically significant γ-ray excess (TS > 25) positionally coincident with any target Seyferts, with possible exceptions of ESO 323–G077 and NGC 6814. The mean value of the 95% confidence level γ-ray upper limit for the integrated photon flux above 100 MeV from the analyzed Seyferts is ≃ 4×10-9 ph cm-2 s-1 , and the upper limits derived for several objects reach ≃ 1 × 10-9 ph cm-2 s-1 . Our results indicate that no prominent γ-ray emission component related to active galactic nucleus activity is present in the spectra of Seyferts around GeV energies. The Fermi–LAT upper limits derived for our sample probe the ratio of γ-ray to X-ray luminosities L /LX < 0.1, and even < 0.01 in some cases. The obtained results impose novel constraints on the models for high energy radiation of ‘radio-quiet’ Seyfert galaxies.« less

  16. X-ray selected Type-2 QSOs: ongoing star formation and obscured accretion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainieri, Vincenzo; Cosmos Collaboration

    2009-09-01

    Although the fraction of obscured AGN is found to decrease with luminosity from several studies, a non-negligible population of obscured QSOs is still required by the X-ray background synthesis models. We present a large sample (121 objects) of X-ray selected Type-2 QSOs from the XMM-COSMOS survey: sources with high X-ray luminosity (LX>10^{44} erg s^{-1}) and heavy obscuration (NH>10^{22} cm^{-2}), as derived from a detailed X-ray spectral analysis (see Mainieri et al.,2007, ApJS, 172, 368) of the 1800 X-ray point-like sources in this survey. Few (˜5%) of the Type-2 QSOs are best fitted with a pure reflection model. We have performed optical spectroscopy for ˜ 30% of the sample and for the remaining sources we have derived accurate photometric redshifts. The redshift range covered is wide, 0.30.8).We compare the general properties of the host galaxies with the ongoing accretion in their nuclei. Morphology: using five non-parametric diagnostics (asymmetry, concentration, Gini coefficient, M20, ellipticity) we found that ˜10% of the Type-2 QSOs are in elliptical galaxies, ˜55% in disk galaxies and ˜35% in irregular galaxies. The majority of the irregular hosts can be described as undergoing merger activity or show tidal debris. Stellar masses have been derived from SED fitting to the observed photometry(from 0.3 to 4.5 micron) and star formation rates from the [OII] or Hα line fluxes. The majority (˜75%) of QSO-2 host galaxies have stellar masses above log(Mstar)˜10.5 MSun and have ongoing star formation (˜100 MSun/yr). The value of 10.5 MSun is similar to the characteristic mass for obscured AGN (Kauffmann et al. 2003) and radio-loud AGN (Best et al. 2005) in the SDSS. It is also consistent with the more general result that the fraction of galaxies hosting AGN increases with the stellar mass.

  17. Larch: X-ray Analysis for Synchrotron Applications using Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newville, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    Larch is an open-source library and toolkit written in Python for processing and analyzing X-ray spectroscopic data. The primary emphasis is on X-ray spectroscopic and scattering data collected at modern synchrotron sources. Larch provides a wide selection of general-purpose processing, analysis, and visualization tools for processing X-ray data; its related target application areas include X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps, quantitative X-ray fluorescence, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), and X-ray standing waves and surface scattering. Larch provides a complete set of XAFS Analysis tools and has support for visualizing and analyzing XRF maps and spectra, and additional tools for X-ray spectral analysis, data handling, and general-purpose data modeling.

  18. SPIDERS: the spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray selected clusters of galaxies in SDSS-IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, N.; Merloni, A.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; Finoguenov, A.; Dwelly, T.; Nandra, K.; Collins, C.; Dawson, K.; Kneib, J.-P.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sadibekova, T.; Brownstein, J.; Lin, Y.-T.; Ridl, J.; Salvato, M.; Schwope, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Seo, H.-J.; Tinker, J.

    2016-12-01

    SPIDERS (The SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources) is a programme dedicated to the homogeneous and complete spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray active galactic nuclei and galaxy clusters over a large area (˜7500 deg2) of the extragalactic sky. SPIDERS is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV project, together with the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey. This paper describes the largest project within SPIDERS before the launch of eROSITA: an optical spectroscopic survey of X-ray-selected, massive (˜1014-1015 M⊙) galaxy clusters discovered in ROSAT and XMM-Newton imaging. The immediate aim is to determine precise (Δz ˜ 0.001) redshifts for 4000-5000 of these systems out to z ˜ 0.6. The scientific goal of the program is precision cosmology, using clusters as probes of large-scale structure in the expanding Universe. We present the cluster samples, target selection algorithms and observation strategies. We demonstrate the efficiency of selecting targets using a combination of SDSS imaging data, a robust red-sequence finder and a dedicated prioritization scheme. We describe a set of algorithms and work-flow developed to collate spectra and assign cluster membership, and to deliver catalogues of spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We discuss the relevance of line-of-sight velocity dispersion estimators for the richer systems. We illustrate our techniques by constructing a catalogue of 230 spectroscopically validated clusters (0.031 < z < 0.658), found in pilot observations. We discuss two potential science applications of the SPIDERS sample: the study of the X-ray luminosity-velocity dispersion (LX-σ) relation and the building of stacked phase-space diagrams.

  19. SPIDERS: the spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies in SDSS-IV

    DOE PAGES

    Clerc, N.; Merloni, A.; Zhang, Y. -Y.; ...

    2016-09-05

    SPIDERS (The SPectroscopic IDentification of ERosita Sources) is a programme dedicated to the homogeneous and complete spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray active galactic nuclei and galaxy clusters over a large area (~7500 deg2) of the extragalactic sky. SPIDERS is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV project, together with the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey. This study describes the largest project within SPIDERS before the launch of eROSITA: an optical spectroscopic survey of X-ray-selected, massive (~1014–1015 M⊙) galaxy clusters discovered in ROSAT and XMM–Newton imaging. The immediate aim is to determine precise (Δz ~ 0.001)more » redshifts for 4000–5000 of these systems out to z ~ 0.6. The scientific goal of the program is precision cosmology, using clusters as probes of large-scale structure in the expanding Universe. We present the cluster samples, target selection algorithms and observation strategies. We demonstrate the efficiency of selecting targets using a combination of SDSS imaging data, a robust red-sequence finder and a dedicated prioritization scheme. We describe a set of algorithms and work-flow developed to collate spectra and assign cluster membership, and to deliver catalogues of spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We discuss the relevance of line-of-sight velocity dispersion estimators for the richer systems. We illustrate our techniques by constructing a catalogue of 230 spectroscopically validated clusters (0.031 < z < 0.658), found in pilot observations. Finally, we discuss two potential science applications of the SPIDERS sample: the study of the X-ray luminosity-velocity dispersion (LX–σ) relation and the building of stacked phase-space diagrams.« less

  20. SPIDERS: the spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies in SDSS-IV

    SciTech Connect

    Clerc, N.; Merloni, A.; Zhang, Y. -Y.; Finoguenov, A.; Dwelly, T.; Nandra, K.; Collins, C.; Dawson, K.; Kneib, J. -P.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sadibekova, T.; Brownstein, J.; Lin, Y. -T.; Ridl, J.; Salvato, M.; Schwope, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Seo, H. -J.; Tinker, J.

    2016-09-05

    SPIDERS (The SPectroscopic IDentification of ERosita Sources) is a programme dedicated to the homogeneous and complete spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray active galactic nuclei and galaxy clusters over a large area (~7500 deg2) of the extragalactic sky. SPIDERS is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV project, together with the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey. This study describes the largest project within SPIDERS before the launch of eROSITA: an optical spectroscopic survey of X-ray-selected, massive (~1014–1015 M⊙) galaxy clusters discovered in ROSAT and XMM–Newton imaging. The immediate aim is to determine precise (Δz ~ 0.001) redshifts for 4000–5000 of these systems out to z ~ 0.6. The scientific goal of the program is precision cosmology, using clusters as probes of large-scale structure in the expanding Universe. We present the cluster samples, target selection algorithms and observation strategies. We demonstrate the efficiency of selecting targets using a combination of SDSS imaging data, a robust red-sequence finder and a dedicated prioritization scheme. We describe a set of algorithms and work-flow developed to collate spectra and assign cluster membership, and to deliver catalogues of spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We discuss the relevance of line-of-sight velocity dispersion estimators for the richer systems. We illustrate our techniques by constructing a catalogue of 230 spectroscopically validated clusters (0.031 < z < 0.658), found in pilot observations. Finally, we discuss two potential science applications of the SPIDERS sample: the study of the X-ray luminosity-velocity dispersion (LX–σ) relation and the building of stacked phase-space diagrams.

  1. Massive Submandibular Sialolith: Complete Radiographic Registration and Biochemical Analysis through X-Ray Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Mattos, Mayara Jessica; Ferrari, Francine; dos Reis Neto, José Manoel; Carta Gambus, Luiz Carlos; Couto Souza, Paulo Henrique; Berti-Couto, Soraya de Azambuja

    2014-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is a pathologic condition that affects 60 million people per year, which is caused by the presence of calcified structures, named sialoliths, inside the salivary glands and their salivary ducts. Despite the large incidence of sialolithiasis, its etiology is still unknown. In the present case report, a 47-year-old female patient, presenting with local pain and hampered mouth opening, underwent a surgical approach for the removal of a 20 mm sialolith, which was further analyzed through X-ray diffraction. In parallel, a radiographic registration of 8 years, covering all the period for sialolith formation, is presented along the case report. PMID:25258693

  2. INFALL REGIONS AND SCALING RELATIONS OF X-RAY SELECTED GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Rines, Kenneth; Diaferio, Antonaldo E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it

    2010-02-15

    We use the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study X-ray-selected galaxy groups and compare their properties to clusters. We search for infall patterns around the groups and use these to measure group mass profiles to large radii. In previous work, we analyzed infall patterns for an X-ray-selected sample of 72 clusters from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. Here, we extend this approach to a sample of systems with smaller X-ray fluxes selected from the 400 deg{sup 2} serendipitous survey of clusters and groups in ROSAT pointed observations. We identify 16 groups with SDSS DR5 spectroscopy, search for infall patterns, and compute mass profiles out to 2-6 h {sup -1} Mpc from the group centers with the caustic technique. No other mass estimation methods are currently available at such large radii for these low-mass groups, because the virial estimate requires dynamical equilibrium and the gravitational lensing signal is too weak. Despite the small masses of these groups, most display recognizable infall patterns. We use caustic and virial mass estimates to measure the scaling relations between different observables, extending these relations to smaller fluxes and luminosities than many previous surveys. Close inspection reveals that three of the groups are subclusters in the outskirts of larger clusters. A fourth group is apparently undergoing a group-group merger. These four merging groups represent the most extreme outliers in the scaling relations. Excluding these groups, we find L{sub X} {proportional_to} {sigma}{sup 3.1{+-}}{sup 1.6} {sub p}, consistent with previous determinations for both clusters and groups. Understanding cluster and group scaling relations is crucial for measuring cosmological parameters from clusters. The complex environments of our group sample reinforce the idea that great care must be taken in determining the properties of low-mass clusters and groups.

  3. X-ray selected galaxy clusters in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, H.; Edge, A. C.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Price, P. A.; Tonry, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of a pilot study for the extended Massive Cluster Survey (eMACS), a comprehensive search for distant, X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at z > 0.5. Our pilot study applies the eMACS concept to the 71 deg2 area extended by the 10 fields of the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Medium Deep Survey (MDS). Candidate clusters are identified by visual inspection of PS1 images in the g, r, i and z bands in a 5 × 5 arcmin2 region around X-ray sources detected in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS). To test and optimize the eMACS X-ray selection criteria, our pilot study uses the largest possible RASS data base, i.e. all RASS sources listed in the Bright and Faint Source Catalogues (BSC and FSC) that fall within the MDS footprint. We apply no additional constraints regarding X-ray flux, spectral hardness ratio or photon statistics and lower the redshift threshold to z > 0.3 to extend the probed luminosity range to poorer systems. Scrutiny of PS1/MDS images for 41 BSC and 200 FSC sources combined with dedicated spectroscopic follow-up observations results in a sample of 11 clusters with estimated or spectroscopic redshifts of z > 0.3. In order to assess and quantify the degree of point source contamination of the observed RASS fluxes, we examine archival Chandra data obtained in targeted and serendipitous observations of six of the 11 clusters found. As expected, the diffuse emission from all six systems is contaminated by point sources to some degree, and for half of them active galactic nucleus emission dominates. X-ray follow-up observations will thus be crucial in order to establish robust cluster luminosities for eMACS clusters. Although the small number of distant X-ray luminous clusters in the MDS does not allow us to make firm predictions for the over 20 000 deg2 of extragalactic sky covered by eMACS, the identification of two extremely promising eMACS cluster candidates at z ≳ 0.6 (both yet to be observed with Chandra) in such a small solid angle is encouraging

  4. Serial data acquisition for the X-ray plasma diagnostics with selected GEM detector structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, T.; Chernyshova, M.; Pozniak, K. T.; Kasprowicz, G.; Zabolotny, W.; Kolasinski, P.; Krawczyk, R.; Wojenski, A.; Zienkiewicz, P.

    2015-10-01

    The measurement system based on GEM—Gas Electron Multiplier detector is developed for X-ray diagnostics of magnetic confinement tokamak plasmas. The paper is focused on the measurement subject and describes the fundamental data processing to obtain reliable characteristics (histograms) useful for physicists. The required data processing have two steps: 1—processing in the time domain, i.e. events selections for bunches of coinciding clusters, 2—processing in the planar space domain, i.e. cluster identification for the given detector structure. So, it is the software part of the project between the electronic hardware and physics applications. The whole project is original and it was developed by the paper authors. The previous version based on 1-D GEM detector was applied for the high-resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer KX1 in the JET tokamak. The current version considers 2-D detector structures for the new data acquisition system. The fast and accurate mode of data acquisition implemented in the hardware in real time can be applied for the dynamic plasma diagnostics. Several detector structures with single-pixel sensors and multi-pixel (directional) sensors are considered for two-dimensional X-ray imaging. Final data processing is presented by histograms for selected range of position, time interval and cluster charge values. Exemplary radiation source properties are measured by the basic cumulative characteristics: the cluster position distribution and cluster charge value distribution corresponding to the energy spectra. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  5. Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: This article describes a method to achieve near optimal performance with low energy resolution detectors. Tapiovaara and Wagner [Phys. Med. Biol. 30, 519-529 (1985)] showed that an energy selective x-ray system using a broad spectrum source can produce images with a larger signal to noise ratio (SNR) than conventional systems using energy integrating or photon counting detectors. They showed that there is an upper limit to the SNR and that it can be achieved by measuring full spectrum information and then using an optimal energy dependent weighting. Methods: A performance measure is derived by applying statistical detection theory to an abstract vector space of the line integrals of the basis set coefficients of the two function approximation to the x-ray attenuation coefficient. The approach produces optimal results that utilize all the available energy dependent data. The method can be used with any energy selective detector and is applied not only to detectors using pulse height analysis (PHA) but also to a detector that simultaneously measures the total photon number and integrated energy, as discussed by Roessl et al. [Med. Phys. 34, 959-966 (2007)]. A generalization of this detector that improves the performance is introduced. A method is described to compute images with the optimal SNR using projections in a ''whitened'' vector space transformed so the noise is uncorrelated and has unit variance in both coordinates. Material canceled images with optimal SNR can also be computed by projections in this space. Results: The performance measure is validated by showing that it provides the Tapiovaara-Wagner optimal results for a detector with full energy information and also a conventional detector. The performance with different types of detectors is compared to the ideal SNR as a function of x-ray tube voltage and subject thickness. A detector that combines two bin PHA with a simultaneous measurement of integrated photon energy provides near ideal

  6. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Contrast and resolution in imaging with microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray ...water jet of carbon suspension and imaged using a microfocus x - ray source coupled in-line with a synchronously gated intensified optically coupled...

  7. Contrast enhancement of x-ray image based on singular value selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Chun; Wang, Jing-Wein; Lin, Shu-Yuan

    2010-04-01

    Low-contrast profile images are frequently encountered in medical practice, and the correct interpretation of these images is of vital importance. This study introduces a contrast enhancement technique based on singular value decomposition (SVD) to enhance low-contrast fracture x-ray images. We propose a development of the traditional singular value solution by applying a feature selection process on the extracted singular values. The proposal calls for the establishment of a feature space in which the interpretability or perception of information in images for human viewers is enhanced, while noise and blurring are reduced. In this approach, the area of interest is manually cropped, and histogram equalization (HE) and singular value selection procedures are then conducted for comparative study. This approach exploits the spectral property of SVD, and the singular value selection algorithm is developed based on the corresponding Fourier domain technique for high frequency enhancement. The proposed method can generate more enhanced views of the target images than HE processing. Ten physicians confirm the performance of the proposed model using the visual analog scale (VAS). The average VAS score improves from 2.5 with HE to 8.3 using the proposed method. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is helpful in fracture x-ray image processing.

  8. Observation of hohlraum-wall motion with spectrally selective x-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N. Meezan, N. B.; Divol, L.; Hall, G. N.; Barrios, M. A.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Vonhof, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Bailey, C. G.; Hardy, C. M.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D.; Jaquez, J.

    2016-11-15

    The high fuel capsule compression required for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion requires careful control of the X-ray drive symmetry throughout the laser pulse. When the outer cone beams strike the hohlraum wall, the plasma ablated off the hohlraum wall expands into the hohlraum and can alter both the outer and inner cone beam propagations and hence the X-ray drive symmetry especially at the final stage of the drive pulse. To quantitatively understand the wall motion, we developed a new experimental technique which visualizes the expansion and stagnation of the hohlraum wall plasma. Details of the experiment and the technique of spectrally selective x-ray imaging are discussed.

  9. Observation of hohlraum-wall motion with spectrally selective x-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Meezan, N. B.; Divol, L.; Hall, G. N.; Barrios, M. A.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Vonhof, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Jaquez, J.; Bailey, C. G.; Hardy, C. M.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-11-01

    The high fuel capsule compression required for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion requires careful control of the X-ray drive symmetry throughout the laser pulse. When the outer cone beams strike the hohlraum wall, the plasma ablated off the hohlraum wall expands into the hohlraum and can alter both the outer and inner cone beam propagations and hence the X-ray drive symmetry especially at the final stage of the drive pulse. To quantitatively understand the wall motion, we developed a new experimental technique which visualizes the expansion and stagnation of the hohlraum wall plasma. Details of the experiment and the technique of spectrally selective x-ray imaging are discussed.

  10. Complete elliptical ring geometry provides energy and instrument calibration for synchrotron-based two-dimensional X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Hart, Michael L; Drakopoulos, Michael; Reinhard, Christina; Connolley, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    A complete calibration method to characterize a static planar two-dimensional detector for use in X-ray diffraction at an arbitrary wavelength is described. This method is based upon geometry describing the point of intersection between a cone's axis and its elliptical conic section. This point of intersection is neither the ellipse centre nor one of the ellipse focal points, but some other point which lies in between. The presented solution is closed form, algebraic and non-iterative in its application, and gives values for the X-ray beam energy, the sample-to-detector distance, the location of the beam centre on the detector surface and the detector tilt relative to the incident beam. Previous techniques have tended to require prior knowledge of either the X-ray beam energy or the sample-to-detector distance, whilst other techniques have been iterative. The new calibration procedure is performed by collecting diffraction data, in the form of diffraction rings from a powder standard, at known displacements of the detector along the beam path.

  11. Sensitivity evaluation and selective plane imaging geometry for x-ray-induced luminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Bryan P; Smith, Corey D; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Souris, Jeffrey S; Pelizzari, Charles A; Chen, Chin-Tu; Lo, Leu-Wei; Reft, Chester S; Wiersma, Rodney D; La Riviere, Patrick J

    2017-07-13

    X-ray-induced luminescence (XIL) is a hybrid x-ray/optical imaging modality that employs nanophosphors that luminescence in response to x-ray irradiation. X-ray-activated phosphorescent nanoparticles have potential applications in radiation therapy as theranostics, nanodosimeters, or radiosensitizers. Extracting clinically relevant information from the luminescent signal requires the development of a robust imaging model that can determine nanophosphor distributions at depth in an optically scattering environment from surface radiance measurements. The applications of XIL in radiotherapy will be limited by the dose-dependent sensitivity at depth in tissue. We propose a novel geometry called selective plane XIL (SPXIL), and apply it to experimental measurements in optical gel phantoms and sensitivity simulations. An imaging model is presented based on the selective plane geometry which can determine the detected diffuse optical signal for a given x-ray dose and nanophosphor distribution at depth in a semi-infinite, optically homogenous material. The surface radiance in the model is calculated using an analytical solution to the extrapolated boundary condition. Y2 O3 :Eu(3+) nanoparticles are synthesized and inserted into various optical phantom in order to measure the luminescent output per unit dose for a given concentration of nanophosphors and calibrate an imaging model for XIL sensitivity simulations. SPXIL imaging with a dual-source optical gel phantom is performed, and an iterative Richardson-Lucy deconvolution using a shifted Poisson noise model is applied to the measurements in order to reconstruct the nanophosphor distribution. Nanophosphor characterizations showed a peak emission at 611 nm, a linear luminescent response to tube current and nanoparticle concentration, and a quadratic luminescent response to tube voltage. The luminescent efficiency calculation accomplished with calibrated bioluminescence mouse phantoms determines 1.06 photons were emitted

  12. LATE-TIME RADIO EMISSION FROM X-RAY-SELECTED TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Metzger, Brian D.

    2013-02-15

    We present new observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array of seven X-ray-selected tidal disruption events (TDEs). The radio observations were carried out between 9 and 22 years after the initial X-ray discovery, and thus probe the late-time formation of relativistic jets and jet interactions with the interstellar medium in these systems. We detect a compact radio source in the nucleus of the galaxy IC 3599 and a compact radio source that is a possible counterpart to RX J1420.4+5334. We find no radio counterparts for five other sources with flux density upper limits between 51 and 200 {mu}Jy (3{sigma}). If the detections truly represent late radio emission associated with a TDE, then our results suggest that a fraction, {approx}> 10%, of X-ray-detected TDEs are accompanied by relativistic jets. We explore several models for producing late radio emission, including interaction of the jet with gas in the circumnuclear environment (blast wave model), and emission from the core of the jet itself. Upper limits on the radio flux density from archival observations suggest that the jet formation may have been delayed for years after the TDE, possibly triggered by the accretion rate dropping below a critical threshold of {approx}10{sup -2}-10{sup -3} M-dot {sub Edd}. The non-detections are also consistent with this scenario; deeper radio observations can determine whether relativistic jets are present in these systems. The emission from RX J1420.4+5334 is also consistent with the predictions of the blast wave model; however, the radio emission from IC 3599 is substantially underluminous, and its spectral slope is too flat, relative to the blast wave model expectations. Future radio monitoring of IC 3599 and RX J1420.4+5334 will help to better constrain the nature of the jets in these systems.

  13. Tip of the iceberg? Selection effects in X-ray AGN and their impact on black hole-galaxy evolution studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Mackenzie L.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Mutch, Simon; Croton, Darren; Ptak, Andrew; DiPompeo, Michael A.

    2017-08-01

    Our understanding of the connection between AGN and their host galaxies and the underlying properties of the full AGN population is presently limited by complex observational biases that are difficult to untangle using conventional methods and theoretical models. To more completely explore these selection effects, we use a semi-numerical galaxy formation simulation along with a universal Eddington ratio distribution, as determined by Jones et al. (2016) from SDSS data, to describe the multi-wavelength AGN population. In particular, we explicitly model selection effects to produce the “observed” AGN population for comparison with both theoretical and observational X-ray data. We investigate the impact on the “observed” population of selecting AGN in the X-rays based on thresholds in luminosity (as they are selected in most surveys). We find that we can broadly reproduce the host galaxies and halos of the X-ray AGN population, and that different AGN selection techniques yield samples with very different host galaxy properties. Furthermore, we discuss the capabilities of using this technique to build synthetic SEDs in order to explore the synthesis of the X-ray background.

  14. Selection for Oil Content During Soybean Domestication Revealed by X-Ray Tomography of Ancient Beans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Yunbing; Yao, Shengkun; Crawford, Gary W.; Fang, Hui; Lang, Jianfeng; Fan, Jiadong; Sun, Zhibin; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jianhua; Duan, Xiulan; Zhou, Guangzhao; Xiao, Tiqiao; Luan, Fengshi; Wang, Qing; Chen, Xuexiang; Jiang, Huaidong

    2017-02-01

    When and under what circumstances domestication related traits evolved in soybean (Glycine max) is not well understood. Seed size has been a focus of archaeological attention because increased soybean seed weight/size is a trait that distinguishes most modern soybeans from their ancestors; however, archaeological seed size analysis has had limited success. Modern domesticated soybean has a significantly higher oil content than its wild counterpart so oil content is potentially a source of new insight into soybean domestication. We investigated soybean oil content using X-ray computed tomography (CT; specifically, synchrotron radiation X-ray CT or SRX-CT) of charred, archaeological soybean seeds. CT identified holes in the specimens that are associated with oil content. A high oil content facilitates the development of small holes, whereas a high protein content results in larger holes. The volume of small holes increased slowly from 7,500 to 4,000 cal B.P. We infer that human selection for higher oil content began as early as 7,500 cal B.P. and that high oil content cultivars were well established by 4,000 cal B.P.

  15. a Snapshot Survey of X-Ray Selected Central Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edge, Alastair

    1999-07-01

    Central cluster galaxies are the most massive stellar systems known and have been used as standard candles for many decades. Only recently have central cluster galaxies been recognised to exhibit a wide variety of small scale {<100 pc} features that can only be reliably detected with HST resolution. The most intriguing of these are dust lanes which have been detected in many central cluster galaxies. Dust is not expected to survive long in the hostile cluster environment unless shielded by the ISM of a disk galaxy or very dense clouds of cold gas. WFPC2 snapshot images of a representative subset of the central cluster galaxies from an X-ray selected cluster sample would provide important constraints on the formation and evolution of dust in cluster cores that cannot be obtained from ground-based observations. In addition, these images will allow the AGN component, the frequency of multiple nuclei, and the amount of massive-star formation in central cluster galaxies to be ass es sed. The proposed HST observatio ns would also provide high-resolution images of previously unresolved gravitational arcs in the most massive clusters in our sample resulting in constraints on the shape of the gravitational potential of these systems. This project will complement our extensive multi-frequency work on this sample that includes optical spectroscopy and photometry, VLA and X-ray images for the majority of the 210 targets.

  16. Selection for Oil Content During Soybean Domestication Revealed by X-Ray Tomography of Ancient Beans

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Yunbing; Yao, Shengkun; Crawford, Gary W.; Fang, Hui; Lang, Jianfeng; Fan, Jiadong; Sun, Zhibin; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jianhua; Duan, Xiulan; Zhou, Guangzhao; Xiao, Tiqiao; Luan, Fengshi; Wang, Qing; Chen, Xuexiang; Jiang, Huaidong

    2017-01-01

    When and under what circumstances domestication related traits evolved in soybean (Glycine max) is not well understood. Seed size has been a focus of archaeological attention because increased soybean seed weight/size is a trait that distinguishes most modern soybeans from their ancestors; however, archaeological seed size analysis has had limited success. Modern domesticated soybean has a significantly higher oil content than its wild counterpart so oil content is potentially a source of new insight into soybean domestication. We investigated soybean oil content using X-ray computed tomography (CT; specifically, synchrotron radiation X-ray CT or SRX-CT) of charred, archaeological soybean seeds. CT identified holes in the specimens that are associated with oil content. A high oil content facilitates the development of small holes, whereas a high protein content results in larger holes. The volume of small holes increased slowly from 7,500 to 4,000 cal B.P. We infer that human selection for higher oil content began as early as 7,500 cal B.P. and that high oil content cultivars were well established by 4,000 cal B.P. PMID:28240321

  17. Simultaneous Planck , Swift , and Fermi observations of X-ray and γ -ray selected blazars

    DOE PAGES

    Giommi, P.; Polenta, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; ...

    2012-05-22

    We present simultaneous Planck, Swift, Fermi, and ground-based data for 105 blazars belonging to three samples with flux limits in the soft X-ray, hard X-ray, and γ-ray bands, with additional 5GHz flux-density limits to ensure a good probability of a Planck detection. We compare our results to those of a companion paper presenting simultaneous Planck and multi-frequency observations of 104 radio-loud northern active galactic nuclei selected at radio frequencies. While we confirm several previous results, our unique data set allows us to demonstrate that the selection method strongly influences the results, producing biases that cannot be ignored. Almost all themore » BL Lac objects have been detected by the Fermi Large AreaTelescope (LAT), whereas 30% to 40% of the flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) in the radio, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray selected samples are still below the γ-ray detection limit even after integrating 27 months of Fermi-LAT data. The radio to sub-millimetre spectral slope of blazars is quite flat, with >α> ~ 0 up to about 70GHz, above which it steepens to <α> ~ -0.65. The BL Lacs have significantly flatter spectra than FSRQs at higher frequencies. The distribution of the rest-frame synchrotron peak frequency (νpeakS) in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of FSRQs is the same in all the blazar samples with <νpeakS> = 1013.1 ± 0.1 Hz, while the mean inverse Compton peak frequency, >νpeakIC>, ranges from 1021 to 1022 Hz. The distributions of νpeakS and νpeakIC of BL Lacs are much broader and are shifted to higher energies than those of FSRQs; their shapes strongly depend on the selection method. The Compton dominance of blazars, defined as the ratio of the inverse Compton to synchrotron peak luminosities, ranges from less than 0.2 to nearly 100, with only FSRQs reaching values larger than about 3. Its distribution is broad and depends strongly on the selection method, with γ-ray selected blazars peaking at ~7 or more, and radio-selected

  18. Simultaneous Planck, Swift, and Fermi Observations of X-ray and Gamma-ray Selected Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giommi, P.; Polenta, G.; Laehteenmaeki, A.; Thompson, D. J.; Capalbi, M.; Cutini, S.; Gasparrini, D.; Gonzalez, Nuevo, J.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present simultaneous Planck, Swift, Fermi, and ground-based data for 105 blazars belonging to three samples with flux limits in the soft X-ray, hard X-ray, and gamma-ray bands, with additional 5 GHz flux-density limits to ensure a good probability of a Planck detection. We compare our results to those of a companion paper presenting simultaneous Planck and multi-frequency observations of 104 radio-loud northern active galactic nuclei selected at radio frequencies. While we confirm several previous results, our unique data set allows us to demonstrate that the selection method strongly influences the results, producing biases that cannot be ignored. Almost all the BL Lac objects have been detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), whereas 30% to 40% of the flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) in the radio, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray selected samples are still below the gamma-ray detection limit even after integrating 27 months of Fermi-LAT data. The radio to sub-millimetre spectral slope of blazars is quite flat, with (alpha) approx 0 up to about 70GHz, above which it steepens to (alpha) approx -0.65. The BL Lacs have significantly flatter spectra than FSRQs at higher frequencies. The distribution of the rest-frame synchrotron peak frequency (nu(sup s)(sub peak)) in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of FSRQs is the same in all the blazar samples with (nu(sup s)(sub peak)) = 10(exp 13.1 +/- 0.1) Hz, while the mean inverse Compton peak frequency, (nu(sup IC)(sub peak)), ranges from 10(exp 21) to 10(exp 22) Hz. The distributions of nu(sup s)(sub peak) and nu(sup IC)(sub peak) of BL Lacs are much broader and are shifted to higher energies than those of FSRQs; their shapes strongly depend on the selection method. The Compton dominance of blazars. defined as the ratio of the inverse Compton to synchrotron peak luminosities, ranges from less than 0.2 to nearly 100, with only FSRQs reaching values larger than about 3. Its distribution is broad and depends

  19. Simultaneous Planck, Swift, and Fermi Observations of X-Ray and gamma-Ray Selected Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giommi, P.; Polenta, G.; Laehteenmaeki, A.; Thompson, D. J.; Capalbi, M.; Cutini, S.; Gasparrini, D.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present simultaneous Planck, Swift, Fermi, and ground-based data for 105 blazars belonging to three samples with flux limits in the soft X-ray, hard X-ray, and -ray bands, and we compare our results to those of a companion paper presenting simultaneous Planck and multi-frequency observations of 104 radio-loud northern active galactic nuclei selected at radio frequencies. While we confirm several previous results, our unique data set has allowed us to demonstrate that the selection method strongly influences the results, producing biases that cannot be ignored. Almost all the BL Lac objects have been detected by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), whereas 30 to 40% of the flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) in the radio, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray selected samples are still below the gamma ray detection limit even after integrating 27 months of Fermi-LAT data. The radio to sub-millimetre spectral slope of blazars is quite flat, with [alpha] approximately 0 up to about 70 GHz, above which it steepens to [alpha] approximately -0.65. BL Lacs have significantly flatter spectra than FSRQs at higher frequencies. The distribution of the rest-frame synchrotron peak frequency (v(sup IC) (sub (PEAK)), ranges from 10(sup 21) to 10(sup 22) HZ. The distribution of the rest-frame synchrotron peak frequency (v(sup s)(sub peak)) in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of FSRQs is the same in all the blazar samples with (v(sup s)(sub peak) = 10(sup 13:1 plus or minus 0.1) Hz, while the mean inverse-Compton peak frequency,(v(sup IC)(sub peak) ranges from 10(sup 21) to 10(sup 22) Hz. The distributions of v(sup S)(sub peak) and of v(sup IC)(sub peak) of BL Lacs are much broader and are shifted to higher energies than those of FSRQs; their shapes strongly depend on the selection method. The Compton dominance of blazars ranges from less than 0.2 to nearly 100, with only FSRQs reaching values larger than about 3. Its distribution is broad and depends strongly on the selection method

  20. Effect of particle-size selectivity on quantitative X-ray dark-field computed tomography using a grating interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Hu, Renfang; Wang, Shengxiang; Gao, Kun; Wang, Yan; Tian, Yangchao; Zhu, Peiping

    2017-08-01

    According to the conclusion of Khelashvili et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 51, 221 (2006)], the minus logarithm of the visibility ratio fulfills the line integral condition; consequently the scattering information can be reconstructed quantitatively by conventional computed tomography (CT) algorithms. Based on Fresnel diffraction theory, we analyzed the influence of particle-size selectivity on the performance of an X-ray grating interferometer (GI) applied for dark-field CT. The results state the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of dark-field imaging is sensitive to the particle size, which demonstrate that the X-ray dark-field CT using a GI can efficiently differentiate materials of identical X-ray absorption and help to choose optimal X-ray energy for known particle size, thus extending the application range of grating interferometer.

  1. CATALOG AND STATISTICAL STUDY OF X-RAY SELECTED BL LACERTAE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kapanadze, Bidzina Z.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a catalog of 312 X-ray selected BL Lacerate objects (XBLs), optically identified through the end of 2011. It contains the names from different surveys, equatorial coordinates, redshifts, multifrequency flux values, and luminosities for each source. In addition, the different characteristics of XBLs are statistically investigated (redshift, radio/optical/X-ray luminosities, central black hole (BH) mass, synchrotron peak frequency, broadband spectral indices, optical flux variability). Their values are collected through an extensive bibliographic and database search or calculated by us. The redshifts range from 0.031 to 0.702 with a maximum of the distribution at z = 0.223. The 1.4 GHz luminosities of XBLs log {nu}L{sub {nu}} {approx} 39-42 erg s{sup -1} while optical V and X-ray 0.1-2.4 keV bands show log {nu}L{sub {nu}} {approx} 43-46 erg s{sup -1}. The XBL hosts are elliptical galaxies with effective radii r{sub eff} = 3.2625.40 kpc and ellipticities, in = 0.040.52. Their R-band absolute magnitudes M{sub R} range from -21.11 mag to -24.86 mag with a mean value of -22.83 mag. The V - R indices of the hosts span from 0.61 to 1.52 and reveal a fourth-degree polynomial relationship with z that enables us to evaluate the redshifts of five sources whose V - R indices were determined from the observations but whose irredshifts values are either not found or not confirmed. The XBL nuclei show a wider range of 7.31 mag for M{sub R} with the highest luminosity corresponding to M{sub R} = -27.24 mag. The masses of central BHs are found in the interval log M{sub BH} = 7.39-9.30 solar masses (with distribution maximum at log M{sub BH}/M{sub Sun} = 8.30). The synchrotron peak frequencies are spread over the range log {nu}{sub peak} = 14.56-19.18 Hz with a peak of the distribution at log {nu}{sub peak} = 16.60 Hz. The broadband radio-to-optical ({alpha}{sub ro}), optical-to-X-ray ({alpha}{sub ox}), and radio-to-X-ray ({alpha}{sub rx}) spectral indices are

  2. Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Millecchia, M.; Regan, S. P.; Bahr, R. E.; Romanofsky, M.; Sorce, C.

    2012-10-15

    The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO/QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals.

  3. Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omega.

    PubMed

    Millecchia, M; Regan, S P; Bahr, R E; Romanofsky, M; Sorce, C

    2012-10-01

    The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO∕QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals.

  4. X-ray-selected galaxy groups in Boötes

    SciTech Connect

    Vajgel, Bruna; Lopes, Paulo A. A.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Goulding, Andrew; Andrade-Santos, Felipe

    2014-10-10

    We present the X-ray and optical properties of the galaxy groups selected in the Chandra X-Boötes survey. We used follow-up Chandra observations to better define the group sample and their X-ray properties. Group redshifts were measured from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey spectroscopic data. We used photometric data from the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey to estimate the group richness (N {sub gals}) and the optical luminosity (L {sub opt}). Our final sample comprises 32 systems at z < 1.75 with 14 below z = 0.35. For these 14 systems, we estimate velocity dispersions (σ {sub gr}) and perform a virial analysis to obtain the radii (R {sub 200} and R {sub 500}) and total masses (M {sub 200} and M {sub 500}) for groups with at least 5 galaxy members. We use the Chandra X-ray observations to derive the X-ray luminosity (L{sub X} ). We examine the performance of the group properties σ{sub gr}, L {sub opt}, and L{sub X} , as proxies for the group mass. Understanding how well these observables measure the total mass is important to estimate how precisely the cluster/group mass function is determined. Exploring the scaling relations built with the X-Boötes sample and comparing these with samples from the literature, we find a break in the L{sub X} -M {sub 500} relation at approximately M {sub 500} = 5 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉} (for M {sub 500} > 5 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉}, M{sub 500}∝L{sub X}{sup 0.61±0.02}, while for M {sub 500} ≤ 5 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉}, M{sub 500}∝L{sub X}{sup 0.44±0.05}). Thus, the mass-luminosity relation for galaxy groups cannot be described by the same power law as galaxy clusters. A possible explanation for this break is the dynamical friction, tidal interactions, and projection effects that reduce the velocity dispersion values of the galaxy groups. By extending the cluster luminosity function to the group regime, we predict the number of groups that new X-ray surveys, particularly eROSITA, will detect. Based on our cluster

  5. Modulator design for x-ray scatter correction using primary modulation: Material selection

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Hewei; Zhu Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: An optimal material selection for primary modulator is proposed in order to minimize beam hardening of the modulator in x-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Recently, a measurement-based scatter correction method using primary modulation has been developed and experimentally verified. In the practical implementation, beam hardening of the modulator blocker is a limiting factor because it causes inconsistency in the primary signal and therefore degrades the accuracy of scatter correction. Methods: This inconsistency can be purposely assigned to the effective transmission factor of the modulator whose variation as a function of object filtration represents the magnitude of beam hardening of the modulator. In this work, the authors show that the variation reaches a minimum when the K-edge of the modulator material is near the mean energy of the system spectrum. Accordingly, an optimal material selection can be carried out in three steps. First, estimate and evaluate the polychromatic spectrum for a given x-ray system including both source and detector; second, calculate the mean energy of the spectrum and decide the candidate materials whose K-edge energies are near the mean energy; third, select the optimal material from the candidates after considering both the magnitude of beam hardening and the physical and chemical properties. Results: A tabletop x-ray CBCT system operated at 120 kVp is used to validate the material selection method in both simulations and experiments, from which the optimal material for this x-ray system is then chosen. With the transmission factor initially being 0.905 and 0.818, simulations show that erbium provides the least amount of variation as a function of object filtrations (maximum variations are 2.2% and 4.3%, respectively, only one-third of that for copper). With different combinations of aluminum and copper filtrations (simulating a range of object thicknesses), measured overall variations are 2.5%, 1.0%, and 8

  6. The host galaxies of ultra hard X-ray selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Michael J.

    One of the great mysteries surrounding active galactic nuclei (AGN) is their triggering mechanism. Since the discovery that almost all massive galaxies host nuclear supermassive black holes, it has become clear that a trigger mechanism is required to 'turn on' and continue to fuel the central black hole. While it is established that accretion processes are responsible for the energy emitted, the source of the accreting material is still controversial. Furthermore, the energy input from phases of black hole growth is thought to be a key regulator in the formation of galaxies and the establishment of various scaling relations. Theorists often invoke galaxy mergers as the violent mechanism to drive gas into the central regions and ignite luminous quasars, but among more common moderate luminosity AGN, there has been great controversy whether secular processes or mergers dominate AGN fueling. A survey in the ultra hard X-ray band (14--195 keV) is an important new way to answer the fundamental question of AGN fueling. This method is independent of selection effects such as dust extinction and obscuration that plague surveys at other wavelengths because of the ability of the primary continuum to easily pass through large columns of obscuring gas and dust (<10 24 cm-2). In this PhD, we have assembled the largest sample of ultra hard X-ray selected AGN with host galaxy optical data to date, with 185 nearby (z<0.05), moderate luminosity AGN from the Swift BAT sample. We find that these AGN show much higher rates of both mergers and massive spirals suggesting both mergers and accretion of cold gas in late type systems are important in AGN fueling. We also find that the most common AGN survey technique, optical line diagnostics, is heavily biased against finding AGN in mergers or spirals. Finally, in agreement with the merger driven AGN link, we find that dual AGN systems may be more common than current observation suggest since some of them are only detected using high

  7. Probing BL Lac and Cluster Evolution via a Wide-angle, Deep X-ray Selected Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, E.; Jones, L.; White, N.; Angelini, L.; Giommi, P.; McHardy, I.; Wegner, G.

