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Sample records for complex antigens inhibition

  1. Brucella abortus inhibits major histocompatibility complex class II expression and antigen processing through interleukin-6 secretion via Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M Victoria; Zwerdling, Astrid; Pasquevich, Karina A; García Samartino, Clara; Wallach, Jorge C; Fossati, Carlos A; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H

    2008-01-01

    The strategies that allow Brucella abortus to survive inside macrophages for prolonged periods and to avoid the immunological surveillance of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes are poorly understood. We report here that infection of THP-1 cells with B. abortus inhibited expression of MHC-II molecules and antigen (Ag) processing. Heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) also induced both these phenomena, indicating the independence of bacterial viability and involvement of a structural component of the bacterium. Accordingly, outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, inhibited both MHC-II expression and Ag processing to the same extent as HKBA. Moreover, a synthetic lipohexapeptide that mimics the structure of the protein lipid moiety also inhibited MHC-II expression, indicating that any Brucella lipoprotein could down-modulate MHC-II expression and Ag processing. Inhibition of MHC-II expression and Ag processing by either HKBA or lipidated Omp19 (L-Omp19) depended on Toll-like receptor 2 and was mediated by interleukin-6. HKBA or L-Omp19 also inhibited MHC-II expression and Ag processing of human monocytes. In addition, exposure to the synthetic lipohexapeptide inhibited Ag-specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Brucella-infected patients. Together, these results indicate that there is a mechanism by which B. abortus may prevent recognition by T cells to evade host immunity and establish a chronic infection.

  2. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  3. Methamphetamine inhibits antigen processing, presentation, and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Tallóczy, Zsolt; Martinez, Jose; Joset, Danielle; Ray, Yonaton; Gácser, Attila; Toussi, Sima; Mizushima, Noboru; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Nosanchuk, Josh; Goldstein, Harris; Loike, John; Sulzer, David; Santambrogio, Laura

    2008-02-08

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is abused by over 35 million people worldwide. Chronic Meth abuse may be particularly devastating in individuals who engage in unprotected sex with multiple partners because it is associated with a 2-fold higher risk for obtaining HIV and associated secondary infections. We report the first specific evidence that Meth at pharmacological concentrations exerts a direct immunosuppressive effect on dendritic cells and macrophages. As a weak base, Meth collapses the pH gradient across acidic organelles, including lysosomes and associated autophagic organelles. This in turn inhibits receptor-mediated phagocytosis of antibody-coated particles, MHC class II antigen processing by the endosomal-lysosomal pathway, and antigen presentation to splenic T cells by dendritic cells. More importantly Meth facilitates intracellular replication and inhibits intracellular killing of Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, two major AIDS-related pathogens. Meth exerts previously unreported direct immunosuppressive effects that contribute to increased risk of infection and exacerbate AIDS pathology.

  4. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression by Disrupting Enhanceosome Assembly through Binding with the Regulatory Factor X Complex

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Suhani; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Gupta, Namrata; Challa, Shanthan; Cai, Qiliang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules play a central role in adaptive antiviral immunity by presenting viral peptides to CD4+ T cells. Due to their key role in adaptive immunity, many viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have evolved multiple strategies to inhibit the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. The expression of MHC-II, which is controlled mainly at the level of transcription, is strictly dependent upon the binding of the class II transactivator (CIITA) to the highly conserved promoters of all MHC-II genes. The recruitment of CIITA to MHC-II promoters requires its direct interactions with a preassembled MHC-II enhanceosome consisting of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) complex and regulatory factor X (RFX) complex proteins. Here, we show that KSHV-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) disrupts the association of CIITA with the MHC-II enhanceosome by binding to the components of the RFX complex. Our data show that LANA is capable of binding to all three components of the RFX complex, RFX-associated protein (RFXAP), RFX5, and RFX-associated ankyrin-containing protein (RFXANK), in vivo but binds more strongly with the RFXAP component in in vitro binding assays. Levels of MHC-II proteins were significantly reduced in KSHV-infected as well as LANA-expressing B cells. Additionally, the expression of LANA in a luciferase promoter reporter assay showed reduced HLA-DRA promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that LANA binds to the MHC-II promoter along with RFX proteins and that the overexpression of LANA disrupts the association of CIITA with the MHC-II promoter. These assays led to the conclusion that the interaction of LANA with RFX proteins interferes with the recruitment of CIITA to MHC-II promoters, resulting in an inhibition of MHC-II gene expression. Thus, the data presented here identify

  5. Antigen cross-presentation of immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Barbara; Stout, Madeleine; Fiebiger, Edda

    2014-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to cross-present tumor antigens has long been a focus of interest to physicians, as well as basic scientists, that aim to establish efficient cell-based cancer immune therapy. A prerequisite for exploiting this pathway for therapeutic purposes is a better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses when initiated by DCs via cross-presentation. The ability of humans DC to perform cross-presentation is of utmost interest, as this cell type is a main target for cell-based immunotherapy in humans. The outcome of a cross-presentation event is guided by the nature of the antigen, the form of antigen uptake, and the subpopulation of DCs that performs presentation. Generally, CD8α(+) DCs are considered to be the most potent cross-presenting DCs. This paradigm, however, only applies to soluble antigens. During adaptive immune responses, immune complexes form when antibodies interact with their specific epitopes on soluble antigens. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) immune complexes target Fc-gamma receptors on DCs to shuttle exogenous antigens efficiently into the cross-presentation pathway. This receptor-mediated cross-presentation pathway is a well-described route for the induction of strong CD8(+) T cell responses. IgG-mediated cross-presentation is intriguing because it permits the CD8(-) DCs, which are commonly considered to be weak cross-presenters, to efficiently cross-present. Engaging multiple DC subtypes for cross-presentation might be a superior strategy to boost CTL responses in vivo. We here summarize our current understanding of how DCs use IgG-complexed antigens for the efficient induction of CTL responses. Because of its importance for human cell therapy, we also review the recent advances in the characterization of cross-presentation properties of human DC subsets.

  6. Degenerate interfaces in antigen-antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    Decanniere, K; Transue, T R; Desmyter, A; Maes, D; Muyldermans, S; Wyns, L

    2001-10-26

    In most of the work dealing with the analysis of protein-protein interfaces, a single X-ray structure is available or selected, and implicitly it is assumed that this structure corresponds to the optimal complex for this pair of proteins. However, we have found a degenerate interface in a high-affinity antibody-antigen complex: the two independent complexes of the camel variable domain antibody fragment cAb-Lys3 and its antigen hen egg white lysozyme present in the asymmetric unit of our crystals show a difference in relative orientation between antibody and antigen, leading to important differences at the protein-protein interface. A third cAb-Lys3-hen lysozyme complex in a different crystal form adopts yet another relative orientation. Our results show that protein-protein interface characteristics can vary significantly between different specimens of the same high-affinity antibody-protein antigen complex. Consideration should be given to this type of observation when trying to establish general protein-protein interface characteristics.

  7. Inhibition of antigen-specific T lymphocyte activation by structurally related Ir gene-controlled polymers. II. Competitive inhibition of I-E- restricted, antigen-specific T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Our previous studies have defined a highly specific competitive inhibition between a pair of structurally related antigens (GT and GAT) for antigen presentation by accessory cells. The present report investigates this phenomenon in a second antigenic system, which is controlled by a distinct Ir gene product. Two GL phi-specific, I-Ed- restricted, interleukin 2-producing T cell hybridomas were constructed. The antigenic fine specificity of these two hybrid clones was distinct. One hybrid reacted solely with GL phi while the second cross-reacted with GLleu and GLT. These latter two copolymers, as well as the antigen GL, were found to inhibit the GL phi response of the non-cross-reactive hybrid. The structurally related antigen G phi was not inhibitory for this clone's response. The cross-reactive GL phi hybrid could also be inhibited, but, in this case, G phi and not GL caused the inhibition. Reciprocal inhibitions could be demonstrated between these and other hybrids (e.g., GAT responsive), indicating a very high degree of specificity to the inhibition. The inhibition caused by the various copolymers was reversible by increasing the concentration of GL phi, This effect was localized to the antigen-presenting cell and not the T cell hybridoma. Functionally, this competition did not appear to be for antigen uptake or general antigen processing. These findings generalize the phenomenon of antigen competition to a second antigen system in the context of a second Ia molecule. The possible mechanisms accounting for the complex pattern of specificities in this system are discussed. PMID:6210339

  8. Immune complexes inhibit interleukin-1 secretion and inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Janczy, John R.; Ciraci, Ceren; Haasken, Stefanie; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Olivier, Alicia K.; Cassel, Suzanne L.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) immune complexes have been shown to modify immune responses driven by antigen presenting cells in either a pro- or anti-inflammatory direction depending upon the context of stimulation. However, the ability of immune complexes to modulate the inflammasome-dependent innate immune response is unknown. Here we show that IgG immune complexes suppress IL-1α and IL-1β secretion through inhibition of inflammasome activation. The mechanism by which this inhibition occurs is via immune complex ligation of activating Fcγ receptors (FcγR), resulting in prevention of both activation and assembly of the inflammasome complex in response to NLRP3, NLRC4, or AIM2 agonists. In vivo, administration of antigen in the form of an immune complex during priming of the immune response inhibited resultant adaptive immune responses in a NLRP3 dependent model of allergic airway disease. Our data reveal an unexpected mechanism regulating CD4+ T cell differentiation, whereby immune complexes suppress inflammasome activation and the generation of IL-1α and IL-1β from antigen presenting cells, which are critical for the antigen-driven differentiation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25320279

  9. Structure and Dynamics of Antigenic Peptides in Complex with TAP

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Elisa; Tampé, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) selectively translocates antigenic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum. Loading onto major histocompatibility complex class I molecules and proofreading of these bound epitopes are orchestrated within the macromolecular peptide-loading complex, which assembles on TAP. This heterodimeric ABC-binding cassette (ABC) transport complex is therefore a major component in the adaptive immune response against virally or malignantly transformed cells. Its pivotal role predestines TAP as a target for infectious diseases and malignant disorders. The development of therapies or drugs therefore requires a detailed comprehension of structure and function of this ABC transporter, but our knowledge about various aspects is still insufficient. This review highlights recent achievements on the structure and dynamics of antigenic peptides in complex with TAP. Understanding the binding mode of antigenic peptides in the TAP complex will crucially impact rational design of inhibitors, drug development, or vaccination strategies. PMID:28194151

  10. Complex Antigens Drive Permissive Clonal Selection in Germinal Centers.

    PubMed

    Kuraoka, Masayuki; Schmidt, Aaron G; Nojima, Takuya; Feng, Feng; Watanabe, Akiko; Kitamura, Daisuke; Harrison, Stephen C; Kepler, Thomas B; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2016-03-15

    Germinal center (GC) B cells evolve toward increased affinity by a Darwinian process that has been studied primarily in genetically restricted, hapten-specific responses. We explored the population dynamics of genetically diverse GC responses to two complex antigens-Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and influenza hemagglutinin-in which B cells competed both intra- and interclonally for distinct epitopes. Preferred VH rearrangements among antigen-binding, naive B cells were similarly abundant in early GCs but, unlike responses to haptens, clonal diversity increased in GC B cells as early "winners" were replaced by rarer, high-affinity clones. Despite affinity maturation, inter- and intraclonal avidities varied greatly, and half of GC B cells did not bind the immunogen but nonetheless exhibited biased VH use, V(D)J mutation, and clonal expansion comparable to antigen-binding cells. GC reactions to complex antigens permit a range of specificities and affinities, with potential advantages for broad protection.

  11. Antigenic diversity of the serotype antigen complex of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: analysis by an indirect enzyme-linked immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, K H

    1980-01-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) has been developed to analyze the antigenic profile of the outer membrane serotype complex of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Antisera raised in rabbits to serotype-specific vesicles (SSV) reacted primarily with homologous SSV; however, there was significant cross-reactivity (less than 50%) with heterologous SSV. N. meningitidis SSV cross-reacted with all antigonococcal SSV but at a lower degree (less than 20%). Preimmune sera did not cross-react significantly with all antigonoccoccal SSV. The sensitivity of the ELISA was enhanced when the integral SSV proteins 1a and 2 were used as adsorbed antigen. Heterologous anti-SSV cross-reacted slightly, having ELISA values less than 15% of the homologous reaction. Antisera prepared by immunoabsorbent affinity columns were highly specific. Homologous affinity anti-SSV reacted only with proteins 1a and 2. The reaction of immune sera was inhibited by homologous proteins 1a and 2; lipopolysaccharide and proteins 1a and 2 isolated from heterologous serotypes did not inhibit the reaction. The reaction of affinity-purified antisera could be inhibited only by homologous protein 1a. By the use of affinity-purified antisera, a specific and highly sensitive ELISA was developed to analyze the antigenic profile of strains of N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:6769815

  12. Trade-offs in antibody repertoires to complex antigens

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Lauren M.; Baskerville, Edward B.; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens vary in their antigenic complexity. While some pathogens such as measles present a few relatively invariant targets to the immune system, others such as malaria display considerable antigenic diversity. How the immune response copes in the presence of multiple antigens, and whether a trade-off exists between the breadth and efficacy of antibody (Ab)-mediated immune responses, are unsolved problems. We present a theoretical model of affinity maturation of B-cell receptors (BCRs) during a primary infection and examine how variation in the number of accessible antigenic sites alters the Ab repertoire. Naive B cells with randomly generated receptor sequences initiate the germinal centre (GC) reaction. The binding affinity of a BCR to an antigen is quantified via a genotype–phenotype map, based on a random energy landscape, that combines local and distant interactions between residues. In the presence of numerous antigens or epitopes, B-cell clones with different specificities compete for stimulation during rounds of mutation within GCs. We find that the availability of many epitopes reduces the affinity and relative breadth of the Ab repertoire. Despite the stochasticity of somatic hypermutation, patterns of immunodominance are strongly shaped by chance selection of naive B cells with specificities for particular epitopes. Our model provides a mechanistic basis for the diversity of Ab repertoires and the evolutionary advantage of antigenically complex pathogens. PMID:26194759

  13. Trade-offs in antibody repertoires to complex antigens.

    PubMed

    Childs, Lauren M; Baskerville, Edward B; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-09-05

    Pathogens vary in their antigenic complexity. While some pathogens such as measles present a few relatively invariant targets to the immune system, others such as malaria display considerable antigenic diversity. How the immune response copes in the presence of multiple antigens, and whether a trade-off exists between the breadth and efficacy of antibody (Ab)-mediated immune responses, are unsolved problems. We present a theoretical model of affinity maturation of B-cell receptors (BCRs) during a primary infection and examine how variation in the number of accessible antigenic sites alters the Ab repertoire. Naive B cells with randomly generated receptor sequences initiate the germinal centre (GC) reaction. The binding affinity of a BCR to an antigen is quantified via a genotype-phenotype map, based on a random energy landscape, that combines local and distant interactions between residues. In the presence of numerous antigens or epitopes, B-cell clones with different specificities compete for stimulation during rounds of mutation within GCs. We find that the availability of many epitopes reduces the affinity and relative breadth of the Ab repertoire. Despite the stochasticity of somatic hypermutation, patterns of immunodominance are strongly shaped by chance selection of naive B cells with specificities for particular epitopes. Our model provides a mechanistic basis for the diversity of Ab repertoires and the evolutionary advantage of antigenically complex pathogens.

  14. Antigenic analysis of immune complexes formed in normal human pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M

    1985-01-01

    Immune complexes, isolated from pregnancy sera by absorption to immobilized protein A, were dissociated and the antigen components separated from the IgG antibodies, which possessed immune reactivity directed against the plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta. Gel filtration studies demonstrated that five separate antigens could be identified and were of placental origin, as observed by their reactivity in an ELISA with affinity purified anti-trophoblast antibodies isolated from maternal sera. The five antigens of apparent mol. wt 2 X 10(6), 400,000, 150,000, 13,000 and less than 10,000 daltons were designated maternally recognised trophoblast antigens (MRTA), numbers V-IX; the relative proportions of these antigens in the sera were 14%, 68%, 16%, 0.5% and 1%, respectively. Immune complexes were also identified in nulliparous non-pregnant female sera and consisted of the 150,000 and the less than 10,000 daltons antigen components. The relationship between the MRTA present in the immune complexes and the MRTA (numbers I-IV) previously identified as components of the trophoblast plasma membrane is discussed. Images Fig. 3 PMID:4042429

  15. Cholera Toxin Inhibits the T-Cell Antigen Receptor-Mediated Increases in Inositol Trisphosphate and Cytoplasmic Free Calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, John B.; Shoback, Dolores M.; Pattison, Gregory; Stobo, John D.

    1986-08-01

    The addition of monoclonal antibodies to the antigen receptor complex on the malignant human T-cell line Jurkat generates increases in inositol trisphosphate and in the concentration of cytoplasmic free calcium. Exposure of Jurkat cells to cholera toxin for 3 hr inhibited these receptor-mediated events and led to a selective, partial loss of the antigen receptor complex from the cellular surface. None of the effects of cholera toxin on the antigen receptor complex were mimicked by the B subunit of cholera toxin or by increasing intracellular cAMP levels with either forskolin or 8-bromo cAMP. These results suggest that a cholera toxin substrate can regulate signal transduction by the T-cell antigen receptor.

  16. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection.

    PubMed

    Cram, Erik D; Simmons, Ryan S; Palmer, Amy L; Hildebrand, William H; Rockey, Daniel D; Dolan, Brian P

    2015-11-23

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8(+) T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8(+) killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins.

  17. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Erik D.; Simmons, Ryan S.; Palmer, Amy L.; Hildebrand, William H.; Rockey, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8+ T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8+ killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins. PMID:26597986

  18. Neisseria lactamica antigens complexed with a novel cationic adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Emanuelle B; Rosetti, Andreza S; Lincopan, Nilton; De Gaspari, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Colonization of the nasopharynx by non-pathogenic Neisseria species, including N. lactamica, has been suggested to lead to the acquisition of natural immunity against Neisseria meningitidis in young children. The aim of this study was to identify a model complex of antigens and adjuvant for immunological preparation against N. meningitidis B, based on cross reactivity with N. lactamica outer membrane vesicles (OMV) antigens and the (DDA-BF) adjuvant. Complexes of 25 µg of OMV in 0.1 mM of DDA-BF were colloidally stable, exhibiting a mean diameter and charge optimal for antigen presentation. Immunogenicity tests for these complexes were performed in mice. A single dose of OMV/DDA-BF was sufficient to induce a (DTH) response, while the same result was achieved only after two doses of OMV/alum. In addition, to achieve total IgG levels that are similar to a single immunization with OMV/DDA-BF, it was necessary to give the mice a second dose of OMV/alum. Moreover, the antibodies induced from a single immunization with OMV/DDA-BF had an intermediate avidity, but antibodies with a similar avidity were only induced by OMV/alum after two immunizations. The use of this novel cationic adjuvant for the first time with a N. lactamica OMV preparation revealed good potential for future vaccine design.

  19. Complex of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen and 48,000-dalton host tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Greenspan, D S; Carroll, R B

    1981-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T Ag) can be separated by sucrose gradient sedimentation into a rapidly sedimenting, maximally phosphorylated fraction and a slowly sedimenting, less phosphorylated fraction. The Mr 48,000 host tumor antigen (48,000 HTA, also called nonviral T Ag) is preferentially complexed with the maximally phosphorylated T Ag. Pulse-labeled T Ag sediments as a 5-6S monomer, whereas T Ag radiolabeled for progressively longer periods slowly increases in sedimentation coefficient to give a broad distribution between 5 S and greater than 28 S. Mutation in the viral A locus causes a decrease in T Ag phosphorylation and a marked decrease in 48,000 HTA binding, shifting the sedimentation coefficient of T Ag to the monomer value. The more highly phosphorylated T Ag also has the highest affinity for chromatin. Images PMID:6941238

  20. Ceramide Inhibits Antigen Uptake and Presentation by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sallusto, Federica; Nicolò, Chiara; De Maria, Ruggero; Corinti, Silvia; Testi, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Ceramides are intramembrane diffusible mediators involved in transducing signals originated from a variety of cell surface receptors. Different adaptive and differentiative cellular responses, including apoptotic cell death, use ceramide-mediated pathways as an essential part of the program. Here, we show that human dendritic cells respond to CD40 ligand, as well as to tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1β, with intracellular ceramide accumulation, as they are induced to differentiate. Dendritic cells down-modulate their capacity to take up soluble antigens in response to exogenously added or endogenously produced ceramides. This is followed by an impairment in presenting soluble antigens to specific T cell clones, while cell viability and the capacity to stimulate allogeneic responses or to present immunogenic peptides is fully preserved. Thus, ceramide-mediated pathways initiated by different cytokines can actively modulate professional antigen-presenting cell function and antigen-specific immune responses. PMID:8976196

  1. Characterization of antigenic components from circulating immune complexes in patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lahey, S J; Steele, G; Rodrick, M L; Berkowitz, R; Goldstein, D P; Ross, D S; Ravikumar, T S; Wilson, R E; Byrn, R; Thomas, P

    1984-03-15

    The authors have studied serial circulating immune complex (CIC) levels in 15 patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) for several reasons. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia can easily be followed from presentation to remission, and CIC changes can be compared with changes in human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) which is a specific and quantitative marker of trophoblastic tumor load. Twelve patients with hydatidiform molar pregnancy presented with normal CIC levels (255 delta OD450 +/- 97, mean SE [standard error]) as measured by our antigen nonspecific polyethylene glycol (PEG) turbidity assay. Only after reduction in tumor load as monitored by a fall in HCG did CIC rise. In contrast, three patients with choriocarcinoma presented with significantly elevated CIC levels (513 delta OD450 +/- 147, P less than 0.05 compared to normals) which slowly declined in parallel with HCG levels following evacuation and chemotherapy. Sera at peak PEG-CIC from three patients with molar pregnancy or choriocarcinoma were precipitated with 3.75% polyethylene glycol to concentrate circulating immune complexes. Circulating immune complex levels were fractionated on Sephadex G-200 in an acid buffer (pH = 2.8). An identifiable antigenic component of the CIC in both diseases was found to be paternal HLA antigen. This was demonstrated by the ability of the latest eluting CIC fraction to inhibit paternal lymphocyte lysis using anti-HLA antisera against the husband's HLA tissue type. In each case, this fraction contained no immunoglobulin or beta-2 microglobulin and was antigenically crossreactive with only one of the husband's HLA haplotypes. The authors believe the PEG-CIC assay has allowed them to define the kinetics of host humoral response in GTN, and has provided a method for recovering immunogenic tumor-associated antigens from these complexes which may apply to other solid tumors.

  2. Efficient major histocompatibility complex class I presentation of exogenous antigen upon phagocytosis by macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacsovics-Bankowski, M; Clark, K; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1993-01-01

    Antigens in extracellular fluids can be processed and presented with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by a subset of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Chicken egg ovalbumin (Ova) linked to beads was presented with MHC class I molecules by these cells up to 10(4)-fold more efficiently than soluble Ova. This enhanced presentation was observed with covalently or noncovalently linked Ova and with beads of different compositions. A key parameter in the activity of these conjugates was the size of the beads. The APC that is responsible for this form of presentation is a macrophage. These cells internalize the antigen constructs through phagocytosis, since cytochalasin B inhibited presentation. Processing of the antigen and association with MHC class I molecules appears to occur intracellularly as presentation was observed under conditions where there was no detectable release of peptides into the extracellular fluids. When injected in vivo in C57BL/6 mice, Ova-beads, but not soluble Ova, primed CD4- CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Similar results were obtained in BALB/c mice immunized with beta-galactosidase-beads. The implications of these findings for development of nonliving vaccines that stimulate CTL immunity are discussed. PMID:8506338

  3. Optimisation of immuno-gold nanoparticle complexes for antigen detection.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Susan; Russell, David A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to define the optimum method of binding antibodies to the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and then to apply the optimised antibody-functionalised AuNPs for the detection of a target antigen. A detailed investigation of three different techniques for the functionalisation of AuNPs with anti-cocaine antibody and methods for the subsequent characterisation of the antibody-functionalised AuNP are reported. The addition of anti-cocaine antibody onto the AuNP surface was facilitated by either: a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker with a COOH terminal functional group; an aminated PEG ligand; or an N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate (SPDP)-Protein A/G intermediate. Characterisation of the functionalised particles was performed using transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectrophotometry and by agarose gel electrophoresis. In addition, the cocaine binding efficacy of the resultant AuNPs and their cocaine-binding capacity was determined using a cocaine-horseradish peroxidase conjugate, and by the application of a microtiter plate-based immunoassay. The results showed that the number of antibody per particle was the highest when the AuNP were functionalised with the Protein A/G intermediate. As compared to free antibody, the cocaine binding efficacy was significantly enhanced using the AuNP-Protein A/G-antibody complex. This optimal antibody-antigen binding efficacy is thought to be the result of the large number of antibody per particle and the oriented binding of the antibody to the Protein A/G on the AuNP surface. These results highlight the ideal immuno-gold nanoparticle characteristics for the detection of target antigens such as cocaine.

  4. Prostate Stem Cell Antigen DNA Vaccination Breaks Tolerance to Self-antigen and Inhibits Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sarfraz; Casey, Garrett; Sweeney, Paul; Tangney, Mark; O'Sullivan, Gerald C

    2009-01-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a cell surface antigen expressed in normal human prostate and over expressed in prostate cancer. Elevated levels of PSCA protein in prostate cancer correlate with increased tumor stage/grade, with androgen independence and have higher expression in bone metastases. In this study, the PSCA gene was isolated from the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate cell line (TRAMPC1), and a vaccine plasmid construct was generated. This plasmid PSCA (pmPSCA) was delivered by intramuscular electroporation (EP) and induced effective antitumor immune responses against subcutaneous TRAMPC1 tumors in male C57 BL/6 mice. The pmPSCA vaccination inhibited tumor growth, resulting in cure or prolongation in survival. Similarly, the vaccine inhibited metastases in PSCA expressing B16 F10 tumors. There was activation of Th-1 type immunity against PSCA, indicating the breaking of tolerance to a self-antigen. This immunity was tumor specific and was transferable by adoptive transfer of splenocytes. The mice remained healthy and there was no evidence of collateral autoimmune responses in normal tissues. EP-assisted delivery of the pmPSCA evoked strong specific responses and could, in neoadjuvant or adjuvant settings, provide a safe and effective immune control of prostate cancer, given that there is significant homology between human and mouse PSCA. PMID:19337234

  5. Inhibition of immune opsonin-independent phagocytosis by antibody to a pulmonary macrophage cell surface antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Parod, R.J.; Godleski, J.J.; Brain J.D.

    1986-03-15

    Unlike other hamster phagoycytes, hamster pulmonary macrophages (PM) avidly ingest albumin-coated latex particles in the absence of serum. They also possess a highly specific cell surface antigen. To evaluate the relationship between these two characteristics, PM were incubated with mouse monoclonal antibody directed against the PM antigen. After unbound antibody was removed, the amount of bound antibody and the phagocytic capability of PM were measured by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Maximum antibody binding produced a 25% inhibition of ingestion. Particle attachment was not affected. This effect was antigen specific, since neither a nonspecific mouse myeloma protein of the same subclass nor a mouse antibody that bound to another hamster surface antigen had any effect on binding or ingestion. If antigen-specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments were introduced both before and during the period of phagocytosis, the inhibition of particle ingestion approached 100%. Particle binding increased at low F(ab')/sub 2/ concentrations but declined at higher concentrations. Because calcium may play a role in the ingestion process, the effect of antibody on /sup 45/Ca uptake was evaluated. It was observed that antigen-specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake, whereas control antibodies did not. These results suggest that the antigen reacting with the anti-hamster PM monoclonal antibody is involved in immune opsonin-independent phagocytosis and that calcium participates in this phagocytic process.

  6. Crystallization of antibody fragments and their complexes with antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulot, G.; Guillon, V.; Mariuzza, R. A.; Poljak, R. J.; Riottot, M.-M.; Souchon, H.; Spinelli, S.; Tello, D.

    1988-07-01

    Immunoglobulins, myeloma light chains and their fragments, and Fab fragments from monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity have been crystallized as single components or complexed with their specific antigens. The intersegmental flexibility of antibody molecules has imposed the strategy of attempting to crystallize their Fab and Fc fragments separately. Intrasegmental mobility in Fabs has not been an obstacle to their crystallization, although this has been a low frequency event, occuring in about 1 in 25 to 1 in 50 trials with different Fabs. However, the immune system provides a large functional and structural diversity of antibody molecules so that an active search may eventually reveal antibodies of the desired specificity suitable for crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies.

  7. Inhibition of T-cell antigen receptor-mediated transmembrane signaling by protein kinase C activation.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, R T; Ho, S N; Barna, T J; Rusovick, K M; McKean, D J

    1988-01-01

    The murine T-lymphoma cell line LBRM-33 is known to require synergistic signals delivered through the antigen receptor (Ti-CD3) complex, together with interleukin 1 (IL-1), for activation of IL-2 gene expression and IL-2 production. Although 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was capable of replacing IL-1 as an activating stimulus under certain conditions, biologic studies indicated that TPA failed to synergize with Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli under conditions in which IL-1 was clearly active. Acute exposure to TPA and other active phorbol esters resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of the increases in phosphoinositide hydrolysis and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration stimulated by phytohemagglutinin or anti-Ti antibodies. TPA treatment induced no direct alteration of phospholipase C enzymatic activities in LBRM-33 cells. In contrast, both Ti-CD3 cross-linkage and TPA rapidly stimulated the phosphorylation of identical CD3 complex polypeptides, presumably via activation of protein kinase C. Exposure of LBRM-33 cells to TPA resulted in a time-dependent, partial down-regulation of surface Ti-CD3 expression. Thus, TPA treatment inhibited the responsiveness of LBRM-33 cells to Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli by inducing an early desensitization of Ti-CD3 receptors, followed by a decrease in membrane receptor expression. These studies indicate that phorbol esters deliver bidirectional signals that both inhibit Ti-CD3-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis and augment IL-2 production in LBRM-33 cells. Images PMID:2977423

  8. Interleukin 12 inhibits antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and Th2 cytokine expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary eosinophilia, and may be mediated by T helper (Th) lymphocytes expressing a Th2 cytokine pattern. Interleukin (IL) 12 suppresses the expression of Th2 cytokines and their associated responses, including eosinophilia, serum immunoglobulin E, and mucosal mastocytosis. We have previously shown in a murine model that antigen- induced increases in airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary eosinophilia are CD4+ T cell dependent. We used this model to determine the ability of IL-12 to prevent antigen-induced increases in airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophils, and lung Th2 cytokine expression. Sensitized A/J mice developed airway hyperresponsiveness and increased numbers of BAL eosinophils and other inflammatory cells after single or repeated intratracheal challenges with sheep red blood cell antigen. Pulmonary mRNA and protein levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 were increased after antigen challenge. Administration of IL-12 (1 microgram/d x 5 d) at the time of a single antigen challenge abolished the airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary eosinophilia and promoted an increase in interferon (IFN) gamma and decreases in IL-4 and IL-5 expression. The effects of IL-12 were partially dependent on IFN-gamma, because concurrent treatment with IL-12 and anti-IFN-gamma monoclonal antibody partially reversed the inhibition of airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilia by IL-12. Treatment of mice with IL-12 at the time of a second antigen challenge also prevented airway hyperresponsiveness and significantly reduced numbers of BAL inflammatory cells, reflecting the ability of IL-12 to inhibit responses associated with ongoing antigen-induced pulmonary inflammation. These data show that antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation can be blocked by IL-12, which suppresses Th2 cytokine expression. Local administration of IL-12 may provide a novel

  9. Chromatofocusing purification of CD1b-antigen complexes and their analysis by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alles, Luis Fernando; de la Salle, Henri

    2013-01-01

    The presentation of lipid antigens to T cells is mediated by the CD1 proteins. Purified functional CD1/lipid complexes are valuable tools to investigate such immune processes. Here, we describe how these complexes can be prepared in vitro, how they can be purified by chromatofocusing and how to control their antigen-loading status by isoelectric focusing.

  10. Phospholipase treatment of accessory cells that have been exposed to antigen selectively inhibits antigen-specific Ia-restricted, but not allospecific, stimulation of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    The corecognition of antigen and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (Ia molecules) by the T-cell receptor is a cell surface event. Before antigen is recognized, it must be taken up, processed, and displayed on the surface of an Ia-bearing accessory cell (antigen-presenting cell, APC). The exact nature of antigen processing and the subsequent associations of antigen with the APC plasma membrane, Ia molecules, and/or the T-cell receptor are not well defined. To further analyze these events, we have characterized the processing and presentation of the soluble polypeptide antigen bovine insulin. We found that this antigen requires APC-dependent processing, as evidenced by the inability of metabolically inactivated APCs to present native antigen to antigen plus Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. The ability of the same APCs to present antigen after uptake and processing showed that this antigen subsequently becomes stably associated with the APC plasma membrane. To characterize the basis for this association, we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. APCs exposed to antigen, treated with phospholipase A2, and then immediately fixed lost the ability to stimulate bovine insulin plus I-Ad-specific hybridomas. In contrast, the ability of these same APCs to stimulate I-Ad allospecific hybridomas was unaffected. This effect of phospholipase is not mimicked by the broadly active protease Pronase, nor is there evidence for contaminating proteases in the phospholipase preparation. These results suggest that one consequence of antigen processing may be an antigen-lipid association that contributes to the anchoring of antigen to the APC membrane. The implications of this model are discussed. PMID:3529095

  11. Restricted diversity of antigen binding residues of antibodies revealed by computational alanine scanning of 227 antibody-antigen complexes.

    PubMed

    Robin, Gautier; Sato, Yoshiteru; Desplancq, Dominique; Rochel, Natacha; Weiss, Etienne; Martineau, Pierre

    2014-11-11

    Antibody molecules are able to recognize any antigen with high affinity and specificity. To get insight into the molecular diversity at the source of this functional diversity, we compiled and analyzed a non-redundant aligned collection of 227 structures of antibody-antigen complexes. Free energy of binding of all the residue side chains was quantified by computational alanine scanning, allowing the first large-scale quantitative description of antibody paratopes. This demonstrated that as few as 8 residues among 30 key positions are sufficient to explain 80% of the binding free energy in most complexes. At these positions, the residue distribution is not only different from that of other surface residues but also dependent on the role played by the side chain in the interaction, residues participating in the binding energy being mainly aromatic residues, and Gly or Ser otherwise. To question the generality of these binding characteristics, we isolated an antibody fragment by phage display using a biased synthetic repertoire with only two diversified complementarity-determining regions and solved its structure in complex with its antigen. Despite this restricted diversity, the structure demonstrated that all complementarity-determining regions were involved in the interaction with the antigen and that the rules derived from the natural antibody repertoire apply to this synthetic binder, thus demonstrating the robustness and universality of our results.

  12. Humoral immune response to the antigen administered as an immune complex.

    PubMed

    Marusić, M; Marusić-Galesić, S; Pokrić, B

    1992-12-01

    Antigen (HSA) bound in immune complexes at equivalence with syngeneic anti-HSA antibodies elicit much stronger humoral immune response then soluble HSA. On the other hand, administration of immune complexes formed with xenogeneic (rabbit) anti-HSA antibodies suppressed humoral immune response against HSA, but not against rabbit IgG in mice. We suggest that immunization with antigen bound in immune complex might represent a powerful tool in enhancing humoral immune responses.

  13. Continual Antigenic Diversification in China Leads to Global Antigenic Complexity of Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yousong; Li, Xiaodan; Zhou, Hongbo; Wu, Aiping; Dong, Libo; Zhang, Ye; Gao, Rongbao; Bo, Hong; Yang, Lei; Wang, Dayan; Lin, Xian; Jin, Meilin; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2017-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus poses a significant potential threat to human society due to its wide spread and rapid evolution. In this study, we present a comprehensive antigenic map for HPAI H5N1 viruses including 218 newly sequenced isolates from diverse regions of mainland China, by computationally separating almost all HPAI H5N1 viruses into 15 major antigenic clusters (ACs) based on their hemagglutinin sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 12 of these 15 ACs originated in China in a divergent pattern. Further analysis of the dissemination of HPAI H5N1 virus in China identified that the virus’s geographic expansion was co-incident with a significant divergence in antigenicity. Moreover, this antigenic diversification leads to global antigenic complexity, as typified by the recent HPAI H5N1 spread, showing extensive co-circulation and local persistence. This analysis has highlighted the challenge in H5N1 prevention and control that requires different planning strategies even inside China. PMID:28262734

  14. Continual Antigenic Diversification in China Leads to Global Antigenic Complexity of Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yousong; Li, Xiaodan; Zhou, Hongbo; Wu, Aiping; Dong, Libo; Zhang, Ye; Gao, Rongbao; Bo, Hong; Yang, Lei; Wang, Dayan; Lin, Xian; Jin, Meilin; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2017-03-06

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus poses a significant potential threat to human society due to its wide spread and rapid evolution. In this study, we present a comprehensive antigenic map for HPAI H5N1 viruses including 218 newly sequenced isolates from diverse regions of mainland China, by computationally separating almost all HPAI H5N1 viruses into 15 major antigenic clusters (ACs) based on their hemagglutinin sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 12 of these 15 ACs originated in China in a divergent pattern. Further analysis of the dissemination of HPAI H5N1 virus in China identified that the virus's geographic expansion was co-incident with a significant divergence in antigenicity. Moreover, this antigenic diversification leads to global antigenic complexity, as typified by the recent HPAI H5N1 spread, showing extensive co-circulation and local persistence. This analysis has highlighted the challenge in H5N1 prevention and control that requires different planning strategies even inside China.

  15. Filaggrin inhibits generation of CD1a neolipid antigens by house dust mite derived phospholipase

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Rachael; Salio, Mariolina; Lloyd-Lavery, Antonia; Subramaniam, Sumithra; Bourgeois, Elvire; Archer, Charles; Cheung, Ka Lun; Hardman, Clare; Chandler, David; Salimi, Maryam; Gutowska-Owsiak, Danuta; de la Serna, Jorge Bernardino; Fallon, Padraic G.; Jolin, Helen; Mckenzie, Andrew; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Podobas, Ewa Izabela; Bal, Wojciech; Johnson, David; Moody, D Branch

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common pruritic skin disease in which barrier dysfunction and cutaneous inflammation play a role in pathogenesis. Mechanisms underlying the associated inflammation are not fully understood, and while CD1a-expressing Langerhans cells are known to be enriched within lesions, their role in clinical disease pathogenesis has not been studied. Here we observed that house dust mite (HDM) generates neolipid antigens for presentation by CD1a to T cells in the blood and skin lesions of affected individuals. HDM-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells increased in frequency after birth and showed rapid effector function, consistent with antigen-driven maturation. To define the underlying mechanisms, we analyzed HDM-challenged human skin and observed allergen-derived phospholipase (PLA2) activity in vivo. CD1a-reactive T cell activation was dependent on HDM-derived PLA2 and such cells infiltrated the skin after allergen challenge. Filaggrin insufficiency is associated with atopic dermatitis, and we observed that filaggrin inhibits PLA2 activity and inhibits CD1a-reactive PLA2-generated neolipid-specific T cell activity from skin and blood. The most widely used classification schemes of hypersensitivity, such as Gell and Coombs are predicated on the idea that non-peptide stimulants of T cells act as haptens that modify peptides or proteins. However our results point to a broader model that does not posit haptenation, but instead shows that HDM proteins generate neolipid antigens which directly activate T cells. Specifically, the data identify a pathway of atopic skin inflammation, in which house dust mite-derived phospholipase A2 generates antigenic neolipids for presentation to CD1a-reactive T cells, and define PLA2 inhibition as a function of filaggrin, supporting PLA2 inhibition as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26865566

  16. Inhibition of effector antigen-specific T cells by intradermal administration of heme oxygenase-1 inducers.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas; Pogu, Julien; Rémy, Séverine; Brau, Frédéric; Pogu, Sylvie; Maquigneau, Maud; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Poirier, Nicolas; Vanhove, Bernard; Blancho, Gilles; Piaggio, Eliane; Anegon, Ignacio; Blancou, Philippe

    2017-03-22

    Developing protocols aimed at inhibiting effector T cells would be key for the treatment of T cell-dependent autoimmune diseases including type 1 autoimmune diabetes (T1D) and multiple sclerosis (MS). While heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inducers are clinically approved drugs for non-immune-related diseases, they do have immunosuppressive properties when administered systemically in rodents. Here we show that HO-1 inducers inhibit antigen-specific effector T cells when injected intradermally together with the T cell cognate antigens in mice. This phenomenon was observed in both a CD8(+) T cell-mediated model of T1D and in a CD4(+) T cell-dependent MS model. Intradermal injection of HO-1 inducers induced the recruitment of HO-1(+) monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDCs) exclusively to the lymph nodes (LN) draining the site of intradermal injection. After encountering HO-1(+)MoDCs, effector T-cells exhibited a lower velocity and a reduced ability to migrate towards chemokine gradients resulting in impaired accumulation to the inflamed organ. Intradermal co-injection of a clinically approved HO-1 inducer and a specific antigen to non-human primates also induced HO-1(+) MoDCs to accumulate in dermal draining LN and to suppress delayed-type hypersensitivity. Therefore, in both mice and non-human primates, HO-1 inducers delivered locally inhibited effector T-cells in an antigen-specific manner, paving the way for repositioning these drugs for the treatment of immune-mediated diseases.

  17. Invasion of erythrocytes in vitro by Plasmodium falciparum can be inhibited by monoclonal antibody directed against an S antigen.

    PubMed

    Saul, A; Cooper, J; Ingram, L; Anders, R F; Brown, G V

    1985-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody has been produced which binds to the heat stable S antigen present in the FCQ-27/PNG isolate of Plasmodium falciparum. This monoclonal antibody also inhibits the invasion in vitro of erythrocytes by malarial merozoites thus demonstrating that the S antigens of Plasmodium falciparum may be a target of protective immune responses.

  18. Serum proteases alter the antigenicity of peptides presented by class I major histocompatibility complex molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Colarusso, L J; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1992-01-01

    Any effect of serum on the antigenicity of peptides is potentially relevant to their use as immunogens in vivo. Here we demonstrate that serum contains distinct proteases that can increase or decrease the antigenicity of peptides. By using a functional assay, we show that a serum component other than beta 2-microglobulin enhances the presentation of ovalbumin peptides produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage. Three features of this serum activity implicate proteolysis: it is temperature dependent, it results in increased antigenicity in a low molecular weight peptide fraction, and it is inhibited by the protease inhibitor leupeptin. Conversely, presentation of the synthetic peptide OVA-(257-264) is inhibited by serum. This inhibition is unaffected by leupeptin but is blocked by bestatin, a protease inhibitor with distinct substrate specificities. Implications for peptide-based vaccine design and immunotherapy are discussed. PMID:1518868

  19. Effect of antigen/antibody ratio on macrophage uptake, processing, and presentation to T cells of antigen complexed with polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Activation of a galactosidase-specific murine T hybridoma clone and of a human tetanus toxoid-specific T clone by antigen-presenting cells (APC) was used to evaluate the regulatory function of antibodies complexed with the relevant antigen. Complexed antigen, in fact, is taken up with high efficiency thanks to Fc receptors borne by APC. Antibody/antigen ratio in the complexes proved to be a critical parameter in enhancing antigen presentation. Complexes in moderate antibody excess provided optimal T cell activation independently of the physical state of the complexes (precipitated by a second antibody or solubilized by complement). Complexes in extreme antibody excess, on the contrary, did not yield T cell activation although taken up by APC efficiently. The effect of antibodies at extreme excess was observed with substimulatory dose of antigen (loss of potentiation) and with optimal dose of antigen (loss of stimulation). An excess of specific polyclonal antibodies hampers proteolytic degradation of antigen in vitro, supporting the view that a similar mechanism may operate within the APC that have internalized immune complexes in extreme antibody excess. The possibility that immune complex forming in extreme antibody excess may turn off the T cell response is proposed as a regulatory mechanism. PMID:1985125

  20. Stability of isolated antibody-antigen complexes as a predictive tool for selecting toxin neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Legler, Patricia M.; Compton, Jaimee R.; Hale, Martha L.; Anderson, George P.; Olson, Mark A.; Millard, Charles B.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ricin is an A-B ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) toxin composed of an A-chain subunit (RTA) that contains a catalytic N-glycosidase and a B-chain (RTB) lectin domain that binds cell surface glycans. Ricin exploits retrograde transport to enter into the Golgi and the endoplasmic reticulum, and then dislocates into the cytoplasm where it can reach its substrate, the rRNA. A subset of isolated antibodies (Abs) raised against the RTA subunit protect against ricin intoxication, and RTA-based vaccine immunogens have been shown to provide long-lasting protective immunity against the holotoxin. Anti-RTA Abs are unlikely to cross a membrane and reach the cytoplasm to inhibit the enzymatic activity of the A-chain. Moreover, there is not a strict correlation between the apparent binding affinity (Ka) of anti-RTA Abs and their ability to successfully neutralize ricin toxicity. Some anti-RTA antibodies are toxin-neutralizing, whereas others are not. We hypothesize that neutralizing anti-RTA Abs may interfere selectively with conformational change(s) or partial unfolding required for toxin internalization. To test this hypothesis, we measured the melting temperatures (Tm) of neutralizing single-domain Ab (sdAb)-antigen (Ag) complexes relative to the Tm of the free antigen (Tm-shift = Tmcomplex – TmAg), and observed increases in the Tmcomplex of 9–20 degrees. In contrast, non-neutralizing sdAb-Ag complexes shifted the TmComplex by only 6–7 degrees. A strong linear correlation (r2 = 0.992) was observed between the magnitude of the Tm-shift and the viability of living cells treated with the sdAb and ricin holotoxin. The Tm-shift of the sdAb-Ag complex provided a quantitative biophysical parameter that could be used to predict and rank-order the toxin-neutralizing activities of Abs. We determined the first structure of an sdAb-RTA1-33/44-198 complex, and examined other sdAb-RTA complexes. We found that neutralizing sdAb bound to regions involved in the early stages

  1. A dual inhibition mechanism of herpesviral ICP47 arresting a conformationally thermostable TAP complex

    PubMed Central

    Herbring, Valentina; Bäucker, Anja; Trowitzsch, Simon; Tampé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    As a centerpiece of antigen processing, the ATP-binding cassette transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) became a main target for viral immune evasion. The herpesviral ICP47 inhibits TAP function, thereby suppressing an adaptive immune response. Here, we report on a thermostable ICP47-TAP complex, generated by fusion of different ICP47 fragments. These fusion complexes allowed us to determine the direction and positioning in the central cavity of TAP. ICP47-TAP fusion complexes are arrested in a stable conformation, as demonstrated by MHC I surface expression, melting temperature, and the mutual exclusion of herpesviral TAP inhibitors. We unveiled a conserved region next to the active domain of ICP47 as essential for the complete stabilization of the TAP complex. Binding of the active domain of ICP47 arrests TAP in an open inward facing conformation rendering the complex inaccessible for other viral factors. Based on our findings, we propose a dual interaction mechanism for ICP47. A per se destabilizing active domain inhibits the function of TAP, whereas a conserved C-terminal region additionally stabilizes the transporter. These new insights into the ICP47 inhibition mechanism can be applied for future structural analyses of the TAP complex. PMID:27845362

  2. A complex water network contributes to high-affinity binding in an antibody-antigen interface.

    PubMed

    Marino, S F; Olal, D; Daumke, O

    2016-03-01

    This data article presents an analysis of structural water molecules in the high affinity interaction between a potent tumor growth inhibiting antibody (fragment), J22.9-xi, and the tumor marker antigen CD269 (B cell maturation antigen, BCMA). The 1.89 Å X-ray crystal structure shows exquisite details of the binding interface between the two molecules, which comprises relatively few, mostly hydrophobic, direct contacts but many indirect interactions over solvent waters. These are partly or wholly buried in, and therefore part of, the interface. A partial description of the structure is included in an article on the tumor inhibiting effects of the antibody: "Potent anti-tumor response by targeting B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) in a mouse model of multiple myeloma", Mol. Oncol. 9 (7) (2015) pp. 1348-58.

  3. The inhibition of Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by antigene oligonucleotides-mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, B; Fournier, R L; Relue, P A

    2000-11-20

    Gene transcription is regulated by transcription factors that can bind to specific regions on DNA. Antigene oligonucleotides (oligos) can bind to specific regions on DNA and form a triplex with the double-stranded DNA. The triplex can competitively inhibit the binding of transcription factors and, as a result, transcription can be inhibited. A genetically structured model has been developed to quantitatively describe the inhibition of the Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by triplex-forming oligos. The model predicts that the effect of triplex-forming oligos on the lac operon gene expression depends on their target sites. Oligonucleotides targeted to the operator are much more effective than those targeted to other regulatory sites on the lac operon. In some cases, the effect of oligo binding is similar to that of a mutation in the lac operon. The model provides insight as to the specific binding site to be targeted to achieve the most effective inhibition of gene expression. The model is also capable of predicting the oligo concentration needed to inhibit gene expression, which is in general agreement with results reported by other investigators.

  4. Exploring covalent allosteric inhibition of antigen 85C from Mycobacterium tuberculosis by ebselen derivatives

    DOE PAGES

    Goins, Christopher M.; Dajnowicz, Steven; Thanna, Sandeep; ...

    2017-03-13

    Previous studies identified ebselen as a potent in vitro and in vivo inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigen 85 (Ag85) complex, comprising three homologous enzymes required for the biosynthesis of the mycobacterial cell wall. In this study, the Mtb Ag85C enzyme was cocrystallized with azido and adamantyl ebselen derivatives, resulting in two crystallographic structures of 2.01 and 1.30 Å resolution, respectively. Both structures displayed the anticipated covalent modification of the solvent accessible, noncatalytic Cys209 residue forming a selenenylsulfide bond. Continuous difference density for both thiol modifiers allowed for the assessment of interactions that influence ebselen binding and inhibitor orientationmore » that were unobserved in previous Ag85C ebselen structures. The kinact/KI values for ebselen, adamantyl ebselen, and azido ebselen support the importance of observed constructive chemical interactions with Arg239 for increased in vitro efficacy toward Ag85C. To better understand the in vitro kinetic properties of these ebselen derivatives, the energetics of specific protein–inhibitor interactions and relative reaction free energies were calculated for ebselen and both derivatives using density functional theory. These studies further support the different in vitro properties of ebselen and two select ebselen derivatives from our previously published ebselen library with respect to kinetics and protein–inhibitor interactions. In both structures, the α9 helix was displaced farther from the enzyme active site than the previous Ag85C ebselen structure, resulting in the restructuring of a connecting loop and imparting a conformational change to residues believed to play a role in substrate binding specific to Ag85C. These notable structural changes directly affect protein stability, reducing the overall melting temperature by up to 14.5 °C, resulting in the unfolding of protein at physiological temperatures. Additionally, this

  5. SHARPIN controls regulatory T cells by negatively modulating the T cell antigen receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon; Jin, Hyung-seung; Lopez, Justine; Lee, Jeeho; Liao, Lujian; Elly, Chris; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2016-01-01

    SHARPIN forms a linear-ubiquitin-chain-assembly complex that promotes signaling via the transcription factor NF-κB. SHARPIN deficiency leads to progressive multi-organ inflammation and immune system malfunction, but how SHARPIN regulates T cell responses is unclear. Here we found that SHARPIN deficiency resulted in a substantial reduction in the number of and defective function of regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Transfer of SHARPIN-sufficient Treg cells into SHARPIN-deficient mice considerably alleviated their systemic inflammation. SHARPIN-deficient T cells displayed enhanced proximal signaling via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) without an effect on the activation of NF-κB. SHARPIN conjugated with Lys63 (K63)-linked ubiquitin chains, which led to inhibition of the association of TCRζ with the signaling kinase Zap70; this affected the generation of Treg cells. Our study therefore identifies a role for SHARPIN in TCR signaling whereby it maintains immunological homeostasis and tolerance by regulating Treg cells. PMID:26829767

  6. Probing molecular interactions in intact antibody: antigen complexes, an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry approach.

    PubMed Central

    Tito, M A; Miller, J; Walker, N; Griffin, K F; Williamson, E D; Despeyroux-Hill, D; Titball, R W; Robinson, C V

    2001-01-01

    Using a combination of nanoflow-electrospray ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry we have analyzed the oligomeric state of the recombinant V antigen from Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. The mass spectrometry results show that at pH 6.8 the V antigen in solution exists predominantly as a dimer and a weakly associated tetramer. A monoclonal antibody 7.3, raised against the V antigen, gave rise to mass spectra containing a series of well-resolved charge states at m/z 6000. After addition of aliquots of solution containing V antigen in substoichiometric and molar equivalents, the spectra revealed that two molecules of the V antigen bind to the antibody. Collision-induced dissociation of the antibody-antigen complex results in the selective release of the dimer from the complex supporting the proposed 1:2 antibody:antigen stoichiometry. Control experiments with the recombinant F1 antigen, also from Yersinia pestis, establish that the antibody is specific for the V antigen because no complex with F1 was detected even in the presence of a 10-fold molar excess of F1 antigen. More generally this work demonstrates a rapid means of assessing antigen subunit interactions as well as the stoichiometry and specificity of binding in antibody-antigen complexes. PMID:11721011

  7. A novel T cell receptor single-chain signaling complex mediates antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer D.; Harris, Daniel T.; Soto, Carolina M.; Chervin, Adam S.; Aggen, David H.; Roy, Edward J.; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells to treat cancer has shown promise in several clinical trials. Two main strategies have been applied to redirect T cells against cancer: 1) introduction of a full-length T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a tumor-associated peptide-MHC, or 2) introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), including an antibody fragment specific for a tumor cell surface antigen, linked intracellularly to T cell signaling domains. Each strategy has advantages and disadvantages for clinical applications. Here, we present data on the in vitro and in vivo effectiveness of a single-chain signaling receptor incorporating a TCR variable fragment as the targeting element (referred to as TCR-SCS). This receptor contained a single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) from a high-affinity TCR called m33, linked to the intracellular signaling domains of CD28 and CD3ζ. This format avoided mispairing with endogenous TCR chains, and mediated specific T cell activity when expressed in either CD4 or CD8 T cells. TCR-SCS-transduced CD8-negative cells showed an intriguing sensitivity, compared to full-length TCRs, to higher densities of less stable pepMHC targets. T cells that expressed this peptide-specific receptor persisted in vivo, and exhibited polyfunctional responses. Growth of metastatic antigen-positive tumors was significantly inhibited by T cells that expressed this receptor, and tumor cells that escaped were antigen loss variants. TCR-SCS receptors represent an alternative targeting receptor strategy that combines the advantages of single-chain expression, avoidance of TCR chain mispairing, and targeting of intracellular antigens presented in complex with MHC proteins. PMID:25082071

  8. A sestrin-dependent Erk-Jnk-p38 MAPK activation complex inhibits immunity during aging.

    PubMed

    Lanna, Alessio; Gomes, Daniel C O; Muller-Durovic, Bojana; McDonnell, Thomas; Escors, David; Gilroy, Derek W; Lee, Jun Hee; Karin, Michael; Akbar, Arne N

    2017-03-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) including Erk, Jnk and p38 regulate diverse cellular functions and are thought to be controlled by independent upstream activation cascades. Here we show that the sestrins bind to and coordinate simultaneous Erk, Jnk and p38 MAPK activation in T lymphocytes within a new immune-inhibitory complex (sestrin-MAPK activation complex (sMAC)). Whereas sestrin ablation resulted in broad reconstitution of immune function in stressed T cells, inhibition of individual MAPKs allowed only partial functional recovery. T cells from old humans (>65 years old) or mice (16-20 months old) were more likely to form the sMAC, and disruption of this complex restored antigen-specific functional responses in these cells. Correspondingly, sestrin deficiency or simultaneous inhibition of all three MAPKs enhanced vaccine responsiveness in old mice. Thus, disruption of sMAC provides a foundation for rejuvenating immunity during aging.

  9. Evaluation of the Secretor Status of ABO Blood Group Antigens in Saliva among Southern Rajasthan Population Using Absorption Inhibition Method

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Nidhi; Mamta; Ramesh, Gayathri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The ABO blood group system was the significant element for forensic serological examination of blood and body fluids in the past before the wide adaptation of DNA typing. A significant proportion of individuals (80%) are secretors, meaning that antigens present in the blood are also found in other body fluids such as saliva. Absorption inhibition is one such method that works by reducing strength of an antiserum based on type and amount of antigen present in the stains. Aim To check the efficacy of identifying the blood group antigens in saliva and to know the secretor status using absorption inhibition method among southern Rajasthan population. Materials and Methods Blood and saliva samples were collected from 80 individuals comprising 20 individuals in each blood group. The absorption inhibition method was used to determine the blood group antigens in the saliva and then the results were correlated with the blood group of the collected blood sample. The compiled data was statistically analysed using chi-square test. Results Blood groups A & O revealed 100% secretor status for both males and females. While blood groups B and AB revealed 95% secretor status. Conclusion Secretor status evaluation of the ABO blood group antigen in saliva using absorption inhibition method can be a useful tool in forensic examination. PMID:27042574

  10. Transgenic Ly-49A inhibits antigen-driven T cell activation and delays diabetes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sherry S; Patterson, Tricia; Pauza, Mary E

    2005-04-01

    Activation of islet-specific T cells plays a significant role in the development of type 1 diabetes. In an effort to control T cell activation, we expressed the inhibitory receptor, Ly-49A, on islet-specific mouse CD4 cells. Ag-mediated activation of Ly-49A T cells was inhibited in vitro when the Ly-49A ligand, H-2D(d), was present on APCs. Ag-driven T cell proliferation, cytokine production, and changes in surface receptor expression were significantly reduced. Inhibition was also evident during secondary antigenic challenge. Addition of exogenous IL-2 did not rescue cells from inhibition, suggesting that Ly-49A engagement does not lead to T cell anergy. Importantly, in an adoptive transfer model, Ly-49A significantly delays the onset of diabetes. Together these results demonstrate that the inhibitory receptor Ly-49A effectively limits Ag-specific CD4 cell responses even in the presence of sustained autoantigen expression in vivo.

  11. Antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen PfMSPDBL1 inhibit merozoite invasion into human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hirokazu; Takeo, Satoru; Maier, Alexander G; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cowman, Alan F; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2012-03-02

    One approach to develop a malaria blood-stage vaccine is to target proteins that play critical roles in the erythrocyte invasion of merozoites. The merozoite surface proteins (MSPs) and the erythrocyte-binding antigens (EBAs) are considered promising vaccine candidates, for they are known to play important roles in erythrocyte invasion and are exposed to host immune system. Here we focused on a Plasmodium falciparum antigen, PfMSPDBL1 (encoded by PF10_0348 gene) that is a member of the MSP3 family and has both Duffy binding-like (DBL) domain and secreted polymorphic antigen associated with merozoites (SPAM) domain. Therefore, we aimed to characterize PfMSPDBL1 as a vaccine candidate. Recombinant full-length protein (rFL) of PfMSPDBL1 was synthesized by a wheat germ cell-free system, and rabbit antiserum was raised against rFL. We show that rabbit anti-PfMSPDBL1 antibodies inhibited erythrocyte invasion of wild type parasites in vitro in a dose dependent manner, and the specificity of inhibitory activity was confirmed using PfMSPDBL1 knockout parasites. Pre-incubation of the anti-PfMSPDBL1 antibodies with the recombinant SPAM domain had no effect on the inhibitory activity suggesting that antibodies to this region were not involved. In addition, antibodies to rFL were elicited by P. falciparum infection in malaria endemic area, suggesting the PfMSLDBL1 is immunogenic to humans. Our results suggest that PfMSPDBL1 is a novel blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate.

  12. Voltage-induced inhibition of antigen-antibody binding at conducting optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Liron, Zvi; Tender, Leonard M; Golden, Joel P; Ligler, Frances S

    2002-06-01

    Optical waveguides coated with electrically conducting indium-tin oxide (ITO) are demonstrated here as a new class of substrate for fluorescent immunosensors. These waveguides combine electrochemical control with evanescent excitation and image-based detection. Presented here are preliminary results utilizing these waveguides that demonstrate influence of waveguide voltage on antigen binding. Specifically, waveguide surfaces were bisected into electrically addressable halves, anti-ovalbumin immobilized in patterns on their surfaces, and a 1.3 V bias applied between waveguide halves in the presence of Cy5-labeled ovalbumin in 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 150 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween-20. Fluorescence imaging indicated that binding of the antigen to positively biased waveguide halves was inhibited nearly 10-fold compared with negatively biased waveguide halves and unbiased controls. Furthermore, it is shown that ovalbumin binding to positively biased waveguide regions is regenerated after removal of applied voltage. These results suggest that electrochemical control of immunosensor substrates can be used as a possible strategy toward minimizing cross-reactive binding and/or nonspecific adsorption, immunosensor regeneration, and controlled binding.

  13. Modified lymphocyte response to mitogens after intraperitoneal injection of glycopeptidolipid antigens from Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Brownback, P E; Barrow, W W

    1988-01-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of glycopeptidolipid (GPL) antigens from Mycobacterium avium complex serovar 4 resulted in the decreased ability of murine splenic lymphocytes to respond to nonspecific-mitogen-induced blastogenesis when exposed to concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, and lipopolysaccharide. Adherent cell depletion and cell mixing experiments with T lymphocytes indicated that macrophages were not a major contributor to the immunosuppression observed in this study. Enumeration of splenic lymphocytes by means of flow-cytometry with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection of GPL antigens resulted in a significant decrease in Thy-1+ and Lyt-1+ cells but no change in the numbers of Lyt-2+ cells. Treatment with GPL antigens in vitro affected the ability of splenic mononuclear cells to respond optimally for concanavalin A-induced blastogenesis at 40 micrograms of GPL per 4 X 10(5) cells per 0.2 ml and lipopolysaccharide-induced blastogenesis at concentrations ranging from 5 to 40 micrograms of GPL per 4 X 10(5) cells per 0.2 ml. However, in vitro treatment with GPL antigens did not affect phytohemagglutinin-induced blastogenesis at concentrations ranging from 5 to 40 micrograms of GPL per 4 X 10(5) cells per 0.2 ml. These findings suggest that GPL antigens or their metabolites affect lymphocyte function and may be important cofactors in the overall pathogenesis of M. avium complex infections. PMID:3258582

  14. Complex Antigens Elicit Diverse Patterns of Clonal Selection in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Masayuki; Schmidt, Aaron G.; Nojima, Takuya; Feng, Feng; Watanabe, Akiko; Kitamura, Daisuke; Harrison, Stephen C.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Germinal center (GC) B cells evolve towards increased affinity by a Darwinian process that has been studied primarily in genetically restricted, hapten-specific responses. We explored the population dynamics of genetically diverse GC responses to two complex antigens – Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and influenza hemagglutinin – in which B cells competed both intra- and interclonally for distinct epitopes. Preferred VH rearrangements among antigen-binding, naïve B cells were similarly abundant in early GCs but, unlike responses to haptens, clonal diversity increased in GC B cells as early “winners” were replaced by rarer, high-affinity clones. Despite affinity maturation, inter- and intraclonal avidities varied greatly, and half of GC B cells did not bind the immunogen but nonetheless exhibited biased VH use, V(D)J mutation, and clonal expansion comparable to antigen-binding cells. GC reactions to complex antigens permit a range of specificities and affinities, with potential advantages for broad protection. PMID:26948373

  15. Rapamycin disrupts cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase/p21/proliferating cell nuclear antigen complexes and cyclin D1 reverses rapamycin action by stabilizing these complexes.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary; Forrester, Elizabeth; Chytil, Anna; Corsino, Patrick; Green, Gail; Davis, Bradley; Rowe, Thomas; Law, Brian

    2006-01-15

    Rapamycin and its derivatives are promising anticancer agents, but the exact mechanisms by which these drugs induce cell cycle arrest and inhibit tumor growth are unknown. A biochemical analysis of human mammary tumor cell lines indicated that rapamycin-induced antiproliferative effects correlated with down-regulation of cellular p21 levels and the levels of p21 in cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 and 4 complexes. Cyclin D1 overexpression reversed rapamycin action and this reversal correlated with increased levels of cellular p21, higher levels of p21 associated with Cdk2, and stabilization of cyclin D1/Cdk2/p21/proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) complexes. Experiments using a novel cyclin D1-Cdk2 fusion protein or a kinase-dead mutant of the fusion protein indicated that reversal of rapamycin action required not only the formation of complexes with p21 and PCNA but also complex-associated kinase activity. Similar results were observed in vivo. The rapamycin derivative RAD001 (everolimus) inhibited the growth of mouse mammary tumors, which correlated with the disruption of cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes. The potential implications of these results with respect to the use of rapamycin derivatives in breast cancer therapy are discussed.

  16. Existence of a squamous cell carcinoma antigen-immunoglobulin complex causes a deviation between squamous cell carcinoma antigen concentrations determined using two different immunoassays: first report of squamous cell carcinoma antigen coupling with immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed

    Mori, Eriko; Kurano, Makoto; Tobita, Akiko; Shimosaka, Hironori; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Background Squamous cell carcinoma antigen is used as a tumour marker and is routinely measured in clinical laboratories. We validated two different immunoassays and found three cases in which the squamous cell carcinoma antigen concentrations deviated greatly between the two immunoassays. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for these deviations. Methods The squamous cell carcinoma antigen concentrations were determined using the ARCHITECT SCC (CLIA method) and the ST AIA-PACK SCC (FEIA method). We performed polyethylene glycol precipitation and size exclusion chromatography to assess the molecular weight and spike recovery and absorption tests to examine the presence of an autoantibody. Results Both methods exhibited good performances for the measurement of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, although a correlation test showed large differences in the squamous cell carcinoma antigen concentrations measured using the two methods in three cases. The results of polyethylene glycol treatment and size exclusion chromatography indicated the existence of a large molecular weight squamous cell carcinoma antigen in these three cases. The spike recovery tests suggested the possible presence of an autoantibody against squamous cell carcinoma antigen. Moreover, the absorption test revealed that large squamous cell carcinoma antigen complexes were formed by the association of squamous cell carcinoma antigen with IgG in two cases and with both IgG and IgA in one case. Conclusions This study describes the existence of large molecular weight squamous cell carcinoma antigen that has complexed with immunoglobulin in the serum samples. The reason for the deviations between the two immunoassays might be due to differences of their reactivities against the squamous cell carcinoma antigen immune complexes with their autoantibody. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the coupling of squamous cell carcinoma antigen with IgA.

  17. HIV infection of monocytes inhibits the T-lymphocyte proliferative response to recall antigens, via production of eicosanoids.

    PubMed Central

    Foley, P; Kazazi, F; Biti, R; Sorrell, T C; Cunningham, A L

    1992-01-01

    Human monocytes infected in vitro with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) soon after adherence to plastic substrate demonstrated a significantly decreased ability to restimulate autologous immune T-lymphocyte proliferation after exposure to soluble (tetanus toxoid) and particulate [herpes simplex virus (HSV)] antigen. Incubation with the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (2-5 microM), prevented inhibition of antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. The inhibitory activity was identified in ultrafiltrates containing the low molecular weight fraction (less than 3000 MW) of supernatants from HIV-infected monocyte cultures. This activity was significantly and markedly reduced in similar ultrafiltrates prepared from indomethacin-treated cultures. Increased concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were detected in ultrafiltrates from HIV-infected monocyte cultures compared with uninfected cultures and cultures preincubated with indomethacin. Ultrafiltrates were inhibitory when added during the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes but not when removed from monocyte cultures prior to the addition of lymphocytes. In addition, ultrafiltrates inhibited antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation and PHA-induced lymphocyte proliferation to the same extent. These data indicate that cyclo-oxygenase products of arachidonic acid, including PGE2, are produced in excess by HIV-infected monocytes and that PGE2 and perhaps other cyclo-oxygenase products are implicated in the inhibition of antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation via a direct effect on T lymphocytes. PMID:1572689

  18. Inhibition of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation by the transforming growth factor-β/Smad signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jennifer C; Iyer, Abhirami K; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lin, Yinling; Nguyen, Hoa; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2014-12-01

    CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation activates a subset of innate immune lymphocytes called invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells that, by virtue of their potent cytokine production, bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β) is a known immune modulator that can activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38; we have previously shown that p38 is a negative regulator of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. Several studies implicate a role for TGF-β in the activation of p38. Therefore, we hypothesized that TGF-β would impair antigen presentation by CD1d. Indeed, a dose-dependent decrease in CD1d-mediated antigen presentation and impairment of lipid antigen processing was observed in response to TGF-β treatment. However, it was found that this inhibition was not through p38 activation. Instead, Smads 2, 3 and 4, downstream elements of the TGF-β canonical signalling pathway, contributed to the observed effects. In marked contrast to that observed with CD1d, TGF-β was found to enhance MHC class II-mediated antigen presentation. Overall, these results suggest that the canonical TGF-β/Smad pathway negatively regulates an important arm of the host's innate immune responses - CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation to NKT cells.