    1994-12-01

    The WARPS survey (Wide-Angle ROSAT Pointed Survey) has been constructed from the archive of all public ROSAT PSPC observations, and is a subset of the WGACAT catalog. WARPS will include a complete sample of >= 100 BL Lacs at F_x >= 10(-13) erg s(-1) cm(-2) . A second selection technique will identify ~ 100 clusters at 0.15complete samples are also small, with 20-50 objects each. Current data shows a discrepancy between XBL (X-ray selected BL Lac) and RBL (Radio-selected BL Lac) evolution, with = 0.304 +/- 0.062 for XBLs but = 0.60 +/- 0.05 for RBLs. Models of the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) are also poorly constrained. WARPS will allow us to compute an accurate XLF, decreasing the error bars above by over a factor of two. We will also test for low-luminosity BL Lacs, whose non-thermal nuclear sources are dim compared to the host galaxy. Browne and Marcha (1993) claim the EMSS missed most of these objects and is incomplete. If their predictions are correct, 20-40% of the BL Lacs we find will fall in this category, enabling us to probe the evolution and internal workings of BL Lacs at lower luminosities than ever before. By removing likely QSOs before optical spectroscopy, WARPS requires only modest amounts of telescope time. It will extend measurement of the cluster XLF both to higher redshifts (z>0.5) and lower luminosities (LX<1x10(44) erg s(-1) ) than previous measurements, confirming or rejecting the 3sigma detection of negative evolution found in the EMSS, and constraining Cold Dark Matter cosmologies. Faint NELGs are a recently discovered major contributor to the X-ray background. They are a mixture of Sy2s, starbursts and galaxies of unknown type. Detailed classification and evolution of their XLF will be determined for the first time.

  8. Orientation-selective X-ray dark field imaging of ordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revol, V.; Kottler, C.; Kaufmann, R.; Neels, A.; Dommann, A.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray scatter dark field imaging with a grating interferometer is becoming a standard tool for the characterization of microscopic texture of samples. Recently, it was shown that directional information could also be recovered when the sample displays an anisotropic ordering such as, for instance, a bundle of microscopic fibers. Here, we demonstrate that previously suggested approaches are ambiguous when multiple anisotropic orientations coexist in the sample. Therefore, we developed a new orientation-selective approach which allows for separating the contributions of individual orientations provided that these orientations are known a-priori. The method, demonstrated experimentally using a well-defined wood sample, is envisioned to be of high interest for the non-destructive inspection of composite materials.

  9. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  10. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  11. [Polarization selectivity of interaction of DNA molecules by the action of X-ray radiation].

    PubMed

    Semchenko, I V; Kakhomov, S A; Balmakov, A P

    2010-01-01

    The optimum form of a long helical molecule, which DNA is, has been calculated in terms of the classical electromagnetic theory. Three different methods of classical electrodynamics are used: the theory of dipole radiation of electromagnetic waves, the energetic power approach, and a helical model of molecules of chiral medium. In all three cases, an identical result for the optimum geometrical form of a long spiral molecule has been obtained. The lead angle between the tangent to the helix and the plane normal to the axis of the helix should be equal to 24.5 degrees. This condition imposes restrictions on the radius and the pitch of the helical molecule. The experimentally measured geometrical characteristics of the DNA molecule satisfy the theoretically calculated condition precisely enough. Having the optimum geometrical form, the DNA molecule is not influenced by a circularly right-handed polarized electromagnetic wave in the soft X-ray range lambda = 7-8 nm. This wave, for which the right-handed DNA molecule is "transparent", should propagate orthogonally to the helix axis and form a right-handed screw in space. The wave radiated by the right-handed DNA molecule orthogonally to helix axis in the range of lambda = 7-8 nm has, accordingly, the left-handed circular polarization. The polarization selectivity of the DNA molecule by the action of X-ray radiation is exhibited strongly enough in the wavelength range of lambda = 1-35 nm. The results obtained are valid for any distribution of electric currents in DNA, i.e., for any sequence of nitrus bases in DNA.

  12. A novel technique for investigation of complete and partial anisotropic wetting on structured surface by X-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, M.; Guilizzoni, M.; Fest-Santini, S.; Lorenzi, M.

    2015-02-15

    An experimental study about the anisotropic wetting behavior of a surface patterned with parallel grooves is presented as an application example of a novel technique for investigation of complete and partial anisotropic wetting on structured surface by X-ray microtomography. Shape of glycerin droplets on such surface is investigated by X-ray micro computed tomography (microCT) acting as a non-intrusive, full volume 3D microscope with micrometric spatial resolution. The reconstructed drop volumes enable to estimate the exact volumes of the drops, their base contours, and 3D static contact angles, based on true cross-sections of the drop-surface couple. Droplet base contours are compared to approximate geometrical contour shapes proposed in the literature. Contact angles along slices parallel and perpendicular to the grooves direction are compared with each other. The effect of the sessile drop volume on the wetting behavior is discussed. The proposed technique, which is applicable for any structured surface, enables the direct measure of Wenzel ratio based on the microCT scan in the wetted region usually inapproachable by any others. Comparisons with simplified models are presented and congruence of results with respect to the minimum resolution needed is evaluated and commented.

  13. A novel technique for investigation of complete and partial anisotropic wetting on structured surface by X-ray microtomography.

    PubMed

    Santini, M; Guilizzoni, M; Fest-Santini, S; Lorenzi, M

    2015-02-01

    An experimental study about the anisotropic wetting behavior of a surface patterned with parallel grooves is presented as an application example of a novel technique for investigation of complete and partial anisotropic wetting on structured surface by X-ray microtomography. Shape of glycerin droplets on such surface is investigated by X-ray micro computed tomography (microCT) acting as a non-intrusive, full volume 3D microscope with micrometric spatial resolution. The reconstructed drop volumes enable to estimate the exact volumes of the drops, their base contours, and 3D static contact angles, based on true cross-sections of the drop-surface couple. Droplet base contours are compared to approximate geometrical contour shapes proposed in the literature. Contact angles along slices parallel and perpendicular to the grooves direction are compared with each other. The effect of the sessile drop volume on the wetting behavior is discussed. The proposed technique, which is applicable for any structured surface, enables the direct measure of Wenzel ratio based on the microCT scan in the wetted region usually inapproachable by any others. Comparisons with simplified models are presented and congruence of results with respect to the minimum resolution needed is evaluated and commented.

  14. A novel technique for investigation of complete and partial anisotropic wetting on structured surface by X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, M.; Guilizzoni, M.; Fest-Santini, S.; Lorenzi, M.

    2015-02-01

    An experimental study about the anisotropic wetting behavior of a surface patterned with parallel grooves is presented as an application example of a novel technique for investigation of complete and partial anisotropic wetting on structured surface by X-ray microtomography. Shape of glycerin droplets on such surface is investigated by X-ray micro computed tomography (microCT) acting as a non-intrusive, full volume 3D microscope with micrometric spatial resolution. The reconstructed drop volumes enable to estimate the exact volumes of the drops, their base contours, and 3D static contact angles, based on true cross-sections of the drop-surface couple. Droplet base contours are compared to approximate geometrical contour shapes proposed in the literature. Contact angles along slices parallel and perpendicular to the grooves direction are compared with each other. The effect of the sessile drop volume on the wetting behavior is discussed. The proposed technique, which is applicable for any structured surface, enables the direct measure of Wenzel ratio based on the microCT scan in the wetted region usually inapproachable by any others. Comparisons with simplified models are presented and congruence of results with respect to the minimum resolution needed is evaluated and commented.

  15. The EMSS catalog of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies. 1: An atlas of CCD images of 41 distant clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gioia, I. M.; Luppino, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    An atlas of deep, wide-field R-band charge coupled device (CCD) images of a complete sample of distant, X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies is presented. These clusters are the 41 most distant (z is greater than or equal to 0.15) and most X-ray-luminous (L(sub x) is greater than or equal to 2 x 10(exp 44) ergs/s) clusters in the Einstein Observatory Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) catalog that are observable from Mauna Kea (delta is greater than -40 deg). The sample spans a redshift range of 0.15 is less than or equal to z is less than or equal to 0.81 and includes at least two and possibly as many as six rich clusters with z is greater than 0.5. For the most part, the data are of superior quality, with a median seeing of 0.8 sec full width half-maximum (FWHM) and coverage of at least 1 Mpc x 1 Mpc in the cluster frame (H(sub 0) = 50; q(sub 0) = 1/2). In addition, we update the available optical, X-ray, and radio data on the entire EMSS sample of 104 clusters. We outline the cluster selection criteria in detail and emphasize that X-ray-selected cluster samples may prove to be more useful for cosmological studies than optically selected samples. The EMSS cluster sample in particular can be exploited for diverse cosmological investigations, as demonstrated by the detection of evolution in the X-ray luminosity function previously reported, and more recently by the discovery of a large number of gravitationally lensed images in these clusters.

  16. Spectral and Timing Investigations of Dwarf Novae Selected in Hard X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorstensen, John; Remillard, Ronald A.

    2000-01-01

    There are 9 dwarf novae (DN) among the 43 cataclysmic variables (accreting white dwarfs in close binary systems) that were detected during the HEAO-1 all-sky X-ray survey (1977-1979). On the other hand, there are roughly one hundred dwarf novae that are closer and/or optically brighter and yet they were not detected as hard X-ray sources. Two of the HEAO-1 DN show evidence for X-ray pulsations that imply strong magnetic fields on the white dwarf surface, and magnetic CVs are known to be strong X-ray sources. However, substantial flux in hard X-rays may be caused by non-magnetic effects, such as an optically thin boundary layer near a massive white dwarf. We proposed RXTE observations to measure plasma temperatures and to search for X-ray pulsations. The observations would distinguish whether these DN belong to one of (rare) magnetic subclasses. For those that do not show pulsations, the observations support efforts to define empirical relations between X-ray temperature, the accretion rate, and the mass of the white dwarf. The latter is determined via optical studies of the dynamics of the binary constituents.

  17. X-Ray Observations of Optically Selected, Radio-quiet Quasars. I. The ASCA Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. M.; Turner, T. J.; Yaqoob, T.; Netzer, H.; Laor, A.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Nandra, K.; Takahashi, T.

    2000-03-01

    We present the result of 27 ASCA observations of 26 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) from the Palomar-Green (PG) survey. The sample is not statistically complete, but it is reasonably representative of RQQs in the PG survey. For many of the sources, the ASCA data are presented here for the first time. All the RQQs were detected except for two objects, both of which contain broad absorption lines in the optical band. We find the variability characteristics of the sources to be consistent with Seyfert 1 galaxies. A power law offers an acceptable description of the time-averaged spectra in the 2-10 keV (quasar frame) band for all but one data set. The best-fitting values of the photon index vary from object to object over the range 1.5<~Γ2-10<~3, with a mean <Γ2-10>~=2 and dispersion σ(Γ2-10)~=0.25. The distribution of Γ2-10 is therefore similar to that observed in other RQ active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and seems to be unrelated to X-ray luminosity. No single model adequately describes the full 0.6-10 keV (observed frame) continuum of all the RQQs. Approximately 50% of the sources can be adequately described by a single power law or by a power law with only very subtle deviations. All but one of the remaining data sets were found to have convex spectra (flattening as one moves to higher energies). The exception is PG 1411+442, in which a substantial column density (NH,z~2x1023 cm-2) obscures ~98% of the continuum. We find only five (maybe six) of 14 objects with z<~0.25 to have ``soft excesses'' at energies <~1 keV, but we find no universal shape for these spectral components. The spectrum of PG 1244+026 contains a rather narrow emission feature centered at an energy ~1 keV (quasar frame). The detection rate of absorption due to ionized material in these RQQs is lower than that seen in Seyfert 1 galaxies. In part, this may be due to selection effects. However, when detected, the absorbers in the RQQs exhibit a similar range of column density and ionization parameter as

  18. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  19. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  20. Nitrogen adsorption on supported size-selected tungsten nanoclusters as studied by X-ray photoelectron and X-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Wataru; Murakami, Junichi

    2003-09-01

    Adsorption states of nitrogen on tungsten pentamers supported on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface have been investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy. An adsorption state that is not seen on a bulk polycrystalline tungsten surface was observed at temperatures below room temperature. It has been found that the adsorption state is a molecular state and is a precursor to dissociation of N 2 on the tungsten nanocluster.

  1. Application of skeletal age based on x-ray in selecting sports talents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zongzhen; Xu, Guodong; Song, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal age has been studied and proved that for most elite athletes, it was coincident with the chronological ages when they were young. In order to explore the application of skeletal age in selecting sports talent, 32 athletes (female, chronological age 5-12 y) were chosen from the Gymnastics Training Base in this study. Their left hand-wrists were photographed with X-rays, and then the skeletal ages were estimated by Chinese version of the Tanner-Whitehouse Skeletal Maturity Assessment System. At the same time, their body shapes, functions, and sports ability were also measured. Results showed that 71.88% of the skeletal age was proportional to their chronological age (+/- 1 y); while 18.75% of the skeletal maturity was retarded by 1- 2 year, 9.37% of those was advanced more than 1 year. On the other hand, the body shape, functions and sports ability of the athletes were positively related with their skeletal maturity. This study proved that the determination of skeletal maturity is a reliable evaluation for selecting sports talent. A further study on the influence of gymnastics on the skeletal age is of great significance.

  2. Signal to noise ratio of energy selective x-ray photon counting systems with pileup.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Robert E

    2014-11-01

    To derive fundamental limits on the effect of pulse pileup and quantum noise in photon counting detectors on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and noise variance of energy selective x-ray imaging systems. An idealized model of the response of counting detectors to pulse pileup is used. The model assumes a nonparalyzable response and delta function pulse shape. The model is used to derive analytical formulas for the noise and energy spectrum of the recorded photons with pulse pileup. These formulas are first verified with a Monte Carlo simulation. They are then used with a method introduced in a previous paper [R. E. Alvarez, "Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors," Med. Phys. 37, 822-841 (2010)] to compare the signal to noise ratio with pileup to the ideal SNR with perfect energy resolution. Detectors studied include photon counting detectors with pulse height analysis (PHA), detectors that simultaneously measure the number of photons and the integrated energy (NQ detector), and conventional energy integrating and photon counting detectors. The increase in the A-vector variance with dead time is also computed and compared to the Monte Carlo results. A formula for the covariance of the NQ detector is developed. The validity of the constant covariance approximation to the Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for larger counts is tested. The SNR becomes smaller than the conventional energy integrating detector (Q) SNR for 0.52, 0.65, and 0.78 expected number photons per dead time for counting (N), two, and four bin PHA detectors, respectively. The NQ detector SNR is always larger than the N and Q SNR but only marginally so for larger dead times. Its noise variance increases by a factor of approximately 3 and 5 for the A1 and A2 components as the dead time parameter increases from 0 to 0.8 photons per dead time. With four bin PHA data, the increase in variance is approximately 2 and 4 times. The constant covariance approximation

  3. X-ray phase imaging with a laboratory source using selective reflection from a mirror.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Paganin, David M

    2013-04-22

    A novel approach for hard x-ray phase contrast imaging with a laboratory source is reported. The technique is based on total external reflection from the edge of a mirror, aligned to intercept only half of the incident beam. The mirror edge thus produces two beams. The refraction x-rays undergo when interacting with a sample placed before the mirror, causes relative intensity variations between direct and reflected beams. Quantitative phase contrast and pure absorption imaging are demonstrated using this method.

  4. High Resolution X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    murine liver. 15. SUBJECT TERMS X-ray, ultrasound, phase contrast, imaging, elastography 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...of the veins in a mouse liver that was excised from an euthanized mouse, fixed in paraformaldehyde and subsequently dried. The vascular tree is...clearly visible in the x-ray image. Contrast agent injections into the portal vein of another mouse liver verified that the veins are imaged and not

  5. Selection of patients for x-ray examinations: the pelvimetry examination

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Pelvimetry is a radiographic examination used to visualize and measure the dimensions of the maternal pelvis and fetal head prior to childbirth. Due to public and professional concern over the potential risks of radiation exposure, the use of diagnostic x-rays has long been studied for ways of reducing unproductive radiation exposure. This report considers the utility of the pelvimetry x-ray examination in terms of its benefits as opposed to its risks to the subjects. (ACR)

  6. Multi-modal hard x-ray imaging with a laboratory source using selective reflection from a mirror.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Paganin, David M

    2014-04-01

    Multi-modal hard x-ray imaging sensitive to absorption, refraction, phase and scattering contrast is demonstrated using a simple setup implemented with a laboratory source. The method is based on selective reflection at the edge of a mirror, aligned to partially reflect a pencil x-ray beam after its interaction with a sample. Quantitative scattering contrast from a test sample is experimentally demonstrated using this method. Multi-modal imaging of a house fly (Musca domestica) is shown as proof of principle of the technique for biological samples.

  7. Multi-modal hard x-ray imaging with a laboratory source using selective reflection from a mirror

    PubMed Central

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Paganin, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-modal hard x-ray imaging sensitive to absorption, refraction, phase and scattering contrast is demonstrated using a simple setup implemented with a laboratory source. The method is based on selective reflection at the edge of a mirror, aligned to partially reflect a pencil x-ray beam after its interaction with a sample. Quantitative scattering contrast from a test sample is experimentally demonstrated using this method. Multi-modal imaging of a house fly (Musca domestica) is shown as proof of principle of the technique for biological samples. PMID:24761297

  8. X-Ray Temperatures, Luminosities, and Masses from XMM-Newton Follow-upof the First Shear-selected Galaxy Cluster Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Amruta J.; Hughes, John P.; Wittman, David

    2017-04-01

    We continue the study of the first sample of shear-selected clusters from the initial 8.6 square degrees of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS); a sample with well-defined selection criteria corresponding to the highest ranked shear peaks in the survey area. We aim to characterize the weak lensing selection by examining the sample’s X-ray properties. There are multiple X-ray clusters associated with nearly all the shear peaks: 14 X-ray clusters corresponding to seven DLS shear peaks. An additional three X-ray clusters cannot be definitively associated with shear peaks, mainly due to large positional offsets between the X-ray centroid and the shear peak. Here we report on the XMM-Newton properties of the 17 X-ray clusters. The X-ray clusters display a wide range of luminosities and temperatures; the L X -T X relation we determine for the shear-associated X-ray clusters is consistent with X-ray cluster samples selected without regard to dynamical state, while it is inconsistent with self-similarity. For a subset of the sample, we measure X-ray masses using temperature as a proxy, and compare to weak lensing masses determined by the DLS team. The resulting mass comparison is consistent with equality. The X-ray and weak lensing masses show considerable intrinsic scatter (˜48%), which is consistent with X-ray selected samples when their X-ray and weak lensing masses are independently determined. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  9. X-RAY REFLECTED SPECTRA FROM ACCRETION DISK MODELS. III. A COMPLETE GRID OF IONIZED REFLECTION CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.; McClintock, J. E.; Dauser, T.; Wilms, J.; Eikmann, W.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R. E-mail: jem@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: thomas.dauser@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de E-mail: wiebke.eikmann@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de

    2013-05-10

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code XILLVER that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic database. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index {Gamma} of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter {xi} at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A{sub Fe} relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are 1.2 {<=} {Gamma} {<=} 3.4, 1 {<=} {xi} {<=} 10{sup 4}, and 0.5 {<=} A{sub Fe} {<=} 10. These ranges capture the physical conditions typically inferred from observations of active galactic nuclei, and also stellar-mass black holes in the hard state. This library is intended for use when the thermal disk flux is faint compared to the incident power-law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file (http://hea-www.cfa.harvard.edu/{approx}javier/xillver/) suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in XSPEC. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of XILLVER.

  10. X-ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. III. A Complete Grid of Ionized Reflection Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Dauser, T.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; McClintock, J. E.; Wilms, J.; Ekmann, W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code xillver that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic data base. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index Gamma of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter zeta at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A(sub Fe) relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are: 1.2 <= Gamma <= 3.4, 1 <= zeta <= 104, and 0.5 <= A(sub Fe) <= 10. These ranges capture the physical conditions typically inferred from observations of active galactic nuclei, and also stellar-mass black holes in the hard state. This library is intended for use when the thermal disk flux is faint compared to the incident power-law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in xspec. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of xillver.

  11. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of select multi-layered transition metal carbides (MXenes)

    DOE PAGES

    Halim, Joseph; Cook, Kevin M.; Naguib, Michael; ...

    2015-12-01

    A detailed high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis is presented in this work for select MXenes—a recently discovered family of two-dimensional (2D) carbides and carbonitrides. Given their 2D nature, understanding their surface chemistry is paramount. Thus we identify and quantify the surface groups present before, and after, sputter-cleaning as well as freshly prepared vs. aged multi-layered cold pressed discs. The nominal compositions of the MXenes studied here are Ti3C2Tx, Ti2CTx, Ti3CNTx, Nb2CTx and Nb4C3Tx, where T represents surface groups that this work attempts to quantify. In all the cases, the presence of three surface terminations, single bondO, single bondOHmore » and single bondF, in addition to OH-terminations relatively strongly bonded to H2O molecules, was confirmed. Moreover, from XPS peak fits, it was possible to establish the average sum of the negative charges of the terminations for the aforementioned MXenes. Based on this work, it is now possible to quantify the nature of the surface terminations. This information can, in turn, be used to better design and tailor these novel 2D materials for various applications.« less

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of select multi-layered transition metal carbides (MXenes)

    SciTech Connect

    Halim, Joseph; Cook, Kevin M.; Naguib, Michael; Eklund, Per; Gogotsi, Yury; Rosen, Johanna; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2015-12-01

    A detailed high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis is presented in this work for select MXenes—a recently discovered family of two-dimensional (2D) carbides and carbonitrides. Given their 2D nature, understanding their surface chemistry is paramount. Thus we identify and quantify the surface groups present before, and after, sputter-cleaning as well as freshly prepared vs. aged multi-layered cold pressed discs. The nominal compositions of the MXenes studied here are Ti3C2Tx, Ti2CTx, Ti3CNTx, Nb2CTx and Nb4C3Tx, where T represents surface groups that this work attempts to quantify. In all the cases, the presence of three surface terminations, single bondO, single bondOH and single bondF, in addition to OH-terminations relatively strongly bonded to H2O molecules, was confirmed. Moreover, from XPS peak fits, it was possible to establish the average sum of the negative charges of the terminations for the aforementioned MXenes. Based on this work, it is now possible to quantify the nature of the surface terminations. This information can, in turn, be used to better design and tailor these novel 2D materials for various applications.

  13. Structure and intermolecular interactions in selected binary solutions studied by X-ray methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdowski, Henryk; Romaniuk, Anna; Błaszczak, Zdzisław

    2013-12-01

    The results of X-ray structural studies of liquid chloroanisole C6H4OCH3Cl and 10% solutions of chloroanisole in 1,4-dimethylbenzene C8H10 are presented. It is the first paper on an X-ray diffraction study of the liquid solutions of chloroanisole. The X-ray measurements were made at 293 K for the scattering angle range 2Θ varying from 6° to 120°. Averaged scattered X-ray angular distributions I¯(S) were determined. The angular distributions of the intensity of X-ray scattered by 10% solutions of chloroanisole in 1,4-dimethylbenzene were compared to the angular distributions obtained for liquid ortho-, meta- and para-chloroanisole. The differential radial distribution functions of electron density 4πr∑j,knK[ρk(r)-ρ0] were numerically found using the Fourier analysis from a modified Warren, Krutter and Morningstar equation. To the maxima of DRDFs, interatomic and intermolecular distances were assigned. The use of short-wave radiation from an X-ray tube with a molybdenum anode permitted determination of the spheres of intermolecular ordering in the studied liquids and their solutions. The experimental results were used to plot models of the most highly probable mutual disposition of the molecules in liquid chloroanisole and their solutions. The benzene rings of two molecules are situated in parallel plane what results in antiparallel setting of the dipole moments of the chloroanisole molecules. X-ray structural analysis was applied to determine the packing coefficients of chloroanisole molecules. The results obtained in this paper confirm the specific structural properties of the solutions studied.

  14. X-ray superbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W.

    1983-01-01

    Four regions of the galaxy, the Cygnus Superbubble, the Eta Carina complex, the Orion/Eridanus complex, and the Gum Nebula, are discussed as examples of collective effects in the interstellar medium. All four regions share certain features, indicating a common structure. The selection effects which determine the observable X-ray properties of the superbubbles are discussed, and it is demonstrated that only a very few more in our Galaxy can be detected in X rays. X-ray observation of extragalactic superbubbles is shown to be possible but requires the capabilities of a large, high quality, AXAF class observatory.

  15. Modern methods of experimental construction of texture complete direct pole figures by using X-ray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaenkova, M.; Perlovich, Yu; Fesenko, V.

    2016-04-01

    Currently used methods for constructing texture complete direct pole figure (CDPF) based on the results of X-ray diffractometric measurements were considered with respect to the products of Zr-based alloys and, in particular, used in a nuclear reactor cladding tubes, for which the accuracy of determination of integral texture parameters is of the especial importance. The main attention was devoted to technical issues which are solved by means of computer processing of large arrays of obtained experimental data. Among considered questions there are amendments of the defocusing, techniques for constructing of complete direct pole figures and determination of integral textural parameters. The methods of reconstruction of complete direct pole figures by partial direct pole figures recorded up to tilt angles of sample ψ=70-80°: the method of extrapolation of data to an uninvestigated region of the stereographic projection, and the method of "sewing" of partial pole figures measured for three mutually perpendicular plane sections of the product. The limits of applicability of these methods, depending on the shape of the test product and the degree of inhomogeneity of the layer-by-layer texture, were revealed. On the basis of a large number of experimental data, the accuracy of the integral parameters used for calculation of the physical and mechanical properties of metals with a hexagonal crystal structure was found to be equal to 0.02, when taking into account the texture heterogeneity of regular products from Zr-based alloys.

  16. The Chandra Multi-wavelength Project: Optical Spectroscopy and the Broadband Spectral Energy Distributions of X-Ray-selected AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichas, Markos; Green, Paul J.; Silverman, John D.; Aldcroft, Tom; Barkhouse, Wayne; Cameron, Robert A.; Constantin, Anca; Ellison, Sara L.; Foltz, Craig; Haggard, Daryl; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kim, Dong-Woo; Marshall, Herman L.; Mossman, Amy; Pérez, Laura M.; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Ruiz, Angel; Smith, Malcolm G.; Smith, Paul S.; Torres, Guillermo; Wik, Daniel R.; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Wolfgang, Angie

    2012-06-01

    strong connection between X-ray obscuration and star formation but we do not find any association between X-ray column density and star formation rate both in the general population or the star-forming X-ray Seyferts. Our large compilation also allows us to report here the identification of 81 X-ray Bright Optically inactive Galaxies, 78 z > 3 X-ray sources, and eight Type-2 QSO candidates. Also, we have identified the highest redshift (z = 5.4135) X-ray-selected QSO with optical spectroscopy.

  17. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  18. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  19. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  20. Variability of Optical Counterparts to X-ray Selected Sources in the Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher; Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, Peter; Torres, Manuel; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Britt, Christopher; Steeghs, Danny; Galactic Bulge Survey Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a wide-field, multi-wavelength survey of new X-ray sources in the Galactic Bulge detected with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The goals of the GBS are to test binary population models by uncovering quiescent Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMXB), and to identify suitable systems for follow-up mass determination using multi-wavelength observations. This follow-up is essential to better determine black hole and neutron star mass distributions. We present preliminary results from the southernmost portion of the GBS positioned 1.5-2.0 degrees below the Galactic Center which contains 424 unique X-ray sources. The optical photometry presented here were acquired using the DECam imager and the previous Mosaic-II imager on the 4m Blanco telescope at Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We combine photometry with optical spectroscopy from several different telescopes to help characterize the detected X-ray sources. To accomplish this goal, we analyze the light curve morphology and the spectroscopic features of the optical counterparts to classify these binary systems. I will describe the technique for determining the correct optical counterpart within the error circle using image subtraction and report on the statistics of the sample. I will then summarize the candidate LMXBs we have identified so far and highlight other interesting sources. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908789 and by NASA through Chandra Award Number AR3-14002X issued by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the National Aeronautics Space Administration under contract NAS8-03060. We also acknowledge support from a Graduate Student Research Award administered by the Louisiana Space Grant Consortium (LaSPACE).

  1. Optical identification and study of X-ray selected weak emission-line T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga outskirts based on ROSAT pointing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Jin-zeng; Hu, Jing-yao

    Optical spectroscopic identification of X-ray selected WTTS (weak emission-line T Tauri stars) candidates in the Taurus-Auriga outskirts on the basis of ROSAT pointing observations, has resulted in the discovery of 4 WTTS and several other Li-rich sources. This paper gives the R magnitudes, coordinates (J2000) from USNO (V1.0), spectral type classifications, equivalent widths of Li I absorption and H α emission lines of all the X-ray sources investigated, and the proper motions and parallaxes of some of them, as well as the spectra of the newly discovered WTTS. For the first time, the spatial distribution of a rather complete, ROSAT-discovered sample of WTTS, including those identified from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey and PSPC pointing observations around one of the nearby star-forming regions has been provided, together with a preliminary analysis.

  2. High-resolution soft x-ray photoionization studies of selected molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, Eric Allen

    1993-08-01

    Near-edge soft x-ray photoionization spectra were measured for CO, SF6, H2S, and D2S in the gas phase, using the Free University of Berlin plane-grating SX-700-II monochromator at the synchrotron radiation source BESSY. Photoionization spectra of carbon monoxide were measured near the carbon and oxygen K edges. Vibrational spacings and bond lengths are derived for several resonances. Results are consistent with equivalent-core model and indicate the different influences of the carbon and oxygen Is core holes. Corresponding spectra of H2CO and D2CO were also measured. Assignment of complex vibrational structure in valence-shell and Rydberg resonances is facilitated by comparison of spectra for the two isotopic species. Geometric and vibrational parameters are derived for several carbon 1s core-excited states. Isotopic shifts are observed in the energies and linewidths of some core-excited states. Sulfur hexafluoride photoionization spectra, measured near the sulfur L2,3 edges, show several series of weak, narrow Rydberg resonances. High resolution and good counting statistics allow a complete assignment of these states. Lineshapes of the broad inner-well resonances are analyzed to establish the magnitudes of vibrational and lifetime broadening in these states. Spectra of the H2S and D2S molecules were also measured near the sulfur L2,3 edges. Besides lower-energy transitions to inner-well states, a complex manifold of overlapping Rydberg resonances is observed. The rich fine structure of these states arises mainly from removal of orbital degeneracies in molecular field. Additional structure due to vibrational excitations in the final state is identified by comparison of the spectra for the two isotopic species.

  3. Signal to noise ratio of energy selective x-ray photon counting systems with pileup

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To derive fundamental limits on the effect of pulse pileup and quantum noise in photon counting detectors on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and noise variance of energy selective x-ray imaging systems. Methods: An idealized model of the response of counting detectors to pulse pileup is used. The model assumes a nonparalyzable response and delta function pulse shape. The model is used to derive analytical formulas for the noise and energy spectrum of the recorded photons with pulse pileup. These formulas are first verified with a Monte Carlo simulation. They are then used with a method introduced in a previous paper [R. E. Alvarez, “Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors,” Med. Phys. 37, 822–841 (2010)] to compare the signal to noise ratio with pileup to the ideal SNR with perfect energy resolution. Detectors studied include photon counting detectors with pulse height analysis (PHA), detectors that simultaneously measure the number of photons and the integrated energy (NQ detector), and conventional energy integrating and photon counting detectors. The increase in the A-vector variance with dead time is also computed and compared to the Monte Carlo results. A formula for the covariance of the NQ detector is developed. The validity of the constant covariance approximation to the Cramèr–Rao lower bound (CRLB) for larger counts is tested. Results: The SNR becomes smaller than the conventional energy integrating detector (Q) SNR for 0.52, 0.65, and 0.78 expected number photons per dead time for counting (N), two, and four bin PHA detectors, respectively. The NQ detector SNR is always larger than the N and Q SNR but only marginally so for larger dead times. Its noise variance increases by a factor of approximately 3 and 5 for the A1 and A2 components as the dead time parameter increases from 0 to 0.8 photons per dead time. With four bin PHA data, the increase in variance is approximately 2 and 4 times. The

  4. Correlations of the IR Luminosity and Eddington Ratio with a Hard X-ray Selected Sample of AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzy, Richard F.; Winter, Lisa M.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Tueller, Jack

    2008-01-01

    We use the SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample of hard x-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a median redshift of 0.03 and the 2MASS J and K band photometry to examine the correlation of hard x-ray emission to Eddington ratio as well as the relationship of the J and K band nuclear luminosity to the hard x-ray luminosity. The BAT sample is almost unbiased by the effects of obscuration and thus offers the first large unbiased sample for the examination of correlations between different wavelength bands. We find that the near-IR nuclear J and K band luminosity is related to the BAT (14 - 195 keV) luminosity over a factor of 10(exp 3) in luminosity (L(sub IR) approx.equals L(sub BAT)(sup 1.25) and thus is unlikely to be due to dust. We also find that the Eddington ratio is proportional to the x-ray luminosity. This new result should be a strong constraint on models of the formation of the broad band continuum.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: X-ray properties of BzK-selected galaxies (Rangel+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel, C.; Nandra, K.; Laird, E. S.; Orange, P.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the X-ray properties of BzK-selected galaxies at z~2 using deep X-ray data in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDFS) and Chandra Deep Field-North (CDFN). A subset of these BzK galaxies have been proposed as Compton-thick active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates based on a high ratio of infrared (IR) to ultraviolet (UV) star formation rates (SFRs). With the benefit of deep 24μm observations, our sample of these IR-excess galaxies is larger than previous studies and combined with the deepest X-ray data yield new insights into the population. We identify 701 and 534 star-forming BzK galaxies (sBzK galaxies) in the range z=1.2-3.0 in CDFS and CDFN, respectively. Of these we directly detect in X-rays 49 sBzK galaxies in CDFS and 32 sBzK galaxies in CDFN. (2 data files).

  6. A 2.5-5 μm spectroscopic study of hard X-ray selected AGNs with AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, A.; Miyaji, T.; Shirahata, M.; Oyabu, S.; Clark, D.; Ichikawa, K.; Imanishi, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Ueda, Y.

    2014-07-01

    We explore the relationships between the 3.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature and active galactic nucleus (AGN) properties of a sample of 54 hard X-ray selected bright AGNs, including both Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 type objects, using the InfraRed Camera (IRC) on board the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. The sample is selected from the 9-month Swift/BAT survey in the 14-195 keV band and all of them have measured X-ray spectra at E <~ 10 keV. These X-ray spectra provide measurements of the neutral hydrogen column density (N H) towards the AGNs. We use the 3.3 μm PAH luminosity (L 3.3μm) as a proxy for star formation activity and hard X-ray luminosity (L 14-195keV) as an indicator of the AGN activity. We searched for possible difference of star-formation activity between type 1 (un-absorbed) and type 2 (absorbed) AGNs. Our regression analysis of log L 14-195keV versus log L 3.3μm shows a positive correlation and the slope seems steeper for type 1/unobscured AGNs than that of type 2/obscured AGNs. The same trend has been found for the log (L 14-195keV/M BH) versus log (L 3.3μm/MBH) correlation. Our analysis show that the circum-nuclear star-formation is more enhanced in type 2/absorbed AGNs than type 1/un-absorbed AGNs for low X-ray luminosity/low Eddington ratio AGNs.

  7. Probing large-scale structure with large samples of X-ray selected AGN. I. Baryonic acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütsi, Gert; Gilfanov, Marat; Kolodzig, Alexander; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the potential of large X-ray-selected AGN samples for detecting baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO). Though AGN selection in X-ray band is very clean and efficient, it does not provide redshift information, and thus needs to be complemented with an optical follow-up. The main focus of this study is (i) to find the requirements needed for the quality of the optical follow-up and (ii) to formulate the optimal strategy of the X-ray survey, in order to detect the BAO. We demonstrate that redshift accuracy of σ0 = 10-2 at z = 1 and the catastrophic failure rate of ffail ≲ 30% are sufficient for a reliable detection of BAO in future X-ray surveys. Spectroscopic quality redshifts (σ0 = 10-3 and ffail ~ 0) will boost the confidence level of the BAO detection by a factor of ~2. For meaningful detection of BAO, X-ray surveys of moderate depth of Flim ~ few 10-15 erg s-1/cm2 covering sky area from a few hundred to ~ten thousand square degrees are required. The optimal strategy for the BAO detection does not necessarily require full sky coverage. For example, in a 1000 day-long survey by an eROSITA type telescope, an optimal strategy would be to survey a sky area of ~9000 deg2, yielding a ~16σ BAO detection. A similar detection will be achieved by ATHENA+ or WFXT class telescopes in a survey with a duration of 100 days, covering a similar sky area. XMM-Newton can achieve a marginal BAO detection in a 100-day survey covering ~400 deg2. These surveys would demand a moderate-to-high cost in terms the optical follow-ups, requiring determination of redshifts of ~105 (XMM-Newton) to ~3 × 106 objects (eROSITA, ATHENA+, and WFXT) in these sky areas.

  8. Bolometric luminosities and Eddington ratios of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei in the XMM-COSMOS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusso, E.; Comastri, A.; Simmons, B. D.; Mignoli, M.; Zamorani, G.; Vignali, C.; Brusa, M.; Shankar, F.; Lutz, D.; Trump, J. R.; Maiolino, R.; Gilli, R.; Bolzonella, M.; Puccetti, S.; Salvato, M.; Impey, C. D.; Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Mainieri, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bongiorno, A.; Merloni, A.; Berta, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.

    2012-09-01

    Bolometric luminosities and Eddington ratios of both X-ray selected broad-line (Type-1) and narrow-line (Type-2) active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the XMM-Newton survey in the Cosmic Evolution Survey field are presented. The sample is composed of 929 AGN (382 Type-1 AGN and 547 Type-2 AGN) and it covers a wide range of redshifts, X-ray luminosities and absorbing column densities. About 65 per cent of the sources are spectroscopically identified as either Type-1 or Type-2 AGN (83 and 52 per cent, respectively), while accurate photometric redshifts are available for the rest of the sample. The study of such a large sample of X-ray selected AGN with a high-quality multiwavelength coverage from the far-infrared (now with the inclusion of Herschel data at 100 and 160 μm) to the optical-ultraviolet allows us to obtain accurate estimates of bolometric luminosities, bolometric corrections and Eddington ratios. The kbol - Lbol relations derived in this work are calibrated for the first time against a sizable AGN sample, and rely on observed redshifts, X-ray luminosities and column density distributions. We find that kbol is significantly lower at high Lbol with respect to previous estimates by Marconi et al. and Hopkins et al. Black hole (BH) masses and Eddington ratios are available for 170 Type-1 AGN, while BH masses for Type-2 AGN are computed for 481 objects using the BH mass-stellar mass relation and the morphological information. We confirm a trend between kbol and λEdd, with lower hard X-ray bolometric corrections at lower Eddington ratios for both Type-1 and Type-2 AGN. We find that, on average, the Eddington ratio increases with redshift for all types of AGN at any given MBH, while no clear evolution with redshift is seen at any given Lbol.

  9. A new sample of X-ray selected narrow emission-line galaxies. II. Looking for True Seyfert 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, E.; Watson, M. G.

    2016-10-01

    A sample of X-ray and optically selected narrow emission-line galaxies (769 sources) from the 3XMM catalogue cross-correlated with SDSS (DR9) catalogue has been studied. Narrow-emission line active galactic nuclei (AGN; type-2) have been selected on the basis of their emission line ratios and/or X-ray luminosity. We have looked for X-ray unobscured type-2 AGN. As X-ray spectra were not available for our whole sample, we have checked the reliability of using the X-ray hardness ratio (HR) as a probe of the level of obscuration and we found a very good agreement with full spectral fitting results, with only 2% of the sources with apparently unobscured HR turning out to have an obscured spectrum. Despite the fact that type-2 AGN are supposed to be absorbed based on the Unified Model, about 60% of them show no sign or very low level of X-ray obscuration. After subtraction of contaminants to the sample, that is Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 and Compton-thick AGN, the fraction of unobscured Sy2 drops to 47%. For these sources, we were able to rule out dust reddening and variability for most of them as an explanation of the absence of optical broad emission-lines. The main explanations remaining are the dilution of weak/very broad emission-lines by the host galaxy and the intrinsic absence of the broad-line region (BLR) due to low accretion rates (i.e. True Sy2). However, the number of True Sy2 strongly depends on the method used to verify the intrinsic lack of broad lines. Indeed using the optical continuum luminosity to predict the BLR properties gives a much larger fraction of True Sy2 (about 90% of the unobscured Sy2 sample) than the use of the X-ray 2 keV luminosity (about 20%). Nevertheless the number of AGN we securely detected as True Sy2 is at least three times larger that the previously confirmed number of True Sy2.

  10. A complete X-ray sample of the high latitude sky from HEAO-1 A-2: log N lo S and luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piccinotti, G.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Marshall, F. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Shafer, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment was performed in which a complete X-ray survey of the 8.2 steradians of the sky at galactic latitudes where the absolute value of b is 20 deg down to a limiting sensitivity of 3.1 x ten to the minus 11th power ergs/sq cm sec in the 2-10 keV band. Of the 85 detected sources 17 were identified with galactic objects, 61 were identified with extragalactic objects, and 7 remain unidentified. The log N - log S relation for the non-galactic objects is well fit by the Euclidean relationship. The X-ray spectra of these objects were used to construct log N - log S in physical units. The complete sample of identified sources was used to construct X-ray luminosity functions, using the absolute maximum likelihood method, for clusters galaxies and active galactic nuclei.

  11. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF X-RAY-SELECTED YOUNG STARS IN THE CARINA NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Kaushar; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Hsu-Tai

    2015-12-15

    We present low-resolution optical spectra for 29 X-ray sources identified as either massive star candidates or low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) star candidates in the clusters Trumpler 16 and Trumpler 14 of the Carina Nebula. Spectra of two more objects (one with an X-ray counterpart, and one with no X-ray counterpart), not originally our targets, but found close (∼3″) to two of our targets, are presented as well. Twenty early-type stars, including an O8 star, seven B1–B2 stars, two B3 stars, a B5 star, and nine emission-line stars, are identified. Eleven T Tauri stars, including eight classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) and three weak-lined T Tauri stars, are identified. The early-type stars in our sample are more reddened compared to the previously known OB stars of the region. The Chandra hardness ratios of our T Tauri stars are found to be consistent with the Chandra hardness ratios of T Tauri stars of the Orion Nebula Cluster. Most early-type stars are found to be nonvariable in X-ray emission, except the B2 star J104518.81–594217.9, the B3 star J104507.84–594134.0, and the Ae star J104424.76–594555.0, which are possible X-ray variables. J104452.20–594155.1, a CTTS, is among the brightest and the hardest X-ray sources in our sample, appears to be a variable, and shows a strong X-ray flare. The mean optical and near-infrared photometric variability in the V and K{sub s} bands, of all sources, is found to be ∼0.04 and 0.05 mag, respectively. The T Tauri stars show significantly larger mean variation, ∼0.1 mag, in the K{sub s} band. The addition of one O star and seven B1–B2 stars reported here contributes to an 11% increase of the known OB population in the observed field. The 11 T Tauri stars are the first ever confirmed low-mass PMS stars in the Carina Nebula region.

  12. Optical Spectroscopy of X-Ray-selected Young Stars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Kaushar; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Hsu-Tai

    2015-12-01

    We present low-resolution optical spectra for 29 X-ray sources identified as either massive star candidates or low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) star candidates in the clusters Trumpler 16 and Trumpler 14 of the Carina Nebula. Spectra of two more objects (one with an X-ray counterpart, and one with no X-ray counterpart), not originally our targets, but found close (˜3″) to two of our targets, are presented as well. Twenty early-type stars, including an O8 star, seven B1-B2 stars, two B3 stars, a B5 star, and nine emission-line stars, are identified. Eleven T Tauri stars, including eight classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) and three weak-lined T Tauri stars, are identified. The early-type stars in our sample are more reddened compared to the previously known OB stars of the region. The Chandra hardness ratios of our T Tauri stars are found to be consistent with the Chandra hardness ratios of T Tauri stars of the Orion Nebula Cluster. Most early-type stars are found to be nonvariable in X-ray emission, except the B2 star J104518.81-594217.9, the B3 star J104507.84-594134.0, and the Ae star J104424.76-594555.0, which are possible X-ray variables. J104452.20-594155.1, a CTTS, is among the brightest and the hardest X-ray sources in our sample, appears to be a variable, and shows a strong X-ray flare. The mean optical and near-infrared photometric variability in the V and Ks bands, of all sources, is found to be ˜0.04 and 0.05 mag, respectively. The T Tauri stars show significantly larger mean variation, ˜0.1 mag, in the Ks band. The addition of one O star and seven B1-B2 stars reported here contributes to an 11% increase of the known OB population in the observed field. The 11 T Tauri stars are the first ever confirmed low-mass PMS stars in the Carina Nebula region.

  13. Complete multiwavelength evolution of galactic black hole transients during outburst decay. II. Compact jets and X-ray variability properties

    SciTech Connect

    Dinçer, T.; Kalemci, E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Buxton, M. M.; Bailyn, C. D.

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the relation between compact jet emission and X-ray variability properties of all black hole transients with multiwavelength coverage during their outburst decays. We studied the evolution of all power spectral components (including low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations; QPOs), and related this evolution to changes in jet properties tracked by radio and infrared observations. We grouped sources according to their tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation and show that the standards show stronger broadband X-ray variability than outliers at a given X-ray luminosity when the compact jet turns on. This trend is consistent with the internal shock model and can be important for the understanding of the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation. We also observed that the total and the QPO rms amplitudes increase together during the earlier part of the outburst decay, but after the compact jet turns, either the QPO disappears or its rms amplitude decreases significantly while the total rms amplitudes remain high. We discuss these results with a scenario including a variable corona and a non-variable disk with a mechanism for the QPO separate from the mechanism that creates broad components. Finally, we evaluated the timing predictions of the magnetically dominated accretion flow model that can explain the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation.

  14. A Complete Overhaul of the Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Database: eelsdb.eu.

    PubMed

    Ewels, Philip; Sikora, Thierry; Serin, Virginie; Ewels, Chris P; Lajaunie, Luc

    2016-06-01

    The electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) database has been completely rewritten, with an improved design, user interface, and a number of new tools. The database is accessible at https://eelsdb.eu/ and can now be used without registration. The submission process has been streamlined to encourage spectrum submissions and the new design gives greater emphasis on contributors' original work by highlighting their papers. With numerous new filters and a powerful search function, it is now simple to explore the database of several hundred EELS and XAS spectra. Interactive plots allow spectra to be overlaid, facilitating online comparison. An application-programming interface has been created, allowing external tools and software to easily access the information held within the database. In addition to the database itself, users can post and manage job adverts and read the latest news and events regarding the EELS and XAS communities. In accordance with the ongoing drive toward open access data increasingly demanded by funding bodies, the database will facilitate open access data sharing of EELS and XAS spectra.

  15. A selection effect boosting the contribution from rapidly spinning black holes to the cosmic X-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, R. V.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Aird, J.; Dauser, T.; Gallo, L. C.

    2016-05-01

    The cosmic X-ray background (CXB) is the total emission from past accretion activity on to supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) and peaks in the hard X-ray band (30 keV). In this paper, we identify a significant selection effect operating on the CXB and flux-limited AGN surveys, and outline how they must depend heavily on the spin distribution of black holes. We show that, due to the higher radiative efficiency of rapidly spinning black holes, they will be over-represented in the X-ray background, and therefore could be a dominant contributor to the CXB. Using a simple bimodal spin distribution, we demonstrate that only 15 per cent maximally spinning AGN can produce 50 per cent of the CXB. We also illustrate that invoking a small population of maximally spinning black holes in CXB synthesis models can reproduce the CXB peak without requiring large numbers of Compton-thick AGN. The spin bias is even more pronounced for flux-limited surveys: 7 per cent of sources with maximally spinning black holes can produce half of the source counts. The detectability for maximum spin black holes can be further boosted in hard (>10 keV) X-rays by up to ˜60 per cent due to pronounced ionized reflection, reducing the percentage of maximally spinning black holes required to produce half of the CXB or survey number counts further. A host of observations are consistent with an over-representation of high-spin black holes. Future NuSTAR and ASTRO-H hard X-ray surveys will provide the best constraints on the role of spin within the AGN population.

  16. X-ray spectral variability of LINERs selected from the Palomar sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-García, L.; González-Martín, O.; Masegosa, J.; Márquez, I.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Variability is a general property of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The way in which these changes occur at X-rays is not yet clearly understood. In the particular case of low-ionization nuclear emission line region (LINER) nuclei, variations on the timescales from months to years have been found for some objects, but the main driver of these changes is still debated. Aims: The main purpose of this work is to investigate the X-ray variability in LINERs, including the main driver of these variations, and to search for possible differences between type 1 and 2 objects. Methods: We examined the 18 LINERs in the Palomar sample with data retrieved from the Chandra and/or XMM-Newton archives that correspond to observations gathered at different epochs. All the spectra for the same object were fitted simultaneously to study long-term variations. The nature of the variability patterns were studied by allowing different parameters to vary during the spectral fit. Whenever possible, short-term variations from the analysis of the light curves and long-term UV variability were studied. Results: Short-term variations are not reported in X-rays. Three LINERs are classified as non-AGN candidates in X-rays, all of them are Compton-thick candidates; none of them show variations at these frequencies, and two of them vary in the UV. Long-term X-ray variations were analyzed in 12 out of 15 AGN candidates; about half of them showed variability (7 out of the 12). At UV frequencies, most of the AGN candidates with available data are variable (five out of six). Thus, 13 AGN candidates are analyzed at UV and/or X-rays, ten of which are variable at least in one energy band. None of the three objects that do not vary in X-rays have available UV data. This means that variability on long-timescales is very common in LINERs. These X-ray variations are mainly driven by changes in the nuclear power, while changes in absorptions are found only for NGC 1052. We do not find any difference

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the (R)-selective amine transaminase from Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Maren; Skalden, Lilly; Palm, Gottfried J; Höhne, Matthias; Bornscheuer, Uwe T; Hinrichs, Winfried

    2013-12-01

    The (R)-selective amine transaminase from Aspergillus fumigatus was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Bright yellow crystals appeared while storing the concentrated solution in the refrigerator and belonged to space group C222(1). X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.27 Å resolution, as well as an anomalous data set to 1.84 Å resolution that was suitable for S-SAD phasing.

  18. Molecular bond selective x-ray scattering for nanoscale analysisof soft matter

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.E.; Koprinarov, I.; Landes, B.G.; Lyons, J.; Kern,B.J.; Devon, M.J.; Gullikson, E.M.; Kortright, J.B.

    2005-05-26

    We introduce a new technique using resonant soft x-ray scattering for characterizing heterogeneous chemical structure at nanometer length scales in polymers, biological material, and other soft matter. Resonant enhancements bring new contrast mechanisms and increased sensitivity to bridge a gap between bond-specific contrast in chemical sensitive imaging and the higher spatial resolution of traditional small-angle scattering techniques. We illustrate sensitivity to chemical bonding with the resonant scattering near the carbon K edge from latex spheres of differing chemistry and sizes. By tuning to x-ray absorption resonances associated with particular carbon-carbon or carbon-oxygen bonds we can isolate the scattering from different phases in a 2-phase mixture. We then illustrate this increased scattering contrast with a study of the templating process to form nanometer scale pores in 100 nm thick polymer films.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS/3XMM X-ray-selected LINERs (Nisbet+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisbet, D. M.; Best, P. N.

    2016-07-01

    This research has been carried out on a data base of LINERs, for which both X-ray and radio luminosity information and black hole mass estimates are available. The sample was constructed by cross-matching the fourth data release of the 3XMM Serendipitous Source catalogue of X-ray sources (released by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre; XMM-SSC 2013, Cat. IX/44) with the seventh data release from the SDSS-DR7; Abazajian et al. (2009ApJS..182..543A) and then adding in radio luminosity data obtained from the FIRST catalogue (Becker, White & Helfand, 1995ApJ...450..559B, Cat. VIII/92). (1 data file).

  20. X-ray observations of selected cataclysmic variable stars using the Einstein Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, F. A.; Mason, K. O.; Nelson, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray observations of 12 cataclysmic variable stars using the Einstein Observatory are reported. Nine of these stars, representing all subclasses of cataclysmic variables, were detected. Their fluxes range from 2 x 10 to the -13th to 1 x 10 to the -11th ergs/sq cm-s in the energy interval 0.16-4.5 keV. The spectra of all the sources detected are relatively hard (kT not less than 5 keV). There is no evidence for an ultrasoft emission component (kT of about 50 eV) such as has been observed from the dwarf novae SS Cyg and U Gem during optical outburst. The X-ray and optical fluxes of the objects observed can be understood in terms of differences in mass accretion rate if the accreting stars in these close binary systems possess a weak magnetic field.

  1. The X-ray selected cataclysmic variables H0459 + 246 and H0857 - 242

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Bradt, H. V.; Brissenden, R. J. V.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Schwartz, D. A.; Silber, A.; Stroozas, B. A.; Tuohy, I. R.

    1994-01-01

    We report the discovery of two cataclysmic variables located with the assistance of X-ray positions from the HEAO 1 Modulation Collimator and the Large-Area Sky Survey. Each case is distinguished by evidence of two periodic modulations that appear to represent the orbital period and the spin period of the white dwarf, respectively. The first case, H0459 + 246, has been observed optically during faint states (V approximately 16), in which there are spectral features of both an accretion disk and a K star. The light curves in the V and I bands are consistent with ellipsoidal variations in the secondary stars with a binary period of 9.952 hr. X-ray observations with EXOSAT reveal a strong pulsation with a period approximately 62 minutes. This result confirms an 'intermediate polar' classification for H0459 + 246. The pulsation is observed at 63.2 minutes in the optical I band. The long orbital period opens the possibility that H0459 + 246 is a relatively young intermediate polar that might evolve into a polar. The second case, H0857--242, shows radial velocity modulations at 1.78 hr along with photometric variations at a period approximately 49 minutes. The latter are observed only during the decay phase of dwarf nova outbursts (13 less than V less than 17), which apparently recur frequently. Given the lack of X-ray monitoring observations and the absence of proof that the 49 minute periodicity is coherent over long time-scales, we regard H0857--242 as a candidate intermediate polar. Photographic records from th e Harvard Observatory Plate Library further reveal superoutbursts for H0857--242 (V approximately 11). A bright X-ray source that is both an intermediate polar and a continually cycling dwarf nova may provide an effective means of measuring the time delay for the arrival of accreting matter at the white dwarf surface, relative to the onset of optical brightening.

  2. Selective trapping of labile S3 in a porous coordination network and the direct X-ray observation.

    PubMed

    Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Choi, Wanuk; Islam, Nazrul; Matsushita, Yoshitaka; Kawano, Masaki

    2013-08-07

    S3 is one of the basic allotropes of sulfur but is still a mysterious labile species. We selectively trapped S3 in a pore of a thermally stable coordination network and determined S3 structure by ab initio X-ray powder diffraction analysis. S3 in a pore has a C2v bent structure. The network containing trapped S3 is remarkably stable under ambient conditions and is inert to photoirradiation. S3 in the network could be transformed to S6 by mechanical grinding or heating in the presence of NH4X (X = Cl or Br). S6 could be reverse-transformed to S3 by photoirradiation. We also determined the structure of the network containing S6 by ab initio X-ray powder diffraction analysis.

  3. X-ray absorptiometry of the breast using mammographic exposure factors: application to units featuring automatic beam quality selection.

    PubMed

    Kotre, C J

    2010-06-01

    A number of studies have identified the relationship between the visual appearance of high breast density at mammography and an increased risk of breast cancer. Approaches to quantify the amount of glandular tissue within the breast from mammography have so far concentrated on image-based methods. Here, it is proposed that the X-ray parameters automatically selected by the mammography unit can be used to estimate the thickness of glandular tissue overlying the automatic exposure sensor area, provided that the unit can be appropriately calibrated. This is a non-trivial task for modern mammography units that feature automatic beam quality selection, as the number of tube potential and X-ray target/filter combinations used to cover the range of breast sizes and compositions can be large, leading to a potentially unworkable number of curve fits and interpolations. Using appropriate models for the attenuation of the glandular breast in conjunction with a constrained set of physical phantom measurements, it is demonstrated that calibration for X-ray absorptiometry can be achieved despite the large number of possible exposure factor combinations employed by modern mammography units. The main source of error on the estimated glandular tissue thickness using this method is shown to be uncertainty in the measured compressed breast thickness. An additional correction for this source of error is investigated and applied. Initial surveys of glandular thickness for a cohort of women undergoing breast screening are presented.

  4. Determining the fraction of reddened quasars in COSMOS with multiple selection techniques from X-ray to radio wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintz, K. E.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Møller, P.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Zabl, J.; Maddox, N.; Krogager, J.-K.; Geier, S.; Vestergaard, M.; Noterdaeme, P.; Ledoux, C.

    2016-10-01

    The sub-population of quasars reddened by intrinsic or intervening clouds of dust are known to be underrepresented in optical quasar surveys. By defining a complete parent sample of the brightest and spatially unresolved quasars in the COSMOS field, we quantify to which extent this sub-population is fundamental to our understanding of the true population of quasars. By using the available multiwavelength data of various surveys in the COSMOS field, we built a parent sample of 33 quasars brighter than J = 20 mag, identified by reliable X-ray to radio wavelength selection techniques. Spectroscopic follow-up with the NOT/ALFOSC was carried out for four candidate quasars that had not been targeted previously to obtain a 100% redshift completeness of the sample. The population of high AV quasars (HAQs), a specific sub-population of quasars selected from optical/near-infrared photometry, some of which were shown to be missed in large optical surveys such as SDSS, is found to contribute 21%+9-5 of the parent sample. The full population of bright spatially unresolved quasars represented by our parent sample consists of 39%+9-8 reddened quasars defined by having AV > 0.1, and 21%+9-5 of the sample having E(B-V) > 0.1 assuming the extinction curve of the Small Magellanic Cloud. We show that the HAQ selection works well for selecting reddened quasars, but some are missed because their optical spectra are too blue to pass the g-r color cut in the HAQ selection. This is either due to a low degree of dust reddening or anomalous spectra. We find that the fraction of quasars with contributing light from the host galaxy, causing observed extended spatial morphology, is most dominant at z ≲ 1. At higher redshifts the population of spatially unresolved quasars selected by our parent sample is found to be representative of the full population of bright active galactic nuclei at J< 20 mag. This work quantifies the bias against reddened quasars in studies that are based solely on

  5. Hard X-Ray-selected AGNs in Low-mass Galaxies from the NuSTAR Serendipitous Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-T. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Reines, A. E.; Lansbury, G.; Stern, D.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F.; Del Moro, A.; Gandhi, P.; Harrison, F. A.; Hickox, R. C.; Koss, M. J.; Lanz, L.; Luo, B.; Mullaney, J. R.; Ricci, C.; Trump, J. R.

    2017-03-01

    We present a sample of 10 low-mass active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the 40-month Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) serendipitous survey. The sample is selected to have robust NuSTAR detections at 3{--}24 {keV}, to be at z< 0.3, and to have optical r-band magnitudes at least 0.5 mag fainter than an {L}\\star galaxy at its redshift. The median values of absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and 2–10 X-ray luminosity of our sample are < {M}r> =-20.03, < {M}\\star > =4.6× {10}9 {M}ȯ , and < {L}2-10{keV}> =3.1× {10}42 erg s‑1, respectively. Five objects have detectable broad Hα emission in their optical spectra, indicating black hole masses of (1.1{--}10.4)× {10}6 {M}ȯ . We find that {30}-10+17 % of the galaxies in our sample do not show AGN-like optical narrow emission lines, and one of the 10 galaxies in our sample, J115851+4243.2, shows evidence for heavy X-ray absorption. This result implies that a non-negligible fraction of low-mass galaxies might harbor accreting massive black holes that are missed by optical spectroscopic surveys and < 10 {keV} X-ray surveys. The mid-IR colors of our sample also indicate that these optically normal low-mass AGNs cannot be efficiently identified with typical AGN selection criteria based on Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer colors. While the hard (> 10 keV) X-ray-selected low-mass AGN sample size is still limited, our results show that sensitive NuSTAR observations are capable of probing faint hard X-ray emission originating from the nuclei of low-mass galaxies out to moderate redshift (z< 0.3), thus providing a critical step in understanding AGN demographics in low-mass galaxies.

  6. Preliminary Measurements Supporting Reactor Vessel and Large Component Inspection Using X-Ray Backscatter Radiography by Selective Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Shedlock, Daniel; Dugan, Edward T.; Jacobs, Alan M.; Houssay, Laurent

    2006-07-01

    X-ray backscatter radiography by selective detection (RSD) is a field tested and innovative approach to non-destructive evaluation (NDE). RSD is an enhanced single-side x-ray Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) technique which selectively detects scatter components to improve image contrast and quality. Scatter component selection is accomplished through a set of specially designed detectors with fixed and movable collimators. Experimental results have shown that this NDE technique can be used to detect boric acid deposition on a metallic plate through steel foil reflective insulation commonly covering reactor pressure vessels. The current system is capable of detecting boric acid deposits with sub-millimeter resolution, through such insulating materials. Industrial systems have been built for Lockheed Martin Space Co. and NASA. Currently the x-ray backscatter RSD scanning systems developed by the University of Florida are being used to inspect the spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) used on the external tank of the space shuttle. RSD inspection techniques have found subsurface cracking in the SOFI thought to be responsible for the foam debris which separated from the external tank during the last shuttle launch. These industrial scanning systems can be customized for many applications, and a smaller, lighter, more compact unit design is being developed. The smaller design is approximately four inches wide, three inches high, and about 12 inches in length. This smaller RSD system can be used for NDE of areas that cannot be reached with larger equipment. X-ray backscatter RSD is a proven technology that has been tested on a wide variety of materials and applications. Currently the system has been used to inspect materials such as aluminum, plastics, honeycomb laminates, reinforced carbon composites, steel, and titanium. The focus of RSD is for one-sided detection for applications where conventional non-destructive examination methods either will not work or give poor

  7. A Multi-Frequency Study of an X-ray Selected Sample of AGN II: Line Emission Studies and the X-ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossan, B.; Remillard, R.; Bradt, H.

    1992-12-01

    We carried out a multi-frequency study of a flux-limited (0.95 mu Jy @ 5 keV) sample of 96 emission-line AGN taken from the HEAO-1 LASS/MC survey. Preliminary results of this study were presented at the Jan. 1992 meeting. Here we present new results from line emission and continuum studies and more details regarding the AGN X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs). We find that narrow [OIII] flux correlates well with X-ray flux. This result is consistent with a simple picture where the photoionizing continuum is distributed over a large solid angle in the narrow line region, and is closely related to the X-ray continuum. Broad Balmer lines do not demonstrate a strong correlation with X-ray flux. The UV continuum ( ~ 1400 Angstroms) does not correlate with any optical line emission we measured, but UV variability could have affected this result. In contrast, we find very strong correlations of high-ionization UV broad line fluxes and the simultaneously measured UV continuum. The geometry and/or obscuration effects in the broad line region may therefore be different than those in the narrow line region. A very large spread in the value of broad line Balmer decrements (Hβ /Hα = 0.13 - 0.40) was observed among objects determined to be un-reddened by the lack of an absorption feature at 2175 Angstroms. If there were an intrinsic Balmer decrement for the broad line regions in AGN, the smallest Hβ /Hα values would correspond to extreme values of reddening (E(B-V) > 1 mag). Therefore, we conclude that the broad line Balmer decrement cannot be used in determining continuum reddening in most AGN. We find that the AGN 2-10 keV XLF is roughly a power law, but steepens with increasing luminosity, and turns over below 10(42) erg s(-1) . The XLF of Seyfert 2's resembles a power law from 10(42) - 10(43.5) erg s(-1) , but at higher luminosity, the XLF steepens. In this sample, the cumulative fraction of Seyfert 2's falls rapidly with luminosity, and the overall fraction of Seyfert 2's

  8. Toward a Complete Metrological Solution for the Mirrors for the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehan, John; Owens, S.; Hadjimichael, T.; Hong, M.; Chan, K.-W.; Saha, T. T.; Reid, P.; Zhang, W. W.

    2007-01-01

    We present an overview update of the metrological approach to be employed for the segmented mirror fabrication for Constellation-X spectroscopy x-ray telescope. We compare results achieved to date with mission requirements. This is discussed in terms of inherent capability versus in-practice capability.

  9. Site- and phase-selective x-ray absorption spectroscopy based on phase-retrieval calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the chemical state of a particular element with multiple crystallographic sites and/or phases is essential to unlocking the origin of material properties. To this end, resonant x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (RXDS) achieved through a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques can allow for the measurement of diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS). This is expected to provide a peerless tool for electronic/local structural analyses of materials with complicated structures thanks to its capability to extract spectroscopic information about a given element at each crystallographic site and/or phase. At present, one of the major challenges for the practical application of RXDS is the rigorous determination of resonant terms from observed DAFS, as this requires somehow determining the phase change in the elastic scattering around the absorption edge from the scattering intensity. This is widely known in the field of XRD as the phase problem. The present review describes the basics of this problem, including the relevant background and theory for DAFS and a guide to a newly-developed phase-retrieval method based on the logarithmic dispersion relation that makes it possible to analyze DAFS without suffering from the intrinsic ambiguities of conventional iterative-fitting. Several matters relating to data collection and correction of RXDS are also covered, with a final emphasis on the great potential of powder-sample-based RXDS (P-RXDS) to be used in various applications relevant to practical materials, including antisite-defect-type electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  10. Site- and phase-selective x-ray absorption spectroscopy based on phase-retrieval calculation.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2017-03-22

    Understanding the chemical state of a particular element with multiple crystallographic sites and/or phases is essential to unlocking the origin of material properties. To this end, resonant x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (RXDS) achieved through a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques can allow for the measurement of diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS). This is expected to provide a peerless tool for electronic/local structural analyses of materials with complicated structures thanks to its capability to extract spectroscopic information about a given element at each crystallographic site and/or phase. At present, one of the major challenges for the practical application of RXDS is the rigorous determination of resonant terms from observed DAFS, as this requires somehow determining the phase change in the elastic scattering around the absorption edge from the scattering intensity. This is widely known in the field of XRD as the phase problem. The present review describes the basics of this problem, including the relevant background and theory for DAFS and a guide to a newly-developed phase-retrieval method based on the logarithmic dispersion relation that makes it possible to analyze DAFS without suffering from the intrinsic ambiguities of conventional iterative-fitting. Several matters relating to data collection and correction of RXDS are also covered, with a final emphasis on the great potential of powder-sample-based RXDS (P-RXDS) to be used in various applications relevant to practical materials, including antisite-defect-type electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  11. HOST GALAXIES, CLUSTERING, EDDINGTON RATIOS, AND EVOLUTION OF RADIO, X-RAY, AND INFRARED-SELECTED AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Hickox, Ryan C.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Brodwin, Mark; Narayan, Ramesh; Kenter, Almus; Caldwell, Nelson; Anderson, Michael E.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Eisenstein, Daniel; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Dey, Arjun; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Cool, Richard J.

    2009-05-01

    We explore the connection between different classes of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the evolution of their host galaxies, by deriving host galaxy properties, clustering, and Eddington ratios of AGNs selected in the radio, X-ray, and infrared (IR) wavebands. We study a sample of 585 AGNs at 0.25 < z < 0.8 using redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES). We select AGNs with observations in the radio at 1.4 GHz from the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, X-rays from the Chandra XBooetes Survey, and mid-IR from the Spitzer IRAC Shallow Survey. The radio, X-ray, and IR AGN samples show only modest overlap, indicating that to the flux limits of the survey, they represent largely distinct classes of AGNs. We derive host galaxy colors and luminosities, as well as Eddington ratios, for obscured or optically faint AGNs. We also measure the two-point cross-correlation between AGNs and galaxies on scales of 0.3-10 h {sup -1} Mpc, and derive typical dark matter halo masses. We find that: (1) radio AGNs are mainly found in luminous red sequence galaxies, are strongly clustered (with M {sub halo} {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M {sub sun}), and have very low Eddington ratios {lambda} {approx}< 10{sup -3}; (2) X-ray-selected AGNs are preferentially found in galaxies that lie in the 'green valley' of color-magnitude space and are clustered similar to the typical AGES galaxies (M {sub halo} {approx} 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M {sub sun}), with 10{sup -3} {approx}< {lambda} {approx}< 1; (3) IR AGNs reside in slightly bluer, slightly less luminous galaxies than X-ray AGNs, are weakly clustered (M {sub halo} {approx}< 10{sup 12} h {sup -1} M {sub sun}), and have {lambda}>10{sup -2}. We interpret these results in terms of a simple model of AGN and galaxy evolution, whereby a 'quasar' phase and the growth of the stellar bulge occurs when a galaxy's dark matter halo reaches a critical mass between {approx}10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} M {sub sun}. After this event

  12. Search For Gamma-Ray Emission From X-Ray-Selected Seyfert Galaxies With Fermi -LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.

    2012-02-23

    We report on a systematic investigation of the γ-ray properties of 120 hard Xray– selected Seyfert galaxies classified as ‘radio-quiet’ objects, utilizing the threeyear accumulation of Fermi–LAT data. Our sample of Seyfert galaxies is selected using the Swift–BAT 58-month catalog, restricting the analysis to the bright sources with average hard X-ray fluxes F14-195 keV ≥ 2.5 × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1 at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10°). In order to remove ‘radio-loud’ objects from the sample, we use the ‘hard X-ray radio loudness parameter’, RrX , defined as the ratio of the total 1.4 GHz radio to 14 - 195 keV hard X-ray energy fluxes. Among 120 X-ray bright Seyfert galaxies with RrX < 10-4, we did not find a statistically significant γ-ray excess (TS > 25) positionally coincident with any target Seyferts, with possible exceptions of ESO 323–G077 and NGC 6814. The mean value of the 95% confidence level γ-ray upper limit for the integrated photon flux above 100 MeV from the analyzed Seyferts is ≃ 4×10-9 ph cm-2 s-1 , and the upper limits derived for several objects reach ≃ 1 × 10-9 ph cm-2 s-1 . Our results indicate that no prominent γ-ray emission component related to active galactic nucleus activity is present in the spectra of Seyferts around GeV energies. The Fermi–LAT upper limits derived for our sample probe the ratio of γ-ray to X-ray luminosities L /LX < 0.1, and even < 0.01 in some cases. The obtained results impose novel constraints on the models for high energy radiation of ‘radio-quiet’ Seyfert galaxies.

  13. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-29

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  14. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  15. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  16. X-Ray Polarization Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    anatomic structures. Johns and Yaffe (2), building on the work of Alvarez and Macovski (3) and that of Lehmann et al (4), discuss a method for...sources of contrast related to both the wave and par- ticulate nature of x rays. References 1. Johns PC, Yaffe MJ. X-ray characterization of normal and...application to mammography. Med Phys 1985; 12:289–296. 3. Alvarez RE, Macovski A. Energy-selective reconstructions in x-ray computerized tomography. Phys

  17. A MULTIWAVELENGTH STUDY OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN SIX NEARBY GALAXIES. I. DETECTION OF NEW X-RAY-SELECTED SUPERNOVA REMNANTS WITH CHANDRA

    SciTech Connect

    Leonidaki, I.; Boumis, P.; Zezas, A.

    2010-12-10

    We present results from a study of the supernova remnant (SNR) population in a sample of six nearby galaxies (NGC 2403, NGC 3077, NGC 4214, NGC 4449, NGC 4395, and NGC 5204) based on Chandra archival data. We have detected 244 discrete X-ray sources down to a limiting flux of 10{sup -15} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. We identify 37 X-ray-selected thermal SNRs based on their X-ray colors or spectra, 30 of which are new discoveries. In many cases, the X-ray classification is confirmed based on counterparts with SNRs identified in other wavelengths. Three of the galaxies in our sample (NGC 4214, NGC 4395, and NGC 5204) are studied for the first time, resulting in the discovery of 13 thermal SNRs. We discuss the properties (luminosity, temperature, and density) of the X-ray-detected SNRs in the galaxies of our sample in order to address their dependence on their environment. We find that X-ray-selected SNRs in irregular galaxies appear to be more luminous than those in spirals. We attribute this to the lower metallicities and therefore more massive progenitor stars of irregular galaxies or the higher local densities of the interstellar medium. We also discuss the X-ray-selected SNR populations in the context of the star formation rate of their host galaxies. A comparison of the numbers of observed luminous X-ray-selected SNRs with those expected based on the luminosity functions of X-ray SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds and M33 suggest different luminosity distributions between the SNRs in spiral and irregular galaxies with the latter tending to have flatter distributions.

  18. A cooling flow in a high-redshift, X-ray-selected cluster of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesci, Roberto; Perola, Giuseppe C.; Gioia, Isabella M.; Maccacaro, Tommaso; Morris, Simon L.

    1989-01-01

    The X-ray cluster of galaxies IE 0839.9 + 2938 was serendipitously discovered with the Einstein Observatory. CCD imaging at R and V wavelengths show that the color of the dominant elliptical galaxy of this cluster is significantly bluer than the colors of the next brightest cluster galaxies. Strong emission lines, typical of cD galaxies with cooling flows, are present in the spectrum of the dominant galaxy, from which a redshift of 0.193 is derived. The emitting line region is spatially resolved with an extension of about 13 kpc. All the collected data suggest that this cluster is one of the most distant cooling flow clusters known to date.

  19. NEW X-RAY-SELECTED PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE MEMBERS OF THE SERPENS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Isa; Van der Laan, Margriet; Brown, Joanna M.

    2013-11-01

    The study of young stars no longer surrounded by disks can greatly add to our understanding of how protoplanetary disks evolve and planets form. We have used VLT/FLAMES optical spectroscopy to confirm the youth and membership of 19 new young diskless stars in the Serpens Molecular Cloud, identified at X-ray wavelengths. Spectral types, effective temperatures, and stellar luminosities were determined using optical spectra and optical/near-infrared photometry. Stellar masses and ages were derived based on pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks. The results yield remarkable similarities for age and mass distribution between the diskless and disk-bearing stellar populations in Serpens. We discuss the important implications these similarities may have on the standard picture of disk evolution.

  20. A cooling flow in a high-redshift, X-ray-selected cluster of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Nesci, R.; Perola, G.C.; Gioia, I.M.; Maccacaro, T.; Morris, S.L.; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA; CNR, Istituto di Radioastronomia, Bologna; Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1989-09-01

    The X-ray cluster of galaxies IE 0839.9 + 2938 was serendipitously discovered with the Einstein Observatory. CCD imaging at R and V wavelengths show that the color of the dominant elliptical galaxy of this cluster is significantly bluer than the colors of the next brightest cluster galaxies. Strong emission lines, typical of cD galaxies with cooling flows, are present in the spectrum of the dominant galaxy, from which a redshift of 0.193 is derived. The emitting line region is spatially resolved with an extension of about 13 kpc. All the collected data suggest that this cluster is one of the most distant cooling flow clusters known to date. 28 refs.

  1. Complete blood counts, liver function tests, and chest x-rays as routine screening in early-stage breast cancer: value added or just cost?

    PubMed

    Louie, Raphael J; Tonneson, Jennifer E; Gowarty, Minda; Goodney, Philip P; Barth, Richard J; Rosenkranz, Kari M

    2015-11-01

    Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines for breast cancer staging include pre-treatment complete blood count (CBC) and liver function tests (LFT) to screen for occult metastatic disease. To date, the relevance of these tests in detecting metastatic disease in asymptomatic women with early-stage breast cancer (Stage I/II) has not been demonstrated. Although chest x-rays are no longer recommended in the NCCN guidelines, many centers continue to include this imaging as part of their screening process. We aim to determine the clinical and financial impact of these labs and x-rays in the evaluation of early-stage breast cancer patients. A single institution IRB-approved retrospective chart review was conducted of patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer treated from January 1, 2005–December 31, 2009. We collected patient demographics, clinical and pathologic staging, chest x-ray, CBC, and LFT results at the time of referral. Patients were stratified according to radiographic stage at the time of diagnosis. We obtained Medicare reimbursement fees for cost analysis. From 2005 to 2009, 1609 patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer were treated at our institution. Of the 1082 patients with radiographic stage I/II disease, 27.3 % of patients had abnormal CBCs. No additional testing was performed to evaluate these abnormalities. In the early-stage population, 24.7 % of patients had elevated LFTs, resulting in 84 additional imaging studies. No metastatic disease was detected. The cost of CBC, LFTs and chest x-rays was $110.20 per patient, totaling $106,410.99. Additional tests prompted by abnormal results cost $58,143.30 over the five-year period. We found that pre-treatment CBCs, LFTs, and chest x-rays did not improve detection of occult metastatic disease but resulted in additional financial costs. Avoiding routine ordering of these tests would save the US healthcare system $25.7 million annually.

  2. NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory Selected as Editor's Choice in 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory, NASA's newest and most powerful X-ray space telescope, has been selected as the winner of the Editor's Choice category of the 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation. The team of government, industry, university and research institutions that designed, built and deployed Chandra for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala, will be formally recognized June 24 at a gala awards celebration at Epcot at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Fl. Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X-ray Science Center, Cambridge, Mass., which conducts the Chandra science mission for NASA, will receive the award on behalf of the team. "Chandra has opened a new window for astronomers into the universe of high-energy cosmic events such as pulsars, supernova remnants and black holes," said Tananbaum. "We're now able to create spectacularly detailed images of celestial phenomena whose mere existence we could only hypothesize before." Among Chandra's most significant discoveries to date, he lists the detection of a giant ring around the heart of the Crab Nebula, details of the shock wave created by an exploding star and resolution of the high-energy X-ray "glow" in the universe into millions of specific light sources. "The successful launch, deployment and on-orbit operations of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is a testament to the solid partnership between TRW, NASA and the science community that has been enabling NASA's most important space science missions for the past 40 years," said Timothy W. Hannemann, executive vice president and general manager, TRW Space & Electronics Group. "The extraordinary images that Chandra is delivering daily speaks loudly not only to the quality of the science instruments on board, but also to the engineering talents and dedication to mission success exhibited by every member of NASA's Chandra mission team." Chandra, named in honor of Nobel

  3. Properties of Galaxy Groups Selected from Chandra X-ray Observations of the Boötes Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajgel, B.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Murray, S. S.

    2014-10-01

    Galaxy groups are not simply scaled down versions of rich clusters (e.g. Mulchaey 2000, Voit 2005). Due to a group's shallow gravitational potential, feedback processes play an important role in the group's evolution. It is important to understand galaxy groups since, in hierarchical clustering, they are the building blocks of large scale structure. Thus, in addition to determining the characteristics of groups, it is important to determine the mass function over the range that includes poor clusters and groups. We present the properties of the galaxy groups selected in the Chandra X-Boötes survey (Kenter et al. 2005). Group redshifts are measured from the AGES (Kochanek et al. 2012) spectroscopic data. We use photometric data from the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey (NDWFS) (Jannuzi & Dey 1999) to estimate the group richness (N_{gals}) and the optical luminosity (L_{opt}). Our final sample comprises 32 systems at z < 0.80, with 14 below z = 0.35. For these systems we estimate velocity dispersions (σ_{gr}) and perform a virial analysis to obtain the radius (R_{200} and R_{500}) and mass (M_{200} and M_{500}) for groups with at least five galaxy members. We use the Chandra X-ray observations to derive the X-ray luminosity (L_{X}). We examine the performance of the group properties σ_{gr}, L_{opt} and L_{X}, as proxies for the group mass. Understanding how these observables measure the total mass is important to estimate how well the cluster/group mass function is determined. By extending the mass function to the group regime, we predict the number of groups that new X-ray surveys, eROSITA, will detect.

  4. Understanding the selectivity of genistein for human estrogen receptor-beta using X-ray crystallography and computational methods.

    PubMed

    Manas, Eric S; Xu, Zhang B; Unwalla, Rayomand J; Somers, William S

    2004-12-01

    We present X-ray crystallographic and molecular modeling studies of estrogen receptors-alpha and -beta complexed with the estrogen receptor-beta-selective phytoestrogen genistein, and coactivator-derived NR box peptides containing an LXXLL motif. We demonstrate that the ligand binding mode is essentially identical when genistein is bound to both isoforms, despite the considerably weaker affinity of this ligand for estrogen receptor-alpha. In addition, we examine subtle differences between binding site residues, providing an explanation for why genistein is modestly selective for the beta isoform. To this end, we also present the results of quantum chemical studies and thermodynamic arguments that yield insight to the nature of the interactions leading to estrogen receptor-beta selectivity. The importance of our analysis to structure-based drug design is discussed.

  5. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of a complete bacterial fatty-acid synthase type I

    SciTech Connect

    Enderle, Mathias; McCarthy, Andrew; Paithankar, Karthik Shivaji; Grininger, Martin

    2015-10-23

    Bacterial and fungal type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) are evolutionarily connected, as bacterial FAS I is considered to be the ancestor of fungal FAS I. In this work, the production, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data analysis of a bacterial FAS I are reported. While a deep understanding of the fungal and mammalian multi-enzyme type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) has been achieved in recent years, the bacterial FAS I family, which is narrowly distributed within the Actinomycetales genera Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium and Nocardia, is still poorly understood. This is of particular relevance for two reasons: (i) although homologous to fungal FAS I, cryo-electron microscopic studies have shown that bacterial FAS I has unique structural and functional properties, and (ii) M. tuberculosis FAS I is a drug target for the therapeutic treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and therefore is of extraordinary importance as a drug target. Crystals of FAS I from C. efficiens, a homologue of M. tuberculosis FAS I, were produced and diffracted X-rays to about 4.5 Å resolution.

  6. X-ray based extensometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    A totally new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was proposed. The intent of the method is to provide a non-contacting technique that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments that plague optical methods. X-rays are virtually unrefractable even by solids. The new method utilizes X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence or X-ray induced optical fluorescence of targets that have melting temperatures of over 3000 F. Many different variations of the basic approaches are possible. In the year completed, preliminary experiments were completed which strongly suggest that the method is feasible. The X-ray induced optical fluorescence method appears to be limited to temperatures below roughly 1600 F because of the overwhelming thermal optical radiation. The X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence scheme appears feasible up to very high temperatures. In this system there will be an unknown tradeoff between frequency response, cost, and accuracy. The exact tradeoff can only be estimated. It appears that for thermomechanical tests with cycle times on the order of minutes a very reasonable system may be feasible. The intended applications involve very high temperatures in both materials testing and monitoring component testing. Gas turbine engines, rocket engines, and hypersonic vehicles (NASP) all involve measurement needs that could partially be met by the proposed technology.

  7. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  8. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  9. Chest X Ray?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test that ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are working ...

  10. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  11. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  12. Skull x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Radiography of skull, chest, and cervical spine - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  14. Observations of High-Redshift X-Ray Selected Clusters with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muchovej, Stephen; Carlstrom, John E.; Cartwright, John; Greer, Christopher; Hawkins, David; Hennessey, Ryan; Joy, Marshall; Lamb, James; Leitch, Erik M.; Loh, Michael; Miller, Amber D.; Mroczkowski, Tony; Pryke, Clem; Reddall, Ben; Runyan, Marcus; Sharp, Matthew; Woody, David

    2006-01-01

    We report measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in three high redshift (0.89 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 1.03), X-ray selected galaxy clusters. The observations were obtained at 30 GHz during the commissioning period of a new, eight-element interferometer - the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA) - built for dedicated SZ effect observations. The SZA observations are sensitive to angular scales larger than those subtended by the virial radii of the clusters. Assuming isothermality and hydrostatic equilibrium for the intracluster medium, and gas-mass fractions consistent with those for clusters at moderate redshift, we calculate electron temperatures, gas masses, and total cluster masses from the SZ data. The SZ-derived masses, integrated approximately to the virial radii, are 1.9 (sup +0.5)(sub -0.4) x 10(exp 14) solar mass for Cl J1415.1+3612, 3.4 (sup +0.6)(sub -0.5) x 10(exp 14) solar mass for Cl J1429.0+4241 and 7.2 (sup +1.3)(sub -0.9) x 10(exp 14) solar mass for Cl J1226.9+3332. The SZ-derived quantities are in good agreement with the cluster properties derived from X-ray measurements.