  19. Human epidermal Langerhans cells cointernalize by receptor-mediated endocytosis "nonclassical" major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (T6 antigens) and class II molecules (HLA-DR antigens).

    PubMed Central

    Hanau, D; Fabre, M; Schmitt, D A; Garaud, J C; Pauly, G; Tongio, M M; Mayer, S; Cazenave, J P

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR and T6 surface antigens are expressed only by Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells in normal human epidermis. We have previously demonstrated that T6 antigens are internalized in Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. This process is induced by the binding of BL6, a monoclonal antibody directed against T6 antigens. In the present study, using a monoclonal antibody directed against HLA-DR antigens, on human epidermal cells in suspension, we show that the surface HLA-DR antigens are also internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis in Langerhans and indeterminate cells. Moreover, using immunogold double labeling, we demonstrate that T6 and HLA-DR antigens are internalized through common coated regions of the membrane of Langerhans or indeterminate cells. The receptor-mediated endocytosis that is induced involves coated pits and vesicles, receptosomes, lysosomes, and also, in Langerhans cells, the Birbeck granules. Thus, T6 antigens, which are considered to be "unusual" or "nonclassical" major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, and the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, HLA-DR, are internalized in Langerhans and indeterminate cells through common receptor-mediated endocytosis organelles. Images PMID:3106979

  20. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T Antigen Disrupts Host Genomic Integrity and Inhibits Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wang, Xin; Diaz, Jason; Tsang, Sabrina H.; Buck, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Clonal integration of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) DNA into the host genome has been observed in at least 80% of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). The integrated viral genome typically carries mutations that truncate the C-terminal DNA binding and helicase domains of the MCV large T antigen (LT), suggesting a selective pressure to remove this MCV LT region during tumor development. In this study, we show that MCV infection leads to the activation of host DNA damage responses (DDR). This activity was mapped to the C-terminal helicase-containing region of the MCV LT. The MCV LT-activated DNA damage kinases, in turn, led to enhanced p53 phosphorylation, upregulation of p53 downstream target genes, and cell cycle arrest. Compared to the N-terminal MCV LT fragment that is usually preserved in mutants isolated from MCC tumors, full-length MCV LT shows a decreased potential to support cellular proliferation, focus formation, and anchorage-independent cell growth. These apparently antitumorigenic effects can be reversed by a dominant-negative p53 inhibitor. Our results demonstrate that MCV LT-induced DDR activates p53 pathway, leading to the inhibition of cellular proliferation. This study reveals a key difference between MCV LT and simian vacuolating virus 40 LT, which activates a DDR but inhibits p53 function. This study also explains, in part, why truncation mutations that remove the MCV LT C-terminal region are necessary for the oncogenic progression of MCV-associated cancers. PMID:23760247

  1. A small protein inhibits proliferating cell nuclear antigen by breaking the DNA clamp

    PubMed Central

    Altieri, Amanda S.; Ladner, Jane E.; Li, Zhuo; Robinson, Howard; Sallman, Zahur F.; Marino, John P.; Kelman, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that encircles duplex DNA and acts as an anchor for a number of proteins involved in DNA metabolic processes. PCNA has two structurally similar domains (I and II) linked by a long loop (inter-domain connector loop, IDCL) on the outside of each monomer of the trimeric structure that makes up the DNA clamp. All proteins that bind to PCNA do so via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that binds near the IDCL. A small protein, called TIP, binds to PCNA and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities although it does not contain a canonical PIP motif. The X-ray crystal structure of TIP bound to PCNA reveals that TIP binds to the canonical PIP interaction site, but also extends beyond it through a helix that relocates the IDCL. TIP alters the relationship between domains I and II within the PCNA monomer such that the trimeric ring structure is broken, while the individual domains largely retain their native structure. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirms the disruption of the PCNA trimer upon addition of the TIP protein in solution and together with the X-ray crystal data, provides a structural basis for the mechanism of PCNA inhibition by TIP. PMID:27141962

  2. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 5 Inhibits B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Antibody Response1

    PubMed Central

    Shotts, Kristin; Donovan, Erin E.; Strauch, Pamela; Pujanauski, Lindsey M.; Victorino, Francisco; Al-Shami, Amin; Fujiwara, Yuko; Tigyi, Gabor; Oravecz, Tamas; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids have emerged as biologically important chemoattractants capable of directing lymphocyte development, trafficking and localization. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a major lysophospholipid found systemically and whose levels are elevated in certain pathological settings such as cancer and infections. Here, we demonstrate that BCR signal transduction by mature murine B cells is inhibited upon LPA engagement of the LPA5 (GPR92) receptor via a Gα12/13 – Arhgef1 pathway. The inhibition of BCR signaling by LPA5 manifests by impaired intracellular calcium store release and most likely by interfering with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity. We further show that LPA5 also limits antigen-specific induction of CD69 and CD86 expression and that LPA5-deficient B cells display enhanced antibody responses. Thus, these data show that LPA5 negatively regulates BCR signaling, B cell activation and immune response. Our findings extend the influence of lysophospholipids on immune function and suggest that alterations in LPA levels likely influence adaptive humoral immunity. PMID:24890721

  3. A small protein inhibits proliferating cell nuclear antigen by breaking the DNA clamp

    DOE PAGES

    Altieri, Amanda S.; Ladner, Jane E.; Li, Zhuo; ...

    2016-05-03

    Here, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that encircles duplex DNA and acts as an anchor for a number of proteins involved in DNA metabolic processes. PCNA has two structurally similar domains (I and II) linked by a long loop (inter-domain connector loop, IDCL) on the outside of each monomer of the trimeric structure that makes up the DNA clamp. All proteins that bind to PCNA do so via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that binds near the IDCL. A small protein, called TIP, binds to PCNA and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities although it does not contain amore » canonical PIP motif. The X-ray crystal structure of TIP bound to PCNA reveals that TIP binds to the canonical PIP interaction site, but also extends beyond it through a helix that relocates the IDCL. TIP alters the relationship between domains I and II within the PCNA monomer such that the trimeric ring structure is broken, while the individual domains largely retain their native structure. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirms the disruption of the PCNA trimer upon addition of the TIP protein in solution and together with the X-ray crystal data, provides a structural basis for the mechanism of PCNA inhibition by TIP.« less

  4. A small protein inhibits proliferating cell nuclear antigen by breaking the DNA clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Altieri, Amanda S.; Ladner, Jane E.; Li, Zhuo; Robinson, Howard; Sallman, Zahur F.; Marino, John P.; Kelman, Zvi

    2016-05-03

    Here, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that encircles duplex DNA and acts as an anchor for a number of proteins involved in DNA metabolic processes. PCNA has two structurally similar domains (I and II) linked by a long loop (inter-domain connector loop, IDCL) on the outside of each monomer of the trimeric structure that makes up the DNA clamp. All proteins that bind to PCNA do so via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that binds near the IDCL. A small protein, called TIP, binds to PCNA and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities although it does not contain a canonical PIP motif. The X-ray crystal structure of TIP bound to PCNA reveals that TIP binds to the canonical PIP interaction site, but also extends beyond it through a helix that relocates the IDCL. TIP alters the relationship between domains I and II within the PCNA monomer such that the trimeric ring structure is broken, while the individual domains largely retain their native structure. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirms the disruption of the PCNA trimer upon addition of the TIP protein in solution and together with the X-ray crystal data, provides a structural basis for the mechanism of PCNA inhibition by TIP.

  5. A small protein inhibits proliferating cell nuclear antigen by breaking the DNA clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Altieri, Amanda S.; Ladner, Jane E.; Li, Zhuo; Robinson, Howard; Sallman, Zahur F.; Marino, John P.; Kelman, Zvi

    2016-05-03

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that encircles duplex DNA and acts as an anchor for a number of proteins involved in DNA metabolic processes. PCNA has two structurally similar domains (I and II) linked by a long loop (inter-domain connector loop, IDCL) on the outside of each monomer of the trimeric structure that makes up the DNA clamp. All proteins that bind to PCNA do so via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that binds near the IDCL. A small protein, called TIP, binds to PCNA and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities although it does not contain a canonical PIP motif. The X-ray crystal structure of TIP bound to PCNA reveals that TIP binds to the canonical PIP interaction site, but also extends beyond it through a helix that relocates the IDCL. TIP alters the relationship between domains I and II within the PCNA monomer such that the trimeric ring structure is broken, while the individual domains largely retain their native structure. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirms the disruption of the PCNA trimer upon addition of the TIP protein in solution and together with the X-ray crystal data, provides a structural basis for the mechanism of PCNA inhibition by TIP.

  6. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with

  7. Class I major histocompatibility complex antigens and tumor ploidy in breast and bronchogenic carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Redondo, M; Concha, A; Ruiz-Cabello, F; Morell, M; Esteban, F; Talavera, P; Garrido, F

    1997-01-01

    We determined the frequency of expression of the major histocompatibility complex antigens HLA-A,B,C in tumor cells from 207 primary tumor lesions of breast and bronchogenic carcinomas, to see if the expression of theses antigens was linked with several clinicopathological parameters associated with tumor aggressivity, such as abnormal cellular DNA content. We compared tumor tissues with nonneoplastic tissues and tissues from 15 benign breast lesions. HLA class I expressor and nonexpressor tumor cells were determined by using immunohistochemical stains (PAP and APAAP methods) and antibodies against these antigens. Reduction of HLA class I antigen was detected in 65 tumors (31.7%) and was significantly associated with poor tumor differentiation and abnormal cellular DNA content (p < 0.001). These characteristics might define a group of aggressive tumors in which the decrease of HLA class I antigens would enable tumor cells to avoid eliciting host immune responses. On the other hand, the altered regulatory mechanisms, of tumors with abnormal cellular DNA content, might modulate the expression of HLA class I molecules.

  8. Isoflurane Selectively Inhibits Distal Mitochondrial Complex I in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Suthammarak, Wichit; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complex I of the electron transport chain (ETC) is a possible target of volatile anesthetics (VAs). Complex I enzymatic activities are inhibited by VAs, and dysfunction of complex I can lead to hypersensitivity to VAs in worms and in people. Mutant analysis in Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans suggests that VAs may specifically interfere with complex I function at the binding site for its substrate ubiquinone. We hypothesized that isoflurane inhibits electron transport by competing with ubiquinone for binding to complex I. METHODS Wildtype and mutant C. elegans were used to study the effects of isoflurane on isolated mitochondria. Enzymatic activities of the ETC were assayed and dose-response curves determined using established techniques. Two-dimensional native gels of mitochondrial proteins were performed after exposure of mitochondria to isoflurane. RESULTS Complex I is the most sensitive component of the ETC to isoflurane inhibition; however the proximal portion of complex I (the flavoprotein) is relatively insensitive to isoflurane. Isoflurane and quinone do not compete for a common binding site on complex I. The absolute rate of complex I enzymatic activity in vitro does not predict immobilization of the animal by isoflurane. Isoflurane had no measurable effect on stability of mitochondrial supercomplexes. Reduction of ubiquinone by complex I displayed positive cooperative kinetics not disrupted by isoflurane. CONCLUSIONS Isoflurane directly inhibits complex I at a site distal to the flavoprotein subcomplex. However, we have excluded our original hypothesis that isoflurane and ubiquinone compete for a common hydrophobic binding site on complex I. In addition, immobilization of the nematode by isoflurane is not due to limiting absolute amounts of complex I electron transport as measured in isolated mitochondria. PMID:21467554

  9. Noncovalent mass spectrometry for the characterization of antibody/antigen complexes.

    PubMed

    Atmanene, Cédric; Wagner-Rousset, Elsa; Corvaïa, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Beck, Alain; Sanglier-Cianférani, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have taken on an increasing importance for the treatment of various diseases including cancers, immunological disorders, and other pathologies. These large biomolecules display specific structural features, which affect their efficiency and need therefore to be extensively characterized using sensitive and orthogonal analytical techniques. Among them, mass spectrometry (MS) has become the method of choice to study mAb amino acid sequences as well as their posttranslational modifications with the aim of reducing their chemistry, manufacturing, and control liabilities. This chapter will provide the reader with a description of the general approach allowing antibody/antigen systems to be characterized by noncovalent MS. In the present chapter, we describe how recent noncovalent MS technologies are used to characterize immune complexes involving both murine and humanized mAb 6F4 directed against human JAM-A, a newly identified antigenic protein (Ag) over-expressed in tumor cells. We will detail experimental conditions (sample preparation, optimization of instrumental parameters, etc.) required for the detection of noncovalent antibody/antigen complexes by MS. We will then focus on the type and the reliability of the information that we get from noncovalent MS data, with emphasis on the determination of the stoichiometry of antibody/antigen systems. Noncovalent MS appears as an additional supporting technique for therapeutic mAbs lead characterization and development.

  10. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins: a new approach to mimic complex antigens for diagnostic purposes?

    PubMed

    Hausammann, Stefanie; Vogel, Monique; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna A; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien; Stadler, Beda M; Horn, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitory antibodies directed against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) can be found in patients with acquired and congenital hemophilia A. Such FVIII-inhibiting antibodies are routinely detected by the functional Bethesda Assay. However, this assay has a low sensitivity and shows a high inter-laboratory variability. Another method to detect antibodies recognizing FVIII is ELISA, but this test does not allow the distinction between inhibitory and non-inhibitory antibodies. Therefore, we aimed at replacing the intricate antigen FVIII by Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins) mimicking the epitopes of FVIII inhibitors. As a model we used the well-described inhibitory human monoclonal anti-FVIII antibody, Bo2C11, for the selection on DARPin libraries. Two DARPins were selected binding to the antigen-binding site of Bo2C11, which mimic thus a functional epitope on FVIII. These DARPins inhibited the binding of the antibody to its antigen and restored FVIII activity as determined in the Bethesda assay. Furthermore, the specific DARPins were able to recognize the target antibody in human plasma and could therefore be used to test for the presence of Bo2C11-like antibodies in a large set of hemophilia A patients. These data suggest, that our approach might be used to isolate epitopes from different sets of anti-FVIII antibodies in order to develop an ELISA-based screening assay allowing the distinction of inhibitory and non-inhibitory anti-FVIII antibodies according to their antibody signatures.

  11. Mycobacterial antigen 85 complex (Ag85) as a target for ficolins and mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Świerzko, Anna S; Bartłomiejczyk, Marcin A; Brzostek, Anna; Łukasiewicz, Jolanta; Michalski, Mateusz; Dziadek, Jarosław; Cedzyński, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    The pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) able to activate complement via the lectin pathway are suspected to be involved in the interaction between pathogenic Mycobacteria and the host immune response. Recently, we have found strong interactions between 25 and 35kDa mycobacterial cell fractions and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. Here we demonstrate that two biologically important mycobacterial structures, mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and the antigen 85 (Ag85) complex, induce activation of the lectin pathway of complement. The strong interaction of recombinant MBL with purified ManLAM was confirmed, but no binding of recombinant ficolins (ficolin-1, -2, -3) with this structure was observed. Interestingly, all PRMs tested reacted with the mycobacterial antigen 85 (Ag85) complex. Based on the use of specific inhibitors (mannan for MBL, acetylated bovine serum albumin for ficolin-1 and -2, Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 lipopolysaccharide for ficolin-3), we concluded that carbohydrate-recognition (MBL) and fibrinogen-like domains (ficolins) were involved in these interactions. Our results indicate that the mycobacterial antigen 85 complex is a target for ficolins and MBL. Furthermore, those PRMs also bound to fibronectin and therefore might influence the Ag85 complex-dependent interaction of Mycobacterium with the extracellular matrix.

  12. Inhibition of autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction by monoclonal antibodies specific for the beta chain of HLA-DR antigens.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, M; Ikeda, H; Ogasawara, K; Ishikawa, N; Okuyama, T; Fukasawa, Y; Kojima, H; Kunikane, H; Hawkin, S; Ohhashi, T

    1984-09-01

    Recent studies using rabbit antisera to the separated HLA-DR alpha and beta subunits have suggested that alpha chain-specific, but not beta chain-specific, antisera inhibit T cell proliferative responses in primary and secondary human autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR). In the present study, with the aid of sequential co-precipitation assays and Western blotting methods, a monoclonal rat alloantibody 1E4, specific for the beta chain of rat class II molecules carrying an Ia determinant Ba-2.7, was characterized to recognize a monomorphic determinant located on the beta chain of DR antigens. This antibody and a murine monoclonal antibody HU-4, also specific for the beta chain of DR antigens, strongly inhibited both primary and secondary AMLR through a mechanism distinct from an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity reaction. These results indicate that the inhibition of AMLR is not a unique feature of DR alpha-specific antibodies.

  13. Cross-linking analysis of antigenic outer membrane protein complexes of Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Sandra; Abel, Ana; Arenas, Jesús; Criado, María Teresa; Ferreirós, Carlos M

    2006-03-01

    Polysaccharide-based approaches have not enabled the development of effective vaccines against meningococci of serogroup B, and the most promising current research is focused on the use of outer membrane vesicles. Due to the toxicity of the outer membrane oligosaccharides, new vaccines based on purified proteins are being sought, but despite the application of advanced techniques, they remain elusive, perhaps due to the fact that standard techniques for analysis of antigens overlook conformational epitopes located in membrane complexes. Membrane complex antigens have been analyzed in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and a study published on Neisseria meningitidis has reported the in vitro formation of 800-kD complexes by deposition of a purified protein (MSP63) onto synthetic lipid layers; however, no studies to date have attempted to identify membrane complexes present in vivo in N. meningitidis. In the present study, cross-linking with formaldehyde was used to identify outer membrane protein associations in various N. meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica strains. In N. meningitides, complexes of about 450 kD (also present in N. lactamica), 165 and 95 kD were detected and shown to be made up of the proteins MSP63, PorA/PorB/RmpM/FetA, and PorA/PorB/RmpM, respectively. In western blots, the 450-kD complex was identified by mouse antibodies raised against outer membrane vesicles, but not by antibodies raised against the purified complex, demonstrating the importance of conformational epitopes, and thus suggesting that the analysis of antigens in their native conformation may be useful or even essential for the design of effective vaccines against meningococci.

  14. Model Building of Antibody-Antigen Complex Structures Using GBSA Scores.

    PubMed

    Shimba, Noriko; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-10-24

    Structure prediction of antibody-antigen complexes, which involves molecular docking to generate decoys that are ranked using a scoring function, is an important approach in the design of antibody drugs and biosensors. However, it is not easy to evaluate the stability of protein-protein complexes, using a single scoring function. Here, we developed a prediction method of antibody-antigen complex structures using the docking engine "surFit" and a scoring function (GBSA score) that combined the generalized Born (GB) energy and the hydration energy based on the solvent-accessible surface area (SA). We chose 95 antibody-antigen structural datasets for self-docking and generated many decoy structures using the surFit program. The GBSA scores were computed for all of the decoys, and the area under the curve (AUC) of the GBSA scores yielded a higher value (0.972) than the values obtained by the original surFit scores (0.873) and the ZRANK scores (0.953). To improve the accuracy of prediction, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed for several decoy structures that had good GBSA scores. Consequently, average GBSA scores from MD trajectories can reduce the number of non-native decoys that have GBSA scores competitive with the near-native ones.

  15. Application of fluorescent monocytes for probing immune complexes on antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Szittner, Zoltán; Papp, Krisztián; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Prechl, József

    2013-01-01

    Microarrayed antigens are used for identifying serum antibodies with given specificities and for generating binding profiles. Antibodies bind to these arrayed antigens forming immune complexes and are conventionally identified by secondary labelled antibodies.In the body immune complexes are identified by bone marrow derived phagocytic cells, such as monocytes. In our work we were looking into the possibility of replacing secondary antibodies with monocytoid cells for the generation of antibody profiles. Using the human monocytoid cell line U937, which expresses cell surface receptors for immune complex components, we show that cell adhesion is completely dependent on the interaction of IgG heavy chains and Fcγ receptors, and this recognition is susceptible to differences between heavy chain structures and their glycosylation. We also report data on a possible application of this system in autoimmune diagnostics.Compared to secondary antibodies, fluorescent monocytesas biosensors are superior in reflecting biological functions of microarray-bound antibodies and represent an easy and robust alternative for profiling interactions between serum proteins and antigens.

  16. Small-molecule targeting of proliferating cell nuclear antigen chromatin association inhibits tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zongqing; Wortman, Matthew; Dillehay, Kelsey L; Seibel, William L; Evelyn, Chris R; Smith, Shanna J; Malkas, Linda H; Zheng, Yi; Lu, Shan; Dong, Zhongyun

    2012-06-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a potential anticancer target, forms a homotrimer and is required for DNA replication and numerous other cellular processes. The purpose of this study was to identify novel small molecules that modulate PCNA activity to affect tumor cell proliferation. An in silico screen of a compound library against a crystal structure of PCNA and a subsequent structural similarity search of the ZINC chemical database were carried out to derive relevant docking partners. Nine compounds, termed PCNA inhibitors (PCNA-Is), were selected for further characterization. PCNA-I1 selectively bound to PCNA trimers with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of ~0.2 to 0.4 μM. PCNA-Is promoted the formation of SDS-refractory PCNA trimers. PCNA-I1 dose- and time-dependently reduced the chromatin-associated PCNA in cells. Consistent with its effects on PCNA trimer stabilization, PCNA-I1 inhibited the growth of tumor cells of various tissue types with an IC(50) of ~0.2 μM, whereas it affected the growth of nontransformed cells at significantly higher concentrations (IC(50), ~1.6 μM). Moreover, uptake of BrdU was dose-dependently reduced in cells treated with PCNA-I1. Mechanistically the PCNA-Is mimicked the effect of PCNA knockdown by siRNA, inducing cancer cell arrest at both the S and G(2)/M phases. Thus, we have identified a class of compounds that can directly bind to PCNA, stabilize PCNA trimers, reduce PCNA association with chromatin, and inhibit tumor cell growth by inducing a cell cycle arrest. They are valuable tools in studying PCNA function and may be useful for future PCNA-targeted cancer therapy.

  17. Identification of small molecule proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) inhibitor that disrupts interactions with PIP-box proteins and inhibits DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Inoue, Akira; Hishiki, Asami; Fujikawa, Yoshihiro; Connelly, Michele; Evison, Benjamin; Shao, Youming; Heath, Richard; Kuraoka, Isao; Rodrigues, Patrick; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kawanishi, Masanobu; Sato, Mamoru; Yagi, Takashi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2012-04-20

    We have discovered that 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) inhibits binding of a PIP-box sequence peptide to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein by competing for the same binding site, as evidenced by the co-crystal structure of the PCNA-T3 complex at 2.1 Å resolution. Based on this observation, we have designed a novel, non-peptide small molecule PCNA inhibitor, T2 amino alcohol (T2AA), a T3 derivative that lacks thyroid hormone activity. T2AA inhibited interaction of PCNA/PIP-box peptide with an IC(50) of ~1 μm and also PCNA and full-length p21 protein, the tightest PCNA ligand protein known to date. T2AA abolished interaction of PCNA and DNA polymerase δ in cellular chromatin. De novo DNA synthesis was inhibited by T2AA, and the cells were arrested in S-phase. T2AA inhibited growth of cancer cells with induction of early apoptosis. Concurrently, Chk1 and RPA32 in the chromatin are phosphorylated, suggesting that T2AA causes DNA replication stress by stalling DNA replication forks. T2AA significantly inhibited translesion DNA synthesis on a cisplatin-cross-linked template in cells. When cells were treated with a combination of cisplatin and T2AA, a significant increase in phospho(Ser(139))histone H2AX induction and cell growth inhibition was observed.

  18. Identification of Small Molecule Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) Inhibitor That Disrupts Interactions with PIP-box Proteins and Inhibits DNA Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Inoue, Akira; Hishiki, Asami; Fujikawa, Yoshihiro; Connelly, Michele; Evison, Benjamin; Shao, Youming; Heath, Richard; Kuraoka, Isao; Rodrigues, Patrick; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kawanishi, Masanobu; Sato, Mamoru; Yagi, Takashi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered that 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3) inhibits binding of a PIP-box sequence peptide to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein by competing for the same binding site, as evidenced by the co-crystal structure of the PCNA-T3 complex at 2.1 Å resolution. Based on this observation, we have designed a novel, non-peptide small molecule PCNA inhibitor, T2 amino alcohol (T2AA), a T3 derivative that lacks thyroid hormone activity. T2AA inhibited interaction of PCNA/PIP-box peptide with an IC50 of ∼1 μm and also PCNA and full-length p21 protein, the tightest PCNA ligand protein known to date. T2AA abolished interaction of PCNA and DNA polymerase δ in cellular chromatin. De novo DNA synthesis was inhibited by T2AA, and the cells were arrested in S-phase. T2AA inhibited growth of cancer cells with induction of early apoptosis. Concurrently, Chk1 and RPA32 in the chromatin are phosphorylated, suggesting that T2AA causes DNA replication stress by stalling DNA replication forks. T2AA significantly inhibited translesion DNA synthesis on a cisplatin-cross-linked template in cells. When cells were treated with a combination of cisplatin and T2AA, a significant increase in phospho(Ser139)histone H2AX induction and cell growth inhibition was observed. PMID:22383522

  19. Investigation of vesicle-capsular plague antigen complex formation by elastic laser radiation scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, N. P.; Maximova, Irina S.; Romanov, Sergey V.; Shubochkin, L. P.; Tatarintsev, Sergey N.

    1991-05-01

    Recently a great deal of attention has been given to the investigation artificial lipid liposomes, due to their application as "containers" for directed transport of biologically active compounds into particular cells, organs and tissues for prophylaxis and therapy of infectious diseases. The use of traditional methods of liposome investigation, such as sedimentation, electrophoresis and chromatography is impeded by low liposome resistivity to different deformations. In conjunction with this, optical methods of laser light scattering are promising as they allow nondisturbing, precise and quick investigations. This paper describes the investigation of vesicle systems prepared from egg lecithin of Serva Corporation and their complexes with the capsular antigen of the plague microbe. The capsular antigen Fl was obtained from EV plague microbe grown at 37° C on Huttinger agar. Fl was isolated by gel-filtration on ASA-22 followed by freeze drying of the preparation. Angular dependences of polarized radiation scattering were measured for several liposome suspension samples in a saline solution before and after the interaction with the plague microbe capsular antigen. The aim of the investigation was to analyze the nature of mutual antigen arrangement in a liposome and to develop methods for measuring its inclusion percentage.

  20. Immune complexes inhibit IL-1 secretion and inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Janczy, John R; Ciraci, Ceren; Haasken, Stefanie; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Olivier, Alicia K; Cassel, Suzanne L; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S

    2014-11-15

    IgG immune complexes have been shown to modify immune responses driven by APCs in either a pro- or anti-inflammatory direction depending upon the context of stimulation. However, the ability of immune complexes to modulate the inflammasome-dependent innate immune response is unknown. In this study, we show that IgG immune complexes suppress IL-1α and IL-1β secretion through inhibition of inflammasome activation. The mechanism by which this inhibition occurs is via immune complex ligation of activating FcγRs, resulting in prevention of both activation and assembly of the inflammasome complex in response to nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat (NLR) P3, NLRC4, or AIM2 agonists. In vivo, administration of Ag in the form of an immune complex during priming of the immune response inhibited resultant adaptive immune responses in an NLRP3-dependent model of allergic airway disease. Our data reveal an unexpected mechanism regulating CD4(+) T cell differentiation, by which immune complexes suppress inflammasome activation and the generation of IL-1α and IL-1β from APCs, which are critical for the Ag-driven differentiation of CD4(+) T cells.

  1. Ethanol Metabolism Alters Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Restricted Antigen Presentation In Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Osna, Natalia A.; White, Ronda L.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Donohue, Terrence M.

    2009-01-01

    The proteasome is a major enzyme that cleaves proteins for antigen presentation. Cleaved peptides traffic to the cell surface, where they are presented in the context of MHC class I. Recognition of these complexes by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is crucial for elimination of cells bearing “non-self” proteins. Our previous studies revealed that ethanol suppresses proteasome function in ethanol-metabolizing liver cells. We hypothesized that proteasome suppression reduces the hydrolysis of antigenic peptides, thereby decreasing the presentation of the peptide-MHC class I-complexes on the cell surface. To test this, we used the mouse hepatocyte cell line (CYP2E1/ADH-transfected HepB5 cells) or primary mouse hepatocytes, both derived from livers of C57Bl/6 mice, which present the ovalbumin peptide, SIINFEKL, complexed with H2Kb. To induce H2Kb expression, HepB5 cells were treated with interferon gamma (IFNγ) and then exposed to ethanol. In these cells, ethanol metabolism decreased not only proteasome activity, but also hydrolysis of the C-extended peptide, SIINFEKL-TE and the presentation of SIINFEKL-H2Kb complexes measured after the delivery of SIINFEKL-TE to cytoplasm. The suppressive effects of ethanol were, in part, attributed to ethanol-elicited impairment of IFNγ signaling. However, in primary hepatocytes, even in the absence of IFNγ, we observed a similar decline in proteasome activity and antigen presentation after ethanol exposure. We conclude that proteasome function is directly suppressed by ethanol metabolism and indirectly, by preventing the activating effects of IFNγ. Ethanol-elicited reduction in proteasome activity contributes to the suppression of SIINFEKL-H2Kb presentation on the surface of liver cells. Immune response to viral antigens plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C or B viral infections (HCV and HBV, respectively). Professional antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages) are responsible for priming the

  2. An experimental and theoretical study of the inhibition of Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by antigene oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Cheng, B; Fournier, R L; Relue, P A; Schisler, J

    2001-08-05

    Previously, we have developed a genetically structured mathematical model to describe the inhibition of Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by antigene oligos. Our model predicted that antigene oligos targeted to the operator region of the lac operon would have a significant inhibitory effect on beta-galactosidase production. In this investigation, the E. coli lac operon gene expression in the presence of antigene oligos was studied experimentally. A 21-mer oligo, which was designed to form a triplex with the operator, was found to be able to specifically inhibit beta-galactosidase production in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast to the 21-mer triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), several control oligos showed no inhibitory effect. The ineffectiveness of the various control oligos, along with the fact that the 21-mer oligo has no homology sequence with lacZYA, and no mRNA is transcribed from the operator, suggests that the 21-mer oligo inhibits target gene expression by an antigene mechanism. To simulate the kinetics of lac operon gene expression in the presence of antigene oligos, a genetically structured kinetic model, which includes transport of oligo into the cell, growth of bacteria cells, and lac operon gene expression, was developed. Predictions of the kinetic model fit the experimental data quite well after adjustment of the value of the oligonucleotide transport rate constant (9.0 x 10(-)(3) min(-)(1)) and oligo binding affinity constant (1.05 x 10(6) M(-)(1)). Our values for these two adjusted parameters are in the range of reported literature values.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif protein enhances the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and reduces major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Ely, Kenneth H; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A; Green, William R; Enelow, Richard I; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-01-03

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8(+) T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation.

  4. Immunostimulatory complexes containing Eimeria tenella antigens and low toxicity plant saponins induce antibody response and provide protection from challenge in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) are unique multimolecular structures formed by encapsulating antigens, lipids and triterpene saponins and are one of the most successful antigen delivery systems for microbial antigens. In the current study, both the route of administration and the antigen conce...

  5. Cinacalcet inhibits neuroblastoma tumor growth and upregulates cancer-testis antigens.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Carlos J; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; García, Marta; Casalà, Carla; Briansó, Ferran; Castrejón, Nerea; Rodríguez, Eva; Suñol, Mariona; Carcaboso, Angel M; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; de Torres, Carmen

    2016-03-29

    The calcium-sensing receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that exerts cell-type specific functions in numerous tissues and some cancers. We have previously reported that this receptor exhibits tumor suppressor properties in neuroblastoma. We have now assessed cinacalcet, an allosteric activator of the CaSR approved for clinical use, as targeted therapy for this developmental tumor using neuroblastoma cell lines and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) with different MYCN and TP53 status. In vitro, acute exposure to cinacalcet induced endoplasmic reticulum stress coupled to apoptosis via ATF4-CHOP-TRB3 in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells. Both phenotypes were partially abrogated by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. Prolonged in vitro treatment also promoted dose- and time-dependent apoptosis in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells and, irrespective of MYCN status, differentiation in surviving cells. Cinacalcet significantly inhibited tumor growth in MYCN-amplified xenografts and reduced that of MYCN-non amplified PDX. Morphology assessment showed fibrosis in MYCN-amplified xenografts exposed to the drug. Microarrays analyses revealed up-regulation of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) in cinacalcet-treated MYCN-amplified tumors. These were predominantly CTAs encoded by genes mapping on chromosome X, which are the most immunogenic. Other modulated genes upon prolonged exposure to cinacalcet were involved in differentiation, cell cycle exit, microenvironment remodeling and calcium signaling pathways. CTAs were up-regulated in PDX and in vitro models as well. Moreover, progressive increase of CaSR expression upon cinacalcet treatment was seen both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, cinacalcet reduces neuroblastoma tumor growth and up-regulates CTAs. This effect represents a therapeutic opportunity and provides surrogate circulating markers of neuroblastoma response to this treatment.

  6. Cinacalcet inhibits neuroblastoma tumor growth and upregulates cancer-testis antigens

    PubMed Central

    Casalà, Carla; Briansó, Ferran; Castrejón, Nerea; Rodríguez, Eva; Suñol, Mariona; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; de Torres, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The calcium–sensing receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that exerts cell-type specific functions in numerous tissues and some cancers. We have previously reported that this receptor exhibits tumor suppressor properties in neuroblastoma. We have now assessed cinacalcet, an allosteric activator of the CaSR approved for clinical use, as targeted therapy for this developmental tumor using neuroblastoma cell lines and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) with different MYCN and TP53 status. In vitro, acute exposure to cinacalcet induced endoplasmic reticulum stress coupled to apoptosis via ATF4-CHOP-TRB3 in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells. Both phenotypes were partially abrogated by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. Prolonged in vitro treatment also promoted dose- and time-dependent apoptosis in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells and, irrespective of MYCN status, differentiation in surviving cells. Cinacalcet significantly inhibited tumor growth in MYCN-amplified xenografts and reduced that of MYCN-non amplified PDX. Morphology assessment showed fibrosis in MYCN-amplified xenografts exposed to the drug. Microarrays analyses revealed up-regulation of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) in cinacalcet-treated MYCN-amplified tumors. These were predominantly CTAs encoded by genes mapping on chromosome X, which are the most immunogenic. Other modulated genes upon prolonged exposure to cinacalcet were involved in differentiation, cell cycle exit, microenvironment remodeling and calcium signaling pathways. CTAs were up-regulated in PDX and in vitro models as well. Moreover, progressive increase of CaSR expression upon cinacalcet treatment was seen both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, cinacalcet reduces neuroblastoma tumor growth and up-regulates CTAs. This effect represents a therapeutic opportunity and provides surrogate circulating markers of neuroblastoma response to this treatment. PMID:26893368

  7. Immunity Provided by an Outer Membrane Vesicle Cholera Vaccine Is Due to O-Antigen-Specific Antibodies Inhibiting Bacterial Motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Lazinski, David W; Camilli, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    An outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-based cholera vaccine is highly efficacious in preventing intestinal colonization in the suckling mouse model. Immunity from OMVs comes from immunoglobulin (Ig), particularly IgG, in the milk of mucosally immunized dams. Anti-OMV IgG renders Vibrio cholerae organisms immotile, thus they pass through the small intestine without colonizing. However, the importance of motility inhibition for protection and the mechanism by which motility is inhibited remain unclear. By using both in vitro and in vivo experiments, we found that IgG inhibits motility by specifically binding to the O-antigen of V. cholerae We demonstrate that the bivalent structure of IgG, although not required for binding to the O-antigen, is required for motility inhibition. Finally, we show using competition assays in suckling mice that inhibition of motility appears to be responsible for most, if not all, of the protection engendered by OMV vaccination, thus providing insight into the mechanism of immune protection.

  8. Rapid formation of cell-particle complexes via dielectrophoretic manipulation for the detection of surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Horii, Takuma; Yamamoto, Masashi; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Fumio

    2014-11-15

    A rapid and simple method for the fabrication of the island patterns with particles and cells was applied to detect the presence of specific antigens on the cell surface. An upper interdigitated microband array (IDA) electrode was mounted on a lower substrate with the same design to fabricate a microfluidic-channel device for dielectrophoretic manipulation. The electrode grid structure was fabricated by rotating the upper template IDA by 90° relative to the lower IDA. A suspension of anti-CD33 modified particles and HL-60 cells was introduced into the channel. An AC electrical signal (typically 20 V peak-to-peak, 100 kHz) was then applied to the bands of the upper and lower IDAs, resulting in the formation of island patterns at the intersections with low electric fields. Immunoreactions between the antibodies immobilized on the accumulated particles and the CD33 present on the surface of the cells led to the formation of complexes comprising corresponding antigen-antibody pairs. Non-specific pairs accumulated at the intersection, which did not form complexes, were then dispersed after removal of the applied field. The time required for the detection of the formation/dispersion of the complexes is as short as 6 min in the present procedure. Furthermore, this novel cell binding assay does not require pretreatment such as target labeling or washing of the unbound cells.

  9. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4+ T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4+ T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  10. Dephosphorylation of JC virus agnoprotein by protein phosphatase 2A: Inhibition by small t antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sariyer, Ilker K.; Khalili, Kamel; Safak, Mahmut

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the JC virus (JCV) late regulatory protein agnoprotein is phosphorylated by the serine/threonine-specific protein kinase-C (PKC) and mutants of this protein at the PKC phosphorylation sites exhibit defects in the viral replication cycle. We have now investigated whether agnoprotein phosphorylation is regulated by PP2A, a serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase and whether JCV small t antigen (Sm t-Ag) is involved in this regulation. Protein–protein interaction studies demonstrated that PP2A associates with agnoprotein and dephosphorylates it at PKC-specific sites. Sm t-Ag was also found to interact with PP2A and this interaction inhibited the dephosphorylation of agnoprotein by PP2A. The interaction domains of Sm t-Ag and agnoprotein with PP2A were mapped, as were the interaction domains of Sm t-Ag with agnoprotein. The middle portion of Sm t-Ag (aa 82–124) was found to be critical for the interaction with both agnoprotein and PP2A and the N-terminal region of agnoprotein for interaction with Sm t-Ag. To further understand the role of Sm t-Ag in JCV regulation, a stop codon was introduced at Ser90 immediately after splice donor site of the JCV early gene and the functional consequences of this mutation were investigated. The ability of this mutant virus to replicate was substantially reduced compared to WT. Next, the functional significance of PP2A in JCV replication was examined by siRNA targeting. Downregulation of PP2A caused a significant reduction in the level of JCV replication. Moreover, the impact of Sm t-Ag on agnoprotein phosphorylation was investigated by creating a double mutant of JCV, where Sm t-Ag stop codon mutant was combined with an agnoprotein triple phosphorylation mutant (Ser7, Ser11 and Thr21 to Ala). Results showed that double mutant behaves much like the triple phosphorylation mutant of agnoprotein during viral replication cycle, which suggests that agnoprotein might be an important target of

  11. T-cell recognition of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in erythrocyte stages of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium yoelii: inhibition of parasitemia by this antigen(s).

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, B; Engels, A; Camus, D; Haque, A

    1993-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated the presence of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in the erythrocyte stage from Plasmodium yoelii (265 BY strain) and Plasmodium falciparum through recognition by T cells primed in vivo with antigens from each of these parasites. BALB/c mice are naturally resistant to P. falciparum but are susceptible to P. yoelii infection. Mice that had recovered from P. yoelii primary infection became resistant to a second infection. A higher in vitro proliferative response to a soluble blood stage preparation of P. falciparum was observed in splenic cells from immune animals than in those from mice with a patent P. yoelii infection. The antigen-induced proliferative response was enhanced when animals were exposed to a secondary infection. Animals exposed to a challenge infection were treated with anti-CD4 or anti-CD8 monoclonal antibodies to deplete the corresponding subset of T cells. There was a marked diminution in P. falciparum antigen-induced proliferative response in the total splenic cell populations from CD8-depleted but not from CD4-depleted mice. In CD8-depleted and nondepleted animals, the antigen-induced proliferation in the total cell populations was markedly lower than in the T-cell-rich populations, indicating inhibitory activities of B cells and/or macrophages. There was no such difference in the stimulation between total and T-enriched cell populations from CD4-depleted animals. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated the presence of an almost equal percentage of CD8+ (59.6%) and CD4+ (64%) T cells in the spleen preparations following in vivo depletion of CD4- and CD8-bearing T cells, respectively. When cultured with P. yoelii blood stage antigen, splenocytes from animals immunized with P. falciparum antigen displayed a significant proliferative response which was markedly diminished by treatment with anti-Thy-1.2 antibody plus complement. Animals immunized with P. falciparum antigen and then challenged with P. yoelii blood stage

  12. Effective expansion of forkhead box P3⁺ regulatory T cells via early secreted antigenic target 6 and antigen 85 complex B from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-E; Du, Zhong-Ren; Cai, Ying-Mu; Peng, Wen-Guang; Zheng, Gao-Zhe; Zheng, Geng-Long; Wu, Li-Biao; Li, Ke

    2015-04-01

    The expansion of CD4+ CD25+ forkhead box (FOX)P3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells has been observed in patients with Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis; however, the mechanism of expansion remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of the early secreted antigenic target 6(ESAT‑6) and antigen 85 complex B (Ag85B) from M. tuberculosis on Treg cell expansion. To investigate the sensitivity of peripheral blood cultures to the M. tuberculosis ESAT‑6 and Ag85B antigens, the proportion of circulating CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells was determined using flow cytometry and the levels of FOXP3 mRNA were determined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The mRNA levels of FOXP3 and the proportion of circulating CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells were increased in multiplicitous drug‑resistant tuberculosis patients compared with those in healthy controls and patients with latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) (P<0.001). The mycobacterial antigens ESAT‑6 and Ag85B increased the expansion of the CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells and the mRNA levels of FOXP3 in healthy controls and LTBI patients compared with the effect of Bacillus Calmette‑Guerin (P<0.05). Additionally, the mRNA levels of FOXP3 were elevated in the LTBI patients following stimulations with the mycobacterial antigens (P=0.012). Therefore, the M. tuberculosis antigens ESAT‑6 and Ag85B induced CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg‑cell expansion, particularly in patients with LTBI. These findings indicated that CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg cells may have a primary role in the failure of the host immune system to eradicate M. tuberculosis.

  13. Size and structure of antigen-antibody complexes. Electron microscopy and light scattering studies.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, R M; Slayter, H; Schurtenberger, P; Chamberlin, R A; Colton, C K; Yarmush, M L

    1988-01-01

    Size parameters of model antigen-antibody (Ag-Ab) complexes formed by the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pairs of monoclonal anti-BSA antibodies (mAb) were evaluated by quasielastic light scattering, classical light scattering, and electron microscopy (EM). Mean values for the hydrodynamic radius, radius of gyration, and molecular weight were determined by light scattering. Detailed information regarding the molecular weight distribution and the presence of cycles or open chains was obtained with EM. Average molecular weights were calculated from the EM data, and the Porod-Kratky wormlike chain theory was used to model the conformational behavior of the Ag-mAb complexes. Ag-mAb complexes prepared from three different mAb pairs displayed significantly different properties as assessed by each of the techniques employed. Observations and size parameter calculations from EM photomicrographs were consistent with the results from light scattering. The differences observed between the mab pairs would not have been predicted by idealized thermodynamic models. These results suggest that the geometric constraints imposed by the individual epitope environment and/or the relative epitope location are important in determining the average size of complexes and the ratio of linear to cyclic complexes. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:3416033

  14. The preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) inhibits myeloid differentiation in normal hematopoietic and leukemic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Katherine A.; Cummings, Carrie L.; Sabo, Kathleen; Wood, Brent L.; Gooley, Ted; Yang, Taimei; Epping, Mirjam T.; Shou, Yaping; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era; Ladne, Paula; Stirewalt, Derek L.; Abkowitz, Janis L.; Radich, Jerald P.

    2009-01-01

    The preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) is expressed in several hematologic malignancies, but either is not expressed or is expressed at only low levels in normal hematopoietic cells, making it a target for cancer therapy. PRAME is a tumor-associated antigen and has been described as a corepressor of retinoic acid signaling in solid tumor cells, but its function in hematopoietic cells is unknown. PRAME mRNA expression increased with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) disease progression and its detection in late chronic-phase CML patients before tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy was associated with poorer therapeutic responses and ABL tyrosine kinase domain point mutations. In leukemia cell lines, PRAME protein expression inhibited granulocytic differentiation only in cell lines that differentiate along this lineage after all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) exposure. Forced PRAME expression in normal hematopoietic progenitors, however, inhibited myeloid differentiation both in the presence and absence of ATRA, and this phenotype was reversed when PRAME was silenced in primary CML progenitors. These observations suggest that PRAME inhibits myeloid differentiation in certain myeloid leukemias, and that its function in these cells is lineage and phenotype dependent. Lastly, these observations suggest that PRAME is a target for both prognostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:19625708

  15. Inhibition of autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction by monoclonal antibodies specific for the β chain of HLA-DR antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, M.; Ikeda, H.; Ogasawara, K.; Ishikawa, N.; Okuyama, T.; Fukasawa, Y.; Kojima, H.; Kunikane, H.; Hawkin, S.; Ohhashi, T.; Natori, T.; Wakisaka, A.; Kikuchi, Y.; Aizawa, M.

    1984-01-01

    Recent studies using rabbit antisera to the separated HLA-DR α and β subunits have suggested that α chain-specific, but not β chain-specific, antisera inhibit T cell proliferative responses in primary and secondary human autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR). In the present study, with the aid of sequential co-precipitation assays and Western blotting methods, a monoclonal rat alloantibody 1E4, specific for the β chain of rat class II molecules carrying an Ia determinant Ba-2.7, was characterized to recognize a monomorphic determinant located on the β chain of DR antigens. This antibody and a murine monoclonal antibody HU-4, also specific for the β chain of DR antigens, strongly inhibited both primary and secondary AMLR through a mechanism distinct from an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity reaction. These results indicate that the inhibition of AMLR is not a unique feature of DR α-specific antibodies. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:6205985

  16. Direct inhibition of the NOTCH transcription factor complex.

    PubMed

    Moellering, Raymond E; Cornejo, Melanie; Davis, Tina N; Del Bianco, Cristina; Aster, Jon C; Blacklow, Stephen C; Kung, Andrew L; Gilliland, D Gary; Verdine, Gregory L; Bradner, James E

    2009-11-12

    Direct inhibition of transcription factor complexes remains a central challenge in the discipline of ligand discovery. In general, these proteins lack surface involutions suitable for high-affinity binding by small molecules. Here we report the design of synthetic, cell-permeable, stabilized alpha-helical peptides that target a critical protein-protein interface in the NOTCH transactivation complex. We demonstrate that direct, high-affinity binding of the hydrocarbon-stapled peptide SAHM1 prevents assembly of the active transcriptional complex. Inappropriate NOTCH activation is directly implicated in the pathogenesis of several disease states, including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). The treatment of leukaemic cells with SAHM1 results in genome-wide suppression of NOTCH-activated genes. Direct antagonism of the NOTCH transcriptional program causes potent, NOTCH-specific anti-proliferative effects in cultured cells and in a mouse model of NOTCH1-driven T-ALL.

  17. Direct inhibition of the NOTCH transcription factor complex

    PubMed Central

    Moellering, Raymond E.; Cornejo, Melanie; Davis, Tina N.; Del Bianco, Cristina; Aster, Jon C.; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Kung, Andrew L.; Gilliland, D. Gary; Verdine, Gregory L.; Bradner, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Direct inhibition of transcription factor complexes remains a central challenge in the discipline of ligand discovery. In general, these proteins lack surface involutions suitable for high-affinity binding by small molecules. Here we report the design of synthetic, cell-permeable, stabilized α-helical peptides that target a critical protein–protein interface in the NOTCH transactivation complex. We demonstrate that direct, high-affinity binding of the hydrocarbon-stapled peptide SAHM1 prevents assembly of the active transcriptional complex. Inappropriate NOTCH activation is directly implicated in the pathogenesis of several disease states, including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). The treatment of leukaemic cells with SAHM1 results in genome-wide suppression of NOTCH-activated genes. Direct antagonism of the NOTCH transcriptional program causes potent, NOTCH-specific anti-proliferative effects in cultured cells and in a mouse model of NOTCH1-driven T-ALL. PMID:19907488

  18. Effect of temperature on the expression of major histocompatibility complex class-I antigens.

    PubMed

    Aboud, M; Segal, S; Priel, E; Blair, D G; O'Hara, B

    1992-06-01

    In the present study we investigated the effect of temperature on MHC class-I gene expression in BALB/C 3T3 cells incubated for 5 days at 34 degrees C, 37 degrees C and 39 degrees C. FACS analysis revealed no significant difference in the cell surface expression of any of the 3 major class-I antigens at 34 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Strikingly, however, when the level of the respective mRNA was determined, only that of the H-2K was comparable at both temperatures, whereas the levels of the H-2D and H-2L mRNA were profoundly higher at 37 degrees C. These data appear to reflect a differential temperature-related transcriptional control of the different class-I genes or a different temperature effect on the stability of their mRNA. The absence of a parallel increase in surface expression of the corresponding H-2D and H-2L antigens may result from some translational or post-translational limiting factors. At 39 degrees C, however, these limiting factors seem to be overcome since the surface expression of all the 3 antigens was remarkably increased although the level of their encoding mRNA was rather lower than in 37 degrees C. This stimulatory effect might be ascribed to heat shock proteins which are known to arise in cells at heat or other stress conditions. They participate in assembly and disassembly of various protein complexes and in transport of certain proteins across intracellular membranes. Such proteins may have arisen in our cells at 39 degrees C and facilitated the intracellular assembly of the class-I molecules and their transport to the cell surface. The possible implication of such heat shock proteins in the anti-tumor effect of hyperthermia is discussed.

  19. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Complex II by the Anticancer Agent Lonidamine*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lili; Shestov, Alexander A.; Worth, Andrew J.; Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Glickson, Jerry D.; Blair, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    The antitumor agent lonidamine (LND; 1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid) is known to interfere with energy-yielding processes in cancer cells. However, the effect of LND on central energy metabolism has never been fully characterized. In this study, we report that a significant amount of succinate is accumulated in LND-treated cells. LND inhibits the formation of fumarate and malate and suppresses succinate-induced respiration of isolated mitochondria. Utilizing biochemical assays, we determined that LND inhibits the succinate-ubiquinone reductase activity of respiratory complex II without fully blocking succinate dehydrogenase activity. LND also induces cellular reactive oxygen species through complex II, which reduced the viability of the DB-1 melanoma cell line. The ability of LND to promote cell death was potentiated by its suppression of the pentose phosphate pathway, which resulted in inhibition of NADPH and glutathione generation. Using stable isotope tracers in combination with isotopologue analysis, we showed that LND increased glutaminolysis but decreased reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate. Our findings on the previously uncharacterized effects of LND may provide potential combinational therapeutic approaches for targeting cancer metabolism. PMID:26521302

  20. Recombinant Lipoprotein Rv1016c Derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is a TLR-2 Ligand that Induces Macrophages Apoptosis and Inhibits MHC II Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Su, Haibo; Zhu, Shenglin; Zhu, Lin; Huang, Wei; Wang, Honghai; Zhang, Zhi; Xu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    TLR2-dependent cellular signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages causes apoptosis and inhibits class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules antigen processing, leading to evasion of surveillance. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) lipoproteins are an important class of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand, and identified as specific components that mediate these effects. In this study, we identified and characterized MTB lipoprotein Rv1016c (lpqT) as a cell wall associated-protein that was exposed on the cell surface and enhanced the survival of recombinants M. smegmatis_Rv1016c under stress conditions. We found that Rv1016c lipoprotein was a novel TLR2 ligand and able to induce macrophage apoptosis in a both dose- and time-dependent manner. Additionally, apoptosis induced by Rv1016c was reserved in THP-1 cells blocked with anti-TLR-2 Abs or in TLR2−/− mouse macrophages, indicating that Rv1016c-induced apoptosis is dependent on TLR2. Moreover, we demonstrated that Rv1016c lipoprotein inhibited IFN-γ-induced MHC-II expression and processing of soluble antigens in a TLR2 dependent manner. Class II transactivator (CIITA) regulates MHC II expression. In this context, Rv1016c lipoprotein diminished IFN-γ-induced expression of CIITA IV through TLR2 and MAPK Signaling. TLR2-dependent apoptosis and inhibition of MHC-II Ag processing induced by Rv1016c during mycobacteria infection may promote the release of residual bacilli from apoptotic cells and decrease recognition by CD4+ T cells. These mechanisms may allow intracellular MTB to evade immune surveillance and maintain chronic infection. PMID:27917375

  1. Eosinophil granule lysis in vitro induced by soluble antigen antibody complexes

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G. T.; Nelson, Margaret; Johnston, Jill

    1969-01-01

    A simple test system is described, for the demonstration of antigen—antibody reactions capable of causing eosinophil granule lysis in vitro. The antigen preparations used were extracts of the nematode Amplicaecum robertsi and body fluid of Ascaris suum. Antisera were obtained from rats infested with Amplicaecum. Eosinophils were obtained from the peritoneal cavity of normal rats. Centrifugation of the cells to form a cell button was an essential step in the procedure. Lysis of eosinophils occurred with antiserum obtained from the animals between the 12th and 32nd days of infestation with Amplicaecum, and was accompanied by vacuole formation in macrophages and mast cell disruption. The reaction was most pronounced during the 3rd week. Serum from adrenalectomized infested animals caused the most marked changes in eosinophils. Serum from cortisonetreated infested animals failed to cause eosinophil changes. Attempts at purification of the antigen in Ascaris body fluid resulted in two fractions with marked activity in the test system. The same two fractions were found to form precipitin lines on agarose gel diffusion against rat antiserum. It is postulated that antigen—antibody complexes soluble in low concentration were responsible for the changes observed in the eosinophils, macrophages and mast cells. One or more labile factors in the serum were found to be necessary for eosinophil granule lysis. The evidence, though incomplete, would favour the suggestion that both labile antibody and complement were necessary. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:4982023

  2. Immunohistochemical detection of major histocompatibility complex antigens and quantitative analysis of tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Y.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Sato, S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to investigate the anti-tumour immune responsiveness of patients with renal cell cancer (RCC), we examined 30 such patients for the degree of expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II antigens on RCC and the populations of tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells (TIM). Normal renal tubular cells expressed class I but not class II antigens. Most of the tumour cells expressed class I antigens in 25 (83%) cases, but the proportion of such cells was reduced in five cases, three of which were of granular cell type histologically. Class II antigens were detected in all specimens with class I positivity. Various numbers of TIM were detected in 25 cases, being composed mainly of T cells and a smaller number of macrophages. Examination for the phenotype of T cells showed that CD8-positive cells were the dominant population. B cells were not detected. Quantitative analysis revealed that the numbers of TIM were significantly lower in cases showing class I reduction than in those with normal class I expression. Therefore, it was clear that class I antigens were preserved in RCC cells in most cases. Furthermore, a higher rate of reduction of class I antigens was observed in cases of granular cell type, which has been reported to have a worse prognosis than the clear cell type. The present data suggest that degree of the expression of MHC class I antigen on RCC might influence the host immune responsiveness against it. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2206942

  3. Biomedical nanoparticles modulate specific CD4+ T cell stimulation by inhibition of antigen processing in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Blank, Fabian; Gerber, Peter; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sakulkhu, Usawadee; Salaklang, Jatuporn; De Peyer, Karin; Gehr, Peter; Nicod, Laurent P; Hofmann, Heinrich; Geiser, Thomas; Petri-Fink, Alke; Von Garnier, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    Understanding how nanoparticles may affect immune responses is an essential prerequisite to developing novel clinical applications. To investigate nanoparticle-dependent outcomes on immune responses, dendritic cells (DCs) were treated with model biomedical poly(vinylalcohol)-coated super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PVA-SPIONs). PVA-SPIONs uptake by human monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) was analyzed by flow cytometry (FACS) and advanced imaging techniques. Viability, activation, function, and stimulatory capacity of MDDCs were assessed by FACS and an in vitro CD4+ T cell assay. PVA-SPION uptake was dose-dependent, decreased by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced MDDC maturation at higher particle concentrations, and was inhibited by cytochalasin D pre-treatment. PVA-SPIONs did not alter surface marker expression (CD80, CD83, CD86, myeloid/plasmacytoid DC markers) or antigen-uptake, but decreased the capacity of MDDCs to process antigen, stimulate CD4+ T cells, and induce cytokines. The decreased antigen processing and CD4+ T cell stimulation capability of MDDCs following PVA-SPION treatment suggests that MDDCs may revert to a more functionally immature state following particle exposure.

  4. Synthesis of biocompatible nanoparticle drug complexes for inhibition of mycobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhave, Tejashree; Ghoderao, Prachi; Sanghavi, Sonali; Babrekar, Harshada; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Ganesan, V.; Kulkarni, Anjali

    2013-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most critical infectious diseases affecting the world today. Current TB treatment involves six months long daily administration of four oral doses of antibiotics. Due to severe side effects and the long treatment, a patient's adherence is low and this results in relapse of symptoms causing an alarming increase in the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. Hence, it is imperative to develop a new drug delivery technology wherein these effects can be reduced. Rifampicin (RIF) is one of the widely used anti-tubercular drugs (ATD). The present study discusses the development of biocompatible nanoparticle-RIF complexes with superior inhibitory activity against both Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by gas phase condensation and NP-RIF complexes were tested against M. smegmatis SN2 strain as well as M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain. These complexes showed significantly better inhibition of M. smegmatis SN2 strain at a much lower effective concentration (27.5 μg ml-1) as compared to neat RIF (125 μg ml-1). Similarly M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain was susceptible to both nanoparticle-RIF complex and neat RIF at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.22 and 1 μg ml-1, respectively. Further studies are underway to determine the efficacy of NPs-RIF complexes in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis as well as MDR isolates.

  5. Influence of antigen charge in the pathogenicity of immune complexes in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Coimbra, T. M.; Gouveia, M. A.; Ebisui, L.; Barbosa, J. E.; Lachat, J. J.; de Carvalho, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    Immune complexes (IC) formed in the presence of excess antigen with native human anionic (AA) or cationic (CA) albumin and anti-human albumin rabbit gamma globulin were administered to 51 female Wistar rats. In animals injected with IC formed with CA, IC deposition in the renal glomeruli (glomerular capillary walls and mesangium) occurred as early as 5 min after injection. These animals also showed slight alterations in renal structure and albuminuria, whereas in the animals injected with IC formed with AA there was no IC deposition in the renal glomeruli nor any alteration in renal structure or albuminuria. The serum complement levels of animals injected with IC formed with CA were significantly lower than those observed in animals treated with similar doses of IC formed with AA. In vitro experiments also showed that the IC formed with CA fixed more complement than those formed with AA. Images Fig. 1 Figs. 2 and 3 Figs. 4, 5 and 6 Fig. 7 PMID:2415147

  6. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I and MHC Class II Proteins: Conformational Plasticity in Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Marek; Abualrous, Esam T.; Sticht, Jana; Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Noé, Frank; Freund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is essential for adaptive immunity. Prior to presentation, peptides need to be generated from proteins that are either produced by the cell’s own translational machinery or that are funneled into the endo-lysosomal vesicular system. The prolonged interaction between a T cell receptor and specific pMHC complexes, after an extensive search process in secondary lymphatic organs, eventually triggers T cells to proliferate and to mount a specific cellular immune response. Once processed, the peptide repertoire presented by MHC proteins largely depends on structural features of the binding groove of each particular MHC allelic variant. Additionally, two peptide editors—tapasin for class I and HLA-DM for class II—contribute to the shaping of the presented peptidome by favoring the binding of high-affinity antigens. Although there is a vast amount of biochemical and structural information, the mechanism of the catalyzed peptide exchange for MHC class I and class II proteins still remains controversial, and it is not well understood why certain MHC allelic variants are more susceptible to peptide editing than others. Recent studies predict a high impact of protein intermediate states on MHC allele-specific peptide presentation, which implies a profound influence of MHC dynamics on the phenomenon of immunodominance and the development of autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the recent literature that describe MHC class I and II dynamics from a theoretical and experimental point of view and we highlight the similarities between MHC class I and class II dynamics despite the distinct functions they fulfill in adaptive immunity. PMID:28367149

  7. Free and complexed prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in the early detection of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tello, F L; Prats, C H; González, M D

    2001-02-01

    We evaluated the analytical performance and diagnostic utility of complexed prostate-specific antigen (CPSA) and their ratios, complexed-to-total PSA (C/T PSA) and free-to-complexed PSA (F/C PSA), in comparison with the total PSA (TPSA) and free-to-total PSA ratio (F/T PSA) as means of diagnosing prostate cancer (PC). Samples (n=101) were drawn from men with no evidence of malignancy (n=80) and from men with PC (n=21) at biopsy. For determination of the F/T PSA ratio, the DPC Immulite-2000 method was used; and the Bayer Immuno-1 CPSA and TPSA assays were used to determine the C/T PSA ratio. The Bayer Immuno-1 CPSA assay provides accurate and precise CPSA values in human serum. The performance of the different forms and ratios was compared using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. CPSA had the greatest area under the curve (AUC, 0.689) although it was not statistically different from the other parameters. A cut-off value of 4.66 ng/ml for CPSA provided a specificity of 38% and a sensitivity of 93%. The F/C PSA ratio maintained a sensitivity of 93% and had an increased specificity of 41%. The measurement of CPSA provides a slight increase in specificity compared with the use of the TPSA in the early detection of prostate cancer.

  8. Presentation of antigen in immune complexes is boosted by soluble bacterial immunoglobulin binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Léonetti, M; Galon, J; Thai, R; Sautès-Fridman, C; Moine, G; Ménez, A

    1999-04-19

    Using a snake toxin as a proteic antigen (Ag), two murine toxin-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), splenocytes, and two murine Ag-specific T cell hybridomas, we showed that soluble protein A (SpA) from Staphylococcus aureus and protein G from Streptococcus subspecies, two Ig binding proteins (IBPs), not only abolish the capacity of the mAbs to decrease Ag presentation but also increase Ag presentation 20-100-fold. Five lines of evidence suggest that this phenomenon results from binding of an IBP-Ab-Ag complex to B cells possessing IBP receptors. First, we showed that SpA is likely to boost presentation of a free mAb, suggesting that the IBP-boosted presentation of an Ag in an immune complex results from the binding of IBP to the mAb. Second, FACS analyses showed that an Ag-Ab complex is preferentially targeted by SpA to a subpopulation of splenocytes mainly composed of B cells. Third, SpA-dependent boosted presentation of an Ag-Ab complex is further enhanced when splenocytes are enriched in cells containing SpA receptors. Fourth, the boosting effect largely diminishes when splenocytes are depleted of cells containing SpA receptors. Fifth, the boosting effect occurs only when IBP simultaneously contains a Fab and an Fc binding site. Altogether, our data suggest that soluble IBPs can bridge immune complexes to APCs containing IBP receptors, raising the possibility that during an infection process by bacteria secreting these IBPs, Ag-specific T cells may activate IBP receptor-containing B cells by a mechanism of intermolecular help, thus leading to a nonspecific immune response.

  9. Characterization of anti-P monoclonal antibodies directed against the ribosomal protein-RNA complex antigen and produced using Murphy Roths large autoimmune-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Onozuka, M; Hagiya, A; Hoshino, S; Narita, I; Uchiumi, T

    2015-02-01

    Autoantibodies, including anti-ribosomal P proteins (anti-P), are thought to be produced by an antigen-driven immune response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted the ribosomal antigenic complex in vitro using human P0, phosphorylated P1 and P2 and a 28S rRNA fragment covering the P0 binding site, and immunized Murphy Roths large (MRL)/lrp lupus mice with this complex without any added adjuvant to generate anti-P antibodies. Using hybridoma technology, we subsequently obtained 34 clones, each producing an anti-P monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognized the conserved C-terminal tail sequence common to all three P proteins. We also obtained two P0-specific monoclonal antibodies, but no antibody specific to P1, P2 or rRNA fragment. Two types of mAbs were found among these anti-P antibodies: one type (e.g. 9D5) reacted more strongly with the phosphorylated P1 and P2 than that with their non-phosphorylated forms, whereas the other type (e.g. 4H11) reacted equally with both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of P1/P2. Both 9D5 and 4H11 inhibited the ribosome/eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF-2)-coupled guanosine triphosphate (GTP)ase activity. However, preincubation with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence common to all three P proteins, but not the peptide that lacked the last three C-terminal amino acids, mostly prevented the mAb-induced inhibition of GTPase activity. Thus, at least two types of anti-P were produced preferentially following the immunization of MRL mice with the reconstituted antigenic complex. Presence of multiple copies of the C-termini, particularly that of the last three C-terminal amino acid residues, in the antigenic complex appears to contribute to the immunogenic stimulus.

  10. Characterization of anti-P monoclonal antibodies directed against the ribosomal protein–RNA complex antigen and produced using Murphy Roths large autoimmune-prone mice

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H; Onozuka, M; Hagiya, A; Hoshino, S; Narita, I; Uchiumi, T

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies, including anti-ribosomal P proteins (anti-P), are thought to be produced by an antigen-driven immune response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted the ribosomal antigenic complex in vitro using human P0, phosphorylated P1 and P2 and a 28S rRNA fragment covering the P0 binding site, and immunized Murphy Roths large (MRL)/lrp lupus mice with this complex without any added adjuvant to generate anti-P antibodies. Using hybridoma technology, we subsequently obtained 34 clones, each producing an anti-P monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognized the conserved C-terminal tail sequence common to all three P proteins. We also obtained two P0-specific monoclonal antibodies, but no antibody specific to P1, P2 or rRNA fragment. Two types of mAbs were found among these anti-P antibodies: one type (e.g. 9D5) reacted more strongly with the phosphorylated P1 and P2 than that with their non-phosphorylated forms, whereas the other type (e.g. 4H11) reacted equally with both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of P1/P2. Both 9D5 and 4H11 inhibited the ribosome/eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF-2)-coupled guanosine triphosphate (GTP)ase activity. However, preincubation with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence common to all three P proteins, but not the peptide that lacked the last three C-terminal amino acids, mostly prevented the mAb-induced inhibition of GTPase activity. Thus, at least two types of anti-P were produced preferentially following the immunization of MRL mice with the reconstituted antigenic complex. Presence of multiple copies of the C-termini, particularly that of the last three C-terminal amino acid residues, in the antigenic complex appears to contribute to the immunogenic stimulus. PMID:25255895

  11. Antigenicity in sheep of synthetic peptides derived from stress-regulated Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins and comparison with recombinant protein and complex native antigens.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ratna B; Begg, Douglas J; Purdie, Auriol C; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-03-15

    Serum antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is the most commonly used test for diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in ruminants. However, the assay requires serum preabsorption with Mycobacterium phlei proteins to reduce cross reactions potentially contributed by the exposure of livestock to environmental mycobacteria. To trial the discovery of novel antigens which do not require serum absorption, synthetic MAP-specific peptides were selected based on in silico research to identify putative B cell epitopes. Four peptides from previously identified stress-regulated proteins were synthesized and evaluated using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific antibodies in sheep. Two peptides were from hypothetical MAP proteins (MAP3567 and MAP1168c) and two were from proteins with known function (MAP2698c, an acyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase-DesA2 and MAP2487c a carbonic anhydrase). The ability of each peptide to discriminate between unexposed and MAP exposed (infected and vaccinated) animals was similar to that of the parent recombinant MAP antigen, with area under receiver operating curve values of 0.86-0.93. Assays run with a combination of two peptides showed slightly higher reactivity than those of individual peptides. Peptides evaluated in this study had diagnostic potential similar to corresponding recombinant proteins but not superior to a complex native MAP antigen or a commercial assay. Further study is required to investigate other peptides for their diagnostic potential, and this may be simpler and cheaper than subunit protein-based research.

  12. Accurate structure prediction of peptide–MHC complexes for identifying highly immunogenic antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Min-Sun; Park, Sung Yong; Miller, Keith R.; Collins, Edward J.; Lee, Ha Youn

    2013-11-01

    Designing an optimal HIV-1 vaccine faces the challenge of identifying antigens that induce a broad immune capacity. One factor to control the breadth of T cell responses is the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex. Here, we present an in silico protocol for predicting peptide–MHC structure. A robust signature of a conformational transition was identified during all-atom molecular dynamics, which results in a model with high accuracy. A large test set was used in constructing our protocol and we went another step further using a blind test with a wild-type peptide and two highly immunogenic mutants, which predicted substantial conformational changes in both mutants. The center residues at position five of the analogs were configured to be accessible to solvent, forming a prominent surface, while the residue of the wild-type peptide was to point laterally toward the side of the binding cleft. We then experimentally determined the structures of the blind test set, using high resolution of X-ray crystallography, which verified predicted conformational changes. Our observation strongly supports a positive association of the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex to its immunogenicity. Our study offers the prospect of enhancing immunogenicity of vaccines by identifying MHC binding immunogens.

  13. Inactivation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85 complex by covalent, allosteric inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Favrot, Lorenza; Lajiness, Daniel H; Ronning, Donald R

    2014-09-05

    The rise of multidrug-resistant and totally drug-resistant tuberculosis and the association with an increasing number of HIV-positive patients developing tuberculosis emphasize the necessity to find new antitubercular targets and drugs. The antigen 85 (Ag85) complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays important roles in the biosynthesis of major components of the mycobacterial cell envelope. For this reason, Ag85 has emerged as an attractive drug target. Recently, ebselen was identified as an effective inhibitor of the Ag85 complex through covalent modification of a cysteine residue proximal to the Ag85 active site and is therefore a covalent, allosteric inhibitor. To expand the understanding of this process, we have solved the x-ray crystal structures of Ag85C covalently modified with ebselen and other thiol-reactive compounds, p-chloromercuribenzoic acid and iodoacetamide, as well as the structure of a cysteine to glycine mutant. All four structures confirm that chemical modification or mutation at this particular cysteine residue leads to the disruption of the active site hydrogen-bonded network essential for Ag85 catalysis. We also describe x-ray crystal structures of Ag85C single mutants within the catalytic triad and show that a mutation of any one of these three residues promotes the same conformational change observed in the cysteine-modified forms. These results provide evidence for active site dynamics that may afford new strategies for the development of selective and potent Ag85 inhibitors.

  14. Complex regulation of transcription from the hepatitis B virus major surface antigen promoter in human hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Raney, A K; Milich, D R; McLachlan, A

    1991-01-01

    A detailed mutational analysis of the regulatory DNA sequence elements that control expression of the hepatitis B virus major surface antigen gene was performed in the human hepatoma cell lines HepG2.1 and Huh7, using transient transfection assays. Seven regions (A to G) of the major surface antigen promoter located within 200 nucleotides of the RNA initiation site have been identified which influence the level of transcription from this promoter. The three distal regions (A to C), located between -188 and -68, appear to possess a level of redundancy in their ability to influence the transcriptional activity from the major surface antigen promoter. The simultaneous deletion of regions A, B, and C resulted in an approximately fourfold reduction in transcription from the major surface antigen promoter. Region D, located between -67 and -49, is an essential element of the major surface antigen promoter. The three proximal regions (E to G) are located within 45 nucleotides of the major transcription initiation site. Region E prevents the negative influence of region F and can compensate for the effect of mutation of region G on transcription from the major surface antigen promoter. Region G can compensate for the effect of the loss of a functional region E sequence on the transcriptional activity of the major surface antigen promoter only in the absence of a functional region F sequence. These results imply that the level of expression of the major surface antigen gene is controlled by the complex interplay between a minimum of six transcription factors which activate and one transcription factor which represses transcription from this gene. PMID:1651407

  15. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bajenova, Olga; Chaika, Nina; Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander; Gapon, Svetlana; Thomas, Peter; O’Brien, Stephen

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  16. A large-tumor-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody inhibits DNA replication of simian virus 40 minichromosomes in an in vitro elongation system.

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, H; Dröge, P; Zentgraf, H; Knippers, R

    1985-01-01

    In productively infected cells, a fraction of large-tumor antigen (T antigen) is tightly bound to replicating simian virus 40 (SV40) minichromosomes and does not dissociate at salt concentrations of greater than 1 M NaCl. We present electronmicrograms demonstrating the presence of T antigen on the replicated sections of replicating SV40 minichromosomes. We also show that the fraction of tightly bound T antigen is recognized by antibodies from mouse tumor serum and, more specifically, by a particular T-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody, PAb 1630. A second T-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody, PAb 101, does not react with the T-antigen fraction remaining on replicating SV40 chromatin at high salt concentrations. We used an in vitro replication system which allows, via semiconservative DNA replication, the completion of in vivo-initiated replicative intermediate DNA molecules. We show that monoclonal antibody PAb 1630, but not monoclonal antibody PAb 101, inhibits viral DNA replication. We discuss the possibility that SV40 T antigen may play a role in chain elongation during SV40 chromatin replication. Images PMID:2985809

  17. Identification of small molecules that inhibit the interaction of TEM8 with anthrax protective antigen using a FRET assay

    PubMed Central

    Cryan, Lorna M.; Habeshian, Kaiane A.; Caldwell, Thomas P.; Morris, Meredith T.; Ackroyd, P. Christine; Christensen, Kenneth A.; Rogers, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor marker endothelial 8 (TEM8) is a receptor for the Protective Antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin. TEM8 is upregulated on endothelial cells lining the blood vessels within tumors, compared to normal blood vessels. A number of studies have demonstrated a pivotal role for TEM8 in developmental and tumor angiogenesis. We have also shown that targeting the anthrax receptors with a mutated form of PA inhibits angiogenesis and tumor formation in vivo. Here we describe the development and testing of a high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay to identify molecules that strongly inhibit the interaction of PA and TEM8. The assay we describe is sensitive and robust, with a Z-prime value of 0.8. A preliminary screen of 2310 known bioactive library compounds identified ebselen and thimerosal as inhibitors of the TEM8-PA interaction. These molecules each contain a cysteine-reactive transition metal, and complimentary studies indicate that their inhibition of interaction is due to modification of a cysteine residue in the TEM8 extracellular domain. This is the first demonstration of a high-throughput screening assay that identifies inhibitors of TEM8, with potential application for anti-anthrax and anti-angiogenic diseases. PMID:23479355

  18. Pharmacologic IKK/NF-κB inhibition causes antigen presenting cells to undergo TNFα dependent ROS-mediated programmed cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Gaddy, Daniel F.; Zhao, Jing; Davé, Shaival H.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Plevy, Scott E.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte-derived antigen presenting cells (APC) are central mediators of the innate and adaptive immune response in inflammatory diseases. As such, APC are appropriate targets for therapeutic intervention to ameliorate certain diseases. APC differentiation, activation and functions are regulated by the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Herein, we examined the effect of NF-κB inhibition, via suppression of the IκB Kinase (IKK) complex, on APC function. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), as well as macrophage and DC lines, underwent rapid programmed cell death (PCD) after treatment with several IKK/NF-κB inhibitors through a TNFα-dependent mechanism. PCD was induced proximally by reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which causes a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of a caspase signaling cascade. NF-κB-inhibition-induced PCD of APC may be a key mechanism through which therapeutic targeting of NF-κB reduces inflammatory pathologies.

  19. EAU in the guinea pig: inhibition of cell-mediated immunity and Ia antigen expression by cyclosporin A.

    PubMed Central

    Liversidge, J; Thomson, A W; Sewell, H F; Forrester, J V

    1987-01-01

    Guinea pigs were immunized subcutaneously with highly purified bovine retinal S antigen (SAg) in complete Freund's adjuvant and treated from day 0 with cyclosporin A (CsA; 25 mg/kg by mouth) or drug vehicle. Skin tests carried out at 7 and 13 days showed maximal reactions to SAg at 24 h; at 13 days, however, strong, early, 'Arthus'-like responses to SAg were also recorded. CsA profoundly reduced DTH skin reactions to SAg and PPD, and prevented vitreal inflammation assessed at 17 days and retinal damage. Lymphocytes from the draining lymph nodes but not spleens of immunized guinea pigs showed a proliferative response to SAg which was suppressed by CsA administration. Responses to PHA, Con A or LPS were not so affected. Immunohistochemical staining (alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase; APAAP) of the eye with newly available monoclonal antibodies to guinea pig T lymphocytes revealed a predominantly T cytotoxic/suppressor cell (Tc/s) infiltrate of the choroid and retina. CsA administration did not affect choroidal infiltration of Tc/s cells but markedly inhibited Ia antigen expression. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3478162

  20. Identifying Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface antigen 3 (MSP3) protein peptides that bind specifically to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Luis E.; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Garcia, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Valbuena, John; Vera, Ricardo; López, Ramses; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2005-01-01

    Receptor–ligand interactions between synthetic peptides and normal human erythrocytes were studied to determine Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP-3) FC27 strain regions that specifically bind to membrane surface receptors on human erythrocytes. Three MSP-3 protein high activity binding peptides (HABPs) were identified; their binding to erythrocytes became saturable, had nanomolar affinity constants, and became sensitive on being treated with neuraminidase and trypsin but were resistant to chymotrypsin treatment. All of them specifically recognized 45-, 55-, and 72-kDa erythrocyte membrane proteins. They all presented α-helix structural elements. All HABPs inhibited in vitro P. falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes by ~55%–85%, suggesting that MSP-3 protein’s role in the invasion process probably functions by using mechanisms similar to those described for other MSP family antigens. PMID:15987906

  1. Targeting Tumor Initiating Cells through Inhibition of Cancer Testis Antigens and Notch Signaling: A Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Michela; Mirandola, Leonardo; Reidy, Adair; Suvorava, Natallia; Konala, Venu; Chiaramonte, Raffaella; Grizzi, Fabio; Rahman, Rakhshanda Layeequr; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Nugyen, Diane D; Dalhbeck, Scott; Cobos, Everardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) differ from normal stem cells (SCs) in their ability to initiate tumorigenesis, invasive growth, metastasis and the acquisition of chemo and/or radio-resistance. Over the past years, several studies have indicated the potential role of the Notch system as a key regulator of cellular stemness and tumor development. Furthermore, the expression of cancer testis antigens (CTA) in TICs, and their role in SC differentiation and biology, has become an important area of investigation. Here, we propose a model in which CTA expression and Notch signaling interacts to maintain the sustainability of self-replicating tumor populations, ultimately leading to the development of metastasis, drug resistance and cancer progression. We hypothesize that Notch-CTA interactions in TICs offer a novel opportunity for meaningful therapeutic interventions in cancer.

  2. Viral Inhibition of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP): A Striking Example of Functional Convergent Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Verweij, Marieke C.; Horst, Daniëlle; Griffin, Bryan D.; Luteijn, Rutger D.; Davison, Andrew J.; Ressing, Maaike E.; Wiertz, Emmanuel J. H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are large DNA viruses that are highly abundant within their host populations. Even in the presence of a healthy immune system, these viruses manage to cause lifelong infections. This persistence is partially mediated by the virus entering latency, a phase of infection characterized by limited viral protein expression. Moreover, herpesviruses have devoted a significant part of their coding capacity to immune evasion strategies. It is believed that the close coexistence of herpesviruses and their hosts has resulted in the evolution of viral proteins that specifically attack multiple arms of the host immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in antiviral immunity. CTLs recognize their target through viral peptides presented in the context of MHC molecules at the cell surface. Every herpesvirus studied to date encodes multiple immune evasion molecules that effectively interfere with specific steps of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) plays a key role in the loading of viral peptides onto MHC class I molecules. This is reflected by the numerous ways herpesviruses have developed to block TAP function. In this review, we describe the characteristics and mechanisms of action of all known virus-encoded TAP inhibitors. Orthologs of these proteins encoded by related viruses are identified, and the conservation of TAP inhibition is discussed. A phylogenetic analysis of members of the family Herpesviridae is included to study the origin of these molecules. In addition, we discuss the characteristics of the first TAP inhibitor identified outside the herpesvirus family, namely, in cowpox virus. The strategies of TAP inhibition employed by viruses are very distinct and are likely to have been acquired independently during evolution. These findings and the recent discovery of a non-herpesvirus TAP inhibitor represent a striking example of functional convergent evolution

  3. Structure of an anti-Lewis X Fab fragment in complex with its Lewis X antigen.

    PubMed

    van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Pannu, Navraj S; de Vrind, Johannes P M; van der Marel, Gijs A; van Boom, Jacques H; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2004-07-01

    The Lewis X trisaccharide is pivotal in mediating specific cell-cell interactions. Monoclonal antibody 291-2G3-A, which was generated from mice infected with schistosomes, has been shown to recognize the Lewis X trisaccharide. Here we describe the structure of the Fab fragment of 291-2G3-A, with Lewis X, to 1.8 A resolution. The crystallographic analysis revealed that the antigen binding site is a rather shallow binding pocket, and residues from all six complementary determining regions of the antibody contact all sugar residues. The high specificity of the binding pocket does not result in high affinity; the K(D) determined by isothermal calorimetry is 11 microM. However, this affinity is in the same range as for other sugar-antibody complexes. The detailed understanding of the antibody-Lewis X interaction revealed by the crystal structure may be helpful in the design of better diagnostic tools for schistosomiasis and for studying Lewis X-mediated cell-cell interactions by antibody interference.

  4. Elastin, a novel extracellular matrix protein adhering to mycobacterial antigen 85 complex.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Jung; Ptak, Christopher P; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Akey, Bruce L; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2013-02-08

    The antigen 85 complex (Ag85) consists of three predominantly secreted proteins (Ag85A, Ag85B, and Ag85C), which play a key role in the mycobacterial pathogenesis and also possess enzymatic mycolyltransferase activity involved in cell wall synthesis. Ag85 is not only considered to be a virulence factor because its expression is essential for intracellular survival within macrophages, but also because it contributes to adherence, invasion, and dissemination of mycobacteria in host cells. In this study, we report that the extracellular matrix components, elastin and its precursor (tropoelastin) derived from human aorta, lung, and skin, serve as binding partners of Ag85 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The binding affinity of M. tuberculosis Ag85 to human tropoelastin was characterized (K(D) = 0.13 ± 0.006 μm), and a novel Ag85-binding motif, AAAKAA(K/Q)(Y/F), on multiple tropoelastin modules was identified. In addition, the negatively charged Glu-258 of Ag85 was demonstrated to participate in an electrostatic interaction with human tropoelastin. Moreover, binding of Ag85 on elastin siRNA-transfected Caco-2 cells was significantly reduced (34.3%), implying that elastin acts as an important ligand contributing to mycobacterial invasion.

  5. Antigen-specific detection of HBsAG-containing immune complexes in the course of hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, W; Sodomann, C P; Lüben, G; Seiler, F R; Sedlacek, H H

    1979-01-01

    In recent studies extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis have been recognized as immune complex diseases. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has been successfully identified in immune complexes, but the pathogenic role of HBsAg-containing immune complexes (IC) remains questionable. The subject of the present study was the antigen-specific determination of IC in the course of hepatitis B virus infection using a new HBsAg-specific IC test (Pernice & Sedlacek, 1978). This test is based on the following principle: rabbit anti-HBs-coated polystyrole test tubes are incubated with the IC-containing test sample. The HBsAg-containing IC bind to the solid phase by their free antigenic determinants. There they can be quantified using a peroxidase-labelled anti-human IgG antibody. A good correlation was found between the level of HBsAg-containing immune complexes and the clinical state of six patients in a follow-up study. IC could be detected simultaneously with HBsAg and either decreased or disappeared before the occurrence of free anti-HBs. In the sera of an additional twenty-eight patient suffering from chronic active hepatitis, HBsAg-containing immune complexes were detected in 85% of cases. One patient suffering from polyarteritis nodosa was also positive. Occasionally, extremely high levels of IC were found in the course of these diseases. PMID:91465

  6. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen is protected from degradation by forming a complex with MutT Homolog2.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu; Cai, Jian-Ping; Tu, Bo; Wu, Lipeng; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Xiangyu; Li, Lian; McNutt, Michael A; Feng, Jingnan; He, Qihua; Yang, Yang; Wang, Haiying; Sekiguchi, Mutsuo; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2009-07-17

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) has been demonstrated to interact with multiple proteins involved in several metabolic pathways such as DNA replication and repair. However, there have been fewer reports about whether these PCNA-binding proteins influence stability of PCNA. Here, we observed a physical interaction between PCNA and MutT homolog2 (MTH2), a new member of the MutT-related proteins that hydrolyzes 8-oxo-7,8-dihydrodeoxyguanosine triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP). In several unstressed human cancer cell lines and in normal human fibroblast cells, PCNA and MTH2 formed a complex and their mutual binding fragments were confirmed. It was intriguing that PCNA and MTH2 were dissociated dependent on acetylation of PCNA, which in turn induced degradation of PCNA in response to UV irradiation, but not in response to other forms of DNA-damaging stress. To further explore the link between dissociation of PCNA-MTH2 and degradation of PCNA, RNAi against MTH2 was performed to mimic the dissociated status of PCNA to evaluate changes in the half-life of PCNA. Knockdown of MTH2 significantly promoted degradation of PCNA, suggesting that the physiological interaction of PCNA-MTH2 may confer protection from degradation for PCNA, whereas UV irradiation accelerates PCNA degradation by inducing dissociation of PCNA-MTH2. Moreover, secondary to degradation of PCNA, UV-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis or cell cycle progression was enhanced. Collectively, our data demonstrate for the first time that PCNA is protected by this newly identified partner molecule MTH2, which is related to DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression.

  7. Crystal Structure of Plasmodium knowlesi Apical Membrane Antigen 1 and Its Complex with an Invasion-Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    van der Eijk, Marjolein; Thomas, Alan W.; Singh, Balbir; Kocken, Clemens H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi, previously associated only with infection of macaques, is now known to infect humans as well and has become a significant public health problem in Southeast Asia. This species should therefore be targeted in vaccine and therapeutic strategies against human malaria. Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1), which plays a role in Plasmodium merozoite invasion of the erythrocyte, is currently being pursued in human vaccine trials against P. falciparum. Recent vaccine trials in macaques using the P. knowlesi orthologue PkAMA1 have shown that it protects against infection by this parasite species and thus should be developed for human vaccination as well. Here, we present the crystal structure of Domains 1 and 2 of the PkAMA1 ectodomain, and of its complex with the invasion-inhibitory monoclonal antibody R31C2. The Domain 2 (D2) loop, which is displaced upon binding the Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2) receptor, makes significant contacts with the antibody. R31C2 inhibits binding of the Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2) receptor by steric blocking of the hydrophobic groove and by preventing the displacement of the D2 loop which is essential for exposing the complete binding site on AMA1. R31C2 recognizes a non-polymorphic epitope and should thus be cross-strain reactive. PkAMA1 is much less polymorphic than the P. falciparum and P. vivax orthologues. Unlike these two latter species, there are no polymorphic sites close to the RON2-binding site of PkAMA1, suggesting that P. knowlesi has not developed a mechanism of immune escape from the host’s humoral response to AMA1. PMID:25886591

  8. Effects of messenger RNA structure and other translational control mechanisms on major histocompatibility complex-I mediated antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Murat, Pierre; Tellam, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Effective T-cell surveillance of antigen-presenting cells is dependent on the expression of an array of antigenic peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) or class II (MHC-II) molecules. Pathogens co-evolving with their hosts exploit crucial translational regulatory mechanisms in order to evade host immune recognition and thereby sustain their infection. Evasion strategies that downregulate viral protein synthesis and thereby restrict antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells through the endogenous MHC-I pathway have been implicated in the pathogenesis of viral-associated malignancies. An understanding of the mechanisms by which messenger RNA (mRNA) structure modulates both viral mRNA translation and the antigen processing machinery to escape immune surveillance, will stimulate the development of alternative therapeutic strategies focused on RNA-directed drugs designed to enhance immune responses against infected cells. In this review, we discuss regulatory aspects of the MHC-I pathway and summarize current knowledge of the role attributed by mRNA structure and other translational regulatory mechanisms in immune evasion. In particular we highlight the impact of recently identified G-quadruplex structures within virally encoded transcripts as unique regulatory signals for translational control and antigen presentation.

  9. Structure-based non-canonical amino acid design to covalently crosslink an antibody-antigen complex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianqing; Tack, Drew; Hughes, Randall A; Ellington, Andrew D; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2014-02-01

    Engineering antibodies to utilize non-canonical amino acids (NCAA) should greatly expand the utility of an already important biological reagent. In particular, introducing crosslinking reagents into antibody complementarity determining regions (CDRs) should provide a means to covalently crosslink residues at the antibody-antigen interface. Unfortunately, finding the optimum position for crosslinking two proteins is often a matter of iterative guessing, even when the interface is known in atomic detail. Computer-aided antibody design can potentially greatly restrict the number of variants that must be explored in order to identify successful crosslinking sites. We have therefore used Rosetta to guide the introduction of an oxidizable crosslinking NCAA, l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA), into the CDRs of the anti-protective antigen scFv antibody M18, and have measured crosslinking to its cognate antigen, domain 4 of the anthrax protective antigen. Computed crosslinking distance, solvent accessibility, and interface energetics were three factors considered that could impact the efficiency of l-DOPA-mediated crosslinking. In the end, 10 variants were synthesized, and crosslinking efficiencies were generally 10% or higher, with the best variant crosslinking to 52% of the available antigen. The results suggest that computational analysis can be used in a pipeline for engineering crosslinking antibodies. The rules learned from l-DOPA crosslinking of antibodies may also be generalizable to the formation of other crosslinked interfaces and complexes.

  10. T-cell receptor gene therapy targeting melanoma-associated antigen-A4 inhibits human tumor growth in non-obese diabetic/SCID/γcnull mice.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Yukari; Wang, Linan; Imai, Naoko; Amaike, Chisaki; Sato, Eiichi; Ito, Mamoru; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with lymphocytes that have been genetically engineered to express tumor-reactive T-cell receptors (TCR) is a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. We have been exploring the development of TCR gene therapy targeting cancer/testis antigens, including melanoma-associated antigen (MAGE) family antigens, that are ideal targets for adoptive T-cell therapy. The efficacy of TCR gene therapy targeting MAGE family antigens, however, has not yet been evaluated in vivo. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo antitumor activity in immunodeficient non-obese diabetic/SCID/γc(null) (NOG) mice of human lymphocytes genetically engineered to express TCR specific for the MAGE-A4 antigen. Polyclonal T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were transduced with the αβ TCR genes specific for MAGE-A4, then adoptively transferred into NOG mice inoculated with MAGE-A4 expressing human tumor cell lines. The transferred T cells maintained their effector function in vivo, infiltrated into tumors, and inhibited tumor growth in an antigen-specific manner. The combination of adoptive cell therapy with antigen peptide vaccination enhanced antitumor activity, with improved multifunctionality of the transferred cells. These data suggest that TCR gene therapy with MAGE-A4-specific TCR is a promising strategy to treat patients with MAGE-A4-expressing tumors; in addition, the acquisition of multifunctionality in vivo is an important factor to predict the quality of the T-cell response during adoptive therapy with human lymphocytes.

  11. Interferon gamma regulates antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the mouse airways by inhibiting the infiltration of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have previously shown that antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the tissue of sensitized mice is mediated by CD4+ T cells and interleukin 5. To determine whether interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) regulates antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the tissue, we studied the effect of recombinant (r) murine IFN-gamma and of anti-IFN- gamma monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the eosinophil infiltration of the trachea induced by antigen inhalation in mice. The intraperitoneal administration of rIFN-gamma prevented antigen-induced eosinophil infiltration in the trachea of sensitized mice. The administration of rIFN-gamma also decreased antigen-induced CD4+ T cell but not CD8+ T cell infiltration in the trachea. On the other hand, pretreatment with anti-IFN-gamma mAb enhanced antigen-induced eosinophil and CD4+ T cell infiltration in the trachea. These results indicate that IFN-gamma regulates antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the tissue by inhibiting CD4+ T cell infiltration. PMID:8093895

  12. Varying expression of major histocompatibility complex antigens on human renal endothelium and epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P. R.; Trickett, L. P.; Smith, J. L.; MacIver, A. G.; Tate, D.; Slapak, M.

    1985-01-01

    Pre-anastomosis wedge biopsies from 14 cadaveric donor kidneys were examined for the expression of class I (HLA-ABC) and class II (HLA-DR) antigens in renal tissue. Two monoclonal antibodies to class I antigens and four to class II antigens were used in an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. Consistent expression of both antigens was demonstrated on the surface of glomerular, peritubular capillary and venous endothelial cells. Renal arteries contained only class I antigens. Proximal tubules contained varying amounts of each antigen in their cytoplasm. Sixteen human lymphocytotoxic allo-antisera showed marked variation in their ability to detect HLA antigens on the kidney. The selection of donors for recipients of renal allografts involves the complement-dependent cytotoxicity test and the failure of some lymphocytotoxic antisera to bind to the kidney indicates that some suitable patients may be incorrectly excluded. The use of a binding assay using an immunoperoxidase technique should be included in cross-match techniques particularly for patients who have high levels of circulating cytotoxic antibodies. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3855644

  13. Need for tripeptidyl-peptidase II in major histocompatibility complex class I viral antigen processing when proteasomes are detrimental.

    PubMed

    Guil, Sara; Rodríguez-Castro, Marta; Aguilar, Francisco; Villasevil, Eugenia M; Antón, Luis C; Del Val, Margarita

    2006-12-29

    CD8(+) T lymphocytes recognize infected cells that display virus-derived antigenic peptides complexed with major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Peptides are mainly byproducts of cellular protein turnover by cytosolic proteasomes. Cytosolic tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) also participates in protein degradation. Several peptidic epitopes unexpectedly do not require proteasomes, but it is unclear which proteases generate them. We studied antigen processing of influenza virus nucleoprotein epitope NP(147-155), an archetype epitope that is even destroyed by a proteasome-mediated mechanism. TPPII, with the assistance of endoplasmic reticulum trimming metallo-aminopeptidases, probably ERAAP (endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing), was crucial for nucleoprotein epitope generation both in the presence of functional proteasomes and when blocked by lactacystin, as shown with specific chemical inhibitors and gene silencing. Different protein contexts and subcellular targeting all allowed epitope processing by TPPII as well as trimming. The results show the plasticity of the cell's assortment of proteases for providing ligands for recognition by antiviral CD8(+) T cells. Our observations identify for the first time a set of proteases competent for antigen processing of an epitope that is susceptible to destruction by proteasomes.

  14. Allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppress NF-κB and Ets-1 DNA binding activity, and inhibit phosphorylated NF-κB p65 nuclear localization in CD4+ T-cells.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Ryuichi; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Obata, Fumiya; Kubo, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    CD8+ T-cells of asymptomatic HIV-1 carriers (AC) suppress human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I)-restricted and -unrestricted manner. In order to investigate the mechanism of MHC-I-unrestricted CD8+ T-cell-mediated HIV-1 suppression, we previously established allo-antigen stimulated CD8+T-cells from HIV-1-uninfected donors. These allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppressed HIV-1 replication in acutely infected autologous CD4+ T-cells when directly co-cultured. To elucidate the mechanism of HIV-1 replication suppression, we analyzed DNA-binding activity and phosphorylation of transcriptional factors associated with HIV-1 replication by electrophoresis mobility shift assay and Western blotting. When CD4+ T-cells were cultured with allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells, the reduction of NF-κB and Ets-1 DNA-binding activity was observed. Nuclear localization of NF-κB p65 and Ets-1 was suppressed in CD4+ T-cells. Although NF-κB p65 and Ets-1 are known to be regulated by protein kinase A (PKA), no difference was observed in the expression and phosphorylation of the PKA catalytic subunit in CD4+ T-cells cultured with PHA-treated CD8+ T-cells or allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells. Cyclic AMP is also known to enter through gap junctions, but the suppression of HIV-1 replication mediated by allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells was not affected by the gap junction inhibitor. The nuclear transport of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (Ser276) was inhibited only in CD4+ T-cells cultured with allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells. Our results indicate that allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppress the transcriptional activity of NF-κB p65 or Ets-1 in an antigen-nonspecific manner, and inhibit the nuclear transport of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (Ser276).

  15. Pectinesterase Inhibitor from Jelly Fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) Achene Inhibits Surface Antigen Expression by Human Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chuen; Jiang, Chii-Ming; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yu-Yawn

    2013-01-01

    Pectinesterase inhibitor (PEI) isolated from jelly fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) is an edible component of a popular drink consumed in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is prevalent in Asia, and current treatments for HBV infection need improvement. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of PEI on the surface antigen expression by HBV (HBsAg). Human hepatoma cell lines Hep3B and Huh7 served as in vitro models for assessing the cytotoxicity and HBsAg expression. A culture of primary hepatocytes cultured from mice served as the normal counterpart. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay. HBsAg expression was evaluated by measuring HBsAg secretion into the culture medium using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that PEI did not affect the viability of the human hepatoma cell lines or primary mouse hepatocytes. PEI inhibited the expression of HBsAg in hepatoma cell lines harboring endogenous (Hep3B) and integrated (Huh7) HBV genomes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, thus implicating a universal activity against HBV gene expression. In conclusion, it suggests that PEI from jelly fig inhibits the expression of human HBsAg in host cells without toxic effects on normal primary hepatocytes.

  16. Investigating Substitutions in Antibody–Antigen Complexes Using Molecular Dynamics: A Case Study with Broad-spectrum, Influenza A Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lees, William D.; Stejskal, Lenka; Moss, David S.; Shepherd, Adrian J.

    2017-01-01

    In studying the binding of host antibodies to the surface antigens of pathogens, the structural and functional characterization of antibody–antigen complexes by X-ray crystallography and binding assay is important. However, the characterization requires experiments that are typically time consuming and expensive: thus, many antibody–antigen complexes are under-characterized. For vaccine development and disease surveillance, it is often vital to assess the impact of amino acid substitutions on antibody binding. For example, are there antibody substitutions capable of improving binding without a loss of breadth, or antigen substitutions that lead to antigenic escape? The questions cannot be answered reliably from sequence variation alone, exhaustive substitution assays are usually impractical, and alanine scans provide at best an incomplete identification of the critical residue–residue interactions. Here, we show that, given an initial structure of an antibody bound to an antigen, molecular dynamics simulations using the energy method molecular mechanics with Generalized Born surface area (MM/GBSA) can model the impact of single amino acid substitutions on antibody–antigen binding energy. We apply the technique to three broad-spectrum antibodies to influenza A hemagglutinin and examine both previously characterized and novel variant strains observed in the human population that may give rise to antigenic escape. We find that in some cases the impact of a substitution is local, while in others it causes a reorientation of the antibody with wide-ranging impact on residue–residue interactions: this explains, in part, why the change in chemical properties of a residue can be, on its own, a poor predictor of overall change in binding energy. Our estimates are in good agreement with experimental results—indeed, they approximate the degree of agreement between different experimental techniques. Simulations were performed on commodity computer hardware; hence

  17. Investigating Substitutions in Antibody-Antigen Complexes Using Molecular Dynamics: A Case Study with Broad-spectrum, Influenza A Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lees, William D; Stejskal, Lenka; Moss, David S; Shepherd, Adrian J

    2017-01-01

    In studying the binding of host antibodies to the surface antigens of pathogens, the structural and functional characterization of antibody-antigen complexes by X-ray crystallography and binding assay is important. However, the characterization requires experiments that are typically time consuming and expensive: thus, many antibody-antigen complexes are under-characterized. For vaccine development and disease surveillance, it is often vital to assess the impact of amino acid substitutions on antibody binding. For example, are there antibody substitutions capable of improving binding without a loss of breadth, or antigen substitutions that lead to antigenic escape? The questions cannot be answered reliably from sequence variation alone, exhaustive substitution assays are usually impractical, and alanine scans provide at best an incomplete identification of the critical residue-residue interactions. Here, we show that, given an initial structure of an antibody bound to an antigen, molecular dynamics simulations using the energy method molecular mechanics with Generalized Born surface area (MM/GBSA) can model the impact of single amino acid substitutions on antibody-antigen binding energy. We apply the technique to three broad-spectrum antibodies to influenza A hemagglutinin and examine both previously characterized and novel variant strains observed in the human population that may give rise to antigenic escape. We find that in some cases the impact of a substitution is local, while in others it causes a reorientation of the antibody with wide-ranging impact on residue-residue interactions: this explains, in part, why the change in chemical properties of a residue can be, on its own, a poor predictor of overall change in binding energy. Our estimates are in good agreement with experimental results-indeed, they approximate the degree of agreement between different experimental techniques. Simulations were performed on commodity computer hardware; hence, this approach

  18. Human hepatitis B viral e antigen and its precursor P20 inhibit T lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Purvina, Maija; Hoste, Astrid; Rossignol, Jean-Michel; Lagaudriere-Gesbert, Cecile

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer P20, precursor of the HBeAg, interacts with the cellular protein gC1qR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBeAg and P20 bind to T cell surface and inhibit mitogen-induced T cell division. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBeAg and P20 inhibition of T cell proliferation is gC1qR and IL-1RAcP-independent. -- Abstract: The hepatitis B virus (HBV) Precore protein is processed through the secretory pathway directly as HBeAg or with the generation of an intermediate (P20). Precore gene has been shown to be implicated in viral persistence, but the functions of HBeAg and its precursors have not been fully elucidated. We show that the secreted proteins HBeAg and P20 interact with T cell surface and alter Kit-225 and primary T cells proliferation, a process which may facilitate the establishment of HBV persistence. Our data indicate that the N-terminal end of Precore is important for these inhibitory effects and exclude that they are dependent on the association of HBeAg and P20 with two characterized cell surface ligands, the Interleukin-1 Receptor Accessory Protein and gC1qR (present study).

  19. Initial HIV-1 antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in acute HIV-1 infection inhibit transmitted/founder virus replication.

    PubMed

    Freel, Stephanie A; Picking, Ralph A; Ferrari, Guido; Ding, Haitao; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Kirchherr, Jennifer L; Soderberg, Kelly A; Weinhold, Kent J; Cunningham, Coleen K; Denny, Thomas N; Crump, John A; Cohen, Myron S; McMichael, Andrew J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2012-06-01

    CD8-mediated virus inhibition can be detected in HIV-1-positive subjects who naturally control virus replication. Characterizing the inhibitory function of CD8(+) T cells during acute HIV-1 infection (AHI) can elucidate the nature of the CD8(+) responses that can be rapidly elicited and that contribute to virus control. We examined the timing and HIV-1 antigen specificity of antiviral CD8(+) T cells during AHI. Autologous and heterologous CD8(+) T cell antiviral functions were assessed longitudinally during AHI in five donors from the CHAVI 001 cohort using a CD8(+) T cell-mediated virus inhibition assay (CD8 VIA) and transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses. Potent CD8(+) antiviral responses against heterologous T/F viruses appeared during AHI at the first time point sampled in each of the 5 donors (Fiebig stages 1/2 to 5). Inhibition of an autologous T/F virus was durable to 48 weeks; however, inhibition of heterologous responses declined concurrent with the resolution of viremia. HIV-1 viruses from 6 months postinfection were more resistant to CD8(+)-mediated virus inhibition than cognate T/F viruses, demonstrating that the virus escapes early from CD8(+) T cell-mediated inhibition of virus replication. CD8(+) T cell antigen-specific subsets mediated inhibition of T/F virus replication via soluble components, and these soluble responses were stimulated by peptide pools that include epitopes that were shown to drive HIV-1 escape during AHI. These data provide insights into the mechanisms of CD8-mediated virus inhibition and suggest that functional analyses will be important for determining whether similar antigen-specific virus inhibition can be induced by T cell-directed vaccine strategies.

  20. Circulating immune complexes of Hodgkin's disease contain an antigen that is present in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells.

    PubMed

    Bepler, G; Zhen, Q Y; Havemann, K

    1985-01-01

    Circulating immune complexes (CIC), isolated from the serum of a patient with Hodgkin's disease (HD) and from control serum (CS) of healthy adults, were used to generate heterologous antisera in rabbits. The antiserum directed against CIC from HD (AS-HD) and the antiserum directed against CIC from CS (AS-CS) were used to identify immunoglobulins, complement factors and alpha2-macroglobulin as immune complex components. After adsorbing both antisera with normal human sera, we found that the adsorbed AS-HD was immunoreactive with radio-labelled CIC from HD serum but not with radiolabelled CIC from CS. Sera of patients with different diseases and sera of healthy adults were assessed for the occurrence of this Hodgkin immune complex-associated antigen (HIC-Ag). The HIC-Ag was present in 37% (12/33) of sera from patients with HD, 8% (8/101) of sera from patients with nonmalignant diseases, and 0% (0/6) of sera from healthy adults. This antigen was equally distributed among HD patients with and without symptoms, but its occurrence correlated with an advanced clinical stage of the disease. Using the adsorbed AS-HD in the immunoperoxidase technique, we identified the HIC-Ag as a cytoplasmic antigen in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells; whereas, the adsorbed AS-CS did not reveal any staining. These data indicate the presence of an HIC-Ag in the sera of patients with HD and suggest that the adsorbed AS-HD might be useful for isolation and characterization of this antigen for future use as a tumour marker.

  1. The EBV Latent Antigen 3C Inhibits Apoptosis through Targeted Regulation of Interferon Regulatory Factors 4 and 8

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Lu, Jie; Cai, Qiliang; Saha, Abhik; Jha, Hem Chandra; Dzeng, Richard Kuo; Robertson, Erle S.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is linked to a broad spectrum of B-cell malignancies. EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is an encoded latent antigen required for growth transformation of primary human B-lymphocytes. Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) and 8 (IRF8) are transcription factors of the IRF family that regulate diverse functions in B cell development. IRF4 is an oncoprotein with anti-apoptotic properties and IRF8 functions as a regulator of apoptosis and tumor suppressor in many hematopoietic malignancies. We now demonstrate that EBNA3C can contribute to B-cell transformation by modulating the molecular interplay between cellular IRF4 and IRF8. We show that EBNA3C physically interacts with IRF4 and IRF8 with its N-terminal domain in vitro and forms a molecular complex in cells. We identified the Spi-1/B motif of IRF4 as critical for EBNA3C interaction. We also demonstrated that EBNA3C can stabilize IRF4, which leads to downregulation of IRF8 by enhancing its proteasome-mediated degradation. Further, si-RNA mediated knock-down of endogenous IRF4 results in a substantial reduction in proliferation of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), as well as augmentation of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. IRF4 knockdown also showed reduced expression of its targeted downstream signalling proteins which include CDK6, Cyclin B1 and c-Myc all critical for cell proliferation. These studies provide novel insights into the contribution of EBNA3C to EBV-mediated B-cell transformation through regulation of IRF4 and IRF8 and add another molecular link to the mechanisms by which EBV dysregulates cellular activities, increasing the potential for therapeutic intervention against EBV-associated cancers. PMID:23658517

  2. Immunoblot analysis for serodiagnosis of tuberculosis using a 45/47-kilodalton antigen complex of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Diagbouga, S; Fumoux, F; Zoubga, A; Sanou, P T; Marchal, G

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response to the 45/47-kDa secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by immunoblot assay, to assess its potential value for serological diagnosis. Control subjects consisted of healthy volunteers with negative or positive tuberculin skin tests. Most (>98%) scored negative in an immunoblot test when the sera were analyzed at a 1:400 dilution. Approximately 40% of sera (diluted 1 in 400) from tuberculous patients (positive smears) recognized the antigen complex. The sensitivity of the test for patients suffering from extrapulmonary tuberculosis was similar to that for patients suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis but who had negative smears. The frequency of positive reactions among the patients suffering from other pulmonary diseases was similar to that among the control subjects. In tuberculous patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, the sensitivity of the immunoblot test was significantly lower. Thus, this test based on an antigen complex used in an immunoblot assay to detect the presence of IgG antibody has a specificity of 98% and a sensitivity of 40%. The simultaneous use of different purified antigens, selected at the same high specificity level, may improve the sensitivity of such an assay. PMID:9144373

  3. Peculiarities of latent inhibition formation in SHR rats in conditioned task of different complexity.

    PubMed

    Kostyunina, N V; Loskutova, L V

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of attention to irrelevant stimuli was studied in SHR rats using latent inhibition test. Latent inhibition was formed in two types of conditioned tasks with different levels of complexity and stress. Passive and active avoidance conditioning was preceded by preexposure to conditioned stimulus consisting of 20 and 100 non-reinforced presentations, respectively. Control Wistar rats demonstrated successful formation of latent inhibition in both tasks. SHR rats showed different degree of disruption of latent inhibition depending on the type of behavioral task. We assume that learning defect in these animals in respect to both novel and preexposed conditioned stimuli is associated with the lack of behavioral inhibition.

  4. Up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II antigen expression in the central nervous system of dogs with spontaneous canine distemper virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Alldinger, S; Wünschmann, A; Baumgärtner, W; Voss, C; Kremmer, E

    1996-09-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) and canine distemper virus (CDV) antigen expression were compared by immunohistochemistry in the cerebellar white matter of ten dogs with naturally occurring canine distemper encephalitis. In addition, infiltrating mononuclear cells were characterized by employing poly- and monoclonal antibodies directed against human CD3, canine MHC II, CD5, B cell antigen and CDV-specific nucleoprotein. Positive antigen-antibody reaction was visualized by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method on frozen sections. Histologically, neuropathological changes were categorized into acute, subacute, and chronic. In control brains, MHC II expression was weak and predominantly detected on resident microglia of the white matter and on endothelial, perivascular and intravascular cells. In CDV antigen-positive brains, MHC II was mainly found on microglia and to a lesser extent on endothelial, meningeal, choroid plexus epithelial, ependymal and intravascular cells. In addition, virtually all of the perivascular cells expressed MHC II antigen. CDV antigen was demonstrated most frequently in astrocytes. Of the perivascular lymphocytes, the majority were CD3-positive cells, followed by B cells. Only a small proportion of perivascular cells expressed the CD5 antigen. In addition, B cells and CD3 and CD5 antigen-positive cells were found occasionally in subacute and frequently in chronic demyelinating plaques. In acute encephalitis, CDV antigen exhibited a multifocal or diffuse distribution, and MHC II was moderately up-regulated throughout the white matter and accentuated in CDV antigen-positive plaques. In subacute encephalitis, moderate multifocal CDV antigen and moderate to strong diffuse MHC II-specific staining, especially prominent in CDV antigen-positive lesions, were observed. In chronic encephalitis, CDV antigen expression was restricted to single astrocytes at the edge of the lesions or was absent, while MHC II expression

  5. The unravelling of the complex pattern of tyrosinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Deri, Batel; Kanteev, Margarita; Goldfeder, Mor; Lecina, Daniel; Guallar, Victor; Adir, Noam; Fishman, Ayelet

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosinases are responsible for melanin formation in all life domains. Tyrosinase inhibitors are used for the prevention of severe skin diseases, in skin-whitening creams and to avoid fruit browning, however continued use of many such inhibitors is considered unsafe. In this study we provide conclusive evidence of the inhibition mechanism of two well studied tyrosinase inhibitors, KA (kojic acid) and HQ (hydroquinone), which are extensively used in hyperpigmentation treatment. KA is reported in the literature with contradicting inhibition mechanisms, while HQ is described as both a tyrosinase inhibitor and a substrate. By visualization of KA and HQ in the active site of TyrBm crystals, together with molecular modeling, binding constant analysis and kinetic experiments, we have elucidated their mechanisms of inhibition, which was ambiguous for both inhibitors. We confirm that while KA acts as a mixed inhibitor, HQ can act both as a TyrBm substrate and as an inhibitor. PMID:27725765

  6. Resveratrol Suppresses Cytokine Production Linked to FcεRI-MAPK Activation in IgE-Antigen Complex-Exposed Basophilic Mast Cells and Mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Seon-Young; Choi, Yean-Jung; Kang, Min-Kyung; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    A complicated interplay between resident mast cells and other recruited inflammatory cells contributes to the development and progression of allergic inflammation entailing the promotion of T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine responses. The current study examined whether resveratrol suppressed the production of inflammatory Th2 cytokines in cultured rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells. Cells pre-treated with resveratrol nontoxic at 1–25 μM were sensitized with anti-dinitrophenyl (anti-DNP), and subsequently stimulated by dinitrophenyl-human serum albumin (DNP–HSA) antigen. Resveratrol dose-dependently diminished the secretion of interleukin (IL)-3, IL-4, IL-13 as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α by the antigen stimulation from sensitized cells. It was found that resveratrol mitigated the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, and JNK elevated in mast cells exposed to Fc epsilon receptor I (FcεRI)-mediated immunoglobulin E (IgE)-antigen complex. The FcεRI aggregation was highly enhanced on the surface of mast cells following the HSA stimulation, which was retarded by treatment with 1–25 μM resveratrol. The IgE-receptor engagement rapidly induced tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Src-related focal adhesion protein paxillin involved in the cytoskeleton rearrangement. The FcεRI-mediated rapid activation of c-Src and paxillin was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the paxillin activation entailed p38 MAPK and ERK-responsive signaling, but the JNK activation was less involved. Consistently, oral administration of resveratrol reduced the tissue level of phosphorylated paxillin in the dorsal skin of DNP–HSA-challenged mice. The other tyrosine kinase Tyk2-STAT1 signaling was activated in the dorsal epidermis of antigen-exposed mice, which was associated with allergic inflammation. These results showed that resveratrol inhibited Th2 cytokines- and paxillin-linked allergic responses dependent upon MAPK signaling. Therefore, resveratrol may possess the

  7. Influence of the electric charge of the antigen and the immune complex (IC) lattice on the IC activation of human complement

    PubMed Central

    Michelin, M A; Crott, L S P; Assis-pandochi, A I; Coimbra, T M; Teixeira, J E; Barbosa, J E

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanism of complement (C) activation by immune complexes (ICs), the anti-complementary effect of ICs containing cationized antigens was compared in vitro to that using ICs formed by native antigens. ICs were prepared with affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal IgG antibovine serum albumin (BSA) antibody and either native BSA (isoelectric point 4.2) or BSA rendered cationic by treatment with ethylenediamine (isoelectric point 9.4). Native and cationized antigens were characterized by isoelectric focusing. ICs containing anti-BSA IgG or F(ab′)2, formed either at equivalence or in excess of native or cationized antigen, were submitted to ultracentrifugation in a sucrose gradient for mesh size determination. The anti-complementary effect of ICs was evaluated by kinetic determination of haemolytic activity of human serum on haemolysin-sensitized sheep red blood cells. In conditions of antigen excess, the ICs formed by cationized BSA were significantly more efficient in activating human complement than those formed by native antigen. This higher activity was dependent on cationized antigen complexed with complete antibody molecules, as non-complexed cationized BSA or ICs prepared with F(ab′)2 fragments were inactive under the same experimental conditions. Furthermore, this difference did not depend on the mesh size of the immune complexes. Our results suggest that the balance between antigen, antibody and C may be of importance in vivo for the onset and course of infections and other pathological processes involving IC formation. ICs containing cationized antigens should be proven of value in experimental models for studies on the regulation of C activation. PMID:12084047

  8. The production of lymphocyte mitogenic factor and migration–inhibition factor by antigen-stimulated lymphocytes of subjects with grass pollen allergy

    PubMed Central

    Maini, R. N.; Dumonde, D. C.; Faux, J. A.; Hargreave, F. E.; Pepys, J.

    1971-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes of twenty-three subjects with grass pollen allergy were cultured with grass pollen antigen for 3 days. After harvesting, the culture supernatants were added to fresh autologous lymphocytes which were maintained in culture for 6 days. Cellular uptake of [3H]thymidine was measured during the sixth day of culture, and revealed that the lymphocyte culture supernatants stimulated greater thymidine uptake than expected from the lymphocyte transformation response to corresponding amounts of antigen. The supernatant factor which mediated this effect was termed `lymphocyte mitogenic factor' by analogy with a similar response of lymphocytes in clinical and experimental delayed hypersensitivity. Lymphocyte culture supernatants were also tested for migration–inhibition factor by their ability to inhibit the migration of guinea-pig macrophages. The majority of `allergic' supernatants contained a lymphocyte mitogenic factor active at 1/3 dilution (14/22) and 1/12 dilution (19/21) in contrast to supernatants derived from non-allergic subjects (2/16 and 1/17 respectively). The production of lymphocyte mitogenic factor corresponded to the occurrence of antigen-induced lymphocyte transformation (allergic: 18/22; non-allergic: 1/14); but only a minority of allergic supernatants contained a migration–inhibition factor (6/20). Clinical analysis revealed that migration–inhibition factor was particularly associated with the milder forms of allergy and with a past history of desensitization by depot injection of emulsified pollen antigen. In contrast, lymphocyte transformation and the production of mitogenic factor were uniformly distributed among the various categories of allergic subjects, all of whom had immediate (reaginic) hypersensitivity, but only three of whom had delayed hypersensitivity. The demonstration of lymphocyte mitogenic factor in a clinical state dominated by immediate hypersensitivity supported the view that antigen

  9. Structures of synthetic O-antigen fragments from serotype 2a Shigella flexneri in complex with a protective monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Vulliez-Le Normand, B.; Saul, F. A.; Phalipon, A.; Bélot, F.; Guerreiro, C.; Mulard, L. A.; Bentley, G. A.

    2008-01-01

    The anti-LPS IgG mAb F22-4, raised against Shigella flexneri serotype 2a bacteria, protects against homologous, but not heterologous, challenge in an experimental animal model. We report the crystal structures of complexes formed between Fab F22-4 and two synthetic oligosaccharides, a decasaccharide and a pentadecasaccharide that were previously shown to be both immunogenic and antigenic mimics of the S. flexneri serotype 2a O-antigen. F22-4 binds to an epitope contained within two consecutive 2a serotype pentasaccharide repeat units (RU). Six sugar residues from a contiguous nine-residue segment make direct contacts with the antibody, including the nonreducing rhamnose and both branching glucosyl residues from the two RUs. The glucosyl residue, whose position of attachment to the tetrasaccharide backbone of the RU defines the serotype 2a O-antigen, is critical for recognition by F22-4. Although the complete decasaccharide is visible in the electron density maps, the last four pentadecasaccharide residues from the reducing end, which do not contact the antibody, could not be traced. Although considerable mobility in the free oligosaccharides can thus be expected, the conformational similarity between the individual RUs, both within and between the two complexes, suggests that short-range transient ordering to a helical conformation might occur in solution. Although the observed epitope includes the terminal nonreducing residue, binding to internal epitopes within the polysaccharide chain is not precluded. Our results have implications for vaccine development because they suggest that a minimum of two RUs of synthetic serotype 2a oligosaccharide is required for optimal mimicry of O-Ag epitopes. PMID:18621718

  10. Successive Administration of Streptococcus Type 5 Group A Antigens and S. typhimurium Antigenic Complex Corrects Elevation of Serum Cytokine Concentration and Number of Bone Marrow Stromal Pluripotent Cells in CBA Mice Induced by Each Antigen Separately.

    PubMed

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Danilova, T A; Grabko, V I; Nesterenko, V G

    2015-12-01

    Administration of bacterial antigens to CBA mice induced an increase in serum concentration of virtually all cytokines with a peak in 4 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens and in 7 h after administration of streptococcus antigens. In 20 h, cytokine concentrations returned to the control level or were slightly below it. In 4 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens preceded 3 h before by administration of streptococcus antigens, we observed a significant decrease in serum concentrations of IFN-γ, IL-10, GM-CSF, IL-12, and TNF-α, in comparison with injection S. typhimurium antigens alone and IL-5, IL-10, GM-CSF, and TNF-α in comparison with injection of streptococcus antigens alone; the concentrations of IL-2 and IFN-γ, in contrast, increased by 1.5 times in this case. In 20 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens, the number of multipotential stromal cells (MSC) in the bone marrow and their cloning efficiency (ECF-MSC) increased by 4.8 and 4.4 times, respectively, in comparison with the control, while after administration of streptococcus antigens by 2.6 and 2.4 times, respectively. In 20 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens preceded 3 h before by administration of streptococcus antigens, these parameters increased by 3.2 and 2.9 times, respectively, in comparison with the control, i.e. the observed increase in the level of MSC count and ECF-MSC is more consistent with the response of the stromal tissue to streptococcus antigens. Thus, successive administration of two bacterial antigens corrected both serum cytokine profiles and MSC response to administration of each antigen separately, which indicates changeability of the stromal tissue in response to changes in the immune response.

  11. Antigen nature and complexity influence human antibody light chain usage and specificity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth; Shah, Hemangi; Muther, Jennifer J; Duke, Angie L; Haley, Kathleen; James, Judith A

    2016-05-27

    Human antibodies consist of a heavy chain and one of two possible light chains, kappa (κ) or lambda (λ). Here we tested how these two possible light chains influence the overall antibody response to polysaccharide and protein antigens by measuring light chain usage in human monoclonal antibodies from antibody secreting cells obtained following vaccination with Pneumovax23. Remarkably, we found that individuals displayed restricted light chain usage to certain serotypes and that lambda antibodies have different specificities and modes of cross-reactivity than kappa antibodies. Thus, at both the monoclonal (7 kappa, no lambda) and serum levels (145μg/mL kappa, 2.82μg/mL lambda), antibodies to cell wall polysaccharide were nearly always kappa. The pneumococcal reference serum 007sp was analyzed for light chain usage to 12 pneumococcal serotypes for which it is well characterized. Similar to results at the monoclonal level, certain serotypes tended to favor one of the light chains (14 and 19A, lambda; 6A and 23F, kappa). We also explored differences in light chain usage at the serum level to a variety of antigens. We examined serum antibodies to diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 and Epstein-Barr virus protein EBNA-1. These responses tended to be kappa dominant (average kappa-to-lambda ratios of 4.52 and 9.72 respectively). Responses to the influenza vaccine were more balanced with kappa-to-lambda ratio averages having slight strain variations: seasonal H1N1, 1.1; H3N2, 0.96; B, 0.91. We conclude that antigens with limited epitopes tend to produce antibodies with restricted light chain usage and that in most individuals, antibodies with lambda light chains have specificities different and complementary to kappa-containing antibodies.

  12. Synthetic antigens reveal dynamics of BCR endocytosis during inhibitory signaling.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Adam H; Bennett, Nitasha R; Zwick, Daniel B; Hudon, Jonathan; Kiessling, Laura L

    2014-01-17

    B cells detect foreign antigens through their B cell antigen receptor (BCR). The BCR, when engaged by antigen, initiates a signaling cascade. Concurrent with signaling is endocytosis of the BCR complex, which acts to downregulate signaling and facilitate uptake of antigen for processing and display on the cell surface. The relationship between signaling and BCR endocytosis is poorly defined. Here, we explore the interplay between BCR endocytosis and antigens that either promote or inhibit B cell activation. Specifically, synthetic antigens were generated that engage the BCR alone or both the BCR and the inhibitory co-receptor CD22. The lectin CD22, a member of the Siglec family, binds sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates found on host tissues, inhibiting BCR signaling to prevent erroneous B cell activation. At low concentrations, antigens that can cocluster the BCR and CD22 promote rapid BCR endocytosis; whereas, slower endocytosis occurs with antigens that bind only the BCR. At higher antigen concentrations, rapid BCR endocytosis occurs upon treatment with either stimulatory or inhibitory antigens. Endocytosis of the BCR, in response to synthetic antigens, results in its entry into early endocytic compartments. Although the CD22-binding antigens fail to activate key regulators of antigen presentation (e.g., Syk), they also promote BCR endocytosis, indicating that inhibitory antigens can be internalized. Together, our observations support a functional role for BCR endocytosis in downregulating BCR signaling. The reduction of cell surface BCR levels in the absence of B cell activation should raise the threshold for BCR subsequent activation. The ability of the activating synthetic antigens to trigger both signaling and entry of the BCR into early endosomes suggests strategies for targeted antigen delivery.

  13. Tumor antigens as related to pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chu, T M; Holyoke, E D; Douglass, H O

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented suggesting the presence of pancreas tumor-associated antigens. Slow progress has been made during the past few years in the identification of pancreatic tumor antigens that may be of clinical usefulness and it seems unlikely that many of the practical problems now being faced in identification and isolation of these antigens and in development of a specific, sensitive assay will be solved by conventional immunochemical approaches. The study of antigen and/or antibody purified from immune complexes in the host and the application of leukocyte adherence inhibition techniques to immunodiagnosis of pancreatic cancer are among the new approaches that may provide effective alternatives in the study of pancreatic tumor antigens.

  14. Structure of a Major Antigenic Site on the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in Complex with Neutralizing Antibody 101F

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Chang, Jung-San; Yang, Yongping; Kim, Albert; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-11-19

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and elderly people. Currently there is no effective vaccine against RSV, but passive prophylaxis with neutralizing antibodies reduces hospitalizations. To investigate the mechanism of antibody-mediated RSV neutralization, we undertook structure-function studies of monoclonal antibody 101F, which binds a linear epitope in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Crystal structures of the 101F antigen-binding fragment in complex with peptides from the fusion glycoprotein defined both the extent of the linear epitope and the interactions of residues that are mutated in antibody escape variants. The structure allowed for modeling of 101F in complex with trimers of the fusion glycoprotein, and the resulting models suggested that 101F may contact additional surfaces located outside the linear epitope. This hypothesis was supported by surface plasmon resonance experiments that demonstrated 101F bound the peptide epitope {approx}16,000-fold more weakly than the fusion glycoprotein. The modeling also showed no substantial clashes between 101F and the fusion glycoprotein in either the pre- or postfusion state, and cell-based assays indicated that 101F neutralization was not associated with blocking virus attachment. Collectively, these results provide a structural basis for RSV neutralization by antibodies that target a major antigenic site on the fusion glycoprotein.

  15. Structure of the malaria vaccine candidate antigen CyRPA and its complex with a parasite invasion inhibitory antibody.

    PubMed

    Favuzza, Paola; Guffart, Elena; Tamborrini, Marco; Scherer, Bianca; Dreyer, Anita M; Rufer, Arne C; Erny, Johannes; Hoernschemeyer, Joerg; Thoma, Ralf; Schmid, Georg; Gsell, Bernard; Lamelas, Araceli; Benz, Joerg; Joseph, Catherine; Matile, Hugues; Pluschke, Gerd; Rudolph, Markus G

    2017-02-14

    Invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodial merozoites is a composite process involving the interplay of several proteins. Among them, the Plasmodium falciparum Cysteine-Rich Protective Antigen (PfCyRPA) is a crucial component of a ternary complex, including Reticulocyte binding-like Homologous protein 5 (PfRH5) and the RH5-interacting protein (PfRipr), essential for erythrocyte invasion. Here we present the crystal structure of PfCyRPA and of its complex with the antigen-binding fragment of a parasite growth inhibitory antibody. While PfCyRPA adopts a 6-bladed β-propeller structure with similarity to the classic sialidase fold, it possesses no sialidase activity, indicating that it fulfills a non-enzymatic function. Characterization of the epitope recognized by protective antibodies will facilitate design of peptidomimetics that focus vaccine responses on protective epitopes. Both in vitro and in vivo anti-PfCyRPA and anti-PfRH5 antibodies showed more potent parasite growth inhibitory activity in combination than on their own, supporting a combined delivery of PfCyRPA and PfRH5 in vaccines.

  16. Structure of the malaria vaccine candidate antigen CyRPA and its complex with a parasite invasion inhibitory antibody

    PubMed Central

    Favuzza, Paola; Guffart, Elena; Tamborrini, Marco; Scherer, Bianca; Dreyer, Anita M; Rufer, Arne C; Erny, Johannes; Hoernschemeyer, Joerg; Thoma, Ralf; Schmid, Georg; Gsell, Bernard; Lamelas, Araceli; Benz, Joerg; Joseph, Catherine; Matile, Hugues; Pluschke, Gerd; Rudolph, Markus G

    2017-01-01

    Invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodial merozoites is a composite process involving the interplay of several proteins. Among them, the Plasmodium falciparum Cysteine-Rich Protective Antigen (PfCyRPA) is a crucial component of a ternary complex, including Reticulocyte binding-like Homologous protein 5 (PfRH5) and the RH5-interacting protein (PfRipr), essential for erythrocyte invasion. Here, we present the crystal structures of PfCyRPA and its complex with the antigen-binding fragment of a parasite growth inhibitory antibody. PfCyRPA adopts a 6-bladed β-propeller structure with similarity to the classic sialidase fold, but it has no sialidase activity and fulfills a purely non-enzymatic function. Characterization of the epitope recognized by protective antibodies may facilitate design of peptidomimetics to focus vaccine responses on protective epitopes. Both in vitro and in vivo anti-PfCyRPA and anti-PfRH5 antibodies showed more potent parasite growth inhibitory activity in combination than on their own, supporting a combined delivery of PfCyRPA and PfRH5 in vaccines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20383.001 PMID:28195038

  17. T-cell diversification reflects antigen selection in the blood of patients on immune checkpoint inhibition and may be exploited as liquid biopsy biomarker.

    PubMed

    Akyüz, Nuray; Brandt, Anna; Stein, Alexander; Schliffke, Simon; Mährle, Thorben; Quidde, Julia; Goekkurt, Eray; Loges, Sonja; Haalck, Thomas; Thomas Ford, Christopher; Asemissen, Anne Marie; Thiele, Benjamin; Radloff, Janina; Thenhausen, Toni; Krohn-Grimberghe, Artus; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Binder, Mascha

    2016-12-07

    Cancer immunotherapy with antibodies targeting immune checkpoints, such as programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), shows encouraging results, but reliable biomarkers predicting response to this costly and potentially toxic treatment approach are still lacking. To explore an immune signature predictive for response, we performed liquid biopsy immunoprofiling in 18 cancer patients undergoing PD-1 inhibition before and shortly after initiation of treatment by multicolor flow cytometry and next-generation T- and B-cell immunosequencing (TCRß/IGH). Findings were correlated with clinical outcomes. We found almost complete saturation of surface PD-1 on all T-cell subsets after the first dose of the antibody. Both T- and B-cell compartments quantitatively expanded during treatment. These expansions were mainly driven by an increase in the activated T-cell compartments, as well as of naïve B- and plasma cells. Deep immunosequencing revealed a clear diversification pattern of the clonal T-cell space indicative of antigenic selection in 47% of patients, while the remaining patients showed stable repertoires. 43% of the patients with a diversification pattern showed disease control in response to the PD-1 inhibitor. No disease stabilizations were observed without clonal T-cell space diversification. Our data show for the first time a clear impact of PD-1 targeting not only on circulating T-cells, but also on B-lineage cells, shedding light on the complexity of the anti-tumor immune response. Liquid biopsy T-cell next-generation immunosequencing should be prospectively evaluated as part of a composite response prediction biomarker panel in the context of clinical studies.

  18. Immune Responses to Tissue-Restricted Nonmajor Histocompatibility Complex Antigens in Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Ankit

    2017-01-01

    Chronic diseases that result in end-stage organ damage cause inflammation, which can reveal sequestered self-antigens (SAgs) in that organ and trigger autoimmunity. The thymus gland deletes self-reactive T-cells against ubiquitously expressed SAgs, while regulatory mechanisms in the periphery control immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs. It is now established that T-cells reactive to SAgs present in certain organs (e.g., lungs, pancreas, and intestine) are incompletely eliminated, and the dysregulation of peripheral immuneregulation can generate immune responses to SAgs. Therefore, chronic diseases can activate self-reactive lymphocytes, inducing tissue-restricted autoimmunity. During organ transplantation, donor lymphocytes are tested against recipient serum (i.e., cross-matching) to detect antibodies (Abs) against donor human leukocyte antigens, which has been shown to reduce Ab-mediated hyperacute rejection. However, primary allograft dysfunction and rejection still occur frequently. Because donor lymphocytes do not express tissue-restricted SAgs, preexisting Abs against SAgs are undetectable during conventional cross-matching. Preexisting and de novo immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs (i.e., autoimmunity) play a major role in rejection. In this review, we discuss the evidence that supports autoimmunity as a contributor to rejection. Testing for preexisting and de novo immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs and treatment based on immune responses after organ transplantation may improve short- and long-term outcomes after transplantation. PMID:28164137

  19. Loss of T Cell Antigen Recognition Arising from Changes in Peptide and Major Histocompatibility Complex Protein Flexibility: Implications for Vaccine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Insaidoo, Francis K.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Hossain, Moushumi; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Baker, Brian M.

    2012-05-08

    Modification of the primary anchor positions of antigenic peptides to improve binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is a commonly used strategy for engineering peptide-based vaccine candidates. However, such peptide modifications do not always improve antigenicity, complicating efforts to design effective vaccines for cancer and infectious disease. Here we investigated the MART-1{sub 27-35} tumor antigen, for which anchor modification (replacement of the position two alanine with leucine) dramatically reduces or ablates antigenicity with a wide range of T cell clones despite significantly improving peptide binding to MHC. We found that anchor modification in the MART-1{sub 27-35} antigen enhances the flexibility of both the peptide and the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Although the resulting entropic effects contribute to the improved binding of the peptide to MHC, they also negatively impact T cell receptor binding to the peptide {center_dot} MHC complex. These results help explain how the 'anchor-fixing' strategy fails to improve antigenicity in this case, and more generally, may be relevant for understanding the high specificity characteristic of the T cell repertoire. In addition to impacting vaccine design, modulation of peptide and MHC flexibility through changes to antigenic peptides may present an evolutionary strategy for the escape of pathogens from immune destruction.

  20. Preparation and diagnostic utility of a hemagglutination inhibition test antigen derived from the baculovirus-expressed hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein gene of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kang-Seuk; Kye, Soo-Jeong; Jeon, Woo-Jin; Park, Mi-Ja; Kim, Saeromi; Seul, Hee-Jung; Kwon, Jun-Hun

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (rHN) protein from Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with hemagglutination (HA) activity was expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda cells using a baculovirus expression system. The rHN protein extracted from infected cells was used as an antigen in a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test for the detection and titration of NDV-specific antibodies present in chicken sera. The rHN antigen produced high HA titers of 2(13) per 25 μL, which were similar to those of the NDV antigen produced using chicken eggs, and it remained stable without significant loss of the HA activity for at least 12 weeks at 4°C. The rHN-based HI assay specifically detected NDV antibodies, but not the sera of other avian pathogens, with a specificity and sensitivity of 100% and 98.0%, respectively, in known positive and negative chicken sera (n = 430). Compared with an NDV-based HI assay, the rHN-based HI assay had a relative sensitivity and specificity of 96.1% and 95.5%, respectively, when applied to field chicken sera. The HI titers of the rHN-based HI assay were highly correlated with those in an NDV-based HI assay (r = 0.927). Overall, these results indicate that rHN protein provides a useful alternative to NDV antigen in HI assays.

  1. Suppression of phospholipase Cγ1 phosphorylation by cinnamaldehyde inhibits antigen-induced extracellular calcium influx and degranulation in mucosal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kageyama-Yahara, Natsuko; Wang, Xiaoyu; Katagiri, Tatsuo; Wang, Ping; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Tominaga, Makoto; Kadowaki, Makoto

    2011-12-16

    Antigen-IgE-mediated mucosal mast-cell activation is critical in the development of food allergies. Cinnamaldehyde, a major constituent of Cinnamomi cortex, dose-dependently inhibited the antigen-IgE-induced degranulation of mucosal-type bone-marrow derived mast cells (mBMMCs) and RBL-2H3 cells. Cinnamaldehyde also suppressed the elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) level that is induced by the extracellular Ca(2+) influx in antigen-IgE-stimulated mBMMCs. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC) γ1, which is a crucial activation switch for the intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in mast cells, was attenuated by cinnamaldehyde. Together, our results demonstrated that cinnamaldehyde suppressed the intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and the degranulation of mucosal mast cells by inhibiting the activity of the IgE receptor-PLCγ-Ca(2+) influx pathway. These findings suggest that cinnamaldehyde may have therapeutic potential in mucosal mast cell-related allergic diseases, such as food allergies.

  2. Human Articular Chondrocytes Regulate Immune Response by Affecting Directly T Cell Proliferation and Indirectly Inhibiting Monocyte Differentiation to Professional Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rui C.; Martinelli, Daniela; Cancedda, Ranieri; Gentili, Chiara; Poggi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard cell therapy for cartilage lesions. However, in some instances, the heavily compromised health of the patient can either impair or limit the recovery of the autologous chondrocytes and a satisfactory outcome of the implant. Allogeneic human articular chondrocytes (hAC) could be a good alternative, but the possible immunological incompatibility between recipient and hAC donor should be considered. Herein, we report that allogeneic hAC inhibited T lymphocyte response to antigen-dependent and -independent proliferative stimuli. This effect was maximal when T cells and hAC were in contact and it was not relieved by the addition of exogenous lymphocyte growth factor interleukin (IL)-2. More important, hAC impaired the differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes induced with granulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-4 (Mo) to professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Indeed, a marked inhibition of the onset of the CD1a expression and an ineffective downregulation of CD14 antigens was observed in Mo–hAC co-cultures. Furthermore, compared to immature or mature DC, Mo from Mo–hAC co-cultures did not trigger an efficacious allo-response. The prostaglandin (PG) E2 present in the Mo–hAC co-culture conditioned media is a putative candidate of the hAC-mediated inhibition of Mo maturation. Altogether, these findings indicate that allogeneic hAC inhibit, rather than trigger, immune response and strongly suggest that an efficient chondrocyte implantation could be possible also in an allogeneic setting. PMID:27822208

  3. Inhibition of dopamine receptor D3 signaling in dendritic cells increases antigen cross-presentation to CD8(+) T-cells favoring anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Claudio; Gálvez-Cancino, Felipe; Oyarce, Cesar; Contreras, Francisco; Prado, Carolina; Valeria, Catalina; Cruz, Sebastián; Lladser, Alvaro; Pacheco, Rodrigo

    2017-02-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) display the unique ability for cross-presenting antigens to CD8(+) T-cells, promoting their differentiation into cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs), which play a pivotal role in anti-tumor immunity. Emerging evidence points to dopamine receptor D3 (D3R) as a key regulator of immunity. Accordingly, we studied how D3R regulates DCs function in anti-tumor immunity. The results show that D3R-deficiency in DCs enhanced expansion of CTLs in vivo and induced stronger anti-tumor immunity. Co-culture experiments indicated that D3R-inhibition in DCs potentiated antigen cross-presentation and CTLs activation. Our findings suggest that D3R in DCs constitutes a new therapeutic target to strengthen anti-tumor immunity.