  15. X-ray fluorescence study of the concentration of selected trace and minor elements in human brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandzilak, Aleksandra; Czyzycki, Mateusz; Radwanska, Edyta; Adamek, Dariusz; Geraki, Kalotina; Lankosz, Marek

    2015-12-01

    Neoplastic and healthy brain tissues were analysed to discern the changes in the spatial distribution and overall concentration of elements using micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. High-resolution distribution maps of minor and trace elements such as P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn made it possible to distinguish between homogeneous cancerous tissue and areas where some structures could be identified, such as blood vessels and calcifications. Concentrations of the elements in the selected homogeneous areas of brain tissue were compared between tumours with various malignancy grades and with the controls. The study showed a decrease in the average concentration of Fe, P, S and Ca in tissues with high grades of malignancy as compared to the control group, whereas the concentration of Zn in these tissues was increased. The changes in the concentration were found to be correlated with the tumour malignancy grade. The efficacy of micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to distinguish between various types of cancer based on the concentrations of studied elements was confirmed by multivariate discriminant analysis. Our analysis showed that the most important elements for tissue classification are Cu, K, Fe, Ca, and Zn. This method made it possible to correctly classify histopathological types in 99.93% of the cases used to build the model and in as much as 99.16% of new cases.

  16. Mid- and Near-infrared spectral properties of a sample of Swift-BAT X-ray selected AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Angel; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Malkan, Matthew A.; Ichikawa, Kohei; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shirahata, M.; Nakagawa, Takao; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Oyabu, Shinki

    2015-08-01

    We present a comparative study of the mid- (MIR) to near-infrared (NIR) properties of a sample of X-ray selected AGNs from the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) 70-month all-sky hard X-ray (14-195 keV) survey. For a sample of 78 AGNs, including both Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 sources with black hole masses derived from 2MASS K-band magnitudes and literature, we obtain spectroscopic data from the IRC (2.5 - 5 μm) and IRS (in the 5-14 μm band) instruments onboard the Akari and Spitzer satellites, respectively. We test possible correlations between the 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.2 and 12.7 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, the continuum slope and CO optical depth, as well as CO2, H2O, and amorphous silicates. Using the 3.3, 6.2 and 11.3 μm PAH emission features as a proxy for the star-formation rate (SFR) we report the AGN type and Eddington-ratio dependences of circum-nuclear star formation.

  17. Use of oily contrast medium for selective drug targeting to tumor: enhanced therapeutic effect and X-ray image

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, K.; Maeda, H.; Konno, T.

    1984-05-01

    Highly malignant rabbit tumor (VX-2) was implanted in the liver in 63 rabbits. Selective delivery of the anticancer agent copoly(styrenemaleic acid) conjugated to neocarzinostatin (SMANCS) was performed by injection via the proper hepatic artery. By using low-kVp X-ray examination of the resected liver, Lipiodol was found to distribute through the entire liver arterial lumina and was retained for about 24 hr, but disappeared gradually. However, Lipiodol was retained in the tumor tissue and vessels for at least 7 days. A radioactive analogue of Lipiodol, was prepared by using (/sup 14/C)linoleic acid. This analogue was used in the study of the distribution by low-kVp X-ray examination, Sudan III staining, and autoradiography. Lipiodol remained in the tumor vessels as well as the tumor cells. The use of the radioisotope yielded a quantitative profile of Lipiodol accumulation in tumor tissues. Its major excretion route appeared to be through the bile. The biological activity of SMANCS was also determined in both tumor and liver, no activity was found in other organs. The relatively high biological activity of SMANCS in the nontumorous liver adjacent to the tumor may be the result of continuous drug release from SMANCS-Lipiodol in the tumor tissue.

  18. Monochromatic X-ray photon counting using an energy-selecting device and its application to iodine imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Yasuyuki; Sato, Eiichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2015-08-01

    Quasi-monochromatic photon counting was performed using a cadmium telluride detector and an energy-selecting device, consisting of two comparators and a microcomputer (MC). The two threshold energies are determined using low and high-energy comparators, respectively. The MC produces a single logical pulse when only a logical pulse from a low-energy comparator is input to the MC. Next, the MC never produces the pulse when two pulses from low and high-energy comparators are input to the MC, simultaneously. The logical pulses from the MC are input to a frequency-voltage converter (FVC) to convert count rates into voltages; the rate is proportional to the voltage. The output voltage from the FVC is sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter to reconstruct tomograms. The X-ray projection curves for tomography are obtained by repeated linear scans and rotations of the object at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a current of 12 μA. Iodine (I) K-edge CT was performed using contrast media and X-ray photons with a count rate of 2.2 kilocounts per second and energies ranging from 34 to 50 keV, since these photons with energies beyond I-K-edge energy 33.2 keV are absorbed effectively by I atoms.

  19. Observations of High-Redshift X-Ray Selected Clusters with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muchovej, Stephen; Carlstrom, John E.; Cartwright, John; Greer, Christopher; Hawkins, David; Hennessy, Ryan; Joy, Marshall; Lamb, James W.; Leitch, Erik M.; Loh, Michael; Miller, Amber D.; Mroczkowski, Tony; Pryke, Clem; Reddall, Ben; Runyan, Marcus; Sharp, Matthew; Woody, David

    2006-01-01

    We report measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in three highredshift (0.89 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 1.03), X-ray selected galaxy clusters. The observations were obtained at 30 GHz during the commissioning period of a new, eight-element interferometer - the Sunyaev-Zel dovich Array (SZA) - built for dedicated SZ effect observations. The SZA observations are sensitive to angular scales larger than those subtended by the virial radii of the clusters. Assuming isothermality and hydrostatic equilibrium for the intracluster medium, and gas-mass fractions consistent with those for clusters at moderate redshift, we calculate electron temperatures, gas masses, and total cluster masses from the SZ data. The SZ-derived masses, integrated approximately to the virial radii, are 1.9(sup +0.5)(sub -0.4) x 10(sup 14) solar mass for ClJ1415.1+3612, 3.4 (sup +0.6)(sup -0.5) x 10(sup 14) solar mass for ClJ1429.0+4241 and 7.2(sup +1.3)(sub -0.9) x 10(sup 14) solar mass for ClJ1226.9+3332. The SZ-derived quantities are in good agreement with the cluster properties derived from X-ray measurements.

  20. Observational constraints on the specific accretion-rate distribution of X-ray-selected AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Aird, J.; Schulze, A.; Dwelly, T.; Salvato, M.; Nandra, K.; Merloni, A.; Schneider, D. P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper estimates the specific accretion-rate distribution of AGNs using a sample of 4821 X-ray sources from both deep and shallow surveys. The specific accretion-rate distribution is used as a proxy of the Eddington ratio and is defined as the probability of a galaxy with a given stellar mass and redshift hosting an active nucleus with a certain specific accretion rate. We find that the probability of a galaxy hosting an AGN increases with decreasing specific accretion rate. There is evidence that this trend reverses at low specific accretion rates, λ ≲ 10 - 4-10 - 3 (Eddington units). There is a break close to the Eddington limit, above which the probability of an accretion event decreases steeply. The specific accretion-rate distribution evolves such that the fraction of AGNs among galaxies drops towards lower redshifts. This decrease in the AGN duty cycle is responsible for the strong evolution of the accretion density of the Universe from redshift z ≈ 1-1.5 to the present day. Our analysis also suggests that this evolution is accompanied by a decoupling of accretion events on to black holes from the formation of stars in galaxies. There is also evidence that at earlier times the relative probability of high versus low specific accretion-rate events among galaxies increases. We argue that this differential redshift evolution of the AGN duty cycle with respect to λ produces the AGN downsizing trend, whereby luminous sources peak at earlier epochs compared to less luminous ones. Finally, we also find a stellar mass dependence of the specific accretion-rate distribution, with more massive galaxies avoiding high specific accretion-rate events.

  1. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of a complete bacterial fatty-acid synthase type I

    PubMed Central

    Enderle, Mathias; McCarthy, Andrew; Paithankar, Karthik Shivaji; Grininger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    While a deep understanding of the fungal and mammalian multi-enzyme type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) has been achieved in recent years, the bacterial FAS I family, which is narrowly distributed within the Actinomycetales genera Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium and Nocardia, is still poorly understood. This is of particular relevance for two reasons: (i) although homologous to fungal FAS I, cryo-electron microscopic studies have shown that bacterial FAS I has unique structural and functional properties, and (ii) M. tuberculosis FAS I is a drug target for the therapeutic treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and therefore is of extraordinary importance as a drug target. Crystals of FAS I from C. efficiens, a homologue of M. tuberculosis FAS I, were produced and diffracted X-rays to about 4.5 Å resolution. PMID:26527268

  2. EDDINGTON RATIO DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-SELECTED BROAD-LINE AGNs AT 1.0 < z < 2.2

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Hyewon; Hasinger, Günther; Steinhardt, Charles; Silverman, John D.; Schramm, Malte

    2015-12-20

    We investigate the Eddington ratio distribution of X-ray-selected broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the redshift range 1.0 < z < 2.2, where the number density of AGNs peaks. Combining the optical and Subaru/Fiber Multi Object Spectrograph near-infrared spectroscopy, we estimate black hole masses for broad-line AGNs in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDF-S), and the XMM-Newton Lockman Hole (XMM-LH) surveys. AGNs with similar black hole masses show a broad range of AGN bolometric luminosities, which are calculated from X-ray luminosities, indicating that the accretion rate of black holes is widely distributed. We find a substantial fraction of massive black holes accreting significantly below the Eddington limit at z ≲ 2, in contrast to what is generally found for luminous AGNs at high redshift. Our analysis of observational selection biases indicates that the “AGN cosmic downsizing” phenomenon can be simply explained by the strong evolution of the comoving number density at the bright end of the AGN luminosity function, together with the corresponding selection effects. However, one might need to consider a correlation between the AGN luminosity and the accretion rate of black holes, in which luminous AGNs have higher Eddington ratios than low-luminosity AGNs, in order to understand the relatively small fraction of low-luminosity AGNs with high accretion rates in this epoch. Therefore, the observed downsizing trend could be interpreted as massive black holes with low accretion rates, which are relatively fainter than less-massive black holes with efficient accretion.

  3. Higher prevalence of X-ray selected AGN in intermediate-age galaxies up to z ˜ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Barro, Guillermo; Aird, James; Ferreras, Ignacio; Cava, Antonio; Cardiel, Nicolás; Esquej, Pilar; Gallego, Jesús; Nandra, Kirpal; Rodríguez-Zaurín, Javier

    2014-10-01

    We analyse the stellar populations in the host galaxies of 53 X-ray selected optically dull active galactic nuclei (AGN) at 0.34 < z < 1.07 with ultradeep (mAB = 26.5, 3σ) optical medium-band (R ˜ 50) photometry from the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS). The spectral resolution of SHARDS allows us to consistently measure the strength of the 4000 Å break, Dn(4000), a reliable age indicator for stellar populations. We confirm that most X-ray selected moderate-luminosity AGN (LX < 1044 erg s-1) are hosted by massive galaxies (typically M* >1010.5 M⊙) and that the observed fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN increases with the stellar mass. A careful selection of random control samples of inactive galaxies allows us to remove the stellar mass and redshift dependences of the AGN fraction to explore trends with several stellar age indicators. We find no significant differences in the distribution of the rest-frame U - V colour for AGN hosts and inactive galaxies, in agreement with previous results. However, we find significantly shallower 4000 Å breaks in AGN hosts, indicative of younger stellar populations. With the help of a model-independent determination of the extinction, we obtain extinction-corrected U - V colours and light-weighted average stellar ages. We find that AGN hosts have younger stellar populations and higher extinction compared to inactive galaxies with the same stellar mass and at the same redshift. We find a highly significant excess of AGN hosts with Dn(4000) ˜ 1.4 and light-weighted average stellar ages of 300-500 Myr, as well as a deficit of AGN in intrinsic red galaxies. We interpret failure in recognizing these trends in previous studies as a consequence of the balancing effect in observed colours of the age-extinction degeneracy.

  4. X-ray observations of highly obscured τ9.7 μm > 1 sources: an efficient method for selecting Compton-thick AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgantopoulos, I.; Dasyra, K. M.; Rovilos, E.; Pope, A.; Wu, Y.; Dickinson, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Elbaz, D.; Armus, L.; Akylas, A.

    2011-07-01

    Observations with the IRS spectrograph onboard Spitzer have found many sources with very deep Si features at 9.7 μm, that have optical depths of τ > 1. Since it is believed that a few of these systems in the local Universe are associated with Compton-thick active galactic nuclei (hereafter AGN), we set out to investigate whether the presence of a strong Si absorption feature is a good indicator of a heavily obscured AGN. We compile X-ray spectroscopic observations available in the literature on the optically-thick (τ9.7 μm > 1) sources from the 12 μm IRAS Seyfert sample. We find that the majority of the high-τ optically confirmed Seyferts (six out of nine) in the 12 μm sample are probably Compton-thick. Thus, we provide direct evidence of a connection between mid-IR optically-thick galaxies and Compton-thick AGN, with the success rate being close to 70% in the local Universe. This is at least comparable to, if not better than, other rates obtained with photometric information in the mid to far-IR, or even mid-IR to X-rays. However, this technique cannot provide complete Compton-thick AGN samples, i.e., there are many Compton-thick AGN that do not display significant Si absorption, with the most notable example being NGC 1068. After assessing the validity of the high 9.7 μm optical-depth technique in the local Universe, we attempt to construct a sample of candidate Compton-thick AGN at higher redshifts. We compile a sample of seven high-τSpitzer sources in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) and five in the Spitzer First-Look Survey. All these have been selected to have no PAH features (EW6.2 μm < 0.3 μm) to maximise the probability that they are bona-fide AGN. Six out of the seven GOODS sources have been detected in X-rays, while for the five FLS sources only X-ray flux upper limits are available. The high X-ray luminosities (LX > 1042 erg s-1) of the detected GOODS sources corroborates that these are AGN. For FLS, ancillary optical

  5. Chandra measurements of a complete sample of X-ray luminous galaxy clusters: the luminosity-mass relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, P. A.; Maughan, B. J.; Dahle, H.; Bonamente, M.; Landry, D.; Jones, C.; Joy, M.; Murray, S. S.; van der Pyl, N.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of work involving a statistically complete sample of 34 galaxy clusters, in the redshift range 0.15 ≤ z ≤ 0.3 observed with Chandra. We investigate the luminosity-mass (LM) relation for the cluster sample, with the masses obtained via a full hydrostatic mass analysis. We utilize a method to fully account for selection biases when modelling the LM relation, and find that the LM relation is significantly different from the relation modelled when not account for selection effects. We find that the luminosity of our clusters is 2.2 ± 0.4 times higher (when accounting for selection effects) than the average for a given mass and its mass is 30 per cent lower than the population average for a given luminosity. Equivalently, using the LM relation measured from this sample without correcting for selection biases would lead to the underestimation by 40 per cent of the average mass of a cluster with a given luminosity. Comparing the hydrostatic masses to mass estimates determined from the YX parameter, we find that they are entirely consistent, irrespective of the dynamical state of the cluster.

  6. Characterization of selective binding of alkali cations with carboxylate by x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid microjets

    SciTech Connect

    Saykally, Richard J; Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2008-01-08

    We describe an approach for characterizing selective binding between oppositely charged ionic functional groups under biologically relevant conditions. Relative shifts in K-shell x-ray absorption spectra of aqueous cations and carboxylate anions indicate the corresponding binding strengths via perturbations of carbonyl antibonding orbitals. XAS spectra measured for aqueous formate and acetate solutions containing lithium, sodium, and potassium cations reveal monotonically stronger binding of the lighter metals, supporting recent results from simulations and other experiments. The carbon K-edge spectra of the acetate carbonyl feature centered near 290 eV clearly indicate a preferential interaction of sodium versus potassium, which was less apparent with formate. These results are in accord with the Law of Matching Water Affinities, relating relative hydration strengths of ions to their respective tendencies to form contact ion pairs. Density functional theory calculations of K-shell spectra support the experimental findings.

  7. Synchrotron radiation x-ray topography and defect selective etching analysis of threading dislocations in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Sintonen, Sakari Suihkonen, Sami; Jussila, Henri; Tuomi, Turkka O.; Lipsanen, Harri; Rudziński, Mariusz; Knetzger, Michael; Meissner, Elke; Danilewsky, Andreas

    2014-08-28

    The crystal quality of bulk GaN crystals is continuously improving due to advances in GaN growth techniques. Defect characterization of the GaN substrates by conventional methods is impeded by the very low dislocation density and a large scale defect analysis method is needed. White beam synchrotron radiation x-ray topography (SR-XRT) is a rapid and non-destructive technique for dislocation analysis on a large scale. In this study, the defect structure of an ammonothermal c-plane GaN substrate was recorded using SR-XRT and the image contrast caused by the dislocation induced microstrain was simulated. The simulations and experimental observations agree excellently and the SR-XRT image contrasts of mixed and screw dislocations were determined. Apart from a few exceptions, defect selective etching measurements were shown to correspond one to one with the SR-XRT results.

  8. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  9. [The study of selecting sample detecting position and lead plate inner material in thin film method X-ray fluorescence measurement].

    PubMed

    Gan, Ting-ting; Zhang, Yu-jun; Zhao, Nan-jing; Yin, Gao-fang; Dong, Xin-xin; Wang, Ya-ping; Liu Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2015-01-01

    (1) In this paper type 316 stainless steel metal plate as the research object, the selection of sample detecting position was studied when thin film method X-ray fluorescence measurement was conducted. The study showed that the optimal location for the sample detection was sample distance X-ray tube and detector baseline 1cm with the baseline into a 16°angle. (2) Heavy metal pollutants of Pb, Cd and Cr in industrial ambient air as the main analysis object, when thin film method X-ray fluorescence conducted with lead plate protection, X-rays will penetrate the membrane and continuely stimulate the protective lead plate. Therefore there is lead spectral line interference in the filter membrane background spectrum, which will affect the detection of lead element in real samples. Studies show that when a layer of isolating material was applied between the thin sample and the protective lead plate, the interference of lead line can effectively be avoided. (3) Several rigid insulating material of type 316 stainless steel, brass, aluminum, red copper and PTEE as lead inner material were selected and studied. The study results showed that compared with X-ray fluorescence spectra of other lead inner materials, the X-ray fluorescence spectrum of red copper contained the least element spectral lines. There were not Cr, Cd and Pb spectrum peaks in the X-ray fluorescence spectrum of red copper. And the target timber scattering spectrum intensity in the high energy part was weaker compared to other X-ray fluorescence spectrum. The above analysis shows that red copper has the minimal disturbance to the actual measurement of heavy metals Cr, Cd and Pb. At the same time, red copper as lead inner materials can effectively avoid the interference of lead spectrum line in lead plate. So red copper is the best lead plate inner materials in thin film method X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy measurement. This study provides an important theoretical basis for the assembling and setting

  10. X-Ray Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Elsner, R. F.; Engelhaupt, D.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; Speegle, C. O.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We are fabricating optics for the hard-x-ray region using electroless nickel replication. The attraction of this process, which has been widely used elsewhere, is that the resulting full shell optics are inherently stable and thus can have very good angular resolution. The challenge with this process is to develop lightweight optics (nickel has a relatively high density of 8.9 g/cu cm), and to keep down the costs of mandrel fabrication. We accomplished the former through the development of high-strength nickel alloys that permit very thin shells without fabrication- and handling-induced deformations. For the latter, we have utilized inexpensive grinding and diamond turning to figure the mandrels and then purpose-built polishing machines to finish the surface. In-house plating tanks and a simple water-bath separation system complete the process. To date we have built shells ranging in size from 5 cm diameter to 50 cm, and with thickness down to 100 micron. For our HERO balloon program, we are fabricating over 200 iridium-coated shells, 250 microns thick, for hard-x-ray imaging up to 75 keV. Early test results on these have indicated half-power-diameters of 15 arcsec. The status of these and other hard-x-ray optics will be reviewed.

  11. X-Ray Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Elsner, R. F.; Engelhaupt, D.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; Speegle, C. O.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We are fabricating optics for the hard-x-ray region using electroless nickel replication. The attraction of this process, which has been widely used elsewhere, is that the resulting full shell optics are inherently stable and thus can have very good angular resolution. The challenge with this process is to develop lightweight optics (nickel has a relatively high density of 8.9 g/cu cm), and to keep down the costs of mandrel fabrication. We accomplished the former through the development of high-strength nickel alloys that permit very thin shells without fabrication- and handling-induced deformations. For the latter, we have utilized inexpensive grinding and diamond turning to figure the mandrels and then purpose-built polishing machines to finish the surface. In-house plating tanks and a simple water-bath separation system complete the process. To date we have built shells ranging in size from 5 cm diameter to 50 cm, and with thickness down to 100 micron. For our HERO balloon program, we are fabricating over 200 iridium-coated shells, 250 microns thick, for hard-x-ray imaging up to 75 keV. Early test results on these have indicated half-power-diameters of 15 arcsec. The status of these and other hard-x-ray optics will be reviewed.

  12. The environment of x ray selected BL Lacs: Host galaxies and galaxy clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtz, Ron; Stocke, John T.; Ellingson, Erica; Yee, Howard K. C.

    1993-01-01

    Using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we have imaged a complete, flux-limited sample of Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey BL Lacertae objects in order to study the properties of BL Lac host galaxies and to use quantitative methods to determine the richness of their galaxy cluster environments.

  13. The XXL Survey. XII. Optical spectroscopy of X-ray-selected clusters and the frequency of AGN in superclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulouridis, E.; Poggianti, B.; Altieri, B.; Valtchanov, I.; Jaffé, Y.; Adami, C.; Elyiv, A.; Melnyk, O.; Fotopoulou, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Horellou, C.; Pierre, M.; Pacaud, F.; Plionis, M.; Sadibekova, T.; Surdej, J.

    2016-06-01

    Context. This article belongs to the first series of XXL publications. It presents multifibre spectroscopic observations of three 0.55 deg2 fields in the XXL Survey, which were selected on the basis of their high density of X-ray-detected clusters. The observations were obtained with the AutoFib2+WYFFOS (AF2) wide-field fibre spectrograph mounted on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. Aims: The paper first describes the scientific rationale, the preparation, the data reduction, and the results of the observations, and then presents a study of active galactic nuclei (AGN) within three superclusters. Methods: To determine the redshift of galaxy clusters and AGN, we assign high priority to a) the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), b) the most probable cluster galaxy candidates, and c) the optical counterparts of X-ray point-like sources. We use the outcome of the observations to study the projected (2D) and the spatial (3D) overdensity of AGN in three superclusters. Results: We obtained redshifts for 455 galaxies in total, 56 of which are counterparts of X-ray point-like sources. We were able to determine the redshift of the merging supercluster XLSSC-e, which consists of six individual clusters at z ~ 0.43, and we confirmed the redshift of supercluster XLSSC-d at z ~ 0.3. More importantly, we discovered a new supercluster, XLSSC-f, that comprises three galaxy clusters also at z ~ 0.3. We find a significant 2D overdensity of X-ray point-like sources only around the supercluster XLSSC-f. This result is also supported by the spatial (3D) analysis of XLSSC-f, where we find four AGN with compatible spectroscopic redshifts and possibly one more with compatible photometric redshift. In addition, we find two AGN (3D analysis) at the redshift of XLSSC-e, but no AGN in XLSSC-d. Comparing these findings with the optical galaxy overdensity we conclude that the total number of AGN in the area of the three superclusters significantly exceeds the field expectations. All of the

  14. EXPLORING THE DIVERSITY OF GROUPS AT 0.1 < z < 0.8 WITH X-RAY AND OPTICALLY SELECTED SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, J. L.; Wilman, David J.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Saglia, Roberto; Hou, Annie; Parker, Laura C.; Henderson, Robert D. E.; Mulchaey, John S.; McGee, Sean L.; Balogh, Michael L.; Bower, Richard G.

    2012-09-10

    We present the global group properties of two samples of galaxy groups containing 39 high-quality X-ray-selected systems and 38 optically (spectroscopically) selected systems in coincident spatial regions at 0.12 < z < 0.79. The total mass range of the combined sample is {approx}(10{sup 12}-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }. Only nine optical systems are associable with X-ray systems. We discuss the confusion inherent in the matching of both galaxies to extended X-ray emission and of X-ray emission to already identified optical systems. Extensive spectroscopy has been obtained and the resultant redshift catalog and group membership are provided here. X-ray, dynamical, and total stellar masses of the groups are also derived and presented. We explore the effects of utilizing different centers and applying three different kinds of radial cut to our systems: a constant cut of 1 Mpc and two r{sub 200} cuts, one based on the velocity dispersion of the system and the other on the X-ray emission. We find that an X-ray-based r{sub 200} results in less scatter in scaling relations and less dynamical complexity as evidenced by results of the Anderson-Darling and Dressler-Schectman tests, indicating that this radius tends to isolate the virialized part of the system. The constant and velocity dispersion based cuts can overestimate membership and can work to inflate velocity dispersion and dynamical and stellar mass. We find L{sub X} -{sigma} and M{sub stellar}-L{sub X} scaling relations for X-ray and optically selected systems are not dissimilar. The mean fraction of mass found in stars, excluding intracluster light, for our systems is {approx}0.014 with a logarithmic standard deviation of 0.398 dex. We also define and investigate a sample of groups which are X-ray underluminous given the total group stellar mass. For these systems the fraction of stellar mass contributed by the most massive galaxy is typically lower than that found for the total population of

  15. The clustering amplitude of X-ray-selected AGN at z ˜ 0.8: evidence for a negative dependence on accretion luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountrichas, G.; Georgakakis, A.; Menzel, M.-L.; Fanidakis, N.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Salvato, M.; Nandra, K.

    2016-04-01

    The northern tile of the wide-area and shallow XMM-XXL X-ray survey field is used to estimate the average dark matter halo mass of relatively luminous X-ray-selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) [log {L}_X (2-10 keV)= 43.6^{+0.4}_{-0.4} erg s^{-1}] in the redshift interval z = 0.5-1.2. Spectroscopic follow-up observations of X-ray sources in the XMM-XXL field by the Sloan telescope are combined with the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey spectroscopic galaxy survey to determine the cross-correlation signal between X-ray-selected AGN (total of 318) and galaxies (about 20 000). We model the large scales (2-25 Mpc) of the correlation function to infer a mean dark matter halo mass of log M / (M_{{⊙}} h^{-1}) = 12.50 ^{+0.22} _{-0.30} for the X-ray-selected AGN sample. This measurement is about 0.5 dex lower compared to estimates in the literature of the mean dark matter halo masses of moderate-luminosity X-ray AGN [LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1042-1043 erg s- 1] at similar redshifts. Our analysis also links the mean clustering properties of moderate-luminosity AGN with those of powerful ultraviolet/optically selected QSOs, which are typically found in haloes with masses few times 1012 M⊙. There is therefore evidence for a negative luminosity dependence of the AGN clustering. This is consistent with suggestions that AGN have a broad dark matter halo mass distribution with a high mass tail that becomes subdominant at high accretion luminosities. We further show that our results are in qualitative agreement with semi-analytic models of galaxy and AGN evolution, which attribute the wide range of dark matter halo masses among the AGN population to different triggering mechanisms and/or black hole fuelling modes.

  16. The AT20G view of Swift/BAT selected AGN: high-frequency radio waves meet hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Murphy, T.; Chhetri, R.; Sadler, E.; Ajello, M.

    2013-05-01

    We cross-matched the 6-year Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey of active galactic nuclei (AGN) with the AT20G radio survey of the southern sky, which is one of the largest high-frequency radio surveys available. With these data we investigated the possible correlation between the radio and the X-ray emission at the highest radio and X-ray frequencies. We found 37 AGN with a high probability of association (>80 per cent), among which 19 are local Seyfert galaxies (with median redshift z = 0.03) and 18 blazars. We found that ≈20 per cent of the AGN detected in hard X-rays are also bright radio sources at 20 GHz, but the apparent correlation between the radio and hard X-ray luminosity is completely driven by the different median redshifts of the two subgroups of AGN. When we consider only the local Seyfert sample we find no evidence of a correlation between their 20 GHz and 15-55 keV power. Therefore it appears that at high frequencies the radio-X connection, which had been previously observed at lower frequencies, disappears. The disappearance of the radio-X correlation at high radio and X-ray frequencies could be tested through Very Long Baseline Interferometry and the use of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) satellite.

  17. Searching for Dual AGNs in Galaxy Mergers: Understanding Double-Peaked [O III] and Ultra Hard X-rays as Selection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGurk, Rosalie C.; Max, Claire E.; Medling, Anne; Shields, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    When galaxies merge, gas accretes onto both central supermassive black holes. Thus, one expects to see close pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or dual AGNs, in a fraction of galaxy mergers. However, finding them remains a challenge. The presence of double-peaked [O III] or of ultra hard X-rays have been proposed as techniques to select dual AGNs efficiently. We studied a sample of double-peaked narrow [O III] emitting AGNs from SDSS DR7. By obtaining new and archival high spatial resolution images taken with the Keck 2 Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the near-infrared (IR) camera NIRC2, we showed that 30% of double-peaked [O III] emission line SDSS AGNs have two spatial components within a 3' radius. However, spatially resolved spectroscopy or X-ray observations are needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems containing two AGNs. We followed up these spatially-double candidate dual AGNs with integral field spectroscopy from Keck OSIRIS and Gemini GMOS and with long-slit spectroscopy from Keck NIRSPEC and Shane Kast Double Spectrograph. We find double-peaked emitters are caused sometimes by dual AGN and sometimes by outflows or narrow line kinematics. We also performed Chandra X-ray ACIS-S observations on 12 double-peaked candidate dual AGNs. Using our observations and 8 archival observations, we compare the distribution of X-ray photons to our spatially double near-IR images, measure X-ray luminosities and hardness ratios, and estimate column densities. By assessing what fraction of double-peaked emission line SDSS AGNs are true dual AGNs, we can better determine whether double-peaked [O III] is an efficient dual AGN indicator and constrain the statistics of dual AGNs. A second technique to find dual AGN is the detection of ultra hard X-rays by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. We use CARMA observations to measure and map the CO(1-0) present in nearby ultra-hard X-ray Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) merging with either a quiescent companion

  18. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  19. X-ray backscatter imaging for radiography by selective detection and snapshot: Evolution, development, and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedlock, Daniel

    Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) is a single-sided imaging technique that uses the penetrating power of radiation and unique interaction properties of radiation with matter to image subsurface features. CBI has a variety of applications that include non-destructive interrogation, medical imaging, security and military applications. Radiography by selective detection (RSD), lateral migration radiography (LMR) and shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR) are different CBI techniques that are being optimized and developed. Radiography by selective detection (RSD) is a pencil beam Compton backscatter imaging technique that falls between highly collimated and uncollimated techniques. Radiography by selective detection uses a combination of single- and multiple-scatter photons from a projected area below a collimation plane to generate an image. As a result, the image has a combination of first- and multiple-scatter components. RSD techniques offer greater subsurface resolution than uncollimated techniques, at speeds at least an order of magnitude faster than highly collimated techniques. RSD scanning systems have evolved from a prototype into near market-ready scanning devices for use in a variety of single-sided imaging applications. The design has changed to incorporate state-of-the-art detectors and electronics optimized for backscatter imaging with an emphasis on versatility, efficiency and speed. The RSD system has become more stable, about 4 times faster, and 60% lighter while maintaining or improving image quality and contrast over the past 3 years. A new snapshot backscatter radiography (SBR) CBI technique, shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR), has been developed from concept and proof-of-principle to a functional laboratory prototype. SABR radiography uses digital detection media and shaded aperture configurations to generate near-surface Compton backscatter images without scanning, similar to how transmission radiographs are taken. Finally, a

  20. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of micro-patterns obtained by spatially selective hydrogenation of GaAsN

    SciTech Connect

    Ciatto, G.; Pettinari, G.; Balakrishnan, N.; Patanè, A.; Berenguer, F.; Birindelli, S.; Felici, M.; Polimeni, A.

    2015-02-02

    We report a comparative synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction study of GaAs{sub 1−y}N{sub y} micro-structures obtained by two different patterning methods: spatially selective H incorporation achieved by using H-opaque masks and spatially selective H removal attained by laser writing. These methods are emerging as original routes for fabrication of micro- and nano-structures with in-plane modulation of the bandgap energy. By measuring the out-of-plane and in-plane lattice parameters, we find that for both patterning approaches the largest part of the micro-structure volume remains tensile-strained and pseudomorphic to the substrate, regardless of the compressive-strained hydrogenated barriers. However, a larger lattice disorder is probed in the laser-written micro-structures and attributed to partial removal of H and/or strain changes at the micro-structure boundaries. This larger lattice disorder is confirmed by photoluminescence studies.

  1. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  2. MS 1603.6 + 2600, an unusual X-ray selected binary system at high Galactic latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Simon L.; Liebert, James; Stocke, John T.; Gioia, Isabella M.; Schild, Rudy E.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of an eclipsing binary system at Galactic latitude 47 deg, found as a serendipitous X-ray source in the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey, is described. The object has X-ray flux 1.1 x 10 to the -12th ergs/sq cm s (0.3-3.5 keV) and mean magnitude R = 19.4. An orbital period of 111 minutes is found. The problem discussed is whether the system has a white dwarf or neutron star primary, in the end preferring the neutron star primary model. If the system has either optical or X-ray luminosities typical of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB), it must be at a very large distance (30-80 kpc). Blueshifted He I absorption is seen, indicating cool outflowing material, similar to that seen in the LMXB AC 211 in the globular cluster M15.

  3. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  4. Polarization selection rules and optical transitions in terbium activated yttrium tantalate phosphor under x-ray, vacuum-ultraviolet, and ultraviolet excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, Mihail; Tsukerblat, Boris; Byeon, Clare Chisu; Arellano, Ivan; Popovici, Elisabeth-Jeanne; Noh, Do Young

    2009-01-01

    The terbium-activated yttrium tantalite (YTaO4:Tb{sup 3{sup +}}) phosphor is of great interest due to the interesting spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in crystals and also practical use in x-ray imaging. Using the group-theoretical approach, we analyze the selection rules for the transition between Stark components of Tb{sup 3{sup +}} in symmetry of the actual crystal field and the polarization for the allowed transitions. The luminescence upon UV, vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV), and x-ray excitation is presented and discussed. The YTaO4:Tb{sup 3{sup +}} phosphors are found to be efficient VUV-excited luminescent materials that could be used not only in x-ray intensifying screens, but also in mercury-free fluorescent lamps or plasma display panels.

  5. Bone x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... not being scanned. Alternative Names X-ray - bone Images Skeleton Skeletal spine Osteogenic sarcoma - x-ray References ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  6. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  7. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  8. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  9. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... image. For most x-rays, the risk of cancer or defects is very low. Most experts feel that the benefits of appropriate x-ray ... Geleijns J, Tack D. Medical physics: radiation risks. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard ...

  10. X-Ray Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Radiographic Image Acquisition & Processing Software for Security Markets. Used in operation of commercial x-ray scanners and manipulation of x-ray images for emergency responders including State, Local, Federal, and US Military bomb technicians and analysts.

  11. The spatial distribution of X-ray selected AGN in the Chandra deep fields: a theoretical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marulli, Federico; Bonoli, Silvia; Branchini, Enzo; Gilli, Roberto; Moscardini, Lauro; Springel, Volker

    2009-07-01

    We study the spatial distribution of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the framework of hierarchical coevolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies and dark matter haloes. To this end, we have applied the theoretical model developed by Croton et al., De Lucia & Blaizot and Marulli et al. to the output of the Millennium Run and obtained hundreds of realizations of past light cones from which we have extracted realistic mock AGN catalogues that mimic the Chandra deep fields. We find that the model AGN number counts are in fair agreement with observations both in the soft and in the hard X-ray bands, except at fluxes <~10-15ergcm-2s-1, where the model systematically overestimates the observations. However, a large fraction of these faint objects are typically excluded from the spectroscopic AGN samples of the Chandra fields. We find that the spatial two-point correlation function predicted by the model is well described by a power-law relation out to 20h-1Mpc, in close agreement with observations. Our model matches the correlation length r0 of AGN in the Chandra Deep Field-North but underestimates it in the Chandra Deep Field-South. When fixing the slope to γ = 1.4, as in Gilli et al., the statistical significance of the mismatch is 2σ-2.5σ, suggesting that the predicted cosmic variance, which dominates the error budget, may not account for the different correlation length of the AGN in the two fields. However, the overall mismatch between the model and the observed correlation function decreases when both r0 and γ are allowed to vary, suggesting that more realistic AGN models and a full account of all observational errors may significantly reduce the tension between AGN clustering in the two fields. While our results are robust to changes in the model prescriptions for the AGN light curves, the luminosity dependence of the clustering is sensitive to the different light-curve models adopted. However, irrespective of the model

  12. Comparison of intensity modulated x-ray therapy and intensity modulated proton therapy for selective subvolume boosting: a phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, R T; Barbee, D L; Mackie, T R; Jeraj, R

    2009-01-01

    Selective subvolume boosting can theoretically improve tumour control probability while maintaining normal tissue complication probabilities similar to those of uniform dose distributions. In this work the abilities of intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to deliver boosts to multiple subvolumes of varying size and proximities are compared in a thorough phantom study. IMXT plans were created using the step-and-shoot (IMXT-SAS) and helical tomotherapy (IMXT-HT) methods. IMPT plans were created with the spot scanning (IMPT-SS) and distal gradient tracking (IMPT-DGT) methods. IMPT-DGT is a generalization of the distal edge tracking method designed to reduce the number of proton beam spots required to deliver non-uniform dose distributions relative to IMPT-SS. The IMPT methods were delivered over both 180° and 360° arcs. The IMXT-SAS and IMPT-SS methods least and most optimally satisfied the non-uniform dose prescriptions, respectively. The IMPT delivery methods reduced normal tissue integral dose by a factor of about two relative to the IMXT delivery methods, regardless of the delivery arc. The IMPT-DGT method reduced the number of proton beam spots by a factor of about three relative to the IMPT-SS method. PMID:17921573

  13. Star Formation and AGN activity of X-ray selected AGN host galaxies in the Chandra-COSMOS Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyewon

    2017-01-01

    One of the ongoing issues for understanding the galaxy formation and evolution is how active galactic nuclei (AGNs) affect the growth of their host galaxies. We investigate the correlations between AGN activity and star formation properties of a large sample of ~3700 X-ray selected AGNs over a wide range of luminosities (42 < log Lx < 45) up to z~5 in the Chandra-COSMOS Legacy Survey. We perform a multi-component modeling from the far-infrared, when available, to the near-UV using AGN emission from the big-blue-bump (for Type 1 AGNs), a nuclear dust torus model, a galaxy model and a starburst component for the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Through detailed analysis of SEDs, we derive AGN host galaxy properties, such as stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and AGN luminosities. We find that AGN host galaxies have, on average, similar SFRs compared to the normal star-forming main sequence galaxies, suggesting no significant enhancement or quenching of star formation. The average SFR of AGN host galaxies shows a flat distribution in bins of AGN luminosity, consistent with recent ideas that the shorter variability timescale of AGN compared to star formation can lead to a flat relationship between the SFR and black hole accretion rates. Our results suggest that both star formation and nuclear activity in the majority of AGN host galaxies might be driven more by internal secular processes at z<3, implying that they have substantially grown at much earlier epoch.

  14. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  15. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  16. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  17. The infrared continuum spectrum of x ray illuminated molecular gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voit, G. Mark

    1990-01-01

    In starburst galaxies, active galaxies, and the mysterious ultraluminous infrared galaxies, x rays are likely to interact with molecular gas and dust, thereby inducing infrared emission. X ray heated thermal dust will emit the IR continuum, and x ray photoelectrons will excite an IR emission-line spectrum. Here, researchers model the IR continuum emission characteristic of some selected x ray spectral fluxes, in particular the x ray bremsstrahlung characteristic of supernova and stellar wind bubble shocks in dense media and the power law spectra characteristic of active galactic nuclei. These models are part of a larger project to determine the complete IR spectra, lines plus continuum, of x ray sources embedded in molecular gas. They modeled the thermal emission from grains by calculating a grain temperature/size/composition distribution function, f(T,a,Comp.), which accounts for temperature fluctuations by averaging over all grain thermal histories. In determining the grain thermal distribution, researchers account for both direct grain heating (by x ray absorption and subsequent electron energy deposition) and indirect grain heating (by absorption of the UV emission stimulated by non-thermal photo- and Auger electrons in the gas phase). We let the grain size distribution be proportional to a(exp -3.5), and they consider two types of grain composition: graphites, which we assume to be pure carbon, and silicates, which contain all other depleted heavy elements. They derive the grain composition distribution function from solar abundances and interstellar depletion data.

  18. The Rosat x-ray sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voges, Wolfgang

    1995-01-01

    The ROSAT (Röntgensatellit) X-ray astronomy satellite has completed the first all-sky x-ray and XUV survey with imaging telescopes. About 60 000 new x-ray and 400 new XUV (1) sources were detected. This contribution will deal with preliminary results from the ROSAT ALL-SKY X-RAY SURVEY. The ROSAT diffuse and point-source x-ray skymaps, the positional accuracy obtained for the x-ray sources, and a few results from correlations performed with available catalogues in various energy bands like the Radio, Infrared, Visible, UV, and hard x-rays as well as identifications from optical follow-up observations will be presented.

  19. Spectral clustering for optical confirmation and redshift estimation of X-ray selected galaxy cluster candidates in the SDSS Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, E.; Takey, A.; Shoukry, A.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a galaxy cluster finding algorithm based on spectral clustering technique to identify optical counterparts and estimate optical redshifts for X-ray selected cluster candidates. As an application, we run our algorithm on a sample of X-ray cluster candidates selected from the third XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalog (3XMM-DR5) that are located in the Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our method works on galaxies described in the color-magnitude feature space. We begin by examining 45 galaxy clusters with published spectroscopic redshifts in the range of 0.1-0.8 with a median of 0.36. As a result, we are able to identify their optical counterparts and estimate their photometric redshifts, which have a typical accuracy of 0.025 and agree with the published ones. Then, we investigate another 40 X-ray cluster candidates (from the same cluster survey) with no redshift information in the literature and found that 12 candidates are considered as galaxy clusters in the redshift range from 0.29 to 0.76 with a median of 0.57. These systems are newly discovered clusters in X-rays and optical data. Among them 7 clusters have spectroscopic redshifts for at least one member galaxy.

  20. Comparison of galaxy clusters selected by weak-lensing, optical spectroscopy, and X-rays in the deep lens survey F2 field

    SciTech Connect

    Starikova, Svetlana; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Murray, Stephen S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.

    2014-05-10

    We compare galaxy clusters selected in Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the 4 deg{sup 2} Deep Lens Survey (DLS) F2 field to the cluster samples previously selected in the same field from a sensitive weak-lensing shear map derived from the DLS and from a detailed galaxy redshift survey—the Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS). Our Chandra and XMM-Newton observations cover 1.6 deg{sup 2} of the DLS F2 field, including all 12 weak-lensing peaks above a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.5, along with 16 of the 20 SHELS clusters with published velocity dispersions >500 km s{sup –1}. We detect 26 extended X-ray sources in this area and confirm 23 of them as galaxy clusters using the optical imaging. Approximately 75% of clusters detected in either X-ray or spectroscopic surveys are found in both; these follow the previously established scaling relations between velocity dispersion, L {sub X}, and T {sub X}. A lower percentage, 60%, of clusters are in common between X-ray and DLS samples. With the exception of a high false-positive rate in the DLS weak-lensing search (5 out of 12 DLS candidates appear to be false), differences between the three cluster detection methods can be attributed primarily to observational uncertainties and intrinsic scatter between different observables and cluster mass.

  1. Focused ion beam patterned Fe thin films A study by selective area Stokes polarimetry and soft x-Ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, P. J.; Shen, T. H.; Grundy, P. J.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.; Morton, S. A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.

    2010-11-14

    We demonstrate the potential to modify the magnetic behavior and structural properties of ferromagnetic thin films using focused ion beam 'direct-write' lithography. Patterns inspired by the split-ring resonators often used as components in meta-materials were defined upon 15 nm Fe films using a 30 keV Ga{sup +} focused ion beam at a dose of 2 x 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2}. Structural, chemical and magnetic changes to the Fe were studied using transmission soft X-ray microscopy at the ALS, Berkeley CA. X-ray absorption spectra showed a 23% reduction in the thickness of the film in the Ga irradiated areas, but no chemical change to the Fe was evident. X-ray images of the magnetic reversal process show domain wall pinning around the implanted areas, resulting in an overall increase in the coercivity of the film. Transmission electron microscopy showed significant grain growth in the implanted regions.

  2. The star-forming properties of an ultra-hard x-ray selected sample of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Thomas Taro

    This thesis provides a comprehensive examination of star formation in the host galaxies of active galactic nuclei or AGN. AGN are bright, central regions of galaxies that are powered through accretion onto a supermassive black hole (SMBH). Through accretion and the loss of gravitational potential energy, AGN emit powerful radiation over all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. This radiation can influence the AGN's host galaxy through what is known as AGN ``feedback'' and is thought to suppress star formation as well as stop accretion onto the SMBH leading to a co-evolution between the SMBH and its host galaxy. Theoretical models have long invoked AGN feedback to be able reproduce the galaxy population we see today but observations have been unclear as to whether AGN actually have an effect on star formation. To address this question, we selected a large sample of local ( z < 0.05) AGN based on their detection at ultra-hard X-ray energies (14-195 keV) with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). Ultra-hard X-ray selection frees our sample from selection effects and biases due to obscuration and host galaxy contamination that can hinder other AGN samples. With these 313 BAT AGN we conducted a far-infrared survey using the HerschelSpace Observatory. We use the far-infrared imaging to probe the cold dust that traces recent star formation in the galaxy and construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from 12-500 \\micron. We decompose the SEDs to remove the AGN contribution and measure infrared luminosity which provides us with robust estimates of the star formation rate (SFR). Through a comparison with a stellar-mass matched non-AGN sample, we find that AGN host galaxies have larger dust masses, dust temperatures, and SFRs, confirming the results of previous studies that showed the optical colors of the BAT AGN are bluer than non-AGN. We find that the AGN luminosity as probed by the 14-195 keV luminosity is not related to the SFR of the host galaxy suggesting

  3. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the beryllium-filtered data from Flight 17.020 was completed. The data base provided by the Wisconsin diffuse X-ray sky survey is being analyzed by correlating the B and C band emission with individual velocity components of neutral hydrogen. Work on a solid state detector to be used in high resolution spectroscopy of diffuse or extend X-ray sources is continuing. A series of 21 cm observations was completed. A paper on the effects of process parameter variation on the reflectivity of sputter-deposited tungsten-carvon multilayers was published.

  4. Combining selective sequential extractions, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and principal component analysis for quantitative zinc speciation in soil.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Andreas C; Kretzschmar, Ruben; Pfister, Sabina; Roberts, Darryl R

    2002-12-01

    Selective sequential extractions (SSE) and, more recently, X-ray absorption fine-structure IXAFS) spectroscopy have been used to characterize the speciation of metal contaminants in soils and sediments. However, both methods have specific limitations when multiple metal species coexist in soils and sediments. In this study, we tested a combined approach, in which XAFS spectra were collected after each of 6 SSE steps, and then analyzed by multishell fitting, principal component analysis (PCA) and linear combination fits (LCF), to determine the Zn speciation in a smelter-contaminated, strongly acidic soil. In the topsoil, Zn was predominately found in the smelter-emitted minerals franklinite (60%) and sphalerite (30%) and as aqueous or outer-sphere Zn2+ (10%). In the subsoil, aqueous or outer-sphere Zn2+ prevailed (55%), but 45% of Zn was incorporated by hydroxy-Al interlayers of phyllosilicates. Formation of such Zn-bearing hydroxy-interlayers, which has been observed here for the first time, may be an important mechanism to reduce the solubility of Zn in those soils, which are too acidic to retain Zn by formation of inner-sphere sorption complexes, layered double hydroxides or phyllosilicates. The stepwise removal of Zn fractions by SSE significantly improved the identification of species by XAFS and PCA and their subsequent quantification by LCF. While SSE alone provided excellent estimates of the amount of mobile Zn species, it failed to identify and quantify Zn associated with mineral phases because of nonspecific dissolution and the precipitation of Zn oxalate. The systematic combination of chemical extraction, spectroscopy, and advanced statistical analysis allowed us to identify and quantify both mobile and recalcitrant species with high reliability and precision.

  5. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.

    1986-04-01

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

  6. CO2-selective methanol steam reforming on In-doped Pd studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rameshan, Christoph; Lorenz, Harald; Mayr, Lukas; Penner, Simon; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Arrigo, Rosa; Haevecker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (in situ XPS) was used to study the structural and catalytic properties of Pd–In near-surface intermetallic phases in correlation with previously studied PdZn and PdGa. Room temperature deposition of ∼4 monolayer equivalents (MLEs) of In metal on Pd foil and subsequent annealing to 453 K in vacuum yields a ∼1:1 Pd/In near-surface multilayer intermetallic phase. This Pd1In1 phase exhibits a similar “Cu-like” electronic structure and indium depth distribution as its methanol steam reforming (MSR)-selective multilayer Pd1Zn1 counterpart. Catalytic characterization of the multilayer Pd1In1 phase in MSR yielded a CO2-selectivity of almost 100% between 493 and 550 K. In contrast to previously studied In2O3-supported PdIn nanoparticles and pure In2O3, intermediate formaldehyde is only partially converted to CO2 using this Pd1In1 phase. Strongly correlated with PdZn, on an In-diluted PdIn intermetallic phase with “Pd-like” electronic structure, prepared by thermal annealing at 623 K, methanol steam reforming is suppressed and enhanced CO formation via full methanol dehydrogenation is observed. To achieve CO2-TOF values on the isolated Pd1In1 intermetallic phase as high as on supported PdIn/In2O3, at least 593 K reaction temperature is required. A bimetal-oxide synergism, with both bimetallic and oxide synergistically contributing to the observed catalytic activity and selectivity, manifests itself by accelerated formaldehyde-to-CO2 conversion at markedly lowered temperatures as compared to separate oxide and bimetal. Combination of suppression of full methanol dehydrogenation to CO on Pd1In1 inhibited inverse water–gas-shift reaction on In2O3 and fast water activation/conversion of formaldehyde is the key to the low-temperature activity and high CO2-selectivity of the supported catalyst. PMID:23226689

  7. Investigation of dual-energy X-ray photon counting using a cadmium telluride detector with dual-energy selection electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Kosuge, Yoshiyuki; Yamanome, Hayato; Mikata, Akiko; Miura, Tatsuya; Oda, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Tomotaka; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    To obtain two kinds of tomograms at two different X-ray energy ranges simultaneously, we have developed a dual-energy X-ray photon counter with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector and two energy-selecting devices (ESDs). The ESD consists of two comparators and a microcomputer (MC). X-ray photons are detected using the CdTe detector, and the event pulses from a shaping amplifier are sent to two ESDs simultaneously to determine two energy ranges. X-ray photons in the two ranges are counted using the MCs, and the logical pulses from the MCs are input to frequency-to-voltage converters (FVCs). The outputs from the two FVCs are input to a personal computer through an analog-to-digital converter to carry out dual-energy computed tomography. The tube voltage and current were 80 kV and 8.5 μA, respectively. Two tomograms were obtained simultaneously with two energy ranges. K-edge CT using iodine and gadolinium media was carried out utilizing two energy ranges of 33-45 and 50-65 keV, respectively. The maximum count rate was 6.8 kilocounts per second with energies ranging from 10 to 80 keV, and the exposure time for tomography was 9.8 min.

  8. Swift J2218.4+1925: a new hard-X-ray-selected polar observed with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, F.; de Martino, D.; Mukai, K.; Falanga, M.

    2014-12-01

    Swift J2218.4+1925, a hard-X-ray source detected by Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), has been proposed as a candidate magnetic cataclysmic variable of the polar type from optical spectroscopy. Using XMM-Newton we perform detailed timing and spectral analysis with simultaneous X-ray (0.3-10 keV) and optical B-band data. We complement the spectral study with archival hard-X-ray (14-70 keV) spectra collected by Swift BAT as well as with optical, near and mid-infrared photometry from Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Two-Micron All Sky Survey and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer archive, respectively. A strong periodic X-ray signal at 2.16 h, fully consistent with the recently determined spectroscopic orbital period, adds Swift J2218.4+1925 to the small group of hard-X-ray polars and locates it at the low edge of the orbital period gap. The X-ray pulse profile shows the typical bright and faint phases seen in polars, that last ˜70 and ˜30 per cent of the orbit, respectively. A pronounced dip centred on the bright phase is also detected. It is stronger at lower energies and is mainly produced by photoelectric absorption. A binary inclination i ˜ 40°-50° and a magnetic colatitude β ˜ 55°-64° are estimated. The source appears to accrete over a large area ˜24° wide. A multitemperature optically thin emission with complex absorption well describes the broad-band (0.3-70 keV) spectrum, with no signs of a soft X-ray blackbody component. The spectral shape strongly varies with the source rotation reaching plasma temperatures up to 55 keV, hardening at the dip and being softer during the faint phase (˜7 keV). We also find the first indication of an absorption edge due to a warm absorber in a polar. Indication of overabundance of neon is found in the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectra. The UV to mid-IR spectral energy distribution reveals an excess in the near and mid-IR, likely due to low cyclotron harmonics. We further estimate a white dwarf mass of 0.97 M

  9. A RADIO-SELECTED BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY CANDIDATE IN THE MILKY WAY GLOBULAR CLUSTER M62

    SciTech Connect

    Chomiuk, Laura; Ransom, Scott; Strader, Jay; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Miller-Jones, James C. A.; Heinke, Craig; Noyola, Eva; Seth, Anil C.

    2013-11-01

    We report the discovery of a candidate stellar-mass black hole in the Milky Way globular cluster M62. We detected the black hole candidate, which we call M62-VLA1, in the core of the cluster using deep radio continuum imaging from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. M62-VLA1 is a faint source with a flux density of 18.7 ± 1.9 μJy at 6.2 GHz and a flat radio spectrum (α = –0.24 ± 0.42, for S{sub ν} = ν{sup α}). M62 is the second Milky Way cluster with a candidate stellar-mass black hole; unlike the two candidate black holes previously found in the cluster M22, M62-VLA1 is associated with a Chandra X-ray source, supporting its identification as a black hole X-ray binary. Measurements of its radio and X-ray luminosity, while not simultaneous, place M62-VLA1 squarely on the well-established radio-X-ray correlation for stellar-mass black holes. In archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging, M62-VLA1 is coincident with a star near the lower red giant branch. This possible optical counterpart shows a blue excess, Hα emission, and optical variability. The radio, X-ray, and optical properties of M62-VLA1 are very similar to those for V404 Cyg, one of the best-studied quiescent stellar-mass black holes. We cannot yet rule out alternative scenarios for the radio source, such as a flaring neutron star or background galaxy; future observations are necessary to determine whether M62-VLA1 is indeed an accreting stellar-mass black hole.

  10. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  11. X-rays surgical revolution.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Wilhelm Roentgen (1845-1923) created a surgical revolution with the discovery of the X-rays in late 1895 and the subsequent introduction of this technique for the management of surgical patients. No other physician or scientist had ever imagined such a powerful and worthwhile discovery. Other scientists paved the way for Roentgen to approach the use of these new X-rays for medical purposes. In this way, initially, and prior to Roentgen, Thompson, Hertz, and Lenard applied themselves to the early developments of this technology. They made good advances but never reached the clearly defined understanding brought about by Roentgen. The use of a Crookes tube, a barium platinocyanide screen, with fluorescent light and the generation of energy to propagate the cathode rays were the necessary elements for the conception of an X-ray picture. On November 8, 1895, Roentgen began his experiments on X-ray technology when he found that some kind of rays were being produced by the glass of the tube opposite to the cathode. The development of a photograph successfully completed this early imaging process. After six intense weeks of research, on December 22, he obtained a photograph of the hand of his wife, the first X-ray ever made. This would be a major contribution to the world of medicine and surgery.

  12. Bone densitometry using x-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Krmar, M; Shukla, S; Ganezer, K

    2010-10-21

    In contrast to the two distinct energy regions that are involved in dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry for bone densitometry, the complete spectrum of a beam transmitted through two layers of different materials is utilized in this study to calculate the areal density of each material. Test objects constructed from aluminum and Plexiglas were used to simulate cortical bone and soft tissue, respectively. Solid-state HPGe (high-purity germanium) detectors provided high-resolution x-ray spectra over an energy range of approximately 20-80 keV. Areal densities were obtained from spectra using two methods: a system of equations for two spectral regions and a nonlinear fit of the entire spectrum. Good agreement with the known areal densities of aluminum was obtained over a wide range of PMMA thicknesses. The spectral method presented here can be used to decrease beam hardening at a small number of bodily points selected for examination.

  13. Lensed arc statistics: comparison of Millennium simulation galaxy clusters to Hubble Space Telescope observations of an X-ray selected sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horesh, Assaf; Maoz, Dan; Hilbert, Stefan; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2011-11-01

    It has been debated for a decade whether there is a large overabundance of strongly lensed arcs in galaxyclusters, compared to expectations from Λ cold dark matter cosmology. We perform ray tracing through the most massive haloes of the Millennium simulation at several redshifts in their evolution, using the Hubble Ultra Deep Field as a source image, to produce realistic simulated lensed images. We compare the lensed arc statistics measured from the simulations to those of a sample of 45 X-ray selected clusters, observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, that we have analysed in Horesh et al. The observations and the simulations are matched in cluster masses, redshifts, observational effects, and the algorithmic arc detection and selection. At z= 0.6, there are too few massive-enough clusters in the Millennium volume for a proper statistical comparison with the observations. At redshifts 0.3 < z < 0.5, however, we have large numbers of simulated and observed clusters, and the latter are an unbiased selection from a complete sample. For these redshifts, we find excellent agreement between the observed and simulated arc statistics, in terms of the mean number of arcs per cluster, the distribution of number of arcs per cluster and the angular separation distribution. At z≈ 0.2 some conflict remains, with real clusters being ˜3 times more efficient arc producers than their simulated counterparts. This may arise due to selection biases in the observed subsample at this redshift, to some mismatch in masses between the observed and simulated clusters or to physical effects that arise at low redshift and enhance the lensing efficiency, but which are not represented by the simulations.

  14. COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH-SELECTED CLUSTERS WITH X-RAY OBSERVATIONS IN THE FIRST 178 deg{sup 2} OF THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; De Haan, T.; Dudley, J. P.; Reichardt, C. L.; Aird, K. A.; Andersson, K.; Bazin, G.; Desai, S.; Armstrong, R.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; and others

    2013-02-15

    We use measurements from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) cluster survey in combination with X-ray measurements to constrain cosmological parameters. We present a statistical method that fits for the scaling relations of the SZ and X-ray cluster observables with mass while jointly fitting for cosmology. The method is generalizable to multiple cluster observables, and self-consistently accounts for the effects of the cluster selection and uncertainties in cluster mass calibration on the derived cosmological constraints. We apply this method to a data set consisting of an SZ-selected catalog of 18 galaxy clusters at z > 0.3 from the first 178 deg{sup 2} of the 2500 deg{sup 2} SPT-SZ survey, with 14 clusters having X-ray observations from either Chandra or XMM-Newton. Assuming a spatially flat {Lambda}CDM cosmological model, we find the SPT cluster sample constrains {sigma}{sub 8}({Omega} {sub m}/0.25){sup 0.30} = 0.785 {+-} 0.037. In combination with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum from the SPT and the seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data, the SPT cluster sample constrains {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.795 {+-} 0.016 and {Omega} {sub m} = 0.255 {+-} 0.016, a factor of 1.5 improvement on each parameter over the CMB data alone. We consider several extensions beyond the {Lambda}CDM model by including the following as free parameters: the dark energy equation of state (w), the sum of the neutrino masses ({Sigma}m {sub {nu}}), the effective number of relativistic species (N {sub eff}), and a primordial non-Gaussianity (f {sub NL}). We find that adding the SPT cluster data significantly improves the constraints on w and {Sigma}m {sub {nu}} beyond those found when using measurements of the CMB, supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and the Hubble constant. Considering each extension independently, we best constrain w = -0.973 {+-} 0.063 and the sum of neutrino masses {Sigma}m {sub {nu}} < 0.28 eV at 95

  15. Low-dimensional systems investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy: a selection of 2D, 1D and 0D cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mino, Lorenzo; Agostini, Giovanni; Borfecchia, Elisa; Gianolio, Diego; Piovano, Andrea; Gallo, Erik; Lamberti, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    Over the last three decades low-dimensional systems have attracted increasing interest both from the fundamental and technological points of view due to their unique physical and chemical properties. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a powerful tool for the characterization of such kinds of systems, owing to its chemical selectivity and high sensitivity in interatomic distance determination. Moreover, XAS does not require long-range ordering, that is usually absent in low-dimensional systems. Finally, this technique can simultaneously provide information on electronic and local structural properties of the nanomaterials, significantly contributing to clarify the relation between their atomic structure and their peculiar physical properties. This review provides a general introduction to XAS, discussing the basic theory of the technique, the most used detection modes, the related experimental setups and some complementary relevant characterization techniques (diffraction anomalous fine structure, extended energy-loss fine structure, pair distribution function, x-ray emission spectroscopy, high-energy resolution fluorescence detected XAS and x-ray Raman scattering). Subsequently, a selection of significant applications of XAS to two-, one- and zero-dimensional systems will be presented. The selected low-dimensional systems include IV and III-V semiconductor films, quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots; carbon-based nanomaterials (epitaxial graphene and carbon nanotubes); metal oxide films, nanowires, nanorods and nanocrystals; metal nanoparticles. Finally, the future perspectives for the application of XAS to nanostructures are discussed.

  16. X-rays from stars.

    PubMed

    Güdel, Manuel

    2002-09-15

    More than two years of observation with Chandra and XMM-Newton has provided a rich harvest of new results on the physics of stellar coronae and winds. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy in particular has opened new windows to the structure, the dynamics and the composition of stellar atmospheres. The present paper presents selected results from the areas of hot and cool stars and star formation, summarizing new views of the thermal structure and energy release in stellar coronae, observations of magnetically active brown dwarfs, the structure of winds in hot stars, the physics in colliding-wind binary systems, and X-rays from protostars and stellar jets.

  17. L X-ray intensity ratio measurements using selective L sub-shell photo-ionisation on synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Himani; Tiwari, M. K.; Mittal, Raj

    2017-10-01

    Lα/Lℓ, Lβ /Lℓ and Lγ/Lℓ intensity ratios have been measured for elements in the range 66≤Z≤83 at tuned photon energies on synchrotron beam line-16 at Indus-2, India. For each element, three incident energies Ei were E3; EL3 < E3 EL1 where ELi are Li absorption edge energies of the element. Emitted L X-ray spectrum of an element constitutes a number of X-ray lines generally grouped into four main groups due to limited resolution of available detectors as Lℓ(L3-M1), Lα(L3-M4,5), Lβ(L1-M2,3,4,5,N4; L2-M3,4; L3-N1,4,5,O1,4,5) and Lγ(L2-N1,4,O1,4; L1-N2,3,5,O3,2). Lα and Lℓ both comprise only the lines feeding L3 level and Lβ group comprises X-ray lines feeding all the three sub-shells where as Lγ involves contribution from L1 and L2 feedings. Only E3 excitation gives the ratios free from intra sub-shell Coster-Kronig (CK) transitions while excitations E2 and E1 give CK affected Lβ/Lℓ and Lγ/Lℓ X-ray intensity ratios and Lα/Lℓ still remains free from CKs. The pattern of intensity ratios at three excitation energies of elements was well interpreted in terms of on/off of CK transitions (Bambynek et al., 1972; Campbell, 2003) and outer shell electron filling configuration (Scofield, 1973).

  18. Evaluation of some selected vaccines and other biological products irradiated by gamma rays, electron beams and X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J. C.; Rey, L.; Lee, Chi-Jen

    2002-03-01

    Molecular sizing potency results are presented for irradiated samples of one lot of Haemophilus b conjugate vaccine, pneumococcal polysaccharide type 6B and typhoid vi polysaccharide vaccine. The samples were irradiated (25 kGy) by gamma rays, electron beams and X-rays. IgG and IgM antibody response in mice test results (ELISA) are given for the Hib conjugate vaccine irradiated at 0°C or frozen in liquid nitrogen.

  19. Modelling the flaring activity of the high-z, hard X-ray-selected blazar IGR J22517+2217: Flaring activity of IGR J22517+2217

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzuisi, G.; De Rosa, A.; Ghisellini, G.; Ubertini, P.; Panessa, F.; Ajello, M.; Bassani, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; D’Ammando, F.

    2012-03-21

    We present new Suzaku and Fermi data and re-analysed archival hard X-ray data from the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) and Swift–Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) surveys to investigate the physical properties of the luminous, high-redshift, hard X-ray-selected blazar IGR J22517+2217, through the modelling of its broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) in two different activity states. Through analysis of new Suzaku data and flux-selected data from archival hard X-ray observations, we build the source SED in two different states, one for the newly discovered flare that occurred in 2005 and one for the following quiescent period. Both SEDs are strongly dominated by the high-energy hump peaked at 1020–1022 Hz, which is at least two orders of magnitude higher than the low-energy (synchrotron) one at 1011–1014 Hz and varies by a factor of 10 between the two states. In both states the high-energy hump is modelled as inverse Compton emission between relativistic electrons and seed photons produced externally to the jet, while the synchrotron self-Compton component is found to be negligible. In our model the observed variability can be accounted for by a variation of the total number of emitting electrons and by a dissipation region radius changing from inside to outside the broad-line region as the luminosity increases. In its flaring activity, IGR J22517+2217 is revealed as one of the most powerful jets among the population of extreme, hard X-ray-selected, high-redshift blazars observed so far.

  20. Modelling the flaring activity of the high-z, hard X-ray-selected blazar IGR J22517+2217: Flaring activity of IGR J22517+2217

    DOE PAGES

    Lanzuisi, G.; De Rosa, A.; Ghisellini, G.; ...

    2012-03-21

    We present new Suzaku and Fermi data and re-analysed archival hard X-ray data from the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) and Swift–Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) surveys to investigate the physical properties of the luminous, high-redshift, hard X-ray-selected blazar IGR J22517+2217, through the modelling of its broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) in two different activity states. Through analysis of new Suzaku data and flux-selected data from archival hard X-ray observations, we build the source SED in two different states, one for the newly discovered flare that occurred in 2005 and one for the following quiescent period. Both SEDs are strongly dominatedmore » by the high-energy hump peaked at 1020–1022 Hz, which is at least two orders of magnitude higher than the low-energy (synchrotron) one at 1011–1014 Hz and varies by a factor of 10 between the two states. In both states the high-energy hump is modelled as inverse Compton emission between relativistic electrons and seed photons produced externally to the jet, while the synchrotron self-Compton component is found to be negligible. In our model the observed variability can be accounted for by a variation of the total number of emitting electrons and by a dissipation region radius changing from inside to outside the broad-line region as the luminosity increases. In its flaring activity, IGR J22517+2217 is revealed as one of the most powerful jets among the population of extreme, hard X-ray-selected, high-redshift blazars observed so far.« less

  1. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Anal Cancer Facet Joint Block Video: Lung Cancer Screening Video: Upper GI Tract X-ray Video: ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  2. X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... of gray. For some types of X-ray tests, a contrast medium — such as iodine or barium — is introduced into your body to provide greater detail on the images. X-ray technology is used to examine many parts of the ...

  3. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, it is called a KUB (kidneys, ureters, bladder) x-ray.

  4. X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a source that surveys the fundamentals of x-ray lasers and summarizes recent advances. The author emphasizes x-ray lasers created using high temperature plasmas as the medium. Specific topics discussed included electron-collisional excitation pumping, plasma laser pumping, and gamma-ray lasers. Numerous literature references provided.

  5. X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to-guide for specialists. It provides comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. The book collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development.

  6. Microstructure selection in thin-sample directional solidification of an Al-Cu alloy: In situ X-ray imaging and phase-field simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, A. J.; Tourret, D.; Song, Y.; ...

    2017-05-01

    We study microstructure selection during during directional solidification of a thin metallic sample. We combine in situ X-ray radiography of a dilute Al-Cu alloy solidification experiments with three-dimensional phase-field simulations. Here we explore a range of temperature gradient G and growth velocity V and build a microstructure selection map for this alloy. We investigate the selection of the primary dendritic spacing Λ and tip radius ρ. While ρ shows a good agreement between experimental measurements and dendrite growth theory, with ρ~V$-$1/2, Λ is observed to increase with V (∂Λ/∂V > 0), in apparent disagreement with classical scaling laws for primarymore » dendritic spacing, which predict that ∂Λ/∂V<0. We show through simulations that this trend inversion for Λ(V) is due to liquid convection in our experiments, despite the thin sample configuration. We use a classical diffusion boundary-layer approximation to semi-quantitatively incorporate the effect of liquid convection into phase-field simulations. This approximation is implemented by assuming complete solute mixing outside a purely diffusive zone of constant thickness that surrounds the solid-liquid interface. This simple method enables us to quantitatively match experimental measurements of the planar morphological instability threshold and primary spacings over an order of magnitude in V. Lastly, we explain the observed inversion of ∂Λ/∂V by a combination of slow transient dynamics of microstructural homogenization and the influence of the sample thickness.« less

  7. Bilirubin oxidase from Myrothecium verrucaria: X-ray determination of the complete crystal structure and a rational surface modification for enhanced electrocatalytic O2 reduction.

    PubMed

    Cracknell, James A; McNamara, Thomas P; Lowe, Edward D; Blanford, Christopher F

    2011-07-07

    The blue multi-copper oxidase bilirubin oxidase (BOx) from the ascomycete plant pathogen Myrothecium verrucaria (Mv) efficiently catalyses the oxidation of bilirubin to biliverdin, with the concomitant reduction of O(2) to water, a reaction of considerable interest for low-temperature bio-fuel cell applications. We have solved the complete X-ray determined structure of Mv BOx at 2.4 Å resolution, using molecular replacement with the Spore Coat Protein A (CotA) enzyme from Bacillus subtilis (PDB code 1GSK) as a template. The structure reveals an unusual environment around the blue type 1 copper (T1 Cu) that includes two non-coordinating hydrophilic amino acids, asparagine and threonine. The presence of a long, narrow and hydrophilic pocket near the T1 Cu suggests that structure of the substrate-binding site is dynamically determined in vivo. We show that the interaction between the binding pocket of Mv BOx and its highly conjugated natural organic substrate, bilirubin, can be used to stabilise the enzyme on a pyrolytic graphite electrode, more than doubling its electrocatalytic activity relative to the current obtained by simple adsorption of the protein to the carbon surface.

  8. Glass transition in ferroic glass K x (ND4)1-x D2PO4: a complete x-ray diffraction line shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan Choudhury, Rajul; Chitra, R.; Jayakrishnan, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Quenching of dynamic disorder in glassy systems is termed as the glass transition. Ferroic glasses belong to the class of paracrystalline materials having crystallographic order in-between that of a perfect crystal and amorphous material, a classic example of ferroic glass is the solid solution of ferroelectric deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate and antiferroelectric deuterated ammonium dihydrogen phosphate. Lowering temperature of this ferroic glass can lead to a glass transition to a quenched disordered state. The subtle atomic rearrangement that takes place at such a glass transition can be revealed by careful examination of the temperature induced changes occurring in the x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns of these materials. Hence we report here results of a complete diffraction line shape analysis of the XRD patterns recorded at different temperatures from deuterated mixed crystals DK x A1-x DP with mixing concentration x ranging as 0 < x < 1. Changes observed in diffraction peak shapes have been explained on the basis of structural rearrangements induced by changing O-D-O hydrogen bond dynamics in these paracrystals.

  9. Effect of selective area growth mask width on multi-quantum-well electroabsorption modulated lasers investigated by synchrotron radiation X-ray microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mino, Lorenzo; Agostino, Angelo; Codato, Simone; Martinez-Criado, Gema; Lamberti, Carlo

    2012-08-01

    High performance optoelectronic devices require monolithic integration of different functions at chip level. This is the case of multi-quantum well (MQW) electroabsorption modulated laser (EML), employed in long-distance, high-frequency optical fiber communication applications, which is realized exploiting the selective area growth (SAG) technique. Optimization of the growth parameters is carried out by empirical approaches since a direct characterization of the MQW is not possible with laboratory X-ray sources, owing to the micrometer-variation of composition and thickness inherent to the SAG technique. In this work we combined micrometer-resolved photoluminescence with synchrotron radiation micrometer-resolved X-ray fluorescence to study the effect of different SAG masks on the electronic properties and chemical composition of the SAG MQW EML device.

  10. N-acetylglyoxylic amide bearing a nitrophenyl group as anion receptors: NMR and X-ray investigations on anion binding and selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanti, Venty; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Black, David StC; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-10-01

    N-Nitrophenylglyoxylic amides 1 and 2 in presence of tetrabutylammonium cation (TBA) act as receptors for anions HSO4-, Cl-, Br- and NO3- as investigated by NMR studies. The receptors formed 1:1 host-guest complexes in solution. X-ray structure of 1 along with TBA that bind a chloride anion is reported. Molecule 1 showed the highest selectivity for HSO4- anion over others measured. X-ray structure of the bound Cl- revealed a pocket containing the anion making strong (Nsbnd H⋯Cl) and weak hydrogen bonds (Csbnd H⋯Cl) that contribute to the recognition of the chloride anion. Nsbnd H and Csbnd H hydrogen bonds resulted in a relatively strong binding for chloride ions.

  11. X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, T.

    In spite of the recent advances in X-ray instrumentation, polarimetry remains an area which has been virtually unexplored in the last 20 years. The scientific motivation to study polarization has increased during this time: emission models designed to repro- duce X-ray spectra can be tested using polarization, and polarization detected in other wavelength bands makes clear predictions as to the X-ray polarization. Polarization remains the only way to infer geometrical properties of sources which are too small to be spatially resolved. At the same time, there has been recent progress in instrumen- tation which is likely to allow searches for X-ray polarization at levels significantly below what was possible for early detectors. In this talk I will review the history of X-ray polarimetry, discuss some experimental techniques and the scientific problems which can be addressed by future experiments.

  12. The Swift X-ray Telescope Cluster Survey. II. X-ray spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozzi, P.; Moretti, A.; Tundo, E.; Liu, T.; Rosati, P.; Borgani, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Campana, S.; Fugazza, D.; D'Avanzo, P.

    2014-07-01

    < 0.4. We derive the luminosity-temperature relation for these 46 sources, finding good agreement with previous studies. Conclusions: Thanks to the good X-ray spectral quality and the low background of Swift/XRT, we are able to measure ICM temperatures and X-ray luminosities for the 46 sources with redshifts. Once redshifts are available for the remaining 26 sources, this sample will constitute a well-characterized, flux-limited catalog of clusters distributed over a broad redshift range (0.1 ≤ z ≤ 1.0) providing a statistically complete view of the cluster population with a selection function that allows a proper treatment of any measurement bias. The quality of the SWXCS sample is comparable to other samples available in the literature and obtained with much larger X-ray telescopes. Our results have interesting implications for the design of future X-ray survey telescopes, characterized by good-quality PSF over the entire field of view and low background. Tables 1 and 2 and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgCatalog and data products of SWXCS, constantly updated, are made available to the public through the websites http://www.arcetri.astro.it/SWXCS/ and http://swxcs.ustc.edu.cn/

  13. Separating Peaks in X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David; Taylor, Clayborne; Wade, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Deconvolution algorithm assists in analysis of x-ray spectra from scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobe analyzers, x-ray fluorescence spectrometers, and like. New algorithm automatically deconvolves x-ray spectrum, identifies locations of spectral peaks, and selects chemical elements most likely producing peaks. Technique based on similarities between zero- and second-order terms of Taylor-series expansions of Gaussian distribution and of damped sinusoid. Principal advantage of algorithm: no requirement to adjust weighting factors or other parameters when analyzing general x-ray spectra.

  14. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  15. Tracing the X-Ray Trail

    MedlinePlus

    What you need to know about… Tracing the X-ray Trail If you’ve just completed an x-ray, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) Start here! or other diagnostic imaging procedure, you probably want to know when you will ... los rayos X Si acaba de hacerse una radiografía, tomografía ¡Empezar ...

  16. The XMM-BCS galaxy cluster survey: I. The X-ray selected cluster catalog from the initial 6 deg$^2$

    SciTech Connect

    Suhada, R.; Song, J.; Bohringer, H.; Mohr, J.J.; Chon, G.; Finoguenov, A.; Fassbender, R.; Desai, S.; Armstrong, R.; Zenteno, A.; Barkhouse, W.A.; /North Dakota U. /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.

    2011-11-01

    The XMM-Newton - Blanco Cosmology Survey project (XMM-BCS) is a coordinated X-ray, optical and mid-infrared cluster survey in a field also covered by Sunyaev-Zel dovich effect (SZE) surveys by the South Pole Telescope and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The aim of the project is to study the cluster population in a 14 deg{sup 2} field (center: {alpha} {approx} 23:29:18.4, {delta} {approx} -54:40:33.6). The uniform multi-wavelength coverage will also allow us for the first time to comprehensively compare the selection function of the different cluster detection approaches in a single test field and perform a cross-calibration of cluster scaling relations. In this work, we present a catalog of 46 X-ray selected clusters from the initial 6 deg{sup 2} survey core.We describe the XMM-BCS source detection pipeline and derive physical properties of the clusters. We provide photometric redshift estimates derived from the BCS imaging data and spectroscopic redshift measurements for a low redshift subset of the clusters. The photometric redshift estimates are found to be unbiased and in good agreement with the spectroscopic values. Our multi-wavelength approach gives us a comprehensive look at the cluster and group population up to redshifts z {approx} 1. The median redshift of the sample is 0.47 and the median mass M{sub 500} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 14} M{sub {circle_dot}} ({approx} 2 keV). From the sample, we derive the cluster log N - log S using an approximation to the survey selection function and find it in good agreement with previous studies. We compare optical mass estimates from the Southern Cosmology Survey available for part of our cluster sample with our estimates derived from the X-ray luminosity. Weak lensing masses available for a subset of the cluster sample are in agreement with our estimates. Optical masses based on cluster richness and total optical luminosity are found to be significantly higher than the X-ray values. The present results illustrate the

  17. The x ray properties of a large, uniform QSO sample: Einstein observations of the LBQS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.; Anderson, S. F.; Xu, X.; Green, P. J.; Foltz, C. B.

    1992-01-01

    Although there are large numbers of Quasi Stellar Objects (QSO's) now observed in X rays, extensive X-ray observations of uniformly selected, 'complete' QSO samples are more rare. The Large Bright QSO Survey (LBQS) consists of about 1000 objects with well understood properties, most brighter than B = 18.8 and thus amenable to X-ray detections in relatively brief exposures. The sample is thought to be highly complete in the range 0.2 less than z less than 3.3, a significantly broader interval than many other surveys. The Einstein IPC observed 150 of these objects, mostly serendipitously, during its lifetime. We report the results of an analysis of these IPC data, considering not only the 20 percent of the objects we find to have positive X-ray detections, but also the ensemble X-ray properties derived by 'image stacking'.

  18. RADIO GALAXY FEEDBACK IN X-RAY-SELECTED GROUPS FROM COSMOS: THE EFFECT ON THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Giodini, S.; Finoguenov, A.; Boehringer, H.; Pierini, D.; Smolcic, V.; Massey, R.; BIrzan, L.; Zamorani, G.; Oklopcic, A.; Pratt, G. W.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Thompson, D.

    2010-05-01

    We quantify the importance of the mechanical energy released by radio galaxies inside galaxy groups. We use scaling relations to estimate the mechanical energy released by 16 radio-active galactic nuclei located inside X-ray-detected galaxy groups in the COSMOS field. By comparing this energy output to the host groups' gravitational binding energy, we find that radio galaxies produce sufficient energy to unbind a significant fraction of the intragroup medium. This unbinding effect is negligible in massive galaxy clusters with deeper potential wells. Our results correctly reproduce the breaking of self-similarity observed in the scaling relation between entropy and temperature for galaxy groups.

  19. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  20. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  1. The XMM-Newton Wide-Field Survey in the COSMOS Field. III. Optical Identification and Multiwavelength Properties of a Large Sample of X-Ray-Selected Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, M.; Zamorani, G.; Comastri, A.; Hasinger, G.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Finoguenov, A.; Mainieri, V.; Salvato, M.; Vignali, C.; Elvis, M.; Fiore, F.; Gilli, R.; Impey, C. D.; Lilly, S. J.; Mignoli, M.; Silverman, J.; Trump, J.; Urry, C. M.; Bender, R.; Capak, P.; Huchra, J. P.; Kneib, J. P.; Koekemoer, A.; Leauthaud, A.; Lehmann, I.; Massey, R.; Matute, I.; McCarthy, P. J.; McCracken, H. J.; Rhodes, J.; Scoville, N. Z.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D.

    2007-09-01

    We present the optical identification of a sample of 695 X-ray sources detected in the first 1.3 deg2 of the COSMOS XMM-Newton survey, down to a 0.5-2 keV (2-10 keV) limiting flux of ~10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 (~5×10-15 erg cm-2 s-1). In order to identify the correct optical counterparts and to assess the statistical significance of the X-ray-to-optical associations we have used the ``likelihood ratio technique.'' Here we present the identification method and its application to the CFHT I-band and photometric catalogs. We were able to associate a candidate optical counterpart to ~90% (626) of the X-ray sources, while for the remaining ~10% of the sources we were not able to provide a unique optical association due to the faintness of the possible optical counterparts (IAB>25) or to the presence of multiple optical sources, with similar likelihoods of being the correct identification, within the XMM-Newton error circles. We also cross-correlated the candidate optical counterparts with the Subaru multicolor and ACS catalogs and with the Magellan/IMACS, zCOSMOS, and literature spectroscopic data; the spectroscopic sample comprises 248 objects (~40% of the full sample). Our analysis of this statistically meaningful sample of X-ray sources reveals that for ~80% of the counterparts there is a very good agreement between the spectroscopic classification, the morphological parameters as derived from ACS data, and the optical-to-near-infrared colors: the large majority of spectroscopically identified broad-line active galactic nuclei (BL AGNs) have a pointlike morphology on ACS data, blue optical colors in color-color diagrams, and an X-ray-to-optical flux ratio typical of optically selected quasars. Conversely, sources classified as narrow line AGNs or normal galaxies are on average associated with extended optical sources, have significantly redder optical-to-near-infrared colors, and span a larger range of X-ray-to-optical flux ratios. However, about 20% of the sources show an

  2. Support of selected X-ray studies to be performed using data from the Uhuru (SAS-A) satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmire, G. P.

    1976-01-01

    A new measurement of the diffuse X-ray emission sets more stringent upper limits on the fluctuations of the background and on the number counts of X-ray sources with absolute value of b 20 deg than previous measurements. A random sample of background data from the Uhuru satellite gives a relative fluctuation in excess of statistics of 2.0% between 2.4 and 6.9 keV. The hypothesis that the relative fluctuation exceeds 2.9% can be rejected at the 90% confidence level. No discernable energy dependence is evident in the fluctuations in the pulse height data, when separated into three energy channels of nearly equal width from 1.8 to 10.0 keV. The probability distribution of fluctuations was convolved with the photon noise and cosmic ray background deviation (obtained from the earth-viewing data) to yield the differential source count distribution for high latitude sources. Results imply that a maximum of 160 sources could be between 1.7 and 5.1 x 10 to the -11 power ergs/sq cm/sec (1-3 Uhuru counts).