  4. The T cell antigen receptor CD3:CD4 molecular complex is diminished on the surface of pulmonary lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Marathias, K.; Pinto, C.; Rodberg, G.; Preffer, F.; Wong, J.; Kradin, R.

    1994-01-01

    CD4, a 55-kd cell surface glycoprotein, binds to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (Ia) antigens and functions as a coreceptor for the T cell antigen receptor (Ti alpha beta)-CD3 complex. We have observed that critical elements of the T cell antigen multireceptor complex, including Ti alpha beta, CD3, CD4, but not CD8, were diminished on CD45RO+ pulmonary T lymphocytes but not CD45RO+ peripheral blood T lymphocytes (PBL). Epitopes mapping from the first (D1) to the fourth (D4) extracytoplasmic Ig-like domains of CD4 were expressed to a lesser degree on pulmonary T cells than on PBL (P = 0.002). CD4 expression on pulmonary T cells did not increase after 72 hours of ex vivo culture in complete medium but was restored toward control levels by stimulation with phytohemagglutinin, anti-CD3, or interleukin-2. CD4 mRNA isolated from lung T cells and PBL co-migrated on Northern blots and the total levels of CD4 mRNA were comparable, suggesting that diminished CD4 expression by pulmonary T cells might reflect a posttranscriptional change. To determine whether CD4bright T cells convert with mitogen stimulation to CD4dim cells, PBLs were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3, anti-CD4, or a molecularly engineered anti-CD3:CD4 bispecific monoclonal antibody and the ratio of the CD4:CD3 mean fluorescence staining intensities was calculated at days 3 and 13. The CD4:CD3 ratio decreased primarily for cells stimulated with anti-CD3:CD4, suggesting that co-ligation of CD3 and CD4 is required for the generation of CD4dim T cells. We conclude that diminished Ti alpha beta-CD3:CD4 expression is a characteristic of T cells in lung that is not shared by peripheral blood T cells in vivo, and speculate that this change reflects T cell activation in a millieu of limited interleukin-2 availability. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7977652

  5. [Isolation of viruses of antigenic complexes of California encephalitis and Bunyamwera (Bunyaviridae, Bunuavirus) from mosquitoes in northeast Asia].

    PubMed

    L'vov, S D; Gromashevskiĭ, V L; Voropanov, Iu V; Andreev, V P; Skvortsova, T M

    1989-01-01

    Studies in suckling mice and by direct solid-phase enzyme immunoassay were carried out with 111,1 thousand Aedes mosquitoes collected in July, 1986, in tundra, forest-tundra, and northern taiga of Kamchatka region and Chukotka autonomous district of Magadan region (North-Pacific natural area within 69 degrees-53 degrees North and 156 degrees-177 degrees East). Eleven strains were isolated of which 7 were classified as members of the California encephalitis complex (Tahyna-like strains) and 4 as members of the Bunyamwera complex (Batai-like strains). According to electron-microscopic studies of 2 strains (one from each antigenic complex), both were classified as belonging to the family of Bunyaviridae. Strains of both complexes were isolated in all landscape zones examined--tundra, forest-tundra, northern taiga. Virus-neutralizing antibodies to them were found in human and reindeer sera also in all the landscape zones, to Tahyna virus in 11%-61%, to Batain virus in 2%-6% blood specimens. No antibody to Uukuniemi virus was found.

  6. Leukocyte procoagulant activity: enhancement of production in vitro by IgG and antigen-antibody complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Rothberger, H; Zimmerman, T S; Spiegelberg, H L; Vaughan, J H

    1977-01-01

    In a variety of immunologic diseases, fibrin-fibrinogen and immune complexes deposit in areas of tissue damage. However, the mechanisms which initiate fibrin-fibrinogen deposition have not been clarified. We find that the procoagulant activity of human leukocytes is markedly increased after incubation with immunoglobulin and immune complexes. This procoagulant activity is evident after 4-24 h incubation in the presence of as little as 0.1 mg/ml of autologous, isologous, or heterologous IgG. At least three of the four subclasses of IgG myeloma proteins are effective. Experiments with purified rabbit and rat antibodies demonstrate that enhancement of procoagulant activity is significantly greater with soluble antigen-antibody complexes than with immunoglobulin alone. In contrast, insoluble complexes are less affective than immunoglobulin alone. Artifacts due to endotoxin contamination of the IgG preparations were excluded on the basis of the differential sensitivities of immunoglobulin and endotoxin to heat and polymyxin B. Evidence is also presented which shows that enhancement of procoagulant activity involves the production, rather than a simple release, of leukocyte procoagulant activity in vitro. PMID:190271

  7. Large, detergent-resistant complexes containing murine antigens Thy-1 and Ly-6 and protein tyrosine kinase p56lck.

    PubMed

    Bohuslav, J; Cinek, T; Horejsí, V

    1993-04-01

    A number of human and mouse leukocyte surface (glyco)proteins anchored in a membrane via glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) moiety have been previously shown to be noncovalently associated with protein tyrosine kinases (Science 1991. 254: 1016; J. Biol. Chem. 1992. 267: 12317). Here we show that two murine antigens of this group, Thy-1 and Ly-6, implicated in the activation of the T cells, are associated with each other, with the kinase p56lck and with several of potential kinase substrates in very large, detergent-resistant complexes, the size of which is between 50 and 200 nm, as determined by ultrafiltration and gel chromatography. Experiments on simultaneous solubilization of mixed human and mouse cells rule out that the observed complexes are artifacts induced by the detergent. Complexes of similar composition and properties were obtained when either detergents Brij-58, Nonidet-P40 or 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]- 1-propane-sulfonate (Chaps) were used for solubilization of the cells, while octylglucoside at least partially dissociated them. These "GPI-complexes" may be essential for the well-known signal-transducing capacity of Thy-1 and Ly-6.

  8. Detection of functional class II-associated antigen: role of a low density endosomal compartment in antigen processing

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a functional assay to identify processed antigen in subcellular fractions from antigen-presenting cells; stimulatory activity in this assay may be caused by either free peptide fragments or by complexes of peptide fragments and class II molecules present on organellar membrane sheets and vesicles. In addition, we have developed a functional assay to identify proteolytic activity in subcellular fractions capable of generating antigenic peptides from intact proteins. These techniques permit the direct identification of intracellular sites of antigen processing and class II association. Using a murine B cell line stably transfected with a phosphorylcholine (PC)-specific membrane-bound immunoglobulin (Ig), we show that PC- conjugated antigens are rapidly internalized and efficiently degraded to generate processed antigen within an early low density compartment. Proteolytic activity capable of generating antigenic peptide fragments from intact proteins is found within low density endosomes and a dense compartment consistent with lysosomes. However, neither processed peptide nor peptide-class II complexes are detected in lysosomes from antigen-pulsed cells. Furthermore, blocking the intracellular transport of internalized antigen from the low density endosome to lysosomes does not inhibit the generation of processed antigen. Therefore, antigens internalized in association with membrane Ig on B cells can be efficiently processed in low density endosomal compartments without the contribution of proteases present within denser organelles. PMID:7722450

  9. Proteasome subtypes and regulators in the processing of antigenic peptides presented by class I molecules of the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Van den Eynde, Benoît J

    2014-11-18

    The proteasome is responsible for the breakdown of cellular proteins. Proteins targeted for degradation are allowed inside the proteasome particle, where they are cleaved into small peptides and released in the cytosol to be degraded into amino acids. In vertebrates, some of these peptides escape degradation in the cytosol, are loaded onto class I molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and displayed at the cell surface for scrutiny by the immune system. The proteasome therefore plays a key role for the immune system: it provides a continued sampling of intracellular proteins, so that CD8-positive T-lymphocytes can kill cells expressing viral or tumoral proteins. Consequently, the repertoire of peptides displayed by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface depends on proteasome activity, which may vary according to the presence of proteasome subtypes and regulators. Besides standard proteasomes, cells may contain immunoproteasomes, intermediate proteasomes and thymoproteasomes. Cells may also contain regulators of proteasome activity, such as the 19S, PA28 and PA200 regulators. Here, we review the effects of these proteasome subtypes and regulators on the production of antigenic peptides. We also discuss an unexpected function of the proteasome discovered through the study of antigenic peptides: its ability to splice peptides.

  10. Latex-protein complexes from an acute phase recombinant antigen of Toxoplasma gondii for the diagnosis of recently acquired toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Peretti, Leandro E; Gonzalez, Verónica D G; Marcipar, Iván S; Gugliotta, Luis M

    2014-08-01

    The synthesis and characterization of latex-protein complexes (LPC), from the acute phase recombinant antigen P35 (P35Ag) of Toxoplasma gondii and "core-shell" carboxylated or polystyrene (PS) latexes (of different sizes and charge densities) are considered, with the aim of producing immunoagglutination reagents able to detect recently acquired toxoplasmosis. Physical adsorption (PA) and chemical coupling (CC) of P35Ag onto latex particles at different pH were investigated. Greater amounts of adsorbed protein were obtained on PS latexes than on carboxylated latexes, indicating that hydrophobic forces govern the interactions between the protein and the particle surface. In the CC experiments, the highest amount of bound protein was obtained at pH 6, near the isoelectric point of the protein (IP=6.27). At this pH, it decreased both the repulsion between particle surface and protein, and the repulsion between neighboring molecules. The LPC were characterized and the antigenicity of the P35Ag protein coupled on the particles surface was evaluated by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA). Results from ELISA showed that the P35Ag coupled to the latex particles surface was not affected during the particles sensitization by PA and CC and the produced LPC were able to recognize specific anti-P35Ag antibodies present in the acute phase of the disease.

  11. Recent advances in Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation: Plastic MHC molecules and TAPBPR-mediated quality control

    PubMed Central

    van Hateren, Andy; Bailey, Alistair; Elliott, Tim

    2017-01-01

    We have known since the late 1980s that the function of classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to bind peptides and display them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. Recognition by these sentinels of the immune system can lead to the destruction of the presenting cell, thus protecting the host from pathogens and cancer. Classical MHC class I molecules (MHC I hereafter) are co-dominantly expressed, polygenic, and exceptionally polymorphic and have significant sequence diversity. Thus, in most species, there are many different MHC I allotypes expressed, each with different peptide-binding specificity, which can have a dramatic effect on disease outcome. Although MHC allotypes vary in their primary sequence, they share common tertiary and quaternary structures. Here, we review the evidence that, despite this commonality, polymorphic amino acid differences between allotypes alter the ability of MHC I molecules to change shape (that is, their conformational plasticity). We discuss how the peptide loading co-factor tapasin might modify this plasticity to augment peptide loading. Lastly, we consider recent findings concerning the functions of the non-classical MHC I molecule HLA-E as well as the tapasin-related protein TAPBPR (transporter associated with antigen presentation binding protein-related), which has been shown to act as a second quality-control stage in MHC I antigen presentation. PMID:28299193

  12. A comparison of cancer stem cell markers and nonclassical major histocompatibility complex antigens in colorectal tumor and noncancerous tissues.

    PubMed

    Özgül Özdemir, Rabia Bilge; Özdemir, Alper Tunga; Oltulu, Fatih; Kurt, Kamile; Yiğittürk, Gürkan; Kırmaz, Cengiz

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most fatal types of cancer in both women and men, and, unfortunately, patients are often diagnosed at an advanced stage. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are associated with poor prognosis, metastasis, and recurrence, as well as chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance. Therefore, different treatment alternatives are needed to facilitate the elimination of CSCs. One such approach is immunotherapy; however, tumor cells can evade immune cells by alteration of the expression patterns of human leukocyte antigens (HLA). In this study, we immunohistochemically investigated the expression patterns of CSC-specific markers CD44, CD133, Nanog, and Oct3/4, and immunosuppressive molecules HLA-G and -E in advanced CRC tumor tissues and noncancerous colon biopsies. We found significantly increased CD44, Nanog, Oct3/4, HLA-G, and HLA-E expression in the CRC tumor tissues compared with the noncancerous colon biopsies. These findings suggest that some tumor cells may be CSC-like and that the increased expression of HLA-G and HLA-E may be considered as an immune-evasive adaptation. Therefore, the nonclassical major histocompatibility complex class Ib antigens HLA-G and HLA-E may be potential targets in the elimination of CRC-CSCs. However, more detailed studies are required to support our findings.

  13. Flunarizine and cinnarizine inhibit mitochondrial complexes I and II: possible implication for parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Veitch, K; Hue, L

    1994-01-01

    Cinnarizine and flunarizine are piperazine derivatives with calcium antagonist and anticonvulsant properties and are used widely in the treatment of vertigo and circulatory disorders. They have been implicated recently in the aggravation, or even the induction, of parkinsonism in elderly patients. Because the aetiology of parkinsonism has been suggested as having a mitochondrial component, we have investigated the effects of both compounds on mitochondrial respiration and on the activities of the individual respiratory chain complexes. In intact mitochondria from rat liver, both drugs inhibited respiration rates, with substrates entering at Complex I (glutamate/malate) and Complex II (succinate). These effects could be explained by potent inhibitions (Ki 3-10 microM) of both complexes. Complex I is inhibited at a site near the ubiquinone-binding site, which is not competitive with respect to ubiquinone, whereas the inhibition of Complex II is apparently caused by competition with ubiquinone. Furthermore, the inhibition of NADH oxidation by flunarizine in submitochondrial particles caused an NADH-dependent generation of superoxide. These inhibitory properties of both compounds could be significant factors in the aggravation or induction of parkinsonism in elderly patients, in whom mitochondrial function already may be impaired.

  14. Computational and biophysical approaches to protein-protein interaction inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum AMA1/RON2 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihan, Emilie; Delgadillo, Roberto F.; Tonkin, Michelle L.; Pugnière, Martine; Lebrun, Maryse; Boulanger, Martin J.; Douguet, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Invasion of the red blood cell by Plasmodium falciparum parasites requires formation of an electron dense circumferential ring called the Moving Junction (MJ). The MJ is anchored by a high affinity complex of two parasite proteins: Apical Membrane Antigen 1 ( PfAMA1) displayed on the surface of the parasite and Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 that is discharged from the parasite and imbedded in the membrane of the host cell. Structural studies of PfAMA1 revealed a conserved hydrophobic groove localized to the apical surface that coordinates RON2 and invasion inhibitory peptides. In the present work, we employed computational and biophysical methods to identify competitive P. falciparum AMA1-RON2 inhibitors with the goal of exploring the `druggability' of this attractive antimalarial target. A virtual screen followed by molecular docking with the PfAMA1 crystal structure was performed using an eight million compound collection that included commercial molecules, the ChEMBL malaria library and approved drugs. The consensus approach resulted in the selection of inhibitor candidates. We also developed a fluorescence anisotropy assay using a modified inhibitory peptide to experimentally validate the ability of the selected compounds to inhibit the AMA1-RON2 interaction. Among those, we identified one compound that displayed significant inhibition. This study offers interesting clues to improve the throughput and reliability of screening for new drug leads.

  15. Complex formation with nucleic acids and aptamers alters the antigenic properties of platelet factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Jaax, Miriam E.; Krauel, Krystin; Marschall, Thomas; Brandt, Sven; Gansler, Julia; Fürll, Birgitt; Appel, Bettina; Fischer, Silvia; Block, Stephan; Helm, Christiane A.; Müller, Sabine; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2013-01-01

    The tight electrostatic binding of the chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) to polyanions induces heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, a prothrombotic adverse drug reaction caused by immunoglobulin G directed against PF4/polyanion complexes. This study demonstrates that nucleic acids, including aptamers, also bind to PF4 and enhance PF4 binding to platelets. Systematic assessment of RNA and DNA constructs, as well as 4 aptamers of different lengths and secondary structures, revealed that increasing length and double-stranded segments of nucleic acids augment complex formation with PF4, while single nucleotides or single-stranded polyA or polyC constructs do not. Aptamers were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to induce structural changes in PF4 that resemble those induced by heparin. Moreover, heparin-induced anti-human–PF4/heparin antibodies cross-reacted with human PF4/nucleic acid and PF4/aptamer complexes, as shown by an enzyme immunoassay and a functional platelet activation assay. Finally, administration of PF4/44mer–DNA protein C aptamer complexes in mice induced anti–PF4/aptamer antibodies, which cross-reacted with murine PF4/heparin complexes. These data indicate that the formation of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies in postoperative patients may be augmented by PF4/nucleic acid complexes. Moreover, administration of therapeutic aptamers has the potential to induce anti-PF4/polyanion antibodies and a prothrombotic diathesis. PMID:23673861

  16. Definition of epitopes and antigens recognized by vaccinia specific immune responses: their conservation in variola virus sequences, and use as a model system to study complex pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sette, Alessandro; Grey, Howard; Oseroff, Carla; Peters, Bjoern; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Crotty, Shane; Assarsson, Erika; Greenbaum, Jay; Kim, Yohan; Kolla, Ravi; Tscharke, David; Koelle, David; Johnson, R Paul; Blum, Janice; Head, Steven; Sidney, John

    2009-12-30

    In the last few years, a wealth of information has become available relating to the targets of vaccinia virus (VACV)-specific CD4(+) T cell, CD8(+) T cell and antibody responses. Due to the large size of its genome, encoding more than 200 different proteins, VACV represents a useful model system to study immunity to complex pathogens. Our data demonstrate that both cellular and humoral responses target a large number of antigens and epitopes. This broad spectrum of targets is detected in both mice and humans. CD4(+) T cell responses target late and structural antigens, while CD8(+) T cells preferentially recognize early antigens. While both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses target different types of antigens, the antigens recognized by T(H) cells are highly correlated with those recognized by antibody responses. We further show that protein abundance and antibody recognition can be used to predict antigens recognized by CD4(+) T cell responses, while early expression at the mRNA level predicts antigens targeted by CD8(+) T cells. Finally, we find that the vast majority of VACV epitopes are conserved in variola virus (VARV), thus suggesting that the epitopes defined herein also have relevance for the efficacy of VACV as a smallpox vaccine.

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 glycoproteins gp120 and gp160 specifically inhibit the CD3/T cell-antigen receptor phosphoinositide transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Cefai, D; Debre, P; Kaczorek, M; Idziorek, T; Autran, B; Bismuth, G

    1990-01-01

    The interference of the recombinant HIV-1 glycoproteins gp160 and gp120 with the CD3/T cell antigen receptor (TcR)-mediated activation process has been investigated in the CD4+ diphtheria toxoid-specific human P28D T cell clone. Both glycoproteins clearly inhibit the T cell proliferation induced in an antigen-presenting cell (APC)-free system by various cross-linked monoclonal antibodies specific for the CD3 molecule or the TcR alpha chain (up to 80% inhibition). Biochemical studies further demonstrate that exposure of the T cell clone to both glycoproteins (gps) specifically inhibits the CD3/TcR phospholipase C (PLC) transduction pathway, without affecting the CD3/TcR cell surface expression. Thus, inositol phosphate production, phosphatidic acid turnover, intracellular free calcium, and intracellular pH increase induced by CD3/TcR-specific MAbs are specifically impaired in gps-treated P28D T cells. Addition of purified soluble CD4 prevents binding of gps to T cells and overcomes all observed inhibitions. Maximal inhibitions are obtained for long-term exposure of the T cell clone to gps (16 h). No early effect of gps is observed. By contrast, gp160 and gp120 fail to suppress the CD2-triggered functional and biochemical P28D T cell responses. These results demonstrate that, in addition to their postulated role in the alteration of the interaction between CD4 on T lymphocytes and MHC class II molecules on APC, soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins may directly and specifically impair the CD3/TcR-mediated activation of PLC in uninfected T cells via the CD4 molecule. PMID:1979339

  18. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-09-30

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1-40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1-40 peptide on the basis of their emission response.

  19. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-01-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1–40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1–40 peptide on the basis of their emission response. PMID:26419607

  20. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-09-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1-40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1-40 peptide on the basis of their emission response.

  1. [Genetic diversity based on swine leukocyte antigen complex mi-crosatellites(SLA-MS) in five pig populations].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Liu, Rong-Hui; Li, Hua; Zuo, Qi-Zhen; Li, Yan; Wu, Zhen-Fang

    2012-11-01

    The genetic diversity of swine leukocyte antigen complex (SLA) was studied among Guangdong local pigs, Huanan wild boars (S.s. chirodontus) and introduced pigs, which aimed at providing a theoretical foundation for further pig anti-disease resistance breeding. Pietrain pigs, Duroc pigs, Large black-white pigs, Lantang pigs, and Huanan wild boars were genotyped by employing 18 microsatellites in swine leukocyte antigen complex (SLA-MS). The result showed that the average diversity in SLA II was higher (He=0.628, PIC=0.581) than that in SLA I (He=0.530, PIC=0.474) and in SLA III (He=0.526, PIC=0.458). The molecular diversity indices (MDI) of Huanan wild boars was the highest(0.716), followed by Lantang pigs (0.614), Large black-white pigs (0.559), Pietrain pigs (0.550) and Duroc pigs (0.507). As a whole, the genetic diversity of Huanan wild boars was the highest over Guangdong native pigs and introduced pigs. Large black-white pigs and Duroc pigs had ever happened a severe bottleneck by comparison with the Garza-Williamson index (GWI) in Huanan wild boar. From the genetic distance, one clade was that Lantang pigs were first clustered with Huanan wild boar, and then grouped together with Large black-white pigs; another clade was that Pietrain pigs were independently clustered with Duroc pigs in the NJ tree. The results would establish the foundation for pig conservation of germplasm resource, disease resistance breeding, and multiplicative strains.

  2. The Cell Wall as the Antigenic Site for Antibodies Stimulating Ingestion (MSF) and Inhibition (BIF) of Brucella in Macrophages from Normal and Immune Animals

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Doris J.; Elberg, S. S.

    1971-01-01

    Following extraction with hot trichloracetic acid and digestion with trypsin, deoxyribonuclease and ribonuclease, cell wall residues of Brucella melitensis strain Rev I contained an antigenic moiety capable of removing antibodies responsible for stimulation of ingestion, inhibition of Brucella growth by macrophages, and agglutination of Brucella. The preparation was dermonecrotic for both normal and immune rabbits and, when injected in oil, stimulated antibody production. The peptidoglycan-containing structure was degraded by egg-white lysozyme and enzymes from normal and immune macrophages with an accompanying loss of dermonecrotic and serumabsorbing capacity. PMID:5582072

  3. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Natalia P.; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Salazar, Julio; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Nunez, Marco T.

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  4. In vivo neutralization of eosinophil-derived major basic protein inhibits antigen-induced bronchial hyperreactivity in sensitized guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Lefort, J; Nahori, M A; Ruffie, C; Vargaftig, B B; Pretolani, M

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the effect of purified rabbit antiguinea pig eosinophil-derived major basic protein (MBP) Ig on antigen-induced bronchial hyperreactivity to inhaled acetylcholine in aerosol-sensitized guinea pigs. Ovalbumin inhalation by sensitized guinea pigs induced a rise in the numbers of eosinophils and in the levels of MBP in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which peaked at 24 h and resolved at 72 h. Antigen-challenged animals exhibited bronchial hyperreactivity to inhale acetylcholine at 72 h, but not at 6 or 24 h. The intranasal administration of 200 microliter of purified rabbit anti-guinea pig MBP Ig, at 2.5 mg/ml, but not of the control preimmune rabbit Ig, 1 h before and 5 h after ovalbumin inhalation suppressed bronchial hyperreactivity to acetylcholine at 72 h without affecting the number of eosinophils accumulating in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These findings indicate that antigen challenge in sensitized guinea pigs is followed by early eosinophil infiltration and activation within the airways and by late bronchial hyperreactivity. Neutralization of endogenously secreted MBP by a specific antiserum prevented antigen-induced bronchial hyperreactivity, suggesting that eosinophil degranulation plays an important role in the alterations of bronchopulmonary function in the guinea pig. PMID:8613536

  5. A COMPARISON OF THE SPECIFICITY OF INHIBITION BY PHOSPHONATE ESTERS OF THE FIRST COMPONENT OF COMPLEMENT AND THE ANTIGEN-INDUCED RELEASE OF HISTAMINE FROM GUINEA PIG LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Elmer L.; Austen, K. Frank

    1964-01-01

    The ability of a number p-nitrophenylethyl alkyl, phenyl alkyl, chloroalkyl, and aminoalkyl phosphonates to inhibit the activated first component (C'1a) of guinea pig complement, and the antigen-induced release of histamine from sliced, perfused guinea pig lung has been compared. C'1a in its reactivity with these phosphonates is distinctly more similar to trypsin than to any of the other enzymes studied previously. It is suggested that both trypsin and C'1a possess an anionic group in the active center of the respective enzyme, but the distance between the anionic and esteratic site in C'1a might be less than in trypsin. The pattern of inhibition of histamine relase by the alkyl, phenyl alkyl, and chloroalkyl phosphonates is similar to the inhibition of C'1a by these compounds, although distinct differences are apparent. The aminoalkyl phosphonates are distinctly less active inhibitors of histamine release than the corresponding alkyl phosphonates, whereas the reverse is true of the inhibition of C'1a. On the basis of these differences, it is tentatively concluded that the organophosphorus-inhibitable enzymes in the guinea pig systems studied here are similar but not identical. PMID:14212115

  6. Envelope protein complexes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and their antigenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic enteric disease of ruminant animals. In the present study, blue native PAGE electrophoresis and 2D SDS-PAGE were used to separate MAP envelope protein complexes, followed by mass spectrometry (MS) ...

  7. Comparative study of blood group-recognizing lectins toward ABO blood group antigens on neoglycoproteins, glycoproteins and complex-type oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Hamako, J; Ozeki, Y; Titani, K

    2001-02-16

    Binding specificities of ABO blood group-recognizing lectins toward blood group antigens on neoglycoproteins, glycoproteins and complex-type oligosaccharides were studied by lectin-blotting analysis, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and lectin-conjugated agarose column chromatography. Human serum albumin conjugated with A- and B-trisaccharides was clearly recognized by Helix pomatia (HPA), Phaseolus lunatus, Dolichos biflorus agglutinins, and Griffonia simplicifolia I agglutinin B(4), respectively. Almost the same results were obtained for human group A and B ovarian cyst and A-active hog gastric mucins, but Glycine max agglutinin only reacted to the group A hog mucin. When human plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF), having Asn-linked blood group antigens, was tested, HPA was highly sensitive to blood group A antigen on the vWF. Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) preferentially bound to the vWF from blood group O plasma. Within the GalNAc-recognizing lectins examined, a biantennary complex-type oligosaccharide having the blood group A structure retarded on an HPA-agarose column, and the affinity was diminished after digestion with alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. This product bound to UEA-I agarose column. These results indicate that HPA and UEA-I are most sensitive for detection of glycoproteins possessing small amounts of blood group A and H antigens and also useful for fractionation of complex-type oligosaccharides with blood group A and H antigens, respectively.

  8. Inhibition of Maize Root H+-ATPase by Fluoride and Fluoroaluminate Complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Facanha, A. R.; De Meis, L.

    1995-01-01

    Vesicles derived from maize roots retain a membrane-bound H+-ATPase that is able to pump H+ at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. The H+ pumping and the ATPase activity of these vesicles are inhibited by lithium fluoride and by the complex formed between fluoride and aluminum. The inhibition promoted by lithium fluoride increases as the MgCl2 concentration in the medium is increased from 2 to 20 mM. The inhibitory activity of both lithium fluoride and aluminum fluoride increases as the temperature of the medium is increased from 20 to 35[deg]C. Inorganic phosphate (10-40 mM) inhibits the H+ -ATPase at pH 6.5 but not at pH 7.0, and at both pH values, it antagonizes the inhibition promoted by lithium fluoride and fluoroaluminate complexes. PMID:12228469

  9. The trimeric serine protease HtrA1 forms a cage-like inhibition complex with an anti-HtrA1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Ciferri, Claudio; Lipari, Michael T; Liang, Wei-Ching; Estevez, Alberto; Hang, Julie; Stawicki, Scott; Wu, Yan; Moran, Paul; Elliott, Mike; Eigenbrot, Charles; Katschke, Kenneth J; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    High temperature requirement A1 (HtrA1) is a trypsin-fold serine protease implicated in the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Our interest in an antibody therapy to neutralize HtrA1 faces the complication that the target adopts a trimeric arrangement, with three active sites in close proximity. In the present study, we describe antibody 94, obtained from a human antibody phage display library, which forms a distinct macromolecular complex with HtrA1 and inhibits the enzymatic activity of recombinant and native HtrA1 forms. Using biochemical methods and negative-staining EM we were able to elucidate the molecular composition of the IgG94 and Fab94 complexes and the associated inhibition mechanism. The 246-kDa complex between the HtrA1 catalytic domain trimer (HtrA1_Cat) and Fab94 had a propeller-like organization with one Fab bound peripherally to each protomer. Low-resolution EM structures and epitope mapping indicated that the antibody binds to the surface-exposed loops B and C of the catalytic domain, suggesting an allosteric inhibition mechanism. The HtrA1_Cat-IgG94 complex (636 kDa) is a cage-like structure with three centrally located IgG94 molecules co-ordinating two HtrA1_Cat trimers and the six active sites pointing into the cavity of the cage. In both complexes, all antigen-recognition regions (paratopes) are found to bind one HtrA1 protomer and all protomers are bound by a paratope, consistent with the complete inhibition of enzyme activity. Therefore, in addition to its potential therapeutic usefulness, antibody 94 establishes a new paradigm of multimeric serine protease inhibition.

  10. Hyaluronidase: Purification and Inhibition by a Gold Complex and a Steroid Derivative.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-11

    Ketocholesterol Oxime .... ........... .42 14 Semi-log Plot of Data From Figure 13 Against Inactivation Time by 22-Ketocholesterol Oxime. . . 43 15. Lineweaver - Burk ...Plot of the Inhibition of Hyaluronidase by 22-Ketocholesterol Oxime . . . . 44 ix ell 16. Secondary Plot Computed from the Lineweaver - Burk Curves in...to formation of the covalently bonded E-X complex (Figure 14). A Lineweaver - Burk plot of the steroid induced inhibition yielded parallel straight

  11. The 2.5 Å Structure of CD1c in Complex with a Mycobacterial Lipid Reveals an Open Groove Ideally Suited for Diverse Antigen Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, Louise; Li, Nan-Sheng; Hawk, Andrew J.; Garzón, Diana; Zhang, Tejia; Fox, Lisa M.; Kazen, Allison R.; Shah, Sneha; Haddadian, Esmael J.; Gumperz, Jenny E.; Saghatelian, Alan; Faraldo-Gómez, José D.; Meredith, Stephen C.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Adams, Erin J.

    2011-08-24

    CD1 molecules function to present lipid-based antigens to T cells. Here we present the crystal structure of CD1c at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution, in complex with the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen mannosyl-{beta}1-phosphomycoketide (MPM). CD1c accommodated MPM's methylated alkyl chain exclusively in the A pocket, aided by a unique exit portal underneath the {alpha}1 helix. Most striking was an open F pocket architecture lacking the closed cavity structure of other CD1 molecules, reminiscent of peptide binding grooves of classical major histocompatibility complex molecules. This feature, combined with tryptophan-fluorescence quenching during loading of a dodecameric lipopeptide antigen, provides a compelling model by which both the lipid and peptide moieties of the lipopeptide are involved in CD1c presentation of lipopeptides.

  12. Human major histocompatibility complex class I antigens: residues 61-83 of the HLA-B7 heavy chain specify an alloreactive site.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, L E; Ketler, T A; Houghten, R A; Schulz, G; Chersi, A; Reisfeld, R A

    1985-01-01

    A chemically synthesized peptide (sequence in text) homologous to residues 61-83 of the HLA-B7 heavy chain, induced antibodies that specifically recognized the HLA heavy chain-beta 2-microglobulin complex and the free heavy chain of the HLA-B7 antigen. These antibodies specifically immunoprecipitated the HLA-B7 beta 2-microglobulin complex solubilized from human lymphoblastoid cells by nonionic detergents and reacted with free HLA-B7 heavy chains in blots on nitrocellulose. These observations suggest that the antigenic conformation of this region of the HLA-B7 molecule is independent of the presence of beta 2-microglobulin and that amino acid residues 61-83 mimic an alloreactive site expressed by the HLA-B7 antigen. Images PMID:3881768

  13. Transcription of a subset of human class II major histocompatibility complex genes is regulated by a nucleoprotein complex that contains c-fos or an antigenically related protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ono, S J; Bazil, V; Levi, B Z; Ozato, K; Strominger, J L

    1991-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the human major histocompatibility complex class II genes requires at least two upstream elements, the X and Y boxes, located in the -50- to -150-base-pair region of all class II promoters. The DRA and DPB promoters contain phorbol ester-responsive elements overlapping the 3' side of their X boxes. Mutation of this sequence down-regulates the efficiency of the DRA promoter, suggesting that a positive regulator(s) binds to this site. In this report, anti-sense c-fos RNA and an anti-c-fos antibody were used to show that the product of the protooncogene c-fos or an antigenically related protein is a component of a complex that binds to the X box and is required for maximal transcription from the DRA and DPB promoters. As c-fos (or its related proteins) cannot bind alone to DNA, these results suggest that it may dimerize with other members of the JUN/AP-1 family, such as hXBP1, to participate in the activation of a subset of class II major histocompatibility complex genes. Images PMID:1709740

  14. Targeting metabolic flexibility by simultaneously inhibiting respiratory complex I and lactate generation retards melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Chaube, Balkrishna; Malvi, Parmanand; Singh, Shivendra Vikram; Mohammad, Naoshad; Meena, Avtar Singh; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is a largely incurable skin malignancy owing to the underlying molecular and metabolic heterogeneity confounded by the development of resistance. Cancer cells have metabolic flexibility in choosing either oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) or glycolysis for ATP generation depending upon the nutrient availability in tumor microenvironment. In this study, we investigated the involvement of respiratory complex I and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in melanoma progression. We show that inhibition of complex I by metformin promotes melanoma growth in mice via elevating lactate and VEGF levels. In contrast, it leads to the growth arrest in vitro because of enhanced extracellular acidification as a result of increased glycolysis. Inhibition of LDH or lactate generation causes decrease in glycolysis with concomitant growth arrest both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking lactate generation in metformin-treated melanoma cells results in diminished cell proliferation and tumor progression in mice. Interestingly, inhibition of either LDH or complex I alone does not induce apoptosis, whereas inhibiting both together causes depletion in cellular ATP pool resulting in metabolic catastrophe induced apoptosis. Overall, our study suggests that LDH and complex I play distinct roles in regulating glycolysis and cell proliferation. Inhibition of these two augments synthetic lethality in melanoma. PMID:26484566

  15. Enhancement and inhibition of immunological mechanisms by immunosuppressive agents. I. Dose effect on priming and generation of memory to a bacterial antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Macario, A J; De Macario, E C

    1978-01-01

    A new experimental system is described which allows the study of the effect of immunosuppressors upon the priming and generation of memory to an antigen from Escherichia coli. A single dose of bacterial beta-D-galactosidase without adjuvant injected into C57B1/6J mice primes and elicits memory but not antibodies. Thus by administering immunosuppressors near the priming injection, one can examine whether primary antibody formation is enhanced and whether priming generation of memory is enhanced or inhibited. We found that X-rays, cyclophosphamide and oxisuran (2-[(methylsulfinyl)acetyl]pyridine) either enhance or inhibit the elicitation of memory, depending on dosage, although they do not alter primary antibody unresponsiveness. The data show two main features: (a) immunosuppressors can enhance immunization; and (b) generation of memory can be improved without increasing antibody levels. The former finding draws attention to the role that immunosuppressors might play in the breaching of tolerance to self-antigens which share determinants with microbes, while the latter observation shows that antibody synthesis and elicitation of memory can follow independent pathways. PMID:417887

  16. HD-03/ES: A Herbal Medicine Inhibits Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Secretion in Transfected Human Hepatocarcinoma PLC/PRF/5 Cells.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sandeep R; Sundaram, R; Gopumadhavan, S; Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Patki, Pralhad S

    2013-01-01

    HD-03/ES is a herbal formulation used for the treatment of hepatitis B. However, the molecular mechanism involved in the antihepatitis B (HBV) activity of this drug has not been studied using in vitro models. The effect of HD-03/ES on hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) secretion and its gene expression was studied in transfected human hepatocarcinoma PLC/PRF/5 cells. The anti-HBV activity was tested based on the inhibition of HBsAg secretion into the culture media, as detected by HBsAg-specific antibody-mediated enzyme assay (ELISA) at concentrations ranging from 125 to 1000  μ g/mL. The effect of HD-03/ES on HBsAg gene expression was analyzed using semiquantitative multiplex RT-PCR by employing specific primers. The results showed that HD-03/ES suppressed HBsAg production with an IC50 of 380  μ g/mL in PLC/PRF/5 cells for a period of 24 h. HD-03/ES downregulated HBsAg gene expression in PLC/PRF/5 cells. In conclusion, HD-03/ES exhibits strong anti-HBV properties by inhibiting the secretion of hepatitis B surface antigen in PLC/PRF/5 cells, and this action is targeted at the transcription level. Thus, HD-03/ES could be beneficial in the treatment of acute and chronic hepatitis B infections.

  17. Increased responsiveness to 5-hydroxytryptamine after antigenic challenge is inhibited by nifedipine and niflumic acid in rat trachea in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moura, Carlos Tiago Martins; Bezerra, Fernanda Carvalho; de Moraes, Isabelle Maciel; Magalhães, Pedro Jorge Caldas; Capaz, Francisco Ruy

    2005-12-01

    Antigenic challenge often induces hyperreactivity in asthmatic airway, although the precise mechanism(s) underlying this increased responsiveness is not entirely known. Tracheae obtained from ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized saline- or OVA-challenged rats were placed in 10 mL bath chambers for isometric recording of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced contractions. 5-Hydroxytryptamine induced a stronger contraction compared with control in antigen-challenged trachea under normal or Ca2+-free conditions. In tracheae pretreated with the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine (10(-6) mol/L) or the Ca2+-activated Cl- channel blocker niflumic acid (10(-4) mol/L), this hyperresponsiveness was not developed in either normal or Ca2+-free medium. The increased contractile response to 5-HT in allergic rat isolated trachea may be related to a greater ionic (Ca2+ and Cl-) channel involvement.

  18. Characterization of the interface of the bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2-Vpu protein complex via computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinming; Zhang, Zhixin; Mi, Zeyun; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Quan; Li, Xiaoyu; Liang, Chen; Cen, Shan

    2012-02-14

    Bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2) inhibits the release of enveloped viruses from the cell surface. Various viral counter measures have been discovered, which allow viruses to escape BST-2 restriction. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes viral protein U (Vpu) that interacts with BST-2 through their transmembrane domains and causes the downregulation of cell surface BST-2. In this study, we used a computer modeling method to establish a molecular model to investigate the binding interface of the transmembrane domains of BST-2 and Vpu. The model predicts that the interface is composed of Vpu residues I6, A10, A14, A18, V25, and W22 and BST-2 residues L23, I26, V30, I34, V35, L41, I42, and T45. Introduction of mutations that have been previously reported to disrupt the Vpu-BST-2 interaction led to a calculated higher binding free energy (MMGBSA), which supports our molecular model. A pharmacophore was also generated on the basis of this model. Our results provide a precise model that predicts the detailed interaction occurring between the transmembrane domains of Vpu and BST-2 and should facilitate the design of anti-HIV agents that are able to disrupt this interaction.

  19. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates N-Ras activation on the Golgi complex of antigen-stimulated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ibiza, Sales; Pérez-Rodríguez, Andrea; Ortega, Ángel; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Barreiro, Olga; García-Domínguez, Carlota A.; Víctor, Víctor M.; Esplugues, Juan V.; Rojas, José M.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Serrador, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    Ras/ERK signaling plays an important role in T cell activation and development. We recently reported that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived NO regulates T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent ERK activation by a cGMP-independent mechanism. Here, we explore the mechanisms through which eNOS exerts this regulation. We have found that eNOS-derived NO positively regulates Ras/ERK activation in T cells stimulated with antigen on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Intracellular activation of N-, H-, and K-Ras was monitored with fluorescent probes in T cells stably transfected with eNOS-GFP or its G2A point mutant, which is defective in activity and cellular localization. Using this system, we demonstrate that eNOS selectively activates N-Ras but not K-Ras on the Golgi complex of T cells engaged with APC, even though Ras isoforms are activated in response to NO from donors. We further show that activation of N-Ras involves eNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation on Cys118, suggesting that upon TCR engagement, eNOS-derived NO directly activates N-Ras on the Golgi. Moreover, wild-type but not C118S N-Ras increased TCR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of Cys118 contributes to activation-induced T cell death. Our data define a signaling mechanism for the regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway based on the eNOS-dependent differential activation of N-Ras and K-Ras at specific cell compartments. PMID:18641128

  20. Immunization with antigenic peptides complexed with β-glucan induces potent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity in combination with CpG-ODNs.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Shinichi; Morishita, Hiromi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ishii, Ken J; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2015-12-28

    The induction of antigen-specific immune responses requires immunization with not only antigens, but also adjuvants. CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) are well-known ligands for Toll-like receptor 9 and a potent adjuvant that induces both Th1-type humoral and cellular immune responses including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. We previously demonstrated that β-glucan schizophyllan (SPG) can form complexes with CpG-ODNs with attached dA40 (CpG-dA/SPG), which can accumulate in macrophages in the draining inguinal lymph nodes and induce strong immune responses by co-administration of antigenic proteins, namely ovalbumin (OVA). Immunization with antigenic peptides, OVA257-264, did not induce these antigen-specific immune responses even in combination with CpG-dA/SPG, indicating that peptides require a carrier to antigen presenting cells. In this study, we prepared conjugates comprising OVA257-264 and dA40, and made complexes with SPG. Immunization with OVA257-264-dA/SPG induced peptide-specific immune responses in combination with CpG-dA regardless of complexation with SPG both in vitro and in vivo. When splenocytes from immunized mice were incubated with E.G7-OVA tumor model cells presenting OVA peptides, the number of cells drastically decreased after 24h. Furthermore, mice pre-immunized with OVA257-264-dA/SPG and CpG-ODNs exhibited a long delay in tumor growth after tumor inoculation. Therefore, these peptide-dA/SPG and CpG-dA/SPG complexes could be used as a potent vaccine for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases.

  1. Tetramer-guided epitope mapping: rapid identification and characterization of immunodominant CD4+ T cell epitopes from complex antigens.

    PubMed

    Novak, E J; Liu, A W; Gebe, J A; Falk, B A; Nepom, G T; Koelle, D M; Kwok, W W

    2001-06-01

    T cell responses to Ags involve recognition of selected peptide epitopes contained within the antigenic protein. In this report, we describe a new approach for direct identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes of complex Ags that uses human class II tetramers to identify reactive cells. With a panel of 60 overlapping peptides covering the entire sequence of the VP16 protein, a major Ag for HSV-2, we generated a panel of class II MHC tetramers loaded with peptide pools that were used to stain peripheral lymphocytes of an HSV-2 infected individual. With this approach, we identified four new DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401- and two DRA1*0101/DRB1*0404-restricted, VP16-specific epitopes. By using tetramers to sort individual cells, we easily obtained a large number of clones specific to these epitopes. Although DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401 and DRA1*0101/DRB1*0404 are structurally very similar, nonoverlapping VP16 epitopes were identified, illustrating high selectivity of individual allele polymorphisms within common MHC variants. This rapid approach to detecting CD4+ T cell epitopes from complex Ags can be applied to any known Ag that gives a T cell response.

  2. Cryptic antigenic determinants on the extracellular pyruvate dehydrogenase complex/mimeotope found in primary biliary cirrhosis. A probe by affinity mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yip, T T; Van de Water, J; Gershwin, M E; Coppel, R L; Hutchens, T W

    1996-12-20

    Affinity mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to evaluate the structural diversity of the E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) in normal and diseased liver cells, including those from patients with the autoimmune disease primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Two different antibodies to PDC-E2, the immunodominant mitochondrial autoantigen in patients with PBC, were used. AMS was performed directly on frozen liver sections and purified bile duct epithelial cells. Mass spectrometric signals associated with the molecular recognition of PBC-specific antigenic determinants were enhanced by an in situ enzyme-linked signal amplification process. Samples from patients with PBC gave strong positive signals for the antigen(s) recognized by the monoclonal antibody C355.1. Conversely, tissues from normal and disease controls showed only a minimal signal. AMS was used to identify specific antigenic determinants within the E2 component of PDC for comparison with unknown antigenic determinants observed by affinity capture with C355.1 monoclonal antibody from PBC samples. PDC components bound to C355.1 were mapped and identified by mass before dissociation from the E2 component. A similar approach was used to identify unknown antigenic determinants associated with PBC. We believe AMS may be an important new approach with wide application to the identification of molecules associated with a number of disease states.

  3. Complexation of chlorpropham with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and its application in potato sprout inhibition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zheng; Tian, Shilong; Ge, Xia; Zhang, Jun; Li, Shouqiang; Li, Mei; Cheng, Jianxin; Zheng, Huaiwen

    2014-07-17

    The effect of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) on the improvement of chlorpropham (CIPC) as a potato sprout inhibitor was investigated. The formation of complex was confirmed by FT-IR spectra, thermoanalysis, (1)H NMR and ROESY. The stoichiometry and stability constant were determined by Job's plot and phase solubility studies, respectively. The inclusion complex CIPC·HPβCD has exhibited different properties from CIPC. The obtained inclusion complex was found to significantly improve the water solubility, thermal stability and dissolution rate of CIPC. In addition, the complex displayed a better effect on sprout inhibition.

  4. Methamphetamine-induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex II: roles of glutamate and peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeffrey M; Quinton, Maria S; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2005-10-01

    High-dose methamphetamine (METH) is associated with long-term deficits in dopaminergic systems. Although the mechanism(s) which contributes to these deficits is not known, glutamate and peroxynitrite are likely to play a role. These factors are hypothesized to inhibit mitochondrial function, increasing the free radical burden and decreasing neuronal energy supplies. Previous studies suggest a role for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in mediating toxicity of METH. The purpose of the present studies was to determine whether METH administration selectively inhibits complex II of the ETC in rats. High-dose METH administration (10 mg/kg every 2 h x 4) rapidly (within 1 h) decreased complex II (succinate dehydrogenase) activity by approximately 20-30%. In addition, decreased activity of complex II-III, but not complex I-III, of the mitochondrial ETC was also observed 24 h after METH. This inhibition was not due to direct inhibition by METH or METH-induced hyperthermia and was specific to striatal brain regions. METH-induced decreases in complex II-III were prevented by MK-801 and the peroxynitrite scavenger 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-sulphonatophenyl) porphinato iron III. These findings provide the first evidence that METH administration, via glutamate receptor activation and peroxynitrite formation, selectively alters a specific site of the ETC.

  5. Citrullinated vimentin as an important antigen in immune complexes from synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients with antibodies against citrullinated proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease, which results in destruction of the joint. The presence of immune complexes (IC) in serum and synovial fluid of RA patients might contribute to this articular damage through different mechanisms, such as complement activation. Therefore, identification of the antigens from these IC is important to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of RA. Since RA patients have antibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPA) in their serum and synovial fluid (SF) and since elevated levels of citrullinated proteins are detected in the joints of RA patients, citrullinated antigens are possibly present in IC from RA patients. Methods IC from serum of healthy persons, serum of RA patients and IC from synovial fluid of RA patients and Spondyloarthropathy (SpA) patients were isolated by immunoprecipitation. Identification of the antigens was performed by SDS-PAGE, mass spectrometry and immunodetection. The presence of citrullinated proteins was evaluated by anti-modified citrulline (AMC) staining. Results Circulating IC in the serum of RA patients and healthy controls contain fibrinogenβ and fibronectin, both in a non-citrullinated form. Additionally, in IC isolated from RA SF, fibrinogenγ and vimentin were identified as well. More importantly, vimentin and a minor portion of fibrinogenβ were found to be citrullinated in the isolated complexes. Moreover these citrullinated antigens were only found in ACPA+ patients. No citrullinated antigens were found in IC from SF of SpA patients. Conclusions Citrullinated fibrinogenβ and citrullinated vimentin were found in IC from SF of ACPA+ RA patients, while no citrullinated antigens were found in IC from SF of ACPA- RA patients or SpA patients or in IC from serum of RA patients or healthy volunteers. The identification of citrullinated vimentin as a prominent citrullinated antigen in IC from SF of ACPA+ RA patients strengthens the hypothesis that citrullinated vimentin

  6. Physical mapping of the human T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) {beta}-chain gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yashim, Y.; So, A.K.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic variation of the TCR loci and their contribution to autoimmune diseases is poorly defined, in direct contrast to the clear examples of disease association with the Class I and II alleles of the major histocompatibility complex. We have therefore started to determine the gene organization and polymorphism of the TCR {beta} locus. Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to construct a physical map of the germline human TCR {beta}-chain gene complex. Variable gene (V{beta}) sequences for the 25 known V{beta} subfamilies were amplified by PCR and were used as probes to screen a YAC library. Five positive YACs were identified. YACs designated B3, E11 and H11 of sizes 820, 400 and 600 kbp, respectively, were analyzed for their V{beta} content by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). YAC B3 was found to contain all 25 V{beta} subfamilies, E11 for 14 and H11 for 7. B3 was also positive for the constant region genes. Restriction enzyme mapping of B3 located V{beta} and C{beta} gene regions to four Sfi I fragments of 280, 110, 90 and 125 kbp, and was in accordance with published data. The data thus showed that YAC B3 encoded a complete and unrearranged TCR {beta}-gene locus. The map was further resolved by locating restriction sites for Sal I and Bssll II on B3. Fluorescent in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes localized B3 to chromosome 7q35. However, two additional signals were obtained: one attributable to V{beta} orphon cluster on chromosome 9q21; the second to the long arm of chromosome 2. PCR amplification of a chromosome 2 somatic cell hybrid using primers for all 25 V{beta} gene families revealed the signal was not attributable to a second orphon cluster. It is suggested that B3 is a chimeric YAC with an intact TCR {beta} locus flanked by chromosome 2 sequences. The determination of the TCR genomic organization will help extend studies of the role T-cells play in autoimmune diseases.

  7. Antibody-producing cell responses to an isolated outer membrane protein and to complexes of this antigen with lipopolysaccharide or with vesicles of phospholipids from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Karch, H; Nixdorff, K

    1981-01-01

    Antibody-producing cell responses of mice to a protein isolated from the outer membrane of Proteus mirabilis were typical of the responses to a thymus-dependent antigen. The immunoglobulin G antibody-producing cell responses to the protein were increased after administration of the antigen complexed with either lipopolysaccharide or with vesicles of phospholipids extracted from P. mirabilis. The protein in turn significantly increased the immune response to lipopolysaccharide and also converted this response from predominantly immunoglobulin M to predominantly immunoglobulin G. PMID:6164651

  8. Eliminating Inhibition of Return by Changing Salient Nonspatial Attributes in a Complex Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Frank K.; Samuel, Arthur G.; Chan, Agnes S.

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) occurs when a target is preceded by an irrelevant stimulus (cue) at the same location: Target detection is slowed, relative to uncued locations. In the present study, we used relatively complex displays to examine the effect of repetition of nonspatial attributes. For both color and shape, attribute repetition produced a…

  9. The Impact of Mitochondrial Complex Inhibition on mESC Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Impact of Mitochondrial Complex Inhibition on mESC Differentiation JE Royland, SH Warren, S Jeffay, MR Hoopes, HP Nichols, ES Hunter U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC The importance of mitochondrial funct...

  10. Organometallic ruthenium anticancer complexes inhibit human glutathione-S-transferase π.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu; Huang, Yongdong; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Fuyi; Habtemariam, Abraha; Luo, Qun; Li, Xianchan; Wu, Kui; Sadler, Peter J; Xiong, Shaoxiang

    2013-11-01

    The organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complexes [(η(6)-arene)Ru(en)Cl](+) (arene = p-cymene (1), biphenyl (2) or 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (3); en = ethylenediamine), exhibit in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. In the present work, we show that they inhibit human glutathione-S-transferase π (GSTπ) with IC50 values of 59.4 ± 1.3, 63.2 ± 0.4 and 37.2 ± 1.1 μM, respectively. Mass spectrometry revealed that complex 1 binds to the S-donors of Cys15, Cys48 within the G-site and Cys102 at the interface of the GSTπ dimer, while complex 2 binds to Cys48 and Met92 at the dimer interface and complex 3 to Cys15, Cys48 and Met92. Moreover, the binding of complex 1 to Cys15 and Cys102, complex 2 to Cys48 and complex 3 to Cys15 induces the irreversible oxidation of the coordinated thiolates to sulfenates. Molecular modeling studies indicate that the coordination of the {(arene)Ru(en)}(2+) fragment to Cys48 blocks the hydrophilic G-site sterically, perhaps preventing substrate from proper positioning and accounting for the reduction in enzymatic activity of ruthenated GSTπ. The binding of the ruthenium arene complexes to Cys102 or Met92 disrupts the dimer interface which is an essential structural feature for the proper functioning of GSTπ, perhaps also contributing to the inhibition of GSTπ.

  11. Mechanisms of cell death pathway activation following drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Naoki; Kwang Lee, Kang; Zhang, Carmen; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex I inhibition by drugs and other chemicals has been implicated as a frequent mode of mitochondria-mediated cell injury. However, the exact mechanisms leading to the activation of cell death pathways are incompletely understood. This study was designed to explore the relative contributions to cell injury of three distinct consequences of complex I inhibition, i.e., impairment of ATP biosynthesis, increased formation of superoxide and, hence, peroxynitrite, and inhibition of the mitochondrial protein deacetylase, Sirt3, due to imbalance of the NADH/NAD+ ratio. We used the antiviral drug efavirenz (EFV) to model drug-induced complex I inhibition. Exposure of cultured mouse hepatocytes to EFV resulted in a rapid onset of cell injury, featuring a no-effect level at 30 µM EFV and submaximal effects at 50 µM EFV. EFV caused a concentration-dependent decrease in cellular ATP levels. Furthermore, EFV resulted in increased formation of peroxynitrite and oxidation of mitochondrial protein thiols, including cyclophilin D (CypD). This was prevented by the superoxide scavenger, Fe-TCP, or the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, Fe-TMPyP. Both ferroporphyrins completely protected from EFV-induced cell injury, suggesting that peroxynitrite contributed to the cell injury. Finally, EFV increased the NADH/NAD+ ratio, inhibited Sirt3 activity, and led to hyperacetylated lysine residues, including those in CypD. However, hepatocytes isolated from Sirt3-null mice were protected against 40 µM EFV as compared to their wild-type controls. In conclusion, these data are compatible with the concept that chemical inhibition of complex I activates multiple pathways leading to cell injury; among these, peroxynitrite formation may be the most critical. PMID:25625582

  12. Crystal structure of tarocystatin-papain complex: implications for the inhibition property of group-2 phytocystatins.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ming-Hung; Liu, Kai-Lun; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Yeh, Kai-Wun; Cheng, Yi-Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Tarocystatin (CeCPI) from taro (Colocasia esculenta cv. Kaohsiung no. 1), a group-2 phytocystatin, shares a conserved N-terminal cystatin domain (NtD) with other phytocystatins but contains a C-terminal cystatin-like extension (CtE). The structure of the tarocystatin-papain complex and the domain interaction between NtD and CtE in tarocystatin have not been determined. We resolved the crystal structure of the phytocystatin-papain complex at resolution 2.03 Å. Surprisingly, the structure of the NtD-papain complex in a stoichiometry of 1:1 could be built, with no CtE observed. Only two remnant residues of CtE could be built in the structure of the CtE-papain complex. Therefore, CtE is easily digested by papain. To further characterize the interaction between NtD and CtE, three segments of tarocystatin, including the full-length (FL), NtD and CtE, were used to analyze the domain-domain interaction and the inhibition ability. The results from glutaraldehyde cross-linking and yeast two-hybrid assay indicated the existence of an intrinsic flexibility in the region linking NtD and CtE for most tarocystatin molecules. In the inhibition activity assay, the glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fused FL showed the highest inhibition ability without residual peptidase activity, and GST-NtD and FL showed almost the same inhibition ability, which was higher than with NtD alone. On the basis of the structures, the linker flexibility and inhibition activity of tarocystatins, we propose that the overhangs from the cystatin domain may enhance the inhibition ability of the cystatin domain against papain.

  13. Anti-apical-membrane-antigen-1 antibody is more effective than anti-42-kilodalton-merozoite-surface-protein-1 antibody in inhibiting plasmodium falciparum growth, as determined by the in vitro growth inhibition assay.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kazutoyo; Zhou, Hong; Diouf, Ababacar; Moretz, Samuel E; Fay, Michael P; Miller, Louis H; Martin, Laura B; Pierce, Mark A; Ellis, Ruth D; Mullen, Gregory E D; Long, Carole A

    2009-07-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and the 42-kDa merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1(42)) are leading malaria vaccine candidates. Several preclinical and clinical trials have been conducted, and an in vitro parasite growth inhibition assay has been used to evaluate the biological activities of the resulting antibodies. In a U.S. phase 1 trial with AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel plus CPG 7909, the vaccination elicited anti-AMA1 immunoglobulin G (IgG) which showed up to 96% inhibition. However, antibodies induced by MSP1(42)-C1/Alhydrogel plus CPG 7909 vaccine showed less than 32% inhibition in vitro. To determine whether anti-MSP1(42) IgG had less growth-inhibitory activity than anti-AMA1 IgG in vitro, the amounts of IgG that produced 50% inhibition of parasite growth (Ab(50)) were compared for rabbit and human antibodies. The Ab(50)s of rabbit and human anti-MSP1(42) IgGs were significantly higher (0.21 and 0.62 mg/ml, respectively) than those of anti-AMA1 IgGs (0.07 and 0.10 mg/ml, respectively) against 3D7 parasites. Ab(50) data against FVO parasites also demonstrated significant differences. We further investigated the Ab(50)s of mouse and monkey anti-AMA1 IgGs and showed that there were significant differences between the species (mouse, 0.28 mg/ml, and monkey, 0.14 mg/ml, against 3D7 parasites). Although it is unknown whether growth-inhibitory activity in vitro reflects protective immunity in vivo, this study showed that the Ab(50) varies with both antigen and species. Our data provide a benchmark for antibody levels for future AMA1- or MSP1(42)-based vaccine development efforts in preclinical and clinical trials.

  14. A small molecule inhibitor of monoubiquitinated Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) inhibits repair of interstrand DNA cross-link, enhances DNA double strand break, and sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Akira; Kikuchi, Sotaro; Hishiki, Asami; Shao, Youming; Heath, Richard; Evison, Benjamin J; Actis, Marcelo; Canman, Christine E; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2014-03-07

    Small molecule inhibitors of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)/PCNA interacting protein box (PIP-Box) interactions, including T2 amino alcohol (T2AA), inhibit translesion DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of PCNA in complex with T2AA revealed that T2AA bound to the surface adjacent to the subunit interface of the homotrimer of PCNA in addition to the PIP-box binding cavity. Because this site is close to Lys-164, which is monoubiquitinated by RAD18, we postulated that T2AA would affect monoubiquitinated PCNA interactions. Binding of monoubiquitinated PCNA and a purified pol η fragment containing the UBZ and PIP-box was inhibited by T2AA in vitro. T2AA decreased PCNA/pol η and PCNA/REV1 chromatin colocalization but did not inhibit PCNA monoubiquitination, suggesting that T2AA hinders interactions of pol η and REV1 with monoubiquitinated PCNA. Interstrand DNA cross-links (ICLs) are repaired by mechanisms using translesion DNA synthesis that is regulated by monoubiquitinated PCNA. T2AA significantly delayed reactivation of a reporter plasmid containing an ICL. Neutral comet analysis of cells receiving T2AA in addition to cisplatin revealed that T2AA significantly enhanced formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by cisplatin. T2AA promoted colocalized foci formation of phospho-ATM and 53BP1 and up-regulated phospho-BRCA1 in cisplatin-treated cells, suggesting that T2AA increases DSBs. When cells were treated by cisplatin and T2AA, their clonogenic survival was significantly less than that of those treated by cisplatin only. These findings show that the inhibitors of monoubiquitinated PCNA chemosensitize cells by inhibiting repair of ICLs and DSBs.

  15. A proprotein convertase subtilisin-like/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) C-terminal domain antibody antigen-binding fragment inhibits PCSK9 internalization and restores low density lipoprotein uptake.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan G; Condra, Jon H; Orsatti, Laura; Shen, Xun; Di Marco, Stefania; Pandit, Shilpa; Bottomley, Matthew J; Ruggeri, Lionello; Cummings, Richard T; Cubbon, Rose M; Santoro, Joseph C; Ehrhardt, Anka; Lewis, Dale; Fisher, Timothy S; Ha, Sookhee; Njimoluh, Leila; Wood, Dana D; Hammond, Holly A; Wisniewski, Douglas; Volpari, Cinzia; Noto, Alessia; Lo Surdo, Paola; Hubbard, Brian; Carfí, Andrea; Sitlani, Ayesha

    2010-04-23

    PCSK9 binds to the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and leads to LDLR degradation and inhibition of plasma LDL cholesterol clearance. Consequently, the role of PCSK9 in modulating circulating LDL makes it a promising therapeutic target for treating hypercholesterolemia and coronary heart disease. Although the C-terminal domain of PCSK9 is not involved in LDLR binding, the location of several naturally occurring mutations within this region suggests that it has an important role for PCSK9 function. Using a phage display library, we identified an anti-PCSK9 Fab (fragment antigen binding), 1G08, with subnanomolar affinity for PCSK9. In an assay measuring LDL uptake in HEK293 and HepG2 cells, 1G08 Fab reduced 50% the PCSK9-dependent inhibitory effects on LDL uptake. Importantly, we found that 1G08 did not affect the PCSK9-LDLR interaction but inhibited the internalization of PCSK9 in these cells. Furthermore, proteolysis and site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that 1G08 Fab binds a region of beta-strands encompassing Arg-549, Arg-580, Arg-582, Glu-607, Lys-609, and Glu-612 in the PCSK9 C-terminal domain. Consistent with these results, 1G08 fails to bind PCSK9DeltaC, a truncated form of PCSK9 lacking the C-terminal domain. Additional studies revealed that lack of the C-terminal domain compromised the ability of PCSK9 to internalize into cells, and to inhibit LDL uptake. Together, the present study demonstrate that the PCSK9 C-terminal domain contribute to its inhibition of LDLR function mainly through its role in the cellular uptake of PCSK9 and LDLR complex. 1G08 Fab represents a useful new tool for delineating the mechanism of PCSK9 uptake and LDLR degradation.

  16. Structural basis of Arp2/3 complex inhibition by GMF, Coronin, and Arpin

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Olga S.; Chemeris, Angelina; Guo, Siyang; Alioto, Salvatore L.; Gandhi, Meghal; Padrick, Shae; Pechnikova, Evgeniya; David, Violaine; Gautreau, Alexis; Goode, Bruce L.

    2017-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Arp2/3 complex plays a central role in nucleating the branched actin filament arrays that drive cell migration, endocytosis, and other processes. To better understand Arp2/3 complex regulation, we used single particle electron microscopy to compare the structures of Arp2/3 complex bound to three different inhibitory ligands: GMF, Coronin, and Arpin. Although the three inhibitors have distinct binding sites on Arp2/3 complex, they each induced an ‘open’ nucleation-inactive conformation. Coronin promoted a standard (previously described) open conformation of Arp2/3 complex, with the N-terminal β-propeller domain of Coronin positioned near the p35/ARPC2 subunit of Arp2/3 complex. GMF induced two distinct open conformations of Arp2/3 complex, which correlated with two suggested binding sites for GMF. Further, GMF synergized with Coronin in inhibiting actin nucleation by Arp2/3 complex. Arpin, which uses VCA-related acidic (A) motifs to interact with the Arp2/3 complex, induced the standard open conformation, and two new masses appeared at positions near Arp2 and Arp3. Further, Arpin showed additive inhibitory effects on Arp2/3 complex with Coronin and GMF. Together, these data suggest that Arp2/3 complex conformation is highly polymorphic and that its activities can be controlled combinatorially by different inhibitory ligands. PMID:27939292

  17. Loss of cohesin complex components STAG2 or STAG3 confers resistance to BRAF inhibition in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Che-Hung; Kim, Sun Hye; Trousil, Sebastian; Frederick, Dennie T.; Piris, Adriano; Yuan, Ping; Cai, Li; Gu, Lei; Li, Man; Lee, Jung Hyun; Mitra, Devarati; Fisher, David E.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Zheng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase V-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) is an oncogenic driver and therapeutic target in melanoma. Inhibitors of BRAF (BRAFi) have shown high response rates and extended survival in melanoma patients bearing tumors that express BRAF Val600 mutations, but a vast majority of these patients develop drug resistance. Here we show that loss of Stromal antigen 2 or 3 (STAG2 or STAG3), which encode subunits of the cohesin complex, in melanoma cells results in resistance to BRAFi. We identified loss-of-function mutations in STAG2 as well as decreased expression of STAG2 or STAG3 proteins in several tumor samples from patients with acquired resistance to BRAFi and in BRAFi-resistant melanoma cell lines. Knockdown of STAG2 or STAG3 decreased sensitivity of Val600Glu BRAF-mutant melanoma cells and xenograft tumors to BRAFi. Loss of STAG2 inhibited CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-mediated expression of dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6), leading to reactivation of ERK signaling. Our studies unveil a previously unknown genetic mechanism of BRAFi resistance and provide new insights into the tumor suppressor function of STAG2 and STAG3. PMID:27500726

  18. Potent inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases by copper complexes with multi-benzimidazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Lu, Liping; Zhu, Miaoli; Wang, Qingming; Yuan, Caixia; Xing, Shu; Fu, Xueqi; Mei, Yuhua

    2011-12-01

    A series of copper complexes with multi-benzimidazole derivatives, including mono- and di-nuclear, were synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The speciation of Cu/NTB in aqueous solution was investigated by potentiometric pH titrations. Their inhibitory effects against human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), megakaryocyte protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (PTP-MEG2), srchomology phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) and srchomology phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) were evaluated in vitro. The five copper complexes exhibit potent inhibition against PTP1B, TCPTP and PTP-MEG2 with almost same inhibitory effects with IC(50) at submicro molar level and about tenfold weaker inhibition versus SHP-1, but almost no inhibition against SHP-2. Kinetic analysis indicates that they are reversible competitive inhibitors of PTP1B. Fluorescence study on the interaction between PTP1B and complex 2 or 4 suggests that the complexes bind to PTP1B with the formation of a 1:1 complex. The binding constant are about 1.14 × 10(6) and 1.87 × 10(6) M(-1) at 310 K for 2 and 4, respectively.

  19. Enzyme inhibition, radical scavenging, and spectroscopic studies of vanadium(IV)-hydrazide complexes.

    PubMed

    Ashiq, Uzma; Jamal, Rifat Ara; Mahroof-Tahir, Mohammad; Maqsood, Zahida T; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Omer, Iman; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopic, enzyme-inhibition, and free-radical scavenging properties of a series of hydrazide ligands and their vanadium(IV) complexes have been investigated. Analytical and spectral data indicate the presence of a dimeric unit with two oxovanadium(IV) ions (VO(2+)) coordinated with two hydrazide ligands along with two water molecules. All complexes are stable in the solid state, but exhibit varying degrees of stability in solution. Binding of the coordinating solvent such as DMSO is indicated at the 6th position of vanadium in the dimeric unit followed by conversion to a monomeric intermediate species, [VOL(DMSO)3]1+ (L = hydrazide ligand). The free hydrazide ligands are inactive against snake venom phosphodiesterase I (SVPD), whereas oxovanadium(IV) complexes of these ligands show varying degrees of inhibition and are found to be non-competitive inhibitors. The superoxide and nitric oxide radical scavenging properties have been determined. Hydrazide ligands are inactive against these free radicals, whereas their V(IV) complexes show varying degrees of inhibition. Structure-activity relationship studies indicate that the electronic and/or steric factors that change the geometry of the complexes play an important role in their inhibitory potential against SVPD and free radicals.

  20. Bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*2703 and DRB3*1501 alleles are associated with variation in levels of protection against Theileria parva challenge following immunization with the sporozoite p67 antigen.

    PubMed

    Ballingall, Keith T; Luyai, Anthony; Rowlands, G John; Sales, Jill; Musoke, Anthony J; Morzaria, Subash P; McKeever, Declan J

    2004-05-01

    Initial laboratory trials of an experimental subunit vaccine against Theileria parva based on the 67-kDa major sporozoite surface antigen revealed a range of responses to challenge. We have analyzed convergence in seven sets of monozygotic twins which suggests that genetic factors may have an influence in determining the degree of protection provided by p67 immunization. In addition, we have examined whether allelic diversity at major histocompatibility complex class II loci influences protection. Analysis of bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3 diversity in 201 animals identified significant associations with vaccine success (DRB3*2703; P = 0.027) and vaccine failure (DRB3*1501; P = 0.013). Furthermore, DRB3*2703 was associated with the likelihood of immunized animals showing little to no clinical signs of disease following challenge. We discuss the acquired and innate immune mechanisms that may be behind the associations described here.

  1. Detection of cytomegalovirus antigens in phagocytosed serum complexes from a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy, cutaneous ulceration, and digital gangrene.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, J N; Wojtacha, D; Edmond, E

    1992-01-01

    A patient with rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy, cutaneous ulceration, and digital gangrene was studied. Circulating immune complexes were detected by C1q binding although serum complement levels were within the normal range. Immunofluorescent staining of buffy coat cells with specific antisera showed the presence of IgG and IgM in phagocytosed inclusions but complement C3 was not detected. A monoclonal antibody specific for cytomegalovirus detected antigens in phagocytosed inclusions on one occasion. These results may suggest that cytomegalovirus antigens are a hitherto unidentified component of serum complexes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the vasculitic complications of rheumatoid arthritis by participating in immune complex formation. Images PMID:1316744

  2. Short-interfering RNA-mediated silencing of proliferating cell nuclear antigen inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, H; Xin, T; Nancai, Y; Yanxia, W; Qian, L; Wei, M; Yandong, Y; Hanju, H

    2008-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an important protein for DNA polymerase delta in the nucleus, and shown to have a fundamental role in cellular proliferation. It is overexpressed to support cell growth in cervical carcinoma. To study its role in stress response, we design and use short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to inhibit PCNA expression in HeLa cells and validate its effect on cell proliferation. In this study, three PCNA-shRNA expression vectors are constructed and introduced into HeLa cells, and the cell cycle is analyzed by flow cytometry. Apoptotic cell is detected by single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay), and caspase cleavage is studied also. Expression of PCNA is assessed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Upon transient transfection with plasmid encoding shRNA, it is found that expression of PCNA decreased in shRNA-transfected cells, downregulation of PCNA inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in HeLa cells. PCNA downregulation also increase cell population in the G0-G1 phase. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that shRNA can inhibit the DNA replication and induce apoptosis in HeLa cells effectively and, therefore, could be used as a new potential anticancer tool for therapy of human cervical carcinoma.

  3. Liposome-Antigen-Nucleic Acid Complexes Protect Mice from Lethal Challenge with Western and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Aaron T.; Schountz, Tony; Toth, Ann M.; Rico, Amber B.; Jarvis, Donald L.; Powers, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Alphaviruses are mosquito-borne viruses that cause significant disease in animals and humans. Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), two New World alphaviruses, can cause fatal encephalitis, and EEEV is a select agent of concern in biodefense. However, we have no antiviral therapies against alphaviral disease, and current vaccine strategies target only a single alphavirus species. In an effort to develop new tools for a broader response to outbreaks, we designed and tested a novel alphavirus vaccine comprised of cationic lipid nucleic acid complexes (CLNCs) and the ectodomain of WEEV E1 protein (E1ecto). Interestingly, we found that the CLNC component, alone, had therapeutic efficacy, as it increased survival of CD-1 mice following lethal WEEV infection. Immunization with the CLNC-WEEV E1ecto mixture (lipid-antigen-nucleic acid complexes [LANACs]) using a prime-boost regimen provided 100% protection in mice challenged with WEEV subcutaneously, intranasally, or via mosquito. Mice immunized with LANACs mounted a strong humoral immune response but did not produce neutralizing antibodies. Passive transfer of serum from LANAC E1ecto-immunized mice to nonimmune CD-1 mice conferred protection against WEEV challenge, indicating that antibody is sufficient for protection. In addition, the LANAC E1ecto immunization protocol significantly increased survival of mice following intranasal or subcutaneous challenge with EEEV. In summary, our LANAC formulation has therapeutic potential and is an effective vaccine strategy that offers protection against two distinct species of alphavirus irrespective of the route of infection. We discuss plausible mechanisms as well the potential utility of our LANAC formulation as a pan-alphavirus vaccine. PMID:24257615

  4. Synthesis, characterization and xanthine oxidase inhibition of Cu(II)-chrysin complex.

    PubMed

    Lin, Suyun; Zeng, Li; Zhang, Guowen; Liao, Yijing; Gong, Deming

    2017-05-05

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is a key enzyme catalyzing hypoxanthine to xanthine and then uric acid causing hyperuricemia. A Cu(II) complex of chrysin was synthesized and characterized by UV-vis absorption, Fourier transform infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) and mass spectroscopy studies. The interaction of Cu(II)-complex with XO was investigated by spectroscopic methods and molecular simulation. The Cu(II)-chrysin complex exhibited a better inhibitory ability (IC50=0.82±0.034μM) against XO than its corresponding ligands chrysin and Cu(2+) in a mix-competitive manner. The binding affinity of Cu(II)-chrysin complex with XO was much higher than that of chrysin. The hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played main roles in the binding. Analysis of circular dichroism spectra indicated that the complex induced the conformational change of XO. The molecular simulation found that the Cu(II)-chrysin complex inserted into the active cavity of XO with Cu acting as a bridge, occupying the catalytic center of the enzyme to avoid entry of the substrate xanthine, leading to the inhibition of XO. This study may provide new insights into the inhibition mechanism of the Cu(II)-chrysin complex as a promising XO inhibitor and its potential application for the treatment of hyperuricemia.

  5. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying; Billiar, Timothy R

    2012-06-22

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC complex upon the binding of TNF to TNFR1. In conclusion, our study shows that cAMP prevents TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes by inhibiting DISC complex formation.

  6. A Role For Mitochondria In Antigen Processing And Presentation.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Lc; Cervantes-Silva, Mp; Ontiveros-Dotor, E; López-Villegas, Eo; Sánchez-García, Fj

    2014-09-23

    Immune synapse formation is critical for T lymphocyte activation, and mitochondria have a role in this process, by localizing close to the immune synapse, regulating intracellular calcium concentration, and providing locally required ATP. The interaction between antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T lymphocytes is a two-way signaling process. However, the role of mitochondria in antigen presenting cells during this process remains unknown. For APCs to be able to activate T lymphocytes, they must first engage in an antigen-uptake, -processing, and -presentation process. Here we show that HEL-loaded B lymphocytes, as a type of APCs, undergo a small but significant mitochondrial depolarization by 1-2 h following antigen exposure thus suggesting an increase in their metabolic demands. Inhibition of ATP synthase (oligomycin) or mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) (Ruthenium red) had no effect on antigen uptake. Therefore, antigen processing and antigen presentation were further analyzed. Oligomycin treatment reduced the amount of specific MHC-peptide complexes but not total MHC II on the cell membrane of B lymphocytes which correlated with a decrease in antigen presentation. However, oligomycin also reduced antigen presentation by B lymphocytes that endogenously express HEL and by B lymphocytes loaded with the HEL48-62 peptide, although to a lesser extent. ATP synthase inhibition and MCU inhibition had a clear inhibitory effect on antigen processing (DQ-OVA). Taking together these results suggest that ATP synthase and MCU are relevant for antigen processing and presentation. Finally, APCs mitochondria were found to re-organize towards the APC-T immune synapse. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential inhibition/inactivation of mitochondrial complex I implicates its alteration in malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Bera, S; Ghosal, S; Ray, S; Basu, A; Ray, M

    2011-09-01

    Methylglyoxal strongly inhibited mitochondrial respiration of a wide variety of malignant tissues including sarcoma of mice, whereas no such significant effect was noted on mitochondrial respiration of normal tissues with the exception of cardiac cells. This inhibition by methylglyoxal was found to be at the level of mitochondrial complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) of the electron transport chain. L-Lactaldehyde, which is structurally and metabolically related to methylglyoxal, could protect against this inhibition. NADH dehydrogenase of submitochondrial particles of malignant and cardiac cells was inhibited by methylglyoxal. This enzyme of these cells was also inactivated by methylglyoxal. The possible involvement of lysine residue(s) for the activity of NADH dehydrogenase was also investigated by using lysine-specific reagents trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) and pyridoxal 5' phosphate (PP). Inactivation of NADH dehydrogenase by both TNBS and PP convincingly demonstrated the involvement of lysine residue(s) for the activity of the sarcoma and cardiac enzymes, whereas both TNBS and PP failed to inactivate the enzymes of skeletal muscle and liver. Together these studies demonstrate a specific effect of methylglyoxal on mitochondrial complex I of malignant cells and importantly some distinct alteration of this complex in cancer cells.

  8. Complex Living Conditions Impair Behavioral Inhibition but Improve Attention in Rats

    PubMed Central

    van der Veen, Rixt; Kentrop, Jiska; van der Tas, Liza; Loi, Manila; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Joëls, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Rapid adaptation to changes, while maintaining a certain level of behavioral inhibition is an important feature in every day functioning. How environmental context and challenges in life can impact on the development of this quality is still unknown. In the present study, we examined the effect of a complex rearing environment during adolescence on attention and behavioral inhibition in adult male rats. We also tested whether these effects were affected by an adverse early life challenge, maternal deprivation (MD). We found that animals that were raised in large, two floor MarlauTM cages, together with 10 conspecifics, showed improved attention, but impaired behavioral inhibition in the 5-choice serial reaction time task. The early life challenge of 24 h MD on postnatal day 3 led to a decline in bodyweight during adolescence, but did not by itself influence responses in the 5-choice task in adulthood, nor did it moderate the effects of complex housing. Our data suggest that a complex rearing environment leads to a faster adaptation to changes in the environment, but at the cost of lower behavioral inhibition. PMID:26733839

  9. MAGE-A Cancer/Testis Antigens Inhibit MDM2 Ubiquitylation Function and Promote Increased Levels of MDM4

    PubMed Central

    Marcar, Lynnette; Ihrig, Bianca; Hourihan, John; Bray, Susan E.; Quinlan, Philip R.; Jordan, Lee B.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Hupp, Ted R.; Meek, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma antigen A (MAGE-A) proteins comprise a structurally and biochemically similar sub-family of Cancer/Testis antigens that are expressed in many cancer types and are thought to contribute actively to malignancy. MAGE-A proteins are established regulators of certain cancer-associated transcription factors, including p53, and are activators of several RING finger-dependent ubiquitin E3 ligases. Here, we show that MAGE-A2 associates with MDM2, a ubiquitin E3 ligase that mediates ubiquitylation of more than 20 substrates including mainly p53, MDM2 itself, and MDM4, a potent p53 inhibitor and MDM2 partner that is structurally related to MDM2. We find that MAGE-A2 interacts with MDM2 via the N-terminal p53-binding pocket and the RING finger domain of MDM2 that is required for homo/hetero-dimerization and for E2 ligase interaction. Consistent with these data, we show that MAGE-A2 is a potent inhibitor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of MDM2, yet it does not have any significant effect on p53 turnover mediated by MDM2. Strikingly, however, increased MAGE-A2 expression leads to reduced ubiquitylation and increased levels of MDM4. Similarly, silencing of endogenous MAGE-A expression diminishes MDM4 levels in a manner that can be rescued by the proteasomal inhibitor, bortezomid, and permits increased MDM2/MDM4 association. These data suggest that MAGE-A proteins can: (i) uncouple the ubiquitin ligase and degradation functions of MDM2; (ii) act as potent inhibitors of E3 ligase function; and (iii) regulate the turnover of MDM4. We also find an association between the presence of MAGE-A and increased MDM4 levels in primary breast cancer, suggesting that MAGE-A-dependent control of MDM4 levels has relevance to cancer clinically. PMID:26001071

  10. Inhibition of replicon initiation in human cells following stabilization of topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, W K; Boyer, J C; Estabrooks, L L; Wilson, S J

    1991-01-01

    Diploid human fibroblast strains were treated for 10 min with inhibitors of type I and type II DNA topoisomerases, and after removal of the inhibitors, the rate of initiation of DNA synthesis at replicon origins was determined. By alkaline elution chromatography, 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide (amsacrine), an inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II, was shown to produce DNA strand breaks. These strand breaks are thought to reflect drug-induced stabilization of topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complexes. Removal of the drug led to a rapid resealing of the strand breaks by dissociation of the complexes. Velocity sedimentation analysis was used to quantify the effects of amsacrine treatment on DNA replication. It was demonstrated that transient exposure to low concentrations of amsacrine inhibited replicon initiation but did not substantially affect DNA chainelongation within operating replicons. Maximal inhibition of replicon initiation occurred 20 to 30 min after drug treatment, and the initiation rate recovered 30 to 90 min later. Ataxia telangiectasia cells displayed normal levels of amsacrine-induced DNA strand breaks during stabilization of cleavable complexes but failed to downregulate replicon initiation after exposure to the topoisomerase inhibitor. Thus, inhibition of replicon initiation in response to DNA damage appears to be an active process which requires a gene product which is defective or missing in ataxia telangiectasia cells. In normal human fibroblasts, the inhibition of DNA topoisomerase I by camptothecin produced reversible DNA strand breaks. Transient exposure to this drug also inhibited replicon initiation. These results suggest that the cellular response pathway which downregulates replicon initiation following genotoxic damage may respond to perturbations of chromatin structure which accompany stabilization of topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complexes. PMID:1646393

  11. On the attribution of binding energy in antigen-antibody complexes McPC 603, D1.3, and HyHEL-5.

    PubMed

    Novotny, J; Bruccoleri, R E; Saul, F A

    1989-05-30

    Using X-ray coordinates of antigen-antibody complexes McPC 603, D1.3, and HyHEL-5, we made semiquantitative estimates of Gibbs free energy changes (delta G) accompanying noncovalent complex formation of the McPC 603 Fv fragment with phosphocholine and the D1.3 or HyHEL-5 Fv fragments with hen egg white lysozyme. Our empirical delta G function, which implicitly incorporates solvent effects, has the following components: hydrophobic force, solvent-modified electrostatics, changes in side-chain conformational entropy, translational/overall rotational entropy changes, and the dilutional (cratic) entropy term. The calculated delta G ranges matched the experimentally determined delta G of McPC 603 and D1.3 complexes and overestimated it (i.e., gave a more negative value) in the case of HyHEL-5. Relative delta G contributions of selected antibody residues, calculated for HyHEL-5 complexes, agreed with those determined independently in site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Analysis of delta G attribution in all three complexes indicated that only a small number of amino acids probably contribute actively to binding energetics. These form a subset of the total antigen-antibody contact surface. In the antibodies, the bottom part of the antigen binding cavity dominated the energetics of binding whereas in lysozyme, the energetically most important residues defined small (2.5-3 nm2) "energetic" epitopes. Thus, a concept of protein antigenicity emerges that involves the active, attractive contributions mediated by the energetic antigenic epitopes and the passive surface complementarity contributed by the surrounding contact area. The D1.3 energetic epitope of lysozyme involved Gly 22, Gly 117, and Gln 121; the HyHEL-5 epitope consisted of Arg 45 and Arg 68. These are also the essential antigenic residues determined experimentally. The above positions belong to the most protruding parts of the lysozyme surface, and their backbones are not exceptionally flexible. Least

  12. Inhibition in the auditory brainstem enhances signal representation and regulates gain in complex acoustic environments

    PubMed Central

    Keine, Christian; Rübsamen, Rudolf; Englitz, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition plays a crucial role in neural signal processing, shaping and limiting responses. In the auditory system, inhibition already modulates second order neurons in the cochlear nucleus, e.g. spherical bushy cells (SBCs). While the physiological basis of inhibition and excitation is well described, their functional interaction in signal processing remains elusive. Using a combination of in vivo loose-patch recordings, iontophoretic drug application, and detailed signal analysis in the Mongolian Gerbil, we demonstrate that inhibition is widely co-tuned with excitation, and leads only to minor sharpening of the spectral response properties. Combinations of complex stimuli and neuronal input-output analysis based on spectrotemporal receptive fields revealed inhibition to render the neuronal output temporally sparser and more reproducible than the input. Overall, inhibition plays a central role in improving the temporal response fidelity of SBCs across a wide range of input intensities and thereby provides the basis for high-fidelity signal processing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19295.001 PMID:27855778

  13. The CD4 and CD8 antigens are coupled to a protein-tyrosine kinase (p56lck) that phosphorylates the CD3 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, E K; Dasgupta, J D; Schlossman, S F; Trevillyan, J M; Rudd, C E

    1989-01-01

    Many mammalian receptors have been found to regulate cell growth by virtue of a protein-tyrosine kinase domain in their cytoplasmic tail. We recently described an association of the CD4 antigen with a T-cell-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (p56lck; formerly termed pp58lck; EC 2.7.1.112). This interaction represents a potential mechanism by which T-cell growth may be regulated and offers a model by which other members of the src family (products of c-src, c-yes, c-fgr, etc.) may interact with mammalian growth factor receptors. As in the case of the CD4 antigen, the CD8 antigen appears to serve as a receptor for nonpolymorphic regions of products of the major histocompatibility complex and has been implicated in the regulation of T-cell growth. In this study, we reveal that the human CD8 antigen is also associated with the T-cell-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (p56lck). The associated p56lck kinase was detected by use of both in vitro and in vivo labeling regimes using an antiserum to the C terminus of p56lck. Two-dimensional nonequilibrium pH-gradient gel electrophoresis and sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated the similarity of p56lck to the protein-tyrosine kinase associated with the CD4 antigen. The catalytic activity of p56lck was revealed by the autophosphorylation of the 55- to 60-kDa kinase and the occasional labeling of a 35-kDa protein. Last, we demonstrate directly that members of the CD3 complex, including the gamma, delta, and epsilon chains, as well as a putative zeta subunit, can be phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by the CD4/CD8.p56lck complex. Images PMID:2470098

  14. Formoterol synergy with des-ciclesonide inhibits IL-4 expression in IgE/antigen-induced mast cells by inhibiting JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-hong; Ge, Ling-tian; Jiang, Jun-xia; Shen, Hui-juan; Jia, Yong-liang; Dong, Xin-wei; Sun, Yun; Xie, Qiang-min

    2015-08-15

    Inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy in combination with long-acting β-adrenergic agonists (LABA) is the most important treatment for allergic asthma, although the mechanism still remains unclear. However, mast cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of asthma. In this study, we explored the sole or synergetic effects of des-ciclesonide (ICS) and formoterol (LABA) on the cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 and on histamine release from mast cells (RBL-2H3 cells). We found that des-ciclesonide (0.1, 1 and 10nM) and formoterol (0.1, 1 and 10μM) alone attenuated DNP-BSA-induced IL-4 and IL-13 production, respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner in DNP-IgE-sensitized mast cells. Des-ciclesonide (0.2nM) and formoterol (1μM) alone also reduced histamine production. However, the combination of des-ciclesonide (0.2nM) and formoterol (1μM) had a synergistic inhibition effect on IL-4 mRNA expression and protein production but not IL-13 and histamine release. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 (10μM) inhibited antigen-induced mRNA expression and protein production of IL-4. Des-ciclesonide and formoterol alone inhibited the activation of JNK in a concentration-dependent manner, and the combination of des-ciclesonide (0.2nM) and formoterol (1μM) exhibited greater inhibition effect compared with des-ciclesonide (0.2nM) or formoterol (1μM) alone. Taken together, these synergistic effects on mast cells might provide the rationale for the development of the most recent ICS/LABA combination approved for asthma therapy.

  15. Inhibition of Antigen-Specific and Nonspecific Stimulation of Bovine T and B Cells by Lymphostatin from Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Bell, Charlotte R.; Elshina, Elizaveta; Hope, Jayne C.; Stevens, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) are enteric bacterial pathogens of worldwide importance. Most EPEC and non-O157 EHEC strains express lymphostatin (also known as LifA), a chromosomally encoded 365-kDa protein. We previously demonstrated that lymphostatin is a putative glycosyltransferase that is important in intestinal colonization of cattle by EHEC serogroup O5, O111, and O26 strains. However, the nature and consequences of the interaction between lymphostatin and immune cells from the bovine host are ill defined. Using purified recombinant protein, we demonstrated that lymphostatin inhibits mitogen-activated proliferation of bovine T cells and, to a lesser extent, proliferation of cytokine-stimulated B cells, but not NK cells. It broadly affected the T cell compartment, inhibiting all cell subsets (CD4, CD8, WC-1, and γδ T cell receptor [γδ-TCR]) and cytokines examined (interleukin 2 [IL-2], IL-4, IL-10, IL-17A, and gamma interferon [IFN-γ]) and rendered T cells refractory to mitogen for a least 18 h after transient exposure. Lymphostatin was also able to inhibit proliferation of T cells stimulated by IL-2 and by antigen presentation using a Theileria-transformed cell line and autologous T cells from Theileria-infected cattle. We conclude that lymphostatin is likely to act early in T cell activation, as stimulation of T cells with concanavalin A, but not phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate combined with ionomycin, was inhibited. Finally, a homologue of lymphostatin from E. coli O157:H7 (ToxB; L7095) was also found to possess comparable inhibitory activity against T cells, indicating a potentially conserved strategy for interference in adaptive responses by attaching and effacing E. coli. PMID:27920212

  16. Geminin Inhibits a Late Step in the Formation of Human Pre-replicative Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Lu, Wenyan; Santos, Ruth E.; Frattini, Mark G.; Kelly, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The initial step in initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication involves the assembly of pre-replicative complexes (pre-RCs) at origins of replication during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. In metazoans initiation is inhibited by the regulatory factor Geminin. We have purified the human pre-RC proteins, studied their interactions in vitro with each other and with origin DNA, and analyzed the effects of HsGeminin on formation of DNA-protein complexes. The formation of an initial complex containing the human origin recognition complex (HsORC), HsCdt1, HsCdc6, and origin DNA is cooperative, involving all possible binary interactions among the components. Maximal association of HsMCM2–7, a component of the replicative helicase, requires HsORC, HsCdc6, HsCdt1, and ATP, and is driven by interactions of HsCdt1 and HsCdc6 with multiple HsMCM2–7 subunits. Formation of stable complexes, resistant to high salt, requires ATP hydrolysis. In the absence of HsMCM proteins, HsGeminin inhibits the association of HsCdt1 with DNA or with HsORC-HsCdc6-DNA complexes. However, HsGeminin does not inhibit recruitment of HsMCM2–7 to DNA to form complexes containing all of the pre-RC proteins. In fact, HsGeminin itself is a component of such complexes, and interacts directly with the HsMcm3 and HsMcm5 subunits of HsMCM2–7, as well as with HsCdt1. Although HsGeminin does not prevent the initial formation of DNA-protein complexes containing the pre-RC proteins, it strongly inhibits the formation of stable pre-RCs that are resistant to high salt. We suggest that bound HsGeminin prevents transition of the pre-RC to a state that is competent for initiation of DNA replication. PMID:25231993

  17. Statin-Induced Myopathy Is Associated with Mitochondrial Complex III Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Schirris, Tom J J; Renkema, G Herma; Ritschel, Tina; Voermans, Nicol C; Bilos, Albert; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Brandt, Ulrich; Koopman, Werner J H; Beyrath, Julien D; Rodenburg, Richard J; Willems, Peter H G M; Smeitink, Jan A M; Russel, Frans G M

    2015-09-01

    Cholesterol-lowering statins effectively reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events. Myopathy is the most important adverse effect, but its underlying mechanism remains enigmatic. In C2C12 myoblasts, several statin lactones reduced respiratory capacity and appeared to be strong inhibitors of mitochondrial complex III (CIII) activity, up to 84% inhibition. The lactones were in general three times more potent inducers of cytotoxicity than their corresponding acid forms. The Qo binding site of CIII was identified as off-target of the statin lactones. These findings could be confirmed in muscle tissue of patients suffering from statin-induced myopathies, in which CIII enzyme activity was reduced by 18%. Respiratory inhibition in C2C12 myoblasts could be attenuated by convergent electron flow into CIII, restoring respiration up to 89% of control. In conclusion, CIII inhibition was identified as a potential off-target mechanism associated with statin-induced myopathies.

  18. Increased sensitivity of antigen-experienced T cells through the enrichment of oligomeric T cell receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rashmi; Ferez, María; Swamy, Mahima; Arechaga, Ignacio; Rejas, María Teresa; Valpuesta, Jose M; Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Alarcon, Balbino; van Santen, Hisse M

    2011-09-23

    Although memory T cells respond more vigorously to stimulation and they are more sensitive to low doses of antigen than naive T cells, the molecular basis of this increased sensitivity remains unclear. We have previously shown that the T cell receptor (TCR) exists as different-sized oligomers on the surface of resting T cells and that large oligomers are preferentially activated in response to low antigen doses. Through biochemistry and electron microscopy, we now showed that previously stimulated and memory T cells have more and larger TCR oligomers at the cell surface than their naive counterparts. Reconstitution of cells and mice with a point mutant of the CD3ζ subunit, which impairs TCR oligomer formation, demonstrated that the increased size of TCR oligomers was directly responsible for the increased sensitivity of antigen-experienced T cells. Thus, we propose that an "avidity maturation" mechanism underlies T cell antigenic memory.

  19. PLK1 (polo like kinase 1) inhibits MTOR complex 1 and promotes autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ruf, Stefanie; Heberle, Alexander Martin; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Gelino, Sara; Wilkinson, Deepti; Gerbeth, Carolin; Schwarz, Jennifer Jasmin; Holzwarth, Birgit; Warscheid, Bettina; Meisinger, Chris; van Vugt, Marcel A T M; Baumeister, Ralf; Hansen, Malene; Thedieck, Kathrin

    2017-01-19

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1) and PLK1 (polo like kinase 1) are major drivers of cancer cell growth and proliferation, and inhibitors of both protein kinases are currently being investigated in clinical studies. To date, MTORC1's and PLK1's functions are mostly studied separately, and reports on their mutual crosstalk are scarce. Here, we identify PLK1 as a physical MTORC1 interactor in human cancer cells. PLK1 inhibition enhances MTORC1 activity under nutrient sufficiency and in starved cells, and PLK1 directly phosphorylates the MTORC1 component RPTOR/RAPTOR in vitro. PLK1 and MTORC1 reside together at lysosomes, the subcellular site where MTORC1 is active. Consistent with an inhibitory role of PLK1 toward MTORC1, PLK1 overexpression inhibits lysosomal association of the PLK1-MTORC1 complex, whereas PLK1 inhibition promotes lysosomal localization of MTOR. PLK1-MTORC1 binding is enhanced by amino acid starvation, a condition known to increase autophagy. MTORC1 inhibition is an important step in autophagy activation. Consistently, PLK1 inhibition mitigates autophagy in cancer cells both under nutrient starvation and sufficiency, and a role of PLK1 in autophagy is also observed in the invertebrate model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. In summary, PLK1 inhibits MTORC1 and thereby positively contributes to autophagy. Since autophagy is increasingly recognized to contribute to tumor cell survival and growth, we propose that cautious monitoring of MTORC1 and autophagy readouts in clinical trials with PLK1 inhibitors is needed to develop strategies for optimized (combinatorial) cancer therapies targeting MTORC1, PLK1, and autophagy.

  20. PLK1 (polo like kinase 1) inhibits MTOR complex 1 and promotes autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, Stefanie; Heberle, Alexander Martin; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Gelino, Sara; Wilkinson, Deepti; Gerbeth, Carolin; Schwarz, Jennifer Jasmin; Holzwarth, Birgit; Warscheid, Bettina; Meisinger, Chris; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.; Baumeister, Ralf; Hansen, Malene; Thedieck, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1) and polo like kinase 1 (PLK1) are major drivers of cancer cell growth and proliferation, and inhibitors of both protein kinases are currently being investigated in clinical studies. To date, MTORC1′s and PLK1′s functions are mostly studied separately, and reports on their mutual crosstalk are scarce. Here, we identify PLK1 as a physical MTORC1 interactor in human cancer cells. PLK1 inhibition enhances MTORC1 activity under nutrient sufficiency and in starved cells, and PLK1 directly phosphorylates the MTORC1 component RPTOR/RAPTOR in vitro. PLK1 and MTORC1 reside together at lysosomes, the subcellular site where MTORC1 is active. Consistent with an inhibitory role of PLK1 toward MTORC1, PLK1 overexpression inhibits lysosomal association of the PLK1-MTORC1 complex, whereas PLK1 inhibition promotes lysosomal localization of MTOR. PLK1-MTORC1 binding is enhanced by amino acid starvation, a condition known to increase autophagy. MTORC1 inhibition is an important step in autophagy activation. Consistently, PLK1 inhibition mitigates autophagy in cancer cells both under nutrient starvation and sufficiency, and a role of PLK1 in autophagy is also observed in the invertebrate model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. In summary, PLK1 inhibits MTORC1 and thereby positively contributes to autophagy. Since autophagy is increasingly recognized to contribute to tumor cell survival and growth, we propose that cautious monitoring of MTORC1 and autophagy readouts in clinical trials with PLK1 inhibitors is needed to develop strategies for optimized (combinatorial) cancer therapies targeting MTORC1, PLK1, and autophagy. PMID:28102733

  1. The SCFSlimb E3 ligase complex regulates asymmetric division to inhibit neuroblast overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Wang, Cheng; Sandanaraj, Edwin; Aw, Sherry S Y; Koe, Chwee T; Wong, Jack J L; Yu, Fengwei; Ang, Beng T; Tang, Carol; Wang, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila larval brain neuroblasts divide asymmetrically to balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that the SCFSlimb E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which is composed of Cul1, SkpA, Roc1a and the F-box protein Supernumerary limbs (Slimb), inhibits ectopic neuroblast formation and regulates asymmetric division of neuroblasts. Hyperactivation of Akt leads to similar neuroblast overgrowth and defects in asymmetric division. Slimb associates with Akt in a protein complex, and SCFSlimb acts through SAK and Akt to inhibit neuroblast overgrowth. Moreover, Beta-transducin repeat containing, the human ortholog of Slimb, is frequently deleted in highly aggressive gliomas, suggesting a conserved tumor suppressor-like function. PMID:24413555

  2. Evolutionary genetics and vector adaptation of recombinant viruses of the western equine encephalitis antigenic complex provides new insights into alphavirus diversity and host switching

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Stallknecht, David E.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), Highlands J virus (HJV), and Fort Morgan virus (FMV) are the sole representatives of the WEE antigenic complex of the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, that are endemic to North America. All three viruses have their ancestry in a recombination event involving eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and a Sindbis (SIN)-like virus that gave rise to a chimeric alphavirus that subsequently diversified into the present-day WEEV, HJV, and FMV. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the genetic, ecological, and evolutionary relationships among these recombinant-origin viruses, including the description of a nsP4 polymerase mutation in FMV that allows it to circumvent the host range barrier to Asian tiger mosquito cells, a vector species that is normally refractory to infection. Notably, we also provide evidence that the recombination event that gave rise to these three WEEV antigenic complex viruses may have occurred in North America. PMID:25463613

  3. Evolutionary genetics and vector adaptation of recombinant viruses of the western equine encephalitis antigenic complex provides new insights into alphavirus diversity and host switching.

    PubMed

    Allison, Andrew B; Stallknecht, David E; Holmes, Edward C

    2015-01-01

    Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), Highlands J virus (HJV), and Fort Morgan virus (FMV) are the sole representatives of the WEE antigenic complex of the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, that are endemic to North America. All three viruses have their ancestry in a recombination event involving eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and a Sindbis (SIN)-like virus that gave rise to a chimeric alphavirus that subsequently diversified into the present-day WEEV, HJV, and FMV. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the genetic, ecological, and evolutionary relationships among these recombinant-origin viruses, including the description of a nsP4 polymerase mutation in FMV that allows it to circumvent the host range barrier to Asian tiger mosquito cells, a vector species that is normally refractory to infection. Notably, we also provide evidence that the recombination event that gave rise to these three WEEV antigenic complex viruses may have occurred in North America.

  4. Inhibition of carrageenin paw edema by pyridinalalkylimine rhodium(I) complexes.

    PubMed

    Sava, G; Pacor, S; Ceschia, V; Zassinovich, G; Mestroni, G

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a series of pyridinalalkyl-1,5-cyclooctadiene Rhodium(I) complexes were studied on the carrageenin paw edema model, using Sprague-Dawley rats. The series of compounds used were administered at 35, 70 and 140 mumol/kg i.p. 1hr before carrageenin application, and the effect was measured 4hr after carrageenin. The 1,5-cyclooctadienepyridinalaldoxime Rhodium(I) complex proved to be the most active compound, effective also when administered 1hr after carrageenin induction of paw swelling. However, the effects of this complex are not superior to those reported for the methyl derivative, and the overall antiinflammatory activity is inferior to that of this latter compound, particularly when the number of dosages causing at least 80% inhibition are compared. These data are consistent with those obtained in a previous investigation indicating that Rhodium(I) complexes have potential antiinflammatory properties, susceptible of further investigations extended also to other models of inflammatory disease.

  5. Boron inhibits the proliferating cell nuclear antigen index, molybdenum containing proteins and ameliorates oxidative stress in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Hina; Ali, Shakir

    2013-01-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy and the main cause of mortality in patients with chronic liver diseases. This study reports the inhibitory effect of boron on HCC induced in rats by administering thioacetamide (TAA) (0.03%) in drinking water for 400days. Boron (4mg/kg body weight) was administered orally after induction of carcinoma. Treatment was continued for 122days, and cell proliferation, histology and biochemistry of treated and control group of rats were studied. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, which increased in rats exposed to carcinogen, significantly decreased after boron treatment. PCNA index decreased from 80 in HCC rats to 32 after boron treatment. In the control group, it was 20. Boron caused a dose-dependent decrease in carcinogen-induced [(3)H]-thymidine uptake by the rat hepatocyte. It could partially reverse the activity of selected biochemical indicators of hepatic damage, oxidative stress, selenium and serum retinol, which are depleted in liver cancer, and improved overall health of animal. The study implicates the elevated levels of mammalian molybdenum Fe-S containing flavin hydroxylases, which increase the free radical production and oxidative stress, consequently causing increased hepatic cell proliferation in HCC, and reports boron to ameliorate these changes in liver cancer.

  6. An Iridium(III) Complex Inhibits JMJD2 Activities and Acts as a Potential Epigenetic Modulator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Juan; Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; He, Bingyong; Kwong, Daniel W J; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2015-08-27

    A novel iridium(III) complex was synthesized and evaluated for its ability to target JMJD2 enzymatic activity. The iridium(III) complex 1 can inhibit JMJD2 activity and was selective for JMJD2 activity over JARID, JMJD3, and HDAC activities. Moreover, 1 suppressed the trimethylation of the p21 promoter on H3K9me3 and interrupted the JMJD2D-H3K9me3 interactions in human cells, suggesting that it could act as an epigenetic modulator. To our knowledge, 1 represents the first metal-based JMJD2 inhibitor reported in the literature.

  7. Inhibition of acid, alkaline, and tyrosine (PTP1B) phosphatases by novel vanadium complexes.

    PubMed

    McLauchlan, Craig C; Hooker, Jaqueline D; Jones, Marjorie A; Dymon, Zaneta; Backhus, Emily A; Greiner, Bradley A; Dorner, Nicole A; Youkhana, Mary A; Manus, Lisa M

    2010-03-01

    In the course of our investigations of vanadium-containing complexes for use as insulin-enhancing agents, we have generated a series of novel vanadium coordination complexes with bidentate ligands. Specifically we have focused on two ligands: anthranilate (anc(-)), a natural metabolite of tryptophan, and imidizole-4-carboxylate (imc(-)), meant to mimic naturally occurring N-donor ligands. For each ligand, we have generated a series of complexes containing the V(III), V(IV), and V(V) oxidation states. Each complex was investigated using phosphatase inhibition studies of three different phosphatases (acid, alkaline, and tyrosine (PTP1B) phosphatase) as prima facia evidence for potential use as an insulin-enhancing agent. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as an artificial phosphatase substrate, the levels of inhibition were determined by measuring the absorbance of the product at 405nm using UV/vis spectroscopy. Under our experimental conditions, for instance, V(imc)(3) appears to be as potent an inhibitor of alkaline phosphatase as sodium orthovanadate when comparing the K(cat)/K(m) term. VO(anc)(2) is as potent an inhibitor of acid phosphatase and tyrosine phosphatase as the Na(3)VO(4). Thus, use of these complexes can increase our mechanistic understanding of the effects of vanadium in vivo.

  8. Complex I inhibition in the visual pathway induces disorganization of the node of Ranvier

    PubMed Central

    Marella, Mathieu; Patki, Gaurav; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial defects can have significant consequences on many aspects of neuronal physiology. In particular, deficiencies in the first enzyme complex of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (complex I) are considered to be involved in a number of human neurodegenerative diseases. The current work highlights a tight correlation between the inhibition of complex I and the state of axonal myelination of the optic nerve. Exposing the visual pathway of rats to rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, resulted in disorganization of the node of Ranvier. The structure and function of the node depends on specific cell adhesion molecules, among others, CASPR (contactin associated protein) and contactin. CASPR and contactin are both on the axonal surface and need to be associated to be able to anchor their myelin counter part. Here we show that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone in rats induces reactive oxygen species, disrupts the interaction of CASPR and contactin couple, and thus damages the organization and function of the node of Ranvier. Demyelination of the optic nerve occurs as a consequence which is accompanied by a loss of vision. The physiological impairment could be reversed by introducing an alternative NADH dehydrogenase to the mitochondria of the visual system. The restoration of the nodal structure was specifically correlated with visual recovery in the treated animal. PMID:23816754

  9. Methylenedioxymethamphetamine inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity in mice: a possible mechanism underlying neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Puerta, Elena; Hervias, Isabel; Goñi-Allo, Beatriz; Zhang, Steven F; Jordán, Joaquín; Starkov, Anatoly A; Aguirre, Norberto

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) causes a persistent loss of dopaminergic cell bodies in the substantia nigra of mice. Current evidence indicates that such neurotoxicity is due to oxidative stress but the source of free radicals remains unknown. Inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes by MDMA was assessed as a possible source. Experimental approach: Activities of mitochondrial complexes after MDMA were evaluated spectrophotometrically. In situ visualization of superoxide production in the striatum was assessed by ethidium fluorescence and striatal dopamine levels were determined by HPLC as an index of dopaminergic toxicity. Key results: 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine decreased mitochondrial complex I activity in the striatum of mice, an effect accompanied by an increased production of superoxide radicals and the inhibition of endogenous aconitase. α-Lipoic acid prevented superoxide generation and long-term toxicity independent of any effect on complex I inhibition. These effects of α-lipoic acid were also associated with a significant increase of striatal glutathione levels. The relevance of glutathione was supported by reducing striatal glutathione content with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine, which exacerbated MDMA-induced dopamine deficits, effects suppressed by α-lipoic acid. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine, partially prevented MDMA-induced dopamine depletions, an effect reversed by L-arginine but not D-arginine. Finally, a direct relationship between mitochondrial complex I inhibition and long-term dopamine depletions was found in animals treated with MDMA in combination with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Conclusions and implications: Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I following MDMA could be the source of free radicals responsible for oxidative stress and the consequent neurotoxicity of this drug in mice. This article is commented on by Moncada, pp. 217

  10. Role of the Brucella suis Lipopolysaccharide O Antigen in Phagosomal Genesis and in Inhibition of Phagosome-Lysosome Fusion in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Porte, Françoise; Naroeni, Aroem; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Liautard, Jean-Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Brucella species are gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that infect humans and animals. These organisms can survive and replicate within a membrane-bound compartment inside professional and nonprofessional phagocytic cells. Inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion has been proposed as a mechanism for intracellular survival in both cell types. However, the molecular mechanisms and the microbial factors involved are poorly understood. Smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Brucella has been reported to be an important virulence factor, although its precise role in pathogenesis is not yet clear. In this study, we show that the LPS O side chain is involved in inhibition of the early fusion between Brucella suis-containing phagosomes and lysosomes in murine macrophages. In contrast, the phagosomes containing rough mutants, which fail to express the O antigen, rapidly fuse with lysosomes. In addition, we show that rough mutants do not enter host cells by using lipid rafts, contrary to smooth strains. Thus, we propose that the LPS O chain might be a major factor that governs the early behavior of bacteria inside macrophages. PMID:12595466

  11. Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen 1 Promotes Caspase-8-Mediated Apoptosis in Response to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress While Inhibiting Necrosis Induced by Lysosomal Injury▿

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Erica; Pan, Ji-An; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma antigen 1 (SCCA1) is a member of the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) family of proteins, whose target proteases include the cathepsins. Initially identified as a serological marker for advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix, SCCA1 has also been found to be associated with other cancer types of epithelial or endodermal origins such as lung cancer, head and neck cancer, melanoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. While the biological function of SCCA1 remains largely unclear, it is believed to limit cellular damage resulting from lysosomal cathepsin release. Here, we show that SCCA1 acts as a molecular switch that inhibits cell death induced by lysosomal injury resulting from DNA alkylating agents and hypotonic shock, whereas it promotes a caspase-8-mediated apoptosis in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In response to ER stress, SCCA1 blocks both lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation pathways and enhances the interaction between sequestosome 1/p62 and caspase-8, which leads to the aggregation of intracellular caspase-8 and its subsequent cleavage and activation. Hence, on one hand, SCCA1 inhibits cell death induced by lysosomal injury while, on the other hand, it sensitizes cells to ER stress by activating caspase-8 independently of the death receptor apoptotic pathway. PMID:21576355

  12. Stat6-Dependent Inhibition of Mincle Expression in Mouse and Human Antigen-Presenting Cells by the Th2 Cytokine IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Hupfer, Thomas; Schick, Judith; Jozefowski, Katrin; Voehringer, David; Ostrop, Jenny; Lang, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) Mincle, Mcl, and Dectin-2 bind mycobacterial and fungal cell wall glycolipids and carbohydrates. Recently, we described that expression of these CLR is downregulated during differentiation of human monocytes to dendritic cells (DC) in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4. Here, we demonstrate that the Th2 cytokine IL-4 specifically inhibits expression of Mincle, Mcl, and Dectin-2 in human antigen-presenting cells (APC). This inhibitory effect of IL-4 was observed across species, as murine macrophages and DC treated with IL-4 also downregulated these receptors. IL-4 blocked upregulation of Mincle and Mcl mRNA expression and cell surface protein by murine macrophages in response to the Mincle ligand Trehalose-6,6-dibehenate (TDB), whereas the TLR4 ligand LPS overcame inhibition by IL-4. Functionally, downregulation of Mincle expression by IL-4 was accompanied by reduced cytokine production upon stimulation with TDB. These inhibitory effects of IL-4 were dependent on the transcription factor Stat6. Together, our results show that the key Th2 cytokine IL-4 exerts a negative effect on the expression of Mincle and other Dectin-2 cluster CLR in mouse and human macrophages and DC, which may render these sentinel cells less vigilant for sensing mycobacterial and fungal ligands. PMID:27790218

  13. Membrane Ia expression and antigen-presenting accessory cell function of L cells transfected with class II major histocompatibility complex genes

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    To study the relationship between the structure and function of Ia antigens, as well as the physiologic requirements for antigen presentation to major histocompatibility complex-restricted T cells, class II A alpha and A beta genes from the k and d haplotypes were transfected into Ltk- fibroblasts using the calcium phosphate coprecipitation technique. Individually transfected genes were actively transcribed in the L cells without covalent linkage to, or cotransformation with, viral enhancer sequences. However, cell surface expression of detectable I-A required the presence of transfected A alpha dA beta d or A alpha kA beta k pairs in a single cell. The level of I-A expression under these conditions was 1/5-1/10 that of Ia+ B lymphoma cells, or B lymphoma cells expressing transfected class II genes. These I-A-expressing transfectants were tested for accessory cell function and shown to present polypeptide and complex protein antigens to T cell clones and hybridomas in the context of the transfected gene products. One T cell clone, restricted to I-Ak plus GAT (L-glutamic acid60-L-alanine30-L-tyrosine10), had a profound cytotoxic effect on I-Ak- but not I-Ad-expressing transfectants in the presence of specific antigen. Assays of unprimed T cells showed that both Ia+ and Ia- L cells could serve as accessory cells for concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses. These data indicate that L cells can transcribe, translate, and express transfected class II genes and that such I-A-bearing L cells possess the necessary metabolic mechanisms for presenting these antigens to T lymphocytes in the context of their I-A molecules. PMID:6436430

  14. Insulin activates Erk1/2 signaling in the dorsal vagal complex to inhibit glucose production.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Beatrice M; Yang, Clair S; Tang, Christine; Lam, Tony K T

    2012-10-03

    Insulin activates PI3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT to regulate glucose homeostasis in the peripheral tissues and the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) of rodents. We report that insulin infusion into the MBH or dorsal vagal complex (DVC) activated insulin receptors. The same dose of insulin that activated MBH PI3K/AKT did not in the DVC. DVC insulin instead activated Erk1/2 and lowered glucose production in rats and mice. Molecular and chemical inhibition of DVC Erk1/2 negated, while activation of DVC Erk1/2 recapitulated, the effects of DVC insulin. Circulating insulin failed to inhibit glucose production when DVC Erk1/2 was inhibited in normal rodents, while DVC insulin action was disrupted in high-fat-fed rodents. Activation of DVC ATP-sensitive potassium channels was necessary for insulin-Erk1/2 and sufficient to inhibit glucose production in normal and high-fat-fed rodents. DVC is a site of insulin action where insulin triggers Erk1/2 signaling to inhibit glucose production and of insulin resistance in high-fat feeding.

  15. Inhibition of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis by Synthetic TF Antigen Mimic/Galectin-3 Inhibitor Lactulose-l-Leucine1

    PubMed Central

    Glinskii, Olga V; Sud, Sudha; Mossine, Valeri V; Mawhinney, Thomas P; Anthony, Douglas C; Glinsky, Gennadi V; Pienta, Kenneth J; Glinsky, Vladislav V

    2012-01-01

    Currently incurable, prostate cancer metastasis has a remarkable ability to spread to the skeleton. Previous studies demonstrated that interactions mediated by the cancer-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich glycoantigen (TF-Ag) and the carbohydrate-binding protein galectin-3 play an important role in several rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis such as metastatic cell adhesion to bone marrow endothelium, homotypic tumor cell aggregation, and clonogenic survival and growth. This study investigated the ability of a synthetic small-molecular-weight nontoxic carbohydrate-based TF-Ag mimic lactulose-l-leucine (Lac-l-Leu) to inhibit these processes in vitro and, ultimately, prostate cancer bone metastasis in vivo. Using an in vivo mouse model, based on intracardiac injection of human PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells stably expressing luciferase, we investigated the ability of Lac-l-Leu to impede the establishment and growth of bone metastasis. Parallel-flow chamber assay, homotypic aggregation assay, modified Boyden chamber assay, and clonogenic growth assay were used to assess the effects of Lac-l-Leu on tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium, homotypic tumor cell aggregation, transendothelial migration, and clonogenic survival and growth, respectively. We report that daily intraperitoneal administration of Lac-l-Leu resulted in a three-fold (P < .05) decrease in metastatic tumor burden compared with the untreated control. Mechanistically, the effect of Lac-l-Leu, which binds and inhibits galectins by mimicking essential structural features of the TF-Ag, was associated with a dose-dependent inhibition of prostate cancer cell adhesion to bone marrow endothelium, homotypic aggregation, transendothelial migration, and clonogenic growth. We conclude that small-molecular-weight carbohydrate-based compounds targeting β-galactoside-mediated interactions could provide valuable means for controlling and preventing metastatic prostate cancer spread to the skeleton. PMID:22355275

  16. A role for mitochondria in antigen processing and presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Laura C; Cervantes-Silva, Mariana P; Ontiveros-Dotor, Elizabeth; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2015-01-01

    Immune synapse formation is critical for T-lymphocyte activation, and mitochondria have a role in this process, by localizing close to the immune synapse, regulating intracellular calcium concentration, and providing locally required ATP. The interaction between antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T lymphocytes is a two-way signalling process. However, the role of mitochondria in APCs during this process remains unknown. For APCs to be able to activate T lymphocytes, they must first engage in an antigen-uptake, -processing and -presentation process. Here we show that hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) -loaded B lymphocytes, as a type of APC, undergo a small but significant mitochondrial depolarization by 1–2 hr following antigen exposure, suggesting an increase in their metabolic demands. Inhibition of ATP synthase (oligomycin) or mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) (Ruthenium red) had no effect on antigen uptake. Therefore, antigen processing and antigen presentation were further analysed. Oligomycin treatment reduced the amount of specific MHC–peptide complexes but not total MHC II on the cell membrane of B lymphocytes, which correlated with a decrease in antigen presentation. However, oligomycin also reduced antigen presentation by B lymphocytes, which endogenously express HEL and by B lymphocytes loaded with the HEL48–62 peptide, although to a lesser extent. ATP synthase inhibition and MCU inhibition had a clear inhibitory effect on antigen processing (DQ-OVA). Taken together these results suggest that ATP synthase and MCU are relevant for antigen processing and presentation. Finally, APC mitochondria were found to re-organize towards the APC–T immune synapse. PMID:25251370

  17. Combined blockade of AKT/mTOR pathway inhibits growth of human hemangioma via downregulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Ou, J M; Qui, M-K; Dai, Y-X; Dong, Q; Shen, J; Dong, P; Wang, X-F; Liu, Y-B; Fei, Z-W

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway plays a crucial role in the tumorigenesis and progression of multiple tumors, and has been shown to be important therapeutic targets for cancer. The present study aimed to explore the role and molecular mechanisms of AKT/mTOR pathway in human hemangioma (HA). Twenty-five cases of human HA tissues were collected. The expression of AKT, mTOR and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) proteins was evaluated using semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry in biopsy samples in different phases of HA. AKT/mTOR pathway was blocked by recombinant small hairpin RNA adenovirus vector rAd5-AKT+mTOR (rAd5-Am), used for infecting proliferating phase HA-derived endothelial cells (HDEC). The expression of AKT, mTOR and PCNA was detected by Real-time PCR and Western blot assays. Cell proliferative activities were determined by MTT assay, and cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. As a consequence, the expression of AKT, mTOR and PCNA was significantly increased in proliferative phase HA, while that was decreased in involutive phase. Combined blockade of AKT/mTOR pathway by rAd5-Am diminished cell proliferative activities, and induced cell apoptosis and cycle arrest with the decreased expression of AKT, mTOR and PCNA in proliferative phase HDEC. In conclusion, the activity of AKT/mTOR pathway was increased in proliferative phase HA, while it was decreased in involutive phase. Combined blockade of AKT/mTOR pathway might suppress cell proliferation via down-regulation of PCNA expression, and induce apoptosis and cycle arrest in proliferative phase HDEC, suggesting that AKT/mTOR pathway might represent the important therapeutic targets for human HA.

  18. The Small Tellurium Compound AS101 Ameliorates Rat Crescentic Glomerulonephritis: Association with Inhibition of Macrophage Caspase-1 Activity via Very Late Antigen-4 Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Hachmo, Yafit; Kalechman, Yona; Skornick, Itai; Gafter, Uzi; Caspi, Rachel R.; Sredni, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN) is the most aggressive form of GN and, if untreated, patients can progress to end-stage renal failure within weeks of presentation. The α4β1 integrin very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) is an adhesion molecule of fundamental importance to the recruitment of leukocytes in inflammation. We addressed the role of VLA-4 in mediating progressive renal injury in a rat model of CGN using a small tellurium compound. AS101 [ammonium trichloro(dioxoethylene-o,o′)tellurate]. This compound has been previously shown to uniquely inhibit VLA-4 activity by redox inactivation of adjacent thiols in the exofacial domain of VLA-4. The study shows that administration of AS101 either before or after glomerular basement membrane anti-serum injection ameliorates crescent formation or preserves renal function. This was associated with profound inhibition of critical inflammatory mediators, accompanied by decreased glomerular infiltration of macrophages. Mechanistic studies demonstrated vla-4 inactivation on glomerular macrophages both in vitro and in vivo as well as inhibition of caspase-1 activity. Importantly, this cysteine protease activity modification was dependent on VLA-4 inactivation and was associated with the anti-inflammatory activity of AS101. We propose that inactivation of macrophage VLA-4 by AS101 in vivo results in a decrease of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines produced in the glomeruli of diseased rats, resulting in decreased further macrophage recruitment and decreased extracellular matrix expansion. Thus, AS101, which is currently in clinical trials for other indications, might be beneficial for treatment of CGN. PMID:28326083

  19. Inhibition Mechanism of Uranyl Reduction Induced by Calcium-Carbonato Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. E.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Uranium mobility in the subsurface is controlled by the redox state and chemical speciation, generally as minimally soluble U(IV) or soluble U(VI) species. In the presence of even low carbonate concentrations the uranyl-carbonato complex quickly becomes the dominant aqueous species; they are, in fact, the primary aqueous species in most groundwaters. Calcium in groundwater leads to ternary calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes that limit the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction. This decrease in reduction rate has been attributed to surface processes, thermodynamic limitations, and kinetic factors. Here we present a new mechanism for the inhibition of ferrous iron reduction of uranyl-carbonato species in the presence of calcium. A series of experiments under variable Ca conditions were preformed to determine the role of Ca in the inhibition of U reduction by ferrous iron. Calcium ions in the Ca2UO2(CO3)3 complex sterically prevent the interaction of Fe(II) with U(VI), in turn preventing the Fe(II)-U(VI) distance required for electron transfer. The mechanism described here helps to predict U redox transformations in suboxic environments and clarifies the role of Ca in the fate and mobility of U. Electrochemical measurements further show the decrease of the U(VI) to U(V) redox potential of the uranyl-carbonato complex with decreasing pH suggesting the first electron transfer is critical determining the rate and extent of uranium reduction.

  20. Chronic systemic complex I inhibition induces a hypokinetic multisystem degeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Günter U; Féger, Jean; Prigent, Annick; Michel, Patrick P; Parain, Karine; Champy, Pierre; Ruberg, Merle; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Hirsch, Etienne C

    2003-02-01

    In Parkinson's disease, nigral dopaminergic neurones degenerate, whereas post-synaptic striatal target neurones are spared. In some atypical parkinsonian syndromes, both nigral and striatal neurones degenerate. Reduced activity of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has been implicated in both conditions, but it remains unclear if this affects the whole organism or only the degenerating brain structures. We therefore investigated the differential vulnerability of various brain structures to generalized complex I inhibition. Male Lewis rats infused with rotenone, a lipophilic complex I inhibitor [2.5 mg/kg/day intraveneously (i.v.) for 28 days], were compared with vehicle-infused controls. They showed reduced locomotor activity and loss of striatal dopaminergic fibres (54%), nigral dopaminergic neurones (28.5%), striatal serotoninergic fibres (34%), striatal DARPP-32-positive projection neurones (26.5%), striatal cholinergic interneurones (22.1%), cholinergic neurones in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (23.7%) and noradrenergic neurones in the locus ceruleus (26.4%). Silver impregnation revealed pronounced degeneration in basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei, whereas the hippocampus, cerebellum and cerebral cortex were less affected. These data suggest that a generalized mitochondrial failure may be implicated in atypical parkinsonian syndromes but do not support the hypothesis that a generalized complex I inhibition results in the rather selective nigral lesion observed in Parkinson's disease.

  1. A defined peptide that inhibits the formation of the glycoprotein IIb and IIIa complex.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Thomas M; Zhu, Jiaqian

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-platelet interaction plays an important role in hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. The proposed mechanism of the interaction was the activation of platelets-->releasing of contents from granules-->aggregation. The common end point is the platelets and fibrin aggregates. Platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa (the alphaIIbbeta3 integrin) complexes serve as a receptor for the binding of fibrinogen to form firmed aggregates. Blockading of GP IIb/IIIa has been proposed to prevent platelet aggregation independent of the substance(s) responsible for activating the platelets. The development of various forms of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor has resulted in the inhibition of platelet aggregation, although studies of alphaIIbbeta3 receptor function and various GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors have demonstrated the potential for these agents to produce effects on other aspects of platelet function as well as having nonplatelet effects. This study investigated platelet inhibition provided by blocking the GP IIb/IIIa complex formation by using a peptide derived from the GP IIIa molecule. The peptide inhibits both types I and III collagen-induced platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent manner. The defined peptide interferes with the formation of the GP IIb/IIIa complex by inhibiting the binding of FITC-PAC-1 onto ADP-, type I collagen-, and type III collagen-activated platelets. However, P-selectin secretion is not affected by the peptide. In addition, the peptide is not interfering with the binding of FITC-PAC-1 to platelets that were preincubated with indomethacin. Results from this study may suggest that the defined peptide is an effective agent to block the interaction of types I and III collagen with platelets.

  2. Differential susceptibility of mitochondrial complex II to inhibition by oxaloacetate in brain and heart.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Anna; Shurubor, Yevgeniya; Valsecchi, Federica; Manfredi, Giovanni; Galkin, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial Complex II is a key mitochondrial enzyme connecting the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the electron transport chain. Studies of complex II are clinically important since new roles for this enzyme have recently emerged in cell signalling, cancer biology, immune response and neurodegeneration. Oxaloacetate (OAA) is an intermediate of the TCA cycle and at the same time is an inhibitor of complex II with high affinity (Kd~10(-8)M). Whether or not OAA inhibition of complex II is a physiologically relevant process is a significant, but still controversial topic. We found that complex II from mouse heart and brain tissue has similar affinity to OAA and that only a fraction of the enzyme in isolated mitochondrial membranes (30.2±6.0% and 56.4±5.6% in the heart and brain, respectively) is in the free, active form. Since OAA could bind to complex II during isolation, we established a novel approach to deplete OAA in the homogenates at the early stages of isolation. In heart, this treatment significantly increased the fraction of free enzyme, indicating that OAA binds to complex II during isolation. In brain the OAA-depleting system did not significantly change the amount of free enzyme, indicating that a large fraction of complex II is already in the OAA-bound inactive form. Furthermore, short-term ischemia resulted in a dramatic decline of OAA in tissues, but it did not change the amount of free complex II. Our data show that in brain OAA is an endogenous effector of complex II, potentially capable of modulating the activity of the enzyme.

  3. Dual-targeting organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complexes bearing EGFR-inhibiting 4-anilinoquinazoline ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Qun; Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Erlong; Liu, Suyan; Wang, Fuyi

    2015-08-07

    We have recently demonstrated that complexation with (η(6)-arene)Ru(II) fragments confers 4-anilinoquinazoline pharmacophores a higher potential for inducing cellular apoptosis while preserving the highly inhibitory activity of 4-anilinoquinazolines against EGFR and the reactivity of the ruthenium centre to 9-ethylguanine (Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 10224-10226). Reported herein are the synthesis, characterisation and evaluation of the biological activity of a new series of ruthenium(ii) complexes of the type [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-L)Cl]PF6 (arene = p-cymene, benzene, 2-phenylethanol or indane, L = 4-anilinoquinazolines). These organometallic ruthenium complexes undergo fast hydrolysis in aqueous solution. Intriguingly, the ligation of (arene)Ru(II) fragments with 4-anilinoquinazolines not only makes the target complexes excellent EGFR inhibitors, but also confers the complexes high affinity to bind to DNA minor grooves while maintaining their reactivity towards DNA bases, characterising them with dual-targeting properties. Molecular modelling studies reveal that the hydrolysis of these complexes is a favourable process which increases the affinity of the target complexes to bind to EGFR and DNA. In vitro biological activity assays show that most of this group of ruthenium complexes are selectively active inhibiting the EGF-stimulated growth of the HeLa cervical cancer cell line, and the most active complex [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-L13)Cl]PF6 (, IC50 = 1.36 μM, = 4-(3'-chloro-4'-fluoroanilino)-6-(2-(2-aminoethyl)aminoethoxy)-7-methoxyquinazoline) is 29-fold more active than its analogue, [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-ethylenediamine)Cl]PF6, and 21-fold more active than gefitinib, a well-known EGFR inhibitor in use clinically. These results highlight the strong promise to develop highly active ruthenium anticancer complexes by ligation of cytotoxic ruthenium pharmacophores with bioactive organic molecules.

  4. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  5. TWEAK inhibits TRAF2-mediated CD40 signaling by destabilization of CD40 signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Steffen; Lang, Isabell; Rosenthal, Alevtina; Schäfer, Viktoria; Weisenberger, Daniela; Carmona Arana, José Antonio; Trebing, Johannes; Siegmund, Daniela; Neumann, Manfred; Wajant, Harald

    2013-09-01

    We found recently that TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and fibroblast growth factor-inducible-14 (Fn14) by virtue of their strong capability to reduce the freely available cytoplasmic pool of TNFR-associated factor (TRAF)2 and cellular inhibitors of apoptosis (cIAPs) antagonize the functions of these molecules in TNFR1 signaling, resulting in sensitization for apoptosis and inhibition of classical NF-κB signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that priming of cells with TWEAK also interferes with activation of the classical NF-κB pathway by CD40. Likewise, there was strong inhibition of CD40 ligand (CD40L)-induced activation of MAPKs in TWEAK-primed cells. FACS analysis and CD40L binding studies revealed unchanged CD40 expression and normal CD40L-CD40 interaction in TWEAK-primed cells. CD40L immunoprecipitates, however, showed severely reduced amounts of CD40 and CD40-associated proteins, indicating impaired formation or reduced stability of CD40L-CD40 signaling complexes. The previously described inhibitory effect of TWEAK on TNFR1 signaling has been traced back to reduced activity of the TNFR1-associated TRAF2-cIAP1/2 ubiquitinase complex and did not affect the stability of the immunoprecipitable TNFR1 receptor complex. Thus, the inhibitory effect of TWEAK on CD40 signaling must be based at least partly on other mechanisms. In line with this, signaling by the CD40-related TRAF2-interacting receptor TNFR2 was also attenuated but still immunoprecipitable in TWEAK-primed cells. Collectively, we show that Fn14 activation by soluble TWEAK impairs CD40L-CD40 signaling complex formation and inhibits CD40 signaling and thus identify the Fn14-TWEAK system as a potential novel regulator of CD40-related cellular functions.

  6. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  7. Cost effective and time efficient measurement of CD4, CD8, major histocompatibility complex Class II, and macrophage antigen expression in the lungs of chickens.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Oscar J; Tan, Xun; Cortes, Lucia; Gimeno, Isabel

    2012-05-15

    Cells expressing CD4, CD8, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II, and macrophage biomarkers in lungs of chickens were quantified by measuring total area of antigen expressed using imageJ, a software program developed at the National Institutes of Health and available at no cost. The procedures reported here were rapid, and reproducible. Total area of antigen expressed had positive correlation with manual counts of cells expressing CD4 and CD8 biomarkers after inoculation with serotype 1 Marek's disease virus (MDV) vaccines. Visual inspection and overlays prepared from outlines of cells counted by imageJ confirmed agreement between antigen expression and area measured. Total area measured was not dependent on time of image acquisition from randomly selected fields from the same slides. Total area values were not computer specific, but acquisition of the original images required standardization of microscope used and camera setup. All steps in the process from sample collection through sectioning, staining, and image acquisition must be standardized as much as possible. Chickens infected with a very virulent+ (vv(+)) isolate of MDV (648A) had increased CD4, CD8, MHC Class II, and macrophage biomarker expression compared to noninfected control chickens at 10 days post infection, but variable responses depending on the specific biomarker measured at 3 and 5 days post infection. The procedure described here is faster and more reproducible than manual counting in cases (CD4 and CD8) where the number of positive cells is low enough for manual counts. Manual counting is not possible with MHC Class II and macrophage antigens nor when CD4(+) cells are present in large numbers following proliferation to tumors, thus subjective systems are used for scoring in these conditions. Using imageJ as described eliminates the need for subjective and less reproducible methods for measuring expression of these antigens.

  8. Cells involved in the immune response. XXXVI. The thymic antigen-specific suppressor cell in the immunized rabbit is a T cell with receptors for FcG and the antigen and it acts, via a secreted suppressor factor, directly on the immune splenic AFC B cell to inhibit antibody secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Talor, E; Jodouin, C A; Richter, M

    1988-01-01

    Following i.v. immunization of the normal outbred rabbit with sheep (SRBC) or horse (HRBC) erythrocytes, antigen-specific suppressor cells are generated in the thymus capable of inhibiting the generation of haemolytic plaques by the autologous or allogeneic splenic antibody-forming cells (AFC) in the plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay. These suppressor cells secrete an antigen-specific suppressor factor in short-term (4-24 hr) culture in vitro. The suppressor cells are not detected in the thymus prior to Day 4, exhibit peak activity between Days 5 and 11 post-immunization, and decline slowly thereafter. Suppressor cells can no longer be detected in the thymus by Day 60 postimmunization. Suppressor cells are not detected in any of the other lymphoid organs of the immunized rabbit nor in any lymphoid organ in the unimmunized rabbit. The thymic suppressor cell is a T cell with surface receptors for the antigen (SRBC or HRBC) and for FcG. On the other hand, the AFC B cells generated in the spleen of the immunized rabbit possess cell-surface receptors for only the antigen and not for FcG. Both the suppressor cells and the secreted suppressor factor act directly on the AFC B lymphocytes to inhibit the generation of antigen-specific haemolytic plaques in the PFC assay. PMID:2455684

  9. A novel dRYBP-SCF complex functions to inhibit apoptosis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fereres, Sol; Simón, Rocío; Busturia, Ana

    2013-12-01

    A balanced response to intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signals is crucial to support homeostatic development and animal survival. Regulation of activation and inhibition of apoptotic pathways involves diverse mechanisms including protein ubiquitylation to control expression levels of apoptotic factors. Here we report that drosophila Ring and YY1 Binding Protein (dRYBP) protein interacts both genetically and biochemically with the E3 ubiquitin ligase SKPA, dCULLIN, F-box (SCF) complex to synergistically inhibit apoptosis in Drosophila. Further, we show that the loss of skpA function activates the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis and down-regulates the levels of expression of the anti-apoptotic DIAP1 protein. Accordingly, the apoptosis induced by inactivation of skpA and dRYBP is rescued by loss of function of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper and overexpression of DIAP1. Of interest, we also find that high levels of SKPA protein rescue the wing phenotype induced by overexpression of Reaper protein. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of SKPA inhibits both developmental and radiation-induced apoptosis. We propose that the function of the dRYBP-SCF complex in the inhibition of apoptosis might possibly be to control the levels of the pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins most likely by promoting their ubiquitylation and consequently, proteasomal degradation. Given the evolutionary conservation of the dRYBP and the SCF proteins, our results suggest that their mammalian homologs may function in balancing cell survival versus cell death during normal and pathological development.

  10. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA) Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mouser, Emily E. I. M.; Pollakis, Georgios; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Harnett, William

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA) and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62) from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th) cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs. PMID:26808476

  11. Characterization of immune response to Eimeria tenella antigens in a natural immunity model with hosts which differ serologically at the B locus of the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Brake, D A; Fedor, C H; Werner, B W; Miller, T J; Taylor, R L; Clare, R A

    1997-04-01

    A model to simulate natural immunity to Eimeria tenella was developed in three chicken lines which differ at the B locus of the major histocompatibility complex. Homozygous, 1-day-old chicks of the B19B19, B24B24, or B30B30 genotype were trickle immunized by being orally fed a small infectious dose of E. tenella oocysts for 5 consecutive days. These naturally exposed birds were then challenged at different times between 5 and 24 days after the final dose, and the level of protection was assessed 6 days after challenge, using body weight gain and intestinal lesion scores. The duration of immunity in naturally exposed birds differed among the major histocompatibility complex lines. Trickle immunization of the B19B19 haplotype afforded the longest and strongest level of protection compared to the other two haplotypes tested. In addition, in vitro splenic and peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferative responses in trickle-immunized birds were measured against sporozoite, merozoite, and tissue culture-derived E. tenella parasite antigens isolated from the recently described SB-CEV-1/F7 established cell line. The lymphocytes obtained from B19B19 birds trickle immunized responded in vitro to the E. tenella-infected SB-CEV-1/F7 tissue culture-derived parasite antigen. Furthermore, antigen-specific immune responses appeared earlier in immune, challenged B19B19 birds than in their naive, challenged counterparts. The development of a model simulating natural immunization will serve as a foundation to further characterize both humoral and cell-mediated responses to E. tenella tissue culture-derived parasite antigens and to better understand host protective immune responses to avian coccidiosis.

  12. [Evaluation of penicillin expandase mutants and complex substrate inhibition characteristics at high concentrations of penicillin G].