  3. X-ray calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures can form the basis of a very high-performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-theart calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous bandpasses, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated X-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. This chapter briefly reviews the detection scheme, the state of the art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

  4. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003381.htm X-ray - skeleton To use the sharing features on this page, ... ray views may be uncomfortable. If the whole skeleton is being imaged, the test usually takes 1 ...

  5. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  6. X-rays and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques.

  7. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  8. X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter H. G.; van Paradijs, Jan; van den Heuvel, Edward Peter Jacobus

    1997-01-01

    Preface; 1. The properties of X-ray binaries, N. E. White, F. Nagase and A. N. Parmar; 2. Optical and ultraviolet observations of X-ray binaries J. van Paradijs and J. E. McClintock; 3. Black-hole binaries Y. Tanaka and W. H. G. Lewin; 4. X-ray bursts Walter H. G. Lewin, Jan Van Paradijs and Ronald E. Taam; 5. Millisecond pulsars D. Bhattacharya; 6. Rapid aperiodic variability in binaries M. van der Klis; 7. Radio properties of X-ray binaries R. M. Hjellming and X. Han; 8. Cataclysmic variable stars France Anne-Dominic Córdova; 9. Normal galaxies and their X-ray binary populations G. Fabbiano; 10. Accretion in close binaries Andrew King; 11. Formation and evolution of neutron stars and black holes in binaries F. Verbunt and E. P. J. van den Heuvel; 12. The magnetic fields of neutron stars and their evolution D. Bhattacharya and G. Srinivasan; 13. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts K. Hurley; 14. A catalogue of X-ray binaries Jan van Paradijs; 15. A compilation of cataclysmic binaries with known or suspected orbital periods Hans Ritter and Ulrich Kolb; References; Index.

  9. Optical counterparts of ROSAT X-ray sources in two selected fields at low vs. high Galactic latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, J.; Richter, G. A.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The optical identification of large number of X-ray sources such as those from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey is challenging with conventional spectroscopic follow-up observations. Aims: We investigate two ROSAT All-Sky Survey fields of size 10°× 10° each, one at galactic latitude b = 83° (26 Com), the other at b = -5° (γ Sge), in order to optically identify the majority of sources. Methods: We used optical variability, among other more standard methods, as a means of identifying a large number of ROSAT All-Sky Survey sources. All objects fainter than about 12 mag and brighter than about 17 mag, in or near the error circle of the ROSAT positions, were tested for optical variability on hundreds of archival plates of the Sonneberg field patrol. Results: The present paper contains probable optical identifications of altogether 256 of the 370 ROSAT sources analysed. In particular, we found 126 active galactic nuclei (some of them may be misclassified cataclysmic variables, CVs), 17 likely clusters of galaxies, 16 eruptive double stars (mostly CVs), 43 chromospherically active stars, 65 stars brighter than about 13 mag, 7 UV Cet stars, 3 semiregular resp. slow irregular variable stars of late spectral type, 2 DA white dwarfs, 1 Am star, 1 supernova remnant and 1 planetary nebula. As expected, nearly all active galactic nuclei are found in the high-galactic latitude field, while the majority of CVs is located at low galactic latitudes. We identify in total 72 new variable objects. Conclusions: X-ray emission is, expectedly, tightly correlated with optical variability, and thus our new method for optically identifying X-ray sources is demonstrated to be feasible. Given the large number of optical plates used, this method was most likely not more efficient than e.g. optical spectroscopy. However, it required no telescope time, only access to archival data. Full Tables 1, 2, 8, and 9, are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  10. CHANDRA X-RAY AND HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF OPTICALLY SELECTED KILOPARSEC-SCALE BINARY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. NATURE OF THE NUCLEAR IONIZING SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Civano, Francesca; Shen, Yue; Green, Paul; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2013-01-10

    Kiloparsec-scale binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) signal active supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs in merging galaxies. Despite their significance, unambiguously confirmed cases remain scarce and most have been discovered serendipitously. In a previous systematic search, we optically identified four kpc-scale binary AGNs from candidates selected with double-peaked narrow emission lines at z = 0.1-0.2. Here, we present Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of these four systems. We critically examine and confirm the binary-AGN scenario for two of the four targets, by combining high angular resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy with Chandra ACIS-S, better nuclear position constraints from WFC3 F105W imaging, and direct starburst estimates from WFC3 F336W imaging; for the other two targets, the existing data are still consistent with the binary-AGN scenario, but we cannot rule out the possibility of only one AGN ionizing gas in both merging galaxies. We find tentative evidence for a systematically smaller X-ray-to-[O III] luminosity ratio and/or higher Compton-thick fraction in optically selected kpc-scale binary AGNs than in single AGNs, possibly caused by a higher nuclear gas column due to mergers and/or a viewing angle bias related to the double-peak narrow-line selection. While our result lends some further support to the general approach of optically identifying kpc-scale binary AGNs, it also highlights the challenge and ambiguity of X-ray confirmation.

  11. Galaxies in X-ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data: Stellar Mass Growth of Bright Central Galaxies Since z~1.2

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; ...

    2016-01-10

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z ~ 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation.

  12. Evidence for the Universality of Properties of Red-sequence Galaxies in X-Ray- and Red-Sequence-Selected Clusters at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltz, R.; Rettura, A.; Wilson, G.; van der Burg, R. F. J.; Muzzin, A.; Lidman, C.; Demarco, R.; Nantais, Julie; DeGroot, A.; Yee, H.

    2015-10-01

    We study the slope, intercept, and scatter of the color-magnitude and color-mass relations for a sample of 10 infrared red-sequence-selected clusters at z ˜ 1. The quiescent galaxies in these clusters formed the bulk of their stars above z ≳ 3 with an age spread Δt ≳ 1 Gyr. We compare UVJ color-color and spectroscopic-based galaxy selection techniques, and find a 15% difference in the galaxy populations classified as quiescent by these methods. We compare the color-magnitude relations from our red-sequence selected sample with X-ray- and photometric-redshift-selected cluster samples of similar mass and redshift. Within uncertainties, we are unable to detect any difference in the ages and star formation histories of quiescent cluster members in clusters selected by different methods, suggesting that the dominant quenching mechanism is insensitive to cluster baryon partitioning at z ˜ 1.

  13. EVIDENCE FOR THE UNIVERSALITY OF PROPERTIES OF RED-SEQUENCE GALAXIES IN X-RAY- AND RED-SEQUENCE-SELECTED CLUSTERS AT z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, R.; Wilson, G.; DeGroot, A.; Rettura, A.; Van der Burg, R. F. J.; Lidman, C.; Demarco, R.; Nantais, Julie; Yee, H. E-mail: gillian.wilson@ucr.edu E-mail: arettura@astro.caltech.edu E-mail: avmuzzin@ast.cam.ac.uk E-mail: rdemarco@astro-udec.cl E-mail: hyee@astro.utoronto.ca

    2015-10-20

    We study the slope, intercept, and scatter of the color–magnitude and color–mass relations for a sample of 10 infrared red-sequence-selected clusters at z ∼ 1. The quiescent galaxies in these clusters formed the bulk of their stars above z ≳ 3 with an age spread Δt ≳ 1 Gyr. We compare UVJ color–color and spectroscopic-based galaxy selection techniques, and find a 15% difference in the galaxy populations classified as quiescent by these methods. We compare the color–magnitude relations from our red-sequence selected sample with X-ray- and photometric-redshift-selected cluster samples of similar mass and redshift. Within uncertainties, we are unable to detect any difference in the ages and star formation histories of quiescent cluster members in clusters selected by different methods, suggesting that the dominant quenching mechanism is insensitive to cluster baryon partitioning at z ∼ 1.

  14. Cosmic X-ray telescope for ARIES rocket observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, R. C.; Acton, L. W.; Berthelsdorf, R.; Culhane, J. L.; Sanford, P. W.; Franks, A.

    1979-01-01

    A rocket-borne Wolter Type I X-ray telescope having a focal length of 2.3m, an entrance aperture of 66cm and a geometrical area of 380cm2 is nearing completion. The telescope mirrors are formed by diamond turning their figures into forged aluminum substrates of 5083 alloy. These diamond-turned substrates are subsequently plated with a thin coating of electroless nickel and polished to obtain the final X-ray reflecting surfaces. Details of the rocket payload, the X-ray telescope, its calculated response and the experience gained in selecting the mirror substrate alloy are discussed and the current status of the telescope is reviewed.

  15. Cosmic X-ray telescope for ARIES rocket observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, R. C.; Acton, L. W.; Berthelsdorf, R.; Culhane, J. L.; Sanford, P. W.; Franks, A.

    1979-01-01

    A rocket-borne Wolter Type I X-ray telescope having a focal length of 2.3m, an entrance aperture of 66cm and a geometrical area of 380cm2 is nearing completion. The telescope mirrors are formed by diamond turning their figures into forged aluminum substrates of 5083 alloy. These diamond-turned substrates are subsequently plated with a thin coating of electroless nickel and polished to obtain the final X-ray reflecting surfaces. Details of the rocket payload, the X-ray telescope, its calculated response and the experience gained in selecting the mirror substrate alloy are discussed and the current status of the telescope is reviewed.

  16. X-rays from Green Pea analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brorby, M.; Kaaret, P.

    2017-09-01

    X-ray observations of two metal-deficient luminous compact galaxies (LCG; SHOC 486 and SDSS J084220.94+115000.2) with properties similar to the so-called Green Pea galaxies were obtained using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Green Pea galaxies are relatively small, compact (a few kpc across) galaxies that get their green colour from strong [O iii] λ5007 Å emission, an indicator of intense, recent star formation. These two galaxies were predicted to have the highest observed count rates, using the X-ray luminosity-star formation rate (LX-SFR) relation for X-ray binaries, from a statistically complete sample drawn from optical criteria. We determine the X-ray luminosity relative to SFR and metallicity for these two galaxies. Neither exhibits any evidence of active galactic nuclei, and we suspect that the X-ray emission originates from unresolved populations of high-mass X-ray binaries. We discuss the LX-SFR-metallicity plane for star-forming galaxies and show that the two LCGs are consistent with the prediction of this relation. This is the first detection of Green Pea analogues in X-rays.

  17. SU-C-209-05: Monte Carlo Model of a Prototype Backscatter X-Ray (BSX) Imager for Projective and Selective Object-Plane Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rolison, L; Samant, S; Baciak, J; Jordan, K

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) model for the validation of a prototype backscatter x-ray (BSX) imager, and optimization of BSX technology for medical applications, including selective object-plane imaging. Methods: BSX is an emerging technology that represents an alternative to conventional computed tomography (CT) and projective digital radiography (DR). It employs detectors located on the same side as the incident x-ray source, making use of backscatter and avoiding ring geometry to enclose the imaging object. Current BSX imagers suffer from low spatial resolution. A MCNP model was designed to replicate a BSX prototype used for flaw detection in industrial materials. This prototype consisted of a 1.5mm diameter 60kVp pencil beam surrounded by a ring of four 5.0cm diameter NaI scintillation detectors. The imaging phantom consisted of a 2.9cm thick aluminum plate with five 0.6cm diameter holes drilled halfway. The experimental image was created using a raster scanning motion (in 1.5mm increments). Results: A qualitative comparison between the physical and simulated images showed very good agreement with 1.5mm spatial resolution in plane perpendicular to incident x-ray beam. The MCNP model developed the concept of radiography by selective plane detection (RSPD) for BSX, whereby specific object planes can be imaged by varying kVp. 10keV increments in mean x-ray energy yielded 4mm thick slice resolution in the phantom. Image resolution in the MCNP model can be further increased by increasing the number of detectors, and decreasing raster step size. Conclusion: MCNP modelling was used to validate a prototype BSX imager and introduce the RSPD concept, allowing for selective object-plane imaging. There was very good visual agreement between the experimental and MCNP imaging. Beyond optimizing system parameters for the existing prototype, new geometries can be investigated for volumetric image acquisition in medical applications. This material is

  18. STRUCTURE AND MORPHOLOGY OF X-RAY-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS HOSTS AT 1 < z < 3 IN THE CANDELS-COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Lulu; Chen, Yang; Li, Jinrong; Lv, Xuanyi; Kong, Xu; Fang, Guanwen; Knudsen, Kirsten K.

    2014-03-20

    We analyze morphologies of the host galaxies of 35 X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z ∼ 2 in the Cosmic Evolution Survey field using Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging taken from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. We build a control sample of 350 galaxies in total by selecting 10 non-active galaxies drawn from the same field with a similar stellar mass and redshift for each AGN host. By performing two-dimensional fitting with GALFIT on the surface brightness profile, we find that the distribution of the Sérsic index (n) of AGN hosts does not show a statistical difference from that of the control sample. We measure the nonparametric morphological parameters (the asymmetry index A, the Gini coefficient G, the concentration index C, and the M {sub 20} index) based on point-source-subtracted images. All the distributions of these morphological parameters of AGN hosts are consistent with those of the control sample. We finally investigate the fraction of distorted morphologies in both samples by visual classification. Only ∼15% of the AGN hosts have highly distorted morphologies, possibly due to a major merger or interaction. We find there is no significant difference in the distortion fractions between the AGN host sample and control sample. We conclude that the morphologies of X-ray-selected AGN hosts are similar to those of non-active galaxies and most AGN activity is not triggered by a major merger.

  19. Structure and Morphology of X-Ray-selected Active Galactic Nucleus Hosts at 1 < z < 3 in the CANDELS-COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lulu; Fang, Guanwen; Chen, Yang; Li, Jinrong; Lv, Xuanyi; Knudsen, Kirsten K.; Kong, Xu

    2014-03-01

    We analyze morphologies of the host galaxies of 35 X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z ~ 2 in the Cosmic Evolution Survey field using Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging taken from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. We build a control sample of 350 galaxies in total by selecting 10 non-active galaxies drawn from the same field with a similar stellar mass and redshift for each AGN host. By performing two-dimensional fitting with GALFIT on the surface brightness profile, we find that the distribution of the Sérsic index (n) of AGN hosts does not show a statistical difference from that of the control sample. We measure the nonparametric morphological parameters (the asymmetry index A, the Gini coefficient G, the concentration index C, and the M 20 index) based on point-source-subtracted images. All the distributions of these morphological parameters of AGN hosts are consistent with those of the control sample. We finally investigate the fraction of distorted morphologies in both samples by visual classification. Only ~15% of the AGN hosts have highly distorted morphologies, possibly due to a major merger or interaction. We find there is no significant difference in the distortion fractions between the AGN host sample and control sample. We conclude that the morphologies of X-ray-selected AGN hosts are similar to those of non-active galaxies and most AGN activity is not triggered by a major merger.

  20. Apollo 15 X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J.; Gerard, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodgett, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Lamothe, R.; Gorenstein, P.

    1971-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, carried in the SIM bay of the command service module was employed principally for compositional mapping of the lunar surface while in lunar orbit, and secondarily, for X-ray astronomical observations during the trans-earth coast. The lunar surface measurements involved observations of the intensity and characteristics energy distribution of the secondary or fluorescent X-rays produced by the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface. The astronomical observations consisted of relatively long periods of measurements of X-rays from pre-selected galactic sources such as Cyg-X-1 and Sco X-1 as well as from the galactic poles.

  1. X-ray modeling for SMILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Wang, C.; Wei, F.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zheng, J.; Yu, X. Z.; Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2016-12-01

    SMILE (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer) is a novel mission to explore the coupling of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system via providing global images of the magnetosphere and aurora. As the X-ray imaging is a brand new technique applied to study the large scale magnetopause, modeling of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray emissions in the magnetosheath and cusps is vital in various aspects: it helps the design of the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) on SMILE, selection of satellite orbits, as well as the analysis of expected scientific outcomes. Based on the PPMLR-MHD code, we present the simulation results of the X-ray emissions in geospace during storm time. Both the polar orbit and the Molniya orbit are used. From the X-ray images of the magnetosheath and cusps, the magnetospheric responses to an interplanetary shock and IMF southward turning are analyzed.

  2. X-Ray Emission from the Halo of M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); DiStefano, Rosanne

    2004-01-01

    Our goal was to use short (10 ksec) observations of selected fields in the halo of M31, to determine the size and characteristics of its X-ray population and to study the connection between globular clusters and X-ray sources. The program of observations has yet to be successfully completed. We received acceptable data from just 2 of the 5 approved fields. Nevertheless, the results were intriguing and we have submitted a paper based on this data to Nature. We find that the X-ray source density is significantly enhanced in the vicinity of one GC, providing the first observational evidence supporting the ejection hypothesis. We also find additional X-ray sources, including some which are very soft, in large enough numbers to suggest that not all could have been formed in GCs. That is, some must be descended from the same primordial halo population that produced any compact stars comprising part of the halo's dark matter. Extrapolating fiom the X-ray source population, we estimate that stellar remnants and dim old stars in the halo could comprise as much as 25% of the estimated mass (approx. 10(exp 12) Solar Mass) of the halo. These results suggest that the other approved fields should be observed soon and also provide strong motivation for the future XMM-Newton programs.

  3. X-ray crystallography facility for the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDdonald, William T.; Lewis, Johanna L.; Smith, Craig D.; Delucas, Lawrence J.

    1997-01-01

    Directed by NASA's Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT), the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Center for Macromolecular Crystallography (CMC) recently completed a Design Feasibility Study for the X-ray Crystallography Facility (XCF) for the International Space Station (ISS). The XCF is a facility for growing macromolecular protein crystals; harvesting, selecting, and mounting sample crystals, and snap-freezing the samples, if necessary; performing x-ray diffraction; and downlinking the diffraction data to the ground. Knowledge of the structure of protein molecules is essential for the development of pharmaceuticals by structure-based drug design techniques. Currently, x-ray diffraction of high quality protein crystals is the only method of determining the structure of these macromolecules. High quality protein crystals have been grown in microgravity onboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter for more than 10 years, but these crystals always have been returned to Earth for x-ray diffraction. The XCF will allow crystal growth, harvesting, mounting, and x-ray diffraction onboard the ISS, maximizing diffraction data quality and timeliness. This paper presents the XCF design concept, describing key feasibility issues for the ISS application and advanced technologies and operational features which resolve those issues. The conclusion is that the XCF design is feasible and can be operational onboard the ISS by early in 2002.

  4. X-Ray Emission from the Halo of M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); DiStefano, Rosanne

    2004-01-01

    Our goal was to use short (10 ksec) observations of selected fields in the halo of M31, to determine the size and characteristics of its X-ray population and to study the connection between globular clusters and X-ray sources. The program of observations has yet to be successfully completed. We received acceptable data from just 2 of the 5 approved fields. Nevertheless, the results were intriguing and we have submitted a paper based on this data to Nature. We find that the X-ray source density is significantly enhanced in the vicinity of one GC, providing the first observational evidence supporting the ejection hypothesis. We also find additional X-ray sources, including some which are very soft, in large enough numbers to suggest that not all could have been formed in GCs. That is, some must be descended from the same primordial halo population that produced any compact stars comprising part of the halo's dark matter. Extrapolating fiom the X-ray source population, we estimate that stellar remnants and dim old stars in the halo could comprise as much as 25% of the estimated mass (approx. 10(exp 12) Solar Mass) of the halo. These results suggest that the other approved fields should be observed soon and also provide strong motivation for the future XMM-Newton programs.

  5. X-ray crystallography facility for the international space station

    SciTech Connect

    McdDonald, William T.; Lewis, Johanna L.; Smith, Craig D.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    1997-01-10

    Directed by NASA's Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT), the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Center for Macromolecular Crystallography (CMC) recently completed a Design Feasibility Study for the X-ray Crystallography Facility (XCF) for the International Space Station (ISS). The XCF is a facility for growing macromolecular protein crystals; harvesting, selecting, and mounting sample crystals, and snap-freezing the samples, if necessary; performing x-ray diffraction; and downlinking the diffraction data to the ground. Knowledge of the structure of protein molecules is essential for the development of pharmaceuticals by structure-based drug design techniques. Currently, x-ray diffraction of high quality protein crystals is the only method of determining the structure of these macromolecules. High quality protein crystals have been grown in microgravity onboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter for more than 10 years, but these crystals always have been returned to Earth for x-ray diffraction. The XCF will allow crystal growth, harvesting, mounting, and x-ray diffraction onboard the ISS, maximizing diffraction data quality and timeliness. This paper presents the XCF design concept, describing key feasibility issues for the ISS application and advanced technologies and operational features which resolve those issues. The conclusion is that the XCF design is feasible and can be operational onboard the ISS by early in 2002.

  6. Acemetacin cocrystals and salts: structure solution from powder X-ray data and form selection of the piperazine salt.

    PubMed

    Sanphui, Palash; Bolla, Geetha; Nangia, Ashwini; Chernyshev, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Acemetacin (ACM) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which causes reduced gastric damage compared with indomethacin. However, acemetacin has a tendency to form a less soluble hydrate in the aqueous medium. We noted difficulties in the preparation of cocrystals and salts of acemetacin by mechanochemical methods, because this drug tends to form a hydrate during any kind of solution-based processing. With the objective to discover a solid form of acemetacin that is stable in the aqueous medium, binary adducts were prepared by the melt method to avoid hydration. The coformers/salt formers reported are pyridine carboxamides [nicotinamide (NAM), isonicotinamide (INA), and picolinamide (PAM)], caprolactam (CPR), p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), and piperazine (PPZ). The structures of an ACM-INA cocrystal and a binary adduct ACM-PABA were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Other ACM cocrystals, ACM-PAM and ACM-CPR, and the piperazine salt ACM-PPZ were solved from high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data. The ACM-INA cocrystal is sustained by the acid⋯pyridine heterosynthon and N-H⋯O catemer hydrogen bonds involving the amide group. The acid⋯amide heterosynthon is present in the ACM-PAM cocrystal, while ACM-CPR contains carboxamide dimers of caprolactam along with acid-carbonyl (ACM) hydrogen bonds. The cocrystals ACM-INA, ACM-PAM and ACM-CPR are three-dimensional isostructural. The carboxyl⋯carboxyl synthon in ACM-PABA posed difficulty in assigning the position of the H atom, which may indicate proton disorder. In terms of stability, the salts were found to be relatively stable in pH 7 buffer medium over 24 h, but the cocrystals dissociated to give ACM hydrate during the same time period. The ACM-PPZ salt and ACM-nicotinamide cocrystal dissolve five times faster than the stable hydrate form, whereas the ACM-PABA adduct has 2.5 times faster dissolution rate. The pharmaceutically acceptable piperazine salt of acemetacin exhibits superior

  7. Acemetacin cocrystals and salts: structure solution from powder X-ray data and form selection of the piperazine salt

    PubMed Central

    Sanphui, Palash; Bolla, Geetha; Nangia, Ashwini; Chernyshev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Acemetacin (ACM) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which causes reduced gastric damage compared with indomethacin. However, acemetacin has a tendency to form a less soluble hydrate in the aqueous medium. We noted difficulties in the preparation of cocrystals and salts of acemetacin by mechanochemical methods, because this drug tends to form a hydrate during any kind of solution-based processing. With the objective to discover a solid form of acemetacin that is stable in the aqueous medium, binary adducts were prepared by the melt method to avoid hydration. The coformers/salt formers reported are pyridine carboxamides [nicotinamide (NAM), isonicotinamide (INA), and picolinamide (PAM)], caprolactam (CPR), p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), and piperazine (PPZ). The structures of an ACM–INA cocrystal and a binary adduct ACM–PABA were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Other ACM cocrystals, ACM–PAM and ACM–CPR, and the piperazine salt ACM–PPZ were solved from high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data. The ACM–INA cocrystal is sustained by the acid⋯pyridine heterosynthon and N—H⋯O catemer hydrogen bonds involving the amide group. The acid⋯amide heterosynthon is present in the ACM–PAM cocrystal, while ACM–CPR contains carboxamide dimers of caprolactam along with acid–carbonyl (ACM) hydrogen bonds. The cocrystals ACM–INA, ACM–PAM and ACM–CPR are three-dimensional isostructural. The carboxyl⋯carboxyl synthon in ACM–PABA posed difficulty in assigning the position of the H atom, which may indicate proton disorder. In terms of stability, the salts were found to be relatively stable in pH 7 buffer medium over 24 h, but the cocrystals dissociated to give ACM hydrate during the same time period. The ACM–PPZ salt and ACM–nicotinamide cocrystal dissolve five times faster than the stable hydrate form, whereas the ACM–PABA adduct has 2.5 times faster dissolution rate. The pharmaceutically acceptable piperazine

  8. Quantification and characterisation of porosity in selectively laser melted Al–Si10–Mg using X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maskery, I.; Aboulkhair, N.T.; Corfield, M.R.; Tuck, C.; Clare, A.T.; Leach, R.K.; Wildman, R.D.; Ashcroft, I.A.; Hague, R.J.M.

    2016-01-15

    We used X-ray computed tomography (CT), microscopy and hardness measurements to study Al–Si10–Mg produced by selective laser melting (SLM). Specimens were subject to a series of heat treatments including annealing and precipitation hardening. The specimen interiors were imaged with X-ray CT, allowing the non-destructive quantification and characterisation of pores, including their spatial distribution. The specimens had porosities less than 0.1%, but included some pores with effective cross-sectional diameters up to 260 μm. The largest pores were highly anisotropic, being flat and lying in the plane normal to the build direction. Annealing cycles caused significant coarsening of the microstructure and a reduction of the hardness from (114 ± 3) HV, in the as-built state, to (45 ± 1) HV, while precipitation hardening increased this to a final hardness of (59 ± 1) HV. The pore size and shape distributions were unaffected by the heat treatments. We demonstrate the applicability of CT measurements and quantitative defect analysis for the purposes of SLM process monitoring and refinement. - Highlights: • We examined SLM Al–Si10–Mg with X-ray CT, microscopy and hardness measurements. • The size, shape and position distributions of the internal pores were determined. • Heat treatments alter the microstructure and hardness, but the pores are unaffected. • The largest pores are highly anisotropic, being at or disc-like in the xy plane. • CT and statistical analysis can play a role in improving the manufacturing process.

  9. Clocking femtosecond X rays.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, A L; Fritz, D M; Lee, S H; Bucksbaum, P H; Reis, D A; Rudati, J; Mills, D M; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Kao, C C; Siddons, D P; Lowney, D P; Macphee, A G; Weinstein, D; Falcone, R W; Pahl, R; Als-Nielsen, J; Blome, C; Düsterer, S; Ischebeck, R; Schlarb, H; Schulte-Schrepping, H; Tschentscher, Th; Schneider, J; Hignette, O; Sette, F; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Chapman, H N; Lee, R W; Hansen, T N; Synnergren, O; Larsson, J; Techert, S; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; van der Spoel, D; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J; Akre, R A; Bong, E; Emma, P; Krejcik, P; Arthur, J; Brennan, S; Gaffney, K J; Lindenberg, A M; Luening, K; Hastings, J B

    2005-03-25

    Linear-accelerator-based sources will revolutionize ultrafast x-ray science due to their unprecedented brightness and short pulse duration. However, time-resolved studies at the resolution of the x-ray pulse duration are hampered by the inability to precisely synchronize an external laser to the accelerator. At the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source at the Stanford Linear-Accelerator Center we solved this problem by measuring the arrival time of each high energy electron bunch with electro-optic sampling. This measurement indirectly determined the arrival time of each x-ray pulse relative to an external pump laser pulse with a time resolution of better than 60 fs rms.

  10. X-RAY SELECTED AGN HOST GALAXIES ARE SIMILAR TO INACTIVE GALAXIES OUT TO z = 3: RESULTS FROM CANDELS/CDF-S

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Wuyts, S.; Nandra, K.; Mozena, M.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Koekemoer, A.; Ferguson, H.; Grogin, N.; McGrath, E.; Hathi, N. P.; Dekel, A.; Donley, J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Giavalisco, M.; Guo, Y.; Kocevski, D. D.; Laird, E.; Rangel, C.; Newman, J.; and others

    2013-01-20

    We use multi-band spatially resolved photometry from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South to explore the nuclear and extended colors, color gradients, and stellar populations of the host galaxies of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) out to z = 3. Based on a study of their central light, we develop X-ray based criteria to exclude objects with strong AGN contamination. We use stellar masses from the FIREWORKS database to understand and account for stellar mass selection effects and carefully study, for the first time, the resolved host galaxy properties of AGNs at z {approx} 2 in their rest-frame optical light without substantial nuclear contamination. AGN hosts span a sizable range of stellar masses, colors, and color gradients at these redshifts. Their colors, color gradients, and stellar population properties are very similar to inactive galaxies of the same stellar mass. At z {approx} 1, we find a slightly narrower range in host colors compared to inactive galaxies, as well as hints of more recent star formation. These differences are weaker or non-existent among AGN hosts at z {approx} 2. We discuss the importance of AGN-driven feedback in the quenching of galaxies at z {approx}> 1 and speculate on possible evolution in the relationship between black hole accretion and the host galaxy toward high redshifts.

  11. Be/X-ray Binary Science for Future X-ray Timing Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    For future missions, the Be/X-ray binary community needs to clearly define our science priorities for the future to advocate for their inclusion in future missions. In this talk, I will describe current designs for two potential future missions and Be X-ray binary science enabled by these designs. The Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT) is an X-ray timing mission selected in February 2011 for the assessment phase from the 2010 ESA M3 call for proposals. The Advanced X-ray Timing ARray (AXTAR) is a NASA explorer concept X-ray timing mission. This talk is intended to initiate discussions of our science priorities for the future.

  12. Analysis of x-ray spectrum obtained in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.; Sunil Sunny, C.

    2006-03-15

    The analysis of the x-ray spectrum obtained in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source is carried out. Assuming single-particle motion, the electron acceleration and its final energy are calculated for TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity field and uniform external dc magnetic field. In the calculation, initial coordinates of 40 000 electrons were uniformly selected over the central plane of the cavity using random number generator. The final energy of each electron when it hits the wall is stored and the electron energy distribution is obtained. Using the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle transport code version 4A, the geometry of the ECR x-ray source is modeled. The x-ray energy spectrum is calculated for the geometry model and the numerically calculated electron energy distribution. The calculated x-ray spectrum is compared with the experimentally measured x-ray spectrum.

  13. 1E 1415.6+2557 - An X-ray-selected BL Lacertae object in a luminous galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Impey, C. D.; Bothun, G. D.; Tapia, S.; Skillman, E. D.

    1986-01-01

    The identification of a fifth serendipitous Einstein source with a new BL Lac object in a very luminous galaxy is reported. The resolved component is well fitted by an exponential disk with scale length 18 kpc and absolute magnitude of roughly -24.2. A redshift of 0.237 is derived from stellar absorption features. No emission lines are seen in the 3200-9000 A wavelength range. Decomposition of the optical spectrum into a standard galaxy plus a power law yields a spectral index of 0.5 + or - 0.5, significantly flatter than in the average BL Lac object. Linear polarization of the nonstellar component is about 6 percent in the 4500-7000 A wavelength range. The X-ray flux in the 0.3-3.5 keV band is 1.16 x 10 to the -11th ergs/sq cm/s, corresponding to a luminosity of 3.5 x 10 to the 45th ergs/s . The radio flux density is 85.6 mJy at 20 cm and 54.5 mJy at 6 cm.

  14. Petrographic and X-ray diffraction analyses of selected samples from Marker Bed 139 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrich, J.T.; Zeuch, D.H.

    1996-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is located 660 m underground in the Salado Formation which consists of thick, horizontally bedded pure and impure salt and thin, laterally continuous clay and anhydrite interbeds. The Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program was established to provide site-specific-two-phase flow and other related rock properties to support performance assessment modeling of the WIPP repository. Owing to their potentially significant role in the hydrologic response of the repository, the program initially focused on the anhydrite interbeds, and in particular, on Marker Bed 139 (MB 139), which lies approximately 1 m below the planned waste storage rooms. This report synthesizes petrographic and X-ray powder diffraction studies performed to support the Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program. Experimental scoping activities in this area were performed in FY 1993 by three independent laboratories in order to: (1) quantify the mineral composition to support laboratory studies of hydrologic properties and facilitate correlation of transport properties with composition; (2) describe textures, including grain size; and (3) describe observed porosity. Samples from various depths were prepared from six 6-inch diameter cores which were obtained by drilling into the marker bed from the floor of two separate rooms. The petrographic analyses are augmented here with additional study of the original thin sections, and the pore structure observations are also examined in relation to an independent observational study of microcracks in Marker Bed 139 core samples performed in FY 1994 by the Geomechanics Department at Sandia National Laboratories.

  15. Optical Studies of 13 Hard X-Ray Selected Cataclysmic Binaries from the Swift-BAT Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Thorstensen, John R.

    2015-12-01

    From a set of 13 cataclysmic binaries that were discovered in the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey, we conducted time-resolved optical spectroscopy and/or time-series photometry of 11, with the goal of measuring their orbital periods and searching for spin periods. Seven of the objects in this study are new optical identifications. Orbital periods are found for seven targets, ranging from 81 minutes to 20.4 hr. PBC J0706.7+0327 is an AM Herculis star (polar) based on its emission-line variations and large amplitude photometric modulation on the same period. Swift J2341.0+7645 may be a polar, although the evidence here is less secure. Coherent pulsations are detected from two objects, Swift J0503.7-2819 (975 s) and Swift J0614.0+1709 (1412 s and 1530 s, spin and beat periods, respectively), indicating that they are probable intermediate polars (DQ Herculis stars). For two other stars, longer spin periods are tentatively suggested. We also present the discovery of a 2.00 hr X-ray modulation from RX J2015.6+3711, possibly a contributor to Swift J2015.9+3715, and likely a polar. Based on observations obtained at the MDM Observatory, operated by Dartmouth College, Columbia University, Ohio State University, Ohio University, and the University of Michigan.

  16. OPTICAL STUDIES OF 13 HARD X-RAY SELECTED CATACLYSMIC BINARIES FROM THE SWIFT-BAT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, Jules P.; Thorstensen, John R.

    2015-12-15

    From a set of 13 cataclysmic binaries that were discovered in the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey, we conducted time-resolved optical spectroscopy and/or time-series photometry of 11, with the goal of measuring their orbital periods and searching for spin periods. Seven of the objects in this study are new optical identifications. Orbital periods are found for seven targets, ranging from 81 minutes to 20.4 hr. PBC J0706.7+0327 is an AM Herculis star (polar) based on its emission-line variations and large amplitude photometric modulation on the same period. Swift J2341.0+7645 may be a polar, although the evidence here is less secure. Coherent pulsations are detected from two objects, Swift J0503.7−2819 (975 s) and Swift J0614.0+1709 (1412 s and 1530 s, spin and beat periods, respectively), indicating that they are probable intermediate polars (DQ Herculis stars). For two other stars, longer spin periods are tentatively suggested. We also present the discovery of a 2.00 hr X-ray modulation from RX J2015.6+3711, possibly a contributor to Swift J2015.9+3715, and likely a polar.

  17. X-ray Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, A. C.; Ross, R. R.

    2010-12-01

    Material irradiated by X-rays produces backscattered radiation which is commonly known as the Reflection Spectrum. It consists of a structured continuum, due at high energies to the competition between photoelectric absorption and electron scattering enhanced at low energies by emission from the material itself, together with a complex line spectrum. We briefly review the history of X-ray reflection in astronomy and discuss various methods for computing the reflection spectrum from cold and ionized gas, illustrated with results from our own work reflionx. We discuss how the reflection spectrum can be used to obtain the geometry of the accretion flow, particularly the inner regions around black holes and neutron stars.

  18. X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Gerard, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodgett, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Lamothe, R.; Gorenstein, P.

    1972-01-01

    The preliminary results from the Sco X-1 and Cyg X-1 obtained from the Apollo 15 X-ray detector data are presented along with preliminary results of the X-ray fluorescence spectrometric data of the lunar surface composition. The production of the characteristic X-rays following the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface is described along with the X-ray spectrometer. Preliminary analyses of the astronomical X-ray observation and the X-ray fluorescence data are presented.

  19. Probing convex polygons with X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Edelsbrunner, H.; Skiena, S.S. )

    1988-10-01

    An X-ray probe through a polygon measures the length of intersection between a line and the polygon. This paper considers the properties of various classes of X-ray probes, and shows how they interact to give finite strategies for completely describing convex n-gons. It is shown that (3n/2)+6 probes are sufficient to verify a specified n-gon, while for determining convex polygons (3n-1)/2 X-ray probes are necessary and 5n+O(1) sufficient, with 3n+O(1) sufficient given that a lower bound on the size of the smallest edge of P is known.

  20. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  1. A multiwavelength photometric census of AGN and star formation activity in the brightest cluster galaxies of X-ray selected clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Stott, J. P.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-09-01

    Despite their reputation as being `red and dead', the unique environment inhabited by brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of `active' BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.5, selected from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Using Pan-STARRS PS1 3π, GALEX and WISE survey data we look for BCGs with photometric colours which deviate from that of the bulk population of passive BCGs - indicative of AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14 per cent of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show strong optical emission lines. On comparing BCG `activity' with the X-ray luminosity of the host cluster, we find that BCGs showing a colour offset are preferentially found in the more X-ray luminous clusters, indicative of the connection between BCG `activity' and the intracluster medium.

  2. X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO INFRARED-SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTERS AT z > 1.4 IN THE IRAC SHALLOW CLUSTER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Brodwin, M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Snyder, G.; Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Moustakas, L. A.; Stanford, S. A.; Zeimann, G.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Gettings, D.; Mancone, C.; Bautz, M.; Miller, E. D.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Hickox, R. C.; Ruel, J.

    2011-05-01

    We report the X-ray detection of two z > 1.4 infrared-selected galaxy clusters from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We present new data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the W. M. Keck Observatory that spectroscopically confirm cluster ISCS J1432.4+3250 at z = 1.49, the most distant of 18 confirmed z > 1 clusters in the ISCS to date. We also present new spectroscopy for ISCS J1438.1+3414, previously reported at z = 1.41, and measure its dynamical mass. Clusters ISCS J1432.4+3250 and ISCS J1438.1+3414 are detected in 36 ks and 143 ks Chandra exposures at significances of 5.2{sigma} and 9.7{sigma}, from which we measure total masses of log (M{sub 200,L{sub X}}/M{sub sun}) = 14.4 {+-} 0.2 and 14.35 {sup +0.14}{sub -0.11}, respectively. The consistency of the X-ray and dynamical properties of these high-redshift clusters further demonstrates that the ISCS is robustly detecting massive clusters to at least z = 1.5.

  3. X-ray Emission from Two Infrared-selected Galaxy Clusters at z > 1.4 in the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodwin, M.; Stern, D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Dey, A.; Forman, W. R.; Gettings, D.; Hickox, R. C.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Jones, C.; Mancone, C.; Miller, E. D.; Moustakas, L. A.; Ruel, J.; Snyder, G.; Zeimann, G.

    2011-05-01

    We report the X-ray detection of two z > 1.4 infrared-selected galaxy clusters from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We present new data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the W. M. Keck Observatory that spectroscopically confirm cluster ISCS J1432.4+3250 at z = 1.49, the most distant of 18 confirmed z > 1 clusters in the ISCS to date. We also present new spectroscopy for ISCS J1438.1+3414, previously reported at z = 1.41, and measure its dynamical mass. Clusters ISCS J1432.4+3250 and ISCS J1438.1+3414 are detected in 36 ks and 143 ks Chandra exposures at significances of 5.2σ and 9.7σ, from which we measure total masses of log {(M_{{\\scriptsize 200,L_X}}/M_\\odot)}= 14.4 +/- 0.2 and 14.35 +0.14 - 0.11, respectively. The consistency of the X-ray and dynamical properties of these high-redshift clusters further demonstrates that the ISCS is robustly detecting massive clusters to at least z = 1.5.

  4. Neck x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... look at cervical vertebrae. These are the 7 bones of the spine in the neck. ... A neck x-ray can detect: Bone joint that is out of position (dislocation) Breathing in a foreign object Broken bone (fracture) Disk problems (disks ...

  5. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... this test if you have signs of: A fracture Tumor Arthritis (inflammation of the joints) Normal Results The x-ray shows normal structures for the age of the person. What Abnormal Results Mean ... bone (fracture) Dislocated bone Osteomyelitis (infection) Arthritis Other conditions for ...

  6. Subnanosecond piezoelectric x-ray switch

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Alexei; Do, Dal-Hyun; Kim, Dong Min; Eom, Chang-Beom; Evans, Paul G.; Adams, Bernhard; Dufresne, Eric M.

    2006-07-10

    We report an ultrafast piezoelectric switch for synchrotron x rays. A thin epitaxial film of piezoelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} works as a diffractive optical switch at frequencies from dc to >1 GHz. The broad frequency range allows single bunches of synchrotron x rays to be selected in an arbitrary sequence. The piezoelectric effect introduces mechanical strains of a fraction of 1% in the Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} film, which can be used for blocking or passing diffracted x rays.