    PubMed

    Wu, Linjun; Fan, Keqiang; Ji, Junjie; Yang, Keqian

    2015-12-01

    Penicillin expandase, also known as deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS), is an essential enzyme involved in cephalosporin C biosynthesis. To evaluate the catalytic behaviors of penicillin expandase under high penicillin G concentration and to identify mutants suitable for industrial applications, the specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and several mutants with increased activities toward penicillin G were determined by HPLC under high penicillin G concentrations. Their specific activity profiles were compared with theoretical predictions by different catalytic dynamics models. We evaluated the specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and previous reported high-activity mutants H4, H5, H6 and H7 at concentrations ranging from 5.6 to 500 mmol/L penicillin G. The specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and mutant H4 increased as penicillin G concentration increased, but decreased when concentrations of substrate go above 200 mmol/L. Other mutants H5, H6 and H7 showed more complex behaviors under high concentration of penicillin G. Among all tested enzymes, mutant H6 showed the highest activity when concentration of penicillin G is above 100 mmol/L. Our results revealed that the substrate inhibition to wild-type DAOCS' by penicillin G is noncompetitive. Other DAOCS mutants showed more complex trends in their specific activities at high concentration of penicillin G (>100 mmol/L), indicating more complex substrate inhibition mechanism might exist. The substrate inhibition and activity of DAOCS mutants at high penicillin G concentration provide important insight to help select proper mutants for industrial application.

  13. Selenite Treatment Inhibits LAPC-4 Tumor Growth and Prostate-Specific Antigen Secretion in a Xenograft Model of Human Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Rumi S.; Husbeck, Bryan; Feldman, David; Knox, Susan J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Selenium compounds have known chemopreventive effects on prostate cancer. However selenite, an inorganic form of selenium, has not been extensively studied as a treatment option for prostate cancer. Our previous studies have demonstrated the inhibition of androgen receptor expression and androgen stimulated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression by selenite in human prostate cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of selenite as a therapy to treat mice with established LAPC-4 tumors. Methods and Materials: Male mice harboring androgen-dependent LAPC-4 xenograft tumors were treated with selenite (2 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times per week) or vehicle for 42 days. In addition, androgen-independent LAPC-4 xenograft tumors were generated in female mice over 4 to 6 months. Once established, androgen-independent LAPC-4 tumor fragments were passaged into female mice and were treated with selenite or vehicle for 42 days. Changes in tumor volume and serum PSA levels were assessed. Results: Selenite significantly decreased androgen-dependent LAPC-4 tumor growth in male mice over 42 days (p < 0.001). Relative tumor volume was decreased by 41% in selenite-treated animals compared with vehicle-treated animals. The inhibition of LAPC-4 tumor growth corresponded to a marked decrease in serum PSA levels (p < 0.01). In the androgen-independent LAPC-4 tumors in female mice, selenite treatment decreased tumor volume by 58% after 42 days of treatment (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These results suggest that selenite may have potential as a novel therapeutic agent to treat both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  14. Berberine inhibits the proliferation of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells via an Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Huan; Zhang, Yaqian; Guo, Wei; Long, Cong; Wang, Jingchao; Liu, Limei; Sun, Xiaoping

    2017-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignancy derived from the epithelial cells of the nasopharynx cavity, and is closely associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In addition to NPC, EBV causes various human malignancies, such as gastric cancer, hematological tumors and lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas. Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) encoded by EBV is indispensable for replication, partition, transcription and maintenance of viral genomes. Berberine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid, shows anti-inflammatory, anticholinergic, antioxidative, and anticancer activities. In the present study, the antitumor effect of berberine was studied. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assays were performed to demonstrate whether the proliferation of EBV-positive NPC cells was inhibited by berberine. Flow cytometric results revealed that berberine induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Quantitative-PCR and western blotting results indicated that berberine decreased the expression of EBNA1 at both the mRNA and protein levels in the EBV-positive NPC cells. The function of EBNA1 promoter Qp which is to drive EBNA1 transcription in type Ⅱ latent infection was strongly suppressed by berberine. Overexpression of EBNA1 attenuated this inhibitory effect. Berberine also suppressed the activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 which is a new therapeutic target in a series of malignancies, including NPC. Viral titer experiments demonstrated that berberine decreased the production of virions in HONE1 and HK1-EBV cells. In a mouse xenograft model of NPC induced by HONE1 cells, berberine significantly inhibited tumor formation. Altogether, these results indicate that berberine decreases the expression of EBNA1 and exhibits an antitumor effect against NPC both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Deviating the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei elicits distinct mechanisms for inhibiting proliferation and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Valenciano, Ana L; Ramsey, Aaron C; Mackey, Zachary B

    2015-01-01

    The DNA replication machinery is spatially and temporally coordinated in all cells to reproduce a single exact copy of the genome per division, but its regulation in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is not well characterized. We characterized the effects of altering the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a key component of the DNA replication machinery, in bloodstream form T. brucei. This study demonstrated that tight regulation of TbPCNA levels was critical for normal proliferation and DNA replication in the parasite. Depleting TbPCNA mRNA reduced proliferation, severely diminished DNA replication, arrested the synthesis of new DNA and caused the parasites to accumulated in G2/M. Attenuating the parasite by downregulating TbPCNA caused it to become hypersensitive to hydroxyurea. Overexpressing TbPCNA in T. brucei arrested proliferation, inhibited DNA replication and prevented the parasite from exiting G2/M. These results indicate that distinct mechanisms of cell cycle arrest are associated with upregulating or downregulating TbPCNA. The findings of this study validate deregulating intra-parasite levels of TbPCNA as a potential strategy for therapeutically exploiting this target in bloodstream form T. brucei.

  16. Antibody Against Integrin Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen 1 Inhibits HIV Type 1 Infection in Primary Cells Through Caspase-8-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Tiffany N.; Cimakasky, Lisa M.; Coleman, Ebony M.; Madison, M. Nia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 infection induces formation of a virological synapse wherein CD4, chemokine receptors, and cell-adhesion molecules such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) form localized domains on the cell surface. Studies show that LFA-1 on the surface of HIV-1 particles retains its adhesion function and enhances virus attachment to susceptible cells by binding its counterreceptor intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). This virus–cell interaction augments virus infectivity by facilitating binding and entry events. In this study, we demonstrate that inhibition of the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction by a monoclonal antibody leads to decreased virus production and spread in association with increased apoptosis of HIV-infected primary T cells. The data indicate that the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction may limit apoptosis in HIV-1-infected T cells. This phenomenon appears similar to anoikis wherein epithelial cells are protected from apoptosis conferred by ligand-bound integrins. These results have implications for further understanding HIV pathogenesis and replication in peripheral compartments and lymphoid organs. PMID:22697794

  17. Analysis of Anti-Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Antibodies in Children, Adults, and the Elderly by ELISA and Enzyme Inhibition: Evidence for Original Antigenic Sin

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Madhusudan; Ermler, Megan E.; Bunduc, Paul; Amanat, Fatima; Izikson, Ruvim; Cox, Manon; Palese, Peter; Eichelberger, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibody responses to influenza virus hemagglutinin provide protection against infection and are well studied. Less is known about the human antibody responses to the second surface glycoprotein, neuraminidase. Here, we assessed human antibody reactivity to a panel of N1, N2, and influenza B virus neuraminidases in different age groups, including children, adults, and the elderly. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), we determined the breadth, magnitude, and isotype distribution of neuraminidase antibody responses to historic, current, and avian strains, as well as to recent isolates to which these individuals have not been exposed. It appears that antibody levels against N1 neuraminidases were lower than those against N2 or B neuraminidases. The anti-neuraminidase antibody levels increased with age and were, in general, highest against strains that circulated during the childhood of the tested individuals, providing evidence for “original antigenic sin.” Titers measured by ELISA correlated well with titers measured by the neuraminidase inhibition assays. However, in the case of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, we found evidence of interference from antibodies binding to the conserved stalk domain of the hemagglutinin. In conclusion, we found that antibodies against the neuraminidase differ in magnitude and breadth between subtypes and age groups in the human population. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00336453, NCT00539981, and NCT00395174.) PMID:28325769

  18. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2008-08-15

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC{sub 50} value of 13.8 {mu}M, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC{sub 50} 5.3 {mu}M). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells.

  19. Human erythrocytes inhibit complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes by human serum

    SciTech Connect

    Dorval, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an autologus human system to evaluate the effects of human erythrocytes on solubilization of immune complex precipitates (IC) by human serum. Incubation of IC with fresh human serum or guinea pig serum resulted in solubilization of IC. When packed erythrocytes were added to human serum or guinea pig serum binding of IC to the erythrocyte occurred and IC solubilization was inhibited significantly (p <.025). Sheep erythrocytes did not bind IC or inhibit IC solubilization. To evaluate the role of human erythrocyte complement receptor (CR1) on these findings, human erythrocytes were treated with trypsin or anti-CR1 antibodies. Both treatments abrogated IC binding to human erythrocytes but did not affect the ability of the human erythrocyte to inhibit IC solubilization. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure C3, C4 and C5 activation in human serum after incubation with IC, human erythrocytes, human erythrocytes plus IC, whole blood or in whole blood plus IC.

  20. Sestrin2 inhibits mTORC1 through modulation of GATOR complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Sig; Ro, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Myungjin; Park, Hwan-Woo; Semple, Ian A.; Park, Haeli; Cho, Uhn-Soo; Wang, Wei; Guan, Kun-Liang; Karin, Michael; Lee, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Sestrins are stress-inducible metabolic regulators that suppress a wide range of age- and obesity-associated pathologies, many of which are due to mTORC1 overactivation. Upon various stresses, the Sestrins inhibit mTORC1 activity through an indirect mechanism that is still unclear. GATORs are recently identified protein complexes that regulate the activity of RagB, a small GTPase essential for mTORC1 activation. GATOR1 is a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for RagB whereas GATOR2 functions as an inhibitor of GATOR1. However, how the GATORs are physiologically regulated is unknown. Here we show that Sestrin2 binds to GATOR2, and liberates GATOR1 from GATOR2-mediated inhibition. Released GATOR1 subsequently binds to and inactivates RagB, ultimately resulting in mTORC1 suppression. Consistent with this biochemical mechanism, genetic ablation of GATOR1 nullifies the mTORC1-inhibiting effect of Sestrin2 in both cell culture and Drosophila models. Collectively, we elucidate a new signaling cascade composed of Sestrin2-GATOR2-GATOR1-RagB that mediates stress-dependent suppression of mTORC1 activity. PMID:25819761

  1. Evidence that transporters associated with antigen processing translocate a major histocompatibility complex class I-binding peptide into the endoplasmic reticulum in an ATP-dependent manner.

    PubMed Central

    Androlewicz, M J; Anderson, K S; Cresswell, P

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the putative peptide transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) by using a permeabilized-cell system. The main objective was to determine whether these molecules, which bear homology to the ATP-binding cassette family of transporters, translocate antigenic peptides across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for assembly with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and beta 2-microglobulin light chain. The pore-forming toxin streptolysin O was used to generate permeabilized cells, and peptide translocation was determined by measuring the amount of added radiolabeled peptide bound to endogenous class I molecules. No radiolabeled peptide was associated with MHC class I glycoproteins from unpermeabilized cells. We found that efficient peptide binding to MHC class I molecules in permeabilized cells is both transporter dependent and ATP dependent. In antigen-processing mutant cells lacking a functional transporter, uptake occurs only through a less-efficient transporter and ATP-independent pathway. In addition, short peptides (8-10 amino acids) known to bind MHC class I molecules compete efficiently with a radiolabeled peptide for TAP-dependent translocation, whereas longer peptides and a peptide derived from an endoplasmic reticulum signal sequence do not compete efficiently. This result indicates that the optimal substrates for TAP possess the characteristics of MHC-binding peptides. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8415666

  2. Localization of the rabies virus antigen in Merkel cells in the follicle-sinus complexes of muzzle skins of rabid dogs.

    PubMed

    Shimatsu, Taichi; Shinozaki, Harumi; Kimitsuki, Kazunori; Shiwa, Nozomi; Manalo, Daria L; Perez, Rodolfo C; Dilig, Joselito E; Yamada, Kentaro; Boonsriroj, Hassadin; Inoue, Satoshi; Park, Chun-Ho

    2016-11-01

    The direct fluorescent antibody test (dFAT) on fresh brain tissues is the gold standard for rabies virus antigen detection in dogs. However, this method is laborious and holds a high risk of virus exposure for the experimenter. Skin biopsies are useful for the diagnosis of humans and animals. In mammals, the tactile hair, known as the follicle-sinus complex (FSC), is a specialized touch organ that is abundant in the muzzle skin. Each tactile hair is equipped with more than 2,000 sensory nerve endings. Therefore, this organ is expected to serve as an alternative postmortem diagnostic material. However, the target cells and localization of rabies virus antigen in the FSCs remain to be defined. In the present study, muzzle skins were obtained from 60 rabid dogs diagnosed with rabies by dFAT at the Research Institute of Tropical Medicine in the Philippines. In all dogs, virus antigen was clearly detected in a part of the outer root sheath at the level of the ring sinus of the FSCs, and the majority of cells were positive for the Merkel cell (MC) markers cytokeratin 20 and CAM5.2. Our results suggest that MCs in the FSCs of the muzzle skin are a target for virus replication and could serve as a useful alternative specimen source for diagnosis of rabies.

  3. Techniques to improve the direct ex vivo detection of low frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T cells with peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I tetramers.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Pratip K; Melenhorst, J Joseph; Ladell, Kristin; Gostick, Emma; Scheinberg, Phillip; Barrett, A John; Wooldridge, Linda; Roederer, Mario; Sewell, Andrew K; Price, David A

    2008-11-01

    The ability to quantify and characterize antigen-specific CD8+ T cells irrespective of functional readouts using fluorochrome-conjugated peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I (pMHCI) tetramers in conjunction with flow cytometry has transformed our understanding of cellular immune responses over the past decade. In the case of prevalent CD8+ T cell populations that engage cognate pMHCI tetramers with high avidities, direct ex vivo identification and subsequent data interpretation is relatively straightforward. However, the accurate identification of low frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T cell populations can be complicated, especially in situations where T cell receptor-mediated tetramer binding occurs at low avidities. Here, we highlight a few simple techniques that can be employed to improve the visual resolution, and hence the accurate quantification, of tetramer binding CD8+ T cell populations by flow cytometry. These methodological modifications enhance signal intensity, especially in the case of specific CD8+ T cell populations that bind cognate antigen with low avidities, minimize background noise, and enable improved discrimination of true pMHCI tetramer binding events from nonspecific uptake.

  4. MLN4924 suppresses the BRCA1 complex and synergizes with PARP inhibition in NSCLC cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zong-Pei; Hu, Ying-Chun; Xie, Yu; Jin, Feng; Song, Zhi-Quan; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Ma, Teng; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2017-01-29

    Like ubiquitination, several studies have demonstrated that neddylation is implicated to be involved in the double strand break repair. BRCA1 is one of the key repair factors in the homologous recombination repair and may play a downstream role of the neddylation. BRCA1 is also a frequently mutated gene in cancers, which serve as the targets for PARP inhibitors. Here we further investigated the correlation between neddylation and BRCA1 complex using neddylation inhibitor MLN4924. MLN4924 efficiently inhibited the recruitment of components of BRCA1 complex to DNA damage sites. Thus MLN4924 may collaborate with PARP inhibitor to suppress tumor. Our results showed that combination MLN4924 and PARP inhibitor Olaparib impaired the DNA repair process in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, MLN4924 and Olaparib significantly inhibited the cancer cell growth. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis from lung cancer patients showed that high expression of NEDD8, BRCA1 and PARPs correlate with worse overall survival. Thus the combination of MLN4924 and PARP inhibitor may serve as a new strategy for NSCLC treatment.

  5. Molecular Modeling Analysis of the Inhibition of Mitochondrial Cytochrome BC1 Complex Activity by Tocol Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Awantika; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Compadre, Cesar M.; Kumar, K. Sree

    2011-06-01

    The biological functions of vitamin E related compounds have been of interest in biomedical research for several decades. Among those compounds, α-, β-, δ-, and γ-tocopherols and their oxidation products, α-, β-, δ-, γ-tocopherylquinone and their analogs α-TQo, γ-TQo, TMC20 and TMC40 were recently shown to inhibit the mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex. In this investigation the effects of the structural variation on the inhibition of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex were analyzed using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA). CoMFA performed using steric and electrostatic molecular fields produced a very good correlation. The best CoMFA models were obtained using the manual alignment of 12 compounds with 5 components (q2 = 0.589, SPRESS = 0.515, r2 = 0.992, s = 0.068 and F value = 156.520). The resulting contour maps produced by the best CoMFA model were helpful in identifying the structural features required for the biological activity of compounds under study. These results would be helpful for predicting the activity of new compounds, and they could be used for guiding the design, synthesis and development of new and more effective agents.

  6. Protection from mitochondrial complex II inhibition in vitro and in vivo by Nrf2-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Marcus J; Jakel, Rebekah J; Johnson, Delinda A; Chan, Kaimin; Kan, Yuet Wai; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2005-01-04

    Complex II inhibitors 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) and malonate cause striatal damage reminiscent of Huntington's disease and have been shown to involve oxidative stress in their pathogenesis. Because nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent transcriptional activation by means of the antioxidant response element is known to coordinate the up-regulation of cytoprotective genes involved in combating oxidative stress, we investigated the significance of Nrf2 in complex II-induced toxicity. We found that Nrf2-deficient cells and Nrf2 knockout mice are significantly more vulnerable to malonate and 3NP and demonstrate increased antioxidant response element (ARE)-regulated transcription mediated by astrocytes. Furthermore, ARE preactivation by means of intrastriatal transplantation of Nrf2-overexpressing astrocytes before lesioning conferred dramatic protection against complex II inhibition. These observations implicate Nrf2 as an essential inducible factor in the protection against complex II inhibitor-mediated neurotoxicity. These data also introduce Nrf2-mediated ARE transcription as a potential target of preventative therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease.

  7. Inhibition of phosphate uptake in corn roots by aluminum-fluoride complexes.

    PubMed

    Façanha, Arnoldo Rocha; Okorokova-Façanha, Anna L

    2002-08-01

    F forms stable complexes with Al at conditions found in the soil. Fluoroaluminate complexes (AlF(x)) have been widely described as effective analogs of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in Pi-binding sites of several proteins. In this work, we explored the possibility that the phytotoxicity of AlF(x) reflects their activity as Pi analogs. For this purpose, (32)P-labeled phosphate uptake by excised roots and plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity were investigated in an Al-tolerant variety of maize (Zea mays L. var. dwarf hybrid), either treated or not with AlF(x). In vitro, AlF(x) competitively inhibited the rate of root phosphate uptake as well as the H(+)-ATPase activity. Conversely, pretreatment of seedlings with AlF(x) in vivo promoted no effect on the H(+)-ATPase activity, whereas a biphasic effect on Pi uptake by roots was observed. Although the initial rate of phosphate uptake by roots was inhibited by AlF(x) pretreatment, this situation changed over the following minutes as the rate of uptake increased and a pronounced stimulation in subsequent (32)Pi uptake was observed. This kinetic behavior suggests a reversible and competitive inhibition of the phosphate transporter by fluoroaluminates. The stimulation of root (32)Pi uptake induced by AlF(x) pretreatment was tentatively interpreted as a phosphate starvation response. This report places AlF(3) and AlF(4)(-) among Al-phytotoxic species and suggests a mechanism of action where the accumulation of Pi-mimicking fluoroaluminates in the soil may affect the phosphate absorption by plants. The biochemical, physiological, and environmental significance of these findings is discussed.

  8. Inhibition of Phosphate Uptake in Corn Roots by Aluminum-Fluoride Complexes1

    PubMed Central

    Façanha, Arnoldo Rocha; Okorokova-Façanha, Anna L.

    2002-01-01

    F forms stable complexes with Al at conditions found in the soil. Fluoroaluminate complexes (AlFx) have been widely described as effective analogs of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in Pi-binding sites of several proteins. In this work, we explored the possibility that the phytotoxicity of AlFx reflects their activity as Pi analogs. For this purpose, 32P-labeled phosphate uptake by excised roots and plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity were investigated in an Al-tolerant variety of maize (Zea mays L. var. dwarf hybrid), either treated or not with AlFx. In vitro, AlFx competitively inhibited the rate of root phosphate uptake as well as the H+-ATPase activity. Conversely, pretreatment of seedlings with AlFx in vivo promoted no effect on the H+-ATPase activity, whereas a biphasic effect on Pi uptake by roots was observed. Although the initial rate of phosphate uptake by roots was inhibited by AlFx pretreatment, this situation changed over the following minutes as the rate of uptake increased and a pronounced stimulation in subsequent 32Pi uptake was observed. This kinetic behavior suggests a reversible and competitive inhibition of the phosphate transporter by fluoroaluminates. The stimulation of root 32Pi uptake induced by AlFx pretreatment was tentatively interpreted as a phosphate starvation response. This report places AlF3 and AlF4− among Al-phytotoxic species and suggests a mechanism of action where the accumulation of Pi-mimicking fluoroaluminates in the soil may affect the phosphate absorption by plants. The biochemical, physiological, and environmental significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:12177489

  9. Vanadyl complexes with dansyl-labelled di-picolinic acid ligands: synthesis, phosphatase inhibition activity and cellular uptake studies.

    PubMed

    Collins, Juliet; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Fedorova, Marina; Whyte, Gillian; Mak, Lok Hang; Guterman, Inna; Leatherbarrow, Robin; Woscholski, Rudiger; Vilar, Ramon

    2016-04-28

    Vanadium complexes have been previously utilised as potent inhibitors of cysteine based phosphatases (CBPs). Herein, we present the synthesis and characterisation of two new fluorescently labelled vanadyl complexes (14 and 15) with bridged di-picolinic acid ligands. These compounds differ significantly from previous vanadyl complexes with phosphatase inhibition properties in that the metal-chelating part is a single tetradentate unit, which should afford greater stability and scope for synthetic elaboration than the earlier complexes. These new complexes inhibit a selection of cysteine based phosphatases (CBPs) in the nM range with some selectivity. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies (including fluorescence anisotropy) were carried out to demonstrate that the complexes are not simply acting as vanadyl delivery vehicles but they interact with the proteins. Finally, we present preliminary fluorescence microscopy studies to demonstrate that the complexes are cell permeable and localise throughout the cytoplasm of NIH3T3 cells.

  10. Intron Lariat RNA Inhibits MicroRNA Biogenesis by Sequestering the Dicing Complex in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jinping; Su, Chuanbin; Zhong, Songxiao; Liu, Qi; Fang, Yuda; Yu, Yao; Lv, Hong; Zheng, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Lariat RNAs formed as by-products of splicing are quickly degraded by the RNA debranching enzyme 1 (DBR1), leading to their turnover. Null dbr1 mutants in both animals and plants are embryo lethal, but the mechanism underlying the lethality remains unclear. Here we characterized a weak mutant allele of DBR1 in Arabidopsis, dbr1-2, and showed that a global increase in lariat RNAs was unexpectedly accompanied by a genome-wide reduction in miRNA accumulation. The dbr1-2 mutation had no effects on expression of miRNA biogenesis genes or primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs), but the association of pri-miRNAs with the DCL1/HYL1 dicing complex was impaired. Lariat RNAs were associated with the DCL1/HYL1 dicing complex in vivo and competitively inhibited the binding of HYL1 with pri-miRNA. Consistent with the impacts of lariat RNAs on miRNA biogenesis, over-expression of lariat RNAs reduced miRNA accumulation. Lariat RNAs localized in nuclear bodies, and partially co-localize with HYL1, and both DCL1 and HYL1 were mis-localized in dbr1-2. Together with our findings that nearly four hundred lariat RNAs exist in wild type plants and that these lariat RNAs also associate with the DCL1/HYL1 dicing complex in vivo, we thus propose that lariat RNAs, as decoys, inhibit miRNA processing, suggesting a hitherto unknown layer of regulation in miRNA biogenesis. PMID:27870853

  11. The antigenic determinants on HIV p24 for CD4+ T cell inhibiting antibodies as determined by limited proteolysis, chemical modification, and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jason G; Tomer, Kenneth B; Hioe, Catarina E; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Norris, Philip J

    2006-11-01

    In the last decade, mass spectrometry has been employed by more and more researchers for identifying the proteins in a macromolecular complex as well as for defining the surfaces of their binding interfaces. This characterization of protein-protein interfaces usually involves at least one of several different methodologies in addition to the actual mass spectrometry. For example, limited proteolysis is often used as a first step in defining regions of a protein that are protected from proteolysis when the protein of interest is part of a macromolecular complex. Other techniques used in conjunction with mass spectrometry for determining regions of a protein involved in protein-protein interactions include chemical modification, such as covalent cross-linking, acetylation of lysines, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, or other forms of modification. In this report, both limited proteolysis and chemical modification were combined with several mass spectrometric techniques in efforts to define the protein surface on the HIV core protein, p24, recognized by two different monoclonal human antibodies that were isolated from HIV+ patients. One of these antibodies, 1571, strongly inhibits the CD4+ T cell proliferative response to a known epitope (PEVIPMFSALSEGATP), while the other antibody, 241-D, does not inhibit as strongly. The epitopes for both of these antibodies were determined to be discontinuous and localized to the N-terminus of p24. Interestingly, the epitope recognized by the strongly inhibiting antibody, 1571, completely overlaps the T cell epitope PEVIPMFSALSEGATP, while the antibody 241-D binds to a region adjacent to the region of p24 recognized by the antibody 1571. These results suggest that, possibly due to epitope competition, antibodies produced during HIV infection can negatively affect CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity against the virus.

  12. Proteasome inhibition blocks NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathways, restores antigen expression and sensitizes resistant human melanoma to TCR-engineered CTLs

    PubMed Central

    Jazirehi, Ali R.; Economou, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of ex vivo engineered autologous lymphocytes encoding high-affinity MART-1/HLA-A*0201-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) α/β chains (F5 CTL), densely infiltrate into sites of metastatic disease, mediating dramatic but partial clinical responses in melanoma patients. We hypothesized that MART-1 down-modulation in addition to aberrant apoptotic/survival signaling could confer resistance to death signals delivered by transgenic CTLs. To explore this hypothesis, we established an in vitro model of resistant (R) lines from MART-1+/HLA-A*0201+ F5 CTL-sensitive parental (P) lines under serial F5 CTL-selective pressure. We have recently reported that several melanoma R lines, while retaining MART-1 expression, exhibited constitutive NF-κB activation and over-expression of NF-κB-dependent resistance factors. Another established melanoma cell line M244, otherwise sensitive to F5 CTL, yielded R lines after serial F5 CTL selective pressure which had both reduced MART-1 expression levels, thus, could not be recognized, and were resistant to CTL-delivered apoptotic death signals. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib blocked NF-κB activity, decreased phopspho-ERK1/2, increased phospho-JNK levels, reduced expression of resistance-factors, restored MART-1 expression to sufficient levels, which in combination allowed M244R lines be sensitized to F5 CTL-killing. These findings suggest that proteasome inhibition in immune resistant tumors can restore proapoptotic signaling and improve tumor antigen expression. PMID:22532603

  13. A Novel Prostate-Specific Membrane-Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Micelle-Encapsulating Wogonin Inhibits Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation via Inducing Intrinsic Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hailong; Liu, Xiaogang; Wu, Fengbo; Qin, Feifei; Feng, Ping; Xu, Ting; Li, Xiang; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a malignant tumor for which there are no effective treatment strategies. In this study, we developed a targeted strategy for prostate-specific membrane-antigen (PSMA)-positive PCa in vitro based on 2-(3-((S)-5-amino-1-carboxypentyl)ureido) pentanedioic acid (ACUPA) modified polyethylene glycol (PEG)-Cholesterol micelles containing wogonin (WOG), which was named ACUPA-M-WOG. ACUPA-M-WOG was conventionally prepared using a self-assembling method, which produced stable particle size and ζ potential. Moreover, ACUPA-M-WOG showed good drug encapsulating capacity and drug release profiles. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) results suggested that ACUPA modified PEG-Cholesterol micelles could effectively enhance the drug uptake on PSMA(+) PCa cells, and the cytotoxicity of ACUPA-M-WOG was stronger than other controls according to in vitro cellular proliferation and apoptosis assays, separately through methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and Annexin V/Propidium Iodide (PI) staining. Finally, the molecular mechanisms of ACUPA-M-WOG’s effects on human PSMA(+) PCa were investigated, and were mainly the intrinsic or extrinsic apoptosis signaling pathways. The Western blot results suggested that ACUPA-M-WOG could enhance the WOG-induced apoptosis, which was mainly via the intrinsic signaling pathway rather than the extrinsic signaling pathway. In conclusion, ACUPA-M-WOG was successfully developed for WOG-selective delivery to PSMA(+) PCa cells and had stronger inhibition than free drugs, which might make it an effective strategy for PSMA(+) PCa. PMID:27196894

  14. [Epidemiological studies of viral hepatitis with and without HB antigen by means of complex studies in families].

    PubMed

    Ionescu, T r; Telniceanu, A; Dreptate, N; Bărbulescu, V; Lăzărescu, V; Zamfirescu-Gheorghiu, M; Roşu, S; Miron, C

    1977-01-01

    The results of an epidemiological and laboratory investigation on 242 adults and children, who had come in contact with patients suffering from viral hepatitis (in the family or outside it), showed the importance of family contact and the role of routes of transmission other than the parenteral and transfusional ones in viral hepatitis with positive HB antigen. Attention is likewise drawn to the importance of the laboratory tests (classical enzymatic tests and immunoelectrodiffusion) in the detection of epidemogenic sources, represented by the subclinical forms of infection.

  15. Molecular and biological interaction between major histocompatibility complex class I antigens and luteinizing hormone receptors or beta-adrenergic receptors triggers cellular response in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Solano, A R; Cremaschi, G; Sánchez, M L; Borda, E; Sterin-Borda, L; Podestá, E J

    1988-01-01

    Purified IgG from BALB/c mouse anti-C3H serum exerts positive inotropic and chronotropic effects in C3H mouse atria and induces testosterone synthesis in C3H mouse Leydig cells. The effect depends on IgG concentration and can be abolished by beta-adrenergic-receptor and luteinizing hormone-receptor antagonists. IgG interferes with the binding of dihydroalprenolol and luteinizing hormone. Monoclonal antibodies against major histocompatibility complex class I antigens were active on the Leydig cells of C3H and BALB/c mice. There was a parallelism between the effect of each individual monoclonal antibody with specificity for a particular haplotype and the response of the target cell from the strains carrying such haplotypes. These antibodies could precipitate the soluble luteinizing hormone-receptor complex. The results suggested that bound hormone triggers the association of major histocompatibility class I antigen with the receptor, thereby activating the respective target cells. PMID:2839829

  16. Efficient targeting of protein antigen to the dendritic cell receptor DEC-205 in the steady state leads to antigen presentation on major histocompatibility complex class I products and peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Steinman, Ralph M

    2002-12-16

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal alphaDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c- cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When alphaDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4-48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of alphaDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4-7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with alphaDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic alphaCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon gamma, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation.

  17. Efficient Targeting of Protein Antigen to the Dendritic Cell Receptor DEC-205 in the Steady State Leads to Antigen Presentation on Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Products and Peripheral CD8+ T Cell Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2002-01-01

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal αDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c− cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When αDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4–48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of αDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4–7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with αDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic αCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon γ, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation. PMID:12486105

  18. Extensive Variation in the O-Antigen Gene Cluster within One Salmonella enterica Serogroup Reveals an Unexpected Complex History

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Andrianopoulos, Kanella; Liu, Dan; Popoff, Michel Y.; Reeves, Peter R.

    2002-01-01

    The 46 serogroups of Salmonella enterica have different O-antigens, and each is thought to have a specific form of the O-antigen cluster. Comparison of the 145 serovars of serogroup B revealed much more intraserogroup genetic diversity than expected. The O27 factor, due to an α 1-6 linkage between O units in place of the more common α 1-2 linkage and previously thought to be due to a converting bacteriophage, is now shown to be due to a wzyα(1-6) gene located within the major gene cluster. Surprisingly a remnant of this gene in all O27− serovars shows that the ancestor was O27+. There are six distinct gene cluster forms, five apparently derived by a series of deletions and one by an insertion from an ancestral O27+ form present in 57 serovars. The history of the gene cluster and movement between subspecies I and II can be traced. Two of the derivative forms still have a functional wzyα(1-6) gene, while in three it has been inactivated by deletion or insertion. Two of the forms lacking a functional wzyα(1-6) gene have the wzyα(1-2) gene first described for strain LT2 as rfc, whereas for the third the wzy gene has not been located. PMID:11872718

  19. Prolonged antigen presentation by immune complex-binding dendritic cells programs the proliferative capacity of memory CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    León, Beatriz; Ballesteros-Tato, André; Randall, Troy D; Lund, Frances E

    2014-07-28

    The commitment of naive CD8 T cells to effector or memory cell fates can occur after a single day of antigenic stimulation even though virus-derived antigens (Ags) are still presented by DCs long after acute infection is resolved. However, the effects of extended Ag presentation on CD8 T cells are undefined and the mechanisms that regulate prolonged Ag presentation are unknown. We showed that the sustained presentation of two different epitopes from influenza virus by DCs prevented the premature contraction of the primary virus-specific CD8 T cell response. Although prolonged Ag presentation did not alter the number of memory CD8 T cells that developed, it was essential for programming the capacity of these cells to proliferate, produce cytokines, and protect the host after secondary challenge. Importantly, prolonged Ag presentation by DCs was dependent on virus-specific, isotype-switched antibodies (Abs) that facilitated the capture and cross-presentation of viral Ags by FcγR-expressing DCs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that B cells and Abs can regulate the quality and functionality of a subset of antiviral CD8 T cell memory responses and do so by promoting sustained Ag presentation by DCs during the contraction phase of the primary T cell response.

  20. Uniformity detector retinal ganglion cells fire complex spikes and receive only light-evoked inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sivyer, Benjamin; Taylor, W Rowland; Vaney, David I

    2010-03-23

    Retinal ganglion cells convey information by increasing their firing in response to an optimal visual stimulus or "trigger feature." However, one class of ganglion cell responds to changes in the visual scene by decreasing its firing. These cells, termed uniformity detectors in the rabbit retina, are encountered only rarely and the synaptic mechanisms underlying their unusual responses have not been investigated. In this study, patch-clamp recordings of uniformity detectors show that the action potentials underlying the maintained firing arise within "complex spikes." Both ON and OFF visual stimuli elicit only inhibitory synaptic input, the immediate effect of which is to suppress the maintained firing. However, this inhibition also alters the properties of the "renascent" spiking by increasing the amplitude of the spikes within each burst, suggesting that the effect may increase the efficacy of spike propagation and transmission.

  1. Delayed inhibition in cortical receptive fields and the discrimination of complex stimuli.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rajiv; Ergün, Ayla; Sen, Kamal

    2005-10-01

    Although auditory cortex is thought to play an important role in processing complex natural sounds such as speech and animal vocalizations, the specific functional roles of cortical receptive fields (RFs) remain unclear. Here, we study the relationship between a behaviorally important function: the discrimination of natural sounds and the structure of cortical RFs. We examine this problem in the model system of songbirds, using a computational approach. First, we constructed model neurons based on the spectral temporal RF (STRF), a widely used description of auditory cortical RFs. We focused on delayed inhibitory STRFs, a class of STRFs experimentally observed in primary auditory cortex (ACx) and its analog in songbirds (field L), which consist of an excitatory subregion and a delayed inhibitory subregion cotuned to a characteristic frequency. We quantified the discrimination of birdsongs by model neurons, examining both the dynamics and temporal resolution of discrimination, using a recently proposed spike distance metric (SDM). We found that single model neurons with delayed inhibitory STRFs can discriminate accurately between songs. Discrimination improves dramatically when the temporal structure of the neural response at fine timescales is considered. When we compared discrimination by model neurons with and without the inhibitory subregion, we found that the presence of the inhibitory subregion can improve discrimination. Finally, we modeled a cortical microcircuit with delayed synaptic inhibition, a candidate mechanism underlying delayed inhibitory STRFs, and showed that blocking inhibition in this model circuit degrades discrimination.

  2. Metastatin: a hyaluronan-binding complex from cartilage that inhibits tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, N; Lapcevich, R K; Underhill, C B; Han, Z; Gao, F; Swartz, G; Plum, S M; Zhang, L; Green, S J

    2001-02-01

    In this study, a hyaluronan-binding complex, which we termed Metastatin, was isolated from bovine cartilage by affinity chromatography and found to have both antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic properties. Metastatin was able to block the formation of tumor nodules in the lungs of mice inoculated with B16BL6 melanoma or Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Single i.v. administration of Metastatin into chicken embryos inhibited the growth of both B16BL6 mouse melanoma and TSU human prostate cancer cells growing on the chorioallantoic membrane. The in vivo biological effect may be attributed to the antiangiogenic activity because Metastatin is able to inhibit the migration and proliferation of cultured endothelial cells as well as vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis on the chorioallantoic membrane. In each case, the effect could be blocked by either heat denaturing the Metastatin or premixing it with hyaluronan, suggesting that its activity critically depends on its ability to bind hyaluronan on the target cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Metastatin is an effective antitumor agent that exhibits antiangiogenic activity.

  3. Use of neural networks to model complex immunogenetic associations of disease: human leukocyte antigen impact on the progression of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, J P; McQueen, P G; Goedert, J J; Kaslow, R A

    1998-03-01

    Complex immunogenetic associations of disease involving a large number of gene products are difficult to evaluate with traditional statistical methods and may require complex modeling. The authors evaluated the performance of feed-forward backpropagation neural networks in predicting rapid progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on the basis of major histocompatibility complex variables. Networks were trained on data from patients from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (n = 139) and then validated on patients from the DC Gay cohort (n = 102). The outcome of interest was rapid disease progression, defined as progression to AIDS in <6 years from seroconversion. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variables were selected as network inputs with multivariate regression and a previously described algorithm selecting markers with extreme point estimates for progression risk. Network performance was compared with that of logistic regression. Networks with 15 HLA inputs and a single hidden layer of five nodes achieved a sensitivity of 87.5% and specificity of 95.6% in the training set, vs. 77.0% and 76.9%, respectively, achieved by logistic regression. When validated on the DC Gay cohort, networks averaged a sensitivity of 59.1% and specificity of 74.3%, vs. 53.1% and 61.4%, respectively, for logistic regression. Neural networks offer further support to the notion that HIV disease progression may be dependent on complex interactions between different class I and class II alleles and transporters associated with antigen processing variants. The effect in the current models is of moderate magnitude, and more data as well as other host and pathogen variables may need to be considered to improve the performance of the models. Artificial intelligence methods may complement linear statistical methods for evaluating immunogenetic associations of disease.

  4. Effect of oxygen on activation state of complex I and lack of oxaloacetate inhibition of complex II in Langendorff perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Maklashina, Elena; Kotlyar, Alexander B; Karliner, Joel S; Cecchini, Gary

    2004-01-02

    Two main entry points for electrons into the mitochondrial respiratory chain are NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) and succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex II). Metabolic regulation of these two respiratory complexes is not understood in detail. It has been suggested that the Krebs cycle metabolic intermediate oxaloacetate (OAA) inhibits complex II in vivo, whereas complex I undergoes a reversible active/de-active transition. In normoxic and anoxic hearts it has been shown that the proportion of complex I in the active and de-active states is different suggesting a possible mode of regulation of the enzyme by oxygen concentration. In the current studies rapid isolation of mitochondrial membranes in a state that preserves the activity of both complex I and complex II has been achieved using Langendorff perfused rat hearts. The findings indicate that the state of activation of complex I is controlled by the oxygen saturation in the perfusate. In addition, these studies show that complex II is fully active in the mitochondrion and not inhibited by OAA regardless of the oxygen concentration.

  5. Differential inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complexes by inhalation of combustion smoke and carbon monoxide, in vivo, in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung M; Hallberg, Lance M; Greeley, George H; Englander, Ella W

    2010-08-01

    Combustion smoke contains gases and particulates, which act via hypoxia and cytotoxicity producing mechanisms to injure cells and tissues. While carbon monoxide (CO) is the major toxicant in smoke, its toxicity is exacerbated in the presence of other compounds. Here, we examined modulations of mitochondrial and cytosolic energy metabolism by inhalation of combustion smoke versus CO, in vivo, in the rat brain. Measurements revealed reduced activities of respiratory chain (RC) complexes, with greater inhibition by smoke than equivalent CO in ambient air. In the case of RC complex IV, inhibition by CO and smoke was similar--suggesting that complex IV inhibition is primarily by the action of CO. In contrast, inhibition of complexes I and III was greater by smoke. Increases in cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase activities accompanied inhibition of RC complexes, likely reflecting compensatory increases in cytosolic energy production. Together, the data provide new insights into the mechanisms of smoke inhalation-induced perturbations of brain energetics, which impact neuronal function and contribute to the development of neuropathologies in survivors of exposures to CO and combustion smoke.

  6. Inhibition of immunologic injury of cultured cells infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus: role of defective interfering virus in regulating viral antigenic expression

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, RM; Oldstone, MBA

    1977-01-01

    The expression of viral antigens on the surfaces of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-infected L-929 cells peaked 2-4 days postinfection and thereafter precipitously declined. Little or no viral antigen was expressed on the plasma membrane surfaces of persistently infected cells, but LCMV antigens were clearly present in the cytoplasms of most of those cells. Cells early after acute infection (days 2-4) were lysed by both virus-specific antibody and complement (C) and immune T lymphocytes. To the contrary, antibody and C did not kill persistently infected cells, but T lymphocytes did kill such cells although at a lower efficiency than acutely infected cells. The expression of viral antigens on the surfaces of infected cells was regulated by the virus- cell interaction in the absence of immune reagents and was closely associated with defective interfering (DI) LCMV interference. DI LCMV, per se, blocked the synthesis and cell surface expression of LCMV antigens, and DI LCMV generation immediately preceded a precipitous reduction in cell surface antigenicity during the acute infection. Persistently infected cells produced DI LCMV but no detectable S LCMV. Peritoneal cells isolated from mice persistently infected with LCMV resembled cultured persistently infected cells in their reduced expression of cell surface antigens and their resistance to LCMV superinfection. It is proposed that DI virus-mediated interference with viral protein synthesis may allow cells to escape immune surveillance during persistent infections. PMID:301173

  7. Inhibition of atherosclerosis-promoting microRNAs via targeted polyelectrolyte complex micelles

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Leon, Lorraine; Chung, Eun Ji; Huang, Ru-Ting; Sontag, Timothy J.; Reardon, Catherine A.; Getz, Godfrey S.; Tirrell, Matthew; Fang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte complex micelles have great potential as gene delivery vehicles because of their ability to encapsulate charged nucleic acids forming a core by neutralizing their charge, while simultaneously protecting the nucleic acids from non-specific interactions and enzymatic degradation. Furthermore, to enhance specificity and transfection efficiency, polyelectrolyte complex micelles can be modified to include targeting capabilities. Here, we describe the design of targeted polyelectrolyte complex micelles containing inhibitors against dys-regulated microRNAs (miRNAs) that promote atherosclerosis, a leading cause of human mortality and morbidity. Inhibition of dys-regulated miRNAs in diseased cells associated with atherosclerosis has resulted in therapeutic efficacy in animal models and has been proposed to treat human diseases. However, the non-specific targeting of microRNA inhibitors via systemic delivery has remained an issue that may cause unwanted side effects. For this reason, we incorporated two different peptide sequences to our miRNA inhibitor containing polyelectrolyte complex micelles. One of the peptides (Arginine-Glutamic Acid-Lysine-Alanine or REKA) was used in another micellar system that demonstrated lesion-specific targeting in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. The other peptide (Valine-Histidine-Proline-Lysine-Glutamine-Histidine-Arginine or VHPKQHR) was identified via phage display and targets vascular endothelial cells through the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). In this study we have tested the in vitro efficacy and efficiency of lesion- and cell-specific delivery of microRNA inhibitors to the cells associated with atherosclerotic lesions via peptide-targeted polyelectrolyte complex micelles. Our results show that REKA-containing micelles (fibrin-targeting) and VHPKQHR-containing micelles (VCAM-1 targeting) can be used to carry and deliver microRNA inhibitors into macrophages and human endothelial cells, respectively

  8. Mechanism of Origin DNA Recognition and Assembly of an Initiator-Helicase Complex by SV40 Large Tumor Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y. Paul; Xu, Meng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Yu, Xian Jessica; Rohs, Remo; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The DNA tumor virus Simian virus 40 (SV40) is a model system for studying eukaryotic replication. SV40 large tumor antigen (LTag) is the initiator/helicase that is essential for genome replication. LTag recognizes and assembles at the viral replication origin. We determined the structure of two multidomain LTag subunits bound to origin DNA. The structure reveals that the origin binding domains (OBDs) and Zn and AAA+ domains are involved in origin recognition and assembly. Notably, the OBDs recognize the origin in an unexpected manner. The histidine residues of the AAA+ domains insert into a narrow minor groove region with enhanced negative electrostatic potential. Computational analysis indicates that this region is intrinsically narrow, demonstrating the role of DNA shape readout in origin recognition. Our results provide important insights into the assembly of the LTag initiator/ helicase at the replication origin and suggest that histidine contacts with the minor groove serve as a mechanism of DNA shape readout. PMID:23545501

  9. Astrocyte-Specific Overexpression of Nrf2 Protects Striatal Neurons from Mitochondrial Complex II Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Marcus J.; Vargas, Marcelo R.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that is known to regulate a variety of cytoprotective genes through the antioxidant response element (ARE). This endogenous response is one of the major pathways by which cells are protected from xenobiotic or innate oxidative insults. Furthermore, in neural systems, astrocyte-specific activation of Nrf2 is known to protect neurons. In previous work, our laboratory found that Nrf2 protects from intrastriatal injections of the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor malonate. Here, we extend these results to show that multiple methods of astrocyte-specific Nrf2 overexpression provide protection from neurotoxicity in vivo. GFAP-Nrf2 transgenic mice are significantly more resistant to malonate lesioning. This outcome is associated with an increased basal resistance, but more so, an enhanced Nrf2 response to lesioning that attenuated the ensuing neurotoxicity. Furthermore, striatal transplantation of neuroprogenitor cells overexpressing Nrf2 that differentiate into astrocytes after grafting also significantly reduced malonate toxicity. Overall, these data establish that enhanced astrocytic Nrf2 response and Nrf2 preconditioning are both sufficient to protect from acute lesions from mitochondrial complex II inhibition. PMID:20211941

  10. Endosidin2 targets conserved exocyst complex subunit EXO70 to inhibit exocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chunhua; Brown, Michelle Q.; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Wu, Bin; Young, Michael C.; Synek, Lukáš; Borchardt, Dan; Harrison, Reed; Pan, Songqin; Luo, Nan; Huang, Yu-ming M.; Ghang, Yoo-Jin; Ung, Nolan; Li, Ruixi; Isley, Jonathan; Morikis, Dimitrios; Song, Jikui; Guo, Wei; Hooley, Richard J.; Chang, Chia-en A.; Yang, Zhenbiao; Zarsky, Viktor; Muday, Gloria K.; Hicks, Glenn R.; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2015-11-25

    The exocyst complex regulates the last steps of exocytosis, which is essential to organisms across kingdoms. In humans, its dysfunction is correlated with several significant diseases, such as diabetes and cancer progression. Investigation of the dynamic regulation of the evolutionarily conserved exocyst-related processes using mutants in genetically tractable organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana is limited by the lethality or the severity of phenotypes. We discovered that the small molecule Endosidin2 (ES2) binds to the EXO70 (exocyst component of 70 kDa) subunit of the exocyst complex, resulting in inhibition of exocytosis and endosomal recycling in both plant and human cells and enhancement of plant vacuolar trafficking. An EXO70 protein with a C-terminal truncation results in dominant ES2 resistance, uncovering possible distinct regulatory roles for the N terminus of the protein. Ultimately, this study not only provides a valuable tool in studying exocytosis regulation but also offers a potentially new target for drugs aimed at addressing human disease.

  11. Endosidin2 targets conserved exocyst complex subunit EXO70 to inhibit exocytosis

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Chunhua; Brown, Michelle Q.; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; ...

    2015-11-25

    The exocyst complex regulates the last steps of exocytosis, which is essential to organisms across kingdoms. In humans, its dysfunction is correlated with several significant diseases, such as diabetes and cancer progression. Investigation of the dynamic regulation of the evolutionarily conserved exocyst-related processes using mutants in genetically tractable organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana is limited by the lethality or the severity of phenotypes. We discovered that the small molecule Endosidin2 (ES2) binds to the EXO70 (exocyst component of 70 kDa) subunit of the exocyst complex, resulting in inhibition of exocytosis and endosomal recycling in both plant and human cells andmore » enhancement of plant vacuolar trafficking. An EXO70 protein with a C-terminal truncation results in dominant ES2 resistance, uncovering possible distinct regulatory roles for the N terminus of the protein. Ultimately, this study not only provides a valuable tool in studying exocytosis regulation but also offers a potentially new target for drugs aimed at addressing human disease.« less

  12. Astrocyte-specific overexpression of Nrf2 protects striatal neurons from mitochondrial complex II inhibition.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Marcus J; Vargas, Marcelo R; Johnson, Delinda A; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that is known to regulate a variety of cytoprotective genes through the antioxidant response element (ARE). This endogenous response is one of the major pathways by which cells are protected from xenobiotic or innate oxidative insults. Furthermore, in neural systems, astrocyte-specific activation of Nrf2 is known to protect neurons. In previous work, our laboratory found that Nrf2 protects from intrastriatal injections of the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor malonate. Here, we extend these results to show that multiple methods of astrocyte-specific Nrf2 overexpression provide protection from neurotoxicity in vivo. GFAP-Nrf2 transgenic mice are significantly more resistant to malonate lesioning. This outcome is associated with an increased basal resistance, but more so, an enhanced Nrf2 response to lesioning that attenuated the ensuing neurotoxicity. Furthermore, striatal transplantation of neuroprogenitor cells overexpressing Nrf2 that differentiate into astrocytes after grafting also significantly reduced malonate toxicity. Overall, these data establish that enhanced astrocytic Nrf2 response and Nrf2 preconditioning are both sufficient to protect from acute lesions from mitochondrial complex II inhibition.

  13. EGCG inhibit chemical reactivity of iron through forming an Ngal-EGCG-iron complex.

    PubMed

    Bao, Guan-Hu; Xu, Jie; Hu, Feng-Lin; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Deng, Shi-Xian; Barasch, Jonathan

    2013-12-01

    Accumulated evidence indicates that the interconversion of iron between ferric (Fe(3+)) and ferrous (Fe(2+)) can be realized through interaction with reactive oxygen species in the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reactions and thereby physiologically effects redox cycling. The imbalance of iron and ROS may eventually cause tissue damage such as renal proximal tubule injury and necrosis. Many approaches were exploited to ameliorate the oxidative stress caused by the imbalance. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate, the most active and most abundant catechin in tea, was found to be involved in the protection of a spectrum of renal injuries caused by oxidative stress. Most of studies suggested that EGCG works as an antioxidant. In this paper, Multivariate analysis of the LC-MS data of tea extracts and binding assays showed that the tea polyphenol EGCG can form stable complex with iron through the protein Ngal, a biomarker of acute kidney injury. UV-Vis and Luminescence spectrum methods showed that Ngal can inhibit the chemical reactivity of iron and EGCG through forming an Ngal-EGCG-iron complex. In thinking of the interaction of iron and ROS, we proposed that EGCG may work as both antioxidant and Ngal binding siderphore in protection of kidney from injuries.

  14. Endosidin2 targets conserved exocyst complex subunit EXO70 to inhibit exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunhua; Brown, Michelle Q.; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Wu, Bin; Young, Michael C.; Synek, Lukáš; Borchardt, Dan; Harrison, Reed; Pan, Songqin; Luo, Nan; Huang, Yu-ming M.; Ghang, Yoo-Jin; Ung, Nolan; Li, Ruixi; Isley, Jonathan; Morikis, Dimitrios; Song, Jikui; Guo, Wei; Hooley, Richard J.; Chang, Chia-en A.; Yang, Zhenbiao; Zarsky, Viktor; Muday, Gloria K.; Hicks, Glenn R.; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2016-01-01

    The exocyst complex regulates the last steps of exocytosis, which is essential to organisms across kingdoms. In humans, its dysfunction is correlated with several significant diseases, such as diabetes and cancer progression. Investigation of the dynamic regulation of the evolutionarily conserved exocyst-related processes using mutants in genetically tractable organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana is limited by the lethality or the severity of phenotypes. We discovered that the small molecule Endosidin2 (ES2) binds to the EXO70 (exocyst component of 70 kDa) subunit of the exocyst complex, resulting in inhibition of exocytosis and endosomal recycling in both plant and human cells and enhancement of plant vacuolar trafficking. An EXO70 protein with a C-terminal truncation results in dominant ES2 resistance, uncovering possible distinct regulatory roles for the N terminus of the protein. This study not only provides a valuable tool in studying exocytosis regulation but also offers a potentially new target for drugs aimed at addressing human disease. PMID:26607451

  15. Sibling rivalry: competition between MHC class II family members inhibits immunity.

    PubMed

    Denzin, Lisa K; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules in the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen-presenting cells is catalyzed by human leukocyte antigen-DM (HLA-DM) and modulated by HLA-DO. In a structural study in this issue, Guce et al. show that HLA-DO is an MHC class II mimic and functions as a competitive and essentially irreversible inhibitor of HLA-DM activity, thereby inhibiting MHC class II antigen presentation.

  16. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody by structure-based computational design: generation of electrostatic interactions in the transition state stabilizes the antibody-antigen complex.

    PubMed

    Kiyoshi, Masato; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Miura, Eri; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Nakakido, Makoto; Soga, Shinji; Shirai, Hiroki; Kawabata, Shigeki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of antibodies is a desirable goal towards the development of better therapeutic strategies. The antibody 11K2 was previously developed as a therapeutic tool for inflammatory diseases, and displays very high affinity (4.6 pM) for its antigen the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). We have employed a virtual library of mutations of 11K2 to identify antibody variants of potentially higher affinity, and to establish benchmarks in the engineering of a mature therapeutic antibody. The most promising candidates identified in the virtual screening were examined by surface plasmon resonance to validate the computational predictions, and to characterize their binding affinity and key thermodynamic properties in detail. Only mutations in the light-chain of the antibody are effective at enhancing its affinity for the antigen in vitro, suggesting that the interaction surface of the heavy-chain (dominated by the hot-spot residue Phe101) is not amenable to optimization. The single-mutation with the highest affinity is L-N31R (4.6-fold higher affinity than wild-type antibody). Importantly, all the single-mutations showing increase affinity incorporate a charged residue (Arg, Asp, or Glu). The characterization of the relevant thermodynamic parameters clarifies the energetic mechanism. Essentially, the formation of new electrostatic interactions early in the binding reaction coordinate (transition state or earlier) benefits the durability of the antibody-antigen complex. The combination of in silico calculations and thermodynamic analysis is an effective strategy to improve the affinity of a matured therapeutic antibody.

  17. Association of the bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*4401 allele with host resistance to the Lone Star tick, Amblyomma americanum.

    PubMed

    Untalan, Pia M; Pruett, John H; Steelman, C Dayton

    2007-04-10

    The MHC of cattle, known as the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) complex, plays an integral role in disease and parasite susceptibility, and immune responsiveness of the host. While susceptibility to tick infestation in cattle is believed to be heritable, genes that may be responsible for the manifestation of this phenotype remain elusive. In an effort to analyze the role that genes within the BoLA complex may play in host resistance to ticks, we have evaluated components of this system within a herd of cattle established at our laboratory that has been phenotyped for ectoparasite susceptibility. Of three microsatellite loci within the BoLA complex analyzed, alleles of two microsatellite loci within the BoLA class IIa cluster (DRB1-118 and DRB3-174) associated with the tick-resistant phenotype, prompting further investigation of gene sequences within the DRB3 region. DRB3 is a class IIa gene, the second exon of which is highly polymorphic since it encodes the antigen recognition site of the DR class II molecule. Analysis of the second exon of the DRB3 gene from the phenotyped calves in our herd revealed a significant association between the DRB3*4401 allele and the tick-resistant phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a putative association between a class IIa DRB3 sequence and host resistance to the Lone Star tick. Elucidation of the mechanism involved in tick resistance will contribute to improving breeding schemes for parasite resistance, which will be beneficial to the cattle industry.

  18. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle Rj; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie Sv; Figdor, Carl G; Ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-02-24

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer.

  19. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation

    PubMed Central

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle RJ; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie SV; Figdor, Carl G; ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer. PMID:26907999

  20. Metformin Inhibits Hepatic mTORC1 Signaling via Dose-Dependent Mechanisms Involving AMPK and the TSC Complex.

    PubMed

    Howell, Jessica J; Hellberg, Kristina; Turner, Marc; Talbott, George; Kolar, Matthew J; Ross, Debbie S; Hoxhaj, Gerta; Saghatelian, Alan; Shaw, Reuben J; Manning, Brendan D

    2017-02-07

    Metformin is the most widely prescribed drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, knowledge of the full effects of metformin on biochemical pathways and processes in its primary target tissue, the liver, is limited. One established effect of metformin is to decrease cellular energy levels. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) are key regulators of metabolism that are respectively activated and inhibited in acute response to cellular energy depletion. Here we show that metformin robustly inhibits mTORC1 in mouse liver tissue and primary hepatocytes. Using mouse genetics, we find that at the lowest concentrations of metformin that inhibit hepatic mTORC1 signaling, this inhibition is dependent on AMPK and the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) protein complex (TSC complex). Finally, we show that metformin profoundly inhibits hepatocyte protein synthesis in a manner that is largely dependent on its ability to suppress mTORC1 signaling.

  1. Diagnosis of tuberculosis in an Indian population by an indirect ELISA protocol based on detection of Antigen 85 complex: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Rajpal S; Rajan, Anju N; Ramteke, Sonali S; Agrawal, Vijay S; Kelkar, Sanjivani S; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F

    2007-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) remains problematic despite many new advanced diagnostic methods. A reliable and rapid diagnostic test, which could be performed in any standard pathology laboratory, would help to obtain definitive early diagnoses of TB. In the present study we describe a prospective evaluation for demonstrating Antigen (Ag) 85 complex in the sera from TB patients. Methods Indirect ELISA, employing monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against the purified Ag 85 complex, was used to demonstrate Ag 85 complex in sera from TB patients. Serum samples were obtained from 197 different groups of patients: confirmed TB {n = 24}, clinically diagnosed TB {n = 104}, disease controls {n = 49} and healthy controls {n = 20}. Receiver operating curve (ROC) was used to calculate the cut off value and comparison between TB and non-TB groups were done by the chi-square test. Results The indirect ELISA method, using an mAb against Ag 85 complex, yielded 82% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] 67 to 93%) and 86% specificity (95% CI, 57 to 98%) for the diagnosis of TB. The serum positivities for Ag 85 complex in cases of confirmed and clinically diagnosed TB patients were 96% (23/24) and 79% (82/104) respectively, while the positivity for patients in the non-tuberculosis group was 14% (10/69). Conclusion The detection of Ag 85 complex in sera from TB patients by indirect ELISA using mAb against purified Ag 85 complex gives a reliable diagnosis and can be used to develop an immunodiagnostic assay with increased sensitivity and specificity. PMID:17620147

  2. Major histocompatibility complex class II dextramers: New tools for the detection of antigen-specific, CD4 T cells in basic and clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Krishnan, Bharathi; Reddy, Jay

    2015-01-01

    The advent of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramer technology has been a major contribution to T cell immunology, because tetramer reagents permit detection of antigen-specific T cells at the single-cell level in heterogeneous populations by flow cytometry. However, unlike MHC class I tetramers, the utility of MHC class II tetramers has been less frequently reported. MHC class II tetramers can be used successfully to enumerate the frequencies of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in cells activated in vitro, but their use for ex vivo analyses continues to be a problem, due in part to their activation dependency for binding with T cells. To circumvent this problem, we recently reported the creation of a new generation of reagents called MHC class II dextramers, which were found to be superior to their counterparts. In this review, we discuss the utility of class II dextramers vis-a-vis tetramers, with respect to their specificity and sensitivity, including potential applications and limitations. PMID:26207337

  3. Immune response genes controlling responsiveness to major transplantation antigens. Specific major histocompatibility complex-linked defect for antibody responses to class I alloantigens

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, G.W.; Corvalan, J.R.; Licence, D.R.; Howard, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    We have identified two major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked Ir genes that control the antibody response made by rats against class I major alloantigens. We have named these genes Ir-RT1Aa and Ir-RT1Ac. These Ir genes determine responsiveness of the immunized animal in a typical codominant fashion. There is no evidence so far for trans-complementation between low-responder haplotypes. Detailed studies of Ir-RT1Aa indicate that it controls the antibody response to at least two distinct alloantigenic determinants on RT1Aa molecules. These class I molecules thus behave like hapten-carrier conjugates when the response against the carrier is under Ir gene control. Analysis of the origin of alloantibody-forming cells in tetraparental radiation chimeras indicates that Ir-RT1Aa must control the provision of effective help to B cells. In many respects therefore, the properties of Ir-RT1Aa are broadly similar to those described for Ir genes controlling antibody responses to conventional antigens. The existence of apparently conventional Ir genes controlling the antibody response to major alloantigens strongly suggest that the processing of these transmembrane molecules by host antigen-presenting cells is a prerequisite for immune induction, and that it is the MHC of the responder rather than that of the allograft to which T helper cells are restricted in alloimmune responses in vivo.

  4. Inhibition of Viability, Proliferation, Cytokines Secretion, Surface Antigen Expression, and Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Seven-Day Exposure to 0.5 T Static Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Bo; Deng, Jixian; Freed, Darren H; Arora, Rakesh C; Tian, Ganghong

    2016-01-01

    After seven-day exposure to 0.5-Tesla Static Magnetic Field (SMF), Adipose-derived Stem Cells (ASCs) and those labeled by superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were examined for viability by methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay, proliferation by cell counting and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, DNA integrity by single cell gel electrophoresis, surface antigen by flow cytometry analysis, and the expression of cytokines and genetic markers by reverse transcription-PCR and underwent adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation assessed by quantifying related specific genes expression. The SMF slightly reduced cell viability and proliferation and inhibited the expression of CD49d, CD54, and CD73 but did not damage DNA integrity. The SMF slightly downregulated the expression of cytokines including Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 (TGF-β1), genetic markers comprising Stem Cell Antigen-1 (Sca1), Octamer-4 (Oct-4), ATP-binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1 (ABCB1), adipogenic marker genes containing Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPAR-γ), and osteogenic marker genes including Secreted Phosphor-protein 1 (SPP1) and Osterix (OSX). Exposure to 0.5 T SMF for seven days inhibited viability, proliferation, surface antigen expression, cytokine secretion, stem cell genetic marker expression, and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation but did not affect the DNA integrity in ASCs with or without SPIO labeling.

  5. Inhibition of Viability, Proliferation, Cytokines Secretion, Surface Antigen Expression, and Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Seven-Day Exposure to 0.5 T Static Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Bo; Deng, Jixian; Freed, Darren H.; Arora, Rakesh C.; Tian, Ganghong

    2016-01-01

    After seven-day exposure to 0.5-Tesla Static Magnetic Field (SMF), Adipose-derived Stem Cells (ASCs) and those labeled by superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were examined for viability by methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay, proliferation by cell counting and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, DNA integrity by single cell gel electrophoresis, surface antigen by flow cytometry analysis, and the expression of cytokines and genetic markers by reverse transcription-PCR and underwent adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation assessed by quantifying related specific genes expression. The SMF slightly reduced cell viability and proliferation and inhibited the expression of CD49d, CD54, and CD73 but did not damage DNA integrity. The SMF slightly downregulated the expression of cytokines including Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 (TGF-β1), genetic markers comprising Stem Cell Antigen-1 (Sca1), Octamer-4 (Oct-4), ATP-binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1 (ABCB1), adipogenic marker genes containing Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPAR-γ), and osteogenic marker genes including Secreted Phosphor-protein 1 (SPP1) and Osterix (OSX). Exposure to 0.5 T SMF for seven days inhibited viability, proliferation, surface antigen expression, cytokine secretion, stem cell genetic marker expression, and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation but did not affect the DNA integrity in ASCs with or without SPIO labeling. PMID:26880984

  6. Native MS and ECD Characterization of a Fab-Antigen Complex May Facilitate Crystallization for X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Cui, Weidong; Wecksler, Aaron T.; Zhang, Hao; Molina, Patricia; Deperalta, Galahad; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-07-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) and top-down electron-capture dissociation (ECD) combine as a powerful approach for characterizing large proteins and protein assemblies. Here, we report their use to study an antibody Fab (Fab-1)-VEGF complex in its near-native state. Native ESI with analysis by FTICR mass spectrometry confirms that VEGF is a dimer in solution and that its complex with Fab-1 has a binding stoichiometry of 2:2. Applying combinations of collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), ECD, and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) allows identification of flexible regions of the complex, potentially serving as a guide for crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  7. β-diketone-cobalt complexes inhibit DNA synthesis and induce S-phase arrest in rat C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaizhi; Zhao, Xingli; Liu, Junzhi; Fang, Xiangyang; Wang, Xuepeng; Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Rui

    2014-03-01

    β-diketone-cobalt complexes, a family of newly synthesized non-platinum metal compounds, exhibit potential antitumor activity; however, the antitumor mechanism is unclear. The current study investigated the mechanism by which β-diketone-cobalt complexes inhibit rat C6 glioma cell proliferation. It was found that β-diketone-cobalt complexes suppress rat C6 glioma cell viability in a dose-dependent manner (3.125-100 μg/ml). In rat C6 glioma cells, the IC50 value of β-diketone-cobalt complexes was 24.7±3.395 μg/ml and the IC10 value was 4.37±1.53 μg/ml, indicating a strong inhibitory effect. Further investigation suggested that β-diketone-cobalt complexes inhibit rat C6 glioma cell proliferation, which is associated with S-phase arrest and DNA synthesis inhibition. During this process, β-diketone-cobalt complexes decreased cyclin A expression and increased cyclin E and p21 expression. In addition, β-diketone-cobalt complexes exhibit a stronger antitumor capability than the antineoplastic agent, 5-fluorouracil.

  8. Inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling pathway reduces itch behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Obara, Ilona; Medrano, Maria C; Signoret-Genest, Jérémy; Jiménez-Díaz, Lydia; Géranton, Sandrine M; Hunt, Stephen P

    2015-08-01

    Activated mammalian target of rapamycin (P-mTOR) has been shown to maintain the sensitivity of subsets of small-diameter primary afferent A-nociceptors. Local or systemic inhibition of the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway reduced punctate mechanical and cold sensitivity in neuropathic pain and therefore offered a new approach to chronic pain control. In this study, we have investigated the effects of the rapamycin analog temsirolimus (CCI-779) on itch. Bouts of scratching induced by the histamine-dependent pruritogenic compound 48/80 and histamine-independent pruritogens, chloroquine and SLIGRL-NH2, injected intradermally were significantly reduced by local (intradermal) or systemic (intraperitoneal, i.p.) pretreatment with CCI-779. We also investigated the action of metformin, a drug taken to control type 2 diabetes and recently shown to inhibit mTORC1 in vivo. Although the response to nonhistaminergic stimuli was reduced at all of the time points tested, scratching to compound 48/80 was modified by metformin only when the drug was injected 24 hours before this pruritogen. We also examined the colocalization of P-mTOR with gastrin-releasing peptide, a putative marker for some itch-sensitive primary afferents, and found that P-mTOR was coexpressed in less than 5% of gastrin-releasing peptide-positive fibers in the mouse skin. Taken together, the data highlight the role that P-mTOR-positive A-fibers play in itch signaling and underline the importance of the mTORC1 pathway in the regulation of homeostatic primary afferent functions such as pain and itch. The actions of the antidiabetic drug metformin in ameliorating nonhistamine-mediated itch also suggest a new therapeutic route for the control of this category of pruritus.

  9. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol.

  10. Immunoregulatory effects of covalent antigen-antibody complexes. IV. Priming and tolerance in T-dependent responses.

    PubMed Central

    Tite, J P; Morrison, C A; Taylor, R B

    1982-01-01

    Stable, covalently bonded, monomeric complexes of rabbit anti-NAP (4-azido-2-nitrophenyl) antibodies and NAP-bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase), when injected into mice, prime the subsequent response to a soluble challenge of RNase. This effect is shown to be dependent on an intact Fc portion of the rabbit antibody and not simply due to foreign determinants recognized on the latter. A study of the kinetics of elimination of radioiodinated complexes from the serum indicates that the generation of a primary anti-rabbit IgG response and subsequent clearance of the complex leads to priming of the anti-RNase response. If mice are previously rendered tolerant to rabbit IgG or the complexes are ultracentrifuged, the priming to RNase is often abolished and tolerance may be induced. PMID:6179858

  11. Dissection of the interaction of the human cytomegalovirus-derived US2 protein with major histocompatibility complex class I molecules: prominent role of a single arginine residue in human leukocyte antigen-A2.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Claudia; Berglund, Peter; Applequist, Steven E; Yewdell, Jonathan W; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Achour, Adnane

    2006-03-31

    Human cytomegalovirus encodes several proteins that interfere with expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules on the surface of infected cells. The unique short protein 2 (US2) binds to many MHC class I allomorphs in the endoplasmic reticulum, preventing cell surface expression of the class I molecule in question. The molecular interactions underlying US2 binding to MHC class I molecules and its allele specificity have not been fully clarified. In the present study, we first compared the sequences and the structures of US2 retained versus non-retained human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allomorphs to identify MHC residues of potential importance for US2 binding. On the basis of this analysis, 18 individual HLA-A2 mutants were generated and the ability of full-length US2 to bind wild-type and mutated HLA-A2 complexes was assessed. We demonstrate that Arg181 plays a critical role in US2-mediated inhibition of HLA-A2 cell surface expression. The structural comparison of all known crystal structures of HLA-A2 either alone, or in complex with T cell receptor or the CD8 co-receptor, indicates that binding of US2 to HLA-A2 results in a unique, large conformational change of the side chain of Arg181. However, although the presence of Arg181 seems to be a prerequisite for US2 binding to HLA-A2, it is not sufficient for binding to all MHC class I alleles.

  12. Stable interaction between the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complex Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC) and DNA polymerase {epsilon} is mediated by the cohesion-specific subunits, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takeshi; Takano, Ryuji; Takeo, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Rina; Ogawa, Kaori; Ohashi, Eiji; Tsurimoto, Toshiki

    2010-11-05

    One of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complexes, Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC), is involved in sister chromatid cohesion. To examine its relationship with factors involved in DNA replication, we performed a proteomics analysis of Ctf18-interacting proteins. We found that Ctf18 interacts with a replicative DNA polymerase, DNA polymerase ε (pol ε). Co-immunoprecipitation with recombinant Ctf18-RFC and pol ε demonstrated that their binding is direct and mediated by two distinct interactions, one weak and one stable. Three subunits that are specifically required for cohesion in yeast, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8, formed a trimeric complex (18-1-8) and together enabled stable binding with pol ε. The C-terminal 23-amino acid stretch of Ctf18 was necessary for the trimeric association of 18-1-8 and was required for the stable interaction. The weak interaction was observed with alternative loader complexes including Ctf18-RFC(5), which lacks Dcc1 and Ctf8, suggesting that the common loader structures, including the RFC small subunits (RFC2-5), are responsible for the weak interaction. The two interaction modes, mediated through distinguishable structures of Ctf18-RFC, both occurred through the N-terminal half of pol ε, which includes the catalytic domain. The addition of Ctf18-RFC or Ctf18-RFC(5) to the DNA synthesis reaction caused partial inhibition and stimulation, respectively. Thus, Ctf18-RFC has multiple interactions with pol ε that promote polymorphic modulation of DNA synthesis. We propose that their interaction alters the DNA synthesis mode to enable the replication fork to cooperate with the establishment of cohesion.

  13. The CD3-gamma and CD3-delta subunits of the T cell antigen receptor can be expressed within distinct functional TCR/CD3 complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón, B; Ley, S C; Sánchez-Madrid, F; Blumberg, R S; Ju, S T; Fresno, M; Terhorst, C

    1991-01-01

    The T cell receptor for antigen (TCR) consists of two glycoproteins containing variable regions (TCR-alpha/beta or TCR-gamma/delta) which are expressed on the cell surface in association with at least four invariant proteins (CD3-gamma, -delta, -epsilon and -zeta). CD3-gamma and CD3-delta chains are highly homologous, especially in the cytoplasmic domain. The similarity observed in their genomic organization and their proximity in the chromosome indicate that both genes arose from duplication of a single gene. Here, we provide several lines of evidence which indicate that in human and murine T cells which expressed both the CD3-gamma and CD3-delta chains on their surface, the TCR/CD3 complex consisted of a mixture of alpha beta gamma epsilon zeta and alpha beta delta epsilon zeta complexes rather than a single alpha beta gamma delta epsilon zeta complex. First, a CD3-gamma specific antibody failed to co-immunoprecipitate CD3-delta and conversely, several CD3-delta specific antibodies did not coprecipitate CD3-gamma. Secondly, analysis of a panel of human and murine T cell lines demonstrated that CD3-gamma and CD3-delta were expressed at highly variable ratios on their surface. This suggested that these chains were not expressed as a single complex. Thirdly, CD3-gamma and CD3-delta competed for binding to CD3-epsilon in transfected COS cells, suggesting that CD3-gamma and CD3-delta formed mutually exclusive complexes. The existence of these two forms of TCR/CD3 complexes could have important implications in the understanding of T cell receptor function and its role in T cell development. Images PMID:1826255

  14. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) assembles a macromolecular complex regulating growth and survival of prostate cancer cells "in vitro" and correlating with progression "in vivo".

    PubMed

    Perico, Maria Elisa; Grasso, Silvia; Brunelli, Matteo; Martignoni, Guido; Munari, Enrico; Moiso, Enrico; Fracasso, Giulio; Cestari, Tiziana; Naim, Hassan Y; Bronte, Vincenzo; Colombatti, Marco; Ramarli, Dunia

    2016-11-08

    The expression of Prostate Specific-Membrane Antigen (PSMA) increases in high-grade prostate carcinoma envisaging a role in growth and progression. We show here that clustering PSMA at LNCaP or PC3-PSMA cell membrane activates AKT and MAPK pathways thus promoting proliferation and survival. PSMA activity was dependent on the assembly of a macromolecular complex including filamin A, beta1 integrin, p130CAS, c-Src and EGFR. Within this complex beta1 integrin became activated thereby inducing a c-Src-dependent EGFR phosphorylation at Y1086 and Y1173 EGF-independent residues. Silencing or blocking experiments with drugs demonstrated that all the complex components were required for full PSMA-dependent promotion of cell growth and/or survival in 3D culture, but that p130CAS and EGFR exerted a major role. All PSMA complex components were found assembled in multiple samples of two high-grade prostate carcinomas and associated with EGFR phosphorylation at Y1086. The expression of p130CAS and pEGFRY1086 was thus analysed by tissue micro array in 16 castration-resistant prostate carcinomas selected from 309 carcinomas and stratified from GS 3+4 to GS 5+5. Patients with Gleason Score ≤5 resulted negative whereas those with GS≥5 expressed p130CAS and pEGFRY1086 in 75% and 60% of the cases, respectively.Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that PSMA recruits a functionally active complex which is present in high-grade patients. In addition, two components of this complex, p130CAS and the novel pEGFRY1086, correlate with progression in castration-resistant patients and could be therefore useful in therapeutic or surveillance strategies of these patients.

  15. Enhanced humanization and affinity maturation of neutralizing anti-hepatitis B virus preS1 antibody based on antigen-antibody complex structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hong; Gripon, Philippe; Bouezzedine, Fidaa; Jeong, Mun Sik; Chi, Seung-Wook; Ryu, Seong-Eon; Hong, Hyo Jeong

    2015-01-16

    To improve a previously constructed broadly neutralizing hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific preS1 humanized antibody (HzKR127), we further humanized it through specificity-determining residue (SDR) grafting. Moreover, we improved affinity by mutating two residues in heavy-chain complementarity-determining regions (CDR), on the basis of the crystal structure of the antigen-antibody complex. HzKR127-3.2 exhibited 2.5-fold higher affinity and enhanced virus-neutralizing activity compared to the original KR127 antibody and showed less immunogenic potential than HzKR127. Enhanced virus-neutralizing activity was achieved by the increased association rate, providing insights into engineering potent antibody therapeutics for HBV immunoprophylaxis. HzKR127-3.2 may be a good candidate for HBV immunoprophylaxis.

  16. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Seho; Lim, Chunghun; Lee, Jae Young; Song, Yoon-Jae; Park, Junsoo; Choe, Joonho; Seo, Taegun

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  17. The mouse Lyt-2/3 antigen complex--I. Mode of association of the subunits with the membrane.

    PubMed

    Luescher, B; Naim, H Y; MacDonald, H R; Bron, C

    1984-04-01

    Different radiolabeling procedures have been used in conjunction with specific immunoprecipitation to assess the mode of association of Lyt-2/3 antigens with the cell membrane. Thus, cells were labeled with two different hydrophobic probes reacting selectively with lipid-associated portions of membrane proteins. The segments of glycoproteins exposed on the outside of the plasma membrane were specifically labeled using either enzyme-catalysed surface iodination or specific labeling of the carbohydrate moiety. The results show that the three disulfide-linked polypeptides of Lyt-2/3 molecules are all surface-expressed glycopeptides possessing hydrophobic regions residing within the lipid bilayer. In particular, the 28,000 mol. wt component, barely detectable by surface iodination, can be identified as a strongly labeled homogeneous and basic species by hydrophobic, biosynthetic and glycoprotein-specific labeling procedures. In addition, differences in the expression of these components were observed between thymocytes and differentiated T-lymphocytes. Probably due to glycosylation or other processing events, the 37,000 and 32,000 mol. wt components distinguishable on thymocytes co-migrate as a broad band of apparent mol. wt 41,000-42,000 when precipitated from a cloned cytolytic T-cell line. Finally, the 28,000 mol. wt component which is abundant in thymocytes is expressed in reduced amounts on cytolytic T-cells.

  18. Omental implantation of BOECs in hemophilia dogs results in circulating FVIII antigen and a complex immune response.

    PubMed

    Ozelo, Margareth C; Vidal, Barbara; Brown, Christine; Notley, Colleen; Hegadorn, Carol; Webster, Sandra; Harpell, Lori; Ahlin, James; Winterborn, Andrew; Handforth, Janine; Arruda, Valder R; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2014-06-26

    Ex vivo gene therapy strategies avoid systemic delivery of viruses thereby mitigating the risk of vector-associated immunogenicity. Previously, we delivered autologous factor VIII (FVIII)-expressing blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) to hemophilia A mice and showed that these cells remained sequestered within the implanted matrix and provided therapeutic levels of FVIII. Prior to translating this strategy into the canine (c) model of hemophilia A, we increased cFVIII transgene expression by at least 100-fold with the use of the elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1α) promoter and a strong endothelial enhancer element. BOECs isolated from hemophilia A dogs transduced with this lentiviral vector express levels of cFVIII ranging between 1.0 and 1.5 U/mL per 10(6) cells over 24 hours. Autologous BOECs have been implanted into the omentum of 2 normal and 3 hemophilia A dogs. These implanted cells formed new vessels in the omentum. All 3 hemophilia A dogs treated with FVIII-expressing autologous BOECs developed anti-FVIII immunoglobulin G2 antibodies, but in only 2 of the dogs were these antibodies inhibitory. FVIII antigen levels >40% in the absence of FVIII coagulant function were detected in the circulation for up to a year after a single gene therapy treatment, indicating prolonged cellular viability and synthesis of FVIII.

  19. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D.; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L.; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line–encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC. PMID:27588903

  20. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W

    2016-09-20

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line-encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC.

  1. Structures of MART-126/27-35Peptide/HLA-A2 Complexes Reveal a Remarkable Disconnect between Antigen Structural Homology and T Cell Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Insaidoo, Francis K; Baxter, Tiffany K; Powell, Jr., Daniel J.; Johnson, Laura A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Baker, Brian M

    2008-09-17

    Small structural changes in peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules often result in large changes in immunogenicity, supporting the notion that T cell receptors are exquisitely sensitive to antigen structure. Yet there are striking examples of TCR recognition of structurally dissimilar ligands. The resulting unpredictability of how T cells will respond to different or modified antigens impacts both our understanding of the physical bases for TCR specificity as well as efforts to engineer peptides for immunomodulation. In cancer immunotherapy, epitopes and variants derived from the MART-1/Melan-A protein are widely used as clinical vaccines. Two overlapping epitopes spanning amino acid residues 26 through 35 are of particular interest: numerous clinical studies have been performed using variants of the MART-1 26-35 decamer, although only the 27-35 nonamer has been found on the surface of targeted melanoma cells. Here, we show that the 26-35 and 27-35 peptides adopt strikingly different conformations when bound to HLA-A2. Nevertheless, clonally distinct MART-1{sub 26/27-35}-reactive T cells show broad cross-reactivity towards these ligands. Simultaneously, however, many of the cross-reactive T cells remain unable to recognize anchor-modified variants with very subtle structural differences. These dichotomous observations challenge our thinking about how structural information on unligated peptide/MHC complexes should be best used when addressing questions of TCR specificity. Our findings also indicate that caution is warranted in the design of immunotherapeutics based on the MART-1 26/27-35 epitopes, as neither cross-reactivity nor selectivity is predictable based on the analysis of the structures alone.

  2. Lipodepsipeptide empedopeptin inhibits cell wall biosynthesis through Ca2+-dependent complex formation with peptidoglycan precursors.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anna; Münch, Daniela; Schmidt, Yvonne; Reder-Christ, Katrin; Schiffer, Guido; Bendas, Gerd; Gross, Harald; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Schneider, Tanja; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike

    2012-06-08

    Empedopeptin is a natural lipodepsipeptide antibiotic with potent antibacterial activity against multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in vitro and in animal models of bacterial infection. Here, we describe its so far elusive mechanism of antibacterial action. Empedopeptin selectively interferes with late stages of cell wall biosynthesis in intact bacterial cells as demonstrated by inhibition of N-acetylglucosamine incorporation into polymeric cell wall and the accumulation of the ultimate soluble peptidoglycan precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid-pentapeptide in the cytoplasm. Using membrane preparations and the complete cascade of purified, recombinant late stage peptidoglycan biosynthetic enzymes and their respective purified substrates, we show that empedopeptin forms complexes with undecaprenyl pyrophosphate containing peptidoglycan precursors. The primary physiological target of empedopeptin is undecaprenyl pyrophosphate-N-acetylmuramic acid(pentapeptide)-N-acetylglucosamine (lipid II), which is readily accessible at the outside of the cell and which forms a complex with the antibiotic in a 1:2 molar stoichiometry. Lipid II is bound in a region that involves at least the pyrophosphate group, the first sugar, and the proximal parts of stem peptide and undecaprenyl chain. Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate and also teichoic acid precursors are bound with lower affinity and constitute additional targets. Calcium ions are crucial for the antibacterial activity of empedopeptin as they promote stronger interaction with its targets and with negatively charged phospholipids in the membrane. Based on the high structural similarity of empedopeptin to the tripropeptins and plusbacins, we propose this mechanism of action for the whole compound class.

  3. A Model of Motor Inhibition for a Complex Skill: Baseball Batting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rob

    2009-01-01

    The ability to inhibit an ongoing action in response to a signal from the environment is important for many perceptual-motor actions. This paper examines a particular example of this behavior: attempting to inhibit or "check" a swing in baseball batting. A model of motor inhibition in batting is proposed. In the model there are three different…

  4. A Simple Proteomics-Based Approach to Identification of Immunodominant Antigens from a Complex Pathogen: Application to the CD4 T Cell Response against Human Herpesvirus 6B

    PubMed Central

    Becerra-Artiles, Aniuska; Dominguez-Amorocho, Omar; Stern, Lawrence J.; Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Most of humanity is chronically infected with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), with viral replication controlled at least in part by a poorly characterized CD4 T cell response. Identification of viral epitopes recognized by CD4 T cells is complicated by the large size of the herpesvirus genome and a low frequency of circulating T cells responding to the virus. Here, we present an alternative to classical epitope mapping approaches used to identify major targets of the T cell response to a complex pathogen like HHV-6B. In the approach presented here, extracellular virus preparations or virus-infected cells are fractionated by SDS-PAGE, and eluted fractions are used as source of antigens to study cytokine responses in direct ex vivo T cell activation studies. Fractions inducing significant cytokine responses are analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify viral proteins, and a subset of peptides from these proteins corresponding to predicted HLA-DR binders is tested for IFN-γ production in seropositive donors with diverse HLA haplotypes. Ten HHV-6B viral proteins were identified as immunodominant antigens. The epitope-specific response to HHV-6B virus was complex and variable between individuals. We identified 107 peptides, each recognized by at least one donor, with each donor having a distinctive footprint. Fourteen peptides showed responses in the majority of donors. Responses to these epitopes were validated using in vitro expanded cells and naturally expressed viral proteins. Predicted peptide binding affinities for the eight HLA-DRB1 alleles investigated here correlated only modestly with the observed CD4 T cell responses. Overall, the response to the virus was dominated by peptides from the major capsid protein U57 and major antigenic protein U11, but responses to other proteins including glycoprotein H (U48) and tegument proteins U54 and U14 also were observed. These results provide a means to follow and potentially modulate the CD4 T-cell immune response to HHV-6

  5. Effects of carotenoid inhibition on the photosynthetic RC-LH1 complex in purple sulphur bacterium Thiorhodospira sibirica.

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, A A; Makhneva, Z K; Fiedor, L; Scheer, H

    2005-11-01

    Core complexes (LH1-RC) were isolated using preparative gel electrophoresis from photosynthetic membranes of the purple bacterium, Thiorhodospira sibirica, grown in the absence or presence of the carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitor, diphenylamine. The biosynthesis of carotenoids is affected by diphenylamine both quantitavely and qualitatively: after inhibition, the level of carotenoids in core complexes reaches only 10% of the normal content, as analyzed by HPLC and absorption spectroscopy. The normally grown bacterium biosynthesizes spirilloxanthin, rhodopin, anhydrorhodovibrin and lycopene, whereas after inhibition only neurosporene, zeta-carotene and their derivatives are found in the complexes. There is no concomitant accumulation of appreciable amounts of colorless carotenoid precursors. Interestingly, the main absorption band of the core light harvesting complex isolated from carotenoid-inhibited cells, shows a red shift to 889 nm, instead of a blue shift observed in many carotenoid-deficient species of purple photosynthetic bacteria. The stability of isolated core complexes against n-octyl-beta-D: -glucopyranoside clearly depends on the presence of carotenoids. Subcomplexes resulting from the detergent treatment, were characterized by non-denaturating gel electrophoresis combined with in situ absorption spectroscopy. Core complexes with the native carotenoid complement dissociate into three subcomplexes: (a) LH1 complexes partially depleted of carotenoids, with an unusual spectrum in the NIR region (lambdamax = 791, 818, 847 and 875 nm), (b) reaction centers associated with fragments of LH1, (c) small amounts of a carotenoidless B820 subcomplex. The core complex from the carotenoid-deficient bacterium is much less stable and yields only the two sub-complexes (b) and (c). We conclude that carotenoids contribute critically to stability and interactions of the core complexes with detergents.

  6. Inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Dutta, S; Halder, J; Ray, M

    1994-10-01

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of Ehrlich-ascites-carcinoma (EAC)-cell mitochondria was tested by using different respiratory substrates, electron donors at different segments of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and site-specific inhibitors to identify the specific respiratory complex which might be involved in the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption by these cells. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxo-glutarate and malate plus pyruvate-dependent respiration, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinol, an artificial electron donor. Moreover, methylglyoxal cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the NNN'N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. The inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is identical on both ADP-stimulated and uncoupler-stimulated respiration. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of EAC-cell mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. We suggest that methylglyoxal possibly inhibits the electron flow through complex I of the EAC-cell mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  7. Structures of a pan-specific antagonist antibody complexed to different isoforms of TGFβ reveal structural plasticity of antibody-antigen interactions.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Aaron; Mathieu, Magali; Lawrence, Catherine; Bigelow, Russell; Levine, Mark; Hamel, Christine; Marquette, Jean-Piere; Le Parc, Josiane; Loux, Christophe; Ferrari, Paul; Capdevila, Cecile; Dumas, Jacques; Dumas, Bruno; Rak, Alexey; Bird, Julie; Qiu, Huawei; Pan, Clark Q; Edmunds, Tim; Wei, Ronnie R

    2014-12-01

    Various important biological pathways are modulated by TGFβ isoforms; as such they are potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Fresolimumab, also known as GC1008, is a pan-TGFβ neutralizing antibody that has been tested clinically for several indications including an ongoing trial for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The structure of the antigen-binding fragment of fresolimumab (GC1008 Fab) in complex with TGFβ3 has been reported previously, but the structural capacity of fresolimumab to accommodate tight interactions with TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 was insufficiently understood. We report the crystal structure of the single-chain variable fragment of fresolimumab (GC1008 scFv) in complex with target TGFβ1 to a resolution of 3.00 Å and the crystal structure of GC1008 Fab in complex with TGFβ2 to 2.83 Å. The structures provide further insight into the details of TGFβ recognition by fresolimumab, give a clear indication of the determinants of fresolimumab pan-specificity and provide potential starting points for the development of isoform-specific antibodies using a fresolimumab scaffold.

  8. Structures of a pan-specific antagonist antibody complexed to different isoforms of TGFβ reveal structural plasticity of antibody–antigen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, Aaron; Mathieu, Magali; Lawrence, Catherine; Bigelow, Russell; Levine, Mark; Hamel, Christine; Marquette, Jean-Piere; Le Parc, Josiane; Loux, Christophe; Ferrari, Paul; Capdevila, Cecile; Dumas, Jacques; Dumas, Bruno; Rak, Alexey; Bird, Julie; Qiu, Huawei; Pan, Clark Q; Edmunds, Tim; Wei, Ronnie R

    2014-01-01

    Various important biological pathways are modulated by TGFβ isoforms; as such they are potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Fresolimumab, also known as GC1008, is a pan-TGFβ neutralizing antibody that has been tested clinically for several indications including an ongoing trial for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The structure of the antigen-binding fragment of fresolimumab (GC1008 Fab) in complex with TGFβ3 has been reported previously, but the structural capacity of fresolimumab to accommodate tight interactions with TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 was insufficiently understood. We report the crystal structure of the single-chain variable fragment of fresolimumab (GC1008 scFv) in complex with target TGFβ1 to a resolution of 3.00 Å and the crystal structure of GC1008 Fab in complex with TGFβ2 to 2.83 Å. The structures provide further insight into the details of TGFβ recognition by fresolimumab, give a clear indication of the determinants of fresolimumab pan-specificity and provide potential starting points for the development of isoform-specific antibodies using a fresolimumab scaffold. 4KV5; 4KXZ PMID:25209176

  9. Synchrony is Key: Complex Spike Inhibition of the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tianyu; Suh, Colleen Y; Blenkinsop, Timothy A; Lang, Eric J

    2016-02-01

    The control of deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) neuronal firing is central to cerebellar function but is not well understood. The large majority of synapses onto DCN neurons derive from Purkinje cells (PCs), suggesting that PC activity is an important determinant of DCN firing; however, PCs fire both simple and complex spikes (CSs), and little is known about how the latter's action affects DCN activity. Thus, here, we explored the effects of CSs on DCN activity. CSs were recorded from PC arrays along with individual DCN neurons. Presumed synaptically connected PC-DCN cell pairs were identified using CS-triggered correlograms of DCN activity, which also showed that CS activity was associated with a predominantly inhibitory effect on DCN activity. The strength of the CS effect varied as a function of synchrony, such that isolated CSs produced only weak inhibition of DCN activity, whereas highly synchronous CSs caused a larger drop in firing levels. Although the present findings were obtained in anesthetized animals, similar CS synchrony levels exist in awake animals, and changes in synchrony level have been observed in association with movements in awake animals. Thus, the present data suggest that synchronous CS activity may be a mechanism for shaping DCN output related to motor commands.

  10. Mutant p53 inhibits miRNA biogenesis by interfering with the microprocessor complex.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, F; Falcone, E; Trisciuoglio, D; Colombo, T; Lisek, K; Walerych, D; Del Sal, G; Paci, P; Bossi, G; Piaggio, G; Gurtner, A

    2016-07-21

    Downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is commonly observed in cancers and promotes tumorigenesis suggesting that miRNAs may function as tumor suppressors. However, the mechanism through which miRNAs are regulated in cancer, and the connection between oncogenes and miRNA biogenesis remain poorly understood. The TP53 tumor-suppressor gene is mutated in half of human cancers resulting in an oncogene with gain-of-function activities. Here we demonstrate that mutant p53 (mutp53) oncoproteins modulate the biogenesis of a subset of miRNAs in cancer cells inhibiting their post-transcriptional maturation. Interestingly, among these miRNAs several are also downregulated in human tumors. By confocal, co-immunoprecipitation and RNA-chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that endogenous mutp53 binds and sequesters RNA helicases p72/82 from the microprocessor complex, interfering with Drosha-pri-miRNAs association. In agreement with this, the overexpression of p72 leads to an increase of mature miRNAs levels. Moreover, functional experiments demonstrate the oncosuppressive role of mutp53-dependent miRNAs (miR-517a, -519a, -218, -105). Our study highlights a previously undescribed mechanism by which mutp53 interferes with Drosha-p72/82 association leading, at least in part, to miRNA deregulation observed in cancer.

  11. The Structure of KinA-Sda Complex Suggests An Allosteric Mechanism of Histidine Kinase Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, A.E.; Jacques, D.A.; Hammouda, B.; Hanley, T.; King, G.F.; Guss, J.Mitchell.; Trewhella, J.; Langley, D.B.; /Sydney U. /NIST, Wash., D.C. /Utah U.

    2007-07-13

    The Bacillus subtilis histidine kinase KinA controls activation of the transcription factor governing sporulation, Spo0A. The decision to sporulate involves KinA phosphorylating itself on a conserved histidine residue, after which the phosphate moiety is relayed via two other proteins to Spo0A. The DNA-damage checkpoint inhibitor Sda halts this pathway by binding KinA and blocking the autokinase reaction. We have performed small-angle X-ray scattering and neutron contrast variation studies on the complex formed by KinA and Sda. The data show that two Sda molecules bind to the base of the DHp dimerization domain of the KinA dimer. In this position Sda does not appear to be able to sterically block the catalytic domain from accessing its target histidine, as previously proposed, but rather may effect an allosteric mode of inhibition involving transmission of the inhibitory signal via the four-helix bundle that forms the DHp domain.

  12. Isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding the antigenic protein of the human tRNP(Ser)Sec complex recognized by autoantibodies from patients with type-1 autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, M; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J L; Czaja, A J; Gelpí, C

    2000-01-01

    We previously described autoantibodies against a UGA serine tRNA–protein complex (tRNP(Ser)Sec) in patients with type-1 autoimmune hepatitis [1] and now define the specificity and frequency of this autoantibody and the DNA sequence encoding the tRNA(Ser)Sec-associated antigenic protein. The presence of anti‐tRNP(Ser)Sec antibodies was highly specific for type-1 autoimmune hepatitis, as 47·5% of patients were positive compared with none of the control subjects. To characterize the antigenic protein(s), we immunoscreened a human cDNA library with anti-tRNP(Ser)Sec-positive sera. Two clones (19 and 13) were isolated. Clone 19 encodes a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 48·8 kD. Clone 13 is a shorter cDNA, almost identical to clone 19, which encodes a 35·9-kD protein. Expression of both cDNAs was accomplished in Escherichia coli as His-tagged recombinant proteins. Antibodies eluted from both purified recombinant proteins were able to immunoprecipitate the tRNA(Ser)Sec from a HeLa S3 cell extract, demonstrating their cross-reactivity with the mammalian antigenic complex. Recent cloning data relating to the target antigen(s) of autoantibodies in autoimmune hepatitis patients that react with a soluble liver antigen (SLA) and a liver-pancreas antigen (LP) have revealed that these two autoantibodies are identical and that the cloned antigen shows 99% amino acid sequence homology with tRNP(Ser)Sec. PMID:10931155

  13. Complex preimplantation genetic diagnosis for beta-thalassaemia, sideroblastic anaemia, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing.

    PubMed

    Kakourou, Georgia; Vrettou, Christina; Kattamis, Antonis; Destouni, Aspasia; Poulou, Myrto; Moutafi, Maria; Kokkali, Georgia; Pantos, Konstantinos; Davies, Stephen; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sophia; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to select histocompatible siblings to facilitate curative haematopoeitic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is now an acceptable option in the absence of an available human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatible donor. We describe a case where the couple who requested HLA-PGD, were both carriers of two serious haematological diseases, beta-thalassaemia and sideroblastic anaemia. Their daughter, affected with sideroblastic anaemia, was programmed to have HSCT. A multiplex-fluorescent-touchdown-PCR protocol was optimized for the simultaneous amplification of: the two HBB-gene mutated regions (c.118C> T, c.25-26delAA), four short tandem repeats (STRs) in chr11p15.5 linked to the HBB gene, the SLC25A38 gene mutation (c.726C > T), two STRs in chr3p22.1 linked to the SLC25A38 gene, plus eleven informative STRs for HLA-haplotyping (chr6p22.1-21.3). This was followed by real-time nested PCR and high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) for the detection of HBB and SLC25A38 gene mutations, as well as the analysis of all STRs on an automatic genetic analyzer (sequencer). The couple completed four clinical in vitro fertilization (IVF)/PGD cycles. At least one matched unaffected embryo was identified and transferred in each cycle. A twin pregnancy was established in the fourth PGD cycle and genotyping results at all loci were confirmed by prenatal diagnosis. Two healthy baby girls were delivered at week 38 of pregnancy. The need to exclude two familial disorders for HLA-PGD is rarely encountered. The methodological approach described here is fast, accurate, clinically-validated, and of relatively low cost.

  14. Inhibition of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II and depletion of extrinsic polypeptides by nickel.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Steve; Joly, David; Leclerc, Sébastien; Govindachary, Sridharan; Harnois, Johanne; Carpentier, Robert

    2007-12-01

    The toxic effect of Ni(2+) on photosynthetic electron transport was studied in a photosystem II submembrane fraction. It was shown that Ni(2+) strongly inhibits oxygen evolution in the millimolar range of concentration. The inhibition was insensitive to NaCl but significantly decreased in the presence of CaCl(2). Maximal chlorophyll fluorescence, together with variable fluorescence, maximal quantum yield of photosystem II, and flash-induced fluorescence decays were all significantly declined by Ni(2+). Further, the extrinsic polypeptides of 16 and 24 kDa associated with the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II were depleted following Ni(2+) treatment. It was deduced that interaction of Ni(2+) with these polypeptides caused a conformational change that induced their release together with Ca(2+) from the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II with consequent inhibition of the electron transport activity.

  15. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  16. A novel ruthenium(II)-polypyridyl complex inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis by impairing DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingyuan; Zhang, Zhao; Mei, Wenjie; Sun, Fenyong

    2014-08-01

    Ruthenium complexes are widely recognized as one of the most promising DNA damaging chemotherapeutic drugs. The main goal of this study was to explore the anticancer activity and underlying mechanisms of [Ru(phen)(2)(p-BrPIP)](ClO(4))(2), a novel chemically synthesized ruthenium (Ru) complex. To this end, we employed MTT assays to determine the anticancer activity of the complex, and performed single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) and Western blotting to evaluate DNA damage. Our results showed that the Ru(II)-poly complex caused severe DNA damage, possibly by downregulating key factors involved in DNA repair pathways, such as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and ring finger protein 8 (RNF8). In addition, this complex induced cell apoptosis by upregulating both p21 and p53. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the Ru(II)-poly complex exhibits antitumour activity by inducing cell apoptosis, which results from the accumulation of large amounts of unrepaired DNA damage.

  17. Intranasal Administration of Novel Chitosan Nanoparticle/DNA Complexes Induces Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lebre, F; Borchard, G; Faneca, H; Pedroso de Lima, M C; Borges, O

    2016-02-01

    The generation of strong pathogen-specific immune responses at mucosal surfaces where hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission can occur is still a major challenge. Therefore, new vaccines are urgently needed in order to overcome the limitations of existing parenteral ones. Recent studies show that this may be achieved by intranasal immunization. Chitosan has gained attention as a nonviral gene delivery system; however, its use in vivo is limited due to low transfection efficiency mostly related to strong interaction between the negatively charged DNA and the positively charged chitosan. We hypothesize that the adsorption of negatively charged human serum albumin (HSA) onto the surface of the chitosan particles would facilitate the intracellular release of DNA, enhancing transfection activity. Here, we demonstrate that a robust systemic immune response was induced after vaccination using HSA-loaded chitosan nanoparticle/DNA (HSA-CH NP/DNA) complexes. Furthermore, intranasal immunization with HSA-CH NP/DNA complexes induced HBV specific IgA in nasal and vaginal secretions; no systemic or mucosal responses were detected after immunization with DNA alone. Overall, our results show that chitosan-based DNA complexes elicited both humoral and mucosal immune response, making them an interesting and valuable gene delivery system for nasal vaccination against HBV.

  18. Characterization of antigen association with accessory cells: specific removal of processed antigens from the cell surface by phospholipases.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Haber, S I; Herrmann, S; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1987-01-01

    To characterize the basis for the cell surface association of processed antigen with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. Antigen-exposed APC that are treated with phospholipase and then immediately fixed lose their ability to stimulate antigen-plus-Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. This effect is seen with highly purified phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C. In addition it is observed with three distinct antigens--ovalbumin, bovine insulin, and poly(LGlu56LLys35LPhe9) [(GluLysPhe)n]. The effect of phospholipases is highly specific. Identically treated APC are equivalent to controls in their ability to stimulate alloreactive hybridomas specific for precisely the same Ia molecule that is corecognized by antigen-plus-Ia-specific hybrids. Furthermore, the antigen-presenting function of enzyme-treated, fixed APC can be reconstituted by the addition of exogenous in vitro processed or "processing independent" antigens. In parallel studies 125I-labeled avidin was shown to specifically bind to APC that were previously exposed and allowed to process biotin-insulin. Biotin-insulin-exposed APC that are pretreated with phospholipase bind significantly less 125I-labeled avidin than do untreated, exposed APC. Identical enzyme treatment does not reduce the binding of avidin to a biotinylated antibody already bound to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules of APC. At least some of the biotin-insulin surface sites are immunologically relevant, because the presentation of processed biotin-insulin by fixed APC is blocked by avidin. This effect is specific. Avidin binding to biotin-insulin-exposed APC does not inhibit allospecific stimulation nor the presentation of unconjugated insulin. These studies demonstrate that phospholipase effectively removes processed cell surface antigen. PMID:3467371

  19. Protection from clinical disease against three highly virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus after in ovo application of an antibody-antigen complex vaccine in maternal antibody-positive chickens.

    PubMed

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Martin, Alison; Haddad, Eid E; King, Daniel J

    2012-09-01

    Worldwide, Newcastle disease (ND) remains one of the most economically important diseases of poultry. Current vaccination strategies for commercial poultry include the use of inactivated and live ND vaccines that typically induce protection against virulent field viruses. Here, we tested the efficacy of an antigen-antibody complex (AAC) ND vaccine delivered in ovo. Commercial maternal antibody-positive broiler chickens (Gallus domesticus) were vaccinated in ovo with an AAC vaccine composed of live B1-LaSota Newcastle disease virus (NDV) complexed with NDV-specific antiserum, and then they were challenged at weekly intervals after hatch. Challenge viruses included three exotic ND disease (END) viruses: the neurotropic strain Texas GB NDV-92-01 (TxGB) and two viscerotropic isolates, one isolate from the 2002-2003 outbreak in California (California 2002 isolate S212676 [CA]) and the other isolate from a 1997 END outbreak in South Korea (South Korea 94-147 [SK]). Results demonstrate that maternal antibody was able to provide approximately 50% protection in either vaccinated or control chickens at 7 days of age after TxGB challenge. However, with challenge at > or = 14 days, most control birds died, whereas all AAC-vaccinated birds were protected. Challenge with the CA or SK viruses in chickens at 28 days of age resulted in 100% protection of vaccinated birds, whereas all control birds died. In addition, AAC-vaccinated birds displayed decreased incidence of viral shedding in oral and cloacal swabs than control birds. Antibody titers were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in vaccinated chickens, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hemagglutinin-inhibition tests, than in nonvaccinated controls. Together, these results demonstrate the efficacy of AAC vaccines delivered in ovo to protect commercial poultry.

  20. Myofibroblast differentiation and its functional properties are inhibited by nicotine and e-cigarette via mitochondrial OXPHOS complex III

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wei; Lerner, Chad; Sundar, Isaac K.; Rahman, Irfan

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine is the major stimulant in tobacco products including e-cigarettes. Fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation is a key process during wound healing and is dysregulated in lung diseases. The role of nicotine and e-cigarette derived nicotine on cellular functions including profibrotic response and other functional aspects is not known. We hypothesized that nicotine and e-cigarettes affect myofibroblast differentiation, gel contraction, and wound healing via mitochondria stress through nicotinic receptor-dependent mechanisms. To test the hypothesis, we exposed human lung fibroblasts with various doses of nicotine and e-cigarette condensate and determined myofibroblast differentiation, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), wound healing, and gel contraction at different time points. We found that both nicotine and e-cigarette inhibit myofibroblast differentiation as shown by smooth muscle actin and collagen type I, alpha 1 abundance. Nicotine and e-cigarette inhibited OXPHOS complex III accompanied by increased MitoROS, and this effect was augmented by complex III inhibitor antimycin A. These mitochondrial associated effects by nicotine resulted in inhibition of myofibroblast differentiation. These effects were associated with inhibition of wound healing and gel contraction suggesting that nicotine is responsible for dysregulated repair during injurious responses. Thus, our data suggest that nicotine causes dysregulated repair by inhibition of myofibroblast differentiation via OXPHOS pathway. PMID:28256533

  1. Heterometallic titanium-gold complexes inhibit renal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo‡

    PubMed Central

    Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Prabha, Swayam; Sanaú, Mercedes; Rotenberg, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    Following recent work on heterometallic titanocene-gold complexes as potential chemotherapeutics for renal cancer, we report here on the synthesis, characterization and stability studies of new titanocene complexes containing a methyl group and a carboxylate ligand (mba = S-C6H4-COO−) bound to gold(I)-phosphane fragments through a thiolate group ([(η-C5H5)2TiMe(μ-mba)Au(PR3)]. The compounds are more stable in physiological media than those previously reported and are highly cytotoxic against human cancer renal cell lines. We describe here preliminary mechanistic data involving studies on the interaction of selected compounds with plasmid (pBR322) DNA used as a model nucleic acid, and with selected protein kinases from a panel of 35 protein kinases having oncological interest. Preliminary mechanistic studies in Caki-1 renal cells indicate that the cytotoxic and anti-migration effects of the most active compound 5 ([(η-C5H5)2TiMe(μ-mba)Au(PPh3)] involve inhibition of thioredoxin reductase and loss of expression of protein kinases that drive cell migration (AKT, p90-RSK, and MAPKAPK3). The co-localization of both titanium and gold metals (1:1 ratio) in Caki-1 renal cells was demonstrated for 5 indicating the robustness of the heterometallic compound in vitro. Two compounds were selected for further in vivo studies on mice based on their selectivity in vitro against renal cancer cell lines when compared to non-tumorigenic human kidney cell lines (HEK-293T and RPTC) and the favourable preliminary toxicity profile in C57BL/6 mice. Evaluation of Caki-1 xenografts in NOD.CB17-Prkdc SCID/J mice showed an impressive tumor reduction (67%) after treatment for 28 days (3 mg/kg/every other day) with heterometallic compound 5 as compared with the previously described [(η-C5H5)2Ti{OC(O)-4-C6H4-P(Ph2)AuCI}2] 3 which was non-inhibitory. These findings indicate that structural modifications on the ligand scaffold affect the in vivo efficacy of this class of compounds. PMID

  2. Nuclear export signal-interacting protein forms complexes with lamin A/C-Nups to mediate the CRM1-independent nuclear export of large hepatitis delta antigen.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Jiang, Jia-Yin; Chang, Shin C; Tsay, Yeou-Guang; Chen, Mei-Ru; Chang, Ming-Fu

    2013-02-01

    Nuclear export is an important process that not only regulates the functions of cellular factors but also facilitates the assembly of viral nucleoprotein complexes. Chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) that mediates the transport of proteins bearing the classical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) is the best-characterized nuclear export receptor. Recently, several CRM1-independent nuclear export pathways were also identified. The nuclear export of the large form of hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg-L), a nucleocapsid protein of hepatitis delta virus (HDV), which contains a CRM1-independent proline-rich NES, is mediated by the host NES-interacting protein (NESI). The mechanism of the NESI protein in mediating nuclear export is still unknown. In this study, NESI was characterized as a highly glycosylated membrane protein. It interacted and colocalized well in the nuclear envelope with lamin A/C and nucleoporins. Importantly, HDAg-L could be coimmunoprecipitated with lamin A/C and nucleoporins. In addition, binding of the cargo HDAg-L to the C terminus of NESI was detected for the wild-type protein but not for the nuclear export-defective HDAg-L carrying a P205A mutation [HDAg-L(P205A)]. Knockdown of lamin A/C effectively reduced the nuclear export of HDAg-L and the assembly of HDV. These data indicate that by forming complexes with lamin A/C and nucleoporins, NESI facilitates the CRM1-independent nuclear export of HDAg-L.

  3. Chicken major histocompatibility complex-encoded B-G antigens are found on many cell types that are important for the immune system.

    PubMed Central

    Salomonsen, J; Dunon, D; Skjødt, K; Thorpe, D; Vainio, O; Kaufman, J

    1991-01-01

    B-G antigens are a polymorphic multigene family of cell surface molecules encoded by the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC). They have previously been described only on cells of the erythroid lineage. By using flow cytometry, section staining, and immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies and rabbit antisera to B-G molecules and by using Northern blots with B-G cDNA clones, we demonstrate here that B-G molecules and RNA are present in many other cell types: thrombocytes, peripheral B and T lymphocytes, bursal B cells and thymocytes, and stromal cells in the bursa, thymus, and caecal tonsil of the intestine. The reactions also identify at least one polymorphic B-G determinant encoded by the B-F/B-L region of the chicken MHC. The serology and tissue distribution of B-G molecules are as complex as those of mammalian MHC class I and class II molecules. These facts, taken with certain functional data, lead us to suggest that B-G molecules have an important role in the selection of B cells in the chicken bursa. Images PMID:1996336

  4. The structure of a furin-antibody complex explains non-competitive inhibition by steric exclusion of substrate conformers

    PubMed Central

    Dahms, Sven O.; Creemers, John W. M.; Schaub, Yvonne; Bourenkov, Gleb P.; Zögg, Thomas; Brandstetter, Hans; Than, Manuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein Convertases (PCs) represent highly selective serine proteases that activate their substrates upon proteolytic cleavage. Their inhibition is a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. Inhibitory camelid antibodies were developed, targeting the prototypical PC furin. Kinetic analyses of them revealed an enigmatic non-competitive mechanism, affecting the inhibition of large proprotein-like but not small peptidic substrates. Here we present the crystal structures of furin in complex with the antibody Nb14 and of free Nb14 at resolutions of 2.0 Å and 2.3 Å, respectively. Nb14 binds at a site distant to the substrate binding pocket to the P-domain of furin. Interestingly, no major conformational changes were observed upon complex formation, neither for the protease nor for the antibody. Inhibition of furin by Nb14 is instead explained by steric exclusion of specific substrate conformers, explaining why Nb14 inhibits the processing of bulky protein substrates but not of small peptide substrates. This mode of action was further supported by modelling studies with the ternary factor X-furin-antibody complex and a mutation that disrupted the interaction interface between furin and the antibody. The observed binding mode of Nb14 suggests a novel approach for the development of highly specific antibody-based proprotein convertase inhibitors. PMID:27670069

  5. Effect of oil overlay on inhibition potential of roscovitine in sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Crocomo, L F; Marques Filho, W C; Ulian, C M V; Branchini, N S; Silva, D T; Ackermann, C L; Landim-Alvarenga, F C; Bicudo, S D

    2015-06-01

    Inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases, as roscovitine, have been used to prevent the spontaneous resumption of meiosis in vitro and to improve the oocyte developmental competence. In this study, the interference of oil overlay on the reversible arrest capacity of roscovitine in sheep oocytes as well as its effects on cumulus expansion was evaluated. For this, cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were cultured for 20 h in TCM 199 with 10% foetal bovine serum (Control) containing 75 μm roscovitine (Rosco). Subsequently, they were in vitro matured (IVM) for further 18 h in inhibitor-free medium with LH and FSH. The culture was performed in Petri dishes under mineral oil (+) or in 96 well plates without oil overlay (-) at 38.5°C and 5% CO2 . At 20 and 38 h, the cumulus expansion and nuclear maturation were evaluated under stereomicroscope and by Hoechst 33342 staining, respectively. No group presented cumulus expansion at 20 h. After additional culture with gonadotrophins, a significant rate of COCs from both Control groups (+/-) exhibited total expansion while in both Rosco groups (+/-) the partial expansion prevailed. Among the oocytes treated with roscovitine, 65.2% were kept at GV in the absence of oil overlay while 40.6% of them reached MII under oil cover (p < 0.05). This meiotic arrest was reversible, and proper meiosis progression also occurred in the Control groups (+/-). So, the culture system without oil overlay improved the meiotic inhibition promoted by roscovitine without affecting the cumulus expansion rate or the subsequent meiosis progression.

  6. Potential inhibition of HIV-1 encapsidation by oligoribonucleotide–dendrimer nanoparticle complexes

    PubMed Central

    Parboosing, Raveen; Chonco, Louis; de la Mata, Francisco Javier; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn EM; Kruger, Hendrik G

    2017-01-01

    Background Encapsidation, the process during which the genomic RNA of HIV is packaged into viral particles, is an attractive target for antiviral therapy. This study explores a novel nanotechnology-based strategy to inhibit HIV encapsidation by an RNA decoy mechanism. The design of the 16-mer oligoribonucleotide (RNA) decoy is based on the sequence of stem loop 3 (SL3) of the HIV packaging signal (Ψ). Recognition of the packaging signal is essential to the encapsidation process. It is theorized that the decoy RNA, by mimicking the packaging signal, will disrupt HIV packaging if efficiently delivered into lymphocytes by complexation with a carbosilane dendrimer. The aim of the study is to measure the uptake, toxicity, and antiviral activity of the dendrimer–RNA nanocomplex. Materials and methods A dendriplex was formed between cationic carbosilane dendrimers and the RNA decoy. Uptake of the fluorescein-labeled RNA into MT4 lymphocytes was determined by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The cytoprotective effect (50% effective concentration [EC50]) and the effect on HIV replication were determined in vitro by the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and viral load measurements, respectively. Results Flow cytometry and confocal imaging demonstrated efficient transfection of lymphocytes. The dendriplex containing the Ψ decoy showed some activity (EC50 =3.20 µM, selectivity index =8.4). However, there was no significant suppression of HIV viral load. Conclusion Oligoribonucleotide decoys containing SL3 of the packaging sequence are efficiently delivered into lymphocytes by carbosilane dendrimers where they exhibit a modest cytoprotective effect against HIV infection. PMID:28115849

  7. sTLR4/MD-2 complex inhibits colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo by targeting LPS

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jie; Wei, Liuhua; Wu, Chunlin; Zhang, Qiaoyun; Wei, Dong; Chen, Xiang; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xiaoli; Dai, Shengming

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is aggressive and associated with TLR4-MD-2 signaling. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) were highly expressed in human CRC. The soluble form of extracellular TLR4 domain (sTLR4) and MD-2 may have important roles in binding lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, sTLR4 and MD-2 protein and prepared sTLR4/MD-2 complex were synthesized successfully to restrain LPS-TLR4/MD-2 activation by competing with cellular membrane TLR4 for binding LPS. The sTLR4/MD-2 complex can significantly attenuate LPS induced pro-inflammatory and migration cytokine production in vitro and in vivo, and inhibit the effect of LPS on the cell cycle, migration and invasion of human CRC cells in vitro. Administration of sTLR4/MD-2 complex protected mice from tumor both in xenograft and implantation metastasis model. The sTLR4/MD-2 complex treated mice had smaller tumor, less body weight loss and lower expression of inflammatory cytokines. Here, the azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium salt (AOM/DSS) murine model was used as an experimental platform to simulate the physiological and pathological processes of cancers associated with chronic intestinal inflammation. AOM/DSS-induced tumors were inhibited in mice treated by sTLR4/MD-2 complex. It is demonstrated in our study that sTLR4/MD-2 complex could inhibit CRC by competing with binding LPS, raising the complex's possibility of a new prevention agent against CRC. PMID:27409669

  8. Arp2/3 complex inhibition radically alters lamellipodial actin architecture, suspended cell shape, and the cell spreading process

    PubMed Central

    Henson, John H.; Yeterian, Mesrob; Weeks, Richard M.; Medrano, Angela E.; Brown, Briana L.; Geist, Heather L.; Pais, Mollyann D.; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Shuster, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have investigated the dendritic actin cytoskeleton of the cell edge's lamellipodial (LP) region by experimentally decreasing the activity of the actin filament nucleator and branch former, the Arp2/3 complex. Here we extend these studies via pharmacological inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex in sea urchin coelomocytes, cells that possess an unusually broad LP region and display correspondingly exaggerated centripetal flow. Using light and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that Arp2/3 complex inhibition via the drug CK666 dramatically altered LP actin architecture, slowed centripetal flow, drove a lamellipodial-to-filopodial shape change in suspended cells, and induced a novel actin structural organization during cell spreading. A general feature of the CK666 phenotype in coelomocytes was transverse actin arcs, and arc generation was arrested by a formin inhibitor. We also demonstrate that CK666 treatment produces actin arcs in other cells with broad LP regions, namely fish keratocytes and Drosophila S2 cells. We hypothesize that the actin arcs made visible by Arp2/3 complex inhibition in coelomocytes may represent an exaggerated manifestation of the elongate mother filaments that could possibly serve as the scaffold for the production of the dendritic actin network. PMID:25568343

  9. Neurodegeneration in methylmalonic aciduria involves inhibition of complex II and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and synergistically acting excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Okun, Jürgen G; Hörster, Friederike; Farkas, Lilla M; Feyh, Patrik; Hinz, Angela; Sauer, Sven; Hoffmann, Georg F; Unsicker, Klaus; Mayatepek, Ertan; Kölker, Stefan

    2002-04-26

    Methylmalonic acidurias are biochemically characterized by an accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA) and alternative metabolites. There is growing evidence for basal ganglia degeneration in these patients. The pathomechanisms involved are still unknown, a contribution of toxic organic acids, in particular MMA, has been suggested. Here we report that MMA induces neuronal damage in cultures of embryonic rat striatal cells at a concentration range encountered in affected patients. MMA-induced cell damage was reduced by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, antioxidants, and succinate. These results suggest the involvement of secondary excitotoxic mechanisms in MMA-induced cell damage. MMA has been implicated in inhibition of respiratory chain complex II. However, MMA failed to inhibit complex II activity in submitochondrial particles from bovine heart. To unravel the mechanism underlying neuronal MMA toxicity, we investigated the formation of intracellular metabolites in MMA-loaded striatal neurons. There was a time-dependent intracellular increase in malonate, an inhibitor of complex II, and 2-methylcitrate, a compound with multiple inhibitory effects on the tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting their putative implication in MMA neurotoxicity. We propose that neuropathogenesis of methylmalonic aciduria may involve an inhibition of complex II and the tricarboxylic acid cycle by accumulating toxic organic acids, and synergistic secondary excitotoxic mechanisms.

  10. The life span of major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes influences the efficiency of presentation and immunogenicity of two class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes in the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 4

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the reactivity to two human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) A11-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes derived from amino acids 416-424 (IVTDFSVIK, designated IVT) and 399-408 (AVFDRKSVAK, designated AVF) of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen (EBNA) 4. A strong predominance of CTL clones specific for the IVT epitope was demonstrated in polyclonal cultures generated by stimulation of lymphocytes from the EBV-seropositive donor BK with the autologous B95.8 virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). This was not due to intrinsic differences of CTL efficiency since clones specific for the two epitopes lysed equally well A11- positive phytohemagglutinin blasts and LCLs pulsed with the relevant synthetic peptide. Irrespective of the endogenous levels of EBNA4 expression, untreated LCLs were lysed more efficiently by the IVT- specific effectors, suggesting that a higher density of A11-IVT complexes is presented at the cell surface. In accordance, 10-50-fold higher amounts of IVT peptides were found in high-performance liquid chromatography fractions of acid extracts corresponding to an abundance of about 350-12,800 IVT and 8-760 AVF molecules per cell. Peptide- mediated competition of CTL sensitization, transport assays in streptolysin-O permeabilized cells, and induction of A11 expression in the transporter associated with antigen presentation-deficient T2/A11 transfectant demonstrated that the IVT and AVF peptides bind with similar affinities to A11, are translocated with equal efficiency to the endoplasmic reticulum, and form complexes of comparable stability over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. A rapid surface turnover of A11 molecules containing the AVF peptide was demonstrated in metabolically active T2/A11 cells corresponding to a half-life of approximately 3.5 as compared to approximately 2 h for molecules induced at 26 degrees C in the absence of exogenous peptides and >12 h for IVT

  11. DNA Interaction, Photocleavage and Topoisomerase I Inhibition by Ru(II) Complex with a New Ligand Possessing Phenazine Unit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-Wen; Shen, You-Ming; Shu, Jun-Shi; Xiao, Yang; Zhang, Song-Bai; Lu, Ji-Lin

    2015-09-01

    A new ruthenium complex with a dppz-like ligand pyidppz, [Ru(bpy)2(pyidppz)](2+) (pyidppz = 2-(pyridine-2-yl)imidazo-[4,5-b]dipyrido-[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) has been synthesized and characterized by ES-MS, elemental analysis, (1)H NMR. Intercalative mode of the complex bound to calf thymus DNA has been supported by different spectroscopic methods and viscosity measurements. The introduction of phenazine unit may be one of the main reasons for the weak emission of Ru(II) complex in aqueous solution. Under irradiation, this complex can efficiently cleave DNA. And the photocleavage reaction of the complex is found to be inhibited in the presence of singlet oxygen scavenger. Topoisomerase inhibition and DNA strand passage assay demonstrated that [Ru(bpy)2(pyidppz)](2+) and its parent complex [Ru(bpy)2(pyip)](2+) (pyip = 2-(pyridine-2-yl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) can act as efficient catalytic inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase I.

  12. The PD-1/PD-L1 complex resembles the antigen-binding Fv domains of antibodies and T cell receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, David Yin-wei; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Masashi; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Su, Hua-Poo; Mikami, Bunzo; Okazaki, Taku; Honjo, Tasuku; Minato, Nagahiro; Garboczi, David N.

    2008-07-29

    Signaling through the programmed death 1 (PD-1) inhibitory receptor upon binding its ligand, PD-L1, suppresses immune responses against autoantigens and tumors and plays an important role in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance. Release from PD-1 inhibitory signaling revives 'exhausted' virus-specific T cells in chronic viral infections. Here we present the crystal structure of murine PD-1 in complex with human PD-L1. PD-1 and PD-L1 interact through the conserved front and side of their Ig variable (IgV) domains, as do the IgV domains of antibodies and T cell receptors. This places the loops at the ends of the IgV domains on the same side of the PD-1/PD-L1 complex, forming a surface that is similar to the antigen-binding surface of antibodies and T cell receptors. Mapping conserved residues allowed the identification of residues that are important in forming the PD-1/PD-L1 interface. Based on the structure, we show that some reported loss-of-binding mutations involve the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction but that others compromise protein folding. The PD-1/PD-L1 interaction described here may be blocked by antibodies or by designed small-molecule drugs to lower inhibitory signaling that results in a stronger immune response. The immune receptor-like loops offer a new surface for further study and potentially the design of molecules that would affect PD-1/PD-L1 complex formation and thereby modulate the immune response.

  13. Salivary Antigen-5/CAP Family Members Are Cu2+-dependent Antioxidant Enzymes That Scavenge O2⨪ and Inhibit Collagen-induced Platelet Aggregation and Neutrophil Oxidative Burst*

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Teresa C. F.; Ma, Dongying; Schwarz, Alexandra; Reiter, Karine; Santana, Jaime M.; Andersen, John F.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Nardone, Glenn; Yu, Lee L.; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The function of the antigen-5/CAP family of proteins found in the salivary gland of bloodsucking animals has remained elusive for decades. Antigen-5 members from the hematophagous insects Dipetalogaster maxima (DMAV) and Triatoma infestans (TIAV) were expressed and discovered to attenuate platelet aggregation, ATP secretion, and thromboxane A2 generation by low doses of collagen (<1 μg/ml) but no other agonists. DMAV did not interact with collagen, glycoprotein VI, or integrin α2β1. This inhibitory profile resembles the effects of antioxidants Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD) in platelet function. Accordingly, DMAV was found to inhibit cytochrome c reduction by O2⨪ generated by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase, implying that it exhibits antioxidant activity. Moreover, our results demonstrate that DMAV blunts the luminescence signal of O2⨪ generated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils. Mechanistically, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that DMAV, like Cu,Zn-SOD, interacts with Cu2+, which provides redox potential for catalytic removal of O2⨪. Notably, surface plasmon resonance experiments (BIAcore) determined that DMAV binds sulfated glycosaminoglycans (e.g. heparin, KD ∼100 nmol/liter), as reported for extracellular SOD. Finally, fractions of the salivary gland of D. maxima with native DMAV contain Cu2+ and display metal-dependent antioxidant properties. Antigen-5/CAP emerges as novel family of Cu2+-dependent antioxidant enzymes that inhibit neutrophil oxidative burst and negatively modulate platelet aggregation by a unique salivary mechanism. PMID:23564450

  14. Differential effect of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition on antigen- and ionophore-induced release of slow reacting substance from fragmented guinea-pig lung.

    PubMed Central

    Krell, R. D.; Kusner, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) indomethacin and mefenamic acid, at concentrations ranging from 3 microM to 18 microM, enhanced antigen-induced slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) release from sensitized fragmented guinea-pig lung. In contrast, these agents had no effect on SRS-A release from nonsensitized guinea-pig lung induced by several concentrations of the calcium ionophore, A23187. Neither increasing preincubation time with the NSAID nor the use of sensitized tissue resulted in an enhancement of A23187-induced SRS-A release by indomethacin. NSAID did not alter histamine release by either stimulus. These results suggest that antigen and A23187 induce SRS-A release from different sources or by different mechanisms in guinea-pig lung. PMID:6434013

  15. Immunization with recombinant DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vectors delivering PSCA and STEAP1 antigens inhibits prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Magdalena; Canamero, Marta; Gomez, Carmen E; Najera, Jose L; Gil, Jesus; Esteban, Mariano

    2011-02-04

    Despite recent advances in early detection and improvement of conventional therapies, there is an urgent need for development of additional approaches for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, and the use of immunotherapeutic modalities, such as cancer vaccines, is one of the most promising strategies. In this study, we evaluated the prophylactic efficacy of an active immunization protocol against prostate cancer associated antigens mPSCA and mSTEAP1 in experimental prostate cancer. Two antigen delivery platforms, recombinant DNA and MVA vectors, both encoding either mPSCA or mSTEAP1 were used in diversified DNA prime/MVA boost vaccination protocol. Antitumour activity was evaluated in TRAMP-C1 subcutaneous syngeneic tumour model and TRAMP mice. DNA prime/MVA boost immunization against either mPSCA or mSTEAP1, delayed tumour growth in TRAMP-C1 cells-challenged mice. Furthermore, simultaneous vaccination with both antigens produced a stronger anti-tumour effect against TRAMP-C1 tumours than vaccination with either mPSCA or mSTEAP1 alone. Most importantly, concurrent DNA prime/MVA boost vaccination regimen with those antigens significantly decreased primary tumour burden in TRAMP mice without producing any apparent adverse effects. Histopathological analysis of prostate tumours from vaccinated and control TRAMP mice revealed also that mPSCA/mSTEAP1 based-vaccination was effective at reducing the severity of prostatic lesions and incidence of high-grade poorly differentiated prostate cancer. Suppression of the disease progression in TRAMP mice was correlated with decreased proliferation index and increased infiltration of T-cells in prostate tissue. Active immunization against PSCA and STEAP1 using DNA prime/MVA boost strategy is a promising approach for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer.

  16. Mitochondrial complex I inhibition triggers a mitophagy-dependent ROS increase leading to necroptosis and ferroptosis in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Basit, Farhan; van Oppen, Lisanne Mpe; Schöckel, Laura; Bossenbroek, Hasse M; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E; Hermeling, Johannes Cw; Grefte, Sander; Kopitz, Charlotte; Heroult, Melanie; Hgm Willems, Peter; Koopman, Werner Jh

    2017-03-30

    Inhibition of complex I (CI) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain by BAY 87-2243 ('BAY') triggers death of BRAF(V600E) melanoma cell lines and inhibits in vivo tumor growth. Here we studied the mechanism by which this inhibition induces melanoma cell death. BAY treatment depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ), increased cellular ROS levels, stimulated lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione levels. These effects were paralleled by increased opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and stimulation of autophagosome formation and mitophagy. BAY-induced cell death was not due to glucose shortage and inhibited by the antioxidant α-tocopherol and the mPTP inhibitor cyclosporin A. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1) overexpression in BAY-treated cells lowered ROS levels and inhibited mPTP opening and cell death, whereas the latter was potentiated by TRAP1 knockdown. Knockdown of autophagy-related 5 (ATG5) inhibited the BAY-stimulated autophagosome formation, cellular ROS increase and cell death. Knockdown of phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) inhibited the BAY-induced Δψ depolarization, mitophagy stimulation, ROS increase and cell death. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) knockdown induced mitochondrial filamentation and inhibited BAY-induced cell death. The latter was insensitive to the pancaspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK, but reduced by necroptosis inhibitors (necrostatin-1, necrostatin-1s)) and knockdown of key necroptosis proteins (receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) and mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL)). BAY-induced cell death was also reduced by the ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1 and overexpression of the ferroptosis-inhibiting protein glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4). This overexpression also inhibited the BAY-induced ROS increase and lipid peroxidation. Conversely, GPX4 knockdown potentiated BAY-induced cell death. We propose a

  17. Physicochemical properties and inhibition effect on iron deficiency anemia of a novel polysaccharide-iron complex (LPPC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Han, Zhi-Ping; Yin, Li; Zhao, Ming-Xing; Yu, Shu-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Porphyran (P) was extracted from red algae Porphyra by boiling water. A novel polysaccharide-iron complex (LPPC) was prepared under the alkaline condition by adding a ferric chloride solution to the low molecular weight porphyran (LP) solution. Physicochemical properties and inhibition effect on iron deficiency anemia of this complex were studied. The content of iron(III) in the complex is 21.57% determined with iodometry. The results indicate that LPPC was product required. The complex can increase red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), Serum iron (SI), spleen index, spleen mass and mass of mice with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Although the structure and deeper mechanisms on hemolytic anemia of LPPC should be further studied, LPPC is hoped to be developed as a late-model iron supplement which has a synergism on anemia.

  18. Inhibition of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex by the myeloperoxidase products, hypochlorous acid and mono-N-chloramine.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Xu, Hui; Gibson, Gary E

    2005-01-01

    Abstract alpha-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHC) complex activity is diminished in a number of neurodegenerative disorders and its diminution in Alzheimer Disease (AD) is thought to contribute to the major loss of cerebral energy metabolism that accompanies this disease. The loss of KGDHC activity appears to be predominantly due to post-translation modifications. Thiamine deficiency also results in decreased KGDHC activity and a selective neuronal loss. Recently, myeloperoxidase has been identified in the activated microglia of brains from AD patients and thiamine-deficient animals. Myeloperoxidase produces a powerful oxidant, hypochlorous acid that reacts with amines to form chloramines. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of hypochlorous acid and chloramines to inhibit the activity of KGDHC activity as a first step towards investigating the role of myeloperoxidase in AD. Hypochlorous acid and mono-N-chloramine both inhibited purified and cellular KGDHC and the order of inhibition of the purified complex was hypochlorous acid (1x) > mono-N-chloramine (approximately 50x) > hydrogen peroxide (approximately 1,500). The inhibition of cellular KGDHC occurred with no significant loss of cellular viability at all exposure times that were examined. Thus, hypochlorous acid and chloramines have the potential to inactivate a major target in neurodegeneration.

  19. Inhibition of cytokinesis by wiskostatin does not rely on N-WASP/Arp2/3 complex pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bompard, Guillaume; Rabeharivelo, Gabriel; Morin, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    Background Cytokinesis is the final step of cell division taking place at the end of mitosis during which the cytoplasmic content and replicated chromosomes of a cell are equally partitioned between the two daughter cells. This process is achieved by the formation and the ingression of an actomyosin contractile ring under the control of equatorial microtubules. The mechanisms of contractile ring formation are not fully understood but involve recruitment of preexisting actin filaments and de novo actin polymerisation. Results In this study, we evaluated the role of the actin nucleation factor, Arp2/3 complex, during cytokinesis. We found that the Arp2/3 complex is recruited late to the cleavage furrow suggesting a potential involvement of Arp2/3 complex during this process. Furthermore, wiskostatin a potent inhibitor of N-WASP activity towards the Arp2/3 complex blocked cytokinesis without affecting mitosis. Nonetheless, this inhibition could not be reproduced using alternative approaches targeting the N-WASP/Arp2/3 complex pathway. Conclusion We conclude that the wiskostatin induced defective cytokinesis does not occur through the inhibition of the N-WASP/Arp2/3 pathway. Wiskostatin is likely to either directly target other proteins required for cytokinesis progression or alternately wiskostatin bound to N-WASP could affect the activity of other factors involved in cytokinesis. PMID:18667055

  20. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase CDK1 by oxindolimine ligands and corresponding copper and zinc complexes.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Rodrigo Bernardi; Petersen, Philippe Alexandre Divina; Gonzales-Zubiate, Fernando A; Oliveira, Carla Columbano; Kumar, Naresh; do Nascimento, Rafael Rodrigues; Petrilli, Helena Maria; da Costa Ferreira, Ana Maria

    2015-10-01

    Oxindolimine-copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes that previously have shown to induce apoptosis, with DNA and mitochondria as main targets, exhibit here significant inhibition of kinase CDK1/cyclin B protein. Copper species are more active than the corresponding zinc, and the free ligand shows to be less active, indicating a major influence of coordination in the process, and a further modulation by the coordinated ligand. Molecular docking and classical molecular dynamics provide a better understanding of the effectiveness and kinase inhibition mechanism by these compounds, showing that the metal complex provides a stronger interaction than the free ligand with the ATP-binding site. The metal ion introduces charge in the oxindole species, giving it a more rigid conformation that then becomes more effective in its interactions with the protein active site. Analogous experiments resulted in no significant effect regarding phosphatase inhibition. These results can explain the cytotoxicity of these metal complexes towards different tumor cells, in addition to its capability of binding to DNA, and decreasing membrane potential of mitochondria.

  1. [The enlarged diagnosis of the fatal penicillin accident. Immunehistologic demonstration of antigen-antibody complexes and of antibodies against the tubular basement membrane after administraiton of depot penicillin].

    PubMed

    Dirnhofer, R; Sonnabend, W; Sigrist, T

    1978-05-20

    In a case of fatal penicillin allergy it proved possible at autopsy to demonstrate (by immunohistological examination of basal membranes of proximal renal tubuli) antigen-antibody complexes belonging to the penicillin (BPO) group and to an anti-penicilloyl antibody of the IgG type. In addition, complement C3 was detected. Antibodies against the basal membranes or renal tubuli were also demonstrated in material eluted from the kidney, although an inflammatory reaction ot the immunoligical changes had not yet been observed in light microscopy. It is undecided whether this discrepancy is due to the low dose of penicillin administered or the relatively short time lag between first injection and time of fatality. It is assumed that, pathogenetically, a reaction of the serum sickness type is probably involved. For etiological clarification the use of immunohistological methods in addition to serological procedures provides further indices for an antecedent sensitization to penicillin, because assay effectiveness does not decrease even after a lengthy postmortal time-lapse. On the other hand, tissues and serum for examination should be frozen at low temperatures immediately after autopsy.

  2. Changes in Serum IgA Antibody Levels against the Glycopeptidolipid Core Antigen during Antibiotic Treatment of Mycobacterium avium Complex Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Jhun, Byung Woo; Kim, Su-Young; Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2017-03-28

    We evaluated serial changes in the levels of serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody to the glycopeptidolipid (GPL) core antigen during antibiotic treatment in 57 patients with M. avium complex (MAC) lung disease, at baseline (T0) and after 3 months (T3) and 6 months (T6) of treatment. The median patient age was 59 years and 37 (65%) were female. Etiologic organisms included M. avium in 32 (56%) patients and M. intracellulare in 25 (44%). Seven (12%) patients had the fibrocavitary form of the disease on computed tomography. After 12 months of treatment, 42 (74%) patients achieved favorable responses, whereas 15 (26%) patients had unfavorable responses defined as no sputum culture conversion within 12 months of treatment. The initial median serum anti-GPL IgA levels in the 57 patients was 3.50 U/mL, and measurements at T0 (median 3.50 U/mL), T3 (median 2.71 U/mL), and T6 (median 2.61 U/mL) revealed significant decreases following treatment (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that an initially elevated anti-GPL IgA level (> 3.50 U/mL) was associated with an unfavorable response (P = 0.049). Our data suggest that elevated anti-GPL IgA levels may reflect disease activity, which may help to predict treatment response in patients with MAC lung disease.