  7. Metal artifact correction for x-ray computed tomography using kV and selective MV imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meng; Keil, Andreas; Constantin, Dragos; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The overall goal of this work is to improve the computed tomography (CT) image quality for patients with metal implants or fillings by completing the missing kilovoltage (kV) projection data with selectively acquired megavoltage (MV) data that do not suffer from photon starvation. When both of these imaging systems, which are available on current radiotherapy devices, are used, metal streak artifacts are avoided, and the soft-tissue contrast is restored, even for regions in which the kV data cannot contribute any information. Methods: Three image-reconstruction methods, including two filtered back-projection (FBP)-based analytic methods and one iterative method, for combining kV and MV projection data from the two on-board imaging systems of a radiotherapy device are presented in this work. The analytic reconstruction methods modify the MV data based on the information in the projection or image domains and then patch the data onto the kV projections for a FBP reconstruction. In the iterative reconstruction, the authors used dual-energy (DE) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) methods to simultaneously combine the kV/MV data and perform the reconstruction. Results: The authors compared kV/MV reconstructions to kV-only reconstructions using a dental phantom with fillings and a hip-implant numerical phantom. Simulation results indicated that dual-energy sinogram patch FBP and the modified dual-energy PWLS method can successfully suppress metal streak artifacts and restore information lost due to photon starvation in the kV projections. The root-mean-square errors of soft-tissue patterns obtained using combined kV/MV data are 10–15 Hounsfield units smaller than those of the kV-only images, and the structural similarity index measure also indicates a 5%–10% improvement in the image quality. The added dose from the MV scan is much less than the dose from the kV scan if a high efficiency MV detector is assumed. Conclusions: The authors have shown that it

  8. Simultaneous Planck , Swift , and Fermi observations of X-ray and γ -ray selected blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Giommi, P.; Polenta, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Thompson, D. J.; Capalbi, M.; Cutini, S.; Gasparrini, D.; González-Nuevo, J.; León-Tavares, J.; López-Caniego, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Monte, C.; Perri, M.; Rainò, S.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Verrecchia, F.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Bastieri, D.; Berdyugin, A.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Burigana, C.; Burrows, D. N.; Buson, S.; Cavazzuti, E.; Chincarini, G.; Colafrancesco, S.; Costamante, L.; Cuttaia, F.; D’Ammando, F.; de Zotti, G.; Frailis, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Galeotta, S.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Keihänen, E.; King, O.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Lasenby, A.; Lavonen, N.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leto, C.; Lindfors, E.; Mandolesi, N.; Massardi, M.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Michelson, P. F.; Mingaliev, M.; Natoli, P.; Nestoras, I.; Nieppola, E.; Nilsson, K.; Partridge, B.; Pavlidou, V.; Pearson, T. J.; Procopio, P.; Rachen, J. P.; Readhead, A.; Reeves, R.; Reimer, A.; Reinthal, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, J.; Riquelme, D.; Saarinen, J.; Sajina, A.; Sandri, M.; Savolainen, P.; Sievers, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sotnikova, Y.; Stevenson, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Takalo, L.; Tammi, J.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Turunen, M.; Umana, G.; Ungerechts, H.; Villa, F.; Wu, J.; Zacchei, A.; Zensus, J. A.; Zhou, X.

    2012-05-22

    We present simultaneous Planck, Swift, Fermi, and ground-based data for 105 blazars belonging to three samples with flux limits in the soft X-ray, hard X-ray, and γ-ray bands, with additional 5GHz flux-density limits to ensure a good probability of a Planck detection. We compare our results to those of a companion paper presenting simultaneous Planck and multi-frequency observations of 104 radio-loud northern active galactic nuclei selected at radio frequencies. While we confirm several previous results, our unique data set allows us to demonstrate that the selection method strongly influences the results, producing biases that cannot be ignored. Almost all the BL Lac objects have been detected by the Fermi Large AreaTelescope (LAT), whereas 30% to 40% of the flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) in the radio, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray selected samples are still below the γ-ray detection limit even after integrating 27 months of Fermi-LAT data. The radio to sub-millimetre spectral slope of blazars is quite flat, with >α> ~ 0 up to about 70GHz, above which it steepens to <α> ~ -0.65. The BL Lacs have significantly flatter spectra than FSRQs at higher frequencies. The distribution of the rest-frame synchrotron peak frequency (νpeakS) in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of FSRQs is the same in all the blazar samples with <νpeakS> = 1013.1 ± 0.1 Hz, while the mean inverse Compton peak frequency, >νpeakIC>, ranges from 1021 to 1022 Hz. The distributions of νpeakS and νpeakIC of BL Lacs are much broader and are shifted to higher energies than those of FSRQs; their shapes strongly depend on the selection method. The Compton dominance of blazars, defined as the ratio of the inverse Compton to synchrotron peak luminosities, ranges from less than 0.2 to nearly 100, with only FSRQs reaching values larger than about 3. Its distribution is

  9. A Cu(II) complex of an imidazolium-based ionic liquid: synthesis, X-ray structure and application in the selective electrochemical sensing of guanine.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amanpreet; Singh, Ajnesh; Singh, Narinder

    2014-11-21

    An imidazolium-based ionic liquid containing a carboxylic acid group was synthesized and complexed with Cu(II). The resulting complex R1 was fully characterized using various techniques, including IR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Binding studies of the complex R1 were performed with anions and biomolecules using cyclic voltammetry, which showed no change in its voltammogram upon the addition of various anions and most biomolecules. However, a shift in the reduction peak from +0.20 to -0.15 was observed upon the addition of guanine. This selective determination of guanine by R1 was extended by using R1 as an electrochemical sensor for guanine in various voltammetric techniques, including cyclic voltammetry, LSV and DPV. The proposed sensor showed excellent reproducibility and high selectivity and sensitivity towards guanine, with a linear range of 0-20 μM and a detection limit of 45 nM.

  10. Synthesis, magnetic behaviour, and X-ray structures of dinuclear copper complexes with multiple bridges. Efficient and selective catalysts for polymerization of 2,6-dimethylphenol.

    PubMed

    Murugavel, Ramaswamy; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Gogoi, Nayanmoni; Clérac, Rodolphe; Lecren, Lollita; Butcher, Ray J; Nethaji, Munirathinam

    2007-06-21

    The use of a potentially tridentate mono-anionic bridging ligand, 1,3-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-propan-2-ol (bdmpp-H), in assembling new dimeric copper complexes with interesting magnetic properties has been investigated. The reaction of copper hydroxide or copper acetate with phenyl phosphinic acid or diphenyl phosphinic acid in the presence of bdmpp-H produces the dinuclear complexes [Cu(bdmpp)(ppi)]2 (1) and [Cu(bdmpp)(dppi-H)]2(dppi)2 (2) (ppi-H = phenylphosphinic acid: dppi-H = diphenylphosphinic acid), respectively. The products have been characterized with the help of analytical, thermal, and spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis, and EPR) techniques. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of 1 and 2 reveal that the two bdmpp ligands hold together the dimeric copper unit in each complex through mu-O alkoxide and the pyrazolyl nitrogen ligating centers. Two phenyl phosphinate ligands additionally bridge the dicopper core in 1 to result in octahedral coordination geometry around each metal ion. The diphenyl phosphinic acid acts as a terminal ligand in 2, and thus completes a square pyramidal geometry around each copper ion. Both complexes show a very short Cu...Cu separation (3.001 and 3.065 angstroms for 1 and 2, respectively). The investigation of the magnetic properties reveals the efficiency of the double alkoxide bridge between the two paramagnetic copper ions to mediate strong antiferromagnetic interactions [J/k(B) = -620(5) K (-431(4) cm(-1)) and -685(5) K (-476(4) cm(-1)) for 1 and 2, respectively]. Compounds 1 and 2, along with a few other copper phosphate complexes, were tested as catalysts for the oxidative polymerization of 2,6-dimethylphenol; 1 and 2 were found to be efficient catalysts with an increased selectivity for the formation of the polyphenylene ether. However a related mononuclear octahedral copper complex [Cu(imz)4(dtbp)2] (dtbp-H = di-tert-butylphosphate) was found to be more efficient.

  11. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  12. TU-A-9A-07: X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT): 100% Sensitivity to X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, L; Ahmad, M; Nikoozadeh, A; Pratx, G; Khuri-Yakub, B; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess whether X-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is more sensitive to X-ray absorption than that of the conventional X-ray imaging. Methods: First, a theoretical model was built to analyze the X-ray absorption sensitivity of XACT imaging and conventional X-ray imaging. Second, an XACT imaging system was developed to evaluate the X-ray induced acoustic signal generation as well as the sensitivity improvement over transmission x-ray imaging. Ultra-short x-ray pulses (60-nanosecond) were generated from an X-ray source operated at the energy of 150 kVp with a 10-Hz repetition rate. The X-ray pulse was synchronized with the acoustic detection via a x-ray scintillation triggering to acquire the X-ray induced acoustic signal. Results: Theoretical analysis shows that X-ray induced acoustic signal is sensitive only to the X-ray absorption, while completely insensitive to out the X-ray scattering and fluorescence. XACT has reduced background and increased contrast-to-noise ratio, and therefore has increased sensitivity compared to transmission x-ray imaging. For a 50-μm size, gadolinium insertion in tissue exposed to 40 keV X-rays; the sensitivity of XACT imaging is about 28.9 times higher than that of conventional X-ray imaging. Conclusion: X-ray acoustic computer tomography (XACT) as a new imaging modality combines X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. It is feasible to improve the imaging sensitivity with XACT imaging compared with conventional X-ray imaging. Taking advantage of the high ultrasonic resolution, it is possible to perform 3-D imaging with a single x-ray pulse with arrays of transducers without any mechanical motion of the imaging system. This single-shot capability offers the potential of reducing radiation dose by a factor of 1000, and imaging 100 times faster when compared to the conventional X-ray CT, and thus revolutionizing x-ray imaging applications in medicine and biology. The authors

  13. GEMS X-ray Polarimeter Performance Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Strohmayer, Tod; Kallman, Tim; Black, J. Kevin; Hill, Joanne; Swank, Jean

    2012-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small explorer (GEMS) is an X-ray polarization telescope selected as a NASA small explorer satellite mission. The X-ray Polarimeter on GEMS uses a Time Projection Chamber gas proportional counter to measure the polarization of astrophysical X-rays in the 2-10 keV band by sensing the direction of the track of the primary photoelectron excited by the incident X-ray. We have simulated the expected sensitivity of the polarimeter to polarized X-rays. We use the simulation package Penelope to model the physics of the interaction of the initial photoelectron with the detector gas and to determine the distribution of charge deposited in the detector volume. We then model the charge diffusion in the detector,and produce simulated track images. Within the track reconstruction algorithm we apply cuts on the track shape and focus on the initial photoelectron direction in order to maximize the overall sensitivity of the instrument, using this technique we have predicted instrument modulation factors nu(sub 100) for 100% polarized X-rays ranging from 10% to over 60% across the 2-10 keV X-ray band. We also discuss the simulation program used to develop and model some of the algorithms used for triggering, and energy measurement of events in the polarimeter.

  14. X-ray transmission microscope development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Rosenberger, Franz E.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the third 6 month period, from February 28, 1995 to August 31, 1995, under this contract. The main efforts during this period were the construction of the X-ray furnace, evaluation and selection of the CCD technology for the X-ray camera, solidification experiments with Al alloys and Al-zirconia composites in the prototype furnace, evaluation of specimens for the particle pushing flight experiment - PEPSI, measurements of emitted spectra from X-ray source, testing of the high resolution X-ray test targets, and the establishment of criteria for and selection of peripheral equipment. In addition to these tasks, two presentations were prepared in this period; one for the AIAA Microgravity Symposium and another for the Gordon Conference on Gravitational Effects in Pyisico-Chemical Systems.

  15. X-ray transmission microscope development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Rosenberger, Franz E.

    1995-08-01

    This report covers the third 6 month period, from February 28, 1995 to August 31, 1995, under this contract. The main efforts during this period were the construction of the X-ray furnace, evaluation and selection of the CCD technology for the X-ray camera, solidification experiments with Al alloys and Al-zirconia composites in the prototype furnace, evaluation of specimens for the particle pushing flight experiment - PEPSI, measurements of emitted spectra from X-ray source, testing of the high resolution X-ray test targets, and the establishment of criteria for and selection of peripheral equipment. In addition to these tasks, two presentations were prepared in this period; one for the AIAA Microgravity Symposium and another for the Gordon Conference on Gravitational Effects in Pyisico-Chemical Systems.

  16. Metal artifact correction for x-ray computed tomography using kV and selective MV imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng; Keil, Andreas; Constantin, Dragos; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The overall goal of this work is to improve the computed tomography (CT) image quality for patients with metal implants or fillings by completing the missing kilovoltage (kV) projection data with selectively acquired megavoltage (MV) data that do not suffer from photon starvation. When both of these imaging systems, which are available on current radiotherapy devices, are used, metal streak artifacts are avoided, and the soft-tissue contrast is restored, even for regions in which the kV data cannot contribute any information. Methods: Three image-reconstruction methods, including two filtered back-projection (FBP)-based analytic methods and one iterative method, for combining kV and MV projection data from the two on-board imaging systems of a radiotherapy device are presented in this work. The analytic reconstruction methods modify the MV data based on the information in the projection or image domains and then patch the data onto the kV projections for a FBP reconstruction. In the iterative reconstruction, the authors used dual-energy (DE) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) methods to simultaneously combine the kV/MV data and perform the reconstruction. Results: The authors compared kV/MV reconstructions to kV-only reconstructions using a dental phantom with fillings and a hip-implant numerical phantom. Simulation results indicated that dual-energy sinogram patch FBP and the modified dual-energy PWLS method can successfully suppress metal streak artifacts and restore information lost due to photon starvation in the kV projections. The root-mean-square errors of soft-tissue patterns obtained using combined kV/MV data are 10–15 Hounsfield units smaller than those of the kV-only images, and the structural similarity index measure also indicates a 5%–10% improvement in the image quality. The added dose from the MV scan is much less than the dose from the kV scan if a high efficiency MV detector is assumed. Conclusions: The authors have shown that it

  17. Compact pnCCD-based X-ray camera with high spatial and energy resolution: a color X-ray camera.

    PubMed

    Scharf, O; Ihle, S; Ordavo, I; Arkadiev, V; Bjeoumikhov, A; Bjeoumikhova, S; Buzanich, G; Gubzhokov, R; Günther, A; Hartmann, R; Kühbacher, M; Lang, M; Langhoff, N; Liebel, A; Radtke, M; Reinholz, U; Riesemeier, H; Soltau, H; Strüder, L; Thünemann, A F; Wedell, R

    2011-04-01

    For many applications there is a requirement for nondestructive analytical investigation of the elemental distribution in a sample. With the improvement of X-ray optics and spectroscopic X-ray imagers, full field X-ray fluorescence (FF-XRF) methods are feasible. A new device for high-resolution X-ray imaging, an energy and spatial resolving X-ray camera, is presented. The basic idea behind this so-called "color X-ray camera" (CXC) is to combine an energy dispersive array detector for X-rays, in this case a pnCCD, with polycapillary optics. Imaging is achieved using multiframe recording of the energy and the point of impact of single photons. The camera was tested using a laboratory 30 μm microfocus X-ray tube and synchrotron radiation from BESSY II at the BAMline facility. These experiments demonstrate the suitability of the camera for X-ray fluorescence analytics. The camera simultaneously records 69,696 spectra with an energy resolution of 152 eV for manganese K(α) with a spatial resolution of 50 μm over an imaging area of 12.7 × 12.7 mm(2). It is sensitive to photons in the energy region between 3 and 40 keV, limited by a 50 μm beryllium window, and the sensitive thickness of 450 μm of the chip. Online preview of the sample is possible as the software updates the sums of the counts for certain energy channel ranges during the measurement and displays 2-D false-color maps as well as spectra of selected regions. The complete data cube of 264 × 264 spectra is saved for further qualitative and quantitative processing.

  18. X-ray in Zeta-Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, M. A.; López-Santiago, J. L.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-05-01

    Nearby star-forming regions are ideal laboratories to study high-energy emission processes but they usually present high absorption what makes difficult to detect the stellar population inside the molecular complex. As young late-type stars show high X-ray emission and X-ray photons are little absorbed by interstellar material, X-ray dedicated surveys are an excellent tool to detect the low-mass stellar population in optically absorbed regions. In this work, we present a study of the star-forming region Zeta-Ori and its surroundings. We combine optical, infrared and X-ray data. Properties of the X-ray emiting plasma and infrared features of the young stellar objects detected in the XMM-Newton observation are determined. The southern part of the Orion B giant molecular cloud complex harbor other star forming regions, as NGC 2023 and NGC 2024, we use this regions to compare. We study the spectral energy distribution of X-ray sources. Combining these results with infrared, the X-ray sources are classified as class I, class II and class III objects. The X-ray spectrum and ligth curve of detected X-ray sources is analyzed to found flares. We use a extincion-independent index to select the stars with circumstellar disk, and study the relationship between the present of disk and the flare energy. The results are similar to others studies and we conclude that the coronal properties of class II and class III objects in this region do not differ significantly from each other and from stars of similar infrared class in the ONC.

  19. Planetary X ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    Design studies for an X-ray experiment using solid state detectors and for an experiment using a proportional counter for investigating Jovian and Saturnian magnetospheres are reported. Background counting rates through the forward aperture and leakage fluxes are discussed for each design. It is concluded that the best choice of instrument appears to have following the characteristics: (1) two separate multiwire proportional counters for redundancy; (2) passive collimation to restrict the field to about 5 deg, wiregrid modulation collimation to about 0.1 deg angular resolution; (3) no active shielding system around the counter body; and (4) light passive shielding around any portion of the counter body exposed to space to absorb most of the cosmic X-ray background.

  20. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  1. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  2. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  3. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  4. Chandra X-Ray and Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Optically Selected Kiloparsec-scale Binary Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Host Galaxy Morphology and AGN Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Jinyi; Liu, Xin; Ho, Luis C.; Shen, Yue; Peng, Chien Y.; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) provide clues to how gas-rich mergers trigger and fuel AGNs and how supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs evolve in a gas-rich environment. While significant effort has been invested in their identification, the detailed properties of binary AGNs and their host galaxies are still poorly constrained. In a companion paper, we examined the nature of ionizing sources in the double nuclei of four kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs with redshifts between 0.1 and 0.2. Here, we present their host galaxy morphology based on F336W (U-band) and F105W (Y-band) images taken by the Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our targets have double-peaked narrow emission lines and were confirmed to host binary AGNs with follow-up observations. We find that kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs occur in galaxy mergers with diverse morphological types. There are three major mergers with intermediate morphologies and a minor merger with a dominant disk component. We estimate the masses of the SMBHs from their host bulge stellar masses and obtain Eddington ratios for each AGN. Compared with a representative control sample drawn at the same redshift and stellar mass, the AGN luminosities and Eddington ratios of our binary AGNs are similar to those of single AGNs. The U - Y color maps indicate that clumpy star-forming regions could significantly affect the X-ray detection of binary AGNs, e.g., the hardness ratio. Considering the weak X-ray emission in AGNs triggered in merger systems, we suggest that samples of X-ray-selected AGNs may be biased against gas-rich mergers. Based, in part, on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program number GO 12363.

  5. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your privacy. Information entered here ...

  6. Soft X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John

    1999-05-20

    The contents of this report cover the following: (1) design of the soft x-ray telescope; (2) fabrication and characterization of the soft x-ray telescope; and (3) experimental implementation at the OMEGA laser facility.

  7. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  8. Encapsulating X-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Joseph M.; Bradley, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Vapor-deposited polymer shields crystals from environment while allowing X rays to pass. Polymer coating transparental to X rays applied to mercuric iodide detector in partial vacuum. Coating protects crystal from sublimation, chemical attack, and electrical degradation.

  9. Dual X-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Albert; Aaron, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    Dual X-ray absorptiometry is widely used in analyzing body composition and imaging. Both the method and its limitations are related to the Compton and photoelectric contributions to the X-ray attenuation coefficients of materials.

  10. L-Lysine: exploiting powder X-ray diffraction to complete the set of crystal structures of the 20 directly encoded proteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Andrew; Hughes, Colan E; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2015-03-23

    During the last 75 years, crystal structures have been reported for 19 of the 20 directly encoded proteinogenic amino acids in their natural (enantiomerically pure) form. The crystal structure is now reported for the final member of this set: L-lysine. As crystalline L-lysine has a strong propensity to incorporate water under ambient atmospheric conditions to form a hydrate phase, the pure (non-hydrate) crystalline phase can be obtained only by dehydration under rigorously anhydrous conditions, resulting in a microcrystalline powder sample. For this reason, modern powder X-ray diffraction methods have been exploited to determine the crystal structure in this final, elusive case. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. High-energy resolution X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy reveals insight into unique selectivity of La-based nanoparticles for CO2

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Ofer; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Luo, Li; Süess, Martin J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Koziej, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    The lanthanum-based materials, due to their layered structure and f-electron configuration, are relevant for electrochemical application. Particularly, La2O2CO3 shows a prominent chemoresistive response to CO2. However, surprisingly less is known about its atomic and electronic structure and electrochemically significant sites and therefore, its structure–functions relationships have yet to be established. Here we determine the position of the different constituents within the unit cell of monoclinic La2O2CO3 and use this information to interpret in situ high-energy resolution fluorescence-detected (HERFD) X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (vtc XES). Compared with La(OH)3 or previously known hexagonal La2O2CO3 structures, La in the monoclinic unit cell has a much lower number of neighboring oxygen atoms, which is manifested in the whiteline broadening in XANES spectra. Such a superior sensitivity to subtle changes is given by HERFD method, which is essential for in situ studying of the interaction with CO2. Here, we study La2O2CO3-based sensors in real operando conditions at 250 °C in the presence of oxygen and water vapors. We identify that the distribution of unoccupied La d-states and occupied O p- and La d-states changes during CO2 chemoresistive sensing of La2O2CO3. The correlation between these spectroscopic findings with electrical resistance measurements leads to a more comprehensive understanding of the selective adsorption at La site and may enable the design of new materials for CO2 electrochemical applications. PMID:26668362

  12. X-shooter reveals powerful outflows in z ˜ 1.5 X-ray selected obscured quasi-stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Cresci, G.; Perna, M.; Marconi, A.; Mainieri, V.; Maiolino, R.; Salvato, M.; Lusso, E.; Santini, P.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Gilli, R.; La Franca, F.; Lanzuisi, G.; Lutz, D.; Merloni, A.; Mignoli, M.; Onori, F.; Piconcelli, E.; Rosario, D.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present X-shooter at Very Large Telescope observations of a sample of 10 luminous, X-ray obscured quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) at z ˜ 1.5 from the XMM-COSMOS survey, expected to be caught in the transitioning phase from starburst to active galactic nucleus (AGN)-dominated systems. The main selection criterion is X-ray detection at bright fluxes (LX ≳ 1044 erg s-1) coupled to red optical-to-near-infrared-to-mid-infrared colours. Thanks to its large wavelength coverage, X-shooter allowed us to determine accurate redshifts from the presence of multiple emission lines for five out of six targets for which we had only a photometric redshift estimate, with an 80 per cent success rate, significantly larger than what is observed in similar programs of spectroscopic follow-up of red QSOs. We report the detection of broad and shifted components in the [O III] λλ5007, 4959 complexes for six out of eight sources with these lines observable in regions free from strong atmospheric absorptions. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) associated with the broad components are in the range FWHM ˜ 900-1600 km s-1, larger than the average value observed in Sloan Digital Sky Survey type 2 AGN samples at similar observed [O III] luminosity, but comparable to those observed for QSO/ultraluminous infrared galaxies systems for which the presence of kpc scale outflows has been revealed through integral field unit spectroscopy. Although the total outflow energetics (inferred under reasonable assumptions) may be consistent with winds accelerated by stellar processes, we favour an AGN origin for the outflows given the high outflow velocities observed (v > 1000 km s-1) and the presence of strong winds also in objects undetected in the far-infrared.

  13. X-ray properties of K-selected galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.0: investigating trends with stellar mass, redshift and spectral type

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Therese M.; Kriek, Mariska; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Labbé, Ivo; Greene, Jenny E. E-mail: mkriek@berkeley.edu

    2014-03-01

    We examine how the total X-ray luminosity correlates with stellar mass, stellar population, and redshift for a K-band limited sample of ∼3500 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.0 from the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey in the COSMOS field. The galaxy sample is divided into 32 different galaxy types, based on similarities between the spectral energy distributions. For each galaxy type, we further divide the sample into bins of redshift and stellar mass, and perform an X-ray stacking analysis using the Chandra COSMOS data. We find that full band X-ray luminosity is primarily increasing with stellar mass, and at similar mass and spectral type is higher at larger redshifts. When comparing at the same stellar mass, we find that the X-ray luminosity is slightly higher for younger galaxies (i.e., weaker 4000 Å breaks), but the scatter in this relation is large. We compare the observed X-ray luminosities to those expected from low- and high-mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). For blue galaxies, XRBs can almost fully account for the observed emission, while for older galaxies with larger 4000 Å breaks, active galactic nuclei (AGN) or hot gas dominate the measured X-ray flux. After correcting for XRBs, the X-ray luminosity is still slightly higher in younger galaxies, although this correlation is not significant. AGN appear to be a larger component of galaxy X-ray luminosity at earlier times, as the hardness ratio increases with redshift. Together with the slight increase in X-ray luminosity this may indicate more obscured AGNs or higher accretion rates at earlier times.

  14. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  16. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  17. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  18. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Pelvis Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  19. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Forearm Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A forearm X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  20. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R [Williamsburg, VA

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  1. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  2. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  3. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  4. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  5. History of Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-01

    This photograph shows a TRW technician inspecting the completely assembled Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) in the Thermal Vacuum Chamber at TRW Space and Electronics Group of Redondo Beach, California. The CXO is formerly known as the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), which was renamed in honor of the late Indian-American Astronomer, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar in 1999. The CXO will help astronomers worldwide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-rays such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes and other exotic celestial objects. X-ray astronomy can only be done from space because Earth's atmosphere blocks x-rays from reaching the surface. The Observatory provides images that are 50 times more detailed than previous x-ray missions. At more than 45 feet in length and weighing more than 5 tons, it will be one of the largest objects ever placed in Earth orbit by the Space Shuttle. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor and assembled and tested the observatory for NASA. The CXO program is managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The Observatory was launched on July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission. (Image courtesy of TRW)

  6. Ethylene tri- and tetramerization: a steric parameter selectivity switch from X-ray crystallography and computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Cloete, Nicoline; Visser, Hendrik G; Engelbrecht, Ilana; Overett, Matthew J; Gabrielli, William F; Roodt, Andreas

    2013-03-04

    A steric parameter (θN-sub) is introduced to describe the steric bulk at the nitrogen atom on a range of PNP ligands used in ethylene tri- and tetramerization. This parameter was calculated for the free ligands and different metal complexes thereof and compared to catalytic data. A specific tendency is observed for the value of θN-sub and 1-hexene selectivity, and a slight increase in 1-octene selectivity is found with increased bulkiness of the substituents on the nitrogen atom.

  7. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  8. Fixed energy X-ray absorption voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Minguzzi, Alessandro; Lugaresi, Ottavio; Locatelli, Cristina; Rondinini, Sandra; D'Acapito, Francesco; Achilli, Elisabetta; Ghigna, Paolo

    2013-08-06

    In this paper, the fixed energy X-ray absorption voltammetry (FEXRAV) is introduced. FEXRAV represents a novel in situ X-ray absorption technique for fast and easy preliminary characterization of electrode materials and consists of recording the absorption coefficient at a fixed energy while varying at will the electrode potential. The energy is chosen close to an X-ray absorption edge, in order to give the maximum contrast between different oxidation states of an element. It follows that any shift from the original oxidation state determines a variation of the absorption coefficient. Although the information given by FEXRAV obviously does not supply the detailed information of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) or extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), it allows to quickly map the oxidation states of the element under consideration within the selected potential windows. This leads to the rapid screening of several systems under different experimental conditions (e.g., nature of the electrolyte, potential window) and is preliminary to more deep X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) characterizations, like XANES or EXAFS. In addition, the time-length of the experiment is much shorter than a series of XAS spectra and opens the door to kinetic analysis.

  9. The SAS-3 X-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The experiment section of the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3) launched in May 1975 is an X-ray observatory intended to determine the location of bright X-ray sources to an accuracy of 15 arc-seconds; to study a selected set of sources over a wide energy range, from 0.1 to 55 keV, while performing very specific measurements of the spectra and time variability of known X-ray sources; and to monitor the sky continuously for X-ray novae, flares, and unexpected phenomena. The improvements in SAS-3 spacecraft include a clock accurate to 1 part in 10 billion, rotatable solar panels, a programmable data format, and improved nutation damper, a delayed command system, improved magnetic trim and azimuth control systems. These improvements enable SAS-3 to perform three-axis stabilized observations of any point on the celestial sphere at any time of the year. The description of the experiment section and the SAS-3 operation is followed by a synopsis of scientific results obtained from the observations of X-ray sources, such as Vela X-1 (supposed to be an accreting neutron star), a transient source of hard X-ray (less than 36 min in duration) detected by SAS-3, the Crab Nebula pulsar, the Perseus cluster of galaxies, and the Vela supernova remnant.

  10. X-ray crystallographic and mass spectrometric structure determination and functional characterization of succinylated porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus: implications for ion selectivity and single-channel conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Przybylski, M.; Glocker, M. O.; Nestel, U.; Schnaible, V.; Blüggel, M.; Diederichs, K.; Weckesser, J.; Schad, M.; Schmid, A.; Welte, W.; Benz, R.

    1996-01-01

    The role of charges near the pore mouth has been discussed in theoretical work about ion channels. To introduce new negative charges in a channel protein, amino groups of porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus 37b4 were succinylated with succinic anhydride, and the precise extent and sites of succinylations and structures of the succinylporins determined by mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. Molecular weight and peptide mapping analyses using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry identified selective succinylation of three lysine-epsilon-amino groups (Lys-46, Lys-298, Lys-300) and the N-terminal alpha-amino group. The structure of a tetra-succinylated porin (TS-porin) was determined to 2.4 A and was generally found unchanged in comparison to native porin to form a trimeric complex. All succinylated amino groups found in a mono/di-succinylated porin (MS-porin) and a TS-porin are localized at the inner channel surface and are solvent-accessible: Lys-46 is located at the channel constriction site, whereas Lys-298, Lys-300, and the N-terminus are all near the periplasmic entrance of the channel. The Lys-46 residue at the central constriction loop was modeled as succinyl-lysine from the electron density data and shown to bend toward the periplasmic pore mouth. The electrical properties of the MS-and TS-porins were determined by reconstitution into black lipid membranes, and showed a negative charge effect on ion transport and an increased cation selectivity through the porin channel. The properties of a typical general diffusion porin changed to those of a channel that contains point charges near the pore mouth. The single-channel conductance was no longer a linear function of the bulk aqueous salt concentration. The substantially higher cation selectivity of the succinylated porins compared with the native protein is consistent with the increase of negatively charged groups introduced. These results show tertiary structure-selective

  11. 1-[(Imidazolidin-2-yl)imino]indazole. Highly alpha 2/I1 selective agonist: synthesis, X-ray structure, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Saczewski, Franciszek; Kornicka, Anita; Rybczyńska, Apolonia; Hudson, Alan L; Miao, Shu Sean; Gdaniec, Maria; Boblewski, Konrad; Lehmann, Artur

    2008-06-26

    Novel benzazole derivatives bearing a (imidazolidin-2-yl)imino moiety at position 1 or 2 were synthesized by reacting 1-amino- or 2-aminobenzazoles with N, N'-bis( tert-butoxycarbonyl)imidazolidine-2-thione in the presence of HgCl 2. Structures of 1-[(imidazolidin-2-yl)imino]indazole (marsanidine, 13a) and free base of the 4-Cl derivative 12e were confirmed by X-ray single crystal structure analysis. Compound 13a was found to be the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor ligand with alpha 2-adrenoceptor/imidazoline I 1 receptor selectivity ratio of 3879, while 1-[(imidazolidin-2-yl)imino]-7-methylindazole ( 13k) proved to be a mixed alpha 2-adrenoceptor/imidazoline I 1 receptor agonist with alpha 2/I 1 selectivity ratio of 7.2. Compound 13k when administered intravenously to male Wistar rats induced a dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (ED50 = 0.6 microg/kg) and heart rate, which was attenuated following pretreatment with alpha 2A-adrenoceptor antagonist RX821002. Compound 13a may find a variety of medical uses ascribed to alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists, and its 7-methyl derivative 13k is a good candidate for development as a centrally acting antihypertensive drug.

  12. Chemical-state-selective X-ray absorption spectroscopy by detecting bond-specific Auger electrons for SiO2/SiC interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Murai, Takaaki; Oji, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Toyokazu; Watanabe, Yukihiko; Kimoto, Yasuji

    2017-08-01

    Chemical-state-selective Si K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements of SiO2 and SiC are demonstrated by detecting bond-specific Auger electrons in SiC coated with a very thin SiO2 film. Differential-electron-yield (DEY) mode is used for the measurements. Each EXAFS spectrum may be subject to the following two spectrally overlapping influences: (i) the background spectrum formed by energy-losing SiC Auger electrons overlaps the SiO2 Auger peak, and (ii) the resonant SiO2 Auger peak overlaps the SiC Auger peak. The SiO2- and SiC-selective DEY-EXAFS spectra differ from each other and are similar to the spectra of bulk SiO2 and SiC, respectively, in the EXAFS regions, indicating that the two influences are negligible, and that this method can be considered valid for selection of chemical states.

  13. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  14. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  15. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1991-10-08

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for minitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency.

  16. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1991-10-08

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency. 2 figures.

  17. Dual-energy X-ray photon counting using an LSO-MPPC spectrometer and an energy-selecting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2015-08-01

    Dual-energy photon counting was performed using an energy-selecting device (ESD) and a detector, consisting of a Lu2(SiO4)O [LSO)] crystal and a multipixel photon counter (MPPC). The ESD is used to determine a low-energychannel range for CT and consists of two comparators and a microcomputer (MC). The two threshold channels in proportion to energies are determined using low and high-energy comparators, respectively. The MC in the ESD produces a single logical pulse when only a logical pulse from the low-energy comparator is input to the MC. To determine the high-energy-channel range for CT, logical pulses from the high-energy comparator are input to the MC outside the ESD. Logical pulses from the two MCs are input to frequency-voltage converters (FVCs) to convert count rates into voltages. The output voltages from the two FVCs are sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter to reconstruct tomograms. Dual-energy computed tomography was accomplished at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a maximum count rate of 14.3 kilocounts per second, and two-different-energy tomograms were obtained simultaneously.

  18. On the evolutionary status of X-ray selected weak-line T Tauri star candidates in Taurus-Auriga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, E. L.; Magazzù, A.

    1999-02-01

    We present lithium observations of 35 stars previously reported by Wichmann et al. (1996) to be possible new weak T Tauri stars (WTTS) discovered by ROSAT in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. These stars were identified on the basis of low-resolution optical spectra. We have used our higher resolution spectra for measuring the equivalent widths of the Li i 670.8 nm resonance line, and for revisiting the evolutionary status of these stars. Most ( ~ 85%) of the stars in our sample coming from ROSAT pointed observations are indeed confirmed to be new WTTS, but only a minority ( ~ 22%) of the stars coming from the ROSAT all-sky survey are confirmed as WTTS. There are two reasons why we reject some stars as WTTS. One is that seven of the stars do not have a detectable lithium line at all. The other is that we use a definition different from that Wichmann et al. (1996) for classifying stars as WTTS. In particular, we identify eight stars as post T Tauri stars (PTTS) on the basis of their moderate lithium depletion. Our results confirm that the widely dispersed RASS-selected candidate WTTS tend to be older than the T Tauri stars associated with dark molecular clouds. The presence of PTTS around central Taurus suggests that the clouds may have been forming stars for more than ~ 10 Myr, although at a very low rate. On the basis of the PTTS identified in this work we discuss possible differences between them and the WTTS. We find that PTTS seem to have slightly lower Hα emission equivalent width than WTTS, but the small number of known PTTS prevent us from making a strong conclusion. Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton and the William Herschel telescopes operated on the island of La~Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrof\\'\\i sica de Canarias

  19. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  20. Swift J0525.6+2416 and IGR J04571+4527: two new hard X-ray-selected magnetic cataclysmic variables identified with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, F.; de Martino, D.; Mukai, K.; Israel, G.; Falanga, M.; Ramsay, G.; Masetti, N.

    2015-11-01

    IGR J04571+4527 and Swift J0525.6+2416 are two hard X-ray sources detected in the Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL/IBIS surveys. They were proposed to be magnetic cataclysmic variables of the intermediate polar (IP) type, based on optical spectroscopy. IGR J04571+4527 also showed a 1218 s optical periodicity, suggestive of the rotational period of a white dwarf, further pointing towards an IP classification. We here present detailed X-ray (0.3-10 keV) timing and spectral analysis performed with XMM-Newton, complemented with hard X-ray coverage (15-70 keV) from Swift/BAT. These are the first high-S/N observations in the soft X-ray domain for both sources, allowing us to identify the white dwarf X-ray spin period of Swift J0525.6+2416 (226.28 s), and IGR J04571+4527 (1222.6 s). A model consisting of multitemperature optically thin emission with complex absorption adequately fits the broad-band spectrum of both sources. We estimate a white dwarf mass of about 1.1 and 1.0 M⊙ for IGR J04571+4527 and Swift J0525.6+2416, respectively. The above characteristics allow us to unambiguously classify both sources as IPs, confirming the high incidence of this subclass among hard X-ray emitting cataclysmic variables.

  1. Conservative treatment in a patient with diabetic osteomyelitis: antibiotic treatment is sufficient for complete bone regeneration in selected cases.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Sune Møller; Frøkjær, Johnny; Yderstræde, Knud

    2015-11-18

    Diabetic foot ulcers are commonly complicated by bone involvement and osteomyelitis. Diagnosing diabetic osteomyelitis can be problematic. However, positive findings at clinical examination and X-ray may set the diagnosis. Recent guidelines suggest that selected cases of diabetic osteomyelitis can be treated conservatively with antibiotics. We report on the successful treatment of a 52-year-old man with diabetes with osteomyelitis in the distal phalanx of a toe. On X-ray, the affected phalanx appeared completely eroded. However, regeneration of the bone tissue was observed following outpatient treatment with antibiotics. We therefore encourage doctors to provide conservative treatment for selected cases of diabetic osteomyelitis.

  2. Atomic Data in X-Ray Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, N. S.

    2000-01-01

    With the launches of the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) and the X-ray Multimirror Mission (XMM) and the upcoming launch of the Japanese mission ASTRO-E, high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of cosmic sources has begun. Early, deep observations of three stellar coronal sources will provide not only invaluable calibration data, but will also give us benchmarks for the atomic data under collisional equilibrium conditions. Analysis of the Chandra X-ray Observatory data, and data from other telescopes taken simultaneously, for these stars is ongoing as part of the Emission Line Project. Goals of the Emission Line Project are: (1) to determine and verify accurate and robust diagnostics and (2) to identify and prioritize issues in fundamental spectroscopy which will require further theoretical and/or laboratory work. The Astrophysical Plasma Emission Database will be described in some detail, as it is introducing standardization and flexibility into X-ray spectral modeling. Spectral models of X-ray astrophysical plasmas can be generally classified as dominated by either collisional ionization or by X-ray photoionization. While the atomic data needs for spectral models under these two types of ionization are significantly different, there axe overlapping data needs, as I will describe. Early results from the Emission Line Project benchmarks are providing an invaluable starting place, but continuing work to improve the accuracy and completeness of atomic data is needed. Additionally, we consider the possibility that some sources will require that both collisional ionization and photoionization be taken into account, or that time-dependent ionization be considered. Thus plasma spectral models of general use need to be computed over a wide range of physical conditions.

  3. X-ray irradiation of yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, Alessandra; Batani, Dimitri; Previdi, Fabio; Conti, Aldo; Pisani, Francesca; Botto, Cesare; Bortolotto, Fulvia; Torsiello, Flavia; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Allott, Ric M.; Lisi, Nicola; Milani, Marziale; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Koenig, Michel

    1997-10-01

    Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast cells were irradiated using the soft X-ray laser-plasma source at Rutherford Laboratory. The aim was to produce a selective damage of enzyme metabolic activity at the wall and membrane level (responsible for fermentation) without interfering with respiration (taking place in mitochondria) and with nuclear and DNA activity. The source was calibrated by PIN diodes and X-ray spectrometers. Teflon stripes were chosen as targets for the UV laser, emitting X-rays at about 0.9 keV, characterized by a very large decay exponent in biological matter. X-ray doses to the different cell compartments were calculated following a Lambert-Bouguet-Beer law. After irradiation, the selective damage to metabolic activity at the membrane level was measured by monitoring CO2 production with pressure silicon detectors. Preliminary results gave evidence of pressure reduction for irradiated samples and non-linear response to doses. Also metabolic oscillations were evidenced in cell suspensions and it was shown that X-ray irradiation changed the oscillation frequency.

  4. College Selectivity and Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heil, Scott; Reisel, Liza; Attewell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    How much of a difference does it make whether a student of a given academic ability enters a more or a less selective four-year college? Some studies claim that attending a more academically selective college markedly improves one's graduation prospects. Others report the reverse: an advantage from attending an institution where one's own skills…

  5. Galaxies in X-Ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data. I. Stellar Mass Growth of Bright Central Galaxies since z~1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; Perfecto, R.; Song, J.; Desai, S.; Mohr, J.; Wilcox, H.; Bermeo-Hernandez, A.; Jeltema, T.; Hollowood, D.; Bacon, D.; Capozzi, D.; Collins, C.; Das, R.; Gerdes, D.; Hennig, C.; Hilton, M.; Hoyle, B.; Kay, S.; Liddle, A.; Mann, R. G.; Mehrtens, N.; Nichol, R. C.; Papovich, C.; Sahlén, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stott, J.; Viana, P. T.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Castander, F. J.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Cunha, C. E.; Eifler, T. F.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, Paul; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, R. C.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.; da Costa, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z ~ 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into an analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, m*∝ (M200/{1.5×10}14M⊙})0.24+/-0.08 (1+z)-0.19+/- 0.34, and compare the observed relation to the model prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of M200,z = 1013.8 M⊙ at z = 1.0: m*,BCG appears to have grown by 0.13 ± 0.11 dex, in tension at the ˜2.5σ significance level with the 0.40 dex growth rate expected from the semi-analytic model. We show that the build-up of extended intracluster light after z = 1.0 may alleviate this tension in BCG growth rates.

  6. X-ray Structural and Biological Evaluation of a Series of Potent and Highly Selective Inhibitors of Human Coronavirus Papain-like Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Structure-guided design was used to generate a series of noncovalent inhibitors with nanomolar potency against the papain-like protease (PLpro) from the SARS coronavirus (CoV). A number of inhibitors exhibit antiviral activity against SARS-CoV infected Vero E6 cells and broadened specificity toward the homologous PLP2 enzyme from the human coronavirus NL63. Selectivity and cytotoxicity studies established a more than 100-fold preference for the coronaviral enzyme over homologous human deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), and no significant cytotoxicity in Vero E6 and HEK293 cell lines is observed. X-ray structural analyses of inhibitor-bound crystal structures revealed subtle differences between binding modes of the initial benzodioxolane lead (15g) and the most potent analogues 3k and 3j, featuring a monofluoro substitution at para and meta positions of the benzyl ring, respectively. Finally, the less lipophilic bis(amide) 3e and methoxypyridine 5c exhibit significantly improved metabolic stability and are viable candidates for advancing to in vivo studies. PMID:24568342

  7. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  8. British X-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, K. A.

    1986-09-01

    The development of solar and cosmic X-ray studies in the UK, in particular the Skylark and Ariel programs, is discussed. The characteristics and capabilities of the X-ray emulsion detector developed to monitor the solar X-radiation in the Skylark program, and of the proportional counter spectrometer developed for solar X-ray measurements on the Ariel I satellite are described. The designs and functions of the pin-hole camera, the Bragg crystal spectrometer, and the X-ray spectroheliograph are exmained. The Skylark observations of cosmic X-ray sources and high-resolution solar spectra, and the Ariel 5 data on cosmic X-ray sources are presented. Consideration is given to the Ariel 6, the U.S. Einstein Observatory, Exosat, and ASTRO-C.

  9. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  10. Catalog of candidates for quasars at 3 < z < 5.5 selected among X-Ray sources from the 3XMM-DR4 survey of the XMM-Newton observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorunzhev, G. A.; Burenin, R. A.; Meshcheryakov, A. V.; Sazonov, S. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    We have compiled a catalog of 903 candidates for type 1 quasars at redshifts 3 < z < 5.5 selected among the X-ray sources of the "serendipitous" XMM-Newton survey presented in the 3XMMDR4 catalog (the median X-ray flux is ≈5 × 10-15 erg s-1 cm-2 in the 0.5-2 keV energy band) and located at high Galactic latitudes | b| > 20° in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) fields with a total area of about 300 deg2. Photometric SDSS data as well infrared 2MASS and WISE data were used to select the objects. We selected the point sources from the photometric SDSS catalog with a magnitude error δ mz' < 0.2 and a color i' - z' < 0.6 (to first eliminate the M-type stars). For the selected sources, we have calculated the dependences χ2( z) for various spectral templates from the library that we compiled for these purposes using the EAZY software. Based on these data, we have rejected the objects whose spectral energy distributions are better described by the templates of stars at z = 0 and obtained a sample of quasars with photometric redshift estimates 2.75 < z phot < 5.5. The selection completeness of known quasars at z spec > 3 in the investigated fields is shown to be about 80%. The normalized median absolute deviation (Δ z = | z spec - z phot|) is σ Δ z /(1+ z spec) = 0.07, while the outlier fraction is η = 9% when Δ z/(1 + z cпek.) > 0.2. The number of objects per unit area in our sample exceeds the number of quasars in the spectroscopic SDSS sample at the same redshifts approximately by a factor of 1.5. The subsequent spectroscopic testing of the redshifts of our selected candidates for quasars at 3 < z < 5.5 will allow the purity of this sample to be estimated more accurately.

  11. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  12. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  13. Calibration of X-Ray Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; L'Dell, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate calibration of x-ray observatories has proved an elusive goal. Inaccuracies and inconsistencies amongst on-ground measurements, differences between on-ground and in-space performance, in-space performance changes, and the absence of cosmic calibration standards whose physics we truly understand have precluded absolute calibration better than several percent and relative spectral calibration better than a few percent. The philosophy "the model is the calibration" relies upon a complete high-fidelity model of performance and an accurate verification and calibration of this model. As high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy begins to play a more important role in astrophysics, additional issues in accurately calibrating at high spectral resolution become more evident. Here we review the challenges of accurately calibrating the absolute and relative response of x-ray observatories. On-ground x-ray testing by itself is unlikely to achieve a high-accuracy calibration of in-space performance, especially when the performance changes with time. Nonetheless, it remains an essential tool in verifying functionality and in characterizing and verifying the performance model. In the absence of verified cosmic calibration sources, we also discuss the notion of an artificial, in-space x-ray calibration standard. 6th

  14. Imaging of x rays for magnetospheric investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Imhof, W.L.; Voss, H.D.; Datlowe, D.W. . Space Sciences Lab.)

    1994-02-01

    X-ray imagers can provide large-scale maps of bremsstrahlung x rays produced by electron precipitation into the atmosphere. Complete day and night coverage is obtained and the electron energy spectra at each position in space can be derived from the measured x-ray energy spectra. Early x-ray imagers were limited in field of view and to one map for each pass over the emitting regions. The Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment, launched on a TIROS satellite, makes time-space mappings by scanning a 16-pixel pinhole camera. The data distinguish intensity variations of a fixed auroral feature from motion of a steadily radiating feature. However, the spatial deconvolution is complex and features stay in the field of view for only [approximately]10 min. These problems will be resolved by a high-altitude ([approximately]9 R[sub e]) imaging spectrometer PIXIE on the ISTP/GGS Polar Satellite to be launched in 1994. PIXIE's position-sensitive proportional counter will continuously image the entire auroral zone for periods of hours.

  15. Imaging of x rays for magnetospheric investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, William L.; Voss, Henry D.; Datlowe, Dayton W.

    1994-02-01

    X-ray imagers can provide large-scale maps of bremsstrahlung x rays produced by electron precipitation into the atmosphere. Complete day and night coverage is obtained and the electron energy spectra at each position in space can be derived from the measured x-ray energy spectra. Early x-ray imagers were limited in field of view and to one map for each pass over the emitting regions. The Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment, launched on a TIROS satellite, makes time-space mappings by scanning a 16-pixel pinhole camera. The data distinguish intensity variations of a fixed auroral feature from motion of a steadily radiating feature. However, the spatial deconvolution is complex and features stay in the field of view for only approximately 10 min. These problems will be resolved by a high- altitude (approximately 9 Re) imaging spectrometer PIXIE on the ISTP/GGS Polar Satellite to be launched in 1994. PIXIE's position-sensitive proportional counter will continuously image the entire auroral zone for periods of hours.

  16. Wide Field X-Ray Telescope Mission Concept Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. C.; Thomas, H. D.; Fabisinski, L. L.; Baysinger, M.; Hornsby, L. S.; Maples, C. D.; Purlee, T. E.; Capizzo, P. D.; Percy, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Wide Field X-Ray Telescope (WFXT) is an astrophysics mission concept for detecting and studying extra-galactic x-ray sources, including active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies, in an effort to further understand cosmic evolution and structure. This Technical Memorandum details the results of a mission concept study completed by the Advanced Concepts Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in 2012. The design team analyzed the mission and instrument requirements, and designed a spacecraft that enables the WFXT mission while using high heritage components. Design work included selecting components and sizing subsystems for power, avionics, guidance, navigation and control, propulsion, structures, command and data handling, communications, and thermal control.

  17. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  18. Diffraction enhanced x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Chapman, D.; Johnston, R.E.; Sayers, D.

    1997-09-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using synchrotron x-rays which produces images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. They show dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging applied to the same phantoms. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. The diffraction component and the apparent absorption component (absorption plus extinction contrast) can each be determined independently. This imaging method may improve the image quality for medical applications such as mammography.

  19. X-ray photonics: Bending X-rays with nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele

    2016-02-01

    X-ray counterparts of visible light optical elements are notoriously difficult to realize because the refractive index of all materials is close to unity. It has now been demonstrated that curved waveguides fabricated on a silicon chip can channel and deflect X-ray beams by consecutive grazing reflections.

  20. Luminous Binary Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, Rosanne; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This grant was for the study of Luminous Supersoft X-Ray Sources (SSSs). During the first year a number of projects were completed and new projects were started. The projects include: 1) Time variability of SSSs 2) SSSs in M31; 3) Binary evolution scenarios; and 4) Acquiring new data.

  1. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  2. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm S.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1997-01-01

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

  3. A complete X-ray sample of the high-latitude /absolute value of b greater than 20 deg/ sky from HEAO 1 A-2 - Log N-log S and luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piccinotti, G.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Marshall, F. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Shafer, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    An all-sky survey of X-ray sources was performed, complete to a limiting sensitivity of 3.1 x 10 to the -11 ergs/sq cm/s in the 2-10 keV band. The complete sample has allowed construction of luminosity functions based on a flux-limited sample for clusters of galaxies and active galactic nuclei. Integration of the best-fit luminosity functions indicates that clusters of galaxies contribute about 4% of the 2-10 keV DXRB, and active galactic nuclei about 20%. It is predicted that many of the objects seen in the deep survey should be local, relatively low luminosity active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies.

  4. X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean./Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

  5. ASTRO-H Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soong, Yang; Okajima, Takashi; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Odell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Ishida, Manabu; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Iizuka, Ryo; Hayashi, Takayuki; Tawara, Yuzuru; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Mori, Hideyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Sugita, Satoshi; Tamura, Keisuke; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Izumiya, Takanori; Minami, Sari; Sato, Toshiki; Tomikawa, Kazuki; Kikuchi, Naomichi; Iwase, Toshihiro

    2014-07-01

    ASTRO-H is an astrophysics satellite dedicated for non-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic study on selective celestial X-ray sources. Among the onboard instruments there are four Wolter-I X-ray mirrors of their reflectors' figure in conical approximation. Two of the four are soft X-ray mirrors1, of which the energy range is from a few hundred eV to 15 keV within the effective aperture being defined by the nested reflectors' radius ranging between 5.8 cm to 22.5 cm. The focal point instruments will be a calorimeter (SXS) and a CCD camera (SXI), respectively. The mirrors were in quadrant configuration with photons being reflected consecutively in the primary and secondary stage before converging on the focal plane of 5.6 m away from the interface between the two stages. The reflectors of the mirror are made of heat-formed aluminum substrate of the thickness gauged of 152 μm, 229 μm, and 305 μm of the alloy 5052 H-19, followed by epoxy replication on gold-sputtered smooth Pyrex cylindrical mandrels to acquire the X-ray reflective surface. The epoxy layer is 10 m nominal and surface gold layer of 0.2 μm. Improvements on angular response over its predecessors, e.g. Astro-E1/Suzaku mirrors, come from error reduction on the figure, the roundness, and the grazing angle/radius mismatching of the reflecting surface, and tighter specs and mechanical strength on supporting structure to reduce the reflector positioning and the assembly errors. Each soft x-ray telescope (SXT), SXT-1 or SXT-2, were integrated from four independent quadrants of mirrors. The stray-light baffles, in quadrant configuration, were mounted onto the integrated mirror. Thermal control units were attached to the perimeter of the integrated mirror to keep the mirror within operating temperature in space. The completed instrument went through a series of optical alignment, thus made the quadrant images confocal and their optical axes in parallel to achieve highest throughput possible. Environmental tests

  6. Comparative study of the 3-phenylcoumarin scaffold: Synthesis, X-ray structural analysis and semiempirical calculations of a selected series of compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Maria J.; Vilar, Santiago; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Santana, Lourdes; Uriarte, Eugenio

    2013-10-01

    Compounds 1 (6-methyl-3-phenylcoumarin), 2 (3-(o-methoxyphenyl)-6-methylcoumarin) and 3 (3-(m-methoxyphenyl)-6-methylcoumarin) were synthesized by a Perkin reaction between the 2-hydroxy-5-methylbenzaldehyde and the corresponding phenyl acetic acid. 1H and 13C NMR and X-ray diffractometry determined the molecular structures of the derivatives. A comparative study between compounds 1, 2 and 3, based on the structural results, was carried out. In addition, the X-ray structures were compared to those obtained combining conformational analysis with semiempirical methodologies (AM1 and PM3). The results provided by the semiempirical calculations in gas phase are in strong agreement with the X-ray method for the three molecules under study, meaning that the determination of the 3D structure for this type of compounds could be extrapolated from semiempirical studies.

  7. A Study of the X-Ray Emission from Three Radio Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The subject grant is for work on a study of x-ray emission from isolated pulsars. The purpose of the study was to: determine whether the pulsars were x-ray sources; and, if so, search for evidence of pulsations at the known radio period; and study the nature of the x-ray emission. Observation of the pulsar PSR 0355+54 were obtained, and the analysis of these data is complete. These results were reported at the 183rd AAS Meeting, and in a paper entitled 'X-Ray Emission from PSR 0355+54' which as published in the The Astrophysical Journal. Also obtained an approx. 3 ks PSPC observations of PSR 1642-03. A summary of the results from these data were reported in a Conference Proceedings for the 'New Horizon of X-ray Astronomy' symposium. In addition, as part of a study with a student from the SAO Summer Intern Program, I incorporated ROSAT archival data in an extended study of pulsar emission. These results were reported at the 185th AAS Meeting, and in a paper entitled 'Soft X-ray Emission from Selected Isolated Pulsars' which was published in The Astrophysical Journal (Letters).

  8. Development of a microfocus x-ray tube with multiple excitation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Maeo, Shuji; Kraemer, Markus; Taniguchi, Kazuo

    2009-03-15

    A microfocus x-ray tube with multiple targets and an electron gun with a focal spot size of 10 {mu}m in diameter has been developed. The electron gun contains a LaB{sub 6} cathode and an Einzel lens. The x-ray tube can be operated at 50 W (50 kV, 1 mA) and has three targets, namely, Cr, W, and Rh on the anode that can be selected completely by moving the anode position. A focal spot size of 10 {mu}m in diameter can be achieved at 0.5 mA current. As demonstration of the usability of a multiexcitation x-ray tube, the fluorescence x-rays have been measured using a powder specimen mixed of TiO{sub 2}, Co, and Zr of the same quantity. The differences of excitation efficiency have clearly appeared according to the change in excitation source. From the results discussed here, it can be expected that the presented x-ray tube will be a powerful tool in microx-ray fluorescence spectrometers and various x-ray instruments.

  9. Current status of ASTRO-H Hard X-ray Telescopes (HXTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaki, Hisamitsu; Kunieda, Hideyo; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Haba, Yoshito; Hayashi, Takayuki; Iizuka, Ryo; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Itoh, Masayuki; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Matsumoto, Hironori; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mori, Hideyuki; Nagano, Hosei; Namba, Yoshiharu; Ogasaka, Yasushi; Ogi, Keiji; Okajima, Takashi; Sugita, Satoshi; Suzuki, Yoshio; Tamura, Keisuke; Tawara, Yuzuru; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yamashita, Koujun; Yamauchi, Shigeo

    2012-09-01

    ASTRO-H is an international X-ray mission of ISAS/JAXA, which will be launched in 2014. One of the main characteristics of ASTRO-H is imaging spectroscopy in the hard X-ray band above 10 keV. ASTRO-H will carry two identical Hard X-ray telescopes (HXTs), whose mirror surfaces are coated with Pt/C depth-graded multilayers to enhance hard X-ray effective area up to 80 keV. HXT was designed based on the telescope on board the SUMIT balloon borne experiment. After feasibility study of the HXT design, the FM design has been deteremined. Mass production of the mirror shells at Nagoya University has been going on since August 2010, and production of mirror shells for HXT-1 was completed in March 2012. After the integation of X-ray mirrors for HXT-1, we measured hard X-ray performance of selected mirror shells for HXT-1 at a synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8 beamline BL20B2. We will perform environment tests and ground calibarations at SPring-8 for HXT-1. In HXT-2, foil production is going on.

  10. Astronomical X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, M. K.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past two decades, grazing incidence optics have transformed observational x-ray astronomy into a major scientific discipline at the cutting edge of research in astrophysics and cosmology. This review summarizes the fundamental design principles of grazing incidence optics for astronomical applications, describes the capabilities of the current generation of x-ray telescopes, and explores several avenues of future development.

  11. Dual x-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Albert; Aaron, Ronald

    2011-04-01

    Dual x-ray absorptiometry is widely used in analyzing body composition and imaging. We discuss the physics of the method and exhibit its limitations and show it is related to the Compton and photoelectric contributions to the x-ray absorption coefficients of materials.

  12. X-ray position detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmire, G. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    An X-ray position detector for real time operation is described. A set of proportional counters is arranged into an array which can detect and indicate the position of an X-ray interaction within the array, in the X Y plane.

  13. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Jeffrey A [Livermore, CA

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  14. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  15. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; hide

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  16. X-ray Haloes and Scattering by Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2003-01-01

    The presence of dust in the general interstellar medium is inferred f r o m the general extinction of starlight, the diffuse infrared emission, and the elemental abundance constraints. X-ray haloes around X-ray sources, produced by small angle scattering from intervening interstellar dust particles provide a new probe into the nature of interstellar dust. In this talk I will review the physics of X-ray scattering by dust particles, and present an analysis of dust properties around select X-ray sources.

  17. X-ray Haloes and Scattering by Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2003-01-01

    The presence of dust in the general interstellar medium is inferred from the general extinction of starlight, the diffuse infrared emission, and the elemental abundance constraints. X-ray haloes around X-ray sources, produced by small angle scattering from intervening interstellar dust particles provide a new probe into the nature of interstellar dust. In this talk I will review the physics of X-ray scattering by dust particles, and present an analysis of dust properties around select X-ray sources.

  18. X-ray Haloes and Scattering by Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2003-01-01

    The presence of dust in the general interstellar medium is inferred f r o m the general extinction of starlight, the diffuse infrared emission, and the elemental abundance constraints. X-ray haloes around X-ray sources, produced by small angle scattering from intervening interstellar dust particles provide a new probe into the nature of interstellar dust. In this talk I will review the physics of X-ray scattering by dust particles, and present an analysis of dust properties around select X-ray sources.

  19. X-ray Haloes and Scattering by Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2003-01-01

    The presence of dust in the general interstellar medium is inferred from the general extinction of starlight, the diffuse infrared emission, and the elemental abundance constraints. X-ray haloes around X-ray sources, produced by small angle scattering from intervening interstellar dust particles provide a new probe into the nature of interstellar dust. In this talk I will review the physics of X-ray scattering by dust particles, and present an analysis of dust properties around select X-ray sources.

  20. Languages of shape feature description and syntactic methods for recognition of morphological changes in organs in analysis of selected x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiela, Marek R.

    1998-06-01

    The presented paper treats a subject of elaboration of new algorithms for recognition of lesions and analysis of shape features of selected abdominal cavity organs visible on radiograms or tomograms. The aim of the methods is to determine and examine morphological shapes of the analyzed anatomical structures in order to diagnose cancerous lesions and inflammatory processes. The formulated target was accomplished in the case of the diagnosis of cancer and chronic inflammation of the pancreas made on the base of X- ray images obtained during the ERCP examinations. For this purpose an effective algorithm for thresholding of the ERCP images was employed. Hence it was possible to extract the pancreas duct together with morphological changes which could occur. Then, thanks to determination and application of special sequence of geometric operations (skeletonizing and rotations of contour points about a skeleton), a linear graph representing the width of pancreas duct and showing morphological changes was obtained. In order to find these changes the context-free attributed grammars, enabling description of all searched morphological changes were used. These attributes contained an additional information (height and width of the discovered change) used for recognition of ambiguous cases. For proper description and recognition of symptoms, for which the 2D analysis is required (i.e. e.g. large cavernous bulges), the language of shape features description with a special multidirectional sinquad distribution were employed. Research on usefulness of the proposed methods, performed so far, justified the application of syntactic methods to recognition of medical images, especially to support medical diagnostics.

  1. Monitoring selected hydrogen bonds in crystal hydrates of amino acid salts: combining variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction and polarized Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Boris A; Kolesov, Boris A; Boldyreva, Elena V

    2011-07-28

    Predicting behaviour of hydrogen bonds with varying temperature, in particular-correlating donor-acceptor distances in the O-H···O hydrogen bonds with the frequencies of O-H stretching vibrations is important for understanding dynamics of biomolecules and phase transitions in crystals. A commonly used correlation suggested earlier in the literature is based on statistical analysis of different compounds [A. Novak, Structure and Bonding, 1974, 18, 177; K. Nakamoto, M. Margoshes, R. E. Rundle, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1955, 77, 6480]. The present study is a rare example when correlations between geometry and energy parameters have been found for selected individual hydrogen bonds in the same crystalline compound at multiple temperatures. The properties of several types of O-H···O hydrogen bonds in bis(DL-serinium) oxalate dihydrate and DL-alaninium semi-oxalate monohydrate have been studied by a combination of variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction and polarized Raman spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrogen bonds geometry could be compared with the changes of the corresponding spectral modes. The correlation suggested by Novak is roughly followed, better for medium and weak, than for short hydrogen bonds. Fine details of spectral changes differ for individual bonds. The way how H-bonds are affected by cooling depends on their environment in the crystal structure. Short O-H···O hydrogen bonds in bis(DL-serinium) oxalate dihydrate expand or remain almost unchanged on cooling, whereas in DL-alaninium semi-oxalate monohydrate all strong H-bonds are compressed under these conditions. The distortion of individual hydrogen bonds on temperature variations is correlated with the anisotropy of lattice strain.

  2. The host galaxies of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei to z = 2.5: Structure, star formation, and their relationships from CANDELS and Herschel/PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, D. J.; McIntosh, D. H.; van der Wel, A.; Kartaltepe, J.; Lang, P.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Lutz, D.; Rafelski, M.; Villforth, C.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Bell, E. F.; Berta, S.; Brandt, W. N.; Conselice, C. J.; Dekel, A.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Genzel, R.; Grogin, N. A.; Kocevski, D. D.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Lotz, J. M.; Magnelli, B.; Maiolino, R.; Mozena, M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Papovich, C. J.; Popesso, P.; Tacconi, L. J.; Trump, J. R.; Avadhuta, S.; Bassett, R.; Bell, A.; Bernyk, M.; Bournaud, F.; Cassata, P.; Cheung, E.; Croton, D.; Donley, J.; DeGroot, L.; Guedes, J.; Hathi, N.; Herrington, J.; Hilton, M.; Lai, K.; Lani, C.; Martig, M.; McGrath, E.; Mutch, S.; Mortlock, A.; McPartland, C.; O'Leary, E.; Peth, M.; Pillepich, A.; Poole, G.; Snyder, D.; Straughn, A.; Telford, O.; Tonini, C.; Wandro, P.

    2015-01-01

    We study the relationship between the structure and star formation rate (SFR) of X-ray selected low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the two Chandra Deep Fields, using Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and deep far-infrared maps from the PEP+GOODS-Herschel survey. We derive detailed distributions of structural parameters and FIR luminosities from carefully constructed control samples of galaxies, which we then compare to those of the AGNs. At z ~ 1, AGNs show slightly diskier light profiles than massive inactive (non-AGN) galaxies, as well as modestly higher levels of gross galaxy disturbance (as measured by visual signatures of interactions and clumpy structure). In contrast, at z ~ 2, AGNs show similar levels of galaxy disturbance as inactive galaxies, but display a red central light enhancement, which may arise from a more pronounced bulge in AGN hosts or extinguished nuclear light. We undertake a number of tests of both these alternatives, but our results do not strongly favor one interpretation over the other. The mean SFR and its distribution among AGNs and inactive galaxies are similar at z> 1.5. At z< 1, however, clear and significant enhancements are seen in the SFRs of AGNs with bulge-dominated light profiles. These trends suggest an evolution in the relation between nuclear activity and host properties with redshift, towards a minor role for mergers and interactions at z> 1.5. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Transforming Our Understanding of the X-ray Universe: The Imaging X-ray Polarimeter Explorer (IXPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Matt, Giorgio; Marshall, Herman; ODell, Stephen L.; Pavlov, George; Ramsey, Brian; Romani, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Accurate X-ray polarimetry can provide unique information on high-energy-astrophysical processes and sources. As there have been no meaningful X-ray polarization measurements of cosmic sources since our pioneering work in the 1970's, the time is ripe to explore this new parameter space in X-ray astronomy. To accomplish this requires a well-calibrated and well understood system that-particularly for an Explorer mission-has technical, cost, and schedule credibility. The system that we shall present satisfies these conditions, being based upon completely calibrated imaging- and polarization-sensitive detectors and proven X-ray-telescope technology.

  4. X-ray monitoring optical elements

    DOEpatents

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvydko, Yury; Katsoudas, John; Blank, Vladimir D.; Terentyev, Sergey A.

    2016-12-27

    An X-ray article and method for analyzing hard X-rays which have interacted with a test system. The X-ray article is operative to diffract or otherwise process X-rays from an input X-ray beam which have interacted with the test system and at the same time provide an electrical circuit adapted to collect photoelectrons emitted from an X-ray optical element of the X-ray article to analyze features of the test system.

  5. X-ray diagnostics for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.

    1982-12-01

    A short description of the x-ray diagnostic preparation for the TFTR tokamak is given. The x-ray equipment consists of the limiter x-ray monitoring system, the soft x-ray pulse-height-analysis-system, the soft x-ray imaging system and the x-ray crystal spectrometer. Particular attention is given to the radiation protection of the x-ray systems from the neutron environment.

  6. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    Using the XMM-Newton slew survey, we construct a hard-band selected sample of low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources. Two source populations are represented, namely coronally active stars and binaries (ASBs) and cataclysmic variables (CVs), with X-ray luminosities collectively spanning the range 1028-34 erg s-1 (2-10 keV). We derive the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and volume emissivity of each population. Scaled to the local stellar mass density, the latter is found to be 1.08 ± 0.16 × 1028 and 2.5 ± 0.6 × 10^{27} {erg s}^{-1} M_{{⊙}}^{-1}, for the ASBs and CVs, respectively, which in total is a factor of 2 higher than previous estimates. We employ the new XLFs to predict the X-ray source counts on the Galactic plane at l = 28.5° and show that the result is consistent with current observational constraints. The X-ray emission of faint, unresolved ASBs and CVs can account for a substantial fraction of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We discuss a model in which ˜80 per cent of the 6-10 keV GRXE intensity is produced in this way, with the remainder attributable to X-ray scattering in the interstellar medium and/or young Galactic source populations. Much of the hard X-ray emission attributed to the ASBs is likely to be produced during flaring episodes.

  7. HERMES: a soft X-ray beamline dedicated to X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Belkhou, Rachid; Stanescu, Stefan; Swaraj, Sufal; Besson, Adrien; Ledoux, Milena; Hajlaoui, Mahdi; Dalle, Didier

    2015-07-01

    The HERMES beamline (High Efficiency and Resolution beamline dedicated to X-ray Microscopy and Electron Spectroscopy), built at Synchrotron SOLEIL (Saint-Auban, France), is dedicated to soft X-ray microscopy. The beamline combines two complementary microscopy methods: XPEEM (X-ray Photo Emitted Electron Microscopy) and STXM (Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy) with an aim to reach spatial resolution below 20 nm and to fully exploit the local spectroscopic capabilities of the two microscopes. The availability of the two methods within the same beamline enables the users to select the appropriate approach to study their specific case in terms of sample environment, spectroscopy methods, probing depth etc. In this paper a general description of the beamline and its design are presented. The performance and specifications of the beamline will be reviewed in detail. Moreover, the article is aiming to demonstrate how the beamline performances have been specifically optimized to fulfill the specific requirements of a soft X-ray microscopy beamline in terms of flux, resolution, beam size etc. Special attention has been dedicated to overcome some limiting and hindering problems that are usually encountered on soft X-ray beamlines such as carbon contamination, thermal stability and spectral purity.

  8. Ultraviolet-excess selection of the counterpart to a globular cluster X-ray burster - Hubble Space Telescope images of the core of NGC 6712

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Scott F.; Margon, Bruce; Deutsch, Eric W.; Downes, Ronald A.

    1993-01-01

    Using the Planetary Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained high spatial resolution, multicolor images and photometry of the core of the globular cluster NGC 6712. A comparison of our blue and ultraviolet images unambiguously reveals a faint (B = 21), UV-excess object, 'star S', within the Einstein error box for the bursting X-ray source X1850-086. The unusual color of star S is immediately apparent even in a cursory visual comparison of the images, and is more quantitatively (U-B of about -1) confirmed via photometry. A variety of different candidate optical counterparts to the X-ray source have previously been suggested from ground-based work, but our images indicate that star S is almost certainly the only viable candidate brighter than U = 21. Compared with the mean values for low mass X-ray binaries in the field, star S has a typical (U-B) color, and a moderate-to-high X-ray-to-optical luminosity ratio, but its luminosity (MB = 5) is about 4 mag fainter than average.

  9. Ultraviolet-excess selection of the counterpart to a globular cluster X-ray burster - Hubble Space Telescope images of the core of NGC 6712

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Scott F.; Margon, Bruce; Deutsch, Eric W.; Downes, Ronald A.

    1993-01-01

    Using the Planetary Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained high spatial resolution, multicolor images and photometry of the core of the globular cluster NGC 6712. A comparison of our blue and ultraviolet images unambiguously reveals a faint (B = 21), UV-excess object, 'star S', within the Einstein error box for the bursting X-ray source X1850-086. The unusual color of star S is immediately apparent even in a cursory visual comparison of the images, and is more quantitatively (U-B of about -1) confirmed via photometry. A variety of different candidate optical counterparts to the X-ray source have previously been suggested from ground-based work, but our images indicate that star S is almost certainly the only viable candidate brighter than U = 21. Compared with the mean values for low mass X-ray binaries in the field, star S has a typical (U-B) color, and a moderate-to-high X-ray-to-optical luminosity ratio, but its luminosity (MB = 5) is about 4 mag fainter than average.

  10. X-Ray Microdiffraction at Megabar Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H.

    2003-12-01

    High-pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD) provides unique, important sources of structural information of minerals in the Earth's deep interior, but encounters major limitations. The restriction to forward diffraction geometry (2θ less than 90° ) severely limits the accuracy. With the 50-5 μ m size x-ray beam typically used to probe samples at 30-200 GPa, the number of crystals covered by the x-ray beam is often too few for good polycrystalline XRD, but too numerous for single-crystal XRD. Single-crystal XRD method with monochromatic x-ray source and 2-d detector works satisfactorily for crystal size larger than 20 μ m, but when the crystal is significantly less than 5 μ m, the sample signals are often overwhelmed by the background. Energy dispersive XRD with polychromatic x-radiation has been used successfully to determine unit-cell parameters of smaller single crystals, but the intensity information is unusable for structural refinement because this method requires rotation of the small crystal relative to the small x-ray beam. Recent integration of panoramic diamond anvil cell1 (PDAC) with synchrotron x-ray microdiffraction2 (XRMD) method has finally overcome these limitations and can potentially revolutionize the high-pressure XRD field. This XRMD method focuses polychromatic x-radiation to submicrometer size to resolve very small single crystals, and collects Laue spots with a 2-d CCD detector. The PDAC allows complete forward, 90° , and back scatterings, while the background signal is minimized by directing the incident x-ray beam through single-crystal diamonds (i.e., avoiding the beryllium seats and gasket). The incident beam can be changed to monochromatic, tuned through the full energy (wavelength) range, and focused to the identical submicrometer spot for d-spacing determination of each Laue spot. All polychromatic Laue spots are collected simultaneously from the same x-ray sampled volume, thus reliable for structure determination. The development

  11. X-ray spectroscopy of manganese clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Grush, M.M. |

    1996-06-01

    Much of this thesis represents the groundwork necessary in order to probe Mn clusters more productively than with conventional Mn K-edge XAS and is presented in Part 1. Part 2 contains the application of x-ray techniques to Mn metalloproteins and includes a prognosis at the end of each chapter. Individual Mn oxidation states are more readily distinguishable in Mn L-edge spectra. An empirical mixed valence simulation routine for determining the average Mn oxidation state has been developed. The first Mn L-edge spectra of a metalloprotein were measured and interpreted. The energy of Mn K{beta} emission is strongly correlated with average Mn oxidation state. K{beta} results support oxidation states of Mn(III){sub 2}(IV){sub 2} for the S{sub 1} state of Photosystem II chemical chemically reduced preparations contain predominantly Mn(II). A strength and limitation of XAS is that it probes all of the species of a particular element in a sample. It would often be advantageous to selectively probe different forms of the same element. The first demonstration that chemical shifts in x-ray fluorescence energies can be used to obtain oxidation state-selective x-ray absorption spectra is presented. Spin-dependent spectra can also be used to obtain a more simplified picture of local structure. The first spin-polarized extended x-ray absorption fine structure using Mn K{beta} fluorescence detection is shown.

  12. X-ray cavities in a sample of 83 SPT-selected clusters of galaxies: Tracing the evolution of AGN feedback in clusters of galaxies out to z = 1.2

    DOE PAGES

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; ...

    2015-05-18

    X-ray cavities are key tracers of mechanical (or radio mode) heating arising from the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Here, we report on a survey for X-ray cavities in 83 massive, high-redshift (more » $$0.4\\lt z\\lt 1.2$$) clusters of galaxies selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. Based on Chandra X-ray images, we find a total of six clusters having symmetric pairs of surface brightness depressions consistent with the picture of radio jets inflating X-ray cavities in the intracluster medium (ICM). Furthermore, the majority of these detections are of relatively low significance and require deeper follow-up data in order to be confirmed. Further, this search will miss small (<10 kpc) X-ray cavities that are unresolved by Chandra at high ($$z\\gtrsim 0.5$$) redshift. Despite these limitations, our results suggest that the power generated by AGN feedback in BCGs has remained unchanged for over half of the age of the universe ($$\\gt 7$$ Gyr at $$z\\sim 0.8$$). On average, the detected X-ray cavities have powers of $$(0.8-5)\\times {{10}^{45}}\\ {\\rm erg}\\ {{{\\rm s}}^{-1}}$$, enthalpies of $$(3-6)\\times {{10}^{59}}\\ {\\rm erg}$$, and radii of ~17 kpc. Integrating over 7 Gyr, we find that the supermassive black holes in BCGs may have accreted 108 to several $${{10}^{9}}\\;{{M}_{\\odot }}$$ of material to power these outflows. This level of accretion indicates that significant supermassive black hole growth may occur not only at early times, in the quasar era, but at late times as well. We also find that X-ray cavities at high redshift may inject an excess heat of 0.1–1.0 keV per particle into the hot ICM above and beyond the energy needed to offset cooling. Though our result needs to be confirmed, we note that the magnitude of excess heating is similar to the energy needed to preheat clusters, break self-similarity, and explain the excess entropy in hot atmospheres.« less

  13. X-ray cavities in a sample of 83 SPT-selected clusters of galaxies. Tracing the evolution of AGN feedback in clusters of galaxies out to z = 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; Forman, W. R.; Allen, S. W.; Bleem, L. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Dietrich, J. P.; Jones, C.; Liu, J.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Song, J.; Stalder, B.; Vikhlinin, A.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-05-18

    X-ray cavities are key tracers of mechanical (or radio mode) heating arising from the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We report on a survey for X-ray cavities in 83 massive, high-redshift ($0.4\\lt z\\lt 1.2$) clusters of galaxies selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. Based on Chandra X-ray images, we find a total of six clusters having symmetric pairs of surface brightness depressions consistent with the picture of radio jets inflating X-ray cavities in the intracluster medium (ICM). The majority of these detections are of relatively low significance and require deeper follow-up data in order to be confirmed. Further, this search will miss small (<10 kpc) X-ray cavities that are unresolved by Chandra at high ($z\\gtrsim 0.5$) redshift. Despite these limitations, our results suggest that the power generated by AGN feedback in BCGs has remained unchanged for over half of the age of the universe ($\\gt 7$ Gyr at $z\\sim 0.8$). On average, the detected X-ray cavities have powers of $(0.8-5)\\times {{10}^{45}}\\ {\\rm erg}\\ {{{\\rm s}}^{-1}}$, enthalpies of $(3-6)\\times {{10}^{59}}\\ {\\rm erg}$, and radii of ~17 kpc. Integrating over 7 Gyr, we find that the supermassive black holes in BCGs may have accreted 108 to several ${{10}^{9}}\\;{{M}_{\\odot }}$ of material to power these outflows. This level of accretion indicates that significant supermassive black hole growth may occur not only at early times, in the quasar era, but at late times as well. We also find that X-ray cavities at high redshift may inject an excess heat of 0.1–1.0 keV per particle into the hot ICM above and beyond the energy needed to offset cooling. Although this result needs to be confirmed, we note that the magnitude of excess heating is similar to the energy needed to preheat clusters, break self-similarity, and explain the excess entropy in hot atmospheres.

  14. X-ray cavities in a sample of 83 SPT-selected clusters of galaxies: Tracing the evolution of AGN feedback in clusters of galaxies out to z = 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; Forman, W. R.; Allen, S. W.; Bleem, L. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Dietrich, J. P.; Jones, C.; Liu, J.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Song, J.; Stalder, B.; Vikhlinin, A.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-05-18

    X-ray cavities are key tracers of mechanical (or radio mode) heating arising from the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Here, we report on a survey for X-ray cavities in 83 massive, high-redshift ($0.4\\lt z\\lt 1.2$) clusters of galaxies selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. Based on Chandra X-ray images, we find a total of six clusters having symmetric pairs of surface brightness depressions consistent with the picture of radio jets inflating X-ray cavities in the intracluster medium (ICM). Furthermore, the majority of these detections are of relatively low significance and require deeper follow-up data in order to be confirmed. Further, this search will miss small (<10 kpc) X-ray cavities that are unresolved by Chandra at high ($z\\gtrsim 0.5$) redshift. Despite these limitations, our results suggest that the power generated by AGN feedback in BCGs has remained unchanged for over half of the age of the universe ($\\gt 7$ Gyr at $z\\sim 0.8$). On average, the detected X-ray cavities have powers of $(0.8-5)\\times {{10}^{45}}\\ {\\rm erg}\\ {{{\\rm s}}^{-1}}$, enthalpies of $(3-6)\\times {{10}^{59}}\\ {\\rm erg}$, and radii of ~17 kpc. Integrating over 7 Gyr, we find that the supermassive black holes in BCGs may have accreted 108 to several ${{10}^{9}}\\;{{M}_{\\odot }}$ of material to power these outflows. This level of accretion indicates that significant supermassive black hole growth may occur not only at early times, in the quasar era, but at late times as well. We also find that X-ray cavities at high redshift may inject an excess heat of 0.1–1.0 keV per particle into the hot ICM above and beyond the energy needed to offset cooling. Though our result needs to be confirmed, we note that the magnitude of excess heating is similar to the energy needed to preheat clusters, break self-similarity, and explain the excess entropy in hot atmospheres.

  15. The Swift/BAT Hard X-Ray Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, Jack; Markwardt, C. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Skinner, G. K.; Falcone, A.; Kennea, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    The BAT instrument on Swift is a wide field (70 deg. '100 deg.) coded aperture instrument with a CdZnTe detector array sensitive to energies of 14-200 keV. Each day, the BAT survey typically covers 60% of the sky to a detection limit of 30 millicrab. BAT makes hard X-ray light curves of similar sensitivity and coverage to the X-ray light curves from XTE/ASM, but in an energy range where sources show remarkably different behavior. Integrating the BAT data produces an all sky map with a source detection limit at 15 months of a few 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second, depending on the exposure. This is the first uniform all-sky survey at energies high enough to be unaffected by absorption since HEAO 1 in 1977-8. BAT has detected greater than 200 AGN and greater than 180 galactic sources. At high galactic latitudes, the BAT sources are usually easy to identify, but many are heavily absorbed and there are a few quite surprising identifications. The BAT selected galaxies can be used to calculate LogN/LogS and the luminosity function for AGN which are complete and free from common systematics. Several crucial parameters for understanding the cosmic hard x-ray background are now determined.

  16. The Swift/BAT Hard X-ray Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, Jack; Markwardt, C. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, A.; Skinner, G. K.; Falcone, A.; Kennea, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    The BAT instrument on Swift is a wide field (70 deg. '100 deg.) coded aperture instrument with a CdZnTe detector array sensitive to energies of 14-200 keV. Each day, the BAT survey typically covers 60% of the sky to a detection limit of 30 millicrab. BAT makes hard X-ray light curves of similar sensitivity and coverage to the X-ray light curves from XTE/ASM, but in an energy range where sources show remarkably different behavior. Integrating the BAT data produces an all sky map with a source detection limit at 15 months of a few 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second, depending on the exposure. This is the first uniform all-sky survey at energies high enough to be unaffected by absorption since HEAO 1 in 1977-8. BAT has detected greater than 200 AGN and greater than 180 galactic sources. At high galactic latitudes, the BAT sources are usually easy to identify, but many are heavily absorbed and there are a few quite surprising identifications. The BAT selected galaxies can be used to calculate LogN/LogS and the luminosity function for AGN which are complete and free from common systematics. Several crucial parameters for understanding the cosmic hard x-ray background are now determined.

  17. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  18. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  19. Dissociative X-ray Lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Q.; Liu, J.-C.; Ågren, H.; Rubensson, J.-E.; Gel'mukhanov, F.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray lasing is predicted to ensue when molecules are pumped into dissociative core-excited states by a free-electron-laser pulse. The lasing is due to the population inversion created in the neutral dissociation product, and the process features self-trapping of the x-ray pulse at the gain ridge. Simulations performed for the HCl molecule pumped at the 2p1/2→6σ resonance demonstrate that the scheme can be used to create ultrashort coherent x-ray pulses.

  20. SMM X-ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith T.; Haisch, Bernhard M. (Compiler); Lemen, James R. (Compiler); Acton, L. W.; Bawa, H. S.; Claflin, E. S.; Freeland, S. L.; Slater, G. L.; Kemp, D. L.; Linford, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The range of observing and analysis programs accomplished with the X-Ray Polychromator (XRP) instruments during the decline of solar cycle 21 and the rise of the solar cycle 22 is summarized. Section 2 describes XRP operations and current status. This is meant as a guide on how the instrument is used to obtain data and what its capabilities are for potential users. The science section contains a series of representative abstracts from recently published papers on major XRP science topics. It is not meant to be a complete list but illustrates the type of science that can come from the analysis of the XRP data. There then follows a series of appendixes that summarize the major data bases that are available. Appendix A is a complete bibliography of papers and presentations produced using XRP data. Appendix B lists all the spectroscopic data accumulated by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS). Appendix C is a compilation of the XRP flare catalogue for events equivalent to a GOES C-level flare or greater. It lists the start, peak and end times as well as the peak Ca XIX flux.