  3. Crystal Structures of GII.10 and GII.12 Norovirus Protruding Domains in Complex with Histo-Blood Group Antigens Reveal Details for a Potential Site of Vulnerability

    SciTech Connect

    Hansman, Grant S.; Biertümpfel, Christian; Georgiev, Ivelin; McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Tongqing; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-10-10

    Noroviruses are the dominant cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide, and interactions with human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are thought to play a critical role in their entry mechanism. Structures of noroviruses from genogroups GI and GII in complex with HBGAs, however, reveal different modes of interaction. To gain insight into norovirus recognition of HBGAs, we determined crystal structures of norovirus protruding domains from two rarely detected GII genotypes, GII.10 and GII.12, alone and in complex with a panel of HBGAs, and analyzed structure-function implications related to conservation of the HBGA binding pocket. The GII.10- and GII.12-apo structures as well as the previously solved GII.4-apo structure resembled each other more closely than the GI.1-derived structure, and all three GII structures showed similar modes of HBGA recognition. The primary GII norovirus-HBGA interaction involved six hydrogen bonds between a terminal {alpha}fucose1-2 of the HBGAs and a dimeric capsid interface, which was composed of elements from two protruding subdomains. Norovirus interactions with other saccharide units of the HBGAs were variable and involved fewer hydrogen bonds. Sequence analysis revealed a site of GII norovirus sequence conservation to reside under the critical {alpha}fucose1-2 and to be one of the few patches of conserved residues on the outer virion-capsid surface. The site was smaller than that involved in full HBGA recognition, a consequence of variable recognition of peripheral saccharides. Despite this evasion tactic, the HBGA site of viral vulnerability may provide a viable target for small molecule- and antibody-mediated neutralization of GII norovirus.

  4. Anti-thyroid and antifungal activities, BSA interaction and acid phosphatase inhibition of methimazole copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Urquiza, Nora M; Islas, María S; Ariza, Santiago T; Jori, Nadir; Martínez Medina, Juan J; Lavecchia, Martín J; López Tévez, Leonor L; Lezama, Luis; Rojo, Teófilo; Williams, Patricia A M; Ferrer, Evelina G

    2015-03-05

    It has been reported that various metal coordination compounds have improved some biological properties. A high activity of acid phosphatase (AcP) is associated to several diseases (osteoporosis, Alzheimer's, prostate cancer, among others) and makes it a target for the development of new potential inhibitors. Anti-thyroid agents have disadvantageous side effects and the scarcity of medicines in this area motivated many researchers to synthesize new ones. Several copper(II) complexes have shown antifungal activities. In this work we presented for a first time the inhibition of AcP and the anti-thyroid activity produced by methimazole-Cu(II) complexes. Cu-Met ([Cu(MeimzH)2(H2O)2](NO3)2·H2O) produces a weak inhibition action while Cu-Met-phen ([Cu(MeimzH)2(phen)(H2O)2]Cl2) shows a strong inhibition effect (IC50 = 300 μM) being more effective than the reported behavior of vanadium complexes. Cu-Met-phen also presented a fairly good anti-thyroid activity with a formation constant value, Kc=1.02 × 10(10)M(-1) being 10(6) times more active than methimazole (Kc = 4.16 × 10(4)M(-1)) in opposition to Cu-Met which presented activity (Kc=9.54 × 10(3)M(-1)) but in a lesser extent than that of the free ligand. None of the complexes show antifungal activity except Cu-phen (MIC = 11.71 μgmL(-1) on Candidaalbicans) which was tested for comparison. Besides, albumin interaction experiments denoted high affinity toward the complexes and the calculated binding constants indicate reversible binding to the protein.

  5. Crystal structures of human group-VIIA phospholipase A2 inhibited by organophosphorus nerve agents exhibit non-aged complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Uttamkumar; Kirby, Stephen D.; Srinivasan, Prabhavathi; Cerasoli, Douglas M.; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2009-09-02

    The enzyme group-VIIA phospholipase A2 (gVIIA-PLA2) is bound to lipoproteins in human blood and hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-2 position of phospholipid substrates with a short sn-2 chain. The enzyme belongs to a serine hydrolase superfamily of enzymes, which react with organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents. OPs ultimately exert their toxicity by inhibiting human acetycholinesterase at nerve synapses, but may additionally have detrimental effects through inhibition of other serine hydrolases. We have solved the crystal structures of gVIIA-PLA2 following inhibition with the OPs diisopropylfluorophosphate, sarin, soman and tabun. The sarin and soman complexes displayed a racemic mix of P{sub R} and P{sub S} stereoisomers at the P-chiral center. The tabun complex displayed only the P{sub R} stereoisomer in the crystal. In all cases, the crystal structures contained intact OP adducts that had not aged. Aging refers to a secondary process OP complexes can go through, which dealkylates the nerve agent adduct and results in a form that is highly resistant to either spontaneous or oxime-mediated reactivation. Non-aged OP complexes of the enzyme were corroborated by trypsin digest and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of OP-enzyme complexes. The lack of stereoselectivity of sarin reaction was confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using a chiral column to separate and quantitate the unbound stereoisomers of sarin following incubation with enzyme. The structural details and characterization of nascent reactivity of several toxic nerve agents is discussed with a long-term goal of developing gVIIA-PLA2 as a catalytic bioscavenger of OP nerve agents.

  6. A DFT study of pyrazine derivatives and their Fe complexes in corrosion inhibition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadi, Hadi; Roonasi, Payman; Momeni, Mohammad Jafar; Manzetti, Sergio; Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Obot, I. B.; Yousefvand, Mostafa; Morteza Mousavi-Khoshdel, S.

    2015-04-01

    The DFT/B3LYP calculations were applied to investigate the relationship between electronic properties and corrosion inhibition efficiency of three pyrazine derivatives, 2-methylpyrazine (MP), 2-aminopyrazine (AP) and 2-amino-5-bromopyrazine (ABP). To take into account the solution acidity in experimental conditions, all possible mono-protonated forms, that is protonation at N1, N4 and NH2 sites, as well as the non-protonated form were considered. The molecular orbital analysis showed a good correlation between EHOMO, ELUMO and ΔE (EHOMO - ELUMO) with inhibition efficiency of the three pyrazine derivatives. Four types of interactions between iron and pyrazine molecules, i.e. Fe-π, Fe-N1, Fe-N4 and Fe-NH2 were included in the calculations. As a new approach to this system, inhibition mechanism of the three pyrazine molecules has been discussed in detail based on these four types of interactions. It was found that all four interactions are energetically important. The flat pyrazine ring was substantially deformed followed by a Fe-π interaction. The calculated binding energy of ABP in all forms was found to be higher than two other pyrazines, which is consistent with experimentally observed highest corrosion inhibition efficiency. The lack of Fe-NH2 interaction for MP molecule seems to be the reason for its lower corrosion inhibition efficiency.

  7. ATP is required for the release of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome from inhibition by the mitotic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Teichner, Adar; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Hershko, Avram

    2010-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system ensures accurate segregation of chromosomes by delaying anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. This system acts by inhibiting the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase to target securin for degradation. APC/C is inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of BubR1, Bub3, Mad2, and Cdc20. The molecular mechanisms of the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint, including the release of APC/C from inhibition, remain obscure. It has been reported that polyubiquitylation by the APC/C is required for the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint [Reddy SK, Rape M, Margansky WA, Kirschner MW (2007) Nature, 446:921–924]. We confirmed the involvement of polyubiquitylation, but found that another process, which requires ATP cleavage at the β–γ position (as opposed to α–β bond scission involved in ubiquitylation), is essential for the release of APC/C from checkpoint inhibition. ATP (β–γ) cleavage is required both for the dissociation of MCC components from APC/C and for the disassembly of free MCC, whereas polyubiquitylation is involved only in the former process. We find that the requirement for ATP (β–γ) cleavage is not due to the involvement of the 26S proteasome and that the phenomena observed are not due to sustained activity of protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B, caused by inhibition of the degradation of cyclin B. Thus, some other energy-consuming process is needed for the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint. PMID:20212161

  8. Glutathione deficiency in Gclm null mice results in complex I inhibition and dopamine depletion following paraquat administration.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li-Ping; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Patel, Manisha

    2013-08-01

    Depletion of glutathione has been shown to occur in autopsied brains of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and in animal models of PD. The goal of this study was to determine whether chronic glutathione (GSH) deficiency per se resulted in complex I inhibition and/or dopamine depletion and whether these indices were further potentiated by aging or administration of paraquat, a redox-cycling herbicide that produces a PD-like neurodegeneration model in rodents (Brooks, A. I., Chadwick, C. A., Gelbard, H. A., Cory-Slechta, D. A., and Federoff, H. J. [1999]. Paraquat elicited neurobehavioral syndrome caused by dopaminergic neuron loss. Brain Res. 823, 1-10; McCormack, A. L., Thiruchelvam, M., Manning-Bog, A. B., Thiffault, C., Langston, J. W., Cory-Slechta, D. A., and Di Monte, D. A. [2002]. Environmental risk factors and Parkinson's disease: Selective degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons caused by the herbicide paraquat. Neurobiol. Dis. 10, 119-127.) Deletion of the rate-limiting GSH synthesis gene, glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (Gclm), leads to significantly lower GSH concentrations in all tissues including brain. Gclm null (Gclm (-/-)) mice provide a model of prolonged GSH depletion to explore the relationship between GSH, complex I inhibition, and dopamine loss in vivo. Despite ~60% depletion of brain GSH in Gclm (-/-) mice of ages 3-5 or 14-16 months, striatal complex I activity, dopamine levels, 3-nitrotyroine/tyrosine ratios, aconitase activity, and CoASH remained unchanged. Administration of paraquat (10mg/kg, twice/week, 3 weeks) to 3- to 5-month-old Gclm (-/-) mice resulted in significantly decreased aconitase activity, complex I activity, and dopamine levels but not in 3- to 5-month-old Gclm (+/+) mice. Furthermore, paraquat-induced inhibition of complex I and aconitase activities in Gclm (-/-) mice was observed in the striatum but not in the cortex. The results suggest that chronic deficiency of GSH in Gclm (-/-) mice was not

  9. The Novel mTOR Complex 1/2 Inhibitor P529 Inhibits Human Lung Myofibroblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Keith T; Torr, Elizabeth E; Bernau, Ksenija; Leet, Jonathan; Sherris, David; Sandbo, Nathan

    2017-01-11

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and deadly disorder with very few therapeutic options. Palomid 529 (8-(1-hydroxyethyl)-2-methoxy-3-(4-methoxybenzyloxy)-benzo[c]chromen-6-one; P529) is a novel dual inhibitor of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2). In these studies, we investigated the effect of P529 on TGF-β-dependent signaling and myofibroblast differentiation. TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of the mTORC1 targets, p70 S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), were both dose dependently inhibited by P529 in human lung fibroblasts with maximal inhibition occurring between 10-20 µM. mTORC2-mediated phosphorylation of Akt at the S473 site was partially inhibited with a similar dose dependency, as was TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation. Protein levels of TGF-β-induced fibronectin and collagen were similarly decreased by P529. At this dose, there was also inhibition of mRNA transcript levels for Col1 and α-SMA, suggesting inhibition of transcriptional activation. However, there was no effect of P529 on canonical TGF-β-induced Smad signaling, as assessed by receptor-associated Smad2/3 phosphorylation, Smad2/3/4 translocation, or Smad-driven gene expression, as assessed by Smad-binding element driven luciferase. Conversely, activation of mTORC1/2 signaling was dependent on TGF-β type I receptor (ALK5) signaling and on Smad2/3 expression. P529 treatment disrupted TGF-β-induced actin stress fiber formation during myofibroblast differentiation, the deposition of new extracellular fibronectin matrix, and linear wound closure by fibroblasts. Likewise, mTOR knockdown inhibited TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation. In conclusion, P529 inhibits TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation, actin stress fiber formation, and matrix protein expression and deposition. Inhibition of mTORC1/2 by P529 may be a promising approach to inhibit in vivo fibrosis. This article is

  10. Light-Activated Protein Inhibition through Photoinduced Electron Transfer of a Ruthenium(II)–Cobalt(III) Bimetallic Complex

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly, the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. These results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers. PMID:25671465

  11. Light-activated protein inhibition through photoinduced electron transfer of a ruthenium(II)–cobalt(III) bimetallic complex

    DOE PAGES

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; ...

    2015-02-11

    In this paper, we describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly,more » the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. Finally, these results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers.« less

  12. Light-activated protein inhibition through photoinduced electron transfer of a ruthenium(II)–cobalt(III) bimetallic complex

    SciTech Connect

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-02-11

    In this paper, we describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly, the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. Finally, these results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers.

  13. Roles of inhibition in creating complex auditory responses in the inferior colliculus: facilitated combination-sensitive neurons.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Kiran; Wenstrup, Jeffrey J

    2005-06-01

    We studied roles of inhibition on temporally sensitive facilitation in combination-sensitive neurons from the mustached bat's inferior colliculus (IC). In these integrative neurons, excitatory responses to best frequency (BF) tones are enhanced by much lower frequency signals presented in a specific temporal relationship. Most facilitated neurons (76%) showed inhibition at delays earlier than or later than the delays causing facilitation. The timing of inhibition at earlier delays was closely related to the best delay of facilitation, but the inhibition had little influence on the duration or strength of the facilitatory interaction. Local iontophoretic application of antagonists to receptors for glycine (strychnine, STRY) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) (bicuculline, BIC) showed that STRY abolished facilitation in 96% of tested units, but BIC eliminated facilitation in only 28%. This suggests that facilitatory interactions are created in IC and reveals a differential role for these neurotransmitters. The facilitation may be created by coincidence of a postinhibitory rebound excitation activated by the low-frequency signal with the BF-evoked excitation. Unlike facilitation, inhibition at earlier delays was not eliminated by application of antagonists, suggesting an origin in lower brain stem nuclei. However, inhibition at delays later than facilitation, like facilitation itself, appears to originate within IC and to be more dependent on glycinergic than GABAergic mechanisms. Facilitatory and inhibitory interactions displayed by these combination-sensitive neurons encode information within sonar echoes and social vocalizations. The results indicate that these complex response properties arise through a series of neural interactions in the auditory brain stem and midbrain.

  14. Nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in the central complex of the grasshopper brain inhibits singing behavior.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Beate; Kunst, Michael; Günther, Cornelia; Ganter, Geoffrey K; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard; Elsner, Norbert; Heinrich, Ralf

    2005-07-25

    Grasshopper sound production, in the context of mate finding, courtship, and rivalry, is controlled by the central body complex in the protocerebrum. Stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central complex has been demonstrated to stimulate specific singing in various grasshoppers including the species Chorthippus biguttulus. Sound production elicited by stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central complex is inhibited by co-applications of various drugs activating the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathway. The nitric oxide-donor sodium nitroprusside caused a reversible suppression of muscarine-stimulated sound production that could be blocked by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), which prevents the formation of cGMP by specifically inhibiting soluble guanylyl cyclase. Furthermore, injections of both the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-Br-cGMP and the specific inhibitor of the cGMP-degrading phosphodiesterase Zaprinast reversibly inhibited singing. To identify putative sources of nitric oxide, brains of Ch. biguttulus were subjected to both nitric oxide synthase immunocytochemistry and NADPH-diaphorase staining. Among other areas known to express nitric oxide synthase, both procedures consistently labeled peripheral layers in the upper division of the central body complex, suggesting that neurons supplying this neuropil contain nitric oxide synthase and may generate nitric oxide upon activation. Exposure of dissected brains to nitric oxide and 3-(5'hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1) induced cGMP-associated immunoreactivity in both the upper and lower division. Therefore, both the morphological and pharmacological data presented in this study strongly suggest a contribution of the nitric oxide/cGMP signaling pathway to the central control of grasshopper sound production.

  15. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  16. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A R; Strick, N; Baker, L; Krugman, S

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bond adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure. Images PMID:6956871

  17. Combined Inhibition of the Renin-Angiotensin System and Neprilysin Positively Influences Complex Mitochondrial Adaptations in Progressive Experimental Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Jörg; Schröder, Josef; Dietl, Alexander; Schmid, Peter M.; Jungbauer, Carsten; Resch, Markus; Maier, Lars S.; Luchner, Andreas; Birner, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Background Inhibitors of the renin angiotensin system and neprilysin (RAS-/NEP-inhibitors) proved to be extraordinarily beneficial in systolic heart failure. Furthermore, compelling evidence exists that impaired mitochondrial pathways are causatively involved in progressive left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Consequently, we aimed to assess whether RAS-/NEP-inhibition can attenuate mitochondrial adaptations in experimental heart failure (HF). Methods and Results By progressive right ventricular pacing, distinct HF stages were induced in 15 rabbits, and 6 animals served as controls (CTRL). Six animals with manifest HF (CHF) were treated with the RAS-/NEP-inhibitor omapatrilat. Echocardiographic studies and invasive blood pressure measurements were undertaken during HF progression. Mitochondria were isolated from LV tissue, respectively, and further worked up for proteomic analysis using the SWATH technique. Enzymatic activities of citrate synthase and the electron transfer chain (ETC) complexes I, II, and IV were assessed. Ultrastructural analyses were performed by transmission electron microscopy. During progression to overt HF, intricate expression changes were mainly detected for proteins belonging to the tricarboxylic acid cycle, glucose and fat metabolism, and the ETC complexes, even though ETC complex I, II, or IV enzymatic activities were not significantly influenced. Treatment with a RAS-/NEP-inhibitor then reversed some maladaptive metabolic adaptations, positively influenced the decline of citrate synthase activity, and altered the composition of each respiratory chain complex, even though this was again not accompanied by altered ETC complex enzymatic activities. Finally, ultrastructural evidence pointed to a reduction of autophagolytic and degenerative processes with omapatrilat-treatment. Conclusions This study describes complex adaptations of the mitochondrial proteome in experimental tachycardia-induced heart failure and shows that a combined RAS-/NEP-inhibition

  18. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappaB proteins-platinated DNA interactions correlates with cytotoxic effectiveness of the platinum complexes

    PubMed Central

    Brabec, Viktor; Kasparkova, Jana; Kostrhunova, Hana; Farrell, Nicholas P.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear DNA is the target responsible for anticancer activity of platinum anticancer drugs. Their activity is mediated by altered signals related to programmed cell death and the activation of various signaling pathways. An example is activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB). Binding of NF-κB proteins to their consensus sequences in DNA (κB sites) is the key biochemical activity responsible for the biological functions of NF-κB. Using gel-mobility-shift assays and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy we examined the interactions of NF-κB proteins with oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplexes containing κB site damaged by DNA adducts of three platinum complexes. These complexes markedly differed in their toxic effects in tumor cells and comprised highly cytotoxic trinuclear platinum(II) complex BBR3464, less cytotoxic conventional cisplatin and ineffective transplatin. The results indicate that structurally different DNA adducts of these platinum complexes exhibit a different efficiency to affect the affinity of the platinated DNA (κB sites) to NF-κB proteins. Our results support the hypothesis that structural perturbations induced in DNA by platinum(II) complexes correlate with their higher efficiency to inhibit binding of NF-κB proteins to their κB sites and cytotoxicity as well. However, the full generalization of this hypothesis will require to evaluate a larger series of platinum(II) complexes. PMID:27574114

  19. Melanocortin 4 receptor activation inhibits presynaptic N-type calcium channels in amygdaloid complex neurons.

    PubMed

    Agosti, Francina; López Soto, Eduardo J; Cabral, Agustina; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Schioth, Helgi B; Perelló, Mario; Raingo, Jesica

    2014-09-01

    The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is a G protein-coupled receptor involved in food intake and energy expenditure regulation. MC4R activation modifies neuronal activity but the molecular mechanisms by which this regulation occurs remain unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that MC4R activation regulates the activity of voltage-gated calcium channels and, as a consequence, synaptic activity. We also tested whether the proposed effect occurs in the amygdala, a brain area known to mediate the anorexigenic actions of MC4R signaling. Using the patch-clamp technique, we found that the activation of MC4R with its agonist melanotan II specifically inhibited 34.5 ± 1.5% of N-type calcium currents in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. This inhibition was concentration-dependent, voltage-independent and occluded by the Gαs pathway inhibitor cholera toxin. Moreover, we found that melanotan II specifically inhibited 25.9 ± 2.0% of native N-type calcium currents and 55.4 ± 14.4% of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents in mouse cultured amygdala neurons. In vivo, we found that the MC4R agonist RO27-3225 increased the marker of cellular activity c-Fos in several components of the amygdala, whereas the N-type channel blocker ω conotoxin GVIA increased c-Fos expression exclusively in the central subdivision of the amygdala. Thus, MC4R specifically inhibited the presynaptic N-type channel subtype, and this inhibition may be important for the effects of melanocortin in the central subdivision of the amygdala.

  20. Inhibition of endonuclease cleavage and DNA replication of E. coli plasmid by the antitumor rhodium(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Masudur; Yasuda, Hachiro; Katsura, Shinji; Mizuno, Akira

    2007-08-01

    Binding effect of the antitumor complex rhodium(II) acetate [Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(4)] (Rh1) to the plasmid pUC19 DNA has been studied under different molar ratio of Rh1 compound to base pair of pUC19 DNA (R(f)) and reaction time. The Rh1 binding inhibited the activity of restriction enzyme. The binding effect was monitored using gel electrophoresis. The results indicate that at least one Rh1 binds with the recognition sequence and the binding has no preference between A-T and G-C pairs. At high value of R(f)=100, ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) measurement confirmed that 46% of Rh1 binds to DNA. PCR amplification of the DNA was also inhibited by the Rh1 binding. The transformation experiment using Escherichia coli suggested that the cell growth was inhibited after binding the Rh1 to the plasmid. These results indicated that DNA synthesis could be inhibited both in vitro and in vivo by the Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(4) binding.

  1. Tannic acid, a higher galloylated pentagalloylglucose, suppresses antigen-specific IgE production by inhibiting ɛ germline transcription induced by STAT6 activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Hee; Yoshimoto, Miki; Nakayama, Kazuko; Tanino, Sousuke; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Yamada, Koji; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-4 is a critical stimulator that induces ɛ germline transcripts (ɛGT) for switch recombination to initiate immunoglobulin (Ig) E and is important in allergic disease pathogenesis. We found pentagalloylglucose (PGG) inhibited IL-4-induced ɛGT expression. PGG exerted its inhibitory function by suppressing IL-4-induced activation of IL-4Rα, JAK3 and STAT6. Furthermore, tannic acid, a higher galloylated PGG, attenuated ovalbumin-induced IgE production in vivo by inhibiting IL-4-induced ɛGT expression and the IL-4 signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that tannic acid may attenuate allergic diseases by suppressing IgE production by inhibiting IL-4-induced signaling.

  2. Antibody response to inactivated influenza vaccines of various antigenic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, K M; Monto, A S; Foster, D A

    1990-02-01

    Four inactivated influenza vaccines (containing the recommended antigens for the 1985-1986 influenza season) of various antigenic concentration levels were randomly administered to 140 study participants. The effect of the increasing antigen concentration resulted in significantly higher influenza hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody levels 3 weeks after vaccination for the A/H1N1 antigen but not for the A/H3N2 or B antigens. Also, at 3 weeks after vaccination, there were significantly lower antibody titer levels associated with increasing age for the A/H1N1 and B antigens (adjusting for the prevaccination antibody titer and antigen content).

  3. Enzyme Mechanism and Slow-Onset Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase by an Inorganic Complex

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Patrícia Soares de Maria; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Malaria continues to be a major cause of children's morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing nearly one million deaths annually. The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, synthesizes fatty acids employing the Type II fatty acid biosynthesis system (FAS II), unlike humans that rely on the Type I (FAS I) pathway. The FAS II system elongates acyl fatty acid precursors of the cell membrane in Plasmodium. Enoyl reductase (ENR) enzyme is a member of the FAS II system. Here we present steady-state kinetics, pre-steady-state kinetics, and equilibrium fluorescence spectroscopy data that allowed proposal of P. falciparum ENR (PfENR) enzyme mechanism. Moreover, building on previous results, the present study also evaluates the PfENR inhibition by the pentacyano(isoniazid)ferrateII compound. This inorganic complex represents a new class of lead compounds for the development of antimalarial agents focused on the inhibition of PfENR. PMID:21603269

  4. Cyclosporine A inhibits colorectal cancer proliferation probably by regulating expression levels of c-Myc, p21(WAF1/CIP1) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Masuo, Takashige; Okamura, Shinichi; Zhang, Yajing; Mori, Masatomo

    2009-11-18

    The present study investigated the role of calcineurin (CaN) in the proliferation of human colorectal cancers. CaN activity and protein expression were increased in human colorectal cancers. Nuclear transcription factor NFAT, a physiological substrate for CaN, was activated in human colon cancer specimen as well as in the human colon cancer cell lines. CaN inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) reduced cell growth in these cell lines. CsA decreased the expressions of c-Myc and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) but also increased p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression. Our results suggest that CaN promotes colorectal cancer proliferation probably by regulating levels of c-Myc, p21(WAF1/CIP1), and PCNA.

  5. Up-regulation of lymphocyte antigen 6 complex expression in side-population cells derived from a human trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Tetsunori; Kusunoki, Soshi; Tabu, Kouichi; Okabe, Hitomi; Yamada, Izumi; Taga, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Akemi; Makino, Shintaro; Takeda, Satoru; Kato, Kiyoko

    2016-01-01

    The continual proliferation and differentiation of trophoblasts are critical for the maintenance of pregnancy. It is well known that the tissue stem cells are associated with the development of tissues and pathologies. It has been demonstrated that side-population (SP) cells identified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) are enriched with stem cells. The SP cells in HTR-8/SVneo cells derived from human primary trophoblast cells were isolated by FACS. HTR-8/SVneo-SP cell cultures generated both SP and non-SP (NSP) subpopulations. In contrast, NSP cell cultures produced NSP cells and failed to produce SP cells. These SP cells showed self-renewal capability by serial colony-forming assay. Microarray expression analysis using a set of HTR-8/SVneo-SP and -NSP cells revealed that SP cells overexpressed several stemness genes including caudal type homeobox2 (CDX2) and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs), and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus D (LY6D) gene was the most highly up-regulated in HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. LY6D gene reduced its expression in the course of a 7-day cultivation in differentiation medium. SP cells tended to reduce its fraction by treatment of LY6D siRNA indicating that LY6D had potential to maintain cell proliferation of HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. On ontology analysis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway was involved in the up-regulated genes on microarray analysis. HTR-SVneo-SP cells showed enhanced migration. This is the first report that LY6D was important for the maintenance of HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. EMT was associated with the phenotype of these SP cells.

  6. Determinant selection of major histocompatibility complex class I- restricted antigenic peptides is explained by class I-peptide affinity and is strongly influenced by nondominant anchor residues

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The contribution of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I- peptide affinity to immunodominance of particular peptide antigens (Ags) in the class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is not clearly established. Therefore, we have compared the H-2Kb- restricted binding and presentation of the immunodominant ovalbumin (OVA)257-264 (SIINFEKL) determinant to that of a subdominant OVA determinant OVA55-62 (KVVRFDKL). Immunodominance of OVA257-264 was not attributable to the specific T cell repertoire but correlated instead with more efficient Ag presentation. This enhanced Ag presentation could be accounted for by the higher affinity of Kb/OVA257-264 compared with Kb/OVA55-62 despite the presence of a conserved Kb-binding motif in both peptides. Kinetic binding studies using purified soluble H-2Kb molecules (Kbs) and biosensor techniques indicated that the Kon for association of OVA257-264-C6 and Kbs at 25 degrees C was integral of 10- fold faster (5.9 x 10(3) M-1 s-1 versus 6.5 x 10(2) M-1 s-1), and the Koff approximately twofold slower (9.1 x 10(-6) s-1 versus 1.6 x 10(-5) s-1), than the rate constants for interaction of OVA55-62-C6 and Kbs. The association of these peptides with Kb was significantly influenced by multiple residues at presumed nonanchor sites within the peptide sequence. The contribution of each peptide residue to Kb-binding was dependent upon the sequence context and the summed contributions were not additive. Thus the affinity of MHC class I-peptide binding is a critical factor controlling presentation of peptide Ag and immunodominance in the class I-restricted CTL response. PMID:7523572

  7. Evaluation of squamous cell carcinoma antigen-immunoglobulin M complex (SCCA-IGM) and alpha-L-fucosidase (AFU) as novel diagnostic biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Nehad A; Mahmoud, Enas H; Osman, Enas A; Mahmoud, Sherif H; Shousha, Hend I

    2014-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) surveillance lacks a reliable biomarker. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is the most widely used. However, not all HCCs secrete AFP. AFP may be elevated with cirrhosis in the absence of HCC. Serum alpha-L-fucosidase (AFU) and squamous cell carcinoma antigen-immunoglobulin M complex (SCCA-IgM) were found to be useful markers in diagnosing HCC. SCCA-IgM and AFU were assessed by ELISA technique; AFP was measured by enzyme chemiluminescence in serum of 40 patients with HCC, 30 patients with liver cirrhosis, and 20 healthy control participants to compare their accuracy in early diagnosis of HCC. Serum SCCA-IgM and AFU levels were significantly elevated in HCC group compared to cirrhotic group (P value<0.001 and <0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic curve showed the optimal cutoff value for SCCA-IgM was 233 AU/ml with sensitivity 87.5% and specificity 66% and for AFU was 25 U/L with sensitivity 87.5% and specificity 98%. AFP cutoff value was 48 ng/mL with sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 53.3%. The simultaneous determination of AFP and SCCA-IgM activity increased the sensitivity to 92.5% and specificity to 62.1%. There were positive significant correlations between SCCA-IgM and each of AFU (r=0.296, P=0.005) and AFP (r=0.284, P=0.007) and no correlation between AFP and AFU. All markers did not correlate with the tumor size or affected by the Child score. The significant difference between SCCA-IgM and AFU levels among HCC and cirrhotic patients suggests their use as potential diagnostic tools and allows identifying a new group of HCC patients even in the absence of elevated AFP.

  8. Structural analysis of the human interferon gamma receptor: a small segment of the intracellular domain is specifically required for class I major histocompatibility complex antigen induction and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Cook, J R; Jung, V; Schwartz, B; Wang, P; Pestka, S

    1992-12-01

    Mutations of the human interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) receptor intracellular domain have permitted us to define a restricted region of that domain as necessary for both induction of class I major histocompatibility complex antigen by IFN-gamma and protection against encephalomyocarditis virus. This region consists of five amino acids (YDKPH), all of which are conserved in the human and murine receptors. Tyr-457 and His-461 are essential for activity. Approximately 80% of the amino acids of the intracellular domain of the receptor is not required for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen induction or for antiviral protection against encephalomyocarditis virus. The observation that there was no protection by IFN-gamma against vesiculostomatitis virus indicates that other factors, in addition to chromosome 21 accessory factor(s), are required to generate the full complement of transduction signals from the human IFN-gamma receptor.

  9. The LH2 complexes are assembled in the cells of purple sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira haloalkaliphila with inhibition of carotenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ashikhmin, Aleksandr; Makhneva, Zoya; Moskalenko, Andrey

    2014-03-01

    The effect of the inhibitor of carotenoid (Car) biosynthesis, diphenylamine (DPA), on the cells of the purple sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira (Ect.) haloalkaliphila has been studied. There occurs an inhibition of the biosynthesis of colored Cars (≥99 %) at 71 μM DPA. Considering "empty" Car pockets (Moskalenko and Makhneva 2012) the content of Cars in the DPA-treated samples is first calculated more correctly. The total content of the colored Cars in the sample at 71 μM DPA does not exceed 1 % of the wild type. In the DPA-treated cells (membranes) a complete set of pigment-protein complexes is retained. The LH2 complex at 71 μM DPA is isolated, which is identical to the LH2 complex of the wild type in near IR absorption spectra. This suggests that the principles for assembling this LH2 complex in vivo in the absence of colored Cars remain the same. These results are in full agreement with the data obtained earlier for Allochromatium (Alc.) minutissimum (Moskalenko and Makhneva 2012). They are as follows: (1) DPA almost entirely inhibits the biosynthesis of the colored Cars in Ect. haloalkaliphila cells. (2) In the DPA-treated samples non-colored Cars are detected at 53.25 μM DPA (as traces) and at 71 μM DPA. (3) DPA may affect both phytoene synthase (at ≤71 μM DPA) and phytoene desaturase (at ≥53.25 μM DPA). (4) The assembly of LH2 complex does occur without any colored Cars.

  10. Theoretical investigations on the hydrolysis pathway of tin verdoheme complexes: elucidation of tin's ring opening inhibition role.

    PubMed

    Davari, Mahdi D; Bahrami, Homayoon; Zahedi, Mansour; Safari, Nasser

    2009-11-01

    In order to obtain a better molecular understanding of inhibitory role of tin metal in the verdoheme ring opening process, hydrolysis of three possibly six, five, and four coordinate verdoheme complexes of tin(IV) and (II) have been studied using DFT method. The results of calculations indicate that, in excellent accord with experimental reports, hydrolysis of different possibly coordinated tin(IV) and (II) verdohemes does not lead to the opening of the macrocycle. Contrary to iron and zinc verdohemes, in five and four coordinate verdoheme complexes of tin(IV) and (II), formation of open ring helical complexes of tin are unfavorable both thermodynamically and kinetically. In these pathways, coordination of hydroxide nucleophile to tin metal due to the highly charged, exclusive oxophilicity nature of the Sn center, and high affinity of Sn to increase coordination state are proposed responsible as inhibiting roles of tin via the ring opening. While, in saturated six coordinate tin(IV) and (II) verdoheme complexes the ring opening of tin verdohemes is possible thermodynamically, but it is not predicted to occur from a kinetics point of view. In the six coordinate pathway, tin plays no coordination role and direct addition of hydroxide nucleophile to the positive oxo-carbon centers and formation of closed ring hydroxy compounds is proposed for preventing the verdoheme ring opening. These key points and findings have been corroborated by the results obtained from atomic charge analysis, geometrical parameters, and molecular orbital calculations. In addition, the results of inhibiting ring opening reaction of tin verdoheme complexes could support the great interest of tin porphyrin analogues as pharmacologic means of chemoprevention of neonatal jaundice by the competitive inhibitory action of tin porphyrins on heme oxygenase.

  11. Complex Response of Epithelial Cells to Inhibition of Na(+) Transport by Amiloride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Physiol. 23): C297-C303, occurring within milliseconds (1, 12), it would be ex- 1988. ’When toad urinary bladder or frog skin epithelia are pected that I...amiloride indicated in response to inhibition of Na+ entry into epithelial that the magnitude of the secondary decline increased in frog cells. We suggest...electrophysiology; cytoskele- ton; short-circuit current Experiments were performed using isolated frog skin and toad urinary bladders. Frogs (Rana

  12. Peptide-MHC-I from Endogenous Antigen Outnumber Those from Exogenous Antigen, Irrespective of APC Phenotype or Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sei, Janet J.; Haskett, Scott; Kaminsky, Lauren W.; Lin, Eugene; Truckenmiller, Mary E.; Bellone, Clifford J.; Buller, R. Mark; Norbury, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Naïve anti-viral CD8+ T cells (TCD8+) are activated by the presence of peptide-MHC Class I complexes (pMHC-I) on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPC). Increasing the number of pMHC-I in vivo can increase the number of responding TCD8+. Antigen can be presented directly or indirectly (cross presentation) from virus-infected and uninfected cells, respectively. Here we determined the relative importance of these two antigen presenting pathways in mousepox, a natural disease of the mouse caused by the poxvirus, ectromelia (ECTV). We demonstrated that ECTV infected several pAPC types (macrophages, B cells, and dendritic cells (DC), including DC subsets), which directly presented pMHC-I to naïve TCD8+ with similar efficiencies in vitro. We also provided evidence that these same cell-types presented antigen in vivo, as they form contacts with antigen-specific TCD8+. Importantly, the number of pMHC-I on infected pAPC (direct presentation) vastly outnumbered those on uninfected cells (cross presentation), where presentation only occurred in a specialized subset of DC. In addition, prior maturation of DC failed to enhance antigen presentation, but markedly inhibited ECTV infection of DC. These results suggest that direct antigen presentation is the dominant pathway in mice during mousepox. In a broader context, these findings indicate that if a virus infects a pAPC then the presentation by that cell is likely to dominate over cross presentation as the most effective mode of generating large quantities of pMHC-I is on the surface of pAPC that endogenously express antigens. Recent trends in vaccine design have focused upon the introduction of exogenous antigens into the MHC Class I processing pathway (cross presentation) in specific pAPC populations. However, use of a pantropic viral vector that targets pAPC to express antigen endogenously likely represents a more effective vaccine strategy than the targeting of exogenous antigen to a limiting p

  13. Inhibiting complex IL-17A and IL-17RA interactions with a linear peptide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shenping; Desharnais, Joel; Sahasrabudhe, Parag V.; Jin, Ping; Li, Wei; Oates, Bryan D.; Shanker, Suman; Banker, Mary Ellen; Chrunyk, Boris A.; Song, Xi; Feng, Xidong; Griffor, Matt; Jimenez, Judith; Chen, Gang; Tumelty, David; Bhat, Abhijit; Bradshaw, Curt W.; Woodnutt, Gary; Lappe, Rodney W.; Thorarensen, Atli; Qiu, Xiayang; Withka, Jane M.; Wood, Lauren D.

    2016-01-01

    IL-17A is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that has been implicated in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Monoclonal antibodies inhibiting IL-17A signaling have demonstrated remarkable efficacy, but an oral therapy is still lacking. A high affinity IL-17A peptide antagonist (HAP) of 15 residues was identified through phage-display screening followed by saturation mutagenesis optimization and amino acid substitutions. HAP binds specifically to IL-17A and inhibits the interaction of the cytokine with its receptor, IL-17RA. Tested in primary human cells, HAP blocked the production of multiple inflammatory cytokines. Crystal structure studies revealed that two HAP molecules bind to one IL-17A dimer symmetrically. The N-terminal portions of HAP form a β-strand that inserts between two IL-17A monomers while the C-terminal section forms an α helix that directly blocks IL-17RA from binding to the same region of IL-17A. This mode of inhibition suggests opportunities for developing peptide antagonists against this challenging target. PMID:27184415

  14. Common antigenicity between Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen and Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) pollen, I. H-2 complex affects cross responsiveness to Cry j 1 and Cha o 1 at the T- and B-cell level in mice.

    PubMed

    Kingetsu, I; Ohno, N; Hayashi, N; Sakaguchi, M; Inouye, S; Saito, S

    2000-04-01

    Common antigenicity among two purified Japanese cedar pollen allergens (Cry j 1 and Cry j 2) and one Japanese cypress pollen allergen (Cha o 1) was explored at the T-cell and B-cell level in mice of different H-2 haplotypes. Cry j 2 did not show any common antigenicity with Cry j 1 or Cha o 1. B10.S (H-2S) mice immunized with Cry j 1 or Cha o 1 generated T cells and antibodies reactive to both antigens, indicating the common antigenicity of these antigens. C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice were non-responders to Cry j 1. BALB/c (H-2d) mice immunized with Cry j 1 or Cha o 1 and C57BL/6 mice immunized with Cha o 1 generated T cells that were only reactive with the respective immunogen, but produced antibody reactive to both Cry j 1 and Cha o 1, indicating that Cry j 1 and Cha o 1 share their B-cell epitope but not their T-cell epitope. This finding may provide a clue for the clarification of the T-cell and B-cell epitopes of Cry j 1 and Cha o 1, even though the data are influenced by H-2 complex restriction in mice. Considering that H-2 complex restriction affects cross responsiveness to Cry j 1 and Cha o 1 at the T- and B-cell level in mice, we assessed the possible situation in humans exposed sequentially to Japanese cedar pollen and Japanese cypress pollen.

  15. Inhibition of neuronal mitochondrial complex I or lysosomal glucocerebrosidase is associated with increased dopamine and serotonin turnover.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Carmen; Burke, Derek; Eaton, Simon; Heales, Simon J

    2017-02-24

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic and serotoninergic signalling. A number of pathogenic mechanisms have been implicated including loss of mitochondrial function at the level of complex I, and lysosomal metabolism at the level of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA1). In order to investigate further the potential involvement of complex I and GBA1 in PD, we assessed the impact of loss of respective enzyme activities upon dopamine and serotonin turnover. Using SH-SY5Y cells, complex I deficiency was modelled by using rotenone whilst GBA1 deficiency was modelled by the use of conduritol B epoxide (CBE). Dopamine, its principal metabolites, and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the extracellular medium were quantified by HPLC. Inhibition of complex I significantly increased extracellular concentrations of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and 5-HIAA. Comparable results were observed with CBE. These results suggest increased monoamine oxidase activity and provide evidence for involvement of impaired complex I or GBA1 activity in the dopamine/serotonin deficiency seen in PD. Use of extracellular media may also permit relatively rapid assessment of dopamine/serotonin metabolism and permit screening of novel therapeutic agents.

  16. Detection of peste des petits ruminants virus antigen using immunofiltration and antigen-competition ELISA methods.

    PubMed

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Rajanathan, T M C; Kumar, C Senthil; Ramathilagam, G; Hiremath, Geetha; Shaila, M S

    2008-06-22

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is one of the most economically important diseases affecting sheep and goats in India. An immunofiltration-based test has been developed using either mono-specific serum/monoclonal antibodies (mAb) prepared against a recombinant truncated nucleocapsid protein of rinderpest virus (RPV) cross-reactive with PPR virus. This method consists of coating ocular swab eluate from suspected animals onto a nitrocellulose membrane housed in a plastic module, which is allowed to react with suitable dilutions of a mAb or a mono-specific polyclonal antibody. The antigen-antibody complex formed on the membrane is then detected by protein A-colloidal gold conjugate, which forms a pink colour. In the immunofiltration test, concordant results were obtained using either PPRV mAb or mono-specific serum. Another test, an antigen-competition ELISA which relies on the competition between plate-coated recombinant truncated 'N' protein of RPV and the PPRV 'N' protein present in ocular swab eluates (sample) for binding to the mono-specific antibody against N protein of RPV (in liquid phase) was developed. The cut-off value for this test was established using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positive and negative oculo-nasal swab samples. Linear correlation between percent inhibition (PI) values in antigen-competition ELISA and virus infectivity titres was 0.992. Comparison of the immunofiltration test with the antigen-competition ELISA yielded a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100%. These two tests can serve as a screening (immunofiltration) and confirmatory (antigen-competition ELISA) test, respectively, in the diagnosis of PPR in sheep or goats.

  17. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 inhibition increases the antitumor activity of adoptive T-cell therapy when carried out with naïve rather than differentiated T cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takeshi; Adachi, Satoko; Okayama, Tetsuya; Kokura, Satoshi; Mizushima, Katsura; Doi, Toshifumi; Matsuyama, Tatsuzo; Sakamoto, Naoyuki; Katada, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Handa, Osamu; Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2015-05-01

    Although treatment with an antibody against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) combined with multiple therapeutic interventions has been explored, the effect of combination therapy with CTLA-4 inhibition and adoptive T-cell therapy has not been determined. In the present study, our aim was to determine whether CTLA-4 inhibition, combined with adoptive transfer of T cells at different stages of differentiation, exhibits synergistic antitumor effects in a murine colon cancer model. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were administered adoptive T-cell transfer of CD62Lhigh or CD62Llow cells combined with an anti-CTLA-4 antibody (α-CTLA-4) or control immunoglobulin G. Subcutaneous tumors were harvested, and the antitumor effects and helper T-cell polarization were analyzed. CTLA-4 inhibition combined with CD62Lhigh cell administration showed the strongest antitumor effect. Combination therapy increased the number of CD3+ cells within the tumor. Moreover, CTLA-4 inhibition induced polarization of T cells infiltrating the tumor toward the T helper 1 lineage, and suppressed the frequency of regulatory T cells within the tumor, particularly in combination with CD62Lhigh T-cell transfer. This is the first report demonstrating that the efficacy of α-CTLA-4 and adoptive T-cell transfer combination therapy depends on the state of differentiation of the transferred T cells. Our data support the notion that a combination of α-CTLA-4 and adoptive T-cell transfer containing an abundance of naïve phenotype cells could potentially exert antitumor effects in a clinical setting.

  18. The consequences of the intracellular retention of pathogen-derived T-cell-independent antigens on protein presentation to T cells.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Cobián, F; Outschoorn, I M; Carrasco-Marín, E; Alvarez-Domínguez, C

    1997-10-01

    Intracellular pathogens can be considered as particulate antigens chemically composed of a complex mixture of T-cell-dependent antigens (TD) (peptides and proteins) and T-cell-independent antigens (TI) (glycolipids and complex polysaccharides). A large range of saccharides (from oligosaccharides to complex polysaccharides) derived from pathogenic microorganisms are being isolated and characterized. They are currently implicated in signaling systems and concomitant host-parasite relationships. However, there are not many structure-function relationships described for these pathogens. This is particularly true of polysaccharides. In this report we have reviewed the role of defined TI antigens in the processing and presentation of defined TD antigens to specific T cells by antigen-presenting cells (APC). We also considered the importance of some of the chemical characteristics shared by different carbohydrates implicated in the inhibition of antigen presentation. These findings are discussed in relation to the clear immunopathological consequences of long retention periods of complex carbohydrate molecules derived from intracellular parasites inside certain APC and the absence of antigen presentation impairment in physiological situations such as the removal of senescent or damaged red blood cells by splenic macrophages or intracellular accumulation of carbohydrates in colostrum and milk macrophages during lactation.

  19. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism. PMID:27853655

  20. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-04-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism.

  1. Dietary arginine silicate inositol complex inhibits periodontal tissue loss in rats with ligature-induced periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Dundar, Serkan; Eltas, Abubekir; Hakki, Sema S; Malkoc, Sıddık; Uslu, M Ozay; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Komorowski, James; Ozercan, I Hanifi; Akdemir, Fatih; Sahin, Kazim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to induce experimental periodontitis in rats previously fed diets containing arginine silicate inositol (ASI) complex and examine the biochemical, immunological, and radiological effects. Fifty two 8-week-old female Sprague Dawley rats were equally divided into four groups. The control group included those fed a standard rat diet with no operation performed during the experiment. The periodontitis, ASI I, and ASI II groups were subjected to experimental periodontitis induction for 11 days after being fed a standard rat diet alone, a diet containing 1.81 g/kg ASI complex, or a diet containing 3.62 g/kg ASI complex, respectively, for 8 weeks. Throughout the 11-day duration of periodontitis induction, all rats were fed standard feed. The rats were euthanized on the eleventh day, and their tissue and blood samples were collected. In the periodontitis group, elevated tissue destruction parameters and reduced tissue formation parameters were found, as compared to the ASI groups. Levels of enzymes, cytokines, and mediators associated with periodontal tissue destruction were lower in rats fed a diet containing ASI complex after experimental periodontitis. These results indicate that ASI complex could be an alternative agent for host modulation. PMID:27895467

  2. Chemistry, urease inhibition, and phytotoxic studies of binuclear vanadium(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Ara, Rifat; Ashiq, Uzma; Mahroof-Tahir, Mohammad; Maqsood, Zahida Tasneem; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Lodhi, Muhammad Arif; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal

    2007-01-01

    Vanadium plays an important role in biological systems and exhibits a variety of bioactivities. In an effort to uncover the chemistry and biochemistry of vanadium with nitrogen- and oxygen-containing ligands, we report herein the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of vanadium(IV) complexes with hydrazide ligands. Substituents on these ligands exhibit systematic variations of electronic and steric factors. Elemental and spectral data indicate the presence of a dimeric unit with two vanadium(IV) ions coordinated with two hydrazide ligands along with two H(2)O molecules. The stability studies of these complexes over time in coordinating solvent, DMSO, indicates binding of the solvent molecules to give [V2O2L2(H2O)2(DMSO)2]2+ (L=hydrazide ligand) and then conversion of it to a monomeric intermediate species, [VOL(DMSO)3]1+. Hydrazide ligands are inactive against urease, whereas vanadium(IV) complexes of these ligands show significant inhibitory potential against this enzyme and are found to be non-competitive inhibitors. These complexes also show low phytotoxicity indicating their usefulness for soil ureases. Structure-activity relationship studies indicate that the steric and/or electronic effects that may change the geometry of the complexes play an important role in their inhibitory potential and phytotoxicity.

  3. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigens in human Schwann cell cultures and effects of infection with Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, N M; Mirsky, R; Grange, J M; Jessen, K R

    1987-01-01

    Recent experiments on rats have raised the possibility that Schwann cells can present antigens to T lymphocytes. We have investigated whether this mechanism might be relevant in leprosy by determining under what conditions human Schwann cells express class I and class II antigens, and whether infection with Mycobacterium leprae affects this expression. The distribution of these antigens was examined on human Schwann cells in dissociated cell cultures derived from human fetal peripheral nerves. We find that both Schwann cells and fibroblastic cells in these cultures normally express class I antigens but not class II antigens. When Schwann cells are infected with live Mycobacterium leprae for 48 h, 73% of Schwann cells phagocytose the bacteria. Mycobacterium leprae prevents 3H-thymidine incorporation into cultured human Schwann cells, but does not affect class I expression in these cells. Treatment of normal and Mycobacterium leprae infected cultures with gamma-interferon for 72 h induces class II expression on most Schwann cells but not on the majority of fibroblastic cells. The fact that human Schwann cells infected with Mycobacterium leprae can be induced by gamma-interferon to express class II antigens suggests that they may be able to present Mycobacterium leprae antigens to T lymphocytes and thus initiate immune responses against the bacteria. We suggest that a failure of this response, such as that seen within nerve trunks in lepromatous leprosy, is caused by deficient class II expression on Schwann cells. This deficiency in class II expression, in turn, may be caused by the reduced gamma-interferon production characteristic of lepromatous leprosy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3115648

  4. In vitro inhibition of hyaluronidase by sodium copper chlorophyllin complex and chlorophyllin analogs

    PubMed Central

    McCook, John P; Dorogi, Peter L; Vasily, David B; Cefalo, Dustin R

    2015-01-01

    Background Inhibitors of hyaluronidase are potent agents that maintain hyaluronic acid homeostasis and may serve as anti-aging, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial agents. Sodium copper chlorophyllin complex is being used therapeutically as a component in anti-aging cosmeceuticals, and has been shown to have anti-hyaluronidase activity. In this study we evaluated various commercial lots of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex to identify the primary small molecule constituents, and to test various sodium copper chlorophyllin complexes and their small molecule analog compounds for hyaluronidase inhibitory activity in vitro. Ascorbate analogs were tested in combination with copper chlorophyllin complexes for potential additive or synergistic activity. Materials and methods For hyaluronidase activity assays, dilutions of test materials were evaluated for hydrolytic activity of hyaluronidase by precipitation of non-digested hyaluronate by measuring related turbidity at 595 nm. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy was used to analyze and identify the primary small molecule constituents in various old and new commercial lots of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex. Results The most active small molecule component of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex was disodium copper isochlorin e4, followed by oxidized disodium copper isochlorin e4. Sodium copper chlorophyllin complex and copper isochlorin e4 disodium salt had hyaluronidase inhibitory activity down to 10 µg/mL. The oxidized form of copper isochlorin e4 disodium salt had substantial hyaluronidase inhibitory activity at 100 µg/mL but not at 10 µg/mL. Ascorbate derivatives did not enhance the hyaluronidase inhibitory activity of sodium copper chlorophyllin. Copper isochlorin e4 analogs were always the dominant components of the small molecule content of the commercial lots tested; oxidized copper isochlorin e4 was found in increased concentrations in older compared to newer lots tested

  5. Ubiquilin-mediated Small Molecule Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Rory T.; Shi, Yuntao; Long, Marcus J. C.; Marr, Michael T.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation. mTORC1 has been implicated in many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration, and is a target to prolong lifespan. Here we report a small molecule inhibitor (Cbz-B3A) of mTORC1 signaling. Cbz-B3A inhibits the phosphorylation of eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) and blocks 68% of translation. In contrast, rapamycin preferentially inhibits the phosphorylation of p70S6k and blocks 35% of translation. Cbz-B3A does not appear to bind directly to mTORC1, but instead binds to ubiquilins 1, 2, and 4. Knockdown of ubiquilin 2, but not ubiquilins 1 and 4, decreases the phosphorylation of 4EBP1, suggesting that ubiquilin 2 activates mTORC1. The knockdown of ubiquilins 2 and 4 decreases the effect of Cbz-B3A on 4EBP1 phosphorylation. Cbz-B3A slows cellular growth of some human leukemia cell lines, but is not cytotoxic. Thus Cbz-B3A exemplifies a novel strategy to inhibit mTORC1 signaling that might be exploited for treating many human diseases. We propose that Cbz-B3A reveals a previously unappreciated regulatory pathway coordinating cytosolic protein quality control and mTORC1 signaling. PMID:26740621

  6. Development of an opsonin inhibition assay for evaluation of complex polysaccharide protective epitopes.

    PubMed

    McNeely, Tessie; Luo, Shengyuan; Manger, Walt; Herber, Wayne; Schofield, Tim; Tan, Charles; Newman, Kathy; Sadoff, Jerald; Donnelly, John; Cross, Alan

    2006-03-10

    The induction of opsonic antibodies directed against capsular polysaccharides (Ps) is an important mechanism by which immunization protects against the development of invasive pneumococcal (Pn) infection. In preparing Pn vaccines, it is necessary to compare different manufacturing lots of capsular Ps, or to compare oligosaccharides used for conjugate vaccines with native capsular Ps, in order to insure that important epitopes of the Ps are maintained. We have developed an opsonic-antibody inhibition assay (OIA) to compare the functional epitopes of different capsular Ps preparations in vitro. Components of the OIA are primary neutrophils, rabbit complement (C'), and type-specific antibody (Ab). After conditions for optimal opsonic killing were determined for each Pn serotype, anti-Pn Ab was pre-incubated with different dilutions of purified capsular Ps, then added to the OIA mix. Plotting the % bacteria killed versus Ps concentration (log transformed) yielded a linear curve that was used to quantify the concentration of capsular Ps which inhibited the bacteria killing by 50% (IC50). The IC50 was determined for 8 Pn Ps types. These ranged between 6 ng/ml for type 6B and 1268 ng/ml for type 23F. Importantly OIA curves were statistically identical for two different manufacturing lots of capsular Ps for the 8 Pn Ps types. We conclude that differences among capsular Ps used for Pn vaccines could be detected with an OIA assay and these differences may predict the ability of Ps preparations to induce functionally active antibody when formulated into vaccines.

  7. Caspase-8 tyrosine-380 phosphorylation inhibits CD95 DISC function by preventing procaspase-8 maturation and cycling within the complex

    PubMed Central

    Powley, I R; Hughes, M A; Cain, K; MacFarlane, M

    2016-01-01

    Caspase-8 is a key initiator of apoptotic cell death where it functions as the apical protease in death receptor-mediated apoptosis triggered via the death-inducing signalling complex (DISC). However, the observation that caspase-8 is upregulated in many common tumour types led to the discovery of alternative non-apoptotic, pro-survival functions, many of which are contingent on phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue (Y380) found in the linker region between the two catalytic domains of the enzyme. Furthermore, Src-mediated Y380 phosphorylation leads to increased resistance to CD95-induced apoptosis; however, the mechanism underlying this impaired response to extrinsic apoptotic stimuli has not been identified. Consequently, we have employed a number of model systems to further dissect this protective mechanism. First, using an in vitro DISC model together with recombinant procaspase-8 variants, we show that Y380 phosphorylation inhibits procaspase-8 activation at the CD95 DISC, thereby preventing downstream activation of the caspase cascade. Second, we validated this finding in a cellular context using transfected neuroblastoma cell lines deficient in caspase-8. Reconstitution of these lines with phosphomimetic-caspase-8 results in increased resistance to CD95-mediated apoptosis and enhanced cell migration. When the in vitro DISC is assembled in the presence of cell lysate, caspase-8 Y380 phosphorylation attenuates DISC activity by inhibiting procaspase-8 autoproteolytic activity but not recruitment or homodimerization of caspase-8 within the complex. Once incorporated into the DISC, phosphorylated caspase-8 is unable to be released from the complex; this inhibits further cycling and release of active catalytic subunits into the cytoplasm, thus resulting in increased apoptotic resistance. Taken together, our novel findings expand our understanding of the key mechanisms underlying the anti-apoptotic functions of caspase-8 which may act as a critical block to

  8. Dopaminergic inhibition by G9a/Glp complex on tyrosine hydroxylase in nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Shen, Xiaofeng; Bao, Senzhu; Feng, Shan-Wu; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Yiquan; Wang, Xian; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Wu, Haibo; Lei, Liming; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-01-01

    The neural balance between facilitation and inhibition determines the final tendency of central sensitization. Nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity was considered as the results from the enhanced ascending facilitation and the diminished descending inhibition. The role of dopaminergic transmission in the descending inhibition has been well documented, but its underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that the lysine dimethyltransferase G9a/G9a-like protein (Glp) complex plays a critical role in cocaine-induced central plasticity, and given cocaine’s role in the nerve system is relied on its function on dopamine system, we herein proposed that the reduced inhibition of dopaminergic transmission was from the downregulation of tyrosine hydroxylase expression by G9a/Glp complex through methylating its gene Th. After approval by the Animal Care and Use Committee, C57BL/6 mice were used for pain behavior using von Frey after spared nerve injury, and Th CpG islands methylation was measured using bisulfite sequencing at different nerve areas. The inhibitor of G9a/Glp, BIX 01294, was administered intraventricularly daily with bolus injection. The protein levels of G9a, Glp, and tyrosine hydroxylase were measured with immunoblotting. Dopamine levels were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression of G9a but not Glp was upregulated in ventral tegmental area at post-injury day 4 till day 49 (the last day of the behavioral test). Correspondingly, the Th CpG methylation is increased, but the tyrosine hydroxylase expression was downregulated and the dopamine level was decreased. After the intracerebroventriclar injection of BIX 01294 since the post-injury days 7 and 14 for consecutive three days, three weeks, and six weeks, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase was upregulated with a significant decrease in Th methylation and increase in dopamine level. Moreover, the pain after G9a/Glp inhibitor was attenuated

  9. Inhibition of the Membrane Attack Complex by Dengue Virus NS1 through Interaction with Vitronectin and Terminal Complement Proteins.

    PubMed

    Conde, Jonas Nascimento; da Silva, Emiliana Mandarano; Allonso, Diego; Coelho, Diego Rodrigues; Andrade, Iamara da Silva; de Medeiros, Luciano Neves; Menezes, Joice Lima; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2016-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infects millions of people worldwide and is a major public health problem. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a conserved glycoprotein that associates with membranes and is also secreted into the plasma in DENV-infected patients. The present study describes a novel mechanism by which NS1 inhibits the terminal complement pathway. We first identified the terminal complement regulator vitronectin (VN) as a novel DENV2 NS1 binding partner by using a yeast two-hybrid system. This interaction was further assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. The NS1-VN complex was also detected in plasmas from DENV-infected patients, suggesting that this interaction occurs during DENV infection. We also demonstrated that the DENV2 NS1 protein, either by itself or by interacting with VN, hinders the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC) and C9 polymerization. Finally, we showed that DENV2, West Nile virus (WNV), and Zika virus (ZIKV) NS1 proteins produced in mammalian cells inhibited C9 polymerization. Taken together, our results points to a role for NS1 as a terminal pathway inhibitor of the complement system.

  10. Extracellular Fibrinogen-binding Protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus Inhibits the Formation of Platelet-Leukocyte Complexes.

    PubMed

    Posner, Mareike G; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Abubaker, Aisha Alsheikh; Fortunato, Tiago M; Vara, Dina; Canobbio, Ilaria; Bagby, Stefan; Pula, Giordano

    2016-02-05

    Extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus inhibits platelet activation, although its mechanism of action has not been established. In this study, we discovered that the N-terminal region of Efb (Efb-N) promotes platelet binding of fibrinogen and that Efb-N binding to platelets proceeds via two independent mechanisms: fibrinogen-mediated and fibrinogen-independent. By proteomic analysis of Efb-interacting proteins within platelets and confirmation by pulldown assays followed by immunoblotting, we identified P-selectin and multimerin-1 as novel Efb interaction partners. The interaction of both P-selectin and multimerin-1 with Efb is independent of fibrinogen. We focused on Efb interaction with P-selectin. Excess of P-selectin extracellular domain significantly impaired Efb binding by activated platelets, suggesting that P-selectin is the main receptor for Efb on the surface of activated platelets. Efb-N interaction with P-selectin inhibited P-selectin binding to its physiological ligand, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), both in cell lysates and in cell-free assays. Because of the importance of P-selectin-PSGL-1 binding in the interaction between platelets and leukocytes, we tested human whole blood and found that Efb abolishes the formation of platelet-monocyte and platelet-granulocyte complexes. In summary, we present evidence that in addition to its documented antithrombotic activity, Efb can play an immunoregulatory role via inhibition of P-selectin-PSGL-1-dependent formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes.

  11. STX140, but not paclitaxel, inhibits mammary tumour initiation and progression in C3(1)/SV40 T/t-antigen transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Losic, Florence; Newman, Simon P; Day, Joanna M; Reed, Michael J; Kasprzyk, Philip G; Purohit, Atul; Foster, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Despite paclitxael's clinical success, treating hormone-refractory breast cancer remains challenging. Paclitaxel has a poor pharmacological profile, characterized by a low therapeutic index (TIX) caused by severe dose limiting toxicities, such as neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy. Consequently, new drugs are urgently required. STX140, a compound previously shown to have excellent efficacy against many tumors, is here compared to paclitaxel in three translational in vivo breast cancer models, a rat model of peripheral neuropathy, and through pharmacological testing. Three different in vivo mouse models of breast cancer were used; the metastatic 4T1 orthotopic model, the C3(1)/SV40 T-Ag model, and the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. To determine TIX and pharmacological profile of STX140, a comprehensive dosing regime was performed in mice bearing MDA-MD-231 xenografts. Finally, peripheral neuropathy was examined using a rat plantar thermal hyperalgesia model. In the 4T1 metastatic model, STX140 and paclitaxel significantly inhibited primary tumor growth and lung metastases. All C3(1)/SV40 T-Ag mice in the control and paclitaxel treated groups developed palpable mammary cancer. STX140 blocked 47% of tumors developing and significantly inhibited growth of tumors that did develop. STX140 treatment caused a significant (P<0.001) survival advantage for animals in early and late intervention groups. Conversely, in C3(1)/SV40 T-Ag mice, paclitaxel failed to inhibit tumor growth and did not increase survival time. Furthermore, paclitaxel, but not STX140, induced significant peripheral neuropathy and neutropenia. These results show that STX140 has a greater anti-cancer efficacy, TIX, and reduced neurotoxicity compared to paclitaxel in C3(1)/SV40 T-Ag mice and therefore may be of significant benefit to patients with breast cancer.

  12. Hepatitis B virus surface antigen selectively inhibits TLR2 ligand-induced IL-12 production in monocytes/macrophages by interfering with JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Chen, Zhiao; Hu, Conghua; Qian, Fangxing; Cheng, Yuming; Wu, Min; Shi, Bisheng; Chen, Jieliang; Hu, Yunwen; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2013-05-15

    It is widely accepted that chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the result of an ineffective antiviral immune response against HBV infection. Our previous study found that the hepatitis B surface Ag (HBsAg) was related to decreased cytokine production induced by the TLR2 ligand (Pam3csk4) in PBMCs from chronic hepatitis B patients. In this study, we further explored the mechanism involved in the inhibitory effect of HBsAg on the TLR2 signaling pathway. The results showed that both Pam3csk4-triggered IL-12p40 mRNA expression and IL-12 production in PMA-differentiated THP-1 macrophage were inhibited by HBsAg in a dose-dependent manner, but the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α was not influenced. The Pam3csk4-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling were further examined. The phosphorylation of JNK-1/2 and c-Jun was impaired in the presence of HBsAg, whereas the degradation of IκB-α, the nuclear translocation of p65, and the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK-1/2 were not affected. Moreover, the inhibition of JNK phosphorylation and IL-12 production in response to Pam3csk was observed in HBsAg-treated monocytes/macrophages (M/MΦs) from the healthy donors and the PBMCs and CD14-positive M/MΦs from chronic hepatitis B patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HBsAg selectively inhibits Pam3csk4- stimulated IL-12 production in M/MΦs by blocking the JNK-MAPK pathway and provide a mechanism by which HBV evades immunity and maintains its persistence.

  13. Antigen-specific inhibition of CD8+ T cell response by immature myeloid cells in cancer is mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Nefedova, Yulia; Yoder, Daniel; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2004-01-15

    Tumor growth is associated with the accumulation of immature myeloid cells (ImC), which in mice are characterized by the expression of Gr-1 and CD11b markers. These cells suppress Ag-specific CD8+ T cells via direct cell-cell contact. However, the mechanism of immunosuppressive activity of tumor-derived ImC remains unclear. In this study we analyzed the function of ImC isolated from tumor-free control and tumor-bearing mice. Only ImC isolated from tumor-bearing mice, not those from their control counterparts, were able to inhibit the Ag-specific response of CD8+ T cells. ImC obtained from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) than ImC isolated from tumor-free animals. Accumulation of H2O2, but not superoxide or NO, was a major contributor to this increased pool of ROS. It appears that arginase activity played an important role in H2O2 accumulation in these cells. Inhibition of ROS in ImC completely abrogated the inhibitory effect of these cells on T cells, indicating that ImC generated in tumor-bearing hosts suppress the CD8+ T cell response via production of ROS. Interaction of ImC with Ag-specific T cells in the presence of specific Ags resulted in a significant increase in ROS production compared with control Ags. That increase was independent of IFN-gamma production by T cells, but was mediated by integrins CD11b, CD18, and CD29. Blocking of these integrins with specific Abs abrogated ROS production and ImC-mediated suppression of CD8+ T cell responses. This study demonstrates a new mechanism of Ag-specific T cell inhibition mediated by ROS produced by ImCs in cancer.

  14. Water-Soluble Coenzyme Q10 Inhibits Nuclear Translocation of Apoptosis Inducing Factor and Cell Death Caused by Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haining; Chen, Guisheng; Ma, Wanrui; Li, Ping-An Andy

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to explore the mechanism of rotenone-induced cell damage and to examine the protective effects of water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on the toxic effects of rotenone. Murine hippocampal HT22 cells were cultured with mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone. Water-soluble CoQ10 was added to the culture media 3 h prior to the rotenone incubation. Cell viability was determined by alamar blue, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by dihydroethidine (DHE) and mitochondrial membrane potential by tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM). Cytochrome c, caspase-9 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) were measured using Western blotting after 24 h rotenone incubation. Rotenone caused more than 50% of cell death, increased ROS production, AIF nuclear translocation and reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, but failed to cause mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation. Pretreatment with water-soluble CoQ10 enhanced cell viability, decreased ROS production, maintained mitochondrial membrane potential and prevented AIF nuclear translocation. The results suggest that rotenone activates a mitochondria-initiated, caspase-independent cell death pathway. Water-soluble CoQ10 reduces ROS accumulation, prevents the fall of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibits AIF translocation and subsequent cell death. PMID:25089873

  15. Anthrax Toxin Protective Antigen: Inhibition of Channel Function by Chloroquine and Related Compounds and Study of Binding Kinetics Using the Current Noise Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Orlik, Frank; Schiffler, Bettina; Benz, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA) of the tripartite anthrax toxin binds to a cell surface receptor and mediates the transport of two enzymatic components, edema factor and lethal factor, into the cytosol of host cells. Here recombinant PA63 from Bacillus anthracis was reconstituted into artificial lipid bilayer membranes and formed ion permeable channels. The heptameric PA63-channel contains a binding site for 4-aminoquinolones, which block ion transport through PA in vitro. This result allowed a detailed investigation of ligand binding and the stability constants for the binding of chloroquine, fluphenazine, and quinacrine to the binding site inside the PA63-channel were determined using titration experiments. Open PA63-channels exhibit 1/f noise in the frequency range between 1 and 100 Hz, whereas the spectral density of the ligand-induced current noise was of Lorentzian type. The analysis of the power density spectra allowed the evaluation of the on- and off-rate constants (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}k_{1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}k_{-1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) of ligand binding. The on-rate constants of ligand binding were between 106 and 108 M−1 s−1 and were dependent on the ionic strength of the aqueous phase, sidedness of ligand addition, as well as the orientation and intensity of the applied electric field. The off-rates varied between ∼10 s−1 and 2